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Sample records for western australian courts

  1. Acknowledging Children’s Voice and Participation in Family Courts: Criteria that Guide Western Australian Court Consultants

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    Vicki Banham

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The Australian family courts introduced Child Inclusive Conferencing after the country adopted the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child. The legislation governing these conferences is minimalistic but the Family Court Consultants in the Family Court of Australia and the Federal Circuit Court have well-developed and documented guidelines. The Family Court of Western Australia is, however, a separate entity and in the absence of regulatory guidelines its Family Consultants developed their own process and criteria. This model is unique, in Australia at least, because it has been organically developed by the practitioners providing the Child Inclusive Conferences with very little, if any, statutory and regulatory guidance. This model therefore serves as an example of how practitioners think child inclusive services should be offered. The model is, however, not documented and the aim of this study was to understand and document Family Consultants’ decision making regarding if and when they will conduct a Child Inclusive Conference in the Family Court of Western Australia. Ten Family Consultants were interviewed using semi-structured interviews. A thematic analysis was conducted on the transcripts of the interviews identifying 12 themes. Overall the data suggested that Family Consultants take into account a range of criteria and although they were very cognisant of the importance for the child to be engaged in decision making they noted specific challenges regarding how they could use Child Inclusive Conferencing to do this. These findings provide a basis for the development of regulations that ensure that Child Inclusive Conferences are used optimally to improve the inclusion of children in the family court procedures in Western Australia and potentially elsewhere. Further research is, however, necessary before such regulations can be finalised.

  2. Key performance indicators for Australian mental health court liaison services.

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    Davidson, Fiona; Heffernan, Ed; Greenberg, David; Butler, Tony; Burgess, Philip

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe the development and technical specifications of a framework and national key performance indicators (KPIs) for Australian mental health Court Liaison Services (CLSs) by the National Mental Health Court Liaison Performance Working Group (Working Group). Representatives from each Australian State and Territory were invited to form a Working Group. Through a series of national workshops and meetings, a framework and set of performance indicators were developed using a review of literature and expert opinion. A total of six KPIs for CLSs have been identified and a set of technical specifications have been formed. This paper describes the process and outcomes of a national collaboration to develop a framework and KPIs. The measures have been developed to support future benchmarking activities and to assist services to identify best practice in this area of mental health service delivery.

  3. Western Australian food security project

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    Maycock Bruce

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the Western Australian (WA Food Security Project was to conduct a preliminary investigation into issues relating to food security in one region within the Perth metropolitan area in Western Australia. The first phase of the project involved a food audit in one lower income area that was typical of the region, to identify the range, variety and availability of foods in the region. Methods A comprehensive food audit survey was provided to all food outlet owners/operators in one lower socio-economic region within the City of Mandurah (n = 132 outlets. The purpose of the survey was to investigate the range, variety and availability of foods in the Mandurah region as well as examining specific in-store characteristics such as the types of clientele and in-store promotions offered. Surveys were competed for 99 outlets (response rate = 75%. Results The range of foods available were predominantly pre-prepared with more than half of the outlets pre-preparing the majority of their food. Sandwiches and rolls were the most popular items sold in the outlets surveyed (n = 51 outlets followed by pastries such as pies, sausage rolls and pasties (n = 33 outlets. Outlets considered their healthiest food options were sandwiches or rolls (n = 51 outlets, salads (n- = 50 outlets, fruit and vegetables (n = 40 outlets, seafood (n = 27 outlets, meats such as chicken (n = 26 outlets and hot foods such as curries, soups or quiches (n = 23 outlets. The majority of outlets surveyed considered pre-prepared food including sandwiches, rolls and salads, as healthy food options regardless of the content of the filling or dressings used. Few outlets (n = 28% offered a choice of bread type other than white or wholemeal. High fat pastries and dressings were popular client choices (n = 77% as were carbonated drinks (n = 88% and flavoured milks (n = 46%. Conclusion These findings clearly indicate the need for further investigation of the impact of

  4. Philosophy and Ethics in Western Australian Secondary Schools

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    Millett, Stephan; Tapper, Alan

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of Philosophy and Ethics to the Western Australian Certificate of Education courses in 2008 brought philosophy into the Western Australian secondary school curriculum for the first time. How philosophy came to be included is part of a larger story about the commitment and perseverance of a relatively small number of Australian…

  5. Leading for Sustainability in Western Australian Regional Schools

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    Pepper, Coral

    2014-01-01

    In this paper I report on leadership for sustainability in regional schools in Western Australia (WA) in the context of the Australian Sustainable Schools Initiative (AuSSI-WA). Case studies are developed to examine leading cultural change in eight WA regional schools with data presented in three representative narrative accounts. Consistency is…

  6. Dental age estimation standards for a Western Australian population.

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    Karkhanis, Shalmira; Mack, Peter; Franklin, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    Age estimation in the juvenile skeleton primarily relies on the assessment of the degree of dental and skeletal development relative to full maturity. The timing of the mineralization and eruption of the teeth is a sequential process that, compared to skeletal growth and development, is less affected by extrinsic influences such as nutrition and/or chronic illness. Accordingly, radiographic visualization and analysis of different tooth formation stages are the foundation for a number of widely applied age estimation standards. Presently, however, there is a relative paucity of contemporary dental age estimation standards for a Western Australian population. To that end, the aim of the present study is to develop statistically quantified radiographic age estimation standards for a Western Australian juvenile population. A total of 392 digital orthopantomograms (202 male and 190 female) of Western Australian individuals are analyzed. Following, Moorrees et al. (J. Dent. Res. 42 (1963a) 490-502; Am. J. Phys. Anthropol. 21 (1963) 205-213), dental development and root resorption was assessed. Alveolar eruption was analyzed following Bengston (Northwest Univ. Bull. 35 (1935) 3-9). Stages of dental development were used to formulate a series of age estimation polynomial regression models; prediction accuracy (±0.998 to 2.183 years) is further validated using a cross-validation (holdout) sample of 30 film orthopantomograms. A visual atlas of dental development and eruption was subsequently designed for the pooled sex sample. The standards presented here represent a non-invasive and statistically quantified approach for accurate dental age estimation in Western Australian juvenile individuals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Western Australian goldfields gas up for the future

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    Hutchinson, R. [Goldfields Gas Transmission Joint Venture, West Perth, WA (Australia)

    1995-12-31

    A $A400 million project to pipe gas from fields in the Carnarvon Basin to iron ore mining areas in the Pilbara and the gold and nickel mines around Kalgoorlie is described in this article. It aims to provide a cheaper source of power generation to the industries along its route. Goldfields Gas Transmission joint venture, comprising Western Mining Corporation, BHP Minerals and Normandy Poseidon, were given approval to construct the pipeline by the Western Australian Government. On completion the pipeline will extend from Yarraloola in north west of Western Australia to Kalgoorlie in the Eastern Goldfields to the south, a total of 620 km. It is believed that it could be several years before the joint venturers receive a return on their investment but is expected to become a catalyst for lower cost energy and general development along the pipeline route. 2 figs., 5 photos.

  8. Western Australian schools access to dentally optimal fluoridated water.

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    Desai, P; Kruger, E; Trolio, R; Tennant, M

    2015-03-01

    This study examined water fluoride levels at schools across Western Australia. The aim was to identify schools where levels of water fluoride appeared to be below dental health thresholds (0.5-1.0 mg/L) as recommended by the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC). The objective is to provide health organizations with the knowledge for a more targeted approach to schools with greater risk of decay. Population data, school location, enrolment data and water quality data were integrated into geographic databases for analysis using Quantum GIS, Lisboa 1.8. The results indicated that 46% of school attendees in the northern half of Western Australia were at schools where there was the potential that the water was not dentally optimally fluoridated while in the southern half of Western Australia this was about 10%. Of these attendees (north and south), 45% were at primary school. Similarly, there was an association between socio-economic decile and proportion of school attendees in non-dentally optimally fluoridated schools. Lower deciles (i.e. poorer attendees) had a greater risk of being in schools outside dentally optimally fluoridated areas. This study clearly highlights areas where more prevention (and probably) treatment needs are present and provides a framework for targeted service planning. © 2015 Australian Dental Association.

  9. Understanding food security issues in remote Western Australian Indigenous communities.

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    Pollard, Christina M; Nyaradi, Anett; Lester, Matthew; Sauer, Kay

    2014-08-01

    Food insecurity in remote Western Australian (WA) Indigenous communities. This study explored remote community store managers' views on issues related to improving food security in order to inform health policy. A census of all remote WA Indigenous community store managers was conducted in 2010. Telephone interviews sought managers' perceptions of community food insecurity, problems with their store, and potential policy options for improving the supply, accessibility, affordability and consumption of nutritious foods. Descriptive analyses were conducted using SPSS for Windows version 17.0. Managers stated that freight costs and irregular deliveries contributed to high prices and a limited range of foods. Poor store infrastructure, compromised cold chain logistics, and commonly occurring power outages affected food quality. Half of the managers said there was hunger in their community because people did not have enough money to buy food. The role of nutritionists beyond a clinical and educational role was not understood. Food security interventions in remote communities need to take into consideration issues such as freight costs, transport and low demand for nutritious foods. Store managers provide important local knowledge regarding the development and implementation of food security interventions. SO WHAT? Agencies acting to address the issue of food insecurity in remote WA Indigenous communities should heed the advice of community store managers that high food prices, poor quality and limited availability are mainly due to transport inefficiencies and freight costs. Improving healthy food affordability in communities where high unemployment and low household income abound is fundamental to improving food security, yet presents a significant challenge.

  10. Relationships and Sexuality Education Topics Taught in Western Australian Secondary Schools during 2014

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    McKay, Erin; Vlazny, Carl; Cumming, Steven

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports on findings from the first Western Australian Survey of Educators of Sexuality Education, which aimed to assess the state of relationships and sexuality education (RSE) in the state of Western Australia. Key findings show that secondary school teachers provided more hours of RSE instruction than the national average. However,…

  11. Gardner; re BWV: Victorian Supreme Court makes landmark Australian ruling on tube feeding.

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    Ashby, Michael A; Mendelson, Danuta

    2004-10-18

    The Victorian Supreme Court has decided that artificial nutrition and hydration provided through a percutaneous gastrostomy tube to a woman in a persistent vegetative state may be withdrawn. The judge ruled, in line with a substantial body of international medical, ethical and legal opinion, that any form of artificial nutrition and hydration is a medical procedure, not part of palliative care, and that it is a procedure to sustain life, not to manage the dying process. Thus, the law does not impose a rigid obligation to administer artificial nutrition or hydration to people who are dying, without due regard to their clinical condition. The definition of key terms such as "medical treatment", "palliative care", and "reasonable provision of food and water" in this case will serve as guidance for end-of-life decisions in other states and territories. The case also reiterates the right of patients, and, when incompetent, their validly appointed agents or guardians, to refuse medical treatment. Where an incompetent patient has not executed a binding advance directive and no agent or guardian has been appointed, physicians, in consultation with the family, may decide to withdraw medical treatment, including artificial nutrition or hydration, on the basis that continuation of treatment is inappropriate and not in the patient's best interests. However, Victoria and other jurisdictions would benefit from clarification of this area of the law.

  12. Court Governance in Context: Beyond Independence

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    Tin Bunjevac

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing trend in some of the world’s most advanced western democracies of entrusting certain “framework” aspects of court administration to independent judicial agencies. This trend was highlighted in my recent study of the models of court administration, in which I examined court governance systems in seven Australian and international jurisdictions.This article will focus on the reasons behind the establishment of such agencies and the need for judges and policy makers to clearly identify the problems, aims and drivers for reform before embarking on a mission to adopt a particular “model.” At first, this may seem like an obvious proposition; however, recent experience in overseas jurisdictions demonstrates that it is not easy to reach a consensus on even the most basic issues affecting the administration of justice in courts.

  13. Efficiency and technical change in the Western Australian wheatbelt

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    Cattle, Nathan; White, Benedict

    2007-01-01

    The production performance of wheatbelt farms in Western Australia is analysed to determine whether potential to exploit scale economies and improve technical efficiency has driven the trend towards increased farm size. An input-orientated stochastic frontier model is used to estimate technical efficiency and scale economies using an unbalanced panel dataset provided by BankWest for the period 1995/1996 to 2005/2006. Differences in the relative efficiency of farms are explored by the simultan...

  14. Carbon footprint assessment of Western Australian Groundwater Recycling Scheme.

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    Simms, Andrew; Hamilton, Stacey; Biswas, Wahidul K

    2017-04-01

    This research has determined the carbon footprint or the carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2 eq) of potable water production from a groundwater recycling scheme, consisting of the Beenyup wastewater treatment plant, the Beenyup groundwater replenishment trial plant and the Wanneroo groundwater treatment plant in Western Australia, using a life cycle assessment approach. It was found that the scheme produces 1300 tonnes of CO2 eq per gigalitre (GL) of water produced, which is 933 tonnes of CO2 eq higher than the desalination plant at Binningup in Western Australia powered by 100% renewable energy generated electricity. A Monte Carlo Simulation uncertainty analysis calculated a Coefficient of Variation value of 5.4%, thus confirming the accuracy of the simulation. Electricity input accounts for 83% of the carbon dioxide equivalent produced during the production of potable water. The chosen mitigation strategy was to consider the use of renewable energy to generate electricity for carbon intensive groundwater replenishment trial plant. Depending on the local situation, a maximum of 93% and a minimum of 21% greenhouse gas saving from electricity use can be attained at groundwater replenishment trial plant by replacing grid electricity with renewable electricity. In addition, the consideration of vibrational separation (V-Sep) that helps reduce wastes generation and chemical use resulted in a 4.03 tonne of CO2 eq saving per GL of water produced by the plant.

  15. Carbon footprint assessment of Western Australian Groundwater Recycling Scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simms, Andrew; Hamilton, Stacey; Biswas, Wahidul K.

    2017-04-01

    This research has determined the carbon footprint or the carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2 eq) of potable water production from a groundwater recycling scheme, consisting of the Beenyup wastewater treatment plant, the Beenyup groundwater replenishment trial plant and the Wanneroo groundwater treatment plant in Western Australia, using a life cycle assessment approach. It was found that the scheme produces 1300 tonnes of CO2 eq per gigalitre (GL) of water produced, which is 933 tonnes of CO2 eq higher than the desalination plant at Binningup in Western Australia powered by 100% renewable energy generated electricity. A Monte Carlo Simulation uncertainty analysis calculated a Coefficient of Variation value of 5.4%, thus confirming the accuracy of the simulation. Electricity input accounts for 83% of the carbon dioxide equivalent produced during the production of potable water. The chosen mitigation strategy was to consider the use of renewable energy to generate electricity for carbon intensive groundwater replenishment trial plant. Depending on the local situation, a maximum of 93% and a minimum of 21% greenhouse gas saving from electricity use can be attained at groundwater replenishment trial plant by replacing grid electricity with renewable electricity. In addition, the consideration of vibrational separation (V-Sep) that helps reduce wastes generation and chemical use resulted in a 4.03 tonne of CO2 eq saving per GL of water produced by the plant.

  16. The role and value of herbicide resistant lupins in Western Australian agriculture

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    Schmidt, Carmel P; Pannell, David J.

    1995-01-01

    Herbicide resistant weeds are having a major impact on Australian agriculture In response to this new problem, "genetic engineering" techniques are being used to create new types of lupins which are resistant to non-selective herbicides which still kill the weeds In this study the economic value of such a transgenic lupin was investigated using a multiperiod bioeconomic model The model represents the wheat/lupin cropping system of Western Australia. The profitability of a wide range of weed c...

  17. Introducing clinical supervision across Western Australian public mental health services.

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    Taylor, Monica; Harrison, Carole A

    2010-08-01

    Retention and recruitment of the mental health nursing workforce is a critical issue in Australia and more specifically in Western Australia (WA), partly due to the isolation of the state. It has been suggested that these workforce issues might be minimized through the introduction of clinical supervision within WA mental health services, where, historically, it has been misunderstood and viewed with caution by mental health nurses. This may have been partly due to a lack of understanding of clinical supervision, its models, and its many benefits, due to a paucity of information delivered into initial nurse education programs. The aim of this pilot project is to explore and evaluate the introduction of clinical supervision in WA public mental health services. A quantitative approach informed the study and included the use of an information gathering survey initially, which was followed with evaluation questionnaires. The findings show that education can increase the uptake of clinical supervision. Further, the findings illustrate the importance of linking clinicians from all professional groups via a clinical supervision web-based database.

  18. Continental geodynamics and mineral exploration - the Western Australian perspective

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    Gessner, Klaus; Murdie, Ruth; Yuan, Huaiyu; Brisbout, Lucy; Sippl, Christian; Tyler, Ian; Kirkland, Chris; Wingate, Michael; Johnson, Simon; Spaggiari, Catherine; Smithies, Hugh; Lu, Yongjun; Gonzalez, Chris; Jessell, Mark; Holden, Eun-Jung; Gorczyk, Weronika; Occhipinti, Sandra

    2017-04-01

    The exploration for mineral resources and their extraction has been a fundamental human activity since the dawn of civilisation: Geology is everywhere - ore deposits are rare. Most deposits were found at or near Earth's surface, often by chance or serendipity. To meet the challenge of future demand, successful exploration requires the use of advanced technology and scientific methods to identify targets at depth. Whereas the use and development of high-tech exploration, extraction and processing methods is of great significance, understanding how, when and where dynamic Earth systems become ore-forming systems is a difficult scientific challenge. Ore deposits often form by a complex interplay of coupled physical processes with evolving geological structure. The mineral systems approach states that understanding the geodynamic and tectonic context of crustal scale hydrothermal fluid flow and magmatism can help constrain the spatial extent of heat and mass transport and therefore improve targeting success in mineral exploration. Tasked with promoting the geological assets of one of the World's largest and most resource-rich jurisdictions, the Geological Survey of Western Australia is breaking new ground by systematically collecting and integrating geophysical, geological and geochemical data with the objective to reveal critical ties between lithospheric evolution and mineral deposits. We present examples where this approach has led to fundamental reinterpretations of Archean and Proterozoic geodynamics and the nature of tectonic domains and their boundaries, including cases where geodynamic modelling has played an important role in testing hypotheses of crustal evolution.

  19. Hippocratic obligation to shareholder profit? Medical treatment patents and the Australian High Court in Apotex Pty Ltd v Sanofi-Aventis Australia Pty Ltd [2013] HCA 50.

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    Vines, Tim

    2014-06-01

    The method of treatment of suffering in patients, including through surgery and the administration of therapeutic drugs, are essential features of medical professionalism. Few, if any practitioners committed to developing the core professional virtue of loyalty to relief of patient suffering through consistently implementing the basic principles of medical ethics, would consider that such beneficial methods of practice are, or should be, the subject of a patent--requiring the practitioner utilising them to pay a royalty or risk infringement proceedings. Indeed a formal opinion of the American Medical Association declares "the use of patents, trade secrets, confidentiality agreements, or other means to limit the availability of medical procedures places significant limitation on the dissemination of medical knowledge, and is therefore unethical". Yet this could be the direction in which Australian patent law is heading. The decision of the High Court of Australia in Apotex Pty Ltd v Sanofi-Aventis Australia Pty Ltd [2013] HCA 50, upholding a patent over a method of using a known drug to prevent or treat psoriasis, may ultimately force practitioners to re-consider whether their basic ethical obligations to patients are secondary to a requirement to maximise profit for shareholders in companies holding medical patents. This column reviews this decision and its possible implications for health practitioners. It places it in context of other recent court decisions that have expanded the intrusion of corporate-owned intellectual property monopolies into Australian medical practices, and how legislative restrictions upon them in the Patents Act 1990 (Cth) places practitioners and patients at risk of more costly, ineffective or restricted health care. This column concludes by cautioning that Australia's scope to address policy problems caused by this case may be limited should it sign up to the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement, particularly if that preferential trade

  20. A Western Dietary Pattern Is Associated with Poor Academic Performance in Australian Adolescents

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    Nyaradi, Anett; Li, Jianghong; Hickling, Siobhan; Foster, Jonathan K.; Jacques, Angela; Ambrosini, Gina L.; Oddy, Wendy H.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate cross-sectional associations between dietary patterns and academic performance among 14-year-old adolescents. Study participants were from the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study. A food frequency questionnaire was administered when the adolescents were 14 years old, and from the dietary data, a ‘Healthy’ and a ‘Western’ dietary pattern were identified by factor analysis. The Western Australian Literacy and Numeracy Assessment (WALNA) results from grade nine (age 14) were linked to the Raine Study data by The Western Australian Data Linkage Branch. Associations between the dietary patterns and the WALNA (mathematics, reading and writing scores) were assessed using multivariate linear regression models adjusting for family and socioeconomic characteristics. Complete data on dietary patterns, academic performance and covariates were available for individuals across the different analyses as follows: n = 779 for mathematics, n = 741 for reading and n = 470 for writing. Following adjustment, significant negative associations between the ‘Western’ dietary pattern and test scores for mathematics (β = −13.14; 95% CI: −24.57; −1.76); p = 0.024) and reading (β = −19.16; 95% CI: −29.85; −8.47; p ≤ 0.001) were observed. A similar trend was found with respect to writing (β = −17.28; 95% CI: −35.74; 1.18; p = 0.066). ANOVA showed significant trends in estimated means of academic scores across quartiles for both the Western and Healthy patterns. Higher scores for the ‘Western’ dietary pattern are associated with poorer academic performance in adolescence. PMID:25898417

  1. A Western Dietary Pattern Is Associated with Poor Academic Performance in Australian Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anett Nyaradi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate cross-sectional associations between dietary patterns and academic performance among 14-year-old adolescents. Study participants were from the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine Study. A food frequency questionnaire was administered when the adolescents were 14 years old, and from the dietary data, a ‘Healthy’ and a ‘Western’ dietary pattern were identified by factor analysis. The Western Australian Literacy and Numeracy Assessment (WALNA results from grade nine (age 14 were linked to the Raine Study data by The Western Australian Data Linkage Branch. Associations between the dietary patterns and the WALNA (mathematics, reading and writing scores were assessed using multivariate linear regression models adjusting for family and socioeconomic characteristics. Complete data on dietary patterns, academic performance and covariates were available for individuals across the different analyses as follows: n = 779 for mathematics, n = 741 for reading and n = 470 for writing. Following adjustment, significant negative associations between the ‘Western’ dietary pattern and test scores for mathematics (β = −13.14; 95% CI: −24.57; −1.76; p = 0.024 and reading (β = −19.16; 95% CI: −29.85; −8.47; p ≤ 0.001 were observed. A similar trend was found with respect to writing (β = −17.28; 95% CI: −35.74; 1.18; p = 0.066. ANOVA showed significant trends in estimated means of academic scores across quartiles for both the Western and Healthy patterns. Higher scores for the ‘Western’ dietary pattern are associated with poorer academic performance in adolescence.

  2. Western Australian Music Teachers and the WACE Music Syllabus Five Years down the Track: Where Are We Now?

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    Lowe, Geoffrey M.; Sutherland, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Western Australia introduced a new Western Australian Certificate of Education (WACE) Music course for Year 11 and 12 students in 2009. The construction of the course was protracted due to political interference at the ministerial level, input from vested interests within the music teaching community and adverse publicity in the wider community.…

  3. Early life programming of cardiometabolic disease in the Western Australian pregnancy cohort (Raine) study.

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    Huang, Rae-Chi; Mori, Trevor A; Beilin, Lawrence J

    2012-11-01

    The Raine study (http://www.rainestudy.org.au, accessed 18 June 2012) is a longitudinal Australian birth cohort that has serially assessed the offspring of 2900 pregnant women from 18 weeks gestation in utero to 17 years of age. The Raine study data have shown that low birth weight is a surrogate for poor in utero growth from 18 weeks gestation. A U-shaped relationship between birth size and cardiometabolic risk exists in this Western Australian cohort, implying that both low and high birth weight are associated with increased risk. High birth weight is a risk factor for cardiometabolic risk, particularly for females. Lifetime adiposity trajectories are better at predicting metabolic risk of the offspring than birth size or current body mass index. Therefore, early life programming is an ongoing process, starting in utero and undergoing at least some level of modification in parallel with changes in adiposity during early childhood. Maternal smoking during pregnancy, maternal obesity, hypertension and diabetes increase the risk for metabolic risk in the offspring. Breast feeding is protective for cardiometabolic risk in this Australian cohort. © 2012 The Authors Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology © 2012 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  4. Sex estimation using anthropometry of feet and footprints in a Western Australian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemy, Naomi; Flavel, Ambika; Ishak, Nur-Intaniah; Franklin, Daniel

    2013-09-10

    An important component of forensic investigation is the identification of deceased (and increasingly living) individuals, which is often the role of the forensic anthropologist. One of the most valuable steps towards identification is via a biological profile, developed through the application of population specific standards. In disaster victim identification scenarios, fleshed feet are often recovered in footwear; footprints are another potential source of trace evidence found at crime scenes. In medico-legal investigations, feet and footprints can be useful for extrapolating living height, it is thus expedient to determine whether sex can be estimated from the same anthropometric data. The aim of the present study is to develop accurate sex estimation standards for a contemporary Western Australian population from measurements of the feet and footprints. The sample comprises 200 adults (90 males, 110 females). Three bilateral linear measurements were taken from each foot and seven bilateral measurements were acquired from static footprints obtained using a Podograph. A precision test was first conducted to assess data accuracy and reliability. Measurement data are then analysed using a range of parametric statistical tests. Results show that males were significantly (Pfoot and footprint measurements; cross-validated sex classification accuracies ranged from 71% to 91%. Although in many instances the sex bias was large (>±5%), this study provides viable alternatives for estimating sex in Western Australian individuals with accuracy equivalent to established standards developed from foot bones. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Estimation of stature using anthropometry of feet and footprints in a Western Australian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemy, Naomi; Flavel, Ambika; Ishak, Nur-Intaniah; Franklin, Daniel

    2013-07-01

    The aim of the study is to develop accurate stature estimation models for a contemporary Western Australian population from measurements of the feet and footprints. The sample comprises 200 adults (90 males, 110 females). A stature measurement, three linear measurements from each foot and bilateral footprints were collected from each subject. Seven linear measurements were then extracted from each print. Prior to data collection, a precision test was conducted to determine the repeatability of measurement acquisition. The primary data were then analysed using a range of parametric statistical tests. Results show that all foot and footprint measurements were significantly (P stature and estimation models were formulated with a prediction accuracy of ± 4.673 cm to ± 6.926 cm. Left foot length was the most accurate single variable in the simple linear regressions (males: ± 5.065 cm; females: ± 4.777 cm). This study provides viable alternatives for estimating stature in a Western Australian population that are equivalent to established standards developed from foot bones. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  6. Estimation of sex from the metric assessment of digital hand radiographs in a Western Australian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSilva, Rebecca; Flavel, Ambika; Franklin, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    The forensic anthropologist is responsible for contributing to the identification of an unknown by constructing a biological profile from their skeletal remains. Towards achieving this goal, anthropologists can apply population and temporally specific standards with known error margins to morphometric data collected from a decedent. Recent research relating to the formulation of sex estimation standards has focussed on the assessment of bones other than the traditionally favoured pelvis and cranium, such as long bones of the appendicular skeleton. In particular, sex estimation standards based on morphometric data from metacarpals and phalanges have reported classification accuracy rates of 80% (and above) based on a narrow range of populations. The purpose of this study is to provide population-specific hand bone sex-estimation standards for a contemporary Western Australian population. The present study examines digital right hand radiographs of 300 adults of known age, equally represented by sex. A total of 40 measurements were taken in each hand (metacarpals and proximal phalanges); the measurements were then analysed using univariate statistics and cross-validated direct and stepwise discriminant function analysis. All hand bone measurements were significantly sexually dimorphic, with a tendency for the width measurements to express a higher degree of dimorphism than the length measurements. A maximum cross-validated classification accuracy of 91% was achieved with a sex bias of -6%. The standards presented here can be used in future forensic investigations that require sex estimation of hand bones in a Western Australian population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Tap into Good Teeth--a Western Australian pilot study of children's drinking patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavy, Justine E; Heyworth, Jane; Middleton, Aves; Rosenberg, Michael; Woloszyn, Magdalene

    2012-04-01

    ISSUED ADDRESSED: The increase trend in the prevalence of dental caries in Australian children is a concern to public health professionals. Attitudes, behaviours and lifestyle patterns established in childhood are often carried throughout adult life. The objective of the study was to estimate the proportion of Perth metropolitan year two public primary school children drinking tap water at home, school and play. It also aimed to explore knowledge and attitudes that children and parents have towards drinking tap water, bottled water, fruit juices and soft drinks. Nine Western Australian government primary schools were recruited. A facilitator-led questionnaire was administered to year two primary school students and a matched parent self-administered questionnaire was also completed. Forty-two per cent of the children in our study reported if thirsty they drank tap (fluoridated) water at home whereas parents stated 60% of children drank tap water at home. The type of drink appeared to vary with time of day/activity while overall water was most frequently drunk; a higher proportion of milk was drunk at breakfast, whereas soft drinks were drunk in a greater proportion while watching television. This study found the vast majority of year two children in metropolitan Perth public primary schools are drinking tap water.

  8. Lessons from the Western Australian experience: A buyer`s perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irvine, J. [Alcoa of Australia Ltd., Perth, WA (Australia)

    1996-10-01

    The aim of deregulating the Western Australian gas industry was to introduce competition and drive down the price. In doing so, it was expected that cheaper gas would enable further mineral processing, thus assisting economic growth. Gas prices have fallen, though some customers have gained more than others. Gas prices for Pilbara customers have halved, with the main beneficiaries being the iron ore industries and the power generation facilities. However, only some medium size customers in the southwest of the state have benefited to date. After deregulation, major opportunities opened up for private pipelines, and one is now being constructed to the goldfields. Gas producers will be able to grow a market down the length of the pipeline and sell gas at prices set by free competition. (author). 1 fig.

  9. Interannual variability in the seasonal cycle of chlorophyll in the Leeuwin Current off the southwest Western Australian coast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greenwood, J.E.; Soetaert, K.E.R.

    2008-01-01

    The seasonal cycle of surface chlorophyll in the Leeuwin Current off the southwest Western Australian coast is characterized by low austral summer concentrations that increase during the austral autumn and winter. Results from a one-dimensional numerical model show that a combination of solar

  10. Estimation of stature from hand and handprint dimensions in a Western Australian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishak, Nur-Intaniah; Hemy, Naomi; Franklin, Daniel

    2012-03-10

    As part of the formulation of a biological profile, the estimation of stature is an important element that provides useful data towards narrowing the pool of potentially matching identities. Recent literature has demonstrated that anthropometry of the hand has considerable promise for the accurate estimation of stature; although the technique has only been tested in a relatively limited range of populations. The aim of the present study, therefore, is to assess the reliability and accuracy of using anthropometric hand measurements for the estimation of stature in a contemporary Western Australian population; we also evaluate whether stature can be accurately estimated from the measurement of handprints. The study sample comprises 91 male and 110 female adult individuals. Following the measurement of stature, seven measurements are taken on each hand and its corresponding print. To establish the reliability of acquiring these measurements, a precision study was performed prior to primary data collection. Measurements data are analysed using basic univariate statistics and simple and multiple regression analyses. Our results show that the degree of measurement error and reliability are well within accepted standards. Stature prediction accuracy using hand and handprint measurements ranges from ±4.74 to 6.53cm, which is comparable to established skeletal standards for the hand. This study provides new forensic standards for the estimation of stature in a Western Australian population and also demonstrates that the measurement and analysis of handprints affords a novel source of profiling data that is statistically quantified. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders: notifications to the Western Australian Register of Developmental Anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutch, Raewyn C; Watkins, Rochelle; Bower, Carol

    2015-04-01

    There is increasing attention on fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) in Australia, but there are limited data on their birth prevalence. Our aim was to report on the birth prevalence of FASD in Western Australia. Data on notified cases of FASD born in Western Australia 1980-2010 were identified from the Western Australian Register of Developmental Anomalies. Tabulated denominator data were obtained from the Midwives Notification System. Prevalence rates per 1000 births were calculated by demographic variables. Prevalence ratios (PRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of Aboriginal compared with non-Aboriginal prevalence rates were calculated. PRs were also calculated to compare rates for births 2000-2010 with 1980-1989. Two hundred ten cases of FASDs were identified: a birth prevalence of 0.26/1000 births (95% CI 0.23-0.30). The majority of cases reported were Aboriginal (89.5%), a rate of 4.08/1000, compared with 0.03/1000 in notified non-Aboriginal cases, giving a PR of 139 (95% CI 89-215). The prevalence of FASD in 2000-2010 was over twice that in 1980-1989 for both Aboriginal (PR 2.37; CI 1.60-3.51) and non-Aboriginal (PR 2.13; CI 0.68-6.69) children. There has been a twofold increase in FASD notifications in Western Australia over the last 30 years. Population surveillance data such as these are valuable in advocating for and monitoring the effectiveness of preventive activities and diagnostic and management services. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd on behalf of Paediatrics and Child Health Division. (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  12. Process Philosophy and the Text-Image Interface: A Study of Three Western Australian Botanical Illustrators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Charles Ryan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Botanical illustration combines scientific knowledge and artistic technique. However, whereas illustrated botanical images record static visual qualities, such as form and color, written botanical narratives supply crucial sensory, ecological, historical, and cultural contexts that complement visual representation. Understanding the text-image interface—where images and words intersect—contributes to humanities-based analyses of botanical illustration and illustrators. More specifically, a process philosophy perspective reveals the extent to which botanical representations engage the temporality, cyclicality, and contextuality of the living plants being illustrated. This article takes up these themes through a comparative theoretical study of three female Western Australian botanical illustrators, Georgiana Leake (1812–1869, Emily Pelloe (1877–1941, and Philippa Nikulinsky (born 1942, whose lives together span the 183 year history of the Swan River Colony and the state of Western Australia. I apply a processist framework to examine the text-image interface of their works. All three illustrators use some form of textuality: marginalia, annotations, written accompaniments, introductory statements, and other narrative materials. In examining their written commentaries and traces, I identify the emergence of a process mode of botanical illustration that represents plants as ecological, historical, cultural, and temporal organisms.

  13. Biogeography and speciation of terrestrial fauna in the south-western Australian biodiversity hotspot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rix, Michael G; Edwards, Danielle L; Byrne, Margaret; Harvey, Mark S; Joseph, Leo; Roberts, J Dale

    2015-08-01

    The south-western land division of Western Australia (SWWA), bordering the temperate Southern and Indian Oceans, is the only global biodiversity hotspot recognised in Australia. Renowned for its extraordinary diversity of endemic plants, and for some of the largest and most botanically significant temperate heathlands and woodlands on Earth, SWWA has long fascinated biogeographers. Its flat, highly weathered topography and the apparent absence of major geographic factors usually implicated in biotic diversification have challenged attempts to explain patterns of biogeography and mechanisms of speciation in the region. Botanical studies have always been central to understanding the biodiversity values of SWWA, although surprisingly few quantitative botanical analyses have allowed for an understanding of historical biogeographic processes in both space and time. Faunistic studies, by contrast, have played little or no role in defining hotspot concepts, despite several decades of accumulating quantitative research on the phylogeny and phylogeography of multiple lineages. In this review we critically analyse datasets with explicit supporting phylogenetic data and estimates of the time since divergence for all available elements of the terrestrial fauna, and compare these datasets to those available for plants. In situ speciation has played more of a role in shaping the south-western Australian fauna than has long been supposed, and has occurred in numerous endemic lineages of freshwater fish, frogs, reptiles, snails and less-vagile arthropods. By contrast, relatively low levels of endemism are found in birds, mammals and highly dispersive insects, and in situ speciation has played a negligible role in generating local endemism in birds and mammals. Quantitative studies provide evidence for at least four mechanisms driving patterns of endemism in south-western Australian animals, including: (i) relictualism of ancient Gondwanan or Pangaean taxa in the High Rainfall

  14. Hospital admissions for skin infections among Western Australian children and adolescents from 1996 to 2012.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasnim Abdalla

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to describe the occurrence of skin infection associated hospitalizations in children born in Western Australia (WA. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of all children born in WA between 1996 and 2012 (n = 469,589. Of these, 31,348 (6.7% were Aboriginal and 240,237 (51.2% were boys. We report the annual age-specific hospital admission rates by geographical location and diagnostic category. We applied log-linear regression modelling to analyse changes in temporal trends of hospitalizations. Hospitalization rates for skin infections in Aboriginal children (31.7/1000 child-years; 95% confidence interval [CI] 31.0-32.4 were 15.0 times higher (95% CI 14.5-15.5; P<0.001 than those of non-Aboriginal children (2.1/1000 child-years; 95% CI 2.0-2.1. Most admissions in Aboriginal children were due to abscess, cellulitis and scabies (84.3%, while impetigo and pyoderma were the predominant causes in non-Aboriginal children (97.7%. Admissions declined with age, with the highest rates for all skin infections observed in infants. Admissions increased with remoteness. Multiple admissions were more common in Aboriginal children. Excess admissions in Aboriginal children were observed during the wet season in the Kimberley and during summer in metropolitan areas. Our study findings show that skin infections are a significant cause of severe disease, requiring hospitalization in Western Australian children, with Aboriginal children at a particularly high risk. Improved community-level prevention of skin infections and the provision of effective primary care are crucial in reducing the burden of skin infection associated hospitalizations. The contribution of sociodemographic and environmental risk factors warrant further investigation.

  15. Revision of the Western Australian pebble-mimic dragon species-group (Tympanocryptis cephalus: Reptilia: Agamidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doughty, Paul; Kealley, Luke; Shoo, Luke P; Melville, Jane

    2015-11-03

    Recent work on species complexes of the pebble-mimic dragons of the Australian genus Tympanocryptis has greatly clarified evolutionary relationships among taxa and also indicated that species diversity has been severely underestimated. Here we provide a morphological and molecular appraisal of variation in the T. cephalus species-group and find evidence for recognizing five species-level lineages from Western Australia. Four species-level lineages are strongly supported with a combined mitochondrial and nuclear DNA Bayesian analysis (a fifth population from the Gascoyne region lacked tissue samples). Morphologically, we found subtle, yet consistent, differences among the populations in scalation, color and pattern. True T. cephalus Günther is restricted to the coastal Pilbara region and characterized by five dark blotches on the dorsum, keeled ventrals, and other characters. Two other lineages within the Pilbara, from the Hamersley range and Fortescue/northern Pilbara region, differed from T. cephalus senso stricto by possessing a more elongate body and a plain dorsum. Furthermore, the Hamersley lineage differed from the Fortescue lineage by possessing slightly more reddish coloration and feeble keeling on the snout. Although there are few specimens and no tissue samples available for the Gascoyne population, these individuals are larger, have rugose scales on the snout, and possess scattered enlarged tubercles with three large blotches on the dorsum. The name T. cephalus gigas Mitchell is available for this population. The most widespread lineage, and the one best represented in collections and in field guides, occurs throughout central Western Australia. These Goldfield populations are characterized by a protruding snout, narrow rostral, and uniform reddish-brown coloration, often with a dark wash. Based on the genetic and morphological differences, we redescribe T. cephalus, resurrect and elevate T. gigas to a full species and designate a neotype for this taxon

  16. Western Australian High School Students' Understandings about the Socioscientific Issue of Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Vaille

    2015-05-01

    Climate change is one of the most significant science issues facing humanity; yet, teaching students about climate change is challenging: not only is it multidisciplinary, but also it is contentious and debated in political, social and media forums. Students need to be equipped with an understanding of climate change science to be able to participate in this discourse. The purpose of this study was to examine Western Australian high school students' understanding of climate change and the greenhouse effect, in order to identify their alternative conceptions about climate change science and provide a baseline for more effective teaching. A questionnaire designed to elicit students' understanding and alternative conceptions was completed by 438 Year 10 students (14-15 years old). A further 20 students were interviewed. Results showed that students know different features of both climate change and the greenhouse effect, however not necessarily all of them and the relationships between. Five categories of alternative conceptions were identified. The categories were (1) the greenhouse effect and the ozone layer; (2) types of greenhouse gases; (3) types of radiation; (4) weather and climate and (5) air pollution. These findings provide science educators a basis upon which to develop strategies and curriculum resources to improve their students' understanding and decision-making skills about the socioscientific issue, climate change.

  17. Seismic structure of a late-Archean microcontinent in the middle of the Western Australian Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Huaiyu; Johnson, Simon; Dentith, Mike; Murdie, Ruth; Gessner, Klaus; Korhonen, Fawna; Bodin, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    The Capricorn Orogen recorded the Paleoproterozoic amalgamation of the Archean Pilbara and Yilgarn cratons to form the Western Australian Craton. Regional surveys involving geological mapping, geochemistry, and geophysics reveal a prolonged tectonic history in craton assembly and subsequent intracratonic reworking, which have significantly re-shaped the orogenic crust. A high-density earthquake seismology deployment targeted the Glenburgh Terrane, an exotic late-Archean to Paleoproterozoic crustal block previously inferred from distinct structural and isotopic characters in the core region of the terrane. Prominent Moho and intracrustal discontinuities are present, replicating the overall trend and depth range found in the previous high-resolution deep crustal reflection image. Significant lateral variations in the seismic signal are found across the terrane boundary, showing a relatively thin crust (40km) crust with elevated Vp/Vs ratios (>1.76) in the margin. The small Vp/Vs ratios ( 1.70) are mapped terrane-wide, indicating a felsic bulk crustal composition. Considering the available constraints from isotopic age, magnetotelluric models and absolute shear wave velocities from ambient noise tomography, the Glenburgh Terrane is interpreted as a microcontinent made in the Archean, which however may have been altered during the WAC assembly and cratonization, as well as subsequent intracratonic reworking/magmatic differentiation processes. Our results illustrate that multi-disciplinary datasets bring complementary resolution and therefore may put tighter constraints on the tectonic processes that have affected the crust.

  18. Which Food Security Determinants Predict Adequate Vegetable Consumption among Rural Western Australian Children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godrich, Stephanie L; Lo, Johnny; Davies, Christina R; Darby, Jill; Devine, Amanda

    2017-01-03

    Improving the suboptimal vegetable consumption among the majority of Australian children is imperative in reducing chronic disease risk. The objective of this research was to determine whether there was a relationship between food security determinants (FSD) (i.e., food availability, access, and utilisation dimensions) and adequate vegetable consumption among children living in regional and remote Western Australia (WA). Caregiver-child dyads ( n = 256) living in non-metropolitan/rural WA completed cross-sectional surveys that included questions on FSD, demographics and usual vegetable intake. A total of 187 dyads were included in analyses, which included descriptive and logistic regression analyses via IBM SPSS (version 23). A total of 13.4% of children in this sample had adequate vegetable intake. FSD that met inclusion criteria ( p ≤ 0.20) for multivariable regression analyses included price; promotion; quality; location of food outlets; variety of vegetable types; financial resources; and transport to outlets. After adjustment for potential demographic confounders, the FSD that predicted adequate vegetable consumption were, variety of vegetable types consumed ( p = 0.007), promotion ( p = 0.017), location of food outlets ( p = 0.027), and price ( p = 0.043). Food retail outlets should ensure that adequate varieties of vegetable types (i.e., fresh, frozen, tinned) are available, vegetable messages should be promoted through food retail outlets and in community settings, towns should include a range of vegetable purchasing options, increase their reliance on a local food supply and increase transport options to enable affordable vegetable purchasing.

  19. Relationships between Psychosocial Resilience and Physical Health Status of Western Australian Urban Aboriginal Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Katrina D; Shepherd, Carrington C J; Taylor, Catherine L; Zubrick, Stephen R

    2015-01-01

    Psychosocial processes are implicated as mediators of racial/ethnic health disparities via dysregulation of physiological responses to stress. Our aim was to investigate the extent to which factors previously documented as buffering the impact of high-risk family environments on Aboriginal youths' psychosocial functioning were similarly beneficial for their physical health status. We examined the relationship between psychosocial resilience and physical health of urban Aboriginal youth (12-17 years, n = 677) drawn from a representative survey of Western Australian Aboriginal children and their families. A composite variable of psychosocial resilient status, derived by cross-classifying youth by high/low family risk exposure and normal/abnormal psychosocial functioning, resulted in four groups- Resilient, Less Resilient, Expected Good and Vulnerable. Separate logistic regression modeling for high and low risk exposed youth revealed that Resilient youth were significantly more likely to have lower self-reported asthma symptoms (OR 3.48, pResilient youth. The findings are consistent with biopsychosocial models and provide a more nuanced understanding of the patterns of risks, resources and adaptation that impact on the physical health of Aboriginal youth. The results support the posited biological pathways between chronic stress and physical health, and identify the protective role of social connections impacting not only psychosocial function but also physical health. Using a resilience framework may identify potent protective factors otherwise undetected in aggregated analyses, offering important insights to augment general public health prevention strategies.

  20. Teachers' Perspectives of the New Western Australian Earth and Environmental Science Course: Lessons for the Australian Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Vaille; Moore, Leah

    2011-01-01

    In 2007, a new upper secondary course, Earth and Environmental Science (EES) was introduced in Western Australia. The development and implementation of the course was supported by Earth Science Western Australia (ESWA), a consortium of universities, the CSIRO and other organisations. The role of ESWA is to support the teaching of earth science in…

  1. Kim Scott’s Fiction within Western Australian Life-Writing: Voicing the Violence of Removal and Displacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelis Martin Renes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It is nowadays evident that the West’s civilising, eugenic zeal have had a devastating impact on all aspects of the Indigenous-Australian community tissue, not least the lasting trauma of the Stolen Generations. The latter was the result of the institutionalisation, adoption, fostering, virtual slavery and sexual abuse of thousands of mixed-descent children, who were separated at great physical and emotional distances from their Indigenous kin, often never to see them again. The object of State and Federal policies of removal and mainstream absorption and assimilation between 1930 and 1970, these lost children only saw their plight officially recognised in 1997, when the Bringing Them Home report was published by the Federal government. The victims of forced separation and migration, they have suffered serious trans-generational problems of adaptation and alienation in Australian society, which have been not only documented from the outside in the aforementioned report but also given shape from the inside of and to Indigenous-Australian literature over the last three decades. The following addresses four Indigenous Western-Australian writers within the context of the Stolen Generations, and deals particularly with the semi-biographical fiction by the Nyoongar author Kim Scott, which shows how a very liminal hybrid identity can be firmly written in place yet. Un-writing past policies of physical and ‘epistemic’ violence on the Indigenous Australian population, his fiction addresses a way of approaching Australianness from an Indigenous perspective as inclusive, embracing transculturality within the nation-space.

  2. Ethics and health promotion practice: exploring attitudes and practices in Western Australian health organisations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, T; Crawford, G; Lobo, R; Leavy, J; Jancey, J

    2016-04-01

    Issue addressed Evidence-informed practice underpinned by ethics is fundamental to developing the science of health promotion. Knowledge and application of ethical principles are competencies required for health promotion practice. However, these competencies are often inconsistently understood and applied. This research explored attitudes, practices, enablers and barriers related to ethics in practice in Western Australian health organisations. Methods Semistructured, in-depth interviews were conducted with 10 health promotion practitioners, purposefully selected to provide a cross-section of government and non-government organisations. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and then themed. Results The majority of participants reported consideration of ethics in their practice; however, only half reported seeking Human Research Ethics Committee (HREC) approval for projects in the past 12 months. Enablers identified as supporting ethics in practice and disseminating findings included: support preparing ethics applications; resources and training about ethical practice; ability to access HRECs for ethics approval; and a supportive organisational culture. Barriers included: limited time; insufficient resourcing and capacity; ethics approval not seen as part of core business; and concerns about academic writing. Conclusion The majority of participants were aware of the importance of ethics in practice and the dissemination of findings. However, participants reported barriers to engaging in formal ethics processes and to publishing findings. So what? Alignment of evidence-informed and ethics-based practice is critical. Resources and information about ethics may be required to support practice and encourage dissemination of findings, including in the peer-reviewed literature. Investigating the role of community-based ethics boards may be valuable to bridging the ethics-evidence gap.

  3. Provenance of Holocene calcareous beach-dune sediments, Western Eyre Peninsula, Great Australian Bight, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Noel P.; Bone, Yvonne

    2017-07-01

    Much of western Eyre Peninsula adjacent to the Great Australian Bight is veneered with siliceous and calcareous Quaternary aeolian dunes. The lengthy coastline adjacent to this cool-water carbonate factory is a series of Precambrian crystalline bedrock-Pleistocene aeolianite headlands that separate many long, sweeping, Holocene carbonate sand beaches and their backbeach dunes. Incessant SW waves, rolling swells, and onshore winds have resulted in > 350 km of semi-continuous calcareous strandline aeolian sands. The sediment is composed of quartz grains, Cenozoic limestone clasts, and relict particles (extraclasts) but the deposits are overwhelmingly dominated by contemporaneous biofragments from offshore. These skeletal grains are, in order of relative abundance, molluscs > benthic foraminifers > coralline algae > bryozoans, and echinoids. Benthic foraminifers are mostly small (especially rotaliids and miliolids) but the large relict symbiont-bearing protistMarginopora vertebralis, which grew in the latter stages of MIS 2, is present locally. There are no significant onshore-offshore trends within individual beach-dune complexes. There is, however, a prominent spatial partitioning, with extraclast-rich sediments in the north and biofragment-rich deposits in the south. This areal trend is interpreted to result from more active seafloor carbonate production in the south, an area of conspicuous seasonal nutrient upwelling and profound nektic and benthic biological productivity. The overall system is strikingly similar to Holocene and Pleistocene aeolianites along the inboard margin of the Lacepede Shelf and Bonney Coast some 500 km to the southeast, implying a potential universality to the nature of cool-water carbonate aeolianite deposition. The composition of these cool-water aeolianites is more multifaceted than those formed on warm-water, shallow flat-topped platforms, largely because of the comparatively deep, temperate shelf, the high-energy wave and swell

  4. Western Australian Public Opinions of a Minimum Pricing Policy for Alcohol: Study Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keatley, David A; Carragher, Natacha; Chikritzhs, Tanya; Daube, Mike; Hardcastle, Sarah J; Hagger, Martin S

    2015-11-18

    Excessive alcohol consumption has significant adverse economic, social, and health outcomes. Recent estimates suggest that the annual economic costs of alcohol in Australia are up to AUD $36 billion. Policies influencing price have been demonstrated to be very effective in reducing alcohol consumption and alcohol-related harms. Interest in minimum pricing has gained traction in recent years. However, there has been little research investigating the level of support for the public interest case of minimum pricing in Australia. This article describes protocol for a study exploring Western Australian (WA) public knowledge, understanding, and reaction to a proposed minimum price policy per standard drink. The study will employ a qualitative methodological design. Participants will be recruited from a wide variety of backgrounds, including ethnic minorities, blue and white collar workers, unemployed, students, and elderly/retired populations to participate in focus groups. Focus group participants will be asked about their knowledge of, and initial reactions to, the proposed policy and encouraged to discuss how such a proposal may affect their own alcohol use and alcohol consumption at the population level. Participants will also be asked to discuss potential avenues for increasing acceptability of the policy. The focus groups will adopt a semi-structured, open-ended approach guided by a question schedule. The schedule will be based on feedback from pilot samples, previous research, and a steering group comprising experts in alcohol policy and pricing. The study is expected to take approximately 14 months to complete. The findings will be of considerable interest and relevance to government officials, policy makers, researchers, advocacy groups, alcohol retail and licensed establishments and organizations, city and town planners, police, and other stakeholder organizations.

  5. Relationships between Psychosocial Resilience and Physical Health Status of Western Australian Urban Aboriginal Youth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrina D Hopkins

    Full Text Available Psychosocial processes are implicated as mediators of racial/ethnic health disparities via dysregulation of physiological responses to stress. Our aim was to investigate the extent to which factors previously documented as buffering the impact of high-risk family environments on Aboriginal youths' psychosocial functioning were similarly beneficial for their physical health status.We examined the relationship between psychosocial resilience and physical health of urban Aboriginal youth (12-17 years, n = 677 drawn from a representative survey of Western Australian Aboriginal children and their families. A composite variable of psychosocial resilient status, derived by cross-classifying youth by high/low family risk exposure and normal/abnormal psychosocial functioning, resulted in four groups- Resilient, Less Resilient, Expected Good and Vulnerable. Separate logistic regression modeling for high and low risk exposed youth revealed that Resilient youth were significantly more likely to have lower self-reported asthma symptoms (OR 3.48, p<.001 and carer reported lifetime health problems (OR 1.76, p<.04 than Less Resilient youth.The findings are consistent with biopsychosocial models and provide a more nuanced understanding of the patterns of risks, resources and adaptation that impact on the physical health of Aboriginal youth. The results support the posited biological pathways between chronic stress and physical health, and identify the protective role of social connections impacting not only psychosocial function but also physical health. Using a resilience framework may identify potent protective factors otherwise undetected in aggregated analyses, offering important insights to augment general public health prevention strategies.

  6. Sports-related eye and adnexal injuries in the Western Australian paediatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoskin, Annette K; Yardley, Anne-Marie E; Hanman, Kate; Lam, Geoffrey; Mackey, David A

    2016-09-01

    To identify the causes of sports-related eye and adnexal injuries in children in Perth, Western Australia, to determine which sporting activities pose the highest risk of eye and adnexal injury to children. We performed a 12-year retrospective review of children admitted to hospital from 2002 to 2013 with sports-related ocular and adnexal eye injuries. The main outcome measures were the cause and type of ocular and adnexal injuries, age and gender risk factors. A total of 93 cases of sports-related ocular and adnexal injury were identified in the 12-year time period. A peak in injuries occurred for 12- to 14-year-olds with a second peak in 6- to 8-year-olds; the median age was 8.82 years (range = 1.59-16.47). Cycling, football (including soccer and Australian Rules Football), tennis, trampolining, fishing and swimming were the sports responsible for the greatest number of injuries, a total of 63%. More than one-third (35%) of injuries resulted from being struck by a blunt object, and more than a quarter (26%) were as a result of contact with a blunt projectile. Serious ocular and adnexal injuries have occurred in children as a result of participating in sports, with cycling and football being the largest contributors in the 12-year period we assessed. As we continue to encourage children to spend more time participating in sports and recreational activities, identifying associated risk factors will help us develop injury prevention strategies to promote eye safety for children. © 2015 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Western Australian Public Opinions of a Minimum Pricing Policy for Alcohol: Study Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keatley, David A; Daube, Mike; Hardcastle, Sarah J

    2015-01-01

    Background Excessive alcohol consumption has significant adverse economic, social, and health outcomes. Recent estimates suggest that the annual economic costs of alcohol in Australia are up to AUD $36 billion. Policies influencing price have been demonstrated to be very effective in reducing alcohol consumption and alcohol-related harms. Interest in minimum pricing has gained traction in recent years. However, there has been little research investigating the level of support for the public interest case of minimum pricing in Australia. Objective This article describes protocol for a study exploring Western Australian (WA) public knowledge, understanding, and reaction to a proposed minimum price policy per standard drink. Methods The study will employ a qualitative methodological design. Participants will be recruited from a wide variety of backgrounds, including ethnic minorities, blue and white collar workers, unemployed, students, and elderly/retired populations to participate in focus groups. Focus group participants will be asked about their knowledge of, and initial reactions to, the proposed policy and encouraged to discuss how such a proposal may affect their own alcohol use and alcohol consumption at the population level. Participants will also be asked to discuss potential avenues for increasing acceptability of the policy. The focus groups will adopt a semi-structured, open-ended approach guided by a question schedule. The schedule will be based on feedback from pilot samples, previous research, and a steering group comprising experts in alcohol policy and pricing. Results The study is expected to take approximately 14 months to complete. Conclusions The findings will be of considerable interest and relevance to government officials, policy makers, researchers, advocacy groups, alcohol retail and licensed establishments and organizations, city and town planners, police, and other stakeholder organizations. PMID:26582408

  8. Resilience, Adaptive Capacity, and the "Lock-in Trap" of the Western Australian Agricultural Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen E. Allison

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Using the Western Australian (WA agricultural region as an example of a large-scale social-ecological system (SES, this paper applies a framework based on resilience theory to examine the region's resilience and capacity for change and renewal. Despite numerous policies directed at controlling natural resource degradation in this SES, sustainable natural resource management (NRM has not been achieved. Disparities between the scale and complexity of the problem, the design of management policies, and region's history have all contributed to policy resistance. Historically, when considered as an integrated system, changes may be described by two iterations of the adaptive cycle. These cycles are also synchronous with the third and fourth Kondratiev long-wave economic cycles. The WA agricultural region has experienced sequential periods of growth and accumulation followed by reorganization and renewal, and currently is in the backloop (reorganization to exploitation phases of the adaptive cycle. A region's adaptive capacity is achieved by substituting direct reliance on regional factors with institutional intervention and sophisticated technology, often generated at the global scale. This substitution alters the thresholds of the commodity system and gives the perception of an adaptive system. In contrast, however, if resource depletion, environmental pollution, and population decline, also effects of the commodity system, are included within the model then the region may be considered to be in a "Lock-in" pathological trap. We propose that the dynamics of land-use change between 1900-2003 were driven by macroeconomics at the global scale, mediated by institutions at the national and state scale. Also, the SES, which is composed of relatively fast-moving variables, is largely decoupled from the slow-moving ecological variables.

  9. Which Food Security Determinants Predict Adequate Vegetable Consumption among Rural Western Australian Children?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie L. Godrich

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Improving the suboptimal vegetable consumption among the majority of Australian children is imperative in reducing chronic disease risk. The objective of this research was to determine whether there was a relationship between food security determinants (FSD (i.e., food availability, access, and utilisation dimensions and adequate vegetable consumption among children living in regional and remote Western Australia (WA. Caregiver-child dyads (n = 256 living in non-metropolitan/rural WA completed cross-sectional surveys that included questions on FSD, demographics and usual vegetable intake. A total of 187 dyads were included in analyses, which included descriptive and logistic regression analyses via IBM SPSS (version 23. A total of 13.4% of children in this sample had adequate vegetable intake. FSD that met inclusion criteria (p ≤ 0.20 for multivariable regression analyses included price; promotion; quality; location of food outlets; variety of vegetable types; financial resources; and transport to outlets. After adjustment for potential demographic confounders, the FSD that predicted adequate vegetable consumption were, variety of vegetable types consumed (p = 0.007, promotion (p = 0.017, location of food outlets (p = 0.027, and price (p = 0.043. Food retail outlets should ensure that adequate varieties of vegetable types (i.e., fresh, frozen, tinned are available, vegetable messages should be promoted through food retail outlets and in community settings, towns should include a range of vegetable purchasing options, increase their reliance on a local food supply and increase transport options to enable affordable vegetable purchasing.

  10. Constructive Conquest in the Courts: A Legal History of the Western Shoshone Lands Struggle—1861 to 1991

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    JOHN D. O'CONNELL

    2002-01-01

    .... However, a claim alleging that the United States had long ago taken all Western Shoshone lands had been filed in the Indian Claims Commission by a tribal government representing only a portion of the tribe...

  11. Age estimation standards for a Western Australian population using the dental age estimation technique developed by Kvaal et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkhanis, Shalmira; Mack, Peter; Franklin, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    In the present global socio-political scenario, an increasing demand exists for age estimation in living persons, such as refugees and asylum seekers, who seldom have any documentation for proof of identity. Age estimation in the living poses significant challenges because the methods need to be non-invasive, accurate and ethically viable. Methods based on the analysis of the pulp chamber are recommended for age estimation in living adults. There is, however, a paucity of studies of this nature and population specific standards in Western Australia. The aim of the present study is therefore, to test the reliability and applicability of the method developed by Kvaal et al. (1995) for the purpose of developing age estimation standards for an adult Western Australian population. A total of 279 digital orthopantomograms (143 female; and 136 male) of Australian individuals were analysed. A subset of the total sample (50) was removed as a cross-validation (holdout) sample. Following the method described in Kvaal et al. (1995), length and width measurements of the tooth and pulp chamber were acquired in maxillary central and lateral incisors; second premolars, mandibular lateral incisors; canines and first premolars. Those measurements were then used to calculate a series of ratios (length and width), which were subsequently used to formulate age estimation regression models. The most accurate model based on a single tooth was for the maxillary central incisor (SEE ±9.367 years), followed by the maxillary second premolar (SEE ±9.525 years). Regression models based on the measurement of multiple teeth improved age prediction accuracy (SEE ±7.963 years). The regression models presented here have expected accuracy rates comparable (if not higher than) to established skeletal morphoscopic methods. This method, therefore, offers a statistically quantified methodological approach for forensic age estimation in Western Australian adults. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd

  12. Court Briefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nankivell, R.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Presents court briefs for three separate constitutional issues: the individual right to die as tested in the "Cruzan v. Missouri Department of Health" case; constitutional rights and drunk driving; and student religious clubs' right to meet at public schools in accordance with the Equal Access Act of 1984. Analyzes court opinions and…

  13. Equine peripheral dental caries: An epidemiological survey assessing prevalence and possible risk factors in Western Australian horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, K; Kelty, E; Tennant, M

    2018-01-01

    Peripheral dental caries is defined as macroscopic destruction of the calcified dental tissues and can cause considerable dental pathology and pain. It appears to occur at a high prevalence in Western Australian horses. At present, risk factors for the condition are poorly understood, making treatment and prevention difficult. To assess the prevalence of and potential risk factors for peripheral caries in Western Australian horses. Cross-sectional, epidemiological study. A survey of 500 Western Australian horses was administered in two sections. The first section was completed by the owner and referred to the horse's signalment, diet and husbandry conditions. The second section was completed by veterinarians and focused on the horse's oral health. A multivariable logistic regression model was used to assess risk factors associated with peripheral caries. Peripheral caries was present in 58.8% (95% confidence interval [CI] 54.5-63.1%) of surveyed horses. Breed was significantly associated with peripheral caries, with Warmbloods (odds ratio [OR] 0.44, 95% CI 0.24-0.82; P = 0.009) and Western breeds (OR 0.38, 95% CI 0.19-0.78; P = 0.008) being less likely to have peripheral caries than Thoroughbreds. Dietary risk factors included oaten hay (OR 2.90, 95% CI 1.87-4.53; Pcaries than horses without access to grazing (OR 0.31, 95% CI 0.15-0.66; P = 0.002), as were horses on groundwater compared with horses on rainwater (OR 3.35, 95% CI 1.65-6.78; P = 0.001), drinking water (OR 2.03, 95% CI 1.14-3.62; P = 0.016) or dam water (OR 3.53, 95% CI 1.08-11.53; P = 0.037). Peripheral caries was positively correlated with periodontal disease (OR 4.53, 95% CI 2.91-7.06; Pcaries. Management factors that may help to prevent or reduce peripheral caries include more access to quality pasture, use of groundwater, feeding on meadow hay and avoidance of oaten hay. © 2017 EVJ Ltd.

  14. Addressing the Educational Challenges Faced by African Refugee Background Students: Perceptions of Western Australian Stakeholders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Rhonda; Haig, Yvonne; Grote, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Australian schools have a long history of providing education to students from culturally and linguistically diverse background, including new arrivals who are still in the process of acquiring English as an additional language. Nonetheless, the cohort of refugee children and youth coming from Africa's troubled regions in the last few years poses…

  15. Population differentiation and hybridisation of Australian snubfin (Orcaella heinsohni) and Indo-Pacific humpback (Sousa chinensis) dolphins in North-Western Australia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brown, Alexander M.; Kopps, Anna M.; Allen, Simon J.; Bejder, Lars; Littleford-Colquhoun, Bethan; Parra, Guido J.; Cagnazzi, Daniele; Thiele, Deborah; Palmer, Carol; Frere, Celine H.

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the Australian snubfin (Orcaella heinsohni) and Indo-Pacific humpback (Sousa chinensis) dolphins ('snubfin' and 'humpback dolphins', hereafter) of north-western Australia. While both species are listed as 'near threatened' by the IUCN, data deficiencies are impeding rigorous

  16. Effects of "Find Thirty Every Day [R]": Cross-Sectional Findings from a Western Australian Population-Wide Mass Media Campaign, 2008-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavy, Justine E.; Rosenberg, Michael; Bauman, Adrian E.; Bull, Fiona C.; Giles-Corti, Billie; Shilton, Trevor; Maitland, Clover; Barnes, Rosanne

    2013-01-01

    Background: Internationally, over the last four decades large-scale mass media campaigns have been delivered to promote physical activity and its associated health benefits. In 2002-2005, the first Western Australian statewide adult physical activity campaign "Find Thirty. It's Not a Big Exercise" was launched. In 2007, a new iteration…

  17. A Comparison of Dynamical Seasonal Tropical Cyclone Predictions for the Australian and Western Pacific Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Kay; Charles, Andrew; Nakaegawa, Toshiyuki; Hendon, Harry; Kuleshov, Yuriy

    2013-04-01

    The Australian Bureau of Meteorology (BoM) issues predictions of tropical cyclone (TC) activity in the Australian and South Pacific regions in the October before the TC season (November to April). Currently, these predictions utilise a statistical model based on the historical relationship between tropical cyclone activity and (i) sea surface temperature anomalies in the Equatorial Pacific (NINO3.4 region) and (ii) the Southern Oscillation Index over the past few decades. Variations in the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO)-TC relationship that are not contained within the historical record can lead to deficiencies in future predictions. The use of dynamical (physics-based) climate models (GCMs) offers an alternative to statistical TC prediction schemes. Any changes to the environment (whatever their character or cause) are incorporated in the analyses used to initialise a dynamical model. As part of the Pacific-Australia Climate Change Science and Adaptation Planning (PACCSAP) Program, BoM is developing dynamically-based seasonal TC predictions for the Australian, South Pacific and North-West Pacific regions. The seasonal TC predictions from two fully-coupled GCMs are evaluated and compared. These models are BoM's Predictive Ocean-Atmosphere Model for Australia (POAMA) and the Japan Meteorological Agency/Meteorological Research Institute Coupled GCM (JMA/MRI-CGCM). The resolution of POAMA's atmospheric component is T42 (~2.5° x 2.5°), while JMA/MRI-CGCM is T95 (~1.8° x 1.8°). Two TC tracking methods are employed and applied to both models to evaluate the influence of model composition and tracking technique on seasonal TC predictions. In the more traditional TC detection scheme TCs are identified where 850-hPa relative vorticity is a maximum (minimum in the Southern Hemisphere) and exceeds a certain threshold. Additionally, the 500-200-hPa thickness and the difference in maximum winds at 850 and 200 hPa are used to differentiate tropical from extratropical

  18. Learning about knowledge management for improving environmental impact assessment in a government agency: the Western Australian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Luis Enrique; Morrison-Saunders, Angus

    2011-09-01

    How does knowledge management (KM) by a government agency responsible for environmental impact assessment (EIA) potentially contribute to better environmental assessment and management practice? Staff members at government agencies in charge of the EIA process are knowledge workers who perform judgement-oriented tasks highly reliant on individual expertise, but also grounded on the agency's knowledge accumulated over the years. Part of an agency's knowledge can be codified and stored in an organizational memory, but is subject to decay or loss if not properly managed. The EIA agency operating in Western Australia was used as a case study. Its KM initiatives were reviewed, knowledge repositories were identified and staff surveyed to gauge the utilisation and effectiveness of such repositories in enabling them to perform EIA tasks. Key elements of KM are the preparation of substantive guidance and spatial information management. It was found that treatment of cumulative impacts on the environment is very limited and information derived from project follow-up is not properly captured and stored, thus not used to create new knowledge and to improve practice and effectiveness. Other opportunities for improving organizational learning include the use of after-action reviews. The learning about knowledge management in EIA practice gained from Western Australian experience should be of value to agencies worldwide seeking to understand where best to direct their resources for their own knowledge repositories and environmental management practice. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A comparative study of nutrient intakes of migrant and Australian children in Western Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owles, E N

    1975-07-26

    Little is known about the dietary patterns and nutrient intakes of preschool children in Australia. A study was undertaken in Perth on Australian and migrant children to obtain information on preschool diets. It was found that, although the mean nutrient intakes in both groups were adequate, some individual migrant national groups showed deficiencies of one or more nutrients. Many children were obtaining excessive calories and protein. The consumption of "empty calorie" foods was also high. In order to find different ways to teach good principles and practice of nutrition, the types of media which might influence parents were studied. It was considered that television and, to a lesser degree, radio were media which might exert a considerable effect if they were used to the best advantage. These forms of communication particularly were of potential value, as some migrant parents could not read English and some were illiterate. A positive nutrition education programme to combat commerical food advertising of "empty calorie" foods is recommended.

  20. Internationalization as De-Westernization of the Curriculum: The Case of Journalism at an Australian University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breit, Rhonda; Obijiofor, Levi; Fitzgerald, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Internationalization of the curriculum points to the interdependent and interconnected (globalized) world in which higher education operates. However, while international awareness is crucial to the study of journalism, in practice this often means an Anglo-American curriculum based around Western principles of journalism education and training…

  1. Patterns of Dolphin Bycatch in a North-Western Australian Trawl Fishery

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, Simon J.; Julian A Tyne; Kobryn, Halina T.; Lars Bejder; Pollock, Kenneth H.; Neil R Loneragan

    2014-01-01

    The bycatch of small cetaceans in commercial fisheries is a global wildlife management problem. We used data from skippers' logbooks and independent observers to assess common bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) bycatch patterns between 2003 and 2009 in the Pilbara Trawl Fishery, Western Australia. Both datasets indicated that dolphins were caught in all fishery areas, across all depths and throughout the year. Over the entire datasets, observer reported bycatch rates (n = 52 dolphins in ...

  2. A survey of Western Australian sheep, cattle and kangaroos to determine the prevalence of Coxiella burnetii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banazis, Michael Janis; Bestall, Abbey Simone; Reid, Simon Andrew; Fenwick, Stan Gordon

    2010-07-14

    The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of Coxiella burnetii in two domestic ruminant species (cattle and sheep) and the western grey kangaroo (Macropus fuliginosus) in Western Australia (WA). The IDEXX CHEKiT Q Fever ELISA and CFT were used to test sera from 50 sheep and 329 head of cattle for anti-C. burnetii antibodies and 343 kangaroo sera were tested using an indirect ELISA developed specifically for this study. Faecal or urine samples collected from the same animals were tested with two PCR assays to identify active shedding of C. burnetii in excreta. Only two of the 379 ruminant sera had detectable levels of anti-C. burnetii antibodies according to the ELISA while the CFT did not detect any positive samples. In contrast 115 of the 343 western grey kangaroo serum samples were positive when tested with the antibody-ELISA. The first qPCR assay, targeting the IS1111a element, identified 41 of 379 ruminant and 42 of 343 kangaroo DNA samples as positive for C. burnetii DNA. The second qPCR, targeting the JB153-3 gene, identified nine C. burnetii DNA-positive ruminant samples and six positive kangaroo samples. Sequence comparisons showed high degrees of identity with C. burnetii. Isolation of C. burnetii from faeces was also attempted but was not successful. From the results presented here it appears that domestic ruminants may not be the most significant reservoir of C. burnetii in WA and that kangaroos may pose a significant threat for zoonotic transfer of this pathogen. (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Geochemistry and Mineralogy of Western Australian Salt Lake Sediments: Implications for Meridiani Planum on Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruecker, A; Schröder, C; Byrne, J; Weigold, P; Behrens, S; Kappler, A

    2016-07-01

    Hypersaline lakes are characteristic for Western Australia and display a rare combination of geochemical and mineralogical properties that make these lakes potential analogues for past conditions on Mars. In our study, we focused on the geochemistry and mineralogy of Lake Orr and Lake Whurr. While both lakes are poor in organic carbon (Lake Orr and from 5.4 to 6.3 in Lake Whurr sediments. Lake Whurr sediments were dominated by orange and red sediment zones in which the main Fe minerals were identified as hematite, goethite, and tentatively jarosite and pyrite. Lake Orr was dominated by brownish and blackish sediments where the main Fe minerals were goethite and another paramagnetic Fe(III)-phase that could not be identified. Furthermore, a likely secondary Fe(II)-phase was observed in Lake Orr sediments. The mineralogy of these two salt lakes in the sampling area is strongly influenced by events such as flooding, evaporation, and desiccation, processes that explain at least to some extent the observed differences between Lake Orr and Lake Whurr. The iron mineralogy of Lake Whurr sediments and the high salinity make this lake a suitable analogue for Meridiani Planum on Mars, and in particular the tentative identification of pyrite in Lake Whurr sediments has implications for the interpretation of the Fe mineralogy of Meridiani Planum sediments. Western Australia-Salt lakes-Jarosite-Hematite-Pyrite-Mars analogue. Astrobiology 16, 525-538.

  4. Antibacterial activity and chemical characteristics of several Western Australian honeys compared to manuka honey and pasture honey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshan, Niloufar; Rippers, Thomas; Locher, Cornelia; Hammer, Katherine A

    2017-03-01

    The physicochemical parameters and antibacterial activity of 10 Western Australian (WA) and two comparator honeys were determined. Honeys showed a pH range of 4.0-4.7, colour range of 41.3-470.7 mAU, methylglyoxal levels ranging from 82.2 to 325.9 mg kg-1 and hydrogen peroxide levels after 2 h of 22.7-295.5 µM. Antibacterial activity was assessed by the disc diffusion assay, phenol equivalence assay, determination of minimum inhibitory and bactericidal concentrations and a time-kill assay. Activity was shown for all honeys by one or more method, however, activity varied according to which assay was used. Minimum inhibitory concentrations for WA honeys against 10 organisms ranged from 4.0 to >32.0% (w/v). Removal of hydrogen peroxide activity by catalase resulted in decreased activity for several honeys. Overall, the data showed that honeys in addition to those derived from Leptospermum spp. have antimicrobial activity and should not be overlooked as potential sources of clinically useful honey.

  5. . . . Sending out an SMS: an impact and outcome evaluation of the Western Australian Department of Health's 2005 chlamydia campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Alexa; Mak, Donna B

    2007-08-01

    Evaluation of the Western Australian (WA) Department of Health 2005 chlamydia campaign. Twenty-nine people aged 17-25 years were focus tested and 122 people aged 14-29 years were surveyed to investigate awareness and opinions of a multimedia chlamydia campaign targeting young people and to seek their recommendations on how to communicate sexual health information to young people. Forty-three general practice (GP) waiting rooms in the Perth metropolitan area were visited to examine type, availability and standard of display of sexual health resources. The majority of participants surveyed (63.2%) were aware of the chlamydia campaign. Campaign recall ranged from 27% for the website to 48.4% for the posters and print advertisements. Participants predominantly nominated television, radio, posters and magazines as preferred media for receiving sexual health messages. Participants preferred to obtain sexual health information through the Internet or a health professional. The majority of participants (58.2%) rated Short Message Service (SMS) as a very good or good communication method. Chlamydia testing increased during the campaign period by 21% in females and 29% in males, and notifications increased by 12% in females and 4% in males. The study demonstrated a high level of awareness of the chlamydia campaign among the target audience. Television, radio, posters, magazines, the Internet and health professionals were the preferred media for receiving and obtaining sexual health information. SMS was identified as a useful marketing strategy. There was a low level of uptake of the campaign resources in GP waiting rooms.

  6. Climate change threats to family farmers' sense of place and mental wellbeing: A case study from the Western Australian Wheatbelt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Neville R; Albrecht, Glenn A

    2017-02-01

    'Sense of place' has become a central concept in the analysis of the cultural, personal and mental health risks posed by a changing climate. However, such place-related understandings of mental health and wellbeing remain largely limited to Indigenous health contexts. In this article we argue the relevance of sense of place in understanding the mental health impacts of climate change on family farmers who retain close living and working relationships to the land. We conducted a community-based qualitative case study located in the Western Australian Wheatbelt - a region that has experienced some of the most significant climate change in Australia. A three-part interview series was conducted with 22 family farmers between February 2013 and April 2014, and 15 interviews with various agricultural and mental health key informants. The research findings reveal that recently observed patterns of climate change have exacerbated farmers' worries about the weather, undermined notions of self-identity, and contributed to cumulative and chronic forms of place-based distress, culminating in heightened perceived risk of depression and suicide. The research findings highlight the tightly coupled ecosystem health-human health relationships that exist for family farmers living in regions affected by climate change, as well as the significance of farmers' place-based attachments and identities for their mental health and wellbeing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The prevalence and experience of Australian naturopaths and Western herbalists working within community pharmacies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bailey Michael

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Naturopaths and Western herbal medicine (WHM practitioners were surveyed to identify their extent, experience and roles within the community pharmacy setting and to explore their attitudes to integration of complementary medicine (CM practitioners within the pharmacy setting. Method Practising naturopaths and WHM practitioners were invited to participate in an anonymous, self-administered, on-line survey. Participants were recruited using the mailing lists and websites of CM manufacturers and professional associations. Results 479 practitioners participated. 24% of respondents (n = 111 reported they had worked in community pharmacy, three-quarters for less than 5 years. Whilst in this role 74% conducted specialist CMs sales, 62% short customer consultations, 52% long consultations in a private room and 51% staff education. This was generally described as a positive learning experience and many appreciated the opportunity to utilise their specialist knowledge in the service of both customers and pharmacy staff. 14% (n = 15 did not enjoy the experience of working in pharmacy at all and suggested pharmacist attitude largely influenced whether the experience was positive or not. Few practitioners were satisfied with the remuneration received. 44% of the total sample provided comment on the issue of integration into pharmacy, with the main concern being the perceived incommensurate paradigms of practice between pharmacy and naturopathy. Of the total sample, 38% reported that they would consider working as a practitioner in retail pharmacy in future. Conclusions The level of integration of CM into pharmacy is extending beyond the mere stocking of supplements. Naturopaths and Western Herbalists are becoming utilised in pharmacies

  8. Factors affecting river health and its assessment over broad geographic ranges: the Western Australian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halse, S A; Scanlon, M D; Cocking, J S; Smith, M J; Kay, W R

    2007-11-01

    AusRivAS is an Australia-wide program that measures river condition using predictive models to compare the macroinvertebrate families occurring at a river site with those expected if the site were in natural condition. Results of assessment of 685 sites across all major rivers in Western Australia are presented. Most rivers were in relatively natural condition in the northern half of the state where the human population is low and pastoralism is the major land use. In the south, where the human population is higher and agriculture is more intensive, rivers were mostly more disturbed. AusRivAS assessment produced some erroneous results in rivers of the south-west cropping zone because of the lack of appropriate reference site groups and biased distribution of sampling sites. Collecting low numbers of animals from many forested streams, because of low stream productivity and samples that were difficult to sort, also affected assessments. Overall, however, AusRivAs assessment identified catchment processes that were inimical to river health. These processes included salinisation, high nutrient and organic loads, erosion and loss of riparian vegetation. River regulation, channel modification and fire were also associated with river degradation. As is the case with other assessment methods, one-off sampling at individual sites using AusRivAS may be misleading. Seasonal drought, in particular, may make it difficult to relate conditions at the time of sampling to longer-term river health. AusRivAS has shown river condition in Western Australia is not markedly different from other parts of Australia which, as a whole, lacks the substantial segments of severely degraded river systems reported in England.

  9. Youth Court: An Alternative to Juvenile Court?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heward, Michelle E.

    2000-01-01

    Explains that youth courts are alternatives to the juvenile justice system in which trained youth volunteers hold youthful offenders accountable for their wrongful actions. Discusses the reasons for the increased popularity of youth courts, the differences between juvenile and youth courts, and the effects the changes in juvenile courts have on…

  10. Differences in the population structure of Neisseria meningitidis in two Australian states: Victoria and Western Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakeel Mowlaboccus

    Full Text Available Neisseria meningitidis is the causative agent of invasive meningococcal disease (IMD. A recombinant vaccine called Bexsero® incorporates four subcapsular antigens (fHbp, NHBA, NadA and PorA which are used to assign a Bexsero® antigen sequence type (BAST to each meningococcal strain. The vaccine elicits an immune response against combinations of variants of these antigens which have been grouped into specific BAST profiles that have been shown to have different distributions within geographical locations thus potentially affecting the efficacy of the vaccine. In this study, invasive meningococcal disease isolates from the western seaboard of Australia (Western Australia; WA were compared to those from the south-eastern seaboard (Victoria; VIC from 2008 to 2012. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS of 131 meningococci from VIC and 70 meningococci from WA were analysed for MLST, FetA and BAST profiling. Serogroup B predominated in both jurisdictions and a total of 10 MLST clonal complexes (cc were shared by both states. Isolates belonging to cc22, cc103 and cc1157 were unique to VIC whilst isolates from cc60 and cc212 were unique to WA. Clonal complex 41/44 represented one-third of the meningococcal population in each state but the predominant ST was locally different: ST-6058 in VIC and ST-146 in WA. Of the 108 BAST profiles identified in this collection, only 9 BASTs were simultaneously observed in both states. A significantly larger proportion of isolates in VIC harboured alleles for the NHBA-2 peptide and fHbp-1, antigenic variants predicted to be covered by the Bexsero® vaccine. The estimate for vaccine coverage in WA (47.1% [95% CI: 41.1-53.1%] was significantly lower than that in VIC (66.4% [95% CI: 62.3-70.5%]. In conclusion, the antigenic structure of meningococci causing invasive disease in two geographically distinct states of Australia differed significantly during the study period which may affect vaccine effectiveness and highlights the

  11. Effects of moisture and coal blending on Hardgrove Grindability Index of Western Australian coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vuthaluru, H.B.; Zhang, D.K.; Yan, H.M. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Curtin University of Technology, GPO Box 1987, Perth, Western Australia 6845 (Australia); Brooke, R.J. [Wesfarmers Premier Coal Limited, P.O. Box 21, Premier Road, Collie, Western Australia 6225 (Australia)

    2003-04-15

    Investigations into the effects of moisture and coal blending on Hardgrove Grindability Index (HGI) were carried out on Collie coal of Western Australia. Experiments were conducted in a standard Hardgrove apparatus on four individual Premier seam coals (namely P2, P3, P4 and Hebe) and several blends (namely Hebe/P2, Hebe/P3, Hebe/P4, Hebe/P2/P4) prepared at various blending ratios. The experiments comprised of 5 days of air-drying followed by oven drying. Among the coal seams tested, Hebe showed the highest HGI (58) whereas P4 was the lowest (47). HGI was found to correlate well with residual moisture, with correlation coefficients ranging from 0.5 to 0.9 depending on the type of coal seam or blend. In contrast, moisture measurements on the samples loaded into the HGI apparatus (size 0.600 to 1.180 mm), referred to as the 'coarse fraction' showed erratic trends with HGI. The experimental results suggest that no relationship exist between the coarse fraction moisture and HGI. Measured HGI values of binary and ternary blends were found to correspond well with the weighted average values of HGI within {+-}2 HGI units. This effect was confirmed by a further investigation with a range of 11 binary (P3/Hebe) blends of various proportions.

  12. Geographic factors as determinants of food security: a Western Australian food pricing and quality study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, Christina Mary; Landrigan, Timothy John; Ellies, Pernilla Laila; Kerr, Deborah Anne; Lester, Matthew Langdon Underwood; Goodchild, Stanley Edward

    2014-01-01

    Food affordability and quality can influence food choice. This research explores the impact of geographic factors on food pricing and quality in Western Australia (WA). A Healthy Food Access Basket (HFAB) was cost and a visual and descriptive quality assessment of 13 commonly consumed fresh produce items was conducted in-store on a representative sample of 144 food grocery stores. The WA retail environment in 2010 had 447 grocery stores servicing 2.9 million people: 38% of stores the two major chains (Coles® Supermarkets Australia and Woolworths ® Limited) in population dense areas, 50% were smaller independently owned stores (Independent Grocers Association®) in regional areas as well, and 12% Indigenous community stores in very remote areas. The HFAB cost 24% (pfoods cost more and the quality of fresh produce was lower. Food affordability and quality may deter healthier food choice in geographically isolated communities. Improving affordability and quality of nutritious foods in remote communities may positively impact food choices, improve food security and prevent diet-sensitive chronic disease. Policy makers should consider influencing agriculture, trade, commerce, transport, freight, and modifying local food economies.

  13. How do pregnancy outcomes differ in teenage mothers? A Western Australian study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Lucy N; Hickey, Martha; Doherty, Dorota A; Skinner, S Rachel

    2009-05-18

    To determine whether teenage pregnancy and Indigenous status are associated with increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes. A cross-sectional descriptive analysis of nulliparous women with singleton pregnancies who delivered at the sole tertiary obstetric hospital in Western Australia between June 2004 and September 2006, using data obtained from computerised midwifery records. Maternal risk factors, pregnancy characteristics, and obstetric and perinatal outcomes for teenage and adult pregnancies. Of the 4896 births reviewed, 560 (11%) were to teenage mothers. Teenagers were more likely to be Indigenous and to experience maternal risk factors such as anaemia and smoking. Indigenous women were more likely than non-Indigenous women to be smokers, with young Indigenous teenagers (aged 12-16 years) being most likely to smoke (odds ratio [OR], 6.29; 95% CI, 3.99-9.92). Perinatal outcomes for teenage and adult births were similar, while adjustment for smoking and Indigenous status changed the observed association for the Indigenous population of preterm delivery teenagers (aged 17-18 years) were the group at highest risk of stillbirth (OR, 1.99; 95% CI, 1.03-3.76). These results improve our understanding of the obstetric and medical issues associated with teenage pregnancy and birth in WA and how we might tailor our approach to care. Indigenous teenagers need special attention, and there is significant scope for public health interventions around anaemia and smoking in this population.

  14. Rhetorically self-sufficient arguments in Western Australian parliamentary debates on Lesbian and Gay Law Reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Mark

    2007-12-01

    Western Australia's Acts Amendment (Lesbian and Gay Law Reform) Bill 2001 delivered a measure of legal equality in such areas as property transfer, superannuation, inheritance and discrimination, and more controversially, adoption, lesbian access to IVF, lowering the age of consent for sex between men from 21 to 16, and incorporating information on homosexuality into high school sex education classes. This paper examines the use of various moral principles within parliamentary speeches supporting or opposing the legislation, and the extent to which they were treated by members as beyond question, or 'rhetorically self-sufficient'. The resources of 'equality', 'human rights', 'democracy', 'the interests of the majority' and 'the interests of children' were given a kind of beyond-question, self-sufficient status, but their use was able to be undermined in a number of ways, relating to members' management of what the Bill was 'about', and the flexibility of these social constructs. It is argued that rather than pitting one set of resources against another, members on both sides of the debate faced a rhetorical pressure to adopt and mobilize all of the same self-sufficient moral resources, due to the flexible, constructed and non-hierarchical, yet often rhetorically self-sufficient nature of common-sense moral principles.

  15. Gaining insight into how women conceptualize satisfaction: Western Australian women's perception of their maternity care experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Lucy; Hauck, Yvonne L; Ronchi, Fiona; Crichton, Caroline; Waller, Liana

    2016-02-04

    The concept of maternal satisfaction is challenging, as women's and clinicians' expectations and experiences can differ. Our aim was to investigate women's experiences of maternity care in an urban tertiary obstetric setting, to gain insight into conceptualization of satisfaction across the childbirth continuum. This mixed method study was conducted at a public maternity hospital in Western Australia. A questionnaire was sent to 733 women two weeks post birth, which included an invitation for an audio-recorded, telephone interview. Frequency distributions and univariate comparisons were employed for quantitative data. Thematic analysis of interview transcripts was undertaken to extract common themes. A total of 54% (399 of 733) returned the questionnaire. Quantitative results indicated that women were less likely to feel: involved if they did not have a spontaneous vaginal birth (P = 0.020); supported by a midwife if they had a caesarean (P = care, resources and facilities had on women's satisfaction. These paradigms unfolded as three broad themes constructed by four sub-themes, each illustrating a dichotomy of experiences. The first theme 'how care was provided' encompassed: familiar faces versus a different one every time and the best place to be as opposed to so disappointed. The second theme 'attributes of staff' included: above and beyond versus caring without caring and in good hands as opposed to handled incorrectly. The third theme 'engaged in care' incorporated: explained everything versus did not know why and had a choice as opposed to did not listen to my needs. Quantitative analysis confirmed that the majority of women surveyed were satisfied. Mode of birth influenced women's perception of being involved with their birth. Being able to explore the diversity of women's experiences in relation to satisfaction with their maternity care in an urban, tertiary obstetric setting has offered greater insight into what women value: a sensitive, respectful

  16. Major cluster of chilblain cases in a cold dry Western Australian winter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkins, Nicholas; Murray, Kevin J

    2013-02-01

    Primary chilblains are an idiopathic cold-induced vasculopathy affecting the soft tissues of the hands and feet. Secondary chilblains occur in different forms of vasculitis and chronic autoimmune connective tissue disorders. Idiopathic chilblains are rarely reported in children and may generate significant anxiety to doctors and patients. We describe a cluster of idiopathic chilblains encountered over the winter of 2010 in Perth, Western Australia. This is a retrospective review of patients identified from a prospectively compiled database of all new cases seen in our department. Data on history, examination, investigations, prescribed treatments and outcomes were collected. Thirty-two patients with isolated idiopathic chilblains were included, including 20 females and 12 males with a median age at onset of 13.5 years. Lesions were papular with signs of peripheral vasoconstriction causing acrocyanosis, and uncomfortable due to pain and/or pruritis in most. Thickening of the small joints was common where lesions involved these areas. Ulceration of lesions also occurred in some. One patient required hospitalisation for secondary bacterial infection. Most received some form of treatment including non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, prednisolone or nifedipine. Most patients improved spontaneously with warmer weather or responded to cold protection advice. All had resolved completely by late spring (November). Our cluster of chilblains was associated with an unusually cold winter in Perth 2010. It is the largest series reported in the literature, suggesting that chilblains may be more common than previously thought. Chilblains are almost always benign in nature and patients are systemically well and usually need no further investigation and only symptomatic treatment. Prompt recognition can avoid excessive investigation and anxiety, allowing appropriate simple advice and treatment. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2013 Paediatrics and

  17. Would you Find Thirty online? Website use in a Western Australian physical activity campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavy, J E; Rosenberg, M; Barnes, R; Bauman, A; Bull, F C

    2013-08-01

    Mass media campaigns have used a range of traditional media (television, radio and print) to communicate health messages. In the past decade the Internet has added to these traditional methods with Web 2.0, smart phone technology and interactive media. 'Find Thirty every day(®)', a Western Australia population-wide mass media campaign delivered over 2 years, used a combination of traditional mass media, a website, online resources and banner advertising. The aim of the present study is to describe the use of the Find Thirty every day(®) website during the campaign media activities of May 2008-June 2010. Cross-sectional self-reported survey data were collected from a random sample of adults using a computer-assisted telephone interview over the period February-March 2010. Objective online analytical measures of unique visits to the Find Thirty every day(®) website were collected between June 2008 and June 2010. Monthly visitors to the Find Thirty every day(®) website increased from 3193 in 2009 to 4374 in 2010. During the last two media waves (October 2009 and February 2010), site visits were 5388 and 5272 per month, respectively. The impact of the Find Thirty every day(®) website was a positive outcome, considering the minimal online presence. SO WHAT? Health communication campaign planners should maximise the potential synergy of traditional mass media and new social media in future campaigns. Accordingly, a multidisciplinary approach that includes communication researchers, experts in information systems and a creative team experienced in online environments will need to be the way forward.

  18. Patterns of dolphin bycatch in a north-western Australian trawl fishery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Simon J; Tyne, Julian A; Kobryn, Halina T; Bejder, Lars; Pollock, Kenneth H; Loneragan, Neil R

    2014-01-01

    The bycatch of small cetaceans in commercial fisheries is a global wildlife management problem. We used data from skippers' logbooks and independent observers to assess common bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) bycatch patterns between 2003 and 2009 in the Pilbara Trawl Fishery, Western Australia. Both datasets indicated that dolphins were caught in all fishery areas, across all depths and throughout the year. Over the entire datasets, observer reported bycatch rates (n = 52 dolphins in 4,124 trawls, or 12.6 dolphins/1,000 trawls) were ca. double those reported by skippers (n = 180 dolphins in 27,904 trawls, or 6.5 dolphins/1,000 trawls). Generalised Linear Models based on observer data, which better explained the variation in dolphin bycatch, indicated that the most significant predictors of dolphin catch were: (1) vessel--one trawl vessel caught significantly more dolphins than three others assessed; (2) time of day--the lowest dolphin bycatch rates were between 00:00 and 05:59; and (3) whether nets included bycatch reduction devices (BRDs)--the rate was reduced by ca. 45%, from 18.8 to 10.3 dolphins/1,000 trawls, after their introduction. These results indicated that differences among vessels (or skippers' trawling techniques) and dolphin behavior (a diurnal pattern) influenced the rates of dolphin capture; and that spatial or seasonal adjustments to trawling effort would be unlikely to significantly reduce dolphin bycatch. Recent skipper's logbook data show that dolphin bycatch rates have not declined since those reported in 2006, when BRDs were introduced across the fishery. Modified BRDs, with top-opening escape hatches from which dolphins might escape to the surface, may be a more effective means of further reducing dolphin bycatch. The vulnerability of this dolphin population to trawling-related mortality cannot be assessed in the absence of an ongoing observer program and without information on trawler-associated dolphin community size

  19. Patterns of dolphin bycatch in a north-western Australian trawl fishery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon J Allen

    Full Text Available The bycatch of small cetaceans in commercial fisheries is a global wildlife management problem. We used data from skippers' logbooks and independent observers to assess common bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus bycatch patterns between 2003 and 2009 in the Pilbara Trawl Fishery, Western Australia. Both datasets indicated that dolphins were caught in all fishery areas, across all depths and throughout the year. Over the entire datasets, observer reported bycatch rates (n = 52 dolphins in 4,124 trawls, or 12.6 dolphins/1,000 trawls were ca. double those reported by skippers (n = 180 dolphins in 27,904 trawls, or 6.5 dolphins/1,000 trawls. Generalised Linear Models based on observer data, which better explained the variation in dolphin bycatch, indicated that the most significant predictors of dolphin catch were: (1 vessel--one trawl vessel caught significantly more dolphins than three others assessed; (2 time of day--the lowest dolphin bycatch rates were between 00:00 and 05:59; and (3 whether nets included bycatch reduction devices (BRDs--the rate was reduced by ca. 45%, from 18.8 to 10.3 dolphins/1,000 trawls, after their introduction. These results indicated that differences among vessels (or skippers' trawling techniques and dolphin behavior (a diurnal pattern influenced the rates of dolphin capture; and that spatial or seasonal adjustments to trawling effort would be unlikely to significantly reduce dolphin bycatch. Recent skipper's logbook data show that dolphin bycatch rates have not declined since those reported in 2006, when BRDs were introduced across the fishery. Modified BRDs, with top-opening escape hatches from which dolphins might escape to the surface, may be a more effective means of further reducing dolphin bycatch. The vulnerability of this dolphin population to trawling-related mortality cannot be assessed in the absence of an ongoing observer program and without information on trawler-associated dolphin community

  20. Patterns of Dolphin Bycatch in a North-Western Australian Trawl Fishery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Simon J.; Tyne, Julian A.; Kobryn, Halina T.; Bejder, Lars; Pollock, Kenneth H.; Loneragan, Neil R.

    2014-01-01

    The bycatch of small cetaceans in commercial fisheries is a global wildlife management problem. We used data from skippers' logbooks and independent observers to assess common bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) bycatch patterns between 2003 and 2009 in the Pilbara Trawl Fishery, Western Australia. Both datasets indicated that dolphins were caught in all fishery areas, across all depths and throughout the year. Over the entire datasets, observer reported bycatch rates (n = 52 dolphins in 4,124 trawls, or 12.6 dolphins/1,000 trawls) were ca. double those reported by skippers (n = 180 dolphins in 27,904 trawls, or 6.5 dolphins/1,000 trawls). Generalised Linear Models based on observer data, which better explained the variation in dolphin bycatch, indicated that the most significant predictors of dolphin catch were: (1) vessel - one trawl vessel caught significantly more dolphins than three others assessed; (2) time of day – the lowest dolphin bycatch rates were between 00:00 and 05:59; and (3) whether nets included bycatch reduction devices (BRDs) - the rate was reduced by ca. 45%, from 18.8 to 10.3 dolphins/1,000 trawls, after their introduction. These results indicated that differences among vessels (or skippers' trawling techniques) and dolphin behavior (a diurnal pattern) influenced the rates of dolphin capture; and that spatial or seasonal adjustments to trawling effort would be unlikely to significantly reduce dolphin bycatch. Recent skipper's logbook data show that dolphin bycatch rates have not declined since those reported in 2006, when BRDs were introduced across the fishery. Modified BRDs, with top-opening escape hatches from which dolphins might escape to the surface, may be a more effective means of further reducing dolphin bycatch. The vulnerability of this dolphin population to trawling-related mortality cannot be assessed in the absence of an ongoing observer program and without information on trawler-associated dolphin community size

  1. Using UV photoaged photography to better understand Western Australian teenagers' attitudes towards adopting sun-protective behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Myra F; Westbrook, Dominique; Chang, Paul

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to determine whether the viewing of a personal photoaged photograph had the capacity to alter Western Australian teenagers' pro-tanning attitudes. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with fifteen teenagers. The teenagers' pro-tanning attitudes prior to viewing their photoaged photograph are encapsulated in the study's central theme: 'You've got to look after your skin and use sunscreen, but I always forget!'. Post-viewing their photoaged facial image many teenagers reiterated their intentions to adopt (when they remembered) skin-protective measures. However, photoaged photography did not alter other teenagers' intention to tan. NEW KNOWLEDGE: Teenagers who choose to continue to tan were aware of the long-term health risks associated with ultra-violet over-exposure. However, their desire remained strong to emulate the media promoted image of bronzed youth being popular individuals. Indeed, the social benefits of being considered attractive to their peers became an attitudinal barrier to the teenagers' adoption of skin-protective behaviours. Those teenagers who changed their pro-tanning attitudes following their viewing of their ultra-violet photoaged photograph did so because of the shock they received when they saw their sun-damaged facial image. This suggests that photoageing photography can be effective with many adolescents because it reduces the cause-and-effect delay that exists between the occurrence of sun-damage and its visual presentation in later-life. Greater effort needs to be focused on increasing teenagers' understanding of how sun-damage occurs, when it is appropriate to apply sunscreen, as well as in changing the prevailing media image of an attractive body being a tanned body.

  2. COURT INTERPRETING AT DENPASAR COURT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Ayu Made Puspani

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This is a research on interpreting (oral translation on a criminal case ofdrug user in the court proceedings at Denpasar Court. The study of theinterpreting is concerned with two-ways rendition from Indonesian into Englishand vice-versa. The study is related to: (1 the description of modes of interpretingapplied by the interpreter, (2 the application of translation strategies: shift,addition and deletion of information, (3 factors that underlie the application ofthe strategies, and (4 the impact of the application of those strategies towards thequality of the interpreting.The methodology applied in this study is qualitative based on eclectictheories (translation, syntax, semantics and pragmatics. The utilization of thetheories is in accordance with the type of the data analyzed in regard to thetranslation phenomena as an applied study and its complexity.The interpreting at court applied the consecutive and simultaneous modes.The strategy of shift was applied when there were differences in structure betweenthe source and the target languages. Addition of information was used when theinterpreter emphasized the message of the source language in the target language.The deletion of information applied if the context in the target language has beencovered, and it was not necessary for the interpreter to interpret the same thingbecause the message of the source language was pragmatically implied in thetarget language.The factors which underlie the application of the interpreting strategies incourt interpreting were communication factor and the differences in the languagesystems between the source and the target languages. The impact of the use of thestrategies towards the quality of the interpreting happened when the interpretationof the source language message into the message of the target language and themessage in the source language was not completely render into the targetlanguage.The novelties of the research are: (1 relevance theory and its

  3. Courtly Capitalism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Brian Benjamin; Jøker Bjerre, Henrik; Ugilt, Rasmus

    “Pretty Woman” is not just a romantic comedy about the perfect relationship between a cynical businessman and a beautiful prostitute. It is a myth on the level of other great foundational myths of Western culture and should be read as such. The film thematizes the relation between romantic love...

  4. At the Supreme Court.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Charles F.

    2000-01-01

    States that in the past juvenile courts afforded children with fewer rights than criminal courts accorded to adults accused of the same crimes. Reviews three U.S. Supreme Court cases that affirmed the constitutional rights of juvenile offenders and changed juvenile court proceedings. Discusses whether the juvenile death penalty violates…

  5. Breaking down the stigma of mental health nursing: A qualitative study reflecting opinions from western australian nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Carole A; Hauck, Yvonne; Ashby, Rebekah

    2017-09-01

    192 Western Australian nurses from one public mental health service. Results Thematic analysis revealed an overarching theme "breaking down stigma" and additional themes of: "visibility of mental health nursing" and "growing mental health nursing." Subthemes under "visibility" included "self-promotion" plus "industry and university promotion," whereas subthemes related to "growing" focused upon "improving the student experience." Finally, "recognizing the mental health specialty" was identified for an attractive career pathway. Discussion This study adds to international evidence and showcases unique insights from mental health nurses into why they chose a career in mental health whilst previously replicated research focused on why nurses chose to leave. Implications for practice Findings suggest that before we can entice nurses to choose mental health, there is urgency to reduce stigma related to the role. "Breaking down stigma" will allow the role to become more visible and be represented in a more positive authentic manner. New findings in this paper will drive improvements of future nurse education, policy planning and recruitment design for the next generation of mental health nurses. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. A Futures Orientation in the Australian Curriculum: Current Levels of Teacher Interest, Activity and Support in Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paynter, Mark; Bruce, Neville

    2014-01-01

    The soon to be implemented Australian Curriculum aims to integrate a futures orientation across subject areas. Guidelines and support for this specific initiative are being finalized. Only a little is known about the current teaching of a futures orientation or of secondary teacher interest, understanding and support for this important but…

  7. Population Differentiation and Hybridisation of Australian Snubfin (Orcaella heinsohni) and Indo-Pacific Humpback (Sousa chinensis) Dolphins in North-Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Alexander M.; Kopps, Anna M.; Allen, Simon J.; Bejder, Lars; Littleford-Colquhoun, Bethan; Parra, Guido J.; Cagnazzi, Daniele; Thiele, Deborah; Palmer, Carol; Frère, Celine H.

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the Australian snubfin (Orcaella heinsohni) and Indo-Pacific humpback (Sousa chinensis) dolphins (‘snubfin’ and ‘humpback dolphins’, hereafter) of north-western Australia. While both species are listed as ‘near threatened’ by the IUCN, data deficiencies are impeding rigorous assessment of their conservation status across Australia. Understanding the genetic structure of populations, including levels of gene flow among populations, is important for the assessment of conservation status and the effective management of a species. Using nuclear and mitochondrial DNA markers, we assessed population genetic diversity and differentiation between snubfin dolphins from Cygnet (n = 32) and Roebuck Bays (n = 25), and humpback dolphins from the Dampier Archipelago (n = 19) and the North West Cape (n = 18). All sampling locations were separated by geographic distances >200 km. For each species, we found significant genetic differentiation between sampling locations based on 12 (for snubfin dolphins) and 13 (for humpback dolphins) microsatellite loci (FST = 0.05–0.09; Pgenetic diversity and differentiation for snubfin and humpback dolphins in Western Australia, providing valuable information towards the assessment of their conservation status in this rapidly developing region. Our results suggest that north-western Australian snubfin and humpback dolphins may exist as metapopulations of small, largely isolated population fragments, and should be managed accordingly. Management plans should seek to maintain effective population size and gene flow. Additionally, while interactions of a socio-sexual nature between these two species have been observed previously, here we provide strong evidence for the first documented case of hybridisation between a female snubfin dolphin and a male humpback dolphin. PMID:24988113

  8. Population differentiation and hybridisation of Australian snubfin (Orcaella heinsohni) and Indo-Pacific humpback (Sousa chinensis) dolphins in north-western Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Alexander M; Kopps, Anna M; Allen, Simon J; Bejder, Lars; Littleford-Colquhoun, Bethan; Parra, Guido J; Cagnazzi, Daniele; Thiele, Deborah; Palmer, Carol; Frère, Celine H

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the Australian snubfin (Orcaella heinsohni) and Indo-Pacific humpback (Sousa chinensis) dolphins ('snubfin' and 'humpback dolphins', hereafter) of north-western Australia. While both species are listed as 'near threatened' by the IUCN, data deficiencies are impeding rigorous assessment of their conservation status across Australia. Understanding the genetic structure of populations, including levels of gene flow among populations, is important for the assessment of conservation status and the effective management of a species. Using nuclear and mitochondrial DNA markers, we assessed population genetic diversity and differentiation between snubfin dolphins from Cygnet (n = 32) and Roebuck Bays (n = 25), and humpback dolphins from the Dampier Archipelago (n = 19) and the North West Cape (n = 18). All sampling locations were separated by geographic distances >200 km. For each species, we found significant genetic differentiation between sampling locations based on 12 (for snubfin dolphins) and 13 (for humpback dolphins) microsatellite loci (FST = 0.05-0.09; Pdolphins in Western Australia, providing valuable information towards the assessment of their conservation status in this rapidly developing region. Our results suggest that north-western Australian snubfin and humpback dolphins may exist as metapopulations of small, largely isolated population fragments, and should be managed accordingly. Management plans should seek to maintain effective population size and gene flow. Additionally, while interactions of a socio-sexual nature between these two species have been observed previously, here we provide strong evidence for the first documented case of hybridisation between a female snubfin dolphin and a male humpback dolphin.

  9. Digitate and capitate soft corals (Cnidaria: Octocorallia: Alcyoniidae) from Western Australia with reports on new species and new Australian geographical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryce, Monika; Poliseno, Angelo; Alderslade, Philip; Vargas, Sergio

    2015-05-26

    We report on digitate and capitate Octocorallia within the genera Parasphaerasclera McFadden & Ofwegen, 2013, Eleutherobia Pütter, 1900, Sphaerasclera McFadden & Ofwegen, 2013, and Paraminabea Williams & Alderslade, 1999 from tropical Western Australian waters. Three new species (Parasphaerasclera kimberleyensis, Eleutherobia australiensis, Eleutherobia imaharai) are described, with a discussion of their taxonomic placement in the light of a recent treatment of the genus Eleutherobia and related taxa by McFadden & Ofwegen (2013). In addition, range extensions for three species are reported, Parasphaerasclera grayi (Thomson & Dean, 1931) known from Indonesia and the Pacific Ocean, Eleutherobia somaliensis Verseveldt & Bayer, 1988 from Somalia, and Eleutherobia splendens (Thomson & Dean, 1931) recorded from Indonesia and the Philippines. Additionally, one new Australian geographical record (Sphaerasclera flammicerebra) (Williams, 2003) with a known distribution from Palau to Mauritius, has been included. We complement morphological taxonomy with molecular data (mtMutS, 28S rDNA) to analyse and clarify phylogenetic placement of these species. The mitochondrial mtMutS phylogeny supported Eleutherobia, Paraminabea, Parasphaerasclera and Sphaerasclera as distinct monophyletic genera. Phylogenetic analyses based on 28S rDNA lacked resolution and were largely unresolved. Additionally, the molecular data corroborated our proposed morphological hypothesis of the placement of the new species P. kimberleyensis sp. nov. with no anthocodial armature in the genus Parasphaerasclera, and the assignment of the new species, E. australiensis sp. nov. and E. imaharai sp. nov., with distinct polyps sclerites in the genus Eleutherobia.

  10. Longitudinal, Whole-population Data Examining Pathways of Risk from Conception to Disease: The Western Australian Schizophrenia High-risk e-Cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera A. Morgan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This database has been constructed to support a program of work designed to untangle genetic and environmental contributions to the risk for schizophrenia and other adverse outcomes in the offspring of mothers with schizophrenia and other severe mental illness. To do this, it utilises Western Australian whole-population health and social services databases. Records on the Western Australian psychiatric case register have been linked to Midwives’ Notification of Birth records and to Registrations of Births (for paternal links as well as to other data sets. Maternal links identify women with psychosis who gave birth in Western Australia between 1980 and 2001. Comparison mothers are those with no record of psychiatric illness who gave birth in Western Australia over the same period. The study database comprises 246,873 mothers and 467,945 children: 889 mothers with schizophrenia (1,672 children; 1,644 mothers with bipolar disorder (3,358 children; 4,200 mothers with unipolar major depression (8,864 children; 775 mothers with other psychoses (1,592 children; and 239,365 comparison mothers (452,459 children. Full psychiatric histories for mothers, fathers and children have been extracted. At the time of the most recent update to the psychiatric data on children, 33,363 children had a history of psychiatric illness; 5,500 of these had had at least one contact with mental health services at which a diagnosis of a psychotic disorder had been recorded. Data have also been collected on obstetric complications and a range of infant and childhood morbidities including birth defects, intellectual disability, educational achievement, childhood abuse, criminal offending. The program aims are to: (i determine the frequency and distribution of obstetric complications in women with schizophrenia compared to a non-psychiatric comparison group of mothers; (ii explore the spectrum of outcomes for the children born to women with schizophrenia compared to comparison

  11. Disparities experienced by Aboriginal compared to non-Aboriginal metropolitan Western Australians in receiving coronary angiography following acute ischaemic heart disease: the impact of age and comorbidities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Derrick; Katzenellenbogen, Judith M; Sanfilippo, Frank M; Woods, John A; Hobbs, Michael S T; Knuiman, Matthew W; Briffa, Tom G; Thompson, Peter L; Thompson, Sandra C

    2014-10-21

    Aboriginal Australians have a substantially higher frequency of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) events than their non-Aboriginal counterparts, together with a higher prevalence of comorbidities. The pattern of health service provision for IHD suggests inequitable delivery of important diagnostic procedures. Published data on disparities in IHD management among Aboriginal Australians are conflicting, and the role of comorbidities has not been adequately delineated. We compared the profiles of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal patients in the metropolitan area undergoing emergency IHD admissions at Western Australian metropolitan hospitals, and investigated the determinants of receiving coronary angiography. Person-linked administrative hospital and mortality records were used to identify 28-day survivors of IHD emergency admission events (n =20,816) commencing at metropolitan hospitals in 2005-09. The outcome measure was receipt of angiography. The Aboriginal to non-Aboriginal risk ratio (RR) was estimated from a multivariable Poisson log-linear regression model with allowance for multiple IHD events in individuals. The subgroup of myocardial infarction (MI) events was modelled separately. Compared with their non-Aboriginal counterparts, Aboriginal IHD patients were younger and more likely to have comorbidities. In the age- and sex-adjusted model, Aboriginal patients were less likely than others to receive angiography (RRIHD 0.77, 95% CI 0.72-0.83; RRMI 0.81, 95% CI 0.75-0.87) but in the full multivariable model this disparity was accounted for by comorbidities as well as IHD category and MI subtype, and private health insurance (RRIHD 0.95, 95% CI 0.89-1.01; RRMI 0.94, 95% CI 0.88-1.01). When stratified by age groups, this disparity was not significant in the 25-54 year age group (RRMI 0.95, 95% CI 0.88-1.02) but was significant in the 55-84 year age group (RRMI 0.88, 95% CI 0.77-0.99). The disproportionate under-management of older Aboriginal IHD patients is of

  12. 1.2 million years of aeolian activity in northwestern Western Australian recorded in a deep-sea core in the eastern Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuut, Jan-Berend; Bassinot, Franck; De Deckker, Patrick

    2017-04-01

    There is no continuous record of aridity from the Australian continent and we are presenting here, for the first time, a record of aeolian activity for northwestern Western Australia. Our data are based on a 32m long deep-sea core taken offshore North West Cape, the northwestern tip of Western Australia. Our data rely on 2 adjacent studies: (a) a complete XRF scan of the core which provide elemental ratios which are translated into an aeolian component as well as a fluvial discharge-to-sea component. The first one relates to periods of aridity inland Australia, whereas the second one is interpreted as river discharge during periods of monsoonal activity; (b) a close examination of samples collected in the source area(s) of sediments that are both blown to the core site as well as washed into the ocean by rivers. The bulk-chemical composition of these sediments are compared to each other and show that there is clear end-member signal in the sediment core that can be related to differing sediment-transport mechanisms: aeolian dust and river mud. Our results clearly show a cyclic record of alternating dry and wet periods spanning the last 1.2 million years. Our findings also indicate that monsoonal activity as well as desertification were already in place in northern Australia so long ago, and this has clear implications for the evolution of the arid zone biota, associated fire activities and geomorphological features in northern Australia.

  13. Population differentiation and hybridisation of Australian snubfin (Orcaella heinsohni and Indo-Pacific humpback (Sousa chinensis dolphins in north-western Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander M Brown

    Full Text Available Little is known about the Australian snubfin (Orcaella heinsohni and Indo-Pacific humpback (Sousa chinensis dolphins ('snubfin' and 'humpback dolphins', hereafter of north-western Australia. While both species are listed as 'near threatened' by the IUCN, data deficiencies are impeding rigorous assessment of their conservation status across Australia. Understanding the genetic structure of populations, including levels of gene flow among populations, is important for the assessment of conservation status and the effective management of a species. Using nuclear and mitochondrial DNA markers, we assessed population genetic diversity and differentiation between snubfin dolphins from Cygnet (n = 32 and Roebuck Bays (n = 25, and humpback dolphins from the Dampier Archipelago (n = 19 and the North West Cape (n = 18. All sampling locations were separated by geographic distances >200 km. For each species, we found significant genetic differentiation between sampling locations based on 12 (for snubfin dolphins and 13 (for humpback dolphins microsatellite loci (FST = 0.05-0.09; P<0.001 and a 422 bp sequence of the mitochondrial control region (FST = 0.50-0.70; P<0.001. The estimated proportion of migrants in a population ranged from 0.01 (95% CI 0.00-0.06 to 0.13 (0.03-0.24. These are the first estimates of genetic diversity and differentiation for snubfin and humpback dolphins in Western Australia, providing valuable information towards the assessment of their conservation status in this rapidly developing region. Our results suggest that north-western Australian snubfin and humpback dolphins may exist as metapopulations of small, largely isolated population fragments, and should be managed accordingly. Management plans should seek to maintain effective population size and gene flow. Additionally, while interactions of a socio-sexual nature between these two species have been observed previously, here we provide strong evidence for

  14. Towards a line-of-sight, implementation of performance measurement by road agencies : A European and Western Australian perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoenmaker, R.; Van der Lei, T.T.E.

    2015-01-01

    This paper is the result of an international, explorative study of the alignment of government and road authority goals from different European countries and Western Australia. The goal of the study is to advance the understanding of the development of performance management of road agencies.

  15. Prevalence and risk factors for parent-reported recurrent otitis media during early childhood in the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan-Jones, Christopher G; Whitehouse, Andrew Jo; Park, Jae; Hegarty, Mary; Jacques, Angela; Eikelboom, Robert H; Swanepoel, De Wet; White, Joanna D; Jamieson, Sarra E

    2015-04-01

    To describe the prevalence and risk factors of recurrent otitis media (rOM) in an urban Australian population at 3 years of age. Cross-sectional examination of prevalence and risk factors of rOM in 2280 participants from the Raine Study enrolled from public and private hospitals in Perth, Western Australia, between 1989 and 1991. Parental report questionnaires at 3 years of age were used for rOM identification, with secondary confirmation by otoscopic examination at 1, 2 or 3 years of age. The prevalence of parent-reported rOM was 26.8% (611/2280) and 5.5% (125/2280) for severe rOM in the Study. Independent associations were found between rOM and the presence of older siblings, attendance at day care and the introduction of other milk products at ≤4 months of age. Independent associations for severe rOM were the presence of allergies and attendance at day care. Prevalence rates of rOM within the Raine Study children are similar to a number of other known cohorts. Parity, presence of allergies, attendance at day care and introduction of other milk products at ≤4 months are highlighted as specific risk factors for rOM in this population and presence of allergies and attendance at day care being risk factors for severe rOM. Diagnosis of rOM by parent report and the delay between data collection and reporting are limitations of this study. However, as there is very limited data on OM in urban, non-Indigenous Australian children, this study improves our understanding of OM for this group. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2014 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  16. Age estimation in a sub-adult Western Australian population based on the analysis of the pelvic girdle and proximal femur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Siobhan; Flavel, Ambika; Franklin, Daniel

    2017-10-16

    The accurate and precise estimation of skeletal age by a forensic anthropologist is both a professional and judicial requirement. When unknown skeletal remains are referred to the anthropologist, the estimation of the requisite biological attributes (e.g., age and sex) should accordingly be based on the application of population-specific standards (statistical data). Deviations from the latter practice may result in reduced accuracy and compromised identification. Towards informing appropriate forensic practice, the aim of the present study is to develop statistically quantified age estimation models for a contemporary sub-adult Western Australian population based on the timing of fusion in the os coxa and proximal femur. The study sample comprises 562 known age and sex MDCT scans (292 male, 270 female) representing contemporary Western Australian individuals birth through 30 years of age. Scans are viewed in multi-planar reconstructed (MPR) and/or three-dimensionally reconstructed images using OsiriX(®). Fusion status is scored according to a three-stage system across a total of nine sites in the proximal femur and os coxae. Observer accordance, bilateral asymmetry and sex-specific variation in fusion timing are statistically quantified. Polynomial regression is used to formulate age prediction models; transition analysis is used to calculate age ranges and determine the mean age for transition between an unfused, fusing and fused status. Observer accordance in stage assignation is acceptable (ϰ=0.79) and there is no significant bilateral variation in fusion timing. It was found that the mean age of commencement of fusion is significantly earlier (∼2 years) in females. The accuracy (SEE) of the polynomial models ranges from ±3.29 to ±3.80 years and the transition analysis shows that fusion of the iliac crest is delayed in comparison to other attributes of os coxa and proximal femur. Results of the present study confirm that the pelvic girdle and proximal

  17. When Linguistic and Cultural Differences Are Not Disclosed in Court Interpreting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jieun

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores the role of the court interpreter in cross-cultural and cross-linguistic communication in the courtroom. Drawing on the analysis of the discourse of witness examinations interpreted by Korean interpreters in Australian court proceedings, this paper argues that in the absence of cultural and/or linguistic explanations by the…

  18. The International Criminal Court

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Ciara Therése

    This article considers whether acts of international terrorism can and should be prosecuted before the International Criminal Court as crimes against humanity.......This article considers whether acts of international terrorism can and should be prosecuted before the International Criminal Court as crimes against humanity....

  19. Genetics in the courts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coyle, Heather; Drell, Dan

    2000-12-01

    Various: (1)TriState 2000 Genetics in the Courts (2) Growing impact of the new genetics on the courts (3)Human testing (4) Legal analysis - in re G.C. (5) Legal analysis - GM ''peanots'', and (6) Legal analysis for State vs Miller

  20. Supreme Court Trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, L. Anita

    1997-01-01

    Identifies and discusses recent decisions and upcoming cases of the Supreme Court that are likely to be of interest to teachers. Educational issues addressed include Internet access and censorship, affirmative action, sexual harassment, drug testing, and the separation of church and state. Includes a brief description Supreme Court duties. (MJP)

  1. Organizations, Decisions, and Courts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Lawrence B.

    1976-01-01

    Discusses the applicability of organizational theory to the analysis of American courts. Considers various decision-making models as they apply to courts, including the "firm,""rational,""garbage can," and "political" models. Available from Executive Office, Law and Society Association, University of Denver College of Law, 200 West 14th Avenue,…

  2. Advance care planning and end-of-life care in a network of rural Western Australian hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auret, Kirsten; Sinclair, Craig; Averill, Barbara; Evans, Sharon

    2015-08-01

    To provide a current perspective on end-of-life (EOL) care in regional Western Australia, with a particular focus on the final admission prior to death and the presence of documented advance care planning (ACP). Retrospective medical notes audit. One regional hospital (including colocated hospice) and four small rural hospitals in the Great Southern region of Western Australia. Ninety recently deceased patients, who died in hospitals in the region. Fifty consecutive patients from the regional hospital and 10 consecutive patients from each of the four rural hospitals were included in the audit. A retrospective medical notes audit was undertaken. A 94-item audit tool assessed patient demographics, primary diagnosis, family support, status on admission and presence of documented ACP. Detailed items described the clinical care delivered during the final admission, including communication with family, referral to palliative care, transfers, medical investigations, medical treatments and use of EOL care pathways. Fifty-two per cent were women; median age was 82 years old. Forty per cent died of malignancy. Median length of stay was 7 days. Thirty-nine per cent had formal or informal ACP documented. Rural hospitals performed comparably with the regional hospital on all measures. This study provides benchmarking information that can assist other rural hospitals and suggests ongoing work on optimal methods of measuring quality in EOL care. © 2015 National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  3. Water uptake by two river red gum ( Eucalyptus camaldulensis) clones in a discharge site plantation in the Western Australian wheatbelt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, John K.; Morgan, Anne L.; Akilan, Kandia; Farrell, Richard C. C.; Bell, David T.

    1997-12-01

    The heat-pulse technique was used to estimate year-long water uptake in a discharge zone plantation of 9-year-old clonal Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehnh. near Wubin, Western Australia. Water uptake matched rainfall closely during weter months but exceeded rainfall as the dry season progressed. Average annual water uptake (1148 mm) exceeded rainfall (432 mm) by about 2.7 fold and approached 56% of pan evaporation for the area. The data suggest that at least 37% (i.e. ( {1}/{2.7}) × 100 ) of the lower catchment discharge zone should be planted to prevent the rise of groundwater. Water uptake varied with soil environment, season and genotype. Upslope trees used more water than did downslope trees. Water uptake was higher in E. camaldulensis clone M80 than in clone M66 until late spring. The difference reversed as summer progressed. Both clones, however, have the potential to dry out the landscape when potential evapotranspiration exceeds rainfall. This variation in water uptake within the species indicates the potential for manipulating plantation uptake by matching tree characteristics to site characteristics. Controlled experiments on the heat-pulse technique indicated accuracy errors of approximately 10%. This, combined with the ability to obtain long-term, continuous data and the superior logistics of use of the heat-pulse technique, suggests that results obtained by it would be much more reliable than those achieved by the ventilated chamber technique.

  4. Interactions of phosphate solubilising microorganisms with natural rare-earth phosphate minerals: a study utilizing Western Australian monazite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, Melissa K; Eksteen, Jacques J; Niu, Xi-Zhi; Croue, Jean-Philippe; Watkin, Elizabeth L J

    2017-06-01

    Many microbial species are capable of solubilising insoluble forms of phosphate and are used in agriculture to improve plant growth. In this study, we apply the use of known phosphate solubilising microbes (PSM) to the release of rare-earth elements (REE) from the rare-earth phosphate mineral, monazite. Two sources of monazite were used, a weathered monazite and mineral sand monazite, both from Western Australia. When incubated with PSM, the REE were preferentially released into the leachate. Penicillum sp. released a total concentration of 12.32 mg L-1 rare-earth elements (Ce, La, Nd, and Pr) from the weathered monazite after 192 h with little release of thorium and iron into solution. However, cultivation on the mineral sands monazite resulted in the preferential release of Fe and Th. Analysis of the leachate detected the production of numerous low-molecular weight organic acids. Gluconic acid was produced by all microorganisms; however, other organic acids produced differed between microbes and the monazite source provided. Abiotic leaching with equivalent combinations of organic acids resulted in the lower release of REE implying that other microbial processes are playing a role in solubilisation of the monazite ore. This study demonstrates that microbial solubilisation of monazite is promising; however, the extent of the reaction is highly dependent on the monazite matrix structure and elemental composition.

  5. Formative research to develop theory-based messages for a Western Australian child drowning prevention television campaign: study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denehy, Mel; Crawford, Gemma; Leavy, Justine; Nimmo, Lauren; Jancey, Jonine

    2016-05-20

    Worldwide, children under the age of 5 years are at particular risk of drowning. Responding to this need requires the development of evidence-informed drowning prevention strategies. Historically, drowning prevention strategies have included denying access, learning survival skills and providing supervision, as well as education and information which includes the use of mass media. Interventions underpinned by behavioural theory and formative evaluation tend to be more effective, yet few practical examples exist in the drowning and/or injury prevention literature. The Health Belief Model and Social Cognitive Theory will be used to explore participants' perspectives regarding proposed mass media messaging. This paper describes a qualitative protocol to undertake formative research to develop theory-based messages for a child drowning prevention campaign. The primary data source will be focus group interviews with parents and caregivers of children under 5 years of age in metropolitan and regional Western Australia. Qualitative content analysis will be used to analyse the data. This study will contribute to the drowning prevention literature to inform the development of future child drowning prevention mass media campaigns. Findings from the study will be disseminated to practitioners, policymakers and researchers via international conferences, peer and non-peer-reviewed journals and evidence summaries. The study was submitted and approved by the Curtin University Human Research Ethics Committee. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  6. A qualitative study of Western Australian women's perceptions of using a Snoezelen room for breastfeeding during their postpartum hospital stay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    White Ellie

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is limited evidence on the use of the Snoezelen concept for maternity clients. Snoezelen, a Dutch concept, initiated in the 1970s as a leisure activity for severely disabled people, involves creating an indoor environment using controllable stimuli to enhance comfort and relaxation. These specially designed rooms expose the user to multiple sensory stimulations combining vision, touch, sounds and aromas. The aim of this study was to provide insight into breastfeeding women's experience of using a Snoezelen room during hospitalisation. Methods A qualitative exploratory design was chosen to reveal women's perceptions of using the Snoezelen room. Osborne Park Hospital, the study setting is the second largest public provider of obstetric services in Western Australia. A purposive sample was drawn from breastfeeding women who used the Snoezelen room during their postpartum stay from March 2006 to March 2007. Saturation was achieved after eleven breastfeeding women were interviewed six weeks post discharge. Data analysis involved the constant comparison method. Results Participants entered the room feeling tired and emotional with an unsettled baby and breastfeeding issues aggravated by maternal stress and anxiety. All women indicated they were able to achieve relaxation while in the room and would recommend its use to other breastfeeding mothers. Two key themes revealed how the Snoezelen room facilitated maternal relaxation, which ultimately enhanced the breastfeeding experience. The first theme, "Finding Relaxation for the Breastfeeding Mother" incorporates three subthemes: 'Time out' for mother; Control in own personal space; and a Quiet/calm environment with homelike atmosphere. The second theme, "Enabling Focus on Breastfeeding", occurred after relaxation was achieved and involved four subthemes: Able to get one-on-one attention; Not physically exposed to others; Away from prying, judgemental eyes and Able to safely

  7. Validation and description of two new north-western Australian Rainbow skinks with multispecies coalescent methods and morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonso Silva, Ana C; Santos, Natali; Ogilvie, Huw A; Moritz, Craig

    2017-01-01

    While methods for genetic species delimitation have noticeably improved in the last decade, this remains a work in progress. Ideally, model based approaches should be applied and considered jointly with other lines of evidence, primarily morphology and geography, in an integrative taxonomy framework. Deep phylogeographic divergences have been reported for several species of Carlia skinks, but only for some eastern taxa have species boundaries been formally tested. The present study does this and revises the taxonomy for two species from northern Australia, Carlia johnstonei and C. triacantha. We introduce an approach that is based on the recently published method StarBEAST2, which uses multilocus data to explore the support for alternative species delimitation hypotheses using Bayes Factors (BFD). We apply this method, jointly with two other multispecies coalescent methods, using an extensive (from 2,163 exons) data set along with measures of 11 morphological characters. We use this integrated approach to evaluate two new candidate species previously revealed in phylogeographic analyses of rainbow skinks (genus Carlia) in Western Australia. The results based on BFD StarBEAST2, BFD* SNAPP and BPP genetic delimitation, together with morphology, support each of the four recently identified Carlia lineages as separate species. The BFD StarBEAST2 approach yielded results highly congruent with those from BFD* SNAPP and BPP. This supports use of the robust multilocus multispecies coalescent StarBEAST2 method for species delimitation, which does not require a priori resolved species or gene trees. Compared to the situation in C. triacantha, morphological divergence was greater between the two lineages within Kimberley endemic C. johnstonei, which also had deeper divergent histories. This congruence supports recognition of two species within C. johnstonei. Nevertheless, the combined evidence also supports recognition of two taxa within the more widespread C. triacantha

  8. A qualitative study of Western Australian women's perceptions of using a Snoezelen room for breastfeeding during their postpartum hospital stay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauck, Yvonne L; Summers, Lisa; White, Ellie; Jones, Cheryl

    2008-08-13

    There is limited evidence on the use of the Snoezelen concept for maternity clients. Snoezelen, a Dutch concept, initiated in the 1970s as a leisure activity for severely disabled people, involves creating an indoor environment using controllable stimuli to enhance comfort and relaxation. These specially designed rooms expose the user to multiple sensory stimulations combining vision, touch, sounds and aromas. The aim of this study was to provide insight into breastfeeding women's experience of using a Snoezelen room during hospitalisation. A qualitative exploratory design was chosen to reveal women's perceptions of using the Snoezelen room. Osborne Park Hospital, the study setting is the second largest public provider of obstetric services in Western Australia. A purposive sample was drawn from breastfeeding women who used the Snoezelen room during their postpartum stay from March 2006 to March 2007. Saturation was achieved after eleven breastfeeding women were interviewed six weeks post discharge. Data analysis involved the constant comparison method. Participants entered the room feeling tired and emotional with an unsettled baby and breastfeeding issues aggravated by maternal stress and anxiety. All women indicated they were able to achieve relaxation while in the room and would recommend its use to other breastfeeding mothers. Two key themes revealed how the Snoezelen room facilitated maternal relaxation, which ultimately enhanced the breastfeeding experience. The first theme, "Finding Relaxation for the Breastfeeding Mother" incorporates three subthemes: 'Time out' for mother; Control in own personal space; and a Quiet/calm environment with homelike atmosphere. The second theme, "Enabling Focus on Breastfeeding", occurred after relaxation was achieved and involved four subthemes: Able to get one-on-one attention; Not physically exposed to others; Away from prying, judgemental eyes and Able to safely attempt breastfeeding alone knowing help is nearby. Insight

  9. 'We're not told why--we're just told': qualitative reflections about the Western Australian Go for 2&5® fruit and vegetable campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Owen B J; Pollard, Christina M; Atkins, Jenny F P; Marie Milliner, Jessica; Pratt, Iain S

    2011-06-01

    To explore why there is a lack of acceptance among Western Australian (WA) adults of the Go for 2&5® fruit and vegetable social marketing message to consume at least five servings of vegetables per day. A series of focus group discussions comprised of homogeneous groups varied by sex and age, until saturation of themes was achieved, followed by thematic analysis. Part of qualitative research for the Go for 2&5® fruit and vegetable social marketing campaign in WA (2009 population: 2.2 million). WA adults stratified by sex and age groups (18-29 and 30-55 years) drawn from the second and third quartiles of socio-economic disadvantage. Familiarity with the Go for 2&5® message was excellent. Understanding of what constitutes 'two servings of fruit' was excellent and regarded by participants as highly achievable. Understanding of what constitutes 'five servings of vegetables' was suboptimal with widespread overestimation contributing to the belief that it is unrealistic. Participants did not know how the 2&5 recommendation was formulated and believed that daily consumption of two servings of fruit and five of vegetables would confer no greater health benefit than one of fruit and three of vegetables. Participants assumed that the 2&5 recommendation was 'aspirational' in the sense that it was purposely exaggerated to simply encourage greater overall consumption. A convincing case needs to be presented to WA adults as to why they should consume five servings of vegetables per day. Continuing efforts to educate incorporating what constitutes a serving will assist perceptions that the recommendation is realistic.

  10. Effects of vicariant barriers, habitat stability, population isolation and environmental features on species divergence in the south-western Australian coastal reptile community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, D L; Keogh, J S; Knowles, L L

    2012-08-01

    Identifying explicit hypotheses regarding the factors determining genetic structuring within species can be difficult, especially in species distributed in historically dynamic regions. To contend with these challenges, we use a framework that combines species distribution models, environmental data and multi-locus genetic data to generate and explore phylogeographic hypotheses for reptile species occupying the coastal sand-dune and sand-plain habitats of the south-western Australian biodiversity hotspot, a community which has both a high diversity of endemics and has varied dramatically in spatial extent over time. We use hierarchical amova, summary statistic and distance-based analyses to explicitly test specific phylogeographic hypotheses. Namely, we test if biogeographic vicariance across barriers, habitat stability, population isolation along a linear habitat or fragmentation across different environments can explain genetic divergence within five co-distributed squamate reptile species. Our results show that patterns of genetic variation reflect complex and species-specific interactions related to the spatial distribution of habitats present currently and during repeated glacial minima, as opposed to being associated with historical factors such as habitat stability between glacial and inter-glacial periods or vicariant barriers. We suggest that the large impact of habitat characteristics over time (i.e. relative levels of habitat connectivity, climatic gradients and spatial heterogeneity of soil types) reflects the ecological restrictions of the sand-dune and sand-plain reptile communities and may explain the lack of concordance across taxa. The study demonstrates the general utility of the approach for assemblage-level, as well as single species, phylogeographic study, including its usefulness for exploring biologically informed hypotheses about what factors have influenced patterns of genetic variation. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Towards Leadership: The Emergence Of Contemporary Court Administration In Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Foster

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Australian court administration as we know it today emerged in the mid-1980s in response to a range of factors. This paper draws on the wisdom of pioneering court and judicial administrators to explain how the past has shaped contemporary court practices, and to explore the challenges for modern leaders in court administration.The paper briefly sets out the recent history of court administration, including an examination of practices and roles priorto the beginning of reforms in the 1980s. The paper then chronicles the remarkable role that court administrators haveplayed in responding to the demands of change, and their reinvention as educated and respected managementprofessionals.Discussion then turns to current court administration and the demands it places on its practitioners in areas including performance measurement, client centered services, financial management, relationships with the judiciary, external relationships and innovation. The subjects covered in this section have been confined to those areas where the author believes the leadership implications are greatest. The paper then looks forward, examining the implications of emerging trends.Finally, the paper concludes that while the technical management skills demanded of the court administrator are important and should in no way be diminished, reflection on the past, present and emerging future shows that it is an aptitude for the intangible art of leadership that sets apart those who succeed in this role.While much of this paper is written with the senior court administrator or chief executive in mind, many of its observations and conclusions can be applied to the profession of court administration more generally.

  12. Consumer attitudes and misperceptions associated with trends in self-reported cereal foods consumption: cross-sectional study of Western Australian adults, 1995 to 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Mary Pollard

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The reasons for low adherence to cereal dietary guidelines are not well understood but may be related to knowledge, attitudes, beliefs and perceived barriers. This study aims to assess trends in cereal foods consumption, intention to change and factors associated with intake among Western Australian (WA adults 18 to 64 years. Method Cross-sectional data from the 1995, 1998, 2001, 2004, 2009, and 2012 Nutrition Monitoring Survey Series involving 7044 adults were pooled. Outcome variables: types and amount of cereals (bread, rice, pasta, and breakfast cereal eaten the day prior. Attitudes, knowledge, intentions, weight status and sociodemographic characteristics were measured. Descriptive statistics, multiple binary logistic and multinomial logistic regressions assess factors associated with consumption. Results Bread (78% was the most commonly consumed cereal food. The proportion eating bread decreased across survey years (Odds Ratio OR = 0.31; 95% Confidence Interval; 0.24–0.40 in 2012 versus 1995, as did the amount (4.1 slices of bread in 1995 to 2.4 in 2012. The odds of consuming whole-grain cereal foods increased since 2009 (OR = 1.27; 1.02–1.58 versus 1995 p < 0.05. The likelihood of trying to eat less cereal food in the past year was greater in 2012 compared to 1995 (Relative Risk Ratio RRR 10.88; 6.81–17.4. Knowledge of cereal recommendations decreased over time (OR = 0.20; 0.15–0.27 in 2012 versus 1995 p < 0.001. Overweight and obese respondents were more likely than healthy weight respondents to have tried to eat less cereals (RRR 1.65; 1.22–2.24 and 1.88; 1.35–2.63 respectively. ‘I already eat enough’ was the main barrier (75% in 1995 to 84% in 2012 (p < 0.001. Conclusions WA adults are actively reducing the amount of cereal foods they eat and intake is associated with a misperception of adequacy of intake. Nutrition intervention is needed to increase awareness of the health benefits of

  13. National Youth Court Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godwin, Tracy M.

    Youth courts provide communities with an opportunity to impose immediate consequences for first time youthful offenders, while providing a peer operated disposition mechanism that constructively allows young people to take responsibility, be held accountable, and make amends for violating the law. Dispositions hold youth accountable in part…

  14. Court of Public Opinion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguntoyinbo, Lekan

    2011-01-01

    It was late on Election Day 2010 and Vander Plaats, a Sioux City, Iowa, businessman and leader of a campaign to oust three Iowa Supreme Court justices, had just gotten word that he and his team had pulled it off. The voters had rejected the three justices up for a retention vote: David Baker, Michael Streit, and Chief Justice Marsha Ternus.…

  15. Courting Reform: Indonesia's Islamic Courts and Justice for the Poor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cate Sumner

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper documents a judicial reform case study in the world’s most populous Islamic country that has involved increasing access to the courts for disadvantaged groups. The process began with an Access and Equity Study in the area of family law conducted by the Religious Courts of Indonesia in partnership with the Family Court of Australia as well as Indonesian research institutes and an NGO for female heads of household. The key findings of that study showed that the 50% of Indonesia’s citizens living below $2 a day would face challenges in bringing their family law cases to the Religious Courts, something that is mandatory under Indonesian law. The paper documents the steps taken by the Religious Courts over the last five years to increase access to the courts for disadvantaged groups, principally women, the poor and those living in remote areas. It is estimated that 30-40,000 Indonesian citizens facing financial and other forms of disadvantage will access the Religious Courts for their family law cases during 2011as a result of court fees being waived or a circuit court visiting their locality. The paper also highlights why legalising marriage and divorce and the provision of birth certificates (requiring a legal marriage certificate are important for female heads of household and the families they support in terms of accessing broader public services, such as education and health.

  16. Chinese court case fiction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim Toft

    2011-01-01

    established as early as the 6th Century AD, whereas the first substantial evidence of the tradition is from 13th Century and the first Chinese crime fiction novels were written during the 17th Century. This article is, then, a corrective for the international history of crime fiction based on numerous...... breathed the breath of life into it? The usual answer is that crime fiction, in fact, was invented by Poe, but another counter-view is that China – at that point – had had a long narrative tradition for stories about crime and detection. The socalled gongan genre – court case fiction – was probably...

  17. Swallowing the scroll: legal implications of the recent Supreme Court peyote cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullis, R K

    1990-01-01

    Two cases decided by the United States Supreme Court in the past two years, with the same factual bases and involving the religious use of peyote by Native American Church members, are described and analyzed. In 1990 the Supreme Court ruled that states may prohibit the use of peyote for religious purposes. These cases are examined by applying traditional equal-protection and First Amendment religious liberty analyses as well as by traditional Western interpretations of sacrament. The Supreme Court now has established a legal precendent running contrary to previous lower court cases that has implications for the religious use of peyote, specifically, and for nontraditional use of sacramental drugs, generally.

  18. Sexual health and sexual trauma in women with severe mental illness: An exploratory survey of Western Australian community mental health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thinh; Hauck, Yvonne L; Pedruzzi, Rebecca A; Frayne, Jacqueline; Rock, Daniel; Dragovic, Milan

    2017-07-01

    Australian women attending community mental health services were surveyed to determine the relationship between sexual trauma, sexual activity, and sexual health seeking behaviors. Self-reported history of "forced sex" was 58.4% (n = 122 out of 220). Latent class analysis revealed a three-class model: "sexually active and health seeking," "low sexual activity and health seeking" and "low sexual activity and not health seeking." An association with general practitioner engagement and sexual health seeking behaviors was found. Rates of self-reported sexual trauma reinforce the need for screening and trauma informed care. Groupings may reflect different aspects of recovery associated with sexual health behaviors.

  19. European courts and old people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulley, Graham P

    2013-09-01

    There are two major European Courts, the European Court of Justice (ECJ) and the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR). The ECJ deals with legal matters, mainly involving the interpretation of EU law and ensuring that the law is applied evenly across all 27 EU member states. The ECHR aims to make certain that civil and political rights of citizens in the 46 member states of the Council of Europe are observed. Most cases involving older citizens are about social policy (such as pension arrangements, equality, age discrimination and mandatory retirement). There have been few cases dealing with patients' rights, long-term care or housing. Referrals of selected cases involving old people should be considered if their rights are not being protected. In this Commentary, there is an account of how these Courts have evolved, together with guidance on whom to refer, to which Court, and when and how referrals should be made.

  20. Patients' rights--why the Australian courts have rejected 'Bolam'.

    OpenAIRE

    Kirby, M.

    1995-01-01

    This point of view compares the issue of informed patient consent primarily as it operates in Australia and the United Kingdom. It affords an overview, also, of the applicable law in the United States and Canada. It particularly focuses on the legal test to be applied to patient consent as established in the Bolam case in the United Kingdom. The case, following its approval by the House of Lords, holds that the negligent standard in patient consent situations is to be determined, in cases of ...

  1. Court interpreting and pragmatic meaning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Bente

    In Denmark, court interpreters are required to deliver verbatim translations of speakers' originals and to refrain from transferring pragmatic meaning. Yet, as this paper demonstrates, pragmatic meaning is central to courtroom interaction.......In Denmark, court interpreters are required to deliver verbatim translations of speakers' originals and to refrain from transferring pragmatic meaning. Yet, as this paper demonstrates, pragmatic meaning is central to courtroom interaction....

  2. Paris court attacks abortion law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorozynski, A

    1995-07-15

    A Paris court last week challenged a 1993 law that makes it a criminal offense to obstruct abortions. The court acquitted nine anti-abortion protestors who had broken into the maternity ward of the public hospital Pitie-Salpetriere last November and prayed at the entrance of a ward where patients are admitted for abortions. The judges ruled that the protestors had not interfered with abortions being carried out because none were taking place at the time of the demonstration; furthermore, the judges stated, because the fetus could be considered a person (child), the protestors were protected by other laws which give immunity to those breaking a law in order to protect another person's life, or to defend a child that had been abandoned. The court continued to say that a fetus should be protected, whether or not it was considered a person, because it was definitely more than nothing. The Syndicat de la Magistrature, the association of French magistrates, believes the tribunal has denied the right to abortion guaranteed in the 1975 law. Veronique Neietz, who drafted the 1993 law, was "scandalized" by the decision and believes the decision of the court was made in retribution for a recent parliamentary decision to exclude anti-abortion protestors from the general amnesty given after presidential elections to minor offenders. During the same week of this court decision, two tribunals, in Lyons and in Bourg-en-Bresse, sentenced 45 anti-abortionists to suspended prison terms with fines.

  3. Teen Courts and Law-Related Education. ERIC Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nessel, Paula A.

    Teen courts have gained in popularity in the 1990s. These courts include youth courts, peer juries, peer courts, student courts, and other courts using juveniles to determine the sentences of juvenile offenders. The courts issue sentences that are carried out in a school or community setting and generally involve community service, jury duty,…

  4. Non-multiresistant methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia in Sydney, Australia: emergence of EMRSA-15, Oceania, Queensland and Western Australian MRSA strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosbell, Iain B; Barbagiannakos, Thelma; Neville, Stephen A; Mercer, Joanne L; Vickery, Alison M; O'Brien, Frances G; Coombs, Geoffrey W; Malkowski, Mary J; Pearson, Julie C

    2006-06-01

    To describe clinical features and molecular epidemiology of non-multiresistant methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteraemia. Patients with non-multiresistant MRSA isolated from blood at South Western Area Pathology Service from 1 January 1999 to 31 December 2001 were enrolled. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis, phage typing, and (selected instances) multilocus sequence and staphylococcal cassette chromosome typing was performed. PCR was used to detect Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL), toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1), and enterotoxin genes. Sixteen patients were detected: eight with UK EMRSA-15 (ST22-MRSA-IV), three with Oceania (South-West Pacific/Western Samoan phage pattern) (ST30-MRSA-IV), two with WA MRSA-5 (ST8-MRSA-IV), and one each with WA MRSA-1 (ST1-MRSA-IV), Queensland strain (ST93-MRSA-IV), and WA MRSA-15 (ST59-MRSA-IV). Prior hospital admissions occurred with six of the eight patients with UK EMRSA-15, none of the three with Oceania, and three of the five with other strains. Thirteen of 16 patients had underlying disease. Three of the three patients with Oceania strain bacteraemia were Polynesians; 11 of 13 of the others were Caucasians. PVL genes were detected in four of 16 isolates (all Oceania and Queensland strains). entC was detected in two EMRSA-15 strains; entA in one Oceania, two WA MRSA-5 and the WA MRSA-1 strain, with entA and entB in the WA MRSA-15 strain. tst was not detected. Multiple epidemic strains cause non-multiresistant MRSA bacteraemia. Most patients had risk factors. Oceania and Queensland strains possess the PVL gene.

  5. Intercultural pragmatics and court interpreting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Bente

    2008-01-01

      This paper reports on an on-going investigation of conversational implicature in triadic speech events: Interpreter-mediated questionings in criminal proceedings in Danish district courts. The languages involved are Danish and English, and the mode of interpreting is the consecutive mode....... The court interpreters are all state-authorized court interpreters and thus fully competent professionals.   The centrality of pragmatics in triadic speech events has been demonstrated by a number of studies (e.g. Berk-Seligson 2002, Hale 2004, Jacobsen 2002). Thus, conversational implicatures, which...... are a normal part of any interaction, occur also in courtroom interaction where questions and answers are not always entirely explicit and straightforward. However, preserving degrees of ambiguity and non-explicitness is very difficult for interpreters who may have to resort to certain strategies to translate...

  6. National Courts and EU Law

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This insightful and discerning book offers a fresh discourse on the functioning of national courts as decentralised EU courts and a new thematic for revising some older understandings of how national judges apply EU law. Organised into three key sections, the interdisciplinary chapters combine...... approaches and theories originating from law, political science, sociology and economics. The first section addresses issues relating to judicial dialogue and EU legal mandates, the second looks at the topic of EU law in national courts and the third considers national courts’ roles in protecting fundamental...... rights in the area of freedom, security and justice. The analysis of each is enriched through diverse research methods such as case-law analysis, citation network analysis, interviews, surveys and statistics. With its new legal and empirical assessment covering the newest member states of the EU...

  7. Australia: Court recognizes that HIV-positive people face special challenges in prison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Alana

    2006-04-01

    An Australian appellate court granted bail to a man charged with two separate counts of endangering life for allegedly having unprotected sex with two partners without disclosing that he was HIV positive. The man, who has pleaded not guilty to both charges, is accused of having committed the second offence while he was released on bail awaiting trial for the first. In deciding to release him, the Court considered, among other things, the unique difficulties that people living with HIV/AIDS face in prisons.

  8. An Ever More Powerful Court?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinsen, Dorte Sindbjerg

    ) to foster political change for a European Union (EU) social policy, including healthcare. The conventional assumption is that a strong causal link exists between legal and political integration in the EU, in which Court rulings progress and shape European integration. The book challenges this view...... on the basis of a careful examination of how judicial–legislative interactions determine the scope and limits of European integration in the daily EU decision-making processes. The legislative impact of Court rulings is traced by the use of original data over time from 1957 to 2014 and through three case...

  9. The Court of Justice as an inter-state court

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Butler, Graham

    2017-01-01

    Articles 259 and 273 TFEU allow for the jurisdiction for the Court of Justice of the European Union to adjudicate on inter-state disputes between EU Member States, subject to the fulfilment of certain conditions set down in the treaties. Article 259 TFEU relates to inter-state enforcement of Unio...

  10. Find Cancer Early: Evaluation of a Community Education Campaign to Increase Awareness of Cancer Signs and Symptoms in People in Regional Western Australians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Jane Croager

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionCancer outcomes for people living in rural and remote areas are worse than for those living in urban areas. Although access to and quality of cancer treatment are important determinants of outcomes, delayed presentation has been observed in rural patients.MethodsFormative research with people from rural Western Australia (WA led to the Find Cancer Early campaign. Find Cancer Early was delivered in three regions of WA, with two other regions acting as controls. Staff delivered the campaign using a community engagement approach, including promotion in local media. Television communications were not used to minimize contamination in the control regions. The campaign evaluation was undertaken at 20 months via a computer-assisted telephone interview (CATI survey comparing campaign and control regions. The primary outcome variable was knowledge of cancer signs and symptoms.ResultsRecognition and recall of Find Cancer Early and symptom knowledge were higher in the campaign regions. More than a quarter of those who were aware of the campaign reported seeing the GP as a result of their exposure.ConclusionDespite limited use of mass media, Find Cancer Early successfully improved knowledge of cancer symptoms and possibly led to changes in behavior. Social marketing campaigns using community development can raise awareness and knowledge of a health issue in the absence of television advertising.

  11. Molecular epidemiology of Neisseria gonorrhoeae using multi-antigen sequence typing and pulse-field gel electrophoresis in highly endemic Western Australian populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Lyn C; Goire, Namraj; Fisk, Rachel E; Speers, David J

    2015-07-15

    The remote and indigenous populations of Western Australia (WA) have one of the highest notification rates of gonorrhoea in the world. Despite this, the low rate of antimicrobial resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae from these regions permits the use of amoxycillin as empirical therapy. We describe the first molecular epidemiological study of gonococci isolated from this population using two different typing platforms. Pulse-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), Neisseria gonorrhoeae multi-antigen sequence typing (NG-MAST) and antimicrobial susceptibility tests were performed on 128 consecutive N. gonorrhoeae isolates cultured between January 2011 and December 2013. To highlight clusters isolates were evaluated based on their tbpB sequence types. No predominant NG-MAST or PFGE types were found. A total of 67 distinct PFGE pulsotypes were identified amongst the 128 isolates in this study with 20 PFGE pulsotypes representing 78 isolates. A total of 59 NG-MAST sequence types were found, represented by 45 porB alleles and 28 tbpB alleles with 13 tbpB genomogroups from 45 NG-MAST sequence types. TbpB genomogroup 29, represented by 45 isolates, was by far the most common genomogroup overall. Results from this study suggest that gonococcal epidemiology in WA is quite different between remote regions and major population centres and, in some cases, geographically restricted. It is likely that isolates originating from endemic regions of WA mostly represent independent, small sexual networks with an infrequent interchange between other communities and regions. Given the high rate of antimicrobial resistance elsewhere in Australia, ongoing surveillance is essential to ensure the enduring efficacy of amoxycillin empiric use in the remote regions of WA.

  12. Exploring the effects of transfers and readmissions on trends in population counts of hospital admissions for coronary heart disease: a Western Australian data linkage study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Derrick; Nedkoff, Lee; Knuiman, Matthew; Hobbs, Michael S T; Briffa, Thomas G; Preen, David B; Hung, Joseph; Beilby, John; Mathur, Sushma; Reynolds, Anna; Sanfilippo, Frank M

    2017-11-17

    To develop a method for categorising coronary heart disease (CHD) subtype in linked data accounting for different CHD diagnoses across records, and to compare hospital admission numbers and ratios of unlinked versus linked data for each CHD subtype over time, and across age groups and sex. Cohort study. Person-linked hospital administrative data covering all admissions for CHD in Western Australia from 1988 to 2013. Ratios of (1) unlinked admission counts to contiguous admission (CA) counts (accounting for transfers), and (2) 28-day episode counts (accounting for transfers and readmissions) to CA counts stratified by CHD subtype, sex and age group. In all CHD subtypes, the ratios changed in a linear or quadratic fashion over time and the coefficients of the trend term differed across CHD subtypes. Furthermore, for many CHD subtypes the ratios also differed by age group and sex. For example, in women aged 35-54 years, the ratio of unlinked to CA counts for non-ST elevation myocardial infarction admissions in 2000 was 1.10, and this increased in a linear fashion to 1.30 in 2013, representing an annual increase of 0.0148. The use of unlinked counts in epidemiological estimates of CHD hospitalisations overestimates CHD counts. The CA and 28-day episode counts are more aligned with epidemiological studies of CHD. The degree of overestimation of counts using only unlinked counts varies in a complex manner with CHD subtype, time, sex and age group, and it is not possible to apply a simple correction factor to counts obtained from unlinked data. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  13. Juvenile Courts. Creation and development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montserrat GONZÁLEZ FERNÁNDEZ

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the creation of Juvenile or Children's Courts in Spain, analysing their reasons and aims, as well as the ethical and political connotations present on their way of acting. Their history and the one of the institutions that complement them is built from the legislation, writings and ideas of their promoters.

  14. Pragmatics in Court Interpreting: Additions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Bente

    2003-01-01

    Danish court interpreters are expected to follow ethical guidelines, which instruct them to deliver exact verbatim versions of source texts. However, this requirement often clashes with the reality of the interpreting situation in the courtroom. This paper presents and discusses the findings of a...

  15. Freer markets, more court rulings?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hildebrand, Y.

    2010-01-01

    The governance of economic sectors in Europe has over the past decades been characterized by several important shifts. Two of the most notable shifts are those from state to market governance and from state to court governance. The first shift is the result of a coherent set of policies that have

  16. Beyond court digitalization with ODR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dory Reiling

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available “I felt so sorry for you, such a lovely tool, and then you have no users!” This was one of the comments after my presentation of the eKantonrechter at ODR2016, organized by HIIL in the Hague in May 2016. ODR, online dispute resolution, was presented as a tool to solve all problems in the 4th Trend Report by HIIL after the conference. A weblog, however, commented that ODR had raised hopes in its early promoters, but had not really taken off. ODR is a tool to help parties in de dispute resolve their problem. There are various examples of ODR tool: supporting double blind bidding to determine a sum of money, working out divorce settlements, negotiating a solution and taking a case to court. Interesting research questions abound in the area of ODR and its users: What paths do people take when trying to resolve a problem? How can people have ownership of their court procedure? How can solutions, ODR and court procedures, best be tailored to the type of problem? The article describes the development of the e-Kantonrechter, a digital small claims procedure, as an example. ODR and its users is a field in which law and society researchers can effectively contribute to improving digital problem solving and dispute resolution procedures in court.

  17. The Camera Comes to Court.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floren, Leola

    After the Lindbergh kidnapping trial in 1935, the American Bar Association sought to eliminate electronic equipment from courtroom proceedings. Eventually, all but two states adopted regulations applying that ban to some extent, and a 1965 Supreme Court decision encouraged the banning of television cameras at trials as well. Currently, some states…

  18. International Justice through Domestic Courts:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Yi Shin

    2015-01-01

    of Human Rights immediately followed with an opposing view in the Araguaia case, declaring that the amnesty law lacks effect under the American Convention on Human Rights. Brazilian society now faces an unprecedented challenge: can it expect its domestic courts to implement such international obligations...

  19. Pecked to death by (flying) ducks: court decision may extinguish smoking on aircraft.

    OpenAIRE

    Chapman, S.

    1995-01-01

    A case this month in the Australian court may force Australia's national airline, Qantas, to make all its flights non-smoking now rather than next year and in the meantime offers hope of compensation to Australian passengers who are refused non-smoking seats. Mrs Leone Cameron brought a case against Qantas for seating her in the smoking section of a Sydney to Bangkok fight after she had booked a non-smoking seat. She subsequently suffered minor illnesses. She and nine other similarly affected...

  20. Workforce capacity to address obesity: a Western Australian cross-sectional study identifies the gap between health priority and human resources needed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Begley

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The disease burden due to poor nutrition, physical inactivity and obesity is high and increasing. An adequately sized and skilled workforce is required to respond to this issue. This study describes the public health nutrition and physical activity (NAPA practice priorities and explores health managers and practitioner’s beliefs regarding workforce capacity to deliver on these priorities. Methods A workforce audit was conducted including a telephone survey of all managers and a postal survey of practitioners working in the area of NAPA promotion in Western Australia in 2004. Managers gave their perspective on workforce priorities, current competencies and future needs, with a 70 % response rate. Practitioners reported on public health workforce priorities, qualifications and needs, with a 56 % response rate. Results The top practice priorities for managers were diabetes (35 %, alcohol and other drugs (33 %, and cardiovascular disease (27 %. Obesity (19 %, poor nutrition (15 % and inadequate physical activity (10 % were of lower priority. For nutrition, managers identified lack of staff (60.4 %, organisational and management factors (39.5 % and insufficient financial resources (30.2 % as the major barriers to adequate service delivery. For physical activity services, insufficient financial resources (41.7 % and staffing (35.4 % and a lack of specific physical activity service specifications (25.0 % were the main barriers. Practitioners identified inadequate staffing as the main barrier to service delivery for nutrition (42.3 % and physical activity (23.3 %. Ideally, managers said they required 152 % more specialist nutritionists in the workforce and 131 % specialists for physical activity services to meet health outcomes in addition to other generalist staff. Conclusion Human and financial resources and organisational factors were the main barriers to meeting obesity, and public health nutrition and

  1. The impact of fire on sand dune stability: Surface coverage and biomass recovery after fires on Western Australian coastal dune systems from 1988 to 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumack, Samuel; Hesse, Paul; Turner, Liam

    2017-12-01

    This study aims to determine the common response of coastal sand dunes in Western Australia (WA) to fire on decadal time-scales, in terms of ecological-geomorphic-climatic interactions to test the hypothesis that fire plays a role in coastal dune destabilisation. Fires are commonly suggested to have contributed to widespread dune reactivation in Australia and globally, a hypothesis that is relatively untested. We used data from the Landsat Thematic Mapper, Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus, and Operational Land Imager missions to monitor changes in surface coverage on coastal sand dunes in south-west WA after fires. We analysed 31 fire scars from 1988 to 2016 in two Landsat scenes on the west and south coast of WA. Recovery ratios derived from the Normalised Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) were used to monitor patterns in post-fire biomass and surface cover. Recovery ratios are correlated with indices of burn severity, and meteorological data to investigate relationships. We also used Maximum Likelihood Classification to monitor changes in bare sand area. Results suggest that recovery followed a strongly consistent pattern, and is characterised by rapid vegetation cover re-establishment within six to twelve months. Prior to this, some aeolian activity may have occurred but without substantial surface changes. Initial germination and/or resprouting were followed by steady growth up to seven years, where NDVI typically neared pre-fire values. Some variation in early recovery occurred between the west and south coast, possibly owing to relative proportions of reseeding and resprouting plants. A log regression explained 75% of the recovery pattern (79% on the south coast). Precipitation had some ability to explain recovery up to nine months post-fire (r2 = 0.29 to 0.54). No relationships were observed between estimates of burn severity and recovery. After nine months, the biggest cause of spatial variation in recovery was the pre-fire community composition and related

  2. Alcohol, tobacco and illicit drug use amongst same-sex attracted women: results from the Western Australian Lesbian and Bisexual Women's Health and Well-Being Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McManus Alexandra

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of alcohol, tobacco and illicit drug use has been reported to be higher amongst lesbian and bisexual women (LBW than their heterosexual counterparts. However, few studies have been conducted with this population in Australia and rates that have been reported vary considerably. Methods A self-completed questionnaire exploring a range of health issues was administered to 917 women aged 15-65 years (median 34 years living in Western Australia, who identified as lesbian or bisexual, or reported having sex with another woman. Participants were recruited from a range of settings, including Perth Pride Festival events (67.0%, n = 615, online (13.2%, n = 121, at gay bars and nightclubs (12.9%, n = 118, and through community groups (6.9%, n = 63. Results were compared against available state and national surveillance data. Results LBW reported consuming alcohol more frequently and in greater quantities than women in the general population. A quarter of LBW (25.7%, n = 236 exceeded national alcohol guidelines by consuming more than four standard drinks on a single occasion, once a week or more. However, only 6.8% (n = 62 described themselves as a heavy drinker, suggesting that exceeding national alcohol guidelines may be a normalised behaviour amongst LBW. Of the 876 women who provided data on tobacco use, 28.1% (n = 246 were smokers, nearly double the rate in the female population as a whole. One third of the sample (33.6%, n = 308 reported use of an illicit drug in the previous six months. The illicit drugs most commonly reported were cannabis (26.4%, n = 242, meth/amphetamine (18.6%, n = 171, and ecstasy (17.9%, n = 164. Injecting drug use was reported by 3.5% (n = 32 of participants. Conclusion LBW appear to use alcohol, tobacco and illicit drugs at higher rates than women generally, indicating that mainstream health promotion messages are not reaching this group or are not perceived as relevant. There is an urgent

  3. Asian Australian Literatures

    OpenAIRE

    Madsen, Deborah Lea

    2007-01-01

    This article offers an overview of the range of Asian-Australian writers, within the context of changing historical and political conditions, as well as the complexity of defining a single category of literature written by Australians of Asian heritage. Such a category is difficult to define in strictly nationalistic terms as ‘Asian Australian literature’: where Australian literature is the controlling noun and ‘Asian’ functions as an adjective. Some Asian Australian writers are Australian-bo...

  4. The Special Court for Sierra Leone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Ciara Therése

    2004-01-01

    The focus of this article is the Special Court for Sierra Leone and the extent to which it can be said that the Special Court has already challenged, or will, in the future, challenge the tradition of impunity for gender-based crimes. In this regard, an analysis is undertaken of the Special Court......'s Statute, Rules of Procedure and Evidence and practice to date, in order to determine its treatment of gender-based crimes and whether it can be said that the Special Court for Sierra Leone challenges the tradition of impunity for gender-based crimes. Udgivelsesdato: december 2004...

  5. International organizations before national courts

    CERN Document Server

    Reinisch, August

    2000-01-01

    This book presents a radical, empirical investigation of how national courts "react" to disputes involving international organizations, analyzing in particular whether such organizations should be immune to national jurisdictions. Under the headings "domestic legal personality" and "immunity" of international organizations, some of the issues covered have already been treated in international legal scholarship, mostly in the form of short articles or case notes. This study, however, provides a thorough comparative analysis and the largest compilation of relevant decisions on the subject, making it indispensable for practitioners as well as academics in the field.

  6. Speech Cases Turned Aside by High Court

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Supreme Court declined without comment to take up two major appeals involving student free-speech rights on the Internet. One appeal encompassed two cases decided in favor of students last June by the full U.S. Court of Appeals for the 3rd Circuit, in Philadelphia. The other appeal stemmed from a decision by the U.S. Court of Appeals for…

  7. On the utility of data from the International HapMap Project for Australian association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankovich, Jim; Cox, Charles J; Tan, Rachel B; Montgomery, Douglas S; Huxtable, Stewart J; Rubio, Justin P; Ehm, Margaret G; Johnson, Laura; Butzkueven, Helmut; Kilpatrick, Trevor J; Speed, Terence P; Roses, Allen D; Bahlo, Melanie; Foote, Simon J

    2006-03-01

    We compare patterns of linkage disequilibrium (LD) for 633 SNPs in two regions between samples collected in two Australian states and HapMap samples collected from Utah residents of Northern and Western (NW) European ancestry (CEU). Patterns of LD in the Australian and HapMap samples are similar, and tag SNPs chosen using HapMap genotypes perform almost as well on Australian samples as tags chosen using Australian genotypes.

  8. The Christian Nobles at the Court of Great Khan, as Described in Mediaeval European Sources

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Liščák, Vladimír

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 2 (2017), s. 276-289 ISSN 2308-152X Institutional support: RVO:68378009 Keywords : religion in mediaeval China * Yuan Dynasty China * Christianity in the Great Khan court * Franciscan missions * Christian Alan nobility * Western mediaeval sources Subject RIV: AB - History

  9. The Place of Constitutional Courts in the EU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Komárek, Jan

    2013-01-01

    constitutional courts defend the scope for political autonomy – Against national constitutional courts' displacement – Simmenthal II – After the ‘Rights Revolution’ in Europe – National constitutional courts' references to the ECJ – Ordinary courts challenging national constitutional courts through......Going beyond ‘judicial dialogues’ and ‘conflict-and-power’ approaches to the analysis of national constitutional courts' role in the EU – The idea of European constitutional democracy – National constitutional courts constrain individual autonomy expanded by European integration – National...... the preliminar y reference procedure – Parallel references – National constitutional courts enforcing EU law – National constitutional courts challenging EU law...

  10. Victimological aspects of court judgments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bačanović Oliver

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The subject of this paper is the review of the results of the research: „Analysis of judgments form the victimological aspect“ of the Basic court Skopje I in Skopje. It is the first research of it’s kind in the Republic of Macedonia, conducted by the project team of the Faculty of Security in Skopje in the period from January to April 2011. By using the content analysis (for this purpose a special instrument was developed 172 irrevocable court judgment brought in the period 2005-2010 were analyzed, for the following criminal offences: murder, crimes against sexual freedom and sexual morality (sexual assault, severe bodily injuries and insult. The aim of the research was to highlight the victimological dimensions of mentioned criminal offences, while special attention was paid to the role of a victim in a crime, victim‘ s interaction with the perpetrator, individual characteristics of the victim, as well as the characteristics of the time when and the space where the crime occurred.

  11. Formulation of court interpreting models: A South African perspective

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In South Africa there are no models of court interpreting to serve as a guide for court interpreters when performing their task. This is because there is no proper definition of the role of a court interpreter. Models of court interpreting define and describe the process by stating what court interpreters are actually doing when ...

  12. 78 FR 49120 - Courts of Indian Offenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-13

    ... tribes removed from the list are the Seminole Nation, the Miami Tribe, the Wyandotte Tribe, the Choctaw... interim final rule published and effective on March 3, 2013, addressing the addition of two Indian tribes to the list of tribes with Courts of Indian Offenses (also known as CFR Courts), and deletion of five...

  13. Juvenile Drug Courts and Teen Substance Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butts, Jeffrey A., Ed.; Roman, John, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    Juvenile justice officials across the United States are embracing a new method of dealing with adolescent substance abuse. Importing a popular innovation from adult courts, state and local governments have started hundreds of specialized drug courts to provide judicial supervision and coordinate substance abuse treatment for drug-involved…

  14. The Juvenile Court: Changes and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feld, Barry C.

    2000-01-01

    Explores the changes in the juvenile court system, in particular, the juvenile waiver and sentencing laws, as it transformed from a social welfare agency into a type of criminal court system for young offenders. Addresses whether states should create an integrated juvenile and criminal justice system. (CMK)

  15. Desegregation Dead? Not in This Court Decision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneed, Maree

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses the interpretations of the court's ruling in "Parents Involved in Community Schools v. Seattle School District 1." The decision handed down June 28, the last day of the Supreme Court's term, does not prohibit school districts from voluntarily integrating schools as long as the school district meets certain legal…

  16. Battered women's perceptions of civil and criminal court helpfulness: the role of court outcome and process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Margret E; Perez, Sara; Goodman, Lisa A; Dutton, Mary Ann

    2011-01-01

    Although most battered women seeking formal help have some contact with court, limited research exists on what they find helpful and harmful about these experiences. Using qualitative data from low-income, largely Black battered women, this study finds that issues related to court outcomes, such as case disposition and enforcement, are important to evaluations of helpfulness. More frequently mentioned, however, are court processes, including treatment by staff, process length, and public disclosure. Results highlight the importance of research and practice attending to issues beyond court outcomes, as well as the potential impact supportive treatment at court may have for victims' recovery.

  17. [Andreas Vesalius in the Spanish Court].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Hyonosuke

    2004-12-01

    After the publication of "Fabrica," Andreas Vesalius entered the Spanish court and became a court physician to Charles the Fifth, Holy Roman Emperor, and then to Philip the Second, Spanish king. The author studied this process and its historical background. The ancestors of Vesalius had close relations with the Hapsburgs and the dukes of BUrgundy, and served them as court physician or a court pharmacist. Vesalius was born in Brussels, obtained his degree at the University of Padua, Italy, became professor of anatomy and surgery there, and published "Tabulae Anatomicae Sex" and "Fabrica."In the ear of the Spanish court, the treatments of Henry the Second, French king, and of Don Carlos, Spanish crown prince, are famous among Vesalius' medical contributions. In the year of his resignation, Charles the Fifth conferred the title of count palatine on Vesalius.

  18. Love v. Superior Court (People)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-12-28

    The petitioners, April Love and others, were convicted of soliciting acts of prostitution, and were ordered to undergo AIDS testing and counseling in compliance with the California Penal Code. Love challenged the mandatory testing as unconstitutional under the Fourth Amendment and the Fourteenth Amendment's due process and equal protection clauses. The First District Court of Appeal found that the testing complied with the "special needs" exception to the Fourth Amendment's prohibition of unreasonable searches, because the statute's testing and counseling provisions made prostitutes aware of the HIV risk to themselves and others. Further, because the Legislature could reasonably link AIDS transmission and prostitution, the statute comported with due process. Lastly, the statute was held to fulfill equal protection requirements, because use of the blood test's information was restricted equally among various offenders.

  19. Postpartum psychosis and the courts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nau, Melissa L; McNiel, Dale E; Binder, Renée L

    2012-01-01

    Although mental state defenses frequently are raised in cases of infanticide, legal criteria for these defenses vary across jurisdictions. We reviewed outcomes of such cases in states using M'Naughten or model penal code (MPC) standards for insanity, and the factors considered by the courts in reaching these decisions. LexisNexis and Westlaw searches were conducted of case law, legal precedent, and law review articles related to infanticide. Google and other Internet search engines were used to identify unpublished cases. Despite the differing legal standards for insanity among states, the outcomes of infanticide cases do not appear to be dependent solely on which standard is used. The presence of psychosis was important in the successful mental state defenses. This case series suggests that states that use the stricter M'Naughten standard have not been less likely than states with an MPC standard to adjudicate women who have committed infanticide as not guilty by reason of insanity.

  20. Pursuing transparency through science courts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, Thomas G. Jr. [Franklin Pierce Law Center, Concord, NH (United States)

    1999-12-01

    Many, disappointed with traditional ways to assess and manage health, safety and environmental risks, have sought alternatives that might better serve democratic values and truth. Arthur Kantrowitz proposed one in 1967. Named the 'Science Court' by the media, it sought to air opposing viewpoints publicly before an independent, neutral and technically competent panel of scientists. The idea has received considerable attention over the years, but some see it as too opaque and elitist. Ironically, others may view it as too transparent. Beyond that, as proposed it might have been too time-consuming and expensive, and few scientists would have welcomed a suggestion for cross-examination. Yet, its key features still offer promise for resolving difficult policy disputes and might be usefully integrated with notions since leading to the creation and endorsement of advisory science boards.

  1. Hans Kelsen and the Austrian Constitutional Court (1918-1929)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sara Lagi

    2012-01-01

      This article intends to examine Hans Kelsen's contribution to the establishing of the first Austrian Constitutional court, analyzing the key differences between Kelsen's model of Constitutional court...

  2. Regulating the regulators : accountability of Australian regulators

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bird, Joanna

    2011-01-01

    Accountability of Australian regulators - Australian Securities and Investments Commission - Australian Prudential Regulation Authority - concept of 'accountability' - mechanisms for accountability...

  3. Management of the Courts: The Irish Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.J. Fitzpatrick

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The management and administration of the courts in Ireland had remained essentially unchanged since the Courts of Justice Act of 1924, which provided for the courts system of the new State shortly after independence. The 1924 regime left a vacuum, failing to address the need for an independent administrative structure for the Courts. There was, for example, no Department such as the Lord Chancellor’s Department. Under the Act, the Department of Justice managed the Courts and their funding apart from judicial salaries. Those arrangements followed what is often loosely referred to as the “Ministry of Justice” model. Responsibility for the provision of budgetary, staffing and other resources, and the management of those resources, rested with the Department of Justice, Equality and Law Reform, as it is now known, through its Courts Division. As distinct from the allocation of business before the courts, the Judiciary – although it might be consulted and make representations – had little input into the allocation of resources or the way in which they were deployed.

  4. The Future Of Court Interpreting In Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobrić Katja

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Court interpreting in Croatia is a very unregulated field especially regarding the training and the skills that are to be acquired in order to pro- vide accurate translation at courts. One of the prerequisites according to the Regulations on Court Interpreters in Croatia is knowledge of the structure of judicial power, state government and legal terminology. Although the Regulations prescribe that the training should last no longer than two months, the organisations providing such training shorten this to three or four days. Taking into account all that has been said one realizes that in such short time a per- son cannot be properly qualified to practice as a court interpreter. According to the EU Directive on the right to interpretation and translation in criminal proceedings member states should provide adequate training in order to ensure the quality of interpretation and to avoid that suspected or accused persons complain that the quality of interpretation was not good enough to secure the fairness of the proceeding, which according to Article 2 of the Directive they have the right to. Since Croatia joined the European Union on 1 July 2013, it will have to change its Regulations on Court Interpreters in order to com- ply with this Directive. This paper will try to analyze the problems within the scope of court interpreter’s profession in Croatia both in civil and in criminal proceedings. Several examples will be suggested as the possible model for modifying court interpreting in Croatia. Since this profession is often underrated by the national courts, the paper will suggest ways to prevent such views and point out the importance of good court interpretation

  5. Rape trauma syndrome in the military courts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, S A

    1995-01-01

    The military courts have developed a rich case law tradition in the area of rape trauma syndrome testimony. These cases are particularly important in the context of a military that is both increasingly female and increasingly sensitive to mixed gender relationships. This article reviews the military court's approach to rape trauma testimony over the past 15 years. The author notes that military courts have been accepting of this testimony within certain well defined limits. The author analyzes the approach to testimony at one military medical center and offers a testimony model for the forensic psychiatrist who testifies in a military setting.

  6. The Relationship between Judicial Staff and Court Performance: Evidence from Brazilian State Courts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adalmir Oliveira Gomes

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available To handle increasing caseloads, the judicial systems of several countries have adopted three main strategies: developing new standards and judicial procedures; investing in information and communication technologies; and hiring additional judicial staff. This paper investigates the impact of this third strategy on the performance of Brazilian courts. We use multiple regression analysis to test an array of related hypotheses about the complex interactions between the number of judicial staff and court productivity. The empirical research uses ten-year (2003-2012 data from 27 Brazilian courts. The main findings indicate that the number of judicial assistants has a positive influence on court productivity, and the number of assistants mitigates the positive relationship between court caseload and court productivity. The results are discussed and further studies are suggested.

  7. Courts Debunk Common School Sports Myths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Laurence W.

    1973-01-01

    Examines recent court decisions concerning the equalization of fund allocation between athletic programs for boys and those for girls, the eligibility regulations for varsity team members, and the rights of transfer students who participate in varsity sports. (Author/DN)

  8. What Defines an International Criminal Court?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldgaard-Pedersen, Astrid

    2015-01-01

    Since the post-World War II tribunals, only few scholars have attempted to draw a definitional distinction between international and national criminal courts. Remarkable exceptions include Robert Woetzel, who in 1962 categorized criminal courts according to ‘the involvement of the international...... community’, and Sarah Williams, who 50 years later relied on the same factor in her definitions of ‘hybrid’ and ‘internationalized’ criminal tribunals. Through examples of rulings by the Special Court for Sierra Leone and the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia, this article will demonstrate...... that only criminal tribunals deriving their authority from international law should be labelled ‘international’, while the term ‘national criminal court’ should apply to tribunals set up under national law. This terminology would underline that issues concerning jurisdiction and applicable law must...

  9. Alternative court procedures for DUI offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate the need for alternative court procedures in Virginia for handling cases involving persons charged with driving under the influence of alcohol (DUI), with particular focus on the referral of DUI offenders to ...

  10. How to rig the federal courts

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Law, David S

    2011-01-01

    .... But the most familiar strategies for achieving this type of entrenchment -- namely, court-packing and gerrymandering -- are doomed to enjoy only limited success in the context of the Federal Judiciary...

  11. Congressional Authority Over the Federal Courts

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bazan, Elizabeth B; Killian, John; Thomas, Kenneth R

    2005-01-01

    .... While Congress has broad power to regulate the structure, administration and jurisdiction of the courts, its powers are limited by precepts of due process, equal protection and separation of powers...

  12. Military Justice: Courts-Martial, an Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-12

    habeas corpus to an Article III court, which could provide an alternate avenue for Supreme Court review. Selected Procedural Safeguards The...Authority “The Privilege of the Writ of Habeas Corpus shall not be suspended, unless when in Cases of Rebellion or Invasion the public Safety...may require it” Article I §9 cl. 2. Originally, the writ of habeas corpus permitted collateral attack upon a prisoner’s conviction only if the

  13. The Roles of Judicial Officers and Court Administrators in the UK Supreme Court

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Arnold

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article provides a brief historical summary of the process that culminated in the creation of the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom (SCUK, highlighting important changes in the relevant laws and regulations and the institutional framework within which authority for final appellate review of lower court decisions was and currently is vested.  It also examines the administrative organization of the SCUP and where authority for key elements of court administration at that court is vested and how, for practical purposes, the SCUK is administered.

  14. Overhauling the national industrial court act: A pathway to effective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The National Industrial Court was established in 1976 with the aim of adjudicating on labour matters brought before it by disputants. But the provisions of the Act then establishing it made it extremely difficult for the court to effectively discharge its functions.The initial Act establishing the court placed it (the Court) in a ...

  15. 5 CFR 838.225 - Processing amended court orders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Processing amended court orders. 838.225... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) COURT ORDERS AFFECTING RETIREMENT BENEFITS Procedures for Processing Court Orders Affecting Employee Annuities Application and Processing Procedures § 838.225 Processing amended court orders...

  16. Past and Future for Management of Courts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bert Maan

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available This article is written from the perspective of a court president in The Netherlands, a so called civil law country. In theory, in a civil law country, judges and lawyers in civil and commercial cases base their actions on the application of the law and its interpretation. Moreover, in criminal matters, the courts use inquisitorial procedures which differ from the adversarial procedures used in common law countries. The field of court management is not highly developed because of the tension between the need for judicial independence and judicial organization. There are many examples of this tension, including the fact that courts may be subject to budgetary limits which themselves may intrude upon judicial independence. For instance, suppose that a judge believes it necessary to appoint an expert to answer a certain scientific question, but the expert is expensive and budgetary considerations preclude the appointment. When I was involved in the process of the budgets of prosecutors’ offices and courts, this question frequently arose. In an effort to deal with this problem, part of the courts’ budgets were treated as open-ended even though courts rarely spent these open-ended budgets lavishly.

  17. The Development and Role of the Court Administrator in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Ryder-Lahey

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available By the turn of the millennium most courts in Canada had court administrators managing their operations and their staff. As a rule, the court administrators worked in a partnership with the chairmen of their courts, who typically delegated some of their official responsibilities. But the mere presence of court administrators, not to speak of their broad range of functions, was still relatively new. Only in the 1970s did most courts acquire administrators, and it took at least another decade before they were fully accepted by judges and entered into a position of equality with some, if not many, chairs of courts.

  18. Australian Space Situational Awareness Capability Demonstrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morreale, B.; Bessell, T.; Rutten, M.; Cheung, B.

    Australia is increasing its contribution to the global space situational awareness (SSA) problem by committing to acquire and operate SSA sensors. Over the last year, a series of collaborative SSA experiments have been undertaken to demonstrate the capabilities of Australian sensors. These experiments aimed to demonstrate how existing Australian sensors could perform in a surveillance of space role, prove passive radar’s capability to observe low earth orbit (LEO) satellites and perform SSA handoffs to optical sensors. The trials established a data sharing and communications protocol that bridged defence, academia, and industry partners. Geographically dispersed optical assets, including the Falcon telescope in Canberra, Raven telescopes in Exmouth (Western Australia) and Defence Science and Technology (DST) Telescopes in Adelaide (South Australia) collected on LEO satellites and established cueing protocols. The Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) located in Western Australia, demonstrated the capability of passive radar as an SSA asset after successfully observing LEO satellites based on reflected terrestrial radio signals. The combination of radar and optical SSA assets allows for the exploitation of each sensors unique advantages and locations across the Australian continent. This paper outlines the capabilities and diversity of Australian optical and radar sensors as demonstrated by field trials in 2016 and 2017. It suggests future potential for harnessing novel radar and optical integration techniques to supplement high-value assets such as the Space Surveillance Telescope as part of the Space Surveillance Network.

  19. Constitutional Court of South Africa overturns lower court's decision on the right to "sufficient water".

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    On 8 October 2009, the Constitutional Court of South Africa overturned the judgment of the Supreme Court of Appeal, which addressed the proper interpretation of Section 27(1)(b) of the Constitution of South Africa (Constitution)--namely, everyone's right to have access to sufficient water.

  20. Minnesota in the Supreme Court. Lessons on Supreme Court Cases Involving Minnesotans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Jennifer

    This document focuses on cases brought by Minnesotans to the U.S. Supreme Court. The five lessons featured are designed to provide secondary classroom teachers with material needed to teach each unit. Lessons cover Supreme Court proceedings, free press issues, freedom of religion, abortion rights, and privilege against self-incrimination.…

  1. Managing with Human Resources in the General Courts (with the Comparison of the General Court in Kochani with the General Court in Vinica)

    OpenAIRE

    Zdravkova Stojanova, Aleksandra

    2011-01-01

    The managing of the human resources is of a great importance for every organization and so it is for the courts as well. For a difference from the other organizations and companies the courts represent a separate organizational whole which is specific in its organization, composure and jurisdiction. In the courts as well as in the other organizations of great importance for the successful working of the court and accomplishing its goals is the managing with the human resources....

  2. Jurisdiction of courts with a focus on the Special Chamber of the Supreme Court of Kosovo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr.Sc. Sabri Halili

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The legal solution offered by the Law establishing the Special Chamber of the Supreme Court of Kosovo is rather challenging for practical implementation. Due to this fact, the decisions of the Special Chamber contain various dilemmas of judges on the jurisdiction of the Chamber on the matters related to natural persons sued by the PAK, which are related to various liabilities of these persons to socially-owned enterprises, namely to the PAK. Since the PAK administers and represents socially owned property in general, it is naturally bound to seek for legal resolutions for all legal contests before a competent court. Naturally, the PAK would seek for such a solution before the Special Chamber of the Supreme Court of Kosovo on PAK-related matters, which is already bound by the title itself, “on PAK-related matters”. Comparisons of remedies by various laws related to subject competence are based on legal literature used in higher education in Kosovo. Analysis of subject competences of regular and special courts is two-fold: the Commercial Court and the Military Court, while the competence of the Special Chamber is only analysed in relation with the Law on Courts, and the Law on the Special Chamber of the Supreme Court, comparing it with the Law on Contested Procedure and the Law on the PAK. The Special Chamber has before and still continues to avoid jurisdiction of this Court, which is sanctioned by Articles 4 and 5 of the Law on the Special Chamber, due to the fact that in cases in which the PAK has sued a natural or legal person, due to debts, occupation of socially owned property, or any other disputed matter, which is directly related to socially owned properties, the Special Chamber proclaims itself incompetent, and transfers the case to regular courts, although the Special Chamber adjudicates “on PAK-related matters”, but in this case only when the PAK is respondent, not when it is claimant.

  3. PPIM Survey: Religious Courts Access and Equity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jajat Burhanudin

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The importance of religious courts initially rose with the introduction of Marriage Law no. 1, 1974 which mainly aimed to prevent arbitrary divorces, which was viewed to be a common problem among Muslims at the time. The enactment of this law meant that divorces needed to be approved by the religious court, hence acting as a disincentive for men to divorce their wives at the drop of a hat. The impact of this law is evident: the rate of divorce for Indonesian Muslims declined from 16.7% in 1955 to 1.1% in 1990. The survey looked at a range of issues related to the use of the religious courts across the nation and access to these courts. Hence the survey touched on the background of users, equity, satisfaction, accessibility, knowledge of the religious courts and the services provided, and trust in public institutions.Copyright (c 2014 by SDI. All right reserved.DOI: 10.15408/sdi.v14i2.554

  4. An Aboriginal Australian Genome Reveals Separate Human Dispersals into Asia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Morten; Guo, Xiaosen; Wang, Yong

    2011-01-01

    We present an Aboriginal Australian genomic sequence obtained from a 100-year-old lock of hair donated by an Aboriginal man from southern Western Australia in the early 20th century. We detect no evidence of European admixture and estimate contamination levels to be below 0.5%. We show that Abori......We present an Aboriginal Australian genomic sequence obtained from a 100-year-old lock of hair donated by an Aboriginal man from southern Western Australia in the early 20th century. We detect no evidence of European admixture and estimate contamination levels to be below 0.5%. We show...

  5. Australianness as fairness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plage, Stefanie; Willing, Indigo; Skrbis, Zlatko

    2017-01-01

    This article provides an account of interwoven and often competing repertoires of cosmopolitanism and nationalism on which Australians draw when encountering diversity. Using interview and focus group data the article first explores how the notion of Australianness grounded in civic virtues such ...

  6. Supreme Court refuses to review clinic access law; Second Appeals Court upholds statute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-06-30

    On June 19, the US Supreme Court refused to review "Woodall v. Reno," a challenge to the Freedom of Access to Clinic Entrances Act (FACE) filed in Virginia by an anti-choice individual. FACE prohibits the use of force, threat of force, or physical obstruction to intentionally injure, intimidate, or interfere with anyone providing or obtaining reproductive health services. By denying the petition for "certiorari," the High Court let stand the US Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit decision in February. In that ruling, the midlevel federal court affirmed a lower court's dismissal of two of the eight anti-choice lawsuits challenging FACE, "Woodall v. Reno" and "American Life League v. Reno," which were consolidated by the appeals panel. Although plaintiffs in the first case filed a request for review by the High Court within days of the appellate court ruling, plaintiffs in the latter case waited until May to do so. The Department of Justice, which is defending the federal statute, and CRLP and the NOW Legal Defense and Education Fund, who are intervening on behalf of women and health care providers, will file their opposition to the review by July 26. The Justices will then decide to hear the case. On June 23, a three-judge panel for the US Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit affirmed a lower court's decision to dismiss "Cheffer v. Reno," a facial challenge by Florida anti-choice activists seeking to invalidate FACE. The appeals court had ruled the law did not infringe on First Amendment rights, and the panel rejected the argument that Congress had exceeded its authority under the Commerce Clause of the US Constitution by finding that the measure "protects and regulates commercial enterprises." The appeals court accepted an "amicus" brief filed by CRLP and NOW Legal Defense and Education Fund on behalf of the National Abortion Federation, the National Organization of Women, physicians, and women's health clinics, but denied their request to intervene in the

  7. Court-authorised deprivation of liberty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The United Kingdom Supreme Court judgment in Cheshire West and Chester Council v P in 2014 introduced a more inclusive 'acid test' for determining the objective element of a deprivation of liberty in cases concerning people who lack decision-making capacity. The case made clear that adults and young people who lack capacity could be deprived of their liberty in care settings other than hospitals and care homes, including the person's own home. A deprivation of liberty that occurs in a setting other than a hospital or care home must be authorised by a Court. This article explains the revised process for applying for Court authorisation of a deprivation of liberty where it occurs in supported living, Shared Lives placements or the incapable person's own home.

  8. Employers liability to the international criminal court

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yenifer Yiseth Suárez Díaz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The constant changes in the social dynamics due to economic and technological development has brought along the need to dispose of a High Court, with competence over International Crimes. The above was the reason to establish the International Criminal Court, destined to prosecute and punish the maximum responsible for crimes of its jurisdiction. Nonetheless, despite the existence of individual criminal responsibility as an accomplice in the case of entrepreneurs who contribute to the crime, there is not an actual investigation or conviction as such in the Court fase for those individuals. Through a criminological study, the actions in the frame of the criminal policy in international law, in order to hold individual criminal responsibility towards entrepreneurs for international crimes, will be evaluated, from the dogmatic categories established in the international guidelines as well as from international doctrine.

  9. Dispute resolution by Courts and Dispute resolution in court. Partners or rivals?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Hero

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This session of the workshop was dedicated to alternative dispute resolutions (ADR, which consists of dispute resolution processes and techniques through which disagreeing parties come to an agreement without having to litigate. Despite historic resistance, over the years ADR has gained widespread acceptance among both the general public and the legal profession. In the discussion there was a specific emphasis on mediation and arbitration. Kathrin Nitschmann, a lawyer and mediator from Saarbruecken, Germany, talked about “Professionalisation in mediation”. In addition to participation aspects she determined both the risks and the perspectives of professionalization in mediation. Luigi Cominelli, Assistant Professor of Sociology of Law at the University of Milan, Italy, reported on “Regulating Mediation in the EU”. He described the history of regulating mediation in the EU as well as domestic regulations since the beginning of modern mediation movement in the western world since the 1970s. Claude Witz, a French civil law professor at the University of Saarland, Germany, referred to “His experience in arbitration.” After highlighting some aspects of his experience, he pointed out the importance of arbitration in international commercial disputes. Alec Stone Sweet, Leitner Professor of Law, Politics, and International Studies, Yale Law School, United States, was reporting on “Arbitration and judicialization.” Initially, he presented arbitration as a triadic dispute resolution and then focused on judizialization in arbitration. Sir David Edward, former Judge of the Court of Justice of the European Communities and Professor Emeritus of the School of Law of the University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom, spoke about “The view of an arbitrator.” While elaborating on multiple reasons for ADR, he honed focus on mediation and arbitration. Finally Heike Jung, Professor Emeritus of Penal Law of the University of the Saarland, Germany

  10. Selim v Lele and the civil (industrial) conscription prohibition: constitutional protection against federal legislation controlling or privatising Australian public hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faunce, Thomas

    2008-08-01

    Selim v Lele (2008) 167 FCR 61; [2008] FCAFC 13 was a decision of the Federal Court which interpreted s 51(xxiiiA) of the Australian Constitution. This section accords the federal government, among other things, power to make laws with respect to the provision of "medical and dental services (but not so as to authorise any form of civil conscription)". The Federal Court decided that the phrase "civil conscription" was analogous to "industrial conscription". In that sense the Federal Court held that the prohibition was designed to preserve the employment autonomy of Australian medical practitioners or dentists, preventing federal laws that required them, either expressly or by practical compulsion, to work for the federal government or any industrial employer nominated or permitted by the federal government. The specific question in Selim v Lele was whether the imposition of standards and prohibition of "inappropriate practice" under the Health Insurance Act 1973 (Cth), ss 10, 20, 20A and Pt VAA, amounted to civil conscription. The court held they did not. The Federal Court also discussed in that context the sufficiency of "practical compulsion" in relation to the s 51(xxxiiiA) prohibition, The constitutional prohibition on "any form" of civil conscription provides one of the few rights protections in the Australian Constitution and may have an important role to play in shaping the limits of health care system privatisation in Australia.

  11. Social Media and the Courts: Innovative Tools or Dangerous Fad? A Practical Guide for Court Administrators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman Meyer

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article gives a comprehensive overview of what social media are, why social media are important in society and the courts, how social media can be used effectively, what social media platforms are well-suited to the courts, what problems can arise, and how to proactively deal with such problems. In the early years of social media use in the courts there was a lot of skepticism. As we have gained experience most problems have been shown to be less severe or have been solved. Meanwhile, many usage advantages have become apparent. Research in the United States has shown that judges are increasingly supporting social media use by themselves and their courts, and are less concerned about problems and compromising ethics.The courts hold a special place in government as impartial arbiters of legal disputes. We, as court leaders, must fulfill the public’s trust in us to achieve the highest level of service while upholding the rule of law. As we have seen, social media are excellent tools to make this a reality—the challenge is to securely and effectively leverage these tools in the court setting.

  12. Social Media and the Courts: Innovative Tools or Dangerous Fad? A Practical Guide for Court Administrators

    OpenAIRE

    Norman Meyer

    2014-01-01

    This article gives a comprehensive overview of what social media are, why social media are important in society and the courts, how social media can be used effectively, what social media platforms are well-suited to the courts, what problems can arise, and how to proactively deal with such problems. In the early years of social media use in the courts there was a lot of skepticism. As we have gained experience most problems have been shown to be less severe or have been solved. Meanwhile, ma...

  13. Court supervised institutional transformation in South Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... master; enforcement of court order; management of public institutions; special masters; vulnerable in society; children without parents; prisoners; elderly; mentally disabled; prisons; curator; receiver; public institution; school; welfare department; hospital for the mentally disabled; home for the elderly; racial discrimination ...

  14. 78 FR 14017 - Courts of Indian Offenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-04

    ... the list are the Seminole Nation, the Miami Tribe, the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma, the Wyandotte Tribe... established CFR Courts. The tribes to be removed from the list are the Seminole Nation, the Miami Tribe, the... forum. The Wyandotte Tribe of Oklahoma, Seminole Nation of Oklahoma, Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma, the...

  15. U.S. Supreme Court Trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Charles F.; Leiterman, Hannah

    1999-01-01

    Provides summaries of U.S. Supreme Court case decisions during its 1998-99 term on the following issues: (1) sexual harassment; (2) street gangs; (3) search and seizure; (4) welfare; (5) immigration; and (6) census. Previews the 1999-2000 term. Includes the article "Teaching Activities and Discussion Questions" by Hannah Leiterman. (CMK)

  16. The Unified Patent Court (UPC) in Action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Clement Salung; Schovsbo, Jens Hemmingsen; Riis, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The new common judiciary for European patents (UPC) will play a crucial role in the future European patent system. The UPC will be a very specialised court that i.a. recruits judges from specialists’ circles and has as part of its mission to develop a coherent and autonomous body of case law...

  17. The law of treaties before domestic courts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brölmann, C.; Binder, C.

    2015-01-01

    This paper does not aim to reiterate the law of treaties as such. Rather, we focus on how the law of treaties is used and applied in domestic courts -- a continuously relevant perspective as a growing body of substantive international rules and norms is enshrined in treaties (‘treaty law’), with

  18. An International Criminal Court of Public Opinion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwknegt, Thijs Bastiaan

    2012-01-01

    In recent months, South Africa, Burundi and the Gambia have terminated their membership of the International Criminal Court (ICC). Observers and academics alike have narrowly portrayed this walkout as an ‘African’ exodus and an ‘African’ problem. But what about Vladimir Putin’s ‘unsigning’ of the

  19. Push characteristics in wheelchair court sport sprinting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Slikke, R.M.A.; Berger, Monique; Bregman, D.J.J.; Veeger, H.E.J.; van der Helm, FCT; Jansen, AJ

    2016-01-01

    Short sprints are important components of most wheelchair court sports, since being faster than the opponent often determines keeping ball possession or not. Sprinting capacity is best measured during a field test, allowing the athlete to freely choose push strategies adapted to their own

  20. Evolution, Creationism, and the Courts: 20 Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Randy; Miksch, Karen L.

    2003-01-01

    The teaching of evolution and creationism is controversial to many people in the United States. Knowledge of the many important court-decisions about the teaching of evolution and creationism in the United States can be used not only to resist anti-evolution activities of creationists, but also to help teachers address questions about the teaching…

  1. Court Okays Special Leave for Pregnant Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendor, Benjamin

    1987-01-01

    The recent Supreme Court decision in the employment discrimination case "California Savings and Loan Association v. Guerra" permits employers to treat pregnancy the same as other disabling conditions relating to employment opportunities. Also, state legislatures may mandate preferential treatment for pregnancy. (MD)

  2. 22 CFR 19.6-1 - Orders by a court.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... or annulment or any court ordered or approved property settlement agreement incident to any court decree of divorce, legal separation, or annulment, that any payment from the Fund which would otherwise...

  3. Matching Judicial Supervision to Clients’ Risk Status in Drug Court

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlowe, Douglas B.; Festinger, David S.; Lee, Patricia A.; Dugosh, Karen L.; Benasutti, Kathleen M.

    2007-01-01

    This article reports outcomes from a program of experimental research evaluating the risk principle in drug courts. Prior studies revealed that participants who were high risk and had (a) antisocial personality disorder or (b) a prior history of drug abuse treatment performed better in drug court when scheduled to attend biweekly judicial status hearings in court. In contrast, participants who were low risk performed equivalently regardless of the court hearings schedule. This study prospectively matches drug court clients to the optimal schedule of court hearings based on an assessment of their risk status and compares outcomes to clients randomly assigned to the standard hearings schedule. Results confirmed that participants who were high risk and matched to biweekly hearings had better during-treatment outcomes than participants assigned to status hearings as usual. These findings provide confirmation of the risk principle in drug courts and yield practical information for enhancing the efficacy and cost-efficiency of drug courts. PMID:18174915

  4. The pattern of complaints about Australian wind farms does not match the establishment and distribution of turbines: support for the psychogenic, 'communicated disease' hypothesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Chapman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: With often florid allegations about health problems arising from wind turbine exposure now widespread, nocebo effects potentially confound any future investigation of turbine health impact. Historical audits of health complaints are therefore important. We test 4 hypotheses relevant to psychogenic explanations of the variable timing and distribution of health and noise complaints about wind farms in Australia. SETTING: All Australian wind farms (51 with 1634 turbines operating 1993-2012. METHODS: Records of complaints about noise or health from residents living near 51 Australian wind farms were obtained from all wind farm companies, and corroborated with complaints in submissions to 3 government public enquiries and news media records and court affidavits. These are expressed as proportions of estimated populations residing within 5 km of wind farms. RESULTS: There are large historical and geographical variations in wind farm complaints. 33/51 (64.7% of Australian wind farms including 18/34 (52.9% with turbine size >1 MW have never been subject to noise or health complaints. These 33 farms have an estimated 21,633 residents within 5 km and have operated complaint-free for a cumulative 267 years. Western Australia and Tasmania have seen no complaints. 129 individuals across Australia (1 in 254 residents appear to have ever complained, with 94 (73% being residents near 6 wind farms targeted by anti wind farm groups. The large majority 116/129(90% of complainants made their first complaint after 2009 when anti wind farm groups began to add health concerns to their wider opposition. In the preceding years, health or noise complaints were rare despite large and small-turbine wind farms having operated for many years. CONCLUSIONS: The reported historical and geographical variations in complaints are consistent with psychogenic hypotheses that expressed health problems are "communicated diseases" with nocebo effects likely

  5. The Pattern of Complaints about Australian Wind Farms Does Not Match the Establishment and Distribution of Turbines: Support for the Psychogenic, ‘Communicated Disease’ Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Simon; St. George, Alexis; Waller, Karen; Cakic, Vince

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives With often florid allegations about health problems arising from wind turbine exposure now widespread, nocebo effects potentially confound any future investigation of turbine health impact. Historical audits of health complaints are therefore important. We test 4 hypotheses relevant to psychogenic explanations of the variable timing and distribution of health and noise complaints about wind farms in Australia. Setting All Australian wind farms (51 with 1634 turbines) operating 1993–2012. Methods Records of complaints about noise or health from residents living near 51 Australian wind farms were obtained from all wind farm companies, and corroborated with complaints in submissions to 3 government public enquiries and news media records and court affidavits. These are expressed as proportions of estimated populations residing within 5 km of wind farms. Results There are large historical and geographical variations in wind farm complaints. 33/51 (64.7%) of Australian wind farms including 18/34 (52.9%) with turbine size >1 MW have never been subject to noise or health complaints. These 33 farms have an estimated 21,633 residents within 5 km and have operated complaint-free for a cumulative 267 years. Western Australia and Tasmania have seen no complaints. 129 individuals across Australia (1 in 254 residents) appear to have ever complained, with 94 (73%) being residents near 6 wind farms targeted by anti wind farm groups. The large majority 116/129(90%) of complainants made their first complaint after 2009 when anti wind farm groups began to add health concerns to their wider opposition. In the preceding years, health or noise complaints were rare despite large and small-turbine wind farms having operated for many years. Conclusions The reported historical and geographical variations in complaints are consistent with psychogenic hypotheses that expressed health problems are “communicated diseases” with nocebo effects likely to play an

  6. The pattern of complaints about Australian wind farms does not match the establishment and distribution of turbines: support for the psychogenic, 'communicated disease' hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Simon; St George, Alexis; Waller, Karen; Cakic, Vince

    2013-01-01

    With often florid allegations about health problems arising from wind turbine exposure now widespread, nocebo effects potentially confound any future investigation of turbine health impact. Historical audits of health complaints are therefore important. We test 4 hypotheses relevant to psychogenic explanations of the variable timing and distribution of health and noise complaints about wind farms in Australia. All Australian wind farms (51 with 1634 turbines) operating 1993-2012. Records of complaints about noise or health from residents living near 51 Australian wind farms were obtained from all wind farm companies, and corroborated with complaints in submissions to 3 government public enquiries and news media records and court affidavits. These are expressed as proportions of estimated populations residing within 5 km of wind farms. There are large historical and geographical variations in wind farm complaints. 33/51 (64.7%) of Australian wind farms including 18/34 (52.9%) with turbine size >1 MW have never been subject to noise or health complaints. These 33 farms have an estimated 21,633 residents within 5 km and have operated complaint-free for a cumulative 267 years. Western Australia and Tasmania have seen no complaints. 129 individuals across Australia (1 in 254 residents) appear to have ever complained, with 94 (73%) being residents near 6 wind farms targeted by anti wind farm groups. The large majority 116/129(90%) of complainants made their first complaint after 2009 when anti wind farm groups began to add health concerns to their wider opposition. In the preceding years, health or noise complaints were rare despite large and small-turbine wind farms having operated for many years. The reported historical and geographical variations in complaints are consistent with psychogenic hypotheses that expressed health problems are "communicated diseases" with nocebo effects likely to play an important role in the aetiology of complaints.

  7. The International Criminal Court at the crossroads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelwahab Biad

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Since the adoption of the Statute of Rome in July 1998, the ICC has been confronted by a number of problems. One such problem is the disagreement which persists among the members of the Assembly of Member States as to whether the crime of Aggression is one over which the Court has competence pursuant to Article 5 of the Statute. Another diffi culty is the opposition of the United States of America which, since the Bush Administration, has deployed a juridical arsenal with the aim of impeding any type of collaboration with the ICC; the tools in the arsenal include the American Service Members’ Protection Act and bilateral immunity agreements which prevent the transfer of American citizens to the Court by State members of the Rome Statute. The entry into force of the of the Statute on 1 July 2002 allowed the Court Prosecutor to initiate the fi rst investigations and processes for war crimes and crimes against humanity committed in the confl icts which have devastated certain African States (D.R.C., The Central African Republic and Uganda. The arrest warrant against the Sudanese President Omar Al Bashir for atrocities committed in Darfur demonstrates the limitations of action on the Court which cannot carry out its mandate without the cooperation of the States. Above all, the Court must confront the criticism of “double standards” and that it is an instrument of “justice for the poor”, while the “powerful” escape. The answers to these problems can be contributed to, in part, through the revision process foreseen by the Statute nine years after its entry into force.

  8. the south african constitutional court and the rule of law

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cmps073

    of the rule of law, the Court has opted for a context-sensitive, thus more substantive, interpretation of the rule of law. This is evident from the judgment of the. Constitutional Court in President of the Republic of South Africa v South African. Rugby Football Union. 110. The Court made it clear that the power of the President to.

  9. The South African constitutional court's use of foreign precedent in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... Court or whether it is a characteristic of a court which is confident enough that its independence will remain intact in spite of its looking elsewhere for answers. KEYWORDS: transjudicialism; foreign precedent, comparative judicialism, stare decisis; foreign case law; comparative constitutionalism; Constitutional Court.

  10. Do justice to court interpreters in South Africa | Lebese ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Many countries have developed statutory provisions governing norms and standards of practice (NSPs) for court interpreters. However, in South Africa, in the case of State versus Naidoo (1962:631), Judge Williamson states that “in relation to the courts of this country, there appears to be no statutory provision, Rule of Court ...

  11. Problems Faced by Court Interpreters in Botswana | Miyanda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Court interpreting is a rather complex task. Inaccuracies in legal interpreting or translation can have serious consequences. Using oral interviews and a written questionnaire, this study set out to establish the problems faced by court interpreters in Botswana in the course of their duties, the kind of training offered to court ...

  12. The New York Court Review of Children in Foster Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Festinger, Trudy Bradley

    1975-01-01

    Presents a study which investigated three areas: (1) factors related to the court's determination of foster care status or availability of children for adoption; (2) the extent of agreement between agency recommendations and court orders; and (3) the impact of the court review on moving children out of foster care. (SDH)

  13. Damaging the Legitimacy of the Spanish Constitutional Court

    OpenAIRE

    Urías, Joaquín

    2017-01-01

    The Spanish legislative burdens the Constitutional Court with the task to prevent Catalonia from pursuing independence. To use the Constitutional Court as the main barricade against any attempt at starting the independence process does tremendous damage to the Court itself as it undermines its perception as neutral arbiter and, thereby, its legitimation.

  14. Legal Bibliography for Juvenile and Family Courts. Supplement 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, William H.; Freer, Alice B.

    This bibliography provides a listing of journal articles on such topics as: the abused child, adoptions, case decisions, confessions, constitutional law, counsel, court administration and organization, courts, criminal law and procedure, custody, delinquency, domestic relations, due process for juveniles, evidence, family court and family law,…

  15. Court Records Management and Efficient Administration of Justice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the records management practices in Nigerian courts as they affect the administration of justice in Nigeria. Focusing particularly on the Court of Appeal and the Supreme Court of Nigeria, the population of the study comprised 634 records personnel out of which 160 were purposively sampled.

  16. 78 FR 14271 - Manual for Courts-Martial; Proposed Amendments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-05

    ... of the Secretary Manual for Courts-Martial; Proposed Amendments AGENCY: Joint Service Committee on... amendments to the Manual for Courts-Martial, United States (2012 ed.)(MCM). SUMMARY: The Joint Service Committee on Military Justice (JSC) is publishing final proposed amendments to the Manual for Courts-Martial...

  17. 32 CFR 700.1101 - Demand for court-martial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Demand for court-martial. 700.1101 Section 700... Standards of Conduct § 700.1101 Demand for court-martial. Except as otherwise provided in the Uniform Code of Military Justice, no person in the naval service may demand a court martial either on him or...

  18. Court Interpreters and Translators: Developing Ethical and Professional Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funston, Richard

    Changing needs in the courtroom have raised questions about the need for standards in court interpreter qualifications. In California, no formal training or familiarity with the legal system is required for certification, which is done entirely by language testing. The fact that often court interpreters are officers of the court may be…

  19. 5 CFR 1653.3 - Processing retirement benefits court orders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Processing retirement benefits court orders. 1653.3 Section 1653.3 Administrative Personnel FEDERAL RETIREMENT THRIFT INVESTMENT BOARD COURT ORDERS AND LEGAL PROCESSES AFFECTING THRIFT SAVINGS PLAN ACCOUNTS Retirement Benefits Court Orders § 1653...

  20. 5 CFR 1653.2 - Qualifying retirement benefits court orders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Qualifying retirement benefits court orders. 1653.2 Section 1653.2 Administrative Personnel FEDERAL RETIREMENT THRIFT INVESTMENT BOARD COURT ORDERS AND LEGAL PROCESSES AFFECTING THRIFT SAVINGS PLAN ACCOUNTS Retirement Benefits Court Orders § 1653...

  1. Corruption in Australian sport

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    BRICKNELL, Samantha

    2015-01-01

    Corruption and integrity in sport - betting and non-betting related match-fixing - use of inside information for betting - risks of corruption to Australian sport - government and national sporting...

  2. Australian Secondary School Students' Understanding of Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Vaille; Carson, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated 438 Year 10 students (15 and 16 years old) from Western Australian schools, on their understanding of the greenhouse effect and climate change, and the sources of their information. Results showed that most students have an understanding of how the greenhouse effect works, however, many students merge the processes of the…

  3. Effect of socioeconomic disadvantage, remoteness and Indigenous status on hospital usage for Western Australian preterm infants under 12 months of age: a population-based data linkage study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobel, Natalie A; Peter, Sue; McAuley, Kimberley E; McAullay, Daniel R; Marriott, Rhonda; Edmond, Karen M

    2017-01-18

    Our primary objective was to determine the incidence of hospital admission and emergency department presentation in Indigenous and non-Indigenous preterm infants aged postdischarge from birth admission to 11 months in Western Australia. Secondary objectives were to assess incidence in the poorest infants from remote areas and to determine the primary causes of hospital usage in preterm infants. Prospective population-based linked data set. All preterm babies born in Western Australia during 2010 and 2011. All-cause hospitalisations and emergency department presentations. There were 6.9% (4211/61 254) preterm infants, 13.1% (433/3311) Indigenous preterm infants and 6.5% (3778/57 943) non-Indigenous preterm infants born in Western Australia. Indigenous preterm infants had a higher incidence of hospital admission (adjusted incident rate ratio (aIRR) 1.24, 95% CI 1.08 to 1.42) and emergency department presentation (aIRR 1.71, 95% CI 1.44 to 2.02) compared with non-Indigenous preterm infants. The most disadvantaged preterm infants (7.8/1000 person days) had a greater incidence of emergency presentation compared with the most advantaged infants (3.1/1000 person days) (aIRR 1.61, 95% CI 1.30 to 2.00). The most remote preterm infants (7.8/1000 person days) had a greater incidence of emergency presentation compared with the least remote preterm infants (3.0/1000 person days; aIRR 1.82, 95% CI 1.49 to 2.22). In Western Australia, preterm infants have high hospital usage in their first year of life. Infants living in disadvantaged areas, remote area infants and Indigenous infants are at increased risk. Our data highlight the need for improved postdischarge care for preterm infants. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  4. The Family Courts and parentage of children conceived through overseas commercial surrogacy arrangements: A child-centred approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sifris, Adiva

    2015-12-01

    This article adopts a child-centred approach to the vexed issue of commercial surrogacy. These arrangements are prohibited throughout Australia. Nevertheless, Australians are travelling overseas and entering into commercial surrogacy arrangements. This article addresses the dilemma confronting the Family Courts when the commissioning parents and the child return to Australia. Should the Family Courts make parenting orders enabling the commissioning parents to raise the child? Alternatively, should they make parentage orders legally recognising the commissioning parents as the child's parents? After exploring the existing legislative structure and its application, the interest theory of children's rights is utilised to justify changes to the law so that the commissioning parents are regarded as the child's legal parents.

  5. The use of mental health court appearances in supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redlich, Allison D; Steadman, Henry J; Callahan, Lisa; Robbins, Pamela Clark; Vessilinov, Roumen; Ozdoğru, Asil Ali

    2010-01-01

    A defining feature of mental health courts (MHCs) is the requirement that enrollees appear periodically for status review hearings before the MHC judge. Although the research base on these specialty courts is growing, MHC appearances have yet to be examined. In the present study, the authors followed more than 400 MHC clients from four courts. We examined the number of court appearances that were mandated versus attended, the number of bench warrants issued, and the proportion of court appearances that were made in-custody versus out-of-custody. Finally, we describe and report on the proportion of clients at each court who had graduated, had been terminated, or who were still in the court one year following enrollment. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Barriers to addressing substance abuse in domestic violence court.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riger, Stephanie; Bennett, Larry W; Sigurvinsdottir, Rannveig

    2014-03-01

    Substance abuse commonly co-occurs with intimate partner violence among both perpetrators and survivors. Specialized courts that focus on intimate partner violence provide a unique opportunity to address both problems simultaneously, but research has yet to identify whether this happens. In this qualitative study of a domestic violence court in a large midwestern metropolitan area, key informants were interviewed to understand how the Court treats substance abuse. Results indicate that substance abuse typically is not identified among perpetrators or survivors going through the Court unless it is mentioned in a police report. Barriers to such identification are the organization of the Court, bounded definition of actors' roles in the Court, limited resources, and negative attitudes towards survivors. These results suggest that specialized courts that attend to only one problem may overlook the possibility of addressing issues that commonly co-occur.

  7. Internal and External Dialogue: A Method for Quality Court Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Hagsgård

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of quality court work is to maintain or improve public trust in the court as a vital part of a democratic society. Public confidence in the judicial system is affected by a number of factors, including speedy and judicially correct decisions which are generally understandable and a good treatment of parties and witnesses before and during court proceedings. In order to uphold and enhance public trust, courts need to work systematically to improve the quality of court functioning. But questions remain regarding how to institute quality court management, and how to achieve positive results. Although court managers in Sweden have shown an interest in starting systematic quality work, they have found it difficult to find a method for such work and systematically achieving results.

  8. Environmental change: Federal courts and the EPA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Leary, R.

    1993-01-01

    This book presents the findings of a four-year study of the impact of federal court decisions on the policies and administration of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in all seven of its major statutory areas: clean air, clean water, hazardous waste cleanup, controlled pesticide use, resource conservation and recovery, safe drinking water, and control of toxic substances. The author use the Lexis and Westlaw legal data bases to generate a list of all cases in which the EPA was either a plaintiff or a defendant in each of the agency's seven major statutory areas. The author verified these data and at times supplemented them with EPA records and with environmental reporters published by the Bureau of National Affairs and the Environmental Law Institute. She derived settlement agreements from the EPA, the Department of Justice, and the courts.

  9. The current approach of the courts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skene, Loane

    2014-01-01

    The approach of the courts when considering proprietary ('ownership') interests in human bodily material has been pragmatic and piecemeal. The general principle was initially that such material is not legally 'property' that can be 'owned', but courts have recognised many exceptions. In determining disputes between individuals in particular cases, they have stated principles that are often inconsistent with those stated in other cases with different facts. Later judges have been constrained by these decisions, especially when made at appellate level. They can distinguish the facts of one case from another to achieve a different outcome, but they cannot state new principles to be applied more widely to promote consistency. This requires the will of Parliament and legislation to introduce new principles. Experience to date suggests that such legislation will need to be wide-ranging and complex, with different principles for different circumstances. There will not be one area of law that answers all the issues that arise.

  10. Courts, Scheduled Damages, and Medical Malpractice Insurance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertoli, Paola; Grembi, Veronica

    We assess the impact of the introduction of schedules of non-economic damages (i.e. tiered caps systems) on the behavior of insurers operating in the medical liability market for hospitals while controlling the performance of the judicial system, measured as court backlog. Using a difference......-in-differences strategy on Italian data, we find that the introduction of schedules increases the presence of insurers (i.e. medical liability market attractiveness) only in inefficient judicial districts. In the same way, court inefficiency is attractive to insurers for average values of schedules penetration...... of the market, with an increasing positive impact of inefficiency as the territorial coverage of schedules increases. Finally, no significant impact is registered on paid premiums. Our analysis sheds light on a complex set of elements affecting the decisions of insurers in malpractice markets. The analysis...

  11. Battered woman syndrome defense in Canadian courts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regehr, C; Glancy, G

    1995-04-01

    As a result of a 1990 Supreme Court of Canada decision, battered woman syndrome defense is now accepted as a legitimate extension of self-defense in Canadian courts. This defense hinges on the expert testimony that a battered woman who is accused of murder or aggravated assault suffers from the psychological sequelae of abuse and that this psychological distress contributes to her apprehension of danger and ultimately her apprehension of death during a particular battering episode. The authors present a brief overview of the history of battered woman syndrome defense, the role of the expert in assessing the applicability of this defense in any particular situation, and the pitfalls of using battered woman syndrome defense.

  12. Trial by Jury in Russian Military Courts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolai P. Kovalev

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available One of peculiar features of the military criminal justice system in Russia is that in some cases military defendants may apply for trial by jury. Unlike the existing U.S. court-martial jury and the Russian military jury of the early 1900s (World War I period which were comprised of the members of the armed forces, in modern Russia jurors trying military defendants are civilians. This article aims to provide a brief history of military jury in Russia and identify issues of independence and impartiality in Russian military courts with participation of lay decision-makers. In particular, the article will analyze two high-profile cases which resulted in acquittals of Russian officers accused of killing several Chechen civilians during counter-terrorist operations in Chechnya.

  13. [Therapeutic approaches in court-ordered therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floris, Emmanuelle; De Jésus, Arnaud; Cano, Jean-Philippe; Raymondaud, Séverine; Rouveyrol, Éric; Bouchard, Jean-Pierre

    As is the case with other contexts of mental health treatments, the therapeutic approaches to court-ordered therapy are varied. They are based on the principle of their clinical indication and must be delivered by therapists trained in the specific area. The classic therapeutic approaches are used: medication, psychoanalysis and psychoanalytically inspired therapies, cognitive behavioural therapies, group therapies and body-oriented approach. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  14. Procedural Justice in Dutch Administrative Court Proceedings

    OpenAIRE

    André Verburg; Ben Schueler

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we discuss recent developments in administrative court proceedings in the Netherlands, called the New Approach. Along with developments leading to the New Approach, it became clear that the insights from research on procedural justice deserve particular attention. The goals of the judge's actions in this respect are both that the proceedings are fair and just and that parties perceive the way they are being treated during proceedings as fair and just.Within the New Approach we d...

  15. The Drone Court And Due Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Jackson’s language might imply. Proponents of drone strikes overseas in the course of the war in Afghanistan, echoing the Supreme Court’s opinion in...freestanding summaries of court opinions [is] likely to promote [ public ] confusion and misunderstanding.”122 Overall, while FISC’s proceedings are...occurring and plays no role in them.161 While the hearing will not be open to the public , the rulings will be publicly available if the information is

  16. Perceived deterrence and outcomes in drug court.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlowe, Douglas B; Festinger, David S; Foltz, Carol; Lee, Patricia A; Patapis, Nicholas S

    2005-01-01

    According to perceived-deterrence theory, the likelihood that an offender will engage in drug use or illegal activity is influenced by the perceived certainty of being detected for infractions or recognized for accomplishments, the perceived certainty of receiving sanctions for infractions or rewards for accomplishments, and the anticipated magnitude of the sanctions and rewards. This study evaluated drug court participants' perceived deterrence at monthly intervals during their enrollment in drug court. Exploratory cluster analysis (N=255) on the longitudinal scores yielded five subtypes of drug offenders characterized either by consistently elevated perceived-deterrence scores, consistently moderate scores, consistently low scores, increasing scores, or decreasing scores. The best outcomes were associated with consistently elevated scores, whereas the worst outcomes were associated with scores that declined over time as the participants became accustomed to the program. The clusters also differed in predicted directions on demographic variables. The correlational design does not permit inferences of causality; however, the results lend credence to perceived deterrence as a potential explanatory mechanism for the effects of drug courts. Copyright (c) 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Procedural Justice in Dutch Administrative Court Proceedings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Verburg

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we discuss recent developments in administrative court proceedings in the Netherlands, called the New Approach. Along with developments leading to the New Approach, it became clear that the insights from research on procedural justice deserve particular attention. The goals of the judge's actions in this respect are both that the proceedings are fair and just and that parties perceive the way they are being treated during proceedings as fair and just.Within the New Approach we discern five procedural justice elements: (1 respect, (2 voice and due consideration, (3 some influence on how proceedings will continue, (4 an explanation of how the proceedings will continue and (5 direct interpersonal contact.The introduction of the New Approach shows two important bottlenecks in Dutch administrative court proceedings, which are (i the possible or supposed collision between legally right outcomes and  procedural justice and (ii the lack of uniformity and predictability.Although what we describe and discuss in this paper focuses on the Dutch situation, many of these considerations apply to administrative court proceedings in other countries. The themes and difficulties that face the administrative law judge seem to be common to many countries.

  18. Court Supervised Institutional Transformation in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deon Erasmus

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The traditional adversarial model of litigation in South Africa operates on the basis that two or more parties approach the court, each with its own desired outcome. The court is then obliged to decide in favour of one of the parties. A different model of litigation is emerging in South African law. This model involves actions against public institutions that are failing to comply with their constitutional mandate. In this type of litigation there is seldom a dispute regarding the eventual outcome that is desired. Both the applicant and the state, in its capacity of the respondent, have a broad consensus about the manner in which the institution should operate or be transformed. There is accordingly agreement regarding the eventual outcome and the shortcomings that should be addressed. The primary issue relates to the details of the implementation of the transformation of the institution in question, in order that the constitutional mandate of the institution in question will be met. An example of this form of litigation can be seen in litigation concerning the conditions in which prisoners are detained in South African prisons. The constitutional mandate for the imprisonment of offenders is contained in the Correctional Services Act. Ongoing human rights violations often take place in prisons. These include staff shortages, shortages of medical staff and facilities, prison overcrowding, inadequate staff development, the prevalence of HIV/AIDS, infrastructure defects and maintenance problems, gangsterism, requests for prisoner transfers and problems associated therewith, the ineffectiveness of parole boards, staff development needs that are not addressed, an excessive focus on security, lack of rehabilitation and vocational training programmes and assaults of prisoners. The courts have on occasion issued a structured interdict as an appropriate remedy. However, problems arise when violations are widespread and no single order can cause the

  19. Australian Courseware in Geographical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidstone, John G.; Gerber, Rod

    Students pursuing Australian studies should be given every possible opportunity to work with materials produced in Australia. There is a substantial and growing list of good curriculum software written within Australia and from an Australian perspective which can add interest and excitement to Australian geography classrooms. Computers can be used…

  20. Australian Aboriginal Astronomy: Overview

    CERN Document Server

    Norris, Ray P

    2013-01-01

    The traditional cultures of Aboriginal Australians include a significant astronomical component, perpetuated through oral tradition, ceremony, and art. This astronomical component includes a deep understanding of the motion of objects in the sky, and this knowledge was used for practical purposes, such as constructing calendars. There is also evidence that traditional Aboriginal Australians made careful records and measurements of cyclical phenomena, paid careful attention to unexpected phenomena such as eclipses and meteorite impacts, and could determine the cardinal points to an accuracy of a few degrees.

  1. EUROPEAN COURT OF HUMAN RIGHTS JUDGEMENT AS A BASIS FOR REVIEW OF THE NATIONAL COURTS' JUDGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Terekhova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available УДК 347.9The purpose of the article – a critical analysis of the position of the Constitutional Court of the Russian Federation, the justification, through the analysis of the ECtHR practice and scientific work on execution of the ECtHR judgments, about the coordination of positions of national courts and the supranational body.The methodological basis for the study: general scientific methods (analysis, synthesis, comparison; private and academic (interpretation, comparative legal, formal-legal.Problems and basic scientific results:The issue of implementation of the Human Rights Court decisions at the national level oc-curs when the compensation is not enough to eliminate the revealed violations. Russian legislator opted for the situation of Human Rights by the European Court finding a violation of the provisions of the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms in the consideration by the court of a particular case, in connection with the decision by which the applicant applied to the ECtHR mechanism for review of the decision on the new circumstances. Supreme Court puts forward three conditions for the implementation of the revi-sion of the judicial act on a national level, which should be available at the same time: 1 the continuous nature of the adverse effects; 2 the existence of violations of the Convention or gross procedural violations; 3 a causal link between the breach and the consequences.The author point out that the regulation of possible conflicts between the Convention and national legislation is based on cooperation (not confrontation States and the European Court of Human Rights. Such practice of cooperation based on the principles of subsidiarity (addition to national rights protection system; evolutionary interpretation of the Convention (which implies flexibility, and accounting for changes in public relations; Judges dialogue and to develop advisory opinions. Consequently, the task of the Constitutional Court

  2. Western Sufism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sedgwick, Mark

    Western Sufism is sometimes dismissed as a relatively recent "new age" phenomenon, but in this book, Mark Sedgwick argues that it actually has very deep roots, both in the Muslim world and in the West. In fact, although the first significant Western Sufi organization was not established until 1915...... to the internet, Mark Sedgwick demonstrates that the phenomenon of Western Sufism not only draws on centuries of intercultural transfers, but is also part of a long-established relationship between Western thought and Islam that can be productive, not confrontational....

  3. Performance Assessment in Courts - The Swiss Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Lienhard

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Performance assessments have become commonplace in management, even in the public sector. With the increasing pressure on courts to perform while making efficient use of resources, performance assessments in the justice system are also gaining in importance. However, the need for judicial independence poses special challenges for performance assessments in courts. Against this background, this article conducts a constitutional appraisal, and contrasts the need for judicial independence with the principles governing effectiveness and efficiency, self-government and supervision, and appointment and re-appointment. A duty to guarantee justice can be derived from this that does not in principle exclude the performance assessment of judges, but even renders it essential, subject to compliance with certain requirements. In these circumstances, it seems hardly surprising that numerous countries conduct performance assessments of judges and also that various international institutions have developed principles for this purpose, a summary of which is presented – in Switzerland’s case based on a recently conducted survey. In the field of conflict between the guaranteeing justice and protecting the judiciary, the following key questions arise in particular: What is the purpose of performance assessments and what are the consequences?What is subjected to a performance assessment and what are the assessment criteria?How is performance recorded as the basis for the performance assessment?Who is subjected to a performance assessment, and must a distinction be made between judges in higher and lower courts?Who carries out the performance assessment and what methods of protecting one’s rights are available?Who should receive the results of the performance assessment?The contribution sketches out possible answers to these key questions and aims to encourage academics and practitioners to give further consideration to this subject.

  4. First experience of programming a court decision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey B. Polyakov

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective Consideration of the computer program model for making a lawful and wellgrounded judicial act in order to reduce the times for making the court decision. Methods universal dialecticmaterialistic method which removes the contradictions of the professional training of judges and procedural controls the formal legal method for transferring the requirements of the law and jurisprudence for the lawenforcement activity into programs for judges and case participants the objectoriented modeling objectoriented programming methodology. Results a computer program was created that allows to adjudicate in a civil case if the claim is recognized by the defendant. The program does not resolve the judge from the decisionmaking process but creates conditions to move along the stages of lawenforcement procedure and legal reasoning in accordance with the requirements of the law and of legal science. Therefore filling forms manually in the trial should be simultaneous with writing the decision judgment sentence assessment. The program includes the following sections preparation of forms common to certain types of proceedings certain categories of cases courts in the above forms determination of the order to establish the actual circumstances the burden of proof distribution types of evidence methods of law interpretation characteristics of collisions and gaps in legislation and ways to overcome them the standard wording in the judicial act templates and in the forms mandatory and optional information in the form. Based on the above the article concludes that by analogy with the presented program it is possible to create software for making a lawful wellgrounded and fair judicial act for other categories of cases and as a consequence to reduce the period of making judicial decisions. Scientific novelty the first computer program is created for rendering and production of judicial decisions. Practical significance the model is made to create a mass tool of

  5. THE RIGHT TO AN INDEPENDENT COURT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALIN-GHEORGHE GAVRILESCU

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The independence of the court is essential of state of rule, to maintain the stability in juridical intercourse, for the existence of a constitutional democracy achieved through a warranty of the necessary objectivity for the steady and legal settlement of the causes deducted to the trial and the achievement of a fair trial. The article emphasizes the main international juridical tools in which independence of justice is reflected, achieving an examination of judicial practice of European instance as well as an analysis of this principle as it is regulated by Romanian justice.

  6. Australian Curriculum Linked Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurrell, Derek

    2014-01-01

    In providing a continued focus on tasks and activities that help to illustrate key ideas embedded in the new Australian Curriculum, this issue will focus on Number in the Number and Algebra strand. In this article Derek Hurrell provides a few tried and proven activities to develop place value understanding. These activities are provided for…

  7. Australian Curriculum Linked Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurrell, Derek; O'Neil, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    In providing a continued focus on tasks and activities that help to illustrate key ideas embedded in the new Australian Curriculum, this issue the authors focus, on Geometry in the Measurement and Geometry strand with strong links for an integrated focus on the Statistics and Probability strand. The small unit of work on the sorting and…

  8. Australian coal conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-06-01

    Almost 600 people attended this year's Australian Coal Conference on Queensland's Gold Coast. The article reports on issues raised at the conference which included the effects of globalisation and the difficulties of raising funds faced by the coal industry and environmental issues. A life cycle analysis of coal's emissions compared to other fuels, released at the conference had demonstrated that coal was a legitimate part of the world's future energy mix. Conference speakers included Michael Pinnock, Queensland Mining Council Chief Executive Officer, Dr Louis Wibberley and Rich Gazzard of BHP, Robin Batterham, the Australian Governments Chief Scientist, Mark Vale, Federal Minister for Trade, Tony Armor of EPRI, Daren Fooks, Clayton Utz Lawyers, Ron Knapp, Chief Executive of the World Coal Institute and Andrew Tucker, Australian Competition and Consumer Commission. Highlights of their addresses are given. Winners of the five research awards presented by the Australian Coal Association at the conference are reported. 11 photos.

  9. Australian Hackers and Ethics

    OpenAIRE

    Warren, M. J.; Hutchinson, W.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to look at the way hackers act and ways in which society can protect itself. The paper will show the current views and attitudes of hackers in an Australian context. The paper will also include a case study to show how a hacking incident can develop and how technology can be used to protect against hacking.

  10. Cryptocotyly in Australian Dicotyledones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clifford, H.T.

    1984-01-01

    Seedlings exhibit a great diversity in morphology as is well documented (Lubbock, 1892; De Vogel, 1980). As part of an ongoing study on the taxonomic importance of seedling characters and their possible phylogenetic significance the seedlings of about 320 endemic Australian genera of Dicotyledons

  11. Court allows marijuana clubs to raise medical necessity defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-10-01

    A ruling by the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals will allow California's medical marijuana clubs to defend themselves against an injunction against operating. The court ruled that U.S. District Judge Charles R. Breyer erred by failing to consider that marijuana was an indispensable part of treatment for the club's clients. The ruling has applicability in cases in Alaska, Arizona, Nevada, Oregon and Washington, which are all within the jurisdiction of the 9th Circuit Court.

  12. Introduction. National Courts vis-à-vis EU Law

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    National Courts and EU Law examines both how and why national courts and judges are involved in the process of legal integration within the European Union. As well as reviewing conventional thinking, the book presents new legal and empirical insights into the issue of judicial behaviour...... in this process. The expert contributors provide a critical analysis of the key questions, examining the role of national courts in relation to the application of various EU legal instruments....

  13. Sources of International Courts' Legitimacy: A comparative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godzimirska, Zuzanna; Creamer, Cosette

    Despite ample scholarship on the legitimacy of international legal institutions, existing studies on international courts (ICs) tend to adopt normative or deductive approaches to specify their legitimacy and assess its effects. Very few adopt empirical or inductive approaches and examine...... of members on the operation of three ICs with different institutional designs and roles: the International Court of Justice, the International Criminal Court, and the Appellate Body of the World Trade Organization. We employ supervised learning methods of text classification to identify statements...

  14. Do Specialty Courts Achieve Better Outcomes for Children in Foster Care than General Courts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, Frank A.; Gifford, Elizabeth J.; Eldred, Lindsey M.; Acquah, Kofi F.; Blevins, Claire E.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study assessed the effects of unified family and drug treatment courts (DTCs) on the resolution of cases involving foster care children and the resulting effects on school performance. Method: The first analytic step was to assess the impacts of presence of unified and DTCs in North Carolina counties on time children spent in…

  15. Do specialty courts achieve better outcomes for children in foster care than general courts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, Frank A; Gifford, Elizabeth J; Eldred, Lindsey M; Acquah, Kofi F; Blevins, Claire E

    2013-02-01

    This study assessed the effects of unified family and drug treatment courts (DTCs) on the resolution of cases involving foster care children and the resulting effects on school performance. The first analytic step was to assess the impacts of presence of unified and DTCs in North Carolina counties on time children spent in foster care and the type of placement at exit from foster care. In the second step, the same data on foster care placements were merged with school records for youth in Grades 3-8 in public schools. The effect of children's time in foster care and placement outcomes on school performance as measured by math and reading tests, grade retention, and attendance was assessed using child fixed-effects regression. Children in counties with unified family courts experienced shorter foster care spells and higher rates of reunification with parents or primary caregivers. Shorter foster care spells translated into improved school performance measured by end-of-grade reading and math test scores. Adult DTCs were associated with lower probability of reunification with parents/primary caregivers. The shortened time in foster care implies an efficiency gain attributable to unified family courts, which translate into savings for the court system through the use of fewer resources. Children also benefit through shortened stays in temporary placements, which are related to some improved educational outcomes.

  16. Court Interpreting in Denmark - the role of court interpreters in Danish courtrooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Bente

    1999-01-01

    Court interpreters in Denmark are expected to follow the guidelines laid down in the document Instructions for Interpreters, which was published in 1994, and which deals with four principal areas: accuracy and completeness, impartiality, confidentiality and conflict of interest. This paper conten...

  17. The adoption of innovations in Brazilian labour courts from the perspective of judges and court managers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos de Moraes Sousa

    Full Text Available Abstract There is a lack of studies upon the innovation process in the judiciary. To contribute to filling this gap, this study aims to describe the perceptions of the Brazilian labour courts’ judges and managers related to resources and capabilities associated with the development and adoption of innovation, represented by the electronic lawsuit, and the impact on Court's performance and factors that facilitate or hinder the adoption of innovations. A document analysis and 35 interviews were conducted – nine with judges and 26 with court managers – and the data were analyzed using a content analysis with a priori categorization. The results show the following: (i the process of development and adoption of innovation occurs in three ways – centralized in higher bodies, through partnerships with other courts or through internal development; (ii there are important resources and capabilities internal to courts and inter-organizational routines associated with the innovation process; and (iii innovation contributes to the development and integration of other innovations and changes in working routines. Additionally, barriers to and facilitators of the innovation adoption process are discussed and a research agenda is stated.

  18. Abused Mothers' Safety Concerns and Court Mediators' Custody Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Echo A; Zeoli, April M; Sullivan, Cris M

    2012-05-01

    This study adds to research on family court's response to custody in the context of intimate partner abuse (IPA). Mediation is often used to assist family court with custody negotiation; however, debate exists in the field regarding its use when IPA exists. The following study examines experiences with court mediation among a sample of victimized mothers who divorced abusive husbands. Mixed-method data were collected from 19 women. Findings demonstrate that abuse is rarely considered in custody recommendations, as most court mediators prefer joint custody. Implications for the ongoing debate, as well as future directions for research, are discussed.

  19. The courts and health policy: strengths and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, G F

    1992-01-01

    In recent years the nation's courts have expanded their influence in health policy in four areas: reviewing insurers' coverage decisions, deciding the adequacy of Medicaid payment rates to hospitals and nursing homes, arbitrating hospital mergers, and assessing hospitals' tax-exempt status. The major problem with developing health policy through the courts is that the courts' focus will be the concerns of the individuals or groups involved in specific cases, not the broader implications and overall objectives of the health care system. As alternatives to litigation to resolve policy conflicts, scholars have suggested negotiation, binding arbitration, clarification of legislative language, administrative courts, contract revision, and general restructuring of the decision-making process.

  20. [Outpatient commitment under court order in psychiatry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Arie; Rosca, Paola; Shai, Ozi; Charnas, Jacob; Lehman, Dina; Mester, Roberto; Khawaled, Razek

    2007-08-01

    Outpatient commitment under court order is a controversial issue among mental health professionals in different countries. This kind of outpatient involuntary treatment is provided for mental patients suspected to have committed a crime endangering society while in a severe psychotic state. Despite their dangerousness, the Israeli Mental Health Law of 1991 provides outpatient commitment under court order as an alternative to inpatient commitment. This legal provision raises several concerns and important ethical questions. A major dilemma is the question of whether this legal tool is efficacious in stabilizing the mental condition of criminal mental patients in order to prevent the perpetuation of violent crimes in an open setting such as outpatient clinics. Other major concerns are: (a) who bears the responsibility for the implementation of the enforcement? (b) how the enforcement might be implemented? This paper discusses this complex issue and presents some possible solutions aimed at improving the practical use of this important component of the comprehensive modern system of care for mental patients.

  1. Istrict office and first instance court complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuzović Duško

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In Uzice since year 1923. to 1927. was built the facility of District Office and First Instance Court. The project was developed by Krusevac Building Directorate in spirit of historical architecture styles. Property consists an entrance risalit and two side wings cut in axis with lateral risalits. Facility has ground floor and first floor. The main entrance is through central risalit from where is the access to corridors that are on garden side of side wings. From corridors approach continues to offices oriented to the main facade and the street. In courtyard is an annex with court room with entrance from the central hall. Walls are made of brick, mezzanine construction is wooden or metal, and roof structure is of wood. The roof is gabled except above risalit where it is hipped, covered with ceramic tiles. Ground-floor windows have arched beams and first-floor have flat. Ground-floor doors are located in risalit axle and have arched lintel. Facade is composed at high socle, ground floor is treated with deep horizontal fugues, floor is flat plastered. Decoration is limited to risalits and around window areas where are shallow niches with simple decoration of series of medallions and ribbons. Facility contains several cornices arranged by height of the facade. During years 1956. and 1957. building was upgraded and main facade modified.

  2. Historical context of the Albanian Constitutional Court

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravesa Nano

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The Albanian legal tradition is based mostly on the traditional and customary laws. The Ottoman Empire ruled Albania for nearly five centuries and applied some of its translation of Sharia law together with its own rules and procedures. However, the Albanian population, especially in the north was governed by its own customary laws that were included in the Kanun of Lek Dukagjini. For a long period of time, these customary laws were unwritten and were learned generation aft er generation. The Kanun of Lek Dukagjini had very few rules and procedures regarding penal law. They were not arranged properly and there were some repetition for different cases. The National Court was implemented by a popular gathering of the oldest man of the village called Pleqnia. It used to decide on issues immediately, and there was no review of their issues. The rules were clear, simple and strict. There are some ideas from different Albanian researchers that the communist system although exported as an idea from abroad, based its laws and rules very much on the Albanian tradition as for example the creation also People’s Court. There was no institution of judicial review. These researchers point out that it was for this reason that the communist system in Albania lasted for nearly fifty years.

  3. Dementia risk factors for Australian baby boomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panegyres, Peter K; Gray, Victoria

    2010-06-21

    Baby boomers are individuals born in the years 1946 to 1965. The objective of this paper was to define the risk factors for dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD) and their relevance to Australian baby boomers, with the aim of providing evidence-based guidelines for dementia prevention. A series of PubMed searches (1994-2010) were conducted with relevant key words. Data was included from the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) in relation to baby boomers in Australia. Article titles and abstracts were assessed by two reviewers for inclusion. Searches through ABS revealed no specific study on baby boomers at a national level; information was only available for Western Australia, South Australia and Queensland. A number of genetic and non-genetic risk factors for dementia were identified most of which remain controversial and require further study. We did not identify significant differences in the prevalence and incidence of dementia in those under 65 years in Queensland, South Australia and Western Australia. There were no correlations of risk factors and dementia between the Australian states. Modification of risk factors has not been proven to reduce the incidence and prevalence of dementia and AD in baby boomers. Nevertheless, on available evidence, we recommend: i) active management of cardiovascular risk factors such as hypertension; ii) the encouragement of a healthy lifestyle (eg, weight reduction, exercise) as offering the best pathways to reduce the emerging dementia risk for baby boomers. The implications are that activities promoting a healthy heart might lead to a healthy brain and help to prevent dementia.

  4. Dementia risk factors for Australian baby boomers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter K. Panegyres

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Baby boomers are individuals born in the years 1946 to 1965. The objective of this paper was to define the risk factors for dementia and Alzheimer’s disease (AD and their relevance to Australian baby boomers, with the aim of providing evidence-based guidelines for dementia prevention. A series of PubMed searches (1994-2010 were conducted with relevant key words. Data was included from the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS in relation to baby boomers in Australia. Article titles and abstracts were assessed by two reviewers for inclusion. Searches through ABS revealed no specific study on baby boomers at a national level; information was only available for Western Australia, South Australia and Queensland. A number of genetic and non-genetic risk factors for dementia were identified most of which remain controversial and require further study. We did not identify significant differences in the prevalence and incidence of dementia in those under 65 years in Queensland, South Australia and Western Australia. There were no correlations of risk factors and dementia between the Australian states. Modification of risk factors has not been proven to reduce the incidence and prevalence of dementia and AD in baby boomers. Nevertheless, on available evidence, we recommend: i active management of cardiovascular risk factors such as hypertension; ii the encouragement of a healthy lifestyle (eg, weight reduction, exercise as offering the best pathways to reduce the emerging dementia risk for baby boomers. The implications are that activities promoting a healthy heart might lead to a healthy brain and help to prevent dementia.

  5. Money Matters: Cost-Effectiveness of Juvenile Drug Court with and without Evidence-Based Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheidow, Ashli J.; Jayawardhana, Jayani; Bradford, W. David; Henggeler, Scott W.; Shapiro, Steven B.

    2012-01-01

    The 12-month cost-effectiveness of juvenile drug court and evidence-based treatments within court were compared with traditional Family Court for 128 substance-abusing/dependent juvenile offenders participating in a 4-condition randomized trial. Intervention conditions included Family Court with community services (FC), Drug Court with community…

  6. An Aboriginal Australian genome reveals separate human dispersals into Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Morten; Guo, Xiaosen; Wang, Yong; Lohmueller, Kirk E; Rasmussen, Simon; Albrechtsen, Anders; Skotte, Line; Lindgreen, Stinus; Metspalu, Mait; Jombart, Thibaut; Kivisild, Toomas; Zhai, Weiwei; Eriksson, Anders; Manica, Andrea; Orlando, Ludovic; De La Vega, Francisco M; Tridico, Silvana; Metspalu, Ene; Nielsen, Kasper; Ávila-Arcos, María C; Moreno-Mayar, J Víctor; Muller, Craig; Dortch, Joe; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Lund, Ole; Wesolowska, Agata; Karmin, Monika; Weinert, Lucy A; Wang, Bo; Li, Jun; Tai, Shuaishuai; Xiao, Fei; Hanihara, Tsunehiko; van Driem, George; Jha, Aashish R; Ricaut, François-Xavier; de Knijff, Peter; Migliano, Andrea B; Gallego Romero, Irene; Kristiansen, Karsten; Lambert, David M; Brunak, Søren; Forster, Peter; Brinkmann, Bernd; Nehlich, Olaf; Bunce, Michael; Richards, Michael; Gupta, Ramneek; Bustamante, Carlos D; Krogh, Anders; Foley, Robert A; Lahr, Marta M; Balloux, Francois; Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas; Villems, Richard; Nielsen, Rasmus; Wang, Jun; Willerslev, Eske

    2011-10-07

    We present an Aboriginal Australian genomic sequence obtained from a 100-year-old lock of hair donated by an Aboriginal man from southern Western Australia in the early 20th century. We detect no evidence of European admixture and estimate contamination levels to be below 0.5%. We show that Aboriginal Australians are descendants of an early human dispersal into eastern Asia, possibly 62,000 to 75,000 years ago. This dispersal is separate from the one that gave rise to modern Asians 25,000 to 38,000 years ago. We also find evidence of gene flow between populations of the two dispersal waves prior to the divergence of Native Americans from modern Asian ancestors. Our findings support the hypothesis that present-day Aboriginal Australians descend from the earliest humans to occupy Australia, likely representing one of the oldest continuous populations outside Africa.

  7. The Relevance of Criminal Courts in the Global South

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Leandro Ciocchini

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The literature on comparative law has a long and robust tradition, but studies comparing courts and judicial systems are scarce. Comparative studies in the Global South, following Shapiro’s institutional approach, have aimed to measure the involvement of courts in politics by assessing the power of the judiciary in society, the level of judicial independence, and their role in the context of the judicialization of politics. The focus was on the high courts, including either Constitutional or Supreme Courts. Criminal courts have not received similar attention despite the influence of their everyday decisions on people’s lives and their perception of the judicial system. This article argues that developing a comparative approach for criminal courts in the Global South is needed to help understand the role they play in the development of the rule of law and democratic life. This comparative study helps understand the impact of judicial reform programmes in the Global South. These reforms, inspired by a neoliberal paradigm, have focused on improving the efficiency of the courts. The reforms have promoted managerial techniques detrimental to the standards of due process. Any assessment of the impact of the reforms on the courts in the Global South should start by recognising the widely differing settings under which they operate. This context is characterised by serious economic constraints, such as a lack of material and human resources, and a democratic deficit legacy from the past authoritarian regimes, including widespread police abuse and corruption. Given this context, the role of the courts in ensuring due process and the legality of police procedures is crucial. The impact of the judicial reforms promoting managerial rationality in recent decades must be analysed. To examine the role courts are playing in criminal matters, two cases were explored where courts have undergone extensive judicial reforms, Argentina and the Philippines.

  8. Pecked to death by (flying) ducks: court decision may extinguish smoking on aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, S

    1995-07-01

    A case this month in the Australian court may force Australia's national airline, Qantas, to make all its flights non-smoking now rather than next year and in the meantime offers hope of compensation to Australian passengers who are refused non-smoking seats. Mrs Leone Cameron brought a case against Qantas for seating her in the smoking section of a Sydney to Bangkok fight after she had booked a non-smoking seat. She subsequently suffered minor illnesses. She and nine other similarly affected passengers claimed that Qantas had misled them. The judged ruled that Qantas had misled passengers in five of the cases though he refused to rule that Qantas had misled those placed in non-smoking seats next to the smoking area. He also refused to order Qantas to make all its flights non-smoking. The ruling is important for enabling other passengers to seek compensation through consumer claims tribunals when refused a requested non-smoking seat. It also brings closer the day when smoking will be forbidden on all flights.

  9. Formulation of court interpreting models: A South African perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Joseph Lebese

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In South Africa there are no models of court interpreting to serve as a guide for court interpreters when performing their task. This is because there is no proper definition of the role of a court interpreter. Models of court interpreting define and describe the process by stating what court interpreters are actually doing when carrying out their task. The absence of these models presents challenges to South African court interpreters as they are expected to follow international models which are formulated culturally, using English metaphorical language which differs from that of indigenous South African languages. As a result, the metaphorical language is likely to be misinterpreted by South African court interpreters as English is not their first language. The application of international models is likely to cause challenges when applied in the South African context, hence the need to formulate models of court interpreting which can be applied to the South African linguistic context. The study follows a qualitative research approach and uses multifaceted theoretical frameworks, namely descriptive translation studies (DTS, cognitive process analysis, and content analysis in collecting and analysing the data.

  10. Assisted Reproduction and the Courts: The Case of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maule, Linda S.; Schmid, Karen

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors analyze appellate court cases heard in California between 1960 and 2000 that focus on the status of children conceived through reproductive technology in an effort to examine the role of the courts in defining parentage and family in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. In the absence of legislation, the primary…

  11. 78 FR 26425 - Sentencing Guidelines for United States Courts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-06

    ... has sufficient indicia of reliability to support its probable accuracy (see Sec. 6A1.3 (Resolution of.... Gordon, 291 F.3d 181, 187 (2d Cir. 2002) (applying Martinez-Rios, the court held that the district court... support its probable accuracy. Consistent with the principles set forth in Sec. 6A1.3 (Resolution of...

  12. K-12 Implications Seen in Some Cases before High Court

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Arizona's variation on government vouchers for religious schools and California's prohibition on the sale of violent video games to minors present the top two cases with implications for education in the U.S. Supreme Court term that formally begins Oct. 4. New Justice Elena Kagan brings to the court extensive education policy experience as a…

  13. Saskatchewan Court of Appeal: marriage commissioners cannot discriminate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Cynthia; Davies, Christine

    2011-04-01

    The Saskatchewan Court of Appeal has ruled that proposed legislation allowing marriage commissioners to refuse to solemnize same-sex marriages based on religious objections would violate the equality rights of gays and lesbians under the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms (Charter). The Court expressed its opinion in a Reference involving proposed amendments to the Marriage Act.

  14. The universal jurisdiction of South African criminal courts and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Under the "complementarity" regime of the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court (ICC), the jurisdiction of the ICC is secondary to the jurisdiction of domestic courts. States Parties, not the ICC, have the primary responsibility of investigating and prosecuting international crimes. The ICC acts only when States are ...

  15. Criminal adjudication by state courts under the FDRE constitution ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    With the introduction of federal arrangement with the FDRE Constitution, the issue of distribution of powers between the Federal Government and the states in general and that of criminal adjudicative jurisdiction between the Federal courts and state courts in particular has become a controversial point. This controversy has ...

  16. Establishing an effective dialog between courts and agencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Humphery-Jenner, Mark L.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis examines the relationship between courts, administrators, and legislators. The goal is to improve the operation of judicial review in the United States and provide suggestions on how to enhance emerging doctrines of judicial review in the EU. The thesis focuses on how courts, agencies,

  17. Matching Judicial Supervision to Clients' Risk Status in Drug Court

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlowe, Douglas B.; Festinger, David S.; Lee, Patricia A.; Dugosh, Karen L.; Benasutti, Kathleen M.

    2006-01-01

    This article reports outcomes from a program of experimental research evaluating the risk principle in drug courts. Prior studies revealed that participants who were high risk and had (a) antisocial personality disorder or (b) a prior history of drug abuse treatment performed better in drug court when scheduled to attend biweekly judicial status…

  18. Jurisdiction of the international Criminal Court: Analysis, loopholes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One of the most fundamental questions of law is whether a given court has jurisdiction to preside over a given case. Jurisdiction is a critical legal issue underpinning the prosecution of offenders of international crimes envisaged by the International Criminal Court(ICC). The ICC must establish proper jurisdiction to assert ...

  19. 22 CFR 19.6 - Court orders and divorce decrees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Court orders and divorce decrees. 19.6 Section 19.6 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE PERSONNEL BENEFITS FOR SPOUSES AND FORMER SPOUSES OF PARTICIPANTS IN THE FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY SYSTEM § 19.6 Court orders and divorce decrees. ...

  20. The Jurisdiction of the Regional Courts Amendment Act , 2008 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Jurisdiction of the Regional Courts Amendment Act , 2008: Some implications for child law and divorce jurisdiction. ... In conclusion, comments are made about the positive and less positive aspects of the JRCAA, and suggestions for reform are provided. Die inwerkingtreding van die Jurisdiction of Regional Courts ...

  1. HIV/STI Risk Behavior of Drug Court Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Angela A.; St. Lawrence, Janet S.; McCluskey, D. Lee

    2012-01-01

    Drug abusing offenders have high rates of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STI). To date, the HIV/STI prevention needs of offenders in drug court programs have been ignored. This multi-method study employed interviews to assess drug court professionals' perceptions of the need for an HIV risk reduction intervention to be integrated…

  2. Individual Factors Predicting Mental Health Court Diversion Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhaaff, Ashley; Scott, Hannah

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study examined which individual factors predict mental health court diversion outcome among a sample of persons with mental illness participating in a postcharge diversion program. Method: The study employed secondary analysis of existing program records for 419 persons with mental illness in a court diversion program. Results:…

  3. Introduction. National Courts vis-à-vis EU Law

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mayoral, Juan A.; Wind, Marlene

    2016-01-01

    National Courts and EU Law examines both how and why national courts and judges are involved in the process of legal integration within the European Union. As well as reviewing conventional thinking, the book presents new legal and empirical insights into the issue of judicial behaviour in this p...

  4. Brandeis Lawsuit Puts Campus Courts in the Dock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gose, Ben

    2000-01-01

    Analyzes the case of a Brandeis University student found guilty of "unwanted sexual activity" by a university judicial panel. The student sued Brandeis, and the Massachusets Appeals Court ruled against Brandeis despite the court's customary deference to the decision making of private institutions. Ten other colleges are supporting…

  5. Domestic courts as agents of development of international immunity rules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Alebeek, R.

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the role of domestic courts in the development of international immunity rules. It assesses how domestic immunity decisions take meaning in the process of law formation and law determination, and examines whether the distinct influence of domestic-court decisions (as compared to

  6. Finding Vredo: the Dutch Supreme Court decision on escitalopram

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsoutsanis, A.

    2014-01-01

    This article is about the pharma patent litigation sparked by Lundbeck's blockbuster drug for escitalopram. The article focuses on the trials and tribulations before the Dutch Patent Court of Appeal and the Supreme Court, while also briefly contrasting and comparing this with the decisions in

  7. Smells Like Teen Spirit: Evaluating a Midwestern Teen Court

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Michael; Twill, Sarah; Kim, Chigon

    2011-01-01

    Teen courts have grown rapidly in the United States despite little evidence of their effectiveness. A survival analysis of 635 teen court and 186 regular diversion participants showed no significant differences in recidivism, although program completers were half as likely to reoffend as noncompleters. Older offenders survived significantly better…

  8. Improving Labour Courts in Mexico: The Case of Cuautitlan | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Improving Labour Courts in Mexico: The Case of Cuautitlan. Outdated and inefficient labour laws and courts make it difficult for workers in Mexico to resolve labour disputes and secure compensation. Although Mexico has rebounded from its 2009 ... Journal articles. Delay and corruption : a simple model with empirical tests ...

  9. The Sociocultural Significance of Court Institutions in Colonial Virginia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel V. Vostrikov

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article the author examines the sociocultural significance of courts in colonial Virginia. Virginia was agrarian “tobacco” colony, where the settlements of urban type did not get proper development. In this connection, court days were very important occasions for social gatherings, when colonists not only might participate in court hearings, but became involved in various social interactions such as news exchange, business transactions, cockfighting, horse racing and attending taverns. If not found in rare towns court buildings weresituated at road junctions and other convenient places to be more easily accessible for inhabitants of the colony. The author also provides a glimpse into the issues of law and order, crime and punishment as well as the general state of the colonial system of justice. During the colonial period the differences between judicial, executive and legislative branches of government were not distinct yet and the institution of the county court had immense importance as it combined all the three types of power on a local level. The court of oyer and terminer dealt with criminal offences. The General court in Williamsburg, the colonial capital, was the main court in Virginia which considered the most crucial cases. The colonial legal system was initially based on English traditions and precedents but it was constantly modified largely due to the singularities of the colony such as abundance of free land and chattel slavery.

  10. Perceived Masculinity Predicts U.S. Supreme Court Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies suggest a significant role of language in the court room, yet none has identified a definitive correlation between vocal characteristics and court outcomes. This paper demonstrates that voice-based snap judgments based solely on the introductory sentence of lawyers arguing in front of the Supreme Court of the United States predict outcomes in the Court. In this study, participants rated the opening statement of male advocates arguing before the Supreme Court between 1998 and 2012 in terms of masculinity, attractiveness, confidence, intelligence, trustworthiness, and aggressiveness. We found significant correlation between vocal characteristics and court outcomes and the correlation is specific to perceived masculinity even when judgment of masculinity is based only on less than three seconds of exposure to a lawyer’s speech sample. Specifically, male advocates are more likely to win when they are perceived as less masculine. No other personality dimension predicts court outcomes. While this study does not aim to establish any causal connections, our findings suggest that vocal characteristics may be relevant in even as solemn a setting as the Supreme Court of the United States. PMID:27737008

  11. the admissibility of subregional courts' decisions before the african

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AbdiJA

    Focusing on the Economic Community of West African States Court of Justice, the East African Court of Justice, ... to their economic development.3 In the Algiers Declaration, African leaders identified a political ...... Commission on the Prevention of Discrimination and Protection of Minorities did not decide on the merit of the ...

  12. Australian Hackers and Ethics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.J. Warren

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to look at the way hackers act and ways in which society can protect itself. The paper will show the current views and attitudes of hackers in an Australian context. The paper will also include a case study to show how a hacking incident can develop and how technology can be used to protect against hacking.

  13. The Constitutional Court and the Imperative of its Reform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Gilia

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent debates on the upcoming review of the Constitution have determined us to pay close attention to the basic institution in a democratic state, that is the Constitutional Court. Being caught in the crossfire between power and opposition, the Constitutional Court had a hard time lately, facing severe attacks. The aim of our study is to analyze the evolution of the Constitutional Court within the inland constitutional system, particularly bringing up the flaws describing the Court’s activity. We have also analyzed the proposals put forth by several bodies or experts regarding the constitutional contentious court. At the end of our study, following an analysis of different constitutional types of constitutional review, used by a number of states in Europe, we introduced several resolutions that may improve the role, the course and, last but not least, the activity of the Romanian Constitutional Court.

  14. 77 FR 71687 - Federal Employees' Group Life Insurance Program: Court Orders Prior to July 22, 1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-04

    ... decree of divorce, annulment, or legal separation, or any court- approved property settlement agreement incident to any court decree of divorce, annulment, or legal separation (hereinafter ``court order'') where...

  15. Investigating deviations from norms in court interpreting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dubslaff, Friedel; Martinsen, Bodil

    , in some cases, all - professional users involved (judges, lawyers, prosecutors). As far as the non-Danish speaking users are concerned, it has, with one notable exception, unfortunately not been possible to obtain data from this group via questionnaires. As this type of data, however, is important...... deviations and sanctions in every case. By way of example: Several judges, who had given their consent to recordings of authentic data in connection with the research project, reported that they had experienced problems with insufficient language proficiency on the part of untrained interpreters speaking...... speaking these languages. This example does not immediately indicate that Translation Studies might be able to contribute to, for example, an improvement of the training situation for the group of court interpreters mentioned above. However, in our opinion, there is reason to believe that TS can make...

  16. From lab bench to court bench: using science to inform decisions in juvenile court.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederman, Cindy S

    2011-09-01

    Juvenile court judges are asked to determine what is in the best interest of the child in every case they hear. As Judge Cindy S. Lederman writes, making these decisions without an awareness of the science of child development can be detrimental to the mental and physical well-being of the child. Yet until about a decade ago, court decisions were routinely made without taking into consideration the needs of toddlers and infants. The Miami Child Well-Being Court™ (MCWBC) program, a partnership of clinicians and judges, has brought science into the courtroom, making it integral to the decision-making process and working to ensure that the needs of the child are met.

  17. The mating dance in cleanup recoveries: How to court responsible parties and in what court to do it

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, G.A. [Parker, Milliken, Clark, O`Hara and Samuelian, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    This article discusses the legalities which pertain specifically to hazardous waste cleanup. Topics of discussion include the following: threshold decisions: litigate or negotiate; forum issues--Federal or state court; claims in state court; and different types of damages and recovery. CERCLA is not the only grounds for recovery in environmental contamination cases. Common law and RCRA are also attractive.

  18. The mating dance in cleanup recoveries: How to court responsible parties and in what court to do it

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, G.A. [Parker, Milliken, Clark, O`Hara and Samuelian, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    CERCLA is not the only grounds for recovery in environmental contamination cases. Common law and RCRA claims are attractive, especially when petroleum contamination is at issue. Attention is focused on the following: threshold decisions (litigate or negotiate); forum issues (federal or state court); claims in state court; and different types of damages and recovery.

  19. The Hellenistic Royal Court. Court Culture, Ceremonial and Ideology in Greece, Egypt and the Near East, 336-30 BCE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strootman, R.

    2007-01-01

    In the Hellenistic empires of Alexander the Great and his successors in Greece, Egypt and the Near East, new forms of court culture and political ideology developed during the last three centuries BCE. Appropriated by Parthian kings and Roman emperors alike, the culture of these Macedonian courts

  20. The Supreme Court’s Role in Defining the Jurisdiction of Military Courts: A Study and Proposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    courts-martial. See United States v. Jacoby , 29 C.M.R. 244 (C.M.A. 1960) (holding that the Bill of Rights apply to Soldiers unless explicitly or...corpus has served as a means of reviewing the legality of executive detention.”); see also Roberto Iraola, Enemy Combatants, the Courts, and the

  1. Activist Infighting among Courts and Breakdown of Mutual Trust? The Danish Supreme Court, the CJEU, and the Ajos Case

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Ulla; Sørensen, Karsten Engsig

    2017-01-01

    In its combative Ajos judgment recently rendered by the Danish Supreme Court, the court openly and controversially challenged the authority of the CJEU. By the same token, in the preliminary ruling by the CJEU preceding it, the CJEU had continued to develop the controversial general principle...

  2. The Modernization of the Audit Courts of Brazil: PROMOEX deployment assessment in Audit Courts subnational

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diones Gomes da Rocha

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Mainly since the Brazilian Federal Constitution of 1988, the Brazilian Courts of Accounts (TC had expanded its expertise to carry out the control of management of public entities on different perspectives, such as operational, accounting, budgetary and financial. The differences between these institutions in terms of economic, technological and human resources were factors that made it difficult to adapt these institutions to the new acquired competences. The Promoex then emerged as a solution for modernization of Brazilian subnational Courts of Accounts. Such solution had funds of US $ 64.4 million dollars. The purpose of this research, therefore, is to assess the implementation of this program by 33 TCs. The evaluation was conducted from documents collected from web pages of MPOG, ATRICON, IRB and the Portal of Brazil Courts of Accounts. The Loan Agreement 1628-OC / BR, Object Compliance Report, Progress Reports of the 1st and 2nd semesters of 2013 (final report, and surveys conducted by the FIA and FGV also were scrutinized. The results indicate that the Promoex was less than expected; the modernization proposals were more focused on solving administrative problems, as well as by the low impact of Promoex over the actions developed by the TCs.

  3. Do Australian Fire Brigades Owe a Common Law Duty of Care? A Review of Three Recent Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Eburn

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The law regarding the fire service’s liability for alleged negligence in the way they plan for or respond to a fire is reasonably untested. This paper reports on three cases that were decided in 2012 by the Supreme Courts of New South Wales, Tasmania and the Australian Capital Territory. It is argued that the weight of authority is that the fire brigades are established to provide fire services for the common good, not for individual benefit, and the financial burden of unfortunate operational decisions should be borne by insurers or by the uninsured. Even so, two Supreme Courts have arrived at different conclusions with respect to the question of whether or not the NSW Rural Fire Service owes a common law duty of care to those at risk from bushfire. It is therefore argued that the issue of duty of care would benefit from a determination by the High Court of Australia.

  4. Occupational therapy in Australian acute hospitals: A modified practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Lauren; Rosenwax, Lorna; McNamara, Beverley

    2016-08-01

    Ongoing changes to health-care funding Australia wide continue to influence how occupational therapists practise in acute hospitals. This study describes the practice challenges experienced by Western Australian acute care occupational therapists. Then, it explores if and how acute care occupational therapists are modifying their practice in response to these practice changes. This study used a qualitative grounded theory approach. Semi-structured interviews were completed with 13 purposively selected acute care occupational therapists from four Western Australian metropolitan hospitals. Data were analysed using a constant comparative method to provide detailed descriptions of acute care occupational therapy practice and to generate theory. Five conceptual categories were developed. The first two addressed practice challenges: pragmatic organisational influences on client care and establishing a professional identity within the multidisciplinary team. Three categories related to therapist responses are as follows: becoming the client advocate, being the facilitator and applying clinical reasoning. Finally, modified practice was identified as the core category which explains the process whereby acute care occupational therapists are ensuring they remain relevant and authentic in the acute care context. Western Australian acute care occupational therapists are practising in a highly complex health context that presents many challenges. They are responding by using a modified form of practice that ensures occupational therapy skills remain relevant within the narrow confines of this health setting. © 2016 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  5. Compliance with Corporate Governance Principles: Australian Evidence

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Maryam Safari; Soheila Mirshekary; Victoria Wise

    2015-01-01

      This study investigates the association between the level of compliance of Australian listed companies with Australian corporate governance principles, in aggregate, and the level of discretionary...

  6. Abused Mothers’ Safety Concerns and Court Mediators’ Custody Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Echo A.; Zeoli, April M.; Sullivan, Cris M.

    2012-01-01

    This study adds to research on family court’s response to custody in the context of intimate partner abuse (IPA). Mediation is often used to assist family court with custody negotiation; however, debate exists in the field regarding its use when IPA exists. The following study examines experiences with court mediation among a sample of victimized mothers who divorced abusive husbands. Mixed-method data were collected from 19 women. Findings demonstrate that abuse is rarely considered in custody recommendations, as most court mediators prefer joint custody. Implications for the ongoing debate, as well as future directions for research, are discussed. PMID:23144531

  7. Court Culture during the Reign of Christian IV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olden-Jørgensen, Sebastian

    2007-01-01

    Court culture can be defined as a range of cultural forms (festival culture, painting, literature, music, architecture) employed for the enhancement of princely status and the communication of political messages. Christian IV evidently set great store on court culture beginning with his magnificent...... coronation in 1596, reaching a climax with the "great wedding" (of crown prince Christian) in 1634 and at last colapsing during the military and political crisis in the last years of his long reign (1588/96-1648). Danish court culture during the reign of Christian IV decidedly was on an European level...

  8. Eastern Australian coalbed methane supply rivals western offshore conventional resource

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkinson, R.

    2011-05-02

    The estimated potential in situ of coal seam gas contained in eastern Australia is around 410,000 PJ. This resource lie primarily in the Surat, Bowen and Galilee basins of Queensland and the Sydney, Gunnedah and Clarence-Moreton basins of northern New South Wales.

  9. Publicly Minded, Privately Focused: Western Australian Teachers and School Choice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsey, Martin G.

    2010-01-01

    In the growing school choice research literature little, if any, attention has been given to the choices made by the providers of educational services. Yet the workplace preferences shown by teachers and school administrators influences educational practice in important ways and helps illuminate some of the important issues raised in the school…

  10. Western Australian students' alcohol consumption and expenditure intentions for Schoolies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongenelis, Michelle I; Pettigrew, Simone; Biagioni, Nicole; Hagger, Martin S

    2017-07-01

    In Australia, the immediate post-school period (known as 'Schoolies') is associated with heavy drinking and high levels of alcohol-related harm. This study investigated students' intended alcohol consumption during Schoolies to inform interventions to reduce alcohol-related harm among this group. An online survey was administered to students in their senior year of schooling. Included items related to intended daily alcohol consumption during Schoolies, amount of money intended to be spent on alcohol over the Schoolies period, and past drinking behaviour. On average, participants (n=187) anticipated that they would consume eight standard drinks per day, which is substantially higher than the recommended maximum of no more than four drinks on a single occasion. Participants intended to spend an average of A$131 on alcohol over the Schoolies period. Although higher than national guidelines, intended alcohol consumption was considerably lower than has been previously documented during Schoolies events. The substantial amounts of money expected to be spent during Schoolies suggest this group has adequate spending power to constitute an attractive target market for those offering alternative activities that are associated with lower levels of alcohol-related harm.

  11. Amicus brief in Ariosa v. Sequenom: Why the U.S. Supreme Court should grant the petition for a writ of certiorari

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minssen, Timo

    2016-01-01

    that the broader impact of such an restrictive interpretation may have grave consequences for a sustainable global drug delivery system, which should involve both public and private actors. In our brief, we recognize that both in Europe and in the US concerns have been raised about overly pre-emptive patents scope...... driving technological progress run dry. Accordingly, we urge the Supreme Court to clarify a patent eligibility test in line with its longstanding jurisprudence and in harmony with international and European law. If the CAFC’s restrictive interpretation should prevail, however, I believe......I am happy to announce that on April 20th the New York attorney Robert M. Schwartz and I have filed an amicus brief at the US Supreme Court with the Berkeley-based attorney Andrew J. Dhuey as Counsel of Record. The brief, which was signed by 10 prominent European and Australian Law Professors...

  12. Amicus brief in Ariosa v. Sequenom: Why the U.S. Supreme Court should grant the petition for a writ of certiorari

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minssen, Timo

    2016-01-01

    I am happy to announce that on April 20th the New York attorney Robert M. Schwartz and I have filed an amicus brief at the US Supreme Court with the Berkeley-based attorney Andrew J. Dhuey as Counsel of Record. The brief, which was signed by 10 prominent European and Australian Law Professors......DNA) from maternal blood and plasma. Before the development of this highly beneficial, non-invasive prenatal diagnostic test, patients were placed at higher risk and maternal plasma was routinely discarded as waste. Distinguishing this case from previous Supreme Court decisions and highlighting...... in a recent series of cases (i.e. the combined effect of Bilski, Prometheus, Myriad and Alice) barred the patent eligibility for many genetic inventions as “products and processes of nature”. In Sequenom the CAFC interpreted these to mean – in essence- that “laws of nature” had to be entirely eliminated from...

  13. Your business in court: 2009-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, John B; Hall, Christopher R; Wartman, Gregory J

    2011-01-01

    During this period, FDA focused considerable effort on its transparency initiative, which is likely to continue into the coming year, as well as continuing to ramp up its enforcement activities, as we predicted last year. The scope of the agency's ability to pre-empt state laws in product liability litigation involving pharmaceutical products still is developing post-Levine, and we are likely to see new decisions in the coming year. Fraud and abuse enforcement still is a major factor facing the industry, with the added threat of personal exposure to criminal sentences, fines and debarment from participation in federal and state programs under the Responsible Corporate Officer doctrine, or under the authorities exercised by the Department of Health and Human Services Office of the Inspector General. Consequently, it is increasingly important that senior corporate officers ensure active oversight of an effective compliance program which should mitigate these risks. The Federal Trade Commission continues to battle consumer fraud, particularly respecting weight loss programs, and it appears to be fighting a losing battle in its effort to prevent "reverse" payments to generic manufacturers by Innovator Manufacturers to delay the introduction of generics to the market. The Securities and Exchange Commission continues to be actively enforcing the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. The Supreme Court gave shareholders more leeway in bringing stockholder suits in situations where a company conceals information that, if revealed, could have a negative effect on stock prices.

  14. Good Faith in Life Insurance Contract by Indonesian Court

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokhamad Khoirul Huda

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews both the interpretation of good faith and its implementation by the Court in terms of life insurance contracts. The principle of good faith in life insurance contracts was under the provision of the Article 251 Wet Boek van Kophandel which assigned the obligation of good faith on the insured. Based on the context of its historical and systematical interpretation, the obligation of good faith should be on both sides, the insurer and the insured. The insured had an obligation to inform any material facts and the insurer had to investigate those all facts. Until recent days, however, judges in all levels of Court did not have any shared and full understanding on the interpretation of good faith in life insurance contracts. As the result, many Courts were frequently inconsistent with each other. Hence, the sense of fairness the people perceived from the court verdict was not achieved.

  15. The Problem of Emergency in the American Supreme Court

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartz, Emily; ugilt, rasmus

    2011-01-01

    Sixty years before Carl Schmitt wrote his Political Theology, and more than a 100 years before President Bush announced a ‘war on terrorism’ the American Supreme Court grappled with the difficult issue of emergency powers in connection with issues arising out of the American Civil War (1861......–1865). The question confronting the Court in a set of cases named the Prize Cases was whether President Lincoln’s decision to respond to acts of aggression by the secessionist Southern states with measures of war was lawful. The legal problem was that Lincoln had made this decision unilaterally although the American...... Constitution specifically allocates the power to declare war to Congress. The Court solved the dilemma by arguing that in cases where no war has been declared, the decision whether the country is in a state of war is ultimately ‘a question to be decided by him [the President], and [the Supreme] Court must...

  16. Sources of International Courts' Legitimacy: A comparative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godzimirska, Zuzanna; Creamer, Cosette

    Despite ample scholarship on the legitimacy of international legal institutions, existing studies on international courts (ICs) tend to adopt normative or deductive approaches to specify their legitimacy and assess its effects. Very few adopt empirical or inductive approaches and examine the reas......Despite ample scholarship on the legitimacy of international legal institutions, existing studies on international courts (ICs) tend to adopt normative or deductive approaches to specify their legitimacy and assess its effects. Very few adopt empirical or inductive approaches and examine...... of members on the operation of three ICs with different institutional designs and roles: the International Court of Justice, the International Criminal Court, and the Appellate Body of the World Trade Organization. We employ supervised learning methods of text classification to identify statements...

  17. 5 CFR 1604.9 - Court orders and legal processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... made pro rata from all sources. (c) Trustee-to-trustee transfers. The current or former spouse of a TSP... request the TSP to transfer the court-ordered payment to the payee's TSP account; the pro rata share...

  18. Courts as communicators: can doctors learn from judges' decisions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skene, Loane

    2004-01-01

    The role of the courts in 'communicating' with those affected by their decisions is contentious. Some legal commentators maintain that courts and legislators are able to communicate decisions effectively and that attempts to 'dumb down' the law will not make such decisions more accessible to doctors and other professionals. Justice Michael Kirby, on the other hand, seems to share the present author's view that judges could improve their communication of their decisions to a wider audience: 'In future, it seems inevitable that proceedings [of the High Court] will be broadcast live. Maybe one of the judges will explain the decisions of the court in simple terms as they are handed down ... Adaptation to new ways and values is part of the genius of our law, although some if its practitioners need to be dragged kicking and screaming to accomplish the changes' (emphasis added).(1) This article explores the position in Australia.

  19. Two major prison cases poised for court review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-02-20

    The courts are divided on whether the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the Rehabilitation Act apply to State prisoners. The debate of whether disabled inmates are entitled to the same programs and services as nondisabled inmates will be addressed in court cases in Alabama and Pennsylvania. The U.S. Supreme Court will hear Pennsylvania Department of Corrections v. [Name removed] to determine whether Federal disability-rights laws apply to State prisons. In the case, the inmate was denied access to a boot camp program because of his hypertension. The 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals will hear [name removed] v. [Name removed], an Alabama case involving the question of whether mandatory HIV testing and segregation are permissible if it serves a prison's interests in protecting uninfected prisoners. Both cases have major implications for HIV-positive inmates.

  20. Federalism in the Taft Court Era: Can It Be Revived"?

    OpenAIRE

    Post, Robert

    2001-01-01

    This article analyzes the Supreme Court's view of federalism during the decade of the 1920s. It offers a detailed discussion of four jurisprudential areas: congressional power, dormant Commerce Clause doctrine, intergovernmental tax immunity, and judicial centralization through the enforcement of federal common law and constitutional rights. The resurgent federalism of the contemporary Court is typically characterized as "reviving" pre-New Deal principles. The article concludes, however, that...

  1. How to Read a U.S. Supreme Court Opinion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Tiffany

    2013-01-01

    Reading U.S. Supreme Court opinions can be intimidating. Yet, in the digital age, it has never been easier to access them. The average opinion is about 4,750 words, and is one of approximately 75 issued by the Court each year. It might be reassuring to know that opinions contain similar parts and tend to follow a similar format. There are also…

  2. Unanimous Supreme Court finds for actions by whistleblowers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norris, J.E.

    1990-07-19

    This article reports on a case before the United States Supreme Court where they have unanimously ruled that the Energy Reorganization Act of 1976 did not preclude a state law claim by an nuclear industry employee for intentional infliction of emotional distress. In addition the court held that federal law did not reflect a congressional desire to preclude all relief to a whistleblower who deliberately committed a safety violation.

  3. Reform of the European Court of human rights

    OpenAIRE

    Mojsilović Marijana

    2013-01-01

    The European Court of Human Rights is the crown in the international system for protecting human rights. In recent years the Court has become a victim of its own success. In response to growing backlog of individual complaints, the Council of Europe has, over the last five years, considered numerous proposals to restructure the European human rights regime and redesign the European Convention on Human Rights. The aim of this article is just to show the most important innovations introduced pr...

  4. Language Planning and Policy Development for Court Interpretation Services in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweda-Nicholson, Nancy

    1986-01-01

    Chronicles the history of federal laws governing use of court interpreters, focusing on the Court Interpreters Act of 1978. The Spanish/English Federal Court Interpreter Certification Examination is discussed, and problems in state court interpreter selection, policy formation, and improvement of interpreting quality are presented. (Author/MSE)

  5. The Effectiveness of Idaho DUI and Misdemeanor/DUI Courts: Outcome Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronan, Scott M.; Collins, Peter A.; Rosky, Jeffrey W.

    2009-01-01

    As DUI Courts continue to expand through the United States, research needs to match the growth to inform administrators and the public on the effectiveness of these courts. The current study found that participation in a DUI or Misdemeanor/DUI Drug Court (23%) reduced recidivism compared to a comparison group (37%) with court filing records that…

  6. 5 CFR 838.222 - OPM action on receipt of a court order acceptable for processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Processing Court Orders Affecting Employee Annuities Application and Processing Procedures § 838.222 OPM action on receipt of a court order acceptable for processing. (a) If OPM receives a court order...) The former spouse— (i) That the court order is acceptable for processing; (ii) Of the date on which...

  7. Grounds for the Specialization of Courts and Judges in Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Terekhova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This article touches upon the different ways of specialization of courts and judges that exist under the legislation of the Russian Federation. The lack of a unified and circumspect approach is noted. The formation of specialized courts, according to the national legislation, takes the form of their establishing within the existing subsystems of regular and arbitration courts. As for the specialization of judges, it is more diversified and is presented by either creation of separate types of procedure (special proceedings, proceedings on cases arising from public relations and some other, or by introduction of special rules on jurisdiction that establish competence of specific courts to consider cases of a particular category: on the compensation for the excessive time taken to consider a case, on the adoption of a child by a foreign national and others.An analysis of existing literature on the issue in question shows that Russian scholars support the idea of judges’ specialization. Against specialization of courts the following arguments are brought: significant material costs, not being in accordance with the small number of cases decided by specialized courts; problems with access to justice; and the necessity to give special training to narrowly specialized judges.

  8. Court Caseload Management: The Role of Judges and Administrative Assistants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adalmir Oliveira Gomes

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Court caseload management is of key importance for guaranteeing the adjudication of cases and depends on how judges and administrative assistants deal with their workload. Results from several studies indicate that an increase in court caseload tends to generate an increase in the judge’s production. However, some authors argue that this relationship is far more complex. To develop a fuller understanding of this relationship we tested an array of direct and moderating hypotheses. We used secondary data from 566 judges working in first trial courts in the State Justice System of Sao Paulo, Brazil. The results indicate a direct and positive relationship between court caseload and judge production, but the strength of this relationship depends on court specialty. The findings also indicate that the number of administrative assistants, judge experience and the number of places a judge works all moderate the caseload-production relationship. The results contribute to the development of strategies to address the delays and congestion of courts, two of the main Brazilian Judiciary problems.

  9. Activist Infighting among Courts and Breakdown of Mutual Trust? The Danish Supreme Court, the CJEU, and the Ajos Case

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Ulla; Sørensen, Karsten Engsig

    2017-01-01

    implications and therefore the remedy are far from certain. While both judgments appear to reflect a lack of mutual trust between the two courts, they also expose a range of highly significant issues of wide importance. To understand both what went wrong in the judicial dialogue and the wider issues at stake...... prohibiting age discrimination. This issue lay at the heart of the dispute and it seems very likely that the Danish Supreme Court felt that the CJEU had been too activist when it originally ‘launched’ this general principle. Indeed, the reasoning of the Danish Supreme Court gives the impression that the CJEU...... showed that it too had an activist streak. Thus, both Courts were quite imaginative in trying to mould the central issues as falling within their exclusive jurisdiction. As a consequence of the judgments, parts of EU law are not, it appears, fully part of Danish law, but unfortunately the full...

  10. DRUG COURTS: Better DOJ Data Collection and Evaluation Efforts Needed to Measure Impact of Drug Court Programs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2002-01-01

    ...; and prescribe sanctions and rewards as appropriate in collaboration with prosecutors, defense attorneys, treatment providers, and others. While some basic requirements are set at the federal level, most decisions about how a drug court operates are left to local jurisdictions.

  11. Hydrology and Ecology Go to Court

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, W. R.; Crisman, T. L.

    2009-04-01

    The authors were involved in a high profile case in the United States District Court involving Lake Okeechobee and the Everglades Agricultural Area in the State of Florida. One of the central issues of the case rested on a theory that all navigable waters of the United States comprised one "unitary" water body, and as such, transfer of water from one navigable water to another did not require any permitting action. Should this theory have prevailed, great precedent would be set regarding inter-basin transfer of volumes of water capable of significantly impact to the ecologic structure and function of all involved basins. Furthermore, the impact would certainly have had demographic implications of great significance. We were asked to serve as an expert witnesses in the case charged with developing a strategy to demonstrate that three large irrigation canals were "meaningfully hydrologically distinct" (language from the U.S. Supreme Court opinion on a related case) from Lake Okeechobee, the second largest freshwater lake wholly in the continental U.S. Although a totally hydrologic approach could have been taken easily, it was thought better for the legal team to include an aquatic ecologic perspective, a true example of the linkage of the two disciplines into ecohydrology. Together, an argument was crafted to explain to the judge how, in fact, the waters could in no way be "unitary" in character and that they were "meaningfully hydrologically distinct." The fundamentals of the arguments rested on well known and established principles of physics, chemistry, and biology. It was incumbent upon the authors to educate the judge on how to think about hydrologic and ecologic principles. Issues of interest to the judge included a forensic assessment of the hydrologic and ecologic regime of the lake and the original Everglades system when the State of Florida first joined the U.S. While there are anecdotal archives that describe some elements of the system, there are few

  12. State Courts, Federal Courts, and Legal Scholars Have Determined That LGBT People Have Experienced a Long History of Discrimination

    OpenAIRE

    Sears, Brad; Mallory, Christy; Hunter, Nan D.

    2009-01-01

    Equal protection analysis, as articulated by the United States Supreme Court1 and followed by most states in interpreting state constitutions, requires that a suspect class must historically have been subjected to discrimination. Every state and federal court that has substantively considered whether sexual orientation is a suspect class has held that LGBT people have faced a long history of discrimination. In addition, dozens of legal scholars have also concluded that LGBT people have suffer...

  13. Geography in Western Australia--A Time of Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawley, Rosemary

    2006-01-01

    The Western Australian schooling system is in the final phase of the move towards Outcomes Based Education with the Post Compulsory Geography Course of Study commencing in 2007. This move has been somewhat controversial amongst politicians, teachers and parent groups, partly because of the negative press Outcomes Based Education has received in…

  14. Can Courts Make Federalism Work? A Game Theory Approach to Court-Induced Compliance and Defection in Federal Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma Sala

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Few studies on federalism analyze the role of courts as safeguards of the federal arrangement, and those that do tend to be too optimistic about what courts can do. This article analyzes the effect of judicial review on the interaction between the central and a regional government in a federation in order to understand the conditions under which courts may or may not enforce compliance with federalism. It argues that politicians of either level of government anticipate the likelihood of a judicial challenge and an eventual veto, and it finds distinct equilibria in the interaction between central and regional governments (imposition, auto-limitation, negotiation and litigation. Only under auto-limitation do courts effectively prevent transgressions to the federal arrangement. In all other scenarios, defection may take place despite the presence of courts. These findings show that as the court’s jurisprudence becomes more solid and defined, the chances for governments to successfully exceed their powers increase. Not only do transgressions take place despite the presence of the court, but because of it.

  15. Assisted suicide and assisted voluntary euthanasia: Stransham-Ford High Court case overruled by the Appeal Court – but the door is left open

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    David J McQuoid-Mason

    2017-01-01

    Whether persons wishing to have doctor-assisted suicide or voluntary active euthanasia may make a court application based on their rights in the Constitution has not been answered by the Appeal Court...

  16. The CSI effect and the Canadian and the Australian Jury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmgren, Janne A; Fordham, Judith

    2011-01-01

    Television shows, such as CBS's CSI and its spin-offs CSI: Miami; CSI: Las Vegas; and CSI: New York, have sparked the imagination of thousands of viewers who want to become forensic scientists. The shows' fictional portrayals of crime scene investigations have prompted fears that jurors will demand DNA and other forensic evidence before they will convict, and have unrealistic expectations of that evidence. This has been dubbed the "CSI effect." This phenomenon was explored using results from a Canadian study based on 605 surveys of Canadian college students who would be considered jury-eligible and Australian quantitative and qualitative findings from a study that surveyed and interviewed real posttrial jurors. Information about the way jurors deal with forensic evidence in the context of other evidence and feedback about the way in which understanding such evidence could be increased were gained from both these studies. The comparison provides insights into the knowledge base of jurors, permitting adaptation of methods of presenting forensic information by lawyers and experts in court, based on evidence rather than folklore. While the Canadian juror data showed statistically significant findings that jurors are clearly influenced in their treatment of some forensic evidence by their television-viewing habits, reassuringly, no support was found in either study for the operation of a detrimental CSI effect as defined above. In the Australian study, in fact, support was found for the proposition that jurors assess forensic evidence in a balanced and thoughtful manner. © 2010 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  17. Lucky to Be Happy: A Study of Happiness in Australian Primary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, John; Cooper, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Providing a curriculum that promotes personal growth and wellbeing is an overarching learning outcome of the Western Australian Curriculum Framework (Curriculum Framework, 1998). However, little is known about what constitutes and causes wellbeing of students in our primary schools. In the study reported in this paper the happiness of 312…

  18. Lac Courte Oreilles Energy Analysis Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leslie Isham; Denise Johnson

    2009-04-01

    The Lac Courte Oreilles Tribe applied for first step funding in 2007 and was awarded in October of that year. We wanted to perform an audit to begin fulfilling two commitments we made to our membership and resolutions that we adopted. One was the Kyoto Protocol and reduce our carbon emissions by 25% and to produce 25% of our energy by sustainable means. To complete these goals we needed to begin with first assessing what our carbon emissions are and begin taking the steps to conserve on the energy we currently use. The First Step Grant gave us the opportunity to do this. Upon funding the Energy Project was formed under the umbrella of the LCO Public Works Department and Denise Johnson was hired as the coordinator. She quickly began fulfilling the objectives of the project. Denise began by contact the LCO College and hiring interns who were able to go to each Tribal entity and perform line logging to read and document the energy used for each electrical appliance. Data was also gathered for one full year from each entity for all their utility bills (gasoline, electric, natural gas, fuel oil, etc.). Relationships were formed with the Green Team and other Green Committees in the area that could assist us in this undertaking. The Energy Task Force was of great assistance as well recommending other committees and guidance to completing our project. The data was gathered, compiled and placed into spreadsheets that would be understandable for anyone who didn't have a background in Renewable Resources. While gathering the data Denise was also looking for ways to conserve energy usage, policies changes to implement and any possible viable renewable energy resources. Changes in the social behaviors of our members and employees will require further education by workshops, energy fairs, etc.. This will be looked into and done in coordination with our schools. The renewable resources seem most feasible are wind resources as well as Bio Mass both of which need further

  19. Performance evaluation of court in construction claims settlement of litigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayati, Kemala; Latief, Yusuf; Rarasati, Ayomi Dita; Siddik, Arief

    2017-06-01

    Claim construction has a major influence on the implementation of projects, such as the cost and time. The success of the construction project is highly dependent on the effective resolution of claims. Although it has been recognized that litigation or court is not the best way because it may reduce or eliminate profits and damage the relationship, it is a method of resolving claims and disputes that is common in the world of construction. The method of resolving claims and disputes through litigation or court may solve the problem in an alternative method, namely the implementation of the judgment which can be enforced effectively against the losing party and the ruling which has the force of law of the country where the claims and disputes are examined. However, litigation or court may take longer time and require high cost. Thus, it is necessary to identify factors affecting the performance of the court and to develop a system capable of improving an existing system in order to run more effectively and efficiently. Resolution in the claims management of construction projects with the method of litigation is a procedure that can be used by the courts in order to shorten the time in order to reduce the cost. The scope of this research is directed to all parties involved in the construction, both the owners and the contractors as implementers and practitioners, as well as experts who are experienced in construction law.

  20. Court Reconstruction for Camera Calibration in Broadcast Basketball Videos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Pei-Chih; Cheng, Wei-Chih; Wang, Yu-Shuen; Chu, Hung-Kuo; Tang, Nick C; Liao, Hong-Yuan Mark

    2016-05-01

    We introduce a technique of calibrating camera motions in basketball videos. Our method particularly transforms player positions to standard basketball court coordinates and enables applications such as tactical analysis and semantic basketball video retrieval. To achieve a robust calibration, we reconstruct the panoramic basketball court from a video, followed by warping the panoramic court to a standard one. As opposed to previous approaches, which individually detect the court lines and corners of each video frame, our technique considers all video frames simultaneously to achieve calibration; hence, it is robust to illumination changes and player occlusions. To demonstrate the feasibility of our technique, we present a stroke-based system that allows users to retrieve basketball videos. Our system tracks player trajectories from broadcast basketball videos. It then rectifies the trajectories to a standard basketball court by using our camera calibration method. Consequently, users can apply stroke queries to indicate how the players move in gameplay during retrieval. The main advantage of this interface is an explicit query of basketball videos so that unwanted outcomes can be prevented. We show the results in Figs. 1, 7, 9, 10 and our accompanying video to exhibit the feasibility of our technique.

  1. HIV not communicable in restaurant setting, court rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-09-06

    The case of [name removed] v. [Name removed] may be brought before the Michigan Supreme Court for the third time. In 1988, restaurateur [name removed] ordered then waitress [name removed] to undergo an HIV-antibody test at her own expense because several customers suspected that she might be HIV-positive. [Name removed] tested negative and sued [name removed] for discrimination under the State handicap statute. The trial judge dismissed the case and the Court of Appeals affirmed. In 1992, the State Supreme Court reversed the ruling, stating that the statute prohibits discrimination, even when it is based on erroneous perception of HIV infection. [Name removed] appealed, contending that he had a right under the Public Health Code to suspend [name removed] because he suspected that she had a contagious disease. The Court of Appeals cited other health regulations stating that a person with AIDS can continue working as a food handler because there is no evidence that HIV is spread through casual contact or exposure to food and water. [Name removed]' attorneys have asked the Michigan Supreme Court to reverse this ruling.

  2. Reform of the European Court of human rights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojsilović Marijana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The European Court of Human Rights is the crown in the international system for protecting human rights. In recent years the Court has become a victim of its own success. In response to growing backlog of individual complaints, the Council of Europe has, over the last five years, considered numerous proposals to restructure the European human rights regime and redesign the European Convention on Human Rights. The aim of this article is just to show the most important innovations introduced primarily by Protocol no. 14, and then the Declarations adopted at the Conference in Interlaken, Izmir and at the end in Brighton, this year. Some of the solutions provided will help to reduce the work load of the Court in the future, while others are introduced for practical reasons, or a well-known political. However, adopted proposals should be given time to show some results. But in the other way, the frequent changes in the Court's work system and in the Convention system may prove to be a new problem. An institution such as the Court, the protector of human rights at the European level should not be allowed to suffer frequent 'eartquakes'. It should be let alone to work quietly and without 'turbulence'.

  3. Courts and open spaces in the Late Helladic III Argolid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siennicka, Malgorzata

    2015-01-01

    While space remains a neglected subject in research on Mycenaean settlements, archaeological and ethnographical studies devoted to social meaning of places and areas used by the inhabitants of the prehistoric and other communities increase in number. This paper aims to review the use...... and significance of courts and other open spaces in the Mycenaean settlements in the Argolid during the Palatial and Post-Palatial periods (c. 15th–11th centuries BC). Various categories of areas, like courts, open spaces and open-air areas are discussed, with an emphasis on their functions and status. Courts...... and open spaces are considered as reflecting patterns of spatial organization in the settlements and of the diverse activities of their residents. The differences between the use of open areas in the acropoleis and in the lower towns are pointed out, as well as changes in the use patterns after the fall...

  4. Quality issues of court reporters and transcriptionists for qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennink, Monique; Weber, Mary Beth

    2013-05-01

    Transcription is central to qualitative research, yet few researchers identify the quality of different transcription methods. We explored the quality of verbatim transcripts from traditional transcriptionists and court reporters by reviewing 16 transcripts from 8 focus group discussions using four criteria: transcription errors, cost, time of transcription, and effect on study participants. Transcriptionists made fewer errors, captured colloquial dialogue, and errors were largely influenced by the quality of the recording. Court reporters made more errors, particularly in the omission of topical content and contextual detail, and were less able to produce a verbatim transcript; however, the potential immediacy of the transcript was advantageous. In terms of cost, shorter group discussions favored a transcriptionist and longer groups a court reporter. Study participants reported no effect by either method of recording. Understanding the benefits and limitations of each method of transcription can help researchers select an appropriate method for each study.

  5. Court based civil commitment of alcoholics and substance abusers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beane, E A; Beck, J C

    1991-01-01

    Problem. To study court ordered substance abuse commitment (SAC) in one jurisdiction. We investigated who was evaluated, by whom, and with what outcome. Is SAC primarily a purely civil procedure as originally intended? Are men and women being treated equally? Questionnaire survey of court clinicians to determine demographic and clinical status of persons evaluated, the process of evaluation, and the disposition. SAC is common and more frequent in criminal cases than in purely civil ones. SAC of women is clearly influenced by the restricted choices for disposition: either state prison or an unlocked facility. SAC is an important public health procedure, which courts are using in highly variable and at times unintended ways. SAC has emerged as an alternative to other dispositions in criminal cases involving substance-abusing defendants.

  6. The privileges and immunities of international organizations in domestic courts

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    International organizations are increasingly operating across borders and engaging in legal transactions in virtually all jurisdictions. This makes, familiarity with the applicable law and practice imperative for both international organizations and those who engage in legal relations with them. Furthermore, the issue of whether, how, and to what extent domestic courts take into account decisions of foreign and international courts and tribunals in their own decision-making has become increasingly important in recent years. This book provides a comprehensive empirical study of this transnational judicial dialogue, focusing on the law and practice of domestic jurisdictions concerning the legal personality, privileges, and immunities of international organizations. It presents a selection of detailed country-by-country studies, examining the manner of judicial dialogue across domestic jurisdictions, and between national and international courts. The approach taken in this book intersects with three highly topi...

  7. THE RIGHT TO AN INDEPENDENT COURT OF LAW. THEORETICAL ASPECTS. THE EUROPEAN COURT OF HUMAN RIGHTS CASE-LAW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIRCEA DAMASCHIN

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available International specialized literature approaches the concept of court of law from two perspectives: on the one hand, this concept refers to the court of law, regarded as a key linking element within the unitary judicial system, and, on the other hand, to the panel of judges, regarded as the main subject of the criminal procedure, i.e. thejudges who take part in trying a criminal case. In a criminal case, the court of law plays the most important role and its main attribute is the function of jurisdiction, which represents the sum of powers granted to a magistrate for the administration of justice1. The court of law plays a significant role in the rule of law state; thus, both at national and international level, attempts are made in order to set up a legal framework consisting of norms issued by national lawmakers or by official international institutions or by some magistrate associations or NGOs. All these efforts are meant to underline the significant role that the judiciary plays in a rule of law democratic society. In this study we shall try to analyse the concept of “independent court of law”, as this is presented in the national system of law, in its specific norms that are provided by international normative acts and in the principles deriving from the ECHR case-law.

  8. Assessing the Courts in Russia: Parameters of Progress under Putin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter H. Solomon

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The Soviet legacy included courts that were dependent and weak, and whose reform had only just begun. The Yeltsin era witnessed considerable progress in making judges more independent and powerful, but the efforts were seriously constrained by budgetary shortcomings and paralysis in the legislative approval of needed procedural changes. As we shall see, the Putin administration overcame both of these obstacles and at the same time began addressing the thorny question of how to make courts and judges accountable without undue harm to their independence. It also started to address the scepticism about the courts among a significant part of the public, through efforts to improve media coverage, make information about courts more available, and make courts user friendly. While praiseworthy and bound to improve the reality and the perception of the administration of justice overall, these initiatives did not end attempts to exert influence on judges and case outcomes by powerful people (in the public and private sectors or the mechanisms that facilitated their efforts. This essay begins by identifying criteria for assessing the quality of the administration of justice in any country, including in the post-soviet world and suggesting specific markers (usually qualitative connected to each of the criteria developed above. Then, the essay provides an account of relevant policy initiatives in judicial reform undertaken first under Yeltsin and then in the Putin years. The essay goes to provide an assessment of the state of the courts in the Russian federation in 2007 in the light of the criteria and markers supplied in the first section. It concludes with a look to the future, and the identification of crucial markers of change for the post-Putin era.

  9. The Impact of an Indiana (United States Drug Court on Criminal Recidivism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R. Gallagher

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated a drug court located in a metropolitan area of Indiana (United States, focusing specifically on identifying variables that predicted recidivism among drug court participants and comparing criminal recidivism patterns among drug court and probation participants. Drug court participants were most likely to recidivate if they were younger, had a violation within the first 30 days of the program, had a previous criminal record, and were terminated unsuccessfully from the program. Furthermore, drug court participants were less likely to recidivate than probationers who had similar offense and demographic characteristics. Implications for drug court practice, policy advocacy, and future research are discussed.

  10. The Virtual Court Action: procedural facilitation in law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Barton

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available When they learn procedural law, students need to understand and memorize the forms of legal court action which can be carried out by parties to a case. A large proportion of this body of law is descriptive and factual, but complex too; and the constraints of academic curricula do not allow students to learn procedural law in the real environment of the court. As a result, even with the inclusion of case law, and with examples to contextualize the procedural principles, the subject can be perceived as an exercise in knowledge acquisition alone (Vaughn, 1995.

  11. Canada's Supreme Court abolishes 'promise of the patent'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, John; Gloor, Alex

    2018-01-01

    The Supreme Court of Canada has done away with the 'promise of the patent' doctrine. This doctrine invalidated patents to numerous otherwise useful inventions from 2005 to 2016. The Supreme Court of Canada has clarified that the statutory utility requirement requires only a scintilla of utility related to the subject matter of the invention. This utility must have been demonstrated or soundly predicted as of the Canadian filing date. The decision brings increased certainty to Canada's patent system and more closely aligns it with international norms.

  12. Civilians in Russian Military Courts, 1881-1904

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William C. Fuller

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available This article was previously published in the Russian Review, Vol. 41, No. 3. (Jul., 1982, pp. 288-305. It is reprinted in our journal with the Blackwell Publishing’s authorization.Clemenceau is supposed to have remarked once that "military justice is to justice as military music is to music." This salty analogy encapsulates the popular conception of military courts in Europe at the turn of the century. In the public mind the courts were presumed to be arbitrary tribunals in which due process...

  13. Montana's high court overturns order terminating parental rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-08-06

    An inmate with AIDS in Montana, who refused to release his medical records, initially had his parental rights terminated by a district court judge. The records were to be used by the Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services to help formulate a treatment program for his children. In addition, the department feared the inmate's health was unstable, but did not disclose either motive for petitioning his medical records. The Montana Supreme Court overturned the ruling, stating the department should have disclosed it's intentions for obtaining the records, and for establishing a treatment plan for the two children.

  14. Commentary (Victim Participation in the International Criminal Court)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marchuk, Iryna

    2014-01-01

    Victim participation is one of the most innovative aspects introduced in the legal framework of the International Criminal Court (hereinafter – ICC), which has not featured in the practices of other international criminal courts and tribunals. The approach of the ad hoc tribunals to victims...... was very ‘consumer like’ because victims were solely used as witnesses to testify about the crimes attributed to the accused, but they were not granted broad participatory rights in the proceedings. The drafters of the Rome Statute acknowledged wide-ranging interests of victims who, apart from seeking...

  15. Australian Paediatric Surveillance Unit study of haemoglobinopathies in Australian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argent, Elizabeth; Emder, Phillip; Monagle, Paul; Mowat, David; Petterson, Toni; Russell, Susan; Sachdev, Rani; Stone, Christine; Ziegler, David S

    2012-04-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the incidence and types of haemoglobinopathies in Australian children and their distribution among ethnic groups, and to collect information on timing of diagnosis of haemoglobinopathies in Australia. Between January 2004 and March 2006, the Australian Paediatric Surveillance Unit asked paediatricians to report all children under 15 years of age with a newly diagnosed haemoglobinopathy. A questionnaire requesting further information was forwarded to those clinicians. Carrier states such as thalassaemia minor were excluded. Eighty-four notifications of haemoglobinopathy were received by the Australian Paediatric Surveillance Unit, with 59 confirmed cases giving a national incidence of 0.74 per 100,000 children < 15 years of age per annum. Of 59 cases, 42 (71%) were Australian born. Twenty-nine (35.6%) children had sickle cell disease, 17 (28.8%) had Hb H disease, six (10.2%) had beta-thalassaemia major and 15 (25.4%) had compound heterozygous conditions. One child died from sickle cell disease. Of Australian born children, at least 10 mothers (23.8%) and 11 fathers (26.2%) were unaware of their carrier status pre-partum (information unavailable for 13 mothers and 17 fathers). Only 11 parents (18.6%) had risks of haemoglobinopathy discussed with them antenatally and only three cases (5.1%) were diagnosed antenatally. We found that a small but significant number of children with haemoglobinopathies are being born in Australia despite existing programmes of testing at-risk groups and neonatal screening. Haemoglobinopathies were also diagnosed in recent immigrants. Greater awareness of these conditions and enhancements of screening and detection programmes may be needed as the genetic diversity of the Australian population continues to develop. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2011 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  16. Australian Muslim civil society organisations: Pathways to social inclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora Shikeen Amath

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available There is great interest on issues related to Muslims and Islam; however, a large concentration of the scholarly literature as well as media and political discourses focus predominantly on political issues and actions related to fundamentalism, radicalisation, militancy and terrorism. The dominance of these issues in the discourses does not provide a holistic understanding of Muslims, particularly their role, place and identity as minorities in a Western society. Indeed, we know relatively little about the larger number of Muslim political actors engaged in civil society, especially those involved in creating pathways to social inclusion. Utilising descriptive phenomenology, this paper explores the complex issues of social inclusion and the Australian Muslim communities. Underpinning this discussion is the theory of social capital; as noted by a number of scholars and social policy experts, the theory of social inclusion alone is inadequate and ineffective in creating participation, equality and cohesion. This paper also observes that while many reports and studies provide pragmatic suggestions on how to work towards the social inclusion of Australian Muslims, the concentration on these suggestions tend to focus on how the government can provide these solutions. What is lacking in the literature is the recognition of the Australian Muslim community’s role and agency in initiating and executing the programs needed to address such issues of social exclusion. The 30 unstructured phenomenological interviews demonstrate that Australian MCSOs are proactively engaging with their communities to ensure that they are responding appropriately to these issues. Moreover, they are creating pathways and access for Australian Muslims to better participate, engage in and contribute to mainstream society. In particular, the MCSO actors revealed four themes related to social inclusion: supporting participation in education and training, facilitating participation

  17. Influence of climate modes on tropical cyclone formation in the Australian region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, A, E-mail: awerner@science.mq.edu.a [Macquarie University, Department of Environment and Geography, Faculty of Science, NSW 2109 Sydney (Australia)

    2010-08-15

    Relationships between tropical cyclogenesis (TCG) in the Australian region and modes of various atmospheric and oceanic parameters are investigated for the period 1968-2006. Seven thermal and seven dynamic variables describing the state of moisture transport and wind flow patterns in the atmosphere were analysed. In order to identify the dominant modes of each variable, an empirical orthogonal function (EOF) is applied. The three leading modes of each variable were then considered. This study corroborates previous work showing that El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is the leading contributor to TCG in the all-Australian, Western and Eastern Australian regions. The ENSO-linked first EOF of the streamfunction at sigma level 0.2101 shows the strongest relationship with TCG variations in the all-Australian and Eastern regions correlating at 0.73 and 0.62, respectively. In the western Australian region, the first EOF of environmental vertical wind shear shows the strongest skill. TCG frequency in the Northern region is mainly affected by the large-scale wind patterns of the subtropics and mid-latitudes such as the subtropical jet and the Rossby wave train.

  18. Sovereign Court of Vasily III: Historical and Genealogical Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandr L. Korzinin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The research is focused on the issues concerning personal and genealogical composition of the Sovereign court during the great reign of Vasily the Third (1505–1533. The relevance of the research is connected with the small number of works devoted to Vasily Ivanovich’s reign (in particular, monographs by A.A. Zimin and A.I. Filyushkin, and with that fact that such institute of the organization of the upper class and middle class of the Russian society as the Sovereign court is insufficiently studied. On the basis of the earlier developed methodology of allocating the servant landowners who constitued the capital court, and the reconstruction of the court nobility in the first third of the 16th century, the authors for the first time analyze the genealogical structure of the Vasily III court. It is proved that the core of the Vasily Ivanovich’s court was formed by those surnames, which had already been known under his father Ivan III. However some changes are also revealed. There was a limited access to the court nobility for little-known and lowborn surnames, so the composition of the court became more aristocratic. This was partly due to strengthening of princely aristocracy represented by the Gediminovich prince’s sons of Northeast Russia, as well as princes of the Lithuanian origin. The greatest number of departures on service to the capital took place from Lithuania and passed against the background of Russian struggle for Smolensk. Another understudied aspect of the court concerns Pskov accession to Moscow and the formation of Pskov service corporation. This article attempts to restore the composition of the first Pskov landowners, to determine the initial land accessory (mainly from the Novgorod land and to trace their gradual inclusion in the capital court during the first half of the 16th century. A section about Vasily the Third’s clerks concludes the publication. The composition of the grand-ducal office is studied, its

  19. Public Participation: What has the Constitutional Court given the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The “minimalist approach to public participation” adopted by the court in this matter, it concludes, “has created a gap wide enough to let an important piece of legislation which has significant implications on the public to be passed as reasonable. Setting such low standards means that judicial review of the other branches of ...

  20. Correspondence author: June P, Brady, 87 Teralynn Court Oakland ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-04-01

    Apr 1, 2011 ... Correspondence author: June P, Brady, 87 Teralynn Court. Oakland, California 94619, USA. E mail: june.brady@ucsf.edu. Tel: 1 510 336 0592. Fax: 1 510 336 0592. Background. Exclusive breastfeeding for the first 6 months of life with continued breastfeeding and appropriate complementary foods to age ...

  1. Wind-induced Vibrations in the European Court Towers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jannick B.; Brincker, Rune; Andersen, Ken G.

    2012-01-01

    Issues regarding occupancy comfort in vibration-sensitive structures are the motivation of this study concerning windinduced vibrations in the European Court Towers in Luxembourg. In one of the two identical towers tuned liquid dampers (TLD) have been installed. Recent studies investigate the cha...

  2. The Constitutional Court and ubuntu's “inseparable trinity" | Keevy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this article is to deconstruct the Constitutional Court's definitions of ubuntu as humanness, group solidarity, umuntu ngumuntu ngabantu, personhood and a moral philosophy. It is submitted that the philosophy of ubuntu or ethnophilosophy represents a religious worldview as it is inseparable from African ...

  3. The International Criminal Court, Justice, Peace and the Fight ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    by establishing an international criminal law section mandated to deal with international crimes within the African Court on Human and Peoples' Rights is unlikely to end impunity and promote peace on the continent. Résumé. L'année 2013 marquait le cinquantième anniversaire de l'Organisation de l'Unité Africaine qui fut ...

  4. Using frames to determine ordinary meaning in court cases: the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kate H

    Abstract. The South African judicial system has a variety of ways to determine the ordinary meaning of words, ranging from preceding court cases and academic publications to expert witnesses. However, one of the main resources in the interpretation of ordinary words is a dictionary. Much has already been published on ...

  5. Creativity in Court-Connected Mediation: Myth or Reality?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adrian, Lin; Mykland, Solfrid

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we examined creativity in court-connected mediation. We analyzed 129 mediated agreements from civil cases in Norway and Denmark and compared the outcomes with the parties' original claims to determine whether the agreement addressed only the disputants' demands or contained other e...

  6. Effects of Juvenile Court Exposure on Crime in Young Adulthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petitclerc, Amelie; Gatti, Uberto; Vitaro, Frank; Tremblay, Richard E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The juvenile justice system's interventions are expected to help reduce recidivism. However, previous studies suggest that official processing in juvenile court fails to reduce adolescents' criminal behavior in the following year. Longer term effects have not yet been investigated with a rigorous method. This study used propensity…

  7. The empire strikes back: CISAC beats Commission in General Court

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quintais, J.P.

    2013-01-01

    he General Court's judgments in Case T-442/08 and related cases annulled Article 3 of the Commission's 2008 decision against CISAC and 20 collecting societies, on the basis of the Commission's failure to prove the required evidentiary legal standard for the existence of a concerted practice on

  8. Sexual Harassment and Sexual Assault in Canadian Sports and Courts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Margery; Moriarty, Richard

    Sexual harassment is deemed a violation of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms which provides protection from discrimination based on sex. Provincial jurisdictions may offer legislation more stringent than that reflected in the Canadian code. Recourse for acts of sexual harassment through the courts is sought by alleging discrimination.…

  9. Do justice to court interpreters in South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Many countries have developed NSPs to guide court interpreters in carrying out their duties. These NSPs vary from ... within a structured context in many countries of the world, but in South Africa the profession still has a long way ... navigating between the Scylla of slavish, which is the literal interpretation, and the Charybdis.

  10. Customary courts' system in West Cameroon: reforms and conflict ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It further held that it continued without any interference from the Federal Government in West Cameroon until 1966, when the former favoured reforms that could reduce their authority (Customary Courts). It called for the reduction of their powers and a transfer of the control of these institutions from West Cameroon Ministry of ...

  11. Double Exposure: The Supreme Court and Sex Discrimination Claims

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Charles J.; Thro, William E.

    2009-01-01

    The Supreme Court's recent decision in "Fitzgerald v. Barnstable School Committee" (2009) expands the opportunities for students and their parents to sue school boards for alleged sex discrimination. Even so, as discussed here, "Fitzgerald" should have little effect on the day-to-day operations of school systems. This column…

  12. Withdrawal from the International Criminal Court: Does Africa have ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    After a century in the making, the International Criminal Court (ICC) came into existence in 2002 with an overwhelming number of states ratifying the Rome Statute. With 34 signatories, Africa is the largest contributor in the Assembly of State Parties, yet Africa has become its severest critic. As threats of withdrawal become a ...

  13. 8 CFR 1003.11 - Administrative control Immigration Courts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Administrative control Immigration Courts. 1003.11 Section 1003.11 Aliens and Nationality EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE GENERAL PROVISIONS EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW Office of the Chief Immigration Judge...

  14. The Challenges Facing the International Criminal Court in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article examines the role of the International Criminal Court (ICC) in dealing with matters of genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes that have increasingly become common phenomena in politics. Indeed, so far there is scanty detailed scholarly research that has been documented on the activities of the ICC.

  15. Predicting Drug Court Treatment Completion Using the MMPI-2-RF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattson, Curtis; Powers, Bradley; Halfaker, Dale; Akeson, Steven; Ben-Porath, Yossef

    2012-01-01

    We examined the ability of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF; Ben-Porath & Tellegen, 2008) substantive scales to predict Drug Court treatment completion in a sample of individuals identified as being at risk for failure to complete the program. Higher scores on MMPI-2-RF scales…

  16. Natural Law, Santa Clara, and the Supreme Court.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Raymond S.; Lujan, Phillip

    The court case, "Santa Clara Pueblo, et al. v. Julia Martinez, et al.," is the subject of this paper. It gives the background of the case of a woman whose children were refused admittance to tribal rolls because of an ordinance prohibiting the enrollment of children whose father is not a tribal member. The paper gives the arguments of…

  17. Supreme Court Strikes Down NCAA Control of Football on Television.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Charles S.

    1984-01-01

    The Supreme Court ruling that the National Collegiate Athletic Association's control of televised intercollegiate football violated antitrust law is discussed. At the heart of the restraint of trade are the limitations placed on the money an institution can receive, the times a team can appear, and the number of games telecast. (MLW)

  18. Participatory Justice: an overview of Gacaca Courts in Rwanda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    persons who witnessed the events to participate and affect restorative community reintegration. The paper concludes by analyzing the conformity of Gacaca courts to international human rights standards and suggests that though they are largely a traditional Rwandan approach, as a matter of principle human rights norms

  19. legal pluralism, sharia courts, and constitutional issues in ethiopia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eliasn

    supremacy clause, gender equality and non-discrimination). Based on the analysis of the relevant ... PhD Candidate, Human Rights Centre, Public Law Department, Faculty of Law,. Ghent University, Belgium .... of Justice gave regard to the interest of Muslims and allowed the sharia courts to exercise their jurisdiction.

  20. The Traditional Courts Bill: Controversy around process, substance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article introduces the Traditional Courts Bill (B15-2008). The Bill has caused controversy, and drawn criticism from rural communities and civil society. Key to the concerns raised was the flawed consultative process that the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development followed in bringing the Bill before ...

  1. Veiled justice, the courts'compassionate case law regarding hunger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    mr. Bart f.w. Wernaart

    2009-01-01

    In this book and elsewhere Dutch courts are portrayed as little short of barbaric for rejecting direct applicability of the human right to food. In this contribution I want to revisit case law asking the question if the rejection of direct applicability of the right to food implies that in the

  2. Court's Flag Ruling Could Affect Policies against Harassment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Robin

    1990-01-01

    The Supreme Court's ruling in a flag-burning case raises questions about whether antiharassment policies that colleges and universities have adopted, penalizing slurs and epithets used by students to harass others, violate the First Amendment to the Constitution. If public college policies were found unconstitutional, private colleges would not…

  3. Withdrawal from the International Criminal Court: Does Africa have ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Where perpetrators convinced the courts of their repentance, punishments tended to be more lenient than in the case of those who did not repent, and in many instances the perpetrators were even allowed to return and reintegrate into their communities without incurring punishment. More than 1.2 million cases were tried in ...

  4. Supreme Court Strikes Down Law on Internet Indecency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biemiller, Lawrence; Blumenstyk, Goldie

    1997-01-01

    The U.S. Supreme Court has struck down parts of the Communications Decency Act as violating the First Amendment. The law was predicted to wreak havoc on the Internet and connected campus computer networks. The 1996 law was aimed at protecting children from pornography but threatened the availability of a wide range of materials,…

  5. Improving Labour Courts in Mexico: The Case of Cuautitlan | CRDI ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Outdated and inefficient labour laws and courts make it difficult for workers in Mexico to resolve labour disputes and secure compensation. Although Mexico has rebounded from its 2009 slump, the country's labour market has yet to return to its pre-recession state. Nationally, the official unemployment rate is 5%, only slightly ...

  6. Establishing Sentencing Guidelines for Military Courts-Martial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    the anxiety I felt was overwhelming. Thinking back to that court-martial, I question the appropriateness of military panel members adjudging sentences...fighting with her 17-year-old “troubled teen ” boyfriend. Wollard grabbed a gun and shot a warning shot through a wall to scare off the aggressor; these

  7. California court says disability benefits do not preclude suit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-05-01

    A California appeals court reversed a lower court decision barring a worker from pursuing an HIV discrimination claim against his employer. [Name removed] claims that [name removed] violated California's Fair Employment and Housing Act when it rescinded accommodations that the bank had made earlier for HIV-related medical needs. The accommodations included a compressed work week and one day of telecommuting per week, which [name removed] performed well enough to earn a promotion. With a change in management, the accommodations were canceled, ostensibly to control costs. The lower court ruled that [name removed] was barred from suing his former employer because of statements on his disability insurance application. However, the appeals court ruled that [name removed]'s statements on the form were honest and did not preclude him from future litigation. Myron Quon, an attorney with Lambda Legal Defense and Education Fund in Los Angeles, noted that [name removed]'s deft handling of the questions was vital to the success of the suit. [Name removed] had made comments and notations on the form, rather than just checking the appropriate yes or no boxes, and noted that he could return to work with a reasonable accommodation. Others applying for disability are cautioned to do the same to preserve their legal rights.

  8. The Never Ending Fight; Court Ordered Parenting Plan

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DrNneka

    Abstract. The question as to who retains the custody, physical control and care of the child or children of a marriage is often cardinal, vexed and contentious between the parties in any court proceedings for dissolution of marriage, divorce or legal separation .This paper examines the legal principles, perspectives and ...

  9. The constitutional court ruling against child marriages in Zimbabwe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    On the 20th of January 2016, the Constitutional Court of Zimbabwe went a step ahead to protect children's rights by banning child marriages and other harmful practices that are detrimental to childhood. The ruling comes at an opportune time to denounce the inadequacy of marriage laws, and to ban all archaic practices ...

  10. Do justice to court interpreters in South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    For example, Hewitt (1995:199) states that in the US, the ... Toury (1980) observes that norms play a central role in Descriptive Translation Studies (DTS) ..... In the US, there has been a significant increase in the number of states that have enacted legislation to set standards for court interpreters and that have joined the ...

  11. The Never Ending Fight; Court Ordered Parenting Plan | Anyogu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines the legal principles, perspectives and dimensions relative to court ordered parenting in Nigeria with particular attention to the comparative positions at common law, under statute and within the realm of customary law. It also x-rays the sociological and psychological considerations and factors at play in ...

  12. Will the International Criminal Court Investigate Mexico's "Drug War"?

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez Caballero, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    The violence of Mexico's so-called "war on drugs" has caught the attention of the international community, with calls for the International Criminal Court (ICC) to turn its attention to the country. If they're successful, high-level government officials - or even leaders of drug trafficking organizations - may be prosecuted in the Hague. But it's a difficult road ahead.

  13. The International Criminal Court, Justice, Peace and the Fight ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Based on its human rights record, this article argues that the AU's attempt to bypass the ICC by establishing an international criminal law section mandated to deal with international crimes within the African Court on Human and Peoples' Rights is unlikely to end impunity and promote peace on the continent.

  14. Court support workers speak out: Upholding children's rights in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We draw on information from two studies that sought the perspectives of court support workers to explore whether a child rights-based approach is followed in the criminal justice system (CJS) for child victims of sexual abuse. Findings suggest varying degrees of protection, assistance and support for child victims of sexual ...

  15. Be a Court Appointed Special Advocate for a Baby. Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Mary G.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the role of a Court Appointed Special Advocate (CASA). CASA volunteers are appointed by judges to represent the best interests of children who have been removed from their homes because of abuse or neglect. CASA volunteers are everyday citizens who have undergone screening and training with their local CASA program (National…

  16. The Role of Ethiopian Courts in Commercial Arbitration | Feyissa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The role of arbitration in settling disputes which involves national and transnational commercial transactions is steadily growing in this era of globalisation. ... This article deals with the legal and practical role of Ethiopian courts during the three stages of arbitral proceeding, i.e., at the beginning of arbitration, during the ...

  17. Court Decisions Specific to Public School Responses to Student Concussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirkel, Perry A.

    2016-01-01

    This article provides an up-to-date and comprehensive canvassing of the judicial case law concerning the responses to students with concussions in the public school context. The two categories of court decisions are (a) those concerning continued participation in interscholastic athletics, referred to under the rubric of "return to play"…

  18. Religious hiring exemption upheld: anatomy of a Supreme Court ruling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopko, M E

    1988-01-01

    In 1980 the Church of Jesus Christ of the Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) notified five employees that they could no longer continue in church employment because they would not or could not attend the temple as members in good standing. Together, the five filed suit in federal district court in Utah, alleging that the LDS Church discriminated against them on religious grounds in violation of Title VII of the federal Civil Rights Act of 1964, which generally prohibits discrimination in employment on the basis of religion. The plaintiffs said the statutory exemption for religious organizations in Section 702 operated as a religious preference and penalized their personal choices of religion in violation of the First Amendment. The case ended up in the Supreme Court, which upheld the provision exempting religious organizations from Title VII with respect to employing people of a particular religion for all not-for-profit activities. Evidence in the case included: Legislative history. As first enacted in 1964, Section 702 provided a limited exemption to religious corporations. In 1972 Congress enacted a broader exemption, effectively exempting from the sweep of Title VII employment decisions made by religious employers with respect to members of that religion in any work connected with the religious corporation. District court proceedings. The Utah court borrowed from several earlier cases, including one that avoided the constitutional issue by deciding that the function challenged was uniquely religious and, thus, exempted. Briefs amicus curiae. Four religious organizations filed briefs amicus curiae.

  19. The Impact of the New York Court Review of Children in Foster Care: A Followup Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Festinger, Trudy Bradley

    1976-01-01

    Examines the data on children studied in a 1974 investigation. Proposes that court review speed movement of children out of foster care, and suggests steps necessary for both court and agencies to make the procedures more effective. (Author/SB)

  20. Text of Supreme Court's Majority Opinion Striking Down NCAA's Control of College Football Telecasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, John Paul; And Others

    1984-01-01

    The text of the Supreme Court's decision in National Collegiate Athletic Association v. Board of Regents of the University of Oklahoma, in which the Court struck down the NCAA's control of televised college football, is provided. (Author/MLW)

  1. Implementation of the court visitor program in a clinical nursing curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowell, Jane M; Pihlak, Mary Rose; Matzke, Amanda; O'Keefe, Mary

    2013-12-01

    The State of Texas has more than 19,000 individuals who lack the physical or mental ability to provide for their need for shelter, financial management, or physical care. These individuals have been designated as wards of the court and placed under guardianship. Texas probate courts appoint individuals known as court visitors to make annual visits to wards of the court to assess their well-being under guardianship. Although the 10 statutory probate courts have court visitor programs, many county courts do not. This article describes the details of a service-learning experience using an online distance educational program to train undergraduate nursing students in a mental health course to become court visitors. This information may be useful to others looking for nontraditional clinical experiences and service-learning opportunities for undergraduate nursing students.

  2. IsTeen Court effective for repeat offenders? A test of the restorative justice approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forgays, Deborah Kirby; DeMilio, Lisa

    2005-02-01

    Teen Courts are an effective judicial alternative for many youth offenders. The majority of youth courts deal solely with first-time offenders. However, repeat offenders are at a greater risk for future crime. Is Teen Court effective with more experienced offenders? In this study, the authors examine the outcomes of 26 Whatcom County Teen Court offenders with at least one prior conviction. The sentence completion rate was higher and the recidivism was lower for the Teen Court offenders when compared with a sample of first-time Court Diversion offenders. This objective evidence of program success is augmented by an offender's perspective on his or her court experience. These perspectives as well as the continued voluntary involvement with Teen Court are discussed in relation to empowerment theory.

  3. Multilingualism as a Principle of the EU Court of Justice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Kh. Rekosh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the jurisprudence reflects relations between the institutions, bodies and organizations of the EU and native speakers, the EU Court of Justice plays a huge role in shaping the legal discourse. Relations between the EU and citizens show the effectiveness of the principle of multilingualism, that is apparent before the Court. The enlargement of the Union to 28 member States and, accordingly, the increase of the number of official languages to 24 complicate the implementation of the principle of multilingualism and create many problems for the EU Court of Justice: legal, linguistic, budget, translation. All documents of the Court are not translated into 24 EU official languages completely and often limited to summaries. All documents are translated only into French and proceeding languages, for the scale of the translation work have a direct impact on the timing of legal proceedings. To provide help in written translations, much work is carried out in the Court on drawing up dictionaries, thesauri, where multilingualism is fully manifested. On the use of languages and language regime, There is an extensive legal practice, however, the term «multilingualism» is not used by the Court, despite the recognition of the principle of equality of all official languages, perhaps, due to the fact that the Court itself not always follows it. The article shows that multilingualism as a legal concept and principle opens up, sometimes adjacent to the already distinguished objects of regulation, new areas of legal research. Comparison of legal solutions to the problems of multilingualism in different states with a variety of languages, law and order, or in international organizations, lays basis of "comparative linguistic law" Now in the doctrine of law of the European Union neither the linguistic law, nor the comparative linguistic law do not exist, but to provide cooperation in the field of justice and mutual recognition of judicial decisions on the

  4. The Australian solar scene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowley, Paul [IT Power Australia (Australia)

    2007-06-15

    This presentation mainly talks about the actions taken by the Australian country concerning the use of renewable energy and the reduction of the peak load in some areas. In the first part, there are found both the geographical aspects as well as the major political, e.g. Asia-Pacific Partnership on Clean development and Climate. There are also explained the issues related to peak load growth and it is shown a comparison graphic having information about the most used photovoltaic systems. Then, there are mentioned the communities that are testing one of the model photovoltaic systems in order to: reduce the peak load, use the energy in a properly way, reduce the energy cost, among others. Finally, it is succinctly explained the photovoltaic rebate program as well as the use of the off-grid systems, besides, it is given relevant information about those remote communities of Australia and the benefits of the implementation of Bushlight. [Spanish] Esta presentacion trata primordialmente de las acciones, referentes al uso de energia renovable, tomadas por Australia y creadas con el fin de reducir la maxima demanda en algunas regiones de este pais. En la primera parte, se encuentran tanto los aspectos geograficos como los principales aspectos politicos; por ejemplo, la Sociedad Asia-Pacifico para el Desarrollo no Contaminante y el Clima. Asimismo, se da una explicacion acerca de las cuestiones relacionadas al crecimiento de la maxima demanda; ademas, se muestra un cuadro comparativo, que contiene informacion relacionada con los sistemas fotovoltaicos mas utilizados. Despues, se mencionan aquellas comunidades que tienen en periodo de prueba alguno de los modelos fotovoltaicos con el fin de: reducir la maxima demanda, utilizar eficientemente la energia, reducir el costo de la misma, entre otros aspectos mas. Finalmente, se explica escuetamente el programa de reembolso centrado en el uso de sistemas fotovoltaicos, asi como el uso de sistemas asilados de la red; ademas, se

  5. The Royal Courts of Equity in England in the 16-17 centuries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilya Strizhakov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available УДК 340.15The subject of research are the courts of England in 16-17 centuries.The purpose of article is to answer the question which courts must be included to a number of "courts of equity".Methodology. Historical analysis of the scientific literature, of the English legislation and judicial practice of the 16-17 centuries.Results. The priority for the Court of Star Chamber was to protect the interests of Royal power and not the rights of people. Moreover, this court did not seek to bridge the gaps of common law. In this regard, his reference to the number of “courts of equity” is incorrect.Star Chamber had a close relationship with the Privy Council. There were no clear boundaries between them during the XVI century. The Star Chamber was the emergency Committee of the Privy CouncilThe purpose of the Court of Requests was to ease social tensions, to create the impression of caring filed emanating from the monarch and the nobility.Despite the fact that the Court of the Requests was conceived as "a court for poor people", it became popular wealthy people under the rule Henry VIII.The Court of High Commission was a court focused on the strengthening of Royal power. In its activities it has been focused on improving the rights of the Kingdom.The Court of Exchequer provided judicial protection for some types of transactions that are not recognized by the common law. In this it is similar to the Chancery Court. Initially, the Court of the Exchequer has been focused on protecting the interests of the crown. Therefore, the function to eliminate the gaps of the common law could not be implemented in full.The Chancery Court, unlike the special courts were required to consider complaints coming from citizens about the inability to get a fair trial.Conclusions. The criteria for judicial institutions to be considered as “courts of equity” are: the purpose of the establishment of the court was to fill gaps in the common law; interference with the

  6. Superior Administrative Court Baden-Wuerttemberg. Judgement of March 30, 1982 (Wyhl)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-01-01

    Presentation and discussion of the leading statements of the decision delivered by the Mannheim Superior Administrative Court on March 30, 1982 concerning the Wyhl nuclear power plant, unit 1. With this decision, covering 548 pages, the Superior Administrative Court changed the decision of the Freiburg Administrative Court of the year 1977 and finally dismissed the action for annulment of the construction licence. The Superior Administrative Court acted upon the appeal brought in by the Land and the plant operator, Kernkraftwerksgesellschaft.

  7. The Jurisdiction of The Constitutional Court In Controlling The Constitutionality of Criminal Judgments: Kosovo Case

    OpenAIRE

    BRAHA, Florentina Shala; Vilard BYTYQI; VUNIQI, Dardan; Berisha, Fadil

    2016-01-01

    This paper will deal with individual requests that are submitted at the Constitutional Court in order to assess the constitutionality of criminal judicial decisions. The right to submit issues for assessing the constitutionality of criminal court decisions is a constitutionally guaranteed right. Many individuals who are dissatisfied with the decisions of the judicial instances use their right to oppose such a decision even at the Constitutional Court.Not all the cases submitted to the Court a...

  8. MODIFICATION BY THE COURT OF DISCIPLINARY SANCTION APPLIED TO THE EMPLOYEE IN ROMANIAN LABOUR LAW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LUPU Dan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available High Court of Justice recently ruled that a court has the right to change too drastic punishment inflicted on an employee by another, more appropriate in relation to the offense committed. The Supreme Court ruling clarifies such a legal provision that was applied by different courts: some substituted for disciplinary sanctions if it were disproportionate to the offense employee, while others refused to do so.

  9. Mortality of fire fighters in Western Australia.

    OpenAIRE

    Eliopulos, E; Armstrong, B K; Spickett, J T; Heyworth, F

    1984-01-01

    All except 17 (1.7%) of 990 fire fighters employed by the Western Australian Fire Brigade between 1 October 1939 and 31 December 1978 were successfully followed up to 31 December 1978. Mortality from all causes was less than expected (SMR 0.80 with 95% confidence interval 0.67 to 0.96). There was evidence of the healthy worker effect but none that mortality increased with increasing duration of employment. A small proportional excess of deaths from road traffic accidents ( SPMR 1.66) appeared...

  10. Attitudes of Australian and Turkish veterinary faculty toward animal welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izmirli, Serdar; Phillips, Clive J C

    2012-01-01

    The attitudes of veterinary faculty toward animal welfare were surveyed in four Australian and three Turkish veterinary schools. The former were considered to be typical of modern Western schools, with a faculty of more than 40% women and a primary focus on companion animals, whereas the latter were considered to represent more traditional veterinary teaching establishments, with a faculty of 88% men and a primary focus on livestock. A total of 116 faculty responded to the survey (42 Australian and 74 Turkish faculty members), for response rates of 30% and 33%, respectively. This survey included demographic questions as well as questions about attitudes toward animal-welfare issues. Women were more concerned than men about animal-welfare issues, especially the use of animals in experiments, zoos, entertainment, and sports and for food and clothing. Total scores demonstrated different concerns among Turkish and Australian faculty. The study demonstrates that the veterinary faculty of these two countries have different concerns for animal welfare, concerns that should be acknowledged in considering the welfare attitudes that students may adopt.

  11. Giving Back: A Community Service-Learning Manual for Youth Courts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degelman, Charles

    Youth courts are among the fastest-growing crime intervention in the nation. Youth courts divert minor offenders from overloaded juvenile courts and hold them responsible for their actions. They educate young people about the impact their actions have on others, teach about the legal system, and provide opportunities and a forum to develop and…

  12. A pilot study on the undefined role of court interpreters in South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In South Africa, legislation that clearly defines the role of court interpreters does not exist. Court interpreters find themselves performing tasks which should be the responsibility of other legal officials. This study considers how the lack of a clearly defined role for court interpreters affects the very quality of their interpreting.

  13. Secondary Prevention Services for Clients Who Are Low Risk in Drug Court: A Conceptual Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMatteo, David S.; Marlowe, Douglas B.; Festinger, David S.

    2006-01-01

    The drug court model assumes that most drug offenders are addicts, and that drug use fuels other criminal activity. As a result, drug court clients must satisfy an intensive regimen of treatment and supervisory obligations. However, research suggests that roughly one third of drug court clients do not have a clinically significant substance use…

  14. The European Courts and the Law of Treaties: The Continuing Story

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijper, P.J.; Cannizzaro, E.

    2011-01-01

    This chapter presents a critical analysis of the case law of the European Court of Justice and of the General Court relating to the application of the international law of treaties. It covers the some forty cases in which the Courts have referred explicitly to the Vienna Convention on the Law of

  15. Mental Retardation and the Law: A Report on Status of Current Court Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Paul, Ed.; Beck, Ronna Lee, Ed.

    Included in the booklet on mental retardation and the law are reports on 11 new court cases and updated information on 35 court cases reported in previous issues. Court cases cover the following issues: architectural barriers, commitment, criminal law, education, employment, guardianship, protection from harm, sterilization, treatment, and zoning.…

  16. The Efficacy of the Rio Hondo Dui Court: A 2-Year Field Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, John M.; Morral, Andrew R.; Raymond, Barbara; Eibner, Christine

    2007-01-01

    This study reports results from an evaluation of the experimental Rio Hondo driving under the influence (DUI) court of Los Angeles County, California. Interviews and official record checks with 284 research participants who were randomly assigned to a DUI court or a traditional criminal court were assessed at baseline and at 24-month follow-up.…

  17. 8 CFR 1003.23 - Reopening or reconsideration before the Immigration Court.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Immigration Court. 1003.23 Section 1003.23 Aliens and Nationality EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE GENERAL PROVISIONS EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW Immigration Court-Rules of Procedure § 1003.23 Reopening or reconsideration before the Immigration Court. (a) Pre-decision motions...

  18. 8 CFR 1003.46 - Protective orders, sealed submissions in Immigration Courts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Immigration Courts. 1003.46 Section 1003.46 Aliens and Nationality EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE GENERAL PROVISIONS EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW Immigration Court-Rules of Procedure § 1003.46 Protective orders, sealed submissions in Immigration Courts. (a) Authority. In any...

  19. 5 CFR 838.423 - OPM action on receipt of a court order acceptable for processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Processing Court Orders Affecting Refunds of Employee Contributions Application and Processing Procedures § 838.423 OPM action on receipt of a court order acceptable for processing. (a) If OPM receives a court order acceptable for processing that is directed at a refund of employee contributions, OPM will inform...

  20. 5 CFR 838.722 - OPM action on receipt of a court order acceptable for processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Processing Court Orders Awarding Former Spouse Survivor Annuities Application and Processing Procedures § 838.722 OPM action on receipt of a court order acceptable for processing. (a) If OPM receives a court order acceptable for processing that awards a former spouse survivor annuity based on the service of a...

  1. Researching Justification Texts of a First Instance Court from Assignment to Results and Reporting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langbroek, Philip|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/070260729; van der Linden - Smith, Tina|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304847674

    2014-01-01

    Court decisions are reasoned to legitimize them. Lay people seem to understand little of the work of the courts. One of the questions for court administrators and judges is: for whom do judges write their judgments? Is it possible to analyze judicial justification texts with a view to the audiences

  2. 32 CFR 724.224 - Court-martial specifications, presumption concerning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Court-martial specifications, presumption...-martial specifications, presumption concerning. (a) Relevant and material facts stated in a court-martial... dismissal adjudged by a court-martial case tried under the Uniform Code of Military Justice, the action may...

  3. 32 CFR 720.12 - Request for delivery of members serving sentence of court-martial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... of court-martial. 720.12 Section 720.12 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT... RECORDS Delivery of Personnel § 720.12 Request for delivery of members serving sentence of court-martial... members serving a sentence of a court-martial. Although seldom utilized, additional authority and...

  4. NL-Netherlands: Court applies Google Spain: no right to be forgotten for convicted criminal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breemen, V.

    2014-01-01

    On 18 September 2014, the Amsterdam Court handed down the first national application of the EU Court of Justice’s Google Spain judgment. The case was initiated by a convicted criminal after Google had not fully granted his online removal requests. The court rejected the claim, but it should be noted

  5. Adapting to Bad News: Lessons from the Harlem Parole Reentry Court

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Zachary K.

    2011-01-01

    The reentry court model was created to address the risks and needs of offenders returning to the community during the period immediately following release. While there is growing interest in reentry courts, research to date has been limited. This study utilized a quasi-experimental design, comparing reentry court participants with traditional…

  6. Stress Literacy in Australian Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varlow, Megan; Wuthrich, Viviana; Murrihy, Rachael; Remond, Louise; Tuqiri, Rebekka; van Kessel, Jacobine; Wheatley, Anna; Dedousis-Wallace, Anna; Kidman, Antony

    2009-01-01

    Stress literacy is a term that refers to knowledge about stress and stress management techniques. Levels of stress literacy were examined in more than nine hundred Australian adolescents by providing a short stress-management education session and assessing stress literacy using a pre-post survey design. It was found that while adolescents had a…

  7. Australian Nursing Informatics Competency Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Joanne; Bryce, Julianne

    2009-01-01

    A study of Australian nurses on their use of information technology in the workplace was undertaken by the Australian Nursing Federation (ANF) in 2007. This study of over 4000 nurses highlighted that nurses recognise benefits to adopting more information technology in the workplace although there are significant barriers to their use. It also identified gross deficits in the capacity of the nursing workforce to engage in the digital processing of information. Following the release of the study last year, the ANF commenced work on a number of key recommendations from the report in order to overcome identified barriers and provide opportunities for nurses to better utilise information technology and information management systems. One of these recommendations was to seek research funding to develop national information technology and information management competency standards for nurses. This project has now received Federal Government funding to undertake this development. This project is being developed in collaboration with the ANF and the Queensland University of Technology. This paper will discuss the methodology, development and publication of the Australian Nursing Informatics Competency Standards Project which is currently underway and due for completion in May 2009. The Australian Nursing Informatics Competencies will be presented at the conference.

  8. Australian Naturalism and Its Critics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyung, Park Sun

    1997-01-01

    Details the ongoing debate between Australian naturalists and their critics since the publication of C.W. Evers and G. Lakomski's seminal book "Knowing Educational Administration." Examines critics' views in several categories: the coherence concept, coherentism criteria, the naturalistic fallacy, and questions concerning foundations and…

  9. Big Ideas for Australian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Within weeks of taking office, Australia's new Labor government commissioned two major reviews--one of Australia's innovation system and one of Australian higher education. Taken together, these reviews will have major implications for the future of research and teaching in Australia for decades to come. This paper discusses the main…

  10. Australian Queer Science Fiction Fans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerry, Stephen Craig

    2017-10-23

    Science fiction (sf) does more than provide a fleeting moment of entertainment; it has many personal and social functions. In addition to offering audiences "romantic escapism" (Gerrold, 1996, pp. 5-6), sf also enables the "postulation of an alternative reality from which to contemplate this one" (Gerrold, 1996, pp. 5-6); as such, it is especially important "for groups which have had limited stakes in the status quo" (Jenkins, 1995, p. 242). To date, no research has been undertaken on the relationship between Australian queers and sf fandom. This article reports the findings of an online survey and explores the psycho-social features of Australian queer sf fans and why they like the genre. While the characteristics of this sample mirror those of Australian queers generally, they also have slightly higher rates of mental illness and are far more likely to state they have "no religion." Furthermore, while enjoying the "sciency" (P10, bisexual woman) aspects of sf, Australian queers also like the "poignant metaphors for our own civilization" (P45, asexual man).

  11. Techniques of Australian forest planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Australian Forestry Council

    1978-01-01

    Computer modeling has been extensively adopted for Australian forest planning over the last ten years. It has been confined almost entirely to the plantations of fast-growing species for which adequate inventory, growth, and experimental data are available. Stand simulation models have replaced conventional yield tables and enabled a wide range of alternative...

  12. Promoting Leadership in Australian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Andrew P.; Grice, Tim; Paulsen, Neil

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we review current practices for developing and promoting academic leadership in universities. We consider the forms of leadership that are appropriate for academic organisations, while exploring the types of leadership favoured by recruitment and promotion committees. Using the Australian higher education context as a case study, we…

  13. Right of action of foreign frontier neighbours before German administrative courts. Note on the judgement of the Federal Administrative Court of December 17, 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyerlin, U.

    1987-03-31

    The author examines the judgment of the Federal Administrative Court of December 17, 1986. In this decision the Court accepted the right of action of Dutch borderers against an atomic licence for a German nuclear power plant. The necessary involvement according to sec. 42 para. 2 of the Administrative Court Procedure Act results from the violation of the third party protection provision in sec. 7 Atomic Energy Act.

  14. Glacial oceanographic contrasts explain phylogeography of Australian bull kelp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Ceridwen I; Spencer, Hamish G; Waters, Jonathan M

    2009-05-01

    The evolutionary effects of Southern Hemisphere Pleistocene oceanographic conditions - marked by fluctuations in sea levels and water temperatures, and redirected currents - are poorly understood. The southeastern tip of Australia presents an intriguing model system for studying the biological impacts of palaeoceanography. In particular, contrasting oceanographic conditions that existed on eastern vs. western sides of the Bassian Isthmus during Pleistocene glacial periods allow for natural comparisons between putative refugial vs. re-invading populations. Whereas many western Tasmanian marine taxa were likely eliminated by cold subantarctic water during the last glacial period, eastern Tasmanian populations would have persisted in relatively warm temperatures mediated by the ongoing influence of the East Australian Current (EAC). Here we test for the effects of contrasting palaeoceanographic conditions on endemic bull kelp, Durvillaea potatorum, using DNA sequence analysis (COI; rbcL) of more than 100 individuals from 14 localities in southeastern Australia. Phylogenetic reconstructions reveal a deep (maximum divergence 4.7%) genetic split within D. potatorum, corresponding to the 'eastern' and 'western' geographical regions delimited by the Bassian Isthmus, a vicariant barrier during low Pleistocene sea levels. Concordant with the western region's cold glacial conditions, samples from western Tasmania and western Victoria are genetically monomorphic, suggesting postglacial expansion from a mainland refugium. Eastern samples, in contrast, comprise distinct regional haplogroups, suggesting the species persisted in eastern Tasmania throughout recent glacial periods. The deep east-west divergence seems consistent with earlier reports of morphological differences between 'western' and 'eastern' D. potatorum, and it seems likely that these forms represent reproductively isolated species.

  15. Calcium Intake in Elderly Australian Women Is Inadequate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin W. Binns

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The role of calcium in the prevention of bone loss in later life has been well established but little data exist on the adequacy of calcium intakes in elderly Australian women. The aim of this study was to compare the dietary intake including calcium of elderly Australian women with the Australian dietary recommendation, and to investigate the prevalence of calcium supplement use in this population. Community-dwelling women aged 70–80 years were randomly recruited using the Electoral Roll for a 2-year protein intervention study in Western Australia. Dietary intake was assessed at baseline by a 3-day weighed food record and analysed for energy, calcium and other nutrients. A total of 218 women were included in the analysis. Mean energy intake was 7,140 ± 1,518 kJ/day and protein provided 19 ± 4% of energy. Mean dietary calcium intake was 852 ± 298 mg/day, which is below Australian recommendations. Less than one quarter of women reported taking calcium supplements and only 3% reported taking vitamin D supplements. Calcium supplements by average provided calcium 122 ± 427 mg/day and when this was taken into account, total calcium intake increased to 955 ± 504 mg/day, which remained 13% lower than the Estimated Average Requirement (EAR, 1,100 mg/day for women of this age group. The women taking calcium supplements had a higher calcium intake (1501 ± 573 mg compared with the women on diet alone (813 ± 347 mg. The results of this study indicate that the majority of elderly women were not meeting their calcium requirements from diet alone. In order to achieve the recommended dietary calcium intake, better strategies for promoting increased calcium, from both diet and calcium supplements appears to be needed.

  16. Exploring Australian Aboriginal women's experiences of menopause: a descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurgenson, Janelle R; Jones, Emma K; Haynes, Emma; Green, Charmaine; Thompson, Sandra C

    2014-03-20

    Despite extensive literature demonstrating differing experiences in menopause around the world, documentation of the experience of menopause in Australian Aboriginal women is scarce, and thus their menopausal experience is relatively unknown. This study aimed to understand Australian Aboriginal women's understanding and experience of menopause and its impact on their lives. The study was an exploratory qualitative study. Twenty-five Aboriginal women were recruited from a regional centre in the Mid-West region of Western Australia using opportunistic and snowballing sampling. Interviews and focus group discussions were undertaken from February 2011 to February 2012 using open-ended questioning with a yarning technique. Thematic analysis was undertaken of the transcribed interviews. A number of themes were revealed. These related to the language used, meanings and attitudes to menopause, symptoms experienced, the role of men, a lack of understanding, coping mechanisms and the attribution of menopausal changes to something else. The term "change of life" was more widely recognised and signified the process of ageing, and an associated gain of respect in the local community. A fear of menopausal symptoms or uncertainty about their origin was also common. Overall, many women reported insufficient understanding and a lack of available information to assist them and their family to understand the transition. There are similarities between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal experiences of menopause, including similar symptom profiles. The current language used within mainstream health settings may not be appropriate to this population if it fails to recognise the importance of language and reflect the attributed meaning of menopause. The fear of symptoms and uncertainty of their relationship to menopause demonstrated a need for more information which has not adequately been supplied to Australian Aboriginal women through current services. While this study is with a select

  17. RADIATION PROTECTION IN AN INTERVENTIONAL LABORATORY: A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF AUSTRALIAN AND SAUDI ARABIAN HOSPITALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alahmari, Mohammed Ali S; Sun, Zhonghua; Bartlett, Andrew

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether the use of protection devices and attitudes of interventional professionals (including radiologists, cardiologists, vascular surgeons, medical imaging technicians and nurses) towards radiation protection will differ between Saudi Arabian and Australian hospitals. Hard copies of an anonymous survey were distributed to 10 and 6 clinical departments in the Eastern province of Saudi Arabia and metropolitan hospitals in Western Australia, respectively. The overall response rate was 43 % comprising 110 Australian participants and 63 % comprising 147 Saudi participants. Analysis showed that Australian respondents differed significantly from Saudi respondents with respect to their usages of leaded glasses (p radiation protection than the corresponding group in Saudi Arabia. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. [Expert Opinions in Court: Liability of the Expert].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiltenwolf, Marcus; Beckmann, Nickolas; Gaidzik, Peter

    2017-12-01

    Experts in criminal, civil and, increasingly, in social court cases have to present their expert opinions in court. This should be regarded not only as a burden, even if this may at times appear superfluous to the expert, perhaps because the discussion is mere repetition of the opinion he has already written, or because the questions appear to be biased against the expert. Nonetheless, the expert is always advised to appear calm and objective during the interrogation by judges and parties or participants and their legal representatives, and should not allow himself or herself to be provoked by questioning. Furthermore, it may be necessary to correct the written expert statement in the course of the interrogation, but this can be a sign of a truly competent medical expert. The expert consulted can be held liable for adverse health effects resulting from the interrogation and investigation, as well as for deliberate or grossly faulty reports. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Keeping potentially responsible parties (PRPs) out of bankruptcy courts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamberg, G.L. (Milling, Benson, Woodward, Hillyer, Pierson and Miller, New Orleans, LA (United States))

    1992-03-01

    In an era when the cost of compliance with state and federal environmental laws is rapidly rising, sometimes entities, such as operators of waste sites, are unable to pay these and other operating costs and are forced to file for bankruptcy. Citing Midlantic Nat'l Bank v. N.J. Dep's of Envtl. Protection and state environmental laws, bankruptcy trustees may be suing PRPs in bankruptcy courts to share the costs to clean up debtors' waste sites. This article suggests strategies by which PRPs can avoid litigating such lawsuits in the bankruptcy courts and instead resolve them before state and/or federal forums - where they properly belong.

  20. Prometheus: the Supreme Court redefines the patentability of diagnostic inventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumamoto, Andrew; Schmid, Cora L

    2012-12-01

    The United States Supreme Court recently issued an opinion regarding the patentability of claims directed to diagnostic methods in Mayo Collab. Service v. Prometheus Lab., Inc. In this opinion, the Supreme Court held that correlations between metabolite levels in the human body and either therapeutic efficacy or adverse effects are unpatentable laws of nature. It further found that a patent claim to a method including such a correlation is unpatentable if the remainder of the claim contains only conventional and well-known steps. The Prometheus decision creates uncertainty regarding the scope of patentable subject matter, particularly in the fields of diagnostic and personalized medicine, that will remain until future cases apply this new doctrine.

  1. Prosecutors and Use of Restorative Justice in Courts: Greek Case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasileski, Gabriela

    2015-06-18

    The purpose of this research study was to examine the experiences of prosecutors in Athens, Greece, as they implement a restorative justice (RJ; mediation) model in cases of intimate partner violence (IPV). Greece recently enacted a new legislation related to domestic violence, part of the requirement is mediation. This study used semi-structured interviews with 15 public prosecutors at the courts of first instance and three interviews with facilitators of mediation process. The findings indicate widespread role confusion. Prosecutors' experiences, professional positions, and views of RJ in adult cases of gendered violence were shaped by their legal training. That is, their perceptions reflected their work in an adversarial system. Their views were complex yet ultimately unreceptive and their practices failed the victims of IPV. The study report concluded with recommendations for the legislators and for better preparation of court actors. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. [The Cagliari (Italy) Court authorizes the preimplantation genetic diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorqui Azofra, María

    2007-01-01

    Today, preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) has been greatly accepted within the framework of positive law of many European countries. Nevertheless, in other countries, such as Italy, it is forbidden by law. The ruling of the Civil Court of Cagliari which has authorized its use to a Sardinian couple, has opened, in this way, a small crack to be able to asses possible modifications to the Italian regulation on this matter. This article analyses the ruling of the Civil Court of Cagliari (Italy) from an ethical and legal perspective. The criteria which is used to analyse the legitimacy or illegitimacy of the practice of PGD is analysed. That is, on reasons which could justify or not the transfer of embryos in vitro to the woman. With this objective in mind, the Italian and Spanish normative models which regulates this controversial subject are looked at. As a conclusion, a critical evaluation of the arguments presented is made.

  3. National constitutional courts in the European Constitutional Democracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Komárek, Jan

    2014-01-01

    This article critically assesses the transformation of national constitutional courts’ place in the law and politics of the EU and its member states. This process eliminates the difference between constitutional and ordinary national courts, which is crucial for the institutional implementation...... the EU and its member states, understood together as the European Constitutional Democracy—the central notion developed in this article in order to support an argument that should speak to both EU lawyers and national constitutionalists....... of the discourse theory of law and democracy. It also disrupts the symbiotic relationship between national constitutional democracies established after World War II and European integration. The article argues that maintaining the special place of national constitutional courts is in the vital interest of both...

  4. Rule by Law: The Politics of Courts in Authoritarian Regimes

    OpenAIRE

    Tom Ginsburg; Tamir Moustafa

    2008-01-01

    Scholars have generally assumed that courts in authoritarian states are pawns oftheir regimes, upholding the interests of governing elites and frustrating the effortsof their opponents. As a result, nearly all studies in comparative judicial politicshave focused on democratic and democratizing countries. This volume bringstogether leading scholars in comparative judicial politics to consider the causesand consequences of judicial empowerment in authoritarian states. It demonstratesthe wide ra...

  5. Quality Issues of Court Reporters and Transcriptionists for Qualitative Research

    OpenAIRE

    Hennink, Monique; Weber, Mary Beth

    2013-01-01

    Transcription is central to qualitative research, yet few researchers identify the quality of different transcription methods. We described the quality of verbatim transcripts from traditional transcriptionists and court reporters by reviewing 16 transcripts from 8 focus group discussions using four criteria: transcription errors, cost and time of transcription, and effect on study participants. Transcriptionists made fewer errors, captured colloquial dialogue, and errors were largely influen...

  6. Enemy Combatant Detainees: Habeas Corpus Challenges in Federal Court

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-05

    way ratchet .”). 259 Cf. Felker, 518 U.S. 663 (Holding that restrictions on successive petitions for habeas corpus by prisoners convicted in state...Evangelical Lutheran Church of Glendale v. Los Angeles County, 482 U.S. 304 (1987)(holding that the Constitution mandates effective remedies for...Constitution’s due process protections did not extend to non-citizen detainees held at Guantanamo. 304 In October 2009, the Supreme Court granted certiorari to

  7. A PLEADING IN FAVOUR OF THE CONSTITUTIONAL COURT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina BĂRBĂŢEANU

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Most of the European countries have chosen the centralized system of constitutional review, performed by a unique authority empowered with the competence of removing from the normative ensemble those legal provisions that do not comply with the principles and rules comprised in the Basic Law. This „European model” has proved to be more appropriate than the so-called „American model” in what concerns the compatibility with the European jurisdictional mechanism. Romania has adopted the same European trend and the Constitutional Court has become a very important actor in the Romanian legal landscape. From the very beginning of its activity, it has influenced in a great measure the national normative system. It has been sometimes criticized and accused that it interferes in an excessive way in the legislative process. Due to its competence to regulate the juridical conflicts between the public authorities and its possibility to repeal laws before their promulgation, it has been many times in the centre of heavy attacks, mostly from different political forces, often driven through mass media. Nevertheless, despite of its detractors, the Constitutional Court has proven, over the years, its ability to develop the Romanian normative system. The present paper intends to display the most significant contribution of the Romanian Constitutional Court in improving various legal regulations. In the same time and much more important, using concrete examples from the Court’s case-law, the paper also intends to demonstrate that the Constitutional Court of Romania has been a major factor of improving peoples’ life, removing unconstitutional obstacles set in front of the unimpeded exercise of their fundamental rights and freedoms.

  8. A History of Court and Commoner Clothing in Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liam C. Kelley

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Trần Quang Đức. Ngàn năm áo mũ: Lich sử trang phục Việt Nam giai đoạn 1009–1945 [One thousand years of caps and robes: A history of Vietnamese clothing in the period 1009–1945]. TP Hồ Chí Minh: Nhã Nam, 2013. ISBN: 1467557900. Đức documents in incredible detail the history of the sartorial decisions made at various Vietnamese courts, from Quyền’s time until the end of the Nguyễn dynasty. Based on an extensive examination of Vietnamese, Chinese, European, and even Korean sources—most of which only briefly mention clothing in various periods—Đức has succeeded in producing a comprehensive overview of the clothing of Vietnamese rulers and their officials; when possible, he also comments on the dress of other segments of society, such as the military and commoners. One Thousand Years of Caps and Robes devotes a chapter to each Vietnamese dynasty: the Lý, the Trần, the Lê, the Tây Sơn, and the Nguyễn. Đức begins each chapter with an overview of the history of that dynasty’s styles of court dress and then goes into a detailed description of exactly which types of cap and robe the ruler and his officials wore, and in what ways these caps and robes extended previous practices or were innovations. He follows his examination of court dress with a discussion of military and commoner attire. The chapter introductions provide a concise history of changes in court clothing across time, while the detailed discussions of the caps and robes from each period offer a deeper level of understanding...

  9. Current issues in the design of running and court shoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinschmidt, C; Nigg, B M

    2000-09-01

    This review paper focuses on the three most important functional design factors for sport shoes: injury prevention, performance and comfort. Concepts for these design factors are discussed for running and court shoes. For running shoes, pronation control and cushioning are still considered to be the key concepts for injury prevention despite the fact that conclusive clinical and epidemiological evidence is missing to show the efficacy of these design strategies. Several design features have been proposed to be effective in controlling the amount of pronation. However, the kinematic effects of such features seem to be subject-specific and rather small especially when looking at the actual skeletal motion. Recent running shoe research suggests that cushioning may not or only marginally be related to injuries and that cushioning during the impact phase of running may be more related to aspects such as comfort, muscle tuning or fatigue. For court shoes, lateral stability, torsional flexibility, cushioning and traction control appear to be important design strategies to decrease the risk of injury. With respect to running performance, the shoe concepts of weight reduction, efficiency and energy return are discussed. The concept of energy return does not seem to be a feasible concept whereas concepts which aim to minimize energy loss appear to be more promising and successful, e.g. weight reduction, reduction of muscle energy required for stabilization. For court shoes, optimal traction seems to be the key factor for performance. Research in the area of shoe comfort is still sparse. Cushioning, fitting and climate concepts appear to improve the comfort of both running and court shoes. Many investigations in the area of sport shoe research have shown that subject-specific responses can be expected. Different groups of athletes may require different types of shoes. The definition of these grouping characteristics and their design needs seem to be the most important

  10. Judicial Activity Concerning Enemy Combatant Detainees: Major Court Rulings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    discussed in greater detail in other CRS products, including CRS Report RL33180, Enemy Combatant Detainees: Habeas Corpus Challenges in Federal Court...by Jennifer K. Elsea and Michael John Garcia; CRS Report RL34536, Boumediene v. Bush: Guantanamo Detainees’ Right to Habeas Corpus , by Michael John...of their detention in habeas corpus proceedings. However, many other issues remain the subject of ongoing litigation, including the full scope of the

  11. Manual for Courts-Martial United States 1998 Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    if the accused was an aggressor, engaged in mutual combat, or provoked the attack which gave rise to the apprehension, unless the accused had...the court-martial, is returned to that state or foreign country under the authority of a mutual agreement or treaty, as the case may be. (C) As...genital-genital, oral-genital, anal-genital, or oral-anal, whether be- tween person of the same or opposite sex; (2) bestiality; (3) masturbation

  12. Federal Constitutional Court. Decision of July 8, 1982 (Wyhl)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-04-01

    With the decision of July 8, 1982, the second senate of the Federal Constitutional Court judged the action on constitutional grounds, brought in by the municipality of Sassbach near Kaiserstuhl to achieve annulment of the construction permit for Wyhl nuclear power plant, to be inadmissible and also partly unfounded. This decision was taken unanimously. In its statement the Court explains basic ideas on the applicability of the Basic Law with regard to juristic persons within the purview of public law and activities on their part outside the scope of fulfilment of public tasks, as well as on the compatibility of material regulations of preclusion in administrative procedures with the Basic Law, especially with article 19, sub-section (4) of the Basic Law. The Court decided that a municipality is not in the position to claim the right of property as laid down in article 14, para. (1) no. 1 of the Basic Law, even if it becomes active outside the scope of fulfilment of public tasks.

  13. Current Perspectives on Profiling and Enhancing Wheelchair Court Sport Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulson, Thomas; Goosey-Tolfrey, Victoria

    2017-03-01

    Despite the growing interest in Paralympic sport, the evidence base for supporting elite wheelchair sport performance remains in its infancy when compared with able-bodied (AB) sport. Subsequently, current practice is often based on theory adapted from AB guidelines, with a heavy reliance on anecdotal evidence and practitioner experience. Many principles in training prescription and performance monitoring with wheelchair athletes are directly transferable from AB practice, including the periodization and tapering of athlete loads around competition, yet considerations for the physiological consequences of an athlete's impairment and the interface between athlete and equipment are vital when targeting interventions to optimize in-competition performance. Researchers and practitioners are faced with the challenge of identifying and implementing reliable protocols that detect small but meaningful changes in impairment-specific physical capacities and on-court performance. Technologies to profile both linear and rotational on-court performance are an essential component of sport-science support to understand sport-specific movement profiles and prescribe training intensities. In addition, an individualized approach to the prescription of athlete training and optimization of the "wheelchair-user interface" is required, accounting for an athlete's anthropometrics, sports classification, and positional role on court. In addition to enhancing physical capacities, interventions must focus on the integration of the athlete and his or her equipment, as well as techniques for limiting environmental influence on performance. Taken together, the optimization of wheelchair sport performance requires a multidisciplinary approach based on the individual requirements of each athlete.

  14. WOMEN, CRIME AND THE SECULAR COURT IN EIGHTEENTH CENTURY CLUJ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Fehér

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this presentation is to address the issue of female criminality in early modern Cluj, and to analyze women’s position before the law. Our investigation is based on the records of the secular Court from the town Cluj, where we have identified more than 250 cases of women accused of fornication, adultery, witchcraft, infanticide, theft and drunkenness, poisoning, swearing and slander. There were a significant number of female convictions during the century, from which most ended with light sentences, such as banishment, corporal punishments, stigmatizations with hot iron, mutilations and only occasionally death. We would like to analyze in detail the types of crime and their punishments presenting the legal background, the jurisdiction and the habitual practices of the Court. We would also like to underline the importance of the narrative strategies used in these inquisitorial trials, since our documents reveal female criminality from a male perspective, as in these times men ran the legal system, consequently the Court records, in our reading contain moral, legal and sexual elements of a male discourse on female crime.

  15. Eclipses in Australian Aboriginal Astronomy

    OpenAIRE

    Hamacher, Duane W.; Norris, Ray P.

    2011-01-01

    We explore 50 Australian Aboriginal accounts of lunar and solar eclipses to determine how Aboriginal groups understood this phenomenon. We summarise the literature on Aboriginal references to eclipses, showing that many Aboriginal groups viewed eclipses negatively, frequently associating them with bad omens, evil magic, disease, blood and death. In many communities, Elders or medicine men were believed to have the ability to control or avert eclipses by magical means, solidifying their role a...

  16. Contemporary Australian writers and Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Maver

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available It is amazing to see just how much travel writing, writing which does not exclusively belong to the travel sub-genre of "creative non-fiction", and also how many non-Australian locales, with emphasis on European and Asian ones, there are in the recent contemporary Australian writing since the 1960s. This perhaps speaks about a certain preoccupation or downright trait in the Australian national character. Perhaps, it is a reflection of a particular condition of being "down under", itself derived from "a tradition of colonialism and post-colonialism; from geographical location, both a deterrent and a spur; from post-Romantic literary tradition, coinciding with the early years of white settlement; and from the universal lure of ideas of travel, never more flourishing than at the present" (Hergenhan, Petersson xiii. Tourism is an increasingly global phenomenon to some extent shaping the physical reality as well as the spiritual world of the people involved in it. Within this globalization process, with the prospect of "cyber" travel, there is, however, always an individual "national" experience of the country of destination that a literary traveller puts into words, an experience which is typical and conditioned by specific socio-political and cultural circumstances.

  17. Reaching out: caring for women prisoners in Western Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraghty, Sadie

    2015-01-01

    Incarcerated women are a vulnerable group with complex needs in pregnancy, birth and early parenting; and this is further complicated with a drug and/or alcohol addiction. Prior to the establishment of an antenatal outreach clinic in a Western Australian prison for women, pregnant inmates received fragmented antenatal care. Some of the women did not disclose drug and alcohol issues for fear of involvement of child protection services, and some refused to be transported for care to maternity hospitals for antenatal appointments. This is the first antenatal care clinic for pregnant women to be established within a prison population in Western Australia.

  18. The Australian Integrated Marine Observing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, R.; Meyers, G.; Roughan, M.; Operators, I.

    2008-12-01

    currents and water properties (Moorings, Ocean Gliders and HF Radar) and three for coastal ecosystems (Acoustic Tagging and Tracking, Autonomous Underwater Vehicle and a biophysical sensor network on the Great Barrier Reef). The value from this infrastructure investment lies in the coordinated deployment of a wide range of equipment aimed at deriving critical data sets that serve multiple applications. Additional information on IMOS is available at the website (http://www.imos.org.au). The IMOS Operators are Australian Institute of Marine Science, James Cook University, Sydney Institute of Marine Science, Geoscience Australia, Bureau of Meteorology, South Australia Research and Development Institute, University of Western Australia, Curtin University of Technology, CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research, University of Tasmania.

  19. Modelling seasonality in Australian building approvals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry M Karamujic

    2012-02-01

    . The observed seasonality could be attributed to the ‘summer holidays’ and ‘the end of financial year’ seasonal effects. [1] Victoria is geographically the second smallest state in Australia. It is also the second most populous state in Australia. Australia has six states (New South Wales, Queensland, South Australia, Tasmania, Victoria, and Western Australia, and two territories (the Northern Territory and the Australian Capital Territory.[2] A modelling approach based on the assumption of deterministic trend and deterministic seasonality.

  20. Nursing students' perspectives of the health and healthcare issues of Australian Indigenous people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Leanne; Ramjan, Lucie; McDonald, Glenda; Koch, Jane; Baird, David; Salamonson, Yenna

    2015-03-01

    Indigenous people are the most disadvantaged population within Australia with living conditions comparable to developing countries. The Bachelor of Nursing programme at the University of Western Sydney has embedded Indigenous health into the undergraduate teaching programme, with an expectation that students develop an awareness of Indigenous health and healthcare issues. To gain insight into students' perceptions of Indigenous people and whether the course learning and teaching strategies implemented improved students' learning outcomes and attitude towards Indigenous people and Indigenous health in Australia. A mixed methods prospective survey design was chosen. Students enrolled in the Indigenous health subject in 2013 were invited to complete pre- and post-subject surveys that contained closed- and open-ended questions. Students' socio-demographic data was collected at baseline, but the 'Attitude Toward Indigenous Australians' (ATIA) scale, and the 3-item Knowledge, Interest and Confidence to nursing Australian Indigenous peoples scale were administered at both pre- and post-subject surveys. 502 students completed the baseline survey and 249 students completed the follow-up survey. There was a statistically significant attitudinal change towards Indigenous Australians, measured by the ATIA scale, and participants' knowledge, intent to work with Indigenous Australians and confidence in caring for them increased significantly at follow-up. Based on the participants' responses to open-ended questions, four key themes emerged: a) understanding Indigenous history, culture and healthcare; b) development of cultural competence; c) enhanced respect for Indigenous Australians' culture and traditional practices; and d) enhanced awareness of the inherent disadvantages for Indigenous Australians in education and healthcare. There were no statistically significant socio-demographic group differences among those who commented on key themes. Addressing health inequalities for

  1. Mean Atmospheric Conditions - Australian Tropical Operating Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-10-01

    analysis method used to define the current ARDU mean ,opi:al atmosphere; b. liaise with appropriate agencies ’eg DRCS, Bureau of Meteorology to assess...encountered in the Austr-alian region . .3 Current Australian _’,teorological Data. 23.1 The Bureau of Meteorology is the prime Australian agen-j -on:e...tropical atmosphere has not been determined, the atmosphere is consistent with current Bureau of Meteorology records which form the basis of Reference E

  2. Improving forensic mental health care for Aboriginal Australians: challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durey, Angela; Wynaden, Dianne; Barr, Lesley; Ali, Mohammed

    2014-06-01

    Mental illnesses constitute a major burden of disease in Aboriginal Australians and Torres Strait Islanders (hereafter Aboriginal Australians), who are also overrepresented in the prison system. A legacy of colonization compounds such prevalence, and is further exacerbated by the persistence of racial discrimination and insensitivity across many sectors, including health. This research completed in a Western Australian forensic mental health setting identifies non-Aboriginal health professionals' support needs to deliver high-quality, culturally-safe care to Aboriginal patients. Data were collected from health professionals using an online survey and 10 semistructured interviews. Survey and interview results found that ongoing education was needed for staff to provide culturally-safe care, where Aboriginal knowledge, beliefs, and values were respected. The findings also support previous research linking Aboriginal health providers to improved health outcomes for Aboriginal patients. In a colonized country, such as Australia, education programmes that critically reflect on power relations privileging white Anglo-Australian cultural dominance and subjugating Aboriginal knowledge, beliefs, and values are important to identify factors promoting or compromising the care of Aboriginal patients and developing a deeper understanding of 'cultural safety' and its clinical application. Organizational commitment is needed to translate the findings to support non-Aboriginal health professionals deliver high-quality care to Aboriginal patients that is respectful of cultural differences. © 2013 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  3. Punishing Genocide: A Comparative Empirical Analysis of Sentencing Laws and Practices at the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR, Rwandan Domestic Courts, and Gacaca Courts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbora Hola

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article compares sentencing of those convicted of participation in the 1994 genocide in Rwanda. With over one million people facing trial, Rwanda constitutes the world’s most comprehensive case of criminal accountability after genocide and presents an important case study of punishing genocide. Criminal courts at three different levels— international, domestic, and local—sought justice in the aftermath of the violence. In order to compare punishment at each level, we analyze an unprecedented database of sentences given by the ICTR, the Rwandan domestic courts, and Rwanda’s Gacaca courts. The analysis demonstrates that sentencing varied across the three levels—ranging from limited time in prison to death sentences. We likewise find that sentencing at the domestic courts appears to have been comparatively more serious than sentencing at the ICTR and at the Gacaca courts, which calls into question consistency of sentences across levels of justice and should be explored in future research.

  4. Law Enforcement Efforts Against Contempt Of Court As The Judges Shield In Indonesian Justice System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wisnu Baroto

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The contempt of court basically is one of criminal offenses against the administration of justice which as a whole deals with the criminal justice system. The contempt of court cases that occurred in Indonesia but the enforcement of the law against the contempt of court is an issue that is never-ending. The provisions of contempt of court are necessary to ensure the position trust authority and integrity of the court in the judicial process including all matters relating to the judicial process. Guarantee that once the public interest to take action against any violation as an endorsement of the judicial process the rights of the public to ensure a fair trial and protecting privacy. On the other hand there is also a public interest that cant be ignored in any democratic society namely the right to freedom of speech and expression. A manifestation of contempt of court is a speech writing pictures or other expressions that can be categorized as a contempt of court. In other words contempt of court is a restriction of the right to freedom of speech opinion and expression. How to limit the collision of the purposes of enforcing the provisions of contempt of court with the right to freedom of speech freedom of opinion and expression. Preparation of deeds category and procedures for enforcement of contempt of court must be specifically and carefully.

  5. A testable theory of problem solving courts: Avoiding past empirical and legal failures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiener, Richard L; Winick, Bruce J; Georges, Leah Skovran; Castro, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    Recent years have seen a proliferation of problem solving courts designed to rehabilitate certain classes of offenders and thereby resolve the underlying problems that led to their court involvement in the first place. Some commentators have reacted positively to these courts, considering them an extension of the philosophy and logic of Therapeutic Jurisprudence, but others show concern that the discourse surrounding these specialty courts has not examined their process or outcomes critically enough. This paper examines that criticism from historical and social scientific perspectives. The analysis culminates in a model that describes how offenders are likely to respond to the process as they engage in problem solving court programs and the ways in which those courts might impact subsequent offender conduct. This Therapeutic Jurisprudence model of problem solving courts draws heavily on social cognitive psychology and more specifically on theories of procedural justice, motivation, and anticipated emotion to offer an explanation of how offenders respond to these programs. We offer this model as a lens through which social scientists can begin to address the concern that there is not enough critical analysis of the process and outcome of these courts. Applying this model to specialty courts constitutes an important step in critically examining the contribution of problem solving courts. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The Australian Natural Disaster Resilience Index

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Parsons, Melissa; Morley, Philip

    2017-01-01

    The Australian Natural Disaster Resilience Index - a consistent spatial assessment of the current state of disaster resilience across Australia - produces the Disaster Resilience Report - Index will...

  7. Remote and Local SST Forcing in Shaping Asian-Australian Monsoon Anomalies

    OpenAIRE

    Tim, LI; Y. C., TUNG; J. W., HWU; IPRC and Department of Meteorology, University of Hawaii; Central Weather Bureau

    2005-01-01

    The most striking feature of the Asian-Australian monsoon associated with the El Nino teleconnection is the evolution of anomalous anticyclones over the western North Pacific (WNP) and southeast Indian Ocean (SIO). In this study we investigated the relative role of remote and local SST forcing in shaping the monsoon anomalies with an atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM). Four idealized AGCM experiments were designed to isolate the effect of anomalous SST forcing from the tropical east...

  8. Legacies of Resistance: Australian Indigenous Resistance Leaders in Indigenous Film, Theatre and Literature

    OpenAIRE

    MATTEO DUTTO

    2017-01-01

    Indigenous resistance to colonisation is a key theme in Australian Indigenous frontier histories, although most knowledge on these events is drawn from non-indigenous sources of information and framed within Western historiographies that can mask continuities between past and present. This thesis develops a decolonising framework to look at how Indigenous cultural producers are redressing this rift through retellings of their stories of Indigenous resistance leaders like Pemulwuy (Bidjigal), ...

  9. Temperature and compositional variations in the Australian cratons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesauro, Magdala; Kaban, Mikhail; Aitken, Alan; Kennett, Brian

    2017-04-01

    composition and the iterative process continues until the convergence is achieved. The results show larger iron depletion in the Western Australian craton than in the Proterozoic terranes. Furthermore, at depths larger than 150 km, the depletion becomes negligible beneath the Proterozoic regions, while persists in the Western Australian craton.

  10. Court Administrators and the Judiciary — Partners in the Delivery of Justice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne Stewart Martin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article examines several topics relating to the administration and governance of courts in democratic societies.  It includes a summary of the development of court administration as a profession, highlighting Australia and the United States.  The summary includes a discussion of how judges and court administrators must work together and coordinate their efforts in key areas of court administration and management.  The article also reviews separation of powers issues, highlighting the problems that emerge in systems in which oversight and administration of the courts is vested in the executive branch or power of government, most commonly in a justice ministry.  It reviews the practical advantages of having courts governed and managed through institutional mechanisms within the judicial power rather than the executive power.

  11. The Impact of Teen Court on Rural Adolescents: Improved Social Relationships, Psychological Functioning, and School Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smokowski, Paul R; Rose, Roderick A; Evans, Caroline B R; Barbee, James; Cotter, Katie L; Bower, Meredith

    2017-08-01

    Teen Court is a prevention program aimed at diverting first time juvenile offenders from the traditional juvenile justice system and reintegrating them into the community. Few studies have examined if Teen Court impacts adolescent functioning. We examined how Teen Court participation impacted psychosocial functioning, social relationships, and school experiences in a sample of 392 rural Teen Court participants relative to two comparison samples, one from the same county as Teen Court (n = 4276) and one from a neighboring county (n = 3584). We found that Teen Court has the potential to decrease internalizing symptoms, externalizing behavior, violent behavior, parent-adolescent conflict, and delinquent friends, and increase self-esteem and school satisfaction.

  12. Differences in food and nutrient intakes between Australian- and Asian-born women living in Australia: Results from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huaqing; Hall, John J; Xu, Xiaoyue; Mishra, Gita D; Byles, Julie E

    2017-12-27

    To determine differences in food and nutrient intakes between Australian- and Asian-born women living in Australia. Data were obtained from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health, including 6461 women born in Australia or Asia who completed food frequency questionnaires in 2001 and 2013. Diet was assessed using the Dietary Questionnaire for Epidemiological Studies version 2. Longitudinal generalised estimating-equation modelling was performed to determine the effect of country of birth and survey year on fruit and vegetable intake. Asian-born women ate more cereals, soybeans and fish but less vegetables, legumes, dairy, meat and meat products than Australian-born women both in 2001 and in 2013. Asian-born women ate less cereals, rice and noodles, meat and its products (P Asian-born women had a lower daily intake of fat, calcium, zinc, thiamin, riboflavin, folate and retinol compared with those born in Australia. Asian-born women living in Australia show different food and nutrient intakes from Australian-born women, although their diets tend to deviate from typical Asian characteristics and approach a Western diet. © 2017 Dietitians Association of Australia.

  13. Utilities, marketers identify with tax issures in Supreme Court case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warkentin, D. [ed.

    1997-04-01

    A recent US Supreme Court decision effectively highlights the continuing disparity that exists in the taxation of regulated vs. nonregulated energy companies that engage in similar activities. While the federal case (General Motors Corp., vs. Tracy) and its decision involved natural gas utilities and natural gas marketers and how they are taxed locally, some noted electric utility industry professionals said the ruling has the potential of impacting the electric utility industry as it deregulates and works through the tax inequities that exist between it and independent unregulated power marketers. According to the Washington, DC-based law firm Chadbourne & Park LLP, under the Supreme Court ruling, which was handed down in late February and favored gas utilities, {open_quotes}a state can discriminate in favor of regulated utilities by exempting natural gas purchased from local distribution companies from sales taxes while collecting taxes on so-called selfhelp gas bought from gas producers at the wellhead or from independent marketers.{close_quotes} The US Supreme Court ruling appears to be important for the electric utility industry and independent power marketers in that there currently exists similar disparities with respect to taxation. The case involved Ohio and a tax it levies on natural gas. Ohio collects a 5 percent sales or use tax on gas purchased for consumption. According to Chadbourne & Park, in Ohio this tax can be as much as 7 percent when local taxes are tacked on to the state`s 5 percent tax. However, local distribution companies (LDC) are exempt from this tax. LDCs are essentially the local natural gas company or companies that many states, such as Ohio, have. In Ohio, these natural gas companies, which have generally been interpreted as those companies that produce, transport and deliver natural gas to Ohio consumers, are fully exempt from sales and use taxes.

  14. A western boundary current eddy characterisation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribbe, Joachim; Brieva, Daniel

    2016-12-01

    The analysis of an eddy census for the East Australian Current (EAC) region yielded a total of 497 individual short-lived (7-28 days) cyclonic and anticyclonic eddies for the period 1993 to 2015. This was an average of about 23 eddies per year. 41% of the tracked individual cyclonic and anticyclonic eddies were detected off southeast Queensland between about 25 °S and 29 °S. This is the region where the flow of the EAC intensifies forming a swift western boundary current that impinges near Fraser Island on the continental shelf. This zone was also identified as having a maximum in detected short-lived cyclonic eddies. A total of 94 (43%) individual cyclonic eddies or about 4-5 per year were tracked in this region. The census found that these potentially displaced entrained water by about 115 km with an average displacement speed of about 4 km per day. Cyclonic eddies were likely to contribute to establishing an on-shelf longshore northerly flow forming the western branch of the Fraser Island Gyre and possibly presented an important cross-shelf transport process in the life cycle of temperate fish species of the EAC domain. In-situ observations near western boundary currents previously documented the entrainment, off-shelf transport and export of near shore water, nutrients, sediments, fish larvae and the renewal of inner shelf water due to short-lived eddies. This study found that these cyclonic eddies potentially play an important off-shelf transport process off the central east Australian coast.

  15. Depression, Readiness for Change, and Treatment Among Court-Mandated DUI Offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nochajski, Thomas H; Stasiewicz, Paul R; Patterson, David A

    2013-01-01

    The current study is part of a larger study that was designed to evaluate the impact of brief interventions on subsequent alcohol and drug use of individuals convicted of driving under the influence (DUI). This element considers the interaction of depression levels with treatment on subsequent substance use and problems related to substance use. Subjects were referred to the Research Institute on Addictions from various courts in the Western New York area for clinical evaluation and treatment referral, if further treatment was indicated. A total of 765 individuals were referred to the program, with 549 agreeing to participate. Participants were assessed at baseline using a number of different measures, with depression and readiness to change among them. A follow-up assessment took place 18-24 months following the baseline, with subsequent treatment experiences being one of the primary measures of interest for this study. A total of 443 participants were successfully interviewed at follow-up. The high depression group had greater readiness to change and a greater likelihood of entering treatment than the low depression group ( p 's DUI risk, alcohol expectancies, abstinence self-efficacy, and psychiatric distress (all p 's DUI offenders' readiness to change their substance use behavior.

  16. The International Criminal Court and Peace Processes in Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gissel, Line Engbo

    The book investigates how involvement by the International Criminal Court (ICC) affects efforts to negotiate peace. It offers an interpretive account of how peace negotiators and mediators in two peace processes in Uganda and Kenya sought to navigate and understand the new terrain of international...... justice, while also tracing how and why international decision-making processes interfered with the negotiations, narrated the conflicts and insisted on a narrow scope of justice. Building on this interpretive analysis, a comparative analysis of peace processes in Uganda, Kenya and Colombia explores a set...... of general features pertaining to the judicialisation of peace....

  17. Ambient Response Analysis of the Heritage Court Tower Building Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brincker, Rune; Andersen, P.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper an ambient response analysis of the Heritage Court Building structure is presented. The work is a part of a blind test organised by Professor Carlos Ventura, University of British Columbia. The response data were analysed using two different techniques: a non-parametric based...... on Frequency Domain Decomposition (FDD), and a parametric technique working on the raw data in time domain, a data driven Stochastic Subspace Identification (SSI) algorithm. Both techniques identified 11 modes under 10 Hz. One case of three close modes and one case of two close modes were identified. For all...

  18. Ambient Response Analysis of the Heritage Court Tower Building Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brincker, Rune; Andersen, Palle

    2000-01-01

    In this paper an ambient response analysis of the Heritage Court Building structure is presented. The work is a part of a blind test organized by Professor Carlos Ventura, University of British Columbia. The response data were analyses using two different techniques: a non-parametric based...... on Frequency Domain Decomposition (FDD), and a parametric technique working on the raw data in time domain, a data driven Stochastic Subspace Identification (SSI) algorithm. Both techniques identified 11 modes under 10 HZ. One case of three close modes and one case of two close modes were identified. For all...

  19. The Communitarian Function of Court-Martial Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-04-01

    participation itself has inherent value. In Balzac v. Porto Rico,𔄂 1 the Court held that "(t)he jury system postulates a conscious duty of participation...One of the issues in Balzac was whether the Sixth Amendment right to ajury trial applied to those criminal prosecutions occurring in a territory...States Corps of Cadets: duty, honor , country.380 The value "duty" means to perform one’s duty to the best of one’s ability, as if one’s entire reputation

  20. Japan’s Supreme Court Discourse and Lifetime Employment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tackney, Charles T.; Sato, Toyoko

    on the Court's discourse. Causally related to this recognition, management councils (a form of employee participation in managerial prerogative) are also a defining feature of Japanese employment relations at the enterprise level. Despite unionization rate declines in both nations, the persistence of Japan......'s participatory employee relations system contrasts sharply with recent U.S. state-based legislative assaults on long-standing collective bargaining, particularly for public sector unions. The concept of cultural cognition, recently deployed in legal studies to account for domestic U.S. risk, public policy...

  1. Discovery en de WHPC (case note : Commercial Court of Termonde - 3 January 2000

    OpenAIRE

    Wautelet, Patrick

    2000-01-01

    In this short comment on a decision issued by the Commercial Court of Termonde, I offer some thoughts on the possibility for a business established in Belgium to seek protection in Belgium against discovery proceedings in which it is involved before a court in the US. In the case commented, the court refused the relief sought mainly because it found that enjoining the defendant would constitute undue influence in the proceedings pending in the US.

  2. A Plea for Caution: Violent Video Games, the Supreme Court, and the Role of Science

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, Ryan C. W.; Day, Terri; Hall, Richard C. W.

    2011-01-01

    On November 2, 2010, the US Supreme Court heard arguments in the case of Schwarzenegger v Entertainment Merchants Association, with a ruling expected in 2011. This case addressed whether states have the right to restrict freedom of speech by limiting the sale of violent video games to minors. To date, 8 states have tried to pass legislation to this effect, with all attempts being found unconstitutional by lower courts. In large part, the Supreme Court's decision will be determined by its revi...

  3. The heavenly court: a study on the Iconopraxis of Daoist temple painting

    OpenAIRE

    Gesterkamp, Lennert

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates four complete sets of Daoist wall paintings, termed Heavenly Court paintings (chaoyuan tu) and depicting a court audience of Daoist deities in heaven, of the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries in the context of related Daoist ritual practices, mural production, and personalisations. After outlining the history and development of Heavenly Court painting in China, it explains the conceptual framework on which painters based their design, how this design was built up, an...

  4. Court dwarfs: an overview of European paintings from fifteenth to eighteenth century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guaraldi, Federica; Prencipe, Nunzia; Gori, Davide; di Giacomo, Stellina; Ghigo, Ezio; Grottoli, Silvia

    2012-12-01

    Since antique times, dwarfs have been commonly employed at court, mostly as servants, entertainers, or personal attendants upon noble women and noblemen. Their presence at European Renaissance courts was very common, as demonstrated by their presence alongside to their masters or mistress in several artworks of that period. Aim of our paper is to derive clinical information regarding the type of dwarfism affecting people living and acting at European courts from an overview of paintings dating fifteenth to the eighteenth century.

  5. Cross-Border Patent Disputes: Unified Patent Court or International Commercial Arbitration?

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Alba Betancourt

    2016-01-01

    Currently, the enforcement of a patent that is registered in several countries involves the risk of getting different and conflicting decisions from the national courts. In 2013, 25 European countries entered in an agreement that aims to homogenise the patent system by creating the European patent with unitary effect and a Unified Patent Court (UPC). This article focuses on the UPC, which aims to have a single court proceeding for cross-border patent conflicts. Does the UPC system represent a...

  6. Court orders Immigration and Refugee Board to take into account evidence of HIV-related discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mysko, Barbara

    2004-12-01

    On 31 August 2004, the Federal Court granted an HIV-positive woman's application for judicial review of a decision by the Immigration and Refugee Board (IRB). The issue before the court was whether the Board erred by ignoring documentary evidence before it with respect to the treatment of people living with HIV/AIDS in Nigeria. The court ordered that a newly constituted panel redetermine the claim in light of evidence of the discrimination faced by HIV-positive people in Nigeria.

  7. Hollingsworth v. Perry : Same-Sex Marriage, the Courts, and Social Reform

    OpenAIRE

    Flatmo, Endre Isachsen

    2014-01-01

    The history of same-sex marriage litigation has often been a story of courts making decisions in opposition to public opinion, which as a result has created powerful political backlash. George N. Rosenberg has argued that when courts try to create social reform without significant political and public support, they will create political backlash against the very issue they have ruled in favor of. William N. Eskridge proposes a different theory and concludes that courts have significantly adva...

  8. Aurorae in Australian Aboriginal Traditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamacher, Duane W.

    2013-07-01

    Transient celestial phenomena feature prominently in the astronomical knowledge and traditions of Aboriginal Australians. In this paper, I collect accounts of the Aurora Australis from the literature regarding Aboriginal culture. Using previous studies of meteors, eclipses, and comets in Aboriginal traditions, I anticipate that the physical properties of aurora, such as their generally red colour as seen from southern Australia, will be associated with fire, death, blood, and evil spirits. The survey reveals this to be the case and also explores historical auroral events in Aboriginal cultures, aurorae in rock art, and briefly compares Aboriginal auroral traditions with other global indigenous groups, including the Maori of New Zealand.

  9. Aurorae in Australian Aboriginal Traditions

    CERN Document Server

    Hamacher, Duane W

    2013-01-01

    Transient celestial phenomena feature prominently in the astronomical knowledge and traditions of Aboriginal Australians. In this paper, I collect accounts of the Aurora Australis from the literature regarding Aboriginal culture. Using previous studies of meteors, eclipses, and comets in Aboriginal traditions, I anticipate that the physical properties of aurora, such as their generally red colour as seen from southern Australia, will be associated with fire, death, blood, and evil spirits. The survey reveals this to be the case and also explores historical auroral events in Aboriginal cultures, aurorae in rock art, and briefly compares Aboriginal auroral traditions with other global indigenous groups, including the Maori of New Zealand.

  10. Competitive engineering in Junior Australian Football: Perceptions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Competitive engineering in Junior Australian Football: Perceptions and experiences of parents, children and coaches of 9-a-side football in an under-8 ... of game engagement, (b) the game as an educative context, and (c) an appropriate developmental step before the introduction of players to 18-a-side Australian Football.

  11. Understanding Culture and Diversity: Australian Aboriginal Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vize, Anne

    2009-01-01

    Australian Aboriginal culture is rich, complex and fascinating. The art of Aboriginal Australians shows a great understanding of the earth and its creatures. This article presents an activity which has been designed as a multi-age project. The learning outcomes have been written to suit both younger and older students. Aspects of the project could…

  12. Australian International Food Security Research Centre | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Australian International Food Security Research Centre. Australian International Food Security Research Centre. http://aciar.gov.au/aifsc/ · What we do · Funding · Resources · About IDRC. Knowledge. Innovation. Solutions. Careers · Contact Us · Site map. Sign up now for IDRC news and views sent directly to your inbox ...

  13. Australian International Food Security Research Centre | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Australian International Food Security Research Centre. Australian International Food Security Research Centre. http://aciar.gov.au/AIFSC. Cultivate Africa's Future. The Cultivate Africa's Future research partnership is designed to support applied research to combat hunger in sub-Saharan Africa by harnessing the potential ...

  14. Four Management Agendas for Australian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharrock, Geoff

    2012-01-01

    In a new mixed economy of higher learning, Australian universities require more strategic management to compete and collaborate sustainably. However, many scholars argue that new modes of university management are at odds with scholarly aims and values. This article examines how Australian universities frame their missions and communicate their…

  15. The sociology of the Australian agricultural environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanclay, F.

    1994-01-01

    Australian agriculture is in crisis, the terms of trade for agriculture are falling, many farmers have negative incomes, and there is massive structural adjustment with government policy assisting the exit of marginal farmers out of agriculture. Australian governments are gripped with the

  16. Non-adversarial justice and the coroner's court: a proposed therapeutic, restorative, problem-solving model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Michael S

    2008-12-01

    Increasingly courts are using new approaches that promote a more comprehensive resolution of legal problems, minimise any negative effects that legal processes have on participant wellbeing and/or that use legal processes to promote participant wellbeing. Therapeutic jurisprudence, restorative justice, mediation and problem-solving courts are examples. This article suggests a model for the use of these processes in the coroner's court to minimise negative effects of coroner's court processes on the bereaved and to promote a more comprehensive resolution of matters at issue, including the determination of the cause of death and the public health and safety promotion role of the coroner.

  17. A Snapshot of the Use of ICT in Primary Mathematics Classrooms in Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Lorraine

    2013-01-01

    Lorraine Day reports on some of the findings of the Teaching Teachers for the Future Project. The Australian Curriculum constantly makes reference to digital technologies so we believe our readers will be interested to see how teachers are making use of technology in classrooms across Western Australia. The results may be used to…

  18. University of Western Sydney Students at Risk: Profile and Opportunities for Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebennikov, Leonid; Skaines, Ivan

    2008-01-01

    Many studies have acknowledged a shift from elite to mass participation in Australian higher education over the last decade. As the diversity of the student intake rises there is a growing interest in the factors predicting their success or failure. This article identifies a set of variables predicting University of Western Sydney (UWS) student…

  19. The Politics of Gaming in Schools: A Sociocultural Perspective from Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bate, Frank; MacNish, Jean; Males, Steven

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses gaming in a Western Australian school for boys. The overriding ethos of the school is supportive of the potential of ICT to better engage students and deliver enhanced educational outcomes. The school sees game-based design as at the vanguard of innovation, but also accepts its important duty of care responsibilities. Tensions…

  20. The birds of the alien Acacia thickets of the South-western Cape

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    THE BIRDS OF THE ALIEN ACACIA THICKETS. OF THE SOUTH WESTERN CAPE. 1. M. WINTERBOTTOM. Percy FitzPatrick Institute of African Ornithology, University of Cape Town. About 1876, the Cape Superintendent of Plantations began using the Australian Acacia cyanophylla and A. cyclops on a large scale to fix ...