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Sample records for west indies

  1. Political struggle and West Indies cricket

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay R. Mandle

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available [First paragraph] An Area of Conquest: Popular Democracy and West Indies Cricket Supremacy. HILARY McD BECKLES (ed.. Kingston: Ian Randle, 1995. xviii + 154 pp. (Paper n.p. Liberation Cricket: West Indies Cricket Culture. HILARY McD BECKLES & BRIAN STODDART (eds.. Kingston: Ian Randle, 1995. xii + 403 pp. (Paper n.p. We discovered cricket's importance in the English-speaking Caribbean nearly thirty years ago when we took up our first post in the West Indies. Exploring the Mona campus of the University of the West Indies, we were alarmed to observe so many people who appeared to be hearing-disabled. Wherever we went we found people with ear-pieces who were slightly distracted and at the same time prone to violent mood swings, ranging from the depths of despair to enormous elation. Uncertain about the meaning of what we observed, but reluctant, as newcomers, to reveal our ignorance of public health problems in the region, we delayed inquiring about hearing disabilities until we could confide our concerns to a trusted friend. At first convulsed with laughter, she finally recovered sufficiently to assure us that the people of the West Indies did not suffer disproportionately from hearing loss. Rather, the large numbers of people with ear-pieces were listening to a cricket test match!

  2. Contraception and induced abortion in the West Indies: a review.

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    Boersma, A A; de Bruijn, J G M

    2011-10-01

    Most islands in the West Indies do not have liberal laws on abortion, nor laws on pregnancy prevention programmes (contraception). We present results of a literature review about the attitude of healthcare providers and women toward (emergency) contraception and induced abortion, prevalence, methods and juridical aspects of induced abortion and prevention policies. Articles were obtained from PubMed, EMBASE, MEDLINE, PsychlNFO and Soclndex (1999 to 2010) using as keywords contraception, induced abortion, termination of pregnancy, medical abortion and West Indies. Thirty-seven articles met the inclusion criteria: 18 on contraception, 17 on induced abortion and two on both subjects. Main results indicated that healthcare providers' knowledge of emergency contraception was low. Studies showed a poor knowledge of contraception, but counselling increased its effective use. Exact numbers about prevalence of abortion were not found. The total annual number of abortions in the West Indies is estimated at 300 000; one in four pregnancies ends in an abortion. The use of misoprostol diminished the complications of unsafe abortions. Legislation of abortion varies widely in the different islands in the West Indies: Cuba, Puerto Rico, Martinique, Guadeloupe and St Martin have legal abortions. Barbados was the first English-speaking island with liberal legislation on abortion. All other islands have restrictive laws. Despite high estimated numbers of abortion, research on prevalence of abortion is missing. Studies showed a poor knowledge of contraception and low use among adolescents. Most West Indian islands have restrictive laws on abortion.

  3. Contraception and Induced Abortion in the West Indies: A Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boersma, A.A.; Bruijn, de J.G.M.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract BACKGROUND: Most islands in the West Indies do not have liberal laws on abortion, nor laws on pregnancy prevention programmes (contraception). We present results of a literature review about the attitude of healthcare providers and women toward (emergency) contraception and induced

  4. University of the West Indies Distance Teaching Experiment (UWIDITE). Report.

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    Lalor, Gerald C.; Marrett, Christine

    Since March 1983, the University of the West Indies has been conducting a distance teaching experiment that links its three campuses and the Extra Mural Centres in Antigua, Dominica, and St. Lucia by telecommunications. The network is used for interactive distance teaching and other types of teleconferences. A variety of modern audio and video…

  5. The University of the West Indies in the 1980s.

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    Bird, Edris

    1984-01-01

    The University of the West Indies is undergoing institutional change brought about by its seeking to adapt itself to the demands and varying needs of its several supporting governments. The university's historical background, the impact of political independence, and the restructuring of the university are discussed. (RM)

  6. Contraception and Induced Abortion in the West Indies: A Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boersma, A.A.; Bruijn, de J.G.M.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract BACKGROUND: Most islands in the West Indies do not have liberal laws on abortion, nor laws on pregnancy prevention programmes (contraception). We present results of a literature review about the attitude of healthcare providers and women toward (emergency) contraception and induced abortion

  7. The West Indies as a laboratory of biogeography and evolution.

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    Ricklefs, Robert; Bermingham, Eldredge

    2008-07-27

    Islands have long provided material and inspiration for the study of evolution and ecology. The West Indies are complex historically and geographically, providing a rich backdrop for the analysis of colonization, diversification and extinction of species. They are sufficiently isolated to sustain endemic forms and close enough to sources of colonists to develop a dynamic interaction with surrounding continental regions. The Greater Antilles comprise old fragments of continental crust, some very large; the Lesser Antilles are a more recent volcanic island arc, and the low-lying Bahama Islands are scattered on a shallow oceanic platform. Dating of island lineages using molecular methods indicates over-water dispersal of most inhabitants of the West Indies, although direct connections with what is now southern Mexico in the Early Tertiary, and subsequent land bridges or stepping stone islands linking to Central and South America might also have facilitated colonization. Species-area relationships within the West Indies suggest a strong role for endemic radiations and extinction in shaping patterns of diversity. Diversification is promoted by opportunities for allopatric divergence between islands, or within the large islands of the Greater Antilles, with a classic example provided by the Anolis lizards. The timing of colonization events using molecular clocks permits analysis of colonization-extinction dynamics by means of species accumulation curves. These indicate low rates of colonization and extinction for reptiles and amphibians in the Greater Antilles, with estimated average persistence times of lineages in the West Indies exceeding 30Myr. Even though individual island populations of birds might persist an average of 2Myr on larger islands in the Lesser Antilles, recolonization from within the archipelago appears to maintain avian lineages within the island chain indefinitely. Birds of the Lesser Antilles also provide evidence of a mass extinction event within

  8. Probabilistic Storm Surge Hazard Assessment in the French West Indies

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    Krien, Y.; Dudon, B.; Roger, J.; Zahibo, N.; Arnaud, G.

    2016-12-01

    The French West Indies are prone to hurricanes formed over the warm tropical waters of the Atlantic Ocean and Caribbean Sea. These events can have great consequences in terms of human, property, and economic losses. Storm surge hazard assessment is therefore required to provide guidance to emergency managers and decision-makers. By combining statistical-deterministic approaches and wave-current coupled models, we assessed storm surge hazard in Guadeloupe and Martinique islands. We present here the methodology, the results, as well as the on-going work on the impact of climate change in the framework of the FEDER-funded project C3AF.

  9. 9 CFR 93.320 - Horses from Central America and the West Indies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Horses from Central America and the... PRODUCTS; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Horses Central America and the West Indies 17 § 93.320 Horses from Central America and the West Indies. Horses from Central America and...

  10. The University of the West Indies Distance Teaching Project. Report to the Advisory Council. ACEP 7.

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    Lalor, Gerald C.

    The three papers in this report relate to the development and activities of the University of the West Indies Distance Teaching Project (UWIDITE), through which the University of the West Indies (UWI) is continuing experiments on the use of telecommunications to extend its regional services. A report to the advisory council, the first paper,…

  11. Tardigrada of the Caribbean island of Dominica (West Indies

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    Juliana G. Hinton

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In June 2009 we surveyed the terrestrial Tardigrada of Dominica, the most northerly of the Windward islands of the Lesser Antilles in the Caribbean sea. Out of 112 moss, lichen, liverwort and leaf litter samples, 35 had tardigrades, representing 10 genera and 25 species or species groups. This survey increases the number of species reported from Dominica from 3 to 25, more than the total recorded from any other West Indian island. Twelve species found in Dominica are cosmopolitan or belong to cosmopolitan species groups. Eight species are new to the fauna of the West Indies, one is new to the fauna of the Americas, and at least one is endemic to Dominica.

  12. Underestimation of Leptospirosis Incidence in the French West Indies.

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    Sylvie Cassadou

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Leptospirosis is a neglected zoonosis affecting mainly tropical and subtropical regions worldwide, particularly South America and the Caribbean. As in many other countries, under-reporting of cases was suspected in the French West Indies because of inadequate access to diagnostic tests for the general population.In order to estimate the real incidence of leptospirosis in Guadeloupe and Martinique, a study was performed in 2011 using the three prevailing available biological tests for diagnosis: Microscopic Agglutination Test (MAT, IgM ELISA and PCR. The study investigated inpatients and outpatients and used active case ascertainment from data provided by a general practitioners' sentinel network. The epidemiology of the disease was also described in terms of severity and demographic characteristics. Leptospirosis incidence was estimated at 69.4 (95%CI 47.6-91.1 and 60.6 (95%CI 36.3-85.0 annual cases per 100 000 inhabitants in Guadeloupe and Martinique, respectively, which was 3 and 4 times higher than previous estimations.Inclusion of PCR and IgM ELISA tests for diagnosis of leptospirosis resulted in improved sensitivity in comparison with MAT alone. Our results highlighted the substantial health burden of the disease in these two territories and the importance of access to appropriate laboratory tests. Based on our results, PCR and IgM ELISA tests have now been included in the list of tests reimbursed by the national system of social security insurance in France. Our results also underline the relevance of implementing an integrated strategy for the surveillance, prevention and control of leptospirosis in the French West Indies.

  13. On a collection of Reptiles and Fishes from the West-Indies

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    Lidth de Jeude, van Th.W.

    1887-01-01

    During the Dutch Expedition to the West-Indies the following reptiles and fishes were collected by Mr. J. R. H. Neervoort van de Poll, the Zoologist of the Expedition, who afterwards presented them to the Leyden Museum.

  14. Canada--West Indies: A Co-Operative Venture in Library Education.

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    McGee, William H. J.

    1981-01-01

    Describes the exchange program involving materials, faculty, and students between the University of Western Ontario's School of Library and Information Science and the University of the West Indies' Department of Library Science. (CHC)

  15. TOXOPLASMA GONDII AND NEOSPORA CANINUM ANTIBODIES IN DOGS FROM GRENADA, WEST INDIES

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    Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora caninum are structurally similar parasites with many common hosts. The prevalence of antibodies to T. gondii and N. caninum was determined in sera from dogs in Grenada, West Indies. Using a modified agglutination test, antibodies to T. gondii were found in 52 (48.5%) o...

  16. Distance Learner Ecologies of the University of the West Indies Open Campus Program

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    Beaubrun, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    This research project examined the learner ecologies of University of the West Indies (UWI) distance learning program participants in two countries within the regional university's network: Dominica, and Antigua and Barbuda. The descriptive study focused on a period of transition from dual-mode delivery (teleconference and in-person tutorial…

  17. New Initiative toward Introducing Adult Education Programs at the University of the West Indies.

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    Allen, Beryl M.; Chadwick, Alan

    1996-01-01

    The University of the West Indies failed to obtain funding for a certificate program for adult education, indicating that access is a key issue. The future of Caribbean societies depends on more flexibility from higher education institutions in admissions policies, course offerings, and teaching approaches. (SK)

  18. Increasing Public Access to University Qualifications: Evolution of The University of the West Indies Open Campus

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    Thomas, Michael L.; Soares, Judith

    2009-01-01

    This paper traces the evolution of The University of the West Indies' Open Campus (UWIOC), which is expected to expand service and increase access to the underserved communities of the Eastern Caribbean. At present, UWI, which caters to the needs of the 16 far flung countries of the Commonwealth Caribbean, has not been able to fully serve these…

  19. Small is beautiful? Progress and collections of the Geology Museum, University of the West Indies, Mona

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donovan, S.K.; Jackson, T.A.; Brown, I.C.; Wood, S.J.

    2004-01-01

    Geology has been taught at the University of the West Indies, Mona, since 1961. The associated Geology Museum (UWIGM) opened to the public in 1969/1970, although the idea for such a museum was over 100 years old at that time. The collections of the UWIGM share many hazards with those in museums in o

  20. Copepods of the genus Scambicornus (Cyclopoida, Lichomolgidae) associated with Holothurians in the West Indies

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    Humes, Arthur G.

    1969-01-01

    The material described below came from washings of holothurians in the West Indies. It was collected in part by the author and Dr. R. U. GOODING during the summer of 1959 in the Bahamas, Barbados, Puerto Rico, and Jamaica. This field work was aided by a grant (G-8628) from the National Science Found

  1. University Admissions Policy in a Developing Country: Evidence from the University of the West Indies.

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    Handa, Sudhanshu; Gordon, Peter-John

    1999-01-01

    Critically analyzes the University of West Indies' admissions policy of increasing the share of undergraduate part-time students. Data on student grades in first-year social-science courses shows that part-time students are significantly more likely to fail these courses, due to lower motivation and greater time constraints. (10 references) (MLH)

  2. Training in Support of Leadership Development at the University of the West Indies, Mona Campus Library

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    Newman, Dunstan; Newman, Nadine

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to focus on training in support of leadership development at the University of the West Indies, Mona Campus, main and branch libraries. Design/methodology/approach: The paper is based on an interview with a campus librarian and desk research. Findings: Like any other institution in the world, the Mona Library…

  3. Role of return migration in the emergence of multiple sclerosis in the French West Indies.

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    Cabre, P; Signate, A; Olindo, S; Merle, H; Caparros-Lefebvre, D; Béra, O; Smadja, D

    2005-12-01

    The emergence of multiple sclerosis in island societies has been investigated only in a few Caucasian populations living in temperate regions. The effect of human migration on the risk of developing this disease is still an open question because of possible genetic selection. We conducted an epidemiological study of the multiple sclerosis population in the French West Indies (Martinique and Guadeloupe), a population which includes large numbers of West Indians who have returned after emigrating to metropolitan France. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) for multiple sclerosis among migrants were calculated and their genetic characteristics were compared to those of non-migrants. The crude prevalence of multiple sclerosis was 14.8/10(5) on December 31, 1999 (95% CI: 11.9-17.7); and its crude mean annual incidence for the period July 1, 1999 to June 30, 2002 was 1.4/10(5) (95% CI: 1.0-1.8), confirming its emergence in the French West Indies. Recurrent neuromyelitis optica, which is virtually the only form of multiple sclerosis in black African populations in tropical regions, represented not >17.8% of these cases. During the 1,440,000 person-years of follow-up, 33 incidence cases were identified in migrants. Since the number of expected cases was 19.3, the overall SIR was 1.71 (95% CI: 1.19-2.38; P return migration, has a higher prevalence of multiple sclerosis (21.0/10(5) versus 8.5/10(5)) and a higher incidence (2.0/10(5) versus 0.7/10(5)) than Guadeloupe. The emergence of the disease in the French West Indies is of environmental rather than genetic origin. It may be explained either through the introduction by migrants of precipitating environmental factors that operate in a critical way before the age of 15 years, and/or by the recent disappearance from the French West Indies of protective environmental factors acting before this age.

  4. A new extinct species of Snipe (Aves: Scolopacidae: Gallinago) from the West Indies.

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    Steadman, David W; Takano, Oona M

    2016-05-09

    We describe an extinct species of snipe (Gallinago kakuki, new species) from late Quaternary fossils in the Bahamian Archipelago (Abaco, New Providence, Little Exuma, Long, and Middle Caicos islands). The new species is known as well from fossils on Cuba, and Cayman Brac in the Cayman Islands. This rather large species of snipe was volant, although because of its relatively short carpometacarpus, the primary flight feathers probably were short. The only other species of Gallinago from the West Indies is the extant, migratory G. delicata, which breeds only in North America. Gallinago kakuki shares more osteological characters with two Eurasian species (G. media, G. hardwickii) than with either of the New World species we examined (G. delicata, G. paraguaiae). A possible inter-hemispherical relationship has been proposed as well for the two extinct, late Quaternary species of woodcocks from the West Indies (Scolopax anthonyi of Puerto Rico, S. brachycarpa of Hispaniola).

  5. Adapting the mini mental status to the context of the West-Indies.

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    Godaert, Lidvine; Godard-Sebillotte, Claire; Bousquet, Lionel; Devouche, Emmanuel; Hugonot-Diener, Laurence; Nuissier, Joëlle; Triboulet, Frank; Fanon, Jean-Luc

    2017-01-27

    The mini mental state examination (MMSE) has become a benchmark for the screening and follow-up of cognitive impairment. The numerous translations of the MMS into other languages attest to its popularity. Clinical practice suggests that the consensual French version from the Greco (Groupe de réflexion sur les évaluations cognitives - Research working group for cognitive assessment) is not adapted to the West-Indies population because of the low socio-economic level and the widespread use of the Creole language among the elderly population. Modification of certain items by a multidisciplinary committee made it possible to adapt the instrument to the Creole culture. This procedure increases comprehension of the instrument, and should lead to improved detection of cognitive impairment in the West-Indies.

  6. Zonation of uplifted pleistocene coral reefs on barbados, west indies.

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    Mesolella, K J

    1967-05-05

    The coral species composition of uplifted Pleistocene reefs on Barbados is very similar to Recent West Indian reefs. Acropora palmata, Acropora cervicornis, and Montastrea annularis are qtuantitatively the most important of the coral species.

  7. Distance Education at the University of the West Indies. Report of an Appraisal Carried Out on Behalf of the Commonwealth of Learning.

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    Renwick, William; And Others

    An appraisal was made of the policy implications of a commitment by the University of the West Indies (UWI) to develop distance education as an integral feature of its teaching responsibilities. Information was gathered through interviews with 163 educators and administrators at the 3 campuses of the University of the West Indies, its 8 member…

  8. Major West Indies MRSA clones in human beings: do they travel with their hosts?

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    Chroboczek, Tomasz; Boisset, Sandrine; Rasigade, Jean-Philippe; Meugnier, Helene; Akpaka, Patrick E; Nicholson, Alison; Nicolas, Muriel; Olive, Claude; Bes, Michele; Vandenesch, François; Laurent, Frederic; Etienne, Jerome; Tristan, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Descriptions of the epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) have seldom been produced in the Caribbean, which is a major tourism destination. Using DNA microarrays and spa typing, we characterized 85 MRSA isolates from human skin and soft-tissue infections from five different islands. In the French West Indies (n = 72), the most frequently isolated clones were the same clones that are specifically isolated from mainland France [Lyon (n = 35) and Geraldine (n = 11) clones], whereas the clones that were most frequently isolated from the other islands (n = 13) corresponded with clones that have a worldwide endemic spread [Vienna/Hungarian/Brazilian (n = 5), Panton Valentine leukocidin-positive USA300 (n = 4), New York/Japan (n = 2), and pediatric (n = 1) clones]. The distribution of the major MRSA clones in the French (Guadeloupe and Martinique) and non-French West Indies (Jamaica, Trinidad, and Tobago) is different, and the clones most closely resemble those found in the home countries of the travelers who visit the islands most frequently. The distribution might be affected by tourist migration, which is specific to each island. © 2013 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  9. Medical problems among dental patients at the school of dentistry, the university of the West Indies.

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    Al-Bayaty, H F; Murti, P R; Naidu, R S; Matthews, R; Simeon, D

    2009-12-01

    This study ascertained demographic information and prevalence rates of medical problems among 571 new and consecutive dental patients attending the emergency clinic of the School of Dentistry, The University of the West Indies. Patients were interviewed by specially trained and calibrated dental students and interns. Various medical problems of patients were recorded in individual open-ended case sheets, maintaining their privacy and confidentiality. This information was then transcribed into a specially designed and pretested form. The data were entered into a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet and analyzed using the SPSS statistical package to obtain the prevalence rates of medical conditions, which were then cross-tabulated with gender, age, ethnicity, and other variables. Significance of differences, if any, was evaluated by chi-square test. In all, 303 medical conditions were encountered in 239 individuals, giving a prevalence rate of 42 percent. Hypertension (12.6 percent), diabetes (6.1 percent), asthma (5.8 percent), arthritis (4.7 percent), and various allergies (8.3 percent) constituted an important segment of the problems. Gender, ethnic, and age differences were also evident for some diseases. In this study-which was the first of this kind in the West Indies-vital information on medical problems among dental patients was obtained by interviews conducted by dental students and interns, forming an important part of their dental education.

  10. The Evaluative Impact of Graduate Scholarships: The Case of the University of the West Indies, St. Augustine

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    Kalloo-Bhagwandeen, Sarah; Mustapha, Nasser

    2013-01-01

    The UWI Postgraduate Scholarship has been the most longstanding award offered by the University of the West Indies. However, completion rates of students have been decreasing and the number of students registered has not been increasing significantly. This paper investigates the UWI Postgraduate Scholarships awarded from 2001 to 2007. This…

  11. Pidgin and Creole Languages, with Particular Reference to the West Indies and English-Based Creoles. Specialised Bibliography A1.

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    British Council, London (England). English-Teaching Information Centre.

    This bibliography is divided into three main sections. The first section lists bibliographies relevant to pidgin and creole studies. The second cites books and articles pertaining both to pidgin and creole studies in general and to the West Indies in particular. The third section gives references for books and articles in areas other than the West…

  12. Quality Management in Course Development and Delivery at the University of the West Indies Distance Education Centre

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    Thurab-Nkhosi, Dianne; Marshall, Stewart

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: In 2004, the University of the West Indies Distance Education Centre (UWIDEC) began incorporating the use of new information and communication technologies (ICTs) in the delivery of its programmes and courses, taking a "blended learning" approach. There is a recognition, however, of the need to ensure the quality of the…

  13. An Exploratory Study Examining Barbadian Students' Knowledge and Awareness of Costs of University of the West Indies Education

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    Persaud, Nadini; Persaud, Indeira

    2016-01-01

    This study explores Barbadian students' knowledge/awareness on various facets of costs associated with their University of the West Indies (UWI) education and student perceptions of State funded education. The study was conducted subsequent to the announcement of UWI tuition fees which came into effect in September 2014. Ninety-three Faculty of…

  14. Thesis Writing and Preservation at the University of the West Indies, St. Augustine, Trinidad: A Librarian's In-Put.

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    Clarke, Reginald

    2000-01-01

    Describes the University of the West Indies, focusing on the St. Augustine (Trinidad) campus and the library's involvement with maintaining, preserving, and disseminating postgraduate student theses. Explains quality control efforts and considers implications for the types of scholarship performed by academic librarians. (LRW)

  15. The genus Cephaloleia (Coleoptera:Chrysomelidae) in Central America and the West Indies.

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    Staines, C L

    1996-01-01

    The species of Cephaloleia Chevrolat known to occur in Central America and the West Indies are revised and a key to the 88 species is presented. Most species are illustrated. Twenty new species of Cephaloleia are described: amblys, cylindrica, eumorpha, erugatus, facetus, formosus, lepida, scitulus, and weisei from Panamá; delectabilis and presignis from México; brunnea and rubra from Trinidad; immaculata, triangularis, and viltata from Costa Rica; splendida and uhmanni from Costa Rica and Panamá; cyanea from Costa Rica, Colombia, and Venezuela; and varabilis from Panamá and Colombia. Three new synonyms are given: abscissa Uhmann (= dilaticollis Baly), beckeri Weise (= gratiosa Baly), and quadrimaculata Uhmann (= fenestrata Weise). Lectotypes are designated for eleven species: belti Baly, consanguinea Baly, elegantula Baly, fulvicollis Weise, instabilis Baly, nigropicta Baly, postuma Weise, quadrilineata Baly, separata Baly, stenosoma Baly, and vicina Baly. Two species are transferred from Demotispa to Cephaloleia: coeruleata Sanderson and costaricensis Uhmann. Cephaloleia coeruleata (Sanderson) is renamed C. sandersoni.

  16. The development of postgraduate anaesthesia and intensive care training at the University of the West Indies.

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    Scarlett, M D; Crawford-Sykes, A; Harding, H E; Chen, D R

    2012-07-01

    The one-year Diploma in Anaesthetics (DA) was the first postgraduate programme offered by the then Faculty of Medicine of The University of the West Indies (UWI). It was instituted in 1966, when the need for trained physician anaesthetists became paramount. Over 200 physicians have been awarded the DA which was discontinued in 1994. The four-year Doctor of Medicine in Anaesthetics [DM (Anaesthetics)] was commenced in 1974 and continues to train most of the region's physician anaesthetists. The majority of the 119 graduates (as of December 2011) are providing invaluable services to the people of the Caribbean. The time has come for the establishment of a regional certifying body, the Caribbean College of Anaesthetists. This college would determine the standards for the training and clinical practice of anaesthetists as perioperative physicians including: the conduct of anaesthesia, critical care, acute and chronic pain management. It would also facilitate continuing medical education and recertification of all practising anaesthetists within the region.

  17. The establishment of an intracranial tumour registry at the University Hospital of the West Indies.

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    Campbell, J; Jaggon, J R; Johnson, P; Bruce, C; Eldemire-Shearer, D

    2012-06-01

    In March 2010, the first intracranial tumour registry (ITR) in the English-speaking Caribbean was started at the University Hospital of the West Indies (UHWI). This was deemed necessary as the already established Jamaica Cancer Registry only reports on malignant brain tumours. The ITR will collect data on all prospective intracranial tumours, benign and malignant, which are diagnosed histologically at the UHWI. Retrospective information dating back five years was also collected. Data collected so far reveal that between the years 2006 to 2010, a total of 317 cases were entered into the database. Of these, only 45 cases were considered eligible. The issues surrounding this discrepancy are discussed in this paper along with the many challenges experienced in the establishment of the ITR. From these experiences, the authors have also put forward several recommendations that may be useful to other researchers who wish to implement similar systems.

  18. Evolution of in vitro fertilization at the University of the West Indies, Jamaica.

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    Pottinger, A M; Everett-Keane, D; McKenzie, C

    2012-07-01

    In vitro fertilization (IVF) provides hope for many couples who believed that they could not have children. This paper tracks the development of IVF treatment at The University of the West Indies (UWI), Mona, from its genesis in 2000. It highlights changes over the years in the population seeking IVF at UWI, Mona, and describes clinical services offered to clients, comparing success rates of services internationally. It also reports on seminal research emerging out of UWI, Mona, in the field of assisted reproductive health. The Hugh Wynter Fertility Management Unit (HWFMU), UWI, Mona, leads the way in shaping how society views those challenged with infertility and in its use of assisted reproductive technologies that improve the quality of life for many locally, within the Caribbean and the Diaspora.

  19. Paediatric nephrology at the University Hospital of the West Indies. A walk through time.

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    Miller, M

    2012-07-01

    Paediatric nephrology at the University Hospital of the West Indies has grown over the last five decades into an established paediatric subspecialty offering to Jamaica and other Caribbean territories the benefit of paediatricians with training and exposure in this field. Dissemination of information to medical practitioners within the island has reduced mortality and morbidity associated with potentially treatable atypical renal disease. Clear investigative guidelines for urinary tract infection have made earlier diagnosis of urological malformations possible. Patterns of glomerular disease in Jamaican children have now been aetiologically and histologically documented. Children with chronic kidney disease now have clear management guidelines and the possibility of renal replacement therapy. Future goals include community education about renal disease and the development of a paediatric dialysis and transplantation unit.

  20. Toxicokinetics of chlordecone in goats: Implications for risk management in French West Indies.

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    Fournier, Agnès; Feidt, Cyril; Lastel, Marie-Laure; Archimede, Harry; Thome, Jean-Pierre; Mahieu, Maurice; Rychen, Guido

    2017-03-01

    The former use of chlordecone (CLD) in the French West Indies has resulted in long-term pollution of soils. CLD is known to be potentially transferred towards animal products of animals reared outdoors, mainly through accidental soil ingestion. Several studies indicate that soil bound CLD is bioavailable when administered to farm animals. Currently there is a need to quantify the level of CLD absorption and its toxicokinetic characteristics in the ruminant and particularly in the goat. These are considered as important farm species in the French West Indies. The objective of this study was to evaluate the absorption rate and the half-life of CLD in the non-lactating goat. The goats were administered either intravenously (i.v., n = 6) or orally (p.o., n = 6) one dose (1 mg kg(-1) body weight) of CLD. Blood samples were collected at defined times up to 160 days post-dosing. CLD was analyzed in serum by high-resolution gas chromatography. A comparison of the area under the serum concentration-time curves (AUC) showed that the i.v. route is equivalent to the oral route. Thus, CLD is considered almost completely absorbed after p.o. administration, as shown by the mean absolute bioavailability. The comparison between the pharmacokinetic profiles of CLD following oral and intravenous dose showed a difference during the first 14 days and a similar kinetic after this period. The half-life of CLD in serum was close to 20 days. These results highlight a possible strategy of decontamination due to the short half-life of CLD, obtained in dry goats that did not excrete fat matter.

  1. Invasive plant species in the West Indies: geographical, ecological, and floristic insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Sandoval, Julissa; Tremblay, Raymond L; Acevedo-Rodríguez, Pedro; Díaz-Soltero, Hilda

    2017-07-01

    The level of invasion (number or proportion of invasive species) in a given area depends on features of the invaded community, propagule pressure, and climate. In this study, we assess the invasive flora of nine islands in the West Indies to identify invasion patterns and evaluate whether invasive species diversity is related to geographical, ecological, and socioeconomic factors. We compiled a database of invasive plant species including information on their taxonomy, origin, pathways of introduction, habitats, and life history. This database was used to evaluate the similarity of invasive floras between islands and to identify invasion patterns at regional (West Indies) and local (island) scales. We found a total of 516 alien plant species that are invasive on at least one of the nine islands studied, with between 24 to 306 invasive species per island. The invasive flora on these islands includes a wide range of taxonomic groups, life forms, and habitats. We detected low similarity in invasive species diversity between islands, with most invasive species (>60%) occurring on a single island and 6% occurring on at least five islands. To assess the importance of different models in predicting patterns of invasive species diversity among islands, we used generalized linear models. Our analyses revealed that invasive species diversity was well predicted by a combination of island area and economic development (gross domestic product per capita and kilometers of paved roadways). Our results provide strong evidence for the roles of geographical, ecological, and socioeconomic factors in determining the distribution and spread of invasive species on these islands. Anthropogenic disturbance and economic development seem to be the major drivers facilitating the spread and predominance of invasive species over native species.

  2. The development and present status of seismic research work in Jamaica, West Indies

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    Jackson, Trevor A.

    1989-11-01

    Jamaica is located near the northern boundary of the Caribbean Plate and is within a seismically active zone. Historic records of earthquakes date back to the sixteenth century during the early period of European settlement and colonization. During the last four centuries more than 4000 lives have been lost as a result of local seismic events and there are at least 55 documented cases in which there was an earthquake of intensity VI or greater on the Modified Mercalli Scale. The Seismic Research Unit of the University of the West Indies first began its operation in Jamaica in 1963 with the installation of three short period vertical-component seismometers. Since 1963 the number of stations has increased and there is now a network of five short-period vertical-component seismometers linked by radio telemetry to the base recording station at the Mona Campus of the University of the West Indies. Seismic events are recorded on 600-m reels of magnetic tape and the position of each event is located by first replaying and then transcribing the data on the tape for the five stations onto strip chart. P and S arrival times are then read into an IBM-PC and the magnitude and epicentre determined by using the 'JCA-HYPO' program, based on a four-layer model for Jamaica. In addition to the network of seismic stations there are six strong motion accelerographs, which are deployed in high-rise buildings in urban and rural Jamaica. Since their installation in the mid-1970s only one earthquake, in 1978, yielded a good strong motion record. In 1983 the Jamaica Bureau of Standards introduced a National Building Code for engineers in which it recommended that structures be designed according to the code of the Structural Engineers' Association of California.

  3. A review of the genus Oosternum Sharp of the West Indies (Coleoptera: Hydrophilidae: Sphaeridiinae

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    Albert Deler-Hernández

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The representatives of the genus Oosternum Sharp, 1882 occurring in the West Indies are revised. Ten species are recorded, of which seven are here described as new: Oosternum andersoni sp. n. (Cuba, O. bacharenge sp. n. (Dominican Republic, O. cercyonoides sp. n. (Jamaica, O. insulare sp. n. (Jamaica, O. luciae sp. n. (Saint Lucia, O. megnai sp. n. (Cuba and O. pecki sp. n. (Dominican Republic. Diagnoses and detailed distributional data are also provided for O. sharpi Hansen, 1999 (widespread throughout both Greater and Lesser Antilles, O. latum Fikáček, Hebauer & Hansen, 2009 (endemic to St. Vincent and an undescribed species from the Bahamas. A key to the West Indian Oosternum is provided and important diagnostic characters are illustrated. The West Indian fauna of Oosternum contains representatives of five different species groups and likely originated by multiple independent colonizations from the American continent. Within the study region, the highest diversity is known from the Greater Antilles, where two endemic species each in Cuba, Jamaica, and Hispaniola. The populations of O. sharpi were found to consist exclusively of females on all islands with the exception Puerto Rico.

  4. The role of the University of the West Indies Mona libraries in HIV/AIDS information access and dissemination.

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    Harris, S

    2013-01-01

    The recommendations for controlling HIV/AIDS, whether prescriptive or descriptive, underscore the value of information: its translation into knowledge, and knowledge into behaviour. Thus, accessing, evaluating, disseminating and applying authoritative, credible and scholarly information on HIV/AIDS are critical elements in the control of this pandemic in the Web 2.0 era. The University of the West Indies (UWI) Mona libraries have embraced this information role. This article provides insights into three of the information initiatives implemented by the UWI Mona libraries in this important capacity. In this regard, it also provides ideas for other West Indian information units and enhances communication on access to information products and services, albeit incrementally, in an important area of health services for the West Indies.

  5. The Chlordecone crisis in the French West Indies : Its fate in soils and water

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    Voltz, Marc; Cattan, Philippe; Saison, Carine; Berns, Anne E.; Colin, François; Crabit, Armand; Crevoisier, David; Fernandez-Bayo, Jesus; Levillain, Joseph; Pak, Lai-Ting; Samouelian, Anatja; Cabidoche, Yves-Marie

    2013-04-01

    In the French West Indies, chlordecone (CLD), an organochlorine pesticide, which is highly persistent in the environment, was applied in banana plantations from 1972 to 1993 against the banana weevil Cosmopolites sordidus. Pollution surveys conducted in 2001 by the French Department of Health revealed the presence of chlordecone in soils, rivers, springs over large areas in Guadeloupe and Martinique islands. Contamination of drinking water, food crops, aquatic species by CLD has been observed as well as its presence in blood of men, pregnant women and newborns. There is therefore a large social concern about the extent and evolution of CLD pollution in the French West Indies and its impact on human health and ecosystems. From 2008 to 2012 a multidisciplinary project CHLORDEXCO took place to study the CLD fate in water, soils and the contamination characteristics of aquatic species and food crops. Here, we summarize results obtained on the processes controlling the spatial and temporal patterns of soil and water contamination at the scale of the banana cropping area in Guadeloupe and of the Perou catchment. The main soils in the contaminated areas are andosols and nitisols and formed from the weathering of volcanic ashes. They have a high organic carbon content and high content of secondary minerals, allophane for andosols and halloysite for nitisols. An analysis of the spatial distribution of CLD in soil over 1045 field plots showed that the soil type had a strong impact. Andosols, with a high sorption capacity (Koc 20 000 L/kg), had the highest CLD concentrations and stocks, unlike Nitisols, which had 10-fold lower sorption capacities. A significant « farm effect », due to between-farm variations of application times and amounts, was also noticed. The observed stocks of CLD clearly correspond to the accumulation in soil of successive treatments and thereby confirm the high persistence of CLD in soil also observed in incubation studies in soil microcosms. Soil

  6. New Dates and Revelations on the Last Interglacial Terrace, Barbados, West Indies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freiburger, N. C.; Gallup, C. D.; Taylor, F. W.; Cheng, H.; Edwards, R. L.

    2005-12-01

    Fourteen new samples from the last interglacial terrace on Barbados reveal a well-preserved mid-last interglacial deposit. The fossil coral deposit lies ±20 m below the top of the last interglacial terrace, which underlies the University of West Indies on the southwest side of Barbados. Four of the fourteen samples measured with U-Th methods (Edwards et al., 1987) by ICP-MS (Finnigan ELEMENT; Shen et al., 2002) have initial δ234U values within error of the modern value (145.8 +/- 1.7‰ Cheng et al., 2000), suggesting that they provide accurate and reliable ages (Gallup et al., 1994; Thompson, et al., 2005). The base of the outcrop is a mix of Acropora palmata (Ap) and head corals such as Porites. Ap is usually a reef crest coral, but the presence of head corals may indicate growth in deeper waters. New dates from this unit are 126.3 ± 0.8 ka (Porites); 124.6 ± 0.8 ka (Ap); and 121.5 ± 0.7 ka (Ap). This unit is overlain by a lense of coral cobbles containing one head coral tilted on its side that computes an age of 125.7 ± 0.7 ka (Siderastrea). Overlying the cobble unit is a fore-reef unit of Acropora cervacornis; within this unit is a 1.5 m tall sea cave ~1-2 m above the cobble unit, indicating a sea level drop that carved a notch into the deposit of Acropora cervacornis and presumably created the cobbles from the mixed Ap/head coral deposit. The top of the last interglacial terrace at the University of the West Indies has been dated extensively (Gallup et al., 2002). Though none of the samples have initial δ234U values within error of the modern value, the last interglacial U-Th ages and the ~10 m thick deposit of Ap establish that the top of the terrace is the main crest of the last interglacial deposit at this location. Thus, given the mixed species assemblage of the new deposit and its location 20 m below the crest, we conclude that it grew in deeper water during the last interglacial period. The cobble deposit and the sea cave suggest that this deeper

  7. Ciguatera fish poisoning and sea surface temperatures in the Caribbean Sea and the West Indies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tester, Patricia A; Feldman, Rebecca L; Nau, Amy W; Kibler, Steven R; Wayne Litaker, R

    2010-10-01

    Ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP) is a circumtropical disease caused by ingestion of a variety of reef fish that bioaccumulate algal toxins. Distribution and abundance of the organisms that produce these toxins, chiefly dinoflagellates of the genus Gambierdiscus, are reported to correlate positively with water temperature. Consequently, there is growing concern that increasing temperatures associated with climate change could increase the incidence of CFP. This concern prompted experiments on the growth rates of six Gambierdiscus species at temperatures between 18 degrees C and 33 degrees C and the examination of sea surface temperatures in the Caribbean and West Indies for areas that could sustain rapid Gambierdiscus growth rates year-round. The thermal optimum for five of six Gambierdiscus species tested was >/=29 degrees C. Long-term SST data from the southern Gulf of Mexico indicate the number of days with sea surface temperatures >/=29 degrees C has nearly doubled (44 to 86) in the last three decades. To determine how the sea surface temperatures and Gambierdiscus growth data correlate with CFP incidences in the Caribbean, a literature review and a uniform, region-wide survey (1996-2006) of CFP cases were conducted. The highest CFP incidence rates were in the eastern Caribbean where water temperatures are warmest and least variable.

  8. Student evaluation of an OSCE in paediatrics at the University of the West Indies, Jamaica

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    Branday J Michael

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of the West Indies first implemented the Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE in the final MB Examination in Medicine and Therapeutics during the 2000–2001 academic year. Simultaneously, the Child Health Department initiated faculty and student training, and instituted the OSCE as an assessment instrument during the Child Health (Paediatric clerkship in year 5. The study set out to explore student acceptance of the OSCE as part of an evaluation of the Child Health clerkship. Methods A self-administered questionnaire was completed by successive groups of students immediately after the OSCE at the end of each clerkship rotation. Main outcome measures were student perception of examination attributes, which included the quality of instructions and organisation, the quality of performance, authenticity and transparency of the process, and usefulness of the OSCE as an assessment instrument compared to other formats. Results There was overwhelming acceptance of the OSCE in Child Health with respect to the comprehensiveness (90%, transparency (87%, fairness (70% and authenticity of the required tasks (58–78%. However, students felt that it was a strong anxiety-producing experience. And concerns were expressed regarding the ambiguity of some questions and inadequacy of time for expected tasks. Conclusion Student feedback was invaluable in influencing faculty teaching, curriculum direction and appreciation of student opinion. Further psychometric evaluation will strengthen the development of the OSCE.

  9. Oviposition behaviour and parity rates of Aedes aegypti collected in sticky traps in Trinidad, West Indies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadee, Dave D; Ritchie, Scott A

    2010-12-01

    The oviposition behaviour of Aedes aegypti was studied using sticky traps (ST), double sticky traps (DST) and standard ovitrap traps in urban St. Augustine and rural Tamana, Trinidad, West Indies. In St. Augustine three traps were deployed in 10 houses for 10 weeks while in Tamana traps were similarly deployed (10 houses for 10 weeks). At each house one ovitrap, one ST and one DST were placed using the criteria established for ovitrap placement. The results showed large numbers of adults collected, 3602 collected in DSTs and 1,670 adults collected in STs. In addition, >9000 immatures were collected in the DST vs >7000 in the STs. Over the 10 weeks 517 Ae. aegypti eggs were collected from ovitraps from Tamana and 3252 eggs from St. Augustine. Most of the females collected were parous (99%) with many older females collected e.g. 7 pars collected in both Tamana and St. Augustine. A major finding of the study was the observation of the "death stress oviposition" behaviour displayed among Ae. aegypti females captures in the sticky traps. This is the first report of this behaviour in the field and may well explain the collection of large numbers of immatures found in the ST and DSTs. The results of this study are discussed in the context of developing surveillance and control strategies, especially for reducing man-vector contact. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Clinical research informing neonatal care at the University Hospital of the West Indies: 50 years experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotman, H

    2012-07-01

    Neonatology has rapidly grown over the past few years to its present status of a highly technologically driven specialty. Centres in resource restricted countries tend to adopt management guidelines from the developed world and integrate them into local practice. Although international neonatal practices have influenced neonatal care at the University Hospital of the West Indies (UHWI), over the past fifty years there has been local clinical research done at the hospital that has informed local practice. Causes of neonatal mortality have been documented and this has informed neonatal resuscitation practices, infection control policies and ventilatory support of premature infants. Changes in the incidence of various aetiologies of jaundice over the years have altered how jaundiced neonates are investigated and managed. Research on neonatal sepsis has informed antibiotic choices and treatment regimes. Studies on preterm infants have informed management polices on ensuring optimal thermal environment, on the timing of discharge and on neurodevelopmental follow-up. It is clear that clinical research at the UHWI has informed neonatal care at the institution over the past 50 years and it is hoped that it will continue to do so for the next 50 years and beyond.

  11. Prevalence of Toxoplasma gondii antibodies in stray and owned dogs of Grenada, West Indies

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    Ravindra N. Sharma

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This serological survey was undertaken to estimate the prevalence of Toxoplasma gondii in two populations of dogs (stray and owned dogs in Grenada. Dogs get infected with oocysts voided from cats, definitive hosts of T. gondii. In dogs, T. gondii causes subclinical to clinical disease. Earlier studies conducted in Grenada on a small population of owned dogs showed evidence of exposure to T. gondii. Materials and Methods: Antibodies to T. gondii were determined in serum samples from 625 dogs (368 stray and 257 owned dogs from around all six parishes in Grenada, West Indies, using an indirect enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Results: Antibodies to T. gondii were found in 123 (33.4%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 28.58-38.22% of stray dogs and in 64 (25%; 95% CI: 19.71-30.29% of the owned dogs. Seropositivity was higher in stray dogs than in pet dogs (p=0.026. Whereas, there was no sex predisposition to seropositivity in owned dogs (p=1.0, female stray dogs showed a higher prevalence than male stray dogs (p=0.04. Conclusion: These results support previous findings that T. gondii is prevalent in Grenada. In this study, overall seropositivity for T. gondii in dogs in Grenada is lower than noted in 2008, but is still higher in stray dogs than in owned dogs.

  12. Detection of West Nile Virus and other common equine viruses in three locations from the Leeward Islands, West Indies.

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    Bolfa, Pompei; Jeon, Isaac; Loftis, Amanda; Leslie, Teresa; Marchi, Silvia; Sithole, Fortune; Beck, Cecile; Lecollinet, Sylvie; Zientara, Stephan; Hans, Aymeric; Issel, Charles J

    2017-10-01

    Equines in the West Indies are used for recreational purposes, tourism industry, racing and agriculture or can be found in feral populations. Little is known in the Caribbean basin about the prevalence of some major equine infectious diseases, some with zoonotic potential, listed as reportable by the OIE. Our objective was to study the prevalence of antibodies for West Nile Virus (WNV), Equine Herpes Virus-1 and 4 (EHV-1 and EHV-4), Equine Influenza (EI), Equine Viral Arteritis (EVA) and Equine Infectious Anemia Virus (EIAV) using a retrospective serological convenience study. We used 180 equine serum samples, 140 from horses and 40 from donkeys in St. Kitts, Nevis, and Sint Eustatius, collected between 2006 and 2015 that were tested with ELISA kits and virus neutralization (for WNV and EVA). Combining ELISA with virus neutralization testing, 25 (13.8%) equine sera were WNV positive (a mixture of indigenous and imported equines) and 3 sera (1.6%) showed doubtful results. For EHV-1, 41 equines (23.7%), mean age 6.7 years, were seropositive. For EHV-4, 138 equines were found seropositive (82.8%), mean age 6.3 years. For EI, 49 equines (27.2%), mean age 7.5 years, were seropositive on ELISA, some previously vaccinated horses. No antibodies against EAV were found on virus neutralization testing, although one animal (0.6%), was EAV positive on ELISA. All samples were EIAV negative. The seroprevalence for EHV-1 and EHV-4 is similar to other parts of the world. For the first time in the study location serologic evidence of antibodies against WNV and EI is reported. This was found in both indigenous and imported animals, highlighting the need for developing proper surveillance plans based on complementary methods of virus detection. Further studies will be needed to define the prevalence, rates of transmission, characterize local virus strains, and study their impact on these populations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Survey of Naegleria fowleri in geothermal recreational waters of Guadeloupe (French West Indies).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussa, Mirna; De Jonckheere, Johan F; Guerlotté, Jérôme; Richard, Vincent; Bastaraud, Alexandra; Romana, Marc; Talarmin, Antoine

    2013-01-01

    In 2008 a fatal case of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis, due to the amoeboflagellate Naegleria fowleri, occurred in Guadeloupe, French West Indies, after a child swam in a bath fed with geothermal water. In order to improve the knowledge on free-living amoebae in this tropical part of France, we investigated on a monthly basis, the presence of Naegleria spp. in the recreational baths, and stream waters which feed them. A total of 73 water samples, 48 sediments and 54 swabs samples were collected from 6 sampling points between June 2011 and July 2012. The water samples were filtered and the filters transferred to non-nutrient agar plates seeded with a heat-killed suspension of Escherichia coli while sediment and swab samples were placed directly on these plates. The plates were incubated at 44°C for the selective isolation of thermophilic Naegleria. To identify the Naegleria isolates the internal transcribed spacers, including the 5.8S rDNA, were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and the sequence of the PCR products was determined. Thermophilic amoebae were present at nearly all collection sites. The pathogenic N. fowleri was the most frequently encountered thermophilic species followed by N. lovaniensis. The concentration of N. fowleri was rather low in most water samples, ranging from 0 to 22 per liter. Sequencing revealed that all N. fowleri isolates belonged to a common Euro-American genotype, the same as detected in the human case in Guadeloupe. These investigations need to be continued in order to counsel the health authorities about prevention measures, because these recreational thermal baths are used daily by local people and tourists.

  14. Ralstonia solanacearum strains from Martinique (French West Indies) exhibiting a new pathogenic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicker, Emmanuel; Grassart, Laurence; Coranson-Beaudu, Régine; Mian, Danièle; Guilbaud, Caroline; Fegan, Mark; Prior, Philippe

    2007-11-01

    We investigated a destructive pathogenic variant of the plant pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum that was consistently isolated in Martinique (French West Indies). Since the 1960s, bacterial wilt of solanaceous crops in Martinique has been caused primarily by strains of R. solanacearum that belong to either phylotype I or phylotype II. Since 1999, anthurium shade houses have been dramatically affected by uncharacterized phylotype II strains that also affected a wide range of species, such as Heliconia caribea, cucurbitaceous crops, and weeds. From 1989 to 2003, a total of 224 R. solanacearum isolates were collected and compared to 6 strains isolated in Martinique in the 1980s. The genetic diversity and phylogenetic position of selected strains from Martinique were assessed (multiplex PCRs, mutS and egl DNA sequence analysis) and compared to the genetic diversity and phylogenetic position of 32 reference strains covering the known diversity within the R. solanacearum species complex. Twenty-four representative isolates were tested for pathogenicity to Musa species (banana) and tomato, eggplant, and sweet pepper. Based upon both PCR and sequence analysis, 119 Martinique isolates from anthurium, members of the family Cucurbitaceae, Heliconia, and tomato, were determined to belong to a group termed phylotype II/sequevar 4 (II/4). While these strains cluster with the Moko disease-causing strains, they were not pathogenic to banana (NPB). The strains belonging to phylotype II/4NPB were highly pathogenic to tomato, eggplant, and pepper, were able to wilt the resistant tomato variety Hawaii7996, and may latently infect cooking banana. Phylotype II/4NPB constitutes a new pathogenic variant of R. solanacearum that has recently appeared in Martinique and may be latently prevalent throughout Caribbean and Central/South America.

  15. A Review of Clostridium difficile Infection at the University Hospital of the West Indies, Jamaica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clare-Pascoe, N; Lee, MG; Murphy, T; Nicholson, A; Ferguson, TS

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: This study examined the frequency of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) among hospital admission and diarrhoeal stool samples over a six-year period. Methods: A review of all suspected cases of C difficile positive patients from 2007 to 2012 at the University Hospital of the West Indies (UHWI), Jamaica, was performed. Clostridium difficile infection was confirmed by clinical features and a positive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) stool test for Clostridium Toxins A and B. The demographics, clinical features, risk factors, treatment and outcomes were also collated. Results: There were 56 patients reviewed. The most commonly affected age group was 40–59 years of age. The proportion of CDI cases per total stool samples increased from 0.5% in 2007 to 5.9% in 2010 then fell to 2.2% in 2011 but increased again to 4.3% in 2012. The proportion of cases per total UHWI admissions also increased from 0.12 cases per 1000 admissions in 2007 to 1.16 in 2010 and 1.36 in 2012 (p < 0.001). Most CDI cases were nosocomial (76% males, 48.6% females). Co-morbidities included hypertension and end-stage renal disease. Ceftazidime was the most common antibiotic associated with the development of CDI. Resolution occurred in 62.5% of patients. Duration of hospital stay was longer in males than females (≥ 21 versus < 7 days) and males had more adverse outcomes, with death in 23.8% versus 11.4%. Conclusion: There has been an increase in the frequency of CDI at UHWI with a greater than expected frequency of community acquired CDI. Increased awareness is needed of the increasing risk for CDI and measures must be taken to prevent the disease, especially in hospitalized patients. PMID:26624597

  16. The phylogeography of rabies in Grenada, West Indies, and implications for control.

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    Ulrike Zieger

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In Grenada, West Indies, rabies is endemic, and is thought to be maintained in a wildlife host, the small Indian mongoose (Herpestes auropunctatus with occasional spillover into other hosts. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to improve understanding of rabies epidemiology in Grenada and to inform rabies control policy. Mongooses were trapped island-wide between April 2011 and March 2013 and examined for the presence of Rabies virus (RABV antigen using the direct fluorescent antibody test (dFAT and PCR, and for serum neutralizing antibodies (SNA using the fluorescent antibody virus neutralization test (FAVN. An additional cohort of brain samples from clinical rabies suspects submitted between April 2011 and March 2014 were also investigated for the presence of virus. Two of the 171 (1.7% live-trapped mongooses were RABV positive by FAT and PCR, and 20 (11.7% had SNAs. Rabies was diagnosed in 31 of the submitted animals with suspicious clinical signs: 16 mongooses, 12 dogs, 2 cats and 1 goat. Our investigation has revealed that rabies infection spread from the northeast to the southwest of Grenada within the study period. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the viruses from Grenada formed a monophyletic clade within the cosmopolitan lineage with a common ancestor predicted to have occurred recently (6-23 years ago, and are distinct from those found in Cuba and Puerto Rico, where mongoose rabies is also endemic. These data suggest that it is likely that this specific strain of RABV was imported from European regions rather than the Americas. These data contribute essential information for any potential rabies control program in Grenada and demonstrate the importance of a sound evidence base for planning interventions.

  17. Survey of Naegleria fowleri in geothermal recreational waters of Guadeloupe (French West Indies.

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    Mirna Moussa

    Full Text Available In 2008 a fatal case of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis, due to the amoeboflagellate Naegleria fowleri, occurred in Guadeloupe, French West Indies, after a child swam in a bath fed with geothermal water. In order to improve the knowledge on free-living amoebae in this tropical part of France, we investigated on a monthly basis, the presence of Naegleria spp. in the recreational baths, and stream waters which feed them. A total of 73 water samples, 48 sediments and 54 swabs samples were collected from 6 sampling points between June 2011 and July 2012. The water samples were filtered and the filters transferred to non-nutrient agar plates seeded with a heat-killed suspension of Escherichia coli while sediment and swab samples were placed directly on these plates. The plates were incubated at 44°C for the selective isolation of thermophilic Naegleria. To identify the Naegleria isolates the internal transcribed spacers, including the 5.8S rDNA, were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and the sequence of the PCR products was determined. Thermophilic amoebae were present at nearly all collection sites. The pathogenic N. fowleri was the most frequently encountered thermophilic species followed by N. lovaniensis. The concentration of N. fowleri was rather low in most water samples, ranging from 0 to 22 per liter. Sequencing revealed that all N. fowleri isolates belonged to a common Euro-American genotype, the same as detected in the human case in Guadeloupe. These investigations need to be continued in order to counsel the health authorities about prevention measures, because these recreational thermal baths are used daily by local people and tourists.

  18. Patterns of Ocular Trauma Presenting to the University Hospital of the West Indies in Jamaica

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    JC Nelson-Imoru

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study is to identify the causes of ocular trauma, determine the groups at risk and types of injuries presenting to the Eye Unit at the University Hospital of the West Indies. Method: A prospective observational study was done over a 14-month period on trauma related referrals to the ophthalmology department. A questionnaire was administered and data were collected on the patient’s age, gender, affected eye, aetiology and location of trauma, visual acuity and intraocular pressure (IOP. Statistical analysis was performed using STATA. Results: There were 84 eyes of 80 patients, of which 71.3% were males and 28.7% were females. The ages ranged from 3–64 (mean 31.2 ± 15.1 years. The highest incidence of trauma was seen in the 18–35-year age group (41.3%. Males had an odds ratio risk of 1.37. Blunt trauma occurred in 35.7% of cases and penetrating trauma in 33.3% of cases. The highest incidence of eye injury occurred at home (47.5% followed by the workplace (25.0%, then road traffic setting (13.8%. Assault-related eye injury was seen in 17.5% of cases and 62.5% of all injuries were accidental. The rate of hospitalization was 40.5%, of which 85.3% were males while 14.7% were females. Previous trauma in the affected eye occurred in 14.3% of cases. Conclusions: Males have a high odds risk ratio of ocular trauma. The majority of eye injuries occur in the home environment. Most injuries were accidental and could be avoided with the use of eye protection or care with interpersonal and work-related activities.

  19. Factors affecting hatch success of hawksbill sea turtles on Long Island, Antigua, West Indies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Allan Ditmer

    Full Text Available Current understanding of the factors influencing hawksbill sea turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata hatch success is disparate and based on relatively short-term studies or limited sample sizes. Because global populations of hawksbills are heavily depleted, evaluating the parameters that impact hatch success is important to their conservation and recovery. Here, we use data collected by the Jumby Bay Hawksbill Project (JBHP to investigate hatch success. The JBHP implements saturation tagging protocols to study a hawksbill rookery in Antigua, West Indies. Habitat data, which reflect the varied nesting beaches, are collected at egg deposition, and nest contents are exhumed and categorized post-emergence. We analyzed hatch success using mixed-model analyses with explanatory and predictive datasets. We incorporated a random effect for turtle identity and evaluated environmental, temporal and individual-based reproductive variables. Hatch success averaged 78.6% (SD: 21.2% during the study period. Highly supported models included multiple covariates, including distance to vegetation, deposition date, individual intra-seasonal nest number, clutch size, organic content, and sand grain size. Nests located in open sand were predicted to produce 10.4 more viable hatchlings per clutch than nests located >1.5 m into vegetation. For an individual first nesting in early July, the fourth nest of the season yielded 13.2 more viable hatchlings than the initial clutch. Generalized beach section and inter-annual variation were also supported in our explanatory dataset, suggesting that gaps remain in our understanding of hatch success. Our findings illustrate that evaluating hatch success is a complex process, involving multiple environmental and individual variables. Although distance to vegetation and hatch success were inversely related, vegetation is an important component of hawksbill nesting habitat, and a more complete assessment of the impacts of specific

  20. Review of six cases of maxillary ameloblastoma from the West Indies: re-entry cryosurgery as prophylactic surgical intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunsalu, C; Scipio, E; Williams, N

    2009-09-01

    Maxillary ameloblastoma is a rare histopathological entity. A total of six cases of histologically confirmed maxillary ameloblastoma from the West Indies is reviewed. Three of the cases were taken from a total of 47 histologically confirmed ameloblastoma over a 15-year period (1980-1995) from two major maxillofacial units in Jamaica. Two other cases were from documentation in Jamaica between 2000 and 2002, one of which occurred in a 13-year-old girl (these two patients have been followed-up periodically to 2006). The sixth case was from the records of the maxillofacial department of the University of the West Indies in Trinidad and Tobago. This last patient, at a recent review, has inoperable recurrence. These cases were reviewed with respect to demographics (patient's age and gender), location and extent of tumour, radiological features, concurrent involvement of the mandible, treatment with special emphasis on current treatment modality and follow-up. The findings do not differ from what has been documented by other authors from other parts of the world. Because of the radiographic anatomy of the maxilla, recurrence may be detected late despite such occurring earlier following initial surgical management. It is for this reason that we suggest re-entry cryosurgery for prevention of recurrence for maxillary ameloblastoma. The only case of maxillary ameloblastoma that had re-entry cryosurgery continues to benefit from absence of recurrence at periodic follow-ups at four years post-primary surgical management (which was enucleation).

  1. A review of molar pregnancy at the university hospital of the West Indies over a 16-year period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simms-Stewart, D; Mcdonald, G; Fletcher, H; Bromfield, M; Williams, N; Bambury, I; James, K

    2013-04-01

    There is a wide variation in reported incidence, risk factors and presentation of molar pregnancy. This necessitates population-based studies to determine these parameters at the University Hospital of the West Indies, which is a referral centre for these conditions. The incidence of molar pregnancy at the University Hospital of the West Indies was found to be 2.81 per 1,000, which fell in the range of worldwide values. Partial moles made up 61.1% and complete moles 31.0%. The mean age of the patients was 28.49 years old with 85% of patients aged between 20 and 40 years old. The median gestational age by dates was 12 weeks and vaginal bleeding was the most common presenting symptom (77%). A significant number of cases (52.2%) of molar pregnancy were diagnosed by routine histopathology for failed pregnancy and not by pre-evacuation ultrasound. The practice of routine assessment of tissue from failed pregnancy should therefore be encouraged in our population.

  2. Effects of Corporal Punishment, Perceived Caretaker Warmth, and Cultural Beliefs on the Psychological Adjustment of Children in St. Kitts, West Indies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohner, Ronald P.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Structural equation modeling analysis of 349 youths, aged 9-16, in St. Kitts, West Indies, showed that physical punishment by itself does make a modest, but significant, direct and negative contribution to youths' psychological adjustment. Children tended to experience themselves to be rejected in direct proportion to the frequency and severity of…

  3. Predictors of Student Success in an Online Learning Environment in the English-Speaking Caribbean: Evidence from the University of the West Indies Open Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrican, S. Joel; Leacock, Coreen J.; Thompson, Benita P.; Alleyne, Melissa L.

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigated success rates and possible predictors of success among students at The University of the West Indies Open Campus. Archival data were mined from admissions and academic records of students from the 2008 intake to explore retention and completion rates, and for students enrolled in two online undergraduate courses in Semester…

  4. Innovation in Tertiary Education in the Caribbean: Distance Teaching in the Faculty of Education at the University of the West Indies. Verhandelingen No. 44.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Zellyne D.

    The University of the West Indies Distance Teaching Experiment (UWIDITE) is an example of a conventional institution with a distance teaching department. The UWI is one of two regional universities serving a region covering 17 countries. Some countries are fairly prosperous; others are suffering severe economic difficulties. All the territories…

  5. Quality Assurance and the Imperatives for Improved Student Experiences in Higher Education: The Case of the University of the West Indies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gift, Sandra Ingrid; Bell-Hutchinson, Camille

    2007-01-01

    This paper critically examines the outcomes of quality assurance programme reviews on the three campuses of the University of the West Indies (UWI) with an emphasis on the factors that impact upon the quality of students' learning experiences. In establishing the context of the discussion, the authors describe the quality assurance system of the…

  6. Problem-based Compared with Traditional Methods at the Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of the West Indies: A Model Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alleyne, T.; Shirley, A.; Bennett, C.; Addae, J.; Walrond, E.; West, S.; Pinto Pereira, L.

    2002-01-01

    Analyzes results from the final clinical examinations of two separate campuses of the University of the West Indies that use two different learning approaches. Concludes that, except for a few isolated cases, there were no statistically significant differences between the performance of the traditional group and the problem based learning (PBL)…

  7. In Quest of an Ideal Library Environment: The Case of the Main Library, the University of the West Indies, St. Augustine, Trinidad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Reginald

    2002-01-01

    Explains the need for attention to library environment in terms of conservation, disaster planning, and external environmental factors. Discusses measures adopted at the University of the West Indies Trinidad related to operation and maintenance of buildings and physical plant, describes a workplace evaluation project, and examines factors…

  8. An Assessment of Support Strategies Used to Facilitate Distance Students' Participation in a Web-Based Learning Environment in the University of the West Indies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuboni, Olabisi; Martin, Alicia

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports on a study undertaken to analyse learner participation in an online teaching-learning environment in the distance education program of the University of the West Indies. In outlining the context of the study, special emphasis was placed on the role of the course coordinator and the site-based technician in facilitating…

  9. [Coping with leprosy in the Dutch West Indies in the 19th century; opposing but meaningful views from Suriname].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menke, Henk; Snelders, Stephen; Pieters, Toine

    2009-01-01

    Leprosy was highly prevalent among African slaves in the Dutch West Indian colony of Suriname. Largely based on observations in Suriname, Dutch physicians described the aetiology of leprosy in terms of'a substrate' to which all sorts of mixtures of infection, heredity and hygiene contributed ('seed and soil'). This explanatory model with multiple options for prevention and treatment left room for different developmental trajectories to control the spread of the disease in the various tropical colonies of the Dutch empire. In Suriname there was a growing worry in the 19th century regarding the spread of leprosy, threatening the health of slaves, settlers and colonial administrators. And this could be harmful to an already weakening plantation economy. This concern prompted the local administration to develop a rigorous policy of strict isolation of leprosy sufferers. This, in turn, intersected with a changing insight in Europe - including the Netherlands - that leprosy was non-contagious. However,'in splendid isolation' in the economically and politically marginal colony Suriname, Dutch physicians like Charles Landre and his son, Charles Louis Drognat Landré, could afford to ignore the European non-contagious approach and continue to support the strict isolation policies. Moreover, they developed a dissident radical explanation of leprosy as a disease caused only by contagion. In the absence of a receptive Dutch audience Drognat Landré published his contagion theory in French and so succeeded in inspiring the Norwegian Hansen, who subsequently discovered the culpable micro-organism. At the same time colonial administrators and physicians in the economically and politically important Dutch colonies in the East Indies adhered to the prevailing European concept and changed policies: the system of isolation was abolished. Given the rather different trajectories of leprosy health policies in the Dutch East and West Indies we point out the importance of a comparative

  10. Predictors of Student Success in an Online Learning Environment in the English-Speaking Caribbean: Evidence from the University of the West Indies Open Campus

    OpenAIRE

    S. Joel Warrican; Coreen J. Leacock; Benita P. Thompson; Alleyne, Melissa L.

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigated success rates and possible predictors of success among students at The University of the West Indies Open Campus. Archival data were mined from admissions and academic records of students from the 2008 intake to explore retention and completion rates, and for students enrolled in two online undergraduate courses in Semester 1 of the 2012/2013 academic year. The two courses had consistently high failure rates. Descriptive statistics and binary logistic regression were u...

  11. Plant-hummingbird interactions in the West Indies: floral specialisation gradients associated with environment and hummingbird size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalsgaard, Bo; Martín González, Ana M; Olesen, Jens M; Ollerton, Jeff; Timmermann, Allan; Andersen, Laila H; Tossas, Adrianne G

    2009-04-01

    Floral phenotype and pollination system of a plant may be influenced by the abiotic environment and the local pollinator assemblage. This was investigated in seven plant-hummingbird assemblages on the West Indian islands of Grenada, Dominica and Puerto Rico. We report all hummingbird and insect pollinators of 49 hummingbird-pollinated plant species, as well as six quantitative and semi-quantitative floral characters that determine visitor restriction, attraction and reward. Using nonmetric multidimensional scaling analysis, we show that hummingbird-pollinated plants in the West Indies separate in floral phenotypic space into two gradients-one associated with the abiotic environment and another with hummingbird size. Plants pollinated by large, long-billed hummingbirds had flowers with long corolla tube, large amounts of nectar and showy orange-red colouration. These attracted few or no insect species, whereas plants pollinated by small, short-billed hummingbirds were frequently pollinated by insects, particularly lepidopterans. The separation of plants related to environmental factors showed that species in the wet and cold highlands produced large amounts of dilute nectar, possessed no or a weak odour, and were associated with few insects, particularly few hymenopterans, compared to plants in the dry and warm lowlands. The most specialised hummingbird-pollinated plants are found in the West Indian highlands where they are pollinated by mainly large, long-billed hummingbirds. At the other extreme, highly generalised plants growing in the dry and warm lowlands are pollinated by small, short-billed hummingbirds and numerous insect species. This illustrates that, even within the hummingbird-pollinated flora, pollination syndrome and the degree of specialisation may vary tremendously depending on pollinator morphology and environment.

  12. Contribution of Heliborne Electro-Magnetic survey for landslide prediction: application to La Martinique (West Indies, France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiery, Yannick; Reninger, Pierre-Alexandre; Vandromme, Rosalie; Nachbaur, Aude

    2017-04-01

    Landslide hazard and risk assessment (LHA & LRA) in French West Indies is a big challenge, because of several factors contributing to high sensitivity of slopes to landslide (complex weathered volcanic grounds, hurricane seasons, heavy land pressure).The initial step is to assess the spatial probability (and sometimes temporal) of failure (i.e. landslide susceptibility assessment; LSA) for a given area. LSA can be evaluated by several approaches (i.e. knowledge approach, data-driven approach, physically based approach). Physically based approaches are used to calculate a slope stability factor taking into account mechanical, geotechnical, hydrological and hydrogeological parameters. However, the parametrization of these models can be difficult because of a lack of information (i.e. soil depths, precipitations chronicles, lithology sometimes due to a difficult ground access, particularly in French Indies. Thus, HEM (Heliborne Electro-Magnetic Survey) appears as a solution to obtain specific information quickly and over large areas. Since 2000, the HEM method is increasingly used for environmental studies: geomorphological and hydrogeological studies. In 2013, The French Geological Survey conducted an HEM survey over La Martinique (West Indies). Resistivity contrasts were imaged up 250-300 meters depth with a horizontal resolution around 30 m and a vertical resolution between 3 and 8 m. Even if the resistivity has not a straightforward relationship with soil mechanical properties (which are key parameters for LHA) it provides relevant information on both the thickness and the extension of formations. The aim of this study is to evaluate the contribution of HEM survey to recognize landslide prone areas and landslide prone formations in volcanic environment. Once the different formations defined, they are introduced in a physically based model to assess the susceptibility of slope for different landslide types with hydrogeological control. The methodology is split in

  13. Secular variation study from non-welded pyroclastic deposits from Montagne Pelée volcano, Martinique (West Indies)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genevey, A.; Gallet, Y.; Boudon, G.

    2002-07-01

    We present palaeomagnetic data obtained from large clasts collected in non-welded pyroclastic deposits from Montagne Pelée volcano (Martinique Island, West Indies). These deposits, dated by the 14C method from 5000 yr BP to the present, comprise block- and ash-flows, ash- and pumice-flows and pumice fallouts. Alternating fields treatment was as a routine chosen to demagnetise large samples for which the magnetisation was measured with a specially designed inductometer. The mean directions obtained from block- and ash-flow deposits of the 1902 and 1929 eruptions are in good agreement with the expected geomagnetic directions at these times in Martinique. The so-called P1 eruption (˜1345 AD), which is characterised by a rarely observed transition from a Peléean to a Plinian eruptive style, allows a direct comparison of the palaeomagnetic directions obtained from the three types of pyroclastic deposits. All deposits provide identical mean directions, which further demonstrates the suitability of the non-welded pyroclastic deposits for geomagnetic secular variation study with a very good accuracy and precision. The possibility of using pyroclastic deposits is promising for obtaining a wider distribution of sampling sites, which may better allow us to constrain our knowledge on the geomagnetic secular variation. We find that large geomagnetic changes occurred in Martinique during the last millennium, while the variations appear more limited prior to this period.

  14. Distinct bacterial community structure of 3 tropical volcanic soils from banana plantations contaminated with chlordecone in Guadeloupe (French West Indies).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercier, Anne; Dictor, Marie-Christine; Harris-Hellal, Jennifer; Breeze, Dominique; Mouvet, Christophe

    2013-08-01

    In the French West Indies (FWI), the soil, andosols, ferralsols and nitisols, is highly polluted by chlordecone, although this organochlorine insecticide extensively applied to banana crops has been banned for 20years. This contamination has led to a major human health concern inducing the need for remediation of the contaminated soils. Work was conducted to help to evaluate the impact of remediation processes on the microbial communities from these soils. Microbial biomass was estimated after direct DNA extraction from three chlordecone-contaminated soils (an andosol, a ferralsol and a nitisol) and the bacterial community analyzed using t-RFLP. The FWI volcanic andosol was particularly recalcitrant to usual direct DNA extraction protocols hampering analysis of soil microbial communities until now, in contrast with the 2 other soils. For the first time, DNA was directly extracted from a FWI andosol based on yeast RNA addition at the lysis step. Differences in microbial biomass were thus observed between the 3 FWI soils. Moreover, the bacterial community structure was significantly distinct from each other's and related to soil physico-chemical characteristics. Interestingly, differences in bacterial diversity could not be exclusively attributed to the level of chlordecone contamination. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Batrachedra nuciferae, an inflorescence-feeding moth associated with coconut, Cocos nucifera, and palmiste, Roystonea oleracea, in Trinidad, West Indies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cock, Matthew J W

    2013-01-01

    In 2006, Batrachedra nuciferae Hodges (Lepidoptera: Batrachedridae) was the first phytophagous insect to be reported from inflorescences of coconut, Cocos nucifera L. (Arecales: Arecaceae), in Trinidad, West Indies. At that time, it was suggested to be an introduced species contributing to decreasing coconut yields on the island and potentially a threat to other palms. In this preliminary study, inflorescences of coconut, seven indigenous palms, and six exotic ornamental palms were surveyed in several areas of Trinidad. Caterpillars of more than 10 species of Lepidoptera were found and reared through to the adult stage. Batrachedra nuciferae was positively identified. It was concluded that the caterpillars of B. nuciferae feed on pollen in the male flowers of coconut and palmiste or royal palm, Roystonea oleracea (Jacquin) O.F. Cook. There was no evidence that B. nuciferae bred on any of the other palms surveyed, but it is not conclusive that they do not do so. A parasitoid, Apanteles (sensu lato) sp. (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), of B. nuciferae was reared. On available information, B. nuciferae is more likely to be an indigenous species that has hitherto been overlooked than an introduced species. In view of what is known about damage-yield relationships and biological control agents, B. nuciferae is unlikely to cause yield losses to coconut, so control measures are not justified.

  16. Prevalence of Salmonella spp. in cane toads (Bufo marinus) from Grenada, West Indies, and their antimicrobial susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, M; Amadi, V; Zieger, U; Johnson, R; Hariharan, H

    2013-09-01

    Cloacal swabs and caecal contents sampled from 58 cane toads (Bufo marinus) in St George's parish, Grenada, during a 7-month period in 2011 were examined by an enrichment and selective culture method for presence of Salmonella spp. Twenty-four (41%) toads were positive for Salmonella spp. of which eight were Salmonella enterica serovar Javiana, and eight were S. enterica serovar Rubislaw. The other serovars were as follows: Montevideo, 6; Arechavaleta, 1; and serovar: IV:43:-:-, 1. The high frequency of isolation of serovar Javiana, an emerging human pathogen associated with several outbreaks in the recent years in the eastern United States, suggests a possible role for cane toads in transmission of this serovar. Although S. Rubislaw has been isolated from lizards, bats and cases of some human infections, there is no report of its carriage by cane toads, and in such high frequency. The rate of carriage of S. Montevideo, a cause for human foodborne outbreaks around the world was also over 10% in the 58 toads sampled in this study. The antimicrobial drug susceptibility tests against amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, ampicillin, cefotaxime, ceftazidime, ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin, gentamicin, imipenem, nalidixic acid, streptomycin, tetracycline and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole showed that drug resistance is minimal and is of little concern. Antimicrobial resistance was limited to ampicillin and amoxicillin-clavulanic acid in one isolate of S. Javiana and one isolate of S. Rubislaw. This is the first report of isolation and antimicrobial susceptibilities of various Salmonella serovars not identified previously in cane toads in Grenada, West Indies.

  17. Prevalence, serovars and antimicrobial susceptibility of Salmonella spp. from wild and domestic green iguanas (Iguana iguana) in Grenada, West Indies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvester, W R B; Amadi, V; Pinckney, R; Macpherson, C N L; McKibben, J S; Bruhl-Day, R; Johnson, R; Hariharan, H

    2014-09-01

    Cloacal swabs from 62 green iguanas (Iguana iguana), including 47 wild and 15 domestic ones from five parishes of Grenada, were sampled during a 4-month period of January to April 2013 and examined by enrichment and selective culture for the presence of Salmonella spp. Fifty-five per cent of the animals were positive, and eight serovars of Salmonella were isolated. The most common serovar was Rubislaw (58.8%), a serovar found recently in many cane toads in Grenada, followed by Oranienburg (14.7%), a serovar that has been causing serious human disease outbreaks in Japan. Serovar IV:48:g,z51 :- (formerly, S. Marina) highly invasive and known for serious infections in children in the United States, constituted 11.8% of the isolates, all of them being from domestic green iguanas. Salmonella Newport, a serovar recently found in a blue land crab in Grenada, comprised 11.8% of the isolates from the green iguanas. The remaining four less frequent serovars included S. Javiana and S. Glostrup. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests conducted by a disc diffusion method against amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, ampicillin, cefotaxime, ceftazidime, ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin, gentamicin, nalidixic acid, streptomycin, tetracycline and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole showed that drug resistance is minimal, with intermediate susceptibility, mainly to streptomycin, tetracycline and cefotaxime. This is the first report of isolation and antimicrobial susceptibilities of various Salmonella serovars from wild and domestic green iguanas in Grenada, West Indies.

  18. A review of medicinal plant research at the University of the West Indies, Jamaica, 1948-2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, S A; Ahmad, M H

    2006-09-01

    This review summarizes research carried out on Jamaican medicinal plants at the Faculty of Pure and Applied Science, The University of the West Indies (UWI), Mona, Jamaica, between 1948 and 2001. The plants identified as being medicinal are listed along with their folk use and a summary of the scientific research done at UWI leading to the identification of natural products (NPs) and determination of their bioactivity. Natural product research on Jamaican medicinal plants began with the inception of UWI in 1948, leading to many postgraduate degrees being awarded (22 MPhil and 31 PhD). At least 334 plant species growing in Jamaica have been identified as having medicinal qualities, 193 of these have been tested for their bioactivity. Crude extracts from 80 of these plants have reasonable bioactivity and natural products (NP) have been identified from 44 plants. At least 29 of these NPs were found to be bioactive. Only 31 of the plants tested at UWI are endemic to Jamaica. Of these 23% were bioactive, as compared to 11% of the non-endemics. Based on these results, patents have been obtained and drugs have been developed. This review represents the first attempt to gather this information together in one place.

  19. Identification of Pre-examination Errors in the Chemical Pathology Laboratory at the University Hospital of the West Indies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilworth, Lowell L; McGrowder, Donovan A; Thompson, Rory K

    2014-04-01

    This study evaluated the types and frequencies of pre-examination errors recorded in the chemical pathology laboratory at the University Hospital of the West Indies, Jamaica. This was a retrospective analysis of errors recorded over a three year period. Data analysis was done on an average of 519,084 samples collected and tested per year. Samples included blood, urine, stool and other fluids. Pre-examination errors were identified and recorded following visual inspection of the samples and corresponding request forms by laboratory staff, then subsequently by the Senior Medical Technologist. Errors were generally classified as inappropriate sample (58 %), inappropriate form (23.4 %), inappropriate sample volume (9.3 %) and inappropriate sample tube (9.3 %). Over 90 % of recorded pre-examination errors were related to blood samples while urine samples accounted for 6.8 % error. Pre-examination errors were lower at this study location than elsewhere. Measures aimed at reducing instances of these errors are recommended for improved laboratory quality output.

  20. EFFECTS OF "SWIM WITH THE TURTLES" TOURIST ATTRACTIONS ON GREEN SEA TURTLE (CHELONIA MYDAS) HEALTH IN BARBADOS, WEST INDIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Kimberly; Norton, Terry; Mohammed, Hamish; Browne, Darren; Clements, Kathleen; Thomas, Kirsten; Yaw, Taylor; Horrocks, Julia

    2016-04-01

    Along the West Coast of Barbados a unique relationship has developed between endangered green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas) and humans. Fishermen began inadvertently provisioning these foraging turtles with fish offal discarded from their boats. Although initially an indirect supplementation, this activity became a popular attraction for visitors. Subsequently, demand for this activity increased, and direct supplementation or provisioning with food began. Food items offered included raw whole fish (typically a mixture of false herring [Harengula clupeola] and pilchard [Harengula humeralis]), filleted fish, and lesser amounts of processed food such as hot dogs, chicken, bread, or various other leftovers. Alterations in behavior and growth rates as a result of the provisioning have been documented in this population. The purpose of this study was to determine how tourism-based human interactions are affecting the overall health of this foraging population and to determine what potential health risks these interactions may create for sea turtles. Juvenile green sea turtles (n=29) were captured from four sites off the coast of Barbados, West Indies, and categorized into a group that received supplemental feeding as part of a tour (n=11) or an unsupplemented group (n=18) that consisted of individuals that were captured at sites that did not provide supplemental feeding. Following capture, a general health assessment of each animal was conducted. This included weight and morphometric measurements, a systematic physical examination, determination of body condition score and body condition index, epibiota assessment and quantification, and clinical pathology including hematologic and biochemical testing and nutritional assessments. The supplemented group was found to have changes to body condition, vitamin, mineral, hematologic, and biochemical values. Based on these results, recommendations were made to decrease negative behaviors and health impacts for turtles as a result

  1. Moss flora and vegetation of Saba and St. Eustatius (West Indies)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersma, Paulien

    1983-01-01

    The known mossflora of the small West Indian island Saba (870 m in altitude) consists to date of 48 species, while the neighbouring island St. Eustatius (600 m) has 40 species. The two islands have 27 species in common. Widely distributed neotropical species dominate at all elevations, while wide-tr

  2. Comparative risk assessments for the city of Pointe-à-Pitre (French West Indies): earthquakes and storm surge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reveillere, A. R.; Bertil, D. B.; Douglas, J. D.; Grisanti, L. G.; Lecacheux, S. L.; Monfort, D. M.; Modaressi, H. M.; Müller, H. M.; Rohmer, J. R.; Sedan, O. S.

    2012-04-01

    In France, risk assessments for natural hazards are usually carried out separately and decision makers lack comprehensive information. Moreover, since the cause of the hazard (e.g. meteorological, geological) and the physical phenomenon that causes damage (e.g. inundation, ground shaking) may be fundamentally different, the quantitative comparison of single risk assessments that were not conducted in a compatible framework is not straightforward. Comprehensive comparative risk assessments exist in a few other countries. For instance, the Risk Map Germany project has developed and applied a methodology for quantitatively comparing the risk of relevant natural hazards at various scales (city, state) in Germany. The present on-going work applies a similar methodology to the Pointe-à-Pitre urban area, which represents more than half of the population of Guadeloupe, an overseas region in the French West Indies. Relevant hazards as well as hazard intensity levels differ from continental Europe, which will lead to different conclusions. French West Indies are prone to a large number of hazards, among which hurricanes, volcanic eruptions and earthquakes dominate. Hurricanes cause damage through three phenomena: wind, heavy rainfall and storm surge, the latter having had a preeminent role during the largest historical event in 1928. Seismic risk is characterized by many induced phenomena, among which earthquake shocks dominate. This study proposes a comparison of earthquake and cyclonic storm surge risks. Losses corresponding to hazard intensities having the same probability of occurrence are calculated. They are quantified in a common loss unit, chosen to be the direct economic losses. Intangible or indirect losses are not considered. The methodology therefore relies on (i) a probabilistic hazard assessment, (ii) a loss ratio estimation for the exposed elements and (iii) an economic estimation of these assets. Storm surge hazard assessment is based on the selection of

  3. Knowledge, Awareness and Compliance with Universal Precautions among Health Care Workers at the University Hospital of the West Indies, Jamaica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Irving

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Universal precautions are not well understood or implemented by health care practitioners, though crucial in the prevention and transmission of blood-borne pathogens like HIV.Objective: To assess knowledge, awareness and compliance of universal precautions among health care workers at the University Hospital of the West Indies, Jamaica.Method: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in September and October 2007. A 28-item self-administered questionnaire was provided to 200 health care workers including medical doctors, medical technologists, nurses and porters to assess their knowledge, awareness and practice towards universal precautions.Results: Almost two-thirds (64.0% of the respondents were very knowledgeable of universal precautions with significantly more females (75.4% than males (42.9% (p<0.0001. More nurses (90.0%, medical doctors (88.0% and medical technologists (70% were very knowledgeable of universal precautions (p<0.0001. More respondents (92.9% who were employed in the health sector for 16 years and over reported high levels of awareness of universal precautions than those who were employed for less than five years (p<0.0001. 28.6% of males and only 6.2% of females reported that they do not use protective gear. More nurses reported frequent use of protective equipment followed by medical technologists and medical doctors (p<0.0001.Conclusions: There was adequate knowledge and a fair level of awareness among medical doctors, medical technologists, and nurses towards universal precautions.

  4. Microbiological hazard analysis of ready-to-eat meats processed at a food plant in Trinidad, West Indies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacey-Marie Syne

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: A bacteriological assessment of the environment and food products at different stages of processing was conducted during the manufacture of ready-to-eat (RTE chicken franks, chicken bologna and bacon at a large meat processing plant in Trinidad, West Indies. Methods: Samples of air, surfaces (swabs, raw materials, and in-process and finished food products were collected during two separate visits for each product type and subjected to qualitative or quantitative analysis for bacterial zoonotic pathogens and fecal indicator organisms. Results: Staphylococcus aureus was the most common pathogen detected in pre-cooked products (mean counts = 0.66, 1.98, and 1.95 log10CFU/g for franks, bologna, and bacon, respectively. This pathogen was also found in unacceptable levels in 4 (16.7% of 24 post-cooked samples. Fifty percent (10 of 20 of pre-cooked mixtures of bacon and bologna were contaminated with Listeria spp., including four with L. monocytogenes. Pre-cooked mixtures of franks and bologna also contained E. coli (35 and 0.72 log10 CFU/g, respectively while 5 (12.5% of 40 pre-cooked mixtures of chicken franks had Salmonella spp. Aerobic bacteria exceeded acceptable international standards in 46 (82.1% of 56 pre-cooked and 6 (16.7% of 36 post-cooked samples. Both pre-and post-cooking air and surfaces had relatively high levels of aerobic bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus and coliforms, including equipment and gloves of employees. A drastic decrease in aerobic counts and Staphylococcus aureus levels following heat treatment and subsequent increase in counts of these bacteria are suggestive of post-cooking contamination. Conclusion: A relatively high level of risk exists for microbial contamination of RTE meats at the food plant investigated and there is a need for enhancing the quality assurance programs to ensure the safety of consumers of products manufactured at this plant.

  5. Knowledge, Beliefs and Practices of Patients with Diabetic Retinopathy at the University Hospital of the West Indies, Jamaica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Tecah; Mowatt, Lizette; Mullings, Jasneth

    2016-06-01

    To determine the knowledge, beliefs and practices of patients with diabetic retinopathy attending the Retina Eye Clinic at the University Hospital of the West Indies. A prospective study was done using a questionnaire with a sample population of 150 patients. The questions included their knowledge about the frequency of their eye examination, the relevance of exercise and a healthy diet, the role of the ophthalmologist and their views on the importance of compliance with medications for diabetes and hypertension. One hundred and fifty patients were recruited. Sixty six percent (99/150) were females and 34 % (51/150) males. The ages ranged from 29 to 83 years (mean ± SD, 56.1 ± 10.3) years. Type II diabetes was more common; 63 and 79 % of females and males respectively. A minority (19.8 %) obtained tertiary education. The mean % knowledge scores were 86 ± 14 for males and 82.8 ± 16.4 for females (p = 0.260). Prior to attending the retina clinic, 50 % were unaware of the need for annual eye examinations. Compliance with medication, exercise and a special diet was seen in 73, 40.3 and 49.7 % respectively. Current knowledge scores were good. However, knowledge about the timing and frequency of eye examinations prior to attending the retina clinic was inadequate. Correct knowledge and beliefs did not correspond to a high level of compliant practices.

  6. Increasing Public Access to University Qualifications: Evolution of The University of the West Indies Open Campus

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    Michael L. Thomas

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper traces the evolution of The University of the West Indies’ Open Campus (UWIOC, which is expected to expand service and increase access to the underserved communities of the Eastern Caribbean. At present, UWI, which caters to the needs of the 16 far flung countries of the Commonwealth Caribbean, has not been able to fully serve these countries, the UWI-12, in a way that is commensurate with their developmental needs. Historically, the institution has been dominated by campus-based education, and its three campuses have been poles of attraction for scholars and scholarship to the significant advantage of the countries in which they are located: Jamaica, Trinidad and Tobago, and Barbados. The University’s creation of an open campus, a fourth campus, enables it to expand its scope, enhance its appeal, and improve the efficiency of its services to individuals, communities, and countries. This new campus, a merger of UWI’s Outreach sector, which comprises the School of Continuing Studies, the Tertiary Level Institute Unit, and The UWI Distance Education Centre, will have a physical presence in each contributing country and will function as a network of real and virtual modes to deliver education and training to anyone with access to Internet facilities.

  7. An attempt to correlate cattle breed origins and diseases associated with or transmitted by the tick Amblyomma variegatum in the French West Indies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maillard, J C; Kemp, S J; Naves, M; Palin, C; Demangel, C; Accipe, A; Maillard, N; Bensaid, A

    1993-01-01

    By using biological data and historical research, we have tried to explain the difference between resistance and susceptibility to the diseases transmitted (cowdriosis) or associated (dermatophilosis) with the tick Amblyomma variegatum, in two cattle breeds of the French West Indies: the Creole crossbred cattle of Guadeloupe and the Brahman zebu cattle of Martinique. Have been studied the polymorphisms of 5 independent genetic systems (erythrocytic haemoglobin, serum albumin and transferrin, the class I region of the BoLA complex and the gamma S crystallin gene) in different breeds comprising Bos taurus cattle of Europe and Africa, Bos indicus of West and East Africa, as well as the Brahman of Martinique and the Creole crossbred of Guadeloupe. By comparing the different allele frequencies of these 5 non related polymorphic loci and by using the two different mathematical matrices of NEI and of CAVALLI-SFORZA, have been established the genetic distances between these breeds. It appears clearly that the Creole cattle of Guadeloupe are in an intermediate position between the Bos taurus N'Dama breed of West Africa and two Bos indicus zebu breeds, namely the West African Sudan zebu and the Brahman. Thanks to studies of different archieves in the Caribbean and in Europe, historical evidence have been accumulated on the geographical origins and on the chronology of the establishment of Creole and Brahman cattle in the French West Indies. The high resistance of the Creole cattle of Guadeloupe to diseases associated with or transmitted by the "Senegalese" tick Amblyomma variegatum seems to be due to the inheritance of a pool of genes from West African cattle and more particularly from the N'Dama breed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Controls on chemical weathering on a mountainous volcanic tropical island: Guadeloupe (French West Indies)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessert, C.; Lajeunesse, E.; Lloret, E.; Clergue, C.; Crispi, O.; Gorge, C.; Quidelleur, X.

    2015-12-01

    Guadeloupe Island is a natural laboratory, ideally suited to the study of biogeochemical processes in tropical and mountainous volcanic environments. The island's east-west rainfall gradient (1200-8000 mm/yr) is superimposed on a north-south age gradient (2.7 Ma to present), providing a unique opportunity to investigate the influence of rainfall and rock age on the chemical weathering of volcanic terrains. Taking advantage of this configuration, we present the first temporal survey (2007-2013) of the geochemical composition of the dissolved load of rain and river waters in Guadeloupe. Our data demonstrate that the chemical composition of river water is influenced by rainfall abundance, hydrothermal alteration (from active or fossilized volcanic systems) and interactions between water and minerals during chemical weathering processes. The contribution of rain to the overall chemical balance is especially significant in the older northern part of the island, where the ferralitic soils are base-cation-depleted. Between 15% and 65% of the Ca or Mg riverine budgets comes from atmospheric deposits, highlighting the major role of rainfall in the geochemical budgets of small tropical and mountainous watersheds. The river water dataset indicates that different chemical weathering processes dominate the budget depending on the age of the local bedrock. In the younger, southern part of the island, a pool of easily-weatherable andesitic minerals from the bedrock dominates. The contribution from this pool decreases significantly (to 5-15 wt.% of the bulk soil) towards the older terrains in the north. The northern rivers are characterized by low Ca/Mg ratios (0.5-1.0), intermediate between those of fresh rocks (1.7-3.3) and soil (0.1). Weathering in the northern part of the island is therefore dominated by the dissolution of depleted secondary minerals into soils. The Ca/Mg ratio of the river water increases from north to south, eventually reaching values similar to those of the

  9. Time series analysis of dengue incidence in Guadeloupe, French West Indies: Forecasting models using climate variables as predictors

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    Ruche Guy

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the last decades, dengue viruses have spread throughout the Americas region, with an increase in the number of severe forms of dengue. The surveillance system in Guadeloupe (French West Indies is currently operational for the detection of early outbreaks of dengue. The goal of the study was to improve this surveillance system by assessing a modelling tool to predict the occurrence of dengue epidemics few months ahead and thus to help an efficient dengue control. Methods The Box-Jenkins approach allowed us to fit a Seasonal Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average (SARIMA model of dengue incidence from 2000 to 2006 using clinical suspected cases. Then, this model was used for calculating dengue incidence for the year 2007 compared with observed data, using three different approaches: 1 year-ahead, 3 months-ahead and 1 month-ahead. Finally, we assessed the impact of meteorological variables (rainfall, temperature and relative humidity on the prediction of dengue incidence and outbreaks, incorporating them in the model fitting the best. Results The 3 months-ahead approach was the most appropriate for an effective and operational public health response, and the most accurate (Root Mean Square Error, RMSE = 0.85. Relative humidity at lag-7 weeks, minimum temperature at lag-5 weeks and average temperature at lag-11 weeks were variables the most positively correlated to dengue incidence in Guadeloupe, meanwhile rainfall was not. The predictive power of SARIMA models was enhanced by the inclusion of climatic variables as external regressors to forecast the year 2007. Temperature significantly affected the model for better dengue incidence forecasting (p-value = 0.03 for minimum temperature lag-5, p-value = 0.02 for average temperature lag-11 but not humidity. Minimum temperature at lag-5 weeks was the best climatic variable for predicting dengue outbreaks (RMSE = 0.72. Conclusion Temperature improves dengue outbreaks forecasts

  10. The annual carnival in Guadeloupe (French West Indies) is associated with an increase in the number of conceptions and subsequent births nine months later: 2000 - 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadhel, Philippe; Costet, Nathalie; Toto, Teddy; Janky, Eustase; Multigner, Luc

    2017-01-01

    The seasonal patterns of conceptions and births differ between geographic areas. Several potential determinants of this variation have been identified, including biological, environmental and behavioral elements, but festive events are rarely mentioned. We investigated the possible association between the carnival and seasonal fertility variations in the French West Indies. We ran a retrospective registry-based study. The data were extracted from the registry of all births on Guadeloupe between 2000 and 2011 (n = 74,412), and from the Maternity Birth Register of the University Hospital, for all pregnancies of at least 14 completed weeks of gestation (observable conceptions) with an outcome recorded between 2007 and 2010 (n = 8,425). We compared data during and outside the carnival period for each year, including 2009, when there was no carnival due to a 44-day general strike. In all years other than 2009, the weekly number of births was higher for pregnancies initiated during the carnival period than for pregnancies initiated at other times, and the weekly number of observable conceptions was higher during the carnival period than at other times. Our findings support the hypothesis that carnivals in the French West Indies are associated with an increase in the number of conceptions and subsequent births.

  11. The annual carnival in Guadeloupe (French West Indies) is associated with an increase in the number of conceptions and subsequent births nine months later: 2000 – 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costet, Nathalie; Toto, Teddy; Janky, Eustase; Multigner, Luc

    2017-01-01

    The seasonal patterns of conceptions and births differ between geographic areas. Several potential determinants of this variation have been identified, including biological, environmental and behavioral elements, but festive events are rarely mentioned. We investigated the possible association between the carnival and seasonal fertility variations in the French West Indies. We ran a retrospective registry-based study. The data were extracted from the registry of all births on Guadeloupe between 2000 and 2011 (n = 74,412), and from the Maternity Birth Register of the University Hospital, for all pregnancies of at least 14 completed weeks of gestation (observable conceptions) with an outcome recorded between 2007 and 2010 (n = 8,425). We compared data during and outside the carnival period for each year, including 2009, when there was no carnival due to a 44-day general strike. In all years other than 2009, the weekly number of births was higher for pregnancies initiated during the carnival period than for pregnancies initiated at other times, and the weekly number of observable conceptions was higher during the carnival period than at other times. Our findings support the hypothesis that carnivals in the French West Indies are associated with an increase in the number of conceptions and subsequent births. PMID:28253323

  12. Long-term pollution by chlordecone of tropical volcanic soils in the French West Indies: A simple leaching model accounts for current residue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabidoche, Y.-M., E-mail: cabidoch@antilles.inra.f [INRA, UR 135 Agropedoclimatique de la Zone Caraibe, Environment and Agronomy, Domaine Duclos, 97170 Petit-Bourg, Guadeloupe (France); Achard, R., E-mail: achard@cirad.f [CIRAD, UPR Systemes Bananes et Ananas (Martinique), 97285 Le Lamentin (France); Cattan, P., E-mail: cattan@cirad.f [CIRAD, UPR Systemes Bananes et Ananas (Guadeloupe), 97130 Capesterre-Belle-Eau (France); Clermont-Dauphin, C., E-mail: clermont@ird.f [INRA, UR 135 Agropedoclimatique de la Zone Caraibe, Environment and Agronomy, Domaine Duclos, 97170 Petit-Bourg, Guadeloupe (France); Massat, F., E-mail: fmassat@ladrome.f [Laboratoire Departemental d' Analyses de la Drome, LDA26, 26000 Valence (France); Sansoulet, J., E-mail: Julie.Sansoulet@cirad.f [INRA, UR 135 Agropedoclimatique de la Zone Caraibe, Environment and Agronomy, Domaine Duclos, 97170 Petit-Bourg, Guadeloupe (France)

    2009-05-15

    Chlordecone was applied between 1972 and 1993 in banana fields of the French West Indies. This resulted in long-term pollution of soils and contamination of waters, aquatic biota, and crops. To assess pollution level and duration according to soil type, WISORCH, a leaching model based on first-order desorption kinetics, was developed and run. Its input parameters are soil organic carbon content (SOC) and SOC/water partitioning coefficient (K{sub oc}). It accounts for current chlordecone soil contents and drainage water concentrations. The model was valid for andosol, which indicates that neither physico-chemical nor microbial degradation occurred. Dilution by previous deep tillages makes soil scrapping unrealistic. Lixiviation appeared the main way to reduce pollution. Besides the SOC and rainfall increases, K{sub oc} increased from nitisol to ferralsol and then andosol while lixiviation efficiency decreased. Consequently, pollution is bound to last for several decades for nitisol, centuries for ferralsol, and half a millennium for andosol. - Soil and water contamination by chlordecone will persist for several centuries in the French West Indies, because the only decontamination is through leaching by drainage water.

  13. Predictors of Student Success in an Online Learning Environment in the English-Speaking Caribbean: Evidence from the University of the West Indies Open Campus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Joel Warrican

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigated success rates and possible predictors of success among students at The University of the West Indies Open Campus. Archival data were mined from admissions and academic records of students from the 2008 intake to explore retention and completion rates, and for students enrolled in two online undergraduate courses in Semester 1 of the 2012/2013 academic year. The two courses had consistently high failure rates. Descriptive statistics and binary logistic regression were used to analyse the data. The results indicate that among the 2008 cohort, the retention rate was high (>75% and the completion rate compared favourably with other similar institutions. Significant predictors of programme completion included sex and location of the students as well as cumulative GPA at the end of the first year of study. Predictors of success for individual courses included the location of the students and engagement with course resources.

  14. Comparison and prediction of preclinical students' performance in the MBBS stage I examination at the University of the West Indies, Mona Campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepple, Dagogo J; Young, Lauriann E; Gordon-Stachan, Georgina M; Carroll, Robert G

    2012-12-18

    This retrospective study involved the analysis of the grades of ninety-four preclinical students who took the Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS) Stage I Examination in Anatomy, Biochemistry, Physiology, Social and Preventive Medicine, and Pharmacology between December 1997 and May 1999 at the Mona Campus of The University of the West Indies (UWI). A statistically significant correlation was observed among the basic science subjects. Additionally, a statistically significant prediction was found between the performances of the students in one discipline and the others, with Physiology being the most predicted. The data support the hypothesis that students who performed well in one discipline were likely to perform well in the other disciplines; and also that the performance in some subjects could predict the performance in others. This result may also justify further investigation as to whether the performance in certain basic sciences disciplines at the preclinical stage can be used to predict performance in the clinical disciplines.

  15. Hypoglycaemic complications with diabetes mellitus management: the predominant adverse drug reaction presenting to the Accident and Emergency Department of The University Hospital of the West Indies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gossell-Williams, M; Williams-Johnson, J; Francis, L

    2010-10-01

    Evaluation of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) is important to the assessment of risk factors in an aim to ensure maximum benefits of drug therapy. This study was done to assess the types of ADRs presenting to the Accident and Emergency department (A&E) of the University Hospital of the West Indies. Admissions to the A&E associated with drugs were followed on a weekly basis for 19 weeks from October 2007 to February 2008 using the patient logbook. Medical records of patients with suspected ADRs were collected and evaluated by an Emergency Medicine Consultant of A & E to confirm the occurrence of ADRs and the suspected drug. Of the 8170 admissions to A&E, 48 (0.6%) were related to ADRs, with most occurring in females and the mean age (+/- standard error) was 58.9 (+/- 3.4) years. Drug induced hypoglycaemia accounted for 28 (56.3%) cases of ADRs and included mainly patients on insulin, with or without a sulphonylurea therapy. Most of these diabetic patients also had co-morbidities and were on multi-drug therapy (18). Allergic reactions accounted for 10 (21%) of the ADR outcomes. Other drugs accounting for ADRs included cardiovascular drugs (10.4%), analgesic/anti-inflammatory medications (8.3%), drugs acting on the central nervous system (8.3%) and anti-infectives (8.3%). It is concluded that drug-induced hypoglycaemia is the major ADR presenting to the A&E of the University Hospital of the West Indies; it is a preventable ADR and therefore further investigation should evaluate possible factors attributed to the occurrences.

  16. Staphylococcus pseudintermedius and Staphylococcus schleiferi Subspecies coagulans from Canine Pyoderma Cases in Grenada, West Indies, and Their Susceptibility to Beta-Lactam Drugs

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    Harry Hariharan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Over a 2-year period 66 cases of canine pyoderma in Grenada, West Indies, were examined by aerobic culture in order to ascertain the bacteria involved and their antimicrobial resistance patterns. Of the 116 total bacterial isolates obtained, the majority belonged to Gram-positive species, and the most common organism identified through biochemical and molecular methods was Staphylococcus pseudintermedius. Additionally, identification of a Staphylococcus schleiferi subspecies coagulans isolate was confirmed by molecular methods. All isolates of staphylococci were susceptible to beta-lactam drugs: amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, cefovecin, cefoxitin, cefpodoxime, and cephalothin. They were also susceptible to chloramphenicol and enrofloxacin. Resistance was highest to tetracycline. Methicillin resistance was not detected in any isolate of S. pseudintermedius or in S. schleiferi. Among the Gram-negative bacteria, the most common species was Klebsiella pneumoniae, followed by Acinetobacter baumannii/calcoaceticus. The only drug to which all Gram-negative isolates were susceptible was enrofloxacin. This report is the first to confirm the presence of S. pseudintermedius and S. schleiferi subspecies coagulans, in dogs with pyoderma in Grenada, and the susceptibility of staphylococcal isolates to the majority of beta-lactam drugs used in veterinary practice.

  17. Isolation and characterization of viable Toxoplasma gondii isolates revealed possible high frequency of mixed infection in feral cats ( Felis domesticus) from St Kitts, West Indies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, J P; Moura, L; Majumdar, D; Sundar, N; Velmurugan, G V; Kwok, O C H; Kelly, P; Krecek, R C; Su, C

    2009-05-01

    Cats are essential in the epidemiology of Toxoplasma gondii because they are the only hosts that can excrete the environmentally resistant oocysts in nature. Samples of serum, feces, and tissues from feral cats from St Kitts, West Indies were examined for T. gondii infection. Antibodies to T. gondii were assayed by the modified agglutination test, and found in 71 of 96 (73.9%) of cats with titres of 1:10 in six, 1: 20 in six,1:40 in seven,1: 80 in three, 1: 160 in 10, 1:320 in 13, 1:640 in nine, and 1:1,280 or higher in 17. Tissues of 10 cats were bio-assayed in mice. Toxoplasma gondii was isolated from tissues of 7 cats; from hearts of 6, from tongue of 5, and brains of 3 cats. All 7 isolates were avirulent for mice. Toxoplasma gondii oocysts were not found in the feces of 51 cats. Genotyping of these 7 T. gondii isolates by 10 multi-locus PCR-RFLP markers, including SAG1, SAG2, SAG3, BTUB, GRA6, c22-8, c29-2, L358, PK1, and an apicoplast marker, Apico, revealed 4 genotypes, including clonal Type II, Type III and 2 unique genotypes. Five of the 7 cats had infection with 2 genotypes, indicating high frequency of mixed infection in the cat population on the St Kitts island.

  18. Biodegradability of HCH in agricultural soils from Guadeloupe (French West Indies): identification of the lin genes involved in the HCH degradation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laquitaine, L; Durimel, A; de Alencastro, L F; Jean-Marius, C; Gros, O; Gaspard, S

    2016-01-01

    Banana has been a main agricultural product in the French West Indies (Guadeloupe and Martinique) since the 1960s. This crop requires the intensive use of pesticides to prevent attacks by insect pests. Chlorinated pesticides, such as hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH), chlordecone and dieldrin, were used until the beginning of the 1990s, resulting in a generalized diffuse contamination of the soil and water in the areas of banana production, hence the need to develop solutions for cleanup of the polluted sites. The aims of this work were (i) to assess lindane degradation in soil slurry microcosms treated with lindane at 10 mg/L and (ii) to detect the catabolic genes involved in the HCH degradation pathway. The soil slurry microcosm system showed a 40% lindane degradation efficiency at the end of a 30-day experiment. Lower lindane removal was also detected in the abiotic controls, probably caused by pesticide adsorption to soil particles. Indeed, the lindane concentration decreased from 6000 to 1330 ng/mL and from 800 to 340 ng/mL for the biotic and abiotic soils, respectively. Nevertheless, some of the genes involved in the HCH degradation pathway were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from crude deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) extracted from the Guadeloupe agricultural soil, suggesting that HCH degradation is probably mediated by bacteria closely related to the family Sphingomonadaceae.

  19. Rediscovery of Bouteloua vaneedenii (Gramineae: Chloridoideae: endemic species from the West Indies Redescubrimiento de Bouteloua vaneedenii (Gramineae: Chloridoideae: especie endémica de las Indias Occidentales

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    María Elena Siqueiros-Delgado

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Bouteloua vaneedenii is an endemic and extremely rare grass of the West Indies. Very few collections are known, and the most recent collection is from 1922. With the aim of finding the species, a team of Mexican and Cuban agrostologists conducted a field trip and found B. vaneedenii in the same locality where it was collected in 1922 on dry limestone rocks. Although it was stated that B. vaneedenii probably was extinct from Cuba, vigorous populations remain in at least 2 localities in Pastelillo. Further exploration may lead to the discovery of additional populations and the reevaluation of its current conservation status.Bouteloua vaneedenii es un pasto extremadamente raro, nativo de Las Indias Occidentales y del que muy pocas recolectas se conocen hasta ahora, la última se realizó en 1922. Con el objetivo de encontrar la especie, un equipo de agrostólogos mexicanos y cubanos condujeron un viaje de campo en busca de B. vaneedenii , la cual fue hallada en la misma localidad donde se recolectó sobre rocas calizas en 1922, a pesar de que se había señalado como probable extinta para Cuba. Se ubicaron 2 poblaciones en buenas condiciones; no obstante, es necesaria una exploración más intensa confirmar su estado actual de conservación.

  20. Effect of mechanical heterogeneity in arc crust on volcano deformation with application to Soufrière Hills Volcano, Montserrat, West Indies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hautmann, Stefanie; Gottsmann, Joachim; Sparks, R. Stephen J.; Mattioli, Glen S.; Sacks, I. Selwyn; Strutt, Michael H.

    2010-09-01

    Analyses of volcano surface deformation are commonly based on models that assume mechanical homogeneity of rocks surrounding the causative pressure source. Here we present a detailed study that shows the differences in deduced surface deformation caused by source pressurization accounting for either mechanical homogeneity or mechanical heterogeneity of encasing rocks in a volcanic arc setting using finite element models. Accounting for crustal heterogeneity from seismic data, we test for a range of source geometries and intermediate crustal depths and explore the misfits of deduced source parameters from the two families of models. In the second part of this study, we test the results from the generic study against cGPS data from two deformation periods (the 2003-2005 ground inflation and the 2005-2007 ground deflation) at Soufrière Hills Volcano, Montserrat, West Indies, to inform on source parameters. Accounting for a variable crustal rigidity with depth as deduced by seismic analysis beneath Montserrat, we find the data to be best explained by pressurization and depressurization of a slightly prolate midcrustal magma chamber that is centered between 11.5 and 13 km below sea level, about 640 m NE of the active vent. Considering source dimension and source pressure changes, we demonstrate that magma compressibility and viscoelasticity of host rocks considerably affect dynamics in the midcrustal magmatic system of Soufrière Hills Volcano and need to be accounted for as first-order effects in geodetic data analyses and modeling.

  1. [Risk factors of ciguatera in the French West Indies in Saint-Barthélémy, Saint-Martin and Anguilla].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdeau, P; Bagnis, R

    1989-01-01

    An epidemiological study on ciguatera fish poisoning in the French West Indies (St-Barthelemy, St-Martin and Anguilla) was conducted during the years 1985-1986. The investigation on intoxications shows a non seasonal significant prevalence. Though it was difficult to list the cases, the morbidity seems to vary between 7 and 30 per thousand. A study of fish toxicity was realised; 46 different species were tested (individually or by pools) by the mosquito bio-test. Observations of intoxications give the following results: High risk species: Caranx bartholomaei, C. lugubris, Seriola dumerili, Lutjanus apodus, L. jocu, Pristipomoides macrophtalmus, Gymnothorax funebris, G. moringa, Scomberomorus cavalla, S. regalis, Mycteroperca venenosa, M. tigris, Epinephelus morio, Sphyraena barracuda. Intermediate species: Caranx latus, C. ruber, Lachnolaimus maximus, Lutjanus analis, L. buccanella, L. griseus, Malacanthus plumieri, Scomberomorus maculatus. Low risk species: Balistes vetula, Alectis ciliaris, Haemulon album, Bodianus rufus, Halichoeres radiatus, Priacanthus arenatus, Alphestes afer. Many species are involved in the toxic food chain. New ones have been identified, but it is difficult to determine the toxic level range. A cartography is presented but no place is free of risk. A research of Gambierdiscus toxicus, the causal agent, on algal surface from dead corals was conducted around St-Barthelemy and St-Martin. The dinoflagellate is found in low or medium populations all around the islands with no difference between North and South. There is a maximal activity during the spring. A model of the epidemiology of the ciguatera in the area is proposed.

  2. Predictors of outcome of neonates with hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy admitted to the neonatal unit of the University Hospital of the West Indies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotman, Helen; Garbutt, Andrea

    2011-02-01

    This was a retrospective review to determine predictors of outcome in term infants with hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy (HIE) at the University Hospital of the West Indies. Ninety-five neonates fulfilled criteria for entry into the study of these 34 (36%) had a poor outcome. The stage of encephalopathy, seizures on admission, the need for more than one antiepileptic for seizure control and an abnormal neurological examination at hospital discharge were found to be associated with poor outcome. Multiple logistic regression analyses showed that an abnormal neurological examination at discharge was the only independent predictor of poor outcome. Babies who had an abnormal neurological examination at hospital discharge were more likely to have a poor outcome (odds ratio 2.6, confidence interval 0.03-0.4). An abnormal neurological examination at discharge had a positive predictive value of 88% and a negative predictive value of 84% for poor outcome, with a sensitivity and specificity of 60 and 96%, respectively. We recommend that if post-HIE, an infant has an abnormal neurological examination at the time of discharge from hospital, that infant should be followed up and monitored in a specialist neurology clinic and parents counselled about the guarded prognosis for normal neurodevelopmental outcome.

  3. Review of mortality of very low birthweight infants at the University Hospital of the West Indies over the past four decades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotman, H

    2012-07-01

    A review of two previously published studies done at the University Hospital of the West Indies, an unpublished study and annual perinatal statistics was conducted to detect trends in the mortality of very low birthweight infants at the institution over four decades. Mortality decreased from 54% to 38% over the time period, the decrease was greater for infants weighing 1001-1500 g (40%) than those weighing < or = 1000 g (28%). Despite increased access to mechanical ventilation over time, there was no appreciable decrease in mortality for infants weighing < or = 750 g. There was a statistically significant decrease in mortality with increasing birthweight for the time period 1987-2002, p < 0.001. The mean +/- SD weight of survivors 1.18 +/- 0.24 kg was significantly greater than that for non-survivors 0.89 +/- 0.21 kg for the same period. Further decrease in mortality of very low birthweight infants will involve measures aimed at decreasing mortality in infants weighing < or = 750 g and increasing the availability of parenteral nutrition and the accessibility of surfactant.

  4. Pre-clinical grades predict clinical performance in the MBBS stage II examination at the University of the West Indies, Mona Campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepple, Dagogo J; Young, Lauriann E; Gordon-Strachan, Georgiana M; Carroll, Robert G

    2013-12-20

    In the preclinical sciences, statistically significant predictive values have been reported between the performances in one discipline and the others, supporting the hypothesis that students who perform well in one discipline were likely to perform well in the other disciplines. We therefore decided to conduct a retrospective study to investigate the predictive effects of preclinical subjects on clinical subjects from 87 students of The University of the West Indies (UWI), Mona Campus who took the MBBS Stage II examination at various times between May 2000 and May 2002. The grade in Pathology was significantly predicted by scores in Anatomy and Pharmacology; Medicine by Physiology and Pharmacology scores; Surgery by Anatomy and Social and Preventive Medicine scores; while, the Obstetrics and Gynecology grade was predicted by the Anatomy score. The results support the hypothesis that the scores in some preclinical subjects can predict the performance in specific clinical subjects, which could be interpreted to suggest that poor performance in specific preclinical disciplines could be a warning sign of future poor performance in the related clinical disciplines.

  5. A study in a hospital setting in Trinidad and Tobago, West Indies, on the psychological factors that cause road traffic collisions

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    Gopaul CD

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Chavin D Gopaul,1 Aruna Singh-Gopaul,2 Edison D Haqq1 1Department of Para-clinical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, The University of the West Indies, St Augustine, 2North West Regional Health Authority, St George Central, Barataria, Trinidad and Tobago Abstract: The following research paper aims to examine the psychological factors that have led to road traffic collisions (RTCs by conducting research on drivers who had been admitted to the Accident and Emergency department at four major hospitals in Trinidad as RTC cases. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in four major hospitals in Trinidad. Sample size was 900 participants admitted to the hospital as RTC cases, and the sample was selected using Daniel’s formula. All 900 participants were drivers involved in an RTC and were mostly male, and majority of drivers involved in an RTC were within the age group of 30–39 years. The survey was conducted in a 3-month window between March and June 2013. The results of the survey indicated that there was a significant relationship between most of the factors and RTCs, that is, p<0.05. This indicated that the null hypotheses did not hold. Thus, there was an positive correlation. The study revealed that attitude of drivers, real driving practice and the driving knowledge possessed by the driver were associated factors for RTCs. The survey also established that factors such as stress, the lack of sleep and fatigue were also likely to be associated with RTC. Keywords: road traffic collision, psychological factors, Trinidad, accident and emergency, stress, depressive symptoms 

  6. Soil and river contamination patterns of chlordecone in a tropical volcanic catchment in the French West Indies (Guadeloupe).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabit, A; Cattan, P; Colin, F; Voltz, M

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to identify primary flow paths involved in the chlordecone (CLD) river contamination and quantify the CLD fluxes to assess CLD pollution levels and duration according to a typical catchment of the banana cropping area in the French Indies (Guadeloupe): the Pérou Catchment (12 km(2)) characterized by heavy rainfall (5686 mm year(-1)). Three sub-catchments (SC1, SC2 and SC3) were studied during the hydrological year 2009-2010: a pedological survey combined with a spatialized hydrochemical approach was conducted. The average soil concentration is higher in the Pérou Catchment (3400 μg kg(-1)) than in the entire banana cropping area in Guadeloupe (2100 μg kg(-1)). The results showed that CLD stocks in soils vary largely among soil types and farming systems: the weakest stocks are located upstream in SC1 (5 kg ha(-1)), where a majority of the area is non-cultivated; medium stocks are located in Nitisols downstream in SC3 (9 kg ha(-1)); and the greatest stocks are observed in SC2 on Andosols (12 kg ha(-1)) characterized by large farms. The annual water balance and the hydro-chemical analysis revealed that the three sub-catchments exhibited different behaviors. Pérou River contamination was high during low flows, which highlighted that contamination primarily originated from groundwater contributions. The results showed that only a small part of the catchment (SC2), contributing little to the water flow, comprises a major CLD contribution, which is in agreement with the highly contaminated andosol soils observed there. Another significant result considers that at least 50 years would be required to export the totality of the actual CLD soil stocks retained in the topsoil layer. The actual time for soil remediation will however be much longer considering (i) the necessary time for the chlordecone to percolate and be stored in the shallow aquifers and (ii) its travel time to reach the river.

  7. Dynamics of avian haemosporidian assemblages through millennial time scales inferred from insular biotas of the West Indies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Leticia; Latta, Steven C; Ricklefs, Robert E

    2017-06-20

    Although introduced hemosporidian (malaria) parasites (Apicomplexa: Haemosporida) have hastened the extinction of endemic bird species in the Hawaiian Islands and perhaps elsewhere, little is known about the temporal dynamics of endemic malaria parasite populations. Haemosporidian parasites do not leave informative fossils, and records of population change are lacking beyond a few decades. Here, we take advantage of the isolation of West Indian land-bridge islands by rising postglacial sea levels to estimate rates of change in hemosporidian parasite assemblages over a millennial time frame. Several pairs of West Indian islands have been connected and separated by falling and rising sea levels associated with the advance and retreat of Pleistocene continental glaciers. We use island isolation following postglacial sea-level rise, ca. 2.5 ka, to characterize long-term change in insular assemblages of hemosporidian parasites. We find that assemblages on formerly connected islands are as differentiated as assemblages on islands that have never been connected, and both are more differentiated than local assemblages sampled up to two decades apart. Differentiation of parasite assemblages between formerly connected islands reflects variation in the prevalence of shared hemosporidian lineages, whereas differentiation between islands isolated by millions of years reflects replacement of hemosporidian lineages infecting similar assemblages of avian host species.

  8. Time Evolution of the Basse Terre Island (Guadeloupe, French West Indies) Effusive Volcanism from New K-Ar Cassignol-Gillot Ages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samper, A.; Quidelleur, X.; Mollex, D.; Komorowski, J. C.; Boudon, G.

    2004-12-01

    Radiometric dating and geochemistry of effusive volcanics have been combined with geomorphological observations in order to provide a general evolution model of the volcanic island of Basse Terre, Guadeloupe (French West Indies). More than forty new Cassignol-Gillot K-Ar ages distributed within the entire island, together with the twenty ages (Blanc, 1983; Carlut et al., 2000) previously obtained with the same technique, makes the Guadeloupe Island the best place to study the evolution of volcanic processes within the Lesser Antilles Arc. Dating was performed on the carefully separated groundmass in order to avoid K loss due to weathering and excess argon carried by mafic minerals. Ages obtained are relatively younger than previously thought on Basse Terre and range from a few ka to 2.79+-0.04 Ma. When available, the paleomagnetic polarity of the dated flows agree with the GPTS and a very good coherence of ages is observed for each massif. Our results demonstrate the general north to south migration of volcanism through time. It correlates with the main volcanic stages previously identified. The 2.75 Ma Basal Complex, the 1.81+-0.03 _ 1.15+-0.02 Ma Septentrional Chain, the 1.02+-0.02 Ma _ 0.606+-0.02 Ma Axial Chain, the 442+-6 _ 207+-28 ka Mateliane _ Sans Toucher Complex and the basaltic andesites and andesites although a few basalt and dacite have also been dated. All of them are characterized by low MgO values (geochemical characteristics similar to that of the central islands of the Lesser Antilles arc. Within Basse Terre, geochemical characteristics are relatively constant through time, indicating no major change of volcanic processes during the whole subaerial activity. Finally the detailed chronological framework now available provides new constraints for estimating rates of edification and destruction at the island scale and, more generally, to help better understand the evolution of the still active Guadeloupe island Soufriere volcano.

  9. A cross-sectional study to determine the prevalence of obesity and other risk factors for type 2 diabetes among school children in Trinidad, West Indies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batson, Yvonne Ann; Teelucksingh, Surujpal; Maharaj, Rohan G; Cockburn, Brian N

    2014-08-01

    Our previous work has shown that type 2 diabetes mellitus is a problem in the school-aged population of Trinidad, West Indies. The current study evaluated the prevalence in this population of selected risk factors for diabetes, viz: obesity, family history of diabetes and acanthosis nigricans. To assess the prevalence of the following risk factors for type 2 diabetes (T2DM) in school children in Trinidad: obesity, family history of diabetes in first- or second-degree relatives and the presence of acanthosis nigricans (AN). A cross-sectional survey was performed among school children aged 7-18 years from September 2009 to June 2010. A convenience sample was selected from a random sample of 32 schools drawn from all educational districts. A self-administered questionnaire was employed to record family history, gender and ethnicity. AN was assessed and scored clinically at the neck and obesity was measured by anthropometry and bio-impedance. There were 2130 participants in the study. Fifteen per cent were obese and 17% were overweight. Primary school children had a higher prevalence of obesity (22·9% vs 11·0%) and overweight (20·0% vs 15·6%) than secondary school children (Pobesity as measured by BMI for age (35·8 vs 29·4%, Pchildren have a degree of AN greater than grade 2, which clinically is readily recognisable. Females displayed this physical sign more commonly than males (Pchildren in Trinidad. More than 40% had at least one risk factor. Strategies aimed at reducing risk factors for T2DM, especially obesity, among Trinidadian school children are urgently warranted.

  10. Detection of aristolochic acids I and II in "Chiniy-trèf", a traditional medicinal preparation containing caterpillars feeding on Aristolochia trilobata L. in Martinique, French West Indies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cachet, Xavier; Langrand, Jerome; Bottai, Cecile; Dufat, Hanh; Locatelli-Jouans, Corinne; Nossin, Emmanuel; Boucaud-Maitre, Denis

    2016-05-01

    "Chiniy-trèf" is a traditional medicinal preparation used in Martinique, French West Indies, for the prevention of all kinds of attempted poisoning and hex. It is produced by the maceration in alcohol (mostly rum) of larvae (caterpillars) of the butterfly Battus polydamas ssp. cebriones, feeding on the leaves of Aristolochia trilobata. Aristolochic acids I and II that are well-known nephrotoxic and carcinogenic substances were identified on two samples of "chiniy-trèfl" by chromatographic methods. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Sedimentology and diagenesis of windward-facing fore-reef calcarenites, Late Pleistocene of Barbados, West Indies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humphrey, J.D.; Kimbell, T.N.

    1989-03-01

    Late Pleistocene reef terraces in southeastern Barbardos developed extensive fore-reef sand facies during deposition in response to high-energy windward-facing conditions. Sedimentology and diagenesis of these deposits illustrate significant contrasts with previous studies from the leeward west coast. These calcarenites are dominantly skeletal packstones with less common grainstones and wackestones present. The fore-reef sand facies occurs within progradational reef sequences, being conformably overlain by deep-water head coral facies. Medium-bedded, laterally continuous sand sheets retain original depositional slopes, dipping seaward at 10/degrees/-15/degrees/. These fore-reef deposits, in places, are over 30 m thick (average 20 m) and developed rapidly during late Pleistocene glacio-eustatic sea level highstands. Sedimentation rate ranges from 2 to 5 m/1000 years. Areal extent of fore-reef calcarenites in southeastern Barbados is estimated to be 8-10 km/sup 2/. Lithologically, the packstones are composed of an abundance of coralline red algae and the benthic foraminifer Amphistegina sp. Other volumetrically significant allochems include echinoids, mollusks, rhodoliths, peloids, and micritized grains. Micrite in the wackestone and packstone lithologies is likely derived from intense physical/mechanical abrasion of shoal-water reef facies. Diagenesis of these lithologies reflects a complex interplay of meteoric, mixing zone, and marine environments as a result of glacio-eustasy. Differences in diagenetic character are derived from differences in terrace ages, terrace geometry, a paleotopographic control on meteoric ground-water distribution, and high-energy coastal conditions. Diagenetic fabrics include equant, blocky meteoric phreatic calcite; limpid dolomite of mixing zone origin: and peloidal and isopachous fibrous cements from marine precipitation.

  12. 30 Year patterns of mortality in Tobago, West Indies, 1976-2005: impact of glucose intolerance and alcohol intake.

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    Mariam Molokhia

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To determine the main predictors of all-cause and cardiovascular (CV mortality in a rural West Indian population in Plymouth, Tobago over 30 years. METHODS: Questionnaire survey for CV risk factors and alcohol consumption patterns administered at baseline in 1976 with 92.5% response rate. 831/832 patients were followed up until 2005 or death. RESULTS: Hypertension (>140/90 mm Hg was prevalent in 48% of men and 44% of women, and 21% of men and 17% of women had diabetes. Evidence showed most predictors for all cause and cardiovascular mortality having the main effects at ages 160/95 mm Hg (HR 1.68, 95% CI 1.09-2.60, diabetes (HR 3.28, 95% CI 1.89-5.69, and BMI (HR 1.04, 95% CI 1.00-1.07. The main predictors of cardiovascular mortality were similar in the fully adjusted model: high sessional alcohol intake (HR 2.47 95% CI 1.10-5.57, severe hypertension (HR 2.78 95% CI 1.56-4.95, diabetes (HR 3.68 95% CI 1.77-7.67 and additionally LVH, (HR 5.54 95% CI 1.38-22.26, however BMI did not show independent effects. For men, high sessional alcohol intake explains 27% of all cause mortality, and 40% of cardiovascular mortality at age <60 yrs. In adults aged <60 years, the attributable risk fraction for IGT/Diabetes and all cause mortality and cardiovascular mortality is 28% in women vs. 11% in men, and 22% in women vs. 6% in men respectively. CONCLUSIONS: In this Afro-Caribbean population we found that a major proportion of deaths are attributable to high sessional alcohol intake (in males, diabetes, and hypertension and these risk factors primarily operate in those below 60 years.

  13. The Impact of Cannabis Use on the Dosage of Antipsychotic Drugs in Patients Admitted on the Psychiatric Ward at the University Hospital of the West Indies

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    P Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the impact of cannabis use on the efficacy of antipsychotic drugs in male subjects presenting to the University Hospital of the West Indies (UHWI with psychotic episodes. Methods: Male subjects, 18–40 years old, admitted to the psychiatric ward of the UHWI between February 2013 and May 2013, diagnosed with schizophrenia, schizophreniform disorder and who tested positive for ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol were recruited for the study. On day one, consenting subjects were assessed using the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS. Patients were prescribed seven days of an oral antipsychotic medication (haloperidol, chlorpromazine, risperidone, quetiapine, olanzapine. Medicated subjects were then reassessed using the BPRS on days three and seven. Statistical analysis involved the use of Student’s t-test and repeated measure analysis of variance. Results: In total, 20 subjects were recruited (mean age = 26.00 ± 5.96 years. Subjects were grouped based on the daily chlorpromazine equivalent (CPZE dose given on day one into CPZE1 (CPZE dose of 100–300mg; n = 8 and CPZE2 (CPZE dose of 400–1250 mg; n = 12. There was no significant difference in the total BPRS score between the groups on day one (CPZE1 = 41.38 ± 16.47 versus CPZE2 = 49.42 ± 25.58; p = 0.44; similar findings were obtained for the positive (26.75 ± 9.27 versus 31.83 ± 17.30; p = 0.46 and negative (14.63 ± 7.73 versus 17.58 ± 9.74; p = 0.48 symptom component on the BPRS. For subjects in CPZE1, there was no significant decrease in total BPRS score [F(2,21 = 0.07, p = 0.93] over the study period. For CPZE2, significant reduction in total BPRS scores was achieved [F(2,33 =7.12, p = 0.01], contributed by significant decrease in the positive [F(2,33 = 5.64, p = 0.02 and negative [F(2,33 = 7.53, p = 0.01 symptom components of the BPRS. Conclusion: The findings of this study purport that male cannabis users presenting with psychotic disorders may not achieve optimal

  14. Exploring the molecular basis of insecticide resistance in the dengue vector Aedes aegypti: a case study in Martinique Island (French West Indies

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    Yébakima André

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti is a major vector of dengue and hemorrhagic fevers, causing up to 100 million dengue infections every year. As there is still no medicine and efficient vaccine available, vector control largely based on insecticide treatments remains the only method to reduce dengue virus transmission. Unfortunately, vector control programs are facing operational challenges with mosquitoes becoming resistant to commonly used insecticides. Resistance of Ae. aegypti to chemical insecticides has been reported worldwide and the underlying molecular mechanisms, including the identification of enzymes involved in insecticide detoxification are not completely understood. Results The present paper investigates the molecular basis of insecticide resistance in a population of Ae. aegypti collected in Martinique (French West Indies. Bioassays with insecticides on adults and larvae revealed high levels of resistance to organophosphate and pyrethroid insecticides. Molecular screening for common insecticide target-site mutations showed a high frequency (71% of the sodium channel 'knock down resistance' (kdr mutation. Exposing mosquitoes to detoxification enzymes inhibitors prior to bioassays induced a significant increased susceptibility of mosquitoes to insecticides, revealing the presence of metabolic-based resistance mechanisms. This trend was biochemically confirmed by significant elevated activities of cytochrome P450 monooxygenases, glutathione S-transferases and carboxylesterases at both larval and adult stages. Utilization of the microarray Aedes Detox Chip containing probes for all members of detoxification and other insecticide resistance-related enzymes revealed the significant constitutive over-transcription of multiple detoxification genes at both larval and adult stages. The over-transcription of detoxification genes in the resistant strain was confirmed by using real-time quantitative RT

  15. CDKN2B polymorphism is associated with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG in the Afro-Caribbean population of Barbados, West Indies.

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    Dan Cao

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to confirm previously reported associations of common variants in or near CDC7/TGFBR3, ZP4, SRBD1, ELOVL5, CAV1/CAV2, TLR4, CDKN2B, CDKN2B-AS1, ATOH7, PLXDC2, TMTC2, SIX1, and CARD10, with primary open angle glaucoma (POAG in the Afro-Caribbean population of Barbados, West Indies. A total of 437 unrelated subjects from the Barbados Family Study of Open Angle Glaucoma (BFSG, including 272 with POAG and 165 unaffected individuals were included in this study. Eighteen SNPs were genotyped by using the multiplex SNaPshot method. Allelic, genotypic and model-based (dominant, recessive, and additive associations of the SNPs with POAG were analyzed using Chi-squared tests and logistic regression. SNP rs1063192 (near CDKN2B was found to be significantly associated with POAG (allelic P = 0.0008, genotypic P = 0.0029, and the minor allele C of rs1063192 was protective against POAG (OR = 0.39; 95%CI = 0.22-0.69. Suggestive association was also noted for rs7916697 (near ATHO7, allelic P = 0.0096, genotypic P = 0.01 with the minor allele being protective (OR = 0.67; 95% CI = 0.50-0.91, although this finding did not withstand correction for multiple testing. However, a significant interactive effect on POAG risk was identified between rs1063192 and rs7916697 (P-interaction = 2.80 × 10(-5. Individuals with the rs1063192 protective genotype CC or CT and also rs7916697 genotypes GG or GA show a significantly decreased risk of POAG (OR = 0.17, 95%CI: 0.07-0.41. Our study confirms the significant association between SNP rs1063192 (CDKN2B, previously shown to influence vertical cup-to-disc ratio and POAG at 9p21 and POAG in the Afro-Caribbean population of Barbados. The minor allele of rs1063192 interacts with that of rs7916697 (ATOH7 to reduce POAG risk. Our results also suggest that rs1063912 is a common protective variant for POAG in populations of African as well as European descent.

  16. The West Indies play Wembley

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    Tom August

    1992-07-01

    Full Text Available The Wembley British Empire Exhibition of 1924 familiarized the public with the resources and products of the Empire. In this decade of severe economic dislocation and indebtness attention was now focused on the commercial value of the colonies rather than on the jingoism of earlier exhibitions.

  17. [Proceedings of the VII international symposium 'Cultural heritage in geosciences, mining and metallurgy : libraries, archives, museums' : "Museums and their collections" held at the Nationaal Natuurhistorisch Museum Leiden (The Netherlands), 19-23 May, 2003 / Cor F. Winkler Prins and Stephen K. Donovan (editors)]: Small is beautiful? Progress and collections of the Geology Museum, University of the West Indies, Mona

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donovan, S.K.; Jackson, T.A.; Brown, I.C.; Wood, S.J.

    2004-01-01

    Geology has been taught at the University of the West Indies, Mona, since 1961. The associated Geology Museum (UWIGM) opened to the public in 1969/1970, although the idea for such a museum was over 100 years old at that time. The collections of the UWIGM share many hazards with those in museums in o

  18. Indy mutations and Drosophila longevity

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    Blanka eRogina

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Decreased expression of the fly and worm Indy genes extends longevity. The fly Indy gene and its mammalian homolog are transporters of Krebs cycle intermediates, with the highest rate of uptake for citrate. Cytosolic citrate has a role in energy regulation by affecting fatty acid synthesis and glycolysis. Fly, worm and mice Indy gene homologues are predominantly expressed in places important for intermediary metabolism. Consequently, decreased expression of Indy in fly and worm, and the removal of mIndy in mice exhibit changes associated with calorie restriction, such as decreased levels of lipids, changes in carbohydrate metabolism and increased mitochondrial biogenesis. Here we report that several Indy alleles in a diverse array of genetic backgrounds confer increased longevity.

  19. Initial development and preliminary evaluation of a multiplex bead assay to detect antibodies to Ehrlichia canis, Anaplasma platys, and Ehrlichia chaffeensis outer membrane peptides in naturally infected dogs from Grenada, West Indies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkerson, Melinda J; Black, Kelley E; Lanza-Perea, Marta; Sharma, Bhumika; Gibson, Kathryn; Stone, Diana M; George, Anushka; Nair, Arathy D S; Ganta, Roman R

    2017-01-01

    Tick-borne bacteria, Ehrlichia canis, Anaplasma platys, and Ehrlichia chaffeensis are significant pathogens of dogs worldwide, and coinfections of E. canis and A. platys are common in dogs on the Caribbean islands. We developed and evaluated the performance of a multiplex bead-based assay to detect antibodies to E. canis, A. platys, and E. chaffeensis peptides in dogs from Grenada, West Indies, where E. canis and A. platys infections are endemic. Peptides from outer membrane proteins of P30 of E. canis, OMP-1X of A. platys, and P28-19/P28-14 of E. chaffeensis were coupled to magnetic beads. The multiplex peptide assay detected antibodies in dogs experimentally infected with E. canis and E. chaffeensis, but not in an A. platys experimentally infected dog. In contrast, the multiplex assay and an in-house enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) detected A. platys antibodies in naturally infected Grenadian dogs. Following testing of 104 Grenadian canine samples, multiplex assay results had good agreement with commercially available ELISA and immunofluorescent assay for E. canis antibody-positive dogs ( K values of 0.73 and 0.84), whereas A. platys multiplex results had poor agreement with these commercial assays ( K values of -0.02 and 0.01). Prevalence of seropositive E. canis and A. platys Grenadian dogs detected by the multiplex and commercial antibody assays were similar to previous reports. Although the multiplex peptide assay performed well in detecting the seropositive status of dogs to E. canis and had good agreement with commercial assays, better antigen targets are necessary for the antibody detection of A. platys.

  20. Integration Of Low-Cost Single-Frequency GPS Stations Using 'Spider' Technology Within Existing Dual-Frequency GPS Network at Soufrière Hills Volcano, Montserrat (West Indies): Processing And Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascal, K.; Palamartchouk, K.; Lahusen, R. G.; Young, K.; Voight, B.

    2015-12-01

    Twenty years ago, began the eruption of the explosive Soufrière Hills Volcano, dominating the southern part of the island of Montserrat, West Indies. Five phases of effusive activity have now occurred, characterized by dome building and collapse, causing numerous evacuations and the emigration of half of the population. Over the years, the volcano monitoring network has greatly expanded. The GPS network, started from few geodetic markers, now consists of 14 continuous dual frequency GPS stations, distributed on and around the edifice, where topography and vegetation allow. The continuous GPS time series have given invaluable insight into the volcano behavior, notably revealing deflation/inflation cycles corresponding to phases and pauses of effusive activity, respectively. In 2014, collaboration of the CALIPSO Project (Penn State; NSF) with the Montserrat Volcano Observatory enriched the GPS and seismic monitoring networks with six 'spider' stations. The 'spiders', developed by R. Lahusen at Cascades Volcano Observatory, are designed to be deployed easily in rough areas and combine a low cost seismic station and a L1-only GPS station. To date, three 'spiders' have been deployed on Soufrière Hills Volcano, the closest at ~1 km from the volcanic conduit, adjacent to a lava lobe on the dome. Here we present the details of GPS data processing in a network consisting of both dual and single frequency receivers ('spiders') using GAMIT/GLOBK software. Processing together single and dual frequency data allowed their representation in a common reference frame, and a meaningful geophysical interpretation of all the available data. We also present the 'spiders' time series along with the results from the rest of the network and examine if any significant deformation, correlating with other manifestations of volcanic activity, has been recorded by the 'spiders' since deployment. Our results demonstrate that low cost GNSS equipment can serve as valuable components in volcano

  1. Cave-fills in Miocene-Pliocene strata on Cayman Brac, British West Indies: Implications for the geological evolution of an isolated oceanic island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Brian

    2016-07-01

    An 8-m-high wall in a quarry on the west end of Cayman Brac exposes the upper part of the Cayman Formation (Miocene), the lower part of the overlying Pedro Castle Formation (Pliocene), and the Cayman Unconformity, which is a karstic unconformity that separates these formations. The modern-day karst surface caps the Pedro Castle Formation. This exposure also includes cross-sections through two filled caves-the "Lower Cave" (> 8 m long, up to 2.5 m high) and "Upper Cave" (> 23 m long, up to 2 m high)-that are housed in the Cayman Formation and Pedro Castle Formation, respectively. The Lower Cave is filled with caymanite, which is formed of laminated, varicolored dolomitized mudstones, and grainstones that contain scattered marine fossils (e.g., foraminifera, red algae). This cave, connected to the Cayman Unconformity by a small-diameter tunnel, evolved as part of the karst system that developed during the Messinian lowstand (7.3-5.3 Ma). The cave was filled and dolomitized prior to deposition of the Pedro Castle Formation. The Upper Cave is filled with a wide spectrum of lithotypes, including dolostones, calcareous mudstones, terra rossa, gastropod coquina, coated grains, and speleothems. U/Th dating indicates that some of the flowstones are > 500,000 years old whereas others are only ~ 21,000 years old. Dolostones and mudstones in the basal part of the Upper Cave contain marine fossils (foraminifera, red algae) whereas the younger deposits are devoid of such fossils. The Upper Cave and its deposits developed after the sediments of the Pedro Castle Formation had been deposited and lithified. Development of the cave filling deposits, which includes a clear transition from marine to non-marine influences, was controlled by eustatic sea-level changes and/or westward tectonic tilting of Cayman Brac that occurred after the Pedro Castle Formation became exposed, probably during the Late Pliocene.

  2. Indy mutants: live long and prosper

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    Stewart eFrankel

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Indy encodes the fly homologue of a mammalian transporter of di and tricarboxylatecomponents of the Krebs cycle. Reduced expression of fly Indy or two of the C. elegansIndy homologs leads to an increase in life span. Fly and worm tissues that play key roles inintermediary metabolism are also the places where Indy genes are expressed. One of themouse homologs of Indy (mIndy is mainly expressed in the liver. It has been hypothesizedthat decreased INDY activity creates a state similar to caloric restriction (CR. Thishypothesis is supported by the physiological similarities between Indy mutant flies on highcalorie food and control flies on CR, such as increased physical activity and decreases inweight, egg production, triglyceride levels, starvation resistance, and insulin signaling. Inaddition, Indy mutant flies undergo changes in mitochondrial biogenesis also observed inCR animals. Recent findings with mIndy knockout mice support and extend the findingsfrom flies. mIndy-/- mice display an increase in hepatic mitochondrial biogenesis, lipidoxidation and decreased hepatic lipogenesis. When mIndy-/- mice are fed high calorie foodthey are protected from adiposity and insulin resistance. These findings point to INDY as apotential drug target for the treatment of metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes and obesity.

  3. Tenebrionid Beetles of the West Indies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marcuzzi, Giorgio

    1962-01-01

    The present paper deals with the results of my investigations regarding the tenebrionid beetles of the Antilles, north of Trinidad. For this work, use has been made of the magnificent collections assembled by Dr. P. WAGENAAR HUMMELINCK, of a number of specimens gathered by Dr. H. J. MAC GILLAVRY as

  4. Lower Miocene echinoderms of Jamaica, West Indies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donovan, S.K.; Portell, R.W.; Veltkamp, C.J.

    2005-01-01

    Despite being diverse globally, Miocene echinoids are poorly known from Jamaica. Moderately diverse echinoids and other echinoderms have been identified mainly from fragmentary specimens collected from chalks and mass-flow deposits of the Lower Miocene Montpelier Formation, White Limestone Group, ne

  5. West Indian Prose Fiction in the Sixties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brathwaite, Edward

    1971-01-01

    A Review and critical discussion of the West Indian prose fiction in the sixties by one of the best-known poets of the Carribean and a member of the faculty of the University of West Indies, Jamaica. (JM)

  6. Distribution of archaeal and bacterial glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers in tropical sediments from Guadeloupe (French West Indies): implications for application of the MBT/CBT and TEX86 proxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huguet, A.; Belmahdi, I.; Fosse, C.; Grossi, V.; Derenne, S.

    2012-04-01

    Glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) are lipids of high molecular weight present in membranes of Archaea and some bacteria. Archaeal membranes are composed predominantly of isoprenoid GDGTs, with acyclic or ring-containg biphytanyl chains. The amount of isoprenoid GDGTs with cyclopentyl moieties was shown to increase with water temperature and variations in surface water temperature can be determined via the TEX86 proxy. Recently, another type of GDGTs, with branched instead of isoprenoid alkyl chains, has been discovered in peat and was observed to occur ubiquitously in soils and in aquatic environments. Branched GDGTs were suggested to be produced in soils by still unknown bacteria. The degree of methylation of branched GDGTs, expressed in the MBT, was shown to depend on air temperature and to a lesser extent on soil pH, whereas the relative abundance of cyclopentyl rings of branched GDGTs, expressed in the CBT, was related to soil pH. The MBT/CBT proxies are increasingly used as paleoclimate proxies. The aim of this study was to investigate the distribution of GDGTs in tropical sediments from Guadeloupe (French West Indies). Surficial sediment samples were collected in four coastal water ponds: two located in Grande-Terre and two in a smaller island named La Désirade, 10 km east from Grande-Terre. GDGTs either present as core lipids (CLs; presumed of fossil origin) or derived from intact polar lipids (IPLs; markers for living cells) were analysed. A large part of archaeal GDGTs was present as IPLs (40-50% of total extractable archaeal GDGTs) in all sites. The proportion of IPL GDGTs of bacterial origin with respect to the total pool (CLs +IPLs) was 25-30% in the sediments from La Désirade and ~ 50% in the upper sediment layers from Grande-Terre. Interestingly, the distribution of archaeal and bacterial GDGTs differed between the four sites, as shown by the higher values of the TEX86 and MBT in sediments from La Désirade (TEX86~0.80; MBT~0

  7. Uudised : Indi. Uus plaadifirma. Lennonid

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2005-01-01

    Islandi indie-ansambli Sigur Rosi esinemine Tallinnas lükkub edasi. Inglise helilooja Michael Nyman loob oma plaadifirma MN Records, andes 11. apr. välja oma klaveri sooloalbumi "The Piano Sings". Järgnevad ka Nymani 2004. a. valminud oopri "Man and Boy: Dada" CD ja Stephan Jeffrey näidendi "The Libertine" põhjal tehtava filmi soundtrack

  8. Uudised : Indi. Uus plaadifirma. Lennonid

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2005-01-01

    Islandi indie-ansambli Sigur Rosi esinemine Tallinnas lükkub edasi. Inglise helilooja Michael Nyman loob oma plaadifirma MN Records, andes 11. apr. välja oma klaveri sooloalbumi "The Piano Sings". Järgnevad ka Nymani 2004. a. valminud oopri "Man and Boy: Dada" CD ja Stephan Jeffrey näidendi "The Libertine" põhjal tehtava filmi soundtrack

  9. Electronic Health Records Place 1st at Indy 500

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues EHR Electronic Health Records Place 1st at Indy 500 Past ... last May's Indy 500 had thousands of personal Electronic Health Records on hand for those attending—and ...

  10. The genus Alangium in the Netherlands Indies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloembergen, S.

    1935-01-01

    The present revision comprises, besides the Alangia of the Netherlands Indies proper, also those of the Malay Peninsula, North Borneo, and Eastern New Guinea. The materials examined were kindly put at the author’s disposal by the Directions of the following herbaria: B = the Herbarium of the Botanic

  11. The American Political Intervention in the Conflict in the Dutch East Indies 1945-1949

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-12

    Harry S. Truman Presidential Library KNIL Koninklijk Nederlands Indisch Leger (Royal Netherlands Indies Army) NATO North Atlantic Treaty Organization......colony and called it Netherlands-Indies ( Nederlands -Indie). In the English language, it remained Dutch East Indies or Netherlands Indies. The Dutch

  12. The role of INDY in metabolism, health & longevity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan P. Rogers

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Indy (I’m Not Dead Yet encodes the fly homolog of a mammalian SLC13A5 plasma membrane transporter. INDY is expressed in metabolically active tissues functioning as a transporter of Krebs cycle intermediates with the highest affinity for citrate. Decreased expression of the Indy gene extends longevity in Drosophila and C. elegans. Reduction of INDY or its respective homologs in C. elegans and mice induces metabolic and physiological changes similar to those observed in calorie restriction. It is thought that these physiological changes are due to altered levels of cytoplasmic citrate, which directly impacts Krebs cycle energy production as a result of shifts in substrate availability. Citrate cleavage is a key event during lipid and glucose metabolism; thus, reduction of citrate due to Indy reduction alters these processes. With regards to mammals, mice with reduced Indy (mIndy-/- also exhibit changes in glucose metabolism, mitochondrial biogenesis and are protected from the negative effects of a high calorie diet. Together, these data support a role for Indy as a metabolic regulator, which suggests INDY as a therapeutic target for treatment of diet and age-related disorders such as Type II Diabetes and obesity.

  13. Ethnomedicine of menstruation in rural Dominica, West Indies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Katherine E; Quinlan, Marsha B

    2014-05-14

    In Dominica, women offer dysmenorrhea, delayed menses, and menorrhagia as prevalent menstrual troubles. Dominican humoral theory considers menstruation to be "hot" such that menstrual problems are caused by the introduction of too much "cold" in the body. These conditions can be painful and may require herbal medicine. Our method finds the most culturally salient plants for these conditions-those which are of common knowledge across the population. We hypothesize that cultural agreement on ethnobotanical treatments (1) reflects their perceived ethnophysiological efficacy, and that (2) salient plants contain bioactive compounds appropriate for the menstrual conditions for which Dominicans employ the plants. Qualitative data on local explanatory models and treatment of menstrual conditions were collected using participant-observation, focus groups, and informal key informant interviews. Quantitative ethnobotanical data come from freelist (or "free-list") tasks, conducted with 54 adults. Mean salience values calculated from freelisted data reveal that the same four plants, Cinnamomum verum (synonym Cinnamomum zeylanicum) (Lauraceae), Mentha suaveolens (Lamiaceae), Pimenta racemosa (Myrtaceae) and Sphagneticola trilobata (synonym Wedelia trilobata) (Asteraceae) are used to treat dysmenorrhea and delayed menses. The only remedy reported for menorrhagia, Sphagneticola trilobata (Asteraceae), is also a treatment for dysmenorrhea and delayed menses. The Dominican humoral system views menstruation as a "hot" condition, yet these "bush medicines" are also "hot." Dominicans do not view menstruation as a problem, rather, they reckon that excess "cold" in a woman׳s menstruating body impedes menstrual function to cause problems thus requiring "hot" plants to alleviate their symptoms. A literature review revealed that all four plants contain analgesic, anti-nociceptive, and anti-inflammatory properties. Additionally, Mentha suaveolens is muscle-relaxing and anti-spasmodic, Cinnamomum verum has a mild anti-coagulant, and Sphagneticola trilobata has wound healing, anti-stress, and sedative properties. In Dominican menstrual problems there is correspondence between cultural consensus, bioactivity, and humoral theory. Examining the ethnophysiology of menstruation and its complications provides evidence for the expectations of actions and effectiveness of locally culturally salient medicinal plants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Integrating banana and ruminant production in the French West Indies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archimède, Harry; Gourdine, Jean Luc; Fanchone, Audrey; Tournebize, Regis; Bassien-Capsa, Mylène; González-García, Eliel

    2012-08-01

    Using a mechanistic model, we compared five alternative farming systems with the purpose of transforming monoculture (MON) banana farms into mixed farming systems (MFS) with ruminants feeding banana by-products (leaves, pseudostems and nonmarketable fruits) and forage from the fallow land. The paper presents the main structure of the model (land surface changes, available biomass for animals, stocking rates, productive or reproductive indicators), and impact assessment (change in farm productivity) is discussed. Five MFS with typical local ruminant production systems were used to compare MON to the strategies using forage from fallow and/or integrating Creole cattle (CC), Creole goats (CG) or Martinik sheep (MS) into banana farming. One hectare MON shifted into an MFS allows a stocking rate of 1,184, 285, and 418 kg of live weight per hectare for CC, CG and MS, respectively. Banana by-products seem to be better valorized by the CC scenario. However, parameters such as length of the cycle, local prices for cattle, goat and sheep meat, work time and farmer's skills in ruminant management may have been taken into account by the farmer when choosing the ruminant species to rear.

  15. A new species of Stichothamnion (Rhodophyta) from the West Indies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vroman, M.

    1967-01-01

    The genus Stichothamnion (Rhodomelaceae) was described by Borgesen in 1930, on the basis of material from the north western coast of Gran Canaria (Canary Islands). During our investigation of marine algae collected from the Netherlands Antilles it appeared that on St. Eustatius (Lesser Antilles) an

  16. On a collection of Bats from the West-Indies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jentink, F.A.

    1893-01-01

    The collection of Bats hereafter described has been presented to the Leyden Museum by our well known correspondent Dr. C. G. Young from Berbice, New Amsterdam, British Guyana. This collection tells us that, although our knowledge about the Bats may have increased during the latest years, much

  17. Self-sustainable housing on Mayreau (West Indies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Hiltrop

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a conceptual approach for developing a local water and energy supply system for a resort on a small Caribbean island. The system designed is guided by four main criteria which are sustainability, lowest cost, least possible maintenance and design simplicity. According to this premise the selected concept includes an integrated solution for collecting and handling potable water and the supply of hot water and electricity for domestic use. The proposed techniques are not strictly specific to the island of Mayreau. They can also be adapted to comparable islands and regions.

  18. On a collection of Bats from the West-Indies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jentink, F.A.

    1893-01-01

    The collection of Bats hereafter described has been presented to the Leyden Museum by our well known correspondent Dr. C. G. Young from Berbice, New Amsterdam, British Guyana. This collection tells us that, although our knowledge about the Bats may have increased during the latest years, much remain

  19. New records of Chiggers from the West Indies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brennan, James M.

    1967-01-01

    This study is based principally on chiggers collected by Dr. P. WAGENAAR HUMMELINCK (Zoologisch Laboratorium, Utrecht) and associates. Supplemental material from Dr. THOMAS H. G. AITKEN (Trinidad Regional Virus Laboratory, Port-of-Spain) has provided several new records, and Mr. A. VENTURA (Universi

  20. In-die job automation for PROVE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesnick, Ronald J., Jr.; Kim, Stephen; Waechter, Matthias; Seidel, Dirk; Mueller, Andreas; Beyer, Dirk

    2011-05-01

    The increasing demands for registration metrology for repeatability, accuracy, and resolution in order to be able to perform measurements in the active area on production features have prompted the development of PROVETM, the nextgeneration registration metrology tool that utilizes 193nm illumination and a metrology stage that is actively controlled in all six degrees of freedom. PROVETM addresses full in-die capability for double patterning lithography and sophisticated inverse-lithography schemes. Innovative approaches for image analysis, such as 2D correlation, have been developed to achieve this demanding goal. In order to take full advantage of the PROVETM resolution and measurement capabilities, a direct link to the mask data preparation for job automation and marker identification is inevitable. This paper describes an integrated solution using Synopsys' CATSR for extracting and preparing tool-specific job input data for PROVE. In addition to the standard marking functionalities, CATSR supports the 2D correlation method by providing reference clips in OASIS.MASK format.

  1. Muslims of the Dutch East Indies and the Caliphate Question

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin van Bruinessen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The abolition of 'Abd al-Majid's caliphate by Turkey's national assembly in March 1924, and the call by Azhar 'ulama' for an international congress in Cairo to elect a new khalifah the following year, had the effct of making Muslims in the Dutch Indies more aware that they were living under infildel rule. These events, and the conquest of the Hijaz by Ibn Sa'ud in the same year, briefly caised feverish activity the Indies. The interm advisor on native affairs to the Dutch Indies goverment, R.A. Kern, even spoke of 'a milestone in the Muhammadan movement in this country." For a few years these issues kept Indonesian Muslim leaders occupied and caused splits in the ranks; then suddenly the caliphate issue dropped from yhe agenda, never to reappear.Copyright (c 2014 by SDI. All right reserved.DOI: 10.15408/sdi.v2i3.829

  2. In Indië geworteld : de twintigste eeuw.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Johannes

    2004-01-01

    The literature about Dutch presence in Indonesia in the colonial era is mainly written by white Dutch expats who stood at the apex of the colonial hierarchy. Their adventures in the Dutch East Indies dominate, while the lives of the majority of the Dutch born and raised in Indonesia, mainly of mixed

  3. The black Dutchmen : African soldiers in the Netherlands East Indies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessel, van W.M.J.; Kessel, van W.M.J.

    2002-01-01

    Between 1831 and 1872 some 3000 African recruits sailed from Elmina (Gold Coast, now Ghana) to Batavia, the capital of the Netherlands East Indies. They had been recruited to serve in the Dutch colonial army, which throughout most of the 19th century experienced a chronic shortage of European manpow

  4. History of the volcanology in the former Netherlands East Indies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neumann van Padang, M.

    1983-01-01

    The description of the volcanoes in the former Netherlands East Indies are analysed in order of their publication, grouping them into three parts. The first group consists of information from old Javanese sources and incidental communications in travel accounts and the like, dating from the 16th, 17

  5. The Shallow-water Octocorallia of the West Indian Region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bayer, Frederick M.

    1961-01-01

    The alcyonarian fauna of the West Indies is prolific and conspicuous and has been known for many years, with the natural result that a great many more species have been described than actually exist. The deep-water fauna, which received little attention prior to the work of VERRILL, was thoroughly r

  6. The Shallow-water Octocorallia of the West Indian Region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bayer, Frederick M.

    1961-01-01

    The alcyonarian fauna of the West Indies is prolific and conspicuous and has been known for many years, with the natural result that a great many more species have been described than actually exist. The deep-water fauna, which received little attention prior to the work of VERRILL, was thoroughly

  7. Amsterdam Expeditions to the West Indian Islands, Report 48. Harpacticoid copepods from the West Indian Islands: Laophontidae (Copepoda, Harpacticoida)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fiers, Frank

    1986-01-01

    The present paper deals exclusively with the species of the family Laophontidae found in samples gathered during several expeditions of the University of Amsterdam to the West Indies. Four new species belonging to different genera are described. Two new species and Laophonte adriatica are assigned t

  8. The life-extending gene Indy encodes an exchanger for Krebs-cycle intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knauf, Felix; Mohebbi, Nilufar; Teichert, Carsten; Herold, Diana; Rogina, Blanka; Helfand, Stephen; Gollasch, Maik; Luft, Friedrich C; Aronson, Peter S

    2006-07-01

    A longevity gene called Indy (for 'I'm not dead yet'), with similarity to mammalian genes encoding sodium-dicarboxylate cotransporters, was identified in Drosophila melanogaster. Functional studies in Xenopus oocytes showed that INDY mediates the flux of dicarboxylates and citrate across the plasma membrane, but the specific transport mechanism mediated by INDY was not identified. To test whether INDY functions as an anion exchanger, we examined whether substrate efflux is stimulated by transportable substrates added to the external medium. Efflux of [14C]citrate from INDY-expressing oocytes was greatly accelerated by the addition of succinate to the external medium, indicating citrate-succinate exchange. The succinate-stimulated [14C]citrate efflux was sensitive to inhibition by DIDS (4,4'-di-isothiocyano-2,2'-disulphonic stilbene), as demonstrated previously for INDY-mediated succinate uptake. INDY-mediated efflux of [14C]citrate was also stimulated by external citrate and oxaloacetate, indicating citrate-citrate and citrate-oxaloacetate exchange. Similarly, efflux of [14C]succinate from INDY-expressing oocytes was stimulated by external citrate, alpha-oxoglutarate and fumarate, indicating succinate-citrate, succinate-alpha-oxoglutarate and succinate-fumarate exchange respectively. Conversely, when INDY-expressing Xenopus oocytes were loaded with succinate and citrate, [14C]succinate uptake was markedly stimulated, confirming succinate-succinate and succinate-citrate exchange. Exchange of internal anion for external citrate was markedly pH(o)-dependent, consistent with the concept that citrate is co-transported with a proton. Anion exchange was sodium-independent. We conclude that INDY functions as an exchanger of dicarboxylate and tricarboxylate Krebs-cycle intermediates. The effect of decreasing INDY activity, as in the long-lived Indy mutants, may be to alter energy metabolism in a manner that favours lifespan extension.

  9. No influence of Indy on lifespan in Drosophila after correction for genetic and cytoplasmic background effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janne M Toivonen

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available To investigate whether alterations in mitochondrial metabolism affect longevity in Drosophila melanogaster, we studied lifespan in various single gene mutants, using inbred and outbred genetic backgrounds. As positive controls we included the two most intensively studied mutants of Indy, which encodes a Drosophila Krebs cycle intermediate transporter. It has been reported that flies heterozygous for these Indy mutations, which lie outside the coding region, show almost a doubling of lifespan. We report that only one of the two mutants lowers mRNA levels, implying that the lifespan extension observed is not attributable to the Indy mutations themselves. Moreover, neither Indy mutation extended lifespan in female flies in any genetic background tested. In the original genetic background, only the Indy mutation associated with altered RNA expression extended lifespan in male flies. However, this effect was abolished by backcrossing into standard outbred genetic backgrounds, and was associated with an unidentified locus on the X chromosome. The original Indy line with long-lived males is infected by the cytoplasmic symbiont Wolbachia, and the longevity of Indy males disappeared after tetracycline clearance of this endosymbiont. These findings underscore the critical importance of standardisation of genetic background and of cytoplasm in genetic studies of lifespan, and show that the lifespan extension previously claimed for Indy mutants was entirely attributable to confounding variation from these two sources. In addition, we saw no effects on lifespan of expression knockdown of the Indy orthologues nac-2 and nac-3 in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

  10. Paratext and meaning-making in indie games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Fiadotau

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The essay discusses the role of paratext in framing players’ experience of videogames, focusing on the indie game scene and specifically examining three types of paratext: game title, game description, and the readme file. It cites examples coming from the author’s experience as an independent game creator and as a player. The focus on concrete manifestations of paratext reflects the author’s belief that examples should not only be used to illustrate theoretical arguments about paratextual phenomena, but should help deepen our understanding of them.

  11. History and the West Indian nation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Birbalsingh

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available [First paragraph] The Art of Kamau Brathwaite. STEWART BROWN (ed.. Bridgend, Wales: Seren/Poetry Wales Press, 1995. 275 pp. (Cloth US$ 50.00, Paper US$ 22.95 Atlantic Passages: History, Community, and Language in the Fiction of Sam Selvon. MARK LOOKER. New York: Peter Lang, 1996. x + 243 pp. (Cloth n.p. Caliban's Curse: George Lamming and the Revisioning of History. SUPRIYA NAIR. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1996. viii + 171 pp. (Cloth US$ 34.50 Phyllis Shand Allfrey: A Caribbean Life. LlZABETH PARAVISINI-GEBERT. New Brunswick NJ: Rutgers University Press, 1996. xii + 335 pp. (Cloth US$ 55.00, Paper US$ 18.95 Of the four books to be considered here, those on Brathwaite, Selvon, and Lamming fit snugly together into a natural category of literature that has to do with the emergence of a Creole or African-centered Caribbean culture, and related issues of race, color, class, history, and nationality. The fourth is a biography of Phyllis Shand Allfrey, a white West Indian, who is of an altogether different race, color, and class than from the other three. Yet the four books are linked together by nationality, for Allfrey and the others are all citizens of one region, the English-speaking West Indies, which, as the Federation of the West Indies between 1958 and 1962, formed a single nation.

  12. Ecology of the Malaria Vector, Anopheles (Nyssorhynchus) Marajoara Galvao and Damasceno in Trinidad, West Indies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    1995b) (RAPDs) and Li and Wilkerson (2005) OTS2-based PCR primers ). RESULTS A total of 1.157 AI/opheles females were cap- lUred during the experimental...intragenomic variation in all 4 species. However. it was possible to design spe- cies-specific primers based on constant sites to make reliable...de-Souza-Rai- mundo -TL. Schlichling CD. Wirtz RA. Povoa MM. 2002. Emergence of a new Neotropical malaria vector facilitated by human migration and

  13. Vannellid Species Isolated from Freshwater Source in a Park in Jamaica, West Indies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Cheridah D.; Reyes-Batlle, María; Valladares, Basilio; Lindo, John F.; Lorenzo-Morales, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Free-living amoebae (FLA) occupy a wide range of freshwater, marine, and soil habitats, and are opportunistic pathogens in human beings. While Acanthamoeba spp., Naegleria fowleri, and Balamuthia mandrillaris are well-known opportunistic organisms, Vannella epipetala is nonpathogenic. Sediments were collected from a freshwater source from a park in Jamaica to investigate the presence of FLA. Acanthamoeba and Naegleria spp. were not recovered; however, a Vannellid species identified by microscopy and PCR analysis as V. epipetala was isolated. These nonpathogens pose a threat to human beings as they may act as Trojan horses for microsporidian parasites and other pathogens, thereby facilitating their transmission to human beings. PMID:26512204

  14. Fenbendazole treatment for Mammomonogamus species infection of a domestic cat on St Kitts, West Indies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gattenuo, Talia; Ketzis, Jennifer; Shell, Linda

    2014-10-01

    A 7-month-old, female, domestic shorthair, indoor/outdoor cat on the island of St Kitts was presented to the Veterinary Teaching Hospital at Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine as part of a student training spay-neuter program. Observation of diarrhea prompted a double centrifugation fecal analysis. Ova of Mammomonogamus species, in addition to Ancylostoma species, Trichuris species and Platynosomum species, were found. Mammomonogamus ierei is a parasitic nematode found on many Caribbean islands for which treatment is not well documented. Five days of fenbendazole (50 mg/kg bodyweight) was administered, and fecal analyses gave negative results for Mammomonogamus species eggs 1 week after the last fenbendazole treatment.

  15. Ehrlichiosis, babesiosis, anaplasmosis and hepatozoonosis in dogs from St. Kitts, West Indies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick J Kelly

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although tick-borne diseases are important causes of morbidity and mortality in dogs in tropical areas, there is little information on the agents causing these infections in the Caribbean. METHODOLOGY: We used PCRs to test blood from a cross-section of dogs on St Kitts for Ehrlichia (E. canis, Babesia (B. spp., Anaplasma (A. spp. and Hepatozoon (H. spp. Antibodies against E. canis and A. phagocytophilum/platys were detected using commercial immunochromatography tests. Records of the dogs were examined retrospectively to obtain clinical and laboratory data. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: There was serological and/or PCR evidence of infections of dogs with E. canis (27%; 46/170, Babesia spp. (24%; 90/372 including B. canis vogeli (12%; 43/372 and B. gibsoni (10%; 36/372, A. platys (11%; 17/157 and H. canis (6%; 15/266. We could not identify the Babesia sp. detected in nine dogs. There was evidence of multiple infections with dual infections with E. canis and B. canis vogeli (8%; 14/179 or B. gibsoni (7%; 11/170 being the most common. There was agreement between immunochromatography and PCR test results for E. canis for 87% of dogs. Only 13% of exposed dogs had signs of a tick-borne disease and 38% had laboratory abnormalities. All 10 dogs presenting for a recheck after treatment of E. canis with doxycycline were apparently healthy although all remained seropositive and six still had laboratory abnormalities despite an average of two treatments with the most recent being around 12 months previously. Infections with Babesia spp. were also mainly subclinical with only 6% (4/67 showing clinical signs and 13% (9/67 having laboratory abnormalities. Similarly, animals with evidence of infections with A. platys and H. canis were largely apparently healthy with only occasional laboratory abnormalities. CONCLUSIONS: Dogs are commonly infected with tick-borne pathogens in the Caribbean with most having no clinical signs or laboratory abnormalities.

  16. Invading freshwater snails and biological control in Martinique Island, French West Indies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre Pointier

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Eight alien freshwater snail species were introduced into Martinique Island during the last 50 years. The introduced snails include four planorbids (Biomphalaria straminea, Helisoma duryi, Amerianna carinata and Gyraulus sp., three thiarids (Melanoides tuberculata, M. amabilis and Tarebia granifera and one ampullarid (Marisa cornuarietis. Four of these species rapidly colonized the whole Martinican hydrographic system whereas the other four remained restricted to some particular sites. The invasion processes were documented during the last 20 years and showed (i a rapid invasion of the island by several morphs of M. tuberculata at the beginning of the 80's; (ii the introduction of T. granifera in 1991 and M. amabilis in 1997; and (iii the rapid spread of these last two species throughout the island. In the years following its introduction, M. tuberculata was used in biological control experiments against the snail hosts of schistosomiasis, B. glabrata and B. straminea. Experiments were conducted with success in several groups of water-cress beds which constituted the latest transmission sites for schistosomiasis at the beginning of the 80's. A malacological survey carried out in 2000 all over the island showed the absence of B. glabrata but the presence of some residual populations of B. straminea. Long-term studies carried out in Martinique have shown that the thiarids are able to maintain relatively stable populations over a long period of time, thus preventing recolonization by the snail hosts. Within this context the invasion of the hydrographic system of Martinique by thiarid snails has resulted in an efficient and sustainable control of the intermediate hosts of schistosomiasis.

  17. New species of Parapharyngodon (Nematoda: Pharyngodonidae) in Rhinella marina (Anura: Bufonidae) from Grenada, West Indies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bursey, Charles; Drake, Michael; Cole, Rebecca; Sterner, Mauritz; Pinckney, Rhonda; Zieger, Ulrike

    2013-01-01

    Parapharyngodon grenadaensis n. sp. (Nematoda: Pharyngodonidae) from the large intestine of the cane toad, Rhinella marina, is described and illustrated. Parapharyngodon grenadaensis n. sp. is the 48th species assigned to the genus and the 16th species from the Neotropical region. It differs from other species in the genus by possessing 4 pairs of caudal papillae, an echinate anterior cloacal lip, and a blunt spicule of 67–104 μm. This is only the second report of R. marina harboring a species of Parapharyngodon.

  18. An updated and annotated checklist of the Hedylidae and Hesperiidae (Lepidoptera) of Trinidad, West Indies

    OpenAIRE

    COCK, Matthew J. W.

    2014-01-01

    A revised checklist for the butterfl y families Hedylidae and Hesperiidae (Lepidoptera) of Trinidad (Trinidad and Tobago) is presented, bringing nomenclature in line with modern usage, and indicating synonyms from earlier lists and papers. The following are new records for Trinidad: Thessia athesis (Hewitson), Bungalotis clusia Evans, Sarmientoia eriopis (Hewitson), Pellicia tyana toza Evans, Quadrus contubernalis contubernalis (Mabille) and Decinea decinea derisor (Mabille). The checklist in...

  19. On Vampyrodes caracciolae (Thomas) and some other bats from the Island of Tobago (British West Indies)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Husson, A.M.

    1954-01-01

    The present paper is based on a collection of bats from Tobago brought together by Mr. G. F. Mees. From July 1953 to March 1954 Mr. Mees stayed at the island of Trinidad, making occasional short visits to Tobago. Though his main attention was directed to the avifauna of these islands, he collected a

  20. Retrospective study of canine heartworm disease with caval syndrome in Grenada, West Indies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikweto, A; Bhaiyat, M I; Lanza-Perea, M; Veytsman, S; Tiwari, K; De Allie, C; Sharma, R N

    2014-10-15

    Canine heartworm disease caused by Dirofilaria immitis is an important disease of dogs. The aim of this retrospective study was to estimate the prevalence of canine heartworm disease and evaluate cases of caval syndrome in dogs submitted for necropsy in Grenada. Out of 1617 dogs necropsied over a period of 13 years (2001-2013), 249 were found to be infected with D. immitis; giving an overall prevalence of 15.4% (95% confidence interval, 13.6% to 17.1%). There was no significant difference between male and female dogs with respect to canine heartworm infection (p = 0.3). During this period, the annual prevalence of canine heartworm disease was 22% in 2001 before slightly declining to an average of 18% in 2002-2003 and peaking at 26.8% in 2004-2005. From 2006 onwards, annual prevalence rates have steadily been decreasing; reaching the lowest (9%) in 2013. Among the 249 positive cases, 33 (13.2%) of the dogs had caval syndrome. Caval syndrome cases presented with concurrent clinical signs and were associated with cardio-pulmonary and hepatic gross lesions at necropsy. Aberrant migration of D. immitis was also noted in 2 dogs with caval syndrome. This is the first report which presents the findings of canine heartworm disease with caval syndrome in Grenada.

  1. Groundwater recharge and flow on Montserrat, West Indies: Insights from groundwater dating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brioch Hemmings

    2015-09-01

    New hydrological insights: δ2H and δ18O analysis indicates uniform recharge elevations for groundwaters on Montserrat. CFC-11 and CFC-12 analysis reveals age differences between isotopically similar, high elevation springs and low elevation aquifer waters. Low CFC concentrations within a confined low elevation aquifer suggest water ages of ∼45 years. High CFC concentrations in the northern and western springs are explained by rapid infiltration of cool (high CFC concentration rainfall into saturated compartments, with flow through the vadose zone to the phreatic zone dominated by compartment flow. Lower CFC concentrations in a number of aligned warmer springs suggest a contribution from older, warmer waters from depth. Temperatures and CFC concentrations indicate older component supply rates of up to 8 L/s to the highest yielding spring on Centre Hills, with contributions of up to 75% in the warmest spring waters.

  2. Epidemiological transition in Trinidad and Tobago, West Indies 1953-1992.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulliford, M C

    1996-04-01

    This study aimed to describe trends in age-specific mortality from diabetes mellitus, hypertension, cerebrovascular disease and ischaemic heart disease in Trinidad and Tobago between 1953 and 1992 and to relate them to earlier changes in infant mortality rates. Average annual age-specific mortality rates per 100 000 were calculated for 5-year time periods from 1953-1957 to 1988-1992 and plotted by mid-year of birth for cohorts born 1874-1882 to 1944-1952. Regression analyses were performed to test associations between adult mortality rates, and infant mortality rates for the same birth cohorts and period of death. Infant mortality declined from 180 per 1000 in 1901 to 10 per 1000 in 1992. Age-standardized mortality from diabetes mellitus increased, in men, from 60 in 1958-1962 to 278 in 1988-1992, in women the increase was from 89 to 303. Mortality from hypertension declined, in men, from 232 in 1953-1957 to 73 in 1988-1992, and in women, from 206 to 67. Cerebrovascular mortality increased, in men, from 341 in 1953-1957 to 451 in 1963-1967 before declining to 224 in 1988-1992. In women cerebrovascular mortality increased from 292 in 1953-1957 to 361 in 1963-1967 before declining to 196 in 1988-1992. There was evidence of a deceleration in cerebrovascular mortality for cohorts born after 1908-1918. Ischaemic heart disease mortality remained constant. Mid-cohort infant mortality rates were not associated with adult mortality after adjusting for age and period of death. Declining infant mortality was subsequently associated with declining mortality from cerebrovascular disease and hypertensive disease and increasing mortality from diabetes mellitus but there was no association with ischaemic heart disease mortality. These relationships were confounded by secular changes associated with year of death.

  3. A serological study of Dirofilaria immitis in feral cats in Grenada, West Indies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, C; Chikweto, A; Mofya, S; Lanum, L; Flynn, P; Burnett, J P; Doherty, D; Sharma, R N

    2010-12-01

    A study to determine the seroprevalence of Dirofilaria immitis was carried out in feral cats in Grenada. Of the 137 feral cats tested for circulating antibodies (IgG; lateral-flow immunoassay) and circulating antigens (Ag; enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay), 8% (95% confidence interval (CI) 3.5-12.5%) were antibody positive and 5.1% (95% CI 1.4-8.8%) were antigen positive. No significant difference between cats aged>1 to 4 years and cats less than 1 year of age was found (P>0.05, χ²). There was also no significant difference (P>0.05, χ²) between male and female cats. Dirofilaria immitis prevalence is relatively high in the feral cat population of Grenada. Evidence of D. immitis infection in feral cats coupled with the endemic nature of heartworm disease in dogs in Grenada leads us to suggest the introduction of heartworm prophylaxis in cats. To the authors' knowledge, this serological evidence of heartworm infection in feral cats in Grenada is the first report from the Caribbean region.

  4. Nurse going native: Language and identity in letters from Africa and the British West Indies

    OpenAIRE

    Howell, Jessica M.

    2015-01-01

    Colonial nurses were ideal agents of colonial medicine’s supposed beneficence: while practising and teaching “hygiene”, they also reinforced racial and cultural separation. In some cases, however, the nurses took their role as healers and teachers of local populations much more seriously than was authorized implicitly by their employer. This article analyses the circulation of original life writing materials between one nurse, CC, and the Colonial Nursing Association, in order to chart the co...

  5. Systematic ichnology of microborings from the Cenozoic White Limestone Group, Jamaica, West Indies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blissett, D.J.; Pickerill, R.K.

    2007-01-01

    The Middle Eocene to Middle Miocene White Limestone Group of Jamaica contains a common and diverse, poorly to well-preserved microboring ichnofauna, namely Centrichnus eccentricus Bromley & Martinell, Curvichnus pediformis isp. nov., Dendrorete balani Tavernier, Campbell & Golubic, Dipatulichnus rot

  6. Soft-sediment ichnotaxa from the Cenozoic White Limestone Group, Jamaica, West Indies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blissett, D.J.; Pickerill, R.K.

    2004-01-01

    Jamaica, the third largest of the Greater Antillean islands, exposes various lithological units that are dominated by Cenozoic carbonate rocks including those of the mid-Cenozoic White Limestone Group. This Group is comprised of six formations, the Troy, Swanswick, Somerset, Moneague, Montpelier and

  7. The Epidemiology of Fatal road traffic Collisions in Trinidad and Tobago, West Indies (2000–2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chavin D. Gopaul

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Summary of what was known• Few studies on road traffic collisions conducted in Latin American and the Caribbean region• Increasing car ownership within the region• Lack of seatbelt usage in Trinidad• Most accidents are associated with alcohol usage• High mortality among pedestriansSummary of what this study adds• Most collisions occur at night• Most collisions occur at weekends• Collisions are evenly distributed throughout the year• More males than females die in fatal collisions• The most productive age group (15–44 is affected the most• More drivers than pedestrians are affected• Reflects the pattern of developed rather than developing countries with respect to time of day for RTCs Background: The purpose of the study is to determine the epidemiology of road traffic collisions (RTCs in Trinidad and Tobago by characterizing RTCs in terms of number of collisions, fatalities, victim profiles, and locations for the purpose of informing accident prevention programs. Previous studies of RTCs in Trinidad and Tobago were primarily concerned with patterns of drivers use of seat belts, road collisions as a cause of mortality in young men, and the economic burden of road collisions. Attempts were made to model road fatalities, but limited epidemiological data meant that it was difficult to determine trends or develop models. Methods: This study determined the epidemiology of RTCs in Trinidad and Tobago over the period 2000–2011using data collected by the Trinidad and Tobago Road Traffic Branch of the Police Service and secondary data from the Central Statistical Office. Data were analyzed using Excel, SPSS, and R statistical packages. Results: Fatalities were greater among men (80% than among women (20% and were highest on two major freeways in Trinidad [the Churchill–Roosevelt Highway and the Sir Solomon Hochoy Highway]. Most collisions occurred during the night among individuals between the ages of 15 and 44 years. Fatalities among drivers steadily increased over the study period and overtook fatalities among pedestrians, who were the group most affected in 2000. Most fatalities occurred at weekends. Conclusions: These patterns can inform (i education programs and (ii road and traffic control measures.

  8. Pattern of seat belt use by drivers in Trinidad and Tobago, West Indies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odekunle Abayomi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Trinidad and Tobago, the law on the mandatory use of seat belts was passed in 1995, but this law is hardly enforced. The objective of this study was to determine the frequency and predictors of seat belt use by motor vehicle drivers in the country. Findings A cross-sectional study of 959 motor vehicle drivers using a self-administered questionnaire. Data analysis included Pearson Chi square test and multinomial logistic regression analysis in order to determine the possible predictors of seat belt use by the drivers in Trinidad and Tobago. A majority of the drivers sometimes (51.8% or always (31.6% use a seat belt. About 16.7%, 29% and 54.2% of the drivers perceived that the other drivers use their seat belts more frequently, with the same frequency and less frequently respectively compared to themselves. The main reason for not using seat belt by the drivers was given as frequent stops (40.7% and the main motivation to use seat belt by the drivers was given as stiffer penalties for non-compliance with the seat belt law (44.5%. The predictors of seat belt use were male driver, no formal or lower level of education, driving for less than 10 years, and the perception that the other drivers use seat belts with the same or higher frequency compared to the respondents. Conclusion Only a small proportion of the drivers in Trinidad and Tobago always use a seat belt when driving. There is the need to enforce the seat belt legislation in the country.

  9. The genus Loxosceles Heineken & Lowe (Araneae: Sicariidae) in Cuba and Hispaniola, West Indies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Alexander Sánchez; Brescovit, Antonio D

    2013-10-30

    The three known species of the genus Loxosceles Heineken & Lowe from Cuba and Hispaniola are revised and two new species, Loxosceles maisi sp. nov. and Loxosceles mogote sp. nov., are described from the eastern region of Cuba. These new species are included in the reclusa group, and are considered close to Loxosceles taino Gertsch & Ennik as they have a greatly thickened male palpal tibia, a projecting cymbium, and large receptacles in the female genitalia. The distribution ranges of the known Cuban and Hispaniolan species are extended.

  10. Magma accumulation or second boiling - Investigating the ongoing deformation field at Montserrat, West Indies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collinson, Amy; Neuberg, Jurgen; Pascal, Karen

    2016-04-01

    For over 20 years, Soufriere Hills Volcano, Montserrat has been in a state of volcanic unrest. Intermittent periods of dome building have been punctuated by explosive eruptions and dome collapse events, endangering the lives of the inhabitants of the island. The last episode of active magma extrusion was in February 2010, and the last explosive event (ash venting) in March 2012. Despite a lack of eruptive activity recently, the volcano continues to emit significant volumes of SO2 and shows an ongoing trend of island inflation. Through the aid of three-dimensional numerical modelling, using a finite element method, we explore the potential sources of the ongoing island inflation. We consider both magmatic (dykes and chamber) and tectonic sources. Whilst a magmatic source suggests the possibility for further eruption, a tectonic source may indicate cessation of volcanic activity. We show that a magmatic source is the most likely scenario, and illustrate the effect of different sources (shapes, characters and depths) on the surface displacement. Furthermore, through the inclusion of topographic data, we investigate how the topography may affect the displacement pattern at the surface. We investigate the conflicting scenarios of magma chamber resupply versus second boiling - crystallisation-induced degassing. Based on numerical modelling results, we suggest the required pressurisation is too high for crystallisation-induced degassing to be the dominant process - thereby suggesting magma accumulation may be ongoing. However, we show that second boiling may be a contributing factor, particularly when taking into account the local tectonics and regional stretching.

  11. Diel biting activity of Culex (Melanoconion) caudelli in Trinidad, West Indies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadee, D D; Tikasingh, E S

    1989-07-01

    The diel biting periodicity of the arbovirus vector Culex (Melanoconion) caudelli Dyar and Knab (Diptera; Culicidae) in the Aripo-Wallerfield forest, Trinidad, was studied by collecting mosquitoes attracted to mouse-baited traps at 2-hourly intervals during eight 24 h periods. Biting females of Cx caudelli were collected during all night-time hours, 18.00-06.00 hours, with an overall unimodal pattern, i.e. one well-defined peak between 22.00 and 04.00 hours. This contrasts with previous reports that Cx caudelli is diurnally active. During the four moon phases, the period of peak biting activity varied from 22.00 to 24.00 hours at fullmoon, from 22.00 to 04.00 hours at first quarter, and from 24.00 to 02.00 hours at new moon and last quarter phases. The number of mosquitoes collected varied significantly with moon phases, the highest (152/24 h) being collected in the first lunar quarter and the lowest (71/24 h) in the last lunar quarter. Cloud cover and rainfall had no significant effect on the diel biting periodicity of Cx caudelli.

  12. Modeling Leptospirosis in Trinidad, West Indies: A Waterborne Zoonosis of Increasing Public Health Importance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, M. C.; Opadeyi, J.

    2012-12-01

    Leptospirosis is a waterborne disease which is considered one of the most common and widely spread bacterial zoonosis and a growing global public health problem. Transmission in humans is caused by direct or indirect contact with contaminated water, soil or infected urine, blood or tissue of carrier animals. Because of the similarity with influenza, dengue and viral hepatitis symptoms it is often misdiagnosed with these diseases, but as the leptospirosis progresses, internal organs can be compromised, causing severe syndromes (e.g. Weil's disease), and potentially can cause death. In less developed countries, leptospirosis is often poorly recognized. In humid tropics and subtropics, where this disease has a high impact, climatic and environmental factors, such as rainfall, floods, land cover and their modifications have been frequently related to the occurrence of leptospirosis. In these regions one of the main problems for the study of the role of environmental factors on disease dynamics is the lack of accurate data since, in many cases, data are either unavailable or do not exist at all. Between 1980 and 2005 a total of 12,475 cases of leptospirosis were reported from all Caribbean countries, with 2,370 (19%) of these corresponding to Trinidad and Tobago, where the current average annual incidence rate is 1.84 per 100,000 population based on confirmed cases. In order to explore the underlying spatial variability of leptospirosis occurrence as related to environmental and socio-economic factors, a series of Geographically Weighted Regression (GWR) models were developed. GWR was used to examine the determinants of leptospirosis in the communities of Trinidad using a total of 1,549 reported cases and 250 confirmed cases from 1998 to 2008. MODIS satellite imagery and GIS analysis were used to develop a series of covariables for each community including land cover, vegetation indices, wetness index (ln (α/tanβ)), river length per Ha, topography, percentage of free draining soils, percentage of imperfectly draining soils, percentage of impeded draining soils and mean annual rainfall. These covariables together with socio-economic data were used to set up the GWR models. Local model correlation (R^{2}) was 0.78, higher than the global correlation of 0.58 and there was found to be a clear spatial correlation between covariables and leptospirosis cases. Percentage of draining soils and topography were found to be significant (p<0.01 and 0.00) indicating spatial variability in the influence of these factors on the occurrence of leptospirosis in Trinidad communities. Composition of the soils and their lack of drainage may be an important factor influencing leptospirosis occurrence. Leptospires do not have a waterproof membrane therefore for their survival they must remain submersed in water. Previous studies have found leptospires to be associated with soils of high moisture and organic matter content.

  13. Geographical information system approaches for hazard mapping of dilute lahars on Montserrat, West Indies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darnell, A. R.; Barclay, J.; Herd, R. A.; Phillips, J. C.; Lovett, A. A.; Cole, P.

    2012-08-01

    Many research tools for lahar hazard assessment have proved wholly unsuitable for practical application to an active volcanic system where field measurements are challenging to obtain. Two simple routing models, with minimal data demands and implemented in a geographical information system (GIS), were applied to dilute lahars originating from Soufrière Hills Volcano, Montserrat. Single-direction flow routing by path of steepest descent, commonly used for simulating normal stream-flow, was tested against LAHARZ, an established lahar model calibrated for debris flows, for ability to replicate the main flow routes. Comparing the ways in which these models capture observed changes, and how the different modelled paths deviate can also provide an indication of where dilute lahars, do not follow behaviour expected from single-phase flow models. Data were collected over two field seasons and provide (1) an overview of gross morphological change after one rainy season, (2) details of dominant channels at the time of measurement, and (3) order of magnitude estimates of individual flow volumes. Modelling results suggested both GIS-based predictive tools had associated benefits. Dominant flow routes observed in the field were generally well-predicted using the hydrological approach with a consideration of elevation error, while LAHARZ was comparatively more successful at mapping lahar dispersion and was better suited to long-term hazard assessment. This research suggests that end-member models can have utility for first-order dilute lahar hazard mapping.

  14. Nurse going native: Language and identity in letters from Africa and the British West Indies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Jessica M

    2016-03-01

    Colonial nurses were ideal agents of colonial medicine's supposed beneficence: while practising and teaching "hygiene", they also reinforced racial and cultural separation. In some cases, however, the nurses took their role as healers and teachers of local populations much more seriously than was authorized implicitly by their employer. This article analyses the circulation of original life writing materials between one nurse, CC, and the Colonial Nursing Association, in order to chart the considerable anxiety around the concept of nurses' cross-cultural and cross-racial sympathy during the interwar period. I draw upon colonial language studies and women's travel writing analysis in order to demonstrate that many of these concerns centred on issues of language and communication. By speaking local languages, it was feared that colonial nurses' loyalty would shift from their employer towards their indigenous patients. This essay places the concept of "going native" within the contexts of nineteenth-century empire literature, racial anthropology and ethnology, in order to suggest that concerns about nurses "going native" were influenced by discourses of degeneration and acclimatization.

  15. A set of alternative explanations to account for the deformation field at Montserrat, West Indies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collinson, Amy; Neuberg, Jurgen; Pascal, Karen

    2015-04-01

    For almost 20 years, Soufrière Hills Volcano, Monsterrat, has been in a state of volcanic unrest. Intermittent periods of dome building have been punctuated by explosive eruptions and dome collapse events, endangering the lives of the inhabitants of the island. To date, there have been numerous phases to the activity, with the current activity designated Pause 5. There has not been any active magma extrusion since February 2010, and the last significant explosive (ash-venting) event occurred in March 2012. However, the volcano continues to emit an average of 374t/d SO2 and shows signs of deformation. Current observations indicate a line lengthening between several pairs of GPS stations across the island, suggesting an overall inflation of Montserrat. Through the use of three-dimensional numerical modelling using a finite element method, we explore the potential sources of this deformation, ranging from an inflating magma chamber or dyke - suggesting ongoing volcanic activity, to the existence of an active left-lateral strike-slip fault - which may indicate cessation of volcanic activity. We show the effect of different dyke sources (shapes, characters and depths) on the surface displacement. Furthermore, through the inclusion of topographic data, we investigate how the topography may affect the displacement pattern at the surface. Alternatively, we determine how much fault slip would be required in order to derive the deformation observed.

  16. Determinants of bird species richness, endemism, and island network roles in Wallacea and the West Indies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Bo; Carstensen, Daniel Wisbech; Fjeldså, Jon;

    2014-01-01

    Island biogeography has greatly contributed to our understanding of the processes determining species' distributions. Previous research has focused on the effects of island geography (i.e., island area, elevation, and isolation) and current climate as drivers of island species richness and endemi...

  17. Trace metals in the sponge Ircinia felix and sediments from North-Western Trinidad, West Indies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Wendy; Slinger-Cohen, Naomi

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to obtain data for trace metals in the sponge, Ircinia felix, and sediments found in coastal areas of north-western Trinidad, and to determine whether this sponge could be useful as a biomonitor for selected metals. Three sets of sediment and tissue samples were collected from four stations representing a range of anthropogenic input over a 12-month period. Samples were analyzed for Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn using flame and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Extractable metal concentrations in sediments ranged from 0.01-0.28 μg g(-1)-cadmium, 0.02-16.2 μg g(-1)-chromium, 0.19-68.5 μg g(-1)-copper, metal concentrations in I. felix tissue (dry weight) ranged from 0.03-1.04 μg g(-1)-cadmium, 2.51-24.9 μg g(-1) -chromium, 15.2-49.9 μg g(-1)-copper, 6.30-53.9 μg g(-1) -nickel, 0.27-35.4 μg g(-1) -lead and 29.7-127 μg g(-1)- zinc. The results of the study suggest that I. felix could potentially have use as a biomonitor for Ni, Cd, Cu, and possibly Cr and Zn but may be less useful for monitoring Pb. Further work on temporal trends and intra-species variation of trace metals in the sponge is recommended.

  18. Isolation and genotyping of acanthamoeba strains from soil sources from Jamaica, West Indies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Cheridah D; Reyes-Batlle, María; Martín-Navarro, Carmen Ma; Dorta-Gorrín, Alexis; López-Arencibia, Atteneri; Martínez-Carretero, Enrique; Piñero, José E; Valladares, Basilio; Lindo, John F; Lorenzo-Morales, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Acanthamoeba spp. are opportunistic pathogens that are ubiquitous in nature. Many species of this genus are responsible for a fatal encephalitis and keratitis in humans and other animals. Seventy-two soil samples were collected from the parishes across Jamaica and assessed for the presence of Acanthamoeba spp. Cultivation was carried out on non-nutrient agar plates seeded with heat killed Escherichia coli. PCR and sequencing of the DF3 region were carried out in order to genotype the isolated strains of Acanthamoeba. Thermotolerance and osmotolerance assays were utilized to investigate the pathogenic potential of the Acanthamoeba isolates. Acanthamoeba spp. was isolated from 63.9% of soil samples. Sequencing of the DF3 region of the 18S rDNA resulted in the identification of genotypes T4, T5, and T11. T4 genotype was most frequently isolated. Most isolates were thermotolerant or both thermotolerant and osmotolerant, indicating that they may present the potential to cause disease in humans and other animals.

  19. The Dragonfly-Fauna of Trinidad in the British West Indies, (Odonata)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geijskes, D.C.

    1932-01-01

    The origin of the present paper is based on two large collections of Odonata, recently made in Trinidad. The first one is my own collection brought home from my stay in the island in July and August 1929, containing several hundreds of specimens from different localities. The second one is that of

  20. Aedes aegypti (L.) mosquitoes in Trinidad, West Indies: longevity case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadee, Dave D; Martinez, Raymond; Sutherland, Joan M

    2017-06-01

    Few laboratory and field studies have reported long survival periods for Ae. aegypti females and even fewer have designed experiments to characterize this important life history trait. This study was conducted under laboratory conditions to determine the number of blood meals taken by individual females, the number of eggs laid per individual female, the length of the gonotrophic cycle, and the duration of female survival. The results showed individual females oviposited between 670 and 1,500 eggs throughout their lifetimes, females undergoing large numbers of gonotrophic cycles and surviving up to 224 days. These results are discussed in the context of vector competence, unique alternating high and low oviposition patterns observed after week 14, and resource partitioning/allocation by older Ae. aegypti females after blood feeding. © 2017 The Society for Vector Ecology.

  1. Use of Benthic Macroinvertebrates to Evaluate Stream Water Quality in Trinidad and Tobago, West Indies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharaj, L. D.; Alkins-Koo, M.

    2005-05-01

    In order to determine the best method of using benthic macroinvertebrates to monitor water quality in Trinidad and Tobago, 63 sites along 38 streams were sampled in each of the wet and dry seasons from 1999-2001. At each site, 5 benthic samples were collected with a 300μm 'D' frame kicknet, along with data for 14 environmental parameters and habitat data. Principal Components Analyses separated the streams into 3 ecoregions based on substrate type and discharge. Using ANOVA, mean values for each environmental parameter were compared across each ecoregion. Values of dissolved Oxygen, BOD-5, nitrates, total suspended solids and pH varied significantly during the wet season, while dissolved Oxygen, pH and chlorophyll-a varied significantly during the dry. Using PRIMER version 5, non-metric multi-dimensional scaling and cluster analyses were performed on the faunal data for each ecoregion separately and for all sites combined. These analyses indicate that the fauna associated with minimally, moderately and severely impaired sites is similar across all 3 ecoregions. Of the different metrics compared during the study, a modified version of the Average Score Per Taxon (ASPT) best fit the clusters were produced.

  2. Bowls and Burials – an Update from Grand Bay, Carriacou, West Indies: May–June 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaye Quetta

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available From May 23 to June 23 2011 Kaye, Fitzpatrick and Kappers directed a team comprising four staff members from England, The Netherlands and the U.S., together with 27 students from various American universities and UCL's Institute of Archaeology, to conduct the sixth season of archaeological investigation at the coastal site of Grand Bay, Carriacou (fig. 1. Our major goal this year was to finalise the excavation of three previously opened 5×5 metre trenches (nos 592, 415 and 446 (fig. 2 (see summaries in Fitzpatrick 'et al.' 2009a, 2009b; Kaye 'et al.' 2009, while training students in fieldwork techniques and continuing our community outreach work by encouraging site visits, giving talks to schools, organising an exhibition of small finds for a public open day and conducting a series of television, radio, and newspaper interviews in order to raise public awareness and encourage interest in the archaeological heritage of the island. The Carriacou Historical Society (CHS also requested us to prepare a report on the possible impact of a proposed "Free Port" coastal development on archaeological sites along the southeastern part of the island. The brief results of the 2011 project are presented in the following.

  3. Seroprevalence of CANINE LEISHMANIASIS AND American trypanosomiasis in dogs from Grenada, West Indies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canine leishmaniasis and American trypanosomiasis (AT) are caused by related hemoflagellated parasites, Leishmania spp. and Trypanosoma cruzi, which share several common host species. Dogs are reservoirs for human infections with both pathogens. We determined the prevalence of antibodies to Leishman...

  4. Hereditary nephritis (with unusual renal histology): report of a first case from the West Indies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, J S; Jankey, N

    1976-11-01

    A 21-year-old Grenadian girl undergoing investigation in Trinidad for anaemia was diagnosed as a case of hereditary nephritis. She had the clinical features of a nephropathy, nerve deafness and an ocular defect. Renal histology was exceptional in that in addition to the typical findings of a hereditary nephritis, cystic areas generally associated with medullary cystic disease were noted. Several members of the patient's maternal family were afflicted with either deafness visual distrubances or renal disease.

  5. A Socio-Historical Analysis of the Labor Revolt of 1878 in the Danish West Indies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Clifton E.

    1981-01-01

    An examination of socioeconomic conditions and political status of the Black community in the Virgin Islands after emancipation supports the contention that the "Fireburn" uprising of 1878 was not a riot but a labor revolt. The revolt resulted in flexible labor contracts, land-buying terms, and unions for working-class Blacks. (ML)

  6. Oviposition response of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes to different concentrations of hay infusion in Trinidad, West Indies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadee, D D; Lakhan, A; Ramdath, W R; Persad, R C

    1993-09-01

    Ovitraps containing various concentrations of hay infusion and tap water were exposed weekly in the field for 15 wk to determine the oviposition patterns of Aedes aegypti. The results showed 10, 20, 60 and 80% hay infusions each attracted similar numbers of Ae. aegypti eggs oviposited and egg occurrences. No repellent effect was observed. In another field study, significantly more eggs and egg occurrences were collected from 25 and 50% hay infusions and tap water. The differences in these results from those of a previous study in Puerto Rico are discussed.

  7. Ethnophysiology and herbal treatments of intestinal worms in Dominica, West Indies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlan, Marsha B; Quinlan, Robert J; Nolan, Justin M

    2002-04-01

    In rural Dominican ethnophysiology worms reside in a human organ called the 'worm bag'. Unchecked, worms can cause illness by growing in size and number, spreading out of the worm bag and into other organs. In this study of 'bush medicine', we use a measure of cognitive salience in free-listing tasks, which reveals five plants commonly used to treat intestinal worms. These were Ambrosia hispida (Asteraceae), Aristolochia trilobata (Aristlochiaceae), Chenopodium ambrosioides (Chenopodiaceae), Portulaca oleracea (Portulacaceae), and Artemisia absinthium (Asteraceae). Bioactive compounds appear to be present in all of these plants. The cognitive salience of these plant remedies coupled with evidence of biochemical properties suggest that they provide efficacious treatments for controlling intestinal parasite loads.

  8. Determinants of bird species richness, endemism, and island network roles in Wallacea and the West Indies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Bo; Carstensen, Daniel Wisbech; Fjeldså, Jon

    2014-01-01

    , current and historical climate, and bird richness/endemism. We found that island geography, especially island area but also isolation and elevation, largely explained the variation in island species richness and endemism. Current and historical climate only added marginally to our understanding...

  9. Nariva Swamp Ramsar Site, Trinidad and Tobago (West Indies) Wetland Habitat Restoration Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montserrat Carbonell; Nadra Nathai-Gyan

    2005-01-01

    Trinidad and Tobago, a twin island nation, is the most southerly of the Caribbean islands and lies just 11 km off the coast of Venezuela, near the Orinoco delta. Trinidad, the larger of the two islands, is approximately 5,000 km² and the Nariva Swamp is located on its eastern coast (fig. 1). In 1993, this site was designated as a wetland of international...

  10. Notes on Agave in the Netherlands West Indies and North Venezuela

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagenaar Hummelinck, P.

    1938-01-01

    In Curaçao, Aruba and Bonaire the most common species of Agave is A. vivipara. Although the variability is rather great, this species is nearly always easily recognizable. In Aruba, however, in two localities agaves are found, namely A. Rutteniae and A. arubensis, which differ from A. vivipara in th

  11. Disease-Bearing Mosquitoes of North and Central America, the West Indies, and the Philippine Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    1913-11-01

    Filaria bancroftii. , . .;. Relation to malaria probably negative. Christophers examined ·about 100 specimens, all of which were negative. Habitat...believes the whole sinensis group breeds in dark shady pools. Positive to filaria nocturna. MYZORHYNCHUS V ANUS, Van der Wulp. (Mono. Cu., i, 142; iii...1900). Cuba, Canal Zone, etc. Time of capture.-Jamaica, November to :March; July, in British Guiana. Positive to malaria. Positive to Filaria

  12. Systematic ichnology of microborings from the Cenozoic White Limestone Group, Jamaica, West Indies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blissett, D.J.; Pickerill, R.K.

    2007-01-01

    The Middle Eocene to Middle Miocene White Limestone Group of Jamaica contains a common and diverse, poorly to well-preserved microboring ichnofauna, namely Centrichnus eccentricus Bromley & Martinell, Curvichnus pediformis isp. nov., Dendrorete balani Tavernier, Campbell & Golubic, Dipatulichnus

  13. Netherlands Antilles and French West Indies. Section 23. Weather and Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    1965-05-01

    Le Lamontin ....... 0800 18 11 11 B 8 6 6 it 15 14 16 18 136 8-10 Southiwest Group: Aruba: Princesa Boatrix Airport ......... 0700 17 1. 16 12 13 13...24 21 24 264 10-12 Lo Mai-n..... Z.004 12 9 8 8 10 12 18 13 14 16 15 12 144 23 Lea Anaes d’Arlet. M0,004 9 8 6 9 8 12 16 13 15 12 10 9 126 a Lo

  14. Fluid dynamics of the 1997 Boxing Day volcanic blast on Montserrat, West Indies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposti Ongaro, T.; Clarke, A. B.; Neri, A.; Voight, B.; Widiwijayanti, C.

    2008-03-01

    Directed volcanic blasts are powerful explosions with a significant laterally directed component, which can generate devastating, high-energy pyroclastic density currents (PDCs). Such blasts are an important class of eruptive phenomena, but quantified understanding of their dynamics and effects is still incomplete. Here we use 2-D and 3-D multiparticle thermofluid dynamic flow codes to examine a powerful volcanic blast that occurred on Montserrat in December 1997. On the basis of the simulations, we divide the blast into three phases: an initial burst phase that lasts roughly 5 s and involves rapid expansion of the gas-pyroclast mixture, a gravitational collapse phase that occurs when the erupted material fails to mix with sufficient air to form a buoyant column and thus collapses asymmetrically, and a PDC phase that is dominated by motion parallel to the ground surface and is influenced by topography. We vary key input parameters such as total gas energy and total solid mass to understand their influence on simulations, and we compare the simulations with independent field observations of damage and deposits, demonstrating that the models generally capture important large-scale features of the natural phenomenon. We also examine the 2-D and 3-D model results to estimate the flow Mach number and conclude that the range of damage sustained at villages on Montserrat can be reasonably explained by the spatial and temporal distribution of the dynamic pressure associated with subsonic PDCs.

  15. Water uptake by trees of coastal forested wetlands in Guadeloupe, French West Indies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bompy, Felix; Lambs, Luc; Dulormne, Maguy; Imbert, Daniel

    2013-04-01

    In the Caribbean islands, coastal wetlands comprise two main ecosystems: the mangrove forest and the freshwater swamp forest dominated by the legume Pterocarpus officinalis. These forest ecosystems make an interface between sea and land, providing significant ecological and socioeconomic functions. During the last centuries, human activities have modified the hydrologic connections of these wetlands by digging canals to drain waterlogged soils and by cutting forests to promote cattle grazing and waterfowl hunting. Peat formation is associated to the highest water-table levels. The thickest peat deposits occur seaward as a result of the Holocene marine transgression into Pleistocene coastal plains and estuaries. Landward, soils overlay volcanic or calcareous bedrocks and are mainly clayey. Such differences in soil formation and physical characteristics (especially porosity) confer to the system its hydraulic properties. Furthermore, the dual origin of water (tides and watershed runoff) gives way to a complex pattern of groundwater salinity. In five forest stands of Guadeloupe wetlands, we have traced water uptake using the stable isotopes of water (d18O and dD). Preliminary results reveal that evapo-transpiration process in the swamp forest is compensated by fresh groundwater coming out from springs scattered around and inside the forest. In the mangrove forest, the highest evaporation rates are located in the Avicennia pure stand and the mixed scrub stand; the mixed tall stand is located where fresh and salt water melt. Measurement of xylem sap also suggests that mangrove trees uptake groundwater where salinity is the lowest. The low tidal range and the absence of large watershed, like in most wetlands of Caribbean islands, certainly explain the poor hydro-dynamics and resilience of the system.

  16. Enterococcal urinary tract infections: eight years experience at a regional hospital in Trinidad, West Indies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective To investigate the prevalence of significant enterococcal isolates from urine and determine what factors are associated with the increased prevalence, with particular reference to antibiotic susceptibilities. Methods Retrospective analysis over an 8-year period of hospital laboratory records of urinary isolates of enterococci was done. Species were identified via colony morphology, growth in 6.5% sodium chloride and their ability to hydrolyze esculin in the presence of 40% bile salts. Susceptibility testing via the disc diffusion technique with 9 commonly used antibiotics was also done as defined by the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards. Results From 39?881 urine specimens, 9116 (22.9%) were culture positive. Of this 9116, 1001 (11.0%) were enterococci, the 4th most common urinary isolate. E. coli was the most common (36.2%). Most enterococci were from pediatric patients (28.4%) and the urology unit (24.5%). All enterococci were fully sensitive to ampicillin and augmentin (amoxicillin-clavulanic acid). Sensitivity to gentamicin decreased significantly from 79% in 1990 to 58% in 1997 (P<0.005). Sensitivity to the cephalosporins and nitrofuratoin were relatively stable, but sensitivity to nalidixic acid varied. No resistance to vancomycin was detected during the study, and no cases of bacteremia complicated bacteriuria were seen. Conclusion Isolation of enterococci was relatively stable during the 8-year period, and all isolates were fully sensitive to the older β-lactams, ampicillin, cefaclor and augmentin, but displayed varying degrees of multi-resistance to other commonly used urinary agents such as nalidixic acid and co-trimoxazole (trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole). Because of the emergence of multi-resistant enterococci in many countries, and the high cost of drugs in our society, it is imperative that vigilance be maintained in monitoring enterococcal infections in hospitals.

  17. The Dragonfly-fauna of Trinidad in the British West Indies (Odonata)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geijskes, D.C.

    1932-01-01

    PART II. Subordo: Anisoptera. Fam. Aeschnidae. Subfam. Gomphinae. Genus: Gomphoides Selys. The little material of the interesting family of Gomphinae we know from this island, is represented by a few specimens of the genus Gomphoides. In the year 1929 on July 13 and some days afterwards, two specime

  18. The Dragonfly-Fauna of Trinidad in the British West Indies, (Odonata)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geijskes, D.C.

    1932-01-01

    The origin of the present paper is based on two large collections of Odonata, recently made in Trinidad. The first one is my own collection brought home from my stay in the island in July and August 1929, containing several hundreds of specimens from different localities. The second one is that of D

  19. Understanding Higher Education Governance Restructuring: The Case of the University of the West Indies

    OpenAIRE

    Austin, Ian O'Brian

    2009-01-01

    Governance is one aspect of university restructuring that in the last 20 years has become ubiquitous worldwide. The restructuring is in part a response to calls for improving governance in higher education. Keller (1983), for example, describes governance in higher education as limiting the capability of universities to make critical strategic decisions. Higher education researchers are seeking to understand governance restructuring. A few studies have been conducted in the United State...

  20. Americans city and countryside seen from the Council of the Indies in Madrid (1570-1650

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Gaudin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available How Madrid administration, i.e. the Council of the Indies, considered urban and rural areas in America? From classical sources (the Ordenanzas of 1573 and Relaciones geográficas of 1577 and unpublished (the work and papers of the clerk of the Council of the Indies, Juan Díez de la Calle, we understand the importance of the city as a place of dominance over the countryside and implementation of royal power thanks to the presence of the representatives of the Crown nominated in Madrid. The city, with its officers and priests, obsesses while the field in the background is only seen as a resource

  1. Revision of the West Indian Wattius Kaszab (Tenebrionidae, Toxicini, Eudysantina) with lectotype designations for Pascoe’s South American species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Aaron D.; Sanchez, Lucio A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The Wattius species occurring in the West Indies are revised for the first time. Wattius cucullatus (Pascoe), previously reported from Cuba, is diagnosed and restricted to Brazil. Wattius asperulus (Pascoe), currently a synonym of Wattius cucullatus, from Colombia is diagnosed and resurrected. All species found in the West Indies are endemic to the islands and form a single informal species-group. Three species are described: Wattius andersoni sp. n. from Cuba, Wattius emmabaconae sp. n. from Hispaniola (Dominican Republic), and Wattius viatorus sp. n. from Cuba and the Bahamas, and lectotypes are designated for Calymmus cucullatus Pascoe and Calymmus asperulus Pascoe. A key to the West Indian species is provided. PMID:26798241

  2. Colonial Exploitation and Economic Development: The Belgian Congo and the Netherlands Indies Compared

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frankema, E.H.P.; Buelens, F.

    2013-01-01

    This volume discusses the comparative legacy of colonial rule in the Netherlands Indies and Belgian Congo during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Whereas the Indonesian economy progressed rapidly during the last three decades of the twentieth century and became a self-reliant and assertive

  3. Deformation properties of pharmaceutical excipients determined using an in-die and out-die method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilić, Ilija; Govedarica, Biljana; Šibanc, Rok; Dreu, Rok; Srčič, Stane

    2013-03-25

    This study investigated deformation mechanisms of some commonly used pharmaceutical fillers, such as microcrystalline cellulose, lactose, dicalcium phosphate, isomalt and cornstarch, using a combination of the in-die and out-die method with the Heckel and Walker models. The tableting mixtures contained of 98.5% (w/w) filler, the rest consisted of dry binder and an antiadhesive agent. Our results showed that plasticity and elasticity may be considered independent deformation properties as highly plastic materials (microcrystalline cellulose, cornstarch) also exhibited high elasticity. Particular emphasis was placed on explaining the differences observed between the in-die and out-die method-comparison revealed that the differences are a consequence of the material's elastic properties. Larger error of in-die results can be expected for more elastic materials, and thus in-die Heckel should be used with some considerations. In contrast, the Walker model was found to be more robust and smaller differences were observed between the two methods. We consider the most correct results to have been obtained by the out-die approach, which excludes the elastic properties of the material evaluated. An excellent correlation between elastic determination at the single-particle level and multiple-particle scale was demonstrated, suggesting a great potential of nanoscale determination of a material's mechanical properties for better elucidation of deformation mechanisms.

  4. Why was the Dutch legacy so poor? Educational development in the Netherlands Indies, 1871-1942

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frankema, Ewout

    2014-01-01

    The educational legacy of Dutch colonial rule in the Netherlands Indies has been widely regarded as disappointing. This paper probes further into the underlying causes of the poor Dutch legacy. It is argued that the spread of popular education was not only hampered by a lack of financial commitment

  5. The Dutch East Indies During the First World War and the Birth of Colonial Radio

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Kuitenbrouwer

    2015-01-01

    The article discusses the disruption of the lines of communication between the Netherlands and the Dutch East Indies which led to the Dutch government's investment in the construction of a wireless radio-connection to prevent future blockades. Topics discussed include an overview of the colonial lin

  6. Shhh! No Opinions in the Library: "IndyKids" and Kids' Right to an Independent Press

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vender, Amanda

    2011-01-01

    "Nintendo Power," "Sports Illustrated for Kids," and a biography of President Obama were on prominent display as the author entered the branch library in Forest Hills, Queens. The librarian looked skeptical when the author asked the librarian if she could leave copies of "IndyKids" newspapers on the free literature table. The branch manager…

  7. Het mijnwezen in Nederlands-Oost-Indië 1850-1950

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiter, P.A.C. de

    2016-01-01

    The Mining Department (Het Mijnwezen) in the Netherlands-East-Indies was set up in 1850. Its task was to assist the operations in the Tin Mines in Bangka and to find other mineable deposits of useful minerals. The primary purpose was to earn quickly lots of money for the Netherlands, which were very

  8. African mutinies in the Netherlands East Indies : a nineteenth-century colonial paradox

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessel, van W.M.J.; Abbink, J.; Bruijn, de M.E.; Walraven, van K.

    2003-01-01

    Between 1831 and 1872, the Dutch government recruited 3,000 Africans from the Gold Coast and Ashanti (Ghana) for service in the colonial army in the Netherlands East Indies. The majority of them were ex-slaves but were promised that their conditions of service would be the same as those of Europeans

  9. PÖFF näitab indie-Oscari nominante

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2008-01-01

    !2. PÖFFi filmide programmist "Crazy Cool: Põhja-Ameerika indie-filmid", mille raames on PÖFFi külalisteks režissöör Danny Jacobs ("Humboldti maa") ja näitleja Ross Patidge ("Kottpea"), Kanada dokumentaalfantaasia "Minu Winnipeg" ("My Winnipeg"), režissöör Guy Maddin

  10. Landschapsbedrijven als middel tot opheffing van onontwikkelde streken in Nederlandsch-Indie

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, van L.J.

    1942-01-01

    The study was of the island of Japen north of Western New Guinea, a wild and undeveloped part of the East Indies.

    The island had vast forests; in the past some attempts to develop forestry and agriculture failed.

    The author suggested exploitation of forest by-product copal, obtained by tapping

  11. American Visions of the Netherlands East Indies/Indonesia : US Foreign Policy and Indonesian Nationalism, 1920-1949

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gouda, Frances; Brocades Zaalberg, Thijs

    2002-01-01

    De auteurs van 'American Visions of the Netherlands East Indies/Indonesia bestrijden de idee dat de Amerikaanse regering en haar buitenlandse beleidsmakers onvoorwaardelijk steun verleenden aan de onafhankelijkheidsstrijd van de Indonesische Republiek, zoals vele Nederlandse geloofden gedurende de p

  12. The politics of publication: Bartolomé de las Casas's 'the devastation of the Indies'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolena Adorno

    1993-07-01

    Full Text Available [First paragraph] The Devastation of the Indies: A Brief Account. BARTOLOMÉ DE LAS CASAS. Translated by Herma Briffault. Introduction by Bill M. Donovan. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1992. 138 pp. (Paper US$ 11.95 The 1992 Johns Hopkins University Press publication of Bartolom? de las Casas's The Devastation of the Indies: A Brief Account has been, I am told, a commercial success. Regrettably, it is a scholarly failure. The translation - a reprint of a 1974 version - is so inaccurate that it barely deserves to go by the name, and the introductory essay that accompanies it repeats the old clich?s and familiar misunderstandings that one commonly reads about Las Casas's life and work. The shortcomings of both the translation and the introduction could have been overcome by a deeper engagement with Las Casas's works and greater attention to basic information about sixteenth-century Spanish history.

  13. The bacterial dicarboxylate transporter VcINDY uses a two-domain elevator-type mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Christopher; Fenollar-Ferrer, Cristina; Fitzgerald, Gabriel A; Vergara-Jaque, Ariela; Kaufmann, Desirée; Li, Yan; Forrest, Lucy R; Mindell, Joseph A

    2016-03-01

    Secondary transporters use alternating-access mechanisms to couple uphill substrate movement to downhill ion flux. Most known transporters use a 'rocking bundle' motion, wherein the protein moves around an immobile substrate-binding site. However, the glutamate-transporter homolog GltPh translocates its substrate-binding site vertically across the membrane, through an 'elevator' mechanism. Here, we used the 'repeat swap' approach to computationally predict the outward-facing state of the Na(+)/succinate transporter VcINDY, from Vibrio cholerae. Our model predicts a substantial elevator-like movement of VcINDY's substrate-binding site, with a vertical translation of ~15 Å and a rotation of ~43°. Our observation that multiple disulfide cross-links completely inhibit transport provides experimental confirmation of the model and demonstrates that such movement is essential. In contrast, cross-links across the VcINDY dimer interface preserve transport, thus revealing an absence of large-scale coupling between protomers.

  14. In-die photomask registration and overlay metrology with PROVE using 2D correlation methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, D.; Arnz, M.; Beyer, D.

    2011-11-01

    According to the ITRS roadmap, semiconductor industry drives the 193nm lithography to its limits, using techniques like double exposure, double patterning, mask-source optimization and inverse lithography. For photomask metrology this translates to full in-die measurement capability for registration and critical dimension together with challenging specifications for repeatability and accuracy. Especially, overlay becomes more and more critical and must be ensured on every die. For this, Carl Zeiss SMS has developed the next generation photomask registration and overlay metrology tool PROVE® which serves the 32nm node and below and which is already well established in the market. PROVE® features highly stable hardware components for the stage and environmental control. To ensure in-die measurement capability, sophisticated image analysis methods based on 2D correlations have been developed. In this paper we demonstrate the in-die capability of PROVE® and present corresponding measurement results for shortterm and long-term measurements as well as the attainable accuracy for feature sizes down to 85nm using different illumination modes and mask types. Standard measurement methods based on threshold criteria are compared with the new 2D correlation methods to demonstrate the performance gain of the latter. In addition, mask-to-mask overlay results of typical box-in-frame structures down to 200nm feature size are presented. It is shown, that from overlay measurements a reproducibility budget can be derived that takes into account stage, image analysis and global effects like mask loading and environmental control. The parts of the budget are quantified from measurement results to identify critical error contributions and to focus on the corresponding improvement strategies.

  15. Potencial Expressivo nos Jogos Indie e Gamearte: Breve análise dos jogos Flower e Journey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Henrique de Paula

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Digital games have been shown to be a powerful expressive and communicative medium, struggling against the traditional view of games as shallow media. It’s especially at indie games space that there has been a greater experimentation, shifting this paradigm. Flower and Journey are in this indie universe, and these games have reached a great success in many spheres, helping this paradigm shift and favoring a new way to face digital games. The objective of this work is to reflect about the gameplay experience of both games, showing how these games innovated and helping to understand why these games have reached an important position on last years.

  16. Gateway to the West

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groeneboer, Kees

    1999-01-01

    This history of language policy traces the fortunes of Dutch in the East Indies from the arrival of the first Dutchmen in the Indonesian archipelago at the end of the sixteenth century to the transfer of sovereignty in 1949.Groeneboer explores the authorities' intentions with regard to Dutch and the

  17. Field evaluation of pyriproxyfen and spinosad mixture for the control of insecticide resistant Aedes aegypti in Martinique (French West Indies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darriet Frédéric

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The resistance of Ae. aegypti to insecticides is already widespread and continues to develop. It represents a serious problem for programmes aimed at the control and prevention of dengue in tropical countries. In the light of this problem measures to control Ae. aegypti are being orientated towards how best to use existing insecticides, notably by combining those that have different modes of action. Results In this study we evaluated the operational efficiency of a mixture composed of pyriproxyfen (an insect growth regulator and spinosad (a biopesticide against a population of Ae. aegypti from Martinique resistant to pyrethroid and organophosphate insecticides. The first step consisted of evaluating the efficacy of pyriproxyfen and spinosad when used alone, or in combination, against Ae. aegypti larvae under simulated conditions. The results showed that the mixture of pyriproxyfen+spinosad remained active for at least 8 months, compared with 3 months for spinosad alone, and 5 months for pyriproxyfen alone. In a second step in containers experiencing natural conditions, pyriproxyfen and spinosad, maintained the rate of adult emergence at 20% for 3 weeks and 3.5 months, respectively. Following the same criteria of evaluation, the mixture pyriproxyfen+spinosad remained effective for 4.5 months, showing that the combination of the two larvicides with different modes of action acted to increase the residual activity of the treatment. Conclusion The mixture of pyriproxyfen and spinosad kills larvae and pupae giving it a broader range of action than either insecticide. This mixture could preserve the utility of both insecticides in public health programs.

  18. Is magma cooling responsible for the periodic activity of Soufrière Hills volcano, Montserrat, West Indies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caricchi, Luca; Simpson, Guy; Chelle-Michou, Cyril; Neuberg, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    After 400 years of quiescence, Soufrière Hills volcano on Montserrat (SHV) started erupting in 1995. Ongoing deformation and sulphur dioxide emission demonstrate that this volcanic systems is still restless, however, after 5 years of inactivity it remains unclear whether magma extrusion will restart. Also, if such periodically observed activity at SHV will restart, can we use past monitoring data to attempt to forecast the reawakening of this volcano? Cooling of volatile saturated magma leads to crystallisation, the formation of gas bubbles and expansion. Such volumetric variations are not only potentially responsible for deformation signals observed at the surface (Caricchi et al., 2014), but also lead to pressurisation of the magmatic reservoir and eventually renewed magma extrusion (Tait et al., 1989). We postulate that volcanic activity observed at SHM over the last 20 years could be essentially the result of the unavoidable progressive cooling of a magmatic body, which was probably assembled over thousands of years and experienced internal segregation of eruptible lenses of magma (Christopher et al., 2015). To test this hypothesis, we performed thermal modelling to test if the cooling of a shallow magma body emplaced since 1990 could account for the monitoring signals observed at SHV. The results show that progressive cooling of a 4km3 volume of melt could explain the deformation rate currently observed. Using the deformation rate obtained from the modelling for the first 15 years of cooling, a reservoir volume of about 13 km3 (Paulatto et al., 2012) and a critical value of overpressure of 10 MPa, it would have taken approximately only 3 years to pressurise the reservoir to the critical pressure and restart magma extrusion. This is in agreement with the time interval between previous pauses at SHV before 2010. Considering the current deformation rates, we speculate that magma extrusion could restart in 6-8 years after the end of the last event in 2010, hence in the period 2016-2018. Because cooling affects mainly the outer portions of the magmatic reservoir, pressurisation by cooling and crystallisation lead to the release of magma from the inner part of the reservoir with essentially constant composition, as observed at SHV over the last 20 years. REFERENCES Caricchi, L., Biggs, J., Annen, C., & Ebmeier, S. (2014). Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 388, 166-174. doi.org/10.1016/j.epsl.2013.12.002. Christopher, T. E., Blundy, J., Cashman, K., Cole, P., Edmonds, M., Smith, P. J., et al. (2015). Geochemistry Geophysics Geosystems, 16(9), 2797-2811. doi.org/10.1002/2015GC005791. Paulatto, M., Annen, C., Henstock, T. J., Kiddle, E., Minshull, T. A., Sparks, R. S. J., & Voight, B. (2012). Geochemistry Geophysics Geosystems, 13(1), doi.org/10.1029/2011GC003892. Tait, S., Jaupart, C., & Vergniolle, S. (1989). Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 92(1), 107-123. doi.org/10.1016/0012-821X(89)90025-3

  19. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Crassostrea rhizophorae and Cathorops spixii from the Caroni Swamp, Trinidad, West Indies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanhai, La Daana K; Gobin, Judith F; Beckles, Denise M; Lauckner, Bruce; Mohammed, Azad

    2015-01-01

    Dietary exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) may pose serious threats to human health. However, within the Caribbean, quantitative assessments regarding the risks associated with dietary PAH exposure remain sparse. This study investigated PAH presence in edible biota from the Caroni Swamp and quantitatively assessed the potential health threat to human consumers. Mangrove oysters (Crassostrea rhizophorae) and Madamango sea catfish (Cathorops spixii) collected from seven sites in the Caroni Swamp were analysed for 16 priority PAHs. Total PAH levels ranged from 109 ± 18.4 to 362 ± 63.0 ng/g dry wt. in Crassostrea rhizophorae and 7.5 ± 0.9 to 43.5 ± 25.5 ng/g dry wt. in Cathorops spixii (average ± standard deviation). Benzo[a]pyrene levels in Crassostrea rhizophorae at all sites exceeded international guidelines from British Colombia (Canada) and the European Union (EU). Incremental lifetime cancer risk (ILCR) values based on the ingestion of Crassostrea rhizophorae ranged from 8.4 × 10(-6) to 1.6 × 10(-5) and slightly exceeded the commonly used 1 × 10(-6) acceptable level of risk. Information from this study is important in understanding the potential health risks posed by PAHs, it is critical towards the protection of public health, and it serves as a useful baseline for comparison with future work.

  20. Gas and particle emissions from Soufrière Hills Volcano, Montserrat, West Indies: characterization and health hazard assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Andrew G.; Baxter, Peter J.; Ottley, Christopher J.

    The Soufrière Hills Volcano, Montserrat, erupting since 18 July 1995, intensified its degassing in early 1996 with the continuing growth of the lava dome inside the summit crater. During this period of increased activity, between 11 and 18 March 1996, we measured gases and particles within the visible plume to determine whether at that time it posed a health risk to the population of Plymouth, the capital town, which is 5km southwest (downwind) and was then still occupied. Gravimetric measurements were made of total suspended particles (TSP) and particles having an aerodynamic diameter of less than 10μm (PM10). Measurements were made of sulphur dioxide (SO2), hydrochloric acid (HCl), hydrofluoric acid (HF), nitric acid (HNO3), acetic acid (CH3COOH), formic acid (HCOOH), and particulate sulphate (SO42-), chloride (Cl-), nitrate (NO3-), fluoride (F-), methanesulphonate (CH3SO3-), acetate (CH3COO-), formate (HCOO-), ammonium (NH4+), sodium (Na+) and acidity (H+). Trace metals having human health implications [chromium (Cr), nickel (Ni), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), arsenic (As), selenium (Se), cadmium (Cd), tin (Sn), mercury (Hg) and lead (Pb)] were also determined. Mean concentrations of HCl, SO2 and HF obtained in the town of Plymouth were 14.0, 5.9 and 0.8ppbv, respectively. Corresponding concentrations in the mixed plume on the crater edge were 533, 168 and 22ppbv. There were no direct emissions of HNO3, although nitrate was detected in coarse particles at the source. Higher concentrations of CH3COOH and HCOOH were measured close to the crater. Mean TSP and PM10 were 64 and 15μgm-3 in Plymouth, and 455 and 47μgm-3 on the upper volcano slope. Aerosols were highly acidic at the source but rapidly neutralised during transport. Trace metals were enriched in the aerosol relative to crater surface material. The concentrations of the acid gases, sulphur dioxide in particular, and particles were found to be too small to pose a health hazard at the time of these measurements, when relatively modest volcanic activity was occurring.

  1. Physician behaviour for antimicrobial prescribing for paediatric upper respiratory tract infections: a survey in general practice in Trinidad, West Indies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramdhanie Joseph

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs are among the most frequent reasons for physician office visits in paediatrics. Despite their predominant viral aetiology, URTIs continue to be treated with antimicrobials. We explored general practitioners' (GPs prescribing behaviour for antimicrobials in children (≤ 16 years with URTIs in Trinidad, using the guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC as a reference. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted on 92 consenting GPs from the 109 contacted in Central and East Trinidad, between January to June 2003. Using a pilot-tested questionnaire, GPs identified the 5 most frequent URTIs they see in office and reported on their antimicrobial prescribing practices for these URTIs to trained research students. Results The 5 most frequent URTIs presenting in children in general practice, are the common cold, pharyngitis, tonsillitis, sinusitis and acute otitis media (AOM in rank order. GPs prescribe at least 25 different antibiotics for these URTIs with significant associations for amoxicillin, co-amoxiclav, cefaclor, cefuroxime, erythromycin, clarithromycin and azithromycin (p 30 years were more likely to prescribe antibiotics for the common cold (p = 0.014. Severity (95.7% and duration of illness (82.5% influenced doctors' prescribing and over prescribing in general practice was attributed to parent demands (75% and concern for secondary bacterial infections (70%. Physicians do not request laboratory investigations primarily because they are unnecessary (86% and the waiting time for results is too long (51%. Conclusions Antibiotics are over prescribed for paediatric URTIs in Trinidad and amoxicillin with co-amoxiclav were preferentially prescribed. Except for AOM, GPs' prescribing varied from the CDC guidelines for drug and duration. Physicians recognise antibiotics are overused and consider parents expecting antibiotics and a concern for secondary bacterial infections are prescribing pressures. Guidelines to manage URTIs, ongoing surveillance programs for antibiotic resistance, public health education on non-antibiotic strategies, and postgraduate education for rational pharmacotherapy in general practice would decrease inappropriate antibiotic use in URTIs.

  2. Using cGPS to estimate the magma budget for Soufrière Hills volcano, Montserrat, West Indies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collinson, Amy; Neuberg, Jurgen; Pascal, Karen

    2017-04-01

    For over 20 years, Soufrière Hills Volcano, Montserrat has been in a state of volcanic unrest. Intermittent periods of dome building have been punctuated by explosive eruptions and dome collapse events, endangering the lives of the inhabitants of the island. The last episode of active magma extrusion was in February 2010, and the last explosive event (ash venting) in March 2012. Despite a lack of recent eruptive activity, the volcano continues to emit significant volumes of SO2 and shows an ongoing trend of island inflation as indicated by cGPS. Through the aid of three-dimensional numerical modelling, using a finite element method, we model the cGPS data to explore the potential sources of the ongoing island deformation. We consider both magmatic (dykes and chambers) and tectonic sources which result in entirely different interpretations: Whilst a magmatic source suggests the possibility for further eruption, a tectonic source may indicate cessation of volcanic activity. We investigate the effects that different sources (shapes, characters and depths) have on the surface displacement. We demonstrate that whilst a tectonic contribution cannot be completely discounted, the dominant source is magmatic. Consequently, we define a best-fit model which we use to assess the source volume change, and therefore, the potential current magma budget. Based on the similarity in the relative displacement between the cGPS stations at every episode of the eruption, we assume that the displacement for all Phases and Pauses can be explained by the same basic source. Therefore, we interpret the cGPS data with our source model for all the preceding Pauses and Phases to estimate the magma budget feeding the entire eruption. Subsequently, we derive important insights into the potential future eruptive behaviour of the volcano.

  3. Land-based nutrient enrichment of the Buccoo Reef Complex and fringing coral reefs of Tobago, West Indies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapointe, Brian E; Langton, Richard; Bedford, Bradley J; Potts, Arthur C; Day, Owen; Hu, Chuanmin

    2010-03-01

    Tobago's fringing coral reefs (FR) and Buccoo Reef Complex (BRC) can be affected locally by wastewater and stormwater, and regionally by the Orinoco River. In 2001, seasonal effects of these inputs on water-column nutrients and phytoplankton (Chl a), macroalgal C:N:P and delta(15)N values, and biocover at FR and BRC sites were examined. Dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN, particularly ammonium) increased and soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) decreased from the dry to wet season. Wet season satellite and Chl a data showed that Orinoco runoff reaching Tobago contained chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) but little Chl a, suggesting minimal riverine nutrient transport to Tobago. C:N ratios were lower (16 vs. 21) and macroalgal delta(15)N values higher (6.6 per thousand vs. 5.5 per thousand) in the BRC vs. FR, indicating relatively more wastewater N in the BRC. High macroalgae and low coral cover in the BRC further indicated that better wastewater treatment could improve the health of Tobago's coral reefs. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Pesticide regulation, utilization, and retailers' selling practices in Trinidad and Tobago, West Indies: current situation and needed changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto Pereira, Lexley M; Boysielal, Kim; Siung-Chang, Avril

    2007-08-01

    To explore pesticide regulation in Trinidad and Tobago, and to ascertain pesticide utilization and retailers' selling practices on Trinidad, which is the larger of twin islands that constitute the republic of Trinidad and Tobago. Between February and June 2005, agrochemical retailers in Trinidad were surveyed about the most frequently sold pesticides and their knowledge and practices of pesticide sale. The Poisons and Toxic Chemicals Control Board of the Ministry of Health informed on legislature. Of 107 actively trading licensed pesticide outlets, 97 participated (91% response rate) in the survey. Currently only 2.9% (21) of 720 registered products from four chemical classes are frequently utilized. Paraquat, methomyl, and alpha-cypermethrin (respective trade names are Gramoxone, Lannate, and Fastac) from World Health Organization (WHO) Hazard Classes I and II, and glyphosate isopropylamine (Swiper, Class U) are the most frequently purchased pesticides. Pet shops constitute 39.2% (38) of retail shops selling pesticides. No regulations guide pesticide sale to agriculturists, and children may purchase them. Inadequate human and technical resources render legislative controls ineffective and disciplinary action against offenders is weak. Extensive governmental resources are employed in legislative procedures and product approval for the very low, 2.9% utilization rate, negatively impacting on monitoring pesticide sales. The Poisons Information Centre (PIC) does not liaise with the Poisons and Toxic Chemicals Control Board or provide educational interventions for the community. As a result of this survey, it was possible to develop the first database to include the chemical, brand, and colloquial names of pesticides used in Trinidad and Tobago; WHO classification of approved pesticides; manufacturers; packaging; and antidotes and their availability for use by the Board and health professionals in Trinidad. Urgent critical evaluation of legislation regarding pesticide imports and use, and partnership with the Rotterdam Convention are recommended for Trinidad and Tobago. A strengthened Poisons Information Centre can provide educational initiatives and information on early management of pesticide exposure.

  5. Prevalence, serovars, and antimicrobial susceptibility of Salmonella isolated from blue land crabs (Cardisoma guanhumi) in Grenada, West Indies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Ross; Hariharan, Harry; Matthew, Vanessa; Chappell, Sam; Davies, Rob; Parker, Regina; Sharma, Andravindra

    2013-07-01

    Samples of intestine and hepatopancreas from 65 blue land crabs (Cardisoma guanhumi), a crustacean commonly consumed as a food item in Grenada, were collected from six geographic sites in Grenada and tested for Salmonella by enrichment and selective culture. The individual animal prevalence of Salmonella based on isolation was 17% (11 of 65), and all infected crabs were from three of the six sampled locations. Isolates were identified by serotyping as Salmonella enterica serovars Saintpaul (n = 6), Montevideo (n = 4), and Newport (n = 1). The intestines of all 11 infected crabs were positive for Salmonella, but only 7 of 11 hepatopancreas samples were positive for Salmonella, and these isolates were the same serovar as isolated from the matching intestine. These three Salmonella serovars are known to cause human illness in many countries, and in the Caribbean Salmonella Saintpaul has been frequently isolated from humans. In a disc diffusion assay, all isolates were susceptible to all 11 drugs tested: amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, ampicillin, cephalothin, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, imipenem, neomycin, streptomycin, tetracycline, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. To our knowledge, this report is the first concerning isolation and antimicrobial susceptibilities of Salmonella serotypes from the blue land crab.

  6. Virological surveillance of dengue in Saint Martin and Saint Barthelemy, French West Indies, using blood samples on filter paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheus, Séverine; Chappert, Jean-Loup; Cassadou, Sylvie; Berger, Franck; Labeau, Bhetty; Bremand, Laetitia; Winicki, Alain; Huc-Anais, Patricia; Quenel, Philippe; Dussart, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    To strengthen active dengue surveillance in Saint Martin and Saint Barthélemy, two French Caribbean islands, we evaluated the epidemiological usefulness of collecting blood samples from NS1-positive dengue patients on filter paper to identify the dengue serotypes circulating in these regions during a 27-month period. This approach allowed dengue serotypes to be identified by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction in 90.1% of the total set of 666 samples analyzed and, in 95.5% of the samples collected during the acute phase of the disease. This prospective virological surveillance using blood samples absorbed onto filter paper, which were stored at 4°C and shipped at ambient temperature to a specialized laboratory for analysis, allowed us to avoid the logistic and financial costs associated with shipping frozen venous blood samples. This surveillance system offers a low-cost alternative for reinforcing dengue prevention in areas where specialized laboratories do not exist, notably by facilitating the early detection of potentially new dengue serotypes.

  7. Isolation and molecular characterization of Acanthamoeba genotypes in recreational and domestic water sources from Jamaica, West Indies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Cheridah D; Reyes-Batlle, María; Piñero, José E; Martínez-Carretero, Enrique; Valladares, Basilio; Streete, Don; Lorenzo-Morales, Jacob; Lindo, John F

    2015-09-01

    Free living amoebae (FLA) are amphizoic protozoa that are ubiquitous in nature. Infection with FLA may result in neurological, ocular and skin infections. Exposure to Acanthamoeba occurs frequently through water contact and knowledge of the presence of the organisms in water sources is important in understanding transmission dynamics. The distribution of Acanthamoeba was studied in recreational and domestic water samples collected from across Jamaica. Morphological assessment and polymerase chain reaction revealed Acanthamoeba spp. isolates in 50.6% (42/83) and 17.3% (14/81) of recreational and domestic water, respectively. Sequencing of the DF3 region of the 18S rDNA resulted in the identification of genotypes T3, T4, T5, T10 and T11 corresponding to Acanthamoeba spp: A. griffini, A. triangularis, A. lenticulata, A. culbertsoni and A. hatchetti. Moreover, T4 was the most frequently isolated genotype in both recreational and domestic water. Thermotolerance and osmotolerance assays indicated that most isolates were potentially pathogenic. This is the first report of T3 and T10 genotypes in the Caribbean and the first report of these Acanthamoeba spp. in Jamaican waters. The study shows that there is potential risk of infection to contact wearers who practise poor lens care. Further, Acanthamoeba should be considered as a cause of neurological infections in Jamaica.

  8. Artificial reefs and marine protected areas: a study in willingness to pay to access Folkestone Marine Reserve, Barbados, West Indies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkbride-Smith, Anne E; Wheeler, Philip M; Johnson, Magnus L

    2016-01-01

    Artificial reefs in marine protected areas provide additional habitat for biodiversity viewing, and therefore may offer an innovative management solution for managing for coral reef recovery and resilience. Marine park user fees can generate revenue to help manage and maintain natural and artificial reefs. Using a stated preference survey, this study investigates the present consumer surplus associated with visitor use of a marine protected area in Barbados. Two hypothetical markets were presented to differentiate between respondents use values of either: (a) natural reefs within the marine reserve or (b) artificial reef habitat for recreational enhancement. Information was also collected on visitors' perceptions of artificial reefs, reef material preferences and reef conservation awareness. From a sample of 250 visitors on snorkel trips, we estimate a mean willingness to pay of US$18.33 (median-US$15) for natural reef use and a mean value of US$17.58 (median-US$12.50) for artificial reef use. The number of marine species viewed, age of respondent, familiarity with the Folkestone Marine Reserve and level of environmental concern were statistically significant in influencing willingness to pay. Regression analyses indicate visitors are willing to pay a significant amount to view marine life, especially turtles. Our results suggest that user fees could provide a considerable source of income to aid reef conservation in Barbados. In addition, the substantial use value reported for artificial reefs indicates a reef substitution policy may be supported by visitors to the Folkestone Marine Reserve. We discuss our findings and highlight directions for future research that include the need to collect data to establish visitors' non-use values to fund reef management.

  9. An Exploratory Study on the Impact of Domestic Violence on the Families in Trinidad and Tobago, the West Indies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Emmanuel Janagan

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the impact of domestic violence on the economic condition of the families. This cross-sectional study utilized a non-probability sampling procedure (purposive sampling) that included 30 women who have sought services from the Coalition Against Domestic Violence Agency. Data were collected using a questionnaire, which was comprised of 21 questions. The questions sought information on socioeconomic conditions and impact on domestic violence on the financial position. The study revealed that more of domestic violence victims were at an early age. Recommendations for future research include identifying the major causes for family disorganization and break down in the families arise out of domestic violence and other associated factors where explored while emphasizing the importance of family-based programs that minimize the impact.

  10. Field efficacy of new larvicide products for control of multi-resistant Aedes aegypti populations in Martinique (French West Indies).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcombe, Sébastien; Darriet, Frédéric; Agnew, Philip; Etienne, Manuel; Yp-Tcha, Marie-Michelle; Yébakima, André; Corbel, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    World-wide dengue vector control is hampered by the spread of insecticide resistance in Aedes aegypti. We report the resistance status of a wild Ae. aegypti population from Martinique (Vauclin) to conventional larvicides (Bacillus thuringiensis var israeliensis [Bti] and temephos) and potential alternatives (spinosad, diflubenzuron, and pyriproxyfen). The efficacy and residual activity of these insecticides were evaluated under simulated and field conditions. The Vauclin strain exhibited a high level of resistance to temephos, a tolerance to insect growth regulators, and full susceptibility to spinosad and Bti. In simulated trials, pyriproxyfen and Bti showed long residual activities in permanent breeding containers (28 and 37 weeks), whereas under field conditions they failed to curtail Ae. aegypti populations after four weeks. Conversely, diflubenzuron and spinosad showed a residual efficacy of 16 weeks, suggesting that these chemicals may be promising alternatives to Bti and temephos for controlling insecticide-resistant Ae. aegypti populations.

  11. Field Efficacy of New Larvicide Products for Control of Multi-Resistant Aedes aegypti Populations in Martinique (French West Indies)

    OpenAIRE

    Marcombe, Sébastien; Darriet, Frédéric; Agnew, Philip; Etienne, Manuel; Yp-Tcha, Marie-Michelle; Yébakima, André; Corbel, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    World-wide dengue vector control is hampered by the spread of insecticide resistance in Aedes aegypti. We report the resistance status of a wild Ae. aegypti population from Martinique (Vauclin) to conventional larvicides (Bacillus thuringiensis var israeliensis [Bti] and temephos) and potential alternatives (spinosad, diflubenzuron, and pyriproxyfen). The efficacy and residual activity of these insecticides were evaluated under simulated and field conditions. The Vauclin strain exhibited a hi...

  12. Artificial reefs and marine protected areas: a study in willingness to pay to access Folkestone Marine Reserve, Barbados, West Indies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Philip M.; Johnson, Magnus L.

    2016-01-01

    Artificial reefs in marine protected areas provide additional habitat for biodiversity viewing, and therefore may offer an innovative management solution for managing for coral reef recovery and resilience. Marine park user fees can generate revenue to help manage and maintain natural and artificial reefs. Using a stated preference survey, this study investigates the present consumer surplus associated with visitor use of a marine protected area in Barbados. Two hypothetical markets were presented to differentiate between respondents use values of either: (a) natural reefs within the marine reserve or (b) artificial reef habitat for recreational enhancement. Information was also collected on visitors’ perceptions of artificial reefs, reef material preferences and reef conservation awareness. From a sample of 250 visitors on snorkel trips, we estimate a mean willingness to pay of US$18.33 (median—US$15) for natural reef use and a mean value of US$17.58 (median—US$12.50) for artificial reef use. The number of marine species viewed, age of respondent, familiarity with the Folkestone Marine Reserve and level of environmental concern were statistically significant in influencing willingness to pay. Regression analyses indicate visitors are willing to pay a significant amount to view marine life, especially turtles. Our results suggest that user fees could provide a considerable source of income to aid reef conservation in Barbados. In addition, the substantial use value reported for artificial reefs indicates a reef substitution policy may be supported by visitors to the Folkestone Marine Reserve. We discuss our findings and highlight directions for future research that include the need to collect data to establish visitors’ non-use values to fund reef management. PMID:27547521

  13. Ostracoda (Arthropoda, Crustacea) in a Miocene oxygen minimum zone, Trinidad, West Indies: A test of the Platycopid Signal Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Brent; Coimbra, João C.; Hayek, Lee-Ann C.

    2014-10-01

    Studies of Recent ostracodes around the area of South America shed little light on the paleoenvironmental interpretation of Miocene assemblages. Consequently, interpretations of the Miocene ostracode assemblages must be supplemented using evidence from better documented taxa. Benthic foraminifera in samples from the Lower to Middle Miocene Brasso Formation at Brasso Village, Trinidad, have previously been used to distinguish three sample groupings (Beneath, Within and Above) around an oxygen minimum zone (OMZ), this being a layer of water within which dissolved oxygen concentrations can be as low as 0.1-1.0 mL/L. Using these same samples and the foraminiferal assemblage demarcations relative to the OMZ, this paper examines the associated and rich ostracode fauna of the Brasso Formation. The mean recovery of ostracode valves per sample was approximately three times greater in the Within OMZ sample group than in either of the Beneath OMZ or Above OMZ groups, perhaps reflecting the exclusion of macro-predators from within the OMZ. Individual rarefaction of species richness S to N = 300 valves was conducted for each sample group. This showed that S did not differ between the sample groups, ranging from 22.4 to 24.8. We used all ostracode species to model group separation. Based upon the Mahalanobis' criterion, we obtained significant group separation using a model with four taxa: Munseyella ex gr. minuta, Argilloecia posterotruncata, Munseyella sp. and Xestoleberis sp., while a fifth, Argilloecia spp., provided a significant but minor increase in separation probabilities over all groups. The two most abundant species (Bradleya sp., Gangamocytheridea reticulata) were thus not the best species for detecting the OMZ. Platycopid ostracodes of the genus Cytherella were found throughout the section, rather than concentrated within the OMZ, which contradicts the Platycopid Signal Hypothesis that OMZs are characterized by platycopid dominance. The total distribution and turnover of both ostracodal and foraminiferal assemblages were compared and contrasted quantitatively using a total assemblage turnover index (ATI) and the paleoenvironmental importance evaluated. The correlated between-sample ATI is for both groups lowest within the OMZ.

  14. The demise of a major Acropora palmata bank-barrier reef off the southeast coast of Barbados, West Indies

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacIntyre, I. G.; Glynn, P. W.; Toscano, M. A.

    2007-12-01

    Formerly attributed to human activity, the demise of a bank-barrier reef off southeastern Barbados known as Cobbler’s Reef is now thought to be largely the result of late Holocene, millennial-scale storm damage. Eleven surface samples of the reef crest coral Acropora palmata from nine sites along its 15-km length plot above the western Atlantic sea-level curve from 3,000 to 4,500 cal years ago (calibrated, calendar 14C years). These elevated clusters suggest that the reef complex suffered extensive storm damage during this period. The constant heavy wave action typical of this area and consequent low herbivory maintain conditions favoring algal growth, thereby limiting the reestablishment of post-storm reef framework. Site descriptions and detailed line surveys show a surface now composed mainly of reworked fragments of A. palmata covered with algal turf, macroalgae and crustose coralline algae. The reef contains no live A. palmata and only a few scattered coral colonies consisting primarily of Diploria spp . and Porites astreoides, along with the hydrocoral Millepora complanata. A few in situ framework dates plot at expected depths for normal coral growth below the sea-level curve during and after the period of intense storm activity. The most recent of these in situ samples are 320 and 400 cal years old. Corals of this late period likely succumbed to high turbidity associated with land clearance for sugarcane agriculture in the mid-1600s.

  15. A new species of living glass-scallop, genus Similipecten (Bivalvia, Propeamussiidae), from the Bahama Islands (West Indies)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, H.H.

    2002-01-01

    Introduction Redfern described and figured a propeamussiid species (as Cyclopecten sp.) from the Bahama Islands, which he compared with Cyclopecten nanus Verril & Bush in Verrill, 1897,known from the sub-tropical and tropical western Atlantic. In fact, both species are more morphologically related t

  16. The genus Brechmorhoga Kirby, 1894, in the West Indies, with a proposed new status for Brechmorhoga archboldi (Donnelly) (Odonata; Libellulidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meurgey, François

    2016-02-10

    A revision of the species of Brechmorhoga from the Lesser Antilles includes Brechmorhoga archboldi (Donnelly, 1970) and Brechmorhoga praecox grenadensis Kirby, 1894. New distribution records are provided. Brechmorhoga archboldi is synonymized with B. praecox grenadensis. Figures, morphological characters of both sexes and the description of the female of B. p. grenadensis are given.

  17. Prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility of Salmonella spp. in small Indian mongooses (Herpestes auropunctatus) in Grenada, West Indies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Steven; Amadi, Victor; Stone, Diana; Johnson, Roger; Hariharan, Harry; Zieger, Ulrike

    2014-09-01

    Intestinal samples from 156 small Indian mongooses (Herpestes auropunctatus) collected island-wide in Grenada from April 2011 to March 2013 were examined for the presence of Salmonella enterica spp. Nineteen (12%) mongooses were culture-positive for S. enterica spp. of which five serotypes were identified. Salmonella javiana and S. Montevideo were the most commonly isolated serotypes. The other serotypes isolated were S. Rubislaw, S. Panama and S. Arechavaleta. All isolates were susceptible to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, ampicillin, cefotaxime, ceftazidime, ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin, gentamicin, nalidixic acid, imipenem and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. One isolate (S. Montevideo) showed resistance to tetracycline and intermediate resistance to streptomycin. The five isolated Salmonella serotypes are potential human pathogens suggesting that the mongoose may play a role in the epidemiology of human salmonellosis in Grenada.

  18. Prevalence of Salmonella spp. and thermophilic Campylobacter spp. in the small Asian mongoose (Herpestes javanicus) in Barbados, West Indies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhynd, Kamara J R; Leighton, Patrick A; Elcock, David A; Whitehall, Pamela J; Rycroft, Andrew; Macgregor, Shaheed K

    2014-12-01

    From April to July 2005, rectal swabs were collected from 48 free-ranging small Asian mongooses (Herpestes javanicus) on the east and south coasts of Barbados and analyzed for Salmonella and Campylobacter spp. Salmonella was recovered in 21.12% (7/33) of mongooses at the east-coast site and 26.67% (4/15) at the south-coast site. Four serotypes were isolated: Salmonella enterica serovar Rubislaw, Kentucky, Javiana, and Panama. One east-coast sample of 11 tested for Campylobacter was positive (9.09%). These results indicate that mongooses in Barbados are carriers and shedders of Salmonella and Campylobacter spp. and are a potential wildlife reservoir for these enteropathogens.

  19. Proportions of eggs laid by Aedes aegypti on different substrates within an ovitrap in Trinidad, West Indies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadee, D D; Corbet, P S; Talbot, H

    1995-01-01

    Ovitraps were exposed outdoors during wet and dry seasons in Trinidad to determine the proportions of eggs laid on three substrates: the widely-used hardboard 'paddle' (P), the water surface (W) and the inside surface of the ovitrap wall (S) in three types of blackened ovitrap: round, glass (RG), round, plastic (RP) and rectangular, plastic (SP). Of the 3556 eggs obtained, most (86.4%) were laid during the wet season when statistically significant differences were detected between substrates but not between ovitrap types. Most eggs (> 80%) were laid on P, significantly fewer (P ovitraps are discussed.

  20. Epiphyte communities on Thalassia testudinum from Grand Cayman, British West Indies: Their composition, structure, and contribution to lagoonal sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corlett, Hilary; Jones, Brian

    2007-02-01

    Thalassia testudinum, the most common seagrass found in lagoons around Grand Cayman, influences sedimentation by baffling currents, binding sediment on the seafloor, and providing substrates for a diverse epiphytic biota. About 85% of the epiphytic biota is formed of at least 3 species of coralline algae, 72 species of foraminifera, and 61 species of diatoms. The rest of the biota is formed of sponges, gastropods, ostracods, coccoliths, dinoflagellates, brown algae, and worms. The epiphytes are organized in three communities that are part of an organized tripartite community succession. The basal diatom community is overlain by the coralline algae community, which is then overlain by a community composed of a variety of taxa. The coralline algae community, which is the most extensive, typically covers ˜ 75% of the leaf's surface. Potentially, the skeletons of these epiphytes can make a significant contribution to the fine-grained sediment budget of these lagoons. Surprisingly, only a few of the epiphytes were found in the lagoonal sediment. It appears, therefore, that the epiphytes are lost through skeletal dissolution or transported out of the lagoon following storms. Irrespective of the cause, the epiphytes do not form a significant part of the lagoon sediment in Grand Cayman.

  1. Constitution and Enrichment of the Cousins Hereward Postcard Collection at the University of the West Indies Mona Library: Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr-Campbell, Maureen; Salmon, Frances

    2013-01-01

    The incorporation of visual resources in academia is becoming increasingly popular. The Cousins Hereward Postcard Collection comprises 212 postcards that depict social, historical, cultural, and economic activities in Jamaica during the period 1900-1912. Illustrations include social conditions of the working class and peasantry, natural history…

  2. Editorial: Global in scope and regionally rich: an IndiSeas workshop helps shape the future of marine ecosystem indicators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shin, Y.J.; Bundy, A.; Piet, G.J.

    2012-01-01

    This report summarizes the outcomes of an IndiSeas workshop aimed at using ecosystem indicators to evaluate the status of the world’s exploited marine ecosystems in support of an ecosystem approach to fisheries, and global policy drivers such as the 2020 targets of the Convention on Biological Diver

  3. Crash protection of stock car racing drivers--application of biomechanical analysis of Indy car crash research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melvin, John W; Begeman, Paul C; Faller, Ronald K; Sicking, Dean L; McClellan, Scott B; Maynard, Edwin; Donegan, Michael W; Mallott, Annette M; Gideon, Thomas W

    2006-11-01

    Biomechanical analysis of Indy car crashes using on-board impact recorders (Melvin et al. 1998, Melvin et al. 2001) indicates that Indy car driver protection in high-energy crashes can be achieved in frontal, side, and rear crashes with severities in the range of 100 to 135 G peak deceleration and velocity changes in the range of 50 to 70 mph. These crashes were predominantly single-car impacts with the rigid concrete walls of oval tracks. This impressive level of protection was found to be due to the unique combination of a very supportive and tight-fitting cockpit-seating package, a six-point belt restraint system, and effective head padding with an extremely strong chassis that defines the seat and cockpit of a modern Indy car. In 2000 and 2001, a series of fatal crashes in stock car racing created great concern for improving the crash protection for drivers in those racecars. Unlike the Indy car, the typical racing stock car features a more spacious driver cockpit due to its resemblance to the shape of a passenger car. The typical racing seat used in stock cars did not have the same configuration or support characteristics of the Indy car seat, and five-point belt restraints were used. The tubular steel space frame chassis of a stock car also differs from an Indy car's composite chassis structure in both form and mechanical behavior. This paper describes the application of results of the biomechanical analysis of the Indy car crash studies to the unique requirements of stock car racing driver crash protection. Sled test and full-scale crash test data using both Hybrid III frontal crash anthropomorphic test devices (ATDs) and BioSID side crash ATDs for the purpose of evaluating countermeasures involving restraint systems, seats and head/neck restraints has been instrumental in guiding these developments. In addition, the development of deformable walls for oval tracks (the SAFER Barrier) is described as an adjunct to improved occupant restraint through control

  4. West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    With its vast expanses of sand, framed by mountain ranges and exposed rock, northwestern Africa makes a pretty picture when viewed from above. This image was acquired by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft. The Canary Islands can be seen on the left side of the image just off Africa's Atlantic shore. The light brown expanse running through the northern two thirds of the image is the Sahara Desert. The desert runs up against the dark brown Haut Atlas mountain range of Morocco in the northwest, the Atlantic Ocean to the west and the semi-arid (light brown pixels) Sahelian region in the South. The Sahara, however, isn't staying put. Since the 1960s, the desert has been expanding into the Sahelian region at a rate of up to 6 kilometers per year. In the 1980s this desert expansion, combined with over cultivation of the Sahel, caused a major famine across west Africa. Over the summer months, strong winds pick up sands from the Sahara and blow them across the Atlantic as far west as North America, causing air pollution in Miami and damaging coral reefs in the Bahamas and the Florida Keys. The white outlines on the map represent country borders. Starting at the top-most portion of the map and working clockwise, the countries shown are Morocco, Western Sahara, Mauritania, Senegal, Mali, Burkina Fasso, Nigeria, Mali (again), and Algeria. Image by Reto Stockli, Robert Simmon, and Brian Montgomery, NASA Earth Observatory, based on data from MODIS

  5. Phame: a novel phase metrology tool of Carl Zeiss for in-die phase measurements under scanner relevant optical settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlitz, Sascha; Buttgereit, Ute; Scherübl, Thomas

    2007-03-01

    Meeting the demands of the lithography mask manufacturing industry moving toward 45nm and 32nm node for in-die phase metrology on phase shifting masks, Zeiss is currently developing an optical phase measurement tool (Phame TM), providing the capability of extending process control from large CD test features to in-die phase shifting features with high spatial resolution. In collaboration with Intel, the necessity of designing this optical metrology tool according to the optical setup of a lithographic exposure tool (scanner) has been researched to be fundamental for the acquisition of phase information generated from features the size of the used wavelength. Main cause is the dependence of the image phase of a scanner on polarization and the angle of incidence of the illumination light due to rigorous effects, and on the imaging NA of the scanner due to the loss of phase information in the imaging pupil. The resulting scanner phase in the image plane only coincides with the etch-depth equivalent phase for large test features, exceeding the size of the in-die feature by an order of magnitude. In this paper we introduce the Phame TM phase metrology tool, using a 193nm light source with the optical capability of phase measurement at scanner NA up to the equivalent of a NA1.6 immersion scanner, under varying, scanner relevant angle of incidence for EAPSMs and CPLs, and with the possibility of polarizing the illuminating light. New options for phase shifting mask process control on in-die features will be outlined with first measurement results.

  6. Race, class, and gender: Debates over the character of social hierarchies in the Netherlands Indies, circa 1600–1942

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susie Protschky

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Review of: Ulbe Bosma, Indiëgangers: Verhalen van Nederlanders die naar Indië trokken. Amsterdam: Bert Bakker, 2010, 333 pp. ISBN 9789035135017. Price: EUR 26.50 (paperback.Ulbe Bosma and Remco Raben, Being ‘Dutch’ in the Indies: A history of creolisation and empire, 1500–1920. Translated from the Dutch by Wendie Shaffer. Athens and Singapore: Ohio University Press, NUS Press, 2008, xx + 439 pp. [Ohio University Research in International Studies Southeast Asia Series No. 116.] ISBN 9780896802612. Price: USD 22.40 (paperback. Eric Jones, Wives, slaves, and concubines: A history of the female underclass in Dutch Asia. DeKalb, Ill.: Northern Illinois University Press, 2010, xi + 186 pp. ISBN 9780875802101. Price: USD 38.00 (hardback. Jean Gelman Taylor, The social world of Batavia: Europeans and Eurasians in colonial Indonesia. Second Edition. Madison, Wisc.: University of Wisconsin Press, 2009, xxv + 279 pp. [First edition 1983.] ISBN 9780299232146. Price: USD 29.95 (paperback.Ann Laura Stoler, Along the archival grain: Epistemic anxieties and colonial common sense. Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2009, xiii + 314 pp. ISBN 9780691015774. Price USD 23.95 (paperback.

  7. IDENTIFICACIONES Y VINCULACIONES: UNA PROPUESTA DE INTERSECCIÓN PARA ANALIZAR LA MÚSICA INDIE DE LA CIUDAD DE LA PLATA (ARGENTINA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ornela Boix

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo examina el problema de las identificaciones musicales a partir de una aproximación etnográfica a la música indie de la ciudad argentina de La Plata, basada en observaciones y entrevistas con un grupo de sellos musicales. Realiza una revisión crítica de la literatura que asume un enfoque narrativo y entiende el indie como género musical asociado a la juventud de las clases medias. En este contexto, el artículo interroga los enfoques subculturalistas, donde el indie es un ethos o una actitud, y las perspectivas bourdieanas, para las cuales el indie es un recurso de distinción. El artículo muestra las limitaciones de es tos análisis y propone una relación de intersección entre la crítica contemporánea del concepto de identidad y una perspectiva sensible a las vinculaciones involucradas en la producción de música. Así, el artículo describe al indie de la ciudad de La Plata en sus vinculaciones específicas: con la universidad, con los lugares de performance, con las nuevas tecnologías, con la ciudad, con los instrumentos musicales. Para concluir, afirma que estos elementos deben incorporarse al estudio de las identificacione s musicales.

  8. Virus infections among young children--the first year of the INDIS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonen-Tikka, Marja-Leena; Klemola, Päivi; Suomenrinne, Sointu; Kaijalainen, Svetlana; Söderström, Daniela; Savolainen-Kopra, Carita; Näntö-Salonen, Kirsti; Ilonen, Jorma; Simell, Tuula; Simell, Olli; Roivainen, Merja

    2013-09-01

    The frequencies of early childhood infections were studied in healthy children with increased genetic risk for type 1 diabetes participating in the ongoing prospective high intensive infection follow-up Study, INDIS, started in 2009 in Turku, Finland. Here the results obtained from 160 stool to 160 nasal swab specimens collected in parallel at times of infectious symptoms in 2009-2010 from 45 children at the age of 24 months or younger are reported. The specimens were analyzed for enteric (human enterovirus, norovirus, rotavirus, sapovirus, astrovirus) and respiratory RNA viruses (human enterovirus and rhinovirus) common in early childhood, respectively, using highly validated virus-specific real-time PCR methods. According to the results 96% of the children had at least one virus infection during the study period and one or several viral agents were detected in 76% of sample sets. The most prevalent viral agents were human rhinovirus, enterovirus, parechovirus, and norovirus (genotype GII) with positive specimens 57.5%, 28.8%, 19.4%, and 6.9%, respectively. Other intestinal viruses were found in less than 2% of stool specimens. Single infections covered 40.0% of the specimens while multiple infections with two or more infectious agents were detected in 36.3% of specimens and altogether 11 combinations of viruses were included in the mixed infections. Although human enterovirus is known to be a frequent finding in stool specimens, especially during early childhood, it was found in this study more frequently in nasal swab specimens. Whether this is true, more general, in countries with the high hygiene level remains to be shown.

  9. Photography and the Making of a Popular, Colonial Monarchy in the Netherlands East Indies during Queen Wilhelmina’s Reign (1898-1948

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    Susie Protschky

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Photography and the Making of a Popular, Colonial MonarchyThe Netherlands East Indies during Queen Wilhelmina’s Reign(1898-1948Public celebrations in the Dutch East Indies (colonial Indonesia for the House of Orange during Queen Wilhelmina’s reign were of an historically unprecedented scale and frequency, regularly attended by large crowds and reported in newspapers. Scholars typically emphasize the leading role of colonial elites in orchestrating these festivals, and the symbolic importance of the monarchy as a  conservative institution that bound the colony to the metropole. The agency of spectators and non-elite participants, and the extent to which a popular ‘oranjegevoel’ (Orange-sentiment can be said to have existed in the colonies, remains to be demonstrated. This article uses a range of popular photographic sources – amateur photographs in personal albums, and published photographs of the Dutch monarchy in private collections as well as commemorative books – to examine the meanings that ordinary people in the Indies derived from engaging with the House of Orange through images. Susie Protschky argues that, for many Indies residents, photographs of royal celebrations and the Dutch monarchy enabled the cultivation of transnational networks and cosmopolitan identities, and integrated international events into colonial and family histories.Fotografie en de wording van een koloniale ‘volksmonarchie’. Nederlands-Indië ten tijde van koningin Wilhelmina (1898-1948 Openbare Oranjefeesten in Nederlands-Indië waren tijdens de regering van koningin Wilhelmina van een historisch ongekende omvang en frequentie. De feesten werden regelmatig bijgewoond door een groot publiek en er werd over geschreven in de kranten. Historici benadrukken meestal de leidende rol van de koloniale elite tijdens de organisatie van deze vieringen of de symbolische betekenis van de monarchie als een conservatieve instelling die de banden tussen kolonie en

  10. What's West Nile Virus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About Puberty Train Your Temper What's West Nile Virus? KidsHealth > For Kids > What's West Nile Virus? Print A A A en español ¿Qué es el Virus del Nilo Occidental? What exactly is the West ...

  11. Heavy and light money in the Netherlands Indies and the Dutch Republic: dilemmas of monetary management with unit of account systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolters, W.G.

    2008-01-01

    In its Asian operations the Dutch United East Indies Company (VOC) (1602–1798) acted both as a territorial ruler and as a trading company. The company shipped large amounts of precious metals to Asia, both in the form of bullion and as coins, to pay for its trade and to provide currency for the area

  12. Heavy and light money in the Netherlands Indies and the Dutch Republic: dilemmas of monetary management with unit of account systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolters, W.G.

    2008-01-01

    In its Asian operations the Dutch United East Indies Company (VOC) (1602–1798) acted both as a territorial ruler and as a trading company. The company shipped large amounts of precious metals to Asia, both in the form of bullion and as coins, to pay for its trade and to provide currency for the area

  13. Call From China West

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Wei; Guo Jin

    2008-01-01

    @@ The 12th East-West China Cooperation and Investment and Trade Fair was held from April 5 to 8 at the International Conference and Exhibition Center in Qu-jiang,Xi'an.Shaanxi province,in the west of China.

  14. First identification of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius strains among coagulase-positive staphylococci isolated from dogs with otitis externa in Trinidad, West Indies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Dziva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Otitis externa is a common inflammatory ear disease in dogs caused by a variety of pathogens, and coagulase-positive staphylococci are frequently isolated from such infections. Objective: To identify antimicrobial susceptibility profiles and methicillin-resistant strains among coagulase-positive staphylococci isolated from otitis externa in dogs. Methods: A cross-sectional study was performed over 2 years on 114 client-owned dogs presented to the Veterinary Teaching Hospital with a primary complaint of ear infections. Swabs were obtained from both ears and cultured for staphylococci which were subsequently confirmed as coagulase-positive using rabbit plasma. Antimicrobial susceptibility assays were assessed on all isolates followed by subsequent genetic analysis for species identification and detection of the mecA gene. Results: Sixty-five coagulase-positive staphylococci were isolated from 114 client-owned dogs. The isolates exhibited resistance against neomycin (58.5%, streptomycin (49.2%, penicillin (49.2%, polymyxin B (44.6%, tetracycline (36.9%, sulphamethoxazole/trimethoprim (33.8%, kanamycin (33.8%, doxycycline (32.3%, norfloxacin (23.1%, amoxicillin/clavulanate (20%, ciprofloxacin (20%, enrofloxacin (18.5%, gentamicin (16.9%, and cephalothin (9.2%. Forty (61.5% of the isolates were resistant to at least three or more antimicrobials and 10 were sensitive to all. Using a multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay based on species-specific regions of the thermonuclease (nuc gene, 38/65 (58.5% isolates were classified as Staphylococcus aureus, 23/65 (35.4% as S. pseudintermedius, 2/65 (3.1% as S. intermedius, and 2/65 (3.1% as S. schleiferi. Analysis for the mecA gene revealed two positive isolates of S. pseudintermedius which were oxacillin-resistant, representing a first report of such organisms in the Caribbean. Conclusion: Despite the relatively high prevalence of multidrug-resistant coagulase-positive staphylococci in Trinidad, these are largely susceptible to gentamicin consistent with use in clinical practice. The first detection of methicillin-resistant S. pseudintermedius (MRSP in dogs is likely to have implications on the treatment options for otitis externa in dogs and potential public health significance.

  15. First identification of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius strains among coagulase-positive staphylococci isolated from dogs with otitis externa in Trinidad, West Indies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziva, Francis; Wint, Crystal; Auguste, Tennille; Heeraman, Carolyn; Dacon, Cherrelle; Yu, Priscilla; Koma, Lee M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Otitis externa is a common inflammatory ear disease in dogs caused by a variety of pathogens, and coagulase-positive staphylococci are frequently isolated from such infections. Objective To identify antimicrobial susceptibility profiles and methicillin-resistant strains among coagulase-positive staphylococci isolated from otitis externa in dogs. Methods A cross-sectional study was performed over 2 years on 114 client-owned dogs presented to the Veterinary Teaching Hospital with a primary complaint of ear infections. Swabs were obtained from both ears and cultured for staphylococci which were subsequently confirmed as coagulase-positive using rabbit plasma. Antimicrobial susceptibility assays were assessed on all isolates followed by subsequent genetic analysis for species identification and detection of the mecA gene. Results Sixty-five coagulase-positive staphylococci were isolated from 114 client-owned dogs. The isolates exhibited resistance against neomycin (58.5%), streptomycin (49.2%), penicillin (49.2%), polymyxin B (44.6%), tetracycline (36.9%), sulphamethoxazole/trimethoprim (33.8%), kanamycin (33.8%), doxycycline (32.3%), norfloxacin (23.1%), amoxicillin/clavulanate (20%), ciprofloxacin (20%), enrofloxacin (18.5%), gentamicin (16.9%), and cephalothin (9.2%). Forty (61.5%) of the isolates were resistant to at least three or more antimicrobials and 10 were sensitive to all. Using a multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay based on species-specific regions of the thermonuclease (nuc) gene, 38/65 (58.5%) isolates were classified as Staphylococcus aureus, 23/65 (35.4%) as S. pseudintermedius, 2/65 (3.1%) as S. intermedius, and 2/65 (3.1%) as S. schleiferi. Analysis for the mecA gene revealed two positive isolates of S. pseudintermedius which were oxacillin-resistant, representing a first report of such organisms in the Caribbean. Conclusion Despite the relatively high prevalence of multidrug-resistant coagulase-positive staphylococci in Trinidad, these are largely susceptible to gentamicin consistent with use in clinical practice. The first detection of methicillin-resistant S. pseudintermedius (MRSP) in dogs is likely to have implications on the treatment options for otitis externa in dogs and potential public health significance. PMID:26715379

  16. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii and concurrent bartonella spp., feline immunodeficiency virus, and feline leukemia infections in cats from Grenada, West Indies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toxoplasma gondii and Bartonella spp. are zoonotic pathogens of cats. Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV), and Feline Leukemia Virus (FeLv) are related to Human Iimmunodeficiency Virus, and Human Leukemia Virus, respectively, and these viruses are immunosuppressive. In the present study, the prevale...

  17. Guide to the Identification and Geographic Distribution of Lutzomyia Sand Flies in Mexico, the West Indies, Central and South America (Diptera:Psychodidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-03-31

    is a zoonosis . Hertig (1948b) isolated Bartonella bacilliformis from the blood of a wild mouse, Phyllotis sp., in Peru but later attempts to find...flies. Symptoms of human illness usually resemble influenza , with fever, retro-orbital pain, myalgia, and malaise. Complete recovery within a week is

  18. Relationships between past and present pesticide applications and pollution at a watershed outlet: The case of a horticultural catchment in Martinique, French West Indies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottes, Charles; Lesueur Jannoyer, Magalie; Le Bail, Marianne; Guéné, Mathilde; Carles, Céline; Malézieux, Eric

    2017-10-01

    The understanding of factors affecting pesticide transfers to catchment outlet is still at a very early stage in tropical context, and especially on tropical volcanic context. We performed on-farm pesticide use surveys during 87 weeks and monitored pesticides in water weekly during 67 weeks at the outlet of a small catchment in Martinique. We identified three types of pollution. First, we showed long-term chronic pollution by chlordecone, diuron and metolachlor resulting from horticultural practices applied 5-20 years ago (quantification frequency higher than 80%). Second, we showed peak pollution. High amounts of propiconazole and fosthiazate applied at low frequencies caused river pollution peaks for weeks following a single application. Low amounts of diquat and diazinon applied at low frequencies also caused pollution peaks. The high amounts of glyphosate applied at high frequency resulted into pollution peaks by glyphosate and aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) in 6 and 20% of the weeks. Any intensification of their uses will result in higher pollution levels. Third, relatively low amounts of glufosinate-ammonium, difenoconazol, spinosad and metaldehyde were applied at high frequencies. Unexpectedly, such pesticides remained barely detected (pollution of shallow aquifers alimenting surface water. We prove that to avoid the past errors and decrease the risk of long-term pollution of water resources, it is urgent to reduce or stop the use of pesticides with leaching potential by changing agricultural practices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. First identification of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius strains among coagulase-positive staphylococci isolated from dogs with otitis externa in Trinidad, West Indies

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background: Otitis externa is a common inflammatory ear disease in dogs caused by a variety of pathogens, and coagulase-positive staphylococci are frequently isolated from such infections.Objective: To identify antimicrobial susceptibility profiles and methicillin-resistant strains among coagulase-positive staphylococci isolated from otitis externa in dogs.Methods: A cross-sectional study was performed over 2 years on 114 client-owned dogs presented to the Veterinary Teaching Hospital with a ...

  20. An Agricultural Apprenticeship Program for Youth in Trinidad, West Indies: Can it Meet the Caribbean’s Urgent Need for Younger Farmers?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne G. Ganpat

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available To address the aging farmer population in Trinidad, W.I., a situation common to the Caribbean region, a Youth Apprenticeship Program in Agriculture (YAPA was initiated. An assessment of its effectiveness was conducted in 2007. Results indicated that present trainees went into agriculture to make “additional” income and for self employment, with “contributing to national food security” being ranked lower. They were generally satisfied with the extent of field work, the experience gained and trainers’ knowledge and skills. However, they would leave agriculture if they received other employment opportunities or if they were not provided with key resources such as land and soft loans. Past YAPA trainees had significantly changed (p

  1. Levels of insecticide resistance to deltamethrin, malathion, and temephos, and associated mechanisms in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes from the Guadeloupe and Saint Martin islands (French West Indies).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goindin, Daniella; Delannay, Christelle; Gelasse, Andric; Ramdini, Cédric; Gaude, Thierry; Faucon, Frédéric; David, Jean-Philippe; Gustave, Joël; Vega-Rua, Anubis; Fouque, Florence

    2017-02-10

    In the Guadeloupe and Saint Martin islands, Aedes aegypti mosquitoes are the only recognized vectors of dengue, chikungunya, and Zika viruses. For around 40 years, malathion was used as a mosquito adulticide and temephos as a larvicide. Since the European Union banned the use of these two insecticide molecules in the first decade of the 21st century, deltamethrin and Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis are the remaining adulticide and larvicide, respectively, used in Guadeloupe. In order to improve the management of vector control activities in Guadeloupe and Saint Martin, we investigated Ae. aegypti resistance to and mechanisms associated with deltamethrin, malathion, and temephos. Ae. aegypti mosquitoes were collected from six different localities of Guadeloupe and Saint Martin. Larvae were used for malathion and temephos bioassays, and adult mosquitoes for deltamethrin bioassays, following World Health Organization recommendations. Knockdown resistance (Kdr) genotyping for V1016I and F1534C mutations, and expression levels of eight enzymes involved in detoxification mechanisms were examined in comparison with the susceptible reference Bora Bora strain. Resistance ratios (RR50) calculated for Ae. aegypti larvae showed high resistance levels to temephos (from 8.9 to 33.1-fold) and low resistance levels to malathion (from 1.7 to 4.4-fold). Adult females displayed moderate resistance levels to deltamethrin regarding the time necessary to affect 50% of individuals, varying from 8.0 to 28.1-fold. Molecular investigations on adult mosquitoes showed high resistant allele frequencies for V1016I and F1534C (from 85 to 96% and from 90 to 98%, respectively), as well as an overexpression of the glutathione S-transferase gene, GSTe2, the carboxylesterase CCEae3a, and the cytochrome genes 014614, CYP6BB2, CYP6M11, and CYP9J23. Ae. aegypti populations from Guadeloupe and Saint Martin exhibit multiple resistance to organophosphates (temephos and malathion), and pyrethroids (deltamethrin). The mechanisms associated with these resistance patterns show strong frequencies of F1534C and V1016I Kdr mutations, and an over-expression of CCEae3a, GSTe2, and four cytochrome P450 genes (014614, CYP9J23, CYP6M11, CYP6BB2). These results will form the baseline for a deeper understanding of the insecticide resistance levels and associated mechanisms of Ae. aegypti populations and will be used to improve vector control strategies in Guadeloupe and Saint Martin.

  2. Theological education in a multi-ethnic society : the United Theological College of the West Indies and its four antecedent colleges (1841-1966)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davis, Edmund

    1998-01-01

    Deze studie analyseert en evalueert de ontwikkeling van het theologisch onderwijs op Jamaïca van 1841 tot 1966. Ze valt in twee delen uiteen. Het eerste deel bepaalt de historische, socio-culturele en zendingscontext waarin ambtsonderricht in deze periode zijn intrede deed in het land. Het

  3. Diagenesis in limestone-dolostone successions after 1 million years of rapid sea-level fluctuations: A case study from Grand Cayman, British West Indies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Min; Jones, Brian

    2016-08-01

    Meteoric diagenesis in young marine carbonate sediments has commonly been linked to fluctuations in Quaternary glacio-eustatic sea levels. The extent to which these sea-level changes are recorded in these carbonate successions, however, remains questionable. This is amply demonstrated by the diagenetic record found in the limestones and dolostones of the Cayman Formation (Miocene) on the Cayman Islands. On the eastern part of Grand Cayman, dolomitization that ceased by 1 million years ago created an architecture whereby the limestones in the central part of the island were surrounded by dolostones in coastal areas of the island. Since then, the upper 90 m of the Cayman Formation has been repeatedly cycled through many different marine and meteoric diagenetic zones as large, rapid eustatic oscillations in sea level affected the island. The records of these diagenetic cycles in the dolostones and limestones are, however, different and impossible to match to the cyclic changes in sea level. In the peripheral dolostones, post-dolomitization diagenetic features are sparse. In contrast, the limestones in the interior of the island exhibit a wider variety of meteoric diagenetic features, including extensive dissolution and calcite cementation. The dolostones have low porosity (limestones are characterized by high porosity (up to 50%), especially in the lower and middle parts of the studied limestone succession. The different phases of diagenesis found in the limestones, however, cannot be specifically matched to any sea-level fluctuations that have affected these successions. This issue is further exemplified by the fact that that the last marine transgression over the last ~ 16,000 years ago appears to have left no tangible record. The analysis of this succession clearly demonstrates that not all diagenetic regimes will be recorded in the fabrics of limestones or dolostones.

  4. Environmental Impact Analysis Process. Environmental Review Starlab Site On Antigua; Phase II Archeological Surveys of Proposed Ground Calibration Sites on Antigua, West Indies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    3, the crew via an umbilical connection (i.e., egress tunnel) accesses the Spacelab module, located forward of the pallet. Primary tasks of the...been observed offshore , near the southeastern end of Antigua (Sect 3.4.3). Although this species could be present in the general area during spring

  5. Oviposition strategies adopted by gravid Aedes aegypti (L.) (Diptera: Culicidae) as detected by ovitraps in Trinidad, West Indies (2002-2006).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadee, D D

    2009-09-01

    Aedes aegypti oviposition strategies were studied weekly over a period of 5 years (2002-2006) in Curepe, Trinidad using modified ovitraps. From a total of 23,293 ovitraps collected, 10,156 were collected in the months of the dry season, with 3041 positive (30%) containing 99,577 Ae. aegypti eggs. In contrast, during the wet season from 13,137 ovitraps collected, 10,652 were positive (81.9%), containing 192,209 Ae. aegypti eggs. When, the number of eggs collected and the number of positive ovitraps were divided into different egg number categories, 91, significantly more eggs (G=89.6; d.f.=4; P91 eggs. The patterns of oviposition displayed by Ae. aegypti during the early, mid and late wet and dry seasons showed a significant (F=102.8; d.f.=5; P91 egg category. These results suggest that the oviposition strategies adopted depend on numerous factors including the physical state of the oviposition site, the presence of eggs from conspecific females, whether the same or different individuals and the number or clutch size already present on the oviposition site. Therefore vector control workers should employ source reduction strategies to remove the small containers which may harbour 1-30 eggs and treat the larger permanent containers like water drums which may contain >60 eggs and may be the sites of superoviposition in nature. These combined strategies can effectively control the vector populations and reduce dengue transmission in Ae. aegypti infested countries.

  6. Region 2 of 8q24 is associated with the risk of aggressive prostate cancer in Caribbean men of African descent from Guadeloupe (French West Indies)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Geraldine CancelTassin; Marc Romana; Cecile Gaffory; Pascal Blanchet; Olivier Cussenot; Luc Multigner

    2015-01-01

    Multiple regions of the genome have been associated with the risk of prostate cancer in Caucasians, particularly including several polymorphisms located at 8q24. Region 2 of 8q24 has been repeatedly found to be associated with the risk of prostate cancer among men of African descent, although one study performed in the Caribbean island of Jamaica did not report this finding. In this study, the single nucleotide polymorphism rs16901979, located in region 2 of 8q24, was genotyped in 498 cases of histologically confirmed prostate cancer and 541 controls from the French Caribbean islands of Guadeloupe, where the population is largely of African descent. The AA genotype and the A allele at rs16901979 were associated with elevated risks of prostate cancer (odds ratios [ORs] = 1.84, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 1.26–2.69, P = 0.002 and OR = 1.36, 95% CI = 1.13–1.64, P = 0.001, respectively). Following stratification of the patients by disease aggressiveness, as defined by the Gleason score, the pooled genotypes AC + AA were associated with a higher risk of a Gleason score ≥7 at diagnosis (OR = 1.79, 95% CI = 1.17–2.73, P = 0.007). In summary, the A allele at rs16901979 was associated with the risk of prostate cancer in the Caribbean population of Guadeloupe, confirming its involvement in populations of African descent. Moreover, our study provides the first evidence of an association between this variant and the risk of aggressive prostate cancer.

  7. Distribution and seasonality of rhinovirus and other respiratory viruses in a cross-section of asthmatic children in Trinidad, West Indies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberg Kathy A

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Childhood asthma in the Caribbean is advancing in prevalence and morbidity. Though viral respiratory tract infections are reported triggers for exacerbations, information on these infections with asthma is sparse in Caribbean territories. We examined the distribution of respiratory viruses and their association with seasons in acute and stable asthmatic children in Trinidad. Methods In a cross-sectional study of 70 wheezing children attending the emergency department for nebulisation and 80 stable control subjects (2 to 16 yr of age in the asthma clinic, nasal specimens were collected during the dry (n = 38, January to May and rainy (n = 112, June to December seasons. A multitarget, sensitive, specific high-throughput Respiratory MultiCode assay tested for respiratory-virus sequences for eight distinct groups: human rhinovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza virus, influenza virus, metapneumovirus, adenovirus, coronavirus, and enterovirus. Results Wheezing children had a higher [χ2 = 5.561, p = 0.018] prevalence of respiratory viruses compared with stabilized asthmatics (34.3% (24 versus (vs. 17.5% (14. Acute asthmatics were thrice as likely to be infected with a respiratory virus (OR = 2.5, 95% CI = 1.2 – 5.3. The predominant pathogens detected in acute versus stable asthmatics were the rhinovirus (RV (n = 18, 25.7% vs. n = 7, 8.8%; p = 0.005, respiratory syncytial virus B (RSV B (n = 2, 2.9% vs. n = 4, 5.0%, and enterovirus (n = 1, 1.4% vs. n = 2, 2.5%. Strong odds for rhinoviral infection were observed among nebulised children compared with stable asthmatics (p = 0.005, OR = 3.6, 95% CI = 1.4 – 9.3,. RV was prevalent throughout the year (Dry, n = 6, 15.8%; Rainy, n = 19, 17.0% and without seasonal association [χ2 = 0.028, p = 0.867]. However it was the most frequently detected virus [Dry = 6/10, (60.0%; Rainy = 19/28, (67.9%] in both seasons. Conclusion Emergent wheezing illnesses during childhood can be linked to infection with rhinovirus in Trinidad's tropical environment. Viral-induced exacerbations of asthma are independent of seasons in this tropical climate. Further clinical and virology investigations are recommended on the role of infections with the rhinovirus in Caribbean childhood wheeze.

  8. Record of Plio-Pleistocene extreme event in the Lesser Antilles fore-arc basin. Example of Grande-Terre (Guadeloupe, French West Indies).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanlèn, L.; Philippon, M. M.; Randrianasolo, A.; Jean-Frederic, L.; Cornée, J. J.; Münch, P.

    2015-12-01

    Guadeloupe archipelago is part of the Lesser Antilles active volcanic arc and is therefore subjected to both enhanced seismic and volcanic activity related to the Lesser Antilles subduction zone, along which the Atlantic plate is subducted westward bellow the Caribbean plate. The volcanic arc is composed of several immerged volcanic islands (St Kitts, Nevis Montserrat, Basse Terre, Dominica, Martinique, St Lucia, Grenada) and submerged volcanoes (Kick em'Jenny). These volcanoes are known to be explosives and when they are entering in an eruptive cycle, debris flow could potentially initiate a tsunami and generate peculiar deposits within the sedimentary record recognized as tsunami deposits (or tsunamite). Subduction- related earthquakes might also initiate slope instabilities and trigger debris flow. Another controlling factor of slope (in-)-stabilities and debris flow is massive rainfalls. During cyclonic season (June to December), massive rainfalls are recorded in the area, which moreover is located on the trajectory of Atlantic Hurricanes that are responsible for numerous landslides. As a consequence, tsunami deposit are described and well studied in the Lesser Antilles arc as the islands shoreline and coastal plain are perpetually re-shaped by hurricanes responsible for tempestite deposits. However, the report of these deposit concern recent to actual events, for example present-day deposits consisting of large (metric) boulders, more or less aligned, located in the supralittoral fringe can be observed along Guadeloupe shore. In this study, we investigate the Plio-pleistocene sedimentary sequence of Grande Terre carbonate platform (Guadeloupe), and track the presence of such extreme-event related deposits and discuss our findings in the frame of the Lesser Antilles geological context.

  9. Building human capacity through early childhood intervention: the Child Development Research Programme at the Tropical Medicine Research Institute, the University of the West Indies, Kingston, Jamaica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, S P; Chang, S M; Powell, C A; Baker-Henningham, H

    2012-07-01

    Research conducted by the Child Development Research Group in the Tropical Medicine Research Institute has made significant contributions to the understanding of the importance of early nutrition and the home environment for children's development and the impact of psychosocial stimulation for disadvantaged and/or undernourished children. The work has provided critical evidence that has contributed to the increasing attention given to early childhood development in the work and policies of agencies such as the World Bank, World Health Organization (WHO) and United Nations Children Fund (UNICEF). This review concerns research which documented the impact of malnutrition on children's development and for the first time demonstrated the benefits and necessity of psychosocial stimulation for improvement in development. Subsequent research was critical in establishing the importance of linear growth retardation (stunting) as a risk factor for poor child development. A twenty-two-year study of stunted children has demonstrated benefits through to adulthood in areas such as educational attainment, mental health and reduced violent behaviour from an early childhood home visiting programme that works through mothers to promote their children's development. The group's research has also demonstrated that it is feasible and effective to integrate the stimulation intervention into primary care services with benefits to children's development and mothers'child rearing knowledge and practices. The group is currently conducting a study to provide information needed for scaling-up of parenting programmes through evaluation of a new approach to improving parenting through health centres and a modified home visit programme.

  10. Satellites for Commonwealth Education: Some Policy Issues. Case Studies: AUSSAT, Australia; Knowledge Network, Canada; INSAT, India; University of the South Pacific; University of the West Indies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, A. W.

    This report presents case studies on the use of satellites for education in five Commonwealth countries: Australia, Canada, India, Fiji, and Jamaica. Information provided in each of the case studies includes geography, production, the distribution system, regulation and management, and costs. Additional information given for the Australian…

  11. Carbon and hydrogen isotopic variations of natural gases in the southeast Columbus basin offshore southeastern Trinidad, West Indies - clues to origin and maturity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norville, Giselle A. [Petroleum Engineering Unit, Chemical Engineering Department, University of West Indies, St. Augustine (Trinidad and Tobago); Dawe, Richard A. [Petroleum Engineering Unit, Chemical Engineering Department, University of West Indies, St. Augustine (Trinidad and Tobago)], E-mail: radawe@eng.uwi.tt

    2007-09-15

    Natural gas can have two distinct origins, biogenic and thermogenic sources. This paper investigates the types and maturities of natural gas present in the SE Columbus basin, offshore Trinidad. The chemical composition and the isotope ratios of C and H were determined for approximately 100 samples of natural gas from eight areas within the SE Columbus basin. These compositions and isotopic data are interpreted to identify the origins of gas (biogenic, thermogenic) and maturity. The data showed that the gases in the SE Columbus basin are of both biogenic and thermogenic origin with a trend of mainly thermogenic to mixed to biogenic when moving from SW to NE across the basin. This trend suggests differential burial of the source rock. The presence of mixed gas indicates there was migration of gas in the basin resulting in deeper thermogenic gas mixing with shallow biogenic gas.

  12. Zuivere en toegepaste wetenschap in de tropen : biologisch onderzoek aan particuliere proefstations in Nederlands-Indië 1870-1940

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Schoor, W. J.

    2012-04-01

    Most experiment stations originated from the cooperation between entrepreneurs and the government. From the 1890s onwards, the government, together with the well organised colonial entrepreneurs, established research departments for several plantation crops at the Botanical Gardens at Buitenzorg (now Bogor), that eventually became independent experiment stations in the first decades of the twentieth century. By the 1920s, the ‘proefstationswezen’ (experiment station system) numbered some fifteen private experiment stations or sub-stations. After the war, the private experiment stations together with the government experiment stations at Buitenzorg were to provide the backbone of Indonesian agricultural science. Dutch biologists in particular, made a striking plea for pursuing the natural sciences in the tropical colonies. First, they pointed out the scientific importance of the tropics. Secondly, they stressed the role of the natural sciences, in particular biology, as a natural ally of colonial agriculture. Pure science was seen as a leading force for technical and social progress. The third motive was the cultural value of science for the Netherlands and its colonies. The cultivation of science in the colonies gave international prestige and strengthened self-confidence in the imperial struggle around 1900. Science had a civilising effect; scientific research, however, was to remain in the hands of western, colonial scientists. From the 1880s and 1890s onward, the experiment stations in the Indies were characterised by their strategic aims and scientific orientation. Up to 1910, the ‘academic’ views of biologists like Treub and Went concerning science and practice were predominant, and research was considered to be the central aim. From 1910 onwards, advice became more central and special extension services were established at the experiment stations. Due to diverging views of science, tasks and aims became a battlefield for discussions in the next

  13. US west coast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Aerial surveys are conducted along the US west coast to determine distribution and abundance of endangered leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea), loggerhead...

  14. WEST Physics Basis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdelle, C.; Artaud, J. F.; Basiuk, V.; Bécoulet, M.; Brémond, S.; Bucalossi, J.; Bufferand, H.; Ciraolo, G.; Colas, L.; Corre, Y.; Courtois, X.; Decker, J.; Delpech, L.; Devynck, P.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Doerner, R. P.; Douai, D.; Dumont, R.; Ekedahl, A.; Fedorczak, N.; Fenzi, C.; Firdaouss, M.; Garcia, J.; Ghendrih, P.; Gil, C.; Giruzzi, G.; Goniche, M.; Grisolia, C.; Grosman, A.; Guilhem, D.; Guirlet, R.; Gunn, J.; Hennequin, P.; Hillairet, J.; Hoang, T.; Imbeaux, F.; Ivanova-Stanik, I.; Joffrin, E.; Kallenbach, A.; Linke, J.; Loarer, T.; Lotte, P.; Maget, P.; Marandet, Y.; Mayoral, M. L.; Meyer, O.; Missirlian, M.; Mollard, P.; Monier-Garbet, P.; Moreau, P.; Nardon, E.; Pégourié, B.; Peysson, Y.; Sabot, R.; Saint-Laurent, F.; Schneider, M.; Travère, J. M.; Tsitrone, E.; Vartanian, S.; Vermare, L.; Yoshida, M.; Zagorski, R.; Contributors, JET

    2015-06-01

    With WEST (Tungsten Environment in Steady State Tokamak) (Bucalossi et al 2014 Fusion Eng. Des. 89 907-12), the Tore Supra facility and team expertise (Dumont et al 2014 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 56 075020) is used to pave the way towards ITER divertor procurement and operation. It consists in implementing a divertor configuration and installing ITER-like actively cooled tungsten monoblocks in the Tore Supra tokamak, taking full benefit of its unique long-pulse capability. WEST is a user facility platform, open to all ITER partners. This paper describes the physics basis of WEST: the estimated heat flux on the divertor target, the planned heating schemes, the expected behaviour of the L-H threshold and of the pedestal and the potential W sources. A series of operating scenarios has been modelled, showing that ITER-relevant heat fluxes on the divertor can be achieved in WEST long pulse H-mode plasmas.

  15. Purge at West Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Warren

    1977-01-01

    Tells how the adviser of the student newspaper at West Valley College (Saratoga, California) was dismissed after the newspaper published stories based on investigations into alleged wrongdoings by administration members. (GW)

  16. Dracaena in West Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, J.J.

    1984-01-01

    This taxonomic revision of the genus Dracaena L. (Liliaceae) in West Africa is another contribution towards a monograph on this group.Short general chapters contain historical, phytogeographical, morphological and phylogenetic observations. The taxonomic treatment contains a revised genus descriptio

  17. Eastern Culture Gone West

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGHONG

    2005-01-01

    THE implication of one of British 19th century writer Rudyard Kipling's most famous quotations: “East is East,West is West and never the twain shall meet” is endorsed by contemporary scholar Dr Samuel Huntington in his work The Clash of Civilizations, in which he asserts that future wars will not be between individual states and political unions but between differing civilizations.

  18. Islam and the West

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd. Kamal Hassan

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available The scientific and technological developments during the 18th and' the 19th centuries ensured material progress of the West, as well as emergence of the West as the dominating power which colonized the rest of the world. During the post-colonial phase, Islam emerged as a revitalized sociopolitical force. This has been mistaken as a threat by the West, and Islam has been portrayed as the "new enemy after the demise of communism. This is partly an effort to establish a Western identity, which is disintegrating due to lack of a challenge; and partly a reflection of the failure of Muslims to realize the social and ethical ideals of Islam.

  19. West Virginia Community Colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Eldon L.; Dziagwa, Constance E.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses efforts over the past 25 years to formalize the role of West Virginia's community colleges in the context of the state's rural character and low college graduation rates. Describes a reorganization following a 1987 study by the Carnegie Foundation and state legislation designed to fine tune the colleges' mission. (10 citations) (AJL)

  20. West Greenlandic Eskimo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trondhjem, Naja Blytmann; Fortescue, Michael David

    the principal economic activity. Research projects and language initiatives currently in progress within Greenland will be touched upon, as will the possibilities of communication with North American Inuit. West Greenlandic is unique among the native languages of the North American Arctic and Sub...

  1. The great West Road

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    From right to centre the 'Nationale 84' relying Meyrin to Saint-Genis. The fence limits Lab I on that side. From bottom the road leading to the double inclined tunnel linking Lab I and Lab II. On the foreground the ISR building (left) and the West Hall (centre).

  2. Invigorating West China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The once-poor west China is growing at a faster rate than the east. The trend is set to continue over the next few years. This is good news for China as the country gears up to shrink the economic divide between eastern and western regions.

  3. JPRS Report, West Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-02-18

    member states are to be brought together. The COMETT Program has elicited great interest within the EC. According to Volker Gehmlich, who is active...of a brand name, an efficient distribution mechanism and a com- petitive cost price. The European "winners" are espe- cially West Germany, which has

  4. Database for West Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Such database can prove an invaluable source of information for a wide range of agricultural and ... national soil classification systems around the world ... West African Journal of Appl ied Ecology, vol. .... SDB FAO-ISRIC English, French, Spanish Morphology and analytical ..... Furthermore, it will enhance the state of soil.

  5. El plan estratégico de comunicación en los festivales de música indie en España

    OpenAIRE

    Martín Alonso, Sagrario

    2016-01-01

    En este trabajo se propone investigar los diferentes tipos de métodos y herramientas utilizados en los planes estratégicos de comunicación de los festivales de música indie en España. Para ello se partirá del análisis de tres entrevistas a los responsables de comunicación a través de un método de triangulación. Y llegar a una conclusión basada en la teoría y el análisis del trabajo de campo. Grado en Publicidad y Relaciones Públicas

  6. A brief history of the development of plastic surgery in The Netherlands East-Indies from World War I until the independence of Indonesia (1914-1950).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeseker, B

    1990-05-01

    This study of surgical operations published in the Medical Journal of the Netherlands East-Indies over the period 1914-1950, supplemented with a series of interviews with retired Dutch East-Indian surgeons and their relatives, shows a vivid interest in plastic surgery from World War I until the independence of Indonesia. One can conclude that plastic surgery was performed more frequently and on a larger scale than in Holland, due to a larger number of patients, specific tropical pathology and often a longer patient delay, requiring extensive reconstructive procedures. The East-Indian publications on plastic surgical topics outnumber the Dutch ones enormously.

  7. FAQ: General Questions about West Nile Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Public Service Videos General Questions About West Nile Virus Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On this ... West Nile virus cases? What is West Nile virus? West Nile virus is an arthropod-borne virus ( ...

  8. West Candor Chasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    During its examination of Mars, the Viking 1 spacecraft returned images of Valles Marineris, a huge canyon system 5,000 km long, up to 240 km wide, and 6.5 km deep, whose connected chasma or valleys may have formed from a combination of erosional collapse and structural activity. The view shows west Candor Chasma, one of the connected valleys of Valles Marineris; north toward top of frame. The image is a composite of Viking high-resolution (about 80 m/pixel or picture element) images in black and white and low resolution (about 250 m/pixel) images in color. The Viking 1 craft landed on Mars in July of 1976. West Candor Chasma occupies the westernmost part of the large west-northwest-trending trough of Candor Chasma. This section is about 150 km wide. West Candor Chasma is bordered on the north and south by straight-walled cliffs, most likely faults, and on its west by two segments of north-northeast-trending cliffs. The north wall is dissected by landslide scars forming reentrants filled with landslide debris. The south wall shows spur-and-gully morphology and smooth sections. The high-standing central mesa, informally dubbed Red Mesa has several curvilinear reentrants carved into the caprock, whose anomalously colored layers were interpreted to be caused by young hydrothermal alteration products (Geissler et al., 1993, Icarus, v. 106, p. 380-391). Light-colored lobes flow away from the top of the interior stack and then flow around and embay the same layered stack from which they originated. One of these apparent flow features is composed of at least two or perhaps even three huge, superposed, vaguely layered, very rugged, light-colored lobes as much as 100 km long, 20 km wide, and over 2 km thick. The layered deposits below the caprock also merge with a chaotic material that has local lobate fronts and overlaps landslide deposits. Hummocky material, similar in hue to wall rock, fills the southwestern-most region of west Candor Chasma and is perhaps as much as 3

  9. The phylogenetic position of the Critically Endangered Saint Croix ground lizard Ameiva polops: revisiting molecular systematics of West Indian Ameiva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado, Luis A; Santamaria, Carlos A; Fitzgerald, Lee A

    2014-05-06

    The phylogenetic position of the critically endangered Saint Croix ground lizard Ameiva polops is presently unknown and several hypotheses have been proposed. We investigated the phylogenetic position of this species using molecular phylogenetic methods. We obtained sequences of DNA fragments of the mitochondrial ribosomal genes 12S rDNA and 16S rDNA for this species. We aligned these sequences with published sequences of other Ameiva species, which include most of the Ameiva species from the West Indies, three Ameiva species from Central America and South America, and one from the teiid lizard Tupinambis teguixin, which was used as outgroup. We conducted Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian phylogenetic analyses. The phylogenetic reconstructions among the different methods were very similar, supporting the monophyly of West Indian Ameiva and showing within this lineage, a basal polytomy of four clades that are separated geographically. Ameiva polops grouped in a cluster that included the other two Ameiva species found in the Puerto Rican Bank: A. wetmorei and A. exsul. A sister relationship between A. polops and A. wetmorei is suggested by our analyses. We compare our results with a previous study on molecular systematics of West Indian Ameiva. 

  10. The Properties of the local Interstellar Medium and the Interaction of the Stellar Winds of epsilon Indi and lambda Andromedae with the Interstellar Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Brian E.; Alexander, William R.; Linsky, Jeffrey L.

    1996-01-01

    We present new observations of the Ly alpha lines of Epsilon Indi (K5 5) and A Andromedae (G8 4-3 + ?) These data were obtained by the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) on the Hubble Space Telescope. Analysis of the interstellar H 1 and D 1 absorption lines reveals that the velocities and temperatures inferred from the H 1 lines are inconsistent with the parameters inferred from the D 1 lines, unless the H 1 absorption is assumed to be produced by two absorption components. One absorption component is produced by interstellar material. For both lines of sight observed, the velocity of this component is consistent with the velocity predicted by the local flow vector. For the Epsilon Indi data, the large velocity separation between the stellar emission and the interstellar absorption allows us to measure the H 1 column density independent of the shape of the intrinsic stellar Ly alpha profile. This approach permits us to quote an accurate column density and to assess its uncertainty with far more confidence than in previous analyses, for which the errors were dominated by uncertainties in the assumed stellar profiles.

  11. JPRS Report, West Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    was no tabula rasa politically. He had worked with EEC Commissioners Sicco Mansholt and Henri Simonet, had represented the Young Socialists in the...OF GERMANY Civil-Military Facilitator Role Proposed for Territorial Army (Hans-Lothar Stegmann; TRUPPENPRAXIS, Mar 87) 80 FRANCE GIAT Problems...supportable. The attitude that Mikhail Gorbachev represents the same type of evil helps them to formulate a specific West German role in the Western world

  12. The West Heslerton Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominic Powlesland

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available The excavation of the Early Anglo-Saxon or Anglian Settlement at West Heslerton, North Yorkshire, between 1986 and 1995, represents one of the largest excavations conducted in Britain in the last two decades. The project, funded by English Heritage, combined the fundamental needs of rescue and research archaeology. The excavation has produced a wealth of new evidence which is forcing us to re-evaluate much that has been said about the formative period of the English nation.

  13. Amsterdam Expeditions to the West Indian Islands, Report 36. The genus Strandesia and other Cypricercini (Crustacea, Ostracoda) in the West Indies. Part II. Carapace length, ecology, and distribution of two Strandesia species

    OpenAIRE

    Broodbakker, Nico W.

    1984-01-01

    The distribution and ecology of two species of Strandesia, s. longula Broodbakker, 1983, and S. stocki Broodbakker, 1983, are discussed. Both species are very common in Haiti, and S. longula is also common in the Bahamas. Both are found on some of the Lesser Antilles, and therefore they are assumed to have a much wider distribution. The two species are mostly found in fresh water, but they can tolerate chlorinities up to 3500 mg/l. No preferences concerning other factors could be found. Both ...

  14. Amsterdam Expeditions to the West Indian Islands, Report 36. The genus Strandesia and other Cypricercini (Crustacea, Ostracoda) in the West Indies. Part II. Carapace length, ecology, and distribution of two Strandesia species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broodbakker, Nico W.

    1984-01-01

    The distribution and ecology of two species of Strandesia, s. longula Broodbakker, 1983, and S. stocki Broodbakker, 1983, are discussed. Both species are very common in Haiti, and S. longula is also common in the Bahamas. Both are found on some of the Lesser Antilles, and therefore they are assumed

  15. Amsterdam Expeditions to the West Indian Islands, Report 36. The genus Strandesia and other Cypricercini (Crustacea, Ostracoda) in the West Indies. Part II. Carapace length, ecology, and distribution of two Strandesia species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broodbakker, Nico W.

    1984-01-01

    The distribution and ecology of two species of Strandesia, s. longula Broodbakker, 1983, and S. stocki Broodbakker, 1983, are discussed. Both species are very common in Haiti, and S. longula is also common in the Bahamas. Both are found on some of the Lesser Antilles, and therefore they are assumed

  16. Drought in West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Drought settled over West Africa's Ivory Coast region when wet season rains came late in 2007. Instead of beginning in February, the rainy season didn't start until March, and steady rains didn't start until late March, said the Famine Early Warning System Network. Though the rain had started to alleviate the drought, vegetation was still depressed in parts of Cote d'Ivoire (Ivory Coast) between March 22 and April 6, 2007, when the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Terra satellite captured the data used to make this image. The image shows current vegetation conditions compared to average conditions recorded since 2000. Areas where plants are growing more slowly or more sparsely than average are brown, while areas where vegetation is denser than average are green. The brown tint that dominates the image indicates that plants through most of the country are more sparse than normal. Among the crops affected by the lack of rain was West Africa's cocoa crop. About 70 percent of the world's cocoa comes from West Africa, and Cote d'Ivoire is a top grower, said Reuters. Cocoa prices climbed as the crop fell short. Farmers called the drought the worst in living memory, Reuters said. The delay in rainfall also led to water shortages in parts of Cote d'Ivoire, according to the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs.

  17. West and Central Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lydie, N; Robinson, N J

    1998-01-01

    This article reviews scientific and other literature during the 1990s that links migration and mobility with the spread of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), including HIV/AIDS. The focus is on key population groups linked to the spread of HIV and STDs in West and Central Africa: migrant laborers, truck drivers, itinerant traders, commercial sex workers (CSWs), and refugees. Countries with high emigration and immigration tend to have high levels of HIV infection, with the exception of Senegal. The main destination of immigrants are Senegal, Nigeria, and Cote d'Ivoire in West Africa and Cameroon, Congo, Gabon, and Congo in Central Africa. The risk of infection and the spread of HIV is variable among migrants. There is little in the literature that substantiates hypotheses about the strong association between migration and HIV-positive status. Information is needed on the duration, frequency of return visits, living conditions, sexual activities with multiple partners, and information before departure, along the routes, at final destination, and at the time of returns. Action-based research in five West African countries (Burkina Faso, Cote d'Ivoire, Mali, Niger, and Senegal) should produce results in late 1998. Comparable studies in Central Africa are unknown. Regional studies should be complemented by local studies. Prevention would benefit from studies on the relative size of these five population groups by geographic location.

  18. God dekoloniseert niet. Een kritiek op de Nederlandse geschiedschrijving over de neergang van Nederlands-Indië en Nederlands Suriname

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. de Beus

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available God has nothing to do with decolonization: A criticism of Dutch historiography on the demise of the Dutch East Indies and Dutch SurinamInevitably, there is a moral side to decolonisation. In the Netherlands, the focus on this aspect has been encouraged by the culture of gospel preaching: that curious constant which permeates the history of the Netherlands. More specifically, however, we have identified an important trend stemming from the 1960s whereby many politicians and influential people placed pressure on historians to bear witness to this aspect. This fitted in with the general pattern of moralizing history, alongside tracing the history of morality. This jarred with the professional self-image of historians who, during the 1960s, had in fact shaken off the roles of moralist, educator of the common man and keeper of souls. Yet, generally speaking, the historiography of the colonies still has a touch of national self-purging about it: various authors still write about decolonization in a judgmental tone.Despite the unmistakable scientific merits of this wave of Dutch East Indian studies and Surinam studies, the effect of this moralising is rather futile: it has not resulted in any great consensus of opinion, nor to any visible demonstration of being able to cope with the past or public reconciliation (as far as historical moralism is actually capable of achieving this. Thisis all the more reason for us to ask ourselves to explain why the art of moralising continues. The reasons for can be attributed to a variety of factors, partly of a professional nature and partly social. With respect to the former, this demonstrates a contrived battle between different schools of thought, a fixation on everything that is Dutch and a lack of interesting historiography from the Indonesian and Caribbean side. As far as the latter is concerned, this centres around afear of losing momentum in a society that is not retrospective, coupled with the post

  19. God dekoloniseert niet. Een kritiek op de Nederlandse geschiedschrijving over de neergang van Nederlands-Indië en Nederlands Suriname

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. de Beus

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available God has nothing to do with decolonization: A criticism of Dutch historiography on the demise of the Dutch East Indies and Dutch SurinamInevitably, there is a moral side to decolonisation. In the Netherlands, the focus on this aspect has been encouraged by the culture of gospel preaching: that curious constant which permeates the history of the Netherlands. More specifically, however, we have identified an important trend stemming from the 1960s whereby many politicians and influential people placed pressure on historians to bear witness to this aspect. This fitted in with the general pattern of moralizing history, alongside tracing the history of morality. This jarred with the professional self-image of historians who, during the 1960s, had in fact shaken off the roles of moralist, educator of the common man and keeper of souls. Yet, generally speaking, the historiography of the colonies still has a touch of national self-purging about it: various authors still write about decolonization in a judgmental tone.Despite the unmistakable scientific merits of this wave of Dutch East Indian studies and Surinam studies, the effect of this moralising is rather futile: it has not resulted in any great consensus of opinion, nor to any visible demonstration of being able to cope with the past or public reconciliation (as far as historical moralism is actually capable of achieving this. Thisis all the more reason for us to ask ourselves to explain why the art of moralising continues. The reasons for can be attributed to a variety of factors, partly of a professional nature and partly social. With respect to the former, this demonstrates a contrived battle between different schools of thought, a fixation on everything that is Dutch and a lack of interesting historiography from the Indonesian and Caribbean side. As far as the latter is concerned, this centres around afear of losing momentum in a society that is not retrospective, coupled with the post

  20. Indie eller klassisk retro?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlacius, Lisbeth

    2009-01-01

    Begrebet retro henviser til ting, attituder og fænomener fra en nylig forgangen tid. Modetrends og stilarter fra 50'erne, 60'erne, 70'erne og 80'erne florerer og blandes i stigende grad i begyndelsen af det 21. århundrede. Især blandt unge manifesterer "neo-stammer" deres sammenhold gennem fælles...

  1. Descripción y cálculo de índices de fragmentación urbana: Herramienta IndiFrag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sapena

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se estudia el concepto de fragmentación del paisaje y su análisis a través de técnicas de teledetección y SIG. Se presenta una nueva herramienta, llamada IndiFrag, que calcula índices y variables que describen de forma cuantitativa el nivel de fragmentación y la distribución espacial de los usos del suelo provenientes de mapas de coberturas en formato vectorial. La herramienta compila un gran número de índices de fragmentación y permite su cálculo para objetos cartográficos según varios niveles de jerarquía. Los índices están divididos en cinco grupos en función de los atributos que describen: área y perímetro, forma, gregación, diversidad y contraste. Esta herramienta se aplica de forma práctica a datos de usos del suelo de la ciudad de Valencia derivados de una clasificación orientada a objetos, generando mapas de índices de fragmentación a nivel de barrio, obteniendo así los resultados de la fragmentación urbana de los barrios de Valencia. El desarrollo de IndiFrag constituye un paso preliminar para la creación de una metodología que cuantifique la evolución de las zonas urbanas a lo largo del tiempo desde el punto de vista de su fragmentación y de la relación de esta propiedad con determinadas variables geográficas.

  2. FAQ: West Nile Virus and Dead Birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education Public Service Videos West Nile Virus & Dead Birds Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On This ... dead bird sightings to local authorities. How do birds get infected with West Nile virus? West Nile ...

  3. Edwardsiella ictaluri infection in Pangasius catfish imported from West Bengal into the Southern Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, A C N; Reichley, S R; Ware, C; Griffin, M J

    2016-09-05

    In response to a mortality event, seven Pangasius catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus) were submitted to the University of the West Indies, School of Veterinary Medicine, Trinidad and Tobago, for diagnostic evaluation. These fish were part of a consignment that arrived from Kolkata two weeks earlier. Fish presented with perianal haemorrhage and blister-like swellings on the skin which ruptured to leave ulcers. Edwardsiella ictaluri was consistently recovered from the brain and skin. Repetitive sequence-mediated PCR analysis revealed genetic fingerprints consistent with E. ictaluri isolates from farm-raised channel catfish in Mississippi, USA. Plasmid analysis of the case isolates identified two unique plasmids that differ slightly in conformation and content from the pEI1 and pEI2 plasmids described for E. ictaluri from other fish hosts. The case isolates were also PCR negative for several E. ictaluri virulence factors. The biological implications of these genetic differences are unclear and warrant further study. This is the first report and documentation of E. ictaluri infection in Trinidad and Tobago, suggesting the pathogen may have been introduced concurrently with the importation of fish. This report emphasizes the importance of adequate health screenings of imported lots to minimize the threat of introducing E. ictaluri to non-endemic areas.

  4. Trade networks in West Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walther, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    To date, most of the literature on trade networks in West Africa has considered networks in a metaphorical way. The aim of this paper is to go one step further by showing how social network analysis may be applied to the study of regional trade in West Africa. After a brief review of the literature......, this exploratory paper investigates two main issues related to regional trade. We start by discussing how recent developments in regional trade in West Africa have contributed to challenging the social structure of traders. We then discuss the changes that have affected the spatiality of regional trade by looking...

  5. [West Nile virus infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Ruiz, Mercedes; Gámez, Sara Sanbonmatsu; Clavero, Miguel Angel Jiménez

    2011-12-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is an arbovirus usually transmitted by mosquitoes. The main reservoirs are birds, although the virus may infect several vertebrate species, such as horses and humans. Up to 80% of human infections are asymptomatic. The most frequent clinical presentation is febrile illness, and neuroinvasive disease can occur in less than 1% of cases. Spain is considered a high-risk area for the emergence of WNV due to its climate and the passage of migratory birds from Africa (where the virus is endemic). These birds nest surrounding wetlands where populations of possible vectors for the virus are abundant. Diagnosis of human neurological infections can be made by detection of IgM in serum and/or cerebrospinal fluid samples, demonstration of a four-fold increase in IgG antibodies between acute-phase and convalescent-phase serum samples, or by detection of viral genome by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (especially useful in transplant recipients). Since WNV is a biosafety level 3 agent, techniques that involve cell culture are restricted to laboratories with this level of biosafety, such as reference laboratories. The National Program for the Surveillance of WNV Encephalitis allows the detection of virus circulation among birds and vectors in areas especially favorable for the virus, such as wetlands, and provides information for evaluation of the risk of disease in horses and humans.

  6. Discourse Between East and West

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The first Chinese-hosted cultural dialogue between the East and the West was held in Nishan, Shandong Province The first Nishan Forum on World Civilizations kicked off on September 26 at Nishan Mountain, 25 km southeast

  7. Dr. West and Mr. Summers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roger Kimball

    2002-01-01

      In all the mainstream press coverage of this affair, it was put about that Comet West is a serious scholar, that AfroAmerican Studies is a serious academic discipline, and that Harvard's department...

  8. Why the West?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Ferguson

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available La cuestión de cómo "Occidente" llegó a dominar el mundo durante la era moderna se ha debatido recientemente entre los historiadores. El debate se ha polarizado entre quienes ven en la "modernidad" como resultado de un 'milagro', el proceso cultural único generado en el seno del mismo Occidente, y aquellos que cuestionan este "milagro" como paradigma eurocéntrico, y buscan otros factores para entender y explicar el dominio occidental del mundo económico y político. La literatura tradicional, representada por David Landes en su reciente “La riqueza y la pobreza de las naciones”, atribuye el éxito europeo a sus valores culturales únicos, a sus instituciones sociales y sus prácticas políticas. Este éxito fue completamente "impulsado desde dentro” por estas características. Recientemente, varios historiadores han cuestionado este "paradigma del milagro" como eurocéntrica, y miran a otros factores para comprender y explicar el dominio occidental del mundo económico y político. Después de examinar los recientes trabajos de los historiadores frente a este problema, este artículo trata de colocar la expansión europea en un contexto global, y la comprensión de la Revolución Industrial como una transformación global. Esta perspectiva nos permite entender los cambios tecnológicos y económicos Europeos en el contexto más amplio de patrones de interacción económica y cultural de todo el mundo._____________ABSTRACT:The question of how 'the West' came to dominate the globe during the modern era has been debated recently among historians. The debate has been polarized between those who view 'modernity' as the result of a 'European miracle', the culturally unique and internally generated project of the West, and those who question this 'European miracle' paradigm as Eurocentric, and look to other factors to understand and explain Western economic and political world dominance. The traditional narrative, represented by David

  9. Landscape evolution of West Kunlun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Chang, Hong

    2010-05-01

    Constituting the northwestern margin of the Tibetan Plateau, the present-day Western Kunlun is a spectacular mountain range, extending from the Pamir Plateau in the west to the Altyn Tagh fault and the Eastern Kunlun Range in the east. Dramatic climate variations have a significant control on the fluvial dissection, glacial erosion and wind transport. The West Kunlun Mountains is one of the key regions for understanding the uplift history of the Plateau and the climate change of Central Asia. The activities of tectonic and erosion make the topography of West Kunlun Mountains complex and varied. However, due to its remote location, there is still limited knowledge about the geomorphologic and geological features in West Kunlun Mountains .This paper tries to figure out the geomorphologic and geological features of this region qualitatively through studying the data of Shuttle Reader Topography Mission (SRTM) and topographic maps by digital elevation models (DEMs) and constructing profiles, aiming to make clear what functions the tectonics and climate exert on the topography of the West Kunlun Mountains. The West Kunlun Mountains, the northwestern margin of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, have strong tectonic activities. From south to north,West Kunlun Mountains developed three major faults: Kangxiwar fracture, North West Kunlun fault and Iron Creek fault. At about 25 Ma B.P., the West Kunlun began to uplift, and from about 5 Ma B.P., the West Kunlun began to grow rapidly. By using topographic analyzing software to make more than 10 vertical profiles across the main faults from south to north, it is obvious that there is a height difference between the upper and lower plate fracture, and the elevation of terrain profiles generally decreases from south to north. There is ~4,500m elevation difference between the main ridge of the West Kunlun Mountains out of Kangxiwar (5500-6000m) and the northern foot of the Tarim Basin (1200-1300m). The same progressively decreasing

  10. Politeness: West and East

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    - Джеффри Лич

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The present paper was planned for this issue of our journal, which Geoffrey Leech and I intended to devote to Politeness phenomena across cultures. It is based on his article titled “Politeness: Is there an East-West Divide?” (2005 which he suggested as a theoretical framework and includes results of our discussions held during our personal meetings and our epistolary exchange. Unfortunately the final version of the paper was never read by Geoffrey Leech for the reasons we all sadly know. Nevertheless I decided to publish it as a tribute to him in the knowledge that the result was not going to have the degree of excellence it would have had if he were still with us today. I therefore apologise for any mistakes or misinterpretations of his thoughts that might be found in the paper. The aim of this article is to sum up the main ideas of Politeness Theory presented earlier in Leech 1983, 2003, 2005, and other publications and discuss how that theory applies (or fails to apply to other languages, with the main emphasis on the Russian language and culture. The term ‘maxim’ used in Principles of Pragmatics (Leech 1983 is avoided here as much as possible, as it implies some kind of moral imperative, rather than a pragmatic constraint. Instead, a single constraint, which comprehends all the maxims (the Maxims of Tact, Generosity, Approbation, Modesty, Agreement, Sympathy, and is called the Grand Strategy of Politeness (GSP, is used. The GSP says: In order to be polite, S expresses or implies meanings which place a high value on what pertains to O- his/her wants, qualities, obligation, opinion, feelings (O = other person[s], [mainly the addressee, i.e. H = hearer] or place a low value on what pertains to S (S = self, speaker. The essential point is that these are not separate, independent constraints or maxims: they are instances of the operation of the GSP as ‘super-maxim’ which is an overarching framework for studying linguistic politeness

  11. Anurans Collected in West Malaysia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cedhagen, Tomas

    1997-01-01

    Distributional records and natural history noles are given for anurans collected in West Malaysia 1976. Rano baramica was observed when it was caught by an Ahaetulfa nasula (Serpentes: Colubridae). Rhacophorus leucomystax, Limnonectes limnociulris and Microhyla heymonsi were all found al night on...

  12. Upgrading of the West Area

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    The rejigged main hall (EHW1) in the West Area: on background, below the crane, is the brown yoke of the Omega magnet which had been resited. The upgrading was completed by the time in July when 400 GeV protons arrived. See Annual Report 1983 p. 107.

  13. The West in Early Cinema

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeff, Nanna

    2006-01-01

    Verhoeff investigates the emergence of the western genre, made in the first two decades of cinema (1895-1915). By analyzing many unknown and forgotten films from international archives she traces the relationships between films about the American West, their surrounding films, and other popular medi

  14. Metamorphic Rocks in West Irian

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wegen, van der G.

    1971-01-01

    Low-grade metamorphics of West Irian occur to the east of Geelvink Bay associated with two narrow belts of basic and ultrabasic igneous rocks which represent ophiolitic suites of an eugeosynclinical development beginning in Early Mesozoic time. In both of these belts there are indications of regiona

  15. Primary Schooling in West Bengal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Amartya

    2010-01-01

    With his Nobel Prize award money, Amartya Sen set up the Pratichi Trust which carries out research, advocacy and experimental projects in basic education, primary health care, and women's development in West Bengal and Bangladesh. Professor Sen himself took active interest in this work--helping set the agenda, looking at the evidence from…

  16. West Nile Virus Neuroinvasive Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological features of West Nile Virus (WNV disease among children (<18 years of age reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention from 1999 through 2007 were analyzed and compared with those of adult WNV neuroinvasive disease (WNND, in a study at CDC&P, Fort Collins, CO.

  17. Team West Virginia/Rome Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korakakis, Dimitris [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2017-04-10

    Overall, the team, West Virginia University (WVU) and University of Rome Tor Vergata (UTV), has a goal of building an attractive, low-cost, energy-efficient solar-powered home that represents both the West Virginian and Italian cultures.

  18. Suggested revision for west mexican archeological sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, S V; Taylor, R E

    1966-12-16

    A review of the radiocarbon dates and published and unpublished archeological data from the West Mexican states of Sinaloa, Nayarit, Jalisco, and Colima has resulted in a revised tentative chronology for West Mexico.

  19. 76 FR 68314 - Special Local Regulations; Key West World Championship, Atlantic Ocean; Key West, FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-04

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AA08 Special Local Regulations; Key West World Championship, Atlantic Ocean; Key West, FL AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast... Key West, Florida during the Key West World Championship, a series of high-speed boat races. The...

  20. 75 FR 17463 - Key West Bank, Key West, Florida; Notice of Appointment of Receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Office of Thrift Supervision Key West Bank, Key West, Florida; Notice of Appointment of Receiver Notice... sole Receiver for Key West Bank, Key West, Florida, (OTS No. 14929) on March 26, 2010. Dated: March...

  1. Population Structure of West Greenland Narwhals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riget, F.; Dietz, R.; Møller, P.;

    The hypothesis that different populations of narwhals in the West Greenland area exist has been tested by different biomarkers (metal and organochlorine concentrations, stable isotopes and DNA). Samples of muscle, liver, kidney, blubber and skin tissues of narwhals from West Greenland have been...... isotopes could not support the population structure with two West Greenland populations suggested by the genetic study....

  2. 33 CFR 117.622 - West Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false West Bay 117.622 Section 117.622 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Massachusetts § 117.622 West Bay The draw of the West Bay Bridge, mile...

  3. On ‘war task’ and ‘peace work’. The Dutch East Indies Red Cross between the colonial wars and the Second World War

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Bergen, Leo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available After the wars against Atjeh (1873-1907 finished, Dutch rule over the Dutch East India was total. The Dutch East Indies Red Cross (DEIRC awaited a new task, preparing to give aid in the case of a foreign invasion. The problem was that the end of the wars against the autochthonous “rebellions” also meant the end of Red Cross visibility and in the minds of many, the end to Red Cross urgency. Aid in wars against a real opponent is from a point of public relations much more important than the preparation of aid against an unknown opponent. “Work in times of peace” had to be the answer to this problem, but this work was only in name, and not de facto different from preparation of aid in times of war. Through “peace work” the DEIRC prepared itself for the war-task. To be able to fulfil the war-task the Red Cross had to have enough doctors, nurses, and stretcher-bearers. Visible peace-work had to provide for that. It enlarged the Red Cross’ popularity and trained its volunteers. However, at the beginning of 1942, when the Japanese invaded the Dutch East Indies, it turned out to be too little, too late.Tras el fin de las guerras contra Aceh (1873-1907, el dominio holandés sobre la India Oriental Holandesa fue total. La Cruz Roja de las Indias Orientales Holandesas (DEIRC quedaba a la espera de una nueva tarea: prepararse para proporcionar ayuda en caso de una invasión extranjera. El problema era que el final de las guerras contra las “rebeliones” autóctonas también significaba el fin de la visibilidad de la Cruz Roja y, a juicio de muchos, el final de la perentoriedad de la Cruz Roja. El socorro en guerras contra un adversario real era desde el punto de vista de las relaciones públicas mucho más importante que los preparativos de socorro contra un enemigo desconocido. El “trabajo en tiempo de paz” debía ser la respuesta a este problema, si bien resultó diferente solo de palabra, no de hecho, en relación a los preparativos

  4. First Report of D. Thomas Ortiz of General Accounting Landázuri the Royal and Supreme Council of the Indies on erection of Real Universidad Mayor de Bogotá, Madrid September 2, 1773

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Betancourt-Serna

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available I. The Viceroyalty of New Granada. II. University reform illustrated in the Viceroyalty of New Granada. III. Francisco Antonio Moreno y Escandon: Status quaestionis university reform illustrated in the Viceroyalty of New Granada in 1772. IV. Representation of Master Fr Bonaventure Antonio Jacinto, OP, Madrid December 19, 1772. V. The first report of the Accountant General of the Royal and Supreme Council of the Indies: a The author of the first report: D. Thomas Ortiz de Landázuri and Arriaga, b The first report: Madrid September 2, 1773.

  5. From a thriving past to an uncertain future: Zooarchaeological evidence of two millennia of human impact on a large emblematic lizard (Iguana delicatissima) on the Guadeloupe Islands (French West Indies)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochaton, C.; Bailon, S.; Ineich, I.; Breuil, M.; Tresset, A.; Grouard, S.

    2016-10-01

    Among the lizards in the Lesser Antillean Islands, iguanas are undoubtedly the most emblematic, especially the endemic species, Iguana delicatissima. However, although much effort is currently made for the conservation of this species as a result of the present biodiversity crisis, nearly nothing is known of the history of this animal on these islands during the last millennia. Here we present the first data relating to the distribution, morphology, and interaction of past iguanas with human populations in the Lesser Antilles. To do so, we review the archaeological Iguana remains collected over the past 15 years on the Guadeloupe Islands. Our results show that the only Iguana species occurring in pre-Columbian archaeological deposits is Iguana delicatissima. Moreover, we demonstrate that this species occurred on all the islands of Guadeloupe during pre-Columbian times and then suddenly became extinct between 1960 and 1990 on most of these islands. We also confirm the modern introduction of I. iguana to the Guadeloupe Islands. In addition, zooarchaeological research demonstrates that pre-Columbian human populations occasionally used iguanas as a source of food, but with no apparent impact on the native population. However, the first data relating to past size variations of I. delicatissima on the Guadeloupe Islands indicate that archaeological iguanas were much larger than the largest remnant modern specimens and that a marked decrease in body length (more than 20%) occurred in these lizards after contact with European populations. This evidence of widespread extinction and morphological change during modern times is another demonstration of the extensive effects of disturbance and selection induced by modern human societies on endemic insular faunas.

  6. A survey for infection with Dirofilaria immitis, Ehrlichia canis, Borrelia burgdorferi, and Babesia canis in feral and client-owned dogs in the Turks and Caicos Islands, British West Indies

    OpenAIRE

    Hoff, Brent; McEwen, Beverly; Peregrine, Andrew S.

    2008-01-01

    The frequency of infection with Dirofilaria immitis and Babesia canis and seropositivity to Ehrlichia canis and Borrelia burgdorferi in feral and client-owned dogs was determined. Feral dogs were 14.8 and 11.2 times more likely to be seropositive to D. immitis and E. canis, respectively, than were client-owned dogs. None of the dogs tested positive for B. burgdorferi or B. canis.

  7. Three new genera and three new species of Lasiopteridi (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) on Rubiaceae from Guadeloupe, French West Indies, and a key to genera of Neotropical Lasiopteridi unplaced to tribe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagné, Raymond J; Etienne, Jean

    2015-10-12

    Three new genera of Lasiopteridi (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae), Faramitella Gagné, new genus, Anapeza Gagné, new genus, and Pellacara Gagné, new genus, each with one new species, are described. The new species are from leaf galls on Rubiaceae collected in Guadeloupe, F.W.I.: Faramitella planicauda Gagné, new species, was reared from Faramea occidentalis (L.) A. Rich.; Anapeza tumida Gagné, new species, and Pellacara postica, new species, were both reared from Psychotria mapourioides DC. The three new genera belong to Lasiopteridi but are unassigned to tribe. A key to the adult stage of these and 23 other Neotropical genera of unplaced Lasiopteridi whose adults are known is provided.

  8. Toxoplasmosis in the Caribbean islands: literature review, seroprevalence in pregnant women in ten countries, isolation of viable Toxoplasma gondii from dogs from St. Kitts, West Indies with report of new T. gondii genetic types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Jitender P; Verma, Shiv Kumar; Villena, Isabelle; Aubert, Dominique; Geers, Régine; Su, Chunlei; Lee, Elise; Forde, Martin S; Krecek, Rosina C

    2016-04-01

    Little is currently known of clinical toxoplasmosis in humans and animals in the Caribbean. We investigated the prevalence of IgG and IgM antibodies in 437 pregnant women from 10 English speaking Caribbean countries. Overall, antibodies (IgG) to Toxoplasma gondii (modified agglutination test, MAT, cut-off 1:6) were found in 174 (39.8 %) of 437 human sera; specifically 12 of 38 from Antigua-Barbuda, 26 of 52 from Belize, 9 of 50 from Bermuda, 29 of 49 from Dominica, 18 of 49 from Grenada, 16 of 47 from Jamaica, 5 of 15 from Montserrat, 8 of 44 from St. Kitts/Nevis, 24 of 45 from St. Lucia, and 27 of 50 from St. Vincent/Grenadines were seropositive. All IgG-positive sera were tested for IgM antibodies using the immunocapture method; all sera were negative for IgM antibodies. Additionally, tissues and sera of 45 dogs from St. Kitts were examined for T. gondii infection. Antibodies (IgG, MAT, 1:≥25) were found in 19 (42.2 %) of 45 dogs. Muscle samples (tongue, leg) of 19 seropositive dogs were digested in pepsin, and homogenates were bioassayed in mice. Viable T. gondii were isolated from 6 dogs. T. gondii isolates were further propagated in cell culture. PCR-RFLP genotyping of cell culture derived tachyzoites using 10 genetic markers, SAG1, SAG2 (5' and 3' SAG2, and alt.SAG2) SAG3, BTUB, GRA6, c22-8, c29-2, L358, PK1, and Apico revealed that 4 isolates were ToxoDB PCR-RFLP genotype #2, and 2 were new genotypes #264 and #265. Review of 22 viable T. gondii isolates from chickens, dogs, and cats from Grenada and St. Kitts revealed that 1 isolate was type II, 13 were type III, and 8 were atypical. Thus, type III strains were predominant. Overall, the study revealed high prevalence of T. gondii in the Caribbean islands.

  9. Influence of Cultural and Literary Tradition of West Indies on Naipaul%西印度群岛文学文化传统对奈保尔的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙妮

    2007-01-01

    奈保尔是个有着双重移民复杂经历的作家,其多元文化背景导致的复杂文化身份对于其文学创作具有重要意义.奈保尔的出生地西印度群岛的文学文化传统赋予他文学创作的起点和立足之点,其作品也成为该传统的一部分.

  10. Children and Community: Progressing through Partnership. Summary Report and Conclusion. Proceedings of the International Seminar of the Bernard van Leer Foundation (10th, Kingston, Jamaica, November 14-24, 1988). With the Cooperation of the West Indies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard Van Leer Foundation, The Hague (Netherlands).

    This report focuses on children and the community. In the community. In the opening address, Dr. Willem H. Welling, Executive Director of the van Leer Foundation, describes the history of the foundation and the content of previous seminars. He concludes the address with a discussion of community empowerment. Father Gerard Pantin, the keynote…

  11. Toxoplasmosis in Caribbean islands: Seroprevalence in pregnant women in ten countries, and isolation and report of new genetic types of Toxoplasma gondii from dogs from St. Kitts, West Indies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little is known of clinical toxoplasmosis in humans and animals in the Caribbean countries. We investigated the prevalence of IgG and IgMantibodies in 437 pregnant women from 10 English speaking Caribbean countries. Antibodies (IgG) to T. gondii (modified agglutination test, MAT, cut-off 1:6) were f...

  12. A Comparison of Student Performance in Multiple-Choice and Long Essay Questions in the MBBS Stage I Physiology Examination at the University of the West Indies (Mona Campus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepple, Dagogo J.; Young, Lauriann E.; Carroll, Robert G.

    2010-01-01

    This retrospective study compared the performance of preclinical medical students in the multiple-choice question (MCQ) and long essay question components of a comprehensive physiology final examination. During the 3 yr analyzed, 307 students had an average score of 47% (SD 9.9) in the long essay questions and 64% (SD 9.9) in the MCQs. Regression…

  13. Using Informal Collaboration to Develop Quality Assurance Processes for eLearning in Developing Countries: The Case of the University of Botswana and the University of the West Indies Distance Education Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Marilyn; Thurab-Nkhosi, Dianne; Giannini-Gachago, Daniela

    2005-01-01

    Collaboration among institutions of higher education involves the sharing of financial, administrative and infrastructural resources with others through a formal memorandum of understanding. There are occasions where due to bureaucratic or political barriers, a formal collaborative arrangement may not be possible, however, academic partnerships…

  14. West Nile virus and "poliomyelitis".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sejvar, James J

    2004-07-27

    West Nile virus (WNV) has recently been associated with a syndrome of acute flaccid paralysis. Most cases of WNV-associated weakness have clinical, histopathologic, and electrophysiologic characteristics indistinguishable from those of poliomyelitis caused by infection with poliovirus. There is debate about the nomenclature of this manifestation of WNV infection. An historical perspective of the term "poliomyelitis" suggests that the term "WNV poliomyelitis" seems appropriate, but members of the neurologic and infectious disease communities should engage in discussion regarding the terminology of this syndrome.

  15. West Nile Virus and wildlife

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, P.P.; Griffing, S.; Caffrey, C.; Kilpatrick, A.M.; McLean, R.; Brand, C.; Saito, E.; Dupuis, A.P.; Kramer, Laura; Novak, R.

    2004-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) has spread rapidly across North America, resulting in human deaths and in the deaths of untold numbers of birds, mammals, and reptiles. The virus has reached Central America and the Caribbean and may spread to Hawaii and South America. Although tens of thousands of birds have died, and studies of some bird species show local declines, few regionwide declines can be attributed to WNV. Predicting future impacts of WNV on wildlife, and pinpointing what drives epidemics, will require substantial additional research into host susceptibility, reservoir competency, and linkages between climate, mosquitoes, and disease. Such work will entail a collaborative effort between scientists in governmental research groups, in surveillance and control programs, and in nongovernmental organizations. West Nile virus was not the first, and it will not be the last, exotic disease to be introduced to the New World. Its spread in North America highlights the need to strengthen animal monitoring programs and to integrate them with research on disease ecology.

  16. Surface winds over West Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromwich, David

    1993-01-01

    Five winter months (April-August 1988) of thermal infrared satellite images were examined to investigate the occurrence of dark (warm) signatures across the Ross Ice Shelf in the Antarctic continent. These features are inferred to be generated by katabatic winds that descend from southern Marie Byrd Land and then blow horizontally across the ice shelf. Significant mass is added to this airstream by katabatic winds blowing from the major glaciers that flow through the Transantarctic Mountains from East Antarctica. These negatively buoyant katabatic winds can reach the northwestern edge of the shelf - a horizontal propagation distance of up to 1,000 km - 14 percent of the time. Where the airstream crosses from the ice shelf to the ice-covered Ross Sea, a prominent coastal polynya is formed. Because the downslope buoyancy force is near zero over the Ross Ice Shelf, the northwestward propagation of the katabatic air mass requires pressure gradient support. The study shows that the extended horizontal propagation of this atmospheric density current occurred in conjunction with the passage of synoptic cyclones over the southern Amundsen Sea. These cyclones can strengthen the pressure gradient in the interior of West Antarctica and make the pressure field favorable for northwestward movement of the katabatic winds from West Antarctica across the ice shelf in a geostrophic direction. The glacier winds from East Antarctica are further accelerated by the synoptic pressure gradient, usually undergo abrupt adjustment beyond the exit to the glacier valley, and merge into the mountain-parallel katabatic air mass.

  17. 78 FR 79061 - Noise Exposure Map Notice; Key West International Airport, Key West, FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-27

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Noise Exposure Map Notice; Key West International Airport, Key West, FL... Administration (FAA) announces its determination that the Noise Exposure Maps submitted by Monroe County for the Key West International Airport under the provisions of the Aviation Safety and Noise Abatement Act...

  18. 78 FR 2916 - Special Local Regulation; West Palm Beach Triathlon Championship, Intracoastal Waterway, West...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-15

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AA08 Special Local Regulation; West Palm Beach Triathlon... Intracoastal Waterway, in West Palm Beach, Florida, during the West Palm Beach Triathlon Championship, on Saturday, June 1, 2013. Approximately 1,500 participants are anticipated to participate in the...

  19. PETROCHINA WEST EAST GAS PIPELINE & SALES COMPANY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ PetroChina West East Gas Pipeline & Sales Company, a regional company directly under PetroChina Company Limited (PetroChina), is responsible for the construction and operation of the West-East Gas Pipeline Project, and the gas marketing and sales of the natural gas market in China.

  20. Briefing : West Africa and its oil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellis, S.D.K.

    2003-01-01

    The US war on terrorism and preparations for war against Iraq have enormously increased the strategic value of West African oil reserves. This comes at a time when there have been massive new discoveries in offshore waters. This article focuses on the increased US interests in West African oil. It e

  1. Environmental History in the American West.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, Hal K.

    1994-01-01

    Asserts that environmental history is an important component of the history of the American west. Discusses the historiography of the American west in relationship to environmental issues. Concludes that environmental history opened the door for scholars to study the way human beings interact with the physical world around them. (CFR)

  2. Permafrost degradation in West Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Niels Nielsen; Ingeman-Nielsen, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Important aspects of civil engineering in West Greenland relate to the presence of permafrost and mapping of the annual and future changes in the active layer due to the ongoing climatically changes in the Arctic. The Arctic Technology Centre (ARTEK) has worked more than 10 years on this topic......, Kangerlussuaq, Sisimiut and Nuuk. They are situated in continuous, discontinuous and sporadic permafrost zones. We will show examples of detoriation of permafrost related to present local scale climate observations and large scale climate and permafrost simulations modeled numerically with the GIPL model driven...... by HIRHAM climate projections for Greenland up to 2075. The engineering modelling is based on a risk assessment methodology based on a flow diagram which classify the risk of permafrost degradation causing settlement and stability problems for buildings and infrastructures based on relatively simple...

  3. Human Rights in the West

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorgen S. Nielsen

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the areas of conflict between Islam and the West in today’s world is the concern for human rights. This has sometimes been criticized in the Muslim world as a form of neo-imperialism. It is therefore necessary to understand the various dimensions of human rights, and the various phases through which this concern has grown. In the earliest form, it was an assertion of the rights of the landed aristocracy against those of the monarch. The French revolution, with its emphasis on "liberty, equality and fraternity," for all individuals, provided another dimension. There were many occasions on which individual and organized religion came into conflict during the Middle Ages. The experience of World War II, particularly the atrocities of the Nazis, led to the internationalization of individual rights.

  4. Westing in New Poems and three Persons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Doğu

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Turkısh literature completes a long period effected by İslamic culture and cıvılızatıon in 19th century when it has tendency to west. Like empire, poets and writers also focus on west. They benefits from west in terms of literature and culture. In this way, they realize innovations in the field of literature and culture as beuracracy realizes in military, financial, administrative and maarif fields. This group of people who interest in the private journal sector in cultural field, French literature styles in literature and some sozcial topics evaluate “west issue” in the perspective of current political and social developments. In this context, Tevfik Fikret is in the favour of extention of borders related to westernism. He thinks of adopting west not only in terms of science, art and techniques but also in all social institutions. With the awakening of nation and nationalism, in the perod of National Literature emerging after II. Mesrutiyet besides the rejection of westernism (alafranga, westernism called civilization (muasırlaşma is also emphized. In this article west is evaluated from the point of view of Ziya Gökalp. According to Ziya Gökalp, west is a civilization circle which should be included in. Turkısh people should take their place in this circle by protecting national culture. Mehmet Akif, living in the same period and follwing Islamic style in his works, emphasizes that there should be limitations on the ınnovations taken from west. According to M. Akif, west can only be a model only in terms of science, art and technique. After 1912, M. Akif criticises west more severely

  5. Population Structure of West Greenland Narwhals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riget, F.; Dietz, R.; Møller, P.

    The hypothesis that different populations of narwhals in the West Greenland area exist has been tested by different biomarkers (metal and organochlorine concentrations, stable isotopes and DNA). Samples of muscle, liver, kidney, blubber and skin tissues of narwhals from West Greenland have been...... analysed for heavy metals, organochlorines, stable isotopes and DNA. The obtained results of metal concentrations and DNA were included in the existing database, whereas no previous data on organochlorines and stable isotopes in West Greenland narwhals existed. The metal and POP concentrations and stable...

  6. West Nile virus and the climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, P R

    2001-06-01

    West Nile virus is transmitted by urban-dwelling mosquitoes to birds and other animals, with occasional "spillover" to humans. While the means by which West Nile virus was introduced into the Americas in 1999 remain unknown, the climatic conditions that amplify diseases that cycle among urban mosquitoes, birds, and humans are warm winters and spring droughts. This information can be useful in generating early warning systems and mobilizing timely and the most environmentally friendly public health interventions. The extreme weather conditions accompanying long-term climate change may also be contributing to the spread of West Nile virus in the United States and Europe.

  7. DOLLY SODS WILDERNESS, WEST VIRGINIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englund, Kenneth J.; Hill, James J.

    1984-01-01

    Coal, the principal mineral resource of the Dolly Sods Wilderness, West Virginia is in at least seven beds of low- to medium-volatile bituminous rank. Of these beds, four are of sufficient thickness, quality, and extent to contain demonstrated coal resources which are estimated to total about 15. 5 million short tons in areas of substantiated coal resource potential. A Small-scale development of the coal resources of the Dolly Sods Wilderness has been by several shallow adits which provided fuel for locomotives during early logging operations and by a one truck mine. All mine entries are now abandoned. Peat, shale, clay, and sandstone, occur in the area but because of remoteness of markets and inaccessability they are not classified as resources in this report. Natural gas may occur in rocks underlying the area, but because of a lack of subsurface information an estimate of resource potential has not been made. No evidence of metallic-mineral resources was found during this investigation.

  8. IAU South West Asian ROAD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickaelian, Areg; Azatyan, Naira; Farmanyan, Sona; Mikayelyan, Gor

    2016-10-01

    Armenia is hosting the IAU South West Asian (SWA) Regional Office of Astronomy for Development (ROAD). It is a county of ancient astronomy and is also rich in modern astronomical facilities and infrastructures, hence may successfully serve as a regional center for various activities. Byurakan Astrophysical Observatory (BAO) has 2.6m and 1m Schmidt, as well as a number of smaller telescopes that are an observational basis for joint projects and collaborations. Armenian Virtual Observatory (ArVO) is hosting astronomical databases, such as the Digitized First Byurakan Survey (DFBS) and may also serve as a basis for development of VO structures in this region. Recently we have conducted a number of new activities; a meeting on ``Relation of Astronomy to other Sciences, Culture and Society" (RASCS) was organized by BAO and Armenian Astronomical Society (ArAS) in Oct 2014 in Byurakan. Activities related to Archaeoastronomy and Astronomy in Culture (AAC) were initiated as well. Discussions on future Armenian-Iranian collaboration in astronomy were carried out, including an Armenian-Iranian Astronomical Workshop held in Oct 2015 in Byurakan. Similar workshops have been carried out between BAO and Abastumani Astronomical Observatory (AbAO, Georgia) since 1974.

  9. Does the geoid drift west?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backus, G. E.; Parker, R. L.; Zumberge, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    In 1970 Hide and Malin noted a correlation of about 0.8 between the geoid and the geomagnetic potential at the Earth's surface when the latter is rotated eastward in longitude by about 160 degrees and the spherical harmonic expansions of both functions are truncated at degree 4. From a century of magnetic observatory data, Hide and Malin inferred an average magnetic westward drift rate of about 0.27 degrees/year. They attributed the magnetic-gravitational correlation to a core event at about 1350 A.D. which impressed the mantle's gravity pattern at long wavelengths onto the core motion and the resulting magnetic field. The impressed pattern was then carried westward 160 degrees by the nsuing magnetic westward drift. An alternative possibility is some sort of steady physical coupling between the magnetic and gravitational fields (perhaps migration of Hide's bumps on the core-mantle interface). This model predicts that the geoid will drift west at the magnetic rate. On a rigid earth, the resulting changes in sea level would be easily observed, but they could be masked by adjustment of the mantle if it has a shell with viscosity considerably less than 10 to the 21 poise. However, steady westward drift of the geoid also predicts secular changes in g, the local acceleration of gravity, at land stations. These changes are now ruled out by recent independent high-accuracy absolute measurements of g made by several workers at various locations in the Northern Hemisphere.

  10. West Bank Gaza Geo-MIS System

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — The Geo-MIS System is USAID/West Bank and Gaza's primary system for capturing and managing projectrelated information. Its purpose is to assist USAID and its...

  11. WEST AND EAST REGIONS OF GHANA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mobilisation and saving as well as records keeping in PMCS in the Upper West and. East Regions. 1. ..... money to meet the maintenance of pump facilities including pump site .... are given some incentives as motivation, the data show that the.

  12. West Nile Virus Mimicking Herpes Encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available A 3-year-old male child with suspected herpes simplex virus encephalitis who asubsequently tested positive for West Nile virus is reported from Schneider Children’s Medical Center, Petah Tikva, Israel.

  13. NNDSS - Table II. West Nile virus disease

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. West Nile virus disease - 2017. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding...

  14. West Coast Rockfish Conservation Areas, 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data delineate Rockfish Conservation Areas (RCA) off the West Coast of the United States for 2015. There are three types of areas closures depicted in this...

  15. West Coast Observing System (WCOS) Temperature Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The West Coast Observing System (WCOS) project provides access to temperature and currents data collected at four of the five National Marine Sanctuary sites,...

  16. Libraries in West Virginia: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/westvirginia.html Libraries in West Virginia To use the sharing features ... enable JavaScript. Bridgeport United Hospital Center Health Sciences Library 327 Medical Park Dr Bridgeport, WV 26330 681- ...

  17. Legume Diversity Patterns in West Central Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Estrella, de la M.; Mateo, M.A.; Wieringa, J.J.; Mackinder, B.; Munoz, J.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives - Species Distribution Models (SDMs) are used to produce predictions of potential Leguminosae diversity in West Central Africa. Those predictions are evaluated subsequently using expert opinion. The established methodology of combining all SDMs is refined to assess species diversity withi

  18. NNDSS - Table II. West Nile virus disease

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. West Nile virus disease - 2015.In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding...

  19. Drought May Beckon Bigger West Nile Outbreaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163495.html Drought May Beckon Bigger West Nile Outbreaks Dry environment ... found that epidemics were larger during years of drought. There were also bigger outbreaks in areas that ...

  20. West Nile Virus: Symptoms and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... treatment, such as intravenous fluids, pain medication, and nursing care. If you think you or a family member might have West Nile virus disease, talk with your health care provider. To learn more about treatment, visit ...

  1. Eighteenth annual West Coast theoretical chemistry conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    Abstracts are presented from the eighteenth annual west coast theoretical chemistry conference. Topics include molecular simulations; quasiclassical simulations of reactions; photodissociation reactions; molecular dynamics;interface studies; electronic structure; and semiclassical methods of reactive systems.

  2. West Nile virus and the climate

    OpenAIRE

    Epstein, Paul R.

    2001-01-01

    West Nile virus is transmitted by urban-dwelling mosquitoes to birds and other animals, with occasional “spillover” to humans. While the means by which West Nile virus was introduced into the Americas in 1999 remain unknown, the climatic conditions that amplify diseases that cycle among urban mosquitoes, birds, and humans are warm winters and spring droughts. This information can be useful in generating early warning systems and mobilizing timely and the most environmentally friendly public h...

  3. Potential seaways across West Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, David G.; Barnes, David K. A.; Fretwell, Peter T.; Bingham, Robert G.

    2011-10-01

    The West Antarctic ice sheet (WAIS) has long been considered vulnerable to rapid retreat and today parts are rapidly losing ice. Projection of future change in WAIS is, however, hampered by our poor understanding of past changes, especially during interglacial periods that could be analogs for the future, but which undoubtedly provide an opportunity for testing predictive models. We consider how ice-loss would open seaways across WAIS; these would likely alter Southern Ocean circulation and climate, and would broadly define the de-glacial state, but they may also have left evidence of their existence in the coastal seas they once connected. We show the most likely routes for such seaways, and that a direct seaway between Weddell and Ross seas, which did not pass through the Amundsen Sea sector, is unlikely. Continued ice-loss at present rates would open seaways between Amundsen and Weddell seas (A-W), and Amundsen and Bellingshausen seas (A-B), in around one thousand years. This timescale indicates potential future vulnerability, but also suggests seaways may have opened in recent interglacial periods. We attempt to test this hypothesis using contemporary bryozoan species assemblages around Antarctica, concluding that anomalously high similarity in assemblages in the Weddell and Amundsen seas supports recent migration through A-W. Other authors have suggested opening of seaways last occurred during Marine Isotope Stage 7a (209 ka BP), but we conclude that opening could have occurred in MIS 5e (100 ka BP) when Antarctica was warmer than present and likely contributed to global sea levels higher than today.

  4. On Universal Telecommunication Service and West China Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    This paper aims at studying the relationship between universal telecommunication service and West China development. It, firstly, introduces our country's demands for universal telecommunication service; secondly, analyses the demand of West China development for the universal telecommunication service; thirdly, depicts the development status of telecommunication industry of the west region; fourthly, points out the significance of universal telecommunication service to the west area; and lastly, brings forward the connotation of universal telecommunication service of west area.

  5. Evolution of the West Siberian Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vyssotski, A.V. [Chevron, 1500 Louisiana Street, Houston (United States); Vyssotski, V.N. [TNK-BP, 1 Arbat St, Moscow 119019 (Russian Federation); Nezhdanov, A.A. [OOO TyumenNIIgiprogas, 2 Vorovskogo Str., Tyumen 625019 (Russian Federation)

    2006-01-01

    The West Siberian Basin is one of the largest intra-cratonic basins of the world and an important hydrocarbon province of Russia. Perhaps the most important geologic event in Siberia was the emplacement of basalts around {approx} 250Ma (i.e. Permo-Triassic boundary) covering an area of about 5x10{sup 6} km{sup 2}. This volcanism may be responsible for a mass extinction that occurred around Permian-Triassic time. The pre-basaltic rifting event was limited to the north-northeastern sector of the basin. Initial basin wide subsidence took place in the Jurassic as a result of which the western part of Siberia became the West Siberian Basin bounded by uplifts to the east and to the west. One of the surprising aspects of the West Siberian Basin is the abundance of sub-vertical faults believed to be result of strike-slip movement. While intra-plate inversions and fault reactivation structures have been observed in many cratons, sub-vertical faults observed in the West Siberian Basin are unique because of their geometries and abundance. The differentiation between the effects of tectonics and eustasy in cratonic basins is simple-the global eustatic signal is basin-wide with regional and local tectonics playing an overprinting role. Thus, the Middle Jurassic-Turonian 1st, 2nd, and 3rd order cycles in the West Siberian Basin were primarily driven by eustasy. The Middle Jurassic-Turonian series can be subdivided into two second-order and 16 third-order transgressive-regressive cycles (within dataset extent). Fourth-order cycles appear to be controlled by delta shifting. Although extensively studied, a number of fundamental questions regarding the origin and evolution of the West Siberian Basin remain unresolved or poorly documented in the literature. [Author].

  6. 78 FR 22193 - Special Local Regulations; West Palm Beach Triathlon Championship, Intracoastal Waterway; West...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-15

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AA08 Special Local Regulations; West Palm Beach Triathlon... Palm Beach, Florida, during the West Palm Beach Triathlon Championship, on Saturday, June 1, 2013. Approximately 1,500 participants are anticipated to participate in the triathlon. The special local...

  7. 77 FR 56125 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; West Virginia; Amendments to West...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-12

    ..., EPA published a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPR) for West Virginia. 77 FR 10423. The ] NPR proposed... adopted a PSD program under 45 CSR 14, and the program became part of the West Virginia SIP. See 51 FR... review by the Office of Management and Budget under Executive Order 12866 (58 FR 51735, October 4,...

  8. Grizzly West: A Failed Attempt to Reintroduce Grizzly Bears in the Mountain West

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas M. Richardson

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Reviewed: Grizzly West: A Failed Attempt to Reintroduce Grizzly Bears in the Mountain West. By Michael M. Dax. Lincoln, NE: University of Nebraska Press, 2015. x + 289 pp. US$ 37.50. ISBN 978-0-8032-6673-5.

  9. Blooming Seas West of Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    For several weeks in May and early June, daily satellite images of the North Atlantic Ocean west of Ireland have captured partial glimpses of luxuriant blooms of microscopic marine plants between patches of clouds. On June 4, 2007, the skies over the ocean cleared, displaying the sea's spring bloom in brilliant color. A bright blue bloom stretches north from the Mouth of the River Shannon and tapers off like a plume of blue smoke north of Clare Island. (In the large image, a second bloom is visible to the north, wrapping around County Donegal, on the island's northwestern tip.) The image was captured by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Terra satellite. Cold, nutrient-stocked water often wells up to the surface from the deeper ocean along coastal shelves and at the edges of ocean currents. When it does, it delivers a boost of nutrients that fuel large blooms of single-celled plants collectively known as phytoplankton. The plants are the foundation of the marine food web, and their proliferation in this area of the North Atlantic explains why the waters of western Ireland support myriad fisheries and populations of large mammals like seals, whales, and dolphins. Like plants on land, phytoplankton make their food through photosynthesis, harnessing sunlight for energy using chlorophyll and other light-capturing pigments. The pigments change the way light reflects off the surface water, appearing as colorful swirls of turquoise and green against the darker blue of the ocean. Though individually tiny, collectively these plants play a big role in Earth's carbon and climate cycles; worldwide, they remove about as much carbon dioxide from the atmosphere during photosynthesis as land plants do. Satellites are the only way to map the occurrence of phytoplankton blooms across the global oceans on a regular basis. That kind of information is important not only to scientists who model carbon and climate, but also to biologists and fisheries

  10. Future markers of the West Greenlandic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trondhjem, Naja Blytmann

    2010-01-01

    Abstract West Greenlandic, a polysynthetic language, belongs to Inuit languages. In Inuktitut (Canada) and West Greenlandic (Inuit languages) tense is marked by optional tense suffixes and in both languages the temporal systems are based on a future/ non-future opposition. In Inuktitut the tense......, and it is used when none of the others can be used. It seems that some of the tense suffixes i.e. past (-sima, perfective, perfect, preterite) and future (-ler, begin, be about to, near future) originally had a more or less concrete aspectual meanings and have developed into more abstract tense meanings...... suffixes have developed a complicated remoteness system. In West Greenlandic the future tense suffixes have a distinction between vague and inevitable future, and the past time suffixes have developed different perfect meanings. In Iñupiaq (Alaska), the temporal system is based on an opposition between...

  11. La memoria y el registro de la Real Hacienda de Indias en la Casa de la Contratación (The memory and the record of the Royal Treasury in Indies in the Casa de la Contratación

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernández López, Francisco

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Resumen: Este artículo presenta, desde una perspectiva metodológica diplomática, la descripción y análisis de los libros de contabilidad que se llevaron en la Casa de la Contratación para el control administrativo y contable de la Real Hacienda. A estos efectos, mi objetivo es establecer el origen, naturaleza, formas y evolución, así como una clasificación de estos libros. Para el registro de las operaciones contables en esta institución se utilizaron, desde el momento de su creación en 1503, los libros de cargo y data. A mediados del siglo XVI aparecieron, además, los libros de arcas y los diarios y mayores de la partida doble. Abstract: This paper present, from a diplomatic methodological perspective, a description and analysis the accounting books of the Casa de la Contratación to the administrative and accounting control of the Royal Treasury in Indies. To this purpose, it is possible to demonstrate the origin, nature, formals requirements and evolution, together with a classification of these books. Transactions were recorded in the charge and discharge books, since 1503, and since the mid-sixteenth century in the books about arks and in the journals and the ledgers for double-entry bookkeeping.

  12. Glucose intolerance in the West African Diaspora

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jannie; Christensen, Dirk Lund

    2011-01-01

    In the United States, Black Americans are largely descendants of West African slaves; they have a higher relative proportion of obesity and experience a higher prevalence of diabetes than White Americans. However, obesity rates alone cannot explain the higher prevalence of type 2 diabetes. Type 2...

  13. Epidemiology: Malaria in a warmer West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caminade, C.; Jones, A. E.

    2016-11-01

    Malaria risk in West Africa is expected to fall (western region) or remain the same (eastern region) in response to climate change over the twenty-first century. This is primarily due to extreme temperature conditions projected under a high greenhouse gas emissions scenario.

  14. Design and manufacturing of WEST Baffle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batal, Tristan, E-mail: tristan.batal@cea.fr [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Firdaouss, Mehdi; Richou, Marianne; Ferlay, Fabien; Larroque, Sébastien; Gargiulo, Laurent [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Dupas, Timothée [SODITECH Ingénierie SA, 1 bis allée des gabians, 06150 Cannes la Bocca (France); Verger, Jean-Marc; Doceul, Louis; Samaille, Franck; Bucalossi, Jérôme [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Salami, Michael [AVANTIS groupe, 12 route de Saint Mathieu, 06130 Grasse (France)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Disruption's torque in the PFC was simulated thanks to ANSYS. • The ANSYS thermal results comply with WEST project requirements. • The cycling analysis complies with WEST project requirements. • 316L components comply with A level RCC-MRx criteria. - Abstract: The Tore Supra tokamak is being transformed in an X-point divertor fusion device in the frame of the WEST project, launched in support to the Iter tungsten divertor strategy. The WEST Baffle aims to evacuate particles by creating a toroidal pumping throat. It also protects the lower divertor cooling pipes and the passive stabilization plate from heat fluxes. The Baffle is made of actively cooled plasma facing components (PFCs), with underneath a passive stabilization plate and a support beam. The Baffle design is presented in a first part. In a second time the different ANSYS simulations are described: electromagnetic, thermal and mechanical results are presented. The design choices are justified for the different results obtained thanks to the simulation. In a final part, some aspects of the PFC manufacturing are presented.

  15. Large Acrobatic Play Pilgrimage to the West

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马洁

    2006-01-01

    Hosted by Ministry of Culture and Guangzhou Municipal People's Government,Guangzhou Bureau of Culture organized a list of first-class singing and dancing and acrobatic plays in Guangzhou in September 2006. Among these plays, large original acrobatic play Pilgrimage to the West of Guangzhou Acrobatic Troupe went on the stage during October 12th and November 5th.

  16. Wildlife resources of the West African savanna

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bie, de S.

    1991-01-01

    The wild fauna in Africa is a renewable resource and its overexploitation has led to the depletion of animal populations. This thesis focusses on the ecological characterization of the ungulate community of the West African savanna, with special reference to the Biosphere Reserve 'Boucle du

  17. Mastomys natalensis and Lassa fever, West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecompte, Emilie; Fichet-Calvet, Elisabeth; Daffis, Stéphane; Koulémou, Kékoura; Sylla, Oumar; Kourouma, Fodé; Doré, Amadou; Soropogui, Barré; Aniskin, Vladimir; Allali, Bernard; Kouassi Kan, Stéphane; Lalis, Aude; Koivogui, Lamine; Günther, Stephan; Denys, Christiane; ter Meulen, Jan

    2006-12-01

    PCR screening of 1,482 murid rodents from 13 genera caught in 18 different localities of Guinea, West Africa, showed Lassa virus infection only in molecularly typed Mastomys natalensis. Distribution of this rodent and relative abundance compared with M. erythroleucus correlates geographically with Lassa virus seroprevalence in humans.

  18. Vaccines in Development against West Nile Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederic Tangy

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available West Nile encephalitis emerged in 1999 in the United States, then rapidly spread through the North American continent causing severe disease in human and horses. Since then, outbreaks appeared in Europe, and in 2012, the United States experienced a new severe outbreak reporting a total of 5,387 cases of West Nile virus (WNV disease in humans, including 243 deaths. So far, no human vaccine is available to control new WNV outbreaks and to avoid worldwide spreading. In this review, we discuss the state-of-the-art of West Nile vaccine development and the potential of a novel safe and effective approach based on recombinant live attenuated measles virus (MV vaccine. MV vaccine is a live attenuated negative-stranded RNA virus proven as one of the safest, most stable and effective human vaccines. We previously described a vector derived from the Schwarz MV vaccine strain that stably expresses antigens from emerging arboviruses, such as dengue, West Nile or chikungunya viruses, and is strongly immunogenic in animal models, even in the presence of MV pre-existing immunity. A single administration of a recombinant MV vaccine expressing the secreted form of WNV envelope glycoprotein elicited protective immunity in mice and non-human primates as early as two weeks after immunization, indicating its potential as a human vaccine.

  19. Writing the New West: A Critical Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Paul; Meehan, Katharine; Gosnell, Hannah; Gilbertz, Susan J.

    2009-01-01

    A vast and growing interdisciplinary research effort has focused on the rise of the so-called New West, purportedly the product of regional socioeconomic, political, and ecological upheavals in states like Montana and Colorado. Reviewing the growing research on this problem in sociology, economics, geography, and conservation science, this article…

  20. West Indian Sojourners in Guatemala and Honduras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald N. Harpelle

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Review of: Race, Nation, and West Indian Immigration to Honduras, 1890-1940. Glenn A. Chambers. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2010. xii +202 pp. (Cloth US$ 35.00Black Labor Migration in Caribbean Guatemala, 1882-1923. Frederick Douglass Opie. Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 2009. 145 pp. (Cloth US$ 65.00

  1. Why We Need West Nile Virus Testing

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-09-27

    Dr. Rodrigo Hasbun, a professor of infectious diseases at McGovern Medical School at UT Health, discusses the need for West Nile virus testing in Texas.  Created: 9/27/2016 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 9/27/2016.

  2. Education and Koranic Literacy in West Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Easton, Peter

    1999-01-01

    The note examines the practical, and literate skills that students acquire at different levels in West African Koranic schools. It is a long-standing parallel system of education, yet, relatively unknown to development planers, thus seldom taken into explicit account in their policies, and strategies. Islamic educational systems have been present since the seventh century, and by the tenth ...

  3. West Florida shelf upwelling: Origins and pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisberg, Robert H.; Zheng, Lianyuan; Liu, Yonggang

    2016-08-01

    Often described as oligotrophic, the west Florida continental shelf supports abundant fisheries, experiences blooms of the harmful alga, Karenia brevis, and exhibits subsurface chlorophyll maxima evident in shipboard and glider surveys. Renewal of inorganic nutrients by the upwelling of deeper ocean water onto the shelf may account for this, but what are the origins and pathways by which such new water may broach the shelf break and advance toward the shoreline? We address these questions via numerical model simulations of pseudo-Lagrangian, isopycnic water parcel trajectories. Focus is on 2010, when the west Florida shelf was subjected to an anomalously protracted period of upwelling caused by Gulf of Mexico Loop Current interactions with the shelf slope. Origins and pathways are determined by integrating trajectories over successive 45 day intervals, beginning from different locations along the shelf break and at various locations and depths along the shelf slope. Waters upwelling across the shelf break are found to originate from relatively shallow depths along the shelf slope. Even for the anomalous 2010 year, much of this upwelling occurs from about 150 m and above, although waters may broach the shelf break from 300 m depth, particularly in the Florida Panhandle. Such interannual renewal of west Florida shelf waters appears to have profound effects on west Florida shelf ecology.

  4. West Virginia State Budgeting for Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meckley, Richard

    County school districts in West Virginia are facing a funding crisis. Significant outmigration resulting in decreased school enrollment has caused the state legislature to change the state school aid formula, forcing school districts to lay off large numbers of low-seniority employees. The state legislature's perception that public schools are…

  5. American Indian Studies in West Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartelt, H. Guillermo

    1986-01-01

    Interest in the American Indian in West Germany is high. Romantic notions, derived from the novels of 19th century German writer Karl May and American westerns shown on German television, combined with a subtle anti-Americanism might be responsible for the American Indian Movement (AIM) support groups that have been forming among students and…

  6. West African spatial patterns of economic activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walther, Olivier; Howard, Allen; Retaillé, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Over the last 30 years, two different bodies of literature developed by both US historians and francophone geographers have moved toward similar conclusions regarding West African economic spatial patterns. Despite their different backgrounds, both the ‘spatial factor’ approach promoted...

  7. West Point student drops out / Jorgen Johansson

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Johansson, Jorgen

    2001-01-01

    Läti kohus mõistis välja kahjutasu Juris Matusevics'ilt, kes rikkus Läti kaitsejõududega sõlmitud kokkulepet, mis kohustas teda pärast USA West Pointi sõjaväeakadeemia lõpetamist teenima viis aastat Läti armees

  8. Ecosystem variability in west Greenland waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch, E.; Pedersen, Søren Anker; Ribergaard, M. H.

    2004-01-01

    A review of the climate conditions off West Greenland during the past 50 years shows large variability in the atmospheric, oceanographic and sea-ice variables, as well as in fish stocks. A positive relationship is found between water temperature and the recruitment of cod and redfish, whereas the...

  9. The lithospheric mantle below southern West Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sand, Karina Krarup; Waight, Tod Earle; Pearson, D. Graham

    2009-01-01

    Geothermobarometry of primarily garnet lherzolitic xenoliths from several localities in southern West Greenland is applied to address the diamond potential, pressure and temperature distribution and the stratigraphy of the subcontinental lithospheric mantle ~600 Ma ago. The samples are from kimbe...... into the reworked Archean North of the Naqssugtoqidian deformation front....

  10. West Tennessee ACEI 2006 Fall Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Anna; Hailey, Beth

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the West Tennessee ACEI 2006 Fall Conference held at Union University in Jackson, Tennessee on October 14, 2006. The conference theme, Turning the Pages: A Focus on Children's Literature, was emphasized throughout the day. During the conference, the early childhood classroom teachers, preservice teachers, and administrators…

  11. South West Province Eye Care Programme, Cameroon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Enyegue Oye

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Situation analysis The South West Province of Cameroon is one of two English speaking provinces, much of which is situated in the equatorial rainforest. Most of the estimated 1.2 million inhabitants live in rural areas. The main occupation is agriculture for subsistence and employment in agro-industrial estates.

  12. Transcending Communication Barriers with West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampadu, Lena

    Americans doing business with West Africans are limited in their ability to communicate successfully in that part of the world because of language, stereotyping, and ethnocentrism. Americans must become accustomed to British patterns of speech and writing. Stereotypes of Africa, its people, and its cultures perpetuated by the media keep Americans…

  13. Hangzhou:EAST CITY,WEST LAKE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    @@ View over West Lake,Hangzhou is in Zhejiang Province,eastern coast area of China.It is one of the most important tourism cities here,famous for its natural beauty and historical and cultural heritages,and the political,economic and cultural center of Zhejiang province as well.

  14. Jimma town, Jimma Zone, South West Ethiopia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and determinants of under five mortality in Jimma ton, Jimma Zone, South West. Ethiopia. All under ... and malnutrition (2). These can vary in .... risk factor. Children breast fed for less than one year were 34 times more likely to die before age of ...

  15. NNDSS - Table II. West Nile virus disease

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. West Nile virus disease - 2016. In this Table, provisional* cases of selected†notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding...

  16. West Point student drops out / Jorgen Johansson

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Johansson, Jorgen

    2001-01-01

    Läti kohus mõistis välja kahjutasu Juris Matusevics'ilt, kes rikkus Läti kaitsejõududega sõlmitud kokkulepet, mis kohustas teda pärast USA West Pointi sõjaväeakadeemia lõpetamist teenima viis aastat Läti armees

  17. Marine fishery possibilities of the west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Panikkar, N.K.

    Marine fishery activity of the west coast of India is discussed. Sea fish production from the west coast of India makes three fourths of total fish production from Indian coasts. Kerala accounts for the largest production of fish in India...

  18. Hydrological modelling of the west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Suprit, K.

    A hydrological modelling framework was assembled for simulating discharges of the west-coast rivers of India. The framework is applied to the Mandovi river, Goa, a typical west-coast river. The modelling framework consisted of a digital elevation...

  19. Tidal propagation off the central west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Unnikrishnan, A.S.

    Present study reviews the characteristics of tidal propagation on the continental shelf off the central west coast of India. Available observations from tide gauges are used to describe the variations of tidal ranges along the west coast. Amplitudes...

  20. Climate change impacts on fisheries in West Africa: implications for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Climate change impacts on fisheries in West Africa: implications for ... as one of the most vulnerable regions to climate change in previous global analyses. ... of the region through economics and food security of West Africa to climate change.

  1. Coeliac disease in children of West Indian origin.

    OpenAIRE

    Hung, J C; Phillips, A D; Walker-Smith, J A

    1995-01-01

    Coeliac disease is uncommon in populations of non-European origin. Two English born West Indian children with coeliac disease are presented. The diagnosis should be considered in children of West Indian origin with chronic diarrhoea.

  2. 78 FR 59841 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; West Virginia; West Virginia's...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    ..., disproportionate human health or environmental effects, using practicable and legally permissible methods, under... Environmental protection, Air pollution control, Incorporation by reference, Nitrogen dioxide, Particulate... Environmental Protection, Division of Air Quality, 601 57th Street SE., Charleston, West Virginia 25304....

  3. 77 FR 10423 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; West Virginia; Amendments to West...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-22

    ... address, as appropriate, disproportionate human health or environmental effects, using practicable and... preempt tribal law. List of Subjects in 40 CFR Part 52 Environmental protection, Air pollution control...; Amendments to West Virginia's Ambient Air Quality Standards AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency...

  4. West Coast DA Event data - West Coast Toxic Pseudo-nitzschia bloom

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Beginning in the spring of 2015 the US West Coast began to experience the most wide-spread toxic Pseudo-nitzschia bloom to date, after approximately eight years...

  5. Optimal for difficult roofs. East-west orientation; Optimal fuer schwierige Daecher. Ost-West-Ausrichtung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouattour, Mohamed Ali [Solar Frontier Europe GmbH, Muenchen (Germany)

    2013-10-01

    With the help of CIS solar modules the unfavorable east-west roofs can be also use efficiently and profitably, since the good weak-light performance almost compensates the weak light components characterized irradiation conditions. [German] Mit Hilfe der CIS-Solarmodule lassen sich auch die unguenstige Ost-West-Daecher effizient und profitabel nutzen, da das gute Schwachlichtverhalten die hier von schwachen Lichtanteilen gepraegten Einstrahlungsverhaeltnisse nahezu kompensiert.

  6. West Virginia Interpretive Guide Training: A Collaborative Effort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcarczyk, Kelly; McKenney, Kathryn; Smaldone, Dave; Arborgast, Doug

    2013-01-01

    West Virginia University's Extension Service partnered with the Recreation, Parks, and Tourism Resources Program to improve guide performance in West Virginia's tourism industry. The result of this partnership is a West Virginia Interpretive Guide Training program aimed at providing low-cost, widely available training to guides…

  7. 78 FR 51199 - West Virginia; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-20

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency West Virginia; Major Disaster and Related Determinations... Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of West Virginia (FEMA-4132-DR), dated July 26, 2013...''), as follows: I have determined that the damage in certain areas of the State of West...

  8. 75 FR 18517 - West Virginia; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-12

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency West Virginia; Major Disaster and Related Determinations... Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of West Virginia (FEMA-1893-DR), dated March 29... Act''), as follows: I have determined that the damage in certain areas of the State of West...

  9. 75 FR 25873 - West Virginia; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-10

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency West Virginia; Major Disaster and Related Determinations... Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of West Virginia (FEMA-1903-DR), dated April 23... Act''), as follows: I have determined that the damage in certain areas of the State of West...

  10. 75 FR 39560 - West Virginia; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-09

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency West Virginia; Major Disaster and Related Determinations... Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of West Virginia (FEMA-1918-DR), dated June 24, 2010... follows: I have determined that the damage in certain areas of the State of West Virginia resulting...

  11. 77 FR 46103 - West Virginia; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-02

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency West Virginia; Major Disaster and Related Determinations... Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of West Virginia (FEMA-4071-DR), dated July 23, 2012...''), as follows: I have determined that the damage in certain areas of the State of West...

  12. 77 FR 76061 - West Virginia; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-26

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency West Virginia; Major Disaster and Related Determinations... Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of West Virginia (FEMA-4093-DR), dated November 27... West Virginia resulting from Hurricane Sandy during the period of October 29 to November 8, 2012, is...

  13. 75 FR 11902 - West Virginia; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-12

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency West Virginia; Major Disaster and Related Determinations... Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of West Virginia (FEMA-1881-DR), dated March 2, 2010... follows: I have determined that the damage in certain areas of the State of West Virginia resulting from...

  14. Study of West syndrome manifesting periventricular leukomalacia by MRI. Correlation between West syndrome and cerebral white matter lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamano, Shinichiro; Nara, Takahiro; Shimizu, Masaki; Arita, Jiro; Sakamoto, Masafumi; Eda, Naruyuki; Ogawara, Yoshikazu [Saitama Children`s Medical Center, Iwatsuki (Japan); Maekawa, Kihei

    1995-09-01

    Clinical features of West syndrome manifesting periventricular leukomalacia (PVL) were studied by MRI. The subjects were 10 patients with West syndrome associated with PVL. Occipital spike on electroencephalograms was considered an important characteristic finding of West syndrome. Patients with West syndrome associated with PVL had a lower cerebral blood flow volume at the early phase than those with cryptogenic West syndrome, suggesting a difference of pathophysiology between West syndrome with PVL and cryptogenic West syndrome. Abnormal findings on electroencephalograms and MRI, which are considered to affect the disease course, suggest the presence of cerebral cortical abnormalities, therefore, it is proved to be difficult to study the pathophysiology of West syndrome solely focusing on the findings of the cerebral cortical basal ganglia and the related parts. (Y.S.).

  15. Excerpt from East Is West and West Is East: Gender, Culture, and Interwar Encounters between Asia and America

    OpenAIRE

    Kuo, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Excerpted from Karen Kuo, East Is West and West Is East: Gender, Culture, and Interwar Encounters between Asia and America (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2012). Reprinted with permission from Temple University Press.

  16. Excerpt from East Is West and West Is East: Gender, Culture, and Interwar Encounters between Asia and America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Kuo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Excerpted from Karen Kuo, East Is West and West Is East: Gender, Culture, and Interwar Encounters between Asia and America (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2012.Reprinted with permission from Temple University Press.

  17. West Africa land use and land cover time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotillon, Suzanne E.

    2017-02-16

    Started in 1999, the West Africa Land Use Dynamics project represents an effort to map land use and land cover, characterize the trends in time and space, and understand their effects on the environment across West Africa. The outcome of the West Africa Land Use Dynamics project is the production of a three-time period (1975, 2000, and 2013) land use and land cover dataset for the Sub-Saharan region of West Africa, including the Cabo Verde archipelago. The West Africa Land Use Land Cover Time Series dataset offers a unique basis for characterizing and analyzing land changes across the region, systematically and at an unprecedented level of detail.

  18. The Influence of the West in American Civil War

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张铂

    2016-01-01

    After the 19th century, the West was no longer an appendage of the South and the North. During the Civil War, the North had superiority in both economy and politics. This owed much to the West. The share of the same labour system laid the foundation of the union between the North and the West. The victory of the North linked closely to the support of the West. The essay analyzed the contribution made by the West from the perspectives of economy and politics.

  19. Tectonics in the Northwestern West Philippine Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ni Xianglong; Wu Shiguo; Shinjo Ryuichi

    2008-01-01

    The West Philippine basin (WPB) is a currently inactive marginal basin belonging to Philippine Sea plate, which has a complex formation history and various crust structures. Based on gravity, magnetic and seismic data, the tectonics in West Philippine basin is characterized by amagnma spreading stage and strike slip fractures. NNE trending Okinawa-Luzon fracture zone is a large fracture zone with apparent geomorphology and shows a right-handed movement. The results of joint gravity-magnetic-seismic inversion suggest that the Okinawa-Luzon fracture zone has intensive deformation and is a transform fault. Western existence of the NW trending fractures under Ryukyu Islands Arc is the main cause of the differences between south and north Okinawa Trough. The Urdaneta plateau is not a remained arc, but remnant of mantle plume although its lava chemistry is similar to oceanic island basalt (OIB).

  20. Evacuation, escape and rescue west of Shetlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallagher, P.; Moran, K.C.

    1998-01-01

    This report has been prepared by WS Atkins Science and Technology on behalf of the Offshore Safety Division of the Health and Safety Executive. It concerns a study into the availability and operability of a range of production platform evacuation and rescue methods which are likely to be used in new field developments in the West of Shetland basin. The research involves an examination of the key factors influencing emergency response arrangements for the West of Shetland sea area. It includes a review of the types of facility envisaged and manning levels, the type of emergency support available to each facility, the availability of helicopters and SAR services. The research also provides comparisons, where appropriate, with both current practice and environmental limitations in the North Sea. (author)

  1. Teaching Scandinavian Interaction Design in West Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jannick Kirk

    2016-01-01

    Methods for interaction design have emerged and established themselves first in a Scandinavian context, later in US context and in the rest of the developed world. While good usability and good user experiences are important to all users of ICT, the question is whether the methods and techniques ...... Scandinavian Participatory design can be used to localize the learning process and make interaction design methods sensitive to the West African context. The paper is based on the author’s reflection on his experiences teaching interaction design in West Africa.......Methods for interaction design have emerged and established themselves first in a Scandinavian context, later in US context and in the rest of the developed world. While good usability and good user experiences are important to all users of ICT, the question is whether the methods and techniques...

  2. Aerial view of the West Area complex

    CERN Multimedia

    1976-01-01

    The SPS lies below ground beyond the top of the picture, and the proton beam from it enters the large West Hall from the right. All hadronic beams but one were concentrated in this hall. The neutrino beam from the underground target Passes through BEBC in the tall structure left of centre. The light-coloured building further left houses the neutrino counter experiments WA1 and WA18, and at the left end of the line, in the small block near the edge of the picture sits Gargamelle on a pedestal, since the beam is rising at an angle of about 2 deg. From right to left: West Hall - Bld 180; BEBC - Bld 191; Neutrino - Bld 182; Gargamelle - Bld 185.

  3. West African International Summer School for Young Astronomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strubbe, Linda E.; Okere, Bonaventure

    2016-10-01

    The West African International Summer School for Young Astronomers (WAISSYA) is a week-long program for university science students and teachers from West Africa to develop their interest in astronomy. The first summer school was held in Abuja, Nigeria, in 2013; the second Summer School was held in Nsukka, Nigeria, in July 2015. West Africa has a large number of students interested in science, but a paucity of facilities or interest from funding bodies in developing West African astronomy. Our broad goals for the WAISSYA program are: (1) to introduce West African students to astronomy; (2) to exchange ideas about teaching and learning in West Africa and abroad; and (3) to continue building a sustained astronomy partnership between West Africa and Canada. We now briefly describe three defining aspects of WAISSYA 2015.

  4. WEST PIONEER WILDERNESS STUDY AREA, MONTANA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Byron R.; Benham, John R.

    1984-01-01

    The West Pioneer Wilderness Study Area is in the Pioneer Mountains, Beaverhead County, Montana. A mineral-resource study of the area identified eight areas with molybdenum potential, four areas with gold-silver potential, one area with tungsten potential, and one area with barite potential. Several small mines were encountered, but none were accessible for the purposes of resource evaluation. No energy resources were identified in the study.

  5. SPS beam to the West Hall

    CERN Multimedia

    1976-01-01

    One of the two target stations feeding the West Hall (see Annual Report 1976). After the proton beam was split into three branches, the outer two were directed on to targets in the cast iron shielding box, the centre one passing through the box to another target station downstream. Five different targets could be put in each beam, controlled by the mechanism seen on top.

  6. Collaborative work between the West and Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hser, Yih-Ing; Bart, Gavin; Li, Li; Giang, Le Minh

    2013-12-01

    The "Collaborative Work between the West and Asia" session was chaired by Dr. Yih-Ing Hser and had three speakers. The speakers (and their topics) were: Dr. Gavin Bart (Collaborative Addiction Research in Asian Populations Home and Abroad), Dr. Li Li (Implementing Intervention Research Projects in Asia), and Dr. Le Minh Giang (Building Research Infrastructure for International Collaborative Studies on Substance Use Disorder and HIV: The Case of Hanoi Medical University/Vietnam).

  7. WEST COAST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larry Myer; Terry Surles; Kelly Birkinshaw

    2004-01-01

    The West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership is one of seven partnerships which have been established by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate carbon dioxide capture, transport and sequestration (CT&S) technologies best suited for different regions of the country. The West Coast Region comprises Arizona, California, Nevada, Oregon, Washington, and the North Slope of Alaska. Led by the California Energy Commission, the West Coast Partnership is a consortium of over thirty five organizations, including state natural resource and environmental protection agencies; national labs and universities; private companies working on CO{sub 2} capture, transportation, and storage technologies; utilities; oil and gas companies; nonprofit organizations; and policy/governance coordinating organizations. In an eighteen month Phase I project, the Partnership will evaluate both terrestrial and geologic sequestration options. Work will focus on five major objectives: (1) Collect data to characterize major CO{sub 2} point sources, the transportation options, and the terrestrial and geologic sinks in the region, and compile and organize this data via a geographic information system (GIS) database; (2) Address key issues affecting deployment of CT&S technologies, including storage site permitting and monitoring, injection regulations, and health and environmental risks (3) Conduct public outreach and maintain an open dialogue with stakeholders in CT&S technologies through public meetings, joint research, and education work (4) Integrate and analyze data and information from the above tasks in order to develop supply curves and cost effective, environmentally acceptable sequestration options, both near- and long-term (5) Identify appropriate terrestrial and geologic demonstration projects consistent with the options defined above, and create action plans for their safe and effective implementation A kickoff meeting for the West Coast Partnership was held on Sept 30-Oct

  8. West Coast, United States and Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    This view shows the west coast of the United States and Mexico (32.5N, 118.0W) and gives an indication of the range of view from orbital altitude. The visual range of this particular scene is from Skammon's Lagoon on Baja to the northern tip of California's Central Valley and Sierra Nevada, a range of over 15 degrees of latitude. Coastal fog drapes over southern California and northern Baja California. White Sands, New Mexico is at far right center.

  9. Developing Pipeline Transportation in West China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Chenghan; Wang Wei

    1997-01-01

    @@ Since the late 1980s, focus of exploration and development for oil & gas has been diverted to thewest of China, resulting in the discovery and development of Shaanbei gas field followed by large-scale exploration and development of Tarim,Turpan and Hami basins. Responding to this situation, pipeline construction focus has also been transferred to west China where large-scale development of pipeline transportation, an opportunity as well as a challenge, is expected.

  10. Electrometallurgical treatment demonstration at ANL-West

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goff, K. M.; Benedict, R. W.; Johnson, S. G.; Mariani, R. D.; Simpson, M. F.; Westphal, B. R.

    2000-03-20

    Electrometallurgical treatment (EMT) was developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to ready sodium-bonded spent nuclear fuel for geological disposal. A demonstration of this technology was successfully completed in August 1999. EMT was used to condition irradiated EBR-II driver and blanket fuel at ANL-West. The results of this demonstration, including the production of radioactive high-level waste forms, are presented.

  11. Visual examinations of K west fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitner, A.L., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-03

    Over 250 fuel assemblies stored in sealed canisters in the K West Basin were extracted and visually examined for damage. Substantial damage was expected based on high cesium levels previously measured in water samples taken from these canisters. About 11% of the inner elements and 45% of the outer elements were found to be failed in these examinations. Canisters that had cesium levels of I curie or more generally had multiple instances of major fuel damage.

  12. The Ramsar Sites of Disko, West Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egevang, C.; Boertmann, D.

    The three Ramsar sites of Disko Island in West Greenland were surveyed for breeding and staging waterbirds in July 2001. Two of the areas (no. 1 and 2) held a high diversity of waterbirds and proved to be of international importance for the Greenland white-fronted goose, while the third (no. 3......) held very few waterbirds and hardly meet any of the specific waterbird criteria of the Ramsar convention...

  13. Multiculturalism and Minority Rights: West and East

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Will Kymlicka

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Are Western models of multiculturalism and minority rights relevant for the post-Communist countries of Central and Eastern Europe? This article describes a range of Western models, and explores the social and political conditions that have led to their adoption in the West. It then considers various factors which might make the adoption of these models difficult in Eastern Europe, and considers the potential role of the international community in overcoming these obstacles.

  14. IR thermography diagnostics for the WEST project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courtois, X., E-mail: xavier.courtois@cea.fr [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Aumeunier, M.H. [OPTIS, ZE de La Farlède, F-83078 Toulon Cedex 9 (France); Joanny, M.; Roche, H.; Micolon, F.; Salasca, S.; Balorin, C.; Jouve, M. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • The WEST project requires a set of three infrared diagnostics. • The tungsten divertor will be monitored by the existing diagnostic renewed. • The antennas monitoring require the development of an innovative diagnostic. • A fiber bundle will be used as image transport for the antennas monitoring. • A wide angle tangential view of the upper divertor and the first wall is studied. - Abstract: To operate long plasma discharge in tokamak equipped with actively cooled plasma facing components (PFC), infrared (IR) thermography is a key diagnostic. Indeed IR data are used for both PFC safety monitoring, to avoid material degradation and water leak, and various physics studies on plasma-wall interaction. The IR monitoring is becoming even more crucial with today metallic PFCs. This is the case for the WEST project (Tungsten (W) Environment for Steady State Tokamak), which aims at installing a W divertor in Tore Supra (TS), in order to operate the 1st tokamak with a full W actively cooled divertor in long plasma discharges. The IR thermography system for the WEST project described in this paper will consist of a set of 3 different diagnostics: (1) Six cameras located in upper ports viewing the full W divertor, which reuse a part of the existing diagnostic of TS. (2) Five novel views located behind the inner protection panels for the antennas monitoring, based on an innovative imaging fibers bundle technology. (3) A tangential wide angle view located in a median port, for the upper divertor and first wall monitoring.

  15. Cause of East-West Earth Asymmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Scalera, Giancarlo

    2015-01-01

    The different slope of the Wadati-Benioff zones oriented towards east and west is considered a main asymmetry of the Earth's globe. Under the Americas they have angles of about 30o, while under the Pacific east coasts (Asia, Japan) the angles are steeper. In the framework of plate tectonics geodynamics the cause of this difference can be identified in the tidal drag that would cause a global shift of the lithosphere towards west. But this solution has been many times criticized on the basis of the irrelevance of the tidal forces with respect to viscous friction. Instead, it is possible to show that in a different framework, in which sudden extrusions of mantle materials occur by local phase change toward a more unpacked lattice, the value of the Coriolis fictitious force can rise of several magnitude orders, becoming the main cause of the east-west asymmetry of the Wadati-Benioff zones, which might be ascribed entirely to internal causes of the planet (its rotation and geodynamics) and not to external causes ...

  16. Poverty and health in West Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmert, U; Mielck, A; Shea, S

    1997-01-01

    The relationship between poverty and several health-related characteristics in West Germany was investigated. Data were derived from the National and Regional Health Surveys conducted in West Germany from 1984 to 1992. 25,544 males and 25,719 females with German nationality aged 25-69 years were examined. Poverty was defined as a household income of 50% less than the mean for West Germany. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to analyze the relationship between poverty and four health variables: individual health behavior, subjective assessment of health status, cardiovascular disease risk factors, and self-reported prevalence of lifetime chronic diseases. 10.2% of males and 12.8% of females were classified as being below the poverty line. For most but not all health parameters, less favourable results were found for the segment of the population with a household income below the poverty line. The most striking poverty-related differences were observed for lack of regular sport activities, subjective health satisfaction, obesity and myocardial infarction/stroke. Significantly lower prevalence rates for study subjects below the poverty line were observed for hypercholesterolemia in females only. Allergic disorders were the only chronic diseases reported significantly less often in males and females below the poverty line. Poverty has strong effects on individual health status and the prevalence of chronic diseases. Due to the rising unemployment rates in Germany in the last years it is very likely that the strong negative consequences of poverty for health are increasing.

  17. Enhanced integrators for WEST magnetic diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spuig, Pascal, E-mail: pascal.spuig@cea.fr [CEA IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Kumari, Praveena [Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), Bhat, Gandhinagar District 382428 (India); Moreau, Michel; Moreau, Philippe; Le-luyer, Alain; Malard, Philippe [CEA IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • On Tokamaks, analogue integrators are key instruments. • Our analogue integrators is reliable and fast, thus relevant for fusion facilities. • Our integrator fulfils requirements for long time pulses of WEST Tokamak. • The performances are amongst the best never obtained for analogue integrators. - Abstract: The WEST project consists of implementing a divertor configuration in the Tore Supra Tokamak. This modification requires to renew the magnetic diagnostics and especially adding new magnetic sensors in the divertor region. This has provided an opportunity to consider some enhancements to the existing integrator modules of the magnetic diagnostics. Two prototypes have been produced using different combinations of technical solutions, aiming to achieve lower drift and higher common mode rejection ratio (CMRR). This paper presents the explored and tested ways we followed in order to create enhanced analogue integrators for long pulses. The results of extensive and comprehensive tests are summarized. The achieved performances are analyzed regarding the WEST project specifications and furthermore, the latest ITER requirements for magnetic diagnostics integrators are also considered.

  18. The ARM West Antarctic Radiation Experiment (AWARE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubin, Dan; Bromwich, David; Vogelmann, Andrew; Verlinde, Johannes; Russell, Lynn

    2016-04-01

    West Antarctica is one of the most rapidly warming regions on Earth, and its changing climate in both atmosphere and ocean is linked to loss of Antarctic ice mass and global sea level rise. The specific mechanisms for West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) warming are not fully understood, but are hypothesized to involve linkage between moisture from Southern Ocean storm tracks and the surface energy balance over the WAIS, and related teleconnections with subtropical and tropical meteorology. This present lack of understanding has motivated a climate science and cloud physics campaign jointly supported by the US National Science Foundation (NSF) and Department of Energy (DOE), called the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) West Antarctic Radiation Experiment (AWARE). The DOE's second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) was deployed to McMurdo Station on Ross Island in November 2015 and will operate through December 2016. The AMF2 includes (1) cloud research radars, both scanning and zenith, operating in the Ka- and X-bands, (2) high spectral resolution and polarized micropulse lidars, and (3) a suite of shortwave and longwave broadband and spectral radiometers. A second suite of instruments is deployed at the WAIS Divide Ice Camp on the West Antarctic plateau during December 2015 and January 2016. The WAIS instrument suite provides (1) measurement of all surface energy balance components, (2) a polarized micropulse lidar and shortwave spectroradiometer, (3) microwave total water column measurement, and (4) four times daily rawinsonde launches which are the first from West Antarctica since 1967. There is a direct linkage between the WAIS instrument suite and the AMF2 at McMurdo, in that air masses originating in Southern Ocean storm tracks that are driven up over the WAIS often subsequently descend over the Ross Ice Shelf and arrive at Ross Island. Preliminary data are already illustrating the prevalence of mixed-phase clouds and their role in the surface energy balance

  19. The ARM West Antarctic Radiation Experiment (AWARE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, R. C.; Lubin, D.; Bromwich, D. H.; Vogelmann, A. M.; Verlinde, J.; Russell, L. M.

    2016-12-01

    West Antarctica is one of the most rapidly warming regions on Earth, and its changing climate in both atmosphere and ocean is linked to loss of Antarctic ice mass and global sea level rise. The specific mechanisms for West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) warming are not fully understood, but are hypothesized to involve linkage between moisture from Southern Ocean storm tracks and the surface energy balance over the WAIS, and related teleconnections with subtropical and tropical meteorology. This present lack of understanding has motivated a climate science and cloud physics campaign jointly supported by the US National Science Foundation (NSF) and Department of Energy (DOE), called the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) West Antarctic Radiation Experiment (AWARE). The DOE's second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) was deployed to McMurdo Station on Ross Island in November 2015 and will operate through December 2016. The AMF2 includes (1) cloud research radars, both scanning and zenith, operating in the Ka- and X-bands, (2) high spectral resolution and polarized micropulse lidars, and (3) a suite of shortwave and longwave broadband and spectral radiometers. A second suite of instruments is deployed at the WAIS Divide Ice Camp on the West Antarctic plateau during December 2015 and January 2016. The WAIS instrument suite provides (1) measurement of all surface energy balance components, (2) a polarized micropulse lidar and shortwave spectroradiometer, (3) microwave total water column measurement, and (4) four times daily rawinsonde launches which are the first from West Antarctica since 1967. There is a direct linkage between the WAIS instrument suite and the AMF2 at McMurdo, in that air masses originating in Southern Ocean storm tracks that are driven up over the WAIS often subsequently descend over the Ross Ice Shelf and arrive at Ross Island. Preliminary data are already illustrating (1) the prevalence of single- versus mixed-phase clouds and their role in the

  20. Profiles Junior high School West Java in Education Learning Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NFN Nahadi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Descriptive studies have been conducted on the existing junior high profile in West Java on Education Learning Environment. The study was conducted by purposive sampling and descriptive done to get an idea about the profile of SMP in West Java implementation of the learning environment. in junior high school in West Java. Research conducted by distributing questionnaires, and observations based on the indicators developed. Based on this research, it is known that, PLH learning in junior high school in West Java has been in force since 2007 after the enactment of the Governor of West Java on environmental education for junior high school students in West Java. Learning that lasts generally implemented in conventional teacher, and it is without any innovations. It has made learning the essential condition runs well, but has not lasted optimally.

  1. Raw material studies of West Central Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Bogosavljević Petrović

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with raw material problems in the territory of West Central Serbia geologically determined as the Čačak-Kraljevo (or West Morava basin. Our research is presented through the most striking case studies, Lojanik, Vlaška Glava and Lazac.  The Lojanik hill is a silicified forest by origin. It has occasionally been in use from the earliest periods of prehistory until today as a source of black and ochre-coloured flint, opal and silicified wood. A detailed prospection, including the mapping of surface finds using square nets, was conducted during two research campaigns.The Vlaška Glava is an open-air Palaeolithic site at which artefacts made of white, ochre, red, brown and black chert, silicified magnesite, volcanic and metamorphic rocks were found. Our research of primary and secondary geological deposits in the vicinity of the site showed equivalent raw material. We also found an interesting primary deposit of high quality bluish grey flint with outcrop activities (Workshop 1.The Lazac shaft is a contemporary magnesite mine, recently abandoned because of the high percentage of silicon-dioxide. We determined the same raw material in collections found at nearby Neolithic sites. Certain similarities between the wooden support systems of ore exploration in the Middle Ages and modern times were established at the entrance of the shaft.Our research in the territory of the West Morava basin resulted in reconstruction of some links between geological deposits and settlements and also creation of a relevant base for future raw material studies.

  2. Lassa fever: another threat from West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosh-Nissimov, Tal

    2016-01-01

    Lassa fever, a zoonotic viral infection, is endemic in West Africa. The disease causes annual wide spread morbidity and mortality in Africa, and can be imported by travelers. Possible importation of Lassa fever and the potential for the use of Lassa virus as an agent of bioterrorism mandate clinicians in Israel and other countries to be vigilant and familiar with the basic characteristics of this disease. The article reviews the basis of this infection and the clinical management of patients with Lassa fever. Special emphasis is given to antiviral treatment and infection control.

  3. Wild snakes harbor West Nile virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.R. Dahlin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available West Nile virus (WNV has a complex eco-epidemiology with birds acting as reservoirs and hosts for the virus. Less well understood is the role of reptiles, especially in wild populations. The goal of our study was to determine whether a wild population of snakes in Pennsylvania harbored WNV. Six species of snakes were orally sampled in the summer of 2013 and were tested for the presence of WNV viral RNA using RT-PCR. Two Eastern Garter Snakes, Thamnophis sirtalis sirtalis tested positive for viral RNA (2/123, 1.62%. These results indicate a possible role for snakes in the complex transmission cycle of WNV.

  4. East-West cooperation at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    From left to right: H. Bokemeyer, in charge of physics for INTAS, J. Sinnaeve, INTAS' general secretary and R. Landua, ATHENA spokesman, visit the ATHENA experiment installations. Heads of INTAS (International Association for the promotion and cooperation of the new independent states of the former Soviet Union) visited CERN on 11 October. This association is in charge of preserving and promoting the scientific potential of the former Soviet Union countries through a cooperation between East and West. In recents years, a certain number of projects related to the LHC experiments have been co-financed by INTAS. The support for young researchers coming from these countries is also a big success.

  5. West of Shetlands FPSO or TLP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1995-09-01

    One of the most promising and active areas, in terms of exploration, for hydrocarbon production offshore Europe is located West of the Shetland Islands and lies in water depths ranging from 350 m to 900 m subject to an extremely harsh environment. Three different field-proven concepts from the Doris Engineering`s point of view must be considered for this deep water area: a floating Production Storage and Off-loading (FPSO) unit, a production Tension Leg Platform (TLP) and a mini TLP designed to support wellheads and work aver facility. (author). 1 fig.

  6. Orchids inventory in Sintang Regency, West Kalimantan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ESTI ENDAH ARIYANTI

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Orchid is one of ornamental plants which have commercial value. Therefore most species are becoming threatened or even endangered because of over exploitation. In addition, its natural habitat is also decreasing. Conservation must be done urgently, both by in situ and ex situ conservation, which can be started by orchid inventory. The orchid inventory was done in TWA Bukit Kelam, TWA Baning and several places in Regency of Sintang, West Kalimantan. The result showed that there were 40 species belonged to 27 genera, which 32 species of them (20 genera were epiphytic orchids and 8 species (7 genera were terrestrial orchids.

  7. 33 CFR 110.189a - Key West Harbor, Key West, Fla., naval explosives anchorage area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., Key West, Fla., naval explosives anchorage area. (a) The anchorage ground. A circular area with its center at latitude 24°30′50.6″, longitude 81°50′31.6″ with a radius of 300 yards, for use for ammunition exceeding the prescribed limits for pier-side handling. (b) The regulations. (1) When occupied by a...

  8. West Virginia Digital Learning: Report to the Governor, Legislature, and West Virginia Board of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Accomplishing personalized, deeper learning through anywhere, anytime digital learning requires a redesign of the K-12 education system. This report looks at readiness for digital learning at two levels in West Virginia: the district capacity building to ready the system for digital learning and school implementation of digital learning. The…

  9. New emerging West Africa Ebola 2014:the present global threaten

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Viroj Wiwanitkit

    2014-01-01

    New emerging West Africa Ebola 2014 is the present global threaten. It is a new emerging viral infection that primarily occurred in West Africa and poses the possible trend of worldwide pandemic. The 2014 West Africa Ebola outbreak is the most severe in recorded history in regards to both the number of human cases and fatalities. World Health Organization calls for global concern and attempts to stop the spread of this emerging viral infection. In this brief review, the author presents and discusses on the clinical feature of the new emerging West Africa Ebola 2014.

  10. K West integrated water treatment system subproject safety analysis document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SEMMENS, L.S.

    1999-02-24

    This Accident Analysis evaluates unmitigated accident scenarios, and identifies Safety Significant and Safety Class structures, systems, and components for the K West Integrated Water Treatment System.

  11. New emerging West Africa Ebola 2014: the present global threaten

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viroj Wiwanitkit

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available New emerging West Africa Ebola 2014 is the present global threaten. It is a new emerging viral infection that primarily occurred in West Africa and poses the possible trend of worldwide pandemic. The 2014 West Africa Ebola outbreak is the most severe in recorded history in regards to both the number of human cases and fatalities. World Health Organization calls for global concern and attempts to stop the spread of this emerging viral infection. In this brief review, the author presents and discusses on the clinical feature of the new emerging West Africa Ebola 2014.

  12. Empowerment model of biomass in west java

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulyana, C.; Fitriani, N. I.; Saad, A.; Yuliah, Y.

    2017-06-01

    Scarcity of fossil energy accelerates the search of renewable energy sources as the substitution. In West Java, biomass has potential to be developed into bio-briquette because the resources are abundant. The objectives of this research are mapping the potency of biomass as bio-briquette in West Java, and making the model of the empowerment biomass potential involving five fundamental step which are raw material, pre-processing process, conversion mechanism, products, and end user. The main object of this model focused on 3 forms which are solid, liquid, and gas which was made by involving the community component as the owner biomass, district government, academics and researcher communities, related industries as users of biomass, and the central government as the policy holders and investors as a funder. In the model was described their respective roles and mutual relationship one with another so that the bio-briquette as a substitute of fossil fuels can be realized. Application of this model will provide the benefits in renewability energy sources, environmental, socio economical and energy security.

  13. Architecture of WEST plasma control system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravenel, N., E-mail: nathalie.ravenel@cea.fr [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Nouailletas, R.; Barana, O.; Brémond, S.; Moreau, P.; Guillerminet, B.; Balme, S.; Allegretti, L. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Mannori, S. [ENEA C.R. Brasimone (Italy)

    2014-05-15

    To operate advanced plasma scenario (long pulse with high stored energy) in present and future tokamak devices under safe operation conditions, the control requirements of the plasma control system (PCS) leads to the development of advanced feedback control and real time handling exceptions. To develop these controllers and these exceptions handling strategies, a project aiming at setting up a flight simulator has started at CEA in 2009. Now, the new WEST (W Environment in Steady-state Tokamak) project deals with modifying Tore Supra into an ITER-like divertor tokamak. This upgrade impacts a lot of systems including Tore Supra PCS and is the opportunity to improve the current PCS architecture to implement the previous works and to fulfill the needs of modern tokamak operation. This paper is dealing with the description of the architecture of WEST PCS. Firstly, the requirements will be presented including the needs of new concepts (segments configuration, alternative (or backup) scenario, …). Then, the conceptual design of the PCS will be described including the main components and their functions. The third part will be dedicated to the proposal RT framework and to the technologies that we have to implement to reach the requirements.

  14. West Virginia's Lost Youth: Appalachian Stereotypes and Residential Preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towers, George

    2005-01-01

    This study uses a cognitive mapping survey to examine the effect of Appalachian stereotypes on West Virginia high school students' residential preferences. The research addresses the popularly held hypothesis that West Virginia is suffering out-migration of its young people in part because of negative regional imagery. Survey results provide some…

  15. Forest gradients in West Africa. A spatial gradient analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rompaey, van R.S.A.R.

    1993-01-01

    The tropical rain forests of West Africa, west of the Dahomey interval, once covered some 40 million ha. Being on the western fringe of the African continent, they receive abundant rainfall from the SW monsoon. Further inland, rainfall gradually decreases and the forests give way to savanna and ulti

  16. Forest gradients in West Africa : a spatial gradient analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rompaey, van R.S.A.R.

    1993-01-01

    The tropical rain forests of West Africa, west of the Dahomey interval, once covered some 40 million ha. Being on the western fringe of the African continent, they receive abundant rainfall from the SW monsoon. Further inland, rainfall gradually decreases and the forests give way to savanna and

  17. A Romantic Study of Shelly's "Ode to the West Wind"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯敏贤

    2007-01-01

    Ode to the West Wind is one of the marvelous poetry of Percy Bysshe Shelley. In order to study the Romanticism in Shelly's Ode to the West Wind, this thesis, by studying the features of Romanticism, shows the fascinating romantic beauty and glamour of this poetry.

  18. Dateline USA: Settling the West, 1800-1900.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatton, Barbara; O'Laughlin, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Presents an annotated bibliography of titles related to the theme "Settling the West" which are appropriate for primary, elementary, and middle grades. Topics include overviews of Western history; early 19th century; the gold rush; the pony express; travelers by trail, rail, and ship; settling the West; cowboys and cattle; and the…

  19. W.E.S.T. Pilot Project. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Gorman, Lori A. Stinson

    The Saskatchewan Federation of Labor (SFL) conducted a Workers' Education for Skills Training, or WEST Program, to upgrade its membership's basic literacy skills. The purpose of the WEST Program was to develop, ensure access to, and build support for a workplace literacy program designed to meet the diverse needs of affiliates' members. Six…

  20. Energy Generation Potential of West African Ocean Current ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. OLIVER OSUAGWA

    2015-12-01

    Dec 1, 2015 ... Department of Marine Engineering, Faculty of Technology, Federal University of Petroleum Resources, P.M.B. 1221 ... West Africa in a streamed regular supply. ... system; Design of ocean current generating system whose efficiency relies .... Offloading Liquefied Natural Gas Facility for Offshore West Africa.

  1. The Contrast between Festivals in China and In West

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    乔烨辛; 乌日乐

    2013-01-01

    When we study a kind of language,it is important to know the phonetic culture background first.We are going to discuss the traditional festivals’origins,social background,and festival customs in China and in West.China has the festal likeness in representative tradition with west the place of the difference.

  2. BP Announces Withdrawal from West-to-East Gas Project

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@ On August 31, 2001, BP announced that BP would not participate in the bidding launched by PetroChina for the West-to-East gas transmission project,China's landmark project for West Development that is valued billions of US dollars.

  3. West Virginia's Lost Youth: Appalachian Stereotypes and Residential Preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towers, George

    2005-01-01

    This study uses a cognitive mapping survey to examine the effect of Appalachian stereotypes on West Virginia high school students' residential preferences. The research addresses the popularly held hypothesis that West Virginia is suffering out-migration of its young people in part because of negative regional imagery. Survey results provide some…

  4. The German East-West Divide in Knowledge Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patuelli, Roberto; Vaona, Andrea; Grimpe, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    , in particular between the East and the West. Based on analyses at the NUTS 3 regional level, we find different knowledge production functions for the East and the West. Moreover, we investigate how our results are affected by the adoption of alternative aggregation levels. Overall, our findings suggest...

  5. 77 FR 20044 - West Virginia; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-03

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency West Virginia; Major Disaster and Related Determinations... Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of West Virginia (FEMA-4059-DR), dated March 16... ``Stafford Act''), as follows: I have determined that the damage in certain areas of the State of...

  6. 77 FR 20042 - West Virginia; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-03

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency West Virginia; Major Disaster and Related Determinations... Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of West Virginia (FEMA-4061-DR), dated March 22... ``Stafford Act''), as follows: I have determined that the damage in certain areas of the State of...

  7. Marine West Coast Forests, Chapter 9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perakis, Steven S.; Geiser, Linda H.; Lilleskov, Erik A.; Pardo, Linda H.; Robin-Abbott, Molly J.; Driscoll, Charles T.

    2011-01-01

    Human activities have greatly increased nitrogen emissions and deposition across large areas of Earth. Although nitrogen is an essential nutrient for plant growth, too much nitrogen in excess of critical loads leads to losses of biodiversity, soil and stream acidification, nutrient imbalances, and other deleterious effects. In a new report quantifying critical loads of nitrogen deposition across the United States, USGS scientist Steve Perakis and co-authors provided a chapter about responses of marine west coast forests. Much of this region is understudied with respect to nitrogen deposition, and in this chapter the authors identify known adverse effects and estimate critical loads of nitrogen deposition for western Oregon and Washington and southeast Alaska forests. Perakis also contributed to the synthesis chapter, which includes background, objectives, advantages and uncertainties of critical loads, an overview of critical loads across U.S. ecoregions, and other topics.

  8. Usability and Interaction Design in West Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jannick Kirk

    , with a specific aim at the dissemination of knowledge in field of interaction design both in an academic context, as well as among practitioners. More specifically the paper discusses how interaction design knowledge can be disseminated in West Africa, particularly in Higher Education.......Good usability is important in all ICT solutions. To achieve good usability, a good praxis for interaction design is needed. Usability and interaction design have however emerged and established itself in a North European and US context. The ICT industry in Africa do not have the same resources...... in the field of interaction design as in the developed world. While good usability and good user experiences are important to all users of ICT, the question is whether the methods and techniques that were mainly developed in Scandinavia, Europe and US are suitable for ICT development in Africa? Can ideals...

  9. I Chemistry Conference of West Bahia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boaz Galdino de Oliveira

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The I Chemistry Conference of West Bahia [1] is an event carried out by the Núcleo de Ensino, Pesquisa e Extensão de Química (NEPEQ, and aims to disseminate chemical researches developed on the Universidade Federal do Oeste da Bahia (UFOB at undergraduate level as well as on the master’s program. This special issue contains some of works presented throughout the JornaQui, such as those from analytical chemistry, natural products, theoretical chemistry, medicinal chemistry, chemistry teaching, spectroscopy, materials science, catalysis and photochemistry. In this context, we would like to highlight the researches of bioactive compounds is by molecular modeling or phytochemistry, studies of intermolecular systems in the infrared spectrum, environmental monitoring by using experimental techniques, new nanocompounds characterized by X-ray diffraction, photochemical degradation organic material, for example. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17807/orbital.v1i1.844

  10. November 2016 West Hackberry Subsidence Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriarty, Dylan Michael [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lord, Anna C. Snider [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Subsidence monitoring is a critical component to understanding the cavern integrity of salt storage caverns. This report looks at historical and recent data from two of the three West Hackberry dome cavern operators. DOE SPR and LA Storage are coordinating subsidence surveys to create a comprehensive understanding of ground movement above the dome. Data from annual level and rod surveys, GPS, and tiltmeter data show the sites are experiencing typical ground movement. The highest subsidence rate is seen in the middle of the DOE SPR site at just under one inch per year with less ground movement around the edge of the site. A GPS and tiltmeter instrument in the northeast areas of the DOE SPR site has not seen any trend change since the devices were installed in 2013. Comparison between recent ground movement data and historical trends suggest that there is no reason to believe that any DOE SPR or LA Storage caverns have been structurally compromised.

  11. ’The West Is Polluting China’

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    China is under increasingly severe criticism from the West for its environ- menial problems,but recently there are varying voices in the international community about the reasons surrounding this issue.According to Britain’s New Economics Foundation,Western countries rely heavily on Chinese commodities,meaning in the process of manufacturing they are transferring pollution to China.This London-based think tank also puts forward that the discussion should shift its focus from commodity producers to consumers. Writing in the Economic Observer,Professor Hou Dongmin from the Center for Population and Development Studies under the Renmin University of China says that the international community has to face up to the truth.He believes one of the reasons for environmental pollution in China is the country is undertaking a high proportion of global manufacturing activities,which naturally brings environmental pressure to China.Excerpts of Hou’s thoughts follow:

  12. Optical polarimetry of Comet West 1976 VI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalsky, J.J.

    1981-09-01

    Four narrowband filters covering the 440-850 nm wavelengths were used to measure the polarization of the continuum of Comet West 1976 VI. Postperihelion observations indicated wavelength-independent linear polarization in all of the three measurements made, in agreement with other polarization measurements of the comet from the visible to the near-infrared but in contrast with the general tendency in comets toward polarization increase with wavelength. No circular polarization was detected, and it is suggested by (1) the magnitude of polarization as a function of scattering angle, (2) wavelength independence, and (3) infrared and optical photometric properties, that dirty silicates with radii approaching 5 microns may be responsible for the phenomena observed.

  13. Spectrophotometry of Comet West 1976 VI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozenbush, V.K.

    1986-05-01

    Spectra obtained for the coma, nuclear fragments A and D, and tail of Comet West 1976 VI on April 1, 2 and 7, 1976 are noted to encompass coma spectra which differed from those of the nuclear fragments, which exhibited a strong continuum with superimposed emissions that included a stronger CO(+)-band system than that of the coma. A detailed comparison between fragment spectra has revealed great differences in both quasi-simultaneously obtained and five-day-separated cases. The relative intensities of different CO(+) bands are compared to the theoretical ones, and the abundances of CO(+) ions corresponding to different vibrational transitions are determined relative to that of CN. 24 references.

  14. [Epidemics and colonial medicine in West Africa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, C; Collignon, R

    1998-01-01

    We studied colonial medical practices and health policies in West Africa, which has faced endemics and epidemics that have affected entire societies. We found that attempts to centralize the organization of colonial medicine, which began in the late 19th Century, were limited until the end of World War I. Research and control programs expanded after 1920, concentrating on epidemics, but largely ignoring many major health problems, such as measles, whooping cough and malnutrition, the importance of which were not recognized until after World War II. This appraisal of colonial medicine highlights the difficulties of introducing modern medicine and its ideas into African societies. There have been various social reactions, resulting in the current duality in which traditional and modern medicine coexist.

  15. Dry spell frequency in West Java, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purnaningtyas, V. I.; Boer, R.; Faqih, A.

    2017-03-01

    The climatology and variability of dry spells are valuable information for scientists, engineers, planners, and managers working in water-related sectors such as agriculture, ecology, hydrology, and water resources. The dry spell concerns consecutive dry days which are the largest number of consecutive days with less than 1 mm of daily precipitation within a year. The objective of this study is to analyse the spatial and temporal characteristics of dry spells and also specifically investigate the frequency patterns of the dry spell distribution based on historical observed daily precipitation from 1981 to 2010. The longest dry spell occured at Pasirukem with the length of 252 days. The northern coast of West Java have higher probabilities of dry spells more than 5, 10, 15, and 20 days.

  16. BRYOPHYTES OF MOUNT PATUHA, WEST JAVA, INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROBBERT GRADSTEIN

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available GRADSTEIN, R.    et al. 2010. Bryophytes of Mount Patuha, West  Java,  Indonesia.  Reinwardtia  13(2:  107–123. This  paper  presents  the  results  of  a  two–day  survey  of  the  bryophyte  flora of Mt.  Patuha  and  its  surroundings  near Bandung, West Java, carried out in the framework of the 5th regional training course on bryophyte and lichen diversity and conservation organized by SEAMEO BIOTROP, Bogor, in July 2009. A total of 159 bryophyte species were identi-fied,  including 98 mosses, 60  liverworts, and 1 hornwort, representing almost 1/6 of the  total bryophyte flora of Java. Three moss species, Bryohumbertia subcomosa (Dix. J.–P. Frahm, Fissidens gymnogynus Besch. and F. polypodioidesHedw., and one liverwort, Lejeunea pectinella Mizut., are new additions to the Javanese flora. The bryophyte diversity of Mt. Patuha is well representative of the Malesian flora and is rich in uncommon species. However, the relatively poor representation of shade epiphytes and commonness of sun epiphytes and generalists reflect disturbance of the forest by anthropogenic activities. Careful attention should be given  to conservation of  the  remaining natural  forest  in order  to prevent further losses of the rich bryophyte diversity of the area.

  17. West Nile Disease Epidemiology in North-West Africa: Bibliographical Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjelloun, A; El Harrak, M; Belkadi, B

    2016-12-01

    West Nile fever (WNF) or West Nile disease (WND) is a mosquito-borne viral disease that can affect birds, humans and horses. West Nile virus (WNV) is a member of the genus Flavivirus in the family Flaviviridae. WNV is maintained in a mosquito-bird-mosquito transmission cycle, whereas humans and horses are considered dead-end hosts. In human and horses, symptoms range from unapparent infection to mild febrile illness, meningitis, encephalitis or death. WNV has a wide geographical range that includes portions of Europe, Asia, Africa, Australia (Kunjin virus), and in North, Central and South America. Migratory birds are thought to be primarily responsible for virus dispersal, including reintroduction of WNV from endemic areas into regions that experience sporadic outbreaks (Fields Virology, 2001, Lippincott Williams and Wilkins, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, 1043-1125). The occurrence of disease in humans and animals along with birds and mosquitoes surveillance for WNV activity demonstrates that the virus range has dramatically expanded including North, Central and South America as well as Europe and countries facing the Mediterranean Basin. WND infection in humans has been reported in Morocco in 1996 (Virologie, 1, 1997, 248), in Tunisia in 2007 (Ann. N. Y. Acad., 951, 2001, 117) (Med. Trop., 61, 2001, 487) and 2003 (Epidémiologie de la fièvre West Nile, 2012, Thèse de doctorat, Université Montpellier II, Sciences et techniques du Langueduc, Montpellier, France), and in Algeria in 1994 (Rev. Sci. Tech., 31, 2012, 829). Outbreaks of equine encephalitis have been also reported in Morocco in 1996 (Bull. OIE, 11, 1996, 867), in 2003 (Emerg. Infect. Dis., 11, 2005, 306) and in 2010 (World Animal Health Information Database. WAHID, 2010). Serological evidence of WNV has been demonstrated in the three countries in many species. The aim of this review was to assess the epidemiological situation of WND in north-west Africa comprising Morocco, Algeria and Tunisia, with

  18. Study on the Names of Places Passing by Kang Xi in His Second Expedition of Galdan in the West of Inner Mongolia%康熙第二次亲征噶尔丹所经内蒙古西部地方地名研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘忠和

    2015-01-01

    This paper studies the places passing by Kang Xi in his second expedition in the west of In-ner Mongolia and the names of these places ,which enables a general correspondence between names indi-cated by Mongolian language in the past with the Chinese names used now .This will give us ,especially the researchers a clear picture Kang Xi's expedition and the relationship with the western region of Inner Mon-golia .In addition ,it will make us understand the development of this region in a clearer way .The paper al-so analyzes the ending of this expedition .%笔者对康熙第二次亲征噶尔丹所经过的今内蒙古西部地方、地名进行研究,使彼时多数用蒙古语标识的地名能与今或蒙语或汉语地名有大致对应,从而使人们特别是研究者对康熙的此次亲征、与今内蒙古西部地区的关系更加清晰,对内蒙古西部地区彼时的发展有较明了的认识。笔者还对此次亲征的结束进行了分析。

  19. The Counterfactual Nostalgia of Indie Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    ” which can be described as a representation of a representation (Juul 2014), Here contemporary technology is used to represent earlier and cheaper representational styles, such as large pixels, crayons, or low-polygon 3D. Seeing independent game history through the lens of visual style, it is apparent...... that while early modern independent games such as Cave Story deliberately used a pixel style to emulate 1980’s video games, visual style in independent games has since become a type of counterfactual nostalgia, where visual styles refer to styles that were not actually part of video game history. For example...

  20. Polar bears, eskimos and indie music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Otte, Andreas Roed

    2013-01-01

    Visse kunstnere og bands fra Grønland gør brug af et grønlandsk nation-brand i forsøg på at differentiere sig på det internationale musikmarked. Ved at se på forskellige strategier til at co-brande musik sammen med Grønland som nation, undersøger denne artikel hvordan grupperne Nive Nielsen and t...

  1. Rural poverty and development in West Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, F

    1981-07-01

    Rural poverty in West Malaysia during the 1957-1970 period is examined. The period covered was 1 of a high rate of growth combined with an increasing inequality of income and worsening poverty. During the 1955-1970 period, a large amount of development funds, manpower, and expertise was directed towards a reduction of West Malaysia's rural poverty. Despite these efforts, rural poverty increased. Over the period under review, the share of income going to the richest 20% of the population increased from 50% to 56%; the share going to the middle 20% of the population remained constant at 20%; the poorest 60% of the population saw their share of income decline from 30% to 24%. The poorest 40% of the population received only 11.6% of income in 1970. They were predominantly rural, with this sector accounting for 87% of all poverty. The 3 development plans of this period set high aggregate growth rates as the primary targets and emphasized productivity and income in the rural sector. Rural development has not been sold short; the total funding figure of $2,209.46 million represents 40% of all development spending between 1956 and 1970. The money funded 3 broad areas of rural development: replanting of smallholder rubber with high-yielding clones; increasing rice production; and opening new land. The strategy has been to concentrate upon raising the yields from existing farmland and expanding into new areas of settlement. The problem of dealing with poverty in West Malaysia was made worse by the rapid rate of population increase. The population increase of 1,657,000 was absorbed into the traditional smallholder sector, very largely in exisitng areas of settlement. Over the same period, the modern sector of agriculture, the rubber estates, reduced their labor force by 30,000 as they moved into the cultivation of oil palm, a crop requiring less labor. Some of the additional agricultural workers were placed on new land under government land-development and resettlement

  2. INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY AND UNIVERSITIES

    OpenAIRE

    Papin-Ramcharan, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    Universities and other institutions of higher learning like the University of the West Indies (UWI), are in the business of creating intellectual property. This article describes the importance of intellectual property protection particularly for developing countries. It also gives the experience of The St. Augustine Campus of the University of the West Indies with intellectual property protection.

  3. On specimens of the coral genus Tubastraea, with notes on phenomena of fission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschma, H.

    1953-01-01

    Among the material brought together in the West Indies by Dr P. Wagenaar Hummelinck there are some coral colonies of the genus Tubastraea that are interesting from various points of view, in the first place because this genus of Madreporaria has but recently become known to occur in the West Indies.

  4. The seismicity of Marapi volcano, West Sumatra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Auria, L.

    2009-04-01

    Marapi is one of the active volcanoes in West Sumatra. It is a stratovolcano with an edifice that is elongated in the ENE-WSW direction. Its elevation is about 2,900 m a.s.l. The summit area is characterized by a caldera that contains some active craters aligned along the ENE-WSW direction. The Marapi volcano is an attractive region for tourists and hosts many small communities its surrounding areas. The recent history of Mt. Marapi is characterized by explosive activity at the summit craters. No lava flows have passed the rim of the summit caldera in recent times. The last eruption occurred on August 5, 2004, and consisted of moderate explosive activity from the central crater. In 1975 an eruption with magmatic and phreatic explosive phases and mudflows and lahars occurred that caused fatalities in the surrounding areas. Since 1980 other eruptions have occurred at Marapi volcano. Even if the explosive intensities of those eruptions have been small to moderate, in some cases, there were fatalities. A cooperation project started between Italy and Indonesia (COVIN) for the monitoring of volcanoes in West Sumatra. In the context of this project a monitoring centre has been set up at the Bukittinggi Observatory and a seismological monitoring system for Marapi volcano has been realized. This system is based on a broadband seismic network including 4 three-component stations. The data acquired by the broadband network of Marapi volcano are continuous recordings of the seismic signals starting from 19/10/2006. Volcano-Tectonic and Long Period events of Marapi volcano together with regional and teleseismic earthquakes are recorded. Several events of high magnitude located at short distances from the network were also recorded such as on March 6, 2007, when two events of Magnitudes Mw 6.4 and 6.3 were recorded with the epicentres near the Marapi volcano. During the following days, there was a sequence of hundreds of aftershocks. The preliminary analysis of the seismicity of

  5. Cell-mediated and humoral immunity in west syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terezinha C. B. Montelli

    1981-03-01

    Full Text Available The immunological status of five children with West syndrome consequent to previous cerebral lesions was investigated. Three children had West syndrome and two were in transition from West to Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. All of them showed cellular immunological deficiencies in the following tests: sensitization to DNCB, intracutaneous reaction to PHA, inhibition of leucocyte migration, blastic transformation of lymphocytes, T and B lymphocytes in peripheric blood and levels of serum immunoglobulins. These immunological deficiencies, of different degrees of severity, were associated to frequent infections in these children. A possible association between the immunological deficiencies and autoimmunity is discussed.

  6. West Royalty substation fire post mortem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-05-12

    This post mortem discussed a fire that occurred as a result of three 13.8 kV circuit breakers tripping at a substation control building in Prince Edward Island (PEI). Employees of the electric utility were immediately dispatched to the substation. Between 25,000 and 55,000 customers were without power as a result of firefighters tripping the 138 kV supply to the substation in order to disconnect electricity from the building. A 55 MW combustion turbine was black-started by the operator in order to pick up the electrical load from the Charlottetown substation. Power was gradually restored to utility customers in the region over the next day. An additional generator was used to supply electricity to a final few customers in outlying areas. A subsequent investigation determined that a squirrel caused the breaker to trip. However, a fault in the breaker caused the outage to become more widespread. The utility will continue to investigate methods of improving pest control for substation buildings. A new 13.8 kV circuit will be built to interconnect the Charlottetown and West Royalty substations. 1 fig.

  7. Passive solar systems performance in West Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habenicht, G.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses the influence of the two main climatic features (solar radiation and temperature) on the performance of passive solar systems in West Germany. Evaluations were made for the four climatic zones - German Lowlands, German Highlands, Alp Foreland, Alps. These zones differ in solar radiation, temperature and diurnal temperature swings. To evaluate different passive solar systems (direct gain, Trombe wall, water wall) a prototypical dwelling was designed which responded to the environmental conditions. The calculations of the ''Solar Savings Fraction'' (SSF) of each systems were made with a program based on the 'LCR-method'. The paper concludes that although the heating requirements decrease with decreasing latitude and altitude, the SSF is nearly the same for all parts of Germany. They are in a range of +- 5%. This is due to the fact that two main climatic features solar radiation and temperature balance each other. In northern Germany the man solar radiation level is low and so is the number of heating degree days. The conditions in southern Germany are reverse.

  8. GENDERED SPACE IN WEST SUMBA TRADITIONAL HOUSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esti Asih NURDIAH

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Rendell stated that gender representation underlined the production of space in architecture both symbolically and functionally in certain cultures (Rendell et al. 2000. Thus, an exploration on the spatial functionality of traditional houses could show how cultural gender rules and roles generate the spatial arrangements. This empirical research explored the traditional houses in two kampongs: Tarung and Ratenggaro of West Sumba, Indonesia, which spaces are divided into two distinct spaces: male’s space and female’s space, each with its own entrance. This firm division leads to the questions on its relation with the traditional gender roles are represented inside the house. Interestingly, the spatial arrangement is not intended to create separation between men and women inside the house or to pose that the status and roles of men are higher than those of women. The research found that the space separation actually is a manifestation of the dynamic roles of male and female members of the house and the circular arrangement of the space around the fireplace at the centre of the house follows the dynamic of gender duality in Sumba culture.

  9. Happy Environments: Bhutan, Interdependence and the West

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randy Schroeder

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing trend to understand economic and environmental policies in terms of multiple dimensions and “interdependence.” Bhutan is increasingly seen as an operational model with its Gross National Happiness (GNH strategy. GNH, which is rooted in Mahayana Buddhism, is a framework and set of policy tools that conceptualizes sustainability as interdependent ecological, economic, social, cultural and good governance concerns. Bhutan’s practical GNH experience illustrates a significant ability to positively couple economic growth with a healthy environment. Can the “West”—with its legacy of either/or economics—learn anything from Bhutan’s multidimensional policy experiment? At first, it would seem not. It is questionable whether the West can replicate Bhutan’s unorthodox policy tools as we do not have a balancing set of Buddhist values rooted in mainstream culture. We are not equipped to respond to the many unintended consequences of interdependent policy because we do not yet understand what “interdependence” actually entails. There is hope, but much of it exists in the grey literature of ecological economics. This literature is in urgent need of greater exposure if we are to imagine and enact sustainability policy tools that are truly sensitive to interdependence, and thus follow Bhutan on its perilous but necessary journey.

  10. Deglacial temperature history of West Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuffey, Kurt M.; Clow, Gary D.; Steig, Eric J.; Buizert, Christo; Fudge, T. J.; Koutnik, Michelle; Waddington, Edwin D.; Alley, Richard B.; Severinghaus, Jeffrey P.

    2016-12-01

    The most recent glacial to interglacial transition constitutes a remarkable natural experiment for learning how Earth’s climate responds to various forcings, including a rise in atmospheric CO2. This transition has left a direct thermal remnant in the polar ice sheets, where the exceptional purity and continual accumulation of ice permit analyses not possible in other settings. For Antarctica, the deglacial warming has previously been constrained only by the water isotopic composition in ice cores, without an absolute thermometric assessment of the isotopes’ sensitivity to temperature. To overcome this limitation, we measured temperatures in a deep borehole and analyzed them together with ice-core data to reconstruct the surface temperature history of West Antarctica. The deglacial warming was 11.3±1.8∘11.3±1.8∘C, approximately two to three times the global average, in agreement with theoretical expectations for Antarctic amplification of planetary temperature changes. Consistent with evidence from glacier retreat in Southern Hemisphere mountain ranges, the Antarctic warming was mostly completed by 15 kyBP, several millennia earlier than in the Northern Hemisphere. These results constrain the role of variable oceanic heat transport between hemispheres during deglaciation and quantitatively bound the direct influence of global climate forcings on Antarctic temperature. Although climate models perform well on average in this context, some recent syntheses of deglacial climate history have underestimated Antarctic warming and the models with lowest sensitivity can be discounted.

  11. Carbon production in comet West 1975n

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldman, P.D.; Brune, W.H.

    1976-10-01

    Ultraviolet spectra of comet West at moderate resolution in the wavelength range 1200--3200 A were obtained with scanning spectrophotometers aboard an Aerobee 200 rocket launched 1976 March 5.49. The principal emission features observed are lines of C, O, and C/sup +/ and bands of OH, CO, CO/sup +/, and CO/sub 2//sup +/. Estimates of the production rates of OH (and thus H/sub 2/O), C, CO, and O are 9.6, 3.1, 4.2, and 11 (all in units of 10/sup 29/ s/sup -1/), respectively. These rates are consistent with photodissociation of H/sub 2/O and CO from a source in which the CO is one-third as abundant as water. The C I (/sup 1/D--/sup 1/P/sup 0/) line at 1931 A indicates that a large fraction of the carbon is produced in the metastable /sup 1/D state. While CO/sub 2/ cannot be definitively excluded, the spectroscopic evidence favors CO as the major carbon constituent of the comet. (AIP)

  12. William Wilde in the West of Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coakley, D

    2016-05-01

    It is widely believed that Sir William Wilde's forebears were in Ireland for just two or three generations. This belief stems from a number of short biographies of Wilde which were published during his lifetime. These biographies gave different versions of the origin of the Wilde family and appear to have been generated by the creative imagination of Lady Jane Wilde or, as she was better known by her nom de plume, Speranza. She was equally imaginative in creating narratives about her own family background and in one she claimed descent from the Italian poet Dante Alighieri. So it was not a great challenge for her to invent biographies of her husband which she deemed suitable for a knight living at the prestigious address of 1 Merrion Square, leading many to believe that William and his son Oscar were more English than Irish. It was also important for Speranza to distance Sir William from any connection which the Wilde family might have had with trade. In this paper published and unpublished material are used, together with a careful examination of family deeds in the Registry of Deeds office, to elucidate the real roots of the Wilde family in Dublin and in the West of Ireland.

  13. Attenuation tomography in West Bohemia/Vogtland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavi, Sima; Haberland, Christian; Bauer, Klaus; Hejrani, Babak; Korn, Michael

    2017-01-01

    We present a three-dimensional (3-D) P-wave attenuation (Qp) model for the geodynamically active swarm earthquake area of West Bohemia/Vogtland in the Czech/German border region. Path-averaged attenuation t* is calculated from amplitude spectra of time windows around the P-wave arrivals of local earthquakes. Average t/t* value or Qp for stations close to Nový Kostel are very low (focal zone (increases up to 500 within 80 km distance). The SIMUL2000 tomography scheme is used to invert the t* for P-wave attenuation perturbation. Analysis of resolution shows that our model is well-resolved in the vicinity of earthquake swarm hypocenters. The prominent features of the model are located around Nový Kostel focal zone and its northern vicinity. Beneath Nový Kostel a vertically stretched (down to depth of 11 km) and a highly attenuating body is observed. We believe that this is due to fracturing and high density of cracks inside the weak earthquake swarm zone in conjunction with presence of free gas/fluid. Further north of Nový Kostel two highly attenuating bodies are imaged which could represent fluid channels toward the surface. The eastern anomaly shows a good correlation with the fluid accumulation area which was suggested in 9HR seismic profile.

  14. Petrojarl Foinaven -- A West of Shetland challenge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boerresen, R.; Krafft, H.

    1996-12-31

    The Foinaven field was first discovered in late 1992. The field will produce oil for the partners BP and Shell in 1996. The owners laid out a commercial strategy in line with the CRINE initiative for the field development. The Field will be produced by a Production Ship, hooked up to the subsea production system via flexible risers and umbilicals. The 300,000 barrels storage capacity ship, Petrojarl Foinaven, will be turret moored in the field. The technical challenges in the Production Ship design have been closely related to the field location in the Atlantic Ocean west of Shetlands. Here the water depth is 500 meters, and the weather is blessed with a climate harsher than the North Sea (e.g., the 100 year wave is some 18 meter significant). The ship solution has been designed by Golar-Nor Offshore, and is being built by Astano shipyard, with a McDermott Engineering oil process design. The ship is owned and operated by Golar-Nor Offshore under a lease agreement with the field operator BP. This presentation will address aspects of the Production Ship design, being one element at the Foinaven Field development. The other element is the subsea system described in another paper in this conference.

  15. ETHNO SEPARATIST TERRORISM IN WEST EUROPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pashchenko L. V.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available For the purpose of this article, the analysis of the development of ethnoseparatism in West Europe has been undertaken. Under current conditions, the ethnical separatism threatens national security of series of European countries and territorial integrity. Special attention has been paid to social and political beginnings and causes of terrorism in Spain and Great Britain. The activity of such terrorist organizations as IRA and ETA has been researched. Ideological basis of violence, purposes and objectives, as well as the main stages of formation and development of these organizations have been disclosed. The author states that the use of the terrorism as a method of political struggle is destructive and does not facilitate a solution to the national problems. We have also considered approaches of the governments to solve the problems of separatism and terrorism on the territory of these countries. In their counter-terrorism efforts political leaders of Spain and Great Britain have used both methods of force and political and legal methods, namely, granting to the regions of wide economical and political independence, preservation of authentic cultural values and language of indigenous people. The formation of violence intolerance in public conscience as control method has become the main direction of the antiterrorist policy in the countries under consideration. Anti-terrorist model which has been developed by the European countries can be effective and useful for the regions being in ethnopolitical conflicts

  16. [West Nile virus: a reality in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Téllez, Ildefonso; Calderón, Oscar; Franco-Paredes, Carlos; del Río, Carlos

    2006-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a RNA virus of the Flaviridae, genus flavivirus family. It is a neuropathogenic virus causing disease in birds, horses and humans. WNVis transmitted by the vector mosquito Culex sp. The virus life 's cycle includes mosquitoes as vectors and birds as natural hosts. Humans are accidental hosts. Since the introduction of the Epidemiological Surveillance Program at the Ministry ofHealth. we have documented 90 positive test results among birds out of 1,223 cases studied in Mexico as of September IS. 2005. The incubation period in humans after a mosquito bite ranges from 3 to 14 days. Disease is characterized by early onset fever, general malaise, decreased appetite, nausea, vomiting, headaches, myalgias, enlarged lymph nodes andrash. Neurological manifestations include encephalitis andflaccid paralysis, which are present in less than 1% of subjects infected with WNV. Older patients display more adverse outcomes including death. The diagnosis is made by the determination of specific IgM and JgG antibodies in serum and/or cerebrospinal fluid. There is no antiviral treatment to date against WNV but interferon ?2b, and WNVspec4ic-immunoglobulin have been used Prevention is therefore the key to control the infection.

  17. ESSEA On-Line Courses and the WestEd Eisenhower Regional Consortium (WERC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rognier, E.

    2001-12-01

    The WestEd Eisenhower Regional Consortium (WERC) is in its second year of offering two Earth Systems Science On-line Graduate courses from IGES - one for High School teachers, and one for Middle School teachers. These high-quality courses support WERC's commitment to "supporting increased scientific and mathematical literacy among our nation's youth through services and other support aimed at enhancing the efforts of those who provide K-12 science and mathematics education." WERC has been able to use its EdGateway online community network to offer these courses to environmental education and science teachers nationwide. Through partnerships with the North American Association for Environmental Education (NAAEE), the National Environmental Education Advancement Project (NEEAP), and other regional, state and local science and environmental education organizations, WERC has a broad reach in connecting with science educators nationwide. WERC manages several state and national listservs, which enable us to reach thousands of educators with information about the courses. EdGateway also provides a private online community in which we offer the courses. WERC partners with two Master Teachers from Utah, who facilitate the courses, and with the Center for Science and Mathematics Education at Weber State University, who provides low-cost graduate credit for the courses. Our students have included classroom teachers from upper elementary through high school, community college science teachers, and environmental science center staff who provide inservice for teachers. Educators from Hawaii to New Jersey have provided diverse personal experiences of Earth Systems Science events, and add richness to the online discussions. Two Earth Science Experts, Dr. Rick Ford from Weber State University, and Dr. Art Sussman from WestEd also contribute to the high caliber of learning the students experience in the courses. (Dr. Sussman's book, Dr. Art's Guide to Planet Earth, is used as one of

  18. West Coast Observing System (WCOS) ADCP Currents Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The West Coast Observing System (WCOS) project provides access to temperature and currents data collected at four of the five National Marine Sanctuary sites,...

  19. Digital elevation model of Walker Lake, West-Central Nevada

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Walker Lake lies within a topographically closed basin in west-central Nevada and is the terminus of the Walker River. Accurately determining the bathymetry and...

  20. Unravelling institutional determinants affecting change in agriculture in West Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struik, P.C.; Klerkx, L.W.A.; Hounkonnou, D.

    2014-01-01

    This paper compares lessons learned from nine studies that explored institutional determinants of innovation towards sustainable intensification of West African agriculture. The studies investigated issues relating to crop, animal, and resources management in Benin, Ghana, and Mali. The constraints