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Sample records for wernicke encephalopathy

  1. [Wernicke encephalopathy accompanying linitis plastica].

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    Soós, Zsuzsanna; Salamon, Mónika; Oláh, Roland; Czégeni, Anna; Salamon, Ferenc; Folyovich, András; Winkler, Gábor

    2014-01-05

    Wernicke encephalopathy (or Wernicke-Korsakoff encephalopathy) is a rarely diagnosed neurological disorder, which is caused by vitamin B1 deficiency. In the classical form it is characterized by a typical triad (confusion, oculomotor disturbance and ataxia), however, in the majority of the cases only confusion is present. It can be frequently observed in subjects with chronic alcohol consumption, but it may accompany different pathological states of which end stage malignant diseases are the most importants, where confusion may have different backgrounds. The authors present the case of an old male patient with advanced gastric cancer recognised and treated vitamin B1 deficiency, and they draw attention to difficulties of the diagnosis of Wernicke's disease.

  2. Wernicke-Korsakoff encephalopathy.

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    Pearce, J M S

    2008-01-01

    Wernicke described the clinical features of three patients, including two alcoholics, suffering from confusion, ataxia and ophthalmoplegia in whom pathologically he found 'polioencephalitis haemorrhagica superioris'. Korsakoff's doctoral thesis related similar findings but expanded the confabulation and amnesic elements, relating them to alcoholism. This paper, which summarises the salient aspects of the syndrome, discusses their work and shows important earlier descriptions by James Jackson, (1822) Samuel Wilks (1868) and Charles Gayet (1875).

  3. Fundus Findings in Wernicke Encephalopathy

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    Tal Serlin

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Wernicke encephalopathy (WE is an acute neuropsychiatric syndrome resulting from thiamine (vitamin B1 deficiency, classically characterized by the triad of ophthalmoplegia, confusion, and ataxia. While commonly associated with chronic alcoholism, WE may also occur in the setting of poor nutrition or absorption. We present a 37-year-old woman who underwent laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy and presented with visual disturbance with bilateral horizontal nystagmus, confusion, and postural imbalance. Fundus examination revealed bilateral optic disc edema with a retinal hemorrhage in the left eye. Metabolic workup demonstrated thiamine deficiency. Her symptoms resolved after thiamine treatment. This case raises the awareness of the possibility of posterior segment findings in WE, which are underreported in WE.

  4. Wernicke encephalopathy in children and adolescents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Matt Lallas; Jay Desai

    2014-01-01

    Background: Wernicke encephalopathy is caused by thiamine (vitamin B1) defi ciency. It is generally considered to be a disease of adult alcoholics. However, it is known to occur in the pediatric population and in non-alcoholic conditions. Data sources: We searched PubMed with the key words Wernicke, thiamine, pediatric, children and adolescents and selected publications that were deemed appropriate. Results: The global prevalence rates of hunger, poverty and resultant nutrient deprivation have decreased in the 21st century. However, several scenarios which may predispose to Wernicke encephalopathy may be increasingly prevalent in children and adolescents such as malignancies, intensive care unit stays and surgical procedures for the treatment of obesity. Other predisposing conditions include magnesium defi ciency and defects in the SLC19A3 gene causing thiamine transporter-2 deficiency. The classic triad consists of encephalopathy, oculomotor dysfunction and gait ataxia but is not seen in a majority of patients. Treatment should be instituted immediately when the diagnosis is suspected clinically without waiting for laboratory confi rmation. Common magnetic resonance findings include symmetric T2 hyperintensities in dorsal medial thalamus, mammillary bodies, periaqueductal gray matter, and tectal plate. Conclusions: Wernicke encephalopathy is a medical emergency. Delay in its recognition and treatment may lead to significant morbidity, irreversible neurological damage or even death. This article aims to raise the awareness of this condition among pediatricians.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging in a case of Wernicke`s encephalopathy

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    Pagnan, L.; Pozzi-Mucelli, R.S. [Institute of Radiology, University of Trieste (Italy); Berlot, G. [Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, University of Trieste, Cattinara Hospital, Trieste (Italy)

    1998-07-01

    Wernicke`s encephalopathy is an uncommon disorder caused by a thiamine deficiency which is clinically characterized by the triad of ophthalmoplegia, ataxia and disturbances of consciousness, each finding being variably present. The disease is caused by malnutrition or malabsorption, and is often associated with prolonged alcohol intake, neoplasm and extensive inflammatory processes of the digestive tract and parenteral hyperalimentation-induced gastrointestinal mucosal atrophy. Clinical diagnosis can be elusive and MRI may be the only imaging technique able to detect the cerebral lesions, whose type and distribution are characteristic of the Wernicke`s encephalopathy, whereas CT is positive only in exceptional cases. We report a case of a 56-year-old woman who developed a Wernicke`s encephalopathy 1 month after a colonic resection with signal intensity changes located in the mammillary bodies and in the medial thalamic nuclei. (orig.) With 3 figs., 23 refs.

  6. Wernicke's encephalopathy: a preventable cause of maternal death.

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    Wedisinghe, Lilantha; Jayakody, Kaushadh; Arambage, Kirana

    2011-01-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is a rare cause of maternal death. It is a difficult diagnosis to make but prevention and treatment is straightforward. Severe thiamine deficiency causes Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. Correct diagnosis and treatment with thiamine will decrease the case fatality rate.

  7. Wernicke's encephalopathy: expanding the diagnostic toolbox.

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    Lough, Mary E

    2012-06-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) is a life threatening neurological disorder that results from thiamine (Vitamin B1) deficiency. Clinical signs include mental status changes, ataxia, occulomotor changes and nutritional deficiency. The conundrum is that the clinical presentation is highly variable. WE clinical signs, brain imaging, and thiamine blood levels, are reviewed in 53 published case reports from 2001 to 2011; 81 % (43/53) were non-alcohol related. Korsakoff Syndrome or long-term cognitive neurological changes occurred in 28 % (15/53). Seven WE cases (13 %) had a normal magnetic resonance image (MRI). Four WE cases (8 %) had normal or high thiamine blood levels. Neither diagnostic tool can be relied upon exclusively to confirm a diagnosis of WE.

  8. Brain MRI findings in Wernicke encephalopathy.

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    Wicklund, Meredith R; Knopman, David S

    2013-08-01

    A 71-year-old woman with myelofibrosis on chemotherapy experienced an acute illness with nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Two weeks later, she developed an acute confusional state characterized by disorientation and fluctuating alertness with normal speech and language. Her neurologic examination demonstrated an upper motor neuron pattern of right hemiparesis. She reported double vision though ophthalmoparesis was not appreciated. Her gait was normal. While hospitalized, she developed generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Brain MRI revealed a small area of restricted diffusion of the left precentral gyrus (figure). She was diagnosed with a stroke with secondary seizures; however, as the confusional state resolved, she developed profound retrograde and anterograde amnesia. Review of the brain MRI showed high T2 signal in the medial thalamus and contrast enhancement of the mamillary bodies; a diagnosis of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome was entertained and she was started on thiamine replacement. The encephalopathy and hemiparesis resolved though she remains severely amnestic.

  9. Neuroimaging of Wernicke's encephalopathy and Korsakoff's syndrome.

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    Jung, Young-Chul; Chanraud, Sandra; Sullivan, Edith V

    2012-06-01

    There is considerable evidence that neuroimaging findings can improve the early diagnosis of Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) in clinical settings. The most distinctive neuroimaging finding of acute WE are cytotoxic edema and vasogenic edema, which are represented by bilateral symmetric hyperintensity alterations on T2-weighted MR images in the periphery of the third ventricle, periaqueductal area, mammillary bodies and midbrain tectal plate. An initial bout of WE can result in Korsakoff's syndrome (KS), but repeated bouts in conjunction with its typical comorbidity, chronic alcoholism, can result in signs of tissue degeneration in vulnerable brain regions. Chronic abnormalities identified with neuroimaging enable examination of brain damage in living patients with KS and have expanded the understanding of the neuropsychological deficits resulting from thiamine deficiency, alcohol neurotoxicity, and their comorbidity. Brain structure and functional studies indicate that the interactions involving the thalamus, mammillary bodies, hippocampus, frontal lobes, and cerebellum are crucial for memory formation and executive functions, and the interruption of these circuits by WE and chronic alcoholism can contribute substantially to the neuropsychological deficits in KS.

  10. [Value of MRI findings in Gayet-Wernicke encephalopathy].

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    Lenz, V; Vargas, M I; Bin, J F; Bogorin, A; Grebici-Guessoum, M; Jacques, C; Marin, H; Zöllner, G; Dietemann, J L

    2002-09-01

    Wernicke encephalopathy (Wernicke-Korsakoff encephalopathy) is related to thiamine deficiency. We report the MRI findings in four patients with visualization of bilateral and symmetrical hyperintense foci on T2W and FLAIR images involving the periaqueductal gray matter, the mamillary bodies and around the third ventricle. Diffusion weighted images obtained in two patients demonstrated mild hypersignal in the same areas. Contrast enhancement within the mamillary bodies was noted in one patient. Follow-up MRI obtained in three patients showed rapid regression of signal abnormalities without correlation with good clinical outcome.

  11. Thiamine in the treatment of Wernicke encephalopathy in patients with alcohol use disorders.

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    Latt, N; Dore, G

    2014-09-01

    Wernicke encephalopathy is an acute, reversible neuropsychiatric emergency due to thiamine deficiency. Urgent and adequate thiamine replacement is necessary to avoid death or progression to Korsakoff syndrome with largely irreversible brain damage. Wernicke Korsakoff syndrome refers to a condition where features of Wernicke encephalopathy are mixed with those of Korsakoff syndrome. Although thiamine is the cornerstone of treatment of Wernicke encephalopathy, there are no universally accepted guidelines with regard to its optimal dose, mode of administration, frequency of administration or duration of treatment. Currently, different dose recommendations are being made. We present recommendations for the assessment and treatment of Wernicke encephalopathy based on literature review and our clinical experience.

  12. A case of chronic Wernicke's encephalopathy: A neuropsychological study

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    Oudman, Erik; Van der Stigchel, Stefan; Postma, Albert; Wijnia, Jan W.; Nijboer, Tanja C W

    2014-01-01

    A 54-year-old woman was referred to our Korsakoff Center because of extensive cognitive problems following acute Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE). She had a relatively short history of alcohol abuse and was found lying on the floor in her home by her son. After 5 days without treatment, she was diagno

  13. Wernicke Encephalopathy Presenting in a Patient with Severe Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cecilia Arana-Guajardo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context Acute pancreatitis can lead to prolonged fasting and malnutrition. Many metabolic changes, including thiamine deficiency, may lead to the well know pancreatic encephalopathy. In this condition however the thiamine deficiency is rarely suspected. Case report We report the case of a 17-year-old woman with severe acute pancreatitis who developed mental status changes and ophthalmoplegia. A magnetic resonance image showed hyperintensive signals in periventricular areas, medial thalamus, and mammillary bodies, findings consistent with the diagnosis of Wernicke encephalopathy. Thiamine treatment reversed neurological complications. Conclusion Wernicke encephalopathy secondary to thiamine deficiency should be considered as a possible cause of acute mental status changes in patients with acute pancreatitis and malnutrition. Prophylactic doses of thiamine could be considered in susceptible patients.

  14. [Wernicke encephalopathy and Korsakoff's psychosis: clinical-pathophysiological correlation, diagnostics and treatment].

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    Sivolap, Iu P; Damulin, I V

    2013-01-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy and Korsakoff's psychosis are severe unfavorable forms of alcoholic brain damage with poor prognosis. Thiamine deficiency represents a common cause of both diseases. In many cases, Korsakoff's psychosis develops in the outcome of Wernicke's encephalopathy, which, along with the general etiology, lets talk about a single disease - Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, acute (usually reversible) stage of which is Wernicke's encephalopathy and a chronic one (often irreversible) is Korsakoff psychosis. The dramatic paradox of Wernicke's encephalopathy is that in most cases it is difficult to detect, but early diagnosed cases are quite easy to cure. Unrecognized and therefore go untreated Wernicke's encephalopathy is a serious threat to the health and lives of patients, worsens the processes of brain aging and increases the risk of Alzheimer's disease in later life. The basic approach to the treatment of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome is long-term parenteral administration of thiamine, often in high doses. As an adjuvant means of therapy memantine is considered.

  15. Need for early diagnosis of mental and mobility changes in Wernicke encephalopathy.

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    Wijnia, Jan W; Oudman, Erik; Bresser, Esmay L; Gerridzen, Ineke J; van de Wiel, Albert; Beuman, Carla; Mulder, Cornelis L

    2014-12-01

    Korsakoff syndrome is a chronic form of amnesia resulting from thiamine deficiency. The syndrome can develop from unrecognized or undertreated Wernicke encephalopathy. The intra-individual course of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome has not been studied extensively, nor has the temporal progression of gait disturbances and other symptoms of Wernicke encephalopathy. Here we present the detailed history of a patient whose acute symptoms of Wernicke encephalopathy were far from stable. We follow his mobility changes and the shifts in his mental status from global confusion and impaired consciousness to more selective cognitive deficits. His Wernicke encephalopathy was missed and left untreated, being labeled as "probable" Korsakoff syndrome. Patients with a history of self-neglect and alcohol abuse, at risk of or suffering with Wernicke encephalopathy, should receive immediate and adequate vitamin replacement. Self-neglecting alcoholics who are bedridden may have severe illness and probably active Wernicke encephalopathy. In these patients, mobility changes, delirium, or impaired consciousness can be an expression of Wernicke encephalopathy, and should be treated to prevent further damage from the neurologic complications of thiamine deficiency.

  16. Wernicke's Encephalopathy in a Patient with Peptic Ulcer Disease.

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    Uruha, Akinori; Shimizu, Toshio; Katoh, Tomoji; Yamasaki, Yasushi; Matsubara, Shiro

    2011-01-01

    We report a 74-year-old man with Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) whose only prior illness was peptic ulcer disease. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy demonstrated gastric ulcer scars accompanied by marked deformity, without pathologic evidence of malignancy. WE due to peptic ulcer disease in previous reports was substantially associated with thiamine deficiency due to recurrent vomiting or surgical procedures. In our case, however, there was no history of vomiting or gastrointestinal surgery. Besides, we thoroughly ruled out other known clinical settings related to WE. There is the possibility that peptic ulcer disease itself provoked thiamine deficiency due to malabsorption.

  17. [Wernicke encephalopathy after subtotal gastrectomy for morbid obesity].

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    Gabaudan, C; La-Folie, T; Sagui, E; Soulier, B; Dion, A-M; Richez, P; Brosset, C

    2008-05-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) is one of the potential complications of obesity surgery. It is an acute neuropsychiatric syndrome resulting from thiamine deficiency often associated with repeated vomiting. The classic triad is frequently reported in these patients (optic neuropathy, ataxia and confusion), associated with uncommon features. Cerebral impairment affects the dorsal medial nucleus of the thalamus and the periaqueductal grey area, appearing on MRI, as hyperintense signals on T2, Flair and Diffusion weighted imaging. Early diagnosis and parenteral thiamine are required to decrease morbidity and mortality. We report a case of WE and Korsakoff's syndrome in a young obese patient after subtotal gastrectomy, who still has substantial sequelae. The contribution of MRI with diffusion-weighted imaging is illustrated. The interest of nutritional supervision in the first weeks and preventive thiamine supplementation in case of repeated vomiting are of particular importance in these risky situations.

  18. Refractory hypotension in a patient with Wernicke's encephalopathy.

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    Wang, Shi; Hou, Xiaojun; Ding, Suju; Guan, Yangtai; Zhen, Huimin; Tu, Laihui; Qiu, Yiqing

    2012-01-01

    A 57-year-old male patient with gastric carcinoma underwent radical distal gastrectomy type II + Braun anastomosis, and received total parenteral nutrition for 10 days after surgery, followed by small amounts of semi-liquid nutrition for 3 days and liquid nutrition for 2 days. The patient developed refractory hypotension for more than 1 week in the early course of disease, and on Day 15 after surgery presented with characteristic signs of Wernicke's encephalopathy, including diplopia and mental confusion. The hypotension did not improve despite appropriate fluid replacement soon after admission. Treatment with moderate dose of thiamine for 3 months partly relieved ophthalmoplegia and confusion, but not Korsakoff syndrome. This extraordinary presentation with refractory hypotension and the unusual course of the disease encouraged us to present this case.

  19. Wernicke's encephalopathy following Hyperemesis gravidarum. A report of three cases.

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    Kotha, V K; De Souza, A

    2013-02-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) due to causes other than chronic alcohol abuse is an uncommon and often misdiagnosed condition. In the setting of hyperemesis gravidarum, an acute deficiency of thiamine results from body stores being unable to meet increased metabolic demands. The condition produces typical clinical and radiological findings and when diagnosed early and treated promptly has a good prognosis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is sensitive and specific for diagnosis. We describe three patients with hyperemesis gravidarum who developed WE, and highlight a range of clinical and imaging features important for appropriate diagnosis. A high degree of clinical suspicion is essential. Treatment is often empirical pending results of investigation, and consists of parenteral repletion of thiamine stores. Reversal of MRI findings parallels clinical improvement. Neurologic outcomes are usually good, but half the pregnancies complicated by this condition do not produce healthy children.

  20. Wernicke's encephalopathy and anabolic steroid drug abuse. Is there any possible relation?

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    Christopoulos, P; Katsanoulas, C; Timplalexi, G; Lathyris, D; Vasiliagkou, S; Antoniadou, E

    2012-10-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is a reversible, neurologic disorder due to thiamine deficiency which is mainly related to chronic alcohol abuse. We report a case of a young male patient, who was bodybuilder and anabolic drug user, in whom encephalopathy was diagnosed after a short medical course in the ICU after a major upper gastrointestinal bleeding (Mallory-Weiss syndrome) and hypovolemic shock. His clinical condition was typical for Wernicke's encephalopathy and although neuroimaging tests were not indicative, the patient received thiamine supplement therapy, which resulted in rapid clinical improvement. The diagnosis was based only on clinical sings and anabolic drug abuse was considered as a possible predisposing factor for the manifestation of the syndrome.

  1. [Wernicke's encephalopathy induced by the use of diet pills and unbalanced diet].

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    Tóth, Adrián; Aradi, Gabriella; Várallyay, György; Arányi, Zsuzsanna; Bereczki, Dániel; Vastagh, Ildikó

    2014-03-23

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is an acute, potentially life-threatening, neurological syndrome resulting from thiamine deficiency. The disorder is still greatly underdiagnosed and, without prompt treatment, the condition can lead to the chronic form of the disease, Korsakoff's syndrome or even death. In developed countries Wernicke's encephalopathy has been associated with alcoholism, but in recent years there has been an increasing number of non-alcoholic cases. Authors report the case of a 23-year-old woman who developed oculomotor dysfunction, encephalopathy and ataxia as a result of an extreme diet and use of diet pills. The diagnosis of Wernicke's encephalopathy was supported by the resolution of neurological signs after parenteral thiamine replacement. This case is presented because of the rare etiology and diagnostic difficulty, and the latest diagnostic and therapic guidelines are also highlighted.

  2. Non-alcoholic Korsakoff syndrome in psychiatric patients with a history of undiagnosed Wernicke's encephalopathy.

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    Nikolakaros, Georgios; Ilonen, Tuula; Kurki, Timo; Paju, Janina; Papageorgiou, Sokratis G; Vataja, Risto

    2016-11-15

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is often undiagnosed, particularly in non-alcoholics. There are very few reports of non-alcoholic patients diagnosed with Korsakoff syndrome in the absence of a prior diagnosis of Wernicke's encephalopathy and no studies of diffusion tensor imaging in non-alcoholic Korsakoff syndrome. We report on three non-alcoholic psychiatric patients (all women) with long-term non-progressive memory impairment that developed after malnutrition accompanied by at least one of the three Wernicke's encephalopathy manifestations: ocular abnormalities, ataxia or unsteadiness, and an altered mental state or mild memory impairment. In neuropsychological examination, all patients had memory impairment, including intrusions. One patient had mild cerebellar vermis atrophy in MRI taken after the second episode of Wernicke's encephalopathy. The same patient had mild hypometabolism in the lateral cortex of the temporal lobes. Another patient had mild symmetrical atrophy and hypometabolism of the superior frontal lobes. Two patients were examined with diffusion tensor imaging. Reduced fractional anisotropy values were found in the corona radiata in two patients, and the uncinate fasciculus and the inferior longitudinal fasciculus in one patient. Our results suggest that non-alcoholic Korsakoff syndrome is underdiagnosed. Psychiatric patients with long-term memory impairment may have Korsakoff syndrome and, therefore, they should be evaluated for a history of previously undiagnosed Wernicke's encephalopathy.

  3. Neuroimaging findings in pediatric Wernicke encephalopathy: a review

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    Zuccoli, Giulio [Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Department of Radiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Siddiqui, Nasir; Bailey, Ariel; Bartoletti, Stefano C. [Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Department of Radiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2010-06-15

    Wernicke encephalopathy (WE) is an acute neurological disease resulting from dietary thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency. WE is characterized by changes in consciousness, ocular dysfunction, and ataxia. Neuroradiologic findings usually show symmetric signal intensity alterations in the mammillary bodies, medial thalami, tectal plate, and periaqueductal area. Selective involvement of the cranial nerve nuclei, cerebellum, red nuclei, dentate nuclei, fornix, splenium, cerebral cortex, and basal ganglia characterize nonalcoholic WE patients. Furthermore, symmetric basal ganglia alterations with involvement of the putamen have only been observed in children. The incidence of WE is underestimated in both adult and pediatric patients. Interestingly, the frequency of WE in children appears to be similar to that observed in adults. The prognosis of the disease largely depends on the time from diagnosis to thiamine supplementation. The aim of this pediatric literature review is to provide an update on neuroradiologic findings in children affected by WE in an effort to determine pertinent clinical and imaging findings that can improve the detection and early identification of the disease. A thorough knowledge of the MRI findings of WE will assist in arriving at an early diagnosis, thereby reducing the morbidity and mortality associated with this disease in children. (orig.)

  4. Wernicke's encephalopathy in a malnourished surgical patient: clinical features and magnetic resonance imaging.

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    Nolli, M; Barbieri, A; Pinna, C; Pasetto, A; Nicosia, F

    2005-11-01

    We report a clinical and neuroradiological description of a severe case of Wernicke's encephalopathy in a surgical patient. After colonic surgery for neoplasm, he was treated for a long time with high glucose concentration total parenteral nutrition. In the early post-operative period, the patient showed severe encephalopathy with ataxia, ophthalmoplegia and consciousness disorders. We used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to confirm the clinical suspicion of Wernicke's encephalopathy. The radiological feature showed hyperintense lesions which were symmetrically distributed along the bulbo-pontine tegmentum, the tectum of the mid-brain, the periacqueductal grey substance, the hypothalamus and the medial periventricular parts of the thalamus. This progressed to typical Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome with ataxia and memory and cognitive defects. Thiamine deficiency is a re-emerging problem in non-alcoholic patients and it may develop in surgical patients with risk factors such as malnutrition, prolonged vomiting and long-term high glucose concentration parenteral nutrition.

  5. Wernicke's encephalopathy: new clinical settings and recent advances in diagnosis and management.

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    Sechi, Gianpietro; Serra, Alessandro

    2007-05-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is an acute neuropsychiatric syndrome resulting from thiamine deficiency, which is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. According to autopsy-based studies, the disorder is still greatly underdiagnosed in both adults and children. In this review, we provide an update on the factors and clinical settings that predispose to Wernicke's encephalopathy, and discuss the most recent insights into epidemiology, pathophysiology, genetics, diagnosis, and treatment. To facilitate the diagnosis, we classify the common and rare symptoms at presentation and the late-stage symptoms. We emphasise the optimum dose of parenteral thiamine required for prophylaxis and treatment of Wernicke's encephalopathy and prevention of Korsakoff's syndrome associated with alcohol misuse. A systematic approach helps to ensure that patients receive a prompt diagnosis and adequate treatment.

  6. Imaging-Based Diagnosis of Wernicke Encephalopathy: a Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delavar Kasmaei

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Wernicke encephalopathy (WE is a medical emergency characterized by ataxia, confusion, nystagmus and ophthalmoplegia resulting from thiamin deficiency. Alcoholism is the common cause for this disease. Case Presentation A 41 year old man was brought to our emergency department (ED complaining of confusion. One week earlier he had started to experience severe nausea and vomiting followed by diplopia, dysarthria and also dysphagia. One day later he had experienced gait disturbance and progressive ataxia accompanied with confusion, apathy and disorientation. He had no history of alcoholism, drug abuse or previous surgery but had history of untreated Crohn disease. Just before arrival to our emergency department, he had been hospitalized in another center for about a week but all investigations had failed to provide a conclusive diagnosis. Upon admission to our ED, he was dysarthric and replied with inappropriate answers. On physical examination, bilateral horizontal nystagmus in lateral gaze, left abducens nerve palsy and upward gaze palsy were seen. Gag reflex was absent and plantar reflexes were upwards bilaterally. After reviewing all the previously performed management measures, MRI was performed and was consistent with the diagnosis of WE. Treatment with thiamine led to partial resolution of his upward gaze palsy and nystagmus on the first day. At the end of the third day of treatment, except for gate ataxia, all other symptoms completely resolved and he was fully conscious. After the fifth day his gait became normal and after one week he was discharged in good general condition. Conclusions After reviewing the current literature, it seems that brain MRI can be helpful in the diagnosis of WE in patients with the classic clinical trial in the absence of clear risk factors.

  7. Pancreatic encephalopathy and Wernicke encephalopathy in association with acute pancreatitis: A clinical study

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    Guo-Hui Sun; Yun-Sheng Yang; Qing-Sen Liu; Liu-Fang Cheng; Xu-Sheng Huang

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate clinical characteristics and therapy of pancreatic encephalopathy (PE) and Wernicke encephalopathy (WE).METHODS: In a retrospective study of 596 patients with acute pancreatitis (AP), patients with PE were compared to those with WE in regards to history, clinical manifestation, diagnosis, treatment and outcome.RESULTS: There were 93 patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). Encephalopathies were discovered in 10 patients (1.7%). Six patients with PE all developed in SAP (6.5%), and three of them died (3% of SAP, 50% of PE). Four patients with WE developed in AP (0.7%),and two of them died (0.3% of AP, 50% of WE). Two patients with WE were treated with parenteral thiamine and survived. Global confusions were seen in all patients with encephalopathy. Ocular abnormalities were found.Conjugate gaze palsies were seen in 1 of 6 (16.7%)patients with PE. Of 4 patients with WE, one (25%)had conjugate gaze palsies, two (50%) had horizontal nystagmus, three (75%) had diplopia, and one (25%)had myosis. Ataxia was not seen in all patients. None of patients with WE presented with the classic clinical triad.CSF examinations for 2 patients with WE showed lightlyincreased proteins and glucose. CT and MRI of the brain had no evidence of characteristic abnormalities.CONCLUSION: PE occurs in early or reiteration stage of SAP, and WE in restoration stage of SAP/AR Ocular abnormalities are the hallmarks of WE, and horizontal nystagmus is common. It is difficult to diagnose earlier an encephalopathy as PE or WE, as well as differentiate one from the other. Long fasting, hyperemesis and total parenteral nutrition (TPN) without thiamine are main causes of thiamine deficiency in the course of pancreatitis.

  8. Wernicke's encephalopathy after cephalic pancreaticoduodenectomy Encefalopatía de Wernicke tras duodenopancreatectomía cefálica

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    Francisco Gabriel Onieva-González

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Wernicke's encephalopathy is an acute neurological disorder resulting from thiamine deficiency. We report a case in a young patient who underwent a cephalic duodenopancreatectomy with a bleeding duodenal ulcer refractory to endoscopic and surgical treatment, requiring total parenteral nutrition, without thiamine supplementation.La encefalopatía de Wernicke (EW es un trastorno neurológico agudo resultado del déficit de tiamina. Presentamos la aparición de dicho cuadro en un enfermo joven que es sometido a una duodenopancreatectomía cefálica ante una úlcera duodenal sangrante refractaria a tratamiento endoscópico y quirúrgico previo, precisando de una nutrición parenteral total, sin suplementos de tiamina.

  9. BNF Recommendations for the treatment of Wernicke's encephalopathy : Lost in translation?

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    Oudman, Erik; Wijnia, Jan W.

    2014-01-01

    We agree with Thomson and Marshall (2013) that the current prescribing of thiamine replacement therapy for Wernicke's Encephalopathy (WE) is ambiguous. In response to their article, we also advocate that any consensus on accurate thiamine treatment for WE should receive sufficient international atte

  10. [Laparoscopic Gastrostomy for a Patient with Wernicke's Encephalopathy after Gastrectomy--A Case Report with a Literature Review].

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    Arita, Tomohiro; Komatsu, Shuhei; Kosuga, Toshiyuki; Konishi, Hirotaka; Morimura, Ryo; Murayama, Yasutoshi; Kuriu, Yoshiaki; Shiozaki, Atsushi; Ikoma, Hisashi; Nakanishi, Masayoshi; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Okamoto, Kazuma; Otsuji, Eigo

    2015-11-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is usually related to alcoholism, malnutrition, or hyperemesis gravidarum. We report a case of Wernicke's encephalopathy after distal gastrectomy for gastric cancer. A 58-year-old man underwent distal gastrectomy with Billroth Ⅰreconstruction for early gastric cancer. Nine months later, he developed anorexia and vomiting for a few days. Brain MRI showed no significant findings, and he resumed ingestion 5 days after admission. On the 8th day of hospitalization, dysphagia suddenly developed and brain MRI indicated Wernicke's encephalopathy. Vitamin B1 was immediately injected, and neurological symptoms gradually improved. However, dysphagia did not adequately improve, leading to severe aspiration pneumonitis. Laparoscopic gastrostomy was performed for aspiration of the stomach contents and initiation of enteral nutrition. After gastrostomy, the patient made good progress and was transferred to a rehabilitation hospital. We should recognize that gastrectomy can cause Wernicke's encephalopathy.

  11. Clinical significance of mammillary body enhancement in Wernicke encephalopathy: report of 2 cases and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konno, Yoshihiro; Kanoto, Masafumi; Hosoya, Takaaki; Toyoguchi, Yuki; Kawanami, Toru; Kato, Takeo

    2014-01-01

    In 2 cases of Wernicke encephalopathy in which the initial symptom was double vision, the only abnormal finding on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was abnormal enhancement of the mammillary bodies. The mammillary bodies are the region most vulnerable to abnormal enhancement. Because MR imaging with contrast enhancement can detect such abnormal enhancement at an early stage, it should be performed more often in patients with oculomotor disorders to avoid underdiagnosis of Wernicke encephalopathy.

  12. Clinical manifestation, imageological and pathological characteristics of Wernicke encephalopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shunchang Han; Chuanqiang Pu; Qiuping Gui; Xusheng Huang; Senyang Lang; Weiping Wu; Peifu Wang

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The clinical manifestations of Wernicke encephalopathy(WE) are atypical and short of effective auxiliary examination means. The effects of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis of WE have been reported suecessively. But its imageological detection needs to be further investigated.OBJECTIVE: To analyze the eharacteristics of clinical manifestations, skull MRI examination and pathological results in patients with WE.DESTGN: Retrospective analysis.SETTTNG: The General Hospital of Chinese PLA.PARTTCTPANTS: Ten patients of WE admitted to the Department of Neurology, General Hospital of Chinese PLA were recruited. Among them, five patients were diagnosed pathologically after death. Their pathological changes accorded with the pathological characteristics of WE. The other 5 patients were diagnosed clinically before death. Their pathological changes accorded with clinical and imageological manifestations and had definite reaction to the treatment of thiamine. Ten patients, 7 males and 3 females, were aged (47±13) years ranging from 33 to 73 years. Their disease courses averaged 6 weeks ranging from 3 to 10 weeks. They all were non-alcoholics. Four patients developed WE after acute pancreatitis, two patients after the recurrence of gastric cancer, two patients after cholecystectomy, one patient after hepatitis medicamentosa, one patient after Alzheimer disease. Informed consents were obtained from all the patients and their relatives.METHODS: After admission, clinical manifestations of patients were observed and recorded. Five patients underwent skull MRI examination and their detected results were recorded. Five dead patients underwent autopsy and brain pathological examinations. Neuropathological examination involved cerebrum, cerebellum and brain stem.MATN OUTCOME MEASURES: Clinical manifestations, MRI examination results, pathological analysis results and prognosis of all the patients.RESULTS: Ten patients with WE were involved in the final

  13. Brain and behavioral pathology in an animal model of Wernicke's encephalopathy and Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetreno, Ryan P; Ramos, Raddy L; Anzalone, Steven; Savage, Lisa M

    2012-02-03

    Animal models provide the opportunity for in-depth and experimental investigation into the anatomical and physiological underpinnings of human neurological disorders. Rodent models of thiamine deficiency have yielded significant insight into the structural, neurochemical and cognitive deficits associated with thiamine deficiency as well as proven useful toward greater understanding of memory function in the intact brain. In this review, we discuss the anatomical, neurochemical and behavioral changes that occur during the acute and chronic phases of thiamine deficiency and describe how rodent models of Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome aid in developing a more detailed picture of brain structures involved in learning and memory.

  14. A Critical Case of Wernicke's Encephalopathy Induced by Hyperemesis Gravidarum

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    Byung Ju Kang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Wernicke’s encephalopathy is a reversible but potentially critical disease caused by thiamine deficiency. Most patients complain of symptoms such as ophthalmoplegia, ataxia and confusion. Heavy alcohol drinking is commonly associated with the disease, but other clinical conditions also can provoke it. In pregnant women, hyperemesis gravidarum can lead to the depletion of body thiamine due to poor oral intake and a high metabolic demand. We report a case of Wernicke’s encephalopathy following hyperemesis gravidarum in a 36-year-old female at 20 weeks of pregnancy, who visited our hospital because of shock with vaginal bleeding. This case suggests that although the initial presentation may include atypical symptoms (e.g., shock or bleeding, Wernicke’s encephalopathy should be considered, and thiamine replacement should be performed in pregnant women with neurologic symptoms and poor oral intake.

  15. Medical image of the week: MRI of Wernicke's encephalopathy

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    Reyes N

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A 61 year old male presented to the ED with altered mental status after being found down at home with several beer cans around him. He was noted to have horizontal nystagmus on hospital day 2 and a MRI was performed. MRI showed bilateral thalamic enhancement (Figure 1, arrows on flair imaging consistent with Wernicke’s encephalopathy. His thiamine dose was increased with improvement in his mental status.

  16. Wernicke脑病的MRI表现%MRI diagnosis of Wernicke encephalopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张祥林; 王倩; 谭威; 马贺骥

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨Wernicke脑病(Wernicke's encephalopathy,WE)的MRI表现,以提高诊断水平.方法 收集临床确诊并具有完整MRI资料的11例WE进行回顾性分析.结果 5例病变对称性分布于丘脑内侧、第三脑室周围灰质及乳头体.3例病变位于第三脑室周围灰质、中脑导水管周围灰质.2例病变位于中脑导水管周围灰质、丘脑内侧并乳头体萎缩.1例病变位于丘脑内侧、第三脑室周围灰质及顶枕叶皮质区.病变于T1WI为等或低信号,T2WI表现为高信号;FLAIR序列呈高信号;4例急性期病变DWI图像呈高信号.2例增强扫描病例示乳头体呈结节状强化.结论 WE具有典型的MRI表现,对临床诊断有重要意义.%Objective To explore MRI features of Wernicke encephalopathy in order to improve accurate rate of diagnosis of this disease. Methods MRI data of Wernicke encephalopathy in 11 cases were retrospectively analyzed. Results The lesions were sym-metrically located at medial thalamus, the grey matter surrounding the third ventricle and mammillary body in 5 cases, at the grey matter surrounding the third cerebral ventricle and aqueduct in 3 cases,at the grey matter surrounding aqueduct and medial thalamus with mammillary body atrophy in 2 cases, at medial thalamus and the grey matter surrounding the third cerebral ventricle in 1 case with the cortex of parietal and occipital lobe involved. The lesions appeared as isointensity or hypointensity on T1 WI, hyperintensity on T2 WI and FLAIR. In 4 acute cases, the lesions appeared as hyperintensity on DWI. Mammillary body showed nodular enhance-ment in 2 cases after administration of contrast medium. Conclusion Wernicke encephalopathy has typical features on MRI, which provide great value in clinical diagnosis.

  17. Wernicke's encephalopathy complicating hyperemesis gravidarum: from the background to the present.

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    Di Gangi, Stefania; Gizzo, Salvatore; Patrelli, Tito Silvio; Saccardi, Carlo; D'Antona, Donato; Nardelli, Giovanni Battista

    2012-08-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) is a neuropsychiatric syndrome due to thiamine deficiency, which is potentially fatal but preventable. In Obstetrics, it can complicate hyperemesis gravidarum because of major daily requirement. Nowadays there is no consensus on early diagnosis, treatment and prevention of this disorder. We present a case report of hyperemesis gravidarum which degenerated into WE and Korsakoff's syndrome. It highlights that the clinical suspicion is necessary to recognize signs and symptoms, to apply the available effective preventive measures in situations at risk and to begin urgent treatment in presence of characteristic clinical features.

  18. Wernicke's encephalopathy that developed during the introduction period of peritoneal dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Yuko; Ito, Kenji; Nakashima, Hitoshi; Shirakawa, Aki; Abe, Yasuhiro; Ogahara, Satoru; Sasatomi, Yoshie; Yasunaga, Tomoe; Ifuku, Masakazu; Tsugawa, Jun; Tsuboi, Yoshio; Saito, Takao

    2013-01-01

    A 43-year-old man was admitted with end-stage renal disease caused by IgA nephropathy, and was treated with maintenance peritoneal dialysis. The patient developed general fatigue and appetite loss, and his symptoms were gradually aggravated by depression. After approximately 2 months on dialysis, the patient presented with altered consciousness and ophthalmoplegia. Wernicke's encephalopathy was diagnosed based on the presence of classic symptoms and the findings on magnetic resonance imaging. Thiamine replacement therapy was immediately initiated. The patient recovered from most of his neurological symptoms; however, the sequela of Korsakoff syndrome remained. A marginal thiamine deficiency in combination with predisposing factors must be considered when treating dialysis patients.

  19. [Wernicke's encephalopathy and Caine criteria. Report of six cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinert-Altamirano, Anke Paula Ingrid; Juárez-Jiménez, Humberto

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCCIÓN: la encefalopatía de Wernicke es un desorden neurológico agudo y reversible debido a deficiencia de tiamina. En el pasado, se reconocía al alcoholismo crónico como una de las principales causas; actualmente se conocen otras condiciones que lo favorecen: nutrición parenteral prolongada, hiperémesis gravídica, anorexia nerviosa, enteritis regional, síndrome de malabsorción, hemodiálisis, diálisis peritoneal y cirugía abdominal extensa, entre otras. CASOS CLÍNICOS: se describen seis pacientes, tres hombres y tres mujeres que tuvieron en común nutrición parenteral total por más de dos meses debido a complicaciones quirúrgicas abdominales que impedían la vía oral. Las manifestaciones clínicas fueron somnolencia, agitación psicomotriz, oftalmoplejía con limitación para la abducción bilateral y nistagmo horizontal; tres pacientes presentaron ataxia y dismetría apendicular. Los hallazgos en la resonancia magnética fueron hiperintensidad en T2 en los colículos superiores, sustancia gris periacueductal, tubérculos mamilares y núcleos dorsomediales del tálamo; así como hiperintensidad en T1 en ambos núcleos lenticulares por depósito de manganeso debido a la nutrición parenteral total.

  20. Wernicke's Encephalopathy Mimicking Acute Onset Stroke Diagnosed by CT Perfusion

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    Alok Bhan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Metabolic syndromes such as Wernicke’s encephalopathy may present with a sudden neurological deficit, thus mimicking acute onset stroke. Due to current emphasis on rapid admission and treatment of acute stroke patients, there is a significant risk that these stroke mimics may end up being treated with thrombolysis. Rigorous clinical and radiological skills are necessary to correctly identify such metabolic stroke mimics, in order to avoid doing any harm to these patients due to the unnecessary use of thrombolysis. Patient. A 51-year-old Caucasian male was admitted to our hospital with suspicion of an acute stroke due to sudden onset dysarthria and unilateral facial nerve paresis. Clinical examination revealed confusion and dysconjugate gaze. Computed tomography (CT including a CT perfusion (CTP scan revealed bilateral thalamic hyperperfusion. The use of both clinical and radiological findings led to correctly diagnosing Wernicke’s encephalopathy. Conclusion. The application of CTP as a standard diagnostic tool in acute stroke patients can improve the detection of stroke mimics caused by metabolic syndromes as shown in our case report.

  1. Non-alcoholic acute Wernicke's encephalopathy: Role of MRI in non typical cases

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    Elefante, Andrea, E-mail: aelefant@unina.it [Department of Neuroradiology, University of Naples “Federico II”, Naples (Italy); Puoti, Gianfranco [I Division of Neurology, General Medicine Department, Second University of Naples, Naples (Italy); Senese, Rossana [Department of Neuroradiology, University of Naples “Federico II”, Naples (Italy); Coppola, Cinzia [I Division of Neurology, General Medicine Department, Second University of Naples, Naples (Italy); Russo, Carmela [Department of Neuroradiology, University of Naples “Federico II”, Naples (Italy); Tortora, Fabio [Department of Neuroradiology, Second University of Naples, Naples (Italy); Divitiis, Oreste de [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Naples “Federico II”, Naples (Italy); Brunetti, Arturo [Department of Neuroradiology, University of Naples “Federico II”, Naples (Italy)

    2012-12-15

    Aim: Acute Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) is a severe neurological disorder caused by thiamine deficiency, most commonly found in chronic alcoholics. It is not so easy to suspect acute WE when the clinical picture does not include all the typical symptoms and alcohol abuse is not reported. Three rare cases of Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) in non-alcoholic patients are reported. Cases presentation: Two patients developed the disease following prolonged intravenous feeding, the third was carrying a gastric lymphoma. None of them presented with the classic clinical triad of WE (ophtalmoplegia/nystagmus, ataxia and consciousness disturbance), showing just one or two of the typical symptoms. Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) represented the key tool to suspect and define WE diagnosis, showing a picture characterized by bilaterally altered signal of the thalamic pulvinar, mesencephalic cup, mammillary bodies, periaqueductal grey matter and floor of fourth ventricle. All patients dramatically improved within 48 h after administration of thiamine. Conclusion: We emphasize that WE should be suspected in all patients showing typical MRI features presenting with at least one of the clinical triad of WE.

  2. Coma and death in unrecognized wernicke's encephalopathy an autopsy study: estudo necroscópico

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    Marco Aurélio Lana-peixoto

    1992-09-01

    Full Text Available Eleven out of 36 autopsied cases of Wernicke's encephalopathy had developed coma. None of these patients had the diagnosis during life. There were six men and five women with ages ranging from 36 to 50 years (mean 36.6. Seven of these patients were heavy drinkers, three exhibited signs of severe malnutrition, whereas one was being evaluated for a disseminated gastric cancer and one was in treatment of hyperemesis gravidarum. Two patients were brought to the hospital after found unconscious at home. Neuropatholo-gical examination disclosed gross changes in the mammillary bodies in eight cases and microscopic changes in all cases. In one case there was atrophy of the anterior superior part of the vermis. Petechial hemorrhages were observed particularly in the walls of the third ventricle. Microscopically there were in addition to hemorrhages, glial proliferation, endothelial hypertrophy and necrosis of nerve cells and myelin. Central pontine myelmolysis was observed in one case. Wernicke's encephalopathy is a clinically underdiagnosed condition. Coma may mask its classical clinical picture or even be the sole manifestation. Although coma points to a poor outlook it may be reversed by thiamine administration. Any patient with Coma of unknown etiology should be given parenteral thiamine.

  3. Wernicke encephalopathy Clinical presentation and MR images in two nonalcoholic patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Zhang; Jun Wu; Zhiping Hu; Bo Xiao; Guoliang Li

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the importance of and correlation between clinical presentations and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of two different cases of nonalcoholic Wernicke encephalopathy. Case 1: A 63-year-old man with a diagnosis of incomplete mechanical intestinal obstruction. His abdominal symptoms were improved by gastrointestinal decompression, but blurred vision, hypoacusis, dizziness, and unsteady gait were noted. His illness deteriorated to confusion on day seven. MRI showed hyperintense lesions in the medial thalami, tectum of the midbrain, and the periaqueduct region on T2- and diffusion-weighted images. Thiamine therapy was commenced immediately with good results. Case 2: A 22-year-old woman was admitted for sudden-onset confabulation and unsteady gait after hyperemesis gravidarum. She had no history of alcohol or any medication. Brain MRI was normal. The patient experienced relief after Vitamin B1 treatment. These results suggest that brain MRI can define characteristic abnormalities in Wernicke encephalopathy, and that diffusion-weighted imaging may improve the diagnosis sensitivity. In addition, the MRI images may be correlated to the clinical stage and severity of the disease. Nevertheless, the clinical features are essential for correct diagnosis.

  4. Wernicke's encephalopathy induced by total parental nutrition Encefalopatía de Wernicke asociada a nutrición parenteral total

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    J. T. Sequeira Lopes da Silva

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Wernicke's encephalopathy is an acute neurological syndrome due to thiamine deficiency, which is characterized by a typical triad of mental status changes, oculomotor dysfunction and ataxia. Despite the fact that Wernicke's encephalopathy, in developed countries, is frequently associated with chronic alcoholism, there have been a number of published cases associating this encephalopathy with parenteral feeding without vitamin supplementation. Diagnosis is primarily a clinical one, and can be supported by laboratory tests and imaging studies; treatment should start as soon as possible, for the morbidity and mortality (almost 20% associated with this syndrome is high. Thiamine supplementation, along with other vitamins, is recommended for patients in risk of developing this syndrome.La Encefalopatía de Wernicke es un síndrome neurológico de instauración aguda secundario a un déficit de tiamina y que se caracteriza por una típica tríada de alteración del nivel de conciencia, disfunción oculomotora y marcha atáxica. Aunque la causa más frecuente de Wernicke en nuestro medio sea el alcoholismo crónico, varios casos han sido descritos en enfermos con nutrición parenteral total sin aporte vitamínimo. El diagnóstico es principalmente clínico, apoyándose en pruebas analíticas y de neuroimagen, recomendándose empezar el tratamiento con tiamina lo más precozmente posible, dada la alta morbilidad y la alta mortalidad (de casi 20%, que se asocian a esta encefalopatía. La suplementación dietética con tiamina y otras vitaminas está indicada en todos los individuos en riesgo de desarrollar este síndrome.

  5. Encefalopatia de Wernicke em criança com doença de Crohn Wernicke encephalopathy in a child with Crohn disease

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    Felippe Borlot

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Descrever um caso de encefalopatia de Wernicke associada à doença de Crohn na infância. DESCRIÇÃO DO CASO: Menino de cinco anos, com diagnóstico de doença de Crohn por colonoscopia com biópsia há um ano; desde então, fez uso de diversos medicamentos sem resultados terapêuticos. Evoluiu com pancreatite há três meses, quando foi iniciada nutrição parenteral. Apresentou subitamente sonolência, episódios de frases desconexas e alteração da movimentação ocular. O exame neurológico evidenciou nistagmo vertical para cima em todas as posições e nistagmo horizontal no desvio conjugado do olhar. A ressonância magnética do encéfalo mostrou alterações compatíveis com a encefalopatia de Wernicke, sendo instituído o tratamento com tiamina parenteral imediatamente, com reversão completa dos sintomas por volta do 30º dia de tratamento. COMENTÁRIOS: Embora seja uma entidade rara, deve-se suspeitar de encefalopatia de Wernicke frente à presença de fatores de risco, uma vez que o tratamento imediato evita as sequelas neurológicas.OBJECTIVE: To report a case of Wernicke encephalopathy associated with Crohn disease in childhood. CASE DESCRIPTION: A five year-old boy with Crohn disease, diagnosed by colonoscopy and biopsy one year ago; he has been treated with many different medications without results. During the past year, the patient was diagnosed with pancreatites and has received parenteral nutrition since then. After three months, the child suddenly presented drowsiness, meaningless speech and ocular movement disturbance. Neurologic examination disclosed upbeat nystagmus in all positions and horizontal nystagmus during conjugate deviation of the eyes. Magnetic resonance showed abnormalities consistent with Wernicke encephalopathy. Parenteral thiamine has been administered soon after diagnosis and by the 30th day of treatment, recovery of symptoms was complete. COMMENTS: Despite being a rare entity, neurological

  6. MR imaging findings in alcoholic and nonalcoholic acute Wernicke's encephalopathy: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzo, Gaetana; De Gennaro, Angela; Cozzolino, Attilio; Serino, Antonietta; Fenza, Giacomo; Manto, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) is a severe neurological syndrome caused by thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency and clinically characterized by the sudden onset of mental status changes, ocular abnormalities, and ataxia. Apart from chronic alcoholism, the most common cause of WE, a lot of other conditions causing malnutrition and decreasing thiamine absorption such as gastrointestinal surgical procedures and hyperemesis gravidarum must be considered as predisposing factors. Due to its low prevalence and clinical heterogeneity, WE is often misdiagnosed, leading to persistent dysfunctions and, in some cases, to death. Nowadays, MR imaging of the brain, showing T2 and FLAIR hyperintensities in typical (thalami, mammillary bodies, tectal plate, and periaqueductal area) and atypical areas (cerebellum, cranial nerve nuclei, and cerebral cortex), is surely the most important and effective tool in the diagnostic assessment of WE. The aim of this paper is to propose a state of the art of the role of MR imaging in the early diagnosis of this complex disease.

  7. Irreversible optic neuropathy in wernicke encephalopathy and leber hereditary optic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, John-Michael; Rucker, Janet C

    2010-03-01

    A 52-year-old woman with alcohol abuse presented with recent worsening of vision, imbalance, and confusion. Examination revealed counting fingers acuity in both eyes with central scotomas, color vision loss, horizontal nystagmus, and gait ataxia. Thiamine was initiated as treatment for a presumptive diagnosis of Wernicke encephalopathy (WE). Brain MRI revealed high T2 signal in the dorsal midbrain and thalami characteristic of WE. The lack of optic disc edema, usually present in patients with WE who have severe optic neuropathy, and lack of visual loss reversibility with thiamine treatment, led to the suspicion of coexisting Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), which was later confirmed when testing revealed the 14484 mitochondrial DNA mutation. Over the ensuing months, vision did not recover despite improvement of other neurologic findings. Irreversible optic neuropathy in WE should prompt consideration of a coexisting mitochondrial disorder such as LHON.

  8. A patient with a 'typical presentation' of Wernicke encephalopathy was found to have sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goossens, K; van Bruchem-Visser, R L

    2017-06-01

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) has a significant degree of clinical heterogeneity that is especially found in the features at onset. Here we present a patient with the sporadic form of CJD mimicking Wernicke encephalopathy. We first treated him with a high dose of thiamine; however, the vitamin B1 levels proved to be normal, which ruled out Wernicke encephalopathy. Meanwhile, his clinical condition progressively worsened and he developed a rapidly progressive cognitive disorder, mutism and myoclonus of the muscles. At this point, the diagnosis of CJD was most likely. The patient died two months after the first symptoms. Autopsy showed prion-protein depositions in several regions. Genetic analysis was negative for familial CJD. Those findings confirmed the diagnosis of 'sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease'. CJD presents in a wide range of sequences and clinical symptoms. Therefore, recognition in the early stage can be difficult.

  9. Wernicke's encephalopathy due to hyperemesis gravidarum: Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging characteristics

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    V V Ashraf

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperemesis gravidarum-induced Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE is an underestimated condition. The purpose of this study is to improve its awareness and early diagnosis. We report five cases of WE secondary to hyperemesis gravidarum. Classic triad of encephalopathy, ataxia, and ocular signs was seen in four out of five patients. Two unusual features noted in this series were papilledema in one patient and severe sensory-motor peripheral neuropathy in one patient. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI was abnormal in all the five patients, and high signal in medial thalamus and surrounding the aqueduct was the most common abnormality (5/5. Involvement of caudate nucleus was seen in two patients with severe psychosis, and two patients had bilateral cerebellar peduncle involvement. Median time delay between onset of neurological symptoms and diagnosis was 7 days. All patients improved with thiamine, but minor sequelae were seen in four patients at 12 months follow-up. One patient had a fetal demise. Hyperemesis gravidarum-induced WE is a common cause of maternal morbidity. Typical MRI findings of symmetric medial thalamic and periaqueductal signal changes may permit a specific diagnosis. A delay in diagnosis, therefore treatment, leads to worse prognosis.

  10. Wernicke's encephalopathy due to hyperemesis gravidarum: Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, V V; Prijesh, J; Praveenkumar, R; Saifudheen, K

    2016-01-01

    Hyperemesis gravidarum-induced Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) is an underestimated condition. The purpose of this study is to improve its awareness and early diagnosis. We report five cases of WE secondary to hyperemesis gravidarum. Classic triad of encephalopathy, ataxia, and ocular signs was seen in four out of five patients. Two unusual features noted in this series were papilledema in one patient and severe sensory-motor peripheral neuropathy in one patient. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was abnormal in all the five patients, and high signal in medial thalamus and surrounding the aqueduct was the most common abnormality (5/5). Involvement of caudate nucleus was seen in two patients with severe psychosis, and two patients had bilateral cerebellar peduncle involvement. Median time delay between onset of neurological symptoms and diagnosis was 7 days. All patients improved with thiamine, but minor sequelae were seen in four patients at 12 months follow-up. One patient had a fetal demise. Hyperemesis gravidarum-induced WE is a common cause of maternal morbidity. Typical MRI findings of symmetric medial thalamic and periaqueductal signal changes may permit a specific diagnosis. A delay in diagnosis, therefore treatment, leads to worse prognosis.

  11. Thirty Days without a Bite: Wernicke's Encephalopathy in a Patient with Paranoid Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlois, Mélanie; Doré, Marie-Claire; Laforce, Robert

    2014-09-25

    Wernicke's Encephalopathy (WE) is a preventable neurologic condition characterized by altered mental status, ophthalmoplegia, and ataxia. Although historically associated with alcoholism, a few authors have described WE in patients with non-alcohol related psychiatric disorders. We report herein the case of a 36-year-old young man with paranoid schizophrenia who was brought to hospital for confusion and difficulties with his vision. His roommate said he had gone about thirty days without eating '…because he was on a slimming cure'. History and physical examination suggested WE as a result of isolation and poor diet leading to nutritional deficiency. This was confirmed by brain magnetic resonance imaging showing classic thalamic, mammillary bodies and brainstem lesions. Of note, his cognitive profile was far more heterogeneous than what had classically been described in the literature and involved both cortical and subcortical pathology, generating memory but also significant executive deficits. Intravenous treatment with thiamine was given and our patient showed mild improvements in visual acuity and nystagmus. However, persistent cognitive and physical disabilities consistent with Korsakoff syndrome remained, and he now lives in a supervised home. This case illustrates the tragic consequences of nutritional deficiencies in a patient with paranoid schizophrenia. The threshold to suspect WE in schizophrenic patients should be lowered and in doubt prophylactic parenteral thiamine should be administered.

  12. Wernicke's Encephalopathy - ‘Pushing the Envelope’ of Patient's Profile: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaprakash, B.; Rao, Karthik N.; Patil, Navin; Bhattacharjee, Dipanjan; Maden, Mohit; Rau, N.R.

    2016-01-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE), an acute neuropsychiatric condition, is caused by thiamine deficiency. Traditionally, it has been associated with patients with a background of alcoholism. However, in the past few decades, with increasing trends in the incidence of WE among patients without a history of alcohol consumption, a pressing need was felt to examine the existing guidelines for the management of WE and its sequelae. The need for a revision was felt as the guidelines for the management of WE were developed around the premise that this affliction is observed mainly among alcoholics. In light of the opportunity presented to us by one of our patients who did not ‘fit the bill’ of a traditional case of WE, we decided to compare and contrast the management of WE among patients with and without a background of alcoholism. After analyzing the available data on WE among alcoholics and non-alcoholics, we concluded that a high degree of suspicion should be kept in mind if any of the classical features are observed, with a special emphasis on eliciting the underlying causes through a detailed history. Furthermore, thiamine supplementation at a lower dose of 100-200 mg should be initiated first, followed by laboratory and radiological investigations. PMID:27721589

  13. [Gayet-Wernicke's encephalopathy. A study of 13 cases observed in a refugee population hospitalized at the Conakry Teaching Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cissé, A F; Camara, N; Diallo, L L; Morel, Y; Koné, S; Camara, M I; Koumbassa, M L; Tafsir, D; Soumah, D; Djigué, B S; Camara, O B; Barry, M; Bangoura, S A; Kourouma, S; Da Silva, L; Cissé, A

    2008-12-01

    The authors report 13 cases of Gayet-Wernicke's encephalopathy observed in 13 patients of a refugee population. 11 presented the classical triad: oculomotor signs, cerebral ataxia and state of confusion and in 2 patients, only 2 symptoms were noted. The etiological factors: chronic alcoholism, malnutrition, uncontrollable vomiting, HIV and tuberculosis were identified. The outcome was evaluated on the basis of the disappearance of symptoms after treatment with 500 mg of thiamine in 7 patients, 1 death and 5 patients progressed toward Korsakoff amnesic syndrome.

  14. Wernicke's encephalopathy induced by total parenteral nutrition in patient with acute leukaemia: unusual involvement of caudate nuclei and cerebral cortex on MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Aprile, P.; Tarantino, A.; Carella, A. [Division of Neuroradiology, Policlinico, Univ. of Bari (Italy); Santoro, N. [Inst. of Paediatric Clinic I, Policlinico, University of Bari, Bari (Italy)

    2000-10-01

    We report a 13-year-old girl with leukaemia and Wernicke's encephalopathy induced by total parenteral nutrition. MRI showed unusual bilateral lesions of the caudate nuclei and cerebral cortex, as well as typical lesions surrounding the third ventricle and aqueduct. After intravenous thiamine, the patient improved, and the abnormalities on MRI disappeared. (orig.)

  15. Clinical characteristics and MR imaging features of nonalcoholic acute Wernicke encephalopathy%非酒精性急性Wernicke 脑病的临床及MRI特点

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董季平; 陈慧玲; 刘红生; 宁文德; 李安泰

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨非酒精性急性Wernicke 脑病的临床及MRI表现.方法 回顾分析6例非酒精性急性Wernicke 脑病的临床与MRI所见.均为女性,年龄21~75岁,平均45岁.无嗜酒史.使用GE 1.5T MR扫描仪,行常规T1WI、T2WI、T2FLAIR、DWI扫描,2例行增强扫描.结果 6例均有2周以上呕吐及不能进食史.起病急,首发症状均为精神异常及意识障碍,其中2例发病后即进入昏迷状态.其他症状有眼部症状4例,共济失调1例.MRI表现:6例均有双侧对称性第三脑室旁、丘脑内侧、大脑导水管周围、中脑被盖长T1长T2异常信号.其他部位信号异常的有第四脑室底部4例,桥脑延髓3例,乳头体3例.DWI病灶区呈扩散受限的高信号.增强扫描病灶边缘有强化.经大剂量维生素B1治疗,临床好转5例,死亡1例.结论 非酒精性急性Wernicke 脑病有特征性的MRI表现,是诊断本病的重要影像学方法.%Objective To investigate the clinical and MR] features of nonalcoholic acute Wernicke encephalopathy( WE). Methods The clinical and MR imaging findings of six cases with nonalcoholic acute WE were analyzed retrospectively. All of them were female with an average age of 45 ycars( range, 20-75ycars). All patients denied a history of alcoholic abuse. 6 cases underwent conventional MR imaging and 2 cases were imaged with contrast enhanced MR imaging. Results All patients had vomiting and less intake of food for more than 2 weeks,symptoms were acute onset. Initial central nervous system (CNS) symptoms included psychotic disorder and disturbance of consciousness, including 2 patients with coma. Some patients had other symptoms:A with ocular abnormalities, 1 with ataxia. MR imaging findings: All six patients showed symmetrically abnormal long T, and long T2 signals in the arc-as surrounding the third ventricle and aqueduct, medial thalami and tegmentum of brain, another areas of abnormal signal intensity were observed in the floor of forth vcntriclc (4

  16. Wernick脑病1例并文献回顾%A case of Wernick encephalopathy and literature review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王前; 袁媛

    2015-01-01

    ABSTACT: Objective To investigate the clinical diagnostic value of MRI for chronic alcoholism Wernick encephalopathy. Methods 1 cases of chronic alcoholism patients were selected, respectively, for the brain MRI and MRA examination. Results In the T2WI and T2FLAIR images, the head signal of and DWI was slightly higher than that of the thalamus, and the lesions had no signiifcant effect. Combined with medical history, diagnosis of Wernick encephalopathy, to give nerve nutrition and symptomatic treatment, the condition improved. Conclusion For patients with chronic alcohol abuse, malnutrition or gastrointestinal surgery history, patients with neurological symptoms may be the ifrst choice for MRI examination, early diagnosis and treatment can avoid irreversible brain damage.%目的:探讨MRI对慢性酒精中毒Wernick脑病患者的诊断价值。方法选取本院收治的1例慢性酒精中毒患者,分别对其进行颅脑MRI及MRA检查。结果于T2WI及T2FLAIR像双侧丘脑内侧、尾状核头部信号略增高,于DWI像呈略高信号影,病变无明显占位效应,结合病史,诊断为Wernick脑病,给予神经营养及对症治疗后,病情好转。结论临床上对于长期饮酒、营养不良或有胃肠道手术史患者,并出现神经症状的患者可首选颅脑MRI检查,早期诊断治疗可以避免不可逆的脑损害。

  17. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging in acute Wernicke's encephalopathy associated with pseudomembranous colitis: a case report and review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Hye On; Lee, Yong Chul; Park, Tai Hwan; Yoo, Seung Min; Lee, Hwa Yeon; Song, In Sup; Lee, Jong Beum; Kim, Kun Sang [Chung-Ang University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-06-15

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is a common complication of thiamine deficiency among chronic alcoholics. However, there have been few reports about MR imaging findings, including the diffusion-weighted changes of this neurologic disorder, in nonalcoholic patients. We present here a rare case of acute Wernicke's encephalopathy that developed in a patient who received prolonged total parenteral nutrition for his pseudomembranous colitis. The MR imaging, including the diffusion-weighted imaging, was performed at the onset of disease and during follow-up. The diagnosis was made by the characteristic MR imaging findings and it was supported by the clinical features. The initial and follow-up MR imaging findings with diffusion-weighted imaging changes are described and correlated with the clinical status.

  18. Wernicke's Encephalopathy, Wet Beriberi, and Polyneuropathy in a Patient with Folate and Thiamine Deficiency Related to Gastric Phytobezoar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huertas-González, Nuria; Hernando-Requejo, Virgilio; Luciano-García, Zaida; Cervera-Rodilla, Juan Luis

    2015-01-01

    Background. Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) is an acute neurological disorder resulting from thiamine deficiency. It is mainly related to alcohol abuse but it can be associated with other conditions such as gastrointestinal disorders. This vitamin deficiency can also present with cardiovascular symptoms, called “wet beriberi.” Association with folate deficit worsens the clinical picture. Subject. A 70-year-old man with gastric phytobezoar presented with gait instability, dyspnoea, chest pain associated with right heart failure and pericarditis, and folate deficiency. Furosemide was administered and cardiac symptoms improved but he soon developed vertiginous syndrome, nystagmus, diplopia, dysmetria, and sensitive and motor deficit in all four limbs with areflexia. Results. A cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed typical findings of WE. He was immediately treated with thiamine. Neurological symptoms improved in a few days and abnormal signals disappeared in a follow-up MRI two weeks later. Conclusion. Patients with malabsorption due to gastrointestinal disorders have an increased risk of thiamine deficiency, and folate deficiency can make this vitamin malabsorption worse. An established deficiency mainly shows neurological symptoms, WE, or rarely cardiovascular symptoms, wet beriberi. Early vitamin treatment in symptomatic patients improves prognosis. We recommend administration of prophylactic multivitamins supplements in patients at risk as routine clinical practice. PMID:26697247

  19. Three-dimensional mapping of local cerebral perfusion in alcoholic encephalopathy with and without Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hata, T.; Meyer, J.S.; Tanahashi, N.; Ishikawa, Y.; Imai, A.; Shinohara, T.; Velez, M.; Fann, W.E.; Kandula, P.; Sakai, F.

    1987-02-01

    Seventeen severe chronic alcoholic patients with and without Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS) were examined prospectively after being treated by withdrawal from alcohol. The WKS patients also received thiamine supplements. Three-dimensional measurements of local cerebral blood flow (LCBF) and local partition coefficients (L lambda) were made utilizing xenon contrast computed tomography (Xe CT-CBF). Results were displayed as color-coded brain maps before and after treatment and these were correlated with neurological and cognitive examinations. Before treatment chronic alcoholics without WKS (n = 10) showed diffuse reductions of LCBF values throughout all gray matter including hypothalamus, vicinity of nucleus basalis of Meynert, thalamus, and basal ganglia. Similar, but more severe, reductions were seen in patients with WKS (n = 7), however, white matter perfusion was also reduced. In WKS, most prominent reductions of LCBF were also seen in hypothalamus and basal forebrain nuclei but thalamus, basal ganglia, and limbic systems were severely reduced. After treatment, both groups with alcoholic encephalopathy showed marked clinical improvement and cerebral perfusion was restored toward normal. Chronic alcohol abuse, in the absence of thiamine deficiency, reduces CBF by direct neurotoxic effects. If thiamine deficiency is also present, more severe and localized hemodynamic reductions are superimposed.

  20. Encefalopatia de Wernicke: A propósito de um caso com síndrome pilórica obstrutiva Wernicke's encephalopathy: report of a case with obstructive pyloric syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélio Araújo Oliveira

    1995-09-01

    Full Text Available Os autores apresentam um caso de encefalopatia de Wernicke em um paciente com síndrome de obstrução pilórica por adenocarcinoma gástrico, sem história de alcoolismo e desnutrição. Comentam aspectos fisiológicos da importância da tiamina como co-enzima da transcetolase e da piruvato-descarboxilase na rota metabólica para produção de ATP e a possibilidade da existência de interação de fatores genéticos e ambientais no surgimento do quadro clínico. Chamam a atenção para a importância do diagnóstico clínico, que deve ser precoce para que a terapêutica específica com tiamina possa surtir efeito, principalmente em pacientes sem história prévia de alcoolismo e desnutrição.The authors present one case of Wernicke's encephalopathy in a patient with obstructive pyloric syndrome caused by gastric adenocarcinoma, wihout previous history of alcoholism or malnutrition. They comment on the importance of physiological aspects of thiamine as a co-enzyme of transketolase and pyruvate-decarboxilase in the metabolic pathway for ATP production and the possibility of existing an interaction between genetical and environmental factors in the onset the symptoms. They draw attention for the clinical diagnosis, which should be precocious for the therapy with thiamine to be efective, especially in patients without previous history of alcoholism or malnutrition.

  1. Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome in Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki Hyang Kim

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Wernicke encephalopathy is a disease that constitutes a medical emergency, but one that can be reversed with thiamine repletion if it is recognized early. Patients with cancer have a high risk of Wernicke encephalopathy because of malnutrition, the use of chemotherapeutic agents, and disease progression. Korsakoff syndrome can follow or accompany Wernicke encephalopathy. Although patients can recover from Wernicke encephalopathy via rapid repletion of thiamine, few patients recover from Korsakoff syndrome. Here, the case of a 76-year-old female patient who had primary peritoneal cancer and developed Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome as a result of prolonged nutritional imbalance and fast-growing tumor cells is reported. The patient's neurologic symptoms improved, but she did not recover from the psychiatric effects of the disease.

  2. Wernicke-korsakoff syndrome in primary peritoneal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki Hyang

    2013-09-01

    Wernicke encephalopathy is a disease that constitutes a medical emergency, but one that can be reversed with thiamine repletion if it is recognized early. Patients with cancer have a high risk of Wernicke encephalopathy because of malnutrition, the use of chemotherapeutic agents, and disease progression. Korsakoff syndrome can follow or accompany Wernicke encephalopathy. Although patients can recover from Wernicke encephalopathy via rapid repletion of thiamine, few patients recover from Korsakoff syndrome. Here, the case of a 76-year-old female patient who had primary peritoneal cancer and developed Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome as a result of prolonged nutritional imbalance and fast-growing tumor cells is reported. The patient's neurologic symptoms improved, but she did not recover from the psychiatric effects of the disease.

  3. 腹部大手术后并发韦尼克脑病10例临床诊治分析%Clinical analysis of 10 patients with Wernicke encephalopathy after major abdominal surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐园; 邵钦树; 王永向; 杨瑾; 徐继

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨腹部大手术后患者并发韦尼克脑病的临床特征及诊治方法.方法 回顾性分析浙江省人民医院2000-2012年间腹部大手术后并发韦尼克脑病的10例患者的临床资料.结果 10例患者发病时间为术后5~36(平均22.9)d.主要临床表现为头晕、嗜睡、意识障碍、视物模糊及步态不稳.MR检查主要表现为丘脑、第三脑室、侧脑室或中脑导水管周围等区域可见对称性长T1和T2信号.给予维生素B1治疗后,症状完全缓解6例,部分缓解2例,死亡2例.结论 对于腹部大手术后需长期禁食的患者,外科医师需警惕并发韦尼克脑病,早期发现并及时补充维生素B1,可避免不可逆性脑损伤.%Objective To explore the pathogenesis,clinical features,diagnosis and treatment of Wernicke encephalopathy after major abdominal surgery.Methods Clinical data of 10 patients with Wemicke encephalopathy after major abdominal surgery in the Zhejiang Provincial People's Hospital from 2000 to 2012 were retrospectively analyzed.Results Wernicke encephalopathy occurred during 5 to 36 days (mean 22.9 days) after surgery.The main symptoms included vertigo,vagueness,blurred vision,and gait incoordination.MRI showed bilaterally symmetrical enhancement of T1 and T2 signal in thalamus,third ventricle,lateral ventricle and periaqueductal region.With treatment of vitamin B1,6patients were completely recovered,and 2 party recovered,but 2 died.Conclusions Surgeons should be aware of Wernicke encephalopathy when treating patients undergoing major abdominal operation who need prolonged fasting postoperatively.Early detection and timely supplement of vitamin B1 can avoid irreversible brain damage.

  4. Hallazgos por RM en la encefalopatía de Wernicke aguda: a propósito de un caso MRI findings in acute Wernicke's encephalopathy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustín Marrero

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Si bien la enfermedad de Wernicke es un desorden neurológico poco frecuente que se produce por el déficit de tiamina, cuando ocurre es una emergencia médica, ya que la ausencia de tratamiento conduce a una psicosis de Korsakoff e, incluso, a la muerte. Presentamos el caso de un paciente en el cual la resonancia magnética (RM, que tiene imágenes características, fue fundamental para el diagnóstico precoz.Even if Wernicke's disease is a rare neurological disorder caused by thiamine deficiency, when it occurs, it is considered as a medical emergency, because the absence of treatment leads to Korsakoff psychosis and even death. We report the case of a patient in whom typical Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI findings were key to an early diagnosis.

  5. Early Detection of Mental and Motor Symptoms In the Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.W. Wijnia (Jan)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractThe clinical signs of Wernicke encephalopathy most often occur within hours to days before a subsequent hospital admission. Wernicke encephalopathy may be identified by the presence of a delirium in malnourished alcoholic patients who have trouble walking. In these patients the

  6. Early Detection of Mental and Motor Symptoms In the Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.W. Wijnia (Jan)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractThe clinical signs of Wernicke encephalopathy most often occur within hours to days before a subsequent hospital admission. Wernicke encephalopathy may be identified by the presence of a delirium in malnourished alcoholic patients who have trouble walking. In these patients the delir

  7. Early Detection of Mental and Motor Symptoms In the Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.W. Wijnia (Jan)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractThe clinical signs of Wernicke encephalopathy most often occur within hours to days before a subsequent hospital admission. Wernicke encephalopathy may be identified by the presence of a delirium in malnourished alcoholic patients who have trouble walking. In these patients the delir

  8. Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the brain that alters brain function or structure. Encephalopathy may be caused by infectious agent (bacteria, virus, or prion), metabolic or mitochondrial dysfunction, brain tumor or increased pressure in the ...

  9. Clinical characteristics and MR imaging features of nonalcoholic wernicke encephalopathy%非酒精性Wernicke脑病临床特点及MRI表现

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王尚尚; 杨轩; 张莹; 陈振; 张敬

    2016-01-01

    目的 探讨非酒精性Wernicke脑病(WE)病人临床特点及MRI表现.方法 回顾性分析经临床证实的10例非酒精性WE病人临床特点及MRI表现.结果 胃肠道疾病所致反复呕吐、急性胰腺炎及妊娠剧烈呕吐为主要发病诱因.精神或意识改变为最常见临床表现.10例病人中仅1例为单发病灶,余9例均为多部位受累,病变部位包括双侧丘脑内侧及三脑室周围区(8例)、中脑导水管周围区(7例)、中脑顶盖(6例)、乳头体(4例)、四脑室底(4例)、小脑蚓部(1例).所有病灶均于T2WI或T2 FLAIR上呈对称性高信号.8例行DWI扫描,病灶呈高或稍高信号.1例行MRI增强检查,病灶呈轻度强化.4例于治疗后复查颅脑MRI,均见病灶缩小或消失.结论 非酒精性WE的颅脑MRI表现具有特征性,结合病史及临床表现有助于做出早期诊断.%Objebtive To investigate the clinical characteristics and MR imaging features of nonalcoholic Wernicke encephalopathy (WE). Methods We retrospectively reviewed clinical characteristics and MR imaging features of 10 patients with nonalcoholic WE. Results The main predisposing factors included recurrent vomiting as a result of gastrointestinal disease, acute pancreatitis, and hyperemesis gravidarum. The most frequent neurologic finding was change in consciousness or mental status. On the MR images of the 10 patients, single area was involved in one cases, and multiple areas were involved in the remain 9 cases. The locations of lesions included the medial thalami and the periventricular region of the third ventricle (8 patients), the periaqueductal area (7 patients), the tectal plate (6 patients), the mamillary bodies (4 patients), the floor of forth ventricle (4 patients), and cerebellar vermis (1 patients). The findings were symmetric hyperintensity on T 2-weighted or fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images in all lesions. Eight patients who underwent diffusion-weighted imaging demonstrated increased

  10. Unusual Presentation of Uncommon Disease: Anorexia Nervosa Presenting as Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome—A Case Report from Southeast Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Raheel Mushtaq; Sheikh Shoib; Tabindah Shah; Mudasir Bhat; Randhir Singh; Sahil Mushtaq

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa presenting as Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome is rare. The causes of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome are multiple like alcohol abuse, thyrotoxicosis, haemodialysis, severe malnutrition because of gastric carcinoma and pyloric obstruction, hyperemesis gravidarum, and prolonged parenteral feeding. We report a case of anorexia nervosa, who presented with Wernicke's encephalopathy and progressed to Korsakoff's syndrome. Knowledge, awareness, and early intervention of anorexia nervosa...

  11. Unusual presentation of uncommon disease: anorexia nervosa presenting as wernicke-korsakoff syndrome-a case report from southeast Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushtaq, Raheel; Shoib, Sheikh; Shah, Tabindah; Bhat, Mudasir; Singh, Randhir; Mushtaq, Sahil

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa presenting as Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome is rare. The causes of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome are multiple like alcohol abuse, thyrotoxicosis, haemodialysis, severe malnutrition because of gastric carcinoma and pyloric obstruction, hyperemesis gravidarum, and prolonged parenteral feeding. We report a case of anorexia nervosa, who presented with Wernicke's encephalopathy and progressed to Korsakoff's syndrome. Knowledge, awareness, and early intervention of anorexia nervosa by mental health professionals can prevent development of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome.

  12. Unusual Presentation of Uncommon Disease: Anorexia Nervosa Presenting as Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome—A Case Report from Southeast Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raheel Mushtaq

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Anorexia nervosa presenting as Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome is rare. The causes of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome are multiple like alcohol abuse, thyrotoxicosis, haemodialysis, severe malnutrition because of gastric carcinoma and pyloric obstruction, hyperemesis gravidarum, and prolonged parenteral feeding. We report a case of anorexia nervosa, who presented with Wernicke's encephalopathy and progressed to Korsakoff's syndrome. Knowledge, awareness, and early intervention of anorexia nervosa by mental health professionals can prevent development of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome.

  13. Evolution of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome in self-neglecting alcoholics: preliminary results of relation with Wernicke-delirium and diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijnia, Jan W; van de Wetering, Ben J M; Zwart, Elles; Nieuwenhuis, K Gerrit A; Goossensen, M Anne

    2012-01-01

    We present a descriptive, retrospective study of initial symptoms, comorbidity, and alcohol withdrawal in 73 alcoholic patients with subsequent Korsakoff syndrome. In 25/73 (35%) of the patients the classic triad of Wernicke's encephalopathy with ocular symptoms, ataxia and confusion, was found. In at least 6/35 (17%) of the initial deliria (95% confidence interval: 10-25%) we observed no other underlying causes, thus excluding other somatic causes, medication, (recent) alcohol withdrawal, or intoxication. We suggest that these deliria may have been representing Wernicke's encephalopathy. A high frequency (15%) of diabetics may reflect a contributing factor of diabetes mellitus in the evolution of the Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome.

  14. Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome in the course of thyrotoxicosis - a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierzbicka-Chmiel, Joanna; Wierzbicki, Krzysztof; Kajdaniuk, Dariusz; Sędziak, Ryszard; Marek, Bogdan

    2011-01-01

    Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (also called Wernicke's encephalopathy) is a potentially fatal, neuropsychiatric syndrome caused most frequently by thiamine deficiency. The three classic symptoms found together are confusion, ataxia and eyeball manifestations. Memory disturbances can also be symptoms. Wernicke's encephalopathy mainly results from alcohol abuse, but also from malnutrition, cancer, chronic dialysis, thyrotoxicosis and, in well-founded cases, encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease (EAATD). The coexistence of many factors makes a proper diagnosis difficult, delays appropriate treatment and consequently reduces the chance of complete recovery. We present the case of a 53 year-old female with Wernicke's encephalopathy caused by chronic malnutrition, surgical operation, as well as thyrotoxicosis. She received treatment with intravenous thiamine administration and also anti-thyroid treatment which caused satisfactory regression of her neurological symptoms.

  15. The clinical and neuroimage features of Non-alcoholic Wernicke's encephalopathy%非酒精性韦尼克脑病的临床与MRI影像特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔红卫; 付振强; 孙同文; 段晓光; 张博爱

    2016-01-01

    Objective Objective The present study was to increase the awareness of nonalcoholic Wernicke's encephalopathy ( WE) to reduce its misdiagnosis.Methods The clinical features and MR imaging findings in 6 patients with nonalcoholic WE were retrospectively analyzed.Results All patients exhibited different degrees of unconsciousness.Only two patients presented with the typical triad of neuro-ophthalmologic manifestations, ataxia, and global confusion.All patients presented with typical MR features characterized by bilaterally altered signal of the medial thalamus, periventricular region of the third ventricle and periaqueductal area. In addition, two patients developed symmetric cortical and facial nerve nucleus involvements with deep coma, which was clinically rare.The average clinical recovery and MRI imaging recovery times were 7.5 months and 2.8 months, respectively,.Two patients with deep coma showed a poor prognosis:1 patient died, and the other had a sever spastic paralysis of her extremities and mental retardation during a follow -up of 2 years.Two patients with deep coma showed symmetric hyperintensities on diffusion -weighted imaging ( DWI) .Conclusions MRI images are useful in the early diagnosis of nonalcoholic WE.Cortical and cranial nerve nucleus involve-ment in nonalcoholic WE patients may be an indication of irreversible damage and a poor prognosis.In addition, hyperintensities on DWI may also indicate an unfavorable prognosis.%目的非酒精性韦尼克脑病( Wernicke encehalopathy,WE)易误诊,本文旨在提高对该病的认识。方法回顾性分析6例非酒精性WE患者临床及MRI特征。结果6例患者均出现不同程度的意识障碍,其中仅2例表现为经典的三联征。6例患者均出现双侧对称性丘脑内侧、脑室及导水管周围、中脑顶盖异常信号典型表现,同时2例深昏迷患者分别表现出弥漫性皮层及面神经核受累。随访患者平均恢复时间为7.5个月,而MRI则为2

  16. Anorexia nervosa and Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Laura; Silva, Luiz Fal; Banzato, Claudio Em; Dantas, Clarissa R; Garcia, Celso

    2010-07-20

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is an acute, potentially fatal, neuropsychiatric syndrome resulting from thiamine deficiency. The disorder is still greatly under-diagnosed, and failure to promptly identify and adequately treat the condition can lead to death or to the chronic form of the encephalopathy - Korsakoff's syndrome. Wernicke's encephalopathy has traditionally been associated with alcoholism but, in recent years, there has been an increase in the number of clinical settings in which the disorder is observed. We report the case of a 45-year-old Caucasian woman who arrived at the emergency room presenting signs of marked malnutrition and mental confusion, ataxic gait and ophthalmoplegia. Main laboratory test findings included low serum magnesium and megaloblastic anemia. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed increased T2 signal in the supratentorial paraventricular region, the medial regions of the thalamus and the central and periaqueductal midbrain. The diagnosis of Wernicke's encephalopathy was made at once and immediate reposition of thiamine and magnesium was started. The patient had a long history of recurrent thoughts of being overweight, severe self-imposed diet restrictions and self-induced vomiting. She had also been drinking gin on a daily basis for the last eight years. One day after admittance the acute global confusional state resolved, but she presented severe memory deficits and confabulation. After six months of outpatient follow-up, memory deficits remained unaltered. In this case, self-imposed long-lasting nutritional deprivation is thought to be the main cause of thiamine deficiency and subsequent encephalopathy, but adjunct factors, such as magnesium depletion and chronic alcohol misuse, might have played an important role, especially in the development of Korsakoff's syndrome. The co-morbidity between eating disorders and substance abuse disorders has emerged as a significant health issue for women, and the subgroup of patients with

  17. Wernicke's encephalopathy with chorea: Neuroimaging findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jivago S. Sabatini

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT We present a case report of motor and cognitive disorders in a 36-year-old woman with a history of twelve years of heavy alcohol abuse. The patient presented depressive symptoms over the course of one year after a loss in the family, evolving with ataxia, bradykinesia and choreiform movements. Progressive cognitive decline, sleep alterations and myalgia were also reported during the course of disease evolution. Physical examination revealed spastic paraparesis with fixed flexion of the hips and knees with important pain upon extension of these joints. Initial investigation suggested the diagnosis of thiamine deficiency by brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI.

  18. Preventing the Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome in Australia: cost-effectiveness of thiamin-supplementation alternatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connelly, L; Price, J

    1996-04-01

    Alcoholic Wernicke's encephalopathy has been commonplace in Australia for many years and, as this syndrome is attributed to a deficiency in the diet, it should be preventable. This study employs conventional cost-effectiveness methodology to compare the economic efficiency of several thiamin-supplementation alternatives that have been proposed for the prevention of Wernicke's encephalopathy. A series of rankings of these measures is derived from an estimated cost per case averted for each of the alternatives studied. These rankings identify the least cost-effective thiamin-supplementation alternative as that of enriching bread-making flour with thiamin.

  19. Case Report : A Relieved Family with the Diagnosis of Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Kokurcan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome (WKS is a diagnosis formed from Wernicke ensephalopathy and Korsakoff Syndrome together. WKS is usually a chronic syndrome beginning acutely. Wernicke%u2019s encephalopathy is an acute syndrome composed of the triad of oculomotor signs; ataxia and confusion. B vitamines especially tiamine are considered to cause the syndrome. Korsakoff syndrome is a syndrome presenting with amnesia and amnesia is permanent in many cases. While Korsakoff syndrome is a continuation form of Wernicke; the syndromes are admitted as the acute and chronic conditions of the same pathophysiology. WKS syndrome means despair for many psychiatrists and the family unless treatment is initiated in the acute phase and irreversible cognitive impairment is prevented. We will discuss a case of WKS pleasing his family as nervousness has improved with cognitive impairment.

  20. Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome and the use of brain imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauhar, P; Montaldi, D

    2000-01-01

    The proportion of patients with Korsakoff psychosis (KP) who have a history of Wernicke's encephalopathy is smaller in recent studies compared to previous studies. Neuropsychological tests, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and single photon emission computed tomography were conducted in eight patients with KP, only four of whom had had a documented Wernicke episode. All subjects showed amnesia without intellectual deterioration. MRI abnormalities were seen in each group to the same extent (atrophy of mammillary bodies, to a less extent thalamus and some generalized gyral atrophy). No MRI measure differentiated the groups. Cerebral blood flow showed reduction of flow to the anterior temporal regions bilaterally, extending to the parietal lobes, to the same degree in each group. Despite the small number of patients examined, the study supports the belief that patients with an insidious onset of KP have the same pathology as those with classical Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. This raises the question of whether episodes of alcohol withdrawal without adequate thiamine protection result in occasionally subclinical Wernicke's events, followed by a subsequently diagnosable KP.

  1. Anorexia nervosa and Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dantas Clarissa R

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Wernicke's encephalopathy is an acute, potentially fatal, neuropsychiatric syndrome resulting from thiamine deficiency. The disorder is still greatly under-diagnosed, and failure to promptly identify and adequately treat the condition can lead to death or to the chronic form of the encephalopathy - Korsakoff's syndrome. Wernicke's encephalopathy has traditionally been associated with alcoholism but, in recent years, there has been an increase in the number of clinical settings in which the disorder is observed. Case presentation We report the case of a 45-year-old Caucasian woman who arrived at the emergency room presenting signs of marked malnutrition and mental confusion, ataxic gait and ophthalmoplegia. Main laboratory test findings included low serum magnesium and megaloblastic anemia. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed increased T2 signal in the supratentorial paraventricular region, the medial regions of the thalamus and the central and periaqueductal midbrain. The diagnosis of Wernicke's encephalopathy was made at once and immediate reposition of thiamine and magnesium was started. The patient had a long history of recurrent thoughts of being overweight, severe self-imposed diet restrictions and self-induced vomiting. She had also been drinking gin on a daily basis for the last eight years. One day after admittance the acute global confusional state resolved, but she presented severe memory deficits and confabulation. After six months of outpatient follow-up, memory deficits remained unaltered. Conclusion In this case, self-imposed long-lasting nutritional deprivation is thought to be the main cause of thiamine deficiency and subsequent encephalopathy, but adjunct factors, such as magnesium depletion and chronic alcohol misuse, might have played an important role, especially in the development of Korsakoff's syndrome. The co-morbidity between eating disorders and substance abuse disorders has emerged as a

  2. Severe dysphagia as the presenting symptom of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome in a non-alcoholic man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaiskos, Ilias; Katsarolis, Ioannis; Stefanis, Leonidas

    2008-02-01

    We present the case of a non-alcoholic man, who, following severe malnutrition, presented with dysphagia that necessitated gastrostomy tube placement. The patient subsequently developed encephalopathy, at which point thiamine deficiency was suspected and thiamine supplementation initiated. The encephalopathy and the dysphagia resolved, but the patient was left with a dense amnestic deficit consistent with Korsakoff syndrome. MRI at the time of the encephalopathy revealed lesions consistent with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. This case represents a remarkable example of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome that for a prolonged time period had as its sole manifestation severe dysphagia. To our knowledge, there is only one similar case reported in the literature. This case serves to alert neurologists that isolated dysphagia may be the presenting symptom of this classic neurological syndrome even in the absence of alcoholism.

  3. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of terms Donate Today Enroll in 123 What is Hepatic Encephalopathy? Hepatic Encephalopathy, sometimes referred to as portosystemic encephalopathy or PSE, is a condition that causes temporary worsening of brain ...

  4. Prevention and treatment of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, C C

    2000-01-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) is both common and associated with high morbidity and mortality and yet there is evidence that appropriate and effective prophylaxis and treatment are often not given. Effective treatment and prophylaxis may only be achieved by use of parenteral vitamin supplements, since oral supplements are not absorbed in significant amounts. Although there are rare anaphylactoid reactions associated with the use of parenteral thiamine preparations, the risks and consequences of inadequate prophylaxis and treatment, in appropriately targeted groups of patients, are far greater. It is therefore proposed that all in-patient alcohol withdrawal should be covered by prophylactic use of parenteral thiamine, that there should be a low threshold for making a presumptive diagnosis of WE, and that there is a need for guidelines to assist physicians in appropriate management of this common clinical problem.

  5. Alexia and agraphia in Wernicke's aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirshner, H S; Webb, W G

    1982-01-01

    Three patients with otherwise typical Wernicke's aphasia showed consistently greater impairment of reading than auditory comprehension. While this syndrome resembles alexia with agraphia, the paraphasia of speech, repetition, and naming underline the aphasic nature of the disorder. Together with previous reports of isolated word deafness in Wernicke's aphasia, these cases suggest a relative independence of auditory and visual language processing. Images PMID:7130996

  6. Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS) in Australia: no room for complacency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeney, Gerald F X; Connor, Jason P

    2008-07-01

    Australia has made a substantial contribution to the recognition and treatment of the Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS). Much of this occurred over a generation ago, and vigilance in identifying this condition needs to be sustained. More recently, treatment protocols have been developed by the Royal College of Physicians (London). These provide guidelines on when and how to treat both patients at risk and those with acute Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE). It is not known how widespread these recommendations have been applied in Australia. We highlight these current treatment guidelines and illustrate management issues with two case reports. A decline in treatment practices in the United Kingdom prompted the development of these guidelines. Current treatment practices in Australia have not been reported. All alcohol and drug workers need to be reminded regularly of this condition and the need for prompt recognition and treatment.

  7. Differences between conduction aphasia and Wernicke's aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzaki, F; Izumi, S

    2001-07-01

    Conduction aphasia and Wernike's aphasia have been differentiated by the degree of auditory language comprehension. We quantitatively compared the speech sound errors of two conduction aphasia patients and three Wernicke's aphasia patients on various language modality tests. All of the patients were Japanese. The two conduction aphasia patients had "conduites d'approche" errors and phonological paraphasia. The patient with mild Wernicke's aphasia made various errors. In the patient with severe Wernicke's aphasia, neologism was observed. Phonological paraphasia in the two conduction aphasia patients seemed to occur when the examinee searched for the target word. They made more errors in vowels than in consonants of target words on the naming and repetition tests. They seemed to search the target word by the correct consonant phoneme and incorrect vocalic phoneme in the table of the Japanese alphabet. The Wernicke's aphasia patients who had severe impairment of auditory comprehension, made more errors in consonants than in vowels of target words. In conclusion, utterance of conduction aphasia and that of Wernicke's aphasia are qualitatively distinct.

  8. Metabolic encephalopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel, Michael J; Young, G Bryan

    2011-11-01

    Kinnier Wilson coined the term metabolic encephalopathy to describe a clinical state of global cerebral dysfunction induced by systemic stress that can vary in clinical presentation from mild executive dysfunction to deep coma with decerebrate posturing; the causes are numerous. Some mechanisms by which cerebral dysfunction occurs in metabolic encephalopathies include focal or global cerebral edema, alterations in transmitter function, the accumulation of uncleared toxic metabolites, postcapillary venule vasogenic edema, and energy failure. This article focuses on common causes of metabolic encephalopathy, and reviews common causes, clinical presentations and, where relevant, management.

  9. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... Symptoms to look for Caregiver Support Caregiver Stories Home › What is Hepatic Encephalopathy? Why Your Liver is ... questions about HE, one step at a time. Home About Us Ways to Give Contact Us Privacy ...

  10. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... Get Worse? How is HE Diagnosed? Prior to Treatment Who treats HE? Preparing for your Medical Appointment Hepatic Encephalopathy Treatment Options Treatment Basics Treatment Medications Importance of Adhering ...

  11. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Get Worse? How is HE Diagnosed? Prior to Treatment Who treats HE? Preparing for your Medical Appointment Hepatic Encephalopathy Treatment Options Treatment Basics Treatment Medications Importance of Adhering ...

  12. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the Stages of Hepatic Encephalopathy? What Triggers or Can Cause HE to Get Worse? How is HE ... liver disease. When your liver is damaged it can no longer remove toxic substances from your blood. ...

  13. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to Treatment Who treats HE? Preparing for your Medical Appointment Hepatic Encephalopathy Treatment Options Treatment Basics Treatment ... treatment. Being a fully-informed participant in your medical care is an important factor in staying as ...

  14. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Hepatic Encephalopathy so you can tell your doctor right away if you think you may have it. ... American Liver Foundation © 2017 American Liver Foundation. All rights reserved. Funding for the HE123 - Diagnosis, Treatment and ...

  15. About pathognomonic images: an infrequent case of acute encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Grasso

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The occurrence of acute encephalopathy is a dramatic clinical dilemma when usual diagnostic techniques (blood tests, cerebral CT and cerebrospinal fluid analysis show no abnormalities. CLINICAL CASE We describe a case of a 73 years old man admitted in our Internal Medicine Unit for acute diarrhoea with vomiting and fever who developed a prolonged gastrointestinal dysmotility syndrome with poor nutritional intake. Although a parenteral support was provided, he developed acute encephalopathy followed by hypotension and lactic acidosis without evidence of renal and hepatic disease or glycemic alterations. Likewise, no cerebral CT and cerebrospinal fluid alterations were found. Conversely, cerebral MRI showed marked and diffuse DP-2 and FLAIR hyperintensity of the mesencephalic tectal plate, of the periaqueductal area, and of the periventricular region of the third ventricle including the median thalamic area. These MRI descriptions were considered pathognomonic of Wernicke encephalopathy. Thus, the immediate use of ev thiamine was followed by a prompt and complete recovery of neurological, hemodinamic and metabolic conditions. CONCLUSIONS Non-alcoholic Wernicke encephalopathy is a rare and dramatic clinical event with high mortality. In this context, brain MRI is the best diagnostic tool providing a typical picture.

  16. Reversible acute axonal polyneuropathy associated with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome: impaired physiological nerve conduction due to thiamine deficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, S; Yokota, T; Shiojiri, T; Matunaga, T; Tanaka, H; Nishina, K; Hirota, H; Inaba, A; Yamada, M; Kanda, T; Mizusawa, H

    2003-05-01

    Acute axonal polyneuropathy and Wernicke-Korsakoff encephalopathy developed simultaneously in three patients. Nerve conduction studies (NCS) detected markedly decreased compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs) and sensory nerve action potentials (SNAPs) with minimal conduction slowing; sympathetic skin responses (SSRs) were also notably decreased. Sural nerve biopsies showed only mild axonal degeneration with scattered myelin ovoid formation. The symptoms of neuropathy lessened within two weeks after an intravenous thiamine infusion. CMAPs, SNAPs, and SSRs also increased considerably. We suggest that this is a new type of peripheral nerve impairment: physiological conduction failure with minimal conduction delay due to thiamine deficiency.

  17. [Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome: malignant tumour as triggering factor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guisado, J; Carbonell, C; Donaire, L; De Miguel, J; Vaz, F

    2001-01-01

    Gastrectomy, alcoholism and malignant tumour are three predisponing risk factors for the development of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. We described the clinical case of a patient with history of alcoholism that developed Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome 30 years after undergoing gastrectomy. This patient had, in the last year, a diagnostic for prostatic adenocarcinoma and changes in dietary habits. We presented the clinical and neuropathological features of the Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. As well as some aspects in the treatment and prognosis.

  18. Hashimoto's encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalho, Joana; Castillo, Mauricio

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of Hashimoto's encephalopathy with atypical and partially reversible MRI findings. T2-weighted MRI images revealed bilaterally symmetric areas of increased signal in the mesial temporal lobes and basal ganglia. Despite clinical and imaging improvement after steroid therapy, some memory deficits and MRI abnormalities persisted.

  19. Severe global amnesia presenting as Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome but resulting from atypical lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, L W; Nimmerrichter, A; Kessler, R; King, D; Hoehn, R; Margolin, R; Martin, P R

    1996-03-01

    A female alcoholic presented with Wernicke's encephalopathy subsequent to administration of diazepam and glucose (without thiamine) for treatment of withdrawal seizures. Nystagmus and cerebellar ataxia quickly resolved when administered thiamine, although severe global amnesia consistent with Korsakoff's syndrome persisted. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed infarction of the right temporal lobe with hippocampal atrophy, but no lesions of thalamus or atrophy of mammillary bodies. Positron emission tomography (PET) confirmed decreased cerebral metabolic rates for glucose (CMRglu) in the right temporal lobe corresponding to MRI findings, but also significant metabolic asymmetry of dorsal thalamus, i.e. reduced CMRglu in left versus right. This patient is unique in that neuroradiological findings revealed intact mammillary bodies and suggest asymmetrical dysfunctions (structural right temporal and functional left diencephalic) to produce her profound amnesia.

  20. Hashimoto's encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montagna, Giacomo; Imperiali, Mauro; Agazzi, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) is a rare not well understood, progressive and relapsing multiform disease, characterized by seizures, movement disorders, subacute cognitive dysfunction, psychiatric symptoms and responsiveness to steroid therapy. The disorder is generally associated with thyroid...... diseases and the most common feature is the presence of anti-thyroperoxidase antibodies (TPOAb). Patients are usually euthyroid or mildly hypothyroid at presentation. All age groups can be affected. The pathophysiology is still unclear, especially the link between elevated serum TPOAb...

  1. Sepsis-associated encephalopathy and its differential diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacobone, Emanuele; Bailly-Salin, Juliette; Polito, Andrea; Friedman, Diane; Stevens, Robert D; Sharshar, Tarek

    2009-10-01

    Sepsis is often complicated by an acute and reversible deterioration of mental status, which is associated with increased mortality and is consistent with delirium but can also be revealed by a focal neurologic sign. Sepsis-associated encephalopathy is accompanied by abnormalities of electroencephalogram and somatosensory-evoked potentials, increased in biomarkers of brain injury (i.e., neuron-specific enolase, S-100 beta-protein) and, frequently, by neuroradiological abnormalities, notably leukoencephalopathy. Its mechanism is highly complex, resulting from both inflammatory and noninflammatory processes that affect all brain cells and induce blood-brain barrier breakdown, dysfunction of intracellular metabolism, brain cell death, and brain injuries. Its diagnosis relies essentially on neurologic examination that can lead one to perform specific neurologic tests. Electroencephalography is required in the presence of seizure; neuroimaging in the presence of seizure, focal neurologic signs or suspicion of cerebral infection; and both when encephalopathy remains unexplained. In practice, cerebrospinal fluid analysis should be performed if there is any doubt of meningitis. Hepatic, uremic, or respiratory encephalopathy, metabolic disturbances, drug overdose, withdrawal of sedatives or opioids, alcohol withdrawal delirium, and Wernicke's encephalopathy are the main differential diagnoses of sepsis-associated encephalopathy. Patient management is based mainly on controlling infection, organ system failure, and metabolic homeostasis, at the same time avoiding neurotoxic drugs.

  2. Hypertensive Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa SHARIFIAN

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available How to cite this article: Sharifian M. Hypertensive Encephalopathy. Iran J Child Neurol 2012; 6(3:1-7.Hypertension is called the silent killer and vital organs such as the brain, eyes,kidneys and the heart are the targets. Seizure, central nervous system (CNShemorrhage, and cerebrovascular accident (CVA, blindness and heart attacksare the end points.The prevalence of hypertension in children is much less than adults, but evidencereveals that the source of hypertension in adulthood goes back to childhood. In70-80% of cases hypertension is due to renal diseases. In children, hypertensiveencephalopathy (HE may be the first manifestation of renal diseases. Seizure isone of the most common manifestations of HE.In this article, definitions, etiology, pathophysiology and finally the acute andchronic managements of HE will be discussed.ReferencesSawicka K, Szczyrek M, Jastrzębska I, Prasal M, ZwolakA, Jadwiga D. Hypertension – The silent killer. J Pre-Clin Clin Res 2011;5(2:43-6.Croix B, Feig DI. Childhood hypertension is not a silent disease. Pediatr Nephrol 2006 Apr;21(4:527-32.Wong TY, Mitchell P. Hypertensive retinopathy. N Engl J Med 2004 Nov;351(22:2310-7.Krzesinski JM, Cohen EP.Hypertension and the kidney.Acta Clin Belg 2007 Jan-Feb;62(1:5-14.Report of the Second Task Force on Blood Pressure Control in Children – 1987. Task Force on Blood Pressure Control in Children. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Bethesda, Maryland. Pediatrics 1987Jan;79(1:1-25.Update on the 1987 Task Force Report on High Blood Pressure in Children and Adolescents: a working group report from the National High Blood Pressure Education Program. National High Blood Pressure Education Program Working Group on Hypertension Control in Children and Adolescents. Pediatrics 1996 Oct;98(4 Pt1:649-58.Ataei N, Aghamohammadi A, Yousefi E, Hosseini M, Nourijelyani K, Tayebi M, et al. Blood pressure nomograms for school children in Iran. Pediatr Nephrol 2004 Feb;19

  3. Pathogenesis of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Ciećko-Michalska

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic encephalopathy can be a serious complication of acute liver failure and chronic liver diseases, predominantly liver cirrhosis. Hyperammonemia plays the most important role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. The brain-blood barrier disturbances, changes in neurotransmission, neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, GABA-ergic or benzodiazepine pathway abnormalities, manganese neurotoxicity, brain energetic disturbances, and brain blood flow abnormalities are considered to be involved in the development of hepatic encephalopathy. The influence of small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO on the induction of minimal hepatic encephalopathy is recently emphasized. The aim of this paper is to present the current views on the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy.

  4. A non-alcoholic Wernicke’s encephalopathy case with atypical MRI findings: Clinic versus radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpaydin, Sezin; Sirin, Hadiye; Calli, Cem; Celebisoy, Neşe

    2015-01-01

    Wernicke's Encephalopathy is an acute neuropsychiatric syndrome that can be seen in both alcohol abusers and non-alcoholic population as a result of thiamine deficiency. We herein report a non-alcoholic patient with typical clinical presentations but atypical MRI findings. Early clinical suspicion of WE is especially important in non-alcoholic patients with atypical MRI findings. The diagnosis of this group is more difficult to make and the prognosis of the syndrome mostly depends on early initiation of thiamine supplementation. PMID:26306933

  5. Wernicke encephalopathy as rare complication of cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Macrì

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: WE is an uncommon neurological disorder. Only 16% of these patients inadequately treated recover fully, with a mortality rate of 10–20%. We consider useful to report this case, because it is the first time that WE is correlated to CRS plus HIPEC.

  6. Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome as a Consequence of Delusional Food Refusal: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargrave, David D; Schroeder, Ryan W; Heinrichs, Robin J; Baade, Lyle E

    2015-12-01

    Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome is caused by thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency, typically resulting from malnutrition secondary to chronic alcohol abuse. Less often, other conditions can lead to malnutrition and Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. We describe a 35-year-old man who developed Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome with a typical neurologic and neuropsychological presentation after somatic delusions led him to refuse to eat. Cases like his serve to heighten awareness of the interplay between psychiatric and neurologic conditions, their sometimes atypical pathogenesis, and the value to primary care providers of consulting with psychiatrists, neurologists, and neuropsychologists when managing patients with possible Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome.

  7. [Clinical and neuropathological aspects of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubaran, C; Fernandes, J; Martins, F; Souza, J; Machado, R; Cadore, M

    1996-12-01

    Alcohol abuse is one of most serious problems in public health and the Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome one of the gravest consequences of alcoholism. The pathology is often undiagnosed in its less evident presentations, therefore an accurate diagnostic approach is a critical step in planning treatment. Besides new pharmacological proposals, treatment is based on the restoration of thiamine, although this is insufficient to prevent the psychological decline of a great number of patients. The cognitive impact of the pathology is derived from the interaction of alcoholic neurotoxicity, thiamine deficiency and personal susceptibility. In this article the history, epidemiology, clinical and neuropathological features of the Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, as well as some aspects of its treatment and prognosis, are described.

  8. [Pyloric stenosis complicated by Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bataller, R; Salmerón, J M; Muñoz, J E; Obach, V; Elizalde, J I; Mas, A; Tolosa, E; Terés, J

    1997-03-01

    The Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS) is a picture of oculomotor alterations, ataxia and confusion presented in chronic alcoholics. It has more rarely been described in non alcoholic patients with malnutrition. The case of a patient with ulcerous peptic disease of long evolution who consulted for a picture compatible with WKS following clinical manifestations of repeated vomiting secondary to complete pyloric stenosis is presented. The peculiarity of the picture and the convenience of prevention in malnourished patients receiving intravenous glucose sera is discussed.

  9. Investigation of metabolic encephalopathy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Encephalopathy may be a presenting sign in a wide range of medical conditions. G F van der ... some mitochondrial disorders, a strictly maternally .... like lysine as a fuel source during times of catabolic .... are not uniformly distributed and that.

  10. Current pathogenetic aspects of hepatic encephalopathy and noncirrhotic hyperammonemic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cichoż-Lach, Halina; Michalak, Agata

    2013-01-07

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a medical phenomenon that is described as a neuropsychiatric manifestation of chronic or acute liver disease that is characterized by psychomotor, intellectual and cognitive abnormalities with emotional/affective and behavioral disturbances. This article focuses on the underlying mechanisms of the condition and the differences between hepatic encephalopathy and noncirrhotic hyperammonemic encephalopathy. Hepatic encephalopathy is a serious condition that can cause neurological death with brain edema and intracranial hypertension. It is assumed that approximately 60%-80% of patients with liver cirrhosis develop hepatic encephalopathy. This review explores the complex mechanisms that lead to hepatic encephalopathy. However, noncirrhotic hyperammonemic encephalopathy is not associated with hepatic diseases and has a completely different etiology. Noncirrhotic hyperammonemic encephalopathy is a severe occurrence that is connected with multiple pathogeneses.

  11. [Hashimoto's encephalopathy - rare encephalopathy with good prognosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczmarczyk, Aleksandra; Patalong-Ogiewa, M; Krzystanek, E

    2016-01-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) is a rare neuropsychiatric syndrome associated with increased level of antithyroid antibodies. Two types of clinical manifestation can be described: a vasculitic type with stroke like episodes and diffuse progressive type with deterioration of mental function. Neurologic symptoms are present in euthyreosis as well as in thyroid dysfunction. Because of good response to immunosuppressive therapy, the prompt diagnosis and management of HE are crucial. In this study we present the review of current literature and discuss two representative cases.

  12. Wernicke’s encephalopathy after sleeve gastrectomy: Literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo-Aranda, Fernando; Perez-Romero, Noelia; Osorio, Javier; Rodriguez-Santiago, Joaquín; Muñoz, Emilio; Puértolas, Noelia; Veloso, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe a case of Wernicke’s encephalopathy after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy. Setting Emergency Department and gastrointestinal surgery department. Case report A 20-year-old man class III obesity (BMI 50.17 kg/m2) underwent laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy with uneventful recovery. Five weeks after surgery he was admitted in the Emergency Department because of persistent vomiting and dysphagia to solids. Esophagogastroduodenal transit and upper gastrointestinal endoscopy were requested but no relevant findings were shown. Laboratory analyses showed vitamin B1 12.2 ng/mL and 48 h following admission the patient experienced generalized weakness, sialorrhea and restrictions of actions such as reading a book. Neurological evaluation found confusion, motor ataxia, diplopy and nystagmus. A brain magnetic resonance was normal. According to low level of vitamin B1 and symptoms found in the patient a presumed diagnosis of Wernicke encephalopathy was made and parenteral thiamine 100 mg/day was started. The patient was discharged asymptomatic with oral intake of vitamin B1 600 mg per day. Conclusion Nutritional deficiencies after restrictive procedures are uncommon but easily preventable and can result in life threatening. With the upswing of bariatric surgery, surgeons and emergency physicians should be able to diagnose and treat those complications. Prophylactic thiamine should be administered to patients with predisposing factors. PMID:26826934

  13. Mechanisms underlying uremic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaini, Giselli; Ferreira, Gabriela Kozuchovski; Streck, Emilio Luiz

    2010-06-01

    In patients with renal failure, encephalopathy is a common problem that may be caused by uremia, thiamine deficiency, dialysis, transplant rejection, hypertension, fluid and electrolyte disturbances or drug toxicity. In general, encephalopathy presents with a symptom complex progressing from mild sensorial clouding to delirium and coma. This review discusses important issues regarding the mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of uremic encephalopathy. The pathophysiology of uremic encephalopathy up to now is uncertain, but several factors have been postulated to be involved; it is a complex and probably multifactorial process. Hormonal disturbances, oxidative stress, accumulation of metabolites, imbalance in excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters, and disturbance of the intermediary metabolism have been identified as contributing factors. Despite continuous therapeutic progress, most neurological complications of uremia, like uremic encephalopathy, fail to fully respond to dialysis and many are elicited or aggravated by dialysis or renal transplantation. On the other hand, previous studies showed that antioxidant therapy could be used as an adjuvant therapy for the treatment of these neurological complications.

  14. Olmesartan-induced Enteropathy Manifesting as Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uehara, Takanori; Ikusaka, Masatomi; Ohira, Yoshiyuki; Noda, Kazutaka; Suzuki, Shingo; Shikino, Kiyoshi; Kondo, Takeshi; Kajiwara, Hideki; Ikegami, Akiko; Hirota, Yusuke

    Cases of sprue-like enteropathy associated with olmesartan have sporadically been encountered since it was first reported in 2012, and their most characteristic manifestation is severe diarrhea. We herein report the first case of sprue-like enteropathy manifesting as Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome due to vitamin B1 malabsorption with only minimally increased bowel movements. When patients are receiving olmesartan and they complain of nonspecific chronic gastrointestinal symptoms, it is important to consider changing the drugs before any serious malabsorption syndrome develops.

  15. Minimal hepatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora Nava, Luis Eduardo; Torre Delgadillo, Aldo

    2011-06-01

    The term minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) refers to the subtle changes in cognitive function, electrophysiological parameters, cerebral neurochemical/neurotransmitter homeostasis, cerebral blood flow, metabolism, and fluid homeostasis that can be observed in patients with cirrhosis who have no clinical evidence of hepatic encephalopathy; the prevalence is as high as 84% in patients with hepatic cirrhosis. Physician does generally not perceive cirrhosis complications, and neuropsychological tests and another especial measurement like evoked potentials and image studies like positron emission tomography can only make diagnosis. Diagnosis of minimal hepatic encephalopathy may have prognostic and therapeutic implications in cirrhotic patients. The present review pretends to explore the clinic, therapeutic, diagnosis and prognostic aspects of this complication.

  16. The encephalopathy of sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, A C; Gilbert, J J; Young, G B; Bolton, C F

    1985-11-01

    Twelve fatal cases of encephalopathy associated with sepsis were examined in a ten-year retrospective study. The sources of infection and organisms isolated were variable. Six of the patients had focal neurologic signs; five had seizures. The level of consciousness varied from drowsiness to deep coma, and electroencephalograms revealed diffuse or multifocal abnormalities. Computed tomographic head scans and cerebrospinal fluid examinations were usually unremarkable. Eight patients had disseminated microabscesses in the brain at autopsy. Four patients had proliferation of astrocytes and microglia in the cerebral cortex, a feature associated with metabolic encephalopathies. Additional findings included cerebral infarcts, brain purpura, multiple small white matter hemorrhages, and central pontine myelinolysis. Although sepsis may cause encephalopathy by producing disturbances in cerebral synaptic transmission and cerebral energy production through a toxic mechanism, bacterial invasion of the brain with the formation of disseminated microabscesses is also an important cause.

  17. Infantile mitochondrial encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uziel, Graziella; Ghezzi, Daniele; Zeviani, Massimo

    2011-08-01

    Individually rare, when taken as a whole, genetic inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) account for a significant proportion of early onset encephalopathy. Prompt diagnosis is crucial to assess appropriate investigation and can sometimes warrant successful therapy. Recent improvements in technology and expansion of knowledge on the biochemical and molecular basis of these disorders allow astute child neurologists and paediatricians to improve the early diagnosis of these genetically determined defects. However, because of rarity and heterogeneity of these disorders, IEM encephalopathies are still a formidable challenge for most physicians. The most frequent cause of childhood IEM encephalopathy is mitochondrial disease, whose biochemical 'signature' is faulty energy supply due to defects of the last component of the oxidative pathways residing within mitochondria, i.e. the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. [Hashimoto's encephalopathy and autoantibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Makoto

    2013-04-01

    Encephalopathy occasionally occurs in association with thyroid disorders, but most of these are treatable. These encephalopathies include a neuropsychiatric disorder associated with hypothyroidism, called myxedema encephalopathy. Moreover, Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) has been recognized as a new clinical disease based on an autoimmune mechanism associated with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Steroid treatment was successfully administered to these patients. Recently, we discovered that the serum autoantibodies against the NH2-terminal of α-enolase (NAE) are highly specific diagnostic biomarkers for HE. Further, we analyzed serum anti-NAE autoantibodies and the clinical features in many cases of HE from institutions throughout Japan and other countries. Approximately half of assessed HE patients carry anti-NAE antibodies. The age was widely distributed with 2 peaks (20-30 years and 50-70 years). Most HE patients were in euthyroid states, and all patients had anti-thyroid (TG) antibodies and anti-thyroid peroxidase (TPO) antibodies. Anti-TSH receptor (TSH-R) antibodies were observed in some cases. The common neuropsychiatry features are consciousness disturbance and psychosis, followed by cognitive dysfunction, involuntary movements, seizures, and ataxia. Abnormalities on electroencephalography (EEG) and decreased cerebral blood flow on brain SPECT were common findings, whereas abnormal findings on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were rare. HE patients have various clinical phenotypes such as the acute encephalopathy form, the chronic psychiatric form, and other particular clinical forms, including limbic encephalitis, progressive cerebellar ataxia, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD)-like form. The cerebellar ataxic form of HE clinically mimics spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD) and is characterized by the absence of nystagmus, absent or mild cerebellar atrophy, and lazy background activities on EEG. Taken together, these data suggest that the possibility of

  19. DNM1 encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Spiczak, Sarah; Helbig, Katherine L; Shinde, Deepali N

    2017-01-01

    cluster within the GTPase or middle domains, and structural modeling and existing functional data suggest a dominant-negative effect on DMN1 function. CONCLUSIONS: The phenotypic spectrum of DNM1-related encephalopathy is relatively homogeneous, in contrast to many other genetic epilepsies. Up to one......-third of patients carry the recurrent p.Arg237Trp variant, which is now one of the most common recurrent variants in epileptic encephalopathies identified to date. Given the predicted dominant-negative mechanism of this mutation, this variant presents a prime target for therapeutic intervention....

  20. Mechanisms of vitamin deficiency in chronic alcohol misusers and the development of the Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, A D

    2000-01-01

    The classic signs of vitamin deficiency only occur in states of extreme depletion and are unreliable indicators for early treatment or prophylaxis of alcoholic patients at risk. Post-mortem findings demonstrate that thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency sufficient to cause irreversible brain damage is not diagnosed ante mortem in 80-90% of these patients. The causes of vitamin deficiency are reviewed with special attention to the inhibition of oral thiamine hydrochloride absorption in man caused by malnutrition present in alcoholic patients or by the direct effects of ethanol on intestinal transport. As the condition of the patient misusing alcohol progresses, damage to brain, liver, gastrointestinal tract, and pancreas continue (with other factors discussed) to further compromise the patient. Decreased intake, malabsorption, reduced storage, and impaired utilization further reduce the chances of unaided recovery. Failure of large oral doses of thiamine hydrochloride to provide an effective treatment for Wernicke's encephalopathy emphasizes the need for adequate and rapid replacement of depleted brain thiamine levels by repeated parenteral therapy in adequate doses.

  1. Management of covert hepatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waghray, Abhijeet; Waghray, Nisheet; Mullen, Kevin

    2015-03-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a reversible progressive neuropsychiatric disorder that encompasses a wide clinical spectrum. Covert hepatic encephalopathy is defined as patients with minimal hepatic encephalopathy and Grade I encephalopathy by West-Haven Criteria. Terminology such as "sub-clinical", "latent", and "minimal" appear to trivialize the disease and have been replaced by the term covert. The lack of clinical signs means that covert hepatic encephalopathy is rarely recognized or treated outside of clinical trials with options for therapy based on patients with episodic hepatic encephalopathy. This review discusses the current available options for therapy in covert hepatic encephalopathy and focuses on non-absorbable disacharides (lactulose or lactitol), antibiotics (rifaximin), probiotics/synbiotics and l-ornithine-l-aspartate.

  2. Non-convulsive status epilepticus presenting with Wernicke's aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qahtani, Mashael; Khan, Sonia A; Kabiraj, Mohammed; Khoja, Waleed A

    2009-07-01

    Ictal aphasia in adults is a rare phenomenon. Most reported cases manifest with non-fluent (Broca) aphasia. Ictal fluent (Wernicke) aphasia is less common. We report a 47-year-old, right-handed woman that presented with recurrent episodes of non-convulsive seizures in the form of Wernicke's aphasia for 2 weeks. An MRI of the brain showed an old cerebral infarction in the left parieto-occipital area. Scalp EEG revealed continuous periodic sharp waves at the left temporal regions with diffusion to the whole left hemisphere and at occasions to the right. This is followed by variable periods of post ictal slowing. Recurrence of the described ictal pattern was noted. Management of status epilepticus was started in the form of intravenous diazepam and a loading dose of phenytoin and phenobarbitone. After treatment, she improved clinically and the EEG improved with disappearance of the left temporal ictal rhythm and normalization of the EEG background. Thus, establishing the diagnosis of non-convulsive partial status epilepticus manifesting as ictal aphasia.

  3. Management of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Wright

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic encephalopathy (HE, the neuropsychiatric presentation of liver disease, is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Reduction of plasma ammonia remains the central therapeutic strategy, but there is a need for newer novel therapies. We discuss current evidence supporting the use of interventions for both the general management of chronic HE and that necessary for more acute and advanced disease.

  4. Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is caused by a novel contagion, known to as a prion. Prions are proteins capable of converting a normal cellular protein into a prion, thereby propagating an infection. BSE is the first known prion zoonotic. As such it has attracted broad scientific and, to a r...

  5. Memory loss and ataxia after hyperemesis gravidarum: a case of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accetta, Solange G; Abeche, Alberto M; Buchabqui, Jorge A; Hammes, Luciano; Pratti, Raquel; Afler, Taciana; Capp, Edison

    2002-04-10

    Hyperemesis gravidarum can induce Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS), a thiamin deficiency disorder characterized by ocular abnormalities, ataxia and disturbance of consciousness. This should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pregnant patients with persisting vomiting and neurological alterations.

  6. Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome in a patient with self-neglect associated with severe depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocksedge, Karen A; Flynn, Adrian

    2014-02-01

    Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome is a neuropsychiatric disorder resulting from thiamine deficiency and commonly associated with chronic alcoholism, but we describe the first case report resulting from self-neglect associated with depression.

  7. Nutritional cerebellar degeneration, with comments on its relationship to Wernicke disease and alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laureno, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Nutritional cerebellar degeneration occurs in alcoholism and other states that predispose to malnutrition, such as gastric bypass surgery. Gait ataxia is the principal clinical manifestation. Ataxia of the lower limbs is not uncommon, but upper extremity ataxia and nystagmus are rare. Atrophy of the anterior superior vermis is the primary pathological manifestation in established disease. Typically, the onset is subacute. This cerebellar disease is part of the spectrum of the Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, i.e. the cerebellar manifestation of Wernicke disease. It may occur with other lesions of Wernicke disease or in isolation. Rarely, with florid disease, lesions may be hemorrhagic. Active disease should be treated with thiamine in the same way that one treats Wernicke disease. Clinicopathologic correlation in this disease has provided the best evidence that the anterior superior vermis is important in coordinating bipedal locomotion.

  8. How to improve repetition ability in patients with Wernicke's aphasia: the effect of a disguised task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuki, M; Soma, Y; Yoshimura, N; Miyashita, K; Nagatsuka, K; Naritomi, H

    2005-05-01

    Dissociation "automatico-voluntaire" is a symptom observed in aphasic patients. We elucidated the difference between voluntary and involuntary speech output in a quantitative manner using the same task materials in nine patients with Wernicke's aphasia. All the patients exhibited better ability and less paraphasias in a repetition task elicited in a disguised condition than in an ordinary repetition condition. This result indicates that the output difficulty in Wernicke's aphasia might be a disability of volitional control over the language system.

  9. Cat scratch encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, B E; Bean, C S

    1991-06-01

    Cat scratch disease is usually benign, self-limited and without sequelae. Margileth has established four clinical criteria, three of which must be satisfied to make the diagnosis: 1) a history of animal exposure, usually kitten, with primary skin or ocular lesions; 2) regional chronic adenopathy without other apparent cause; 3) a positive cat scratch disease antigen skin test; and 4) lymph node biopsy demonstrating noncaseating granulomas and germinal center hyperplasia. Central nervous system involvement in cat scratch disease has been previously reported, although it is extremely uncommon. In a several-month period, we encountered two cases of cat scratch disease complicated by encephalopathy. The intents of this paper are twofold: 1) to briefly review the current literature on cat scratch disease, 2) to demonstrate that cat scratch disease complicated by encephalopathy presents acutely with seizures, posturing and coma and resolves rapidly with supportive care.

  10. Preterm Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna G Gopagondanahalli

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE is a recognizable and defined clinical syndrome in term infants that results from a severe or prolonged hypoxic ischemic episode before or during birth. However, in the preterm infant, defining hypoxic ischemic injury, its clinical course, monitoring and outcomes remains complex. Few studies examine preterm HIE, and these are heterogeneous, with variable inclusion criteria and outcomes reported. We examine the available evidence that implies that the incidence of hypoxic ischemic insult in preterm infants is probably higher than recognized, and follows a more complex clinical course, with higher rates of adverse neurological outcomes, compared to term infants. This review aims to elucidate the causes and consequences of preterm hypoxia ischemia, the subsequent clinical encephalopathy syndrome, diagnostic tools and outcomes. Finally, we suggest a uniform definition for preterm HIE that may help in identifying infants most at risk of adverse outcomes and amenable to neuroprotective therapies.

  11. Minimal Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura M Stinton

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE is the earliest form of hepatic encephalopathy and can affect up to 80% of cirrhotic patients. By definition, it has no obvious clinical manifestation and is characterized by neurocognitive impairment in attention, vigilance and integrative function. Although often not considered to be clinically relevant and, therefore, not diagnosed or treated, MHE has been shown to affect daily functioning, quality of life, driving and overall mortality. The diagnosis of MHE has traditionally been achieved through neuropsychological examination, psychometric tests or the newer critical flicker frequency test. A new smartphone application (EncephalApp Stroop Test may serve to function as a screening tool for patients requiring further testing. In addition to physician reporting and driving restrictions, medical treatment for MHE includes non-absorbable disaccharides (eg, lactulose, probiotics or rifaximin. Liver transplantation may not result in reversal of the cognitive deficits associated with MHE.

  12. Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome following Small Bowel Obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoumitro Deb

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 64-year-old lady who developed clinical features of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome following a laparotomy for small bowel obstruction. Following the operation she developed paralytic ileus and required total parenteral nutrition for one month. A suspected history of average 40 units of weekly alcohol consumption prior to the operation could not be confirmed and the patient did not show any sign of alcohol dependence. Within a few months of treatment with a daily oral dose of thiamine 200 mgs supplemented by multivitamins the patient showed subjective evidence of improvement in confusion, confabulation, and anterograde amnesia, although objective tests showed residual deficits in many areas of cognitive functioning, including immediate and delayed recall of verbal and non-verbal materials, planning and switching of attention.

  13. Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome following small bowel obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, S; Law-Min, R; Fearnley, D

    We report a case of a 64-year-old lady who developed clinical features of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome following a laparotomy for small bowel obstruction. Following the operation she developed paralytic ileus and required total parenteral nutrition for one month. A suspected history of average 40 units of weekly alcohol consumption prior to the operation could not be confirmed and the patient did not show any sign of alcohol dependence. Within a few months of treatment with a daily oral dose of thiamine 200 mgs supplemented by multivitamins the patient showed subjective evidence of improvement in confusion, confabulation, and anterograde amnesia, although objective tests showed residual deficits in many areas of cognitive functioning, including immediate and delayed recall of verbal and non-verbal materials, planning and switching of attention.

  14. [EEG manifestations in metabolic encephalopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chou-Ching K

    2005-09-01

    Normal brain function depends on normal neuronal metabolism, which is closely related to systemic homeostasis of metabolites, such as glucose, electrolytes, amino acids and ammonia. "Metabolic encephalopathy" indicates diffuse brain dysfunction caused by various systemic derangements. Electroencephalogram (EEG) is widely used to evaluate metabolic encephalopathy since 1937, when Berger first observed slow brain activity induced by hypoglycemia. EEG is most useful in differentiating organic from psychiatric conditions, identifying epileptogenicity, and providing information about the degree of cortical or subcortical dysfunction. In metabolic encephalopathy, EEG evolution generally correlates well with the severity of encephalopathy. However, EEG has little specificity in differentiating etiologies in metabolic encephalopathy. For example, though triphasic waves are most frequently mentioned in hepatic encephalopathy, they can also be seen in uremic encephalopathy, or even in aged psychiatric patients treated with lithium. Spike-and-waves may appear in hyper- or hypo-glycemia, uremic encephalopathy, or vitamin deficiencies, etc. Common principles of EEG changes in metabolic encephalopathy are (1) varied degrees of slowing, (2) assorted mixtures of epileptic discharge, (3) high incidence of triphasic waves, and (4), as a rule, reversibility after treatment of underlying causes. There are some exceptions to the above descriptions in specific metabolic disorders and EEG manifestations are highly individualized.

  15. GRIN2B encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Platzer, Konrad; Yuan, Hongjie; Schütz, Hannah

    2017-01-01

    presented with neurodevelopmental disorders and a spectrum of hypotonia, movement disorder, cortical visual impairment, cerebral volume loss and epilepsy. Six patients presented with a consistent malformation of cortical development (MCD) intermediate between tubulinopathies and polymicrogyria. Missense...... treatment response in the respective patients still remains to be demonstrated. CONCLUSIONS: In addition to previously known features of intellectual disability, epilepsy and autism, we found evidence that GRIN2B encephalopathy is also frequently associated with movement disorder, cortical visual impairment...

  16. Muusikamaailm : "Represseeritud muusika" Moskvas. György Kurtagi festival Londonis. Junge Deutshe Philarmonie kevad. Herbert Wernicke lahkunud / Priit Kuusk

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kuusk, Priit, 1938-

    2002-01-01

    Moskvas toimuvast festivalist "Represseeritud muusika". Londonis toimuvast György Kurtagi festivalist. Saksa orkestri Junge Deutshe Philarmonie kevadesinemistest. Suri saksa ooperilavastaja Herbert Wernicke

  17. Muusikamaailm : "Represseeritud muusika" Moskvas. György Kurtagi festival Londonis. Junge Deutshe Philarmonie kevad. Herbert Wernicke lahkunud / Priit Kuusk

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kuusk, Priit, 1938-

    2002-01-01

    Moskvas toimuvast festivalist "Represseeritud muusika". Londonis toimuvast György Kurtagi festivalist. Saksa orkestri Junge Deutshe Philarmonie kevadesinemistest. Suri saksa ooperilavastaja Herbert Wernicke

  18. Proyecto Wernicke-Semi: Estudio multicéntrico y retrospectivo sobre la encefalopatía de Wernicke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Javier Chamorro Fernández

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available La encefalopatía de Wernicke (EW es una patología neuropsiquiátrica aguda o subaguda debida al déficit de tiamina y que clásicamente se caracteriza por la presencia de confusión mental, oftalmoplejía y ataxia de lamarcha. Existen numerosas áreas de incertidumbre desde los puntos devista epidemiológico, clínico, diagnóstico y terapéutico, motivos por los quese ha diseñado un estudio multicéntrico dentro del grupo de trabajo de Alcohol y Alcoholismo de la Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMIque trate de dilucidar estos aspectos.

  19. A case of chronic Wernicke’s Encephalopathy: a neuropsychological study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik eOudman

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A 54-year old woman was referred to our Korsakoff Center because of extensive cognitive problems following acute Wernicke's Encephalopathy (WE. She had a relatively short history of alcohol abuse and was found lying on the floor in her home by her son. After five days without treatment she was diagnosed with WE in a general hospital. During the course of the disease minimal change to the acute situation occurred, with chronic confusion, attention deficits and incoherent behavior symptoms most notable unlike classical Korsakoff's Syndrome (KS. Neuropsychological assessment after four and sixteen months after admission to the hospital revealed global cognitive decline, with striking impairments in attentional, executive and memory functions. The present case study suggests that the state of confusion and the neuropsychological symptoms in WE can become chronic in case of very late treatment. We therefore recommend that confused alcoholics should receive appropriate parenteral thiamine according to the current clinical standards.

  20. Toxic encephalopathy induced by capecitabine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemann, B; Rochlitz, C; Herrmann, R; Pless, M

    2004-01-01

    Toxic encephalopathy is a rarely described side effect of 5-fluorouracil which usually presents with cerebellar, neuropsychiatric, and focal neurological symptoms. Magnetic resonance imaging findings are described as patchy white matter alterations. We report the 1st case of capecitabine-induced toxic encephalopathy with epilepsy-like symptoms and diffuse white matter alterations on magnetic resonance imaging.

  1. Screening of subclinical hepatic encephalopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groeneweg, M; Moerland, W; Quero, J C; Hop, W C; Krabbe, P F; Schalm, S W

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: Subclinical hepatic encephalopathy adversely affects daily functioning. The aim of this study was to determine which elements of daily life have predictive value for subclinical hepatic encephalopathy. METHODS: The study was performed in 179 outpatients with liver cirrhosis. Subclin

  2. [Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrović, Branko; Kostić, Vladimir; Sternić, Nadezda; Kolar, Jovo; Tasić, Nebojsa

    2003-01-01

    Reversible Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome was introduced into clinical practice in 1996 in order to describe unique syndrome, clinically expressed during hypertensive and uremic encephalopathy, eclampsia and during immunosuppressive therapy [1]. First clinical investigations showed that leucoencephalopathy is major characteristic of the syndrome, but further investigations showed no significant destruction in white cerebral tissue [2, 3, 4]. In majority of cases changes are localise in posterior irrigation area of the brain and in the most severe cases anterior region is also involved. Taking into consideration all above mentioned facts, the suggested term was Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome (PRES) for the syndrome clinically expressed by neurological manifestations derived from cortical and subcortical changes localised in posterior regions of cerebral hemispheres, cerebral trunk and cerebellum [5]. Patient, aged 53 years, was re-hospitalized in Cardiovascular Institute "Dediwe" two months after successful aorto-coronary bypass performed in June 2001 due to the chest bone infection. During the treatment of the infection (according to the antibiogram) in September 2001, patient in evening hours developed headache and blurred vision. The recorded blood pressure was 210/120 mmHg so antihypertensive treatment was applied (Nifedipin and Furosemid). After this therapy there was no improvement and intensive headache with fatigue and loss of vision developed. Neurological examination revealed cortical blindness and left hemiparesis. Manitol (20%, 60 ccm every 3 hours) and i.v. Nytroglicerin (high blood pressure). Brain CT revealed oedema of parieto-occipital regions of both hemispheres, more emphasized on the right. (Figure 1a, b, c). There was no sign of focal ischemia even in deeper sections (Figure 1d, e, f). Following three days enormous high blood pressure values were registered. On the fourth day the significant clinical improvement occurred

  3. SCN2A encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Katherine B.; McMahon, Jacinta M.; Carvill, Gemma L.; Tambunan, Dimira; Mackay, Mark T.; Rodriguez-Casero, Victoria; Webster, Richard; Clark, Damian; Freeman, Jeremy L.; Calvert, Sophie; Olson, Heather E.; Mandelstam, Simone; Poduri, Annapurna; Mefford, Heather C.; Harvey, A. Simon

    2015-01-01

    Objective: De novo SCN2A mutations have recently been associated with severe infantile-onset epilepsies. Herein, we define the phenotypic spectrum of SCN2A encephalopathy. Methods: Twelve patients with an SCN2A epileptic encephalopathy underwent electroclinical phenotyping. Results: Patients were aged 0.7 to 22 years; 3 were deceased. Seizures commenced on day 1–4 in 8, week 2–6 in 2, and after 1 year in 2. Characteristic features included clusters of brief focal seizures with multiple hourly (9 patients), multiple daily (2), or multiple weekly (1) seizures, peaking at maximal frequency within 3 months of onset. Multifocal interictal epileptiform discharges were seen in all. Three of 12 patients had infantile spasms. The epileptic syndrome at presentation was epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures (EIMFS) in 7 and Ohtahara syndrome in 2. Nine patients had improved seizure control with sodium channel blockers including supratherapeutic or high therapeutic phenytoin levels in 5. Eight had severe to profound developmental impairment. Other features included movement disorders (10), axial hypotonia (11) with intermittent or persistent appendicular spasticity, early handedness, and severe gastrointestinal symptoms. Mutations arose de novo in 11 patients; paternal DNA was unavailable in one. Conclusions: Review of our 12 and 34 other reported cases of SCN2A encephalopathy suggests 3 phenotypes: neonatal-infantile–onset groups with severe and intermediate outcomes, and a childhood-onset group. Here, we show that SCN2A is the second most common cause of EIMFS and, importantly, does not always have a poor developmental outcome. Sodium channel blockers, particularly phenytoin, may improve seizure control. PMID:26291284

  4. Wernicke's Aphasia Reflects a Combination of Acoustic-Phonological and Semantic Control Deficits: A Case-Series Comparison of Wernicke's Aphasia, Semantic Dementia and Semantic Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Holly; Sage, Karen; Lambon Ralph, Matthew A.

    2012-01-01

    Wernicke's aphasia (WA) is the classical neurological model of comprehension impairment and, as a result, the posterior temporal lobe is assumed to be critical to semantic cognition. This conclusion is potentially confused by (a) the existence of patient groups with semantic impairment following damage to other brain regions (semantic dementia and…

  5. Wernicke-Korsakoff综合征的临床与磁共振特征%The Clinical and MRI features of Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋承伟

    2007-01-01

    目的 探讨Wernicke-Korsakoff综合征的临床与磁共振特征,加深对这种疾病的认识.方法 回顾性分析14例Wernicke-Korsakoff综合征的临床与磁共振表现.结果 Wernicke-Korsakoff综合征的临床表现为眼外肌瘫、精神障碍和共济失调及多发性神经病等表现,磁共振表现为乳头体、第三脑室、双侧丘脑、中脑导水管周围区域异常信号.结论 Wernicke-Korsakoff综合征是维生素B1缺乏导致的代谢性脑病,具有特殊的病因,临床与影像学表现,磁共振是重要的诊断手段.

  6. Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome in patients with cancer: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isenberg-Grzeda, Elie; Rahane, Sudhanshu; DeRosa, Antonio P; Ellis, Janet; Nicolson, Stephen E

    2016-04-01

    Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome in patients with cancer is understudied. Much of what is known-that significant under-recognition and delays in treatment exist-comes from studies of alcohol misuse disorders or non-alcohol-related Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome in patients. We investigated the frequency and associated features of cancer-related Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome in the published literature. We included 90 articles reporting on 129 patients. Only 38 (30%) of 128 patients with data available exhibited the entire triad of classic features of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome: confusion, ataxia, and ophthalmoplegia or nystagmus. Diagnosis during life was missed altogether in 22 (17%) of 128 patients. The operational diagnostic criteria (at least two of the following: nutritional deficiency, ocular signs, cerebellar signs, and either altered mental status or mild memory impairment), which are considered more reliable than the classical triad, were used in only nine (7%) cases, yet 120 (94%) met the operational criteria for diagnosis at the time of presentation when applied retroactively. Complete recovery was reported in only 47 (36%) cases. Given that oncologists or haematologists accounted for only 17 (19%) first authors among the articles included, it is important that oncologists are aware of the risk factors for cancer-related Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, and that they are vigilant about diagnosing and treating the disease especially in the absence of alcohol misuse disorders.

  7. Hypertension and hypertensive encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Raymond S; Kasner, Scott E

    2014-01-01

    The definition of hypertension has continuously evolved over the last 50 years. Hypertension is currently defined as a blood pressure greater than 140/90mmHg. One in every four people in the US has been diagnosed with hypertension. The prevalence of hypertension increases further with age, affecting 75% of people over the age of 70. Hypertension is by far the most common risk factor identified in stroke patients. Hypertension causes pathologic changes in the walls of small (diameter<300 microns) arteries and arterioles usually at short branches of major arteries, which may result in either ischemic stroke or intracerebral hemorrhage. Reduction of blood pressure with diuretics, β-blockers, calcium channel blockers, and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors have all been shown to markedly reduce the incidence of stroke. Hypertensive emergency is defined as a blood pressure greater than 180/120mmHg with end organ dysfunction, such as chest pain, shortness of breath, encephalopathy, or focal neurologic deficits. Hypertensive encephalopathy is believed to be caused by acute failure of cerebrovascular autoregulation. Hypertensive emergency is treated with intravenous antihypertensive agents to reduce blood pressure by 25% within the first hour. Selective inhibition of cerebrovascular blood vessel permeability for the treatment of hypertensive emergency is beginning early clinical trials. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. FDG-PET findings in the Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Laurence J; Lasserson, Dan; Marsden, Paul; Stanhope, Nicola; Stevens, Tom; Bello, Fernando; Kingsley, Derek; Colchester, Alan; Kopelman, Michael D

    2003-01-01

    This study reports FDG-PET findings in Wernicke-Korsakoff patients. Twelve patients suffering amnesia arising from the Korsakoff syndrome were compared with 10 control subjects without alcohol-related disability. Subjects received [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET) imaging as well as neuropsychological assessment and high-resolution MR imaging with volumetric analysis. Volumetric MRI analysis had revealed thalamic and mamillary body atrophy in the patient group as well as frontal lobe atrophy with relative sparing of medial temporal lobe structures. Differences in regional metabolism were identified using complementary region of interest (ROI) and statistical parametric mapping (SPM) approaches employing either absolute methods or a reference region approach to increase statistical power. In general, we found relative hypermetabolism in white matter and hypometabolism in subcortical grey matter in Korsakoff patients. When FDG uptake ratios were examined with occipital lobe metabolism as covariate reference region, Korsakoff patients showed widespread bilateral white matter hypermetabolism on both SPM and ROI analysis. When white matter metabolism was the reference covariate; Korsakoff patients showed relative hypometabolism in the diencephalic grey matter, consistent with their known underlying neuropathology, and medial temporal and retrosplenial hypometabolism, interpreted as secondary metabolic effects within the diencephalic-limbic memory circuits. There was also evidence of a variable degree of more general frontotemporal neocortical hypometabolism on some, but not all, analyses.

  9. [Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome: diagnostic contribution of magnetic resonance imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varnet, O; de Seze, J; Soto-Ares, G; Tiberghien, F; Caparros-Lefebvre, D; Daems, C; Pasquier, F; Pruvo, J P; Destée, A; Vermesch, P

    2002-12-01

    Data regarding the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features in Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS) are scarce. WKS usually combines a cerebellar syndrome, oculomotor disorder and confusion. The aim of this study was to determine more precisely the clinical presentation of WKS and the frequency and topography of MRI abnormalities. Furthermore, we try to assess the prognostic value of both clinical signs and MRI abnormalities. We retrospectively studied 25 patients with WKS in which an MRI was available. We assessed the initial clinical presentation and the outcome. We also analyzed the frequency and the location of MRI lesions. We then correlated clinical and MRI data with the clinical outcome. Eleven patients (44 p. 100) had the full WKS. Fourteen of the 25 patients (56 p. 100) had a poor evolution. The occurrence of full WKS was correlated with a poor outcome (p < 0.02). Signal abnormalities on T2-weighted images were found in the periacqueducal region, in the thalami or in the mamillar bodies in 16 cases (64 p. 100). There was a correlation between an hypersignal in at least one region and a poor clinical outcome (p < 0.02). Our study demonstrates the high frequency of brain MRI lesions in WKS and the correlation of both initial clinical signs and MRI abnormalities with a poor clinical outcome.

  10. Neural Correlate of Anterograde Amnesia in Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahum, Louis; Pignat, Jean-Michel; Bouzerda-Wahlen, Aurélie; Gabriel, Damien; Liverani, Maria Chiara; Lazeyras, François; Ptak, Radek; Richiardi, Jonas; Haller, Sven; Thorens, Gabriel; Zullino, Daniele F; Guggisberg, Adrian G; Schnider, Armin

    2015-09-01

    The neural correlate of anterograde amnesia in Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS) is still debated. While the capacity to learn new information has been associated with integrity of the medial temporal lobe (MTL), previous studies indicated that the WKS is associated with diencephalic lesions, mainly in the mammillary bodies and anterior or dorsomedial thalamic nuclei. The present study tested the hypothesis that amnesia in WKS is associated with a disrupted neural circuit between diencephalic and hippocampal structures. High-density evoked potentials were recorded in four severely amnesic patients with chronic WKS, in five patients with chronic alcoholism without WKS, and in ten age matched controls. Participants performed a continuous recognition task of pictures previously shown to induce a left medial temporal lobe dependent positive potential between 250 and 350 ms. In addition, the integrity of the fornix was assessed using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). WKS, but not alcoholic patients without WKS, showed absence of the early, left MTL dependent positive potential following immediate picture repetitions. DTI indicated disruption of the fornix, which connects diencephalic and hippocampal structures. The findings support an interpretation of anterograde amnesia in WKS as a consequence of a disconnection between diencephalic and MTL structures with deficient contribution of the MTL to rapid consolidation.

  11. Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome in head injury: a missed insult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, R K; Soryal, I N; Pentland, B

    2000-01-01

    A survey of the use of thiamine in patients at risk from Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS) in Scottish specialist neurosurgical units, and a 2-year retrospective study of 218 at-risk patients admitted to a regional neurosurgical unit with a head injury were undertaken. Although responses to the survey indicated otherwise, the study revealed that there was no consistent practice regarding thiamine administration. Overall, 20.6% of patients received thiamine, with an alcohol history being the only factor correlating with thiamine administration. Of known alcoholics and heavy drinkers, 56.1% and 26.2% respectively received thiamine as in-patients; 44.5% of patients received additional carbohydrate loads in the form of i.v. dextrose or parenteral nutrition, but only 28.9% of these received thiamine as well. Although the actual thiamine status of these patients was not known, given the difficulties of diagnosing WKS in the presence of a head injury, the conclusion is that written protocols are needed in units to ensure that head injury patients at risk of WKS receive appropriate thiamine treatment or prophylaxis.

  12. Cerebral glucose metabolism in Wernicke's, Broca's, and conduction aphasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metter, E.J.; Kempler, D.; Jackson, C.; Hanson, W.R.; Mazziotta, J.C.; Phelps, M.E.

    1989-01-01

    Cerebral glucose metabolism was evaluated in patients with either Wernicke's (N = 7), Broca's (N = 11), or conduction (N = 10) aphasia using /sup 18/F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose with positron emission tomography. The three aphasic syndromes differed in the degree of left-to-right frontal metabolic asymmetry, with Broca's aphasia showing severe asymmetry and Wernicke's aphasia mild-to-moderate metabolic asymmetry, while patients with conduction aphasia were metabolically symmetric. On the other hand, the three syndromes showed the same degree of metabolic decline in the left temporal region. The parietal region appeared to separate conduction aphasia from both Broca's and Wernicke's aphasias. Common aphasic features in the three syndromes appear to be due to common changes in the temporal region, while unique features were associated with frontal and parietal metabolic differences.

  13. Dopamine agents for hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junker, Anders Ellekær; Als-Nielsen, Bodil; Gluud, Christian

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with hepatic encephalopathy may present with extrapyramidal symptoms and changes in basal ganglia. These changes are similar to those seen in patients with Parkinson's disease. Dopamine agents (such as bromocriptine and levodopa, used for patients with Parkinson's disease) have...... therefore been assessed as a potential treatment for patients with hepatic encephalopathy. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the beneficial and harmful effects of dopamine agents versus placebo or no intervention for patients with hepatic encephalopathy. SEARCH METHODS: Trials were identified through the Cochrane...... of the trials followed participants after the end of treatment. Only one trial reported adequate bias control; the remaining four trials were considered to have high risk of bias. Random-effects model meta-analyses showed that dopamine agents had no beneficial or detrimental effect on hepatic encephalopathy...

  14. Diabetic encephalopathy: a cerebrovascular disorder?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manschot, S.M.

    2006-01-01

    Animal study: The aim was to investigate the role of vascular disturbances in the development of experimental diabetic encephalopathy. We describe the effects of treatment with the Angiotensin Converting Enzyme(ACE)-inhibitor enalapril (treatment aimed at the vasculature)

  15. Genetics Home Reference: glycine encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... atypical types of glycine encephalopathy appear later in childhood or adulthood and cause a variety of medical problems that primarily affect the nervous system. Rarely, the characteristic features of ...

  16. Sobre algunos factores prosódicos en pacientes con afasia de Wernicke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrián Cabedo Nebot

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Aquest treball d’investigació pretén fer una comparativa de caràcter descriptiu entre la prosòdia de pacients amb afàsia de Wernicke i la d’altres parlants que no experimenten aquest trastorn del llenguatge. En general, s’intenta observar el comportament idiosincràtic de la parla afàsica davant la no afàsica, sempre tenint en compte que, habitualment, l’afàsia fluent o de Wernicke es considera funcional i comuna des d’un punt de vista de l’articulació fonètica.

  17. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, So Won; Park, Shin Who; Seo, Young Jae; Kim, Jae-Hyung; Lee, Chan Ho; Lim, Jong Youb

    2017-02-01

    A 57-year-old man who was diagnosed with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome showed severe impairment of cognitive function and a craving for alcohol, even after sufficient supplementation with thiamine. After completing 10 sessions of 10 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) at 100% of the resting motor threshold over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, dramatic improvement in cognitive function and a reduction in craving for alcohol were noted. This is the first case report of the efficacy of a high-frequency rTMS in the treatment of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome.

  18. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    A 57-year-old man who was diagnosed with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome showed severe impairment of cognitive function and a craving for alcohol, even after sufficient supplementation with thiamine. After completing 10 sessions of 10 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) at 100% of the resting motor threshold over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, dramatic improvement in cognitive function and a reduction in craving for alcohol were noted. This is the first case report of the efficacy of a high-frequency rTMS in the treatment of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. PMID:28289650

  19. Delayed diagnosis of Wernicke encephalopathy with irreversible neural damage after subtotal gastrectomy for gastric cancer: A case of medical liability?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Tozzo

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: There is an urgent need for the specific guidelines to take into account not only the neoplastic follow-up of such patients, but also the possible side effects of necessary surgery, since this could help to ensure the timely diagnosis and management of WE in this setting, and to avoid, when possible, claims for medical malpractice that may cause enormous costs both in economical and professional terms.

  20. Aspectos clínicos e neuropatológicos da síndrome de Wernicke-Korsakoff Clinical and neurophatological aspects of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Zubaran

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available O abuso de álcool é um dos mais sérios problemas de saúde pública e a síndrome de Wernicke-Korsakoff é uma das mais graves conseqüências do alcoolismo. Esta patologia é infreqüentemente diagnosticada nas suas apresentações menos evidentes, razão pela qual uma abordagem diagnóstica apropriada é importante passo para seu tratamento. Entre as novas propostas farmacológicas, está a reposição dos níveis de tiamina, embora isto seja insuficiente para prevenir o declínio psicológico de um grande número de pacientes. O impacto cognitivo da patologia é derivado da interação entre neurotoxicidade alcóolica, deficiência de tiamina e suscetibilidade pessoal. São descritos, a história, a epidemiologia e os achados clínicos e neuropatológicos, bem como alguns aspectos de tratamento e prognóstico da síndrome de Wernicke-Korsakoff.Alcohol abuse is one of most serious problems in public health and the Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome one of the gravest consequences of alcoholism. The pathology is often undiagnosed in its less evident presentations, therefore an accurate diagnostic approach is a critical step in planning treatment. Besides new pharmacological proposals, treatment is based on the restoration of thiamine, although this is insufficient to prevent the psychological decline of a great number of patients. The cognitive impact of the pathology is derived from the interaction of alcoholic neurotoxicity, thiamine deficiency and personal susceptibility. In this article the history, epidemiology, clinical and neuropathological features of the Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, as well as some aspects of its treatment and prognosis, are described.

  1. Strategy and impairment in sentence understanding by Broca's and Wernicke's aphasics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolk, H H; Friederici, A D

    1985-03-01

    15 Broca's aphasics and 14 Wernicke's aphasics, both German and Dutch speaking patients, were presented with a sentence-picture matching task. Both syntactic and semantic distractor pictures were used. Sentences were either reversible or non-reversible, had a topicalized or a non-topicalized word order and contained either of three types of prepositions that were labelled 'syntactic' (case-marking), 'obligatory' (subcategorized) and 'lexical' (locative). Results indicated (a) a significant difference between reversible and non reversible sentences for both Broca's and Wernicke's; (b) no significant differences between these two groups in the differences scores reversible minus non-reversible; (c) an above-chance performance on reversible sentences for both groups. To explain the pattern of differences between the various types of sentences, two schemes of interpretation are presented. The first scheme assumes that both Broca's and Wernicke's have lost basic (but different) syntactic abilities and that they can understand reversible sentences by non-syntactic strategies only. The second scheme assumes that there is no such loss, but that the impairment in Broca's and Wernicke's aphasia is such that the more syntactic analysis is required, the more errors are made. Patients are assumed to approach this task by trying to limit their syntactic analysis to the beginning of the sentence.

  2. B-complex vitamins in the prophylaxis and treatment of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, C C; Thomson, A D

    Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, which is associated with high morbidity and mortality, is a more common neuropsychiatric sequela of alcohol misuse than is widely realized. It is easily prevented and treated with parenteral B-complex vitamins, although this treatment is widely under-utilized.

  3. "Grievous bodily harm:" gamma hydroxybutyrate abuse leading to a Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, J; Westlake, R; Furman, M

    1996-02-01

    Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) is a naturally occurring GABA-like drug used illicitly by bodybuilders. Although there are reports of several cases of GHB abuse, with a variety of nervous system complications, we present the first case associated with a Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome.

  4. MRI finding of ethylmalonic encephalopathy: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Yong; Lee, Shi Kyung; Han, Chun Hwan; Rho, Eun Jin [Kangnam General Hospital Public Corporation, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-12-01

    Ethylmalonic encephalopathy is a rare syndrom characterized by developmental delay, acrocyanosis, petechiae, chronic diarrhea, and ethylmalonic, lactic, and methylsuccinic aciduria. We report the MRI finding of ethylmalonic encephalopathy including previously unreported intracranial hematoma.

  5. The transmissible spongiform encephalopathies of livestock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prion diseases or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are fatal protein misfolding neurodegenerative diseases. TSEs have been described in several species including bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in cattle, scrapie in sheep and goats, chronic wasting disease (CWD) in cervids, tr...

  6. An unusual cause of anemia and encephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Sanjeev Kumar Sharma; Dharma Choudhary; Anil Handoo; Gaurav Dhamija; Gaurav Kharya; Vipin Khandelwal; Mayank Dhamija; Sweta Kothari

    2015-01-01

    The authors present here an interesting case of recent onset anemia that was associated with an encephalopathy of the unusual cause.Although severe anemia can theoretically result in anemic hypoxia and can then lead to hypoxic encephalopathy, it is not a primary cause of encephalopathy. More frequently anemia can contribute together with other multiple causes of encephalopathy, such as infections, metabolic abnormalities, trauma, hepatic dysfunction, hypertension, toxins.

  7. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists for hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, B; Gluud, L L; Gluud, C

    2004-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy may be associated with accumulation of substances that bind to a receptor-complex in the brain resulting in neural inhibition. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists may have a beneficial effect on patients with hepatic encephalopathy.......Hepatic encephalopathy may be associated with accumulation of substances that bind to a receptor-complex in the brain resulting in neural inhibition. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists may have a beneficial effect on patients with hepatic encephalopathy....

  8. Sepsis associated encephalopathy (SAE): a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Rebecca; Scott, L Keith; Minagar, Alireza; Conrad, Steven

    2004-05-01

    Sepsis associated encephalopathy (SAE) is a poorly understood condition that is associated with severe sepsis and appears to have a negative influence on survival. The incidence of encephalopathy secondary to sepsis is unknown. Amino acid derangements, blood-brain barrier disruption, abnormal neurotransmitters, and direct CNS effect are possible causes of septic encephalopathy. Research has not defined the pathogenesis of SAE.

  9. Şizoaffektif bozukluk ve habis over tümörünün tetiklediği Wernicke Korsakoff sendromu

    OpenAIRE

    Güngördük, Kemal; AKBAYIR, Özgür; NUMANOĞLU, Ceyhun; GÜRASLAN, Birgül; GÜLKILIK, Ahmet

    2006-01-01

    Wernicke korsakoff syndrome is a rare disorder, which can be seen secondary to gastrectomy, alcoholism and mating tumors. Tiamine deficiency can cause disorders of brain functions, consciousness loss and convulsions. Here, we presented a case of Wernicke Korsakoff Syndrome in a patient with schizoaffective disorder and undergone an operation for the end stage of malign ovarian tumor. In the history of the patient, there was no alcohol usage. After the operation, the patient developed Wernicke...

  10. Functional MRI study of diencephalic amnesia in Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulo, M; Van Hecke, J; Toma, L; Ferretti, A; Tartaro, A; Colosimo, C; Romani, G L; Uncini, A

    2005-07-01

    Anterograde amnesia in Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome is associated with diencephalic lesions, mainly in the anterior thalamic nuclei. Whether diencephalic and temporal lobe amnesias are distinct entities is still not clear. We investigated episodic memory for faces using functional MRI (fMRI) in eight controls and in a 34-year-old man with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome and diencephalic lesions but without medial temporal lobe (MTL) involvement at MRI. fMRI was performed with a 1.5 tesla unit. Three dual-choice tasks were employed: (i) face encoding (18 faces were randomly presented three times and subjects were asked to memorize the faces); (ii) face perception (subjects indicated which of two faces matched a third face); and (iii) face recognition (subjects indicated which of two faces belonged to the group they had been asked to memorize during encoding). All activation was greater in the right hemisphere. In controls both the encoding and recognition tasks activated two hippocampal regions (anterior and posterior). The anterior hippocampal region was more activated during recognition. Activation in the prefrontal cortex was greater during recognition. In the subject with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, fMRI did not show hippocampal activation during either encoding or recognition. During recognition, although behavioural data showed defective retrieval, the prefrontal regions were activated as in controls, except for the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex. fMRI activation of the visual cortices and the behavioural score on the perception task indicated that the subject with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome perceived the faces, paid attention to the task and demonstrated accurate judgement. In the subject with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, although the anatomical damage does not involve the MTL, the hippocampal memory encoding has been lost, possibly as a consequence of the hippocampal-anterior thalamic axis involvement. Anterograde amnesia could therefore be the expression of

  11. Bovine spongiform encephalopathy in sheep?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, B.E.C.; Somerville, R.A.

    2003-01-01

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in sheep has not been identified under natural conditions at the time of writing and remains a hypothetical issue. However, rumours about the possible finding of a BSE-like isolate in sheep have led to great unrest within the sheep industry, among the general p

  12. Psychopathology and Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Gama Marques

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Since Hippocrates that neuropsychiatric illness secondary to liver disease fascinates physicians, but only in the XIX century Marcel Nencki and Ivan Pavlov suggested the relation between high concentrations of ammonia and Hepatic Encephalopathy (HE. The reaction of ammonia and glutamate (origins glutamine, “the Trojan Horse of neurotoxicity of ammonia continues to be the main responsible for the neurologic lesions, recently confirmed by neurochemistry and neuroimagiology studies. Glutamine starts the inflammatory reaction at the central nervous sys- tem but other important actors seem to be manganese and the neurotransmitters systems of GABA and endocanabinoids. Nowadays there are three different etiologic big groups for HE: type A associated with acute liver failure; type B associated with portosystemic bypass; and type C associated with cirrhosis of the liver. The staging of HE is still based on classic West Haven system, but a latent Grade 0 was introduced (the so called minimal HE; remaining the aggra- vating HE from Grade 1 (subtle changes at clinical examination to Grade 4 (coma. In this work a bibliographic review was made on 30 of the most pertinent and recent papers, focusing in psychopathology, physiopathology, etiology and staging of this clinical entity transversal to Psychiatry and Gastroenterology. Alterations are described in vigility and conscience like temporal, spatial and personal disorientation. Attention, concentration and memory are impaired very early, on latent phase and can be accessed through neuropsychological tests. Mood oscillates between euphoric and depressive. Personality changes begin obviously and abruptly or in a subtle and insidious way. There can be changes in perception like visual hallucinations or even of acoustic-verbal. The thought disorders can be of delusional type, paranoid, systematized or not, but also monothematic ala Capgras Syndrome. Speech can be accelerated, slowed down or completely in

  13. Entrapment of the Temporal Horn as a Cause of Pure Wernicke Aphasia: Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spallone, Aldo; Belvisi, Daniele; Marsili, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Entrapment of the temporal horn is an extremely rare pathologic condition occurring as a result of surgery for tumors, intraventricular infections, hemorrhage, or traumatic events involving the peritrigonal area. We report a case of a 58-year-old man who presented with pure Wernicke aphasia (never described before in the albeit rare cases of isolated temporal horn dilatation) that regressed completely following successful ventriculoperitoneal shunting. The relevant literature is also briefly reviewed. PMID:26251784

  14. 妊娠并发Wernicke-Korsakoff综合征1例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜杰; 覃建庆; 陈丽春; 宋一丽; 梁丙伟

    2002-01-01

    @@ 妊娠并发Wernicke-Korsakoff综合征(W-K综合征)的特点是:起病急,发展快,病情重,发生率低,死亡率高.由于该病在临床上罕见,往往不被人们认识而延误诊断和治疗,从而影响其预后.现将我院所见的1例报告如下.

  15. A placebo-controlled study of memantine (Ebixa) in dementia of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustembegović, Avdo; Kundurović, Zlata; Sapcanin, Aida; Sofic, Emin

    2003-01-01

    We evaluated the responses of 16 patients to preliminarily explore the spectrum of effectiveness and tolerability of the memantine, and NMDA antagonist, in the treatment of dementia in Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. In this study, for the first time in dementia of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, the response to memantine was assessed. 16 patients with median age of 64 years and median body weight of 77 kg were treated with memantine 10 mg twice daily for up to 28 weeks. Clinical global impressions (CGI), and Mini Mental Status Examination (MMSE) were performed during the treatment period (after 2, 4, and 28 weeks). Efficacy measures also included the ADCS-Activities of Daily Living scale (ADCS-ADL). At 28 weeks, the ADCS-ADL showed significantly less deterioration in memantine treated patients compared with placebo (-2.3 compared with -4.3: p = 0.005). The results of MMSE demonstrate a significant and clinically relevant benefit for memantine relative to placebo as shown by positive outcomes in cognitive and functional assessments. Memantine (10 mg) was safe and well tolerated. The preliminarily findings of this study with 16 patients suggested that memantine is effective in the treatment of dementia in Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome.

  16. Challenges in diagnosing hepatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissenborn, K

    2015-02-01

    The term "hepatic encephalopathy" (HE) covers the neuropsychiatric syndrome associated with acute, chronic and acute-on-chronic liver disease (CLD). This paper deals with clinical features and diagnosis of HE in patients with liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension or porto-systemic shunts. The possible impact of concomitant disorders and the cirrhosis underlying liver disease upon brain function is described emphasizing the need of a detailed diagnostic work up of every individual case before diagnosing HE. Currently used methods for diagnosing minimal or covert hepatic encephalopathy are compared with regard to their sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing HE against the background of a multitude of concomitant disorders and diseases that could contribute to brain dysfunction.

  17. Genetics Home Reference: mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalopathy disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... GI Motility MalaCards: mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalopathy disease Neuromuscular Disease Center, Washington University Orphanet: Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy Patient Support and Advocacy ...

  18. Ketogenic Diet in Epileptic Encephalopathies

    OpenAIRE

    Suvasini Sharma; Manjari Tripathi

    2013-01-01

    The ketogenic diet is a medically supervised high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet that has been found useful in patients with refractory epilepsy. It has been shown to be effective in treating multiple seizure types and epilepsy syndromes. In this paper, we review the use of the ketogenic diet in epileptic encephalopathies such as Ohtahara syndrome, West syndrome, Dravet syndrome, epilepsy with myoclonic atonic seizures, and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome.

  19. Ketogenic Diet in Epileptic Encephalopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suvasini Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The ketogenic diet is a medically supervised high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet that has been found useful in patients with refractory epilepsy. It has been shown to be effective in treating multiple seizure types and epilepsy syndromes. In this paper, we review the use of the ketogenic diet in epileptic encephalopathies such as Ohtahara syndrome, West syndrome, Dravet syndrome, epilepsy with myoclonic atonic seizures, and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome.

  20. Metabolic Causes of Epileptic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe Yuezhou Yu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Epileptic encephalopathy can be induced by inborn metabolic defects that may be rare individually but in aggregate represent a substantial clinical portion of child neurology. These may present with various epilepsy phenotypes including refractory neonatal seizures, early myoclonic encephalopathy, early infantile epileptic encephalopathy, infantile spasms, and generalized epilepsies which in particular include myoclonic seizures. There are varying degrees of treatability, but the outcome if untreated can often be catastrophic. The importance of early recognition cannot be overemphasized. This paper provides an overview of inborn metabolic errors associated with persistent brain disturbances due to highly active clinical or electrographic ictal activity. Selected diseases are organized by the defective molecule or mechanism and categorized as small molecule disorders (involving amino and organic acids, fatty acids, neurotransmitters, urea cycle, vitamers and cofactors, and mitochondria and large molecule disorders (including lysosomal storage disorders, peroxisomal disorders, glycosylation disorders, and leukodystrophies. Details including key clinical features, salient electrophysiological and neuroradiological findings, biochemical findings, and treatment options are summarized for prominent disorders in each category.

  1. Birth defects in children with newborn encephalopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Felix, JF; Badawi, N; Kurinczuk, JJ; Bower, C; Keogh, JM; Pemberton, PJ

    2000-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate birth defects found in association with newborn encephalopathy. All possible birth defects were ascertained in a population-based study of 276 term infants with moderate or severe encephalopathy and 564 unmatched term control infants. A strong association

  2. Birth defects in children with newborn encephalopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Felix, JF; Badawi, N; Kurinczuk, JJ; Bower, C; Keogh, JM; Pemberton, PJ

    2000-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate birth defects found in association with newborn encephalopathy. All possible birth defects were ascertained in a population-based study of 276 term infants with moderate or severe encephalopathy and 564 unmatched term control infants. A strong association betwe

  3. De novo mutations in epileptic encephalopathies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allen, Andrew S.; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Cossette, Patrick; Delanty, Norman; Dlugos, Dennis; Eichler, Evan E.; Epstein, Michael P.; Glauser, Tracy; Goldstein, David B.; Han, Yujun; Heinzen, Erin L.; Hitomi, Yuki; Howell, Katherine B.; Johnson, Michael R.; Kuzniecky, Ruben; Lowenstein, Daniel H.; Lu, Yi-Fan; Madou, Maura R. Z.; Marson, Anthony G.; Mefford, Heather C.; Nieh, Sahar Esmaeeli; O'Brien, Terence J.; Ottman, Ruth; Petrovski, Slave; Poduri, Annapurna; Ruzzo, Elizabeth K.; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Sherr, Elliott H.; Yuskaitis, Christopher J.; Abou-Khalil, Bassel; Alldredge, Brian K.; Bautista, Jocelyn F.; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Boro, Alex; Cascino, Gregory D.; Consalvo, Damian; Crumrine, Patricia; Devinsky, Orrin; Dlugos, Dennis; Epstein, Michael P.; Fiol, Miguel; Fountain, Nathan B.; French, Jacqueline; Friedman, Daniel; Geller, Eric B.; Glauser, Tracy; Glynn, Simon; Haut, Sheryl R.; Hayward, Jean; Helmers, Sandra L.; Joshi, Sucheta; Kanner, Andres; Kirsch, Heidi E.; Knowlton, Robert C.; Kossoff, Erich; Kuperman, Rachel; Kuzniecky, Ruben; Lowenstein, Daniel H.; McGuire, Shannon M.; Motika, Paul V.; Novotny, Edward J.; Ottman, Ruth; Paolicchi, Juliann M.; Parent, Jack M.; Park, Kristen; Poduri, Annapurna; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Shellhaas, Renee A.; Sherr, Elliott H.; Shih, Jerry J.; Singh, Rani; Sirven, Joseph; Smith, Michael C.; Sullivan, Joseph; Thio, Liu Lin; Venkat, Anu; Vining, Eileen P. G.; Von Allmen, Gretchen K.; Weisenberg, Judith L.; Widdess-Walsh, Peter; Winawer, Melodie R.

    2013-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies are a devastating group of severe childhood epilepsy disorders for which the cause is often unknown(1). Here we report a screen for de novo mutations in patients with two classical epileptic encephalopathies: infantile spasms (n = 149) and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (n = 115)

  4. Hashimoto's encephalopathy in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erol, Ilknur; Saygi, Semra; Alehan, Füsun

    2011-12-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy is an underdiagnosed, steroid-responsive, progressive or relapsing encephalopathy associated with high titers of serum antithyroid antibodies. Although Hashimoto's encephalopathy is well documented in adults, it is rarely observed or studied in children and adolescents. We describe the clinical and laboratory findings of four children (aged 9-15 years) with Hashimoto's encephalopathy. The clinical features of two patients at presentation included epileptic seizures and confusion. The other presenting signs included breath-holding spells, behavioral problems, psychosis, and ataxia (one patient each). During their presentation, three patients were euthyroid, and one was hyperthyroid. All patients manifested increased antithyroid antibodies, and all improved with steroid treatment. Hashimoto's encephalopathy is rarely suspected at presentation. Therefore, greater awareness of its signs by clinicians is necessary for proper diagnoses.

  5. Opsoclonus as a manifestation of Hashimoto's encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, R; Mehta, C; Zaher, N; Miller, D

    2012-10-01

    We present a 59-year-old male with early manifestation of opsoclonus associated with gait ataxia as a rare clinical presentation of Hashimoto's encephalopathy. Empiric use of intravenous immunoglobulin followed by intravenous high dose methylprednisolone was initiated with subsequent remittance of opsoclonus, encephalopathy, ataxia, and tremor. Extensive workup for infectious, autoimmune, and paraneoplastic etiologies were undertaken and all studies were negative. Thyroglobulin antibodies (312 U/mL) and thyroid peroxidase antibodies (457 U/mL) were elevated (normal antibodies were retested and found to have decreased considerably. Thus, with steroid therapy, the patient's opsoclonus and encephalopathy improved. We have presented a patient with a rare case of opsoclonus as the principal presenting feature of Hashimoto's encephalopathy that was incompletely responsive to intravenous immunoglobulin and resolved with corticosteroids. This report underscores the importance for clinical practitioners to maintain a high index of suspicion for Hashimoto's encephalopathy in cases of opsoclonus, especially when accompanied by an atypical presentation.

  6. Aspectos clínicos e neuropatológicos da síndrome de Wernicke-Korsakoff Clinical and neurophatological aspects of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Zubaran; Jefferson Fernandes; Fernanda Martins; Janete Souza; Rita Machado; Maria Cadore

    1996-01-01

    O abuso de álcool é um dos mais sérios problemas de saúde pública e a síndrome de Wernicke-Korsakoff é uma das mais graves conseqüências do alcoolismo. Esta patologia é infreqüentemente diagnosticada nas suas apresentações menos evidentes, razão pela qual uma abordagem diagnóstica apropriada é importante passo para seu tratamento. Entre as novas propostas farmacológicas, está a reposição dos níveis de tiamina, embora isto seja insuficiente para prevenir o declínio psicológico de um grande núm...

  7. [Diagnostics and treatment of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome patients with an alcohol abuse].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Maria; Sonne, Charlotte

    2013-04-01

    Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome is a condition with high morbidity and mortality and occurs as a consequence of thiamine deficiency. Clinical symptoms are often ambiguous and post-mortem examinations show that the syndrome is underdiagnosed and probably undertreated. There is sparse clinical evidence concerning optimal dosage and duration of treatment. This article reviews the current literature and concludes that all patients with a history of alcohol abuse should be treated with high dosage IV thiamine for an extended period of time, albeit further research is needed.

  8. Wernicke-Korsakoff综合征(附10例临床报告)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵彩君; 高淑凤

    2001-01-01

    @@ 临床上Wernicke-Korsakoff综合征不多见,因该病有明显的精神症状,易掩盖其它症状体征,故极易误诊.但该病病因明确,如早期诊断、早期治疗,预后良好;若误诊及延误治疗,甚者可危及生命.现将近几年遇到的10例报告如下.

  9. Minimal hepatic encephalopathy: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardone, Raffaele; Taylor, Alexandra C; Höller, Yvonne; Brigo, Francesco; Lochner, Piergiorgio; Trinka, Eugen

    2016-10-01

    Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) is the earliest form of hepatic encephalopathy and can affect up to 80% of patients with liver cirrhosis. By definition, MHE is characterized by cognitive function impairment in the domains of attention, vigilance and integrative function, but obvious clinical manifestation are lacking. MHE has been shown to affect daily functioning, quality of life, driving and overall mortality. The diagnosis can be achieved through neuropsychological testing, recently developed computerized psychometric tests, such as the critical flicker frequency and the inhibitory control tests, as well as neurophysiological procedures. Event related potentials can reveal subtle changes in patients with normal neuropsychological performances. Spectral analysis of electroencephalography (EEG) and quantitative analysis of sleep EEG provide early markers of cerebral dysfunction in cirrhotic patients with MHE. Neuroimaging, in particular MRI, also increasingly reveals diffuse abnormalities in intrinsic brain activity and altered organization of functional connectivity networks. Medical treatment for MHE to date has been focused on reducing serum ammonia levels and includes non-absorbable disaccharides, probiotics or rifaximin. Liver transplantation may not reverse the cognitive deficits associated with MHE. We performed here an updated review on epidemiology, burden and quality of life, neuropsychological testing, neuroimaging, neurophysiology and therapy in subjects with MHE.

  10. Hashimoto's Encephalopathy Presenting with Acute Cognitive Dysfunction and Convulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Woo-Hyuk; Na, Ju-Young; Kim, Meyung-Kug; Yoo, Bong-Goo

    2013-12-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy is an immune-mediated disorder characterized by acute or subacute encephalopathy related to increased anti-thyroid antibodies. Clinical manifestations of Hashimoto's encephalopathy may include stroke-like episodes, altered consciousness, psychosis, myoclonus, abnormal movements, seizures, and cognitive dysfunction. Acute cognitive dysfunction with convulsion as initial clinical manifestations of Hashimoto's encephalopathy is very rare. We report a 65-year-old man who developed acute onset of cognitive decline and convulsion due to Hashimoto's encephalopathy.

  11. Renal (uremic) encephalopathy in a goat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radi, Z A; Thomsen, B V; Summers, B A

    2005-10-01

    Renal encephalopathy was diagnosed in a 2-year-old male boar goat with a history of chronic weight loss and ataxia. Histopathological examination of the brain revealed a striking myelin vacuolation distributed mainly in two patterns: (i) along the junction of the neocortex and corona radiata, and (ii) in the bundles of the internal capsule as it dissects through the basal nuclei. The kidneys had diffuse severe tubular and glomerular necrosis and degeneration. The neural lesions are consistent with renal (uremic) encephalopathy. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of renal encephalopathy in a goat.

  12. Rivastigmine in Wernicke-Korsakoff's syndrome: five patients with rivastigmine showed no more improvement than five patients without rivastigmine.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luykx, H.J.; Dorresteijn, L.D.A.; Haffmans, P.M.; Bonebakker, A.; Kerkmeer, M.; Hendriks, V.M.

    2008-01-01

    AIMS: To evaluate whether rivastigmine, an achetylcholinesterase inhibitor (AChEl), may be effective in restoring memory in Wernicke-Korsakoff's syndrome (WKS). METHODS: Five patients treated with rivastigmine for a period of 6 months were compared with five matched control patients, who received 6

  13. Hashimoto's encephalopathy: report of three cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jan-Shun; Chang, Tien-Chun

    2014-11-01

    Both severe thyrotoxicosis and hypothyroidism may affect brain function and cause a change in consciousness, as seen with a thyroid storm or myxedema coma. However, encephalopathy may also develop in patients with autoimmune thyroid diseases independent of actual thyroid function level, and this is known as Hashimoto's encephalopathy. Although most patients are found to have Hashimoto's thyroiditis, less frequently they have Graves' disease. Clinical manifestations include epilepsy, disturbance of consciousness, cognitive impairment, memory loss, myoclonus, hallucinations, stroke-like episodes, tremor, involuntary movements, language impairment, and gait impairment. Hashimoto's encephalopathy is a relatively rare disease. As a good response can be obtained with corticosteroid therapy, early diagnosis and treatment is very beneficial for patients. Here we report three patients with Hashimoto's encephalopathy with typical manifestations of hallucinations that were associated with hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, and euthyroid status, respectively. They all showed a dramatic response to methylprednisolone pulse therapy. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Hashimoto's encephalopathy: Report of three cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Shun Chang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Both severe thyrotoxicosis and hypothyroidism may affect brain function and cause a change in consciousness, as seen with a thyroid storm or myxedema coma. However, encephalopathy may also develop in patients with autoimmune thyroid diseases independent of actual thyroid function level, and this is known as Hashimoto's encephalopathy. Although most patients are found to have Hashimoto's thyroiditis, less frequently they have Graves' disease. Clinical manifestations include epilepsy, disturbance of consciousness, cognitive impairment, memory loss, myoclonus, hallucinations, stroke-like episodes, tremor, involuntary movements, language impairment, and gait impairment. Hashimoto's encephalopathy is a relatively rare disease. As a good response can be obtained with corticosteroid therapy, early diagnosis and treatment is very beneficial for patients. Here we report three patients with Hashimoto's encephalopathy with typical manifestations of hallucinations that were associated with hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, and euthyroid status, respectively. They all showed a dramatic response to methylprednisolone pulse therapy.

  15. Hashimoto's encephalopathy: a rare pediatric brain disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Ryan M; Foster, Michael B; Omoruyi, Adetokunbo O; Kingery, Suzanne E; Wintergerst, Kupper A

    2015-05-01

    We report a 9-year-old female who presented with new onset intractable seizure activity followed by a prolonged encephalopathic state. After ruling out common etiologies, Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) was considered, and antibody levels to thyroid peroxidase and thyroglobulin were both markedly elevated in her serum. She was euthyroid at the time of presentation. Upon treatment with high dose methylprednisolone, the patient demonstrated a significant improvement in her encephalopathy. The diagnosis of HE requires strong clinical suspicion with evidence of antithyroid antibodies, as well as an encephalopathy not explained by another etiology. While well documented in the adult literature, only a handful of pediatric cases have been described to date. Patients with HE have a nearly universal response to high dose glucocorticoids. HE should be considered in the differential diagnosis of any patient, adult or pediatric, who displays prolonged, unexplainable encephalopathy.

  16. Post-partum posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaen, Anne Albers; Jeppesen, Jørgen; Obaid, Hayder

    2015-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a complex clinical condition with vasogenic subcortical oedema caused by hypertension. Oedema is often seen on magnetic resonance imaging. The wide clinical spectrum ranges from headaches to vision loss and even death. Early diagnosis...

  17. Hypoxic Ischaemic Encephalopathy among Asphyxiated Nigeran ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AFRICAN JOURNALS ONLINE (AJOL) · Journals · Advanced Search · USING ... A significantly higher proportion of the babies with HIE had seizures ... Keywords: Asphyxia, Encephalopathy, Neurodevelopmental outcome, Newborn, Seizure.

  18. Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy: Atypical Pros and Cons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are fatal neurologic diseases that affect several mammalian species including human beings. Four animal TSE agents have been reported: scrapie of sheep and goats; chronic wasting disease (CWD) of deer, elk, and moose; transmissible mink encephalopath...

  19. Metabolic encephalopathy in Egyptian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindawy, A; Gouda, A; El-Ayyadi, A; Megahed, H; Bazaraa, H

    2007-01-01

    Fatty Acid Oxidation disorders represent an expanding group of inborn errors of metabolism. Clinical manifestations include episodic encephalopathy, hypoketotic hypoglycemia, Reye like episodes, hepatic, muscular, cardiac affection and sudden death. Analysis of urinary organic acids and plasma fatty acids of 44 clinically suspected patients by Gas Chromatography Mass spectrometry revealed 4 cases of Medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MCADD), 3 cases of Very long chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency, 9 cases of multiple defects of acyl-CoA dehydrogenation in addition to 3 patients with other metabolic disorders. Timely detection of these disorders including screening for MCADD can have a favorable impact on the outcome of these patients (Tab. 11, Fig. 3, Ref. 24) Full Text (Free, PDF).

  20. Acute hepatic encephalopathy with diffuse cortical lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, S.M.; Spreer, J.; Schumacher, M. [Section of Neuroradiology, Univ. of Freiburg (Germany); Els, T. [Dept. of Neurology, University of Freiburg (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    Acute hepatic encephalopathy is a poorly defined syndrome of heterogeneous aetiology. We report a 49-year-old woman with alcoholic cirrhosis and hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia who developed acute hepatic coma induced by severe gastrointestinal bleeding. Laboratory analysis revealed excessively elevated blood ammonia. MRI showed lesions compatible with chronic hepatic encephalopathy and widespread cortical signal change sparing the perirolandic and occipital cortex. The cortical lesions resembled those of hypoxic brain damage and were interpreted as acute toxic cortical laminar necrosis. (orig.)

  1. Differentiation of ruminant transmissible spongiform encephalopathy isolate types, including bovine spongiform encephalopathy and CH1641 scrapie

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, J.G.; Sauer, M.; Keulen, van L.J.M.; Tang, Y.; Bossers, A.; Langeveld, J.P.M.

    2011-01-01

    With increased awareness of the diversity of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) strains in the ruminant population, comes an appreciation of the need for improved methods of differential diagnosis. Exposure to bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) has been associated with the human TSE,

  2. Isolated prospective confabulation in Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome: a case for reality filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnider, Armin; Nahum, Louis; Pignat, Jean-Michel; Leemann, Béatrice; Lövblad, Karl-Olof; Wissmeyer, Michael; Ptak, Radek

    2013-01-01

    A 57-year-old man suffered severe amnesia and disorientation, accompanied by content-specific confabulation, due to an alcoholic Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. For months, he was deeply concerned about a single obligation that he thought he had to respond to, but which he had already assumed 20 years previously. This monothematic, prospective confabulation was associated with failures of reality filtering as previously documented in behaviorally spontaneous confabulation and disorientation: the patient failed to suppress the interference of currently irrelevant memories and to abandon anticipations that were no longer valid (impaired extinction capacity). Magnetic resonance imaging showed damage to the mamillary bodies and the dorsomedial thalamic nucleus. Positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) showed extended orbitofrontal hypometabolism. We suggest that isolated prospective confabulation shares the core feature (acts and thoughts based on currently irrelevant memory), mechanism (failure of reality filtering), and anatomical basis (orbitofrontal dysfunction) with behaviorally spontaneous confabulations.

  3. No association between DLST gene and Alzheimer's disease or Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, S; Arai, H; Yuzuriha, T; Kato, M; Matsui, T; Urakami, K; Higuchi, S

    2001-01-01

    Among many candidate genes for the genetically heterogeneous Alzheimer's disease (AD), only apolipoprotein E (ApoE) has been confirmed. Another candidate is the dihydrolipoyl succinyltransferase (DLST) gene, one of three components of thiamine-dependent mitochondrial alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (KGDHC), because KGDHC activity is reported reduced in AD patients. Also characterized by reduced KGDHC activity is another neuropsychiatric disease, Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS), which results from thiamine deficiency. Examination of specific DLST gene polymorphism in 247 Japanese AD patients, 53 alcoholic WKS patients, and 368 nondemented Japanese control subjects revealed no significant differences in DLST genotypes and failed to replicate the findings of earlier studies indicating an association between DLST gene polymorphism and AD.

  4. Eating avoidance disorder and Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome following gastric bypass: an under-diagnosed association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fandiño, Julia N; Benchimol, Alexander K; Fandiño, Leila N; Barroso, Fernando L; Coutinho, Walmir F; Appolinário, José C

    2005-09-01

    Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS) and disordered eating behavior have been reported separately after bariatric surgery. We report a patient who following a bariatric operation developed WKS associated with a disturbed eating behavior without vomiting. This morbidly obese man developed an intense fear of gaining weight in the postoperative period and engaged in an extreme form of "food avoidance behavior". 2 months postoperatively after severe weight loss, he was hospitalized with disorientation and an amnesic syndrome. He was discharged 2 months later with stable weight and regular eating habits. Despite this, at the last follow-up visit 2 years postoperatively, he still had a residual partial amnesic syndrome. The surgical team must be aware of peculiar forms of pathological eating that may appear after bariatric surgery; the emergence of an eating avoidance disorder may be associated with the development of WKS.

  5. A Generative Model of Speech Production in Broca's and Wernicke's Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Cathy J; Crinion, Jenny T; Macsweeney, Mairéad

    2011-01-01

    Speech production involves the generation of an auditory signal from the articulators and vocal tract. When the intended auditory signal does not match the produced sounds, subsequent articulatory commands can be adjusted to reduce the difference between the intended and produced sounds. This requires an internal model of the intended speech output that can be compared to the produced speech. The aim of this functional imaging study was to identify brain activation related to the internal model of speech production after activation related to vocalization, auditory feedback, and movement in the articulators had been controlled. There were four conditions: silent articulation of speech, non-speech mouth movements, finger tapping, and visual fixation. In the speech conditions, participants produced the mouth movements associated with the words "one" and "three." We eliminated auditory feedback from the spoken output by instructing participants to articulate these words without producing any sound. The non-speech mouth movement conditions involved lip pursing and tongue protrusions to control for movement in the articulators. The main difference between our speech and non-speech mouth movement conditions is that prior experience producing speech sounds leads to the automatic and covert generation of auditory and phonological associations that may play a role in predicting auditory feedback. We found that, relative to non-speech mouth movements, silent speech activated Broca's area in the left dorsal pars opercularis and Wernicke's area in the left posterior superior temporal sulcus. We discuss these results in the context of a generative model of speech production and propose that Broca's and Wernicke's areas may be involved in predicting the speech output that follows articulation. These predictions could provide a mechanism by which rapid movement of the articulators is precisely matched to the intended speech outputs during future articulations.

  6. Cognitive impairments in Hashimoto's encephalopathy: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianhong; Zhang, Jun; Xu, Lan; Shi, Yunbo; Wu, Xunyi; Guo, Qihao

    2013-01-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy is considered as a treatable dementia, but it is often misdiagnosed. We investigated cognitive impairment and the MRI pathology of Hashimoto's encephalopathy patients. The study comprised eight patients with Hashimoto's encephalopathy, 16 patients with mild Alzheimer's disease and 24 healthy subjects. A neuropsychological battery included assessments of memory, language, attention, executive function and visuospatial ability. Cranial MRI was obtained from all Hashimoto's encephalopathy patients. Hashimoto's encephalopathy and mild Alzheimer's disease showed cognitive impairments in episodic memory, attention, executive function and visuospatial ability, but naming ability was unaffected in Hashimoto's encephalopathy. The MRI of Hashimoto's encephalopathy showed leukoencephalopathy-like type or limbic encephalitis-like type; the lesions did not affect the temporal cortex which plays a role in naming ability. Except that the naming ability was retained, the impairments in cognitive functions for the Hashimoto's encephalopathy patients were similar to those of Alzheimer's disease patients. These results were consistent with the MRI findings.

  7. Nonabsorbable disaccharides for hepatic encephalopathy. Protocol for a Cochrane Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, B; Kjaergaard, L L; Gluud, C

    2001-01-01

    Nonabsorbable disaccharides (lactulose or lactitol) are considered the treatment of choice for hepatic encephalopathy.......Nonabsorbable disaccharides (lactulose or lactitol) are considered the treatment of choice for hepatic encephalopathy....

  8. Genetics Home Reference: familial encephalopathy with neuroserpin inclusion bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions FENIB familial encephalopathy with neuroserpin inclusion bodies Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... expand/collapse boxes. Description Familial encephalopathy with neuroserpin inclusion bodies ( FENIB ) is a disorder that causes progressive ...

  9. Hashimoto's encephalopathy : epidemiology, pathogenesis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocellin, Ramon; Walterfang, Mark; Velakoulis, Dennis

    2007-01-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy is a term used to describe an encephalopathy of presumed autoimmune origin characterised by high titres of antithyroid peroxidase antibodies. In a similar fashion to autoimmune thyroid disease, Hashimoto's encephalopathy is more common in women than in men. It has been reported in paediatric, adult and elderly populations throughout the world. The clinical presentation may involve a relapsing and remitting course and include seizures, stroke-like episodes, cognitive decline, neuropsychiatric symptoms and myoclonus. Thyroid function is usually clinically and biochemically normal.Hashimoto's encephalopathy appears to be a rare disorder, but, as it is responsive to treatment with corticosteroids, it must be considered in cases of 'investigation negative encephalopathies'. Diagnosis is made in the first instance by excluding other toxic, metabolic and infectious causes of encephalopathy with neuroimaging and CSF examination. Neuroimaging findings are often not helpful in clarifying the diagnosis. Common differential diagnoses when these conditions are excluded are Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, rapidly progressive dementias, and paraneoplastic and nonparaneoplastic limbic encephalitis. In the context of the typical clinical picture, high titres of antithyroid antibodies, in particular antithyroid peroxidase antibodies, are diagnostic. These antibodies, however, can be detected in elevated titres in the healthy general population. Treatment with corticosteroids is almost always successful, although relapse may occur if this treatment is ceased abruptly. Other forms of immunomodulation, such as intravenous immune-globulin and plasma exchange, may also be effective. Despite the link to autoimmune thyroid disease, the aetiology of Hashimoto's encephalopathy is unknown. It is likely that antithyroid antibodies are not pathogenic, but titres can be a marker of treatment response. Pathological findings can suggest an inflammatory process, but features

  10. Encephalopathy caused by lanthanum carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraile, Pilar; Cacharro, Luis Maria; Garcia-Cosmes, Pedro; Rosado, Consolacion; Tabernero, Jose Matias

    2011-06-01

    Lanthanum carbonate is a nonaluminum, noncalcium phosphate-binding agent, which is widely used in patients with end-stage chronic kidney disease. Until now, no significant side-effects have been described for the clinical use of lanthanum carbonate, and there are no available clinical data regarding its tissue stores. Here we report the case of a 59-year-old patient who was admitted with confusional syndrome. The patient received 3750 mg of lanthanum carbonate daily. Examinations were carried out, and the etiology of the encephalopathy of the patient could not be singled out. The lanthanum carbonate levels in serum and cerebrospinal fluid were high, and the syndrome eased after the drug was removed. The results of our study confirm that, in our case, the lanthanum carbonate did cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Although lanthanum carbonate seems a safe drug with minimal absorption, this work reveals the problem derived from the increase of serum levels of lanthanum carbonate, and the possibility that it may cross the BBB. Further research is required on the possible pathologies that increase serum levels of lanthanum carbonate, as well as the risks and side-effects derived from its absorption.

  11. IMMUNOLOGICAL STUDY OF SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Meenupriya

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Spongiform encephalopathies, categorized as a subclass of neuro-degenerative diseases and commonly known as prion diseases, are a group of progressive conditions that affect the brain and nervous system of many animals, including humans. Prion diseases are common among cannibalistic communities; further research has revealed that the infected or malformed prion protein (named PrPsc spreads its virulence to the normal, healthy prion protein (named PrPc when people consume infected tissues. Knowing that a small interaction between normal and infected prion protein creates virulence, this relationship can be studied as a simple antigen-antibody interaction to understand the series of events that transform a normal prion protein into a virulent misfolded protein. Thoroughly modeled and validated structures of both PrPsc and PrPc can be effectively used to map the epitopes and thereby screen the antigen-antibody interaction using docking studies for a particular organism of concern. This simple immunological approach is used to understand the vital interaction between the normal and malformed proteins that is involved in the disease-spreading mechanism. Clarification of this mechanism could be used in various immune- and bioinformatics algorithms to map the interaction epitopes, furthering an understanding of these pathologies.

  12. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Saulle

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that is a long-term consequence of single or repetitive closed head injuries for which there is no treatment and no definitive pre-mortem diagnosis. It has been closely tied to athletes who participate in contact sports like boxing, American football, soccer, professional wrestling and hockey. Risk factors include head trauma, presence of ApoE3 or ApoE4 allele, military service, and old age. It is histologically identified by the presence of tau-immunoreactive NFTs and NTs with some cases having a TDP-43 proteinopathy or beta-amyloid plaques. It has an insidious clinical presentation that begins with cognitive and emotional disturbances and can progress to Parkinsonian symptoms. The exact mechanism for CTE has not been precisely defined however, research suggest it is due to an ongoing metabolic and immunologic cascade called immunoexcitiotoxicity. Prevention and education are currently the most compelling way to combat CTE and will be an emphasis of both physicians and athletes. Further research is needed to aid in pre-mortem diagnosis, therapies, and support for individuals and their families living with CTE.

  13. Gut microbiota and hepatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhiman, Radha K

    2013-06-01

    There is a strong relationship between liver and gut; while the portal venous system receives blood from the gut, and its contents may affect liver functions, liver in turn, affects intestinal functions through bile secretion. There is robust evidence that the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is linked to alterations in gut microbiota and their by-products such as ammonia, indoles, oxindoles, endotoxins, etc. In the setting of intestinal barrier and immune dysfunction, these by-products are involved in the pathogenesis of complications of liver cirrhosis including HE and systemic inflammation plays an important role. Prebiotics, probiotics and synbiotics may exhibit efficacy in the treatment of HE by modulating the gut flora. They improve derangement in flora by decreasing the counts of pathogenic bacteria and thus improving the endotoxemia, HE and the liver disease. Current evidence suggest that the trials evaluating the role of probiotics in the treatment of HE are of not high quality and all trials had high risk of bias and high risk of random errors. Therefore, the use of probiotics for patients with HE cannot be currently recommended. Further RCTs are required. This review summarizes the main literature findings about the relationships between gut flora and HE, both in terms of the pathogenesis and the treatment of HE.

  14. Therapeutic approach to epileptic encephalopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigevano, Federico; Arzimanoglou, Alexis; Plouin, Perrine; Specchio, Nicola

    2013-11-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies (EEs) are electroclinical entities with a peculiar course of disease; seizures and electroencephalographic (EEG) epileptiform abnormalities, ictal and interictal, contribute to progressive disturbance of cerebral functions. Frequently EEs are drug resistant, and consequences may be catastrophic. The main goal of treatment is to stop the peculiar course of epilepsy, operating on three parameters: seizure control, reduction of EEG abnormalities, and developmental outcome. For a correct therapeutic approach it is mandatory to have an as accurate as possible syndromic and etiologic diagnosis. Given the poor efficacy of conventional antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), the use of specific drugs for EEs, such as adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticosteroids or stiripentol is suggested. In some cases the choice of treatment is strictly related to the etiology: vigabatrin in tuberous sclerosis, ketogenic diet in glucose transporter type 1 (GLUT-1) deficiency, and pyridoxine in pyridoxine deficiency. Some AEDs combinations, such as sodium valproate with lamotrigine, have also provided interesting results, for example, in Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, although controlled studies are lacking. Finally, early surgery can be an option in children with focal structural abnormalities responsible for EEs preferably before irreversible damage on developmental outcome. Multispecialist support is recommended in EE. Management should be global from the onset, integrating not only seizure control but also all issues related to comorbidities, particularly neuropsychological and psychiatric.

  15. Posterior encephalopathy with vasospasm: MRI and angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weidauer, S.; Gaa, J.; Lanfermann, H.; Zanella, F.E. [Institute of Neuroradiology, University of Frankfurt, Schleusenweg 2-16, 60528, Frankfurt (Germany); Sitzer, M.; Hefner, R. [Department of Neurology, University of Frankfurt, Schleusenweg 2-16, 60528, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2003-12-01

    Posterior encephalopathy is characterised by headache, impairment of consciousness, seizures and progressive visual loss. MRI shows bilateral, predominantly posterior, cortical and subcortical lesions with a distribution. Our aim was to analyse the MRI lesion pattern and angiographic findings because the pathophysiology of posterior encephalopathy is incompletely understood. We report three patients with clinical and imaging findings consistent with posterior encephalopathy who underwent serial MRI including diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and construction of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps, and four-vessel digital subtraction angiography (DSA). DWI revealed symmetrical subcortical and cortical parieto-occipital high signal. High and also low ADCs indicated probable vasogenic and cytotoxic oedema. On follow-up there was focal cortical laminar necrosis, while the white-matter lesions resolved almost completely, except in the arterial border zones. DSA revealed diffuse arterial narrowing, slightly more marked in the posterior circulation. These findings suggest that posterior encephalopathy may in some cases be due to diffuse, severe vasospasm affecting especially in the parieto-occipital grey matter, with its higher vulnerability to ischemia. Cerebral vasospasm due to digitoxin intoxication, resulting in posterior encephalopathy, has not yet been described previously. (orig.)

  16. No oxygen delivery limitation in hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjedde, Albert; Keiding, Susanne; Vilstrup, Hendrik

    2010-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a condition of reduced brain functioning in which both blood flow and brain energy metabolism declined. It is not known whether blood flow or metabolism is the primary limiting factor of brain function in this condition. We used calculations of mitochondrial oxygen tension...... to choose between cause and effect in three groups of volunteers, including healthy control subjects (HC), patients with cirrhosis of the liver without hepatic encephalopathy (CL), and patients with cirrhosis with acute hepatic encephalopathy. Compared to HC subjects, blood flow and energy metabolism had...... declined in all gray matter regions of the brain in patients with HE but not significantly in patients with CL. Analysis of flow-metabolism coupling indicated that blood flow declined in HE as a consequence of reduced brain energy metabolism implied by the calculation of increased mitochondrial oxygen...

  17. Sepsis-associated encephalopathy: not just delirium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Godinho Zampieri

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in intensive care units. Organ dysfunction is triggered by inflammatory insults and tissue hypoperfusion. The brain plays a pivotal role in sepsis, acting as both a mediator of the immune response and a target for the pathologic process. The measurement of brain dysfunction is difficult because there are no specific biomarkers of neuronal injury, and bedside evaluation of cognitive performance is difficult in an intensive care unit. Although sepsis-associated encephalopathy was described decades ago, it has only recently been subjected to scientific scrutiny and is not yet completely understood. The pathophysiology of sepsis-associated encephalopathy involves direct cellular damage to the brain, mitochondrial and endothelial dysfunction and disturbances in neurotransmission. This review describes the most recent findings in the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of sepsis-associated encephalopathy and focuses on its many presentations.

  18. 慢性酒精中毒致Wernicke-Korsakoff综合征58例报告

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王国珍

    2006-01-01

    @@ 随着生活水平的提高及商业应酬的频繁,饮酒的人群不断扩大,因饮酒引起的严重神经系统损害,临床上也日益增多,作者对1995年4月至2003年12月因长期大量饮酒引起的Wernicke-Korsakoff综合征58例报告如下.

  19. Thiamine pyrophosphate effect and normalized erythrocyte transketolase activity ratio in Wernicke-Korsakoff patients and acute alcoholics undergoing detoxification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooprai, H K; Pratt, O E; Shaw, G K; Thomson, A D

    1996-09-01

    Thiamine deficiency may be assessed clinically by an abnormally low specific erythrocyte transketolase activity and/or by abnormally large activation by thiamine diphosphate in vitro (or 'TPP effect'). In the present investigation, we report erythrocyte transketolase activation by TPP in acute alcoholics and Wernicke-Korsakoff patients undergoing detoxification. A new age-dependent parameter was used to improve the reliability of transketolase activity as an indicator of marginal thiamine deficiency. Thus normalized transketolase activity ratio (NTKZ), primary activation ratio (PAR) and further activation ratio (FAR) were measured in 29 acute alcoholics and 12 Wernicke-Korsakoff patients upon admission, and also on 47 control subjects. It was possible to follow up 14 of the 29 acute alcoholics after 7 days of treatment. Twenty-one per cent of the acute alcoholics and 33% of the Wernicke-Korsakoff patients, on admission to the detoxification Unit, had NTKZ values beyond the defined critical conditions for thiamine deficiency, whereas 7% of the former and 25% of the latter had PAR values beyond these critical conditions. Furthermore, all three parameters were significantly different in the Wernicke-Korsakoff patients compared to the other groups. The pattern of improvement of the different parameters on follow-up varied considerably and is difficult to explain, as only the NTKZ was statistically significant. Hence, only eight out of 14 acute alcoholics showed improvement in NTKZ, seven showed improvement of PAR and six showed improvement of FAR after treatment. Five patients showed improvement of both NTKZ and PAR and none of the patients showed improvement of all three parameters. We conclude that our findings confirm previous reports and that this modified transketolase activation test improves its reliability as an indicator of marginal thiamine deficiency.

  20. 酒精性心肌病并Wernicke-Korsakoff综合征16例诊治分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨卓; 郭志福

    2007-01-01

    目的 探讨酒精性心肌病并Wernicke-Korsakoff综合征诊治对策.方法 对16例酒精性心肌病并Wernicke-Korsakoff综合征患者进行回顾分析,结果本组病例中知晓率40%,误诊率87.5%,死亡率12.5%,2例继续饮酒死亡,戒酒者治愈率31.3%,好转率56.2%,结论酒精性心肌病并Wernicke-Korsakoff综合征误诊原因复杂,主要为对不典型病例认识不足,病史采集不详细,盲目相信辅助检查,昏迷患者查体不合作.尽早戒酒,配合治疗者预后较好,未彻底戒酒会导致病情进一步恶化.

  1. Epileptic Encephalopathies in Adults and Childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zekiye Kural

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Epileptic encephalopathies are motor-mental retardations or cognitive disorders secondary to epileptic seizures or epileptiform activities. Encephalopaties due to brain damage, medications, or systemic diseases are generally not in the scope of this definition, but they may rarely accompany the condition. Appropriate differential diagnosis of epileptic seizures as well as subclinical electroencephalographic discharges are crucial for management of seizures and epileptiform discharges and relative regression of cognitive deterioration in long-term followup. Proper antiepileptic drug, hormonal treatment, or i.v. immunoglobulin choice play major role in prognosis. In this paper, we evaluated the current treatment approaches by reviewing clinical electrophysiological characteristics of epileptic encephalopathies.

  2. Delayed encephalopathy after acute carbon monoxide poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet İbrahim Turan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide poisoning is a major cause of death following attempted suicide and accidental exposures. Although clinical presentation depends on the duration and the intensity of exposure, the assessment of the severity of intoxication is difficult. A small percentage of patients who show complete initial recovery may develop delayed neurological deficits. Delayed encephalopathy after acute carbon monoxide poisoning is a rare and poor prognosis neurologic disorders and there is no specific treatment. We present a case with early onset of delayed encephalopathy after acute carbon monoxide poisoning with typical cranial imaging findings in a child with atypical history and clinical presentation.

  3. Analysis of Clinical Features of Non-alcoholic Wernicke's Encephalopathy%非酒精性Wernicke脑病临床特征分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付贺飞; 吴哲; 李岩; 陈淑媛

    2013-01-01

    [目的]探讨非酒精性Wernicke脑病(WE)的临床特征、实验室检测和影像学表现以提供早期诊断依据.[方法]对8例临床诊断非酒精性WE的患者资料进行回顾性分析.[结果]8例患者的首发症状不同,3例表现为眼肌麻痹,2例为精神异常,另外3例为精神症状,有4例患者在病程中出现了典型的“三联征”.2例患者的颅脑MRI检查未见异常,6例患者的颅脑MRI出现“典型的”第三、四脑室和导水管周围对称性异常信号影,且其中2例患者同时存在“非典型的”小脑齿状核、胼胝体和中央沟大脑皮质部位受累.经补充维生素B1治疗后,4例患者完全恢复,2例部分缓解遗留轻微后遗症,2例出现Korsakoff综合征.[结论]非酒精性WE多在基础疾病之上出现“三联征”或部分症状,临床表现复杂,MRI检查有助于早期诊断并可能有助于与酒精性WE进行鉴别,及时和足量的维生素B1的补充治疗是改善预后的关键.

  4. BCAP31-associated encephalopathy and complex movement disorder mimicking mitochondrial encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albanyan, Saleh; Al Teneiji, Amal; Monfared, Nasim; Mercimek-Mahmutoglu, Saadet

    2017-06-01

    BCAP31, encoded by BCAP31, is involved in the export of transmembrane proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum. Pathogenic variants in BCAP31 results in global developmental delay, dystonia, deafness and dysmorphic features in males, called deafness, dystonia, and cerebral hypomyelination (DDCH) syndrome. We report a new patient with BCAP3-associated encephalopathy, DDCH syndrome, sensorineural hearing loss, generalized dystonia, and choreoathetosis. This 3.5-year-old boy had microcephaly and failure to thrive within the first 3 months of life. His brain MRI showed bilateral increased signal intensity in globus pallidus at age 3 months raising the suspicion of mitochondrial encephalopathy. His muscle biopsy revealed pleomorphic subsarcolemmal mitochondria collection in electron microscopy. Respiratory chain enzyme activities were normal in muscle. He was enrolled to a whole exome sequencing research study, which identified a hemizygous likely pathogenic truncating variant (c.533_536dup; p.Ser180AlafsX6) in BCAP31, inherited from his mother, who had sensorineural hearing loss and normal cognitive functions. We report a new patient with BCAP31-associated encephalopathy, DDCH syndrome, mimicking mitochondrial encephalopathy. We also report a heterozygous mother who has bilateral sensorineural hearing loss. This patient's clinical features, muscle histopathology, brain MRI features, and family history were suggestive of mitochondrial encephalopathy. Whole exome sequencing research study confirmed the diagnosis of BCAP31-associated encephalopathy, DDCH syndrome. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Hepatic encephalopathy: clinical and experimental studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.C.D. van der Rijt (Carin)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractThe pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy is still unsolved. Therapy, therefore, is often insufficient. For the development of effective, new therapies insight into the disease-inducing substrates and the mechanisms of its toxic actions in the central nervous system ·are required. For b

  6. PRIONS AND THE TRANSMISSIBLE SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    This book chapter is an invited, scholarly review of the mechanism(s) of TSEs for the 2nd edition of Metabolic Encephalopathies. Each chapter in the book assumes a professional knowledge of neuroscience and biochemistry, and the focus of the book is on the metabolic basis of dise...

  7. Pathogenesis of bovine spongiform encephalopathy in sheep

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keulen, van L.J.M.; Vromans, M.E.W.; Dolstra, C.H.; Bossers, A.; Zijderveld, van F.G.

    2008-01-01

    The pathogenesis of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in sheep was studied by immunohistochemical detection of scrapie-associated prion protein (PrPSc) in the gastrointestinal, lymphoid and neural tissues following oral inoculation with BSE brain homogenate. First accumulation of PrPSc was dete

  8. STXBP1 encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stamberger, Hannah; Nikanorova, Marina; Willemsen, Marjolein H

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To give a comprehensive overview of the phenotypic and genetic spectrum of STXBP1 encephalopathy (STXBP1-E) by systematically reviewing newly diagnosed and previously reported patients. METHODS: We recruited newly diagnosed patients with STXBP1 mutations through an international networ...

  9. Wernicke’s encephalopathy following hyperemesis gravidarum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Pourali

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: ″Wernicke’s Korsakoff″ syndrome is the most important complication of severe thiamine deficiency. The term refers to two different syndromes, each representing a different stage of the disease. Wernicke’s encephalopathy (WE is an acute syndrome requiring emergent treatment to prevent death and neurologic morbidity. Korsakoff syndrome (KS refers to a chronic neurologic condition that usually occurs as a consequence of WE. It is a rare complication of hyperemesis gravidarum that confusion, ocular signs, and gait ataxia are the most prevalent symptoms, respectively. Typical brain lesions of wernicke’s encephalopathy (WE are observed at autopsy in 0.4 to 2.8 percent of the general population in the western world and the majority of affected patients are alcoholic. The prevalence of wernicke’s encephalopathy lesions seen on autopsy was 12.5% of alcohol abusers in one report. Among those who with alcohol-related death, it has been reported to be even higher, 29 to 59%. The aim of this study was to report a case of wernicke’s encephalopathy following hyperemesis gravidarum. Case Presentation: A 28-year-old-pregnant woman in 19th weeks of gestation referred to the hospital with hyperemesis, gait ataxia, and dysarthria before that she had hyperemesis gravidarum with weight loss and unresponsive to outpatient and inpatient medical therapy. MRI showed hyperdense lesion around thalamus which was characteristic of wernicke’s encephalopathy. Rapid improvement in patient’s condition occurred after high dose thiamine infusion. Conclusion: In hyperemesis gravidarum, presence of either symptoms of ocular or mental disorder or ataxia must be considered to rule out and appropriate treatment of Wernicke’s syndrome which can cause maternal and fetal death.

  10. Persistence of disturbed thalamic glucose metabolism in a case of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellgiebel, Andreas; Scheurich, Armin; Siessmeier, Thomas; Schmidt, Lutz G; Bartenstein, Peter

    2003-10-30

    We report the case of a 40-year-old alcoholic male patient, hospitalized with an acute ataxia of stance and gait, ocular muscle weakness with nystagmus and a global apathetic-confusional state. After admission, an amnestic syndrome with confabulation was also observed and diagnosis of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome was made. Under treatment with intravenous thiamine, the patient recovered completely from gaze weakness and ataxia, whereas a severe amnestic syndrome persisted. Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) showed bilateral thalamic and severe bilateral temporal-parietal hypometabolism resembling a pattern typical for Alzheimer's disease. Longitudinal assessment of the alcohol-abstinent and thiamine-substituted patient revealed improvements of clinical state and neuropsychological performance that were paralleled by recovered cerebral glucose metabolism. In contrast to metabolic rates that increased between 7.1% (anterior cingulate, left) and 23.5% (parietal, left) in cortical areas during a 9-month remission period, thalamic glucose metabolism remained severely disturbed over time (change: left +0.2%, right +0.3%).

  11. A transketolase assembly defect in a Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J J; Martin, P R; Singleton, C K

    1997-06-01

    Thiamine deficiency, a frequent complication of alcoholism, contributes significantly to the development of damage in various organ systems, including the brain. The molecular mechanisms that underlie the differential vulnerabilities to thiamine deficiency of tissue and cell types and among individuals are not understood. Investigations into these mechanisms have examined potential variations in thiamine utilizing enzymes. Transketolase is a homodimeric enzyme containing two molecules of noncovalently bound thiamine pyrophosphate. In the present study, we examined a his-tagged human transketolase that was produced in and purified from Escherichia coli cells. Previous findings demonstrated that purified his-transketolase had a Km app for cofactor and a thiamine pyrophosphate-dependent lag period for attaining steady-state kinetics that was similar to transketolase purified from human tissues. Interestingly, the time of the lag period, which is normally independent of enzyme concentration, was found herein to be dependent on the concentration of the recombinant protein. This atypical behavior was due to production in E. coli. Generation of the normal, enzyme concentration-independent state required a cytosolic factor(s) derived from human cells. Importantly, the required factor(s) was found to be defective in a Wernicke-Korsakoff patient whose cells in culture show an enhanced sensitivity to thiamine deficiency.

  12. Qualifying and quantifying minimal hepatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Marsha Y; Amodio, Piero; Cook, Nicola A; Jackson, Clive D; Kircheis, Gerald; Lauridsen, Mette M; Montagnese, Sara; Schiff, Sami; Weissenborn, Karin

    2016-12-01

    Minimal hepatic encephalopathy is the term applied to the neuropsychiatric status of patients with cirrhosis who are unimpaired on clinical examination but show alterations in neuropsychological tests exploring psychomotor speed/executive function and/or in neurophysiological variables. There is no gold standard for the diagnosis of this syndrome. As these patients have, by definition, no recognizable clinical features of brain dysfunction, the primary prerequisite for the diagnosis is careful exclusion of clinical symptoms and signs. A large number of psychometric tests/test systems have been evaluated in this patient group. Of these the best known and validated is the Portal Systemic Hepatic Encephalopathy Score (PHES) derived from a test battery of five paper and pencil tests; normative reference data are available in several countries. The electroencephalogram (EEG) has been used to diagnose hepatic encephalopathy since the 1950s but, once popular, the technology is not as accessible now as it once was. The performance characteristics of the EEG are critically dependent on the type of analysis undertaken; spectral analysis has better performance characteristics than visual analysis; evolving analytical techniques may provide better diagnostic information while the advent of portable wireless headsets may facilitate more widespread use. A large number of other diagnostic tools have been validated for the diagnosis of minimal hepatic encephalopathy including Critical Flicker Frequency, the Inhibitory Control Test, the Stroop test, the Scan package and the Continuous Reaction Time; each has its pros and cons; strengths and weaknesses; protagonists and detractors. Recent AASLD/EASL Practice Guidelines suggest that the diagnosis of minimal hepatic encephalopathy should be based on the PHES test together with one of the validated alternative techniques or the EEG. Minimal hepatic encephalopathy has a detrimental effect on the well-being of patients and their care

  13. Does aetiology of neonatal encephalopathy and hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy influence the outcome of treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcintyre, Sarah; Badawi, Nadia; Blair, Eve; Nelson, Karin B

    2015-04-01

    Neonatal encephalopathy, a clinical syndrome affecting term-born and late preterm newborn infants, increases the risk of perinatal death and long-term neurological morbidity, especially cerebral palsy. With the advent of therapeutic hypothermia, a treatment designed for hypoxic or ischaemic injury, associated mortality and morbidity rates have decreased. Unfortunately, only about one in eight neonates (95% confidence interval) who meet eligibility criteria for therapeutic cooling apparently benefit from the treatment. Studies of infants in representative populations indicate that neonatal encephalopathy is a potential result of a variety of antecedents and that asphyxial complications at birth account for only a small percentage of neonatal encephalopathy. In contrast, clinical case series suggest that a large proportion of neonatal encephalopathy is hypoxic or ischaemic, and trials of therapeutic hypothermia are specifically designed to include only infants exposed to hypoxia or ischaemia. This review addresses the differences, definitional and methodological, between infants studied and investigations undertaken, in population studies compared with cooling trials. It raises the question if there may be subgroups of infants with a clinical diagnosis of hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy (HIE) in whom the pathobiology of neonatal neurological depression is not fundamentally hypoxic or ischaemic and, therefore, for whom cooling may not be beneficial. In addition, it suggests approaches to future trials of cooling plus adjuvant therapy that may contribute to further improvement of care for these vulnerable neonates.

  14. Diffusion MR findings in cyclosporin-A induced encephalopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aydin, Kubilay; Minareci, Ozenc [Istanbul Medical School, Istanbul University, Neuroradiology Division, Department of Radiology, Istanbul (Turkey); Donmez, Fuldem [Istanbul (Turkey); Istanbul Medical School, Istanbul University, Department of Radiology, Istanbul (Turkey); Tuzun, Umit [Istanbul Medical School, Istanbul University, Department of Radiology, Istanbul (Turkey); Atamer, Tanju [Istanbul Medical School, Istanbul University, Department of Internal Medicine, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2004-10-01

    Cyclosporin encephalopathy is a well-known entity, which is clinically characterized by altered mental status, vision problems, focal neurological deficits and seizures. The exact pathophysiology of the cyclosporin encephalopathy has not yet been defined. We report the diffusion-weighted MR imaging and proton MR spectroscopy findings in a case of cyclosporin encephalopathy. The white-matter lesions with reversible restricted diffusion supported the hypothesis of reversible vasospasm induced by the cyclosporin. (orig.)

  15. Nonconvulsive Status Epilepticus in Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung Kim

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available We discuss a case of a 64-year-old male with a history of liver failure presenting with altered mental status, initially diagnosed with hepatic encephalopathy but ultimately diagnosed with nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE by electroencephalogram (EEG. NCSE is a difficult diagnosis to make, given no clear consensus on diagnostic criteria. Especially in the intensive care unit setting of persistent altered mental status with no clear etiology, NCSE must be considered in the differential diagnosis, as the consequences of delayed diagnosis and treatment can be substantial. EEG can be useful in the evaluation of patients with hepatic encephalopathy who have persistently altered levels of consciousness despite optimal medical management. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(4:372–374.

  16. Value of plasmapheresis in hepatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riviello, J J; Halligan, G E; Dunn, S P; Widzer, S J; Foley, C M; Breningstall, G N; Grover, W D

    1990-01-01

    Plasmapheresis is used for treating the complications of liver failure. We performed plasmapheresis on 6 children with hepatic encephalopathy resulting from acute hepatic failure and prospectively assessed its effects on neurologic and electrophysiologic (electroencephalography and evoked potentials) function. Clinical improvement was observed in 3 of 6 patients; changes in the serum ammonia value or the results of initial electrophysiologic tests did not predict the patient response. Two patients underwent transplantation after neurologic improvement was produced by plasmapheresis; however, despite plasmapheresis, 4 patients progressed to brain death. Our data demonstrate that plasmapheresis may transiently improve the encephalopathy of acute hepatic failure but is not curative alone. Therefore, plasmapheresis may be a useful adjunct in the treatment of liver failure, potentially improving the pretransplantation status of the patient.

  17. Hashimoto's encephalopathy: A rare proteiform disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagna, Giacomo; Imperiali, Mauro; Agazzi, Pamela; D'Aurizio, Federica; Tozzoli, Renato; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Giovanella, Luca

    2016-05-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) is a rare not well understood, progressive and relapsing multiform disease, characterized by seizures, movement disorders, subacute cognitive dysfunction, psychiatric symptoms and responsiveness to steroid therapy. The disorder is generally associated with thyroid diseases and the most common feature is the presence of anti-thyroperoxidase antibodies (TPOAb). Patients are usually euthyroid or mildly hypothyroid at presentation. All age groups can be affected. The pathophysiology is still unclear, especially the link between elevated serum TPOAb and the encephalopathy. Most reported cases occurred in women and girls. Unspecific symptoms, non-pathognomonic laboratory neurophysiology and neuroimaging features make its diagnosis a real challenge for clinicians. The case of a 16 year old boy, with a clinical picture of HE associated with hypothyroidism, demonstrating an excellent response to high dose steroids is presented together with a systematic review of the literature.

  18. Hepatic encephalopathy after treatment with temozolomide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldbecker, Annemarie; Tryc, Anita Blanka; Raab, Peter; Worthmann, Hans; Herrmann, Julian; Weissenborn, Karin

    2011-05-01

    Temozolomide in combination with radiation has been in use for more than 5 years for the therapy of glioblastoma. Known adverse effects concerning the gastrointestinal system are elevation of liver enzymes. We present the case of a patient treated with temozolomide who developed severe cholestatic liver damage and consecutive hepatic encephalopathy. Neurological symptoms were mistaken as being caused by focal brain damage for more than 9 months. After the correct diagnosis had been made and the treatment had been started, the patient's condition ameliorated. In conclusion, neurological deficits in patients with known brain lesion should not be attributed automatically to the pre-existing damage even if it is progressive but should be examined carefully, also including toxic and metabolic encephalopathies into the differential diagnosis. Furthermore, new side effects of drugs have to be considered. At least this case might lead to a closer monitoring of liver enzymes during temozolomide therapy.

  19. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome at term pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shreepathi Krishna Achar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES is a cliniconeuroradiological syndrome associated with various clinical conditions, presenting with headache, encephalopathy, seizures, cortical visual disturbances or blindness. Imaging predominantly shows parieto-occipital white matter changes, with vasogenic oedema being the most accepted pathophysiology. We report a 25-year-old primigravida who presented in term pregnancy with seizures and blindness, scheduled for emergency caesarean section. She was managed peroperatively under general anaesthesia and shifted to intensive care unit. Postoperative computed tomography brain revealed an intra-axial hypodensity involving predominantly white matter regions of bilateral parieto-occipital lobes, right caudate nucleus and right cerebellum, suggestive of PRES. Clinical improvement with complete resolution of visual disturbances was observed with supportive treatment. The importance of prompt suspicion and management in preventing short- and long-term neurological deficits in reversible condition like PRES is highlighted.

  20. Qualifying and quantifying minimal hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgan, Marsha Y; Amodio, Piero; Cook, Nicola A

    2016-01-01

    . There is no gold standard for the diagnosis of this syndrome. As these patients have, by definition, no recognizable clinical features of brain dysfunction, the primary prerequisite for the diagnosis is careful exclusion of clinical symptoms and signs. A large number of psychometric tests/test systems have been...... analytical techniques may provide better diagnostic information while the advent of portable wireless headsets may facilitate more widespread use. A large number of other diagnostic tools have been validated for the diagnosis of minimal hepatic encephalopathy including Critical Flicker Frequency......, the Inhibitory Control Test, the Stroop test, the Scan package and the Continuous Reaction Time; each has its pros and cons; strengths and weaknesses; protagonists and detractors. Recent AASLD/EASL Practice Guidelines suggest that the diagnosis of minimal hepatic encephalopathy should be based on the PHES test...

  1. Ascariasis-associated worm encephalopathy in a young child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jat, Kana Ram; Marwaha, R K; Panigrahi, Inusha; Gupta, Kunal

    2009-04-01

    Infestation with Ascaris lumbricoides in children has a varied manifestation, but encephalopathy is a very rare presentation. This report describes a case of ascariasis-associated encephalopathy in a child. An 18-month-old boy was admitted with altered sensorium. He had a history of vomiting and was passing Ascaris worms in the vomitus. The cerebrospinal fluid analysis did not reveal any abnormality. The patient was treated with an antihelminthic drug and he recovered completely. Worm encephalopathy should be considered as a differential diagnosis for unexplained encephalopathy in tropical areas.

  2. Hemorrhagic Encephalopathy From Acute Baking Soda Ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Adrienne; Brown, Alisha; Valento, Matthew

    2016-09-01

    Baking soda is a readily available household product composed of sodium bicarbonate. It can be used as a home remedy to treat dyspepsia. If used in excessive amounts, baking soda has the potential to cause a variety of serious metabolic abnormalities. We believe this is the first reported case of hemorrhagic encephalopathy induced by baking soda ingestion. Healthcare providers should be aware of the dangers of baking soda misuse and the associated adverse effects.

  3. Pathogenetic aspects of alcoholic encephalopathy treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Shchetinin S.G.; Barylnik Yu.B.; Lim V.G.

    2010-01-01

    Alcohol is considered to be the most common exogenous toxins, causing encephalopathy. The defeat of almost all parts of the nervous system should be assigned to the special features of ethanol. Neurophysiological mechanisms of development of substance dependence are based in the stem and limbic structures of the brain that are involved in ensuring the regulation of emotional state, mood, motivation sphere, psychophysical tone of human behavior in general and its adaptation to the environment....

  4. Pyridoxal phosphate-dependent neonatal epileptic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagci, S; Zschocke, J; Hoffmann, G F; Bast, T; Klepper, J; Müller, A; Heep, A; Bartmann, P; Franz, A R

    2008-03-01

    Pyridox(am)ine-5'-phosphate oxidase converts pyridoxine phosphate and pyridoxamine phosphate to pyridoxal phosphate, a cofactor in many metabolic reactions, including neurotransmitter synthesis. A family with a mutation in the pyridox(am)ine-5'-phosphate oxidase gene presenting with neonatal seizures unresponsive to pyridoxine and anticonvulsant treatment but responsive to pyridoxal phosphate is described. Pyridoxal phosphate should be considered in neonatal epileptic encephalopathy unresponsive to pyridoxine.

  5. Pyridoxal phosphate-dependent neonatal epileptic encephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Pyridox(am)ine-5′-phosphate oxidase converts pyridoxine phosphate and pyridoxamine phosphate to pyridoxal phosphate, a cofactor in many metabolic reactions, including neurotransmitter synthesis. A family with a mutation in the pyridox(am)ine-5′-phosphate oxidase gene presenting with neonatal seizures unresponsive to pyridoxine and anticonvulsant treatment but responsive to pyridoxal phosphate is described. Pyridoxal phosphate should be considered in neonatal epileptic encephalopathy unrespons...

  6. Wernicke′s encephalopathy following hyperemesis gravidarum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Kantor

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Wernicke′s encephalopathy (WE is a potentially reversible yet serious neurological manifestation caused by vitamin B 1 (thiamine deficiency. It is commonly associated with heavy alcohol consumption. Other clinical associations are with hyperemesis gravidarum (HG, starvation, and prolonged intravenous feeding. Most patients present with the triad of ocular signs, ataxia, and confusion. It can be associated with life-threatening complication like central pontine myelinolysis (CPM. We report two cases of WE following HG, with two different outcomes.

  7. Hemorrhagic Encephalopathy From Acute Baking Soda Ingestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrienne Hughes

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Baking soda is a readily available household product composed of sodium bicarbonate. It can be used as a home remedy to treat dyspepsia. If used in excessive amounts, baking soda has the potential to cause a variety of serious metabolic abnormalities. We believe this is the first reported case of hemorrhagic encephalopathy induced by baking soda ingestion. Healthcare providers should be aware of the dangers of baking soda misuse and the associated adverse effects.

  8. C-peptide and Diabetic Encephalopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-jun Cai; Hui-qin Xu; Yi Lu

    2011-01-01

    With the changes of life style, diabetes and its complications have become a major cause of morbidity and mortality. It is reasonable to anticipate a continued rise in the incidence of diabetes and its complications along with the aging of the population, increase in adult obesity rate, and other risk factors. Diabetic encephalopathy is one of the severe microvascular complications of diabetes, characterized by impaired cognitive functions, and electrophysiological, neurochemical, and structural abnormalities. It may involve direct neuronal damage caused by intracellular glucose. However, the pathogenesis of this disease is complex and its diagnosis is not very clear. Previous researches have suggested that chronic metabolic alterations, vascular changes, and neuronal apoptosis may play important roles in neuronal loss and damaged cognitive fimctions.Multiple factors are responsible for neuronal apoptosis, such as disturbed insulin growth factor (IGF) system,hyperglycemia, and the aging process. Recent data suggest that insulin/C-peptide defidency may exert a primary and key effect in diabetic encephalopathy. Administration of C-peptide partially improves the condition of the IGF system in the brain and prevents neuronal apoptosis in the hippocampus of diabetic patients.Those Findings provide a basis for application of C-peptide as a potentially effective therapy for diabetes and diabetic encephalopathy.

  9. Minimal hepatic encephalopathy matters in daily life

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jasmohan S Bajaj

    2008-01-01

    Minimal hepatic encephalopathy is a neuro-cognitive dysfunction which occurs in an epidemic proportion of cirrhotic patients, estimated as high as 80% of the population tested. It is characterized by a specific, complex cognitive dysfunction which is independent of sleep dysfunction or problems with overall intelligence. Although named "minimal", minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) can have a far-reaching impact on quality of life, ability to function in daily life and progression to overt hepatic encephalopathy. Importantly, MHE has a profound negative impact on the ability to drive a car and may be a significant factor behind motor vehicle accidents. A crucial aspect of the clinical care of MHE patients is their driving history, which is often ignored in routine care and can add a vital dimension to the overall disease assessment. Driving history should be an integral part of care in patients with MHE. The lack of specific signs and symptoms, the preserved communication skills and lack of insight make MHE a difficult condition to diagnose. Diagnostic strategies for MHE abound, but are usually limited by financial, normative or time constraints. Recent studies into the inhibitory control and critical flicker frequency tests are encouraging since these tests can increase the rates of MHE diagnosis without requiring a psychologist. Although testing for MHE and subsequent therapy is not standard of care at this time, it is important to consider this in cirrhotics in order to improve their ability to live their life to the fullest.

  10. BLOOD BIOMARKERS FOR EVALUATION OF PERINATAL ENCEPHALOPATHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernest Marshall Graham

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent research in identification of brain injury after trauma shows many possible blood biomarkers that may help identify the fetus and neonate with encephalopathy. Traumatic brain injury shares many common features with perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Trauma has a hypoxic component, and one of the 1st physiologic consequences of moderate-severe traumatic brain injury is apnea. Trauma and hypoxia-ischemia initiate an excitotoxic cascade and free radical injury followed by the inflammatory cascade, producing injury in neurons, glial cells and white matter. Increased excitatory amino acids, lipid peroxidation products and alteration in microRNAs and inflammatory markers are common to both traumatic brain injury and perinatal encephalopathy. The blood-brain barrier is disrupted in both leading to egress of substances normally only found in the central nervous system. Brain exosomes may represent ideal biomarker containers, as RNA and protein transported within the vesicles are protected from enzymatic degradation. Evaluation of fetal or neonatal brain derived exosomes that cross the blood-brain barrier and circulate peripherally has been referred to as the liquid brain biopsy. A multiplex of serum biomarkers could improve upon the current imprecise methods of identifying fetal and neonatal brain injury such as fetal heart rate abnormalities, meconium, cord gases at delivery, and Apgar scores. Quantitative biomarker measurements of perinatal brain injury and recovery could lead to operative delivery only in the presence of significant fetal risk, triage to appropriate therapy after birth and measure the effectiveness of treatment.

  11. Cholinergic dysfunction and amnesia in patients with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome: a transcranial magnetic stimulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardone, Raffaele; Bergmann, Jürgen; De Blasi, Pierpaolo; Kronbichler, Martin; Kraus, Jörg; Caleri, Francesca; Tezzon, Frediano; Ladurner, Gunther; Golaszewski, Stefan

    2010-03-01

    The specific neurochemical substrate underlying the amnesia in patients with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS) is still poorly defined. Memory impairment has been linked to dysfunction of neurons in the cholinergic system. A transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) protocol, the short latency afferent inhibition (SAI), may give direct information about the function of some cholinergic pathways in the human motor cortex. In the present study, we measured SAI in eight alcoholics with WKS and compared the data with those from a group of age-matched healthy individuals; furthermore, we correlated the individual SAI values of the WKS patients with memory and other cognitive functions. Mean SAI was significantly reduced in WKS patients when compared with the controls. SAI was increased after administration of a single dose of donezepil in a subgroup of four patients. The low score obtained in the Rey Complex Figure delayed recall test, the Digit Span subtest of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R) and the Corsi's Block Span subtest of the WAIS-R documented a severe impairment in the anterograde memory and short-term memory. None of the correlations between SAI values and these neuropsychological tests reached significance. We provide physiological evidence of cholinergic involvement in WKS. However, this putative marker of central cholinergic activity did not significantly correlate with the memory deficit in our patients. These findings suggest that the cholinergic dysfunction does not account for the memory disorder and that damage to the cholinergic system is not sufficient to cause a persisting amnesic syndrome in WKS.

  12. Arterial spin labelling shows functional depression of non-lesion tissue in chronic Wernicke's aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Holly; Specht, Karsten; Beaumont, Helen; Parkes, Laura M; Sage, Karen; Lambon Ralph, Matthew A; Zahn, Roland

    2017-07-01

    Behavioural impairment post-stroke is a consequence of structural damage and altered functional network dynamics. Hypoperfusion of intact neural tissue is frequently observed in acute stroke, indicating reduced functional capacity of regions outside the lesion. However, cerebral blood flow (CBF) is rarely investigated in chronic stroke. This study investigated CBF in individuals with chronic Wernicke's aphasia (WA) and examined the relationship between lesion, CBF and neuropsychological impairment. Arterial spin labelling CBF imaging and structural MRIs were collected in 12 individuals with chronic WA and 13 age-matched control participants. Joint independent component analysis (jICA) investigated the relationship between structural lesion and hypoperfusion. Partial correlations explored the relationship between lesion, hypoperfusion and language measures. Joint ICA revealed significant differences between the control and WA groups reflecting a large area of structural lesion in the left posterior hemisphere and an associated area of hypoperfusion extending into grey matter surrounding the lesion. Small regions of remote cortical hypoperfusion were observed, ipsilateral and contralateral to the lesion. Significant correlations were observed between the neuropsychological measures (naming, repetition, reading and semantic association) and the jICA component of interest in the WA group. Additional ROI analyses found a relationship between perfusion surrounding the core lesion and the same neuropsychological measures. This study found that core language impairments in chronic WA are associated with a combination of structural lesion and abnormal perfusion in non-lesioned tissue. This indicates that post-stroke impairments are due to a wider disruption of neural function than observable on structural T1w MRI. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in alcoholic hepatitis: Hepatic encephalopathy a common theme

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Elizabeth S; Sedhom, Ramy; Dalal, Ishita; Sharma, Ranita

    2017-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a neuro-radiologic diagnosis that has become more widely recognized and reported over the past few decades. As such, there are a number of known risk factors that contribute to the development of this syndrome, including volatile blood pressures, renal failure, cytotoxic drugs, autoimmune disorders, pre-eclampsia, and eclampsia. This report documents the first reported case of PRES in a patient with severe alcoholic hepatitis with hepatic encephalopathy and delves into a molecular pathophysiology of the syndrome. PMID:28127211

  14. Aspectos clínicos e neuropatológicos da síndrome de Wernicke-Korsakoff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Zubaran

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available O abuso de álcool é um dos mais sérios problemas de saúde pública e a síndrome de Wernicke-Korsakoff é uma das mais graves conseqüências do alcoolismo. Esta patologia é infreqüentemente diagnosticada nas suas apresentações menos evidentes, razão pela qual uma abordagem diagnóstica apropriada é importante passo para seu tratamento. Entre as novas propostas farmacológicas, está a reposição dos níveis de tiamina, embora isto seja insuficiente para prevenir o declínio psicológico de um grande número de pacientes. O impacto cognitivo da patologia é derivado da interação entre neurotoxicidade alcóolica, deficiência de tiamina e suscetibilidade pessoal. São descritos, a história, a epidemiologia e os achados clínicos e neuropatológicos, bem como alguns aspectos de tratamento e prognóstico da síndrome de Wernicke-Korsakoff.

  15. Aspectos clínicos e neuropatológicos da síndrome de Wernicke-Korsakoff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zubaran Carlos

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available O abuso de álcool é um dos mais sérios problemas de saúde pública e a síndrome de Wernicke-Korsakoff é uma das mais graves conseqüências do alcoolismo. Esta patologia é infreqüentemente diagnosticada nas suas apresentações menos evidentes, razão pela qual uma abordagem diagnóstica apropriada é importante passo para seu tratamento. Entre as novas propostas farmacológicas, está a reposição dos níveis de tiamina, embora isto seja insuficiente para prevenir o declínio psicológico de um grande número de pacientes. O impacto cognitivo da patologia é derivado da interação entre neurotoxicidade alcóolica, deficiência de tiamina e suscetibilidade pessoal. São descritos, a história, a epidemiologia e os achados clínicos e neuropatológicos, bem como alguns aspectos de tratamento e prognóstico da síndrome de Wernicke-Korsakoff.

  16. Probiotics for people with hepatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalal, Rohan; McGee, Richard G; Riordan, Stephen M; Webster, Angela C

    2017-02-23

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a disorder of brain function as a result of liver failure or portosystemic shunt or both. Both hepatic encephalopathy (clinically overt) and minimal hepatic encephalopathy (not clinically overt) significantly impair patient's quality of life and daily functioning, and represent a significant burden on healthcare resources. Probiotics are live micro-organisms, which when administered in adequate amounts, may confer a health benefit on the host. To determine the beneficial and harmful effects of probiotics in any dosage, compared with placebo or no intervention, or with any other treatment for people with any grade of acute or chronic hepatic encephalopathy. This review did not consider the primary prophylaxis of hepatic encephalopathy. We searched The Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled Trials Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, Science Citation Index Expanded, conference proceedings, reference lists of included trials, and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform until June 2016. We included randomised clinical trials that compared probiotics in any dosage with placebo or no intervention, or with any other treatment in people with hepatic encephalopathy. We used standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. We conducted random-effects model meta-analysis due to obvious heterogeneity of participants and interventions. We defined a P value of 0.05 or less as significant. We expressed dichotomous outcomes as risk ratio (RR) and continuous outcomes as mean difference (MD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). We included 21 trials with 1420 participants, of these, 14 were new trials. Fourteen trials compared a probiotic with placebo or no treatment, and seven trials compared a probiotic with lactulose. The trials used a variety of probiotics; the most commonly used group of probiotic was VSL#3, a proprietary name for a group of eight probiotics. Duration of administration

  17. The Spectrum of Disease in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Ann C.; Stein, Thor D.; Nowinski, Christopher J.; Stern, Robert A.; Daneshvar, Daniel H.; Alvarez, Victor E.; Lee, Hyo-Soon; Hall, Garth; Wojtowicz, Sydney M.; Baugh, Christine M.; Riley, David O.; Kubilus, Caroline A.; Cormier, Kerry A.; Jacobs, Matthew A.; Martin, Brett R.; Abraham, Carmela R.; Ikezu, Tsuneya; Reichard, Robert Ross; Wolozin, Benjamin L.; Budson, Andrew E.; Goldstein, Lee E.; Kowall, Neil W.; Cantu, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy is a progressive tauopathy that occurs as a consequence of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury. We analysed post-mortem brains obtained from a cohort of 85 subjects with histories of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury and found evidence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy in 68 subjects: all males, ranging…

  18. Comparison of Transmissible Mink Encephalopathy Isolates in Raccoons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owing to its susceptibility to various transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) and relatively short incubation times, the raccoon (Procyon lotor) has been suggested as a model for TSE strain differentiation. Transmissible mink encephalopathy (TME) is a prion disease of undetermined origin in...

  19. Cognitive impairments in Hashimoto's encephalopathy: a case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhong Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/AIMS: Hashimoto's encephalopathy is considered as a treatable dementia, but it is often misdiagnosed. We investigated cognitive impairment and the MRI pathology of Hashimoto's encephalopathy patients. METHODS: The study comprised eight patients with Hashimoto's encephalopathy, 16 patients with mild Alzheimer's disease and 24 healthy subjects. A neuropsychological battery included assessments of memory, language, attention, executive function and visuospatial ability. Cranial MRI was obtained from all Hashimoto's encephalopathy patients. RESULTS: Hashimoto's encephalopathy and mild Alzheimer's disease showed cognitive impairments in episodic memory, attention, executive function and visuospatial ability, but naming ability was unaffected in Hashimoto's encephalopathy. The MRI of Hashimoto's encephalopathy showed leukoencephalopathy-like type or limbic encephalitis-like type; the lesions did not affect the temporal cortex which plays a role in naming ability. CONCLUSION: Except that the naming ability was retained, the impairments in cognitive functions for the Hashimoto's encephalopathy patients were similar to those of Alzheimer's disease patients. These results were consistent with the MRI findings.

  20. Branched-chain amino acids for people with hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Lise Lotte; Dam, Gitte; Les, Iñigo

    2017-01-01

    -chain amino acids (BCAA) versus control interventions has evaluated if BCAA may benefit people with hepatic encephalopathy. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the beneficial and harmful effects of BCAA versus any control intervention for people with hepatic encephalopathy. SEARCH METHODS: We identified trials through...

  1. Branched-chain amino acids for people with hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Lise Lotte; Dam, Gitte; Les, Iñigo;

    2015-01-01

    -chain amino acids (BCAA) versus control interventions has evaluated if BCAA may benefit people with hepatic encephalopathy. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the beneficial and harmful effects of BCAA versus any control intervention for people with hepatic encephalopathy. SEARCH METHODS: We identified trials through...

  2. Typical and atypical cases of bovine spongiform encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy of cattle, first detected in 1986 in the United Kingdom and subsequently in other countries. It is the most likely cause of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) in humans, but the origin of BSE has not been eluci...

  3. Minimal hepatic encephalopathy characterized by parallel use of the continuous reaction time and portosystemic encephalopathy tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, M M; Schaffalitzky de Muckadell, O B; Vilstrup, H

    2015-01-01

    Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) is a frequent complication to liver cirrhosis that causes poor quality of life, a great burden to caregivers, and can be treated. For diagnosis and grading the international guidelines recommend the use of psychometric tests of different modalities (computer...

  4. Progressive multicystic encephalopathy: is there more than hypoxia-ischemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garten, Lars; Hueseman, Dieter; Stoltenburg-Didinger, Gisela; Felderhoff-Mueser, Ursula; Weizsaecker, Katharina; Scheer, Ianina; Boltshauser, Eugen; Obladen, Michael

    2007-05-01

    Progressive multicystic encephalopathy following prenatal or perinatal hypoxia-ischemia is a well-described phenomenon in the literature. The authors report on a term infant with a devastating encephalopathy and severe neuronal dysfunction immediately after delivery without a known antecedent of prenatal or perinatal hypoxia or distress. Clinical and paraclinical findings in the patient are compared with those described in the literature. The authors focus on the specific results guiding to the final diagnosis of progressive multicystic encephalopathy and the timing of morphologic changes. As in this case, if the criteria of an acute hypoxic event sufficient to cause neonatal encephalopathy are not met, then factors other than hypoxia-ischemia may be leading to progressive multicystic encephalopathy.

  5. Reversible cortical blindness in a case of hepatic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amlan Kanti Biswas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic encephalopathy is a frequent and often fatal manifestation of chronic liver disease. The pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy is believed to be multifactorial including impaired blood-brain barrier function, imbalance between the excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters in cortex, accumulation of various toxic and false neurotransmitters, and lack of nutrients like oxygen and glucose. Signs and symptoms of hepatic encephalopathy varies and commonly ranges from personality changes, disturbed consciousness, sleep pattern alternation, intellectual deterioration, speech disturbances, asterixis to frank coma and even death. Reversible or transient cortical blindness is rare manifestation of hepatic encephalopathy. It may even precede the phase of altered consciousness in such patients. Very few similar cases have been reported worldwide. Hence, we would like to report a case of transient cortical blindness in a patient of hepatic encephalopathy.

  6. Hepatic encephalopathy with status epileptics: A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hiroto Tanaka; Hiroki Ueda; Yohei Kida; Hiroko Hamagami; Tomikimi Tsuji; Masakazu Ichinose

    2006-01-01

    A 62-year-old male with decompensated liver cirrhosis due to hepatitis C virus developed severe hepatic encephalopathy with status epileptic us. The blood ammonia level on admission was more than twice the normal level. Brain computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging were normal. In addition, electroencephalogram showed diffuse sharp waves, consistent with hepatic encephalopathy. The status epilepticus was resolved after antiepileptic therapy (phenytoin sodium) and treatment for hepatic encephalopathy (Branched chain amino acids). The blood ammonia level normalized with the clinical improvement and the patient did not have a recurrence of status epilepticus after the end of the antiepileptic treatment. Additionally, the electroencephalogram showed normal findings. Thus, we diagnosed the patient as hepatic encephalopathy with status epilepticus. We consider the status epilepticus of this patient to a rare and interesting finding in hepatic encephalopathy.

  7. 代谢性脑病%Metabolic Encephalopathies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石青

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic encephalopathy is a clinical syndrome which describes a state of global cerebral dysfunction induced by many different metabolic disturbances.Organic acids disorders,hepatic encephalopathy,uremic encephalopathy and its dialysis disequilibrium posterior,reversible leukoencephalopathy syndrome,Hashimoto encephalopathy,acute adrenal failure and encephalopathy due to electrolyte disturbances were reviewed.%代谢性脑病是由不同代谢障碍引起全脑功能紊乱的一种临床综合征.本文就有机酸代谢障碍、肝性脑病、尿毒症性脑病及其血透后脑病、可逆性大脑后部白质脑病、Hashimoto脑病和电介质失衡脑病的临床表现和神经影像学进行讨论.

  8. Some aspects of morphogenesis of diabetic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Tumanskiy

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of the literary data and conducted large-scale research it was ascertained that diabetes mellitus raises the risk of cerebral stroke in 2-6 times, the risk of transitional ischemic attacks in 3 times in comparison with the same risk in the general population [3]. Diabetic encephalopathy in its pure form can be found in 80.7% of patients with diabetes mellitus of the 1st type, its development is caused mainly by ineffective metabolic control of autoregulation of cerebral blood flow [4]. Mixed encephalopathy is prevailed among patients with diabetes mellitus of the 2nd type; lacunar heart attack is more often developed among this category of patients [5], multiple focus of ischemic affection of white substance – leukoaraiosis regarded as the areas of increased level of water, gliosis, and demyelination of white substance is often registered [6]. Pathogeny of diabetic encephalopathy hasn’t been studied properly. It is known that it is a multifactor effect in the development of which the main role is led by the vascular dysfunction with the reduction of blood supply and ischemia of brain tissue, as well as direct toxic influence of hyperglycemia and disorder of trophism of nerve tissue [7]. Microangiopathy and macroangiopathy acquire the special meaning in encephalopathy development among patients with diabetes mellitus. The evidence of microangiopathy and macroangiopathy is identified by the disease course and prognosis. On the ultrastructural level the changes of vessel microcircular movement are registered on the 1st month of the experimental alloxan diabetes. During electronic microscopy the thickening of basal membrane of capillaries as well as their dissection is observed. In micro vessels such phenomena as precipitation of lipoproteids, raising of the synthesis of collagen (the second type, dystrophic changes of endotheliocytes, and lowering of micropinocytosis can be found [11,12,13,14]. As the severity of diabetes mellitus

  9. Reversible cortical blindness: posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Sabyasachi; Mondal, Kanchan Kumar; Das, Somnath; Gupta, Anindya; Biswas, Jaya; Bhattacharyya, Subir Kumar; Biswas, Gautam

    2010-11-01

    Cortical blindness is defined as visual failure with preserved pupillary reflexes in structurally intact eyes due to bilateral lesions affecting occipital cortex. Bilateral oedema and infarction of the posterior and middle cerebral arterial territory, trauma, glioma and meningioma of the occipital cortex are the main causes of cortical blindness. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) refers to the reversible subtype of cortical blindness and is usually associated with hypertension, diabetes, immunosuppression, puerperium with or without eclampsia. Here, 3 cases of PRES with complete or partial visual recovery following treatment in 6-month follow-up are reported.

  10. Hashimoto's encephalopathy mimicking Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Angela C; Baehring, Joachim M

    2017-01-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy is a rare, imprecisely defined autoimmune neurologic syndrome associated with Hashimoto's thyroiditis that normally responds to corticosteroids. Here, we describe the case of a 55-year-old woman who presented with subacute cognitive decline and ataxia. Neoplastic, paraneoplastic, infectious, and metabolic etiologies were ruled out. Anti-TPO antibody level was markedly elevated at 966U/mL. After one month of 60mg/day of oral prednisone, she felt back to baseline and her Montreal Cognitive Assessment dramatically improved. Physicians should strongly consider this uncommon diagnosis in patients with rapid cognitive decline and no other clear etiology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Bilirubin encephalopathy due to Rh incompatibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taísa Roberta Ramos Nantes de Castilho

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The authors present the case of a newborn of an Rh-factorsensitizedmother, who received early hospital discharge while icteric only to be readmitted at an Emergency Service at five days of age with signs of kernicterus. Despite treatment given, the neonate progressed with a clinical picture of bilirubin encephalopathy. The lack of interaction between the obstetric and neonatal teams, premature hospital discharge, and lack of concern of neonatologists with jaundice in a full-term infant are highlighted as causes of a condition that should have disappeared if there had been adequateprevention.

  12. Cardiovascular dysfunction in infants with neonatal encephalopathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Armstrong, Katey

    2012-04-01

    Severe perinatal asphyxia with hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy occurs in approximately 1-2\\/1000 live births and is an important cause of cerebral palsy and associated neurological disabilities in children. Multiorgan dysfunction commonly occurs as part of the asphyxial episode, with cardiovascular dysfunction occurring in up to a third of infants. This narrative paper attempts to review the literature on the importance of early recognition of cardiac dysfunction using echocardiography and biomarkers such as troponin and brain type natriuretic peptide. These tools may allow accurate assessment of cardiac dysfunction and guide therapy to improve outcome.

  13. Multicystic encephalopathy in abusive head trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubat, Bela; Bilo, Rob A C; van Rijn, Rick R

    2014-01-01

    The proof of abusive head trauma (AHT) in infants is difficult, especially in cases with a long posttraumatic survival period. In the acute phase, injury to the cranio-cervical junction causes disturbances in respiratory and cardiac control, leading to apnea and bradycardia. Infants who survive the acute phase may subsequently develop multicystic encephalopathy. Because some types of changes are age-dependent, examination of the patterns of brain damage in these cases could provide information about the time in which they were inflicted. In particular, this could apply to the extent of the cystic changes, namely that the severity thereof may decrease with older age upon infliction of the trauma. This could potentially date the injury and thereby help to identify the perpetrator. We present an analysis of the patterns of brain damage in cases of AHT-induced multicystic encephalopathy and comment on the possible etiology and the implications thereof. Nine archival cases of trauma-induced multicystic encephalopathy, originating between the years 2005 and 2011, were identified. In 8 of these cases, hematoxilin-eosin-stained whole-hemisphere histologic slides, as well as small histologic slides of cerebellar hemispheres, were available for the evaluation of the topographic distribution of the macroscopic and microscopic changes. The cerebral hemispheres were more affected than the cerebellum. The magnitude of the cystic changes did not correlate with the age at which the trauma had occurred, nor the surviva period. All cases showed asymmetrical affection of the cerebral hemispheres, which in 3 cases was very pronounced. The analysis revealed both ischemia- and hypoperfusion-induced injury patterns. Analysis of the magnitude and the distribution of the damage do not assist in the estimation of the period at which the trauma had occurred. The evaluation showed that ischemia, and to a lesser extent, hypoperfusion, were the major mechanisms of brain injury in these cases

  14. Hepatic encephalopathy: etiology, pathogenesis, and clinical signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado, Melissa; Cortes, Yonaira

    2013-06-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a manifestation of clinical signs that may result from a variety of liver diseases. In small animals, HE is most commonly a result of portosystemic shunting. The pathogenesis is not completely understood, although it is likely multifactorial. Theories of pathogenesis include altered ammonia metabolism and glutamine and glutamate transmission, an increase in gamma-aminobutyric acid agonists and benzodiazepine-like substances, alterations of the serotonergic system and amino acid metabolism, elevated taurine levels, contributions from inflammatory mediators, and toxic effects of manganese. An understanding of the underlying mechanisms that result in HE may lead to new treatments in the future.

  15. Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE, Mad Cow Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. K. Bruckner

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available Mad Cow Disease or BSE (Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy became a household name internationally and also in South Africa. International hysteria resulted following reports of a possible link between a disease diagnosed in cattle in Britain and a variant of the disease diagnosed in humans after the presumed ingestion or contact with meat from infected cattle. The European Union instituted a ban on the importation of beef from the United Kingdom during March 1996 that had a severe effect on the beef industry in the UK and also resulted in a world wide consumer resistance against beef consumption.

  16. Diagnostic approach to persistent hepatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macías-Rodríguez, R U; Torre, A

    2011-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a complication of cirrhosis manifested by neuropsychiatric and neuromuscular changes with impact on quality of life. Clinical picture ranges from normal physical exam to stupor and coma. In persistent HE, patient never becomes free of HE. To review medical literature searching for evidence concerning persistent HE and nonclassical factors involved in its development. We identified articles by searching PubMed (1966 to January 2011), EMBASE (1980 to January 2011) and Pubgle. Relevant articles with the terms persistent AND hepatic AND encephalopathy were selected. Precipitating factors of this clinical picture were recorded. Many factors lead to HE and contribute to its persistence. The most common are gastrointestinal bleeding, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis and high protein intake. Other non-classical factors such as porto-systemic shunts, small bowel bacterial overgrowth, H. pylori infection and anemia must be considered. Identification and correction of these factors improves morbidity and mortality. It is important to recognize HE precipitants other than classical to provide the pathophysiological basis to understand persistent HE.

  17. The why and wherefore of hepatic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grover VPB

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Vijay PB Grover, Joshua M Tognarelli, Nicolas Massie, Mary ME Crossey, Nicola A Cook, Simon D Taylor-Robinson Liver Unit, Division of Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, UK Abstract: Hepatic encephalopathy is a common neuropsychiatric abnormality, which complicates the course of patients with liver disease. It was probably first described by Hippocrates over 2000 years ago, who said that "those whose madness arises from phlegm are quiet and neither shout nor make a disturbance, while those whose madness arises from bile shout, play tricks and will not keep still, but are always up to some mischief". He was presumably describing the differences between patients with pneumonia and acute liver failure. Despite the fact that the syndrome was probably first recognized thousands of years ago, the exact pathogenesis still remains unclear. Furthermore, a precise definition of the syndrome is lacking, as are definitive methods of diagnosing this condition. It is important as both patients with cirrhosis and the general population with whom they interact may be affected as a consequence. At a minimum, the individual may be affected by impaired quality of life, impaired ability to work, and slowed reaction times, which are relevant to the population at large if affected individuals operate heavy machinery or drive a car. Pathogenic mechanisms, diagnostic tools, and treatment options are discussed. Keywords: hepatic encephalopathy, cirrhosis, ammonia, pathology, treatment, rifaximin, lactulose

  18. Neonatal vitamin-responsive epileptic encephalopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gospe, Sidney M

    2010-01-01

    The treatment of neonatal seizures generally relies on the use of one or more anticonvulsant medications along with evaluation and management of any underlying etiology. In some circumstances, neonatal seizures are refractory to therapy and result in poor outcomes, including death. Certain rare vitamin- responsive inborn errors of metabolism may present as neonatal encephalopathy with anticonvulsant-resistant seizures. Therefore, it is vital for the clinicians of caring for seizing encephalopathic newborns to consider these particular disorders early in the hospital course. Pyridoxine-dependent seizures are due to deficiency of alpha-aminoadipic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (antiquitin) which is encoded by ALDH7A1. Seizures in infants who are pyridoxine-dependent must be treated using pharmacologic doses of pyridoxine (vitamin B(6)), and life-long therapy is required. Despite medical therapy, developmental handicaps, particularly in expressive language, are common. Folinic acidresponsive seizures are treated with supplements of folinic acid (5-formyltetrahydrofolate). Recently, patients with this condition were also demonstrated to be antiquitin deficient. Pyridoxal phosphate-dependent seizures result from a deficiency of pyridox(am)ine 5'-phosphate oxidase which is encoded by PNPO. Patients with this cause of seizures respond to pyridoxal phosphate but not to pyridoxine. This review discusses our current understanding of these three neonatal vitamin-responsive epileptic encephalopathies and a diagnostic and treatment protocol is proposed.

  19. Ohtahara syndrome: Early infantile epileptic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knežević-Pogančev Marija

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available DEFINITION Ohtahara syndrome (early infantile epileptic encephalopathy with suppression bursts, is the earliest developing form of epileptic encephalopathy. ETHIOLOGY It considered to be a result of static structural developing brain damage. CLINICAL PICTURE Variable seizures develop mostly within the first 10 days of life, but may occur during the first hour after delivery. The most frequently observed seizure type are epileptic spasms, which may be either generalized and symmetrical or lateralized. The tonic spasms may occur in clusters or singly, while awake and during sleep alike. The duration of spasms is up to 10 seconds, and the interval between spasms within cluster ranges from 9 to 15 seconds. In one third of cases, other seizure types include partial motor seizures or hemiconvulsions The disorder takes a progressively deteriorating course with increasing frequency of seizures and severe retardation of psychomotor development. DIAGNOSTIC WORKUP In the initial stage of Ohtahara syndrome, interictal EEG shows a pattern of suppression-burst with high-voltage paroxysmal discharges separated by prolonged periods of nearly flat tracing that last for up to 18 seconds. PROGNOSIS AND THREATMENT Half of the reported children having Ohtahara syndrome die in infancy. Anticonvulsant helps little in controlling the seizures and halting the deterioration of psychomotor development. Severe psychomotor retardation is the rule. With time, the disorder may evolve into West syndrome or partial epilepsy. Psychomotor development may be slightly better if the infants do not develop West and later Lennox-Gastaut syndrome.

  20. Endotoxemia, encephalopathy, and mortality in cirrhotic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigatello, L M; Broitman, S A; Fattori, L; Di Paoli, M; Pontello, M; Bevilacqua, G; Nespoli, A

    1987-01-01

    Endotoxemia without sepsis was detected with a chromogenic Limulus assay in 36 of 39 (92.3%) cirrhotic patients and was absent in seven healthy volunteers. In 11 patients who underwent elective portasystemic shunt, portal vein endotoxemia was higher than inferior vena caval: p less than 0.05, systemic endotoxin levels did not change, compared to preoperative levels, on the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd postoperative days, attendant to an uneventful recovery. In 21 patients in hepatic encephalopathy after esophagogastric hemorrhage, systemic endotoxemia was higher than in well-compensated cirrhotics: p less than 0.001; it was higher in deep than in light coma: p less than 0.05; it was higher in those who died than in those who survived: p less than 0.001. Endotoxin levels showed a positive correlation with serum bilirubin: r = 0.59, p less than 0.001, and a negative correlation with prothrombin activity: r = -0.59, p less than 0.001. These data show endotoxemia without sepsis is a constant finding in cirrhosis and increasing levels of endotoxemia are associated with hepatic failure, encephalopathy, and death.

  1. [Clinical importance and diagnostic methods of minimal hepatic encephalopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stawicka, Agnieszka; Zbrzeźniak, Justyna; Świderska, Aleksandra; Kilisińska, Natalia; Świderska, Magdalena; Jaroszewicz, Jerzy; Flisiak, Robert

    2016-02-01

    Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) encompasses a number of neuropsychological and neurophysiological disorders in patients suffering from liver cirrhosis, who do not display abnormalities during a medical interview or physical examination. A negative influence of MHE on the quality of life of patients suffering from liver cirrhosis was confirmed, which include retardation of ability of operating motor vehicles and disruption of multiple health-related areas, as well as functioning in the society. The data on frequency of traffic offences and accidents amongst patients diagnosed with MHE in comparison to patients diagnosed with liver cirrhosis without MHE, as well as healthy persons is alarming. Those patients are unaware of their disorder and retardation of their ability to operate vehicles, therefore it is of utmost importance to define this group. The term minimal hepatic encephalopathy (formerly "subclinical" encephalopathy) erroneously suggested the unnecessity of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in patients with liver cirrhosis. Diagnosing MHE is an important predictive factor for occurrence of overt encephalopathy - more than 50% of patients with this diagnosis develop overt encephalopathy during a period of 30 months after. Early diagnosing MHE gives a chance to implement proper treatment which can be a prevention of overt encephalopathy. Due to continuing lack of clinical research there exist no commonly agreed-upon standards for definition, diagnostics, classification and treatment of hepatic encephalopathy. This article introduces the newest findings regarding the importance of MHE, scientific recommendations and provides detailed descriptions of the most valuable diagnostic methods.

  2. Prominent Bilateral Hand Tremor in Hashimoto's Encephalopathy: A Video Demonstration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramcharan, Kanterpersad; Hosein, Nadeem; Teelucksingh, Joel David; Rampersad, Fidel; Teelucksingh, Surujpal

    2016-01-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy often presents with neuropsychiatric manifestations including seizures and movement disorders. We describe a patient who presented with bilateral hand tremor and mild cognitive defects that fulfilled the criteria for a diagnosis of Hashimoto's encephalopathy. There was a rapid response to glucocorticoid therapy with relapse following treatment withdrawal. Recently published clinical criteria for the diagnosis of Hashimoto's encephalopathy include seizures, myoclonus, hallucinations, or stroke-like episodes but do not include tremor. Our case had mild cognitive dysfunction and a coarse tremor as the predominant clinical features, which probably represent mild disease.

  3. Legal Responsibilities of Physicians When They Diagnose Hepatic Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vierling, John M

    2015-08-01

    Both covert hepatic encephalopathy (CHE) and overt hepatic encephalopathy (OHE) impair the ability to operate machinery. The legal responsibilities of US physicians who diagnose and treat patients with hepatic encephalopathy vary among states. It is imperative that physicians know the laws regarding reporting in their state. OHE represents a neuropsychiatric impairment that meets general reporting criteria. The medical advisory boards of the states have not identified OHE as a reportable condition. In the absence of validated diagnostic guidelines, physicians are not obligated to perform tests for CHE. There is a need for explicit guidance from professional associations regarding this issue.

  4. Dengue viral infections as a cause of encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malavige G

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the clinical characteristics and poor prognostic factors associated with high mortality in dengue encephalopathy. Fifteen patients with confirmed dengue infections, who developed encephalopathy, were recruited from two tertiary care hospitals in Colombo, Sri Lanka. Among the factors that contributed to encephalopathy were: Acute liver failure (73%, electrolyte imbalances (80% and shock (40%. Five (33.3% patients developed seizures. Disseminated intravascular coagulation was seen in five (33.3%. Secondary bacterial infections were observed in 8 (53.3% of our patients. The overall mortality rate was 47%.

  5. Hepatic Encephalopathy-the Old and the New.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandiah, Prem A; Kumar, Gagan

    2016-07-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy occurs ubiquitously in all causes of advanced liver failure, however, its implications on mortality diverge and vary depending upon acuity and severity of liver failure. This associated mortality has decreased in subsets of liver failure over the last 20 years. Aside from liver transplantation, this improvement is not attributable to a single intervention but likely to a combination of practical advances in critical care management. Misconceptions surrounding many facets of hepatic encephalopathy exists due to heterogeneity in presentation, pathophysiology and outcome. This review is intended to highlight the important concepts, rationales and strategies for managing hepatic encephalopathy.

  6. Current concepts in the assessment and treatment of hepatic encephalopathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cash, W J

    2012-02-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is defined as a metabolically induced, potentially reversible, functional disturbance of the brain that may occur in acute or chronic liver disease. Standardized nomenclature has been proposed but a standardized approach to the treatment, particularly of persistent, episodic and recurrent encephalopathy associated with liver cirrhosis has not been proposed. This review focuses on the pathogenesis and treatment of HE in patients with cirrhosis. The pathogenesis and treatment of hepatic encephalopathy in fulminant hepatic failure is quite different and is reviewed elsewhere.

  7. Severe early onset ethylmalonic encephalopathy with West syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papetti, Laura; Garone, Giacomo; Schettini, Livia; Giordano, Carla; Nicita, Francesco; Papoff, Paola; Zeviani, Massimo; Leuzzi, Vincenzo; Spalice, Alberto

    2015-12-01

    Ethylmalonic encephalopathy (EE) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by early onset encephalopathy, chronic diarrhoea, petechiae, orthostatic acrocyanosis and defective cytochrome c oxidase (COX) in muscle and brain. High levels of lactic, ethylmalonic and methylsuccinic acids are detected in body fluids. EE is caused by mutations in ETHE1 gene, a mitochondrial sulfur dioxygenase. Neurologic signs and symptoms include progressively delayed development, hypotonia, seizures, and abnormal movements. We report on the clinical, electroencephalographic and MRI findings of a baby with a severe early onset encephalopathy associated with novel ETHE1 gene mutation. This is the first case described in literature with an early pure epileptic onset, presenting with West syndrome.

  8. Herpesvirus-6 encephalitis complicated by Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome in a pediatric recipient of unrelated cord blood transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvajal, E; Verdeguer, A; Fernández, J M; Cañete, A; Castel, V

    2001-12-01

    A 10-year-old girl with M2 acute myeloid leukemia underwent an unrelated cord blood transplantation in refractory first relapse. On day +13, after 48 hours with fever, she showed a measles-like rash, and on day +15, she began experiencing neurologic symptoms (headache, tremors, weakness, nystagmus, mild confusion, speaking, taste, and behavior disturbances, and focal seizures). She also had amnesia for recent events with disability to learn, mimicking Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. Computed tomography of the brain and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and electroencephalogram were nonspecific. We found human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) DNA in CSF and cytomegalovirus in bronchoalveolar lavage using polymerase chain reaction techniques. Treatment with ganciclovir and foscarnet was effective, with total resolution of symptoms.

  9. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors for the treatment of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome--three further cases show response to donepezil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, Murray; Cochrane, Ashley; Jauhar, Pramod; Ashton, Elizabeth

    2005-01-01

    Three patients diagnosed with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome were treated with the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, donepezil, for periods of 6 to 8 months. Cognitive testing [Alzheimer's disease assessment scale-cognitive subscale (ADAS-Cog), Mini-mental state examination (MMSE), Clock drawing test and six item 2 min recall] and carer questionnaires [Informant Questionnaire (IQ Code), Neuropsychiatric inventory scale (NPI)] were performed at baseline, mid- and endpoint of the treatment period and post-discontinuation. Progressive partial improvement occurred in cognitive measurements through the treatment period, some of which was sustained after discontinuing donepezil. Carer questionnaires also indicated improvement. Confounding factors necessitate caution when attributing improvements to the medication, but these cases suggest that this option merits further investigation.

  10. Aspectos clínicos e neuropatológicos da síndrome de Wernicke-Korsakoff

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Zubaran; Jefferson Fernandes; Fernanda Martins; Janete Souza; Rita Machado; Maria Cadore

    1996-01-01

    O abuso de álcool é um dos mais sérios problemas de saúde pública e a síndrome de Wernicke-Korsakoff é uma das mais graves conseqüências do alcoolismo. Esta patologia é infreqüentemente diagnosticada nas suas apresentações menos evidentes, razão pela qual uma abordagem diagnóstica apropriada é importante passo para seu tratamento. Entre as novas propostas farmacológicas, está a reposição dos níveis de tiamina, embora isto seja insuficiente para prevenir o declínio psicológico de um grande núm...

  11. [A case of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome with dramatic improvement in consciousness immediately after intravenous infusion of thiamine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, A; Chida, K; Misu, T; Okita, N; Nomura, H; Konno, H; Takase, S; Takeda, A; Itoyama, Y

    2000-01-01

    A 68-year-old man was hospitalized on March 4, 1998 for disturbances in consciousness. In 1995, he had received proximal subtotal gastrectomy and reconstructive surgery of the jejunal interposition for gastric cancer. Thereafter he had been taking enough food without the habit of taking liquor. In October 1997, his short term memory was becoming gradually worse. On February 12, 1998, he suffered from numbness in the feet, and then dysphagia, unsteady gait, and diplopia developed gradually. On February 26, brain MRI showed no abnormalities. On March 3, he had a fever of 38.5 degrees C and his consciousness became unclear. Neurological examination revealed semi-coma, total ophthalmoplegia, and absence of doll's eye movement. Deep tendon reflexes were absent. The serum thiamine level was 9 ng/ml (normal range: 20-50). Brain MRI demonstrated symmetrical high intensity lesions in the periaqueductal area of the midbrain, dorsomedial nuclei of bilateral thalami, and vestibular nuclei. About 30 seconds after intravenous infusion of thiamine, his consciousness improved dramatically, but returned to semi-coma after about two minutes. Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome usually occurs acutely. In the present case, however, the disease showed slow onset, chronic progression, and then rapid worsening after fever. Reconstructive surgery of the jejunal interposition might have caused the slow onset of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, and fever might have facilitated the rapid progression of the disease. An immediate high concentration of thiamine modifies the kinetics of acetylcholine receptor ion channels, thereby maintaining wakefulness, and the level of consciousness may change dramatically.

  12. Clinical and Neurologic Manifestation of Minimal Hepatic Encephalopathy and Overt Hepatic Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, P Patrick; Shah, Niraj James

    2015-08-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) shows a wide spectrum of neuropsychiatric manifestations. A combined effort with neuropsychological and psychometric evaluation has to be performed to recognize the syndrome, whereas minimal HE (MHE) is largely under-recognized. Subtle symptoms of MHE can only be diagnosed through specialized neuropsychiatric testing. Early diagnosis and treatment may drastically improve the quality of life for many cirrhotic patients. Further research to gain better insight into the pathophysiology and diagnostic accuracy of HE will help determine future management strategies.

  13. Management of hepatic encephalopathy in the hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leise, Michael D; Poterucha, John J; Kamath, Patrick S; Kim, W Ray

    2014-02-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) develops in up to 50% of patients with cirrhosis and is a feature of decompensated cirrhosis. With the goal of reviewing the evidence for treatment and prevention of overt hepatic encephalopathy, pubmed was searched using search terms hepatic encephalopathy AND treatment, limited to human studies from January 1, 2003, through December 1, 2013, and supplemented by key references. The inpatient incidence of HE is approximately 23,000 annually, and management of these patients is common for internists and subspecialists. Treatment of the hospitalized patient with HE has changed in recent years. Treatment entails 2 phases: induction and maintenance of remission. Most cases of significant HE are precipitated by infection, gastrointestinal bleeding, medications, or other culprits. All patients should be evaluated for secondary triggers of HE, and treatment should be initiated with a nonabsorbable disaccharide (ie, lactulose) in most patients. Rifaximin (off label) can be added in patients not responding to lactulose. Neomycin is a less preferred alternative to rifaximin owing to its adverse effect profile. Other therapies, including zinc, L-ornithine-L-aspartate, and branched-chain amino acids, can be considered for patients not responding to disaccharides and nonabsorbable antibiotics. Large portosystemic shunts may be embolized in patients with medically refractory recurrent or severe HE with otherwise well-compensated cirrhosis. Molecular Adsorbent Recirculating System is now available for patients with severe HE who do not respond to medical therapy. It is critically important that patients hospitalized with significant HE continue maintenance therapy at the time of dismissal to prevent further episodes. Patients with a first-time episode of HE can be administered lactulose, and careful instructions should be provided to patients and caregivers about dose titration to achieve 3 bowel movements daily. Patients with recurrent HE episodes

  14. Uremic encephalopathy and other brain disorders associated with renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifter, Julian Lawrence; Samuels, Martin A

    2011-04-01

    Kidney failure is one of the leading causes of disability and death and one of the most disabling features of kidney failure and dialysis is encephalopathy. This is probably caused by the accumulation of uremic toxins. Other important causes are related to the underlying disorders that cause kidney failure, particularly hypertension. The clinical manifestations of uremic encephalopathy include mild confusional states to deep coma, often with associated movement disorders, such as asterixis. Most nephrologists consider cognitive impairment to be a major indication for the initiation of renal replacement therapy with dialysis with or without subsequent transplantation. Sleep disorders, including Ekbom's syndrome (restless legs syndrome) are also common in patients with kidney failure. Renal replacement therapies are also associated with particular neurologic complications including acute dialysis encephalopathy and chronic dialysis encephalopathy, formerly known as dialysis dementia. The treatments and prevention of each are discussed. © Thieme Medical Publishers.

  15. Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome-associated Encephalopathy Successfully Treated with Corticosteroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosaka, Takashi; Nakamagoe, Kiyotaka; Tamaoka, Akira

    2017-09-25

    The encephalopathy that occurs in association with hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), which is caused by enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (E. coli), has a high mortality rate and patients sometimes present sequelae. We herein describe the case of a 20-year-old woman who developed encephalopathy during the convalescent stage of HUS caused by E.coli O26. Hyperintense lesions were detected in the pons, basal ganglia, and cortex on diffusion-weighted brain MRI. From the onset of HUS encephalopathy, we treated the patient with methylprednisolone (mPSL) pulse therapy alone. Her condition improved, and she did not present sequelae. Our study shows that corticosteroids appear to be effective for the treatment of some patients with HUS encephalopathy.

  16. Pharm GKB: Acute Necrotizing Encephalopathy [PharmGKB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Overview Alternate Names: PharmGKB Accession Id: PA164924608 Publications related to Acute...uman genetics. 2009. Neilson Derek E, et al. Common Searches Search Medline Plus Search CTD Pharm GKB: Acute Necrotizing Encephalopathy ...

  17. Hepatic encephalopathy in acute-on-chronic liver failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Guan-Huei

    2015-10-01

    The presence of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) within 4 weeks is part of the criteria for defining acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF). The pathophysiology of HE is complex, and hyperammonemia and cerebral hemodynamic dysfunction appear to be central in the pathogenesis of encephalopathy. Recent data also suggest that inflammatory mediators may have a significant role in modulating the cerebral effect of ammonia. Multiple prospective and retrospective studies have shown that hepatic encephalopathy in ACLF patients is associated with higher mortality, especially in those with grade III-IV encephalopathy, similar to that of acute liver failure (ALF). Although significant cerebral edema detected by CT in ACLF patients appeared to be less common, specialized MRI imaging was able to detect cerebral edema even in low grade HE. Ammonia-focused therapy constitutes the basis of current therapy, as in the treatment of ALF. Emerging treatment strategies focusing on modulating the gut-liver-circulation-brain axis are discussed.

  18. Hepatic encephalopathy as a complication of liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stephan vom Dahl; Gerald Kircheis; Dieter Haussinger

    2001-01-01

    @@INTRODUCTION Hepatic encephalopathy ( HE) is a frequent complication of chronic liver disease .It is defined as a characteristic functional and reversible alteration of the mental state ,due to impaired liver function and / or increased portosystemic shunting .

  19. Effects of L-carnitine in patients with hepatic encephalopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mariano Malaguarnera; Giovanni Pistone; Rampello Elvira; Carmelo Leotta; Linda Scarpello; Rampello Liborio

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the influence of L-carnitine on mental conditions and ammonia effects on patients with hepatic encephalopathy (HE).METHODS: One hundred and fifty patients (10 patients with alcoholism, 41 patients with hepatitis virus B infection, 78 patients with hepatitis C virus infection,21 patients with cryptogenetic cirrhosis) meeting the inclusion criteria were randomized into group A receiving a 90-d treatment with L-carnitine (2 g twice a day) or into group B receiving placebo in double blind.RESULTS: At the end of the study period, a significant decrease in NH4 fasting serum levels was found in patients with hepatic encephalopathy (P<0.05) afler the treatment with levocarnitine (LC). Significant differences were also found between symbol digit modalities test and block design in patients with hepatic encephalopathy (P<0.05).CONCLUSION: Results of our study suggest an important protective effect of L-carnitine against ammonia-precipitated encephalopathy in cirrhotic patients.

  20. Brain proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy for hepatic encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Chin-Sing; McConnell, James R.; Chu, Wei-Kom

    1993-08-01

    Liver failure can induce gradations of encephalopathy from mild to stupor to deep coma. The objective of this study is to investigate and quantify the variation of biochemical compounds in the brain in patients with liver failure and encephalopathy, through the use of water- suppressed, localized in-vivo Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (HMRS). The spectral parameters of the compounds quantitated are: N-Acetyl Aspartate (NAA) to Creatine (Cr) ratio, Choline (Cho) to Creatine ratio, Inositol (Ins) to Creatine ratio and Glutamine-Glutamate Amino Acid (AA) to Creatine ratio. The study group consisted of twelve patients with proven advanced chronic liver failure and symptoms of encephalopathy. Comparison has been done with results obtained from five normal subjects without any evidence of encephalopathy or liver diseases.

  1. Differential diagnosis of dyscirculatory encephalopathy in outpatient practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D V Neverovsky

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The differential diagnosis of dyscirculatory encephalopathy is one of the topical problems in Russian neurology. Forty-seven patients diagnosed with dyscirculatory encephalopathy and followed up in the polyclinic were examined. Only in 9 (19.2% of them, the diagnosis was confirmed. Most patients were established to have other diseases, among which there were primary depressive and/or anxiety disorders (34%, primary headache (23.4, benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV (8.5%, and Alzheimer’s disease (10.6%. The paper describes patients with migraine and BPPV, in whom the detection and treatment of these diseases have yielded a positive effect. The examination of patients diagnosed with dyscirculatory encephalopathy with investigations of their cognitive and emotional functions, otoneurological examination, and psychiatric consultation (if indicated makes it possible to identify other diseases presenting with the symptoms similar to dyscirculatory encephalopathy and to prescribe effective treatments.

  2. Acute Necrotizing Encephalopathy of Childhood; A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza SALEHIOMRAN

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite this Article: Salehi Omran MR, Nooreddini H, Baghdadi F. Acute Necrotizing Encephalopathy of Childhood; A Case Report. Iran J Child Neurol. 2013 Spring;7(2:51-54. AbstractAcute Necrotizing Encephalopathy of Childhood (ANEC is an atypical disease followed by respiratory or gastrointestinal infection, high fever, which is accompanied with rapid alteration of consciousness and seizures. This disease is seen nearly exclusively in East Asian infants and children who had previously a good health. Serial MRI examinations demonstrated symmetric lesions involving the thalami, brainstem, cerebellum, and white matter. This disease has a poor prognosis, often culminating in profound morbidity and mortality. A 22-month infant with ANEC hospitalized in Amirkola Children Hospital has been evaluated. References1. Mizuguchi M. Acute necrotizing encephalopathy of childhood: a novel form of acute encephalopathy prevalent in Japan and Taiwan. Brain Dev. 1997 Mar;19(2:81-92. Review.2. Wang HS, Huang SC. Acute necrotizing encephalopathy of childhood. Chang Gung Med J 2001 Jan;24(1:1-10.3. Campistol J, Gassió R, Pineda M, Fernandez-Alvarez E. Acute necrotizing encephalopathy of childhood (infantile bilateral  thalamic necrosis: two non-Japanese cases. Dev Med Child Neurol 1998 Nov;40(11:771-4.4. Ito Y, Ichiyama T, Kimura H, Shibata M, Ishiwada N, Kuroki H, Furukawa S, Morishima T. Detection of influenza virus RNA by reverse transcription-PCR and proinflammatory cytokines in influenza-virus-associated encephalopathy. J Med Virol 1999 Aug;58(4:420-5.5. Sugaya N. Influenza-associated encephalopathy in Japan. Semin Pediatr Infect Dis 2002 Apr;13(2:79-84. Review.6. Skelton BW, Hollingshead MC, Sledd AT, Phillips CD, Castillo M. Acute necrotizing encephalopathy of childhood: typical findings in an atypical disease. Pediatr Radiol 2008 Jul; 38(7:810-3.7. Wong AM, Simon EM, Zimmerman RA, Wang HS, Toh CH, Ng SH. Acute necrotizing encephalopathy of childhood

  3. A Case of Valproate Induced Hyperammonemic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surjit Tarafdar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 36-years-old man on phenytoin, levetiracetam, and sodium valproate presented with acute confusion. Routine investigations including serum valproate and phenytoin concentration were normal. His serum ammonia concentration was raised. His valproate was held and 2 days later he recovered with concordant normalisation of serum ammonia concentration. Urea acid cycle disorder was ruled out, and a diagnosis of valproate induced hyperammonemic encephalopathy (VHE was made. Asymptomatic hyperammonemia occurs in 15–50% of valproate-treated patients, and while the true incidence of VHE is not known, it is a recognized complication of sodium valproate treatment. VHE typically presents acutely with impaired consciousness, lethargy, and vomiting. Valproate concentrations may be in the therapeutic range, and liver function tests are typically “normal.” Treatment for VHE consists of ceasing valproate and providing supportive care. Some have advocated carnitine replacement.

  4. Transcranial electrostimulation in patients with alcoholic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barylnik Yu.B.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The method of transcranial electrostimulation (TES was used for treating patients with alcoholic encephalopathy against the background of the basic treatment, which includes nootropics, normotimics, soporifics, over-all strengthening therapy and other devices. The course of treatment consisted of 10 daily procedures lasting for 30 minutes. The TES influence was evaluated according to the clinical state, the neurologic status, including EEG (electroencephalogram, the psychometric scales were also used for evaluating the manifestation of depression, anxiety and working memory in comparison with appropriate indices in the control group of patients, who were being treated by the traditional method. TES led to normalization of health state, neurologic status and vegetative innervation, the reduction in pathologic inclination, which corresponded to general improvement of the state of patients, EEG indices and psychometric scales

  5. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostić Dejan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES is characterized by the following symptoms: seizures, impaired consciousness and/or vision, vomiting, nausea, and focal neurological signs. Diagnostic imaging includes examination by magnetic resonance (MR and computed tomography (CT, where brain edema is visualized bi-laterally and symmetrically, predominantly posteriorly, parietally, and occipitally. Case report. We presented a 73-year-old patient with the years-long medical history of hipertension and renal insufficiency, who developed PRES with the symptomatology of the rear cranium. CT and MR verified changes in the white matter involving all lobes on both sides of the brain. After a two-week treatment (antihypertensive, hypolipemic and rehydration therapy clinical improvement with no complications occurred, with complete resolution of changes in the white matter observed on CT and MR. Conclusion. PRES is a reversible syndrome in which the symptoms withdraw after several days to several weeks if early diagnosis is made and appropriate treatment started without delay.

  6. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumkum Srivastava

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome (PRES is a clinic radiological entity, characterized by variable associations of seizure activity, consciousness impairment, headache, visual abnormalities, nausea and vomiting and focal neurological signs. The global incidence of PRES is not known. It can develop in association with conditions like exposure to toxic agents, hypertension, infection and eclampsia was present in 7%. So, here I am presenting a case of our patient of 22 years primigravida, who presented with ante partum eclampsia at 28 weeks of gestation and delivered vaginally by induction of labor. Post-delivery she developed PRES which was diagnosed by MRI. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2014; 3(4.000: 1155-1156

  7. Nonconvulsive status epilepticus disguising as hepatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Yong Min; Lee, Sung Wook; Han, Sang Young; Baek, Yang Hyun; Ahn, Ji Hye; Choi, Won Jong; Lee, Ji Young; Kim, Sang Ho; Yoon, Byeol A

    2015-04-28

    Nonconvulsive status epilepticus has become an important issue in modern neurology and epileptology. This is based on difficulty in definitively elucidating the condition and its various clinical phenomena and on our inadequate insight into the intrinsic pathophysiological processes. Despite nonconvulsive status epilepticus being a situation that requires immediate treatment, this disorder may not be appreciated as the cause of mental status impairment. Although the pathophysiology of nonconvulsive status epilepticus remains unknown, this disorder is thought to lead to neuronal damage, so its identification and treatment are important. Nonconvulsive status epilepticus should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with liver cirrhosis presenting an altered mental status. We report a case of a 52-year-old male with liver cirrhosis presenting an altered mental status. He was initially diagnosed with hepatic encephalopathy but ultimately diagnosed with nonconvulsive status epilepticus by electroencephalogram.

  8. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: The Impact on Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galgano, Michael A; Cantu, Robert; Chin, Lawrence S

    2016-03-14

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a devastating neuropsychological condition afflicting a small percentage of athletes partaking in high-impact sports. The onset of symptoms lags years behind the inciting events. Repetitive minor head injuries are felt to be the main etiology behind CTE. Routine radiographic imaging generally is unremarkable in cases of CTE. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) are advanced MRI-based sequences that have shown promise in detecting early radiographic findings that may be reflective of CTE. Progressive neuronal loss is the histopathological hallmark of this neurodegenerative disease. Strategizing earlier detection techniques is paramount in delivering optimal care to athletes afflicted with CTE.

  9. Quantitative Risk Assessment of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Toshiyuki; Kasuga, Fumiko

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is a progressive neurological disease of cattle affecting the central nervous system and was first diagnosed in the United Kingdom (UK) in 1986 (Wells et al., 1987). This disease is one of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) which includes Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in humans and scrapie in sheep. The causative agent of TSE is considered to be an abnormal form of prion protein. However, the details of its pathogenic mechanism have not been fully identified. Scrapie, which causes neurological symptoms in sheep and goats, has existed in the UK for 200 years (Hoinville, 1996) and spread across the rest of the world in the 1900s (Detwiler & Baylis, 2003). There has been no report so far that scrapie can be transmitted to humans. Initially, BSE was also considered as a disease affecting only animals. However, a variant type of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) was first reported in the UK, and exposure to a BSE agent was suspected (Collinge, Sidle, Meads, Ironside, & Hill, 1996). vCJD is clinically and pathologically different from the sporadic type of CJD, and age at clinical onset of vCJD is younger than sporadic type (Will et al., 1996). Since the UK government announced the possible association between BSE and vCJD in 1996, BSE has become a huge public health concern all over the world. Of particular concern about vCJD, the fatal disease in younger age, distorted consumer confidence in beef safety, and as a result reduced beef consumption has been seen in many BSE-affected countries.

  10. Neuroprotection of aucubin in primary diabetic encephalopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Hippocampal neuronal apoptosis accompanied by impairment of cognitive function occurs in primary diabetic encephalopathy. In this study, we investigated the neuroprotective mechanism of the iridoid glycoside, aucubin, using rats (n=8). Diabetes mellitus was induced in the rats by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of streptozotocin (60 mg/kg body weight). After 65 d, half of the DM rats were administered aucubin (5 mg/kg; i.p.) for 15 d, yielding treatment DM+A. A third group of rats received no strepto- zotocin or aucibin, and served as controls (CON). Encephalopathy was assessed using Y-maze be- havioral testing. Rats were euthanized on Day 87, and hippocampi were excised for visual (light and transmission electron microscopic) and immunochemical (Western blot; immunohistochemical) as- sessments of the CA1 subfield for apoptosis and expression of regulatory proteins Bcl-2 and Bax. Treatment responses to all the parameters examined (body weight, plasma glucose, Y-maze error rates, pyramidal cell ultrastructure, proportions of apoptotic cells, levels of expression of Bcl-2 and Bax, and survivability of neuronal cells) were identical: there were highly significant differences between DM and CON groups (P<0.001), but the effects were significantly moderated (P<0.01) in DM+A compared with DM. These findings confirm the association of apoptosis with the encephalopathic effects of diabetes mellitus, and suggest a major role of the expression levels of Bcl-2 and Bax in the regulation of apop- totic cell death. All of the results suggest that aucubin could effectively inhibit apoptosis by modulating the expressions of Bcl-2 and Bax genes.

  11. Neuroprotection of aucubin in primary diabetic encephalopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE HongYu; JIN LiJi; JIN Lei; ZHANG Peng; LI DanQing; XIA YanQiu; LU YaNan; XU YongPing

    2008-01-01

    Hippocampal neuronal apoptosis accompanied by impairment of cognitive function occurs in primary diabetic encephalopathy. In this study, we investigated the neuroprotective mechanism of the iridoid glycoside, aucubin, using rats (n=8). Diabetes mellitus was induced in the rats by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of streptozotocin (60 mg/kg body weight). After 65 d, half of the DM rats were administered aucubin (5 mg/kg;i.p.) for 15 d, yielding treatment DM+A. A third group of rats received no strepto-zotocin or aucibin, and served as controls (CON). Encephalopathy was assessed using Y-maze be-havioral testing. Rats were euthanized on Day 87, and hippocampi were excised for visual (light and transmission electron microscopic) and immunochemical (Western blot;immunohistochemical) as-sessments of the CA1 subfield for apoptosis and expression of regulatory proteins Bcl-2 and Bax. Treatment responses to all the parameters examined (body weight, plasma glucose, Y-maze error rates, pyramidal cell ultrastructure, proportions of apoptotic cells, levels of expression of Bcl-2 and Bax, and survivability of neuronal cells) were identical: there were highly significant differences between DM and CON groups (P<0.001), but the effects were significantly moderated (P<0.01) in DM+A compared with DM. These findings confirm the association of apoptosis with the encephalopathic effects of diabetes mellitus, and suggest a major role of the expression levels of Bcl-2 and Bax in the regulation of apop-totic cell death. All of the results suggesf that aucubin could effectively inhibit apoptosis by modulating the expressions of Bcl-2 and Bax genes.

  12. Early progressive encephalopathy in boys and MECP2 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kankirawatana, P; Leonard, H; Ellaway, C; Scurlock, J; Mansour, A; Makris, C M; Dure, L S; Friez, M; Lane, J; Kiraly-Borri, C; Fabian, V; Davis, M; Jackson, J; Christodoulou, J; Kaufmann, W E; Ravine, D; Percy, A K

    2006-07-11

    MECP2 mutations mainly occur in females with Rett syndrome. Mutations have been described in 11 boys with progressive encephalopathy: seven of nine with affected sisters and two de novo. The authors report four de novo occurrences: three pathogenic and one potentially pathogenic. Common features include failure to thrive, respiratory insufficiency, microcephaly, and abnormal motor control. MECP2 mutations should be assessed in boys with progressive encephalopathy and one or more of respiratory insufficiency, abnormal movements or tone, and intractable seizures.

  13. Acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saroj S Yadav

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and reduced diffusion (AESD is a syndrome of encephalopathy characterized by biphasic seizures and altered consciousness in the acute stage followed in the subacute stage by restricted diffusion in the subcortical white matter on magnetic resonance imaging. The etiology of AESD has been attributed to viral infection like influenza A and human herpes virus 6. The exact pathogenesis of AESD is uncertain. Here we report a case of AESD, diagnosed based on clinicoradiological correlation.

  14. Hemorrhagic shock and encephalopathy syndrome: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Sook Ja; Choi, Yun Sun; Shin, Chung Ho; Cho, Sung Bum; Cho, Jae Min; Kim, Hyun Sook; Han, Tae Il; Yoon, Yong Kyu [Eulji Univ. School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-03-01

    Hemorrhagic shock and encephalopathy syndrome (HSES) is a sudden-onset symptom complex that involves multisystem failure and includes encephalopathy, shock, coma, convulsions, prerenal azotemia, hepatic dysfunction, and bleeding coagulopathy and progressive thrombocytopenia in previously healthy infants and children. Its radiologic findings have rarely been reported, and it has not been described in Korea. We present a case of clinically diagnosed HSES, and include the CT and MRI findings.

  15. An unusual presentation of Hashimoto′s encephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Rajeev Philip; Sanjay Saran; Manish Gutch; Keshavkumar Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) is a rare steroid-responsive encephalopathy syndrome, which can have highly variable neuropsychiatric manifestations and can go unrecognized for a long time. HE is a diagnosis of exclusion and should be kept in mind when evaluating a patient with a cognitive dysfunction and high titers of anti-thyroid antibodies as it responds dramatically to steroids. Steroid responsive myoclonus can be a presentation of HE.

  16. Encephalopathy secondary to isoniazid in patients on hemodialysis

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    We report isoniazid (INH)-induced encephalopathy in two male patients on hemodialysis. One of them had tuberculous adenitis, and the other had pulmonary tuberculosis. Both were given rifampicin, INH, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol with pyridoxine 40 mg/day. Two patients developed disturbances in consciousness. After excluding other causes, INH-induced encephalopathy was suspected so the drug was stopped and dose of pyridoxine increased. Both patients retained their consciousness within 1 week a...

  17. A case of hypoxic encephalopathy with delayed exacerbation

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Takeshi Hayashi, Kimihiko HattoriDepartment of Neurology, Fuji Heavy Industries Health Insurance Corporation, Ota General Hospital, Ota, Gunma, JapanAbstract: Most patients contract hypoxic encephalopathy after suffering a cardiac arrest. They usually endure severe neurological sequelae and the temporal profile of the disease progression remains unclear. This case study shows how the effects of hypoxic encephalopathy continue to progress for several years after the initial event. Up to eight ...

  18. Higher Grades and Repeated Recurrence of Hepatic Encephalopathy May Be Related to High Serum Manganese Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobtan, Abdelrahman A; El-Kalla, Ferial S; Soliman, Hanan H; Zakaria, Soha S; Goda, Mohamed A

    2016-02-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a serious complication of liver failure. Until now, the precise pathophysiologic mechanisms are not fully determined. It has been demonstrated that manganese plays an important role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. Therefore, we studied manganese levels in serum of cirrhotic patients with hepatic encephalopathy in relation to grading and recurrence of hepatic encephalopathy. One hundred persons were enrolled in the study, 80 cirrhotic patients with or without encephalopathy and 20 healthy controls. Hepatic encephalopathy was diagnosed clinically and by laboratory findings. Serum manganese levels were measured in all participants. The grading of hepatic encephalopathy was significantly correlated to the severity of liver dysfunction. The mean serum manganese level was significantly higher in cirrhotic patients than in controls and in cirrhotic patients with encephalopathy than in those without encephalopathy. It was also significantly higher in patients with advanced grading of hepatic encephalopathy. Serum manganese level was positively correlated to number of recurrences of encephalopathy during a 6-month follow-up period. Serum manganese levels were able to predict recurrence of hepatic encephalopathy within 6 months following the episode. Serum manganese levels are positively correlated to the modified Child-Pugh score of cirrhosis as well as grading and number of recurrences of hepatic encephalopathy. Higher manganese levels seem to be related to worsening of the condition, and its measurement may be used as a predictor of repeated recurrences.

  19. Topiramate increases the risk of valproic acid-induced encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Young; Kim, Dong Wook; Chu, Kon; Lee, Soon-Tae; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Moon, Hye-Jin; Lee, Sang Kun

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic encephalopathy is a rare but serious complication of valproic acid (VPA) therapy that usually presents with impaired consciousness or increased seizure frequency. Although it has been suggested that topiramate (TPM) increases the risk of VPA-induced encephalopathy, the additional risk in patients receiving TPM therapy has not been evaluated. We reviewed all adult patients who took VPA between January 2005 and February 2009 at the Seoul National University Hospital and identified patients with VPA-induced encephalopathy based on clinical and electroencephalography (EEG) data. Information on sex, age, serum ammonia level, serum VPA level, liver function test, and EEG was collected from patient registry and medical data. We enrolled 8,372 patients who received VPA therapy and 1,236 patients who received VPA/TPM combination therapy. We identified 11 patients with VPA-induced encephalopathy (0.13%), 7 of whom received a combination therapy of VPA and TPM. The odds ratio of VPA-induced encephalopathy with TPM over that without TPM was 10.16. There were no significant differences in sex distribution, number of antiepileptic agents, ammonia level, VPA serum level, underlying diseases, dosage of VPA, duration of VPA treatment, treatment of encephalopathy, and outcomes between the two groups. Our study showed that the prevalence of VPA-induced encephalopathy is approximately 0.1% among patients treated with VPA and that the risk of this condition, although still low, can increase by approximately 10 times in the presence of TPM therapy. Based on these results, we suggest that TPM should be carefully used in patients receiving VPA treatment.

  20. Hashimoto's encephalopathy.%桥本脑病

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵伟秦

    2012-01-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) is a controversial neurological disorder that includes a group of heterogeneous neurological symptoms and the increased level of antithyroid antibodies. The clinical manifestations of HE may include encephalopathic features such as convulsion, behavioral and psychiatric abnormality, movement disorders and coma. Although HE has been believed to be correlated with Hashimoto's thyroiditis or thyroid dysfunction,the most common immuno-logical abnormality of HE is the presence of increased antibodies of antithyroglobulin or antimicrosomal. At present,it is still unclear as to whether the increased antithyroid antibodies is abiogenetic dysimmunity secondary to encephalopathy or it does cause the occurrence of disease. The effective reaction of HE to hormone or plasmapheresis also supported the hypothesis that this belonged to the immune pathogenic mechanism.%桥本脑病(HE)是一种目前尚存在争议的神经系统功能紊乱,包括患者出现的一组异质性的神经系统症状以及抗甲状腺抗体的水平增高.HE的临床表现可包括脑病的特点,如抽搐、精神行为异常、运动障碍和昏迷.尽管被认为与桥本甲状腺炎或甲状腺功能紊乱相关,HE最常见的免疫学异常是出现血清抗甲状腺球蛋白抗体(TG Ab)或抗甲状腺过氧化物酶(antimicrosomal)抗体(TMAb)的增高.目前尚不清楚抗甲状腺抗体的增高是继发于脑病的一种偶发免疫异常还是其确实导致了疾病的发生.HE对激素或者血浆置换等治疗的有效反应也支持这种属于免疫异常发病机制的推论.

  1. Branched-chain amino acids for hepatic encephalopathy. Protocol for Cochrane Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, C; Koretz, RL

    2000-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy may be caused by a decreased plasma ratio of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) to aromatic amino acids. Treatment with BCAA may therefore have a beneficial effect on patients with hepatic encephalopathy.......Hepatic encephalopathy may be caused by a decreased plasma ratio of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) to aromatic amino acids. Treatment with BCAA may therefore have a beneficial effect on patients with hepatic encephalopathy....

  2. Concise review of current concepts on nomenclature and pathophysiology of hepatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savlan, Ilona; Liakina, Valentina; Valantinas, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a neuropsychiatric complication of liver cirrhosis the symptoms of which may vary from imperceptible to severe, invaliding, and even lethal. Minimal hepatic encephalopathy is also important because of its tendency to impair patients' cognitive functions and quality of life. The polyetiological pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy is intensively studied. A general consensus exists that not only excess of ammonia but also inflammatory, oxidative, and other processes are significant in the development of hepatic encephalopathy.

  3. Hashimoto’s Encephalopathy Presenting with Acute Cognitive Dysfunction and Convulsion

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Woo-Hyuk; Na, Ju-Young; Kim, Meyung-Kug; Yoo, Bong-Goo

    2013-01-01

    Hashimoto’s encephalopathy is an immune-mediated disorder characterized by acute or subacute encephalopathy related to increased anti-thyroid antibodies. Clinical manifestations of Hashimoto’s encephalopathy may include stroke-like episodes, altered consciousness, psychosis, myoclonus, abnormal movements, seizures, and cognitive dysfunction. Acute cognitive dysfunction with convulsion as initial clinical manifestations of Hashimoto’s encephalopathy is very rare. We report a 65-year-old man wh...

  4. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy and other neurodegenerative proteinopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Carmela Tartaglia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE is described as a slowly progressive neurodegenerative disease believed to result from multiple concussions. Traditionally, concussions were considered benign events and although most people recover fully, about 10% develop a post-concussive syndrome with persisting neurological, cognitive and neuropsychiatric symptoms. CTE was once thought to be unique to boxers, but it has now been observed in many different athletes having suffered multiple concussions as well as in military personal after repeated blast injuries. Much remains unknown about the development of CTE but its pathological substrate is usually tau, similar to that seen in Alzheimer’s disease and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. The aim of this perspective is to compare and contrast clinical and pathological CTE with the other neurodegenerative proteinopathies and highlight that there is an urgent need for understanding the relationship between concussion and the development of CTE as it may provide a window into the development of a proteinopathy and thus new avenues for treatment.

  5. Hepatic encephalopathy therapy:An overview

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Oliviero; Riggio; Lorenzo; Ridola; Chiara; Pasquale

    2010-01-01

    Type-C hepatic encephalopathy(HE) is a severe complication of cirrhosis,which seriously affects quality of life and is strongly related to patient survival.Treatment based on a classical pharmacological approach that is aimed at reducing the production of gut-derived toxins,such as ammonia,is still under debate.Currently,results obtained from clinical trials do not support any specific treatment for HE and our competence in testing old and new treatment modalities by randomized controlled trials with appropriate clinically relevant end-points urgently needs to be improved.On the other hand,patients who are at risk for HE are now identifiable,based on studies on the natural history of the disease.Today,very few studies that are specifically aimed at establishing whether HE may be prevented are available or in progress.Recent studies have looked at non absorbable disaccharides or antibiotics and other treatment modalities,such as the modulation of intestinal flora.In the treatment of severe stage HE,artificial liver supports have been tested with initial positive results but more studies are needed.

  6. Pathogenesis of bovine spongiform encephalopathy in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Keulen, L J M; Vromans, M E W; Dolstra, C H; Bossers, A; van Zijderveld, F G

    2008-01-01

    The pathogenesis of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in sheep was studied by immunohistochemical detection of scrapie-associated prion protein (PrP(Sc)) in the gastrointestinal, lymphoid and neural tissues following oral inoculation with BSE brain homogenate. First accumulation of PrP(Sc) was detected after 6 months in the tonsil and the ileal Peyer's patches. At 9 months postinfection, PrP(Sc) accumulation involved all gut-associated lymphoid tissues and lymph nodes as well as the spleen. At this time point, PrP(Sc) accumulation in the peripheral neural tissues was first seen in the enteric nervous system of the caudal jejunum and ileum and in the coeliac-mesenteric ganglion. In the central nervous system, PrP(Sc) was first detected in the dorsal motor nucleus of the nervus Vagus in the medulla oblongata and in the intermediolateral column in the spinal cord segments T7-L1. At subsequent time points, PrP(Sc) was seen to spread within the lymphoid system to also involve all non-gut-associated lymphoid tissues. In the enteric nervous system, further spread of PrP(Sc) involved the neural plexi along the entire gastrointestinal tract and in the CNS the complete neuraxis. These findings indicate a spread of the BSE agent in sheep from the enteric nervous system through parasympathetic and sympathetic nerves to the medulla oblongata and the spinal cord.

  7. Pathogenetic aspects of alcoholic encephalopathy treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shchetinin S.G.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol is considered to be the most common exogenous toxins, causing encephalopathy. The defeat of almost all parts of the nervous system should be assigned to the special features of ethanol. Neurophysiological mechanisms of development of substance dependence are based in the stem and limbic structures of the brain that are involved in ensuring the regulation of emotional state, mood, motivation sphere, psychophysical tone of human behavior in general and its adaptation to the environment. Stress or disruption of the normal functioning of these structures can lead to the formation of abstinence syndrome, affective disorders in remission and craving for alcohol. Dopaminergic and opioid (endorphin system play an important role in the genesis of various mental and motor disorders. In some way alcohol dependence can be regarded as an endorfinodefitsitnoe disease with a pathogenetic point of view. Activating of opioidereal system by trans-cranial electrical stimulation promotes the restoration of disturbed emotional, cognitive and autonomic functions, reduces craving for alcohol and in that way increases the effectiveness of rehabilitation treatment

  8. Sporadic hemiplegic migraine presenting as acute encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmura, Kayo; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Saito, Yoshiaki; Wada, Takahito; Goto, Mikio; Seto, Shiro

    2012-09-01

    A 10-year-old boy with psychomotor developmental delay and cerebellar vermis atrophy developed right hemiplegia with vomiting, unconsciousness, convulsions, and late-onset fever. Slow delta activity was noted over the left hemisphere on electroencephalography, and neuroimaging revealed swelling of the left temporo-occipital cerebral cortex with restricted diffusivity, successive transient cortical atrophy, and hyperperfusion over the left cerebral hemisphere. Interleukin-6 was elevated in the cerebrospinal fluid. The acute symptoms resolved completely within 3 weeks after onset, but hypoperfusion persisted in the left posterior cortex thereafter. Another episode with transient left hemiplegia appeared 7 months later, followed by recurrence of migraine attacks. Analysis of the CACNA1A gene revealed a mutation of c.1997 C>T (p.T666M). None of his family members had migraine. This case represents an unusual evolution of sporadic hemiplegic migraine with manifestations of acute encephalopathy, for which the role of migraine-related inflammatory process is assumed. Copyright © 2011 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A critical review of chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, Grant L; Gardner, Andrew J; McCrory, Paul; Zafonte, Ross; Castellani, Rudy J

    2015-09-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) has been described in the literature as a neurodegenerative disease with: (i) localized neuronal and glial accumulations of phosphorylated tau (p-tau) involving perivascular areas of the cerebral cortex, sulcal depths, and with a preference for neurons within superficial cortical laminae; (ii) multifocal axonal varicosities and axonal loss involving deep cortex and subcortical white matter; (iii) relative absence of beta-amyloid deposits; (iv) TDP-43 immunoreactive inclusions and neurites; and (v) broad and diverse clinical features. Some of the pathological findings reported in the literature may be encountered with age and other neurodegenerative diseases. However, the focality of the p-tau cortical findings in particular, and the regional distribution, are believed to be unique to CTE. The described clinical features in recent cases are very similar to how depression manifests in middle-aged men and with frontotemporal dementia as the disease progresses. It has not been established that the described tau pathology, especially in small amounts, can cause complex changes in behavior such as depression, substance abuse, suicidality, personality changes, or cognitive impairment. Future studies will help determine the extent to which the neuropathology is causally related to the diverse clinical features. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Risk factors for sepsis-associated encephalopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Li; Ang Li; Yibing Weng; Shuwen Zhang; Meili Duan

    2011-01-01

    Sepsis-associated encephalopathy (SAE) is a diffuse and acute cerebral dysfunction caused by sepsis. Many sepsis patients exhibit acute deterioration in mental status during the early stage of disease, and central nervous system dysfunction has been shown to increase patient mortality. The present study selected 284 sepsis patients who were admitted to the Intensive Care Unit of Beijing Friendship Hospital, Capital Medical University, from January to December 2009. The patients were assigned to SAE and non-SAE patient groups according to SAE occurrence. SAE incidence was 37.68%, and mortality was significantly greater in SAE patients compared with non-SAE patients (41.12% vs. 17.51%, P < 0.01). Univariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated lower arterial partial pressure of oxygen and greater alanine aminotransferase and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II scores in the SAE group compared with the non-SAE group. Arterial partial pressure of oxygen, alanine aminotransferase, and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II scores were determined to be potential risk factors for SAE.

  11. Gluten encephalopathy with psychiatric onset: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costantini Chiara

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many cases of coeliac disease, a gastrointestinal autoimmune disorder caused by sensitivity to gluten, can remain in a subclinical stage or undiagnosed. In a significant proportion of cases (10–15% gluten intolerance can be associated with central or peripheral nervous system and psychiatric disorders. A 38-year-old man was admitted as to our department an inpatient for worsening anxiety symptoms and behavioural alterations. After the addition of second generation antipsychotic to the therapeutic regimen, the patient presented neuromotor impairment with high fever, sopor, leukocytosis, raised rhabdomyolysis-related indicators. Neuroleptic malignant syndrome was strongly suspected. After worsening of his neuropsychiatric conditions, with the onset of a frontal cognitive deficit, bradykinesia and difficulty walking, dysphagia, anorexia and hypoferraemic anaemia, SPET revealed a reduction of cerebral perfusion and ENeG results were compatible with a mainly motor polyneuropathy. Extensive laboratory investigations gave positive results for anti-gliadin antibodies, and an appropriate diet led to a progressive remission of the encephalopathy.

  12. Prognostic Assessment in Patients with Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita García-Martínez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic encephalopathy (HE is a common complication of liver failure that is associated with poor prognosis. However, the prognosis is not uniform and depends on the underlying liver disease. Acute liver failure is an uncommon cause of HE that carries bad prognosis but is potentially reversible. There are several prognostic systems that have been specifically developed for selecting patients for liver transplantation. In patients with cirrhosis the prognosis of the episode of HE is usually dictated by the underlying precipitating factor. Acute-on-chronic liver failure is the most severe form of decompensation of cirrhosis, the prognosis depends on the number of associated organ failures. Patients with cirrhosis that have experienced an episode of HE should be considered candidates for liver transplant. The selection depends on the underlying liver function assessed by the Model for End-stage Liver Disease (MELD index. There is a subgroup that exhibits low MELD and recurrent HE, usually due to the coexistence of large portosystemic shunts. The recurrence of HE is more common in patients that develop progressive deterioration of liver function and hyponatremia. The bouts of HE may cause sequels that have been shown to persist after liver transplant.

  13. Encephalopathy Associated With Autoimmune Thyroid Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    li A. Raouf

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATDs are immune-endocrine disorders affecting the thyroid gland and, eventually, also a number of other systemic targets, including the brain and the nervous system. Encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease (EAATD is a rare, heterogeneous condition arising from the background of an ATD. It is characterised by neurological and/or psychiatric symptoms with acute or sub-acute onset, and virtually any neurological or psychiatric symptom can appear. However, EAATD often presents with confusion, altered consciousness, seizures, or myoclonus. The majority of cases are associated with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, but a number of patients with Graves’ disease have also been described. EAATD is likely an immune-mediated disorder. Its exact prevalence has not been precisely elucidated, with an increasing number of cases reported in the last few years. Most EAATD patients respond in a dramatic manner to corticosteroids. However, the immunosuppressive treatment may require a long course (up to 12 months. The increasing number of EAATD cases reported in the literature demonstrates a growing interest of the scientific community about this condition, which still requires a better definition of its pathophysiology, the diagnostic criteria, and the most appropriate management, including the long-term follow-up of patients. The current clinical evidence about EAATD is mostly based on the report of single cases or small cohort studies. In this review, we present the current knowledge about EAATD, with a dedicated focus to the clinical management of the patients from a diagnostic and therapeutic perspective.

  14. Benign encephalopathy of pregnancy. Preliminary clinical observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poser, C M; Kassirer, M R; Peyser, J M

    1986-01-01

    A survey of 67 pregnancies in 51 professional women (physicians, psychologists, nurses, administrators, etc.) revealed the occurrence of symptoms of cognitive dysfunction such as forgetfulness, disorientation, confusion and reading difficulties in 28 pregnancies occurring in 21 women. These were unrelated to such factors as age of delivery, percentage weight gain, the baby's sex or birth weight, alcohol consumption, smoking, a history of migraine or allergy or other symptoms occurring during pregnancy such as sleepiness and lack of concentration, irritability, loss of interest in job or nightmares. Nor was there any correlation with hypertension, proteinuria, glycosuria, ketonuria, anemia, or morning sickness. Furthermore, these cognitive disturbances were not related to depression or sleep deprivation. Despite these symptoms, none of the women suffering from them were forced to interrupt their professional activities during pregnancy. The syndrome of benign encephalopathy of pregnancy should be recognized so that simple precautions can be taken to prevent any interference with professional or other activities. The etiology of the syndrome is unknown.

  15. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in a patient with lupus nephritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huseyin Kadikoy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES is characterized by acute onset of headache, nausea, focal neurological deficits or seizures along with radiological findings of white matter defects in the parietal and occipital lobes. Causes of PRES include uremia, hypertensive encephalopathy, eclampsia and immunosuppressive medications. Usually, the treat-ment of choice involves correcting the underlying abnormality. We describe an unusual case of recurrent PRES caused by uremia during a lupus flare in a patient with biopsy-proven Class IV Lupus Nephritis (LN with vasculitis. PRES in systemic lupus erythematosis (SLE is a rare clin-ical phenomenon and, when reported, it is associated with hypertensive encephalopathy. Our patient did not have hypertensive crisis, but had uremic encephalopathy. The patient′s PRES-related symptoms resolved after initiation of hemodialysis. The temporal correlation of the correc-tion of the uremia and the resolution of the symptoms of PRES show the etiology to be uremic encephalopathy, making this the first reported case of uremia-induced PRES in Class IV LN with vasculitis.

  16. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in a patient with lupus nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadikoy, Huseyin; Haque, Waqar; Hoang, Vu; Maliakkal, Joseph; Nisbet, John; Abdellatif, Abdul

    2012-05-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is characterized by acute onset of headache, nausea, focal neurological deficits or seizures along with radiological findings of white matter defects in the parietal and occipital lobes. Causes of PRES include uremia, hypertensive encephalopathy, eclampsia and immunosuppressive medications. Usually, the treatment of choice involves correcting the underlying abnormality. We describe an unusual case of recurrent PRES caused by uremia during a lupus flare in a patient with biopsy-proven Class IV Lupus Nephritis (LN) with vasculitis. PRES in systemic lupus erythematosis (SLE) is a rare clinical phenomenon and, when reported, it is associated with hypertensive encephalopathy. Our patient did not have hypertensive crisis, but had uremic encephalopathy. The patient's PRES-related symptoms resolved after initiation of hemodialysis. The temporal correlation of the correction of the uremia and the resolution of the symptoms of PRES show the etiology to be uremic encephalopathy, making this the first reported case of uremia-induced PRES in Class IV LN with vasculitis.

  17. Seeing more clearly through the fog of encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Peter W; Sutter, Raoul

    2013-10-01

    Patients with acute confusional states (often referred to as encephalopathy or delirium) pose diagnostic and management challenges for treating physicians. Encephalopathy is associated with a high morbidity and mortality rate, and the diagnosis rests on clinical grounds but may also be supported by the finding of electroencephalographic (EEG) evidence for diffuse cerebral dysfunction. The myriad cerebral transmitter and metabolic disruptions are generated by systemic organ system failures, principal among which are those of the liver, kidneys, lungs, heart, and endocrine system, along with the effects of exogenous toxins and medications. In most cases, several of these organ failures together contribute to the confusional state, frequently in the context of a diffuse cerebral atrophy that affects the aging brain. This special issue of the Journal of Clinical Neurophysiology is dedicated to exploring the electrophysiology of these conditions. It reviews the pathophysiology, psychiatric manifestations, clinical and imaging correlations of the many causes and types of encephalopathy. A literature review of the EEG abnormalities in the various types of encephalopathy provides an overview that ranges from paraneoplastic causes, through organ system failures, postcardiorespiratory arrest, to postoperative delirium. The issue is supplemented by tables of relevant clinical correlations, graphs, Venn diagrams, and the use of mathematical modeling used to explain how defects in the neuronal interplay might generate the EEG patterns seen in encephalopathy. We hope that this assembly will act as a springboard for further discussion and investigation into the EEG underpinnings, clinical correlations, diagnosis. and prognostication of these common and morbid disturbances of brain function.

  18. 77 FR 29914 - Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-21

    ... RIN 0579-AC68 Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products AGENCY... live bovines and products derived from bovines with regard to bovine spongiform encephalopathy. This... with regard to bovine spongiform encephalopathy. Comments on the proposed rule were required to......

  19. Apolipoprotein E epsilon 4 allele distribution in Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome with or without global intellectual deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramatsu, T; Kato, M; Matsui, T; Yoshimasu, H; Yoshino, A; Matsushita, S; Higuchi, S; Kashima, H

    1997-01-01

    Recent genetic studies show that the apolipoprotein E (ApoE) epsilon 4 allele is a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Whether this allele is associated with other dementing diseases is the next important question. The information could provide a clue to the pathogenetic role of ApoE. In the present study, patients with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS) of alcoholic etiology were divided into two groups according to the severity of intellectual deficits, i.e., those of "classical" Korsakoff patients with preserved intellectual function other than amnesia and those with global intellectual deficits. Genotyping showed that the frequency of ApoE epsilon 4 allele was significantly higher in the patients with global deficits, suggesting the involvement of this allele in the intellectual decline of WKS. In contrast, distributions of other two markers, alpha 1-antichymotrypsin and presenilin-1, did not differ between the two groups. These results added further support to the notion that the consequence of acute insult to the brain is influenced by the ApoE genotype, and suggested ApoE's role in the development of a certain group of "alcoholic dementia."

  20. Chronic alcoholics without Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome or cirrhosis do not lose serotonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, K G; Halliday, G M; Kril, J J; Harper, C G

    1996-02-01

    Despite the considerable evidence that alcoholics have perturbation of serotonergic function, there is little pathological evidence for alcohol directly affecting the nervous system. The present study aims to assess neuronal loss that occurs as a consequence of alcohol neurotoxicity in the serotonergic dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN). To that end, the brains of eight alcoholics and eight age-matched control cases were carefully screened to eliminate serious liver disease, the sequela of thiamine deficiency, Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS), and other pathological abnormalities. Brains were formalin-fixed for 2 weeks, cut, and then immunohistochemically stained using a monoclonal PH8 antibody specific for the rate-limiting enzyme of serotonin synthesis, tryptophan hydroxylase. The morphology of the serotonin-synthesizing neurons and their average size was similar in all cases. However, there was a reduction in the staining intensity of the reaction product in the DRN serotonergic neurons of most alcoholics. Neuronal counts on spaced serial sections revealed that there were an estimated average total of 106,100 +/- 19,500 serotonergic neurons in the DRN of alcoholics and 108,300 +/- 11,800 in the DRN of controls, indicating that in most alcoholics there is no reduction in the number of these neurons. Therefore, the effect of chronic alcohol consumption on the serotonergic system, in the absence of WKS or liver disease, seems to be functional rather than neuropathological.

  1. EPILEPTIC ENCEPHALOPATHY WITH CONTINUOUS SPIKES-WAVES ACTIVITY DURING SLEEP

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    E. D. Belousova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The author represents the review and discussion of current scientific literature devoted to epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spikes-waves activity during sleep — the special form of partly reversible age-dependent epileptic encephalopathy, characterized by triad of symptoms: continuous prolonged epileptiform (spike-wave activity on EEG in sleep, epileptic seizures and cognitive disorders. The author describes the aspects of classification, pathogenesis and etiology, prevalence, clinical picture and diagnostics of this disorder, including the peculiar anomalies on EEG. The especial attention is given to approaches to the treatment of epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spikeswaves activity during sleep. Efficacy of valproates, corticosteroid hormones and antiepileptic drugs of other groups is considered. The author represents own experience of treatment this disorder with corticosteroids, scheme of therapy and assessment of efficacy.

  2. [Minimal hepatic encephalopathy: characteristics, diagnosis and clinical implications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torre Delgadillo, Aldo; Guerrero-Hernández, Ignacio; Uribe, Misael

    2006-01-01

    The term minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) refers to the subtle changes in cognitive function, electrophysiological parameters, cerebral neurochemical/neurotransmitter homeostasis, cerebral blood flow, metabolism, and fluid homeostasis that can be observed in patients with cirrhosis who have no clinical evidence of hepatic encephalopathy; the prevalence is as high as 84% in patients with hepatic cirrhosis. This cirrhosis complication is generally not perceived by physician, and diagnosis can only be made by neuropsychological tests and other especial measurements like evoked potentials and image studies like positron emission tomography. Diagnosis of minimal hepatic encephalopathy may have prognostic and therapeutic implications in cirrhotic patients. The present review pretends to explore the clinic, therapeutic, diagnosis and prognostic aspects of this complication.

  3. Branched-chain amino acids for people with hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Lise Lotte; Dam, Gitte; Les, Iñigo

    2015-01-01

    -chain amino acids (BCAA) versus control interventions has evaluated if BCAA may benefit people with hepatic encephalopathy. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the beneficial and harmful effects of BCAA versus any control intervention for people with hepatic encephalopathy. SEARCH METHODS: We identified trials through...... randomised clinical trials including 827 participants with hepatic encephalopathy classed as overt (12 trials) or minimal (four trials). Eight trials assessed oral BCAA supplements and seven trials assessed intravenous BCAA. The control groups received placebo/no intervention (two trials), diets (10 trials...... between BCAA and controls (risk ratio (RR) 0.88, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.69 to 1.11; 760 participants; 15 trials; moderate quality of evidence). We found no evidence of small-study effects. Sensitivity analyses of trials with a low risk of bias found no beneficial or detrimental effect of BCAA...

  4. Hashimoto's encephalopathy presenting with neurocognitive symptoms: a case report

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    Cuadra-Urteaga Jose

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Hashimoto's encephalopathy is a neurological disorder of unknown cause associated with thyroid autoimmunity. The disease occurs primarily in the fifth decade of life and may present in two types - a sudden vasculitic type or a progressive subacute type associated to cognitive dysfunction, confusion and memory loss. Case presentation We report the case of a 62-year-old Hispanic woman, previously healthy, who developed a subacute onset of declining upper brain function. Serologic studies demonstrated high levels of antithyroid antibodies. Electroencephalographic and magnetic resonance image findings were consistent with Hashimoto's encephalopathy. Conclusion Hashimoto's encephalopathy is a diagnosis of exclusion. This unusual disorder is often under-recognized because of the multiple and protracted neurocognitive manifestations; therefore, it is important to be aware of the clinical manifestations to make a correct diagnosis.

  5. Colectomy for porto-systemic encephalopathy: is it still topical?

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    Rym Ennaifer

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic encephalopathy (HE is a common long term complication of porto-systemic shunt. We report herein the case of a 59-year-old man with Child-Pugh A cirrhosis treated successfully 9 years earlier with distal splenorenal shunt for uncontrolled variceal bleeding. In the last year, he developed a severe and persistent hepatic encephalopathy secondary to the shunt, which was resistant to medical therapy. As liver transplantation was not available and obliteration of the shunt was hazardous, we performed subtotal colectomy in order to reduce ammonia production. This therapeutic option proved successful, as the grade of encephalopathy decreased and the patient improved. Our experience indicates that colonic exclusion should be considered as an option in the management of HE refractory to medical treatment in highly selected patients when liver transplantation is not available or even as a bridge given the long waiting time on lists.

  6. Covert and Overt Hepatic Encephalopathy: Diagnosis and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patidar, Kavish R; Bajaj, Jasmohan S

    2015-11-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is part of a spectrum of neurocognitive changes in cirrhosis. HE is divided into 2 broad categories based on severity: covert hepatic encephalopathy (CHE) and overt hepatic encephalopathy (OHE). CHE has a significant impact on a patient's quality of life, driving performance, and recently has been associated with increased hospitalizations and death. Likewise, OHE is associated with increased rates of hospitalizations and mortality, and poor quality of life. Given its significant burden on patients, care takers, and the health care system, early diagnosis and management are imperative. In addition, focus also should be directed on patient and family member education on the disease progression and adherence to medications. Treatment strategies include the use of nonabsorbable disaccharides, antibiotics (ie, rifaximin), and, potentially, probiotics. Other therapies currently under further investigation include L-ornithine-L-aspartate, ornithine phenylacetate, glycerol phenylbutyrate, molecular adsorbent recirculating system, and albumin infusion.

  7. A case of hypoxic encephalopathy with delayed exacerbation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Hayashi

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Takeshi Hayashi, Kimihiko HattoriDepartment of Neurology, Fuji Heavy Industries Health Insurance Corporation, Ota General Hospital, Ota, Gunma, JapanAbstract: Most patients contract hypoxic encephalopathy after suffering a cardiac arrest. They usually endure severe neurological sequelae and the temporal profile of the disease progression remains unclear. This case study shows how the effects of hypoxic encephalopathy continue to progress for several years after the initial event. Up to eight years after the hypoxic insult, the patient’s intellect steadily deteriorated, and brain atrophy progressed. As the hypoxic insult on the brain is only transient, the neurological disability seems not to be exacerbated for years. However, our case indicates that this disorder may have a long progression.Keywords: dementia, encephalopathy, hypoxia, MRI

  8. Hashimoto's encephalopathy: four cases and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gul Mert, Gülen; Horoz, Ozden Ozgur; Herguner, M Ozlem; Incecik, Faruk; Yildizdas, R Dincer; Onenli Mungan, Neslihan; Yuksel, Bilgin; Altunbasak, Sakir

    2014-04-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy is a rare clinically heterogenous condition consisting of encephalopathy, seizures and variable neurological and psychiatric manifestations, accompanied by high titres of serum antithyroid antibodies. We described the clinical and laboratory findings of four children (aged 8-17 years) with Hashimoto's encephalopathy. The clinical features of three patients at presentation included refractory epilepsy, and confusion, and one patient presented with behavioral and cognitive changes. During their presentation, two of them were in euthyroid, and the others were in hypothyroid status. All patients manifested increased antithyroid antibodies. Two patients improved with steroid treatment. The others responded to plasmapheresis instead of corticosteroid treatment. Physicians' awareness of this complication is of great importance because most patients respond dramatically to the treatment.

  9. Wernicke’s Encephalopathy Complicating Hyperemesis during Pregnancy

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    Mohamed Adnane Berdai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Wernicke’s encephalopathy is caused by severe thiamine deficiency; it is mostly observed in alcoholic patients. We report the case of a 28-year-old woman, at 17 weeks of gestational age, with severe hyperemesis gravidarum. She presented with disturbance of consciousness, nystagmus, ophthalmoplegia, and ataxia. The resonance magnetic imagery showed bilaterally symmetrical hyperintensities of thalamus and periaqueductal area. The case was managed with very large doses of thiamine. The diagnosis of Wernicke’s encephalopathy was confirmed later by a low thiamine serum level. The patient was discharged home on day 46 with mild ataxia and persistent nystagmus. Wernicke’s encephalopathy is a rare complication of hyperemesis gravidarum. It should be diagnosed as early as possible to prevent long-term neurological sequela or death. Thiamine supplementation in pregnant women with prolonged vomiting should be initiated, especially before parenteral dextrose infusion. Early thiamine replacement will reduce maternal morbidity and fetal loss rate.

  10. Measles-associated encephalopathy in children with renal transplants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, A; Jeyaratnam, D; Haworth, F; Sinha, M D; Hughes, E; Cohen, B; Jin, L; Kidd, I M; Rigden, S P A; MacMahon, E

    2006-06-01

    Two children, boys of 8 and 13 years, presented with measles-associated encephalopathy several years after kidney transplantation for congenital nephrotic syndrome. In the absence of prior clinical measles, the neurological symptoms initially eluded diagnosis, but retrospective analysis of stored samples facilitated the diagnosis of measles-associated encephalopathy without recourse to biopsy of deep cerebral lesions. Each had received a single dose of measles mumps and rubella vaccine before 12 months of age. Prior vaccination, reduction of immunosuppression and treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin and ribavirin may have contributed to their survival. Persistent measles virus RNA shedding, present in one child, was not controlled by treatment with i.v. ribavirin. Two years later, both patients continue to have functioning allografts with only minimal immunosuppression. These cases illustrate the difficulty in diagnosing measles-associated encephalopathy in the immunocompromised host, even in the era of molecular diagnostics, and highlight the renewed threat of neurological disease in communities with incomplete herd immunity.

  11. Hepatic Encephalopathy: Early Diagnosis in Pediatric Patients With Cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naghi DARA*

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Dara N, Sayyari AA, Imanzadeh F. Hepatic Encephalopathy: Early Diagnosis in Pediatric Patients With Cirrhosis. Iran J Child Neurol. 2014 Winter; 8(1:1-11.ObjectiveAs acute liver failure (ALF and chronic liver disease (cirrhosis continue to increase in prevalence, we will see more cases of hepatic encephalopathy.Primary care physician are often the first to suspect it, since they are familiar with the patient’s usual physical and mental status. This serious complication typically occurs in patients with severe comorbidities and needs multidisciplinary evaluation and care. Hepatic encephalopathy should be considered in any patient with acute liver failure and cirrhosis who presents with neuropsychiatric manifestations, decrease level of consciousness (coma, change of personality, intellectualand behavioral deterioration, speech and motor dysfunction.Every cirrhotic patient may be at risk; potential precipitating factors should be addressed in regular clinic visits. The encephalopathy of liver disease may be prominent, or can be present in subtle forms, such as decline of school performance, emotional outbursts, or depression.“Subtle form” of hepatic encephalopathy may not be obvious on clinical examination, but can be detected by neurophysiologic and neuropsychiatric testing.References:Ferenci P, Lockwood A, Mullen K, Tarter R, Weissenborn K, Blei AT. Hepatic encephalopathy definition, nomenclature, diagnosis, and quantification: final report of the working party at the 11th World Congresses of Gastroenterology, Vienna, 1998.Hepatology 2002;35:716-21.BleiAT,Cordoba J. Hepatic encephalopathy. AmJ Gastroenterol 2001;96:1968–76.Vaquero J,Chung C, Cahill ME, BleiAT. Pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy in acute liver failure. Semin Liver Dis 2003;23:259-69.Bajaj JS, Wade JB, Sanyal AJ. Spectrum of neurocognitive impairment in cirrhosis: Implications for the assessment of hepatic encephalopathy

  12. Molecular chaperones and hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

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    Cong Hua

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE is a disease that occurs when the brain is subjected to hypoxia, resulting in neuronal death and neurological deficits, with a poor prognosis. The mechanisms underlying hypoxic-ischemic brain injury include excitatory amino acid release, cellular proteolysis, reactive oxygen species generation, nitric oxide synthesis, and inflammation. The molecular and cellular changes in HIE include protein misfolding, aggregation, and destruction of organelles. The apoptotic pathways activated by ischemia and hypoxia include the mitochondrial pathway, the extrinsic Fas receptor pathway, and the endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced pathway. Numerous treatments for hypoxic-ischemic brain injury caused by HIE have been developed over the last half century. Hypothermia, xenon gas treatment, the use of melatonin and erythropoietin, and hypoxic-ischemic preconditioning have proven effective in HIE patients. Molecular chaperones are proteins ubiquitously present in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. A large number of molecular chaperones are induced after brain ischemia and hypoxia, among which the heat shock proteins are the most important. Heat shock proteins not only maintain protein homeostasis; they also exert anti-apoptotic effects. Heat shock proteins maintain protein homeostasis by helping to transport proteins to their target destinations, assisting in the proper folding of newly synthesized polypeptides, regulating the degradation of misfolded proteins, inhibiting the aggregation of proteins, and by controlling the refolding of misfolded proteins. In addition, heat shock proteins exert anti-apoptotic effects by interacting with various signaling pathways to block the activation of downstream effectors in numerous apoptotic pathways, including the intrinsic pathway, the endoplasmic reticulum-stress mediated pathway and the extrinsic Fas receptor pathway. Molecular chaperones play a key role in neuroprotection in HIE. In

  13. Hepatic encephalopathy in dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidbury, Jonathan A; Cook, Audrey K; Steiner, Jörg M

    2016-07-01

    To comparatively review the pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) in dogs and cats. The Medline database was searched for articles related to HE in people, dogs, and cats. Articles published within the last 5 years were given special importance. The pathogenesis of HE is complex and incompletely understood, but ammonia appears to play a central role. Hyperammonemia leads to accumulation of glutamine in astrocytes, with subsequent astrocyte swelling and neurological dysfunction. The development of HE in patients with hepatic cirrhosis is a poor prognostic indicator. The fermentable disaccharide lactulose and the antimicrobial rifaximin are US Food and Drug Administration approved treatments for human HE. Severe protein restriction is no longer recommended for patients with this condition. HE is often associated with portosystemic shunting in dogs and cats. Ammonia plays a central role in the pathogenesis of HE in dogs and cats, but other factors such as manganese and endogenous benzodiazepines may also contribute. Recently, a soy protein-based diet was found to be beneficial in treating canine HE. Severe dietary protein restriction is likely to be detrimental in affected animals. There have been no clinical trials of drugs routinely used in the management HE in veterinary medicine, but lactulose and antimicrobials such as metronidazole are well-established treatments. HE is a potentially life-threatening condition that is probably underdiagnosed in companion animals. Although various treatment recommendations have been proposed, there is a lack of evidence in the veterinary literature regarding optimal strategies for the management of this condition. As our understanding of the pathogenesis of HE in dogs and cats evolves, novel diagnostic tests and therapeutic agents may become available. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2016.

  14. Hepatic Encephalopathy: Early Diagnosis in Pediatric Patients With Cirrhosis

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    How to Cite This Article: Dara N, Sayyari AA, Imanzadeh F. Hepatic Encephalopathy: Early Diagnosis in Pediatric Patients With Cirrhosis. Iran J Child Neurol. 2014 Winter; 8(1):1-11.ObjectiveAs acute liver failure (ALF) and chronic liver disease (cirrhosis) continue to increase in prevalence, we will see more cases of hepatic encephalopathy.Primary care physician are often the first to suspect it, since they are familiar with the patient’s usual physical and mental status. This serious complic...

  15. Fatal rhinocerebral mucormycosis under the shade of hepatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ataseven, Hilmi; Yüksel, Ilhami; Gültuna, Selcan; Köklü, Seyfettin; Uysal, Serkan; Basar, Omer; Sasmaz, Nurgül

    2010-01-01

    Mucormycosis is an acutely fatal infection that occurs in immuncompromised patients. Cirrhosis is an acquired immune deficiency state and those patients are more prone to develop opportunistic infections. A 42-years-old cirrhotic man was admitted to our gastroenterology clinic with hepatic encephalopathy. Although he recovered from encephalopathy with supportive measurements, he developed paresthesia on the face. He was diagnosed with rhinocerebral mucormycosis and antifungal therapy was administered. Surgical treatment couldn.t be performed because of his bleeding diathesis and poor general condition. He succumbed on the 12th day of his admission.

  16. [Fever-induced refractory epileptic encephalopathy of children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivkova, S N; Bogdanov, E I; Zaĭkova, F M; Morozova, E A; Aiupova, V A; Zabbarova, A T; Shaĭmardanova, R M

    2013-01-01

    Fever-induced refractory epileptic encephalopathy of school-age children is a rare epileptic syndrome that causes difficulties in diagnosis at the initial stage of disease. It is characterized by sudden onset with multifocal refractory status epilepticus in previously healthy children with normal development. Later, children suffer from resistant focal epilepsy in the combination with cognitive deficit and behavioral difficulties. Authors describe a clinical case of fever-induced refractory epileptic encephalopathy of school-age children in a child of 7 years old. Aspects of etiology, pathogenesis, clinical manifestation, differential diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of the disease are discussed.

  17. Acute necrotizing encephalopathy of childhood: a Turkish case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olcay Unver

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute necrotizing encephalopathy of childhood (ANEC is a rare form of acute encephalopathy of unknown etiology characterized by typical symmetrical lesions in the thalami, with variable involvement of the white matter, brainstem and cerebellum. Clinically there is a rapid neurologic deterioration after a short period of a nonspecific viral-like illness associated with gastrointestinal or respiratory signs. Asian children are especially affected. Here we present a 3-year-old boy admitted to our hospital with fever and deterioration of consciousness. The diagnosis of ANEC was made by radiologic findings [Cukurova Med J 2014; 39(3.000: 641-645

  18. Risk factors and outcome of Shigella encephalopathy in Bangladeshi children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzana Afroze

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Although, Shigella encephalopathy, a serious extra-intestinal complication of shigellosis, significantly increases the risks of death, data are very limited on predicting factors particularly related to electrolyte profiles in children below five years of age with Shigella encephalopathy. Our objective was to determine the clinical as well as laboratory predicting factors and outcome of children with Shigella encephalopathy.In this unmatched case-control design, children aged 2-59 months having a positive stool culture for Shigella and who had their serum electrolytes been done from July 2012 to June 2015 were studied. Children with Shigella encephalopathy, defined as having abnormal mentation, constituted the cases, and those without encephalopathy constituted the controls. During the study period, we identified a total of 541 children less than five years of age, who had Shigella in their stool culture. Only 139 children fulfilled the study criteria and among them 69 were cases and 70 were controls. The cases more often had fatal outcome compared to the controls (7% vs. 0%, P = 0.02. In logistic regression analysis, the cases were independently associated with shorter duration (1.2 ± 0.4 days of diarrhea prior to admission, dehydrating diarrhea, sepsis and hyponatremia (p<0.05 for all. Among 139 Shigella isolates, S. flexneri (88/139, 63% and S. sonnei(34/139, 24% were the dominant species. S. dysenteriae was not isolated throughout the study period. S.sonnei was more frequently isolated from the cases (24/69, 35% than the controls (10/70, 14%, whereas the isolation of S. flexneri was comparable between the groups (40/69, 58% vs 48/70, 69%. A total of 94 (67.6% isolates were resistant to trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole, 84 (60.4% to ciprofloxacin, 66/138 (48% to ampicillin, 5 (3.5% to ceftriaxone, 17 (12.2% to mecillinum and 35 (25% to azithromycin.The case-fatality-rate was significantly higher among the children with Shigella encephalopathy

  19. Hyperammonemic Encephalopathy due to Valproic Acid and Topiramate Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer D. Twilla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Valproic acid-induced hyperammonemic encephalopathy is a rare yet serious adverse drug reaction. Medication interactions such a valproic acid and topiramate can precipitate an event. We present the case of a 52-year-old female that presented with acute mental status change and hypersomnolence due to hyperammonemia caused by a valproic acid derivative. The patient improved after withdrawal of the offending medications and treatment with lactulose. Clinicians should remain hypervigilant in monitoring for valproic acid-induced hyperammonemic encephalopathy and risk factors such as polypharmacy.

  20. Evaluation and Management of Hepatic Encephalopathy: Current Status and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suraweera, Duminda; Sundaram, Vinay; Saab, Sammy

    2016-07-15

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a spectrum of neurocognitive manifestations often seen in patients with liver injury or rarely in patients with portosystemic shunting without liver injury. It can be divided into minimal (covert) hepatic encephalopathy and overt hepatic encephalopathy, depending on the severity. Patients with hepatic encephalopathy have compromised clinical outcomes, decreased quality of life, and increased healthcare utilization, often resulting in a heavy financial and personal burden on caregivers. The diagnosis remains largely clinical, with the exclusion of possible other causes for the altered mental status. Current treatment strategies include nonabsorbable disaccharides and antibiotics. This review will focus on the diagnosis, management and clinical impact of hepatic encephalopathy.

  1. Should We Treat Minimal/Covert Hepatic Encephalopathy, and with What?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Phillip K; Herrera, Jorge L

    2015-08-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy exists along a continuum from abnormal neuropsychiatric testing in the absence of clinical findings to varying degrees of detectable clinical findings. The International Society for Hepatic Encephalopathy and Nitrogen Metabolism has endorsed the term "covert" to encompass minimal hepatic encephalopathy and grade I overt hepatic encephalopathy. Covert hepatic encephalopathy has been associated with poor quality of life, decreased employment, increased falls, and increased traffic accidents that significantly impact quality of life and health care expenditures. Probiotics, nonabsorbable dissacharides, rifaximin, and l-ornithine-l-aspartate have been evaluated with varying levels of success. Because of the lack of universally accepted diagnostic tools, optimal timing of testing and treatment remains controversial.

  2. Septic Encephalopathy Characterized by Acute Encephalopathy with Biphasic Seizures and Late Reduced Diffusion and Early Nonconvulsive Status Epilepticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Yamaguchi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection, whether viral or bacterial, can result in various forms of brain dysfunction (encephalopathy. Septic encephalopathy (SE is caused by an excessive immune reaction to infection, with clinical features including disturbed consciousness and seizures. Acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion (AESD is usually accompanied by viral infection in children and is characterized by biphasic seizures and impaired consciousness. The initial neurologic symptom of AESD is typically a febrile seizure that frequently lasts longer than 30 minutes. However, the possible forms this seizure takes are unclear. For example, it is unknown if nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE could be an early seizure symptomatic of AESD. In addition, thus far no cases of combined SE and AESD have been reported. Here, we describe the first reported case of SE with AESD that notably demonstrated NCSE as an early seizure.

  3. Acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy with features on diffusion-weighted images: Report of two cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ja Young; Yu, In Kyu [Dept. of Radiology, Eulji University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy is a rare toxic encephalopathy caused by accumulated plasma ammonia. A few literatures are reported about MRI findings of acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy. It is different from the well-known chronic hepatic encephalopathy. The clinical symptom and MRI findings of acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy can be reversible with proper treatment. Acute hepatic encephalopathy involves the cingulate cortex, diffuse cerebral cortices, insula, bilateral thalami on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery. Acute hepatic encephalopathy might mimic hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy because of their similar predominant involving sites. We experienced 2 cases of acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy consecutively. They showed restricted diffusion at the cingulate cortex, cerebral cortices, insula, and bilateral dorsomedial thalami on DWI. One patient underwent acute fulminant hepatitis A, the other patient with underlying chronic liver disease had acute liver failure due to hepatotoxicity of tuberculosis medication. In this report, we presented the characteristic features of DWI in acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy. In addition, we reviewed articles on MRI findings of acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy.

  4. Antecedents of neonatal encephalopathy in the Vermont Oxford Network Encephalopathy Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Karin B; Bingham, Peter; Edwards, Erika M; Horbar, Jeffrey D; Kenny, Michael J; Inder, Terrie; Pfister, Robert H; Raju, Tonse; Soll, Roger F

    2012-11-01

    Neonatal encephalopathy (NE) is a major predictor of death and long-term neurologic disability, but there are few studies of antecedents of NE. To identify antecedents in a large registry of infants who had NE. This was a maternal and infant record review of 4165 singleton neonates, gestational age of ≥ 36 weeks, meeting criteria for inclusion in the Vermont Oxford Network Neonatal Encephalopathy Registry. Clinically recognized seizures were the most prevalent condition (60%); 49% had a 5-minute Apgar score of ≤ 3 and 18% had a reduced level of consciousness. An abnormal maternal or fetal condition predated labor in 46%; maternal hypertension (16%) or small for gestational age (16%) were the most frequent risk factors. In 8%, birth defects were identified. The most prevalent birth complication was elevated maternal temperature in labor of ≥ 37.5 °C in 27% of mothers with documented temperatures compared with 2% to 3.2% in controls in population-based studies. Clinical chorioamnionitis, prolonged membrane rupture, and maternal hypothyroidism exceeded rates in published controls. Acute asphyxial indicators were reported in 15% (in 35% if fetal bradycardia included) and inflammatory indicators in 24%. Almost one-half had neither asphyxial nor inflammatory indicators. Although most infants with NE were observably ill since the first minutes of life, only 54% of placentas were submitted for examination. Clinically recognized asphyxial birth events, indicators of intrauterine exposure to inflammation, fetal growth restriction, and birth defects were each observed in term infants with NE, but much of NE in this large registry remained unexplained.

  5. Protein restriction in hepatic encephalopathy is appropriate for selected patients: a point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Douglas L; Morgan, Timothy

    2014-09-01

    Since the late nineteenth century, protein restriction has been shown to improve hepatic encephalopathy. However, malnutrition has been described in up to 60 % of cirrhotic patients and is associated with increased mortality. Furthermore, emerging clinical evidence has revealed that a large proportion of cirrhotic patients may tolerate normal protein intake. However, approximately one third of cirrhotic patients with hepatic encephalopathy may need a short course of protein restriction, in addition to maximum medical therapy, to ameliorate the clinical course of their hepatic encephalopathy. For patients with chronic hepatic encephalopathy who are protein-sensitive, modifying their sources of nitrogen by using more vegetable protein, less animal protein, and branched-chain amino acids may improve their encephalopathy without further loss of lean body mass. In conclusion, among cirrhotics with hepatic encephalopathy, modulation of normal protein intake must take into account the patient's hepatic reserve, severity of hepatic encephalopathy, and current nutritional status.

  6. Putative uremic encephalopathy in horses: five cases (1978-1998).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, M A; Johnson, J S; Traub-Dargatz, J L; Savage, C J; Fettman, M J; Gould, D H

    2001-02-15

    To determine historical, physical examination, clinicopathologic, and postmortem findings in horses with putative uremic encephalopathy. Design-Retrospective study. Animals-5 horses with renal failure and neurologic disease not attributable to abnormalities in any other organ system. Medical records from 1978 to 1998 were examined for horses with renal disease and neurologic signs not attributable to primary neurologic, hepatic, or other diseases. Signalment, history, physical examination findings, clinicopathologic data, renal ultrasonographic findings, and postmortem data were reviewed. Of 332 horses with renal disease, 5 met selection criteria. Historical findings, physical examination findings, clinicopathologic data, ultrasonographic data, and postmortem findings were consistent with chronic renal failure. Swollen astrocytes were detected in all 4 horses examined at necropsy. A single criterion was not determined to be pathognomonic for uremic encephalopathy in horses. Uremic encephalopathy should be considered as a differential diagnosis in horses with evidence of chronic renal failure and encephalopathic neurologic sign not attributable to other causes. Astrocyte swelling, which was common to all 4 horses examined at necropsy, may serve as a microscopic indicator of uremic encephalopathy in horses.

  7. Clinical analysis of 22 cases with Hashimoto's encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-yan GE

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the clinical presentations of Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE, so as to improve the diagnosis and treatment of this disease. Methods A retrospective analysis was performed on clinical features, laboratory findings, imaging profiles, treatment and outcomes of 22 patients with HE who were admitted to our hospital between June 2010 and September 2013.  Results Clinical symptoms were mainly acute or subacute cognitive impairment (9 cases, psychiatric symptoms (6 cases, seizures (5 cases, ataxia (5 cases, stroke-like episodes (6 cases, tremor (1 case, myoclonus (2 cases and disturbance of consciousness (3 cases. Marked increase was found in serum anti-thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO antibody level (19 cases and anti-thyroglobulin (anti-TG antibody level (20 cases. Twenty-one cases were treated with glucocorticoids, and one patient was treated only with general neurotrophic therapy, such as ganglioside. Except for 4 cases showed bad response to steroids, the rest patients had an obvious improvement. Conclusions Hashimoto's encephalopathy is an encephalopathy with the presence of elevated antithyroid antibodies, and most patients showed good response to steroids. So early diagnosis and treatment is particularly important for improving prognosis. This disease should be considered as an important differential diagnosis for encephalopathy of unknown etiology, and screening for serum antithyroid antibodies should be performed as initial screening test. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.07.008

  8. Laboratory examinations of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies in Denmark during 2016

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tim Kåre

    The aim of this report is to give detailed information on the diagnostic examination on trans-missible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) performed in Denmark during 2016. The present annual report is the 21st on this topic published by the National Veterinary Institute, Technical University...

  9. Neuropsychiatric Manifestation of Hashimoto's Encephalopathy in an Adolescent and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransing, Ramdas Sarjerao; Mishra, Kshirod Kumar; Sarkar, Dipayan

    2016-01-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy is usually underdiagnosed and untreated because of complex neuropsychiatric manifestation. We report a case of an adolescent female with Hashimoto's encephalopathy who responded well to a combination of aspirin and levothyroxine. A 16-year-old girl presented at psychiatric emergency services with a depressive episode, menstrual irregularities, and a 5-month past history of thyroid swelling. On clinical examination, she was in a euthyroid state with insignificant neurological history. However, her previous investigation revealed a hypothyroid state. Her magnetic resonance imaging findings demonstrated infarcts in the bilateral gangliocapsular region and left frontal periventricular deep white matter lesion. Ultrasonography of the thyroid and fine needle aspiration cytology confirmed lymphocytic thyroiditis. Anti-thyroid peroxidase (289 IU/ml) antibody titer was elevated (289 IU/mL). Her depressive symptoms responded well to antidepressants, mood stabilizers, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and levothyroxine. She remained in the euthyroid state and then in the euthymic state for 3 years. Hashimoto's encephalopathy is steroid-responsive encephalopathy. Most researchers have observed a dramatic response to steroids with or without levothyroxine. A clinician may consider aspirin as an alternative to a steroid in long-term management to avoid steroid-related side effects and contraindications.

  10. Antithyroperoxidase Antibodies in Encephalopathy : Diagnostic Marker or Incidental Finding?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dontje, B.; Van Santen, H. M.; Niermeijer, J. M.; Schonenberg-Meinema, D.; Van Trotsenburg, A. S P

    2016-01-01

    Patients with acute encephalopathy who are thoroughly examined for an underlying diagnosis and in whom infectious, metabolic, and malignant causes are excluded can form a true diagnostic dilemma. If antithyroperoxidase antibodies (anti-TPO abs) are present, the diagnosis steroid responsive encephalo

  11. A quantitative risk assessment for bovine spongiform encephalopathy in Japan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kadohira, M.; Stevenson, M.A.; Hogasen, H.R.; Koeijer, de A.A.

    2012-01-01

    A predictive case-cohort model was applied to Japanese data to analyze the interaction between challenge and stability factors for bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) for the period 1985–2020. BSE risk in cattle was estimated as the expected number of detectable cases per year. The model was comp

  12. Bovine spongiform encephalopathy in Sweden: an H-type variant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) had never been detected in Sweden until 2006, when the active surveillance identified a case in a 12-year-old cow. The case was an unusual form since several molecular features of the protease-resistant prion protein (PrP**res) were different from classical BSE...

  13. Laboratory Examinations of Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies in Denmark during 2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tim Kåre

    , Chapter 2.4.6 and Chapter 2.7.13) regarding diagnostic examinations. The DTU-VET is the national reference laboratory of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and TSE/Scrapie, and therefore the results of all neuropathological examinations on BSE and Scrapie in Denmark are given in the present report...

  14. Laboratory Examinations of Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies in Denmark during 2012

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tim Kåre

    , Chapter 2.4.6 and Chapter 2.7.13) regarding diagnostic examinations. The DTU-VET is the national reference laboratory of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and TSE/Scrapie, and therefore the results of all neuropathological examinations on BSE and Scrapie in Denmark are given in the present report...

  15. Laboratory Examinations of Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies in Denmark during 2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tim Kåre

    , Chapter 2.4.6 and Chapter 2.7.13) regarding diagnostic examinations. The DTU-VET is the national reference laboratory of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and TSE/Scrapie, and therefore the results of all neuropathological examinations on BSE and Scrapie in Denmark are given in the present report...

  16. Neuropsychiatric manifestation of Hashimoto's encephalopathy in an adolescent and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramdas Sarjerao Ransing

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hashimoto's encephalopathy is usually underdiagnosed and untreated because of complex neuropsychiatric manifestation. We report a case of an adolescent female with Hashimoto's encephalopathy who responded well to a combination of aspirin and levothyroxine. A 16-year-old girl presented at psychiatric emergency services with a depressive episode, menstrual irregularities, and a 5-month past history of thyroid swelling. On clinical examination, she was in a euthyroid state with insignificant neurological history. However, her previous investigation revealed a hypothyroid state. Her magnetic resonance imaging findings demonstrated infarcts in the bilateral gangliocapsular region and left frontal periventricular deep white matter lesion. Ultrasonography of the thyroid and fine needle aspiration cytology confirmed lymphocytic thyroiditis. Anti-thyroid peroxidase (289 IU/ml antibody titer was elevated (289 IU/mL. Her depressive symptoms responded well to antidepressants, mood stabilizers, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and levothyroxine. She remained in the euthyroid state and then in the euthymic state for 3 years. Hashimoto's encephalopathy is steroid-responsive encephalopathy. Most researchers have observed a dramatic response to steroids with or without levothyroxine. A clinician may consider aspirin as an alternative to a steroid in long-term management to avoid steroid-related side effects and contraindications.

  17. Hyperammonemic encephalopathy due to suture line breakdown after bladder operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boogerd, W; Zoetmulder, F A; Moffie, D

    1990-01-01

    A patient is described with a severe encephalopathy and hyperammonemia in absence of liver dysfunction, attributed to urine absorption into the systemic circulation due to suture line breakdown after bladder dome resection. At autopsy characteristic Alzheimer type II astrocytes were found in the basal ganglia.

  18. The role of astrocytes in the development of hepatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, M; Yamamoto, T; Gemba, H

    1999-09-01

    Thioacetamide (TAA), a hepatotoxin used to ascertain the role of astrocytes in hepatic encephalopathy, was administered to prepare four experimental groups of rats. (The TAA1D, TAA1.5D, TAA2D, and TAA2.5D group rats were perfusion fixated with formalin at 1, 1.5, 2, and 2.5 days, respectively, after initial administration of TAA. In addition, TAA was readministered to the TAA2D and TAA2.5D rats 24 h after the first dose.) Abnormalities of higher brain function and equilibrium that progressed with time were apparent in the rats receiving TAA. On the other hand, innate reflexes (e.g. pupillary reflex) were similar to those in the normal control group. Astrocyte cell areas in the hippocampus, neocortex, hypothalamus, cerebellum, and basal ganglia (striatum) from the TAA rats were significantly larger than in corresponding sites from the normal rats (maximum in TAA1D and TAA1.5D groups). However, there were no differences with respect to the midbrain. Any morphological difference was not observed in neurons between the hepatic encephalopathy and normal rats. Administration of TAA caused hepatic tissue injury that progressed over time. Surprisingly, encephalopathy was apparent even when hepatic injury was mild. These findings suggest that abnormalities in astrocytes, which precede any abnormal change in neurons, play a role in the development of hepatic encephalopathy.

  19. Subclinical hepatic encephalopathy: diagnosis, clinical implications, and intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C. Guero Guillen

    1997-01-01

    textabstractHepatic encephalopathy (HE) is traditionally graded into four clinical stages of severity, ranging from lethargy, sleep and memory disturbances (grade 1) to coma (grade 4). In addition to the clinical grading of HE, a subclinical stage has been described. In subclinical hepatic encephalo

  20. STXBP1 encephalopathy: A neurodevelopmental disorder including epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stamberger, H.; Nikanorova, M.; Willemsen, M.H.; Accorsi, P.; Angriman, M.; Baier, H.; Benkel-Herrenbrueck, I.; Benoit, V.; Budetta, M.; Caliebe, A.; Cantalupo, G.; Capovilla, G.; Casara, G.; Courage, C.; Deprez, M.; Destree, A.; Dilena, R.; Erasmus, C.E.; Fannemel, M.; Fjaer, R.; Giordano, L.; Helbig, K.L.; Heyne, H.O.; Klepper, J.; Kluger, G.J.; Lederer, D.; Lodi, M.; Maier, O.; Merkenschlager, A.; Michelberger, N.; Minetti, C.; Muhle, H.; Phalin, J.; Ramsey, K.; Romeo, A.; Schallner, J.; Schanze, I.; Shinawi, M.; Sleegers, K.; Sterbova, K.; Syrbe, S.; Traverso, M.; Tzschach, A.; Uldall, P.; Coster, R. van; Verhelst, H.; Viri, M.; Winter, S.; Wolff, M.; Zenker, M.; Zoccante, L.; Jonghe, P. De; Helbig, I.; Striano, P.; Lemke, J.R.; Moller, R.S.; Weckhuysen, S.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To give a comprehensive overview of the phenotypic and genetic spectrum of STXBP1 encephalopathy (STXBP1-E) by systematically reviewing newly diagnosed and previously reported patients. METHODS: We recruited newly diagnosed patients with STXBP1 mutations through an international network o

  1. Neuropsychiatric Manifestation of Hashimoto's Encephalopathy in an Adolescent and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransing, Ramdas Sarjerao; Mishra, Kshirod Kumar; Sarkar, Dipayan

    2016-01-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy is usually underdiagnosed and untreated because of complex neuropsychiatric manifestation. We report a case of an adolescent female with Hashimoto's encephalopathy who responded well to a combination of aspirin and levothyroxine. A 16-year-old girl presented at psychiatric emergency services with a depressive episode, menstrual irregularities, and a 5-month past history of thyroid swelling. On clinical examination, she was in a euthyroid state with insignificant neurological history. However, her previous investigation revealed a hypothyroid state. Her magnetic resonance imaging findings demonstrated infarcts in the bilateral gangliocapsular region and left frontal periventricular deep white matter lesion. Ultrasonography of the thyroid and fine needle aspiration cytology confirmed lymphocytic thyroiditis. Anti-thyroid peroxidase (289 IU/ml) antibody titer was elevated (289 IU/mL). Her depressive symptoms responded well to antidepressants, mood stabilizers, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and levothyroxine. She remained in the euthyroid state and then in the euthymic state for 3 years. Hashimoto's encephalopathy is steroid-responsive encephalopathy. Most researchers have observed a dramatic response to steroids with or without levothyroxine. A clinician may consider aspirin as an alternative to a steroid in long-term management to avoid steroid-related side effects and contraindications. PMID:27570351

  2. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists for acute and chronic hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, B; Kjaergard, L L; Gluud, C

    2001-01-01

    The pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy is unknown. It has been suggested that liver failure leads to the accumulation of substances that bind to a receptor-complex in the brain resulting in neural inhibition which may progress to coma. Several trials have assessed benzodiazepine receptor...

  3. Neuropsychological functioning in Wernicke′s encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushree Sangita Behura

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Wernicke′s encephalopathy (WE is caused by thiamine (Vitamin B1 deficiency and most commonly found in chronic alcoholism and malnutrition. Clinically, the key features are mental status disturbances (global confusion, oculomotor abnormalities, and gait disturbances (ataxia. Apart from these clinical features, we can find deficits in neuropsychological functioning in patients with WE, which is more prominent after the improvement in the physical conditions. Neuropsychological functioning includes both basic cognitive processes (i.e., attention-concentration as well as higher order cognitive processes (i.e., memory, executive functioning, reasoning, which is much vital for the maintenance of quality of life of an individual. However, unfortunately, in most of the cases, neuropsychological functioning is ignored by the clinicians. Materials and Methods: In this study four case reports of WE have been presented. The patients were taken from the outdoor department of Mental Health Institute, S.C.B. Medical College, Cuttack, Odisha. Neuropsychological functioning was measured by administration of PGIBBD and Quality of Life was measured by WHO-QOL BREF Odia Version. Discussion: As described in the literature, among the three cardinal signs ( global confusion, ataxia, and ocular sings, the first two were present in all cases, but nystagmus was present in only two cases.Memory dysfunction was so disabling that the persons were unable to maintain a good Quality of Life and occupational impairment was prominent. There are disturbances in recent, remote memory, immediate recall, delayed recall, and attention and concentration, ultimately creating both physical and mental disability. PGI-BBD findings also suggest the overall impairment in neuropsychological functioning other than memory, that is, executive functioning, visual acuity, and depth perception. Findings of WHO-QOL BREF suggest the impairment of four domains of QOL in all the cases, but

  4. Metformin inhibits glutaminase activity and protects against hepatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampuero, Javier; Ranchal, Isidora; Nuñez, David; Díaz-Herrero, María del Mar; Maraver, Marta; del Campo, José Antonio; Rojas, Ángela; Camacho, Inés; Figueruela, Blanca; Bautista, Juan D; Romero-Gómez, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the influence of metformin use on liver dysfunction and hepatic encephalopathy in a retrospective cohort of diabetic cirrhotic patients. To analyze the impact of metformin on glutaminase activity and ammonia production in vitro. Eighty-two cirrhotic patients with type 2 diabetes were included. Forty-one patients were classified as insulin sensitizers experienced (metformin) and 41 as controls (cirrhotic patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus without metformin treatment). Baseline analysis included: insulin, glucose, glucagon, leptin, adiponectin, TNFr2, AST, ALT. HOMA-IR was calculated. Baseline HE risk was calculated according to minimal hepatic encephalopathy, oral glutamine challenge and mutations in glutaminase gene. We performed an experimental study in vitro including an enzymatic activity assay where glutaminase inhibition was measured according to different metformin concentrations. In Caco2 cells, glutaminase activity inhibition was evaluated by ammonia production at 24, 48 and 72 hours after metformina treatment. Hepatic encephalopathy was diagnosed during follow-up in 23.2% (19/82): 4.9% (2/41) in patients receiving metformin and 41.5% (17/41) in patients without metformin treatment (logRank 9.81; p=0.002). In multivariate analysis, metformin use [H.R.11.4 (95% CI: 1.2-108.8); p=0.034], age at diagnosis [H.R.1.12 (95% CI: 1.04-1.2); p=0.002], female sex [H.R.10.4 (95% CI: 1.5-71.6); p=0.017] and HE risk [H.R.21.3 (95% CI: 2.8-163.4); p=0.003] were found independently associated with hepatic encephalopathy. In the enzymatic assay, glutaminase activity inhibition reached 68% with metformin 100 mM. In Caco2 cells, metformin (20 mM) decreased glutaminase activity up to 24% at 72 hours post-treatment (p<0.05). Metformin was found independently related to overt hepatic encephalopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and high risk of hepatic encephalopathy. Metformin inhibits glutaminase activity in vitro. Therefore, metformin use seems

  5. Metformin Inhibits Glutaminase Activity and Protects against Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampuero, Javier; Ranchal, Isidora; Nuñez, David; Díaz-Herrero, María del Mar; Maraver, Marta; del Campo, José Antonio; Rojas, Ángela; Camacho, Inés; Figueruela, Blanca; Bautista, Juan D.; Romero-Gómez, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Aim To investigate the influence of metformin use on liver dysfunction and hepatic encephalopathy in a retrospective cohort of diabetic cirrhotic patients. To analyze the impact of metformin on glutaminase activity and ammonia production in vitro. Methods Eighty-two cirrhotic patients with type 2 diabetes were included. Forty-one patients were classified as insulin sensitizers experienced (metformin) and 41 as controls (cirrhotic patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus without metformin treatment). Baseline analysis included: insulin, glucose, glucagon, leptin, adiponectin, TNFr2, AST, ALT. HOMA-IR was calculated. Baseline HE risk was calculated according to minimal hepatic encephalopathy, oral glutamine challenge and mutations in glutaminase gene. We performed an experimental study in vitro including an enzymatic activity assay where glutaminase inhibition was measured according to different metformin concentrations. In Caco2 cells, glutaminase activity inhibition was evaluated by ammonia production at 24, 48 and 72 hours after metformina treatment. Results Hepatic encephalopathy was diagnosed during follow-up in 23.2% (19/82): 4.9% (2/41) in patients receiving metformin and 41.5% (17/41) in patients without metformin treatment (logRank 9.81; p = 0.002). In multivariate analysis, metformin use [H.R.11.4 (95% CI: 1.2–108.8); p = 0.034], age at diagnosis [H.R.1.12 (95% CI: 1.04–1.2); p = 0.002], female sex [H.R.10.4 (95% CI: 1.5–71.6); p = 0.017] and HE risk [H.R.21.3 (95% CI: 2.8–163.4); p = 0.003] were found independently associated with hepatic encephalopathy. In the enzymatic assay, glutaminase activity inhibition reached 68% with metformin 100 mM. In Caco2 cells, metformin (20 mM) decreased glutaminase activity up to 24% at 72 hours post-treatment (p<0.05). Conclusions Metformin was found independently related to overt hepatic encephalopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and high risk of hepatic encephalopathy. Metformin

  6. Metformin inhibits glutaminase activity and protects against hepatic encephalopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Ampuero

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the influence of metformin use on liver dysfunction and hepatic encephalopathy in a retrospective cohort of diabetic cirrhotic patients. To analyze the impact of metformin on glutaminase activity and ammonia production in vitro. METHODS: Eighty-two cirrhotic patients with type 2 diabetes were included. Forty-one patients were classified as insulin sensitizers experienced (metformin and 41 as controls (cirrhotic patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus without metformin treatment. Baseline analysis included: insulin, glucose, glucagon, leptin, adiponectin, TNFr2, AST, ALT. HOMA-IR was calculated. Baseline HE risk was calculated according to minimal hepatic encephalopathy, oral glutamine challenge and mutations in glutaminase gene. We performed an experimental study in vitro including an enzymatic activity assay where glutaminase inhibition was measured according to different metformin concentrations. In Caco2 cells, glutaminase activity inhibition was evaluated by ammonia production at 24, 48 and 72 hours after metformina treatment. RESULTS: Hepatic encephalopathy was diagnosed during follow-up in 23.2% (19/82: 4.9% (2/41 in patients receiving metformin and 41.5% (17/41 in patients without metformin treatment (logRank 9.81; p=0.002. In multivariate analysis, metformin use [H.R.11.4 (95% CI: 1.2-108.8; p=0.034], age at diagnosis [H.R.1.12 (95% CI: 1.04-1.2; p=0.002], female sex [H.R.10.4 (95% CI: 1.5-71.6; p=0.017] and HE risk [H.R.21.3 (95% CI: 2.8-163.4; p=0.003] were found independently associated with hepatic encephalopathy. In the enzymatic assay, glutaminase activity inhibition reached 68% with metformin 100 mM. In Caco2 cells, metformin (20 mM decreased glutaminase activity up to 24% at 72 hours post-treatment (p<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: Metformin was found independently related to overt hepatic encephalopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and high risk of hepatic encephalopathy. Metformin inhibits glutaminase

  7. Stage-dependent alterations of progenitor cell proliferation and neurogenesis in an animal model of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetreno, Ryan P; Klintsova, Anna; Savage, Lisa M

    2011-05-19

    Alcohol-induced Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS) culminates in bilateral diencephalic lesion and severe amnesia. Using the pyrithiamine-induced thiamine deficiency (PTD) animal paradigm of WKS, our laboratory has demonstrated hippocampal dysfunction in the absence of gross anatomical pathology. Extensive literature has revealed reduced hippocampal neurogenesis following a neuropathological insult, which might contribute to hippocampus-based learning and memory impairments. Thus, the current investigation was conducted to determine whether PTD treatment altered hippocampal neurogenesis in a stage-dependent fashion. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to one of 4 stages of thiamine deficiency based on behavioral symptoms: pre-symptomatic stage, ataxic stage, early post-opisthotonus stage, or the late post-opisthotonus stage. The S-phase mitotic marker 5'-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) was administered at the conclusion of each stage following thiamine restoration and subjects were perfused 24 hours or 28 days after BrdU to assess cellular proliferation or neurogenesis and survival, respectively. Dorsal hippocampal sections were immunostained for BrdU (proliferating cell marker), NeuN (neurons), GFAP (astrocytes), Iba-1 (microglia), and O4 (oligodendrocytes). The PTD treatment increased progenitor cell proliferation and survival during the early post-opisthotonus stage. However, levels of neurogenesis were reduced during this stage as well as the late post-opisthotonus stage where there was also an increase in astrocytogenesis. The diminished numbers of newly generated neurons (BrdU/NeuN co-localization) was paralleled by increased BrdU cells that did not co-localize with any of the phenotypic markers during these later stages. These data demonstrate that long-term alterations in neurogenesis and gliogenesis might contribute to the observed hippocampal dysfunction in the PTD model and human WKS.

  8. Uremic Encephalopathy: MR Imaging Findings and Clinical Correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, D M; Lee, I H; Song, C J

    2016-09-01

    Uremic encephalopathy is a metabolic disorder in patients with renal failure. The purpose of this study was to describe the MR imaging findings of uremic encephalopathy. This study retrospectively reviewed MR imaging findings in 10 patients with clinically proved uremic encephalopathy between May 2005 and December 2014. Parameters evaluated were lesion location and appearance; MR signal intensity of the lesions on T1WI, T2WI, and T2 fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images; the presence or absence of restricted diffusion on diffusion-weighted images and apparent diffusion coefficient maps; and the reversibility of documented signal-intensity abnormalities on follow-up MR imaging. MR imaging abnormalities accompanying marked elevation of serum creatinine (range, 4.3-11.7 mg/dL) were evident in the 10 patients. Nine patients had a history of chronic renal failure with expansile bilateral basal ganglia lesions, and 1 patient with acute renal failure had reversible largely cortical lesions. Two of 6 patients with available arterial blood gas results had metabolic acidosis. All basal ganglia lesions showed expansile high signal intensity (lentiform fork sign) on T2WI. Varied levels of restricted diffusion and a range of signal intensities on DWI were evident and were not correlated with serum Cr levels. All cortical lesions demonstrated high signal intensity on T2WI. Four patients with follow-up MR imaging after hemodialysis showed complete resolution of all lesions. The lentiform fork sign is reliable in the early diagnosis of uremic encephalopathy, regardless of the presence of metabolic acidosis. Cytotoxic edema and/or vasogenic edema on DWI/ADC maps may be associated with uremic encephalopathy. © 2016 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  9. Performance of the hepatic encephalopathy scoring algorithm in a clinical trial of patients with cirrhosis and severe hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassanein, T.; Blei, A.T.; Perry, W.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The grading of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is based on a combination of indicators that reflect the state of consciousness, intellectual function, changes in behavior, and neuromuscular alterations seen in patients with liver failure. METHODS: We modified the traditional West Haven...

  10. Surgical attenuation of spontaneous congenital portosystemic shunts in dogs resolves hepatic encephalopathy but not hypermanganesemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gow, Adam G; Frowde, Polly E; Elwood, Clive M; Burton, Carolyn A; Powell, Roger M; Tappin, Simon W; Foale, Rob D; Duncan, Andrew; Mellanby, Richard J

    2015-10-01

    Hypermanganesemia is commonly recognized in human patients with hepatic insufficiency and portosystemic shunting. Since manganese is neurotoxic, increases in brain manganese concentrations have been implicated in the development of hepatic encephalopathy although a direct causative role has yet to be demonstrated. Evaluate manganese concentrations in dogs with a naturally occurring congenital shunt before and after attenuation as well as longitudinally following the changes in hepatic encephalopathy grade. Our study demonstrated that attenuation of the shunt resolved encephalopathy, significantly reduced postprandial bile acids, yet a hypermanganasemic state persisted. This study demonstrates that resolution of hepatic encephalopathy can occur without the correction of hypermanganesemia, indicating that increased manganese concentrations alone do not play a causative role in encephalopathy. Our study further demonstrates the value of the canine congenital portosystemic shunt as a naturally occurring spontaneous model of human hepatic encephalopathy.

  11. Chinese Consensus on Diagnosis and Treatment of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-yue; Chen; Jun; Cheng; Fang-ling; Duan; Jian-gao; Fan; Xiao-ling; Fan; Li-min; Guo; Ming-zhou; Guo; Tao; Han; Jing-yuan; Liu; Xiong; Ma; Wei; Shen; Shi-guang; Feng; Xian-bo; Wang; Yun; Wu; Wen; Xie; Yao; Xie; Hui-chun; Xing; Ping-geYuan; Yong-ping; Yang; Fu-kui; Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy(HE)is a complex,neuropsychiatric abnormality that occurs as a consequence of metabolic disorders in patients with hepatic insufficiency.The pathogenesis is complex with a strong prognosticator of death.To standardize the clinical management of HE,relevant new data were reviewed and assessed by Chinese Committee of Experts on Hepatic Encephalopathy in China and was discussed and debated extensively.Then the consensus on the management of HE was developed.The final recommendations are based on the data available at the time of production of the document and may be updated with pertinent scientific developments at a later time.All the discussion was organized by the editorial board of Chinese Journal of Experimental and Clinical Infectious Diseases(Electronic Edition),Chinese Journal of Liver Diseases(Electronic Edition)and Infection International(Electronic Edition).The evidence gradings in the consensus are listed in Table1.

  12. Contributions of microdialysis to new alternative therapeutics for hepatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Espinosa, Liliana; Floriano-Sánchez, Esaú; Pedraza-Chaverrí, José; Coballase-Urrutia, Elvia; Sampieri, Aristides Iii; Ortega-Cuellar, Daniel; Cárdenas-Rodríguez, Noemí; Carmona-Aparicio, Liliana

    2013-08-05

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a common complication of cirrhosis, of largely reversible impairment of brain function occurring in patients with acute or chronic liver failure or when the liver is bypassed by portosystemic shunts. The mechanisms causing this brain dysfunction are still largely unclear. The need to avoid complications caused by late diagnosis has attracted interest to understand the mechanisms underlying neuronal damage in order to find markers that will allow timely diagnosis and to propose new therapeutic alternatives to improve the care of patients. One of the experimental approaches to study HE is microdialysis; this technique allows evaluation of different chemical substances in several organs through the recollection of samples in specific places by semi-permeable membranes. In this review we will discuss the contributions of microdialysis in the understanding of the physiological alterations in human hepatic encephalopathy and experimental models and the studies to find novel alternative therapies for this disease.

  13. Anti-NMDAR encephalitis misdiagnosed as Hashimoto's encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirabelli-Badenier, M; Biancheri, R; Morana, G; Fornarino, S; Siri, L; Celle, M E; Veneselli, E; Vincent, A; Gaggero, R; Mancardi, M M

    2014-01-01

    Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis is a well-defined autoimmune disorder. Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) is a still controversial entity, lacking definite diagnostic criteria. We described a 14-year-old-girl presenting with a clinical picture consistent with the diagnosis of anti-NMDAR encephalitis, confirmed by NMDAR antibody testing. Four years earlier, she had presented a similar episode of acute encephalopathy diagnosed as HE. Anti-NMDAR encephalitis and HE share similar clinical features so that the differential diagnosis can be difficult if specific antibodies are not tested. The correct diagnosis of anti-NMDAR encephalitis is crucial to plan the appropriate management and follow-up, namely in term of oncological screening, since it can be paraneoplastic in origin. We suggest to re-evaluate the clinical history of all subjects with previous HE diagnosis in order to evaluate the possible diagnosis of anti-NMDAR encephalitis and plan the appropriate management of these patients.

  14. Recurrent encephalopathy: NAGS (N-acetylglutamate synthase) deficiency in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartagena, A; Prasad, A N; Rupar, C A; Strong, M; Tuchman, M; Ah Mew, N; Prasad, C

    2013-01-01

    N-acetyl-glutamate synthase (NAGS) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive urea cycle disorder (UCD) that uncommonly presents in adulthood. Adult presentations of UCDs include; confusional episodes, neuropsychiatric symptoms and encephalopathy. To date, there have been no detailed neurological descriptions of an adult onset presentation of NAGS deficiency. In this review we examine the clinical presentation and management of UCDs with an emphasis on NAGS deficiency. An illustrative case is provided. Plasma ammonia levels should be measured in all adult patients with unexplained encephalopathy, as treatment can be potentially life-saving. Availability of N-carbamylglutamate (NCG; carglumic acid) has made protein restriction largely unnecessary in treatment regimens currently employed. Genetic counselling remains an essential component of management of NAGS.

  15. Pathophysiology of septic encephalopathy--an unsolved puzzle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flierl, Michael A; Rittirsch, Daniel; Huber-Lang, Markus S; Stahel, Philip F

    2010-01-01

    The exact cellular and molecular mechanisms of sepsis-induced encephalopathy remain elusive. The breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is considered a focal point in the development of sepsis-induced brain damage. Contributing factors for the compromise of the BBB include cytokines and chemokines, activation of the complement cascade, phagocyte-derived toxic mediators, and bacterial products. To date, we are far from fully understanding the neuropathology that develops as a secondary remote organ injury as a consequence of sepsis. However, recent studies suggest that bacterial proteins may readily cross the functional BBB and trigger an inflammatory response in the subarachnoid space, in absence of a bacterial invasion. A better understanding of the pathophysiological events leading to septic encephalopathy appears crucial to advance the clinical care for this vulnerable patient population.

  16. Wernicke’s encephalopathy following hyperemesis gravidarum: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    leila pourali

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Wernicke’s Korsakoff syndrome is the most important complication of severe thiamine deficiency. Confusion and gait ataxia are the most prevalent symptoms, respectively. The aim of this study was report of a case of Wernicke’s encephalopathy following hyperemesis gravidarum. Case report: A 28-years-old pregnant woman in 19th weeks of gestation referred to the hospital with hyperemesis, gait ataxia, and dysarthria. MRI showed hyperdense lesion which was characteristic of wernicke’s encephalopathy. Rapid improvement in patient’s condition occurred after thiamine infusion. Conclusion: In hyperemesis gravidarum, presence of either symptoms of ocular or mental disorder or ataxia must be considered to rull out Wernicke’s syndrome which can cause maternal death.

  17. Contributions of Microdialysis to New Alternative Therapeutics for Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Carmona-Aparicio

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic encephalopathy (HE is a common complication of cirrhosis, of largely reversible impairment of brain function occurring in patients with acute or chronic liver failure or when the liver is bypassed by portosystemic shunts. The mechanisms causing this brain dysfunction are still largely unclear. The need to avoid complications caused by late diagnosis has attracted interest to understand the mechanisms underlying neuronal damage in order to find markers that will allow timely diagnosis and to propose new therapeutic alternatives to improve the care of patients. One of the experimental approaches to study HE is microdialysis; this technique allows evaluation of different chemical substances in several organs through the recollection of samples in specific places by semi-permeable membranes. In this review we will discuss the contributions of microdialysis in the understanding of the physiological alterations in human hepatic encephalopathy and experimental models and the studies to find novel alternative therapies for this disease.

  18. Contributions of Microdialysis to New Alternative Therapeutics for Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Espinosa, Liliana; Floriano-Sánchez, Esaú; Pedraza-Chaverrí, José; Coballase-Urrutia, Elvia; Sampieri, Aristides; Ortega-Cuellar, Daniel; Cárdenas-Rodríguez, Noemí; Carmona-Aparicio, Liliana

    2013-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a common complication of cirrhosis, of largely reversible impairment of brain function occurring in patients with acute or chronic liver failure or when the liver is bypassed by portosystemic shunts. The mechanisms causing this brain dysfunction are still largely unclear. The need to avoid complications caused by late diagnosis has attracted interest to understand the mechanisms underlying neuronal damage in order to find markers that will allow timely diagnosis and to propose new therapeutic alternatives to improve the care of patients. One of the experimental approaches to study HE is microdialysis; this technique allows evaluation of different chemical substances in several organs through the recollection of samples in specific places by semi-permeable membranes. In this review we will discuss the contributions of microdialysis in the understanding of the physiological alterations in human hepatic encephalopathy and experimental models and the studies to find novel alternative therapies for this disease. PMID:23921686

  19. Severe valproate induced hyperammonemic encephalopathy successfully managed with peritoneal dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amandeep; Suri, Ashish; Sharma, Bhawani S

    2014-07-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is a commonly used drug for epilepsy, psychiatric disorders and migraine and is frequently used in neurosurgical intensive care units. Though most of its side-effects are mild and transient, certain idiosyncratic side-effects have been attributed to VPA. Valproate induced hyperammonemia (VIH) is one such side-effect. VIH can produce symptoms of encephalopathy known as valproate induced hyperammonemic encephalopathy (VHE). VIH and VHE usually respond to withdrawal of VPA. However, in some cases VHE can be unresponsive to supportive measures and severe enough to be life-threatening. In such cases, dialysis can be used to rapidly reverse hyperammonemia and VHE and can prove to be a lifesaving measure. We report such a case of VIH and life-threatening VHE in a postoperative neurosurgical patient that was managed successfully with peritoneal dialysis.

  20. Diagnostic value of fine motor deficits in patients with low-grade hepatic encephalopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sergei Mechtcheriakov; Ivo W. Graziadei; Maria Rettenbacher; Ingrid Schuster; Hartmann Hinterhuber; Wolfgang Vogel; Joser Marksteiner

    2005-01-01

    AIM: The role of motor dysfunction in early diagnosis of low-grade hepatic encephalopathy remains uncertain. We performed a pilot study to comparatively investigate the kinematic characteristics of small and large rapid alternating movements in patients with liver cirrhosis and low-grade hepatic encephalopathy.METHODS: A kinematic analysis of alternating handwriting (7.5 mm) and large drawing movements (DM, 175 mm) was performed in 30 patients with liver cirrhosis (no hepatic encephalopathy: n = 10; minimal hepatic encephalopathy: n = 9; grade I hepatic encephalopathy: n = 11; healthy controls: n = 12). The correlation between kinematic parameters, clinical neuro-psychiatric symptoms of cerebral dysfunction and the grade of encephalopathy was investigated.RESULTS: Both movement types, handwriting and drawing, were significantly slower in cirrhotic patients. In contrast to large DM, the deterioration of handwriting movements significantly correlated with the increase of symptoms of motor dysfunction and differentiated significantly within the group of cirrhosis patients corresponding to the degree of hepatic encephalopathy. CONCLUSION: The deterioration of fine motor control is an important symptom of low-grade hepatic encephalopathy. The kinematic analysis of handwriting allows the quantitative analysis of alterations of motor function and is a possible tool for diagnostics and monitoring of motor dysfunction in patients with low-grade hepatic encephalopathy.

  1. Parainfluenza virus infection associated with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogunneye Owolabi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is a clinical and radiological entity. The most accepted theory of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is a loss of autoregulation in cerebral blood flow with a subsequent increase in vascular permeability and leakage of blood plasma and erythrocytes, producing vasogenic edema. In infection-associated posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome, a clinical pattern consistent with systemic inflammatory response syndrome develops. Parainfluenza virus has not been reported in the medical literature to be associated with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. Case presentation We report herein the case of a 54-year-old Caucasian woman with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome associated with parainfluenza virus infection who presented with generalized headache, blurring of vision, new-onset seizure and flu-like symptoms. Conclusion Infection-associated posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome as well as hypertension-associated posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome favor the contribution of endothelial dysfunction to the pathophysiology of this clinicoradiological syndrome. In view of the reversible nature of this clinical entity, it is important that all physicians are well aware of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in patients presenting with headache and seizure activity. A detailed clinical assessment leading to the recognition of precipitant factors in posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is paramount.

  2. The ketogenic diet can be used successfully in combination with corticosteroids for epileptic encephalopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ville, Dorothée; Chiron, Catherine; Laschet, Jacques; Dulac, Olivier

    2015-07-01

    Hormonal therapy or ketogenic diet often permits overcoming the challenging periods of many epileptic encephalopathies (West and Lennox-Gastaut syndromes and encephalopathy with continuous spike-waves in slow sleep), but relapse affects over 20% of patients. We report here a monocenter pilot series of 42 consecutive patients in whom we combined oral steroids with the ketogenic diet for corticosteroid-resistant or -dependent epileptic encephalopathy. We retrospectively evaluated the effect on seizure frequency, interictal spike activity, neuropsychological course, and steroid treatment course. Twenty-three patients had West syndrome (WS), 13 had encephalopathy with continuous spike-waves in slow sleep (CSWS), and six others had miscellaneous epileptic encephalopathies. All patients succeeded to reach 0.8 to 1.6g/l ketone bodies in the urine following the usual KD regimen. For at least 6 months, 14/42 responded to the addition of the ketogenic diet: 4/23 with WS, 8/13 with CSWS, and 2/6 with miscellaneous epileptic encephalopathies. The addition of the KD allowed withdrawing steroids in all responders. Among them, 10/15 had been patients with steroid-dependent epileptic encephalopathy and 4/27 patients with steroid-resistant epileptic encephalopathy. Therefore, the ketogenic diet can be used successfully in combination with corticosteroids for epileptic encephalopathies. Patients presenting with steroid-dependent CSWS seem to be the best candidates.

  3. Novel STXBP1 mutations in 2 patients with early infantile epileptic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio, Mafalda; Rocha, Ruben; Biskup, Saskia; Leão, Miguel

    2015-04-01

    The authors describe 2 patients with early infantile epileptic encephalopathy caused by 2 novel mutations involving the STXBP1 gene. The authors suggest that in spite of the rarity of STXBP1 mutations, molecular analysis of STXBP1 gene should be performed in patients with early infantile epileptic encephalopathy, after exclusion of ARX mutations in male patients and CDKL5 mutations in female patients. The potential mechanisms explaining the variable clinical phenotypes caused by STXBP1 mutations are discussed and the designation of early-onset epileptic encephalopathies, including an updated genetic classification, is proposed to encompass the epileptic encephalopathies beginning in the first 6 months of life.

  4. Reversible MRI changes in a patient with uremic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, M; Sitter, T; Lederer, S R; Held, E; Schiffl, H

    2001-01-01

    A 19-year-old patient on chronic ambulatory peritoneal dialysis experienced severe neurologic disturbances caused by uremia. Increased signal intensity was seen bilaterally in the cortical and subcortical areas of the occipital and parietal lobe on cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Insufficient peritoneal dialysis efficacy was documented and the patient was switched from peritoneal to hemodialysis. Cranial MRI indicated a marked regression of the lesions to nearly normal, confirming the diagnosis of uremic encephalopathy.

  5. Brainstem variant of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortora, Fabio; Caranci, Ferdinando; Belfiore, Maria Paola; Manzi, Francesca; Pagliano, Pasquale; Cirillo, Sossio

    2015-12-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinico-radiological condition, generally observed in conjunction with severe and acute hypertension, that involves mainly the posterior head areas (occipital and temporal lobes) and anterior "watershed" areas. In this syndrome it is rare to observe a predominant involvement of the brainstem. We describe the clinical and radiological findings in a patient with brainstem involvement, discussing its pathophysiological features and possible differential diagnosis.

  6. Guillain-Barre syndrome with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinicoradiologic entity commonly associated with eclampsia, septicemia, chemotherapeutic drugs etc. Concurrent occurrence of Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) with PRES is a rare entity. Dysautonomia is a proposed mechanism for such occurrence. Here we present a non-diabetic, non-hypertensive 63-year-old male patient, who came with acute onset flaccid quadriparesis, developing generalized seizures, altered sensorium and raised blood pressu...

  7. Covert Hepatic Encephalopathy: Who Should Be Tested and Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flamm, Steven L

    2015-08-01

    Covert hepatic encephalopathy is a common problem in cirrhosis, affecting up to 80% of patients. It is defined as test-dependent brain dysfunction with clinical consequences in the setting of cirrhosis in patients who are not disoriented. Because it is not apparent clinically, and diagnostic testing has not been standardized, the issue has often been ignored in clinical practice. Yet, the clinical consequences are notable, including impaired quality of life, diminished work productivity, and poor driving skills.

  8. Safety, efficacy, and patient acceptability of rifaximin for hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kimer, Nina; Krag, Aleksander; Gluud, Lise L

    2014-01-01

    concurrently with lactulose. Trials have varied greatly in design, outcomes, and duration of treatment regimes. Although a number of retrospective studies have indicated that long-term treatment with rifaximin is safe and possibly beneficial, high quality trials are needed to further clarify efficacy...... and safety of long-term treatment with rifaximin and evaluate effects of combination therapy with lactulose and branched-chain amino acids for patients with liver cirrhosis and hepatic encephalopathy....

  9. Neonatal seizures and therapeutic hypothermia for hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal seizures are associated with morbidity and mortality. Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is the most common cause of seizures in newborns. Neonatal animal models suggest that therapeutic hypothermia can reduce seizures and epileptiform activity in the setting of hypoxia-ischemia, however data from human studies have conflicting results. In this research highlight, we will discuss the findings of our recent study that demonstrated a decreased seizure burden in term newborns with mo...

  10. Clinical profile and outcome of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES)

    OpenAIRE

    Patil, Virendra C.; Vaibhav Agrwal; Amardip Rajput; Rishu Garg; Ketan Kshirsagar; Vinit Chaudhari

    2015-01-01

    Background: Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinico-radiographic syndrome of multiple etiologies. Still, the exact pathophysiology of PRES is not clear. Aims and Objectives: To study demographic, etiological, and clinic-radiological profiles of patients presenting with PRES and their outcome at the tertiary care teaching hospital. Materials and Methods: A retrospective observational and non-interventional study was conducted at tertiary care center in from January 200...

  11. Acute febrile encephalopathy in adults from Northwest India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhalla Ashish

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Acute onset fever with altered mentation is a common problem encountered by the physician practicing in tropical countries. Central nervous system (CNS infections are the most common cause resulting in fever with altered mentation in children. Aim : In this study, we have tried to analyze the cause of encephalopathy following short febrile illness in adults presenting to a tertiary care center in Northwestern part of India. Setting and Design : A prospective observational study carried out in a tertiary care center in the Northwestern India over a period of 1 year. Material and Methods : A total of 127 patients with fever of less than 2 weeks duration along with alteration in mentation were studied prospectively over a period of 12 months. The demographic variables were recorded in detail. In addition to routine investigations, cerebrospinal fluid analysis, noncontrast- and contrast-enhanced computed tomography, along with magnetic resonance imaging were performed in all the subjects. Statistical Analysis : The results were analyzed using SPSS statistical software. The values were expressed as mean with standard deviation for contiguous variable as percentage for the others. Results and Conclusion : Out of these, 70% had primary CNS infection as the etiology. A total of 33% patients had meningitis, 29.9% had evidence of meningoencephalitis, and 12.7% were diagnosed as sepsis-associated encephalopathy. These were followed by cerebral malaria, leptospirosis, and brain abscess as the cause of febrile encephalopathy in adults. Among the noninfectious causes, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, cortical venous thrombosis, and neuroleptic malignant syndrome were documented in 2.36% each. In 11% of the patients, the final diagnosis could not be made in spite of the extensive investigations. Our study demonstrates that acute febrile encephalopathy in adults is a heterogeneous syndrome with primary CNS infections being the commonest

  12. [Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies: neuroinfections with unconventional immune reactions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrová, E

    1997-04-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) as well as the properties of the major component of the infectious agent-prion, and the most important human and animal prion diseases are characterized. Considering the recent biochemical and molecular biological data, possible explanations of natural resistance, species barrier and lack of the immune response to the unconventional infectious particles are presented. Finally the importance of immunoblotting and immunostaining as the most specific confirmation of TSE diagnosis is underlined. (Ref. 11.)

  13. Molecular & Genetic Investigation of Tau in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0399 TITLE: Molecular & Genetic Investigation of Tau in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: John F...information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and...maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information. Send comments regarding this burden estimate or any other

  14. Approach to Clinical Syndrome of Jaundice and Encephalopathy in Tropics

    OpenAIRE

    Anand, Anil C.; Garg, Hitendra K.

    2014-01-01

    A large number of patients present with jaundice and encephalopathy in tropical country like India and acute liver failure is the usual cause. Clinical presentation like ALF is also a complication of many tropical infections, and these conditions may mimic ALF but may have subtle differences from ALF. Moreover, what hepatologists see as acute liver failure in tropics is different from what is commonly described in Western Textbooks. Paracetamol overdose, which is possibly the commonest cause ...

  15. Guillain-Barre syndrome with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basavaraj F Banakar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES is a clinicoradiologic entity commonly associated with eclampsia, septicemia, chemotherapeutic drugs etc. Concurrent occurrence of Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS with PRES is a rare entity. Dysautonomia is a proposed mechanism for such occurrence. Here we present a non-diabetic, non-hypertensive 63-year-old male patient, who came with acute onset flaccid quadriparesis, developing generalized seizures, altered sensorium and raised blood pressure on fifth day of illness. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of brain showed altered signal intensities involving the parieto-occipital areas suggestive of posterior reversible encephalopathy. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis showed albuminocytological dissociation, nerve conduction studies revealed demyelinating type of polyneuropathy. The patient was treated with antihypertensives and antiepileptics. After resolution of the encephalopathy, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg was given. The patient recovered gradually over few months. Our case concludes GBS as independent risk factor, for PRES may be secondary to dysautonomia and physicians should be aware of such rare coexistence so that early treatment can be done to reduce the mortality and morbidity.

  16. Current trends in the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Rasm Al Sibae

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Mohamad Rasm Al Sibae, Brendan M McGuireDepartment of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USAAbstract: Hepatic encephalopathy (HE is a common reversible neuropsychiatric syndrome associated with chronic and acute liver dysfunction and significant morbidity and mortality. Although a clear pathogenesis is yet to be determined, elevated ammonia in the serum and central nervous system are the mainstay for pathogenesis and treatment. Management includes early diagnosis and prompt treatment of precipitating factors (infection, gastrointestinal bleeding, electrolyte disturbances, hepatocellular carcinoma, dehydration, hypotension, and use of benzodiazepines, psychoactive drugs, and/or alcohol. Clinical trials have established the efficacy of lactulose and lactitol enemas in the treatment of acute hepatic encephalopathy. Extensive clinical experience has demonstrated the efficacy of oral lactulose and lactitol with the goal of two to three soft bowel movements a day for the treatment of chronic HE. However, lactulose and lactitol have significant gastrointestinal side effects. For patients unable to tolerate lactulose or lactitol or who still have persistent chronic HE with lactulose or lactitol, neomycin, metronidazole and rifaximin are second-line agents. More recent data supports the benefits of rifaximin used solely and as an additional agent with fewer side effects than neomycin or metronidazole. Newer therapies being investigated in humans with clinical promise include nitazoxanide, the molecular adsorbent recirculating system (MARS, L-ornithine phenylacetate, sodium benzoate, and/or sodium phenylacetate and Kremezin® (AST-120.Keywords: hepatic encephalopathy, liver dysfunction, lactulose, lactitol

  17. [Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome of the midbrain and hypothalamus - a case report of uremic encephalopathy presenting with hypersomnia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiga, Yuji; Kanaya, Yuhei; Kono, Ryuhei; Takeshima, Shinichi; Shimoe, Yutaka; Kuriyama, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 73-year-old woman presenting with hypersomnia and loss of appetite. She suffered from diabetic nephropathy without receiving dialysis, in addition to hypertension, which was well controlled without marked fluctuation. There were no objective neurological findings. Her laboratory findings showed renal failure with 3.7 mg/dl of serum creatinine and decreased serum sodium and potassium. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) with vasogenic edema, which was distributed in the dorsal midbrain, medial thalamus, and hypothalamus. After we addressed the electrolyte imbalance and dehydration, her symptoms and MRI findings gradually improved, but faint high signals on MRI were still present 3 months later. Orexin in the cerebrospinal fluid was decreased on admission, but improved 6 months later. We diagnosed uremic encephalopathy with atypical form PRES showing functional disturbance of the hypothalamus.

  18. A Rare Case of Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome Accompanying Late Postpartum Eclampsia or Hypertensive Encephalopathy-A Clinical Dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakuntala PN

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome (PRES refers to a clinic-radiologic diagnosis. Clinically it is characterized by non specific symptoms such as headache, confusion, visual disturbances and seizures. The radiological findings in PRES are thought to be due to vasogenic oedema, predominantly in the posterior cerebral hemispheres, and are reversible with appropriate management. We report a case of reversible encephalopathy diagnosed by MRI scan occurring in atypical areas like the caudate and lentiform nuclei of the brain following an uneventful lower segment caesarean section in a normotensive patient, who was successfully treated with antihypertensives, anticonvulsants and supportive treatment. The differential diagnosis of convulsions in the post-partum period is discussed.

  19. Experimental interspecies transmission studies of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies to cattle: comparison to bovine spongiform encephalopathy in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamir, Amir N; Kehrli, Marcus E; Kunkle, Robert A; Greenlee, Justin J; Nicholson, Eric M; Richt, Jürgen A; Miller, Janice M; Cutlip, Randall C

    2011-05-01

    Prion diseases or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) of animals include scrapie of sheep and goats; transmissible mink encephalopathy (TME); chronic wasting disease (CWD) of deer, elk and moose; and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) of cattle. The emergence of BSE and its spread to human beings in the form of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) resulted in interest in susceptibility of cattle to CWD, TME and scrapie. Experimental cross-species transmission of TSE agents provides valuable information for potential host ranges of known TSEs. Some interspecies transmission studies have been conducted by inoculating disease-causing prions intracerebrally (IC) rather than orally; the latter is generally effective in intraspecies transmission studies and is considered a natural route by which animals acquire TSEs. The "species barrier" concept for TSEs resulted from unsuccessful interspecies oral transmission attempts. Oral inoculation of prions mimics the natural disease pathogenesis route whereas IC inoculation is rather artificial; however, it is very efficient since it requires smaller dosage of inoculum, and typically results in higher attack rates and reduces incubation time compared to oral transmission. A species resistant to a TSE by IC inoculation would have negligible potential for successful oral transmission. To date, results indicate that cattle are susceptible to IC inoculation of scrapie, TME, and CWD but it is only when inoculated with TME do they develop spongiform lesions or clinical disease similar to BSE. Importantly, cattle are resistant to oral transmission of scrapie or CWD; susceptibility of cattle to oral transmission of TME is not yet determined.

  20. How to diagnose and manage hepatic encephalopathy: A consensus statement on roles and responsibilities beyond the liver specialist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shawcross, D.L. (Debbie L.); Dunk, A.A. (Arthur A.); Jalan, R. (Rajiv); Kircheis, G. (Gerald); R.J. de Knegt (Robert); W. Laleman (W.); Ramage, J.K. (John K.); Wedemeyer, H. (Heiner); Morgan, I.E.J. (Ian E.J.)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction Hepatic encephalopathy is defined as brain dysfunction caused by liver insufficiency and/or portosystemic shunting. Symptoms include nonspecific cognitive impairment, personality changes and changes in consciousness. Overt (symptomatic) hepatic encephalopathy is a common com

  1. Clinical and radiologic features of encephalopathy during 2011 E coli O111 outbreak in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takanashi, Jun-ichi; Taneichi, Hiromichi; Misaki, Takako; Yahata, Yuichiro; Okumura, Akihisa; Ishida, Yoh-ichi; Miyawaki, Toshio; Okabe, Nobuhiko; Sata, Tetsutaro; Mizuguchi, Masashi

    2014-02-18

    To elucidate the clinical and radiologic features and analyze factors associated with neurologic outcomes of encephalopathy secondary to Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O111. We reviewed medical records and neuroimaging in 22 patients with neurologic symptoms among 86 with STEC O111 infection. Twenty-one (6 males and 15 females, 10 children and 11 adults) of the 22 patients were diagnosed with encephalopathy. All patients with encephalopathy also presented with hemolytic-uremic syndrome. Five patients died, from day 1 to 6 months (days 1-5 in 4 patients), due to progressive encephalopathy with severe cerebral edema observed in neuroimaging (4 patients). Fifteen of the 16 surviving patients clinically recovered completely. Statistical analysis revealed differences between patients with poor (n = 6) and good (n = 15) outcomes in the interval from hemolytic-uremic syndrome presentation to encephalopathy, creatinine levels, and the methylprednisolone administration ratio. We note a high incidence of encephalopathy in the Toyama STEC O111 outbreak. All fatal cases resulted from progressive encephalopathy. Methylprednisolone pulse therapy represents a possible therapeutic choice. This study provides Class III evidence that methylprednisolone pulse therapy increases the probability of a good outcome for patients with encephalopathy associated with STEC O111.

  2. Targeted resequencing in epileptic encephalopathies identifies de novo mutations in CHD2 and SYNGAP1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carvill, Gemma L; Heavin, Sinéad B; Yendle, Simone C

    2013-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies are a devastating group of epilepsies with poor prognosis, of which the majority are of unknown etiology. We perform targeted massively parallel resequencing of 19 known and 46 candidate genes for epileptic encephalopathy in 500 affected individuals (cases) to identify ...

  3. Experimental Inoculation of Spiroplasma mirum and Transmissible Mink Encephalopathy (TME) into Raccoons (Procyon lotor)

    Science.gov (United States)

    To determine if Spiroplasma mirum would be capable of producing lesions of spongiform encephalopathy in raccoons (Procyon lotor), 5 groups (n = 5) of raccoon kits were inoculated intracerebrally with either S. mirum and/or transmissible mink encephalopathy (TME). Two other groups (n = 5) of raccoon...

  4. Effect of antibiotics, prebiotics and probiotics in treatment for hepatic encephalopathy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongaerts, G.P.A.; Severijnen, R.S.V.M.; Timmerman, H.

    2005-01-01

    In order to reduce ammonia production by urease-positive bacteria Solga recently hypothesised (S.F. Solga, Probiotics can treat hepatic encephalopathy, Medical Hypotheses 2003; 61: 307-13), that probiotics are new therapeutics for hepatic encephalopathy (HE), and that they may replace antibiotics an

  5. Effect of antibiotics, prebiotics and probiotics in treatment for hepatic encephalopathy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongaerts, G.P.A.; Severijnen, R.S.V.M.; Timmerman, H.

    2005-01-01

    In order to reduce ammonia production by urease-positive bacteria Solga recently hypothesised (S.F. Solga, Probiotics can treat hepatic encephalopathy, Medical Hypotheses 2003; 61: 307-13), that probiotics are new therapeutics for hepatic encephalopathy (HE), and that they may replace antibiotics

  6. Systemic hypothermia after neonatal encephalopathy: outcomes of neo.nEURO.network RCT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simbruner, Georg; Mittal, Rashmi A; Rohlmann, Friederike;

    2010-01-01

    Mild hypothermia after perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) reduces neurologic sequelae without significant adverse effects, but studies are needed to determine the most-efficacious methods.......Mild hypothermia after perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) reduces neurologic sequelae without significant adverse effects, but studies are needed to determine the most-efficacious methods....

  7. Localized Cerebral Energy Failure in DNA Polymerase Gamma-Associated Encephalopathy Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzoulis, Charalampos; Neckelmann, Gesche; Mork, Sverre J.; Engelsen, Bernt E.; Viscomi, Carlo; Moen, Gunnar; Ersland, Lars; Zeviani, Massimo; Bindoff, Laurence A.

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in the catalytic subunit of the mitochondrial DNA-polymerase gamma cause a wide spectrum of clinical disease ranging from infantile hepato-encephalopathy to juvenile/adult-onset spinocerebellar ataxia and late onset progressive external ophthalmoplegia. Several of these syndromes are associated with an encephalopathy that…

  8. Stability properties of PrPSc from cattle with experimental transmissible spongiform encephalopathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies (TSEs), including scrapie in sheep, chronic wasting disease (CWD) in cervids, and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), are fatal diseases of the nervous system associated with accumulation of misfolded prion protein (PrPSc). Different strains of BSE exist...

  9. A collaborative Canadian-United Kingdom evaluation of an immunohistochemistry protocol to diagnose bovine spongiform encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy of domestic cattle. The disorder was reported in the United Kingdom in the late 1980s and was associated with recycling of ruminant byproducts in cattle feed. In 1996, the bovine disease was reported to be the cause of a...

  10. A Qualitative Study of Physician Perspectives on Prognostication in Neonatal Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Lisa Anne; Bell, Emily; Racine, Eric

    2016-10-01

    Hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy is the most frequent cause of neonatal encephalopathy and yields a great degree of morbidity and mortality. From an ethical and clinical standpoint, neurological prognosis is fundamental in the care of neonates with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. This qualitative study explores physician perspectives about neurological prognosis in neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. This study aimed, through semistructured interviews with neonatologists and pediatric neurologists, to understand the practice of prognostication. Qualitative thematic content analysis was used for data analysis. The authors report 2 main findings: (1) neurological prognosis remains fundamental to quality-of-life predictions and considerations of best interest, and (2) magnetic resonance imaging is presented to parents with a greater degree of certainty than actually exists. Further research is needed to explore both the parental perspective and, prospectively, the impact of different clinical approaches and styles to prognostication for neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy.

  11. Event-related evoked potentials in chronic respiratory encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A R Al Tahan

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available A R Al Tahan1, R Zaidan1, S Jones2, A Husain3, A Mobeireek1, A Bahammam11Department of Medicine, 3Department of Physiology, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 2Department of Neurophysiology, Institute of Neurology, London, UKBackground: Cognitive event-related potential (P300 is an index of cognitive processing time. It was found to be prolonged in dementia, renal, and hepatic encephalopathies, but was not extensively assessed in respiratory failure.Objective: To evaluate P300 changes in patients with respiratory failure, and especially those with mild or subclinical hypoxic–hypercapnic encephalopathy.Methods: Auditory event-related evoked potential P300 latency was measured using an oddball paradigm in patients with respiratory failure due to any cause (partial pressure of oxygen in arterial blood (PO2 should be 75 mm/Hg or less. Apart from blood gases measurement, patients underwent the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE. Patient performances were compared with that of matched normal control. Patients were admitted into the study from outpatient clinics and wards at King Khalid University Hospital and Sahara Hospital.Results: Thirty-four patients (12 women, 22 men were admitted to the study. Ages ranged from 19–67 years with a mean of 46.1 years. Respiratory failure was severe or very severe in 11 patients (33%, and mild or moderate in the rest (66%. Mean value for PO2 and partial pressure of carbon dioxide in arterial blood (PCO2 were 63.7 and 45.2 mm/Hg, respectively. pH mean was 7.4 and O2 saturation was 90.7%. P300 latency ranged from 218 to 393 milliseconds, with a mean of 338.4 milliseconds. In comparison with control (309.9 milliseconds, there was a significant difference (P = 0.007. P300 amplitude differences were not significant. No significant difference in MMSE was noted between mild and severe respiratory failure. Results of detailed neuropsychological assessment were clearly abnormal but were

  12. Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... result from alcohol abuse, dietary deficiencies, prolonged vomiting, eating disorders, or the effects of chemotherapy. B1 deficiency causes damage to the brain's thalamus and hypothalamus. Symptoms ...

  13. [Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotov, S V; Lobakov, A I; Isakova, E V; Stashuk, G A; Volchenkova, T V

    Цель исследования. Изучение особенностей диагностики и лечения неалкогольного синдрома Вернике—Корсакова (СВК). Материал и методы. Наблюдали 8 пациентов (5 мужчин и 3 женщин), средний возраст — 38,9±1,4 года с СВК, развившимся у 3 на фоне острых, у 2 — обострения хронических заболеваний желудочно-кишечного тракта с мальабсорбцией, у 3 — после оперативных вмешательств на верхних отделах желудочно-кишечного тракта. Результаты. Заболевание дебютировало нарушением сознания. Симптомы атаксии, глазодвигательных расстройств, бульбарный синдром присоединялся спустя 24—48 ч. У 1 больного развился резистентный к терапии статус тонико-клонических припадков. Картина МРТ головного мозга характеризовалась наличием гиперинтенсивных очагов на Т2-взвешенных изображениях в области гипоталамуса, мамиллярных тел, в стволе мозга, мозжечке и накоплением контраста в мамиллярных телах. Проводилась терапия комплексом витаминов группы В (нейробион) и тиамином с положительным эффектом. Заключение. Риск развития СВК имеется у пациентов с заболеваниями желудочно-кишечного тракта, сопровождающимися мальабсорбцией. Появление у таких пациентов изменения сознания, атаксии, глазодвигательных расстройств является показанием для начала терапии тиамином, это позволяет предупредить развитие стойкого когнитивного дефицита.

  14. A rare case of dengue encephalopathy complicating a term pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopala, Lavanya; Satharasinghe, Ravindra L; Karunarathna, Madhava

    2017-02-02

    Dengue fever has an expanded clinical spectrum ranging from an asymptomatic infection to life threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever and refractory shock. Dengue infection in pregnancy can be a diagnostic dilemma, particularly considering the physiological changes in pregnancy and the obstetric complications encountered in clinical practice. Hence the knowledge of its diagnosis and management in its atypical presentations is of paramount importance. Here we report an unusual case of uncomplicated dengue encephalopathy in a term mother, probably the first to be reported from the Indian subcontinent. A 28 year old woman, 37 weeks of pregnancy presented with fever of four days duration. She eventually developed irritability, altered sensorium, somnolence, and unresponsiveness to commands by the 5th day of febrile illness without any circulatory compromise. Physical examination and investigations including serology confirmed dengue fever. After excluding all other possible causes, the transient neurological deterioration was finally attributed to dengue encephalopathy which is an uncommon manifestation of the disease, particularly in pregnancy. Her deteriorated neurological status which had lasted for 6 days improved spontaneously with the convalescence of dengue infection. Cautious fluid management was carried out in correlation to clinical and hematological parameters. The pregnancy was continued uncomplicated till the platelet count had risen to more than 50,000 cells/cumm. She delivered vaginally a healthy male baby. Dengue fever in pregnancy is increasingly being encountered due to its rising disease burden. Dengue encephalitis/encephalopathy must be suspected in the differential diagnosis of fever and altered sensorium, even in pregnancy, in the tropical countries where the infection is rampant. Management of dengue infection in term pregnancy is a challenge for both the clinician and obstetrician. Further discussion and research are mandatory to decide on

  15. Management of Hepatic Encephalopathy by Traditional Chinese Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Yao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In spite of the impressive progress in the investigation of hepatic encephalopathy (HE, the complex mechanisms underlying the onset and deterioration of HE are still not fully understood. Currently, none of the existing theories provide conclusive explanations on the symptoms that link liver dysfunction to nervous system disorders and clinical manifestations. This paper summarized the diagnostic and therapeutic approaches used for HE in modern medicine and traditional Chinese medicine and provided future perspective in HE therapies from the viewpoint of holistic and personalized Chinese medicine.

  16. The Role of Sarcopenia and Frailty in Hepatic Encephalopathy Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucero, Catherine; Verna, Elizabeth C

    2015-08-01

    Normal regulation of total body and circulating ammonia requires a delicate interplay in ammonia formation and breakdown between several organ systems. In the setting of cirrhosis and portal hypertension, the decreased hepatic clearance of ammonia leads to significant dependence on skeletal muscle for ammonia detoxification; however, cirrhosis is also associated with muscle depletion and decreased functional muscle mass. Thus, patients with diminished muscle mass and sarcopenia may have a decreased ability to compensate for hepatic insufficiency and a higher likelihood of developing physiologically significant hyperammonemia and hepatic encephalopathy.

  17. Diagnosis and Management of Hepatic Encephalopathy in Fulminant Hepatic Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodali, Sudha; McGuire, Brendan M

    2015-08-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is associated with cerebral edema (CE), increased intracranial pressure (ICP), and subsequent neurologic complications; it is the most important cause of morbidity and mortality in fulminant hepatic failure. The goal of therapy should be early diagnosis and treatment of HE with measures to reduce CE. A combination of clinical examination and diagnostic modalities can aid in prompt diagnosis. ICP monitoring and transcranial Doppler help diagnose and monitor response to treatment. Transfer to a transplant center and intensive care unit admission with airway management and reduction of CE with hypertonic saline, mannitol, hypothermia, and sedation are recommended as a bridge to liver transplantation.

  18. Ammonia and Its Role in the Pathogenesis of Hepatic Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, Parth J; Balart, Luis A

    2015-08-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a commonly encountered sequela of chronic liver disease and cirrhosis with significant associated morbidity and mortality. Although ammonia is implicated in the pathogenesis of HE, the exact underlying mechanisms still remain poorly understood. Its role in the urea cycle, astrocyte swelling, and glutamine and gamma-amino-n-butyric acid systems suggests that the pathogenesis is multifaceted. Greater understanding in its underlying mechanism may offer more targeted therapeutic options in the future, and thus further research is necessary to fully understand the pathogenesis of HE.

  19. Elevated cerebral lactate: Implications in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosoi, Cristina R; Rose, Christopher F

    2014-12-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE), a complex neuropsychiatric syndrome, is a frequent complication of liver failure/disease. Increased concentrations of lactate are commonly observed in HE patients, in the systemic circulation, but also in the brain. Traditionally, increased cerebral lactate is considered a marker of energy failure/impairment however alterations in lactate homeostasis may also lead to a rise in brain lactate and result in neuronal dysfunction. The latter may involve the development of brain edema. This review will target the significance of increased cerebral lactate in the pathogenesis of HE.

  20. Acute Liver Failure and Hepatic Encephalopathy After Cleft Palate Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocaaslan, Nihal Durmuş; Tuncer, Fatma Betul; Tutar, Engin; Celebiler, Ozhan

    2015-09-01

    Paracetamol is the most commonly used analgesic after cleft palate repair. It has rarely caused acute hepatic failure at therapeutic or supratherapeutic doses. Only one case of therapeutic paracetamol toxicity after cleft palate repair had been reported previously. Here, we present a similar patient who developed acute liver failure and hepatic encephalopathy after an uncomplicated cleft palate surgery. Lack of large prospective trials in young children due to ethical concerns increases the value of the case reports of acetaminophen toxicity at therapeutic doses. The dosing recommendations of paracetamol may need to be reconsidered after cleft palate surgery.

  1. [Risk assessment for importing bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörnlimann, B; Guidon, D; Griot, C

    1994-07-01

    Since the occurrence of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in Switzerland in 1990, extensive epidemiological investigations and risk factor analyses were carried out. In this study, statistical data on meat and bone meal traded from 1985 to 1989 were analysed addressing the following questions: i) what amount of meat and bone meal was exported from Great Britain (GB) and where to and ii) what amount of meat and bone meal was imported into Switzerland and where from? The findings led to the hypothesis that imported material potentially infected with scrapie-like agents was the cause for BSE in Switzerland.

  2. Hypercalcemic encephalopathy due to milk alkali syndrome and injection teriparatide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Kharb

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An 82-year-old male, a known case of severe osteoporosis with vertebral fracture and prostatic carcinoma, was treated with gonadotropin releasing hormone analogue, calcium carbonate, cholecalciferol sachet and injection teriparatide. His diet consisted of milk and curd. He developed altered behavior and generalized weakness, and on investigation, hypercalcemia, hypokalemia, and metabolic alkalosis with low parathyroid hormone levels were detected. Injection teriparatide was stopped and he was managed with forced saline diuresis and injection zoledronic acid. He was diagnosed as a case of milk alkali syndrome in whom teriparatide and prolonged immobilization played a permissive role in the development of hypercalcemic encephalopathy.

  3. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in a patient of organophosphate poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Phatake

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 32-year-old male presented with a history of consuming some organophosphorous compound with suicidal intention.He was treated with atropine, pralidoxime, ventilator support. During stay patient had persistent irritability, tachycardiaand hypertension despite sedation and labetalol infusion. He developed headache, visual blurring hemiparesis and focal seizures. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed multifocal hyperintensities mainly in subcortical areas of parietal and occipital regions in T2-weighted images, with increased values of Apparent Diffusion Coefficient, suggesting posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES. The possibilities of PRES caused by organophosphorous poisoning either due to hypertension caused by autonomic deregulation or direct neurological toxicity has been discussed.

  4. The assessment and care of patients with hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bager, Palle

    2017-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the metabolic brain dysfunction hepatic encephalopathy (HE). HE is caused by severe liver cirrhosis and patients will often be treated in a liver unit, but patients with symptoms of HE may require nursing care anywhere in the healthcare system. Therefore...... it is beneficial for all nurses to have a basic knowledge of HE and this article explains the symptoms and treatment. Possible differential diagnoses are presented, as well as factors that can trigger episodes of HE. Both patients' and relatives' experiences are examined. Finally, the nurse's role in caring...

  5. Gene Panel Testing in Epileptic Encephalopathies and Familial Epilepsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Rikke S.; Larsen, Line H.G.; Johannesen, Katrine M.

    2016-01-01

    of a wide spectrum of epilepsies with age of onset spanning from the neonatal period to adulthood. A gene panel targeting 46 epilepsy genes was used on a cohort of 216 patients consecutively referred for panel testing. The patients had a range of different epilepsies from benign neonatal seizures...... to epileptic encephalopathies (EEs). Potentially causative variants were evaluated by literature and database searches, submitted to bioinformatic prediction algorithms, and validated by Sanger sequencing. If possible, parents were included for segregation analysis. We identified a presumed disease...

  6. Cattle traceability system in Japan for bovine spongiform encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuaki Sugiura

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available To promote consumer confidence in the safety of beef and to ensure the proper implementation of eradication measures against bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE, the Cattle Traceability Law was approved by the Diet in June 2003 and a cattle traceability system has been in operation in Japan since December 2003. The system enables tracing the cohort and offspring animals of a BSE case within 24 h of its detection. The traceability database system also provides distributors, restaurants and consumers with information on the cattle from which the beef that they sell, serve and consume originate.

  7. Acute headache as a presenting symptom of tacrolimus encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiemeneij, I M; de Leeuw, F-E; Ramos, L M P; van Gijn, J

    2003-08-01

    A 24 year old woman presented with a sudden excruciating headache mimicking an acute vascular event. She had undergone a lung transplantation because of cystic fibrosis and was receiving maintenance treatment with tacrolimus and prednisone. Ancillary investigation excluded vascular causes. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated hyperintense lesions in the infratentorial and parieto-occipital regions consistent with posterior leucencephalopathy syndrome. Both her clinical condition improved and the lesions disappeared completely after withdrawal of tacrolimus, suggesting that her condition could be explained by a tacrolimus encephalopathy.

  8. Contemporary Understanding and Management of Overt and Covert Hepatic Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    NeSmith, Meghan; Ahn, Joseph; Flamm, Steven L

    2016-02-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a major complication of liver disease that leads to significant morbidity and mortality. Caring for hospitalized patients with HE is becoming more complex, and the economic burden of HE continues to rise. Defining and diagnosing HE, particularly covert HE (CHE), remain challenging. In this article, we review new tools and those currently under development for the diagnosis of CHE and the latest advances in the acute and long-term management of overt HE (OHE) and CHE. In particular, we review the latest data on the use of lactulose and rifaximin for treatment of OHE and summarize the data on adjunctive agents such as sodium benzoate and probiotics.

  9. Current status of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies in ruminants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penders J.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE encompass subacute neurological degenerative diseases for which the prototypes are scrapie in sheep and some forms of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in man. The emergence of a new form of TSE in cattle in United Kingdom (UK since 1986, namely bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE, sharply increased the interest for these diseases, especially because of the epidemic nature of BSE in UK, its subsequent spread in continental Europe and the later discovery of its zoonotic character. The number of measures of veterinary public health taken to control the disease and to prevent its spread to animals and human beings increased in time and culminated by the total feed ban. Indeed, since the beginning of 2001, feed containing proteins of animal origin is prohibited for the feeding of production animals, including ruminants and monogastric species. The effect of this total ban of mammalian meat and bone meal needs to be evaluated. The incidence of BSE has a trend to decrease in UK and in most of the other European member states. However, as BSE is a rare event distributed in a large bovine population, it is difficult to state unambiguously whether this trend is significant. Furthermore, the evaluation of this measure will be only effective at least five years after its introduction, since this period is the mean incubation time of BSE. The main concern is currently the eradication of BSE in the infected countries. Additionally, the control of scrapie is also carried out due to the possible contamination of sheep with the BSE agent. These actions must take into account several new facts: the recent discovery of BSE cases in countries with a low geographical BSE risk level as Japan, Canada and the United States of America (USA; the growing incidence of chronic wasting disease, a spongiform encephalopathy observed in deer in USA; the characterization of a new pattern of bovine amyloidotic spongiform encephalopathy in

  10. Moyamoya disease in a child with previous acute necrotizing encephalopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Taik-Kun; Cha, Sang Hoon; Chung, Kyoo Byung; Kim, Jung Hyuck; Kim, Baek Hyun; Chung, Hwan Hoon [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Korea University College of Medicine, Ansan Hospital, 516 Kojan-Dong, Ansan City, Kyungki-Do 425-020 (Korea); Eun, Baik-Lin [Department of Pediatrics, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea)

    2003-09-01

    A previously healthy 24-day-old boy presented with a 2-day history of fever and had a convulsion on the day of admission. MRI showed abnormal signal in the thalami, caudate nuclei and central white matter. Acute necrotising encephalopathy was diagnosed, other causes having been excluded after biochemical and haematological analysis of blood, urine and CSF. He recovered, but with spastic quadriparesis. At the age of 28 months, he suffered sudden deterioration of consciousness and motor weakness of his right limbs. MRI was consistent with an acute cerebrovascular accident. Angiography showed bilateral middle cerebral artery stenosis or frank occlusion with numerous lenticulostriate collateral vessels consistent with moyamoya disease. (orig.)

  11. Wernicke-Korsakoff综合征为主要表现的原发性中枢神经系统淋巴瘤1例报告

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王建秀; 段淑荣; 王德生

    2006-01-01

    原发性中枢神经系统淋巴瘤临床表现多样,早期易误诊;以Wernicke-Korsakoff综合征为主要表现的原发性中枢神经系统淋巴瘤临床少见.现将我院诊断的1例报告如下.

  12. Hypoxic-Ischemic Neonatal Encephalopathy: Animal Experiments for Neuroprotective Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Sameshima

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxic-ischemic neonatal encephalopathy and ensuing brain damage is still an important problem in modern perinatal medicine. In this paper, we would like to share some of the results of our recent studies on neuroprotective therapies in animal experiments, as well as some literature reviews. From the basic animal studies, we have now obtained some possible candidates for therapeutic measures against hypoxic-ischemic neonatal encephalopathy. For example, they are hypothermia, rehabilitation, free radical scavenger, neurotrophic factors and growth factors, steroid, calcium channel blocker, vagal stimulation, some anti apoptotic agents, pre- and post conditioning, antioxidants, cell therapy with stem cells, modulators of K(+-ATP channels, and so on. Whether combination of these therapies may be more beneficial than any single therapy needs to be clarified. Hypoxia-ischemia is a complicated condition, in which the cause, severity, and time-course are different in each case. Likewise, each fetus has its own inherent potentials such as adaptation, preconditioning-tolerance, and intolerance. Therefore, further extensive studies are required to establish an individualized strategy for neuroprotection against perinatal hypoxic-ischemic insult.

  13. Pathogenesis of pancreatic encephalopathy in severe acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi-Ping Zhang; Hua Tian

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Pancreatic encephalopathy (PE) is a serious complication of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). In recent years, more and more PE cases have been reported worldwide, and the onset PE in the early stage was regarded as a poor prognosis sign of SAP, but the pathogenesis of PE in SAP still has not been clariifed in the past decade. The purpose of this review is to elucidate the possible pathogenesis of PE in SAP. DATA SOURCES:The English-language literature concern-ing PE in this review came from the Database of MEDLINE (period of 1991-2005), and the keywords of severe acute pancreatitis and pancreatic encephalopathy were used in the searching. RESULTS:Many factors were involved in the pathogenesis of PE in SAP. Pancreatin activation, excessive release of cytokines and oxygen free radicals, microcirculation abnormalities of hemodynamic disturbance, ET-1/NO ratio, hypoxemia, bacterial infection, water and electrolyte imbalance, and vitamin B1 deifciency participated in the development of PE in SAP. CONCLUSIONS:The pathogenesis of PE in SAP has not yet been fully understood. The development of PE in SAP may be a multi-factor process. To ifnd out the possible inducing factor is essential to the clinical management of PE in SAP.

  14. Recurrent contrast-induced encephalopathy following coronary angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spina, Roberto; Simon, Neil; Markus, Romesh; Muller, David W M; Kathir, Krishna

    2017-02-01

    Contrast-induced encephalopathy (CIE) is an acute and reversible neurological disturbance associated with the intra-arterial administration of iodinated contrast medium during cardiac catheterisation. It may manifest with encephalopathy, motor and sensory disturbances; vision disturbances, including cortical blindness, ophthalmoplegia, aphasia; and seizures. Disruption of the blood-brain barrier and direct neuronal toxicity are believed to be implicated in the pathophysiology of the syndrome. Symptoms appear soon after contrast administration and resolve completely within 24-48 h. Risk factors may include hypertension, diabetes mellitus, renal impairment, the administration of large volumes of iodinated contrast, percutaneous coronary intervention or selective angiography of internal mammary grafts and previous adverse reaction to iodinated contrast. On cerebral imaging, CIE may mimic subarachnoid haemorrhage or cerebral ischaemia, but imaging may be normal. Prognosis is excellent with supportive management alone. CIE may recur, but re-challenge with iodinated contrast without adverse effects has been documented. CIE is a diagnosis of exclusion and is an important clinical entity to consider in the differential diagnosis of stroke following cardiac catheterisation. Physicians should be aware of it and consider it prior to initiating thrombolysis.

  15. Quantitative analysis of brain magnetic resonance imaging for hepatic encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syh, Hon-Wei; Chu, Wei-Kom; Ong, Chin-Sing

    1992-06-01

    High intensity lesions around ventricles have recently been observed in T1-weighted brain magnetic resonance images for patients suffering hepatic encephalopathy. The exact etiology that causes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) gray scale changes has not been totally understood. The objective of our study was to investigate, through quantitative means, (1) the amount of changes to brain white matter due to the disease process, and (2) the extent and distribution of these high intensity lesions, since it is believed that the abnormality may not be entirely limited to the white matter only. Eleven patients with proven haptic encephalopathy and three normal persons without any evidence of liver abnormality constituted our current data base. Trans-axial, sagittal, and coronal brain MRI were obtained on a 1.5 Tesla scanner. All processing was carried out on a microcomputer-based image analysis system in an off-line manner. Histograms were decomposed into regular brain tissues and lesions. Gray scale ranges coded as lesion were then brought back to original images to identify distribution of abnormality. Our results indicated the disease process involved pallidus, mesencephalon, and subthalamic regions.

  16. Neuropathology of a fatal case of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheir, John N; Lawlor, Michael W; Ahn, Edward S; Lehmann, Leslie; Riviello, James J; Silvera, V Michelle; McManus, Michael; Folkerth, Rebecca D

    2010-01-01

    The pathology of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is undefined, since it is rarely fatal and is biopsied in only exceptional circumstances. We describe rapidly progressive PRES following stem cell transplant for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. After development of altered mental status, this 8-year-old girl had T2 prolongation of the white matter in a posterior-dominant distribution, eventually developing cerebellar edema, hemorrhage, hydrocephalus, and herniation. Despite surgical and medical management, she died 36 hours later. At autopsy, the occipital and cerebellar white matter and focal occipital cortical gray matter showed a spectrum of microvascular changes, including dilated perivascular spaces containing proteinaceous exudates and macrophages, as well as fibrinoid necrosis and acute hemorrhage, in a distribution corresponding to the neuroimaging abnormalities and reminiscent of those seen in patients with acute hypertensive encephalopathy. Of note, similar microvascular changes were not seen in the kidney or other systemic sites. Thus, the findings indicate a brain-specific microvascular compromise as the substrate of PRES, at least in the rare instance of cases progressing to fatal outcome.

  17. Is Encephalopathy a Mechanism to Renew Sulfate in Autism?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurie Lentz-Marino

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper makes two claims: (1 autism can be characterized as a chronic low-grade encephalopathy, associated with excess exposure to nitric oxide, ammonia and glutamate in the central nervous system, which leads to hippocampal pathologies and resulting cognitive impairment, and (2, encephalitis is provoked by a systemic deficiency in sulfate, but associated seizures and fever support sulfate restoration. We argue that impaired synthesis of cholesterol sulfate in the skin and red blood cells, catalyzed by sunlight and nitric oxide synthase enzymes, creates a state of colloidal instability in the blood manifested as a low zeta potential and increased interfacial stress. Encephalitis, while life-threatening, can result in partial renewal of sulfate supply, promoting neuronal survival. Research is cited showing how taurine may not only help protect neurons from hypochlorite exposure, but also provide a source for sulfate renewal. Several environmental factors can synergistically promote the encephalopathy of autism, including the herbicide, glyphosate, aluminum, mercury, lead, nutritional deficiencies in thiamine and zinc, and yeast overgrowth due to excess dietary sugar. Given these facts, dietary and lifestyle changes, including increased sulfur ingestion, organic whole foods, increased sun exposure, and avoidance of toxins such as aluminum, mercury, and lead, may help to alleviate symptoms or, in some instances, to prevent autism altogether.

  18. [Hashimoto's encephalopathy: a rare cause of status epilepticus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doe De Maindreville, A; Gombert, C; Thiriaux, A; Chaunu, M; Bakchine, S

    2013-04-01

    Hashimoto's Encephalopathy (HE) is a rare condition defined by the association of encephalopathy and autoimmune thyroiditis with increased levels of antithyroid antibodies. Presenting symptoms of HE may be quite variable. Although seizures are rather frequent, status epilepticus seems very rare (10 reported cases to date) and exceptionally revealing. We report the case of a 48-year-old female, who presented with a series of status epilepticus. The only positive result of the initial exploration was an increased level of antithyroid antibodies. The patient's condition improved only after initiation of corticosteroid treatment, which provided a stable remission. HE pathophysiology still remains poorly understood and controversial. Pathological data are sparse and provide variable pictures. Although an autoimmune mechanism looks very likely, the precise role of antithyroid antibodies is still discussed. A direct toxicity has not been demonstrated and antibodies could simply be a marker of impaired immunity. Occurrence of status epilepticus in HE could be related to the presence of active inflammation of cortical or para-cortical tissue, although such a hypothesis remains to be demonstrated. The diagnosis of HE should be systematically considered in patients with unexplained episodes of status epilepticus. Search for abnormal thyroid function and increased levels of antithyroid antibodies allow both early diagnosis and treatment, with a clear benefit for the patients.

  19. Evaluation of the Zoonotic Potential of Transmissible Mink Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Brown

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Successful transmission of Transmissible Mink Encephalopathy (TME to cattle supports the bovine hypothesis for the still controversial origin of TME outbreaks. Human and primate susceptibility to classical Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (c-BSE and the transmissibility of L-type BSE to macaques indicate a low cattle-to-primate species barrier. We therefore evaluated the zoonotic potential of cattle-adapted TME. In less than two years, this strain induced in cynomolgus macaques a neurological disease similar to L-BSE but distinct from c-BSE. TME derived from another donor species (raccoon induced a similar disease with even shorter incubation periods. L-BSE and cattle-adapted TME were also transmissible to transgenic mice expressing human prion protein (PrP. Secondary transmissions to transgenic mice expressing bovine PrP maintained the features of the three tested bovine strains (cattle TME, c-BSE and L-BSE regardless of intermediate host. Thus, TME is the third animal prion strain transmissible to both macaques and humanized transgenic mice, suggesting zoonotic potentials that should be considered in the risk analysis of animal prion diseases for human health. Moreover, the similarities between TME and L-BSE are highly suggestive of a link between these strains, and therefore the possible presence of L-BSE for many decades prior to its identification in USA and Europe.

  20. A case of tacrolimus-induced encephalopathy after kidney transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myoung Uk; Kim, Sae Yoon; Son, Su Min

    2011-01-01

    We present a case of tacrolimus-induced encephalopathy after successful kidney transplantation. An 11-year-old girl presented with sudden onset of neurologic symptoms, hypertension, and psychiatric symptoms, with normal kidney function, after kidney transplantation. The symptoms improved after cessation of tacrolimus. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed acute infarction of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory in the right frontal lobe. Three days later, she had normal mental function and maintained normal blood pressure with left hemiparesis. Follow-up MRI was performed on D19, showing new infarct lesions at both cerebral hemispheres. Ten days later, MRI showed further improvement, but brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) showed mild reduction of uptake in both the anterior cingulate gyrus and the left thalamus. One month after onset of symptoms, angiography showed complete resolution of stenosis. However, presenting as a mild fine motor disability of both hands and mild dysarthria, what had been atrophy at both centrum semiovale at 4 months now showed progression to encephalomalacia. There are two points of interest in this case. First, encephalopathy occurred after administration of tacrolimus and improved after discontinuation of the drug. Second, the development of right-side hemiplegia could not be explained by conventional MRI; but through diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and diffusion tensor tractography (DTT) of white matter tract, visualization was possible. PMID:21359060

  1. A case of tacrolimus-induced encephalopathy after kidney transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myoung Uk Kim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of tacrolimus-induced encephalopathy after successful kidney transplantation. An 11-year-old girl presented with sudden onset of neurologic symptoms, hypertension, and psychiatric symptoms, with normal kidney function, after kidney transplantation. The symptoms improved after cessation of tacrolimus. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed acute infarction of the middle cerebral artery (MCA territory in the right frontal lobe. Three days later, she had normal mental function and maintained normal blood pressure with left hemiparesis. Follow-up MRI was performed on D19, showing new infarct lesions at both cerebral hemispheres. Ten days later, MRI showed further improvement, but brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT showed mild reduction of uptake in both the anterior cingulate gyrus and the left thalamus. One month after onset of symptoms, angiography showed complete resolution of stenosis. However, presenting as a mild fine motor disability of both hands and mild dysarthria, what had been atrophy at both centrum semiovale at 4 months now showed progression to encephalomalacia. There are two points of interest in this case. First, encephalopathy occurred after administration of tacrolimus and improved after discontinuation of the drug. Second, the development of right-side hemiplegia could not be explained by conventional MRI; but through diffusion tensor imaging (DTI and diffusion tensor tractography (DTT of white matter tract, visualization was possible.

  2. Biallelic TBCD Mutations Cause Early-Onset Neurodegenerative Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Noriko; Fukai, Ryoko; Ohba, Chihiro; Chihara, Takahiro; Miura, Masayuki; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Kakita, Akiyoshi; Imagawa, Eri; Shiina, Masaaki; Ogata, Kazuhiro; Okuno-Yuguchi, Jiu; Fueki, Noboru; Ogiso, Yoshifumi; Suzumura, Hiroshi; Watabe, Yoshiyuki; Imataka, George; Leong, Huey Yin; Fattal-Valevski, Aviva; Kramer, Uri; Miyatake, Satoko; Kato, Mitsuhiro; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Sato, Yoshinori; Mitsuhashi, Satomi; Nishino, Ichizo; Kaneko, Naofumi; Nishiyama, Akira; Tamura, Tomohiko; Mizuguchi, Takeshi; Nakashima, Mitsuko; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2016-10-06

    We describe four families with affected siblings showing unique clinical features: early-onset (before 1 year of age) progressive diffuse brain atrophy with regression, postnatal microcephaly, postnatal growth retardation, muscle weakness/atrophy, and respiratory failure. By whole-exome sequencing, we identified biallelic TBCD mutations in eight affected individuals from the four families. TBCD encodes TBCD (tubulin folding co-factor D), which is one of five tubulin-specific chaperones playing a pivotal role in microtubule assembly in all cells. A total of seven mutations were found: five missense mutations, one nonsense, and one splice site mutation resulting in a frameshift. In vitro cell experiments revealed the impaired binding between most mutant TBCD proteins and ARL2, TBCE, and β-tubulin. The in vivo experiments using olfactory projection neurons in Drosophila melanogaster indicated that the TBCD mutations caused loss of function. The wide range of clinical severity seen in this neurodegenerative encephalopathy may result from the residual function of mutant TBCD proteins. Furthermore, the autopsied brain from one deceased individual showed characteristic neurodegenerative findings: cactus and somatic sprout formations in the residual Purkinje cells in the cerebellum, which are also seen in some diseases associated with mitochondrial impairment. Defects of microtubule formation caused by TBCD mutations may underlie the pathomechanism of this neurodegenerative encephalopathy. Copyright © 2016 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Bovine spongiform encephalopathy surveillance in the Republic of Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y H; Kim, M J; Tark, D S; Sohn, H J; Yun, E I; Cho, I S; Choi, Y P; Kim, C L; Lee, J H; Kweon, C H; Joo, Y S; Chung, G S; Lee, J H

    2012-12-01

    National surveillance for bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) began in the Republic of Korea (ROK) in 1996. Surveillance programmes changed overtime to comply with the guidelines of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE). Bovine spongiform encephalopathy was designated as a notifiable disease in 1997. From July 2008, the BSE surveillance programme was intensified to test cattle in designated high-risk populations more effectively. New measures included the compulsory testing of all non-ambulatory cattle at abattoirs, and encouraging the testing of all dead cattle examined and recorded under the Mutual Aid Insurance Scheme (fallen stock). In addition, there was a vigorous search for animals suspected of being clinically infected. As a result, a total of 426,919 OIE points were achieved over a period of seven consecutive years to the end of October 2009. This enabled the submission of a successful application to the OIE in 2010 for recognition of the ROK's BSE disease status as being one of controlled risk, in accordance with Chapter 11.5. of the OIE Terrestrial Animal Health Code.

  4. Loss of ETHE1, a mitochondrial dioxygenase, causes fatal sulfide toxicity in ethylmalonic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiranti, Valeria; Viscomi, Carlo; Hildebrandt, Tatjana; Di Meo, Ivano; Mineri, Rossana; Tiveron, Cecilia; Levitt, Michael D; Prelle, Alessandro; Fagiolari, Gigliola; Rimoldi, Marco; Zeviani, Massimo

    2009-02-01

    Ethylmalonic encephalopathy is an autosomal recessive, invariably fatal disorder characterized by early-onset encephalopathy, microangiopathy, chronic diarrhea, defective cytochrome c oxidase (COX) in muscle and brain, high concentrations of C4 and C5 acylcarnitines in blood and high excretion of ethylmalonic acid in urine. ETHE1, a gene encoding a beta-lactamase-like, iron-coordinating metalloprotein, is mutated in ethylmalonic encephalopathy. In bacteria, ETHE1-like sequences are in the same operon of, or fused with, orthologs of TST, the gene encoding rhodanese, a sulfurtransferase. In eukaryotes, both ETHE1 and rhodanese are located within the mitochondrial matrix. We created a Ethe1(-/-) mouse that showed the cardinal features of ethylmalonic encephalopathy. We found that thiosulfate was excreted in massive amounts in urine of both Ethe1(-/-) mice and humans with ethylmalonic encephalopathy. High thiosulfate and sulfide concentrations were present in Ethe1(-/-) mouse tissues. Sulfide is a powerful inhibitor of COX and short-chain fatty acid oxidation, with vasoactive and vasotoxic effects that explain the microangiopathy in ethylmalonic encephalopathy patients. Sulfide is detoxified by a mitochondrial pathway that includes a sulfur dioxygenase. Sulfur dioxygenase activity was absent in Ethe1(-/-) mice, whereas it was markedly increased by ETHE1 overexpression in HeLa cells and Escherichia coli. Therefore, ETHE1 is a mitochondrial sulfur dioxygenase involved in catabolism of sulfide that accumulates to toxic levels in ethylmalonic encephalopathy.

  5. Performance of the hepatic encephalopathy scoring algorithm in a clinical trial of patients with cirrhosis and severe hepatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanein, Tarek; Blei, Andres T; Perry, William; Hilsabeck, Robin; Stange, Jan; Larsen, Fin S; Brown, Robert S; Caldwell, Stephen; McGuire, Brendan; Nevens, Frederik; Fontana, Robert

    2009-06-01

    The grading of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is based on a combination of indicators that reflect the state of consciousness, intellectual function, changes in behavior, and neuromuscular alterations seen in patients with liver failure. We modified the traditional West Haven criteria (WHC) to provide an objective assessment of the cognitive parameters to complement the subjective clinical ratings for the performance of extracorporeal albumin dialysis (ECAD) using a molecular adsorption recirculating system in patients with cirrhosis and severe (grade III / IV) encephalopathy. The HE Scoring Algorithm (HESA) combined clinical indicators with those derived from simple neuropsychological tests,the latter more often used in milder grades of HE (I / II). The performance of each indicator was compared across grades and sites. Results of HESA were also compared with the Glasgow Coma Scale. A total of 597 evaluations were performed in patients randomized to ECAD plus standard medical therapy or the latter only. Most parameters exhibited significant separation between grades; the most effective indicators were lack of verbal, eye, and motor response (grade IV), somnolence and disorientation to place (grade III), and lethargy and disorientation to time (grade II). Two clinical and four neuropsychological indicators were useful to classify patients as grade I. The Glasgow Coma Scale differed among the four stages of the WHC, but the differences between grades I and II were small and not clinically useful. HESA extends the traditional WHC for grading HE. In the absence of a "gold" standard, the most useful indicators noted in this trial should be further validated.

  6. Phenotypic similarity of transmissible mink encephalopathy in cattle and L-type bovine spongiform encephalopathy in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Thierry; Bencsik, Anna; Biacabe, Anne-Gaëlle; Morignat, Eric; Bessen, Richard A

    2007-12-01

    Transmissible mink encepholapathy (TME) is a foodborne transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) of ranch-raised mink; infection with a ruminant TSE has been proposed as the cause, but the precise origin of TME is unknown. To compare the phenotypes of each TSE, bovine-passaged TME isolate and 3 distinct natural bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) agents (typical BSE, H-type BSE, and L-type BSE) were inoculated into an ovine transgenic mouse line (TgOvPrP4). Transgenic mice were susceptible to infection with bovine-passaged TME, typical BSE, and L-type BSE but not to H-type BSE. Based on survival periods, brain lesions profiles, disease-associated prion protein brain distribution, and biochemical properties of protease-resistant prion protein, typical BSE had a distint phenotype in ovine transgenic mice compared to L-type BSE and bovine TME. The similar phenotypic properties of L-type BSE and bovine TME in TgOvPrP4 mice suggest that L-type BSE is a much more likely candidate for the origin of TME than is typical BSE.

  7. Use of murine bioassay to resolve ovine transmissible spongiform encephalopathy cases showing a bovine spongiform encephalopathy molecular profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Katy E; Sallis, Rosemary E; Lockey, Richard; Vickery, Christopher M; Béringue, Vincent; Laude, Hubert; Holder, Thomas M; Thorne, Leigh; Terry, Linda A; Tout, Anna C; Jayasena, Dhanushka; Griffiths, Peter C; Cawthraw, Saira; Ellis, Richard; Balkema-Buschmann, Anne; Groschup, Martin H; Simmons, Marion M; Spiropoulos, John

    2012-05-01

    Two cases of unusual transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) were diagnosed on the same farm in ARQ/ARQ PrP sheep showing attributes of both bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and scrapie. These cases, UK-1 and UK-2, were investigated further by transmissions to wild-type and ovine transgenic mice. Lesion profiles (LP) on primary isolation and subpassage, incubation period (IP) of disease, PrP(Sc) immunohistochemical (IHC) deposition pattern and Western blot profiles were used to characterize the prions causing disease in these sheep. Results showed that both cases were compatible with scrapie. The presence of BSE was contraindicated by the following: LP on primary isolation in RIII and/or MR (modified RIII) mice; IP and LP after serial passage in wild-type mice; PrP(Sc) deposition pattern in wild-type mice; and IP and Western blot data in transgenic mice. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry (IHC) revealed that each case generated two distinct PrP(Sc) deposition patterns in both wild-type and transgenic mice, suggesting that two scrapie strains coexisted in the ovine hosts. Critically, these data confirmed the original differential IHC categorization that these UK-1 and UK-2 cases were not compatible with BSE.

  8. Uremic encephalopathy with atypical magnetic resonance features on diffusion-weighted images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Eugene; Jeon, Se Jeong; Choi, See-Sung

    2012-01-01

    Uremic encephalopathy is a well-known disease with typical MR findings including bilateral vasogenic or cytotoxic edema at the cerebral cortex or basal ganglia. Involvement of the basal ganglia has been very rarely reported, typically occurring in uremic-diabetic patients. We recently treated a patient who had non-diabetic uremic encephalopathy with an atypical lesion distribution involving the supratentorial white matter, without cortical or basal ganglia involvement. To the best of our knowledge, this is only the second reported case of non-diabetic uremic encephalopathy with atypical MR findings.

  9. Persistent repeated measurements by magnetic resonance spectroscopy demonstrate minimal hepatic encephalopathy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheau, C; Popa, G A; Ghergus, A E; Preda, E M; Capsa, R A; Lupescu, I G

    2013-09-15

    Minimal Hepatic Encephalopathy (MHE), previously referred to as infraclinical or subclinical is a precursor in the development of clinical hepatic encephalopathy (HE). The demonstration of MHE is done through neuropsychological testing in the absence of clinical evidence of HE, patients showing only a mild cognitive impairment. Neuropsychological tests employed consist of Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS) and portosystemic encephalopathy (PSE) test score. Unfortunately, there are numerous occasions when the tests prove irrelevant: in the situation of inexperienced investigators, the patient's poor education, vision problems or concurring central nervous system disease, all of which may delay or deviate from the correct diagnosis.

  10. Uremic Encephalopathy with Atypical Magnetic Resonance Features on Diffusion-Weighted Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Eu Gene; Jeon, Se Jeong; Choi, See Sung [Dept. of Radiology, Wonkwang University School of Medicine and Hospital, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    Uremic encephalopathy is a well-known disease with typical MR findings including bilateral vasogenic or cytotoxic edema at the cerebral cortex or basal ganglia. Involvement of the basal ganglia has been very rarely reported, typically occurring in uremic-diabetic patients. We recently treated a patient who had non-diabetic uremic encephalopathy with an atypical lesion distribution involving the supratentorial white matter, without cortical or basal ganglia involvement. To the best of our knowledge, this is only the second reported case of non-diabetic uremic encephalopathy with atypical MR findings.

  11. Severe posterior reversible encephalopathy in pheochromocytoma: Importance of susceptibility-weighted MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serter, Asil; Alkan, Alpay; Aralasmak, Ayse; Kocakoc, Ercan [Dept. of Radiology, Bezmialem Vakif University School of Medicine, Istanbul (Turkmenistan)

    2013-10-15

    Pheochromocytoma is a rare cause of hypertension in children. Hypertension is one of the common reasons of posterior reversible encephalopathy. Intracerebral hemorrhage is a serious and unexpected complication of hypertensive encephalopathy due to pheochromocytoma, and very rarely seen in the childhood. Intracerebral hemorrhages should be searched if there are hypertensive reversible signal changes on the brain. Susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) is a more sensitive method than conventional MRI when demonstrating cerebral microhemorrhagic foci. This is the first report of SWI findings on intracerebral hemorrhages in basal ganglia, brain stem and periventricular white matter due to hypertensive encephalopathy in a child with pheochromocytoma.

  12. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome in a Bone Marrow Transplant Patient: A Complication of Immunosuppressive Drugs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Mohammad A; Jehangir, Waqas; Nai, Qiang; Jessani, Naureen; Khan, Rafay; Yousif, Abdalla; Sen, Shuvendu

    2015-08-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy is a complex but well-recognized clinical and radiological entity associated with a variety of benign and malignant conditions including hypertensive encephalopathy, eclampsia, renal failure and immunosuppressive drugs. The pathogenesis is incompletely understood, although it seems to be related to the breakthrough of auto-regulation and endothelial dysfunction. The clinical syndromes typically involve headache, altered mental status, seizures, visual disturbance and other focal neurological signs and radiographically reversible vasogenic subcortical edema without infarction. Here, we report a case of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in a patient with chronic myeloid leukemia who received allogenic bone marrow transplantation (allo-BMT) and immunosuppressive drugs.

  13. Prevalence of subclinical hepatic encephalopathy in cirrhotic patients in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Yuan Li; Yu-Qiang Nie; Wei-Hong Sha; Zheng Zeng; Fu-Ying Yang; Li Ping; Lin Jia

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Subclinical hepatic encephalopathy (SHE) is a common complication of liver diseases. The aim of this study was to find out the normal value of psychometric test and to investigate the prevalence of SHE in Chinese patients with stabilized hepatic cirrhosis.METHODS: Four hundred and nine consecutive cirrhotic patients without overt clinical encephalopathy were screened for SHE by using number connection test part A (NCT-A) and symbol digit test (SDT). SHE was defined as presence of at least one abnormal psychometric test. The age-corrected normal values were defined as the mean±2times standard deviation (2SD), and developed in 356 healthy persons as normal controls. Four hundred and sixteen patients with chronic viral hepatitis were tested as negative controls to assess the diagnostic validity of this test battery.RESULTS: There was no significant difference in NCT scores and SDT quotients between healthy controls and chronic hepatitis group (P>0.05). In all age subgroups,the NCT and SDT measurements of cirrhotic patients differed significantly from those of the controls (P<0.05).When mean±2SD of SDT and NCT measurements from healthy control group was set as the normal range, 119cirrhotic patients (29.1%) were found to have abnormal NCT-A and SDT tests, 53 (13.0%) were abnormal only in SDT and 36 (8.8%) only in NCT-A. Taken together, SHE was diagnosed in 208 (50.9%) cirrhotic patients by this test battery. The prevalence of SHE increased from 39.9%and 55.2% in Child-Pugh's grade A and B groups to 71.8%in Child-Pugh's grade C group (P<0.05). After the adjustment of age and residential areas required from the tests, no correlation was found in the rate of SHE and causes of cirrhosis, education level and smoking habit.CONCLUSION: Psychometric tests are simple and reliable indicators for screening SHE among Chinese cirrhotic patients. By using a NCT and SDT battery, SHE could be found in 50.9% of cirrhotic patients without overt clinical encephalopathy. The

  14. Mitochondrial encephalopathy: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XU Yu-qiao

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the clinical, imaging and pathological characteristics of one case of mitochondrial encephalopathy. Methods The data of physical examination, electromyopraphy(EMG, cranial CT and MRI, electroencephalography (EEG, serologic examination, and light microscopy and electron microscopy of muscle biopsy specimens of one case of mitochondrial encephalopathy were collected. The related literatures were reviewed. Results A 52-year-old female patient was admitted with an 8-month of seizures, numbness of the limbs for three times. The clinical manifestations were mainly focal seizures with intelligence disturbance and positive bilateral pyramidal tract sign. The imaging examination was considered to be ischemic stroke and cerebral atrophy. EEG revealed moderate and severe abmormal brain wave. In cerebrospinal fluid (CSF examination, the intracranial pressure (ICP was initially 2.01 kPa and finally 1.03 kPa, red blood cell count 1.04 × 10 6/L, white blood cell count 5 × 10 6/L (with an increase in neutrophilic granulocyte proportion, protein 0.70 g/L, chlorides 103.30 mmol/L and IgG 51.90 mg/L. Serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP was 15.40 mg/L, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR 23 mm/h. Brain biopsy revealed cortical neuron swelling, loss of natural conical shape. The number of capillary increased and astrocytes proliferated reactively. Immunohistochemical examination showed that there were positive Mito granular materials inside the swelling and normal cytoplasm of neurons. The proliferative astrocytes were positive for glial fibrillany acid protein (GFAP. The electronic microscopic examination revealed that a large number of abnormal mitochondria various in shape and size were accumulated between subsarcolemma and myofibrilla. The mitochondrial cristae were flattened or prolonged and twining in concentricity. Osmiophilic bodies and crystalloid inclusion bodies were found in mitochondria. Conclusion

  15. Altered metal metabolism in patients with HCV-related cirrhosis and hepatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marano, Massimo; Vespasiani Gentilucci, Umberto; Altamura, Claudia; Siotto, Mariacristina; Squitti, Rosanna; Bucossi, Serena; Quintiliani, Livia; Migliore, Simone; Greco, Federico; Scarciolla, Laura; Quattrocchi, Carlo Cosimo; Picardi, Antonio; Vernieri, Fabrizio

    2015-12-01

    Dysfunctional metal homeostasis contributes to oxidative stress and neuronal damage. These have been implicated in hepatic encephalopathy pathogenesis. To investigate whether altered metal metabolism is associated with hepatic encephalopathy. Twenty-one controls and 34 HCV-cirrhotic patients (ENC/NEC patients according to presence/absence of previous overt episodes of hepatic encephalopathy) and a control group were studied. Serum iron, copper, ceruloplasmin, ceruloplasmin activity, transferrin, and ceruloplasmin/transferrin ratio were determined. Neuropsychological tests were performed by the repeatable battery of neuropsychological status. Magnetic resonance assessed basal ganglia volumes and metal deposition (pallidal index and T2*). Cirrhotic patients performed worse than controls at cognitive tests, especially ENC patients,. At biochemical analysis copper concentrations, ceruloplasmin activity and transferrin levels were lower in ENC than in NEC patients and controls (p hepatic encephalopathy.

  16. [Research advances in diagnosis and treatment of post-transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt hepatic encephalopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J F; Zhang, B Q

    2016-07-20

    Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) has become an important minimally invasive interventional technique for the treatment of complications of cirrhotic portal hypertension, and currently, it is often used in cirrhotic patients with esophagogastric variceal bleeding (EVB), intractable ascites, hepatic hydrothorax, and Budd-Chiari syndrome. On one hand, TIPS can effectively reduce portal vein pressure and the risk of EVB and intractable ascites; on the other hand, it may reduce the blood flow in liver perfusion, aggravate liver impairment, and cause porto-systemic encephalopathy. Related influencing factors should be evaluated comprehensively in order to prevent the development of post-TIPS hepatic encephalopathy. The diagnosis and treatment of post-TIPS hepatic encephalopathy is still a great challenge in current clinical practice. This article reviews the diagnosis and treatment of post-TIPS hepatic encephalopathy to enhance people's knowledge of this disease.

  17. Prognostic Value of Cytochrome C and Cytokines in Acute Viral Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Serum cytochrome c and cytokines were evaluated as prognostic predictors in 29 children (ages 9 mos to 9 yrs 11 mos with viral acute encephalopathies and multiple organ failure at Fukushima Medical University School of Medicine, Japan.

  18. Suboptimal performance on neuropsychological tests in patients with suspected chronic toxic encephalopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hout, MSE; Schmand, B; Wekking, EM; Hageman, G; Deelman, BG

    2003-01-01

    Suboptimal performance during neuropsychological testing can seriously complicate assessment in behavioral neurotoxicology. We present data on the prevalence of suboptimal performance in a group of Dutch patients with suspected chronic toxic encephalopathy (CTE) after long-term occupational exposure

  19. Reversible posterior encephalopathy syndrome associated with micronodular adrenocortical disease and Cushing syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodish, Maya; Patronas, Nicholas J; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2010-01-01

    We report a 6-year-old girl with ACTH-independent Cushing syndrome secondary to bilateral adrenal hyperplasia; she presented with hypertension and seizures, and magnetic resonance imaging shows changes consistent with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome.

  20. Lactulose enhances neuroplasticity to improve cognitive function in early hepatic encephalopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nan Yang; He Liu; Yao Jiang; Ji Zheng; Dong-mei Li; Chao Ji; Yan-yong Liu; Ping-ping Zuo

    2015-01-01

    Lactulose is known to improve cognitive function in patients with early hepatic encephalopa-thy; however, the underlying mechanism remains poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated the behavioral and neurochemical effects of lactulose in a rat model of early hepatic encephalopathy induced by carbon tetrachloride. Immunohistochemistry showed that lactulose treatment promoted neurogenesis and increased the number of neurons and astrocytes in the hippocampus. Moreover, lactulose-treated rats showed shorter escape latencies than model rats in the Morris water maze, indicating that lactulose improved the cognitive impairments caused by hepatic encephalopathy. The present ifndings suggest that lactulose effectively improves cog-nitive function by enhancing neuroplasticity in a rat model of early hepatic encephalopathy.

  1. QIL1 mutation causes MICOS disassembly and early onset fatal mitochondrial encephalopathy with liver disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Guarani, Virginia; Jardel, Claude; Chrétien, Dominique; Lombès, Anne; Bénit, Paule; Labasse, Clémence; Lacène, Emmanuelle; Bourillon, Agnès; Imbard, Apolline; Benoist, Jean-François; Dorboz, Imen; Gilleron, Mylène; Goetzman, Eric S; Gaignard, Pauline; Slama, Abdelhamid; Elmaleh-Bergès, Monique; Romero, Norma B; Rustin, Pierre; Ogier de Baulny, Hélène; Paulo, Joao A; Harper, J Wade; Schiff, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    ... (Guarani et al., 2015). Here, we identify QIL1 null alleles in two siblings displaying multiple clinical symptoms of early-onset fatal mitochondrial encephalopathy with liver disease, including defects in respiratory chain...

  2. 77 FR 20319 - Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-04

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service 9 CFR Part 93 RIN 0579-AC68 Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products Correction In proposed rule...

  3. 78 FR 73993 - Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-10

    ... Health Inspection Service 9 CFR Parts 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, and 98 RIN 0579-AC68 Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products Corrections In rule document 2013-28228 appearing...

  4. Brain diffusivity in infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy following whole body hypothermia: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artzi, Moran; Sira, Liat Ben; Bassan, Haim; Gross-Tsur, Varda; Berger, Irit; Marom, Ronella; Leitner, Yael; Bental, Yoram; Shiff, Yakov; Geva, Ronny; Weinstein, Maya; Bashat, Dafna Ben

    2011-10-01

    Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy is an important cause of neuropsychological deficits. Little is known about brain diffusivity in these infants following cooling and its potential in predicting outcome. Diffusion tensor imaging was applied to 3 groups: (1) three infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy: cooled; (2) three infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy: noncooled; and (3) four controls. Diffusivity values at the corticospinal tract, thalamus, and putamen were correlated with Apgar scores and early neurodevelopmental outcome. While cooled infants exhibited lower Apgar scores than noncooled infants, their developmental scores at a mean age of 8 months were higher. All groups differed in their diffusivity values with the cooled infants showing better values compared with the noncooled, correlating with early neurodevelopmental outcome. These preliminary results indicate that diffusion tensor imaging performed at an early age in infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy may forecast clinical outcome and support the neuroprotective effect of hypothermia treatment.

  5. Bruxism Associated with Anoxic Encephalopathy: Successful Treatment with Baclofen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janati, A. Bruce; ALGhasab, Naif Saad; ALGhassab, Fahad Saad

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Bruxism is a movement disorder characterized by grinding and clenching of the teeth. Etiology of bruxism can be divided into three groups: psychosocial factors, peripheral factors, and pathophysiological factors. Methods. The clinical investigation was conducted at King Khaled Hospital in Hail, Saudi Arabia, in 2012. Results. A 16-year-old Saudi female was brought to the hospital in a comatose state and with generalized convulsive seizures secondary to acute anoxic encephalopathy. In the third week of hospitalization, while still in a state of akinetic mutism, she developed incessant bruxism which responded favorably to a GABA receptor agonist (baclofen). Conclusion. Our data support the hypothesis that bruxism emanates from imbalance or dysregulation of the neurotransmitter system. Larger scale studies will be needed to confirm this hypothesis. PMID:24455317

  6. Bovine spongiform encephalopathy and spatial analysis of the feed industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Mathilde; Abrial, David; Jarrige, Nathalie; Rican, Stéphane; Garrido, Myriam; Calavas, Didier; Ducrot, Christian

    2007-06-01

    In France, despite the ban of meat-and-bone meal (MBM) in cattle feed, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) was detected in hundreds of cattle born after the ban. To study the role of MBM, animal fat, and dicalcium phosphate on the risk for BSE after the feed ban, we conducted a spatial analysis of the feed industry. We used data from 629 BSE cases as well as data on use of each byproduct and market area of the feed factories. We mapped risk for BSE in 951 areas supplied by the same factories and connection with use of byproducts. A disease map of BSE with covariates was built with the hierarchical Bayesian modeling methods, based on Poisson distribution with spatial smoothing. Only use of MBM was spatially linked to risk for BSE, which highlights cross-contamination as the most probable source of infection after the feed ban.

  7. Acute cortical blindness due to posterior reversible encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen-Lam, Jenny; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2008-10-01

    An acutely hypertensive 55 year-old male experienced seizures and cortical blindness post-operatively. CT scans demonstrated hypointensities in the occipital lobes bilaterally. MRI revealed symmetrical bilateral hyperintense signals in the same region, involving both grey and white matter. Thromboembolic screening investigations including vertebral artery doppler studies were normal and echocardiography demonstrated borderline left ventricular hypertrophy. A diagnosis of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) was reached and there was complete resolution of blindness with antihypertensive therapy. This case supports the vasogenic theory of PRES which suggests that sustained high grade fluctuations in blood pressure lead to a reduction in cerebral vascular autoregulatory function. The resultant failure of compensatory vasoconstriction to prevent hyperperfusion causes fluid to extravasate into the occipital lobes, which in the present case resulted in cortical blindness.

  8. [Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome Associated with Cancer Therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuya, Koichi; Nakasu, Yoko; Hayashi, Nakamasa; Yasui, Hirofumi; Ikeda, Takashi; Kuji, Shiho; Onozawa, Yusuke; Endo, Masahiro

    2016-03-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome(PRES)is a subacute neurological syndrome typically manifesting with headache, cortical blindness, and seizures. This syndrome is associated with risk factors such as malignant hypertension, eclampsia, and renal failure. Numerous case reports depict its occurrence in cancer patients. The direct causal mechanisms of PRES in cancer patients have not yet been identified. Cytotoxic chemotherapy may cause direct endothelial damage, which would impact the blood brain barrier. Angiogenesis inhibitors also cause elevation in blood pressure;this is significant, because PRES onset may be solely related to hypertension. An increased number of case reports involving new molecular targeted agent suggests that incidence of PRES as an oncological emergency may increase in the future.

  9. Bruxism Associated with Anoxic Encephalopathy: Successful Treatment with Baclofen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bruce Janati

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Bruxism is a movement disorder characterized by grinding and clenching of the teeth. Etiology of bruxism can be divided into three groups: psychosocial factors, peripheral factors, and pathophysiological factors. Methods. The clinical investigation was conducted at King Khaled Hospital in Hail, Saudi Arabia, in 2012. Results. A 16-year-old Saudi female was brought to the hospital in a comatose state and with generalized convulsive seizures secondary to acute anoxic encephalopathy. In the third week of hospitalization, while still in a state of akinetic mutism, she developed incessant bruxism which responded favorably to a GABA receptor agonist (baclofen. Conclusion. Our data support the hypothesis that bruxism emanates from imbalance or dysregulation of the neurotransmitter system. Larger scale studies will be needed to confirm this hypothesis.

  10. Encephalopathy in Wilson disease: copper toxicity or liver failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferenci, Peter; Litwin, Tomasz; Seniow, Joanna; Czlonkowska, Anna

    2015-03-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a complex syndrome of neurological and psychiatric signs and symptoms that is caused by portosystemic venous shunting with or without liver disease irrespective of its etiology. The most common presentation of Wilson disease (WD) is liver disease and is frequently associated with a wide spectrum of neurological and psychiatric symptoms. The genetic defect in WD leads to copper accumulation in the liver and later in other organs including the brain. In a patient presenting with Wilsonian cirrhosis neuropsychiatric symptoms may be caused either by the metabolic consequences of liver failure or by copper toxicity. Thus, in clinical practice a precise diagnosis is a great challenge. Contrary to HE in neurological WD consciousness, is very rarely disturbed and pyramidal signs, myoclonus dominate. Asterixis and many other clinical symptoms may be present in both disease conditions and are quite similar. However details of neurological assessment as well as additional examinations could help in differential diagnosis.

  11. Hashimoto encephalopathy: a case report with proton MR spectroscopic findings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU Tian-hao; JIN Er-hu; HE Wen

    2011-01-01

    A 52-year-old female patient with Hashimoto encephalopathy was admitted to hospital for clinical treatment,and the findings on MR spectroscopy (MRS) and MR imaging (MRI) in the brain were reported.MRS revealed the decreases in N-acetylaspartate (NAA/Cr=1.19) and myo-inositol peaks,and the elevations in lipid,lactate,glutamate/glutamine multiplet and choline (Cho/Cr=1.21) peaks which supported a cerebral inflammatory change,in addition to multifocal hyperintensities on T2WI and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images,slight hyperintensities on diffusion weighted imaging (DWI),hypointensities on T1WI.The atrophy of the brain was revealed on follow-up MRI two years later.

  12. CT perfusion imaging in the management of posterior reversible encephalopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, S.O.; McKinney, A.; Teksam, M.; Liu, H.; Truwit, C.L. [Department of Radiology, University of Minnesota Medical School, 420 Delaware Street SE, Box 292, MN 55455, Minneapolis (United States)

    2004-04-01

    A 13-year-old girl with a renal transplant presented with hypertension and seizures. CT and MRI demonstrated typical bilateral parietal, occipital and posterior frontal cortical and subcortical edema, thought to represent posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. The cause was presumed to be hypertension. Antihypertensive therapy was started, lowering of the blood pressure in the range of 110-120 mmHg systolic. However, stable xenon (Xe) CT perfusion imaging revealed ischemia within the left parietal occipital region. The antihypertensive was adjusted which increased both the systolic and diastolic blood pressure by 31 mm Hg. The patient was re-imaged with Xe CT and was found to have resolution of the ischemic changes within the left parietal occipital region. In this report, we present a case in which stable Xe CT was used to monitor the degree of cerebral perfusion and guide titration of antihypertensive therapy. Such brain perfusion monitoring may have helped to prevent infarction of our patient. (orig.)

  13. Altered Sulfide (H2S) Metabolism in Ethylmalonic Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiranti, Valeria; Zeviani, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (sulfide, H2S) is a colorless, water-soluble gas with a typical smell of rotten eggs. In the past, it has been investigated for its role as a potent toxic gas emanating from sewers and swamps or as a by-product of industrial processes. At high concentrations, H2S is a powerful inhibitor of cytochrome c oxidase; in trace amounts, it is an important signaling molecule, like nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO), together termed “gasotransmitters.” This review will cover the physiological role and the pathogenic effects of H2S, focusing on ethylmalonic encephalopathy, a human mitochondrial disorder caused by genetic abnormalities of sulfide metabolism. We will also discuss the options that are now conceivable for preventing genetically driven chronic H2S toxicity, taking into account that a complete understanding of the physiopathology of H2S has still to be achieved. PMID:23284046

  14. Altered sulfide (H(2)S) metabolism in ethylmalonic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiranti, Valeria; Zeviani, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (sulfide, H(2)S) is a colorless, water-soluble gas with a typical smell of rotten eggs. In the past, it has been investigated for its role as a potent toxic gas emanating from sewers and swamps or as a by-product of industrial processes. At high concentrations, H(2)S is a powerful inhibitor of cytochrome c oxidase; in trace amounts, it is an important signaling molecule, like nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO), together termed "gasotransmitters." This review will cover the physiological role and the pathogenic effects of H(2)S, focusing on ethylmalonic encephalopathy, a human mitochondrial disorder caused by genetic abnormalities of sulfide metabolism. We will also discuss the options that are now conceivable for preventing genetically driven chronic H(2)S toxicity, taking into account that a complete understanding of the physiopathology of H(2)S has still to be achieved.

  15. Epileptic Encephalopathy in Children with Risk Factors for Brain Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefina Ricardo-Garcell

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the study of 887 new born infants with prenatal and perinatal risk factors for brain damage, 11 children with West syndrome that progressed into Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and another 4 children with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome that had not been preceded by West syndrome were found. In this study we present the main findings of these 15 subjects. In all infants multifactor antecedents were detected. The most frequent risk factors were prematurity and severe asphyxia; however placenta disorders, sepsis, and hyperbilirubinemia were also frequent. In all infants MRI direct or secondary features of periventricular leukomalacia were observed. Followup of all infants showed moderate to severe neurodevelopmental delay as well as cerebral palsy. It is concluded that prenatal and perinatal risk factors for brain damage are very important antecedents that should be taken into account to follow up those infants from an early age in order to detect and treat as early as possible an epileptic encephalopathy.

  16. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: An atypical postpartum complication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debashish Paul

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES is presented by headache, altered mental status, blurring of vision, vomiting and seizure in conjunction with radiological finding of posterior cerebral white matter edema. Data suggest that most cases occur in young middle-aged with marked female preponderance, hypertension being the most common cause. In this case, it was diagnosed in a normotensive patient in the postnatal period that underwent cesarean section. The initial symptoms had misled toward a diagnosis of postdural puncture headache. Symptomatic treatment was started immediately in the ICU. This is an interesting case as the patient was a normotensive one without any other contributory factors and there was unanticipated delay in diagnosing the case until the time we could get a magnetic resonance imaging report.

  17. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: the importance of early diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teotónio, Rute; Marmoto, Dina; Januário, Cristina; Bento, Conceição

    2012-09-17

    A 14-year-old boy was submitted to cardiac transplant due to a dilated cardiomyopathy. On the fourth day of immunosuppression (corticosteroids, mycophenolate mofetil and tacrolimus), he developed right focal seizures and drowsiness. Blood pressure was in the normal range and laboratory findings in cerebral spinal fluid and blood were unremarkable, with drugs in non-toxic levels. The EEG showed a slow background rhythm more pronounced on the right and a seizure onset in the right occipital region. MRI revealed a diffuse hyperintense subcortical white-matter lesion on fluid attenuated inversion recovery, with lesser involvement of left temporal-occipital region. There was no enhancement with gadolinium and MRI diffusion-weighted imaging was consistent with vasogenic oedema. Tacrolimus was stopped with regression of MRI abnormalities and clinical recovery. Posterior reversible encephalopathy associated with tacrolimus is a rare but potentially serious complication of solid organ transplants. A prompt diagnosis and correct treatment is essential to avoid irreversible brain damage.

  18. Epileptic Encephalopathy in Children with Risk Factors for Brain Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricardo-Garcell, Josefina; Harmony, Thalía; Porras-Kattz, Eneida; Colmenero-Batallán, Miguel J.; Barrera-Reséndiz, Jesús E.; Fernández-Bouzas, Antonio; Cruz-Rivero, Erika

    2012-01-01

    In the study of 887 new born infants with prenatal and perinatal risk factors for brain damage, 11 children with West syndrome that progressed into Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and another 4 children with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome that had not been preceded by West syndrome were found. In this study we present the main findings of these 15 subjects. In all infants multifactor antecedents were detected. The most frequent risk factors were prematurity and severe asphyxia; however placenta disorders, sepsis, and hyperbilirubinemia were also frequent. In all infants MRI direct or secondary features of periventricular leukomalacia were observed. Followup of all infants showed moderate to severe neurodevelopmental delay as well as cerebral palsy. It is concluded that prenatal and perinatal risk factors for brain damage are very important antecedents that should be taken into account to follow up those infants from an early age in order to detect and treat as early as possible an epileptic encephalopathy. PMID:22957240

  19. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: The Neuropathological Legacy of Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Jennifer; Johnson, Victoria E; Smith, Douglas H; Stewart, William

    2016-05-23

    Almost a century ago, the first clinical account of the punch-drunk syndrome emerged, describing chronic neurological and neuropsychiatric sequelae occurring in former boxers. Thereafter, throughout the twentieth century, further reports added to our understanding of the neuropathological consequences of a career in boxing, leading to descriptions of a distinct neurodegenerative pathology, termed dementia pugilistica. During the past decade, growing recognition of this pathology in autopsy studies of nonboxers who were exposed to repetitive, mild traumatic brain injury, or to a single, moderate or severe traumatic brain injury, has led to an awareness that it is exposure to traumatic brain injury that carries with it a risk of this neurodegenerative disease, not the sport or the circumstance in which the injury is sustained. Furthermore, the neuropathology of the neurodegeneration that occurs after traumatic brain injury, now termed chronic traumatic encephalopathy, is acknowledged as being a complex, mixed, but distinctive pathology, the detail of which is reviewed in this article.

  20. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome following a scorpion sting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcello Marrone, Luiz Carlos; Marrone, Bianca Fontana; Neto, Felipe Kalil; Costa, Francisco Cosme; Thomé, Gustavo Gomes; Aramburu, Martin Brandolt; Schilling, Lucas Porcello; Pascoal, Tharick Ali; Gadonski, Giovani; Huf Marrone, Antônio Carlos; da Costa, Jaderson Costa

    2013-10-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinicoradiologic entity not yet understood, that is present with transient neurologic symptoms and particular radiological findings. The most common imaging pattern in PRES is the presence of edema in the white matter of the posterior portions of both cerebral hemispheres. The cause of PRES is unclear. We report a case of 13-year-old male who was stung by a scorpion and developed a severe headache, visual disturbance, and seizures and had the diagnosis of PRES with a good outcome. Numerous factors can trigger this syndrome, most commonly: acute elevation of blood pressure, abnormal renal function, and immunosuppressive therapy. There are many cases described showing the relationship between PRES and eclampsia, transplantation, neoplasia and chemotherapy treatment, systemic infections, renal disease acute, or chronic. However, this is the first case of PRES following a scorpion sting.