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Sample records for werner protein modulate

  1. Transient overexpression of Werner protein rescues starvation induced autophagy in Werner syndrome cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Jyotirindra; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Laskar, Aparna; Karmakar, Parimal

    2014-12-01

    Reduced autophagy may be associated with normal and pathological aging. Here we report a link between autophagy and Werner protein (WRNp), mutated in Werner syndrome, the human premature aging Werner syndrome (WS). WRN mutant fibroblast AG11395 and AG05229 respond weakly to starvation induced autophagy compared to normal cells. While the fusion of phagosomes with lysosome is normal, WS cells contain fewer autophagy vacuoles. Cellular starvation autophagy in WS cells is restored after transfection with full length WRN. Further, siRNA mediated silencing of WRN in the normal fibroblast cell line WI-38 results in decreased autophagy and altered expression of autophagy related proteins. Thus, our observations suggest that WRN may have a role in controlling autophagy and hereby cellular maintenance.

  2. Roles of Werner syndrome protein in protection of genome integrity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossi, Marie L; Ghosh, Avik K; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2010-01-01

    Werner syndrome protein (WRN) is one of a family of five human RecQ helicases implicated in the maintenance of genome stability. The conserved RecQ family also includes RecQ1, Bloom syndrome protein (BLM), RecQ4, and RecQ5 in humans, as well as Sgs1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Rqh1...... syndrome (WS). WRN is one of the best characterized of the RecQ helicases and is known to have roles in DNA replication and repair, transcription, and telomere maintenance. Studies both in vitro and in vivo indicate that the roles of WRN in a variety of DNA processes are mediated by post...

  3. Hydrogen sulfide restores a normal morphological phenotype in Werner syndrome fibroblasts, attenuates oxidative damage and modulates mTOR pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Talaei, F.; van Praag, V. M.; Henning, R. H.

    2013-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) protein is involved in DNA repair and its truncation causes Werner syndrome, an autosomal recessive genetic disorder with a premature aging phenotype. WRN protein mutation is currently known as the primary cause of WS. In cultured WS fibroblasts, we found an increase in cytosoli

  4. Hydrogen sulfide restores a normal morphological phenotype in Werner syndrome fibroblasts, attenuates oxidative damage and modulates mTOR pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Talaei, F.; van Praag, V. M.; Henning, R. H.

    2013-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) protein is involved in DNA repair and its truncation causes Werner syndrome, an autosomal recessive genetic disorder with a premature aging phenotype. WRN protein mutation is currently known as the primary cause of WS. In cultured WS fibroblasts, we found an increase in cytosoli

  5. Telomeric protein TRF2 protects Holliday junctions with telomeric arms from displacement by the Werner syndrome helicase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nora, Gerald J; Buncher, Noah A; Opresko, Patricia L

    2010-07-01

    WRN protein loss causes Werner syndrome (WS), which is characterized by premature aging as well as genomic and telomeric instability. WRN prevents telomere loss, but the telomeric protein complex must regulate WRN activities to prevent aberrant telomere processing. Telomere-binding TRF2 protein inhibits telomere t-loop deletion by blocking Holliday junction (HJ) resolvase cleavage activity, but whether TRF2 also modulates HJ displacement at t-loops is unknown. In this study, we used multiplex fluorophore imaging to track the fate of individual strands of HJ substrates. We report the novel finding that TRF2 inhibits WRN helicase strand displacement of HJs with telomeric repeats in duplex arms, but unwinding of HJs with a telomeric center or lacking telomeric sequence is unaffected. These data, together with results using TRF2 fragments and TRF2 HJ binding assays, indicate that both the TRF2 B- and Myb domains are required to inhibit WRN HJ activity. We propose a novel model whereby simultaneous binding of the TRF2 B-domain to the HJ core and the Myb domain to telomeric arms promote and stabilize HJs in a stacked arm conformation that is unfavorable for unwinding. Our biochemical study provides a mechanistic basis for the cellular findings that TRF2 regulates WRN activity at telomeres.

  6. The Werner syndrome protein is distinguished from the Bloom syndrome protein by its capacity to tightly bind diverse DNA structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamath-Loeb, Ashwini; Loeb, Lawrence A; Fry, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Loss of Werner syndrome helicase-exonuclease (WRN) or of its homolog Bloom syndrome helicase (BLM) results in different inherited disorders. Whereas Werner syndrome is characterized by premature onset of aging and age-associated diseases, Bloom syndrome involves developmental abnormalities and increased predisposition to diverse malignancies. To identify biochemical differences between WRN and BLM that might contribute to the dissimilar outcomes of their loss, we compared their abilities to unwind and bind in vitro diverse DNA structures. Full-length recombinant WRN and BLM proteins expressed in and purified from Sf9 insect cells unwound to comparable extents and with similar K(m) values partial DNA duplex, splayed arm DNA and G'2 bimolecular quadruplex DNA. However, WRN resolved bubble DNA ∼25-fold more efficiently than BLM. The two enzymes were mainly distinguished by their contrasting abilities to bind DNA. WRN bound partial duplexes, bubble and splayed arm DNA and G'2 bimolecular and G4 four-molecular quadruplexes with dissociation constants of 0.25 to 25 nM. By contrast, BLM formed substantial complexes with only G4 quadruplex DNA while binding only marginally other DNA structures. We raise the possibility that in addition to its enzymatic activities WRN may act as a scaffold for the assembly on DNA of additional DNA processing proteins.

  7. The Werner syndrome protein is distinguished from the Bloom syndrome protein by its capacity to tightly bind diverse DNA structures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwini Kamath-Loeb

    Full Text Available Loss of Werner syndrome helicase-exonuclease (WRN or of its homolog Bloom syndrome helicase (BLM results in different inherited disorders. Whereas Werner syndrome is characterized by premature onset of aging and age-associated diseases, Bloom syndrome involves developmental abnormalities and increased predisposition to diverse malignancies. To identify biochemical differences between WRN and BLM that might contribute to the dissimilar outcomes of their loss, we compared their abilities to unwind and bind in vitro diverse DNA structures. Full-length recombinant WRN and BLM proteins expressed in and purified from Sf9 insect cells unwound to comparable extents and with similar K(m values partial DNA duplex, splayed arm DNA and G'2 bimolecular quadruplex DNA. However, WRN resolved bubble DNA ∼25-fold more efficiently than BLM. The two enzymes were mainly distinguished by their contrasting abilities to bind DNA. WRN bound partial duplexes, bubble and splayed arm DNA and G'2 bimolecular and G4 four-molecular quadruplexes with dissociation constants of 0.25 to 25 nM. By contrast, BLM formed substantial complexes with only G4 quadruplex DNA while binding only marginally other DNA structures. We raise the possibility that in addition to its enzymatic activities WRN may act as a scaffold for the assembly on DNA of additional DNA processing proteins.

  8. WRN protein as a novel erythroblast immunohistochemical marker with applications for the diagnosis of Werner syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadahira, Yoshito; Sugihara, Takashi; Fujiwara, Hideyo; Nishimura, Hirotake; Suetsugu, Yoshimasa; Takeshita, Morishige; Okamura, Seiichi; Goto, Makoto

    2015-03-01

    Genetic testing for mutations in the WRN gene is critical for the diagnosis of Werner syndrome (WS); however, these tests cannot be performed in a clinical setting. Nearly all of the WRN mutations result in expression of truncated WRN proteins that are missing the C-terminal nuclear localization signal. We evaluated the use of WRN protein immunohistochemistry for diagnosing WS using paraffin-embedded bone marrow sections. Using a well-defined commercially available polyclonal antibody against the C terminus of WRN, we found that of all the cell types tested, bone marrow erythroid precursors showed the strongest nuclear expression of WRN. Immunohistochemical analysis of bone marrow samples from 120 patients with non-WS hematological disorders (age range, 7 days-90 years) revealed WRN staining of the nuclei of CD71-positive early and late erythroid precursors. Erythroblasts negative for WRN immunostaining were only observed in two patients, both of whom were diagnosed with WS: one with concomitant myelodysplastic syndrome and the other with erythroleukemia with overexpression of TP53. Western blot analysis and immunocytochemistry indicated WRN was localized in the nuclei of the four positive control cell lines from non-WS patients but not in the five cell lines from WS patients, who had three different types of WRN mutations. Thus, immunohistochemical detection of WRN in erythroblasts from bone marrow paraffin sections could be useful in screening of WS cases and worthy of further molecular confirmation.

  9. Competition between the DNA unwinding and strand pairing activities of the Werner and Bloom syndrome proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orren David K

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The premature aging and cancer-prone Werner and Bloom syndromes are caused by defects in the RecQ helicase enzymes WRN and BLM, respectively. Recently, both WRN and BLM (as well as several other RecQ members have been shown to possess a strand annealing activity in addition to the requisite DNA unwinding activity. Since an annealing function would appear to directly oppose the action of a helicase, we have examined in this study the dynamic equilibrium between unwinding and annealing mediated by either WRN or BLM. Results Our investigation into the competition between annealing and unwinding demonstrates that, under standard reaction conditions, WRN- or BLM-mediated annealing can partially or completely mask unwinding as measured in standard helicase assays. Several strategies were employed to suppress the annealing activity so that the actual strength of WRN- or BLM-dependent unwinding could be more accurately assessed. Interestingly, if a DNA oligomer complementary to one strand of the DNA substrate to be unwound is added during the helicase reaction, both WRN and BLM unwinding is enhanced, presumably by preventing protein-mediated re-annealing. This strategy allowed measurement of WRN-catalyzed unwinding of long (80 base pair duplex regions and fully complementary, blunt-ended duplexes, both of which were otherwise quite refractory to the helicase activity of WRN. Similarly, the addition of trap strand stimulated the ability of BLM to unwind long and blunt-ended duplexes. The stimulatory effect of the human replication protein A (hRPA, the eukaryotic single-stranded DNA binding protein on both WRN- and BLM-dependent unwinding was also re-examined in light of its possible role in preventing re-annealing. Our results show that hRPA influences the outcome of WRN and BLM helicase assays by both inhibiting re-annealing and directly promoting unwinding, with the larger contribution from the latter mechanism. Conclusion These

  10. Competition between the DNA unwinding and strand pairing activities of the Werner and Bloom syndrome proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machwe, Amrita; Lozada, Enerlyn M; Xiao, Liren; Orren, David K

    2006-01-13

    The premature aging and cancer-prone Werner and Bloom syndromes are caused by defects in the RecQ helicase enzymes WRN and BLM, respectively. Recently, both WRN and BLM (as well as several other RecQ members) have been shown to possess a strand annealing activity in addition to the requisite DNA unwinding activity. Since an annealing function would appear to directly oppose the action of a helicase, we have examined in this study the dynamic equilibrium between unwinding and annealing mediated by either WRN or BLM. Our investigation into the competition between annealing and unwinding demonstrates that, under standard reaction conditions, WRN- or BLM-mediated annealing can partially or completely mask unwinding as measured in standard helicase assays. Several strategies were employed to suppress the annealing activity so that the actual strength of WRN- or BLM-dependent unwinding could be more accurately assessed. Interestingly, if a DNA oligomer complementary to one strand of the DNA substrate to be unwound is added during the helicase reaction, both WRN and BLM unwinding is enhanced, presumably by preventing protein-mediated re-annealing. This strategy allowed measurement of WRN-catalyzed unwinding of long (80 base pair) duplex regions and fully complementary, blunt-ended duplexes, both of which were otherwise quite refractory to the helicase activity of WRN. Similarly, the addition of trap strand stimulated the ability of BLM to unwind long and blunt-ended duplexes. The stimulatory effect of the human replication protein A (hRPA, the eukaryotic single-stranded DNA binding protein) on both WRN- and BLM-dependent unwinding was also re-examined in light of its possible role in preventing re-annealing. Our results show that hRPA influences the outcome of WRN and BLM helicase assays by both inhibiting re-annealing and directly promoting unwinding, with the larger contribution from the latter mechanism. These findings indicate that measurements of unwinding by WRN

  11. Downregulation of the Werner syndrome protein induces a metabolic shift that compromises redox homeostasis and limits proliferation of cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Baomin; Iglesias-Pedraz, Juan Manuel; Chen, Leng-Ying; Yin, Fei; Cadenas, Enrique; Reddy, Sita; Comai, Lucio

    2014-04-01

    The Werner syndrome protein (WRN) is a nuclear protein required for cell growth and proliferation. Loss-of-function mutations in the Werner syndrome gene are associated with the premature onset of age-related diseases. How loss of WRN limits cell proliferation and induces replicative senescence is poorly understood. Here, we show that WRN depletion leads to a striking metabolic shift that coordinately weakens the pathways that generate reducing equivalents for detoxification of reactive oxygen species and increases mitochondrial respiration. In cancer cells, this metabolic shift counteracts the Warburg effect, a defining characteristic of many malignant cells, resulting in altered redox balance and accumulation of oxidative DNA damage that inhibits cell proliferation and induces a senescence-like phenotype. Consistent with these findings, supplementation with antioxidant rescues at least in part cell proliferation and decreases senescence in WRN-knockdown cancer cells. These results demonstrate that WRN plays a critical role in cancer cell proliferation by contributing to the Warburg effect and preventing metabolic stress.

  12. Impact of vitamin C on the cardiometabolic and inflammatory profiles of mice lacking a functional Werner syndrome protein helicase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aumailley, Lucie; Dubois, Marie Julie; Garand, Chantal; Marette, André; Lebel, Michel

    2015-12-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is a premature aging disorder caused by mutations in a DNA helicase/exonuclease. Mice lacking the helicase domain of this protein exhibit metabolic abnormalities that are reversed by vitamin C. In this study, we used a targeted metabolomic approach to identify serum metabolites significantly altered in young mutant mice treated with or without vitamin C. We also measured several serum inflammatory and cardiometabolic factors. We show that young mutant mice exhibit an increase in serum hydroxyproline and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), markers of cardiovascular diseases and inflammation, before they exhibit morphological anomalies in different tissues. We also observed an increase in three very long chain lysophosphatidylcholines underlying peroxisome perturbation. Vitamin C reversed the concentrations of these metabolites and PAI-1 to wild type values. Transcriptomic analyses on the liver of mutant mice revealed a decrease in the expression of genes involved in fatty acid degradation compared to wild type animals. Vitamin C treatment increased the expression of genes involved in glutathione metabolism and the synthesis of unsaturated fatty acids in these mice. These results show that changes at the transcriptomic level concord with the alterations of several serum metabolites in these mice. Finally, we found that a mislocalization of the Wrn mutant protein in the liver endoplasmic reticulum fraction increased oxidative stress in that cellular compartment. Vitamin C reversed this oxidative stress. To conclude, this study provides novel potential predictive cardiometabolic biomarkers in WS that will allow the assessment of the impact of vitamin C on patients with WS.

  13. Strand exchange of telomeric DNA catalyzed by the Werner syndrome protein (WRN) is specifically stimulated by TRF2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Deanna N; Orren, David K; Machwe, Amrita

    2014-07-01

    Werner syndrome (WS), caused by loss of function of the RecQ helicase WRN, is a hereditary disease characterized by premature aging and elevated cancer incidence. WRN has DNA binding, exonuclease, ATPase, helicase and strand annealing activities, suggesting possible roles in recombination-related processes. Evidence indicates that WRN deficiency causes telomeric abnormalities that likely underlie early onset of aging phenotypes in WS. Furthermore, TRF2, a protein essential for telomere protection, interacts with WRN and influences its basic helicase and exonuclease activities. However, these studies provided little insight into WRN's specific function at telomeres. Here, we explored the possibility that WRN and TRF2 cooperate during telomeric recombination processes. Our results indicate that TRF2, through its interactions with both WRN and telomeric DNA, stimulates WRN-mediated strand exchange specifically between telomeric substrates; TRF2's basic domain is particularly important for this stimulation. Although TRF1 binds telomeric DNA with similar affinity, it has minimal effects on WRN-mediated strand exchange of telomeric DNA. Moreover, TRF2 is displaced from telomeric DNA by WRN, independent of its ATPase and helicase activities. Together, these results suggest that TRF2 and WRN act coordinately during telomeric recombination processes, consistent with certain telomeric abnormalities associated with alteration of WRN function.

  14. Genetics Home Reference: Werner syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for This Condition Adult premature aging syndrome Adult Progeria Werner's Syndrome Werners Syndrome WS Related Information How ... BK, Monnat RJ Jr. Werner and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndromes: mechanistic basis of human progeroid diseases. Nat ...

  15. Metabolic and Phenotypic Differences between Mice Producing a Werner Syndrome Helicase Mutant Protein and Wrn Null Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aumailley, Lucie; Garand, Chantal; Dubois, Marie Julie; Johnson, F Brad; Marette, André; Lebel, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is a premature aging disorder caused by mutations in a RecQ-family DNA helicase, WRN. Mice lacking part of the helicase domain of the WRN orthologue exhibit many phenotypic features of WS, including metabolic abnormalities and a shorter mean life span. In contrast, mice lacking the entire Wrn protein (i.e. Wrn null mice) do not exhibit a premature aging phenotype. In this study, we used a targeted mass spectrometry-based metabolomic approach to identify serum metabolites that are differentially altered in young Wrn helicase mutant and Wrn null mice. An antibody-based quantification of 43 serum cytokines and markers of cardiovascular disease risk complemented this study. We found that Wrn helicase mutants exhibited elevated and decreased levels, respectively, of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 and the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-18. Wrn helicase mutants also exhibited an increase in serum hydroxyproline and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, markers of extracellular matrix remodeling of the vascular system and inflammation in aging. We also observed an abnormal increase in the ratio of very long chain to short chain lysophosphatidylcholines in the Wrn helicase mutants underlying a peroxisome perturbation in these mice. Remarkably, the Wrn mutant helicase protein was mislocalized to the endoplasmic reticulum and the peroxisomal fractions in liver tissues. Additional analyses with mouse embryonic fibroblasts indicated a severe defect of the autophagy flux in cells derived from Wrn helicase mutants compared to wild type and Wrn null animals. These results indicate that the deleterious effects of the helicase-deficient Wrn protein are mediated by the dysfunction of several cellular organelles.

  16. Metabolic and Phenotypic Differences between Mice Producing a Werner Syndrome Helicase Mutant Protein and Wrn Null Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Aumailley

    Full Text Available Werner syndrome (WS is a premature aging disorder caused by mutations in a RecQ-family DNA helicase, WRN. Mice lacking part of the helicase domain of the WRN orthologue exhibit many phenotypic features of WS, including metabolic abnormalities and a shorter mean life span. In contrast, mice lacking the entire Wrn protein (i.e. Wrn null mice do not exhibit a premature aging phenotype. In this study, we used a targeted mass spectrometry-based metabolomic approach to identify serum metabolites that are differentially altered in young Wrn helicase mutant and Wrn null mice. An antibody-based quantification of 43 serum cytokines and markers of cardiovascular disease risk complemented this study. We found that Wrn helicase mutants exhibited elevated and decreased levels, respectively, of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 and the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-18. Wrn helicase mutants also exhibited an increase in serum hydroxyproline and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, markers of extracellular matrix remodeling of the vascular system and inflammation in aging. We also observed an abnormal increase in the ratio of very long chain to short chain lysophosphatidylcholines in the Wrn helicase mutants underlying a peroxisome perturbation in these mice. Remarkably, the Wrn mutant helicase protein was mislocalized to the endoplasmic reticulum and the peroxisomal fractions in liver tissues. Additional analyses with mouse embryonic fibroblasts indicated a severe defect of the autophagy flux in cells derived from Wrn helicase mutants compared to wild type and Wrn null animals. These results indicate that the deleterious effects of the helicase-deficient Wrn protein are mediated by the dysfunction of several cellular organelles.

  17. The Werner and Bloom syndrome proteins help resolve replication blockage by converting (regressed) holliday junctions to functional replication forks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machwe, Amrita; Karale, Rajashree; Xu, Xioahua; Liu, Yilun; Orren, David K

    2011-08-16

    Cells cope with blockage of replication fork progression in a manner that allows DNA synthesis to be completed and genomic instability minimized. Models for resolution of blocked replication involve fork regression to form Holliday junction structures. The human RecQ helicases WRN and BLM (deficient in Werner and Bloom syndromes, respectively) are critical for maintaining genomic stability and thought to function in accurate resolution of replication blockage. Consistent with this notion, WRN and BLM localize to sites of blocked replication after certain DNA-damaging treatments and exhibit enhanced activity on replication and recombination intermediates. Here we examine the actions of WRN and BLM on a special Holliday junction substrate reflective of a regressed replication fork. Our results demonstrate that, in reactions requiring ATP hydrolysis, both WRN and BLM convert this Holliday junction substrate primarily to a four-stranded replication fork structure, suggesting they target the Holliday junction to initiate branch migration. In agreement, the Holliday junction binding protein RuvA inhibits the WRN- and BLM-mediated conversion reactions. Importantly, this conversion product is suitable for replication with its leading daughter strand readily extended by DNA polymerases. Furthermore, binding to and conversion of this Holliday junction are optimal at low MgCl(2) concentrations, suggesting that WRN and BLM preferentially act on the square planar (open) conformation of Holliday junctions. Our findings suggest that, subsequent to fork regression events, WRN and/or BLM could re-establish functional replication forks to help overcome fork blockage. Such a function is highly consistent with phenotypes associated with WRN- and BLM-deficient cells.

  18. Telomere-binding Protein TRF2 Binds to and Stimulates the Werner and Bloom Syndrome Helicases

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Patricia L. Opresko; Cayetano von Kobbe; Jean-Philippe Laine; Jeanine Harrigan; Ian D. Hickson; Vilhelm A. Bohr

    2002-01-01

    .... This interaction is mediated by the RecQ conserved C-terminal region of WRN. In vitro , TRF2 demonstrates high affinity for WRN and for another RecQ family member, the Bloom syndrome protein (BLM...

  19. In Memoriam Werner Callebaut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boniolo, Giovanni

    2015-12-01

    The article contains some recollections on Werner Callebaut highlighting his personal character and his role in the community of historians, philosophers and sociologists of the life sciences. Werner Callebaut (1952-2014) was a real European philosopher. He was the Scientific Director of the Konrad Lorenz Institute for Evolution and Cognition Research (KLI, Klosterneuburg, Austria) and the President of the International Society for the History, Philosophy, and Social Studies of Biology.

  20. Werner Albrecht (1924 - 2014)

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    Werner Albrecht, one of the very first mechanical designers recruited by CERN, passed away on 28 March. Born and educated in Zurich, where he spent the first years of his professional life, he joined CERN in June 1955.   Thanks to his experience and personality, he soon became the deputy to Frank Blythe, the head of the Synchrocyclotron (SC) technical office. The office, which included a large mechanical workshop, had been created in the light of the development and construction of the SC - the first of CERN’s accelerators. For around 25 years Werner kept this position at Frank’s side while the services under their responsibility evolved to become the natural facility to provide design and development for a large range of apparatus required by experimental physicists. After Frank’s retirement in 1980, Werner became head of the office, maintaining its typical character as an efficient, informal and friendly service. Omega, UA1, Aleph, Opal and Delphi are example...

  1. Correlations in Werner States

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Li; LUO Shun-Long; XIU Xiao-Ming; LI Nan; GAO Ya-Jun; CHI Feng

    2008-01-01

    Werner states are paradigmatic examples of quantum states and play an innovative role in quantum information theory. In investigating the correlating capability of Werner states, we find the curious phenomenon that quantum correlations, as quantified by the entanglement of formation, may exceed the total correlations, as measured by the quantum mutual information. Consequently, though the entanglement of formation is so widely used in quantifying entanglement, it cannot be interpreted as a consistent measure of quantum correlations per se if we accept the folklore that total correlations are measured (or rather upper bounded) by the quantum mutual information.

  2. The Caenorhabditis elegans Werner syndrome protein functions upstream of ATR and ATM in response to DNA replication inhibition and double-strand DNA breaks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Se-Jin Lee

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available WRN-1 is the Caenorhabditis elegans homolog of the human Werner syndrome protein, a RecQ helicase, mutations of which are associated with premature aging and increased genome instability. Relatively little is known as to how WRN-1 functions in DNA repair and DNA damage signaling. Here, we take advantage of the genetic and cytological approaches in C. elegans to dissect the epistatic relationship of WRN-1 in various DNA damage checkpoint pathways. We found that WRN-1 is required for CHK1 phosphorylation induced by DNA replication inhibition, but not by UV radiation. Furthermore, WRN-1 influences the RPA-1 focus formation, suggesting that WRN-1 functions in the same step or upstream of RPA-1 in the DNA replication checkpoint pathway. In response to ionizing radiation, RPA-1 focus formation and nuclear localization of ATM depend on WRN-1 and MRE-11. We conclude that C. elegans WRN-1 participates in the initial stages of checkpoint activation induced by DNA replication inhibition and ionizing radiation. These functions of WRN-1 in upstream DNA damage signaling are likely to be conserved, but might be cryptic in human systems due to functional redundancy.

  3. Werner's syndrome protein is phosphorylated in an ATR/ATM-dependent manner following replication arrest and DNA damage induced during the S phase of the cell cycle.

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    Pichierri, Pietro; Rosselli, Filippo; Franchitto, Annapaola

    2003-03-13

    Werner's syndrome (WS) is an autosomal recessive disorder, characterized at the cellular level by genomic instability in the form of variegated translocation mosaicism and extensive deletions. Individuals with WS prematurely develop multiple age-related pathologies and exhibit increased incidence of cancer. WRN, the gene defective in WS, encodes a 160-kDa protein (WRN), which has 3'-5'exonuclease, DNA helicase and DNA-dependent ATPase activities. WRN-defective cells are hypersensitive to certain genotoxic agents that cause replication arrest and/or double-strand breaks at the replication fork, suggesting a pivotal role for WRN in the protection of the integrity of the genoma during the DNA replication process. Here, we show that WRN is phosphorylated through an ATR/ATM dependent pathway in response to replication blockage. However, we provide evidence that WRN phosphorylation is not essential for its subnuclear relocalization after replication arrest. Finally, we show that WRN and ATR colocalize after replication fork arrest, suggesting that WRN and the ATR kinase collaborate to prevent genome instability during the S phase.

  4. Werner coordination chemistry and neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telpoukhovskaia, Maria A; Orvig, Chris

    2013-02-21

    Neurodegenerative diseases are capturing the world's attention as being the next set of diseases we must tackle collectively. Not only are the patients experiencing gradual cognitive and physical decline in most cases, but these diseases are fatal with no prevention currently available. As these diseases are progressive, providing care and symptom treatment for the ageing population is becoming both a medical and a financial challenge. This review discusses how Werner coordination chemistry plays a role in three diseases - those of Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and prions. Metal ions are considered to be involved in these diseases in part via their propensity to cause toxic aggregation of proteins. First, the coordination of metal ions, with emphasis on copper(II), to metalloproteins that are hallmarks of these diseases - amyloid β, α-synuclein, and prion, respectively - will be discussed. We will present the current understanding of the metal coordination environments created by the amino acids of these proteins, as well as metal binding affinity. Second, a diverse set of examples of rationally designed metal chelators to outcompete this deleterious binding will be examined based on coordination mode and affinity toward bio-relevant metal ions. Overall, this review will give a general overview of protein and metal chelator coordination environments in neurodegenerative diseases.

  5. Early Onset Werner Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berna İmge Aydoğan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Werner syndrome (WS is a rare autosomal recessive adult-onset progeroid disorder characterized by the early onset of aged-appearance and age-related metabolic disorders. Symptoms of premature aging usually first develop in the second-third decades of life. We report a 27-year-old female who was admitted to our clinic at the age of eighteen with hyperglycemia. She was diagnosed with diabetes and type 4 dyslipidemia at the age of seven. In her family history, her parents were first cousins and she had three healthy brothers. On her first physical examination; she had bird-like face appearance, global hair loss, beaked nose, short stature and she was overweight. She had global hair loss with gray and thin hair. Hoarseness of voice and hyperkeratosis of skin were observed. She had bilateral cataracts and moderate sensorineural hearing loss. On psychiatric examination, borderline mental retardation was detected. She had severe insulin resistance and hypertriglyceridemia despite levothyroxine, gemfibrozil, omega-3 and intensive insulin treatment. Routine lipid apheresis was performed to lower the triglyceride levels reaching 5256 mg/dL. She also had focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, hepatosteatosis, osteoporosis and epilepsy. Disease was accompanied by several congenital deformities, such as Rathke’s cleft cyst, angiomyolipoma and femoral neck hypoplasia. WS is a rare genetic disorder characterized by multiple endocrine manifestations as well as soft tissue changes. We present a case of early disturbances that were diagnosed before typical clinical signs and symptoms. We propose that WS should be kept in mind when type 2 diabetes and hyperlipidemia are diagnosed early in childhood. Turk Jem 2015; 19: 99-104

  6. Werner's Relevance for Contemporary Developmental Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glick, Joseph A.

    1992-01-01

    Considers the contributions of Heinz Werner to developmental psychology and identifies the tensions between Werner's theory and the practices of contemporary developmental psychology. Core issues of Werner's psychology concern: (1) development as heuristic, rather than phenomenon; (2) developmental process analysis; and (3) conceptions of the…

  7. Designed Spiroketal Protein Modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheepstra, Marcel; Andrei, Sebastian A; Unver, M Yagiz; Hirsch, Anna K H; Leysen, Seppe; Ottmann, Christian; Brunsveld, Luc; Milroy, Lech-Gustav

    2017-05-08

    Spiroketals are structural motifs found in many biologically active natural products, which has stimulated considerable efforts toward their synthesis and interest in their use as drug lead compounds. Despite this, the use of spiroketals, and especially bisbenzanulated spiroketals, in a structure-based drug discovery setting has not been convincingly demonstrated. Herein, we report the rational design of a bisbenzannulated spiroketal that potently binds to the retinoid X receptor (RXR) thereby inducing partial co-activator recruitment. We solved the crystal structure of the spiroketal-hRXRα-TIF2 ternary complex, and identified a canonical allosteric mechanism as a possible explanation for the partial agonist behavior of our spiroketal. Our co-crystal structure, the first of a designed spiroketal-protein complex, suggests that spiroketals can be designed to selectively target other nuclear receptor subtypes. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  8. Werner Herzog Tallinnas / Aare Ermel

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ermel, Aare, 1957-2013

    2002-01-01

    Detsembris toimuvat Pimedate Ööde Filmifestivali laiendatakse ka suvele, et sobivates paikades näidata väärtfilme. Alates 6. juunist näidatakse Katariina kirikus kuuel õhtul algusega kell 22 Werner Herzogi (1942) filme. Režissöörist ja näidatavatest filmidest

  9. Werner Herzog Tallinnas / Aare Ermel

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ermel, Aare, 1957-2013

    2002-01-01

    Detsembris toimuvat Pimedate Ööde Filmifestivali laiendatakse ka suvele, et sobivates paikades näidata väärtfilme. Alates 6. juunist näidatakse Katariina kirikus kuuel õhtul algusega kell 22 Werner Herzogi (1942) filme. Režissöörist ja näidatavatest filmidest

  10. Werner Heisenberg - Life and Work

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    Werner Heisenberg (centre) with Wolfgang Pauli (left) and Enrico Fermi on Lake Como, September 1927. An exhibition on the life and work of Werner Heisenberg will be on display in the Main Building (Mezzanine) at CERN from 1 - 23 July. The exhibition was produced by the University Archive of Leipzig University (Gerald Wiemers) and the Max-Planck-Institut für Physik in Munich (Helmut Rechenberg) to mark the centenary of Heisenberg's birth in 1901. German theoretical physicist Werner Karl Heisenberg (5 December 1901 - 1 February 1976) was one of the leading scientists of the 20th century. He carried out important work in nuclear and particle physics, but his most significant contribution was to the development of quantum mechanics. He is best known for his uncertainty principle, which restricts the accuracy with which some properties of atoms and particles - such as position and linear momentum - can be determined simultaneously. In 1932 he was awarded the Noble Prize in Physics 'for the creation of q...

  11. Werner Heisenberg - Life and Work

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Werner Heisenberg (centre) with Wolfgang Pauli and Enrico Fermi, 1927. An exhibition on the life and work of Werner Heisenberg will be on display in the Main Building (Mezzanine) at CERN from 1 - 30 July*. German theoretical physicist Werner Karl Heisenberg (1901 - 1976) was one of the leading scientists of the 20th century. Nobel Prize in Physics in 1932, his most significant contribution was to the development of quantum mechanics. He is best known for his uncertainty principle, which restricts the accuracy with which some properties of atoms and particles can be determined simultaneously. Heisenberg was a keen supporter of CERN, and was as the first chairman of CERN's Scientific Policy Committee in October 1954. A related celebration will take place in the TH Amphitheatre (4/3-006), on Thursday 18 July at 16:00. After an introduction from the Director-General Luciano Maiani, his daughter, Barbara Blum, his last postgraduate, Helmut Rechenberg and Valentin Telegdi will evoke memories of the life and work ...

  12. The Werner Protein Acts as a Coactivator of Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) on HIV-1 and Interleukin-8 (IL-8) Promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, Taketoshi; Ishizaka, Aya; Furuichi, Yasuhiro

    2015-07-24

    The Werner syndrome helicase (WRN) plays a role in maintaining genomic stability. The lack of WRN results in Werner syndrome, a rare autosomal recessive genetic disorder, which causes premature aging accompanied by many complications such as rare forms of cancer and type 2 diabetes. However, the underlying mechanisms of these complications, arising due to the loss of WRN, are poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrated the function of WRN in transcriptional regulation of NF-κB targets. WRN physically interacts via its RecQ C-terminal (RQC) domain with the Rel homology domain of both the RelA (p65) and the p50 subunits of NF-κB. In the steady state, WRN is recruited to HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR), a typical NF-κB-responsive promoter, as well as the p50/p50 homodimer, in an NF-κB site-dependent manner. The amount of WRN on LTR increased along with the transactivating RelA/p50 heterodimer in response to TNF-α stimulation. Further, a knockdown of WRN reduced the transactivation of LTR in exogenous RelA/p50-introduced or TNF-α-stimulated cells. Additionally, knockdown of WRN reduced TNF-α stimulation-induced activation of the endogenous promoter of IL-8, an NF-κB-responsive gene, and WRN increased its association with the IL-8 promoter region together with RelA/p50 after TNF-α stimulation. In conjunction with studies that have shown NF-κB to be a key regulator of aging and inflammation, our results indicate a novel role of WRN in transcriptional regulation. Along with NF-κB, the loss of WRN is expected to result in incorrect regulation of downstream targets and leads to immune abnormalities and homeostatic disruption.

  13. Oxidative stress and antioxidant response in fibroblasts from Werner and atypical Werner syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seco-Cervera, Marta; Spis, Marta; García-Giménez, José Luis; Ibañez-Cabellos, José Santiago; Velázquez-Ledesma, Ana; Esmorís, Isabel; Bañuls, Sergio; Pérez-Machado, Giselle; Pallardó, Federico V

    2014-03-01

    Werner Syndrome (WS, ICD-10 E34.8, ORPHA902) and Atypical Werner Syndrome (AWS, ICD-10 E34.8, ORPHA79474) are very rare inherited syndromes characterized by premature aging. While approximately 90% of WS individuals have any of a range of mutations in theWRN gene, there exists a clinical subgroup in which the mutation occurs in the LMNA/C gene in heterozygosity. Although both syndromes exhibit an age-related pleiotropic phenotype, AWS manifests the onset of the disease during childhood, while major symptoms in WS appear between the ages of 20 and 30. To study the molecular mechanisms of progeroid diseases provides a useful insight into the normal aging process. Main changes found were the decrease in Cu/Zn and Mn SOD activities in the three cell lines. In AWS, both mRNA SOD and protein levels were also decreased. Catalase and glutathione peroxidases decrease, mainly in AWS. Glutaredoxin (Grx) and thioredoxin (Trx) protein expression was lower in the three progeroid cell lines. Grx and Trx were subjected to post-transcriptional regulation, because protein expression was reduced although mRNA levels were not greatly affected in WS. Low antioxidant defense and oxidative stress occur simultaneously in these rare genetic instability disorders at the onset of progeroid disease.

  14. Werner Kienzle (1936 – 2016)

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Werner was born in Wiernsheim, a small town in Baden-Württemberg close to Stuttgart. His childhood was profoundly marked by the war and the death of his father on the German eastern front.   Despite life after the war being difficult for his family, he was very successful in his academic studies and earned a fellowship at the University of Göttingen, where he did his PhD in solid-state physics. Werner joined CERN in 1964 as a post-doc fellow and he remained at the Organization for his entire career in experimental particle physics. Concerned and eager for peace in the tense context of the cold war, he was deeply involved in collaboration with Russian colleagues and participated in experiments in Serpukhov from 1968 to 1972. Back at CERN, his work concentrated on the search for experimental evidence of the presence of quarks in hadrons. He was among the main initiators of the NA3 experiment at the SPS that measured the structure functions of the pions: the results indicated a cro...

  15. Werner Heisenberg (1901-1976)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chen Ning

    2013-05-01

    Werner Heisenberg was one of the greatest physicists of all times. When he started out as a young research worker, the world of physics was in a very confused and frustrating state, which Abraham Pais has described1 as: It was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair using Charles Dickens' words in A Tale of Two Cities. People were playing a guessing game: There were from time to time great triumphs in proposing, through sheer intuition, make-shift schemes that amazingly explained some regularities in spectral physics, leading to joy. But invariably such successes would be followed by further work which reveal the inconsistency or inadequacy of the new scheme, leading to despair...

  16. Soft-tissue mineralization in Werner syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leone, Antonio; Costantini, Alessandro Maria; Brigida, Raffaela; Antoniol, Onorina Monica; Bonomo, Lorenzo [Universita Cattolica School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Rome (Italy); Antonelli-Incalzi, Raffaele [Universita Cattolica School of Medicine, Department of Geriatrics, Rome (Italy)

    2005-01-01

    Werner syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by clinical signs of premature aging, short stature, scleroderma-like skin changes, endocrine abnormalities, cataracts, and an increased incidence of malignancies. We report on a 48-year-old woman with Werner syndrome associated with intracranial meningiomas who had extensive musculoskeletal manifestations including osteoporosis of the extremities, extensive tendinopathy about the ankles, osteomyelitis of the phalanges of the first left toe, abundant soft-tissue calcification, and two dense ossified soft-tissue masses, with cortical bone and trabeculae arising from the posterosuperior aspect of the calcanei and extending into Kager fat pads. A review of previous descriptions of the radiological abnormalities of Werner syndrome indicates that the presence of soft-tissue calcifications has either not been noted or been mentioned only briefly. Moreover, there is no mention of bony masses associated with Werner syndrome in the world literature, and this would appear to be the first report of this kind. (orig.)

  17. Werner State Structure and Entanglement Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W. Lyons

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present applications of the representation theory of Lie groups to the analysis of structure and local unitary classification of Werner states, sometimes called the decoherence-free states, which are states of n quantum bits left unchanged by local transformations that are the same on each particle. We introduce a multiqubit generalization of the singlet state and a construction that assembles these qubits into Werner states.

  18. Modulation of protein synthesis by polyamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, Kazuei; Kashiwagi, Keiko

    2015-03-01

    Polyamines are ubiquitous small basic molecules that play important roles in cell growth and viability. Since polyamines mainly exist as a polyamine-RNA complex, we looked for proteins whose synthesis is preferentially stimulated by polyamines at the level of translation, and thus far identified 17 proteins in Escherichia coli and 6 proteins in eukaryotes. The mechanisms of polyamine stimulation of synthesis of these proteins were investigated. In addition, the role of eIF5A, containing hypusine formed from spermidine, on protein synthesis is described. These results clearly indicate that polyamines and eIF5A contribute to cell growth and viability through modulation of protein synthesis.

  19. Robust and fragile Werner states in the collective dephasing Robust and fragile Werner states in the collective dephasing

    CERN Document Server

    Li, S B; Li, S B; Xu, J B; Li, Shang-Bin; Xu, Jing-Bo; Li, Shang-Bin; Xu, Jing-Bo

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the concurrence and Bell violation of the Werner or Werner-like states in the presence of collective dephasing. It is shown that the Werner and certain kinds of Werner-like states are robust against the collective dephasing, and some kinds of Werner-like states is fragile and becomes completely disentangled in a finite-time. The threshold time of complete disentanglement of the Werner state is given. The influence of external driving field on the finite-time disentanglement of Werner states is discussed. Finally, we present a simple method to control the stationary state entanglement of two qubits. We investigate the concurrence and Bell violation of the Werner or Werner-like states in the presence of collective dephasing. It is shown that the Werner and certain kinds of Werner-like states are robust against the collective dephasing, and some kinds of Werner-like states is fragile and becomes completely disentangled in a finite-time. The threshold time of complete disentanglement of the Werner ...

  20. On Two-Distillable Werner States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Đoković, Dragomir

    2016-06-01

    We consider bipartite mixed states in a $d\\otimes d$ quantum system. We say that $\\rho$ is PPT if its partial transpose $1 \\otimes T (\\rho)$ is positive semidefinite, and otherwise $\\rho$ is NPT. The well-known Werner states are divided into three types: (a) the separable states (the same as the PPT states); (b) the one-distillable states (necessarily NPT); and (c) the NPT states which are not one-distillable. We give several different formulations and provide further evidence for validity of the conjecture that the Werner states of type (c) are not two-distillable.

  1. Positive modulator of bone morphogenic protein-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamora, Paul O.; Pena, Louis A.; Lin, Xinhua; Kazuyuki, Takahashi

    2017-06-06

    Compounds of the present invention of formula I and formula II are disclosed in the specification and wherein the compounds are modulators of Bone Morphogenic Protein activity. Compounds are synthetic peptides having a non-growth factor heparin binding region, a linker, and sequences that bind specifically to a receptor for Bone Morphogenic Protein. Uses of compounds of the present invention in the treatment of bone lesions, degenerative joint disease and to enhance bone formation are disclosed.

  2. Positive modulator of bone morphogenic protein-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora, Paul O [Gaithersburg, MD; Pena, Louis A [Poquott, NY; Lin, Xinhua [Plainview, NY; Takahashi, Kazuyuki [Germantown, MD

    2009-01-27

    Compounds of the present invention of formula I and formula II are disclosed in the specification and wherein the compounds are modulators of Bone Morphogenic Protein activity. Compounds are synthetic peptides having a non-growth factor heparin binding region, a linker, and sequences that bind specifically to a receptor for Bone Morphogenic Protein. Uses of compounds of the present invention in the treatment of bone lesions, degenerative joint disease and to enhance bone formation are disclosed.

  3. Síndrome de Werner: Dos nuevos casos Werner´S Syndrome: Two New Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Palombo

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Se comunican dos casos del síndrome de Werner, el primero es un hombre con canicie desde la tercera década de la vida y diabetes mellitus diagnosticada el año pasado. El segundo caso es un hombre con alopecia masculina desde los 30 años y cataratas. Ambos nos consultaron por úlceras muy dolorosas en piernas y tobillos. Se efectúa una revisión del síndrome de Werner.Two cases of Werner´s syndrome are reported. The first case is a man with grey hair since his 30s and diabetes mellitus diagnosed last year. The second case is a man with male alopecia since his 30s and cataracts, both consulted us for extremely painful ulcers in their legs and ankles. A review of the Werner´s syndrome is made.

  4. Inferring modules from human protein interactome classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaurasia Gautam

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The integration of protein-protein interaction networks derived from high-throughput screening approaches and complementary sources is a key topic in systems biology. Although integration of protein interaction data is conventionally performed, the effects of this procedure on the result of network analyses has not been examined yet. In particular, in order to optimize the fusion of heterogeneous interaction datasets, it is crucial to consider not only their degree of coverage and accuracy, but also their mutual dependencies and additional salient features. Results We examined this issue based on the analysis of modules detected by network clustering methods applied to both integrated and individual (disaggregated data sources, which we call interactome classes. Due to class diversity, we deal with variable dependencies of data features arising from structural specificities and biases, but also from possible overlaps. Since highly connected regions of the human interactome may point to potential protein complexes, we have focused on the concept of modularity, and elucidated the detection power of module extraction algorithms by independent validations based on GO, MIPS and KEGG. From the combination of protein interactions with gene expressions, a confidence scoring scheme has been proposed before proceeding via GO with further classification in permanent and transient modules. Conclusions Disaggregated interactomes are shown to be informative for inferring modularity, thus contributing to perform an effective integrative analysis. Validation of the extracted modules by multiple annotation allows for the assessment of confidence measures assigned to the modules in a protein pathway context. Notably, the proposed multilayer confidence scheme can be used for network calibration by enabling a transition from unweighted to weighted interactomes based on biological evidence.

  5. Richard A. Werners forskning i pengeskabelse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    Hvilken rolle spiller penge i samfundsøkonomien og hvilken rolle burde penge spille i den økonomiske videnskab? Det forsker Richard Werner i. Han er professor i økonomi ved Southampton University i England, og her præsenteres fire dele af hans forskning i penge: (1) Hvad foregår der egentlig i en...

  6. Werner Herzogi üksiklased / Kristiina Davidjants

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Davidjants, Kristiina, 1974-

    2002-01-01

    Detsembris toimuvat Pimedate Ööde Filmifestivali laiendatakse ka suvele, et sobivates paikades näidata väärtfilme. Alates 6. juunist näidatakse Katariina kirikus Werner Herzogi (1942) filme. Lähemalt režissöörist

  7. Werner Herzogi üksiklased / Kristiina Davidjants

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Davidjants, Kristiina, 1974-

    2002-01-01

    Detsembris toimuvat Pimedate Ööde Filmifestivali laiendatakse ka suvele, et sobivates paikades näidata väärtfilme. Alates 6. juunist näidatakse Katariina kirikus Werner Herzogi (1942) filme. Lähemalt režissöörist

  8. An Interview with Werner F. Leopold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakuta, Kenji

    A 1983 interview with Werner F. Leopold (1896-1984), a key figure in the study of bilingualism and child language, is presented. An introductory section gives some background to the interview. The discussion itself reviews Leopold's personal and professional background, work, and writing, and focuses largely on the linguistic development of…

  9. Telomere shortening exposes functions for the mouse Werner and Bloom syndrome genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xiaobing; Shen, Johnny; Kugan, Nishan; Furth, Emma E; Lombard, David B; Cheung, Catherine; Pak, Sally; Luo, Guangbin; Pignolo, Robert J; DePinho, Ronald A; Guarente, Leonard; Johnson, F Brad

    2004-10-01

    The Werner and Bloom syndromes are caused by loss-of-function mutations in WRN and BLM, respectively, which encode the RecQ family DNA helicases WRN and BLM, respectively. Persons with Werner syndrome displays premature aging of the skin, vasculature, reproductive system, and bone, and those with Bloom syndrome display more limited features of aging, including premature menopause; both syndromes involve genome instability and increased cancer. The proteins participate in recombinational repair of stalled replication forks or DNA breaks, but the precise functions of the proteins that prevent rapid aging are unknown. Accumulating evidence points to telomeres as targets of WRN and BLM, but the importance in vivo of the proteins in telomere biology has not been tested. We show that Wrn and Blm mutations each accentuate pathology in later-generation mice lacking the telomerase RNA template Terc, including acceleration of phenotypes characteristic of latest-generation Terc mutants. Furthermore, pathology not observed in Terc mutants but similar to that observed in Werner syndrome and Bloom syndrome, such as bone loss, was observed. The pathology was accompanied by enhanced telomere dysfunction, including end-to-end chromosome fusions and greater loss of telomere repeat DNA compared with Terc mutants. These findings indicate that telomere dysfunction may contribute to the pathogenesis of Werner syndrome and Bloom syndrome.

  10. Modulators of 14-3-3 Protein-Protein Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevers, Loes M; Sijbesma, Eline; Botta, Maurizio; MacKintosh, Carol; Obsil, Tomas; Landrieu, Isabelle; Cau, Ylenia; Wilson, Andrew J; Karawajczyk, Anna; Eickhoff, Jan; Davis, Jeremy; Hann, Michael M; O'Mahony, Gavin; Doveston, Richard G; Brunsveld, Luc; Ottmann, Christian

    2017-10-02

    Direct interactions between proteins are essential for the regulation of their functions in biological pathways. Targeting the complex network of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) has now been widely recognized as an attractive means to therapeutically intervene in disease states. Even though this is a challenging endeavor and PPIs have long been regarded as 'undruggable' targets, the last two decades have seen an increasing number of successful examples of PPI modulators resulting in a growing interest in this field. PPI modulation requires novel approaches and the integrated efforts of multiple disciplines to be a fruitful strategy. This Perspective focuses on the hub protein 14-3-3, which has several hundred identified protein interaction partners and is therefore involved in a wide range of cellular processes and diseases. Here, we aim to provide an integrated overview of the approaches explored for the modulation of 14-3-3 PPIs and review the examples resulting from these efforts in both inhibiting and stabilizing specific 14-3-3 protein complexes by small molecules, peptide-mimetics and natural products.

  11. Nucleolin inhibits G4 oligonucleotide unwinding by Werner helicase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fred E Indig

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Werner protein (WRNp, a member of the RecQ helicase family, is strongly associated with the nucleolus, as is nucleolin (NCL, an important nucleolar constituent protein. Both WRNp and NCL respond to the effects of DNA damaging agents. Therefore, we have investigated if these nuclear proteins interact and if this interaction has a possible functional significance in DNA damage repair. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report that WRNp interacts with the RNA-binding protein, NCL, based on immunoprecipitation, immunofluorescent co-localization in live and fixed cells, and direct binding of purified WRNp to nucleolin. We also map the binding region to the C-terminal domains of both proteins. Furthermore, treatment of U2OS cells with 15 µM of the Topoisomerase I inhibitor, camptothecin, causes the dissociation of the nucleolin-Werner complex in the nucleolus, followed by partial re-association in the nucleoplasm. Other DNA damaging agents, such as hydroxyurea, Mitomycin C, and aphidicolin do not have these effects. Nucleolin or its C-terminal fragment affected the helicase, but not the exonuclease activity of WRNp, by inhibiting WRN unwinding of G4 tetraplex DNA structures, as seen in activity assays and electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data suggest that nucleolin may regulate G4 DNA unwinding by WRNp, possibly in response to certain DNA damaging agents. We postulate that the NCL-WRNp complex may contain an inactive form of WRNp, which is released from the nucleolus upon DNA damage. Then, when required, WRNp is released from inhibition and can participate in the DNA repair processes.

  12. The irre cell recognition module (IRM) proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischbach, Karl-Friedrich; Linneweber, Gerit Arne; Andlauer, Till Felix Malte; Hertenstein, Alexander; Bonengel, Bernhard; Chaudhary, Kokil

    2009-01-01

    One of the most challenging problems in developmental neurosciences is to understand the establishment and maintenance of specific membrane contacts between axonal, dendritic, and glial processes in the neuropils, which eventually secure neuronal connectivity. However, underlying cell recognition events are pivotal in other tissues as well. This brief review focuses on the pleiotropic functions of a small, evolutionarily conserved group of proteins of the immunoglobulin superfamily involved in cell recognition. In Drosophila, this protein family comprises Irregular chiasm C/Roughest (IrreC/Rst), Kin of irre (Kirre), and their interacting protein partners, Sticks and stones (SNS) and Hibris (Hbs). For simplicity, we propose to name this ensemble of proteins the irre cell recognition module (IRM) after the first identified member of this family. Here, we summarize evidence that the IRM proteins function together in various cellular interactions, including myoblast fusion, cell sorting, axonal pathfinding, and target recognition in the optic neuropils of Drosophila. Understanding IRM protein function will help to unravel the epigenetic rules by which the intricate neurite networks in sensory neuropils are formed.

  13. Pathogen mimicry of host protein-protein interfaces modulates immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guven-Maiorov, Emine; Tsai, Chung-Jung; Nussinov, Ruth

    2016-10-01

    Signaling pathways shape and transmit the cell's reaction to its changing environment; however, pathogens can circumvent this response by manipulating host signaling. To subvert host defense, they beat it at its own game: they hijack host pathways by mimicking the binding surfaces of host-encoded proteins. For this, it is not necessary to achieve global protein homology; imitating merely the interaction surface is sufficient. Different protein folds often interact via similar protein-protein interface architectures. This similarity in binding surfaces permits the pathogenic protein to compete with a host target protein. Thus, rather than binding a host-encoded partner, the host protein hub binds the pathogenic surrogate. The outcome can be dire: rewiring or repurposing the host pathways, shifting the cell signaling landscape and consequently the immune response. They can also cause persistent infections as well as cancer by modulating key signaling pathways, such as those involving Ras. Mapping the rewired host-pathogen 'superorganism' interaction network - along with its structural details - is critical for in-depth understanding of pathogenic mechanisms and developing efficient therapeutics. Here, we overview the role of molecular mimicry in pathogen host evasion as well as types of molecular mimicry mechanisms that emerged during evolution.

  14. Conserved intron positions in ancient protein modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Roos Albert DG

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The timing of the origin of introns is of crucial importance for an understanding of early genome architecture. The Exon theory of genes proposed a role for introns in the formation of multi-exon proteins by exon shuffling and predicts the presence of conserved splice sites in ancient genes. In this study, large-scale analysis of potential conserved splice sites was performed using an intron-exon database (ExInt derived from GenBank. Results A set of conserved intron positions was found by matching identical splice sites sequences from distantly-related eukaryotic kingdoms. Most amino acid sequences with conserved introns were homologous to consensus sequences of functional domains from conserved proteins including kinases, phosphatases, small GTPases, transporters and matrix proteins. These included ancient proteins that originated before the eukaryote-prokaryote split, for instance the catalytic domain of protein phosphatase 2A where a total of eleven conserved introns were found. Using an experimental setup in which the relation between a splice site and the ancientness of its surrounding sequence could be studied, it was found that the presence of an intron was positively correlated to the ancientness of its surrounding sequence. Intron phase conservation was linked to the conservation of the gene sequence and not to the splice site sequence itself. However, no apparent differences in phase distribution were found between introns in conserved versus non-conserved sequences. Conclusion The data confirm an origin of introns deep in the eukaryotic branch and is in concordance with the presence of introns in the first functional protein modules in an 'Exon theory of genes' scenario. A model is proposed in which shuffling of primordial short exonic sequences led to the formation of the first functional protein modules, in line with hypotheses that see the formation of introns integral to the origins of genome evolution

  15. Bivariate Blending Thiele-Werner's Osculatory Rational Interpolation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Both the expansive Newton's interpolating polynomial and the Thiele-Werner's interpolation are used to construct a kind of bivariate blending Thiele-Werner's osculatory rational interpolation. A recursive algorithm and its characteristic properties are given. An error estimation is obtained and a numerical example is illustrated.

  16. Immortalization of Werner syndrome and progeria fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, H.; Moses, R.E. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (USA))

    1991-02-01

    Human fibroblast cells from two different progeroid syndromes, Werner syndrome (WS) and progeria, were established as immortalized cell lines by transfection with plasmid DNA containing the SV40 early region. The lineage of each immortalized cell line was confirmed by VNTR analysis. Each of the immortalized cell lines maintained its original phenotype of slow growth. DNA repair ability of these cells was also studied by measuring sensitivity to killing by uv or the DNA-damaging drugs methyl methansulfonate, bleomycin, and cis-dichlorodiamine platinum. The results showed that both WS and progeria cells have normal sensitivity to these agents.

  17. Identification of Topological Network Modules in Perturbed Protein Interaction Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardiu, Mihaela E.; Gilmore, Joshua M.; Groppe, Brad; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P.

    2017-01-01

    Biological networks consist of functional modules, however detecting and characterizing such modules in networks remains challenging. Perturbing networks is one strategy for identifying modules. Here we used an advanced mathematical approach named topological data analysis (TDA) to interrogate two perturbed networks. In one, we disrupted the S. cerevisiae INO80 protein interaction network by isolating complexes after protein complex components were deleted from the genome. In the second, we reanalyzed previously published data demonstrating the disruption of the human Sin3 network with a histone deacetylase inhibitor. Here we show that disrupted networks contained topological network modules (TNMs) with shared properties that mapped onto distinct locations in networks. We define TMNs as proteins that occupy close network positions depending on their coordinates in a topological space. TNMs provide new insight into networks by capturing proteins from different categories including proteins within a complex, proteins with shared biological functions, and proteins disrupted across networks. PMID:28272416

  18. WERNER SYNDROME: A NEW CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faida Ajili

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available “Werner’s syndrome” or premature aging syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive genetic disease. It is responsible of several complications related to age, including atherosclerosis and association with cancer. We report the case of a 36 year-old-patient, admitted to department of Internal Medicine of the military hospital of Tunis for suspicion of systemic sclerosis. The patient had all the major signs of Werner syndrome (bilateral cataract, sclerotic skin, “bird face”, baldness, small size, parental consanguinity and 4 minor signs (type 2 diabetes, hypogonadism, squeaky voice, and flat feet. She has also a brother with the same morphotype died at the age of 32 by a myocardial infarction. The current follow-up time is 9 years..

  19. Behavior of Werner states under relativistic boosts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palge, Veiko; Dunningham, Jacob

    2015-12-01

    We study the structure of maps that Lorentz boosts induce on the spin degree of freedom of a system consisting of two massive spin- 1 / 2 particles. We consider the case where the spin state is described by the Werner state and the momenta are discrete. Transformations on the spins are systematically investigated in various boost scenarios by calculating the orbit and concurrence of the bipartite spin state with different kinds of product and entangled momenta. We confirm the general conclusion that Lorentz boosts cause non-trivial behavior of bipartite spin entanglement. Visualization of the evolution of the spin state is shown to be valuable in explaining the pattern of concurrence. The idealized model provides a basis of explanation in terms of which phenomena in systems involving continuous momenta can be understood.

  20. Reflections on My Werner H. Kirsten Student Internship | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Nathalie Walker, Guest Writer Editor’s note: This article represents one student’s perspective on her experiences as a Werner H. Kirsten student intern. Failure isn’t just a possibility, it is a certainty; yet failure is what leads you to success. Above all else, that is what I will retain from my experience in the Werner H. Kirsten Student Intern Program (WHK SIP).

  1. Reflections on My Werner H. Kirsten Student Internship | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Nathalie Walker, Guest Writer Editor’s note: This article represents one student’s perspective on her experiences as a Werner H. Kirsten student intern. Failure isn’t just a possibility, it is a certainty; yet failure is what leads you to success. Above all else, that is what I will retain from my experience in the Werner H. Kirsten Student Intern Program (WHK SIP).

  2. SUMO modulation of protein aggregation and degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Feligioni

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO conjugation and binding to target proteins regulate a wide variety of cellular pathways. The functional aspects of SUMOylation include changes in protein-protein interactions, intracellular trafficking as well as protein aggregation and degradation. SUMO has also been linked to specialized cellular pathways such as neuronal development and synaptic transmission. In addition, SUMOylation is associated with neurological diseases associated with abnormal protein accumulations. SUMOylation of the amyloid and tau proteins involved in Alzheimer's disease and other tauopathies may contribute to changes in protein solubility and proteolytic processing. Similar events have been reported for α-synuclein aggregates found in Parkinson's disease, polyglutamine disorders such as Huntington's disease as well as protein aggregates found in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. This review provides a detailed overview of the impact SUMOylation has on the etiology and pathology of these related neurological diseases.

  3. Werner Sombart and his reception in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Pisanelli

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article intends to focus on the difficulty encountered by Werner Sombart’s works in gaining a hearing in various Italian intellectual circuits. As is well known, Sombart belonged to the German Historical School of economics, sharing with other scholars of that school the same problems in getting his work known in Italy. Our aim is to explain the reason for this hostile reception. First of all, we will analyze the factors which generally hindered the spread of the German Historical School in Italy, recognizing in economists like Francesco Ferrara, Idealists like Benedetto Croce and Marxists like Antonio Labriola some of its strongest opponents. We will dwell on the cases of Gustav Schmoller and Max Weber, in order to give two representative examples of the slow and complicated Italian reception of methodological approaches and analytical perspectives which characterized the scientific experience of the German Historical School. Secondly, we will try to show why Sombart was even less appreciated than other German social scientists, giving the reasons that attracted severe criticism from economists, economic historians and sociologists towards his interdisciplinary approach in the analysis of modern capitalism. Finally, we will show the reasons of the contemporary rediscovery of Sombart and of his works.

  4. Modulating fracture properties of mixed protein systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ersch, C.; Laak, ter I.; Linden, van der E.; Venema, P.; Martin, A.

    2015-01-01

    To design foods with desired textures it is important to understand structure build-up and breakdown. One can obtain a wide range of structures using mixtures of different structuring ingredients such as for example protein mixtures. Mixed soy protein isolate (SPI)/gelatine gels were analyzed for th

  5. A Two-Party Probabilistic Communication Complexity Scenario via Werner States

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Peng; LI Chuan-Feng; GUO Guang-Can

    2001-01-01

    We propose a probabilistic two-party communication complexity scenario with a prior Werner state and analyse the communication abilities of quantum correlations (entanglements) and classical correlations. This process can be used as an entanglement monotone of Werner states.

  6. Protein interaction networks--more than mere modules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Pinkert

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available It is widely believed that the modular organization of cellular function is reflected in a modular structure of molecular networks. A common view is that a "module" in a network is a cohesively linked group of nodes, densely connected internally and sparsely interacting with the rest of the network. Many algorithms try to identify functional modules in protein-interaction networks (PIN by searching for such cohesive groups of proteins. Here, we present an alternative approach independent of any prior definition of what actually constitutes a "module". In a self-consistent manner, proteins are grouped into "functional roles" if they interact in similar ways with other proteins according to their functional roles. Such grouping may well result in cohesive modules again, but only if the network structure actually supports this. We applied our method to the PIN from the Human Protein Reference Database (HPRD and found that a representation of the network in terms of cohesive modules, at least on a global scale, does not optimally represent the network's structure because it focuses on finding independent groups of proteins. In contrast, a decomposition into functional roles is able to depict the structure much better as it also takes into account the interdependencies between roles and even allows groupings based on the absence of interactions between proteins in the same functional role. This, for example, is the case for transmembrane proteins, which could never be recognized as a cohesive group of nodes in a PIN. When mapping experimental methods onto the groups, we identified profound differences in the coverage suggesting that our method is able to capture experimental bias in the data, too. For example yeast-two-hybrid data were highly overrepresented in one particular group. Thus, there is more structure in protein-interaction networks than cohesive modules alone and we believe this finding can significantly improve automated function

  7. Plasma protein haptoglobin modulates renal iron loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fagoonee, Sharmila; Gburek, Jakub; Hirsch, Emilio

    2005-01-01

    Haptoglobin is the plasma protein with the highest binding affinity for hemoglobin. The strength of hemoglobin binding and the existence of a specific receptor for the haptoglobin-hemoglobin complex in the monocyte/macrophage system clearly suggest that haptoglobin may have a crucial role in heme...

  8. Xanthophylls as modulators of membrane protein function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruban, Alexander V; Johnson, Matthew P

    2010-12-01

    This review discusses the structural aspect of the role of photosynthetic antenna xanthophylls. It argues that xanthophyll hydrophobicity/polarity could explain the reason for xanthophyll variety and help to understand their recently emerging function--control of membrane organization and the work of membrane proteins. The structure of a xanthophyll molecule is discussed in relation to other amphiphilic compounds like lipids, detergents, etc. Xanthophyll composition of membrane proteins, the role of their variety in protein function are discussed using as an example for the major light harvesting antenna complex of photosystem II, LHCII, from higher plants. A new empirical parameter, hydrophobicity parameter (H-parameter), has been introduced as an effective measure of the hydrophobicity of the xanthophyll complement of LHCII from different xanthophyll biosynthesis mutants of Arabidopsis. Photosystem II quantum efficiency was found to correlate well with the H-parameter of LHCII xanthophylls. PSII down-regulation by non-photochemical chlorophyll fluorescence quenching, NPQ, had optimum corresponding to the wild-type xanthophyll composition, where lutein occupies intrinsic sites, L1 and L2. Xanthophyll polarity/hydrophobicity alteration by the activity of the xanthophyll cycle explains the allosteric character of NPQ regulation, memory of illumination history and the hysteretic nature of the relationship between the triggering factor, ΔpH, and the energy dissipation process. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Translational Modulation of Proteins Expressed from Bicistronic Vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasun J. Mishra

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Bicistronic vectors are useful tools for exogenous expression of two gene products from a single promoter element; however, reduced expression of protein from the second cistron compared with the first cistron is a common limitation to this approach. To overcome this limitation, we explored use of dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR complementary DNA encoded in bicistronic vectors to induce a second protein of interest by methotrexate (MTX treatment. Previous studies have demonstrated that levels of DHFR protein and DHFR fusion protein can be induced translationally following MTX treatment of cells. We demonstrated that in response to MTX treatment, DHFR partner protein in a bicistronic construct is induced for longer periods of time when compared with endogenous DHFR and DHFR fusion protein, in vitro and in vivo. Using rapamycin pretreatment followed by MTX treatment, we also devised a strategy to modulate levels of two proteins expressed from a bicistronic construct in a cap-independent manner. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating that levels of proteins in DHFR-based bicistronic constructs can be induced and modulated using MTX and rapamycin treatment.

  10. Modulation of apoptosis by V protein mumps virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herrera-Camacho Irma

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Urabe AM9 vaccine strain of mumps virus contains two variants of V protein: VWT (of HN-A1081 viral population and VGly (of HN-G1081. The V protein is a promoting factor of viral replication by blocking the IFN antiviral pathway. Findings We studied the relationship between V protein variants and IFN-α2b-induced apoptosis. V proteins decrease activation of the extrinsic IFN-α2b-induced apoptotic pathway monitored by the caspase 8 activity, being the effect greater with the VWT protein. Both V proteins decrease the activity of caspase 9 of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. In a system without IFN, the VWT and VGly proteins expression promotes activation of caspases 3 and 7. However, when the cellular system was stimulated with IFN-α, this activity decreased partially. TUNEL assay shows that for treatment with IFN-α and ibuprofen of cervical adenocarcinoma cells there is nuclear DNA fragmentation but the V protein expression reduces this process. Conclusions The reduction in the levels of caspases and DNA fragmentation, suggesting that V protein, particularly VWT protein of Urabe AM9 vaccine strain, modulates apoptosis. In addition, the VWT protein shows a protective role for cell proliferation in the presence of antiproliferative signals.

  11. Growing functional modules from a seed protein via integration of protein interaction and gene expression data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrakopoulou Konstantina

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nowadays modern biology aims at unravelling the strands of complex biological structures such as the protein-protein interaction (PPI networks. A key concept in the organization of PPI networks is the existence of dense subnetworks (functional modules in them. In recent approaches clustering algorithms were applied at these networks and the resulting subnetworks were evaluated by estimating the coverage of well-established protein complexes they contained. However, most of these algorithms elaborate on an unweighted graph structure which in turn fails to elevate those interactions that would contribute to the construction of biologically more valid and coherent functional modules. Results In the current study, we present a method that corroborates the integration of protein interaction and microarray data via the discovery of biologically valid functional modules. Initially the gene expression information is overlaid as weights onto the PPI network and the enriched PPI graph allows us to exploit its topological aspects, while simultaneously highlights enhanced functional association in specific pairs of proteins. Then we present an algorithm that unveils the functional modules of the weighted graph by expanding a kernel protein set, which originates from a given 'seed' protein used as starting-point. Conclusion The integrated data and the concept of our approach provide reliable functional modules. We give proofs based on yeast data that our method manages to give accurate results in terms both of structural coherency, as well as functional consistency.

  12. G protein modulation of recombinant P/Q-type calcium channels by regulators of G protein signalling proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, M D; Wittemann, S; Herlitze, S

    2000-10-01

    1. Fast synaptic transmission is triggered by the activation of presynaptic Ca2+ channels which can be inhibited by Gbetagamma subunits via G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR). Regulators of G protein signalling (RGS) proteins are GTPase-accelerating proteins (GAPs), which are responsible for >100-fold increases in the GTPase activity of G proteins and might be involved in the regulation of presynaptic Ca2+ channels. In this study we investigated the effects of RGS2 on G protein modulation of recombinant P/Q-type channels expressed in a human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cell line using whole-cell recordings. 2. RGS2 markedly accelerates transmitter-mediated inhibition and recovery from inhibition of Ba2+ currents (IBa) through P/Q-type channels heterologously expressed with the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 (mAChR M2). 3. Both RGS2 and RGS4 modulate the prepulse facilitation properties of P/Q-type Ca2+ channels. G protein reinhibition is accelerated, while release from inhibition is slowed. These kinetics depend on the availability of G protein alpha and betagamma subunits which is altered by RGS proteins. 4. RGS proteins unmask the Ca2+ channel beta subunit modulation of Ca2+ channel G protein inhibition. In the presence of RGS2, P/Q-type channels containing the beta2a and beta3 subunits reveal significantly altered kinetics of G protein modulation and increased facilitation compared to Ca2+ channels coexpressed with the beta1b or beta4 subunit.

  13. First Japanese case of atypical progeroid syndrome/atypical Werner syndrome with heterozygous LMNA mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motegi, Sei-ichiro; Yokoyama, Yoko; Uchiyama, Akihiko; Ogino, Sachiko; Takeuchi, Yuko; Yamada, Kazuya; Hattori, Tomoyasu; Hashizume, Hiroaki; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Goto, Makoto; Ishikawa, Osamu

    2014-12-01

    Atypical progeroid syndrome (APS), including atypical Werner syndrome (AWS), is a progeroid syndrome involving heterozygous mutations in the LMNA gene encoding the nuclear protein lamin A/C. We report the first Japanese case of APS/AWS with a LMNA mutation (p.D300N). A 53-year-old Japanese man had a history of recurrent severe cardiovascular diseases as well as brain infarction and hemorrhages. Although our APS/AWS patient had overlapping features with Werner syndrome (WS), such as high-pitched voice, scleroderma, lipoatrophy and atherosclerosis, several cardinal features of WS, including short stature, premature graying/alopecia, cataract, bird-like face, flat feet, hyperkeratosis on the soles and diabetes mellitus, were absent. In immunofluorescence staining and electron microscopic analyses of the patient's cultured fibroblasts, abnormal nuclear morphology, an increase in small aggregation of heterochromatin and a decrease in interchromatin granules in nuclei of fibroblasts were observed, suggesting that abnormal nuclear morphology and chromatin disorganization may be associated with the pathogenesis of APS/AWS.

  14. Identifying functional modules in protein-protein interaction networks: An integrated exact approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dittrich, M.; Klau, G.W.; Rosenwald, A.; Dandekar, T.; et al, not CWI

    2008-01-01

    Motivation: With the exponential growth of expression and protein-protein interaction (PPI) data, the frontier of research in system biology shifts more and more to the integrated analysis of these large datasets. Of particular interest is the identification of functional modules in PPI networks, sh

  15. A case of Werner's syndrome associated with osteosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, K; Hatamochi, A; Shinkai, H; Ishikawa, Y; Kawaguchi, N; Goto, M

    1999-10-01

    We described a case of Werner's syndrome associated with osteosarcoma. A 37-year-old Japanese man was diagnosed as having Werner's syndrome by the presence of juvenile cataracts, skin sclerosis and hyperpigmentation of the feet, high-pitched voice, characteristic bird-like appearance of the face with beak-shaped nose, thinning of the entire skin and hyperkeratoses on soles, hyperlipemia, hyperuricemia, diabetes melitus, and the mutated responsible gene (WRN). He had a 3-month history of a tumor on his left forearm. Histologically, the tumor included four histological patterns; a malignant fibrous histiocytoma-like, a desmoid-like, a dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans-like, and a chondrosarcoma-like pattern. Tumoral osteoid formation was also found in the tumor. Therefore, the tumor was diagnosed as osteosarcoma.

  16. ModuleRole: a tool for modulization, role determination and visualization in protein-protein interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guipeng; Li, Ming; Zhang, Yiwei; Wang, Dong; Li, Rong; Guimerà, Roger; Gao, Juntao Tony; Zhang, Michael Q

    2014-01-01

    Rapidly increasing amounts of (physical and genetic) protein-protein interaction (PPI) data are produced by various high-throughput techniques, and interpretation of these data remains a major challenge. In order to gain insight into the organization and structure of the resultant large complex networks formed by interacting molecules, using simulated annealing, a method based on the node connectivity, we developed ModuleRole, a user-friendly web server tool which finds modules in PPI network and defines the roles for every node, and produces files for visualization in Cytoscape and Pajek. For given proteins, it analyzes the PPI network from BioGRID database, finds and visualizes the modules these proteins form, and then defines the role every node plays in this network, based on two topological parameters Participation Coefficient and Z-score. This is the first program which provides interactive and very friendly interface for biologists to find and visualize modules and roles of proteins in PPI network. It can be tested online at the website http://www.bioinfo.org/modulerole/index.php, which is free and open to all users and there is no login requirement, with demo data provided by "User Guide" in the menu Help. Non-server application of this program is considered for high-throughput data with more than 200 nodes or user's own interaction datasets. Users are able to bookmark the web link to the result page and access at a later time. As an interactive and highly customizable application, ModuleRole requires no expert knowledge in graph theory on the user side and can be used in both Linux and Windows system, thus a very useful tool for biologist to analyze and visualize PPI networks from databases such as BioGRID. ModuleRole is implemented in Java and C, and is freely available at http://www.bioinfo.org/modulerole/index.php. Supplementary information (user guide, demo data) is also available at this website. API for ModuleRole used for this program can be

  17. ModuleRole: a tool for modulization, role determination and visualization in protein-protein interaction networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guipeng Li

    Full Text Available Rapidly increasing amounts of (physical and genetic protein-protein interaction (PPI data are produced by various high-throughput techniques, and interpretation of these data remains a major challenge. In order to gain insight into the organization and structure of the resultant large complex networks formed by interacting molecules, using simulated annealing, a method based on the node connectivity, we developed ModuleRole, a user-friendly web server tool which finds modules in PPI network and defines the roles for every node, and produces files for visualization in Cytoscape and Pajek. For given proteins, it analyzes the PPI network from BioGRID database, finds and visualizes the modules these proteins form, and then defines the role every node plays in this network, based on two topological parameters Participation Coefficient and Z-score. This is the first program which provides interactive and very friendly interface for biologists to find and visualize modules and roles of proteins in PPI network. It can be tested online at the website http://www.bioinfo.org/modulerole/index.php, which is free and open to all users and there is no login requirement, with demo data provided by "User Guide" in the menu Help. Non-server application of this program is considered for high-throughput data with more than 200 nodes or user's own interaction datasets. Users are able to bookmark the web link to the result page and access at a later time. As an interactive and highly customizable application, ModuleRole requires no expert knowledge in graph theory on the user side and can be used in both Linux and Windows system, thus a very useful tool for biologist to analyze and visualize PPI networks from databases such as BioGRID.ModuleRole is implemented in Java and C, and is freely available at http://www.bioinfo.org/modulerole/index.php. Supplementary information (user guide, demo data is also available at this website. API for ModuleRole used for this

  18. Werner Herzog - saksa kino atleet ja aadlik / Mart Rummo

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Rummo, Mart

    2002-01-01

    Alates 6. juunist näidatakse Katariina kirikus kuuel õhtul algusega kell 22 Werner Herzogi (1942) filme. Väljavõtteid W. Herzogi poolt 1999. aastal Cannes'i festivali järel antud intervjuust, kus juttu ka režissööri suhetest näitleja Klaus Kinskiga, millest kõneleb ka Tallinnas näidatav "Minu armas vaenlane"

  19. Werner Herzog - saksa kino atleet ja aadlik / Mart Rummo

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Rummo, Mart

    2002-01-01

    Alates 6. juunist näidatakse Katariina kirikus kuuel õhtul algusega kell 22 Werner Herzogi (1942) filme. Väljavõtteid W. Herzogi poolt 1999. aastal Cannes'i festivali järel antud intervjuust, kus juttu ka režissööri suhetest näitleja Klaus Kinskiga, millest kõneleb ka Tallinnas näidatav "Minu armas vaenlane"

  20. Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich syndrome: a rare presentation with pyocolpos

    OpenAIRE

    Cox, Deven; Ching, Brian H.

    2012-01-01

    Obstructed hemivagina and ipsilateral renal anomaly (OHVIRA), also known as Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich syndrome, is a rare syndrome with only a few hundred reported cases described since 1922. Only a handful of these cases have been associated with pyocolpos. Mullerian duct anomalies have an incidence of 2–3%. While OHVIRA constitutes 0.16–10% of these Mullerian duct anomalies. Symptoms usually present shortly after menarche when hematocolpos develops during menstruation resulting in dysmenorrh...

  1. Plant LysM proteins: modules mediating symbiosis and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gust, Andrea A; Willmann, Roland; Desaki, Yoshitake; Grabherr, Heini M; Nürnberger, Thorsten

    2012-08-01

    Microbial glycans, such as bacterial peptidoglycans, fungal chitin or rhizobacterial Nod factors (NFs), are important signatures for plant immune activation or for the establishment of beneficial symbioses. Plant lysin motif (LysM) domain proteins serve as modules mediating recognition of these different N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc)-containing ligands, suggesting that this class of proteins evolved from an ancient sensor for GlcNAc. During early plant evolution, these glycans probably served as immunogenic patterns activating LysM protein receptor-mediated plant immunity and stopping microbial infection. The biochemical potential of plant LysM proteins for sensing microbial GlcNAc-containing glycans has probably since favored the evolution of receptors facilitating microbial infection and symbiosis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Transcriptional Modulation of Heat-Shock Protein Gene Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Anastasis Stephanou; Latchman, David S.

    2011-01-01

    Heat-shock proteins (Hsps) are molecular chaperones that are ubiquitously expressed but are also induced in cells exposed to stressful stimuli. Hsps have been implicated in the induction and propagation of several diseases. This paper focuses on regulatory factors that control the transcription of the genes encoding Hsps. We also highlight how distinct transcription factors are able to interact and modulate Hsps in different pathological states. Thus, a better understanding of the complex sig...

  3. Transcriptional modulation of heat-shock protein gene expression.

    OpenAIRE

    A. Stephanou; Latchman, D S

    2011-01-01

    Heat-shock proteins (Hsps) are molecular chaperones that are ubiquitously expressed but are also induced in cells exposed to stressful stimuli. Hsps have been implicated in the induction and propagation of several diseases. This paper focuses on regulatory factors that control the transcription of the genes encoding Hsps. We also highlight how distinct transcription factors are able to interact and modulate Hsps in different pathological states. Thus, a better understanding of the complex sig...

  4. Werner's Measure on Self-Avoiding Loops and Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, Angel; Pickrell, Doug

    2014-08-01

    Werner's conformally invariant family of measures on self-avoiding loops on Riemann surfaces is determined by a single measure μ_0 on self-avoiding loops in C setminus{0} which surround 0. Our first major objective is to show that the measure μ_0 is infinitesimally invariant with respect to conformal vector fields (essentially the Virasoro algebra of conformal field theory). This makes essential use of classical variational formulas of Duren and Schiffer, which we recast in representation theoretic terms for efficient computation. We secondly show how these formulas can be used to calculate (in principle, and sometimes explicitly) quantities (such as moments for coefficients of univalent functions) associated to the conformal welding for a self-avoiding loop. This gives an alternate proof of the uniqueness of Werner's measure. We also attempt to use these variational formulas to derive a differential equation for the (Laplace transform of) the ''diagonal distribution'' for the conformal welding associated to a loop; this generalizes in a suggestive way to a deformation of Werner's measure conjectured to exist by Kontsevich and Suhov (a basic inspiration for this paper).

  5. Molecular tweezers modulate 14-3-3 protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bier, David; Rose, Rolf; Bravo-Rodriguez, Kenny; Bartel, Maria; Ramirez-Anguita, Juan Manuel; Dutt, Som; Wilch, Constanze; Klärner, Frank-Gerrit; Sanchez-Garcia, Elsa; Schrader, Thomas; Ottmann, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Supramolecular chemistry has recently emerged as a promising way to modulate protein functions, but devising molecules that will interact with a protein in the desired manner is difficult as many competing interactions exist in a biological environment (with solvents, salts or different sites for the target biomolecule). We now show that lysine-specific molecular tweezers bind to a 14-3-3 adapter protein and modulate its interaction with partner proteins. The tweezers inhibit binding between the 14-3-3 protein and two partner proteins--a phosphorylated (C-Raf) protein and an unphosphorylated one (ExoS)--in a concentration-dependent manner. Protein crystallography shows that this effect arises from the binding of the tweezers to a single surface-exposed lysine (Lys214) of the 14-3-3 protein in the proximity of its central channel, which normally binds the partner proteins. A combination of structural analysis and computer simulations provides rules for the tweezers' binding preferences, thus allowing us to predict their influence on this type of protein-protein interactions.

  6. Protein dynamics modulated electron transfer kinetics in early stage photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Prasanta; Dua, Arti

    2013-01-28

    A recent experiment has probed the electron transfer kinetics in the early stage of photosynthesis in Rhodobacter sphaeroides for the reaction center of wild type and different mutants [Science 316, 747 (2007)]. By monitoring the changes in the transient absorption of the donor-acceptor pair at 280 and 930 nm, both of which show non-exponential temporal decay, the experiment has provided a strong evidence that the initial electron transfer kinetics is modulated by the dynamics of protein backbone. In this work, we present a model where the electron transfer kinetics of the donor-acceptor pair is described along the reaction coordinate associated with the distance fluctuations in a protein backbone. The stochastic evolution of the reaction coordinate is described in terms of a non-Markovian generalized Langevin equation with a memory kernel and Gaussian colored noise, both of which are completely described in terms of the microscopics of the protein normal modes. This model provides excellent fits to the transient absorption signals at 280 and 930 nm associated with protein distance fluctuations and protein dynamics modulated electron transfer reaction, respectively. In contrast to previous models, the present work explains the microscopic origins of the non-exponential decay of the transient absorption curve at 280 nm in terms of multiple time scales of relaxation of the protein normal modes. Dynamic disorder in the reaction pathway due to protein conformational fluctuations which occur on time scales slower than or comparable to the electron transfer kinetics explains the microscopic origin of the non-exponential nature of the transient absorption decay at 930 nm. The theoretical estimates for the relative driving force for five different mutants are in close agreement with the experimental estimates obtained using electrochemical measurements.

  7. The effect of RO3201195 and a pyrazolyl ketone P38 MAPK inhibitor library on the proliferation of Werner syndrome cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagley, Mark C; Dwyer, Jessica E; Baashen, Mohammed; Dix, Matthew C; Murziani, Paola G S; Rokicki, Michal J; Kipling, David; Davis, Terence

    2016-01-21

    Microwave-assisted synthesis of the pyrazolyl ketone p38 MAPK inhibitor RO3201195 in 7 steps and 15% overall yield, and the comparison of its effect upon the proliferation of Werner Syndrome cells with a library of pyrazolyl ketones, strengthens the evidence that p38 MAPK inhibition plays a critical role in modulating premature cellular senescence in this progeroid syndrome and the reversal of accelerated ageing observed in vitro on treatment with SB203580.

  8. Werner complex deficiency in cells disrupts the Nuclear Pore Complex and the distribution of lamin B1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi; Zhu, Yizhou; Zhai, Yujia; R Castroagudin, Michelle; Bao, Yifei; White, Tommy E; Glavy, Joseph S

    2013-12-01

    From the surrounding shell to the inner machinery, nuclear proteins provide the functional plasticity of the nucleus. This study highlights the nuclear association of Pore membrane (POM) protein NDC1 and Werner protein (WRN), a RecQ helicase responsible for the DNA instability progeria disorder, Werner Syndrome. In our previous publication, we connected the DNA damage sensor Werner's Helicase Interacting Protein (WHIP), a binding partner of WRN, to the NPC. Here, we confirm the association of the WRN/WHIP complex and NDC1. In established WRN/WHIP knockout cell lines, we further demonstrate the interdependence of WRN/WHIP and Nucleoporins (Nups). These changes do not completely abrogate the barrier of the Nuclear Envelope (NE) but do affect the distribution of FG Nups and the RAN gradient, which are necessary for nuclear transport. Evidence from WRN/WHIP knockout cell lines demonstrates changes in the processing and nucleolar localization of lamin B1. The appearance of "RAN holes" void of RAN corresponds to regions within the nucleolus filled with condensed pools of lamin B1. From WRN/WHIP knockout cell line extracts, we found three forms of lamin B1 that correspond to mature holoprotein and two potential post-translationally modified forms of the protein. Upon treatment with topoisomerase inhibitors lamin B1 cleavage occurs only in WRN/WHIP knockout cells. Our data suggest the link of the NDC1 and WRN as one facet of the network between the nuclear periphery and genome stability. Loss of WRN complex leads to multiple alterations at the NPC and the nucleolus.

  9. Cell-specific modulation of surfactant proteins by ambroxol treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifart, Carola; Clostermann, Ursula; Seifart, Ulf; Müller, Bernd; Vogelmeier, Claus; von Wichert, Peter; Fehrenbach, Heinz

    2005-02-15

    Ambroxol [trans-4-(2-amino-3,5-dibromobenzylamino)-cyclohexanole hydrochloride], a mucolytic agent, was postulated to provide surfactant stimulatory properties and was previously used to prevent surfactant deficiency. Currently, the underlying mechanisms are not exactly clear. Because surfactant homeostasis is regulated by surfactant-specific proteins (SP), we analyzed protein amount and mRNA expression in whole lung tissue, isolated type II pneumocytes and bronchoalveolar lavage of Sprague-Dawley rats treated with ambroxol i.p. (75 mg/kg body weight, twice a day [every 12 h]). The methods used included competitive polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Northern blotting, Western immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry. In isolated type II pneumocytes of ambroxol-treated animals, SP-C protein and mRNA content were increased, whereas SP-A, -B and -D protein, mRNA, and immunoreactivity remained unaffected. However, ambroxol treatment resulted in a significant increase of SP-B and in a decrease of SP-D in whole lung tissue with enhanced immunostaining for SP-B in Clara Cells. SP-A and SP-D were significantly decreased in BAL fluid of ambroxol-treated animals. The data suggest that surfactant protein expression is modulated in a cell-specific manner by ambroxol, as type II pneumocytes exhibited an increase in SP-C, whereas Clara cells exhibited an increase in the immunoreactivity for SP-B accounting for the increased SP-B content of whole lung tissue. The results indicate that ambroxol may exert its positive effects, observed in the treatment of diseases related to surfactant deficiency, via modulation of surfactant protein expression.

  10. Bacteria and protozoa differentially modulate the expression of Rab proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa Seixas

    Full Text Available Phagocytic cells represent an important line of innate defense against microorganisms. Uptake of microorganisms by these cells involves the formation of a phagosome that matures by fusing with endocytic compartments, resulting in killing of the enclosed microbe. Small GTPases of the Rab family are key regulators of vesicular trafficking in the endocytic pathway. Intracellular pathogens can interfere with the function of these proteins in order to subvert host immune responses. However, it is unknown if this subversion can be achieved through the modulation of Rab gene expression. We compared the expression level of 23 distinct Rab GTPases in mouse macrophages after infection with the protozoan Plasmodium berghei, and the bacteria Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica. We found that P. berghei induces an increase in the expression of a different set of Rab genes than E. coli and S. enterica, which behaved similarly. Strikingly, when one of the Rab proteins whose expression was increased by P. berghei, namely Rab14, was silenced, we observed a significant increase in the phagocytosis of P. berghei, whereas Rab14 overexpression led to a decrease in phagocytosis. This suggests that the parasite might induce the increase of Rab14 expression for its own advantage. Similarly, when Rab9a, whose expression was increased by E. coli and S. enterica, was silenced, we observed an increase in the phagocytosis of both bacterial species, whereas Rab9a overexpression caused a reduction in phagocytosis. This further suggests that the modulation of Rab gene expression could represent a mechanism of immune evasion. Thus, our study analyzes the modulation of Rab gene expression induced by bacteria and protozoa and suggests that this modulation could be necessary for the success of microbial infection.

  11. Transcriptional Modulation of Heat-Shock Protein Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasis Stephanou

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat-shock proteins (Hsps are molecular chaperones that are ubiquitously expressed but are also induced in cells exposed to stressful stimuli. Hsps have been implicated in the induction and propagation of several diseases. This paper focuses on regulatory factors that control the transcription of the genes encoding Hsps. We also highlight how distinct transcription factors are able to interact and modulate Hsps in different pathological states. Thus, a better understanding of the complex signaling pathways regulating Hsp expression may lead to novel therapeutic targets.

  12. Transcriptional modulation of heat-shock protein gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephanou, Anastasis; Latchman, David S

    2011-01-01

    Heat-shock proteins (Hsps) are molecular chaperones that are ubiquitously expressed but are also induced in cells exposed to stressful stimuli. Hsps have been implicated in the induction and propagation of several diseases. This paper focuses on regulatory factors that control the transcription of the genes encoding Hsps. We also highlight how distinct transcription factors are able to interact and modulate Hsps in different pathological states. Thus, a better understanding of the complex signaling pathways regulating Hsp expression may lead to novel therapeutic targets.

  13. A novel functional module detection algorithm for protein-protein interaction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Aidong

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The sparse connectivity of protein-protein interaction data sets makes identification of functional modules challenging. The purpose of this study is to critically evaluate a novel clustering technique for clustering and detecting functional modules in protein-protein interaction networks, termed STM. Results STM selects representative proteins for each cluster and iteratively refines clusters based on a combination of the signal transduced and graph topology. STM is found to be effective at detecting clusters with a diverse range of interaction structures that are significant on measures of biological relevance. The STM approach is compared to six competing approaches including the maximum clique, quasi-clique, minimum cut, betweeness cut and Markov Clustering (MCL algorithms. The clusters obtained by each technique are compared for enrichment of biological function. STM generates larger clusters and the clusters identified have p-values that are approximately 125-fold better than the other methods on biological function. An important strength of STM is that the percentage of proteins that are discarded to create clusters is much lower than the other approaches. Conclusion STM outperforms competing approaches and is capable of effectively detecting both densely and sparsely connected, biologically relevant functional modules with fewer discards.

  14. Functional modulation of AMP-activated protein kinase by cereblon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwang Min; Jo, Sooyeon; Kim, Hyunyoung; Lee, Jongwon; Park, Chul-Seung

    2011-03-01

    Mutations in cereblon (CRBN), a substrate binding component of the E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, cause a form of mental retardation in humans. However, the cellular proteins that interact with CRBN remain largely unknown. Here, we report that CRBN directly interacts with the α1 subunit of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK α1) and inhibits the activation of AMPK activation. The ectopic expression of CRBN reduces phosphorylation of AMPK α1 and, thus, inhibits the enzyme in a nutrient-independent manner. Moreover, AMPK α1 can be potently activated by suppressing endogenous CRBN using CRBN-specific small hairpin RNAs. Thus, CRBN may act as a negative modulator of the AMPK signaling pathway in vivo.

  15. Modulation of the Chromatin Phosphoproteome by the Haspin Protein Kinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maiolica, Alessio; de Medina-Redondo, Maria; Schoof, Erwin

    2014-01-01

    protein- protein interaction network. We determined the Haspin consensus motif and the co-crystal structure of the kinase with the histone H3 tail. The structure revealed a unique bent substrate binding mode positioning the histone H3 residues Arg2 and Lys4 adjacent to the Haspin phosphorylated threonine...... into acidic binding pockets. This unique conformation of the kinase-substrate complex explains the reported modulation of Haspin activity by methylation of Lys4 of the histone H3. In addition, the identification of the structural basis of substrate recognition and the amino acid sequence preferences of Haspin......Recent discoveries have highlighted the importance of Haspin kinase activity for the correct positioning of the kinase Aurora B at the centromere. Haspin phosphorylates Thr3 of the histone H3 (H3), which provides a signal for Aurora B to localize to the centromere of mitotic chromosomes. To date...

  16. Small-molecule modulators of 14-3-3 protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottmann, Christian

    2013-07-15

    14-3-3 Proteins are eukaryotic adapter proteins that regulate a plethora of physiological processes by binding to several hundred partner proteins. They play a role in biological activities as diverse as signal transduction, cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, host-pathogen interactions and metabolic control. As such, 14-3-3s are implicated in disease areas like cancer, neurodegeneration, diabetes, pulmonary disease, and obesity. Targeted modulation of 14-3-3 protein-protein interactions (PPIs) by small molecules is therefore an attractive concept for disease intervention. In recent years a number of examples of inhibitors and stabilizers of 14-3-3 PPIs have been reported promising a vivid future in chemical biology and drug development for this remarkable class of proteins. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Experimental preparation of Werner state via spontaneous parametric down-conversion

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Y S; Li, C F; Guo, G C; Zhang, Yong-Sheng; Huang, Yun-Feng; Li, Chuan-Feng; Guo, Guang-Can

    2002-01-01

    We present an experiment of preparing Werner state via spontaneous parametric down-conversion and controlled decoherence of photons in this paper. In this experiment two independent BBO (beta-barium borate) crystals are used to produce down-conversion light beams, which are mixed to prepare Werner state.

  18. Nye lektioner i kærlighedens teologi: Werner G. Jeanrond: Kærlighedens teologi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallesen, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    Anmeldelse af Werner G. Jeanrond, Kærlighedens teologi, Frederiksberg: Aros Forlag 2012 (oversat fra engelsk A Theology of Love, London: T&T Clark 2010)......Anmeldelse af Werner G. Jeanrond, Kærlighedens teologi, Frederiksberg: Aros Forlag 2012 (oversat fra engelsk A Theology of Love, London: T&T Clark 2010)...

  19. WRN mutations in Werner syndrome patients: genomic rearrangements, unusual intronic mutations and ethnic-specific alterations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friedrich, K.; Lee, L.; Leistritz, D.F.; Nurnberg, G.; Saha, B.; Hisama, F.M.; Eyman, D.K.; Lessel, D.; Nurnberg, P.; Li, C.; Garcia-F-Villalta, M.J.; Kets, C.M.; Schmidtke, J.; Cruz, V.T.; Akker, P.C. van den; Boak, J.; Peter, D.; Compoginis, G.; Cefle, K.; Ozturk, S.; Lopez, N.; Wessel, T. van; Poot, M.; Ippel, P.F.; Groff-Kellermann, B.; Hoehn, H.; Martin, G.M.; Kubisch, C.; Oshima, J.

    2010-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is an autosomal recessive segmental progeroid syndrome caused by null mutations at the WRN locus, which codes for a member of the RecQ family of DNA helicases. Since 1988, the International Registry of Werner syndrome had enrolled 130 molecularly confirmed WS cases from among 11

  20. WRN mutations in Werner syndrome patients : genomic rearrangements, unusual intronic mutations and ethnic-specific alterations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friedrich, Katrin; Lee, Lin; Leistritz, Dru F.; Nuernberg, Gudrun; Saha, Bidisha; Hisama, Fuki M.; Eyman, Daniel K.; Lessel, Davor; Nuernberg, Peter; Li, Chumei; Garcia-F-Villalta, Maria J.; Kets, Carolien M.; Schmidtke, Joerg; Cruz, Vitor Tedim; Van den Akker, Peter C.; Boak, Joseph; Peter, Dincy; Compoginis, Goli; Cefle, Kivanc; Ozturk, Sukru; Lopez, Norberto; Wessel, Theda; Poot, Martin; Ippel, P. F.; Groff-Kellermann, Birgit; Hoehn, Holger; Martin, George M.; Kubisch, Christian; Oshima, Junko

    2010-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is an autosomal recessive segmental progeroid syndrome caused by null mutations at the WRN locus, which codes for a member of the RecQ family of DNA helicases. Since 1988, the International Registry of Werner syndrome had enrolled 130 molecularly confirmed WS cases from among 11

  1. Bayesian Nash equilibria using extended Werner-like states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alid-Vaccarezza, M.; Soto, M. E.

    2016-10-01

    We study quantum strategies in games of incomplete information using a formalism of game theory based on multi-sector probability matrix. We analyze an extension of the well-known game of Battle of Sexes using an extended Werner-like state focusing in how its mixedness and entanglement affect the Bayesian Nash payoffs of the player. It is shown that entanglement is needed to outperform classical payoffs but not all entangled states are useful due to the presence of mixedness. A threshold for the mixedness parameter and the minimum entanglement value were found.

  2. 心导管术创始人Werner Forssmann

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周白瑜

    2009-01-01

    @@ Werner Theodor Otto Forssmann教授(1904-1979年,图1),德国人,因发明心导管术获得1956年诺贝尔生理学和医学奖.Forssmann教授毕业于柏林大学医学部,实习期间在Georg Klemperer教授的指导下进行临床实习,师从Rudolph Fick教授学习解削.1929年在柏林市内的Eberswalde医院进行外科实习.

  3. Pyometra and Pregnancy with Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Maria Inês; Vicente, Ana Patrícia; Cominho, Joana; Gomes, Andrea Sousa; Martins, Luísa; Nunes, Filomena

    2016-12-01

    We describe a Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich syndrome (HWWS) patient with previous history of infertility who got pregnant without treatment and presented a pyometra in the contralateral uterus throughout the gestational period, despite multiple antibiotic treatments. Due to the uterus' congenital anomaly and the possibility of ascending infection with subsequent abortion, this pregnancy was classified as high-risk. We believe that the partial horizontal septum in the vagina may have contributed to the closure of the gravid uterus cervix, thus ensuring that the pregnancy came to term, with an uneventful vaginal delivery.

  4. Capacitance-modulated transistor detects odorant binding protein chiral interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulla, Mohammad Yusuf; Tuccori, Elena; Magliulo, Maria; Lattanzi, Gianluca; Palazzo, Gerardo; Persaud, Krishna; Torsi, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral events in olfaction involve odorant binding proteins (OBPs) whose role in the recognition of different volatile chemicals is yet unclear. Here we report on the sensitive and quantitative measurement of the weak interactions associated with neutral enantiomers differentially binding to OBPs immobilized through a self-assembled monolayer to the gate of an organic bio-electronic transistor. The transduction is remarkably sensitive as the transistor output current is governed by the small capacitance of the protein layer undergoing minute changes as the ligand-protein complex is formed. Accurate determination of the free-energy balances and of the capacitance changes associated with the binding process allows derivation of the free-energy components as well as of the occurrence of conformational events associated with OBP ligand binding. Capacitance-modulated transistors open a new pathway for the study of ultra-weak molecular interactions in surface-bound protein-ligand complexes through an approach that combines bio-chemical and electronic thermodynamic parameters.

  5. Activated protein C modulates the proinflammatory activity of dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsumoto T

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Takahiro Matsumoto,1,2* Yuki Matsushima,1* Masaaki Toda,1 Ziaurahman Roeen,1 Corina N D'Alessandro-Gabazza,1,5 Josephine A Hinneh,1 Etsuko Harada,1,3 Taro Yasuma,4 Yutaka Yano,4 Masahito Urawa,1,5 Tetsu Kobayashi,5 Osamu Taguchi,5 Esteban C Gabazza1 1Department of Immunology, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsu, Mie Prefecture, 2BONAC Corporation, BIO Factory 4F, Fukuoka, 3Iwade Research Institute of Mycology, 4Department of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, 5Department of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsu, Mie Prefecture, Japan *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Previous studies have demonstrated the beneficial activity of activated protein C in allergic diseases including bronchial asthma and rhinitis. However, the exact mechanism of action of activated protein C in allergies is unclear. In this study, we hypothesized that pharmacological doses of activated protein C can modulate allergic inflammation by inhibiting dendritic cells. Materials and methods: Dendritic cells were prepared using murine bone marrow progenitor cells and human peripheral monocytes. Bronchial asthma was induced in mice that received intratracheal instillation of ovalbumin-pulsed dendritic cells. Results: Activated protein C significantly increased the differentiation of tolerogenic plasmacytoid dendritic cells and the secretion of type I interferons, but it significantly reduced lipopolysaccharide-mediated maturation and the secretion of inflammatory cytokines in myeloid dendritic cells. Activated protein C also inhibited maturation and the secretion of inflammatory cytokines in monocyte-derived dendritic cells. Activated protein C-treated dendritic cells were less effective when differentiating naïve CD4 T-cells from Th1 or Th2 cells, and the cellular effect of activated protein C was mediated by its receptors. Mice that received adoptive transfer of activated protein C

  6. C2 Domains as Protein-Protein Interaction Modules in the Ciliary Transition Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Remans

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available RPGR-interacting protein 1 (RPGRIP1 is mutated in the eye disease Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA and its structural homolog, RPGRIP1-like (RPGRIP1L, is mutated in many different ciliopathies. Both are multidomain proteins that are predicted to interact with retinitis pigmentosa G-protein regulator (RPGR. RPGR is mutated in X-linked retinitis pigmentosa and is located in photoreceptors and primary cilia. We solved the crystal structure of the complex between the RPGR-interacting domain (RID of RPGRIP1 and RPGR and demonstrate that RPGRIP1L binds to RPGR similarly. RPGRIP1 binding to RPGR affects the interaction with PDEδ, the cargo shuttling factor for prenylated ciliary proteins. RPGRIP1-RID is a C2 domain with a canonical β sandwich structure that does not bind Ca2+ and/or phospholipids and thus constitutes a unique type of protein-protein interaction module. Judging from the large number of C2 domains in most of the ciliary transition zone proteins identified thus far, the structure presented here seems to constitute a cilia-specific module that is present in multiprotein transition zone complexes.

  7. The Werner syndrome helicase/exonuclease processes mobile D-loops through branch migration and degradation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia L Opresko

    Full Text Available RecQ DNA helicases are critical for preserving genome integrity. Of the five RecQ family members identified in humans, only the Werner syndrome protein (WRN possesses exonuclease activity. Loss of WRN causes the progeroid disorder Werner syndrome which is marked by cancer predisposition. Cellular evidence indicates that WRN disrupts potentially deleterious intermediates in homologous recombination (HR that arise in genomic and telomeric regions during DNA replication and repair. Precisely how the WRN biochemical activities process these structures is unknown, especially since the DNA unwinding activity is poorly processive. We generated biologically relevant mobile D-loops which mimic the initial DNA strand invasion step in HR to investigate whether WRN biochemical activities can disrupt this joint molecule. We show that WRN helicase alone can promote branch migration through an 84 base pair duplex region to completely displace the invading strand from the D-loop. However, substrate processing is altered in the presence of the WRN exonuclease activity which degrades the invading strand both prior to and after release from the D-loop. Furthermore, telomeric D-loops are more refractory to disruption by WRN, which has implications for tighter regulation of D-loop processing at telomeres. Finally, we show that WRN can recognize and initiate branch migration from both the 5' and 3' ends of the invading strand in the D-loops. These findings led us to propose a novel model for WRN D-loop disruption. Our biochemical results offer an explanation for the cellular studies that indicate both WRN activities function in processing HR intermediates.

  8. Ankyrin-repeat proteins from sponge symbionts modulate amoebal phagocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Mary T H D; Liu, Michael; Thomas, Torsten

    2014-03-01

    Bacteria-eukaryote symbiosis occurs in all stages of evolution, from simple amoebae to mammals, and from facultative to obligate associations. Sponges are ancient metazoans that form intimate symbiotic interactions with complex communities of bacteria. The basic nutritional requirements of the sponge are in part satisfied by the phagocytosis of bacterial food particles from the surrounding water. How bacterial symbionts, which are permanently associated with the sponge, survive in the presence of phagocytic cells is largely unknown. Here, we present the discovery of a genomic fragment from an uncultured gamma-proteobacterial sponge symbiont that encodes for four proteins, whose closest known relatives are found in a sponge genome. Through recombinant approaches, we show that these four eukaryotic-like, ankyrin-repeat proteins (ARP) when expressed in Eschericha coli can modulate phagocytosis of amoebal cells and lead to accumulation of bacteria in the phagosome. Mechanistically, two ARPs appear to interfere with phagosome development in a similar way to reduced vacuole acidification, by blocking the fusion of the early phagosome with the lysosome and its digestive enzymes. Our results show that ARP from sponge symbionts can function to interfere with phagocytosis, and we postulate that this might be one mechanism by which symbionts can escape digestion in a sponge host.

  9. On the Work of the German-American Artist Werner Klotz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kacunko, Slavko

    2010-01-01

    A closer look is a must if we want to begin to appreciate the reflecting material and reflexive effect of German-American artist Werner Klotz’s array of Wahrnehmungsinstrumenten – his Instruments of Perception from today’s standpoint, better still one taken a step aside from the exploding Art...... as it was interesting then, to observe how in Werner Klotz’s oeuvre, following an artistic logic, they entered into a symbiosis with the closed-circuit video installations but have ultimately left that stage to today’s world-wide Public Art. Especially in his current public installations and projects, Werner Klotz...

  10. Simulation of modulated protein crystal structure and diffraction data in a supercell and in superspace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovelace, Jeffrey J; Simone, Peter D; Petříček, Václav; Borgstahl, Gloria E O

    2013-06-01

    The toolbox for computational protein crystallography is full of easy-to-use applications for the routine solution and refinement of periodic diffraction data sets and protein structures. There is a gap in the available software when it comes to aperiodic crystallographic data. Current protein crystallography software cannot handle modulated data, and small-molecule software for aperiodic crystallography cannot work with protein structures. To adapt software for modulated protein data requires training data to test and debug the changed software. Thus, a comprehensive training data set consisting of atomic positions with associated modulation functions and the modulated structure factors packaged as both a three-dimensional supercell and as a modulated structure in (3+1)D superspace has been created. The (3+1)D data were imported into Jana2006; this is the first time that this has been performed for protein data.

  11. Quantum Errors and Disturbances: Response to Busch, Lahti and Werner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Marcus Appleby

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Busch, Lahti and Werner (BLW have recently criticized the operator approach to the description of quantum errors and disturbances. Their criticisms are justified to the extent that the physical meaning of the operator definitions has not hitherto been adequately explained. We rectify that omission. We then examine BLW’s criticisms in the light of our analysis. We argue that, although the BLW approach favour (based on the Wasserstein two-deviation has its uses, there are important physical situations where an operator approach is preferable. We also discuss the reason why the error-disturbance relation is still giving rise to controversies almost a century after Heisenberg first stated his microscope argument. We argue that the source of the difficulties is the problem of interpretation, which is not so wholly disconnected from experimental practicalities as is sometimes supposed.

  12. Quantum Errors and Disturbances: Response to Busch, Lahti and Werner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, David

    2016-05-01

    Busch, Lahti and Werner (BLW) have recently criticized the operator approach to the description of quantum errors and disturbances. Their criticisms are justified to the extent that the physical meaning of the operator definitions has not hitherto been adequately explained. We rectify that omission. We then examine BLW's criticisms in the light of our analysis. We argue that, although the approach BLW favour (based on the Wasserstein 2-deviation) has its uses, there are important physical situations where an operator approach is preferable. We also discuss the reason why the error-disturbance relation is still giving rise to controversies almost a century after Heisenberg first stated his microscope argument. We argue that the source of the difficulties is the problem of interpretation, which is not so wholly disconnected from experimental practicalities as is sometimes supposed.

  13. Stochastic simulations of normal aging and Werner's syndrome.

    KAUST Repository

    Qi, Qi

    2014-04-26

    Human cells typically consist of 23 pairs of chromosomes. Telomeres are repetitive sequences of DNA located at the ends of chromosomes. During cell replication, a number of basepairs are lost from the end of the chromosome and this shortening restricts the number of divisions that a cell can complete before it becomes senescent, or non-replicative. In this paper, we use Monte Carlo simulations to form a stochastic model of telomere shortening to investigate how telomere shortening affects normal aging. Using this model, we study various hypotheses for the way in which shortening occurs by comparing their impact on aging at the chromosome and cell levels. We consider different types of length-dependent loss and replication probabilities to describe these processes. After analyzing a simple model for a population of independent chromosomes, we simulate a population of cells in which each cell has 46 chromosomes and the shortest telomere governs the replicative potential of the cell. We generalize these simulations to Werner\\'s syndrome, a condition in which large sections of DNA are removed during cell division and, amongst other conditions, results in rapid aging. Since the mechanisms governing the loss of additional basepairs are not known, we use our model to simulate a variety of possible forms for the rate at which additional telomeres are lost per replication and several expressions for how the probability of cell division depends on telomere length. As well as the evolution of the mean telomere length, we consider the standard deviation and the shape of the distribution. We compare our results with a variety of data from the literature, covering both experimental data and previous models. We find good agreement for the evolution of telomere length when plotted against population doubling.

  14. Aging stem cells. A Werner syndrome stem cell model unveils heterochromatin alterations as a driver of human aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weiqi; Li, Jingyi; Suzuki, Keiichiro; Qu, Jing; Wang, Ping; Zhou, Junzhi; Liu, Xiaomeng; Ren, Ruotong; Xu, Xiuling; Ocampo, Alejandro; Yuan, Tingting; Yang, Jiping; Li, Ying; Shi, Liang; Guan, Dee; Pan, Huize; Duan, Shunlei; Ding, Zhichao; Li, Mo; Yi, Fei; Bai, Ruijun; Wang, Yayu; Chen, Chang; Yang, Fuquan; Li, Xiaoyu; Wang, Zimei; Aizawa, Emi; Goebl, April; Soligalla, Rupa Devi; Reddy, Pradeep; Esteban, Concepcion Rodriguez; Tang, Fuchou; Liu, Guang-Hui; Belmonte, Juan Carlos Izpisua

    2015-06-05

    Werner syndrome (WS) is a premature aging disorder caused by WRN protein deficiency. Here, we report on the generation of a human WS model in human embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Differentiation of WRN-null ESCs to mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) recapitulates features of premature cellular aging, a global loss of H3K9me3, and changes in heterochromatin architecture. We show that WRN associates with heterochromatin proteins SUV39H1 and HP1α and nuclear lamina-heterochromatin anchoring protein LAP2β. Targeted knock-in of catalytically inactive SUV39H1 in wild-type MSCs recapitulates accelerated cellular senescence, resembling WRN-deficient MSCs. Moreover, decrease in WRN and heterochromatin marks are detected in MSCs from older individuals. Our observations uncover a role for WRN in maintaining heterochromatin stability and highlight heterochromatin disorganization as a potential determinant of human aging.

  15. A novel Werner Syndrome mutation: pharmacological treatment by read-through of nonsense mutations and epigenetic therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrelo, Ruben; Sutz, Miguel Arocena; Setien, Fernando; Aldunate, Fabian; Esteller, Manel; Da Costa, Valeria; Achenbach, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Werner Syndrome (WS) is a rare inherited disease characterized by premature aging and increased propensity for cancer. Mutations in the WRN gene can be of several types, including nonsense mutations, leading to a truncated protein form. WRN is a RecQ family member with both helicase and exonuclease activities, and it participates in several cell metabolic pathways, including DNA replication, DNA repair, and telomere maintenance. Here, we reported a novel homozygous WS mutation (c.3767 C > G) in 2 Argentinian brothers, which resulted in a stop codon and a truncated protein (p.S1256X). We also observed increased WRN promoter methylation in the cells of patients and decreased messenger WRN RNA (WRN mRNA) expression. Finally, we showed that the read-through of nonsense mutation pharmacologic treatment with both aminoglycosides (AGs) and ataluren (PTC-124) in these cells restores full-length protein expression and WRN functionality. PMID:25830902

  16. Acidic bile salts modulate the squamous epithelial barrier function by modulating tight junction proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin; Oshima, Tadayuki; Tomita, Toshihiko; Fukui, Hirokazu; Watari, Jiro; Matsumoto, Takayuki; Miwa, Hiroto

    2011-08-01

    Experimental models for esophageal epithelium in vitro either suffer from poor differentiation or complicated culture systems. An air-liquid interface system with normal human bronchial epithelial cells can serve as a model of esophageal-like squamous epithelial cell layers. Here, we explore the influence of bile acids on barrier function and tight junction (TJ) proteins. The cells were treated with taurocholic acid (TCA), glycocholic acid (GCA), or deoxycholic acid (DCA) at different pH values, or with pepsin. Barrier function was measured by transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and the diffusion of paracellular tracers (permeability). The expression of TJ proteins, including claudin-1 and claudin-4, was examined by Western blotting of 1% Nonidet P-40-soluble and -insoluble fractions. TCA and GCA dose-dependently decreased TEER and increased paracellular permeability at pH 3 after 1 h. TCA (4 mM) or GCA (4 mM) did not change TEER and permeability at pH 7.4 or pH 4. The combination of TCA and GCA at pH 3 significantly decreased TEER and increased permeability at lower concentrations (2 mM). Pepsin (4 mg/ml, pH 3) did not have any effect on barrier function. DCA significantly decreased the TEER and increased permeability at pH 6, a weakly acidic condition. TCA (4 mM) and GCA (4 mM) significantly decreased the insoluble fractions of claudin-1 and claudin-4 at pH 3. In conclusion, acidic bile salts disrupted the squamous epithelial barrier function partly by modulating the amounts of claudin-1 and claudin-4. These results provide new insights for understanding the role of TJ proteins in esophagitis.

  17. Quantum Discord and Entanglement of Quasi-Werner States Based on Bipartite Entangled Coherent States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Manoj K.; Maurya, Ajay K.; Prakash, Hari

    2016-06-01

    Present work is an attempt to compare quantum discord and quantum entanglement of quasi-Werner states formed with the four bipartite entangled coherent states (ECS) used recently for quantum teleportation of a qubit encoded in superposed coherent state. Out of these, the quasi-Werner states based on maximally ECS due to its invariant nature under local operation is independent of measurement basis and mean photon numbers, while for quasi-Werner states based on non-maximally ECS, it depends upon measurement basis as well as on mean photon number. However, for large mean photon numbers since non-maximally ECS becomes almost maximally entangled therefore dependence of quantum discord for non-maximally ECS based quasi-Werner states on the measurement basis disappears.

  18. ON THE CONVERGENCE OF KING-WERNER ITERATIONMETHOD IN BANACH SPACE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng-da Huang

    2000-01-01

    In this paper , a Kantorovitch-Ostrowskitype convergence theorem and an error estimate ofusing the information of higher derivativesat the center between initial points for King-Werner iteration method in Banachspace are established.

  19. Entanglement of Formation for Werner States and Isotropic States via Logical Gates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertini, Cesarino; Chiara, Maria Luisa Dalla; Leporini, Roberto

    To what extent is a logical characterization of entanglement possible? We investigate some correlations that hold between the concept of entanglement of formation for Werner states and for isotropic states and the probabilistic behavior of some quantum logical gates.

  20. Chondrosarcoma of the mandibular condyle in a patient with Werner syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goutzanis, Labros; Kalfarentzos, Evagelos F; Petsinis, Vassilis; Papadogeorgakis, Nick

    2013-10-01

    Werner syndrome, also called progeria of the adult and pangeria is a rare autosomal recessive disorder that affects connective tissue throughout the body. It is associated with premature ageing and an increased risk of cancer and other diseases. The mean survival for patients with Werner syndrome is 47 years. Death usually occurs when patients are aged 30-65 years because of atherosclerosis or malignant tumours. The purpose of this paper is to present a patient with Werner syndrome exhibiting a chondrosarcoma of the left temporomandibular joint and ramus. To the best of our knowledge this is the first case, of a Werner syndrome patient with an associated head and neck chondrosarcoma being reported. The diagnostic procedure followed and management of the patient are outlined in the paper as well.

  1. Use of p38 MAPK Inhibitors for the Treatment of Werner Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark C. Bagley

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Werner syndrome provides a convincing model for aspects of the normal ageing phenotype and may provide a suitable model for therapeutic interventions designed to combat the ageing process. Cultured primary fibroblast cells from Werner syndrome patients provide a powerful model system to study the link between replicative senescence in vitro and in vivo pathophysiology. Genome instability, together with an increased pro-oxidant state, and frequent replication fork stalling, all provide plausible triggers for intracellular stress in Werner syndrome cells, and implicates p38 MAPK signaling in their shortened replicative lifespan. A number of different p38 MAPK inhibitor chemotypes have been prepared rapidly and efficiently using microwave heating techniques for biological study in Werner syndrome cells, including SB203580, VX-745, RO3201195, UR-13756 and BIRB 796, and their selectivity and potency evaluated in this cellular context. Werner syndrome fibroblasts treated with a p38 MAPK inhibitor reveal an unexpected reversal of the accelerated ageing phenotype. Thus the study of p38 inhibition and its effect upon Werner pathophysiology is likely to provide new revelations into the biological mechanisms operating in cellular senescence and human ageing in the future.

  2. Simulation of modulated protein crystal structure and diffraction data in a supercell and in superspace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovelace, Jeffrey J.; Simone, Peter D. [Eppley Institute for Research in Cancer and Allied Diseases, 987696 Nebraska Medical, Omaha, NE 68198-7696 (United States); Petříček, Václav [Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Na Slovance 10, 182 21 Praha (Czech Republic); Borgstahl, Gloria E. O., E-mail: gborgstahl@unmc.edu [Eppley Institute for Research in Cancer and Allied Diseases, 987696 Nebraska Medical, Omaha, NE 68198-7696 (United States)

    2013-06-01

    A computer simulation was created for a modulated protein structure along with structure factors in a periodic supercell and in superspace for the purpose of developing and validating software modifications that will be used to solve and refine modulated protein crystals. The toolbox for computational protein crystallography is full of easy-to-use applications for the routine solution and refinement of periodic diffraction data sets and protein structures. There is a gap in the available software when it comes to aperiodic crystallographic data. Current protein crystallography software cannot handle modulated data, and small-molecule software for aperiodic crystallography cannot work with protein structures. To adapt software for modulated protein data requires training data to test and debug the changed software. Thus, a comprehensive training data set consisting of atomic positions with associated modulation functions and the modulated structure factors packaged as both a three-dimensional supercell and as a modulated structure in (3+1)D superspace has been created. The (3+1)D data were imported into Jana2006; this is the first time that this has been performed for protein data.

  3. Analysis of hepatocellular carcinoma and metastatic hepatic carcinoma via functional modules in a protein-protein interaction network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Pan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study aims to identify protein clusters with potential functional relevance in the pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC and metastatic hepatic carcinoma using network analysis. Materials and Methods: We used human protein interaction data to build a protein-protein interaction network with Cytoscape and then derived functional clusters using MCODE. Combining the gene expression profiles, we calculated the functional scores for the clusters and selected statistically significant clusters. Meanwhile, Gene Ontology was used to assess the functionality of these clusters. Finally, a support vector machine was trained on the gold standard data sets. Results: The differentially expressed genes of HCC were mainly involved in metabolic and signaling processes. We acquired 13 significant modules from the gene expression profiles. The area under the curve value based on the differentially expressed modules were 98.31%, which outweighed the classification with DEGs. Conclusions: Differentially expressed modules are valuable to screen biomarkers combined with functional modules.

  4. Mutations in the consensus helicase domains of the Werner syndrome gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Chang-En; Oshima, Junko; Wijsman, E.M. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)] [and others

    1997-02-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is an autosomal recessive disease with a complex phenotype that is suggestive of accelerated aging. WS is caused by mutations in a gene, WRN, that encodes a predicted 1,432-amino-acid protein with homology to DNA and RNA helicases. Previous work identified four WS mutations in the 3{prime} end of the gene, which resulted in predicted truncated protein products of 1,060-1,247 amino acids but did not disrupt the helicase domain region (amino acids 569-859). Here, additional WS subjects were screened for mutations, and the intron-exon structure of the gene was determined. A total of 35 exons were defined, with the coding sequences beginning in the second exon. Five new WS mutations were identified: two nonsense mutations at codons 369 and 889; a mutation at a splice-junction site, resulting in a predicted truncated protein of 760 amino acids; a 1-bp deletion causing a frameshift; and a predicted truncated protein of 391 amino acids. Another deletion is >15 kb of genomic DNA, including exons 19-23; the predicted protein is 1,186 amino acids long. Four of these new mutations either partially disrupt the helicase domain region or result in predicted protein products completely missing the helicase region. These results confirm that mutations in the WRN gene are responsible for WS. Also, the location of the mutations indicates that the presence or absence of the helicase domain does not influence the WS phenotype and suggests that WS is the result of complete loss of function of the WRN gene product. 63 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  5. Semantic integration to identify overlapping functional modules in protein interaction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramanathan Murali

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The systematic analysis of protein-protein interactions can enable a better understanding of cellular organization, processes and functions. Functional modules can be identified from the protein interaction networks derived from experimental data sets. However, these analyses are challenging because of the presence of unreliable interactions and the complex connectivity of the network. The integration of protein-protein interactions with the data from other sources can be leveraged for improving the effectiveness of functional module detection algorithms. Results We have developed novel metrics, called semantic similarity and semantic interactivity, which use Gene Ontology (GO annotations to measure the reliability of protein-protein interactions. The protein interaction networks can be converted into a weighted graph representation by assigning the reliability values to each interaction as a weight. We presented a flow-based modularization algorithm to efficiently identify overlapping modules in the weighted interaction networks. The experimental results show that the semantic similarity and semantic interactivity of interacting pairs were positively correlated with functional co-occurrence. The effectiveness of the algorithm for identifying modules was evaluated using functional categories from the MIPS database. We demonstrated that our algorithm had higher accuracy compared to other competing approaches. Conclusion The integration of protein interaction networks with GO annotation data and the capability of detecting overlapping modules substantially improve the accuracy of module identification.

  6. Therapeutic design of peptide modulators of protein-protein interactions in membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Tracy A; Deber, Charles M

    2017-04-01

    Membrane proteins play the central roles in a variety of cellular processes, ranging from nutrient uptake and signalling, to cell-cell communication. Their biological functions are directly related to how they fold and assemble; defects often lead to disease. Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) within the membrane are therefore of great interest as therapeutic targets. Here we review the progress in the application of membrane-insertable peptides for the disruption or stabilization of membrane-based PPIs. We describe the design and preparation of transmembrane peptide mimics; and of several categories of peptidomimetics used for study, including d-enantiomers, non-natural amino acids, peptoids, and β-peptides. Further aspects of the review describe modifications to membrane-insertable peptides, including lipidation and cyclization via hydrocarbon stapling. These approaches provide a pathway toward the development of metabolically stable, non-toxic, and efficacious peptide modulators of membrane-based PPIs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Lipid order/lipid defects and lipid-control of protein activity edited by Dirk Schneider.

  7. iPPI-DB: an online database of modulators of protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labbé, Céline M; Kuenemann, Mélaine A; Zarzycka, Barbara; Vriend, Gert; Nicolaes, Gerry A F; Lagorce, David; Miteva, Maria A; Villoutreix, Bruno O; Sperandio, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    In order to boost the identification of low-molecular-weight drugs on protein-protein interactions (PPI), it is essential to properly collect and annotate experimental data about successful examples. This provides the scientific community with the necessary information to derive trends about privileged physicochemical properties and chemotypes that maximize the likelihood of promoting a given chemical probe to the most advanced stages of development. To this end we have developed iPPI-DB (freely accessible at http://www.ippidb.cdithem.fr), a database that contains the structure, some physicochemical characteristics, the pharmacological data and the profile of the PPI targets of several hundreds modulators of protein-protein interactions. iPPI-DB is accessible through a web application and can be queried according to two general approaches: using physicochemical/pharmacological criteria; or by chemical similarity to a user-defined structure input. In both cases the results are displayed as a sortable and exportable datasheet with links to external databases such as Uniprot, PubMed. Furthermore each compound in the table has a link to an individual ID card that contains its physicochemical and pharmacological profile derived from iPPI-DB data. This includes information about its binding data, ligand and lipophilic efficiencies, location in the PPI chemical space, and importantly similarity with known drugs, and links to external databases like PubChem, and ChEMBL.

  8. Amyloid precursor protein modulates β-catenin degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Yuzhi

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The amyloid precursor protein (APP is genetically associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD. Elucidating the function of APP should help understand AD pathogenesis and provide insights into therapeutic designs against this devastating neurodegenerative disease. Results We demonstrate that APP expression in primary neurons induces β-catenin phosphorylation at Ser33, Ser37, and Thr41 (S33/37/T41 residues, which is a prerequisite for β-catenin ubiquitinylation and proteasomal degradation. APP-induced phosphorylation of β-catenin resulted in the reduction of total β-catenin levels, suggesting that APP expression promotes β-catenin degradation. In contrast, treatment of neurons with APP siRNAs increased total β-catenin levels and decreased β-catenin phosphorylation at residues S33/37/T41. Further, β-catenin was dramatically increased in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells from APP knockout animals. Acute expression of wild type APP or of familial AD APP mutants in primary neurons downregulated β-catenin in membrane and cytosolic fractions, and did not appear to affect nuclear β-catenin or β-catenin-dependent transcription. Conversely, in APP knockout CA1 pyramidal cells, accumulation of β-catenin was associated with the upregulation of cyclin D1, a downstream target of β-catenin signaling. Together, these data establish that APP downregulates β-catenin and suggest a role for APP in sustaining neuronal function by preventing cell cycle reactivation and maintaining synaptic integrity. Conclusion We have provided strong evidence that APP modulates β-catenin degradation in vitro and in vivo. Future studies may investigate whether APP processing is necessary for β-catenin downregulation, and determine if excessive APP expression contributes to AD pathogenesis through abnormal β-catenin downregulation.

  9. [The birth of acknowledgement: Michel Foucault and Werner Leibbrand].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mildenberger, Florian

    2006-01-01

    In 1964, Werner Leibbrand (1896-1974) was the first German medical historian to present, in Sudhoffs Archiv, a review of the work of Michel Foucault (1926-1984). This paper examines some of the reasons leading to the fact that Leibbrand's own generation refused to acknowledge the importance of Foucault's ideas, while, later on, younger German medical historians, although impressed with Foucault's writings, failed to acknowledge, first, the close relationship between Leibbrand's and Foucault's world views, and, second, Leibbrand's attempts at introducing Foucault to German medical historians. Leibbrand with his Jewish wife had survived the Nazi period partly in hiding. His attempts at clearing post-war German psychiatry and medical historiography of NS-sympathizers isolated him among his colleagues, many of whom had begun their career during the Third Reich. Leibbrand enjoyed the support by the Swiss medical historian and avowed Communist Erwin Ackerknecht (1906-1988), but later turned against him, possibly because Acknerknecht had called Leibbrand's writings "unscientific". Leibbrand was unable to overcome his antagonisms with his contemporaries. At the same time, opposition to Ackerknecht made him appear a respresentative of the past in the eyes of the younger generation. Thus, when Foucault was accepted by the latter, they were not prepared to examine the work of Leibbrand and realize how close some of the ideas developed by Leibbrand and Foucault had been.

  10. Leg ulcer in Werner syndrome (adult progeria): a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumo, Giuseppe; Pau, Monica; Patta, Federico; Aste, Nicola; Atzori, Laura

    2013-03-15

    Werner syndrome (WS; MIM#277700) or adult progeria, is a rare disease, associated with mutations of a single gene (RECQL2 or WRN), located on chromosome 8 (8p12). It codes a DNA-helicase, whose defects cause genomic instability. The highest incidences are reported in Japan and Sardinia (Italy). On this major island of the Mediterranean Basin, the WS cases have been observed in the northern areas. The authors describe the apparently first case reported in southern Sardinia, a 51-year-old woman, who was born in and resides in the province of Cagliari. She presented with a 9-year history of an intractable leg ulcer and other characteristic symptoms, including "bird-like" face, high-pitched voice, premature greying, short stature, abdominal obesity in contrast with thin body type, scleroderma-like legs, decreased muscle mass, diabetes, atherosclerosis, and premature menopause. A specialized genetic Institute of Research (IRCCS-IDI, Rome) confirmed the clinical diagnosis. There is no cure or specific treatment and patients must be periodically screened for an increased risk of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease and malignancies. Among the many findings, leg ulcers significantly affect the patient's quality of life. This problem may send the patient to the dermatologist, who finally suspects the diagnosis. Poor response to medical treatment may require aggressive repeated surgery, with poor or temporary results.

  11. Werner Hacke:卒中治疗的先驱

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Geoff Watts; 李兆伟(译)

    2009-01-01

    作为其所在学科的权威,Werner Hacke早年的经历可谓一波三折。尽管他后来成为了德国海德堡大学神经病学系的主任,但通往这一职位的道路并非一帆风顺,一开始就困难重重。作为一名学习不太刻苦的高中生,Hacke曾决定学习医科,希望在将来能够将行医与他唯一擅长的学科——运动——结合起来。但他的成绩不够上医学院校,因此眼完兵役后,他开始主修心理学学位。他非常喜欢这门学科,

  12. Lyman-Werner UV escape fractions from primordial haloes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauer, Anna T. P.; Whalen, Daniel J.; Glover, Simon C. O.; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2015-12-01

    Population III (Pop III) stars can regulate star formation in the primordial Universe in several ways. They can ionize nearby haloes, and even if their ionizing photons are trapped by their own haloes, their Lyman-Werner (LW) photons can still escape and destroy H2 in other haloes, preventing them from cooling and forming stars. LW escape fractions are thus a key parameter in cosmological simulations of early reionization and star formation but have not yet been parametrized for realistic haloes by halo or stellar mass. To do so, we perform radiation hydrodynamical simulations of LW UV escape from 9-120 M⊙ Pop III stars in 105-107 M⊙ haloes with ZEUS-MP. We find that photons in the LW lines (i.e. those responsible for destroying H2 in nearby systems) have escape fractions ranging from 0 to 85 per cent. No LW photons escape the most massive halo in our sample, even from the most massive star. Escape fractions for photons elsewhere in the 11.18-13.6 eV energy range, which can be redshifted into the LW lines at cosmological distances, are generally much higher, being above 60 per cent for all but the least massive stars in the most massive haloes. We find that shielding of H2 by neutral hydrogen, which has been neglected in most studies to date, produces escape fractions that are up to a factor of 3 smaller than those predicted by H2 self-shielding alone.

  13. Lyman-Werner UV Escape Fractions from Primordial Halos

    CERN Document Server

    Schauer, Anna T P; Glover, Simon C O; Klessen, Ralf S

    2015-01-01

    Population III stars can regulate star formation in the primordial Universe in several ways. They can ionize nearby halos, and even if their ionizing photons are trapped by their own halos, their Lyman-Werner (LW) photons can still escape and destroy H$_2$ in other halos, preventing them from cooling and forming stars. LW escape fractions are thus a key parameter in cosmological simulations of early reionization and star formation but have not yet been parametrized for realistic halos by halo or stellar mass. To do so, we perform radiation hydrodynamical simulations of LW UV escape from 9--120 M$_{\\odot}$ Pop III stars in $10^5$ to $10^7$ M$_{\\odot}$ halos with ZEUS-MP. We find that photons in the LW lines (i.e. those responsible for destroying H$_{2}$ in nearby systems) have escape fractions ranging from 0% to 85%. No LW photons escape the most massive halo in our sample, even from the most massive star. Escape fractions for photons elsewhere in the 11.18--13.6~eV energy range, which can be redshifted into t...

  14. Inflammageing assessed by MMP9 in normal Japanese individuals and the patients with Werner syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Makoto; Chiba, Junji; Matsuura, Masaaki; Iwaki-Egawa, Sachiko; Watanabe, Yasuhiro

    2016-05-01

    Age-associated minor inflammation: inflammageing may explain human ageing mechanism(s). Our previous study reported a significant increase in the serum level of highly sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP) with normal ageing and the patients with Werner syndrome (WS). To further study the minor inflammatory condition associated with ageing, another possible ageing biomarker: matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9) was examined in the sera from 217 normal Japanese individuals aged between 1 and 100 years and 41 mutation-proven Japanese WS aged between 32 and 70 years. MMP9 was assayed by ELISA. The serum level of MMP9 was elevated significantly (p normal ageing from both sexes as hsCRP. In contrast to normal ageing, the serum MMP9 level in WS decreased significantly with calendar age (p normal adult population aged between 25 and 70 years (109.1 ± 9.4), nor normal elderly population aged between 71 and 100 years (179.9 ± 16.1). Although both normal ageing and WS were associated with minor inflammation, the inflammatory parameters such as serum MMP9 and hsCRP changed differently between normal ageing and WS. The WS-specific chronic inflammation including skin ulcer and diabetes mellitus may contribute the different behavior of both ageing biomarkers from normal ageing.

  15. DNA damage accumulation and TRF2 degradation in atypical Werner syndrome fibroblasts with LMNA mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Bidisha; Zitnik, Galynn; Johnson, Simon; Nguyen, Quyen; Risques, Rosa A; Martin, George M; Oshima, Junko

    2013-01-01

    Segmental progeroid syndromes are groups of disorders with multiple features suggestive of accelerated aging. One subset of adult-onset progeroid syndromes, referred to as atypical Werner syndrome, is caused by mutations in the LMNA gene, which encodes a class of nuclear intermediate filaments, lamin A/C. We previously described rapid telomere attrition and accelerated replicative senescence in cultured fibroblasts overexpressing mutant lamin A. In this study, we investigated the cellular phenotypes associated with accelerated telomere shortening in LMNA mutant primary fibroblasts. In early passage primary fibroblasts with R133L or L140R LMNA mutations, shelterin protein components were already reduced while cells still retained telomere lengths comparable to those of controls. There was a significant inverse correlation between the degree of abnormal nuclear morphology and the level of TRF2, a shelterin subunit, suggesting a potential causal relationship. Stabilization of the telomeres via the introduction of the catalytic subunit of human telomerase, hTERT (human telomerase reverse transcriptase), did not prevent degradation of shelterin components, indicating that reduced TRF2 in LMNA mutants is not mediated by short telomeres. Interestingly, γ-H2AX foci (reflecting double strand DNA damage) in early passage LMNA mutant primary fibroblasts and LMNA mutant hTERT fibroblasts were markedly increased in non-telomeric regions of DNA. Our results raise the possibility that mutant lamin A/C causes global genomic instability with accumulation of non-telomeric DNA damage as an early event, followed by TRF2 degradation and telomere shortening.

  16. Regulating the ethylene response of a plant by modulation of F-box proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hongwei [Beijing, CN; Ecker, Joseph R [Carlsbad, CA

    2014-01-07

    The relationship between F-box proteins and proteins invovled in the ethylene response in plants is described. In particular, F-box proteins may bind to proteins involved in the ethylene response and target them for degradation by the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway. The transcription factor EIN3 is a key transcription factor mediating ethylne-regulated gene expression and morphological responses. EIN3 is degraded through a ubiquitin/proteasome pathway mediated by F-box proteins EBF1 and EBF2. The link between F-box proteins and the ethylene response is a key step in modulating or regulating the response of a plant to ethylene. Described herein are transgenic plants having an altered sensitivity to ethylene, and methods for making transgenic plant haing an althered sensitivity to ethylene by modulating the level of activity of F-box proteins. Methods of altering the ethylene response in a plant by modulating the activity or expression of an F-box protein are described. Also described are methods of identifying compounds that modulate the ethylene response in plants by modulating the level of F-box protein expression or activity.

  17. Combining sequence and Gene Ontology for protein module detection in the Weighted Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yang; Liu, Jie; Feng, Nuan; Song, Bo; Zheng, Zeyu

    2017-01-07

    Studies of protein modules in a Protein-Protein Interaction (PPI) network contribute greatly to the understanding of biological mechanisms. With the development of computing science, computational approaches have played an important role in locating protein modules. In this paper, a new approach combining Gene Ontology and amino acid background frequency is introduced to detect the protein modules in the weighted PPI networks. The proposed approach mainly consists of three parts: the feature extraction, the weighted graph construction and the protein complex detection. Firstly, the topology-sequence information is utilized to present the feature of protein complex. Secondly, six types of the weighed graph are constructed by combining PPI network and Gene Ontology information. Lastly, protein complex algorithm is applied to the weighted graph, which locates the clusters based on three conditions, including density, network diameter and the included angle cosine. Experiments have been conducted on two protein complex benchmark sets for yeast and the results show that the approach is more effective compared to five typical algorithms with the performance of f-measure and precision. The combination of protein interaction network with sequence and gene ontology data is helpful to improve the performance and provide a optional method for protein module detection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Optical protein modulation via quantum dot coupling and use of a hybrid sensor protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griep, Mark; Winder, Eric; Lueking, Donald; Friedrich, Craig; Mallick, Govind; Karna, Shashi

    2010-09-01

    Harnessing the energy transfer interactions between the optical protein bacteriorhodopsin (bR) and CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) could provide a novel bio-nano electronics substrate with a variety of applications. In the present study, a polydimethyldiallyammonium chloride based I-SAM technique has been utilized to produce bilayers, trilayers and multilayers of alternating monolayers of bR, PDAC and QD's on a conductive ITO substrate. The construction of multilayer systems was directly monitored by measuring the unique A570 nm absorbance of bR, as well as QD fluorescence emission. Both of these parameters displayed a linear relationship to the number of monolayers present on the ITO substrate. The photovoltaic response of bilayers of bR/PDAC was observed over a range of 3 to 12 bilayers and the ability to efficiently create an electrically active multilayered substrate composed of bR and QDs has been demonstrated for the first time. Evaluation of QD fluorescence emission in the multilayer system strongly suggests that FRET coupling is occurring and, since the I-SAM technique provide a means to control the bR/QD separation distance on the nanometer scale, this technique may prove highly valuable for optimizing the distance dependent energy transfer effects for maximum sensitivity to target molecule binding by a biosensor. Finally, preliminary studies on the production of a sensor protein/bR hybrid gene construct are presented. It is proposed that the energy associated with target molecule binding to a hybrid sensor protein would provide a means to directly modulate the electrical output from a sensor protein/bR biosensor platform.

  19. Allosteric modulation of G-protein coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders A.; Spalding, Tracy A

    2004-01-01

    The superfamily of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) has more than 1000 members and is the largest family of proteins in the body. GPCRs mediate signalling of stimuli as diverse as light, ions, small molecules, peptides and proteins and are the targets for many pharmaceuticals. Most GPCR ligands...

  20. Modulation of Protein Fragmentation Through Carbamylation of Primary Amines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Sylvester M.; Holden, Dustin D.; Fellers, Ryan; Kelleher, Neil L.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2017-08-01

    We evaluate the impact of carbamylation of the primary amines of the side-chains of Lys and the N-termini on the fragmentation of intact protein ions and the chromatographic properties of a mixture of E. coli ribosomal proteins. The fragmentation patterns of the six unmodified and carbamylated proteins obtained by higher energy collision dissociation (HCD) and ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD) were compared. Carbamylation significantly reduced the total number of protons retained by the protein owing to the conversion of basic primary amines to non-basic carbamates. Carbamylation caused a significant negative impact on fragmentation of the protein by HCD (i.e., reduced sequence coverage and fewer diagnostic fragment ions) consistent with the mobile proton model, which correlates peptide fragmentation with charge distribution and the opportunity for charge-directed pathways. In addition, fragmentation was enhanced near the N- and C-termini upon HCD of carbamylated proteins. For LCMS/MS analysis of E. coli ribosomal proteins, the retention times increased by 16 min on average upon carbamylation, an outcome attributed to the increased hydrophobicity of the proteins after carbamylation. As noted for both the six model proteins and the ribosomal proteins, carbamylation had relatively little impact on the distribution or types of fragment ions product by UVPD, supporting the proposition that the mechanism of UVPD for intact proteins does not reflect the mobile proton model.

  1. Guanylate kinase domains of the MAGUK family scaffold proteins as specific phospho-protein-binding modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jinwei; Shang, Yuan; Xia, Caihao; Wang, Wenning; Wen, Wenyu; Zhang, Mingjie

    2011-01-01

    Membrane-associated guanylate kinases (MAGUKs) are a large family of scaffold proteins that play essential roles in tissue developments, cell–cell communications, cell polarity control, and cellular signal transductions. Despite extensive studies over the past two decades, the functions of the signature guanylate kinase domain (GK) of MAGUKs are poorly understood. Here we show that the GK domain of DLG1/SAP97 binds to asymmetric cell division regulatory protein LGN in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. The structure of the DLG1 SH3-GK tandem in complex with a phospho-LGN peptide reveals that the GMP-binding site of GK has evolved into a specific pSer/pThr-binding pocket. Residues both N- and C-terminal to the pSer are also critical for the specific binding of the phospho-LGN peptide to GK. We further demonstrate that the previously reported GK domain-mediated interactions of DLGs with other targets, such as GKAP/DLGAP1/SAPAP1 and SPAR, are also phosphorylation dependent. Finally, we provide evidence that other MAGUK GKs also function as phospho-peptide-binding modules. The discovery of the phosphorylation-dependent MAGUK GK/target interactions indicates that MAGUK scaffold-mediated signalling complex organizations are dynamically regulated. PMID:22117215

  2. New Classification of Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Uterus didelphys and blind hemivagina associated with ipsilateral renal agenesis are collectively known as Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich syndrome (HWWS. In the literature, the syndrome often appears as a single case report or as a small series. In our study, we reviewed the characteristics of all HWWS patients at Peking Union Medical College Hospital (PUMCH and suggested a new classification for this syndrome because the clinical characteristics differed significantly between the completely and incompletely obstructed vaginal septum. This new classification allows for earlier diagnosis and treatment. Methods: From January 1986 to March 2013, all diagnosed cases of HWWS at PUMCH were reviewed. A retrospective long-term follow-up study of the clinical presentation, surgical prognosis, and pregnancy outcomes was performed. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS, version 15.0 (IBM, Armonk, NY, USA. Between-group comparisons were performed using the χ2 test, Fisher′s exact test, and the t-test. The significance level for all analyses was set at P < 0.05. Results: The clinical data from 79 patients with HWWS were analyzed until March 31, 2013. According to our newly identified characteristics, we recommend that the syndrome be classified by the complete or incomplete obstruction of the hemivagina as follows: Classification 1, a completely obstructed hemivagina and Classification 2, an incompletely obstructed hemivagina. The clinical details associated with these two types are distinctly different. Conclusions: HWWS patients should be differentiated according to these two classifications. The two classifications could be generalized by gynecologists world-wide.

  3. Force modulated conductance of artificial coiled-coil protein monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanassov, Alexander; Hendler, Ziv; Berkovich, Inbal; Ashkenasy, Gonen; Ashkenasy, Nurit

    2013-01-01

    Studies of charge transport through proteins bridged between two electrodes have been the subject of intense research in recent years. However, the complex structure of proteins makes it difficult to elucidate transport mechanisms, and the use of simple peptide oligomers may be an over simplified model of the proteins. To bridge this structural gap, we present here studies of charge transport through artificial parallel coiled-coil proteins conducted in dry environment. Protein monolayers uniaxially oriented at an angle of ∼ 30° with respect to the surface normal were prepared. Current voltage measurements, obtained using conductive-probe atomic force microscopy, revealed the mechano-electronic behavior of the protein films. It was found that the low voltage conductance of the protein monolayer increases linearly with applied force, mainly due to increase in the tip contact area. Negligible compression of the films for loads below 26 nN allowed estimating a tunneling attenuation factor, β(0) , of 0.5-0.6 Å(-1) , which is akin to charge transfer by tunneling mechanism, despite the comparably large charge transport distance. These studies show that mechano-electronic behavior of proteins can shed light on their complex charge transport mechanisms, and on how these mechanisms depend on the detailed structure of the proteins. Such studies may provide insightful information on charge transfer in biological systems.

  4. Aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis with a small aortic annulus in a patient having Werner's syndrome and liver cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sogawa, M; Kasuya, S; Yamamoto, K; Koshika, M; Oguma, F; Hayashi, J

    2001-12-01

    Werner's syndrome is a rare genetic disease characterized by premature aging and scleroderma-like involvement of the skin. We report a case of aortic valve replacement for severely calcified aortic valve stenosis with a small annulus in a patient suffering from Werner's syndrome and liver cirrhosis

  5. Direct Modulation of Heterotrimeric G Protein-coupled Signaling by a Receptor Kinase Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunc-Ozdemir, Meral; Urano, Daisuke; Jaiswal, Dinesh Kumar; Clouse, Steven D; Jones, Alan M

    2016-07-01

    Plants and some protists have heterotrimeric G protein complexes that activate spontaneously without canonical G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). In Arabidopsis, the sole 7-transmembrane regulator of G protein signaling 1 (AtRGS1) modulates the G protein complex by keeping it in the resting state (GDP-bound). However, it remains unknown how a myriad of biological responses is achieved with a single G protein modulator. We propose that in complete contrast to G protein activation in animals, plant leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases (LRR RLKs), not GPCRs, provide this discrimination through phosphorylation of AtRGS1 in a ligand-dependent manner. G protein signaling is directly activated by the pathogen-associated molecular pattern flagellin peptide 22 through its LRR RLK, FLS2, and co-receptor BAK1.

  6. Surface dynamics in allosteric regulation of protein-protein interactions: modulation of calmodulin functions by Ca2+.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosef Y Kuttner

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the structural basis of protein-protein interactions (PPI is of fundamental importance for understanding the organization and functioning of biological networks and advancing the design of therapeutics which target PPI. Allosteric modulators play an important role in regulating such interactions by binding at site(s orthogonal to the complex interface and altering the protein's propensity for complex formation. In this work, we apply an approach recently developed by us for analyzing protein surfaces based on steered molecular dynamics simulation (SMD to the study of the dynamic properties of functionally distinct conformations of a model protein, calmodulin (CaM, whose ability to interact with target proteins is regulated by the presence of the allosteric modulator Ca(2+. Calmodulin is a regulatory protein that acts as an intracellular Ca(2+ sensor to control a wide variety of cellular processes. We demonstrate that SMD analysis is capable of pinpointing CaM surfaces implicated in the recognition of both the allosteric modulator Ca(2+ and target proteins. Our analysis of changes in the dynamic properties of the CaM backbone elicited by Ca(2+ binding yielded new insights into the molecular mechanism of allosteric regulation of CaM-target interactions.

  7. Excitation of the Werner bands of H2 by electron impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, E. J.; Zipf, E. C.

    1972-01-01

    Absolute cross sections for the excitation of the Werner band system of molecular hydrogen have been measured from energy threshold to 300 eV for electron impact on molecular hydrogen. The bands were observed in emission in the wavelength region of 1100 to 1250 A. From a comparison of the measured cross sections with previously calculated transition probabilities, it is concluded that the Werner bands are suitable as the basis for relative spectral response calibration only when the bands are observed under sufficiently high resolution. The effect of the perturbation interaction between the B and C states of the hydrogen molecule was observed in the rotational intensity distribution of the Werner (3,7) and (3,6) bands.

  8. Hypermutable ligation of plasmid DNA ends in cells from patients with Werner syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rünger, T M; Bauer, C; Dekant, B; Möller, K; Sobotta, P; Czerny, C; Poot, M; Martin, G M

    1994-01-01

    Werner Syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by an increased cancer risk and by symptoms suggestive of premature aging. Cells from these patients demonstrate a typical pattern of chromosomal instability and a spontaneous hypermutability with a high rate of unusually large deletions. We have studied the in vivo DNA ligation in three lymphoblast cell lines from Werner syndrome patients and three from normal donors. In our host cell ligation assay we transfected linearized plasmid pZ189 and measured the amount of plasmid DNA ends rejoined by these host cells as the ability of the recovered plasmid to transform bacteria. A mutagenesis marker gene close to the ligation site allowed screening for mutations. Subsequent mutation analysis provided information about the accuracy of the ligation process. The cells from Werner syndrome patients were as effective as normal cells in ligating DNA ends. However, mutation analysis revealed that the three Werner syndrome cell lines introduced 2.4-4.6 times more mutations (p < 0.001) than the normal cell lines during ligation of the DNA ends: the mutation rates were 69.4, 97.2, and 58.7%, as compared to 23.6, 21.7, and 24.4% in the normal cell lines. These increased mutation frequencies in plasmids ligated during passage through Werner syndrome cells were mainly due to a significant (p < 0.001) increase in deletions. This error-prone DNA ligation might be responsible for the spontaneous hypermutability and the genomic instability in Werner syndrome cells and related to the apparently accelerated aging and high cancer risk in affected patients.

  9. Optimisation of ultrafiltration of a highly viscous protein solution using spiral-wound modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lipnizki, Jens; Casani, S.; Jonsson, Gunnar Eigil

    2005-01-01

    The ultrafiltration process of highly viscous protein process water with spiral-wound modules was optimised by analysing the fouling and developing a strategy to reduce it. It was shown that the flux reduction during filtration is mainly caused by the adsorption of proteins on the membrane and no...

  10. Alfred Werner's role in the mid-20th century flourishing of American inorganic chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labinger, Jay A

    2014-01-01

    The development of organic and physical chemistry as specialist fields, during the middle and end of the 19th century respectively, left inorganic behind as a decidedly less highly regarded subfield of chemistry. Despite Alfred Werner's groundbreaking studies of coordination chemistry in the early 20th century, that inferior status remained in place - particularly in the US - until the 1950s, when the beginnings of a resurgence that eventually restored its parity with the other subfields can be clearly observed. This paper explores the extent to which Werner's heritage - both direct, in the form of academic descendants, and indirect - contributed to those advances.

  11. Protein conservation and variation suggest mechanisms of cell type-specific modulation of signaling pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin H Schaefer

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Many proteins and signaling pathways are present in most cell types and tissues and yet perform specialized functions. To elucidate mechanisms by which these ubiquitous pathways are modulated, we overlaid information about cross-cell line protein abundance and variability, and evolutionary conservation onto functional pathway components and topological layers in the pathway hierarchy. We found that the input (receptors and the output (transcription factors layers evolve more rapidly than proteins in the intermediary transmission layer. In contrast, protein expression variability decreases from the input to the output layer. We observed that the differences in protein variability between the input and transmission layer can be attributed to both the network position and the tendency of variable proteins to physically interact with constitutively expressed proteins. Differences in protein expression variability and conservation are also accompanied by the tendency of conserved and constitutively expressed proteins to acquire somatic mutations, while germline mutations tend to occur in cell type-specific proteins. Thus, conserved core proteins in the transmission layer could perform a fundamental role in most cell types and are therefore less tolerant to germline mutations. In summary, we propose that the core signal transmission machinery is largely modulated by a variable input layer through physical protein interactions. We hypothesize that the bow-tie organization of cellular signaling on the level of protein abundance variability contributes to the specificity of the signal response in different cell types.

  12. Saturated fatty acids modulate autophagy's proteins in the hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portovedo, Mariana; Ignacio-Souza, Letícia M; Bombassaro, Bruna; Coope, Andressa; Reginato, Andressa; Razolli, Daniela S; Torsoni, Márcio A; Torsoni, Adriana S; Leal, Raquel F; Velloso, Licio A; Milanski, Marciane

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is an important process that regulates cellular homeostasis by degrading dysfunctional proteins, organelles and lipids. In this study, the hypothesis that obesity could lead to impairment in hypothalamic autophagy in mice was evaluated by examining the hypothalamic distribution and content of autophagic proteins in animal with obesity induced by 8 or 16 weeks high fat diet to induce obesity and in response to intracerebroventricular injections of palmitic acid. The results showed that chronic exposure to a high fat diet leads to an increased expression of inflammatory markers and downregulation of autophagic proteins. In obese mice, autophagic induction leads to the downregulation of proteins, such as JNK and Bax, which are involved in the stress pathways. In neuron cell-line, palmitate has a direct effect on autophagy even without inflammatory activity. Understanding the cellular and molecular bases of overnutrition is essential for identifying new diagnostic and therapeutic targets for obesity.

  13. Modulation of the MAP kinase signaling cascade by Raf kinase inhibitory protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nicholas TRAKUL; Marsha R. ROSNER

    2005-01-01

    Proteins like Raf kinase inhibitory protein (RKIP) that serve as modulators of signaling pathways, either by promoting or inhibiting the formation of productive signaling complexes through protein-protein interactions, have been demonstrated to play an increasingly important role in a number of cell types and organisms. These proteins have been implicated in development as well as the progression of cancer. RKIP is a particularly interesting regulator, as it is a highly conserved, ubiquitously expressed protein that has been shown to play a role in growth and differentiation in a number of organisms and can regulate multiple signaling pathways. RKIP is also the first MAP kinase signaling modulator to be identified as playing a role in cancer metastasis, and identification of the mechanism by which it regulates Raf-1 activation provides new targets for therapeutic intervention.

  14. Identification of Lipid Binding Modulators Using the Protein-Lipid Overlay Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Tuo-Xian; Xiong, Wen; Finkielstein, Carla V; Capelluto, Daniel G S

    2017-01-01

    The protein-lipid overlay assay is an inexpensive, easy-to-implement, and high-throughput methodology that employs nitrocellulose membranes to immobilize lipids in order to rapid screen and identify protein-lipid interactions. In this chapter, we show how this methodology can identify potential modulators of protein-lipid interactions by screening water-soluble lipid competitors or even the introduction of pH changes during the binding assay to identify pH-dependent lipid binding events.

  15. Human Ezrin-Moesin-Radixin Proteins Modulate Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Bukong, Terence N; Kodys, Karen; Szabo, Gyongyi

    2013-01-01

    Host cytoskeletal proteins of the ezrin-moesin-radixin (EMR) family have been shown to modulate single-stranded RNA virus infection through regulating stable microtubule formation. Antibody engagement of CD81, a key receptor for HCV entry, induces ezrin phosphorylation. Here we tested the role of EMR proteins in regulating HCV infection and explored potential therapeutic targets. We show that HCV E2 protein induces rapid ezrin phosphorylation and its cellular redistribution with F-actin via s...

  16. Calcium phosphate bioceramics induce mineralization modulated by proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kefeng; Leng, Yang; Lu, Xiong; Ren, Fuzeng

    2013-08-01

    Proteins play an important role in the process of biomineralization, which is considered the critical process of new bone formation. The calcium phosphate (Ca-P) mineralization happened on hydroxyapatite (HA), β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) and biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) when proteins presented were investigated systematically. The results reveal that the presence of protein in the revised simulated body fluid (RSBF) did not alter the shape and crystal structure of the precipitated micro-crystals in the Ca-P layer formed on the three types of bioceramics. However, the morphology of the Ca-P precipitates was regulated but the structure of Ca-P crystal was unchanged in vivo. The presence of proteins always inhibits Ca-P mineralization in RSBF and the degree of inhibitory effect is concentration dependent. Furthermore, Protein presence can increase the possibility of HA precipitation in vitro and in vivo. The results obtained in this study can be helpful for better understanding the mechanism of biomineralization induced by the Ca-P bioceramics.

  17. G protein-coupled receptor modulation with pepducins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimond, Patricia; Carlson, Kenneth; Bouvier, Michel;

    2011-01-01

    At the 2nd Pepducin Science Symposium held in Cambridge, Massachusetts, on November 4-5, 2010, investigators working in G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) research convened to discuss progress since last year's inaugural conference. This year's symposium focused on increasing knowledge of the stru......At the 2nd Pepducin Science Symposium held in Cambridge, Massachusetts, on November 4-5, 2010, investigators working in G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) research convened to discuss progress since last year's inaugural conference. This year's symposium focused on increasing knowledge...

  18. The RecX protein interacts with the RecA protein and modulates its activity in Herbaspirillum seropedicae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galvão, C.W. [Departamento de Biologia Estrutural, Molecular e Genética, Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Souza, E.M. [Departamento de Bioquímica e Biologia Molecular, Universidade Federal do Paraná, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Etto, R.M. [Departamento de Biologia Estrutural, Molecular e Genética, Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Pedrosa, F.O.; Chubatsu, L.S.; Yates, M.G. [Departamento de Bioquímica e Biologia Molecular, Universidade Federal do Paraná, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Schumacher, J.; Buck, M. [Department of Life Sciences, Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom); Steffens, M.B.R. [Departamento de Bioquímica e Biologia Molecular, Universidade Federal do Paraná, Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2012-10-15

    DNA repair is crucial to the survival of all organisms. The bacterial RecA protein is a central component in the SOS response and in recombinational and SOS DNA repairs. The RecX protein has been characterized as a negative modulator of RecA activity in many bacteria. The recA and recX genes of Herbaspirillum seropedicae constitute a single operon, and evidence suggests that RecX participates in SOS repair. In the present study, we show that the H. seropedicae RecX protein (RecX{sub Hs}) can interact with the H. seropedicae RecA protein (RecA{sub Hs}) and that RecA{sub Hs} possesses ATP binding, ATP hydrolyzing and DNA strand exchange activities. RecX{sub Hs} inhibited 90% of the RecA{sub Hs} DNA strand exchange activity even when present in a 50-fold lower molar concentration than RecA{sub Hs}. RecA{sub Hs} ATP binding was not affected by the addition of RecX, but the ATPase activity was reduced. When RecX{sub Hs} was present before the formation of RecA filaments (RecA-ssDNA), inhibition of ATPase activity was substantially reduced and excess ssDNA also partially suppressed this inhibition. The results suggest that the RecX{sub Hs} protein negatively modulates the RecA{sub Hs} activities by protein-protein interactions and also by DNA-protein interactions.

  19. Temperature-dependent solvation modulates the dimensions of disordered proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuttke, René; Hofmann, Hagen; Nettels, Daniel; Borgia, Madeleine B; Mittal, Jeetain; Best, Robert B; Schuler, Benjamin

    2014-04-01

    For disordered proteins, the dimensions of the chain are an important property that is sensitive to environmental conditions. We have used single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer to probe the temperature-induced chain collapse of five unfolded or intrinsically disordered proteins. Because this behavior is sensitive to the details of intrachain and chain-solvent interactions, the collapse allows us to probe the physical interactions governing the dimensions of disordered proteins. We find that each of the proteins undergoes a collapse with increasing temperature, with the most hydrophobic one, λ-repressor, undergoing a reexpansion at the highest temperatures. Although such a collapse might be expected due to the temperature dependence of the classical "hydrophobic effect," remarkably we find that the largest collapse occurs for the most hydrophilic, charged sequences. Using a combination of theory and simulation, we show that this result can be rationalized in terms of the temperature-dependent solvation free energies of the constituent amino acids, with the solvation properties of the most hydrophilic residues playing a large part in determining the collapse.

  20. Modulation of lipoprotein receptor functions by intracellular adaptor proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolt, Peggy C; Bock, Hans H

    2006-10-01

    Members of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor gene family are critically involved in a wide range of physiological processes including lipid and vitamin homeostasis, cellular migration, neurodevelopment, and synaptic plasticity, to name a few. Lipoprotein receptors exert these diverse biological functions by acting as cellular uptake receptors or by inducing intracellular signaling cascades. It was discovered that a short sequence in the intracellular region of all lipoprotein receptors, Asn-Pro-X-Tyr (NPXY) is important for mediating either endocytosis or signal transduction events, and that this motif serves as a binding site for phosphotyrosine-binding (PTB) domain containing scaffold proteins. These molecular adaptors connect the transmembrane receptors with the endocytosis machinery and regulate cellular trafficking, or function as assembly sites for dynamic multi-protein signaling complexes. Whereas the LDL receptor represents the archetype of an endocytic lipoprotein receptor, the structurally closely related apolipoprotein E receptor 2 (apoER2) and very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) receptor activate a kinase-dependent intracellular signaling cascade after binding to the neuronal signaling molecule Reelin. This review focuses on two related PTB domain containing adaptor proteins that mediate these divergent lipoprotein receptor responses, ARH (autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia protein) and Dab1 (disabled-1), and discusses the structural and molecular basis of this different behaviour.

  1. High Throughput Screening for Drugs that Modulate Intermediate Filament Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jingyuan; Groppi, Vincent E.; Gui, Honglian; Chen, Lu; Xie, Qing; Liu, Li

    2016-01-01

    Intermediate filament (IF) proteins have unique and complex cell and tissue distribution. Importantly, IF gene mutations cause or predispose to more than 80 human tissue-specific diseases (IF-pathies), with the most severe disease phenotypes being due to mutations at conserved residues that result in a disrupted IF network. A critical need for the entire IF-pathy field is the identification of drugs that can ameliorate or cure these diseases, particularly since all current therapies target the IF-pathy complication, such as diabetes or cardiovascular disease, rather than the mutant IF protein or gene. We describe a high throughput approach to identify drugs that can normalize disrupted IF proteins. This approach utilizes transduction of lentivirus that expresses green-fluorescent-protein-tagged keratin 18 (K18) R90C in A549 cells. The readout is drug ‘hits’ that convert the dot-like keratin filament distribution, due to the R90C mutation, to a wildtype-like filamentous array. A similar strategy can be used to screen thousands of compounds and can be utilized for practically any IF protein with a filament-disrupting mutation, and could therefore potentially target many IF-pathies. ‘Hits’ of interest require validation in cell culture then using in vivo experimental models. Approaches to study the mechanism of mutant-IF normalization by potential drugs of interest are also described. The ultimate goal of this drug screening approach is to identify effective and safe compounds that can potentially be tested for clinical efficacy in patients. PMID:26795471

  2. On the Work of the German-American Artist Werner Klotz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kacunko, Slavko

    2010-01-01

    A closer look is a must if we want to begin to appreciate the reflecting material and reflexive effect of German-American artist Werner Klotz’s array of Wahrnehmungsinstrumenten – his Instruments of Perception from today’s standpoint, better still one taken a step aside from the exploding Art...

  3. Physical and functional interactions between Werner syndrome helicase and mismatch-repair initiation factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saydam, Nurten; Kanagaraj, Radhakrishnan; Dietschy, Tobias;

    2007-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is a severe recessive disorder characterized by premature aging, cancer predisposition and genomic instability. The gene mutated in WS encodes a bi-functional enzyme called WRN that acts as a RecQ-type DNA helicase and a 3'-5' exonuclease, but its exact role in DNA metabolism...

  4. Werner Koch Maschinenfabrik:先进的模块化辅助加工技术

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Werner Koch Maschinenfabrik拥有33年的历史,是全球知名的专业化混料、定量给料、输送、干燥系统供应商,其产品以创新、高精确度、灵活和低成本而著称。

  5. Computer Series, 85. Werner and Jorgensen: Presenting History with a Computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whisnant, David M.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a computer simulation which deals with the Werner-Jorgensen controversy from the standpoint of Kuhn's description of scientific change. Encourages the use of such instructional approaches to introduce general chemistry students to the process of science, including how (1) theories develop, (2) change occurs, and (3) scientists behave.…

  6. Werner-Type Matrix Valued Rational Interpolation and Its Recurrence Algorithms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾传青; 王金波

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, a practical Werner-type continued fraction method for solving matrix valued rational interpolation problem isprovided by using a generalized inverse of matrices. In order to reduce the continued fraction form to rational function form of the in-terpolants, an efficient forward recurrence algorithm is obtained.

  7. 3. Chromosomal instability in B-lymphoblasotoid cell lines from Werner's and Bloom's syndrome patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@Werner's syndrome (WS) and Bloom's syndrome (BS) are rare autosomal recessive diseases in which the feature of premature aging and the elevated risk of neoplasia may be associated with genomic instability. To cha-racterize the genomic instability of WS and BS, B-lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) from WS and BS patients were cytogenetically analyzed, comparing to those from healthy donors. Although all

  8. Generation of Werner-like stationary states of two qubits in a thermal reservoir

    CERN Document Server

    Jakobczyk, Lech

    2009-01-01

    The dynamics of entanglement between two-level atoms immersed in a common photon reservoir at finite temperature is investigated. It is shown that in the regime of strong correlations there are nontrivial asymptotic states which can be interpreted in terms of thermal generalization of Werner states.

  9. Correction of defective protein kinesis of human P-glycoprotein mutants by substrates and modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loo, T W; Clarke, D M

    1997-01-10

    There is growing evidence that abnormal protein folding or trafficking (protein kinesis) leads to diseases. We have used P-glycoprotein as a model protein to develop strategies to overcome defects in protein kinesis. Misprocessed mutants of the human P-glycoprotein are retained in the endoplasmic reticulum as core-glycosylated biosynthetic intermediates and rapidly degraded. Synthesis of the mutant proteins in the presence of drug substrates or modulators such as capsaicin, cyclosporin, vinblastine, or verapamil, however, resulted in the appearance of a fully glycosylated and functional protein at the cell surface. These effects were dose-dependent and occurred within a few hours after the addition of substrate. The ability to facilitate processing of the misfolded mutants appeared to be independent of the cell lines used and location of the mutation. P-glycoproteins with mutations in transmembrane segments, extracellular or cytoplasmic loops, the nucleotide-binding domains, or the linker region were processed to the fully mature form in the presence of these substrates. These drug substrates or modulators acted as specific chemical chaperones for P-glycoprotein because they were ineffective on the deltaF508 mutant of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator. Therefore, one possible strategy to prevent protein misfolding is to carry out synthesis in the presence of specific substrates or modulators of the protein.

  10. Effector proteins that modulate plant--insect interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogenhout, Saskia A; Bos, Jorunn I B

    2011-08-01

    Insect herbivores have highly diverse life cycles and feeding behaviors. They establish close interactions with their plant hosts and suppress plant defenses. Chewing herbivores evoke characteristic defense responses distinguishable from general mechanical damage. In addition, piercing-sucking hemipteran insects display typical feeding behavior that suggests active suppression of plant defense responses. Effectors that modulate plant defenses have been identified in the saliva of these insects. Tools for high-throughput effector identification and functional characterization have been developed. In addition, in some insect species it is possible to silence gene expression by RNAi. Together, this technological progress has enabled the identification of insect herbivore effectors and their targets that will lead to the development of novel strategies for pest resistances in plants.

  11. Whey protein particles modulate mechanical properties of gels at high protein concentrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saglam, D.; Venema, P.; Vries, de R.J.; Berg, van den L.; Linden, van der E.

    2014-01-01

    We have studied the influence of dense whey protein particles on the mechanical properties of whey protein isolate (WPI) gels at high protein concentrations (16–22% (w/w)). Incorporation of dense whey protein particles in the gel, while keeping the total protein concentration constant, leads to a co

  12. Pb2+ as modulator of protein-membrane interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Krystal A; Lasagna, Mauricio; Gribenko, Alexey V; Yoon, Youngdae; Reinhart, Gregory D; Lee, James C; Cho, Wonhwa; Li, Pingwei; Igumenova, Tatyana I

    2011-07-13

    Lead is a potent environmental toxin that mimics the effects of divalent metal ions, such as zinc and calcium, in the context of specific molecular targets and signaling processes. The molecular mechanism of lead toxicity remains poorly understood. The objective of this work was to characterize the effect of Pb(2+) on the structure and membrane-binding properties of C2α. C2α is a peripheral membrane-binding domain of Protein Kinase Cα (PKCα), which is a well-documented molecular target of lead. Using NMR and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) techniques, we established that C2α binds Pb(2+) with higher affinity than its natural cofactor, Ca(2+). To gain insight into the coordination geometry of protein-bound Pb(2+), we determined the crystal structures of apo and Pb(2+)-bound C2α at 1.9 and 1.5 Å resolution, respectively. A comparison of these structures revealed that the metal-binding site is not preorganized and that rotation of the oxygen-donating side chains is required for the metal coordination to occur. Remarkably, we found that holodirected and hemidirected coordination geometries for the two Pb(2+) ions coexist within a single protein molecule. Using protein-to-membrane Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) spectroscopy, we demonstrated that Pb(2+) displaces Ca(2+) from C2α in the presence of lipid membranes through the high-affinity interaction with the membrane-unbound C2α. In addition, Pb(2+) associates with phosphatidylserine-containing membranes and thereby competes with C2α for the membrane-binding sites. This process can contribute to the inhibitory effect of Pb(2+) on the PKCα activity.

  13. Alphacoronavirus protein 7 modulates host innate immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Jazmina L G; Becares, Martina; Sola, Isabel; Oliveros, Juan Carlos; Enjuanes, Luis; Zúñiga, Sonia

    2013-09-01

    Innate immune response is the first line of antiviral defense resulting, in most cases, in pathogen clearance with minimal clinical consequences. Viruses have developed diverse strategies to subvert host defense mechanisms and increase their survival. In the transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) as a model, we previously reported that accessory gene 7 counteracts the host antiviral response by associating with the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1c). In the present work, the effect of the absence of gene 7 on the host cell, during infection, was further analyzed by transcriptomic analysis. The pattern of gene expression of cells infected with a recombinant mutant TGEV, lacking gene 7 expression (rTGEV-Δ7), was compared to that of cells infected with the parental virus (rTGEV-wt). Genes involved in the immune response, the interferon response, and inflammation were upregulated during TGEV infection in the absence of gene 7. An exacerbated innate immune response during infection with rTGEV-Δ7 virus was observed both in vitro and in vivo. An increase in macrophage recruitment and activation in lung tissues infected with rTGEV-Δ7 virus was observed compared to cells infected with the parental virus. In summary, the absence of protein 7 both in vitro and in vivo led to increased proinflammatory responses and acute tissue damage after infection. In a porcine animal model, which is immunologically similar to humans, we present a novel example of how viral proteins counteract host antiviral pathways to determine the infection outcome and pathogenesis.

  14. Cellular prion protein and NMDA receptor modulation: protecting against excitotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie A.G. Black

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Although it is well established that misfolding of the cellular prion protein (PrPC into the beta-sheet-rich, aggregated scrapie conformation (PrPSc causes a variety of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs, the physiological roles of PrPC are still incompletely understood. There is accumulating evidence describing the roles of PrPC in neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation. Recently, we identified a functional regulation of NMDA receptors by PrPC that involves formation of a physical protein complex between these proteins. Excessive NMDA receptor activity during conditions such as ischemia mediates enhanced Ca2+ entry into cells and contributes to excitotoxic neuronal death. In addition, NMDA receptors and/or PrPC play critical roles in neuroinflammation and glial cell toxicity. Inhibition of NMDA receptor activity protects against PrPSc-induced neuronal death. Moreover, in mice lacking PrPC, infarct size is increased after focal cerebral ischemia, and absence of PrPC increases susceptibility of neurons to NMDA receptor-dependent death. Recently, PrPC was found to be a receptor for oligomeric beta-amyloid (Abeta peptides, suggesting a role for PrPC in Alzheimer’s disease. Our recent findings suggest that Abeta peptides enhance NMDA receptor current by perturbing the normal copper- and PrPC-dependent regulation of these receptors. Here, we review evidence highlighting a role for PrPC in preventing NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity and inflammation. There is a need for more detailed molecular characterization of PrPC-mediated regulation of NMDA receptors, such as determining which NMDA receptor subunits mediate pathogenic effects upon loss of PrPC-mediated regulation and identifying PrPC binding site(s on the receptor. This knowledge will allow development of novel therapeutic interventions for not only TSEs, but also for Alzheimer’s disease and other neurodegenerative disorders involving dysfunction of PrPC.

  15. Transitive closure and metric inequality of weighted graphs:detecting protein interaction modules using cliques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Chris; He, Xiaofeng; Xiong, Hui; Peng, Hanchuan; Holbrook,Stephen R.

    2006-06-02

    We study transitivity properties of edge weights in complex networks. We show that enforcing transitivity leads to a transitivity inequality which is equivalent to ultra-metric inequality. This can be used to define transitive closure on weighted undirected graphs, which can be computed using a modified Floyd-Warshall algorithm. We outline several applications and present results of detecting protein functional modules in a protein interaction network.

  16. Protein phosphatase Z modulates oxidative stress response in fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiter, Éva; González, Asier; Erdei, Éva; Casado, Carlos; Kovács, László; Ádám, Csaba; Oláh, Judit; Miskei, Márton; Molnar, Monika; Farkas, Ilona; Hamari, Zsuzsanna; Ariño, Joaquín; Pócsi, István; Dombrádi, Viktor

    2012-09-01

    The genome of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans harbors the gene ppzA that codes for the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase Z (PPZ), and the closely related opportunistic pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus encompasses a highly similar PPZ gene (phzA). When PpzA and PhzA were expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae or Schizosaccharomyces pombe they partially complemented the deleted phosphatases in the ppz1 or the pzh1 mutants, and they also mimicked the effect of Ppz1 overexpression in slt2 MAP kinase deficient S. cerevisiae cells. Although ppzA acted as the functional equivalent of the known PPZ enzymes its disruption in A. nidulans did not result in the expected phenotypes since it failed to affect salt tolerance or cell wall integrity. However, the inactivation of ppzA resulted in increased sensitivity to oxidizing agents like tert-butylhydroperoxide, menadione, and diamide. To demonstrate the general validity of our observations we showed that the deletion of the orthologous PPZ genes in other model organisms, such as S. cerevisiae (PPZ1) or Candida albicans (CaPPZ1) also caused oxidative stress sensitivity. Thus, our work reveals a novel function of the PPZ enzyme in A. nidulans that is conserved in very distantly related fungi.

  17. Zinc ions modulate protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellomo, Elisa; Massarotti, Alberto; Hogstrand, Christer; Maret, Wolfgang

    2014-07-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are key enzymes in cellular regulation. The 107 human PTPs are regulated by redox signalling, phosphorylation, dimerisation, and proteolysis. Recent findings of very strong inhibition of some PTPs by zinc ions at concentrations relevant in a cellular environment suggest yet another mechanism of regulation. One of the most extensively investigated PTPs is PTP1B (PTPN1). It regulates the insulin and leptin signalling pathway and is implicated in cancer and obesity/diabetes. The development of novel assay conditions to investigate zinc inhibition of PTP1B provides estimates of about 5.6 nM affinity for inhibitory zinc(II) ions. Analysis of three PTP1B 3D structures (PDB id: 2CM2, 3I80 and 1A5Y) identified putative zinc binding sites and supports the kinetic studies in suggesting an inhibitory zinc only in the closed and cysteinyl-phosphate intermediate forms of the enzyme. These observations gain significance with regard to recent findings of regulatory roles of zinc ions released from the endoplasmic reticulum.

  18. Application of a micromembrane chromatography module to the examination of protein adsorption equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Káňavová, Natália; Kosior, Anna; Antošová, Monika; Faber, René; Polakovič, Milan

    2012-11-01

    A micromembrane chromatography module based on a 96-well plate design and enabling fast and simple separation of small amounts of proteins was used for the determination of binding capacities of lysozyme, bovine serum albumin, ovalbumin, bovine γ-globulin, and human immunoglobulin G on a hydrophobic membrane Sartobind® Phenyl. Dependence of the binding capacity of the proteins on the ammonium sulfate concentration was examined in the salt concentration range of 0.5-2.0 mol L(-1). An exponential increase of the binding capacity was observed for all proteins. Simple Langmuir one-component isotherm was found suitable for the characterization of the effect of protein concentration in all cases. A combined effect of protein and salt concentrations was expressed via the Langmuir exponential isotherm and fitted the adsorption data for three of the investigated proteins well.

  19. Heterotrimeric G protein participated in modulation of cytoplasmic calcium concentration in pollen cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHANG Zhonglin; MA Ligeng; WANG Xuechen; SUN Daye

    2003-01-01

    Cytoplasmic free calcium concentration([Ca2+]c) in pollen cells of Lilium daviddi is measured with confocal laser scanning microscopy to investigate the effect of heterotrimeric G protein (G protein) on [Ca2+]c and the possible signal transduction pathway of G protein triggering cellular calcium signal. After application, cholera toxin (CTX), an agonist of G protein, triggers a transient increase of [Ca2+]c in pollen cells, and evokes a spatial-temporal characteristic calcium dynamics; while pertussis toxin (PTX), a G protein antagonist, leads to the decrease of [Ca2+]c. Both L-type Ca2+ channel blocker verapamil and inhibitor of IP3 receptor heparin inhibit CTX-induced [Ca2+]c increase. The results show that G protein may play a role in the modulation of [Ca2+]c through enhancing the extracellular Ca2+ influx and releasing of Ca2+ from intracellular stores.

  20. A PAIDERASTIA SOB O HISTORICISMO DE WERNER JAEGER. (Dossiê: O Mundo Antigo: Literatura e Historiografia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Barbo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Resumo: Este texto faz uma análise do modo historicista com que o historiador alemão Werner Jaeger, nas décadas de 1930 e 1940, aborda o homoerotismo grego (paiderastia e sua relação com a pedagogia em sua obra Paidéia, a formação do homem grego. Palavras-Chave: Homoerotismo Grego, Historicismo, Werner Jaeger Abstract: This text analyzes the historicist manner with which the German historian Werner Jaeger, in the 1930s and 1940s, addresses the Greek homoeroticism (paiderastia and its relation to pedagogy in his work Paideia, the ideals of the Greek culture. Keywords: Greek Homoerotiscism, Historicism, Werner Jaeger Recebido em: 069/08/2015  – Aceito em 10/09/2015

  1. Tough Coating Proteins: Subtle Sequence Variation Modulates Cohesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Saurabh; Miller, Dusty R.; Kaufman, Yair; Martinez Rodriguez, Nadine R.; Pallaoro, Alessia; Harrington, Matthew J.; Gylys, Maryte; Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Waite, J. Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Mussel foot protein-1 (mfp-1) is an essential constituent of the protective cuticle covering all exposed portions of the byssus (plaque and the thread) that marine mussels use to attach to intertidal rocks. The reversible complexation of Fe3+ by the 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (Dopa) side chains in mfp-1 in Mytilus californianus cuticle is responsible for its high extensibility (120%) as well as its stiffness (2 GPa) due to the formation of sacrificial bonds that help to dissipate energy and avoid accumulation of stresses in the material. We have investigated the interactions between Fe3+ and mfp-1 from two mussel species, M. californianus (Mc) and M. edulis (Me), using both surface sensitive and solution phase techniques. Our results show that although mfp-1 homologues from both species bind Fe3+, mfp-1 (Mc) contains Dopa with two distinct Fe3+-binding tendencies and prefers to form intramolecular complexes with Fe3+. In contrast, mfp-1 (Me) is better adapted to intermolecular Fe3+ binding by Dopa. Addition of Fe3+ did not significantly increase the cohesion energy between the mfp-1 (Mc) films at pH 5.5. However, iron appears to stabilize the cohesive bridging of mfp-1 (Mc) films at the physiologically relevant pH of 7.5, where most other mfps lose their ability to adhere reversibly. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underpinning the capacity of M. californianus cuticle to withstand twice the strain of M. edulis cuticle is important for engineering of tunable strain tolerant composite coatings for biomedical applications. PMID:25692318

  2. Differential expression of Werner and Bloom syndrome genes in the peripheral blood of HIV-1 infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordi, Licia; Gioia, Cristiana; Lalle, Eleonora; Piselli, Pierluca; Poccia, Fabrizio; Capobianchi, Maria R; Amendola, Alessandra

    2007-02-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-induced immunodeficiency and immune-system aging share some analogies. Since Werner (WRN) and Bloom (BLM) helicases are crucial in cell repair and aging, their peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) mRNA levels were compared in HIV-1 infected patients and in normal donors. The mean levels of WRN mRNA were 3.7-fold higher in PBMCs from HIV-1 infected individuals in comparison to healthy donors, whereas BLM mRNA mean levels were slightly higher, although not significantly. WRN increase was positively correlated to CD4 and CD8 T-cell numbers, and also the percentage of naive T lymphocytes, and was observed also in T-cell subsets. Interestingly, a general trend toward increased WRN mRNA levels in individuals with lower viral load was observed, without association with patient age, time of seroconversion, and on/off antiretroviral therapy regimen. On the whole, this study shows that WRN and BLM are differentially modulated in HIV infection, as WRN--but not BLM--is significantly increased, suggesting that mechanisms different from defect or loss of helicase function, observed in WRN and BLM syndromes, may be at the basis of T-cell aging in HIV infection.

  3. Heinz Werner: His Life, Ideas, and Contributions to Developmental Psychology in the First Half of the 20th Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostler, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    The author provides an overview of Heinz Werner's life and contributions to the field of developmental psychology during the first half of the 20th century. She focuses on his early work in Vienna and Munich as well as his tenure at the Psychological Institute in Hamburg, up through the time when he became a named Professor in Psychology at Clark University. Recognized as one of the founders of developmental psychology, Heinz Werner worked in the areas of perceptual development, comparative psychology, and symbol formation. Versatile in rigorous experimental methodologies, and in observational and phenomenological methodologies, Werner's approach to development stood in contrast to other approaches of development, both past and current. For Werner, development was a heuristic, a way of looking at processes in a variety of domains, including ontogeny, phylogeny, microgenesis, biology, developmental psychopathology, neuropsychology, and comparative psychology. Werner viewed development as proceeding from a state of relative globality and lack of differentiation to a state of increasing differentiation, articulation, and hierarchical integration, but he also stressed that individuals can function at different developmental levels under different times and conditions. Werner's holistic, organismic, comparative, and contextual approach to development transcended interdisciplinary boundaries, allowing him to study the interrelatedness between thought, language, feeling, perception, and culture.

  4. The Drosophila homologue of the amyloid precursor protein is a conserved modulator of Wnt PCP signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessia Soldano

    Full Text Available Wnt Planar Cell Polarity (PCP signaling is a universal regulator of polarity in epithelial cells, but it regulates axon outgrowth in neurons, suggesting the existence of axonal modulators of Wnt-PCP activity. The Amyloid precursor proteins (APPs are intensely investigated because of their link to Alzheimer's disease (AD. APP's in vivo function in the brain and the mechanisms underlying it remain unclear and controversial. Drosophila possesses a single APP homologue called APP Like, or APPL. APPL is expressed in all neurons throughout development, but has no established function in neuronal development. We therefore investigated the role of Drosophila APPL during brain development. We find that APPL is involved in the development of the Mushroom Body αβ neurons and, in particular, is required cell-autonomously for the β-axons and non-cell autonomously for the α-axons growth. Moreover, we find that APPL is a modulator of the Wnt-PCP pathway required for axonal outgrowth, but not cell polarity. Molecularly, both human APP and fly APPL form complexes with PCP receptors, thus suggesting that APPs are part of the membrane protein complex upstream of PCP signaling. Moreover, we show that APPL regulates PCP pathway activation by modulating the phosphorylation of the Wnt adaptor protein Dishevelled (Dsh by Abelson kinase (Abl. Taken together our data suggest that APPL is the first example of a modulator of the Wnt-PCP pathway specifically required for axon outgrowth.

  5. The Natural Killer Cell Cytotoxic Function Is Modulated by HIV-1 Accessory Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Barker

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells’ major role in the control of viruses is to eliminate established infected cells. The capacity of NK cells to kill virus-infected cells is dependent on the interactions between ligands on the infected cell and receptors on the NK cell surface. Because of the importance of ligand-receptor interactions in modulating the NK cell cytotoxic response, HIV has developed strategies to regulate various NK cell ligands making the infected cell surprisingly refractory to NK cell lysis. This is perplexing because the HIV-1 accessory protein Vpr induces expression of ligands for the NK cell activating receptor, NKG2D. In addition, the accessory protein Nef removes the inhibitory ligands HLA-A and -B. The reason for the ineffective killing by NK cells despite the strong potential to eliminate infected cells is due to HIV-1 Vpu’s ability to down modulate the co-activation ligand, NTB-A, from the cell surface. Down modulation of NTB-A prevents efficient NK cell degranulation. This review will focus on the mechanisms through which the HIV-1 accessory proteins modulate their respective ligands, and its implication for NK cell killing of HIV-infected cells.

  6. The Drosophila homologue of the amyloid precursor protein is a conserved modulator of Wnt PCP signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldano, Alessia; Okray, Zeynep; Janovska, Pavlina; Tmejová, Kateřina; Reynaud, Elodie; Claeys, Annelies; Yan, Jiekun; Atak, Zeynep Kalender; De Strooper, Bart; Dura, Jean-Maurice; Bryja, Vítězslav; Hassan, Bassem A

    2013-01-01

    Wnt Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) signaling is a universal regulator of polarity in epithelial cells, but it regulates axon outgrowth in neurons, suggesting the existence of axonal modulators of Wnt-PCP activity. The Amyloid precursor proteins (APPs) are intensely investigated because of their link to Alzheimer's disease (AD). APP's in vivo function in the brain and the mechanisms underlying it remain unclear and controversial. Drosophila possesses a single APP homologue called APP Like, or APPL. APPL is expressed in all neurons throughout development, but has no established function in neuronal development. We therefore investigated the role of Drosophila APPL during brain development. We find that APPL is involved in the development of the Mushroom Body αβ neurons and, in particular, is required cell-autonomously for the β-axons and non-cell autonomously for the α-axons growth. Moreover, we find that APPL is a modulator of the Wnt-PCP pathway required for axonal outgrowth, but not cell polarity. Molecularly, both human APP and fly APPL form complexes with PCP receptors, thus suggesting that APPs are part of the membrane protein complex upstream of PCP signaling. Moreover, we show that APPL regulates PCP pathway activation by modulating the phosphorylation of the Wnt adaptor protein Dishevelled (Dsh) by Abelson kinase (Abl). Taken together our data suggest that APPL is the first example of a modulator of the Wnt-PCP pathway specifically required for axon outgrowth.

  7. Quantum information transmission in the quantum wireless multihop network based on Werner state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Li-Hui; Yu, Xu-Tao; Cai, Xiao-Fei; Gong, Yan-Xiao; Zhang, Zai-Chen

    2015-05-01

    Many previous studies about teleportation are based on pure state. Study of quantum channel as mixed state is more realistic but complicated as pure states degenerate into mixed states by interaction with environment, and the Werner state plays an important role in the study of the mixed state. In this paper, the quantum wireless multihop network is proposed and the information is transmitted hop by hop through teleportation. We deduce a specific expression of the recovered state not only after one-hop teleportation but also across multiple intermediate nodes based on Werner state in a quantum wireless multihop network. We also obtain the fidelity of multihop teleportation. Project supported by the Prospective Future Network Project of Jiangsu Province, China (Grant No. BY2013095-1-18) and the Independent Project of State Key Laboratory of Millimeter Waves (Grant No. Z201504).

  8. WRN mutations in Werner syndrome patients: genomic rearrangements, unusual intronic mutations and ethnic-specific alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Katrin; Lee, Lin; Leistritz, Dru F; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Saha, Bidisha; Hisama, Fuki M; Eyman, Daniel K; Lessel, Davor; Nürnberg, Peter; Li, Chumei; Garcia-F-Villalta, María J; Kets, Carolien M; Schmidtke, Joerg; Cruz, Vítor Tedim; Van den Akker, Peter C; Boak, Joseph; Peter, Dincy; Compoginis, Goli; Cefle, Kivanc; Ozturk, Sukru; López, Norberto; Wessel, Theda; Poot, Martin; Ippel, P F; Groff-Kellermann, Birgit; Hoehn, Holger; Martin, George M; Kubisch, Christian; Oshima, Junko

    2010-07-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is an autosomal recessive segmental progeroid syndrome caused by null mutations at the WRN locus, which codes for a member of the RecQ family of DNA helicases. Since 1988, the International Registry of Werner syndrome had enrolled 130 molecularly confirmed WS cases from among 110 worldwide pedigrees. We now report 18 new mutations, including two genomic rearrangements, a deep intronic mutation resulting in a novel exon, a splice consensus mutation leading to utilization of the nearby splice site, and two rare missense mutations. We also review evidence for founder mutations among various ethnic/geographic groups. Founder WRN mutations had been previously reported in Japan and Northern Sardinia. Our Registry now suggests characteristic mutations originated in Morocco, Turkey, The Netherlands and elsewhere.

  9. Recent insights into Pasteurella multocida toxin and other G-protein-modulating bacterial toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Brenda A; Ho, Mengfei

    2010-08-01

    Over the past few decades, our understanding of the bacterial protein toxins that modulate G proteins has advanced tremendously through extensive biochemical and structural analyses. This article provides an updated survey of the various toxins that target G proteins, ending with a focus on recent mechanistic insights in our understanding of the deamidating toxin family. The dermonecrotic toxin from Pasteurella multocida (PMT) was recently added to the list of toxins that disrupt G-protein signal transduction through selective deamidation of their targets. The C3 deamidase domain of PMT has no sequence similarity to the deamidase domains of the dermonecrotic toxins from Escherichia coli (cytotoxic necrotizing factor [CNF]1-3), Yersinia (CNFY) and Bordetella (dermonecrotic toxin). The structure of PMT-C3 belongs to a family of transglutaminase-like proteins, with active site Cys-His-Asp catalytic triads distinct from E. coli CNF1.

  10. Werner and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndromes: mechanistic basis of human progeroid diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudlow, Brian A; Kennedy, Brian K; Monnat, Raymond J

    2007-05-01

    Progeroid syndromes have been the focus of intense research in part because they might provide a window into the pathology of normal ageing. Werner syndrome and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome are two of the best characterized human progeroid diseases. Mutated genes that are associated with these syndromes have been identified, mouse models of disease have been developed, and molecular studies have implicated decreased cell proliferation and altered DNA-damage responses as common causal mechanisms in the pathogenesis of both diseases.

  11. Partial lipodystrophy with severe insulin resistance and adult progeria Werner syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Donadille, Bruno; D'Anella, Pascal; Auclair, Martine; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Sorel, Marc; Grigorescu, Romulus; Ouzounian, Sophie; Cambonie, Gilles; Boulot, Pierre; Laforêt, Pascal; Carbonne, Bruno; Christin-Maitre, Sophie; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Vigouroux, Corinne

    2013-01-01

    International audience; BACKGROUND: Laminopathies, due to mutations in LMNA, encoding A type-lamins, can lead to premature ageing and/or lipodystrophic syndromes, showing that these diseases could have close physiopathological relationships. We show here that lipodystrophy and extreme insulin resistance can also reveal the adult progeria Werner syndrome linked to mutations in WRN, encoding a RecQ DNA helicase. METHODS: We analysed the clinical and biological features of two women, aged 32 and...

  12. A conserved patch of hydrophobic amino acids modulates Myb activity by mediating protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukare, Sandeep; Klempnauer, Karl-Heinz

    2016-07-01

    The transcription factor c-Myb plays a key role in the control of proliferation and differentiation in hematopoietic progenitor cells and has been implicated in the development of leukemia and certain non-hematopoietic tumors. c-Myb activity is highly dependent on the interaction with the coactivator p300 which is mediated by the transactivation domain of c-Myb and the KIX domain of p300. We have previously observed that conservative valine-to-isoleucine amino acid substitutions in a conserved stretch of hydrophobic amino acids have a profound effect on Myb activity. Here, we have explored the function of the hydrophobic region as a mediator of protein-protein interactions. We show that the hydrophobic region facilitates Myb self-interaction and binding of the histone acetyl transferase Tip60, a previously identified Myb interacting protein. We show that these interactions are affected by the valine-to-isoleucine amino acid substitutions and suppress Myb activity by interfering with the interaction of Myb and the KIX domain of p300. Taken together, our work identifies the hydrophobic region in the Myb transactivation domain as a binding site for homo- and heteromeric protein interactions and leads to a picture of the c-Myb transactivation domain as a composite protein binding region that facilitates interdependent protein-protein interactions of Myb with regulatory proteins.

  13. Schrödinger cat and Werner state disentanglement simulated by trapped ion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittencourt, Victor A. S. V.; Bernardini, Alex E.

    2017-04-01

    Disentanglement and loss of quantum correlations due to one global collective noise effect are described for two-qubit Schrödinger cat and Werner states of a four level trapped ion quantum system. Once the Jaynes–Cummings ionic interactions are mapped onto a Dirac spinor structure, the elementary tools for computing quantum correlations of two-qubit ionic states are provided. With two-qubit quantum numbers related to the total angular momentum and to its projection onto the direction of an external magnetic field (which lifts the degeneracy of the ion’s internal levels), a complete analytical profile of entanglement for the Schrödinger cat and Werner states is obtained. Under vacuum noise (during spontaneous emission), the two-qubit entanglement in the Schrödinger cat states is shown to vanish asymptotically. Otherwise, the robustness of Werner states is concomitantly identified, with the entanglement content recovered by their noiseless-like evolution. Most importantly, our results point to a firstly reported sudden transition between classical and quantum decay regimes driven by a classical collective noise on the Schrödinger cat states, which has been quantified by the geometric discord.

  14. Stereochemistry of coordination compounds. From alfred werner to the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Zelewsky, Alex

    2014-01-01

    As a contribution to the scientific symposium, November 22nd, 2013, commemorating the Nobel Prize awarded to Alfred Werner in 1913, a presentation of the development of stereochemistry of coordination compounds during the past 120 years was given. Stereochemistry was fundamental to Werner's theory of coordination compounds. After Werner's death in 1919, stereochemistry in this field did not progress much further for almost 20 years, but then developed continuously. It was realized that stereochemical features of elements showing coordination numbers larger than four are responsible for an almost unlimited number of stereochemical possibilities, thus opening a molecular world of new structures. In the beginning of the 21st century, interest in the field rose again considerably, mainly due to the potential of stereoselective catalysis, and the self-assembly of supramolecular structures. An end of these developments is not in sight. Here an abbreviated version of the lecture is given. A PowerPoint(®) file, or a video of the presentation, can be downloaded.

  15. Temperature-induced protein secretion by Leishmania mexicana modulates macrophage signalling and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassani, Kasra; Antoniak, Elisabeth; Jardim, Armando; Olivier, Martin

    2011-05-03

    Protozoan parasites of genus Leishmania are the causative agents of leishmaniasis. These digenetic microorganisms undergo a marked environmental temperature shift (TS) during transmission from the sandfly vector (ambient temperature, 25-26°C) to the mammalian host (37°C). We have observed that this TS induces a rapid and dramatic increase in protein release from Leishmania mexicana (cutaneous leishmaniasis) within 4 h. Proteomic identification of the TS-induced secreted proteins revealed 72 proteins, the majority of which lack a signal peptide and are thus thought to be secreted via nonconventional mechanisms. Interestingly, this protein release is accompanied by alterations in parasite morphology including an augmentation in the budding of exovesicles from its surface. Here we show that the exoproteome of L. mexicana upon TS induces cleavage and activation of the host protein tyrosine phosphatases, specifically SHP-1 and PTP1-B, in a murine bone-marrow-derived macrophage cell line. Furthermore, translocation of prominent inflammatory transcription factors, namely NF-κB and AP-1 is altered. The exoproteome also caused inhibition of nitric oxide production, a crucial leishmanicidal function of the macrophage. Overall, our results provide strong evidence that within early moments of interaction with the mammalian host, L. mexicana rapidly releases proteins and exovesicles that modulate signalling and function of the macrophage. These modulations can result in attenuation of the inflammatory response and deactivation of the macrophage aiding the parasite in the establishment of infection.

  16. Temperature-induced protein secretion by Leishmania mexicana modulates macrophage signalling and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasra Hassani

    Full Text Available Protozoan parasites of genus Leishmania are the causative agents of leishmaniasis. These digenetic microorganisms undergo a marked environmental temperature shift (TS during transmission from the sandfly vector (ambient temperature, 25-26°C to the mammalian host (37°C. We have observed that this TS induces a rapid and dramatic increase in protein release from Leishmania mexicana (cutaneous leishmaniasis within 4 h. Proteomic identification of the TS-induced secreted proteins revealed 72 proteins, the majority of which lack a signal peptide and are thus thought to be secreted via nonconventional mechanisms. Interestingly, this protein release is accompanied by alterations in parasite morphology including an augmentation in the budding of exovesicles from its surface. Here we show that the exoproteome of L. mexicana upon TS induces cleavage and activation of the host protein tyrosine phosphatases, specifically SHP-1 and PTP1-B, in a murine bone-marrow-derived macrophage cell line. Furthermore, translocation of prominent inflammatory transcription factors, namely NF-κB and AP-1 is altered. The exoproteome also caused inhibition of nitric oxide production, a crucial leishmanicidal function of the macrophage. Overall, our results provide strong evidence that within early moments of interaction with the mammalian host, L. mexicana rapidly releases proteins and exovesicles that modulate signalling and function of the macrophage. These modulations can result in attenuation of the inflammatory response and deactivation of the macrophage aiding the parasite in the establishment of infection.

  17. Modulation of the multistate folding of designed TPR proteins through intrinsic and extrinsic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, J J; Javadi, Y; Millership, C; Main, E R G

    2012-03-01

    Tetratricopeptide repeats (TPRs) are a class of all alpha-helical repeat proteins that are comprised of 34-aa helix-turn-helix motifs. These stack together to form nonglobular structures that are stabilized by short-range interactions from residues close in primary sequence. Unlike globular proteins, they have few, if any, long-range nonlocal stabilizing interactions. Several studies on designed TPR proteins have shown that this modular structure is reflected in their folding, that is, modular multistate folding is observed as opposed to two-state folding. Here we show that TPR multistate folding can be suppressed to approximate two-state folding through modulation of intrinsic stability or extrinsic environmental variables. This modulation was investigated by comparing the thermodynamic unfolding under differing buffer regimes of two distinct series of consensus-designed TPR proteins, which possess different intrinsic stabilities. A total of nine proteins of differing sizes and differing consensus TPR motifs were each thermally and chemically denatured and their unfolding monitored using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and CD/fluorescence, respectively. Analyses of both the DSC and chemical denaturation data show that reducing the total stability of each protein and repeat units leads to observable two-state unfolding. These data highlight the intimate link between global and intrinsic repeat stability that governs whether folding proceeds by an observably two-state mechanism, or whether partial unfolding yields stable intermediate structures which retain sufficient stability to be populated at equilibrium.

  18. Characterization of a novel protein-binding module--the WW domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudol, M; Chen, H I; Bougeret, C; Einbond, A; Bork, P

    1995-08-01

    We have identified, characterized and cloned human, mouse and chicken cDNA of a novel protein that binds to the Src homology domain 3 (SH3) of the Yes proto-oncogene product. We subsequently named it YAP for Yes-associated protein. Analysis of the YAP sequence revealed a protein module that was found in various structural, regulatory and signaling molecules. Because one of the prominent features of this sequence motif is the presence of two conserved tryptophans (W), we named it the WW domain. Using a functional screen of a cDNA expression library, we have identified two putative ligands of the WW domain of YAP which we named WBP-1 and WBP-2. Peptide sequence comparison between the two partial clones revealed a homologous proline-rich region. Binding assays and site-specific mutagenesis have shown that the proline-rich motif binds with relatively high affinity and specificity to the WW domain of YAP, with a preliminary consensus that is different from the SH3-binding PXXP motif. This suggests that the WW domain has a role in mediating protein-protein interactions via proline-rich regions, similar but distinct from Src homology 3 (SH3) domains. Based on this finding, we hypothesize that additional protein modules exist and that they could be isolated using proline-rich peptides as functional probes.

  19. Modulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 3 by hepatitis C virus core protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ngo, HT; Pham, Long; Kim, JW;

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is highly dependent on cellular proteins for its own propagation. In order to identify the cellular factors involved in HCV propagation, we performed protein microarray assays using the HCV core protein as a probe. Of ~9,000 host proteins immobilized in a microarray......, approximately 100 cellular proteins were identified as HCV core-interacting partners. Of these candidates, mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 3 (MAPKAPK3) was selected for further characterization. MAPKAPK3 is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is activated by stress and growth...... inducers. Binding of HCV core to MAPKAPK3 was confirmed by in vitro pulldown assay and further verified by coimmunoprecipitation assay. HCV core protein interacted with MAPKAPK3 through amino acid residues 41 to 75 of core and the N-terminal half of kinase domain of MAPKAPK3. In addition, both RNA...

  20. Dual roles of the transmembrane protein p23/TMP21 in the modulation of amyloid precursor protein metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wieland Felix T

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alzheimer's disease (AD is characterized by cerebral deposition of β-amyloid (Aβ peptides. Aβ is released from ectodomain cleaved amyloid precursor protein (APP via intramembranous proteolysis by γ-secretase, a complex consisting of presenilin and a few other proteins. p23/TMP21, a member of the p24 family type I transmembrane proteins, was recently identified as a presenilin complex component capable of modulating γ-secretase cleavage. The p24 family proteins form oligomeric complexes and regulate vesicular trafficking in the early secretory pathway, but their role in APP trafficking has not been investigated. Results Here, we report that siRNA-mediated depletion of p23 in N2a neuroblastoma and HeLa cells produces concomitant knockdown of additional p24 family proteins and increases secretion of sAPP. Furthermore, intact cell and cell-free Aβ production increases following p23 knockdown, similar to data reported earlier using HEK293 cells. However, we find that p23 is not present in mature γ-secretase complexes isolated using an active-site γ-secretase inhibitor. Depletion of p23 and expression of a familial AD-linked PS1 mutant have additive effects on Aβ42 production. Knockdown of p23 expression confers biosynthetic stability to nascent APP, allowing its efficient maturation and surface accumulation. Moreover, immunoisolation analyses show decrease in co-residence of APP and the APP adaptor Mint3. Thus, multiple lines of evidence indicate that p23 function influences APP trafficking and sAPP release independent of its reported role in γ-secretase modulation. Conclusion These data assign significance to p24 family proteins in regulating APP trafficking in the continuum of bidirectional transport between the ER and Golgi, and ascribe new relevance to the regulation of early trafficking in AD pathogenesis.

  1. Amyloid beta modulated the selectivity of heme-catalyzed protein tyrosine nitration: an alternative mechanism for selective protein nitration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Can; Li, Hailing; Gao, Zhonghong

    2012-10-01

    Protein tyrosine nitration is a post-translational modification associated with numerous pathological conditions. The biological consequences of this modification strongly depend on the site selectivity. Unfortunately, to date there is still no reliable model for predicting the selectivity of protein tyrosine nitration. Previously, we found that amyloid beta (Aβ) changed the selectivity of enolase tyrosine nitration upon binding to heme. It seemed that there was a link between the hydrophilicity of Aβ and the site-specific tyrosine nitration. We further investigated the role of the hydrophilicity of the molecules that bind to heme in the selectivity of protein tyrosine nitration. We found that Aβ(1-16), Aβ(1-20), and Aβ(1-40), upon binding to heme and interacting with glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) in a site-specific manner, differently modulated the site selectivity of heme-catalyzed GAPDH tyrosine nitration. The modulation is associated with the hydrophilicity of the Aβ peptides, which changed the surrounding environment of the heme. At the same time, the Aβ-heme complexes were found to be more effective at inactivating GAPDH than heme alone, and the selective tyrosine nitration that was catalyzed by Aβ-heme played an important role. These findings suggest an alternative mechanism for the selectivity of protein tyrosine nitration, which may lead to a better understanding of the factors that influence protein tyrosine nitration selectivity and the important roles of Aβ and heme in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, where Aβ accumulation and Aβ-dependent protein nitration play central roles.

  2. Biophysical insights into how surfaces, including lipid membranes, modulate protein aggregation related to neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen A Burke

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available There are a vast number of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD, Parkinson’s disease (PD, and Huntington’s disease (HD, associated with the rearrangement of specific proteins to non-native conformations that promotes aggregation and deposition within tissues and/or cellular compartments. These diseases are commonly classified as protein misfolding or amyloid diseases. The interaction of these proteins with liquid/surface interfaces is a fundamental phenomenon with potential implications for protein misfolding diseases. Kinetic and thermodynamic studies indicate that significant conformational changes can be induced in proteins encountering surfaces, which can play a critical role in nucleating aggregate formation or stabilizing specific aggregation states. Surfaces of particular interest in neurodegenerative diseases are cellular and subcellular membranes that are predominately comprised of lipid components. The two-dimensional liquid environments provided by lipid bilayers can profoundly alter protein structure and dynamics by both specific and nonspecific interactions. Importantly for misfolding diseases, these bilayer properties can not only modulate protein conformation, but also exert influence on aggregation state. A detailed understanding of the influence of (subcellular surfaces in driving protein aggregation and/or stabilizing specific aggregate forms could provide new insights into toxic mechanisms associated with these diseases. Here, we review the influence of surfaces in driving and stabilizing protein aggregation with a specific emphasis on lipid membranes.

  3. Expression of Yes-associated protein modulates Survivin expression in primary liver malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Haibo; Gayyed, Mariana F; Lam-Himlin, Dora M; Klein, Alison P; Nayar, Suresh K; Xu, Yang; Khan, Mehtab; Argani, Pedram; Pan, Duojia; Anders, Robert A

    2012-09-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma account for 95% of primary liver cancer. For each of these malignancies, the outcome is dismal; incidence is rapidly increasing, and mechanistic understanding is limited. We observed abnormal proliferation of both biliary epithelium and hepatocytes in mice after genetic manipulation of Yes-associated protein, a transcription coactivator. Here, we comprehensively documented Yes-associated protein expression in the human liver and primary liver cancers. We showed that nuclear Yes-associated protein expression is significantly increased in human intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and hepatocellular carcinoma. We found that increased Yes-associated protein levels in hepatocellular carcinoma are due to multiple mechanisms including gene amplification and transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation. Survivin, a member of the inhibitors-of-apoptosis protein family, has been reported as an independent prognostic factor for poor survival in both hepatocellular carcinoma and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. We found that nuclear Yes-associated protein expression correlates significantly with nuclear Survivin expression for both intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and hepatocellular carcinoma. Furthermore, using mice engineered to conditionally overexpress Yes-associated protein in the liver, we found that Survivin messenger RNA expression depends upon Yes-associated protein levels. Our findings suggested that Yes-associated protein contributes to primary liver tumorigenesis and likely mediates its oncogenic effects through modulating Survivin expression.

  4. Muscarinic modulation of sodium current by activation of protein kinase C in rat hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, A R; Ma, J Y; Scheuer, T; Catterall, W A

    1996-05-01

    Phosphorylation of brain Na+ channels by protein kinase C (PKC) decreases peak Na+ current and slows macroscopic inactivation, but receptor-activated modulation of Na+ currents via the PKC pathway has not been demonstrated. We have examined modulation of Na+ channels by activation of muscarinic receptors in acutely-isolated hippocampal neurons using whole-cell voltage-clamp recording. Application of the muscarinic agonist carbachol reduced peak Na+ current and slowed macroscopic inactivation at all potentials, without changing the voltage-dependent properties of the channel. These effects were mediated by PKC, since they were eliminated when the specific PKC inhibitor (PKCI19-36) was included in the pipette solution and mimicked by the extracellular application of the PKC activator, OAG. Thus, activation of endogenous muscarinic receptors on hippocampal neurons strongly modulates Na+ channel activity by activation of PKC. Cholinergic input from basal forebrain neurons may have this effect in the hippocampus in vivo.

  5. LOV Domain-Containing F-Box Proteins:Light-Dependent Protein Degradation Modules in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shogo Ito; Young Hun Song; Takato Imaizumi

    2012-01-01

    Plants constantly survey the surrounding environment using several sets of photoreceptors.They can sense changes in the quantity (=intensity) and quality (=wavelength) of light and use this information to adjust their physiological responses,growth,and developmental patterns.In addition to the classical photoreceptors,such as phytochromes,cryptochromes,and phototropins,ZEITLUPE (ZTL),FLAVIN-BINDING,KELCH REPEAT,F-BOX 1 (FKF1),and LOV KELCH PROTEIN 2 (LKP2) proteins have been recently identified as blue-light photoreceptors that are important for regulation of the circadian clock and photoperiodic flowering.The ZTL/FKF1/LKP2 protein family possesses a unique combination of domains:a blue-light-absorbing LOV (Light,Oxygen,or Voltage) domain along with domains involved in protein degradation.Here,we summarize recent advances in our understanding of the function of the Arabidopsis ZTL/FKF1/LKP2 proteins.We summarize the distinct photochemical properties of their LOV domains and discuss the molecular mechanisms by which the ZTL/FKF1/LKP2 proteins regulate the circadian clock and photoperiodic flowering by controlling blue-light-dependent protein degradation.

  6. Reishi immuno-modulation protein induces interleukin-2 expression via protein kinase-dependent signaling pathways within human T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hsien-Yeh; Hua, Kuo-Feng; Wu, Wei-Chi; Hsu, Jason; Weng, Shih-Ting; Lin, Tsai-Leng; Liu, Chun-Yi; Hseu, Ruey-Shyang; Huang, Ching-Tsan

    2008-04-01

    Ganoderma lucidum, a medicinal fungus is thought to possess and enhance a variety of human immune functions. An immuno-modulatory protein, Ling Zhi-8 (LZ-8) isolated from G. lucidum exhibited potent mitogenic effects upon human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL). However, LZ-8-mediated signal transduction in the regulation of interleukin-2 (IL-2) gene expression within human T cells is largely unknown. Here we cloned the LZ-8 gene of G. lucidum, and expressed the recombinant LZ-8 protein (rLZ-8) by means of a yeast Pichia pastoris protein expression system. We found that rLZ-8 induces IL-2 gene expression via the Src-family protein tyrosine kinase (PTK), via reactive oxygen species (ROS), and differential protein kinase-dependent pathways within human primary T cells and cultured Jurkat T cells. In essence, we have established the nature of the rLZ-8-mediated signal-transduction pathways, such as PTK/protein kinase C (PKC)/ROS, PTK/PLC/PKCalpha/ERK1/2, and PTK/PLC/PKCalpha/p38 pathways in the regulation of IL-2 gene expression within human T cells. Our current results of analyzing rLZ-8-mediated signal transduction in T cells might provide a potential application for rLZ-8 as a pharmacological immune-modulating agent.

  7. Single-step affinity purification of recombinant proteins using a self-excising module from Neisseria meningitidis FrpC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadilkova, Lenka; Osicka, Radim; Sulc, Miroslav; Linhartova, Irena; Novak, Petr; Sebo, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Purification of recombinant proteins is often a challenging process involving several chromatographic steps that must be optimized for each target protein. Here, we developed a self-excising module allowing single-step affinity chromatography purification of untagged recombinant proteins. It consists of a 250-residue-long self-processing module of the Neisseria meningitidis FrpC protein with a C-terminal affinity tag. The N terminus of the module is fused to the C terminus of a target protein of interest. Upon binding of the fusion protein to an affinity matrix from cell lysate and washing out contaminating proteins, site-specific cleavage of the Asp–Pro bond linking the target protein to the self-excising module is induced by calcium ions. This results in the release of the target protein with only a single aspartic acid residue added at the C terminus, while the self-excising affinity module remains trapped on the affinity matrix. The system was successfully tested with several target proteins, including glutathione-S-transferase, maltose-binding protein, β-galactosidase, chloramphenicol acetyltransferase, and adenylate cyclase, and two different affinity tags, chitin-binding domain or poly-His. Moreover, it was demonstrated that it can be applied as an alternative to two currently existing systems, based on the self-splicing intein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and sortase A of Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:18662906

  8. Modulating protein interaction on a molecular and Microstructural level for texture control in protein based gels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin, A.H.; Baigts Allende, D.; Munialo, C.D.; Urbonaite, V.; Pouvreau, L.A.M.; Jongh, de H.H.J.

    2014-01-01

    The exploration of microstructures and textures of protein based systems is essential to understand (oral) breakdown properties and thereby textural aspects, or macroscopic functionalities such as water holding. Upon structure breakdown, the applied energy (W) is primarily directed towards fracture

  9. A fast iterative-clique percolation method for identifying functional modules in protein interaction networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Penggang SUN; Lin GAO

    2009-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that biological systems are composed of interacting, separable, functional modules-groups of vertices within which connections are dense but between which they are sparse. Identifying these modules is likely through capturing the biologically mean-ingful interactions. In recent years, many algorithms have been developed for detecting such structures. These al-gorithms, however, are computationally demanding, which limits their applications. In this paper, we propose a fast iterative-clique percolation method (ICPM) for identifying overlapping functional modules in protein-protein interac-tion (PPI) networks. Our method is based on clique percola-tion method (CPM), and it not only considers the degree of nodes to minimize the search space (the vertices in k-cliques must have the degree of k - 1 at least), but also converts k-cliques to (k - 1)-cliques. It finds k-cliques by append-ing one node to (k - 1)-cliques. By testing our method on PPI networks, our analysis of the yeast PPI network suggeststhat most of these modules have well-supported biological significance.

  10. PINCH proteins regulate cardiac contractility by modulating integrin-linked kinase-protein kinase B signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meder, Benjamin; Huttner, Inken G; Sedaghat-Hamedani, Farbod; Just, Steffen; Dahme, Tillman; Frese, Karen S; Vogel, Britta; Köhler, Doreen; Kloos, Wanda; Rudloff, Jessica; Marquart, Sabine; Katus, Hugo A; Rottbauer, Wolfgang

    2011-08-01

    Integrin-linked kinase (ILK) is an essential component of the cardiac mechanical stretch sensor and is bound in a protein complex with parvin and PINCH proteins, the so-called ILK-PINCH-parvin (IPP) complex. We have recently shown that inactivation of ILK or β-parvin activity leads to heart failure in zebrafish via reduced protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) activation. Here, we show that PINCH proteins localize at sarcomeric Z disks and costameres in the zebrafish heart and skeletal muscle. To investigate the in vivo role of PINCH proteins for IPP complex stability and PKB signaling within the vertebrate heart, we inactivated PINCH1 and PINCH2 in zebrafish. Inactivation of either PINCH isoform independently leads to instability of ILK, loss of stretch-responsive anf and vegf expression, and progressive heart failure. The predominant cause of heart failure in PINCH morphants seems to be loss of PKB activity, since PKB phosphorylation at serine 473 is significantly reduced in PINCH-deficient hearts and overexpression of constitutively active PKB reconstitutes cardiac function in PINCH morphants. These findings highlight the essential function of PINCH proteins in controlling cardiac contractility by granting IPP/PKB-mediated signaling.

  11. Protein interactions of the MLL PHD fingers modulate MLL target gene regulation in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fair, K; Anderson, M; Bulanova, E; Mi, H; Tropschug, M; Diaz, M O

    2001-05-01

    The PHD fingers of the human MLL and Drosophila trx proteins have strong amino acid sequence conservation but their function is unknown. We have determined that these fingers mediate homodimerization and binding of MLL to Cyp33, a nuclear cyclophilin. These two proteins interact in vitro and in vivo in mammalian cells and colocalize at specific nuclear subdomains. Overexpression of the Cyp33 protein in leukemia cells results in altered expression of HOX genes that are targets for regulation by MLL. These alterations are suppressed by cyclosporine and are not observed in cell lines that express a mutant MLL protein without PHD fingers. These results suggest that binding of Cyp33 to MLL modulates its effects on the expression of target genes.

  12. Dimerization of complement factor H-related proteins modulates complement activation in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goicoechea de Jorge, Elena; Caesar, Joseph J E; Malik, Talat H; Patel, Mitali; Colledge, Matthew; Johnson, Steven; Hakobyan, Svetlana; Morgan, B Paul; Harris, Claire L; Pickering, Matthew C; Lea, Susan M

    2013-03-19

    The complement system is a key component regulation influences susceptibility to age-related macular degeneration, meningitis, and kidney disease. Variation includes genomic rearrangements within the complement factor H-related (CFHR) locus. Elucidating the mechanism underlying these associations has been hindered by the lack of understanding of the biological role of CFHR proteins. Here we present unique structural data demonstrating that three of the CFHR proteins contain a shared dimerization motif and that this hitherto unrecognized structural property enables formation of both homodimers and heterodimers. Dimerization confers avidity for tissue-bound complement fragments and enables these proteins to efficiently compete with the physiological complement inhibitor, complement factor H (CFH), for ligand binding. Our data demonstrate that these CFHR proteins function as competitive antagonists of CFH to modulate complement activation in vivo and explain why variation in the CFHRs predisposes to disease.

  13. Erythropoietin Modulates the Structure of Bone Morphogenetic Protein 2–Engineered Cranial Bone

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Hongli; Jung, Younghun; Shiozawa, Yusuke; Taichman, Russell S.; Krebsbach, Paul H.

    2012-01-01

    The ideally engineered bone should have similar structural and functional properties to the native tissue. Although structural integrity is critical for functional bone regeneration, we know less about modulating the structural properties of the engineered bone elicited by bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) than efficacy and safety. Erythropoietin (Epo), a primary erythropoietic hormone, has been used to augment blood transfusion in orthopedic surgery. However, the effects of Epo on bone regene...

  14. Encapsulated Cellular Implants for Recombinant Protein Delivery and Therapeutic Modulation of the Immune System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélien Lathuilière

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Ex vivo gene therapy using retrievable encapsulated cellular implants is an effective strategy for the local and/or chronic delivery of therapeutic proteins. In particular, it is considered an innovative approach to modulate the activity of the immune system. Two recently proposed therapeutic schemes using genetically engineered encapsulated cells are discussed here: the chronic administration of monoclonal antibodies for passive immunization against neurodegenerative diseases and the local delivery of a cytokine as an adjuvant for anti-cancer vaccines.

  15. An allosteric modulator to control endogenous G protein-coupled receptors with light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittolo, Silvia; Gómez-Santacana, Xavier; Eckelt, Kay; Rovira, Xavier; Dalton, James; Goudet, Cyril; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Llobet, Artur; Giraldo, Jesús; Llebaria, Amadeu; Gorostiza, Pau

    2014-10-01

    Controlling drug activity with light offers the possibility of enhancing pharmacological selectivity with spatial and temporal regulation, thus enabling highly localized therapeutic effects and precise dosing patterns. Here we report on the development and characterization of what is to our knowledge the first photoswitchable allosteric modulator of a G protein-coupled receptor. Alloswitch-1 is selective for the metabotropic glutamate receptor mGlu5 and enables the optical control of endogenous mGlu5 receptors.

  16. Deciphering and modulating G protein signalling in C. elegans using the DREADD technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prömel, Simone; Fiedler, Franziska; Binder, Claudia; Winkler, Jana; Schöneberg, Torsten; Thor, Doreen

    2016-01-01

    G-protein signalling is an evolutionary conserved concept highlighting its fundamental impact on developmental and functional processes. Studies on the effects of G protein signals on tissues as well as an entire organism are often conducted in Caenorhabditis elegans. To understand and control dynamics and kinetics of the processes involved, pharmacological modulation of specific G protein pathways would be advantageous, but is difficult due to a lack in accessibility and regulation. To provide this option, we designed G protein-coupled receptor-based designer receptors (DREADDs) for C. elegans. Initially described in mammalian systems, these modified muscarinic acetylcholine receptors are activated by the inert drug clozapine-N-oxide, but not by their endogenous agonists. We report a novel C. elegans-specific DREADD, functionally expressed and specifically activating Gq-protein signalling in vitro and in vivo which we used for modulating mating behaviour. Therefore, this novel designer receptor demonstrates the possibility to pharmacologically control physiological functions in C. elegans. PMID:27461895

  17. Pili-like proteins of Akkermansia muciniphila modulate host immune responses and gut barrier function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reunanen, Justus; Meijerink, Marjolein; Pietilä, Taija E.; Kainulainen, Veera; Klievink, Judith; Huuskonen, Laura; Aalvink, Steven; Skurnik, Mikael; Boeren, Sjef; Satokari, Reetta; Mercenier, Annick; Palva, Airi; Smidt, Hauke; de Vos, Willem M.; Belzer, Clara

    2017-01-01

    Gut barrier function is key in maintaining a balanced response between the host and its microbiome. The microbiota can modulate changes in gut barrier as well as metabolic and inflammatory responses. This highly complex system involves numerous microbiota-derived factors. The gut symbiont Akkermansia muciniphila is positively correlated with a lean phenotype, reduced body weight gain, amelioration of metabolic responses and restoration of gut barrier function by modulation of mucus layer thickness. However, the molecular mechanisms behind its metabolic and immunological regulatory properties are unexplored. Herein, we identify a highly abundant outer membrane pili-like protein of A. muciniphila MucT that is directly involved in immune regulation and enhancement of trans-epithelial resistance. The purified Amuc_1100 protein and enrichments containing all its associated proteins induced production of specific cytokines through activation of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and TLR4. This mainly leads to high levels of IL-10 similar to those induced by the other beneficial immune suppressive microorganisms such as Faecalibacterium prausnitzii A2-165 and Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1. Together these results indicate that outer membrane protein composition and particularly the newly identified highly abundant pili-like protein Amuc_1100 of A. muciniphila are involved in host immunological homeostasis at the gut mucosa, and improvement of gut barrier function. PMID:28249045

  18. Protein conformational modulation by photons: a mechanism for laser treatment effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebert, Ann D; Bicknell, Brian T; Adams, Roger D

    2014-03-01

    Responsiveness to low-level laser treatment (LLTT) at a wavelength of 450-910 nm has established it as an effective treatment of medical, veterinary and dental chronic pain, chronic inflammation conditions (arthritis and macular degeneration), wound repair, and lymphoedema, yet the mechanisms underlying the effectiveness of LLLT remain unclear. However, there is now sufficient evidence from recent research to propose an integrated model of LLLT action. The hypothesis presented in this paper is that external applications of photons (through laser at an appropriate dose) modulates the nervous system through an integrated mechanism. This stimulated mechanism involves protein-to-protein interaction, where two or more proteins bind together to facilitate molecular processes, including modification of proteins by members of SUMO (small ubiquitin-related modifier proteins) and also protein phosphorylation and tyrosination. SUMO has been shown to have a role in multiple nuclear and perinuclear targets, including ion channels, and in the maintenance of telomeres and the post-translational modification of genes. The consequence of laser application in treatment, therefore, can be seen as influencing the transmission of neural information via an integrated and rapid modulation of ion channels, achieved through both direct action on photo-acceptors (such as cytochrome c-oxidase) and through indirect modulation via enzymes, including tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), tyrosine kinases and tyrosine kinase receptors. This exogenous action then facilitates an existing photonic biomodulation mechanism within the body, and initiates ion channel modulation both in the periphery and the central nervous system (CNS). Evidence indicates that the ion channel modulation functions predominately through the potassium channels, including two pore leak channels (K2P), which act as signal integrators from the periphery to the cortex. Photonic action also transforms SUMOylation processes at the cell

  19. The DNA repair endonuclease XPG interacts directly and functionally with the WRN helicase defective in Werner syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trego, Kelly S.; Chernikova, Sophia B.; Davalos, Albert R.; Perry, J. Jefferson P.; Finger, L. David; Ng, Cliff; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Yannone, Steven M.; Tainer, John A.; Campisi, Judith; Cooper, Priscilla K.

    2011-04-20

    XPG is a structure-specific endonuclease required for nucleotide excision repair (NER). XPG incision defects result in the cancer-prone syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum, whereas truncating mutations of XPG cause the severe postnatal progeroid developmental disorder Cockayne syndrome. We show that XPG interacts directly with WRN protein, which is defective in the premature aging disorder Werner syndrome, and that the two proteins undergo similar sub-nuclear redistribution in S-phase and co-localize in nuclear foci. The co-localization was observed in mid- to late-S-phase, when WRN moves from nucleoli to nuclear foci that have been shown to contain protein markers of both stalled replication forks and telomeric proteins. We mapped the interaction between XPG and WRN to the C-terminal domains of each and show that interaction with the C-terminal domain of XPG strongly stimulates WRN helicase activity. WRN also possesses a competing DNA single-strand annealing activity that, combined with unwinding, has been shown to coordinate regression of model replication forks to form Holliday junction/chicken foot intermediate structures. We tested whether XPG stimulated WRN annealing activity and found that XPG itself has intrinsic strand annealing activity that requires the unstructured R- and C-terminal domains, but not the conserved catalytic core or endonuclease activity. Annealing by XPG is cooperative, rather than additive, with WRN annealing. Taken together, our results suggest a novel function for XPG in S-phase that is at least in part carried out coordinately with WRN, and which may contribute to the severity of the phenotypes that occur upon loss of XPG.

  20. Brucella Modulates Secretory Trafficking via Multiple Type IV Secretion Effector Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myeni, Sebenzile; Child, Robert; Ng, Tony W.; Kupko, John J.; Wehrly, Tara D.; Porcella, Stephen F.; Knodler, Leigh A.; Celli, Jean

    2013-01-01

    The intracellular pathogenic bacterium Brucella generates a replicative vacuole (rBCV) derived from the endoplasmic reticulum via subversion of the host cell secretory pathway. rBCV biogenesis requires the expression of the Type IV secretion system (T4SS) VirB, which is thought to translocate effector proteins that modulate membrane trafficking along the endocytic and secretory pathways. To date, only a few T4SS substrates have been identified, whose molecular functions remain unknown. Here, we used an in silico screen to identify putative T4SS effector candidate proteins using criteria such as limited homology in other bacterial genera, the presence of features similar to known VirB T4SS effectors, GC content and presence of eukaryotic-like motifs. Using β-lactamase and CyaA adenylate cyclase reporter assays, we identified eleven proteins translocated into host cells by Brucella, five in a VirB T4SS-dependent manner, namely BAB1_0678 (BspA), BAB1_0712 (BspB), BAB1_0847 (BspC), BAB1_1671 (BspE) and BAB1_1948 (BspF). A subset of the translocated proteins targeted secretory pathway compartments when ectopically expressed in HeLa cells, and the VirB effectors BspA, BspB and BspF inhibited protein secretion. Brucella infection also impaired host protein secretion in a process requiring BspA, BspB and BspF. Single or combined deletions of bspA, bspB and bspF affected Brucella ability to replicate in macrophages and persist in the liver of infected mice. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that Brucella modulates secretory trafficking via multiple T4SS effector proteins that likely act coordinately to promote Brucella pathogenesis. PMID:23950720

  1. The Ribosomal Protein uL22 Modulates the Shape of the Protein Exit Tunnel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wekselman, Itai; Zimmerman, Ella; Davidovich, Chen

    2017-01-01

    Erythromycin is a clinically useful antibiotic that binds to an rRNA pocket in the ribosomal exit tunnel. Commonly, resistance to erythromycin is acquired by alterations of rRNA nucleotides that interact with the drug. Mutations in the β hairpin of ribosomal protein uL22, which is rather distal t...

  2. Protein thermal denaturation is modulated by central residues in the protein structure network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Valquiria P; Ikegami, Cecília M; Arantes, Guilherme M; Marana, Sandro R

    2016-03-01

    Network structural analysis, known as residue interaction networks or graphs (RIN or RIG, respectively) or protein structural networks or graphs (PSN or PSG, respectively), comprises a useful tool for detecting important residues for protein function, stability, folding and allostery. In RIN, the tertiary structure is represented by a network in which residues (nodes) are connected by interactions (edges). Such structural networks have consistently presented a few central residues that are important for shortening the pathways linking any two residues in a protein structure. To experimentally demonstrate that central residues effectively participate in protein properties, mutations were directed to seven central residues of the β-glucosidase Sfβgly (β-D-glucoside glucohydrolase; EC 3.2.1.21). These mutations reduced the thermal stability of the enzyme, as evaluated by changes in transition temperature (Tm ) and the denaturation rate at 45 °C. Moreover, mutations directed to the vicinity of a central residue also caused significant decreases in the Tm of Sfβgly and clearly increased the unfolding rate constant at 45 °C. However, mutations at noncentral residues or at surrounding residues did not affect the thermal stability of Sfβgly. Therefore, the data reported in the present study suggest that the perturbation of the central residues reduced the stability of the native structure of Sfβgly. These results are in agreement with previous findings showing that networks are robust, whereas attacks on central nodes cause network failure. Finally, the present study demonstrates that central residues underlie the functional properties of proteins.

  3. Application of TZERO calibrated modulated temperature differential scanning calorimetry to characterize model protein formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badkar, Aniket; Yohannes, Paulos; Banga, Ajay

    2006-02-17

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using T(ZERO) modulated temperature differential scanning calorimetry (MDSC) as a novel technique to characterize protein solutions using lysozyme as a model protein and IgG as a model monoclonal antibody. MDSC involves the application of modulated heating program, along with the standard heating program that enables the separation of overlapping thermal transitions. Although characterization of unfolding transitions for protein solutions requires the application of high sensitive DSC, separation of overlapping transitions like aggregation and other exothermic events may be possible only by use of MDSC. A newer T(ZERO) calibrated MDSC model from TA instruments that has improved sensitivity than previous models was used. MDSC analysis showed total, reversing and non-reversing heat flow signals. Total heat flow signals showed a combination of melting endotherms and overlapping exothermic events. Under the operating conditions used, the melting endotherms were seen in reversing heat flow signal while the exothermic events were seen in non-reversing heat flow signal. This enabled the separation of overlapping thermal transitions, improved data analysis and decreased baseline noise. MDSC was used here for characterization of lysozyme solutions, but its feasibility for characterizing therapeutic protein solutions needs further assessment.

  4. Effects of Protein-pheromone Complexation on Correlated Chemical Shift Modulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perazzolo, Chiara; Wist, Julien [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Institut des Sciences et Ingenierie Chimiques (Switzerland); Loth, Karine; Poggi, Luisa [Ecole Normale Superieure, Departement de chimie, associe au CNRS (France); Homans, Steve [University of Leeds, School of Biochemistry and Microbiology (United Kingdom); Bodenhausen, Geoffrey [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Institut des Sciences et Ingenierie Chimiques (Switzerland)], E-mail: Geoffrey.Bodenhausen@ens.fr

    2005-12-15

    Major urinary protein (MUP) is a pheromone-carrying protein of the lipocalin family. Previous studies by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) show that the affinity of MUP for the pheromone 2-methoxy-3-isobutylpyrazine (IBMP) is mainly driven by enthalpy, with a small unfavourable entropic contribution. Entropic terms can be attributed in part to changes in internal motions of the protein upon binding. Slow internal motions can lead to correlated or anti-correlated modulations of the isotropic chemical shifts of carbonyl C' and amide N nuclei. Correlated chemical shift modulations (CSM/CSM) in MUP have been determined by measuring differences of the transverse relaxation rates of zero- and double-quantum coherences ZQC{l_brace}C'N{r_brace} and DQC{l_brace}C'N{r_brace}, and by accounting for the effects of correlated fluctuations of dipole-dipole couplings (DD/DD) and chemical shift anisotropies (CSA/CSA). The latter can be predicted from tensor parameters of C' and N nuclei that have been determined in earlier work. The effects of complexation on slow time-scale protein dynamics can be determined by comparing the temperature dependence of the relaxation rates of APO-MUP (i.e., without ligand) and HOLO-MUP (i.e., with IBMP as a ligand)

  5. IQGAP1 Binds to Yes-associated Protein (YAP) and Modulates Its Transcriptional Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayedyahossein, Samar; Li, Zhigang; Hedman, Andrew C; Morgan, Chase J; Sacks, David B

    2016-09-09

    During development, the Hippo signaling pathway regulates key physiological processes, such as control of organ size, regeneration, and stem cell biology. Yes-associated protein (YAP) is a major transcriptional co-activator of the Hippo pathway. The scaffold protein IQGAP1 interacts with more than 100 binding partners to integrate diverse signaling pathways. In this study, we report that IQGAP1 binds to YAP and modulates its activity. IQGAP1 and YAP co-immunoprecipitated from cells. In vitro analysis with pure proteins demonstrated a direct interaction between IQGAP1 and YAP. Analysis with multiple fragments of each protein showed that the interaction occurs via the IQ domain of IQGAP1 and the TEAD-binding domain of YAP. The interaction between IQGAP1 and YAP has functional effects. Knock-out of endogenous IQGAP1 significantly increased the formation of nuclear YAP-TEAD complexes. Transcription assays were performed with IQGAP1-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts and HEK293 cells with IQGAP1 knockdown by CRISPR/Cas9. Quantification demonstrated that YAP-TEAD-mediated transcription in cells lacking IQGAP1 was significantly greater than in control cells. These data reveal that IQGAP1 binds to YAP and modulates its co-transcriptional function, suggesting that IQGAP1 participates in Hippo signaling. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. IQGAP1 Binds to Yes-associated Protein (YAP) and Modulates Its Transcriptional Activity *

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayedyahossein, Samar; Li, Zhigang; Hedman, Andrew C.; Morgan, Chase J.

    2016-01-01

    During development, the Hippo signaling pathway regulates key physiological processes, such as control of organ size, regeneration, and stem cell biology. Yes-associated protein (YAP) is a major transcriptional co-activator of the Hippo pathway. The scaffold protein IQGAP1 interacts with more than 100 binding partners to integrate diverse signaling pathways. In this study, we report that IQGAP1 binds to YAP and modulates its activity. IQGAP1 and YAP co-immunoprecipitated from cells. In vitro analysis with pure proteins demonstrated a direct interaction between IQGAP1 and YAP. Analysis with multiple fragments of each protein showed that the interaction occurs via the IQ domain of IQGAP1 and the TEAD-binding domain of YAP. The interaction between IQGAP1 and YAP has functional effects. Knock-out of endogenous IQGAP1 significantly increased the formation of nuclear YAP-TEAD complexes. Transcription assays were performed with IQGAP1-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts and HEK293 cells with IQGAP1 knockdown by CRISPR/Cas9. Quantification demonstrated that YAP-TEAD-mediated transcription in cells lacking IQGAP1 was significantly greater than in control cells. These data reveal that IQGAP1 binds to YAP and modulates its co-transcriptional function, suggesting that IQGAP1 participates in Hippo signaling. PMID:27440047

  7. Diversity-oriented synthetic strategy for developing a chemical modulator of protein-protein interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jonghoon; Jung, Jinjoo; Koo, Jaeyoung; Cho, Wansang; Lee, Won Seok; Kim, Chanwoo; Park, Wonwoo; Park, Seung Bum

    2016-10-01

    Diversity-oriented synthesis (DOS) can provide a collection of diverse and complex drug-like small molecules, which is critical in the development of new chemical probes for biological research of undruggable targets. However, the design and synthesis of small-molecule libraries with improved biological relevance as well as maximized molecular diversity represent a key challenge. Herein, we employ functional group-pairing strategy for the DOS of a chemical library containing privileged substructures, pyrimidodiazepine or pyrimidine moieties, as chemical navigators towards unexplored bioactive chemical space. To validate the utility of this DOS library, we identify a new small-molecule inhibitor of leucyl-tRNA synthetase-RagD protein-protein interaction, which regulates the amino acid-dependent activation of mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 signalling pathway. This work highlights that privileged substructure-based DOS strategy can be a powerful research tool for the construction of drug-like compounds to address challenging biological targets.

  8. Modulation of neurite branching by protein phosphorylation in cultured rat hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audesirk, G; Cabell, L; Kern, M

    1997-09-20

    The control of branching of axons and dendrites is poorly understood. It has been hypothesized that branching may be produced by changes in the cytoskeleton [F.J. Diez-Guerra, J. Avila, MAP2 phosphorylation parallels dendrite arborization in hippocampal neurones in culture, NeuroReport 4 (1993) 412-419; P. Friedrich, A. Aszodi, MAP2: a sensitive cross-linker and adjustable spacer in dendritic architecture, FEBS Lett. 295 (1991) 5-9]. The assembly and stability of microtubules, which are prominent cytoskeletal elements in both axons and dendrites, are regulated by microtubule-associated proteins, including tau (predominantly found in axons) and MAP2 (predominantly found in dendrites). The phosphorylation state of tau and MAP2 modulates their interactions with microtubules. In their low-phosphorylation states, tau and MAP2 bind to microtubules and increase microtubule assembly and/or stability. Increased phosphorylation decreases these effects. Diez-Guerra and Avila [F.J. Diez-Guerra, J. Avila, MAP2 phosphorylation parallels dendrite arborization in hippocampal neurones in culture, NeuroReport 4 (1993) 412-419] found that protein phosphorylation correlates with neurite branching in cultured rat hippocampal neurons, and hypothesized that increased protein phosphorylation stimulates neurite branching. To test this hypothesis, we cultured rat hippocampal neurons in the presence of specific modulators of serine-threonine protein kinases and phosphatases. Inhibitors of several protein kinases, which would be expected to decrease protein phosphorylation, reduced branching. KT5720, an inhibitor of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase, and KN62, an inhibitor of Ca(2+)-calmodulin-dependent protein kinases, inhibited branching of both axons and dendrites. Calphostin C and chelerythrine, inhibitors of protein kinase C, inhibited branching of axons but not dendrites. Treatments that would be expected to increase protein phosphorylation, including inhibitors of protein

  9. STAT3-Interacting Proteins as Modulators of Transcription Factor Function: Implications to Targeted Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Jennifer E; Frank, David A

    2016-04-19

    The oncogenic transcription factor STAT3 is inappropriately activated in multiple hematopoietic and solid malignancies, in which it drives the expression of genes involved in cell proliferation, differentiation, survival, and angiogenesis. Thus far, strategies to inhibit the function of STAT3 have focused on blocking the function of its activating kinases or sequestering its DNA binding ability. A less well-explored aspect of STAT3 function is its interaction with other proteins, which can modulate the oncogenic activity of STAT3 via its subcellular localization, DNA binding ability, and recruitment of transcriptional machinery. Herein we summarize what is currently known about STAT3-interacting proteins and describe the utility of a proteomics-based approach for successfully identifying and characterizing novel STAT3-interacting proteins that affect STAT3 transcriptional activity and oncogenic function.

  10. An efficient method for the purification of proteins from four distinct toxin-antitoxin modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterckx, Yann G-J; De Gieter, Steven; Zorzini, Valentina; Hadži, San; Haesaerts, Sarah; Loris, Remy; Garcia-Pino, Abel

    2015-04-01

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) modules are stress response elements that are ubiquitous in the genomes of bacteria and archaea. Production and subsequent purification of individual TA proteins is anything but straightforward as over-expression of the toxin gene is lethal to bacterial and eukaryotic cells and over-production of the antitoxin leads to its proteolytic degradation because of its inherently unstructured nature. Here we describe an effective production and purification strategy centered on an on-column denaturant-induced dissociation of the toxin-antitoxin complex. The success of the method is demonstrated by its application on four different TA families, encoding proteins with distinct activities and folds. A series of biophysical and in vitro activity tests show that the purified proteins are of high quality and suitable for structural studies.

  11. Acute exercise modulates BDNF and pro-BDNF protein content in immune cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunelli, Andrea; Dimauro, Ivan; Sgrò, Paolo; Emerenziani, Gian Pietro; Magi, Fiorenza; Baldari, Carlo; Guidetti, Laura; Di Luigi, Luigi; Parisi, Paolo; Caporossi, Daniela

    2012-10-01

    Although several studies have shown that immune cells stimulated by in vitro stress are capable to produce neurotrophins, there is still no evidence whether physiological stress, such as exercise, can modulate the in vivo levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). This work investigated whether acute exercise modulates the expression of BDNF, pro-BDNF, and p75(NTR) in the PBMCs of 10 healthy young men who performed a cycling incremental test to exhaustion (MAX) or exercised at individual anaerobic threshold (IAT). The PBMC expression of stress response proteins and the level of circulating BDNF, vascular endothelial growth growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor subunit B, basic fibroblast growth factor pro-inflammatory, and anti-inflammatory cytokines were analyzed as well. A major finding is that both sessions of acute exercise regulated the content of BDNF isoforms within PBMCs in a manner related to the physiological stress exerted. Although the pro-BDNF increased after both MAX and IAT protocols, BDNF showed a kinetics dependent on exercise type: MAX induced a 54% protein increase immediately after exercise, followed by a significant drop 60 min after its conclusion (38% lower than the baseline). Differently, in the IAT, BDNF increased significantly up to 75% from the baseline throughout the recovery phase. All physiological parameters, as well as the p75(NTR) receptor and the stress-inducible proteins, were also differently regulated by the two exercise conditions. These data supported the hypothesis that PBMCs might produce and secrete BDNF isoforms, as well as modulate the proteins p75(NTR) , Bcl-xL, hsp90, hsp27, and αB-crystallin, as part of the physiological stress response induced by acute exercise, offering a novel example of bidirectional interaction between nervous and immune systems.

  12. Cycle modulation of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 1 in human endometrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corleta H.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Endometrium is one of the fastest growing human tissues. Sex hormones, estrogen and progesterone, in interaction with several growth factors, control its growth and differentiation. Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1 interacts with cell surface receptors and also with specific soluble binding proteins. IGF-binding proteins (IGF-BP have been shown to modulate IGF-1 action. Of six known isoforms, IGF-BP-1 has been characterized as a marker produced by endometrial stromal cells in the late secretory phase and in the decidua. In the current study, IGF-1-BP concentration and affinity in the proliferative and secretory phase of the menstrual cycle were measured. Endometrial samples were from patients of reproductive age with regular menstrual cycles and taking no steroid hormones. Cytosolic fractions were prepared and binding of 125I-labeled IGF-1 performed. Cross-linking reaction products were analyzed by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (7.5% followed by autoradiography. 125I-IGF-1 affinity to cytosolic proteins was not statistically different between the proliferative and secretory endometrium. An approximately 35-kDa binding protein was identified when 125I-IGF-1 was cross-linked to cytosol proteins. Secretory endometrium had significantly more IGF-1-BP when compared to proliferative endometrium. The specificity of the cross-linking process was evaluated by the addition of 100 nM unlabeled IGF-1 or insulin. Unlabeled IGF-1 totally abolished the radioactivity from the band, indicating specific binding. Insulin had no apparent effect on the intensity of the labeled band. These results suggest that IGF-BP could modulate the action of IGF-1 throughout the menstrual cycle. It would be interesting to study this binding protein in other pathologic conditions of the endometrium such as adenocarcinomas and hyperplasia.

  13. Topology Engineering of Proteins in Vivo Using Genetically Encoded, Mechanically Interlocking SpyX Modules for Enhanced Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Recombinant proteins are traditionally limited to linear configuration. Herein, we report in vivo protein topology engineering using highly efficient, mechanically interlocking SpyX modules named AXB and BXA. SpyX modules are protein domains composed of p53dim (X), SpyTag (A), and SpyCatcher (B). The p53dim guides the intertwining of the two nascent protein chains followed by autocatalytic isopeptide bond formation between SpyTag and SpyCatcher to fulfill the interlocking, leading to a variety of backbone topologies. Direct expression of AXB or BXA produces protein catenanes with distinct ring sizes. Recombinant proteins containing SpyX modules are obtained either as mechanically interlocked obligate dimers if the protein of interest is fused to the N- or C-terminus of SpyX modules, or as star proteins if the protein is fused to both N- and C-termini. As examples, cellular syntheses of dimers of (GB1)2 (where GB1 stands for immunoglobulin-binding domain B1 of streptococcal protein G) and of four-arm elastin-like star proteins were demonstrated. Comparison of the catenation efficiencies in different constructs reveals that BXA is generally much more effective than AXB, which is rationalized by the arrangement of three domains in space. Mechanical interlocking induces considerable stability enhancement. Both AXB and BXA have a melting point ∼20 °C higher than the linear controls and the BXA catenane has a melting point ~2 °C higher than the cyclic control BX’A. Notably, four-arm elastin-like star proteins demonstrate remarkable tolerance against trypsin digestion. The SpyX modules provide a convenient and versatile approach to construct unconventional protein topologies via the “assembly-reaction” synergy, which opens a new horizon in protein science for stability enhancement and function reinforcement via topology engineering. PMID:28573210

  14. Cellular differentiation state modulates the mRNA export activity of SR proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botti, Valentina; McNicoll, François; Steiner, Michaela C; Richter, Florian M; Solovyeva, Anfisa; Wegener, Marius; Schwich, Oliver D; Poser, Ina; Zarnack, Kathi; Wittig, Ilka; Neugebauer, Karla M; Müller-McNicoll, Michaela

    2017-07-03

    SR proteins function in nuclear pre-mRNA processing, mRNA export, and translation. To investigate their cellular dynamics, we developed a quantitative assay, which detects differences in nucleocytoplasmic shuttling among seven canonical SR protein family members. As expected, SRSF2 and SRSF5 shuttle poorly in HeLa cells but surprisingly display considerable shuttling in pluripotent murine P19 cells. Combining individual-resolution cross-linking and immunoprecipitation (iCLIP) and mass spectrometry, we show that elevated arginine methylation of SRSF5 and lower phosphorylation levels of cobound SRSF2 enhance shuttling of SRSF5 in P19 cells by modulating protein-protein and protein-RNA interactions. Moreover, SRSF5 is bound to pluripotency-specific transcripts such as Lin28a and Pou5f1/Oct4 in the cytoplasm. SRSF5 depletion reduces and overexpression increases their cytoplasmic mRNA levels, suggesting that enhanced mRNA export by SRSF5 is required for the expression of pluripotency factors. Remarkably, neural differentiation of P19 cells leads to dramatically reduced SRSF5 shuttling. Our findings indicate that posttranslational modification of SR proteins underlies the regulation of their mRNA export activities and distinguishes pluripotent from differentiated cells. © 2017 Botti et al.

  15. Pharmacological activation of CB1 receptor modulates long term potentiation by interfering with protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navakkode, Sheeja; Korte, Martin

    2014-04-01

    Cognitive impairment is one of the most important side effects associated with cannabis drug abuse, as well as the serious issue concerning the therapeutic use of cannabinoids. Cognitive impairments and neuropsychiatric symptoms are caused by early synaptic dysfunctions, such as loss of synaptic connections in different brain structures including the hippocampus, a region that is believed to play an important role in certain forms of learning and memory. We report here that metaplastic priming of synapses with a cannabinoid type 1 receptor (CB1 receptor) agonist, WIN55,212-2 (WIN55), significantly impaired long-term potentiation in the apical dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons. Interestingly, the CB1 receptor exerts its effect by altering the balance of protein synthesis machinery towards higher protein production. Therefore the activation of CB1 receptor, prior to strong tetanization, increased the propensity to produce new proteins. In addition, WIN55 priming resulted in the expression of late-LTP in a synaptic input that would have normally expressed early-LTP, thus confirming that WIN55 priming of LTP induces new synthesis of plasticity-related proteins. Furthermore, in addition to the effects on protein translation, WIN55 also induced synaptic deficits due to the ability of CB1 receptors to inhibit the release of acetylcholine, mediated by both muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Taken together this supports the notion that the modulation of cholinergic activity by CB1 receptor activation is one mechanism that regulates the synthesis of plasticity-related proteins.

  16. A new role for laminins as modulators of protein toxicity in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Louise T; Møller, Tine H; Larsen, Simon A; Jakobsen, Helle; Olsen, Anders

    2012-02-01

    Protein misfolding is a common theme in aging and several age-related diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. The processes involved in the development of these diseases are many and complex. Here, we show that components of the basement membrane (BM), particularly laminin, affect protein integrity of the muscle cells they support. We knocked down gene expression of epi-1, a laminin α-chain, and found that this resulted in increased proteotoxicity in different Caenorhabditis elegans transgenic models, expressing aggregating proteins in the body wall muscle. The effect could partially be rescued by decreased insulin-like signaling, known to slow the aging process and the onset of various age-related diseases. Our data points to an underlying molecular mechanism involving proteasomal degradation and HSP-16 chaperone activity. Furthermore, epi-1-depleted animals had altered synaptic function and displayed hypersensitivity to both levamisole and aldicarb, an acetylcholine receptor agonist and an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, respectively. Our results implicate the BM as an extracellular modulator of protein homeostasis in the adjacent muscle cells. This is in agreement with previous research showing that imbalance in neuromuscular signaling disturbs protein homeostasis in the postsynaptic cell. In our study, proteotoxicity may indeed be mediated by the neuromuscular junction which is part of the BM, where laminins are present in high concentration, ensuring the proper microenvironment for neuromuscular signaling. Laminins are evolutionarily conserved, and thus the BM may play a much more causal role in protein misfolding diseases than currently recognized.

  17. Macromolecular Crowding Modulates Folding Mechanism of α/β Protein Apoflavodoxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homouz, D.; Stagg, L.; Wittungstafshede, P.; Cheung, M.

    2009-01-01

    Protein dynamics in cells may be different from that in dilute solutions in vitro since the environment in cells is highly concentrated with other macromolecules. This volume exclusion due to macromolecular crowding is predicted to affect both equilibrium and kinetic processes involving protein conformational changes. To quantify macromolecular crowding effects on protein folding mechanisms, here we have investigated the folding energy landscape of an alpha/beta protein, apoflavodoxin, in the presence of inert macromolecular crowding agents using in silico and in vitro approaches. By coarse-grained molecular simulations and topology-based potential interactions, we probed the effects of increased volume fraction of crowding agents (phi_c) as well as of crowding agent geometry (sphere or spherocylinder) at high phi_c. Parallel kinetic folding experiments with purified Desulfovibro desulfuricans apoflavodoxin in vitro were performed in the presence of Ficoll (sphere) and Dextran (spherocylinder) synthetic crowding agents. In conclusion, we have identified in silico crowding conditions that best enhance protein stability and discovered that upon manipulation of the crowding conditions, folding routes experiencing topological frustrations can be either enhanced or relieved. The test-tube experiments confirmed that apoflavodoxin's time-resolved folding path is modulated by crowding agent geometry. We propose that macromolecular crowding effects may be a tool for manipulation of protein folding and function in living cells.

  18. Does protein binding modulate the effect of angiotensin II receptor antagonists?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc P Maillard

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionAngiotensin II AT 1-receptor antagonists are highly bound to plasma proteins (≥ 99%. With some antagonists, such as DuP-532, the protein binding was such that no efficacy of the drug could be demonstrated clinically. Whether protein binding interferes with the efficacy of other antagonists is not known. We have therefore investigated in vitro how plasma proteins may affect the antagonistic effect of different AT1-receptor antagonists.MethodsA radio-receptor binding assay was used to analyse the interaction between proteins and the ability of various angiotensin II (Ang II antagonists to block AT1-receptors. In addition, the Biacore technology, a new technique which enables the real-time monitoring of binding events between two molecules, was used to evaluate the dissociation rate constants of five AT1-receptor antagonists from human serum albumin.ResultsThe in vitro AT 1-antagonistic effects of different Ang II receptor antagonists were differentially affected by the presence of human plasma, with rightward shifts of the IC50 ranging from one to several orders of magnitude. The importance of the shift correlates with the dissociation rate constants of these drugs from albumin. Our experiments also show that the way that AT1-receptor antagonists bind to proteins differs from one compound to another. These results suggest that the interaction with plasma proteins appears to modulate the efficacy of some Ang II antagonists.ConclusionAlthough the high binding level of Ang II receptor antagonist to plasma proteins appears to be a feature common to this class of compounds, the kinetics and characteristics of this binding is of great importance. With some antagonists, protein binding interferes markedly with their efficacy to block AT1-receptors.

  19. Coxiella burnetii Nine Mile II proteins modulate gene expression of monocytic host cells during infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaw Edward I

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coxiella burnetii is an intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes acute and chronic disease in humans. Bacterial replication occurs within enlarged parasitophorous vacuoles (PV of eukaryotic cells, the biogenesis and maintenance of which is dependent on C. burnetii protein synthesis. These observations suggest that C. burnetii actively subverts host cell processes, however little is known about the cellular biology mechanisms manipulated by the pathogen during infection. Here, we examined host cell gene expression changes specifically induced by C. burnetii proteins during infection. Results We have identified 36 host cell genes that are specifically regulated when de novo C. burnetii protein synthesis occurs during infection using comparative microarray analysis. Two parallel sets of infected and uninfected THP-1 cells were grown for 48 h followed by the addition of chloramphenicol (CAM to 10 μg/ml in one set. Total RNA was harvested at 72 hpi from all conditions, and microarrays performed using Phalanx Human OneArray™ slides. A total of 784 (mock treated and 901 (CAM treated THP-1 genes were up or down regulated ≥2 fold in the C. burnetii infected vs. uninfected cell sets, respectively. Comparisons between the complementary data sets (using >0 fold, eliminated the common gene expression changes. A stringent comparison (≥2 fold between the separate microarrays revealed 36 host cell genes modulated by C. burnetii protein synthesis. Ontological analysis of these genes identified the innate immune response, cell death and proliferation, vesicle trafficking and development, lipid homeostasis, and cytoskeletal organization as predominant cellular functions modulated by C. burnetii protein synthesis. Conclusions Collectively, these data indicate that C. burnetii proteins actively regulate the expression of specific host cell genes and pathways. This is in addition to host cell genes that respond to the presence of the

  20. Retinoblastoma Binding Protein 4 Modulates Temozolomide Sensitivity in Glioblastoma by Regulating DNA Repair Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitange, Gaspar J.; Mladek, Ann C.; Schroeder, Mark A.; Pokorny, Jenny C.; Carlson, Brett L.; Zhang, Yuji; Nair, Asha A.; Lee, Jeong-Heon; Yan, Huihuang; Decker, Paul A.; Zhang, Zhiguo; Sarkaria, Jann N.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Here we provide evidence that RBBP4 modulates temozolomide (TMZ) sensitivity through coordinate regulation of 2 key DNA repair genes critical for recovery from TMZ-induced DNA damage: methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT) and RAD51. Disruption of RBBP4 enhanced TMZ sensitivity, induced synthetic lethality to PARP inhibition and increased DNA damage signaling in response to TMZ. Moreover, RBBP4 silencing enhanced TMZ-induced H2AX phosphorylation and apoptosis in GBM cells. Intriguingly, RBBP4 knockdown suppressed the expression of MGMT, RAD51 and other genes in association with decreased promoter H3K9 acetylation (H3K9Ac) and increased H3K9 tri-methylation (H3K9me3). Consistent with these data, RBBP4 interacts with CBP/p300 to form a chromatin modifying complex that binds within the promoter of MGMT, RAD51 and perhaps other genes. Globally, RBBP4 positively and negatively regulates genes involved in critical cellular functions including tumorigenesis. RBBP4/CBP/p300 complex may provide an interesting target for developing therapy sensitizing strategies for GBM and other tumors. PMID:26972001

  1. Retinoblastoma Binding Protein 4 Modulates Temozolomide Sensitivity in Glioblastoma by Regulating DNA Repair Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaspar J. Kitange

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Here we provide evidence that RBBP4 modulates temozolomide (TMZ sensitivity through coordinate regulation of two key DNA repair genes critical for recovery from TMZ-induced DNA damage: methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT and RAD51. Disruption of RBBP4 enhanced TMZ sensitivity, induced synthetic lethality to PARP inhibition, and increased DNA damage signaling in response to TMZ. Moreover, RBBP4 silencing enhanced TMZ-induced H2AX phosphorylation and apoptosis in GBM cells. Intriguingly, RBBP4 knockdown suppressed the expression of MGMT, RAD51, and other genes in association with decreased promoter H3K9 acetylation (H3K9Ac and increased H3K9 tri-methylation (H3K9me3. Consistent with these data, RBBP4 interacts with CBP/p300 to form a chromatin-modifying complex that binds within the promoter of MGMT, RAD51, and perhaps other genes. Globally, RBBP4 positively and negatively regulates genes involved in critical cellular functions including tumorigenesis. The RBBP4/CBP/p300 complex may provide an interesting target for developing therapy-sensitizing strategies for GBM and other tumors.

  2. Síndrome de Werner associada a quadro esclerodermiforme: relato de caso e revisão da literatura Werner's syndrome associated with scleroderma-like syndrome: case report and literature revision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Kayser

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available A síndrome de Werner é uma doença autossômica recessiva rara associada a envelhecimento precoce, cujo quadro cutâneo deve ser distinguido daquele encontrado na esclerose sistêmica (ES. Descrevemos aqui o caso de uma paciente de 39 anos de idade, portadora de síndrome de Werner, encaminhada ao nosso serviço com hipótese diagnóstica inicial de ES. A paciente apresentava várias manifestações associadas à síndrome de Werner, incluindo cabelos precocemente grisalhos, voz estridente, baixa estatura, alterações cutâneas esclerodermiformes, diabetes melito, catarata, hipogonadismo, hipotireoidismo e hiperlipidemia. Não apresentava fenômeno de Raynaud, manifestações viscerais típicas da ES, alterações capilaroscópicas periungueais ou auto-anticorpos. O diagnóstico de síndrome de Werner, apesar de raro, deve ser lembrado no diagnóstico diferencial de ES, principalmente na presença de manifestações atípicas e na ausência de alterações típicas da ES.Werner's syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disease associated with premature ageing. Skin alteration must be distinguished from cutaneous manifestation of systemic sclerosis (SSc. We describe a case of a 39 years old patient with Werner's syndrome admitted with an initial diagnostic hypothesis of SSc. The patient had many characteristic features associated with Werner's syndrome including gray hair, hoarseness, short stature, scleroderma-like skin changes, diabetes mellitus, cataracts, hypogonadism, hypothyroidism, and hyperlipidemia. There was no Raynaud's phenomenon, other typical visceral manifestation of SSc, nailfold capillary alterations or autoantibodies. Werner's syndrome diagnosis notwithstanding rare, should be remember in the differential diagnosis of SSc, mainly in the presence of atypical manifestations and in the absence of typical features of SSc.

  3. ANTHEPROT 2.0: a three-dimensional module fully coupled with protein sequence analysis methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geourjon, C; Deléage, G

    1995-06-01

    ANTHEPROT is a fully interactive graphics program devoted to the analysis of the sequences and structures of proteins. This program, originally developed to facilitate the protein sequence analysis coupled with multiple alignments and predicted secondary structures of proteins, now comprises a powerful 3D module to display and handle macromolecular structures. All the methods that were previously integrated into ANTHEPROT are now directly coupled with a 3D window that provides the user all the classic features of a molecular modeling package. Indeed, it allows real-time rotation and translation of 3D structures with many kinds of models in depth-cueing mode (space filling, backbone, wire models, main chain, and ribbons), selections (atom type, residue type, segments, and chain), color-coding systems (amino acid properties, predicted or observed secondary structures, temperature B factor, and subunits), geometric calculations (Ramachandran plot, distances, and angles), and fitting molecules. Stereo views are possible as well as HPGL standard files. A module specifically devoted to the determination of 3D structures using nuclear magnetic resonance is also available. This major release of our program for IBM rs6000 workstations is available by anonymous ftp to ibcp.fr for academic institutions.

  4. Modulation of Wound Healing and Scar Formation by MG53 Protein-mediated Cell Membrane Repair*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haichang; Duann, Pu; Lin, Pei-Hui; Zhao, Li; Fan, Zhaobo; Tan, Tao; Zhou, Xinyu; Sun, Mingzhai; Fu, Minghuan; Orange, Matthew; Sermersheim, Matthew; Ma, Hanley; He, Duofen; Steinberg, Steven M.; Higgins, Robert; Zhu, Hua; John, Elizabeth; Zeng, Chunyu; Guan, Jianjun; Ma, Jianjie

    2015-01-01

    Cell membrane repair is an important aspect of physiology, and disruption of this process can result in pathophysiology in a number of different tissues, including wound healing, chronic ulcer and scarring. We have previously identified a novel tripartite motif family protein, MG53, as an essential component of the cell membrane repair machinery. Here we report the functional role of MG53 in the modulation of wound healing and scarring. Although MG53 is absent from keratinocytes and fibroblasts, remarkable defects in skin architecture and collagen overproduction are observed in mg53−/− mice, and these animals display delayed wound healing and abnormal scarring. Recombinant human MG53 (rhMG53) protein, encapsulated in a hydrogel formulation, facilitates wound healing and prevents scarring in rodent models of dermal injuries. An in vitro study shows that rhMG53 protects against acute injury to keratinocytes and facilitates the migration of fibroblasts in response to scratch wounding. During fibrotic remodeling, rhMG53 interferes with TGF-β-dependent activation of myofibroblast differentiation. The resulting down-regulation of α smooth muscle actin and extracellular matrix proteins contributes to reduced scarring. Overall, these studies establish a trifunctional role for MG53 as a facilitator of rapid injury repair, a mediator of cell migration, and a modulator of myofibroblast differentiation during wound healing. Targeting the functional interaction between MG53 and TGF-β signaling may present a potentially effective means for promoting scarless wound healing. PMID:26306047

  5. The Parkinson's Disease-Associated Protein Kinase LRRK2 Modulates Notch Signaling through the Endosomal Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuzuru Imai

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2 is a key molecule in the pathogenesis of familial and idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD. We have identified two novel LRRK2-associated proteins, a HECT-type ubiquitin ligase, HERC2, and an adaptor-like protein with six repeated Neuralized domains, NEURL4. LRRK2 binds to NEURL4 and HERC2 via the LRRK2 Ras of complex proteins (ROC domain and NEURL4, respectively. HERC2 and NEURL4 link LRRK2 to the cellular vesicle transport pathway and Notch signaling, through which the LRRK2 complex promotes the recycling of the Notch ligand Delta-like 1 (Dll1/Delta (Dl through the modulation of endosomal trafficking. This process negatively regulates Notch signaling through cis-inhibition by stabilizing Dll1/Dl, which accelerates neural stem cell differentiation and modulates the function and survival of differentiated dopaminergic neurons. These effects are strengthened by the R1441G ROC domain-mutant of LRRK2. These findings suggest that the alteration of Notch signaling in mature neurons is a component of PD etiology linked to LRRK2.

  6. Ribosomal protein S6 phosphorylation is controlled by TOR and modulated by PKA in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Tahmeena; Köhler, Julia R

    2015-10-01

    TOR and PKA signaling pathways control eukaryotic cell growth and proliferation. TOR activity in model fungi, such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, responds principally to nutrients, e.g., nitrogen and phosphate sources, which are incorporated into the growing cell mass; PKA signaling responds to the availability of the cells' major energy source, glucose. In the fungal commensal and pathogen, Candida albicans, little is known of how these pathways interact. Here, the signal from phosphorylated ribosomal protein S6 (P-S6) was defined as a surrogate marker for TOR-dependent anabolic activity in C. albicans. Nutritional, pharmacologic and genetic modulation of TOR activity elicited corresponding changes in P-S6 levels. The P-S6 signal corresponded to translational activity of a GFP reporter protein. Contributions of four PKA pathway components to anabolic activation were then examined. In high glucose concentrations, only Tpk2 was required to upregulate P-S6 to physiologic levels, whereas all four tested components were required to downregulate P-S6 in low glucose. TOR was epistatic to PKA components with respect to P-S6. In many host niches inhabited by C. albicans, glucose is scarce, with protein being available as a nitrogen source. We speculate that PKA may modulate TOR-dependent cell growth to a rate sustainable by available energy sources, when monomers of anabolic processes, such as amino acids, are abundant.

  7. A new tool for modeling dune field evolution based on an accessible, GUI version of the Werner dune model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barchyn, Thomas E.; Hugenholtz, Chris H.

    2012-02-01

    Research into aeolian dune form and dynamics has benefited from simple and abstract cellular automata computer models. Many of these models are based upon a seminal framework proposed by Werner (1995). Unfortunately, most versions of this model are not publicly available or are not provided in a format that promotes widespread use. In our view, this hinders progress in linking model simulations to empirical data (and vice versa). To this end, we introduce an accessible, graphical user interface (GUI) version of the Werner model. The novelty of this contribution is that it provides a simple interface and detailed instructions that encourage widespread use and extension of the Werner dune model for research and training purposes. By lowering barriers for researchers to develop and test hypotheses about aeolian dune and dune field patterns, this release addresses recent calls to improve access to earth surface models.

  8. Modulating protein behaviors on responsive surface by external electric fields: A molecular dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Yun, E-mail: xieyunxx@gdpu.edu.cn; Pan, Yufang; Zhang, Rong; Liang, Ying; Li, Zhanchao

    2015-01-30

    Graphical abstract: The adsorption of Cyt c on phosphorylcholine self-assembled monolayers (N atoms of the choline groups are colored in blue while the P atoms of the phosphate groups in orange). - Highlights: • PC-SAM could sensitively adjust its charge distribution to applied electric fields. • Adsorption of Cyt c on the PC-SAM is promoted or retarded as the charge distribution of the SAM changes. • Orientations of Cyt c on the PC-SAM are regulated by the structural changes of the SAM. • The structural changes of the SAM cause little deformation in Cyt c. - Abstract: Molecular dynamics simulations were employed to investigate the modulation of protein behaviors on the electrically responsive zwitterionic phosphorylcholine self-assembled monolayers (PC-SAMs). Results show that PC-SAMs could sensitively respond to the applied electric fields and exhibit three states with different charge distributions, namely both the negatively charged phosphate groups and the positively charged choline groups are exposed to the solution in the absence of electric fields (state 1), phosphate groups exposed in the presence of positive electric fields (state 2), and choline groups exposed in the presence of negative electric fields (state 3). Under state 1, the adsorption of Cyt c on the PC-SAM is reversible and the orientations of Cyt c are randomly distributed. Under state 2, the adsorption of Cyt c is enhanced due to the electrostatic attractions between the exposed phosphate groups and the positively charged protein; when adsorbed on the PC-SAMs, Cyt c tends to adopt the orientation with the heme plane perpendicular to the surface plane, and the percentage of this orientation increases as the field strength rises up. Under state 3, the adsorption of Cyt c is retarded because of the electrostatic repulsions between the exposed choline groups and the protein; however, if the gaps between PC chains are large enough, Cyt c could insert into the PC-SAM and access the

  9. Aerobic fitness does not modulate protein metabolism in response to increased exercise: a controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byerley Lauri O

    2009-06-01

    suggest that aerobic fitness level does not modulate protein "sparing" in response to an unaccustomed increase in energy expenditure.

  10. Vom Hören der Sphärenharmonie in Werner Schulzes "Sokrates"

    OpenAIRE

    Molina Moreno, Francisco

    2003-01-01

    El compositor, pensador, investigador y profesor de la Universidad para la Música y las Artes Escénicas de Viena, Werner Schulze, es autor de un drama con música sobre la vida y personalidad de Sócrates. El soporte verbal del drama lo constituyen pasajes de Platón y Aristófanes, en su versión original en griego antiguo. La obra incluye una evocación musical del mito de Er, al final de la "República" de Platón, que constituye el primer testimonio griego de la música de las esferas. En este tra...

  11. Werner Aisslinger 环保可以如此前卫

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    岳彬

    2011-01-01

    当生态环保成为绝大多数设计师作秀的噱头时,Werner Aisslinger对其的设计理解已经超越了简单意义上的材质"绿色"。他以简洁和实用的设计理念,来确保环保设计的纯粹性,设计作品很多都充满了现代主义色彩。

  12. Modulation of secreted proteins of mouse mammary epithelial cells by the collagenous substrata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, E.Y.H.; Parry, G.; Bissell, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    It has been shown previously that cultures of mouse mammary epithelial cells retain their characteristic morphology and their ability to produce ..gamma..-casein, a member of the casein gene family, only if they are maintained on floating collagen gels. In this paper we show: (a) Cells on floating collagen gels secrete not only ..gamma..-casein but also ..cap alpha../sub 1/-, ..cap alpha../sub 2/-, and ..beta..-caseins. These are not secreted by cells on plastic and are secreted to only a very limited extent by cells on attached collagen gels. (b) The floating collagen gel regulates at the level of synthesis and/or stabilization of the caseins rather than at the level of secretion alone. Contraction of the floating gel is important in that cells cultured on floating glutaraldehyde cross-linked gels do not secrete any of the caseins. (c) The secretion of an 80,000-mol-wt protein, most probably transferrin, and a 67,000-mol-wt protein, probably butyrophilin, a major protein of the milk fat globule membrane, are partially modulated by substrata. However, in contrast to the caseins, these are always detectable in media from cells cultured on plastic and attached gels. (d) Whey acidic protein, a major whey protein, is actively secreted by freshly isolated cells but is secreted in extremely limited quantities in cultured cells regardless of the nature of the substratum used. Lactalbumin secretion is also decreased significantly in cultured cells. (e) A previously unreported set of proteins, which may be minor milk proteins, are prominently secreted by the mammary cells on all substrata tested. We conclude that while the substratum profoundly influences the secretion of the caseins, it does not regulate the expression of every milk-specific protein in the same way. The mechanistic implications of these findings are discussed.

  13. Clofazimine modulates the expression of lipid metabolism proteins in Mycobacterium leprae-infected macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Degang

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae lives and replicates within macrophages in a foamy, lipid-laden phagosome. The lipids provide essential nutrition for the mycobacteria, and M. leprae infection modulates expression of important host proteins related to lipid metabolism. Thus, M. leprae infection increases the expression of adipophilin/adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP and decreases hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL, facilitating the accumulation and maintenance of lipid-rich environments suitable for the intracellular survival of M. leprae. HSL levels are not detectable in skin smear specimens taken from leprosy patients, but re-appear shortly after multidrug therapy (MDT. This study examined the effect of MDT components on host lipid metabolism in vitro, and the outcome of rifampicin, dapsone and clofazimine treatment on ADRP and HSL expression in THP-1 cells. Clofazimine attenuated the mRNA and protein levels of ADRP in M. leprae-infected cells, while those of HSL were increased. Rifampicin and dapsone did not show any significant effects on ADRP and HSL expression levels. A transient increase of interferon (IFN-β and IFN-γ mRNA was also observed in cells infected with M. leprae and treated with clofazimine. Lipid droplets accumulated by M. leprae-infection were significantly decreased 48 h after clofazimine treatment. Such effects were not evident in cells without M. leprae infection. In clinical samples, ADRP expression was decreased and HSL expression was increased after treatment. These results suggest that clofazimine modulates lipid metabolism in M. leprae-infected macrophages by modulating the expression of ADRP and HSL. It also induces IFN production in M. leprae-infected cells. The resultant decrease in lipid accumulation, increase in lipolysis, and activation of innate immunity may be some of the key actions of clofazimine.

  14. The Biological Function of the Prion Protein: A Cell Surface Scaffold of Signaling Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    The prion glycoprotein (PrPC) is mostly located at the cell surface, tethered to the plasma membrane through a glycosyl-phosphatydil inositol (GPI) anchor. Misfolding of PrPC is associated with the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), whereas its normal conformer serves as a receptor for oligomers of the β-amyloid peptide, which play a major role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD). PrPC is highly expressed in both the nervous and immune systems, as well as in other organs, but its functions are controversial. Extensive experimental work disclosed multiple physiological roles of PrPC at the molecular, cellular and systemic levels, affecting the homeostasis of copper, neuroprotection, stem cell renewal and memory mechanisms, among others. Often each such process has been heralded as the bona fide function of PrPC, despite restricted attention paid to a selected phenotypic trait, associated with either modulation of gene expression or to the engagement of PrPC with a single ligand. In contrast, the GPI-anchored prion protein was shown to bind several extracellular and transmembrane ligands, which are required to endow that protein with the ability to play various roles in transmembrane signal transduction. In addition, differing sets of those ligands are available in cell type- and context-dependent scenarios. To account for such properties, we proposed that PrPC serves as a dynamic platform for the assembly of signaling modules at the cell surface, with widespread consequences for both physiology and behavior. The current review advances the hypothesis that the biological function of the prion protein is that of a cell surface scaffold protein, based on the striking similarities of its functional properties with those of scaffold proteins involved in the organization of intracellular signal transduction pathways. Those properties are: the ability to recruit spatially restricted sets of binding molecules involved in specific signaling

  15. APL-1, the Alzheimer's Amyloid precursor protein in Caenorhabditis elegans, modulates multiple metabolic pathways throughout development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewald, Collin Y; Raps, Daniel A; Li, Chris

    2012-06-01

    Mutations in the amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene or in genes that process APP are correlated with familial Alzheimer's disease (AD). The biological function of APP remains unclear. APP is a transmembrane protein that can be sequentially cleaved by different secretases to yield multiple fragments, which can potentially act as signaling molecules. Caenorhabditis elegans encodes one APP-related protein, APL-1, which is essential for viability. Here, we show that APL-1 signaling is dependent on the activity of the FOXO transcription factor DAF-16 and the nuclear hormone receptor DAF-12 and influences metabolic pathways such as developmental progression, body size, and egg-laying rate. Furthermore, apl-1(yn5) mutants, which produce high levels of the extracellular APL-1 fragment, show an incompletely penetrant temperature-sensitive embryonic lethality. In a genetic screen to isolate mutants in which the apl-1(yn5) lethality rate is modified, we identified a suppressor mutation in MOA-1/R155.2, a receptor-protein tyrosine phosphatase, and an enhancer mutation in MOA-2/B0495.6, a protein involved in receptor-mediated endocytosis. Knockdown of apl-1 in an apl-1(yn5) background caused lethality and molting defects at all larval stages, suggesting that apl-1 is required for each transitional molt. We suggest that signaling of the released APL-1 fragment modulates multiple metabolic states and that APL-1 is required throughout development.

  16. 5S rRNA-recognition module of CTC family proteins and its evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korobeinikova, A V; Gongadze, G M; Korepanov, A P; Eliseev, B D; Bazhenova, M V; Garber, M B

    2008-02-01

    The effects of amino acid replacements in the RNA-binding sites of homologous ribosomal proteins TL5 and L25 (members of the CTC family) on ability of these proteins to form stable complexes with ribosomal 5S RNA were studied. It was shown that even three simultaneous replacements of non-conserved amino acid residues by alanine in the RNA-binding site of TL5 did not result in noticeable decrease in stability of the TL5-5S rRNA complex. However, any replacement among five conserved residues in the RNA-binding site of TL5, as well as of L25 resulted in serious destabilization or complete impossibility of complex formation. These five residues form an RNA-recognition module in TL5 and L25. These residues are strictly conserved in proteins of the CTC family. However, there are several cases of natural replacements of these residues in TL5 and L25 homologs in Bacilli and Cyanobacteria, which are accompanied by certain changes in the CTC-binding site of 5S rRNAs of the corresponding organisms. CTC proteins and specific fragments of 5S rRNA of Enterococcus faecalis and Nostoc sp. were isolated, and their ability to form specific complexes was tested. It was found that these proteins formed specific complexes only with 5S rRNA of the same organism. This is an example of coevolution of the structures of two interacting macromolecules.

  17. Dynamic control of the complement system by modulated expression of regulatory proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurman, Joshua M; Renner, Brandon

    2011-01-01

    The complement system serves many biological functions, including the eradication of invasive pathogens and the removal of damaged cells and immune-complexes. Uncontrolled complement activation causes injury to host cells, however, so adequate regulation of the system is essential. Control of the complement system is maintained by a group of cell surface and circulating proteins referred to as complement regulatory proteins. The expression of the cell surface complement regulatory proteins varies from tissue to tissue. Furthermore, specific cell types can upregulate or downregulate the expression of these proteins in response to a variety of signals or insults. Altered regulation of the complement regulatory proteins can have important effects on local complement activation. In some circumstances this can be beneficial, such as in the setting of certain infections. In other circumstances, however, this can be a cause of complement-mediated injury of the tissue. A full understanding of the mechanisms by which the complement system is modulated at the local level can have important implications for how we diagnose and treat a wide range of inflammatory diseases.

  18. The CRM domain: an RNA binding module derived from an ancient ribosome-associated protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkan, Alice; Klipcan, Larik; Ostersetzer, Oren; Kawamura, Tetsuya; Asakura, Yukari; Watkins, Kenneth P

    2007-01-01

    The CRS1-YhbY domain (also called the CRM domain) is represented as a stand-alone protein in Archaea and Bacteria, and in a family of single- and multidomain proteins in plants. The function of this domain is unknown, but structural data and the presence of the domain in several proteins known to interact with RNA have led to the proposal that it binds RNA. Here we describe a phylogenetic analysis of the domain, its incorporation into diverse proteins in plants, and biochemical properties of a prokaryotic and eukaryotic representative of the domain family. We show that a bacterial member of the family, Escherichia coli YhbY, is associated with pre-50S ribosomal subunits, suggesting that YhbY functions in ribosome assembly. GFP fused to a single-domain CRM protein from maize localizes to the nucleolus, suggesting that an analogous activity may have been retained in plants. We show further that an isolated maize CRM domain has RNA binding activity in vitro, and that a small motif shared with KH RNA binding domains, a conserved "GxxG" loop, contributes to its RNA binding activity. These and other results suggest that the CRM domain evolved in the context of ribosome function prior to the divergence of Archaea and Bacteria, that this function has been maintained in extant prokaryotes, and that the domain was recruited to serve as an RNA binding module during the evolution of plant genomes.

  19. BinTree seeking: a novel approach to mine both bi-sparse and cohesive modules in protein interaction networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-Ju Jiao

    Full Text Available Modern science of networks has brought significant advances to our understanding of complex systems biology. As a representative model of systems biology, Protein Interaction Networks (PINs are characterized by a remarkable modular structures, reflecting functional associations between their components. Many methods were proposed to capture cohesive modules so that there is a higher density of edges within modules than those across them. Recent studies reveal that cohesively interacting modules of proteins is not a universal organizing principle in PINs, which has opened up new avenues for revisiting functional modules in PINs. In this paper, functional clusters in PINs are found to be able to form unorthodox structures defined as bi-sparse module. In contrast to the traditional cohesive module, the nodes in the bi-sparse module are sparsely connected internally and densely connected with other bi-sparse or cohesive modules. We present a novel protocol called the BinTree Seeking (BTS for mining both bi-sparse and cohesive modules in PINs based on Edge Density of Module (EDM and matrix theory. BTS detects modules by depicting links and nodes rather than nodes alone and its derivation procedure is totally performed on adjacency matrix of networks. The number of modules in a PIN can be automatically determined in the proposed BTS approach. BTS is tested on three real PINs and the results demonstrate that functional modules in PINs are not dominantly cohesive but can be sparse. BTS software and the supporting information are available at: www.csbio.sjtu.edu.cn/bioinf/BTS/.

  20. Interactions between Starch, Lipids, and Proteins in Foods: Microstructure Control for Glycemic Response Modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parada, Javier; Santos, Jose L

    2016-10-25

    In real food, starch is usually forming part of a matrix with lipids and proteins. However, research on this ternary system and interactions between such food components has been scarce so far. The control of food microstructure is crucial to determine the product properties, including sensorial and nutritionals ones. This paper reviews the microstructural principles of interactions between starch, lipids, and proteins in foods as well as their effect on postprandial glycemic response, considering human intrinsic differences on postprandial glycemic responses. Several lines of research support the hypothesis that foods without rapidly digestible starch will not mandatorily generate the lowest postprandial glycemic response, highlighting that the full understanding of food microstructure, which modulates starch digestion, plays a key role on food design from a nutritional viewpoint.

  1. A new zinc binding fold underlines the versatility of zinc binding modules in protein evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, Belinda K; Matthews, Jacqueline M; Kwan, Ann H Y; Newton, Anthea; Gell, David A; Crossley, Merlin; Mackay, Joel P

    2002-05-01

    Many different zinc binding modules have been identified. Their abundance and variety suggests that the formation of zinc binding folds might be relatively common. We have determined the structure of CH1(1), a 27-residue peptide derived from the first cysteine/histidine-rich region (CH1) of CREB binding protein (CBP). This peptide forms a highly ordered zinc-dependent fold that is distinct from known folds. The structure differs from a subsequently determined structure of a larger region from the CH3 region of CBP, and the CH1(1) fold probably represents a nonphysiologically active form. Despite this, the fold is thermostable and tolerant to both multiple alanine mutations and changes in the zinc-ligand spacing. Our data support the idea that zinc binding domains may arise frequently. Additionally, such structures may prove useful as scaffolds for protein design, given their stability and robustness.

  2. Arachidonic acid modulates hippocampal calcium current via protein kinase C and oxygen radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyser, D O; Alger, B E

    1990-10-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) is a second messenger liberated via receptor activation of phospholipase A2 or diacylglycerol-lipase. We used whole-cell voltage clamp of acutely isolated hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells to investigate the hypothesis that AA modulates Ca2+ channel current (ICa) via activation of protein kinase C (PKC) and generation of free radicals. AA depressed ICa in a dose- and time-dependent manner similar to that previously reported for the action of phorbol esters on ICa. A similar depression was seen with a xanthine-based free radical generating system. The specific PKC inhibitor PKCI (19-36), the protein kinase inhibitor H-7, and the superoxide free radical scavenger SOD each blocked ICa depression by 70%-80%. Complete block of the AA response occurred when SOD was used simultaneously with a PKC inhibitor. These data suggest that PKC and free radicals play a role in AA-induced suppression of ICa.

  3. Alanine and proline content modulate global sensitivity to discrete perturbations in disordered proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Romel B; Tischer, Alexander; Auton, Matthew; Whitten, Steven T

    2014-12-01

    Molecular transduction of biological signals is understood primarily in terms of the cooperative structural transitions of protein macromolecules, providing a mechanism through which discrete local structure perturbations affect global macromolecular properties. The recognition that proteins lacking tertiary stability, commonly referred to as intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs), mediate key signaling pathways suggests that protein structures without cooperative intramolecular interactions may also have the ability to couple local and global structure changes. Presented here are results from experiments that measured and tested the ability of disordered proteins to couple local changes in structure to global changes in structure. Using the intrinsically disordered N-terminal region of the p53 protein as an experimental model, a set of proline (PRO) and alanine (ALA) to glycine (GLY) substitution variants were designed to modulate backbone conformational propensities without introducing non-native intramolecular interactions. The hydrodynamic radius (R(h)) was used to monitor changes in global structure. Circular dichroism spectroscopy showed that the GLY substitutions decreased polyproline II (PP(II)) propensities relative to the wild type, as expected, and fluorescence methods indicated that substitution-induced changes in R(h) were not associated with folding. The experiments showed that changes in local PP(II) structure cause changes in R(h) that are variable and that depend on the intrinsic chain propensities of PRO and ALA residues, demonstrating a mechanism for coupling local and global structure changes. Molecular simulations that model our results were used to extend the analysis to other proteins and illustrate the generality of the observed PRO and alanine effects on the structures of IDPs. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. DENSE: efficient and prior knowledge-driven discovery of phenotype-associated protein functional modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendrix Willam

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identifying cellular subsystems that are involved in the expression of a target phenotype has been a very active research area for the past several years. In this paper, cellular subsystem refers to a group of genes (or proteins that interact and carry out a common function in the cell. Most studies identify genes associated with a phenotype on the basis of some statistical bias, others have extended these statistical methods to analyze functional modules and biological pathways for phenotype-relatedness. However, a biologist might often have a specific question in mind while performing such analysis and most of the resulting subsystems obtained by the existing methods might be largely irrelevant to the question in hand. Arguably, it would be valuable to incorporate biologist's knowledge about the phenotype into the algorithm. This way, it is anticipated that the resulting subsytems would not only be related to the target phenotype but also contain information that the biologist is likely to be interested in. Results In this paper we introduce a fast and theoretically guranteed method called DENSE (Dense and ENriched Subgraph Enumeration that can take in as input a biologist's prior knowledge as a set of query proteins and identify all the dense functional modules in a biological network that contain some part of the query vertices. The density (in terms of the number of network egdes and the enrichment (the number of query proteins in the resulting functional module can be manipulated via two parameters γ and μ, respectively. Conclusion This algorithm has been applied to the protein functional association network of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824, a hydrogen producing, acid-tolerant organism. The algorithm was able to verify relationships known to exist in literature and also some previously unknown relationships including those with regulatory and signaling functions. Additionally, we were also able to hypothesize

  5. Interaction between protein kinase C and protein kinase A can modulate transmitter release at the rat neuromuscular synapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santafé, M M; Garcia, N; Lanuza, M A; Tomàs, M; Tomàs, J

    2009-02-15

    We used intracellular recording to investigate the functional interaction between protein kinase C (PKC) and protein kinase A (PKA) signal transduction cascades in the control of transmitter release in the neuromuscular synapses from adult rats. Our results indicate that: 1) PKA and PKC are independently involved in asynchronous release. 2) Evoked acetylcholine (ACh) release is enhanced with the PKA agonist Sp-8-BrcAMP and the PKC agonist phorbol ester (PMA). 3) PKA has a constitutive role in promoting a component of normal evoked transmitter release because, when the kinase is inhibited with H-89, the release diminishes. However, the PKC inhibitor calphostin C (CaC) does not affect ACh release. 4) PKA regulates neurotransmission without PKC involvement because, after PMA or CaC modulation of the PKC activity, coupling to the ACh release of PKA can normally be stimulated with Sp-8-BrcAMP or inhibited with H-89. 5) After PKA inhibition with H-89, PKC stimulation with PMA (or inhibition with CaC) does not lead to any change in evoked ACh release. However, in PKA-stimulated preparations with Sp-8-BrcAMP, PKC becomes tonically active, thus potentiating a component of release that can now be blocked with CaC. In normal conditions, therefore, PKA was able to modulate ACh release independently of PKC activity, whereas PKA stimulation caused the PKC coupling to evoked release. In contrast, PKA inhibition prevent PKC stimulation (with the phorbol ester) and coupling to ACh output. There was therefore some dependence of PKC on PKA activity in the fine control of the neuromuscular synaptic functionalism and ACh release.

  6. Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase modulates nociception: evidence from genetic deletion and pharmacological inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azkona, Garikoitz; Saavedra, Ana; Aira, Zigor; Aluja, David; Xifró, Xavier; Baguley, Tyler; Alberch, Jordi; Ellman, Jonathan A; Lombroso, Paul J; Azkue, Jon J; Pérez-Navarro, Esther

    2016-02-01

    The information from nociceptors is processed in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord by complex circuits involving excitatory and inhibitory interneurons. It is well documented that GluN2B and ERK1/2 phosphorylation contributes to central sensitization. Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) dephosphorylates GluN2B and ERK1/2, promoting internalization of GluN2B and inactivation of ERK1/2. The activity of STEP was modulated by genetic (STEP knockout mice) and pharmacological (recently synthesized STEP inhibitor, TC-2153) approaches. STEP(61) protein levels in the lumbar spinal cord were determined in male and female mice of different ages. Inflammatory pain was induced by complete Freund's adjuvant injection. Behavioral tests, immunoblotting, and electrophysiology were used to analyze the effect of STEP on nociception. Our results show that both genetic deletion and pharmacological inhibition of STEP induced thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia, which were accompanied by increased pGluN2B(Tyr1472) and pERK1/2(Thr202/Tyr204)levels in the lumbar spinal cord. Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase heterozygous and knockout mice presented a similar phenotype. Furthermore, electrophysiological experiments showed that TC-2153 increased C fiber-evoked spinal field potentials. Interestingly, we found that STEP(61) protein levels in the lumbar spinal cord inversely correlated with thermal hyperalgesia associated with age and female gender in mice. Consistently, STEP knockout mice failed to show age-related thermal hyperalgesia, although gender-related differences were preserved. Moreover, in a model of inflammatory pain, hyperalgesia was associated with increased phosphorylation-mediated STEP(61) inactivation and increased pGluN2B(Tyr1472) and pERK1/2(Thr202/Tyr204)levels in the lumbar spinal cord. Collectively, the present results underscore an important role of spinal STEP activity in the modulation of nociception.

  7. The 21-cm signature of the first stars during the Lyman-Werner feedback era

    CERN Document Server

    Fialkov, Anastasia; Visbal, Eli; Tseliakhovich, Dmitriy; Hirata, Christopher M

    2012-01-01

    The formation of the first stars is an exciting frontier area in astronomy. Early redshifts z ~ 20 have become observationally promising as a result of a recently recognized effect of a supersonic relative velocity between the dark matter and gas. This effect produces prominent structure on 100 comoving Mpc scales, which makes it much more feasible to detect 21-cm fluctuations from the epoch of first heating. We use semi-numerical hybrid methods to follow for the first time the joint evolution of the X-ray and Lyman-Werner radiative backgrounds, including the effect of the supersonic streaming velocity on the cosmic distribution of stars. We incorporate self-consistently the negative feedback on star formation induced by the Lyman-Werner radiation, which dissociates molecular hydrogen and thus suppresses gas cooling. We find that the feedback delays the X-ray heating transition by a Delta z ~ 2, but leaves a promisingly large fluctuation signal over a broad redshift range. The large-scale power spectrum is pr...

  8. POLD1 Germline Mutations in Patients Initially Diagnosed with Werner Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessel, Davor; Hisama, Fuki M; Szakszon, Katalin; Saha, Bidisha; Sanjuanelo, Alexander Barrios; Salbert, Bonnie A; Steele, Pamela D; Baldwin, Jennifer; Brown, W Ted; Piussan, Charles; Plauchu, Henri; Szilvássy, Judit; Horkay, Edit; Högel, Josef; Martin, George M; Herr, Alan J; Oshima, Junko; Kubisch, Christian

    2015-11-01

    Segmental progeroid syndromes are rare, heterogeneous disorders characterized by signs of premature aging affecting more than one tissue or organ. A prototypic example is the Werner syndrome (WS), caused by biallelic germline mutations in the Werner helicase gene (WRN). While heterozygous lamin A/C (LMNA) mutations are found in a few nonclassical cases of WS, another 10%-15% of patients initially diagnosed with WS do not have mutations in WRN or LMNA. Germline POLD1 mutations were recently reported in five patients with another segmental progeroid disorder: mandibular hypoplasia, deafness, progeroid features syndrome. Here, we describe eight additional patients with heterozygous POLD1 mutations, thereby substantially expanding the characterization of this new example of segmental progeroid disorders. First, we identified POLD1 mutations in patients initially diagnosed with WS. Second, we describe POLD1 mutation carriers without clinically relevant hearing impairment or mandibular underdevelopment, both previously thought to represent obligate diagnostic features. These patients also exhibit a lower incidence of metabolic abnormalities and joint contractures. Third, we document postnatal short stature and premature greying/loss of hair in POLD1 mutation carriers. We conclude that POLD1 germline mutations can result in a variably expressed and probably underdiagnosed segmental progeroid syndrome.

  9. Characterization of strychnine-sensitive glycine receptor in the intact frog retina: modulation by protein kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salceda, Rocío; Aguirre-Ramirez, Marisela

    2005-03-01

    We studied 3H-glycine and 3H-strychnine specific binding to glycine receptor (GlyR) in intact isolated frog retinas. To avoid glycine binding to glycine uptake sites, experiments were performed at low ligand concentrations in a sodium-free medium. The binding of both radiolabeled ligands was saturated. Scatchard analysis of bound glycine and strychnine revealed a KD of 2.5 and 2.0 microM, respectively. Specific binding of glycine was displaced by beta-alanine, sarcosine, and strychnine. Strychnine binding was displaced 50% by glycine, and sarcosine. Properties of the strychnine-binding site in the GlyR were modified by sarcosine. Binding of both radioligands was considerably reduced by compounds that inhibit or activate adenylate cyclase and increased cAMP levels. A phorbol ester activator of PKC remarkably decreased glycine and strychnine binding. These results suggest modulation of GlyR in response to endogenous activation of protein kinases A and C, as well as protein phosphorylation modulating GlyR function in retina.

  10. SLAM family receptors and the SLAM-associated protein (SAP) modulate T cell functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detre, Cynthia; Keszei, Marton; Romero, Xavier; Tsokos, George C; Terhorst, Cox

    2010-06-01

    One or more of the signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) family (SLAMF) of cell surface receptors, which consists of nine transmembrane proteins, i.e., SLAMF1-9, are expressed on most hematopoietic cells. While most SLAMF receptors serve as self-ligands, SLAMF2 and SLAMF4 use each other as counter structures. Six of the receptors carry one or more copies of a unique intracellular tyrosine-based switch motif, which has high affinity for the single SH2-domain signaling molecules SLAM-associated protein and EAT-2. Whereas SLAMF receptors are costimulatory molecules on the surface of CD4+, CD8+, and natural killer (NK) T cells, they also involved in early phases of lineage commitment during hematopoiesis. SLAMF receptors regulate T lymphocyte development and function and modulate lytic activity, cytokine production, and major histocompatibility complex-independent cell inhibition of NK cells. Furthermore, they modulate B cell activation and memory generation, neutrophil, dendritic cell, macrophage and eosinophil function, and platelet aggregation. In this review, we will discuss the role of SLAM receptors and their adapters in T cell function, and we will examine the role of these receptors and their adapters in X-linked lymphoproliferative disease and their contribution to disease susceptibility in systemic lupus erythematosus.

  11. Insulin Stimulates S100B Secretion and These Proteins Antagonistically Modulate Brain Glucose Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wartchow, Krista Minéia; Tramontina, Ana Carolina; de Souza, Daniela F; Biasibetti, Regina; Bobermin, Larissa D; Gonçalves, Carlos-Alberto

    2016-06-01

    Brain metabolism is highly dependent on glucose, which is derived from the blood circulation and metabolized by the astrocytes and other neural cells via several pathways. Glucose uptake in the brain does not involve insulin-dependent glucose transporters; however, this hormone affects the glucose influx to the brain. Changes in cerebrospinal fluid levels of S100B (an astrocyte-derived protein) have been associated with alterations in glucose metabolism; however, there is no evidence whether insulin modulates glucose metabolism and S100B secretion. Herein, we investigated the effect of S100B on glucose metabolism, measuring D-(3)H-glucose incorporation in two preparations, C6 glioma cells and acute hippocampal slices, and we also investigated the effect of insulin on S100B secretion. Our results showed that: (a) S100B at physiological levels decreases glucose uptake, through the multiligand receptor RAGE and mitogen-activated protein kinase/ERK signaling, and (b) insulin stimulated S100B secretion via PI3K signaling. Our findings indicate the existence of insulin-S100B modulation of glucose utilization in the brain tissue, and may improve our understanding of glucose metabolism in several conditions such as ketosis, streptozotocin-induced dementia and pharmacological exposure to antipsychotics, situations that lead to changes in insulin signaling and extracellular levels of S100B.

  12. Trace levels of innate immune response modulating impurities (IIRMIs) synergize to break tolerance to therapeutic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verthelyi, Daniela; Wang, Vivian

    2010-12-22

    Therapeutic proteins such as monoclonal antibodies, replacement enzymes and toxins have significantly improved the therapeutic options for multiple diseases, including cancer and inflammatory diseases as well as enzyme deficiencies and inborn errors of metabolism. However, immune responses to these products are frequent and can seriously impact their safety and efficacy. Of the many factors that can impact protein immunogenicity, this study focuses on the role of innate immune response modulating impurities (IIRMIs) that could be present despite product purification and whether these impurities can synergize to facilitate an immunogenic response to therapeutic proteins. Using lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and CpG ODN as IIRMIs we showed that trace levels of these impurities synergized to induce IgM, IFNγ, TNFα and IL-6 expression. In vivo, trace levels of these impurities synergized to increase antigen-specific IgG antibodies to ovalbumin. Further, whereas mice treated with human erythropoietin showed a transient increase in hematocrit, those that received human erythropoietin containing low levels of IIRMIs had reduced response to erythropoietin after the 1(st) dose and developed long-lasting anemia following subsequent doses. This suggests that the presence of IIRMIs facilitated a breach in tolerance to the endogenous mouse erythropoietin. Overall, these studies indicate that the risk of enhancing immunogenicity should be considered when establishing acceptance limits of IIRMIs for therapeutic proteins.

  13. Trace levels of innate immune response modulating impurities (IIRMIs synergize to break tolerance to therapeutic proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Verthelyi

    Full Text Available Therapeutic proteins such as monoclonal antibodies, replacement enzymes and toxins have significantly improved the therapeutic options for multiple diseases, including cancer and inflammatory diseases as well as enzyme deficiencies and inborn errors of metabolism. However, immune responses to these products are frequent and can seriously impact their safety and efficacy. Of the many factors that can impact protein immunogenicity, this study focuses on the role of innate immune response modulating impurities (IIRMIs that could be present despite product purification and whether these impurities can synergize to facilitate an immunogenic response to therapeutic proteins. Using lipopolysaccharide (LPS and CpG ODN as IIRMIs we showed that trace levels of these impurities synergized to induce IgM, IFNγ, TNFα and IL-6 expression. In vivo, trace levels of these impurities synergized to increase antigen-specific IgG antibodies to ovalbumin. Further, whereas mice treated with human erythropoietin showed a transient increase in hematocrit, those that received human erythropoietin containing low levels of IIRMIs had reduced response to erythropoietin after the 1(st dose and developed long-lasting anemia following subsequent doses. This suggests that the presence of IIRMIs facilitated a breach in tolerance to the endogenous mouse erythropoietin. Overall, these studies indicate that the risk of enhancing immunogenicity should be considered when establishing acceptance limits of IIRMIs for therapeutic proteins.

  14. Estrogens and selective estrogen receptor modulators regulate gene and protein expression in the mesenteric arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark-Kappeler, Connie J; Martin, Douglas S; Eyster, Kathleen M

    2011-01-01

    Estrogen has both beneficial and detrimental effects on the cardiovascular system. Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) exhibit partial estrogen agonist/antagonist activity in estrogen target tissues. Gene targets of estrogen and SERMs in the vasculature are not well-known. Thus, the present study tested the hypothesis that estrogens (ethinyl estradiol, estradiol benzoate, and equilin) and SERMs (tamoxifen and raloxifene) cause differential gene and protein expression in the vasculature. DNA microarray and real-time RT-PCR were used to investigate gene expression in the mesenteric arteries of estrogen and SERM treated ovariectomized rats. The genes shown to be differentially expressed included stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD), soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH), secreted frizzled related protein-4 (SFRP-4), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), phospholipase A2 group 1B (PLA2-G1B), and fatty acid synthase (FAS). Western blot further confirmed the differential expression of sEH, SFRP-4, FAS, and SCD protein. These results reveal that estrogens and SERMs cause differential gene and protein expression in the mesenteric artery. Consequently, the use of these agents may be associated with a unique profile of functional and structural changes in the mesenteric arterial circulation.

  15. Protein kinase C modulates inactivation of Kv3.3 channels.

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    Desai, Rooma; Kronengold, Jack; Mei, Jianfeng; Forman, Stuart A; Kaczmarek, Leonard K

    2008-08-08

    Modulation of some Kv3 family potassium channels by protein kinase C (PKC) regulates their amplitude and kinetics and adjusts firing patterns of auditory neurons in response to stimulation. Nevertheless, little is known about the modulation of Kv3.3, a channel that is widely expressed throughout the nervous system and is the dominant Kv3 family member in auditory brainstem. We have cloned the cDNA for the Kv3.3 channel from mouse brain and have expressed it in a mammalian cell line and in Xenopus oocytes to characterize its biophysical properties and modulation by PKC. Kv3.3 currents activate at positive voltages and undergo inactivation with time constants of 150-250 ms. Activators of PKC increased current amplitude and removed inactivation of Kv3.3 currents, and a specific PKC pseudosubstrate inhibitor peptide prevented the effects of the activators. Elimination of the first 78 amino acids of the N terminus of Kv3.3 produced noninactivating currents suggesting that PKC modulates N-type inactivation, potentially by phosphorylation of sites in this region. To identify potential phosphorylation sites, we investigated the response of channels in which serines in this N-terminal domain were subjected to mutagenesis. Our results suggest that serines at positions 3 and 9 are potential PKC phosphorylation sites. Computer simulations of model neurons suggest that phosphorylation of Kv3.3 by PKC may allow neurons to maintain action potential height during stimulation at high frequencies, and may therefore contribute to stimulus-induced changes in the intrinsic excitability of neurons such as those of the auditory brainstem.

  16. Modulation of dopamine D(2) receptor signaling by actin-binding protein (ABP-280).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, M; Bermak, J C; Wang, Z W; Zhou, Q Y

    2000-03-01

    Proteins that bind to G protein-coupled receptors have recently been identified as regulators of receptor anchoring and signaling. In this study, actin-binding protein 280 (ABP-280), a widely expressed cytoskeleton-associated protein that plays an important role in regulating cell morphology and motility, was found to associate with the third cytoplasmic loop of dopamine D(2) receptors. The specificity of this interaction was originally identified in a yeast two-hybrid screen and confirmed by protein binding. The functional significance of the D(2) receptor-ABP-280 association was evaluated in human melanoma cells lacking ABP-280. D(2) receptor agonists were less potent in inhibiting forskolin-stimulated cAMP production in these cells. Maximal inhibitory responses of D(2) receptor activation were also reduced. Further yeast two-hybrid experiments showed that ABP-280 association is critically dependent on the carboxyl domain of the D(2) receptor third cytoplasmic loop, where there is a potential serine phosphorylation site (S358). Serine 358 was replaced with aspartic acid to mimic the effects of receptor phosphorylation. This mutant (D(2)S358D) displayed compromised binding to ABP-280 and coupling to adenylate cyclase. PKC activation also generated D(2) receptor signaling attenuation, but only in ABP-containing cells, suggesting a PKC regulatory role in D(2)-ABP association. A mechanism for these results may be derived from a role of ABP-280 in the clustering of D(2) receptors, as determined by immunocytochemical analysis in ABP-deficient and replete cells. Our results suggest a new molecular mechanism of modulating D(2) receptor signaling by cytoskeletal protein interaction.

  17. SQL-1, homologue of the Golgi protein GMAP210, modulates intraflagellar transport in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broekhuis, Joost R; Rademakers, Suzanne; Burghoorn, Jan; Jansen, Gert

    2013-04-15

    Primary cilia are microtubule-based organelles that have important sensory functions. For their function, cilia rely on the delivery of specific proteins, both by intracellular trafficking and intraflagellar transport (IFT). In the cilia of Caenorhabditis elegans, anterograde IFT is mediated by kinesin-II and OSM-3. Previously, we have shown that expression of a dominant active G protein α subunit (GPA-3QL) in amphid channel neurons affects the coordination of kinesin-II and OSM-3 and also affects cilia length, suggesting that environmental signals can modulate these processes. Here, we show that loss-of-function of sql-1 (suppressor of gpa-3QL 1), which encodes the homologue of the mammalian Golgi protein GMAP210, suppresses the gpa-3QL cilia length phenotype. SQL-1 localizes to the Golgi apparatus, where it contributes to maintaining Golgi organization. Loss of sql-1 by itself does not affect cilia length, whereas overexpression of sql-1 results in longer cilia. Using live imaging of fluorescently tagged IFT proteins, we show that in sql-1 mutants OSM-3 moves faster, kinesin-II moves slower and that some complex A and B proteins move at an intermediate velocity, while others move at the same velocity as OSM-3. This indicates that mutation of sql-1 destabilizes the IFT complex. Finally, we show that simultaneous inactivation of sql-1 and activation of gpa-3QL affects the velocity of OSM-3. In summary, we show that in C. elegans the Golgin protein SQL-1 plays an important role in maintaining the stability of the IFT complex.

  18. Epstein - Barr virus latent membrane protein 1 suppresses reporter activity through modulation of promyelocytic leukemia protein-nuclear bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flemington Erik K

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV encoded Latent Membrane Protein 1 (LMP1 has been shown to increase the expression of promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML and the immunofluorescent intensity of promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML NBs. PML NBs have been implicated in the modulation of transcription and the association of reporter plasmids with PML NBs has been implicated in repression of reporter activity. Additionally, repression of various reporters in the presence of LMP1 has been noted. This study demonstrates that LMP1 suppresses expression of reporter activity in a dose responsive manner and corresponds with the LMP1 induced increase in PML NB intensity. Disruption of PML NBs with arsenic trioxide or a PML siRNA restores reporter activity. These data offer an explanation for previously conflicting data on LMP1 signaling and calls attention to the possibility of false-positives and false-negatives when using reporter assays as a research tool in cells expressing LMP1.

  19. LIM and SH3 protein-1 modulates CXCR2-mediated cell migration.

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    Dayanidhi Raman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The chemokine receptor CXCR2 plays a pivotal role in migration of neutrophils, macrophages and endothelial cells, modulating several biological responses such as angiogenesis, wound healing and acute inflammation. CXCR2 is also involved in pathogenesis of chronic inflammation, sepsis and atherosclerosis. The ability of CXCR2 to associate with a variety of proteins dynamically is responsible for its effects on directed cell migration or chemotaxis. The dynamic network of such CXCR2 binding proteins is termed as "CXCR2 chemosynapse". Proteomic analysis of proteins that co-immunoprecipitated with CXCR2 in neutrophil-like dHL-60 cells revealed a novel protein, LIM and SH3 protein 1 (LASP-1, binds CXCR2 under both basal and ligand activated conditions. LASP-1 is an actin binding cytoskeletal protein, involved in the cell migration. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We demonstrate that CXCR2 and LASP-1 co-immunoprecipitate and co-localize at the leading edge of migrating cells. The LIM domain of LASP-1 directly binds to the carboxy-terminal domain (CTD of CXCR2. Moreover, LASP-1 also directly binds the CTD of CXCR1, CXCR3 and CXCR4. Using a site-directed and deletion mutagenesis approach, Iso323-Leu324 of the conserved LKIL motif on CXCR2-CTD was identified as the binding site for LASP-1. Interruption of the interaction between CXCR2-CTD and LIM domain of LASP-1 by dominant negative and knock down approaches inhibited CXCR2-mediated chemotaxis. Analysis for the mechanism for inhibition of CXCR2-mediated chemotaxis indicated that LASP-1/CXCR2 interaction is essential for cell motility and focal adhesion turnover involving activation of Src, paxillin, PAK1, p130CAS and ERK1/2. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We demonstrate here for the first time that LASP-1 is a key component of the "CXCR2 chemosynapse" and LASP-1 interaction with CXCR2 is critical for CXCR2-mediated chemotaxis. Furthermore, LASP-1 also directly binds the CTD of CXCR1, CXCR3 and

  20. LIM and SH3 protein-1 modulates CXCR2-mediated cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Dayanidhi; Sai, Jiqing; Neel, Nicole F; Chew, Catherine S; Richmond, Ann

    2010-04-19

    The chemokine receptor CXCR2 plays a pivotal role in migration of neutrophils, macrophages and endothelial cells, modulating several biological responses such as angiogenesis, wound healing and acute inflammation. CXCR2 is also involved in pathogenesis of chronic inflammation, sepsis and atherosclerosis. The ability of CXCR2 to associate with a variety of proteins dynamically is responsible for its effects on directed cell migration or chemotaxis. The dynamic network of such CXCR2 binding proteins is termed as "CXCR2 chemosynapse". Proteomic analysis of proteins that co-immunoprecipitated with CXCR2 in neutrophil-like dHL-60 cells revealed a novel protein, LIM and SH3 protein 1 (LASP-1), binds CXCR2 under both basal and ligand activated conditions. LASP-1 is an actin binding cytoskeletal protein, involved in the cell migration. We demonstrate that CXCR2 and LASP-1 co-immunoprecipitate and co-localize at the leading edge of migrating cells. The LIM domain of LASP-1 directly binds to the carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) of CXCR2. Moreover, LASP-1 also directly binds the CTD of CXCR1, CXCR3 and CXCR4. Using a site-directed and deletion mutagenesis approach, Iso323-Leu324 of the conserved LKIL motif on CXCR2-CTD was identified as the binding site for LASP-1. Interruption of the interaction between CXCR2-CTD and LIM domain of LASP-1 by dominant negative and knock down approaches inhibited CXCR2-mediated chemotaxis. Analysis for the mechanism for inhibition of CXCR2-mediated chemotaxis indicated that LASP-1/CXCR2 interaction is essential for cell motility and focal adhesion turnover involving activation of Src, paxillin, PAK1, p130CAS and ERK1/2. We demonstrate here for the first time that LASP-1 is a key component of the "CXCR2 chemosynapse" and LASP-1 interaction with CXCR2 is critical for CXCR2-mediated chemotaxis. Furthermore, LASP-1 also directly binds the CTD of CXCR1, CXCR3 and CXCR4, suggesting that LASP-1 is a general mediator of CXC chemokine mediated chemotaxis

  1. Modulation of wound healing and scar formation by MG53 protein-mediated cell membrane repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haichang; Duann, Pu; Lin, Pei-Hui; Zhao, Li; Fan, Zhaobo; Tan, Tao; Zhou, Xinyu; Sun, Mingzhai; Fu, Minghuan; Orange, Matthew; Sermersheim, Matthew; Ma, Hanley; He, Duofen; Steinberg, Steven M; Higgins, Robert; Zhu, Hua; John, Elizabeth; Zeng, Chunyu; Guan, Jianjun; Ma, Jianjie

    2015-10-02

    Cell membrane repair is an important aspect of physiology, and disruption of this process can result in pathophysiology in a number of different tissues, including wound healing, chronic ulcer and scarring. We have previously identified a novel tripartite motif family protein, MG53, as an essential component of the cell membrane repair machinery. Here we report the functional role of MG53 in the modulation of wound healing and scarring. Although MG53 is absent from keratinocytes and fibroblasts, remarkable defects in skin architecture and collagen overproduction are observed in mg53(-/-) mice, and these animals display delayed wound healing and abnormal scarring. Recombinant human MG53 (rhMG53) protein, encapsulated in a hydrogel formulation, facilitates wound healing and prevents scarring in rodent models of dermal injuries. An in vitro study shows that rhMG53 protects against acute injury to keratinocytes and facilitates the migration of fibroblasts in response to scratch wounding. During fibrotic remodeling, rhMG53 interferes with TGF-β-dependent activation of myofibroblast differentiation. The resulting down-regulation of α smooth muscle actin and extracellular matrix proteins contributes to reduced scarring. Overall, these studies establish a trifunctional role for MG53 as a facilitator of rapid injury repair, a mediator of cell migration, and a modulator of myofibroblast differentiation during wound healing. Targeting the functional interaction between MG53 and TGF-β signaling may present a potentially effective means for promoting scarless wound healing. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Yes-associated protein (YAP) increases chemosensitivity of hepatocellular carcinoma cells by modulation of p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Nan; Zhang, Chunyan; Liang, Ning; Zhang, Zhuhong; Chang, Antao; Yin, Jing; Li, Zongjin; Luo, Na; Tan, Xiaoyue; Luo, Na; Luo, Yunping; Xiang, Rong; Li, Xiru; Reisfeld, Ralph A; Stupack, Dwayne; Lv, Dan; Liu, Chenghu

    2013-06-01

    The yes-associated protein (YAP) transcription co-activator has been reported either as an oncogene candidate or a tumor suppressor. Liver tissue chips revealed that about 51.4% human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) samples express YAP and 32.9% HCC samples express phosphorylated YAP. In this study, we found that chemotherapy increased YAP protein expression and nuclear translocation in HepG2 cells, as well as p53 protein expression and nuclear translocation. However, little is known about YAP functions during chemotherapy. Our results show that overexpression of YAP increases chemosensitivity of HepG2 cells during chemotherapy. Dominant negative transfection of Flag-S94A (TEAD binding domain mutant) or Flag-W1W2 (WW domain mutant) to HepG2 cells decreases p53 expression/ nuclear translocation and chemosensitivity when compared with control HepG2 cells. Furthermore, rescue transfection of Flag-5SA-S94A or Flag-5SA-W1W2, respectively to HepG2 cells regains p53 expression/nuclear translocation and chemosensitivity. These results indicate that YAP promotes chemosensitivity by modulating p53 during chemotherapy and both TEAD and WW binding domains are required for YAP-mediated p53 function. ChIP assay results also indicated that YAP binds directly to the p53 promoter to improve its expression. In addition, p53 could positively feedback YAP expression through binding to the YAP promoter. Taken together, our current data indicate that YAP functions as a tumor suppressor that enhances apoptosis by modulating p53 during chemotherapy.

  3. Prediction of the anti-inflammatory mechanisms of curcumin by module-based protein interaction network analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanxiong Gan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin, the medically active component from Curcuma longa (Turmeric, is widely used to treat inflammatory diseases. Protein interaction network (PIN analysis was used to predict its mechanisms of molecular action. Targets of curcumin were obtained based on ChEMBL and STITCH databases. Protein–protein interactions (PPIs were extracted from the String database. The PIN of curcumin was constructed by Cytoscape and the function modules identified by gene ontology (GO enrichment analysis based on molecular complex detection (MCODE. A PIN of curcumin with 482 nodes and 1688 interactions was constructed, which has scale-free, small world and modular properties. Based on analysis of these function modules, the mechanism of curcumin is proposed. Two modules were found to be intimately associated with inflammation. With function modules analysis, the anti-inflammatory effects of curcumin were related to SMAD, ERG and mediation by the TLR family. TLR9 may be a potential target of curcumin to treat inflammation.

  4. Hypoxia-induced modulation of apoptosis and BCL-2 family proteins in different cancer cell types.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey Sermeus

    Full Text Available Hypoxia plays an important role in the resistance of tumour cells to chemotherapy. However, the exact mechanisms underlying this process are not well understood. Moreover, according to the cell lines, hypoxia differently influences cell death. The study of the effects of hypoxia on the apoptosis induced by 5 chemotherapeutic drugs in 7 cancer cell types showed that hypoxia generally inhibited the drug-induced apoptosis. In most cases, the effect of hypoxia was the same for all the drugs in one cell type. The expression profile of 93 genes involved in apoptosis as well as the protein level of BCL-2 family proteins were then investigated. In HepG2 cells that are strongly protected against cell death by hypoxia, hypoxia decreased the abundance of nearly all the pro-apoptotic BCL-2 family proteins while none of them are decreased in A549 cells that are not protected against cell death by hypoxia. In HepG2 cells, hypoxia decreased NOXA and BAD abundance and modified the electrophoretic mobility of BIM(EL. BIM and NOXA are important mediators of etoposide-induced cell death in HepG2 cells and the hypoxia-induced modification of these proteins abundance or post-translational modifications partly account for chemoresistance. Finally, the modulation of the abundance and/or of the post-translational modifications of most proteins of the BCL-2 family by hypoxia involves p53-dependent and -independent pathways and is cell type-dependent. A better understanding of these cell-to-cell variations is crucial in order to overcome hypoxia-induced resistance and to ameliorate cancer therapy.

  5. Interaction of dengue virus nonstructural protein 5 with Daxx modulates RANTES production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khunchai, Sasiprapa [Division of Molecular Medicine, Department of Research and Development, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Graduate Program in Immunology, Department of Immunology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Junking, Mutita [Division of Molecular Medicine, Department of Research and Development, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Suttitheptumrong, Aroonroong; Yasamut, Umpa [Division of Molecular Medicine, Department of Research and Development, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Graduate Program in Immunology, Department of Immunology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Sawasdee, Nunghathai [Division of Molecular Medicine, Department of Research and Development, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Netsawang, Janjuree [Faculty of Medical Technology, Rangsit University, Bangkok (Thailand); Morchang, Atthapan [Division of Molecular Medicine, Department of Research and Development, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Graduate Program in Immunology, Department of Immunology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Chaowalit, Prapaipit [Division of Molecular Medicine, Department of Research and Development, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Noisakran, Sansanee [Medical Biotechnology Research Unit, National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, National Science and Technology Development Agency, Bangkok (Thailand); Yenchitsomanus, Pa-thai, E-mail: grpye@mahidol.ac.th [Division of Molecular Medicine, Department of Research and Development, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); and others

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer For the first time how DENV NS5 increases RANTES production. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DENV NS5 physically interacts with human Daxx. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nuclear localization of NS5 is required for Daxx interaction and RANTES production. -- Abstract: Dengue fever (DF), dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), and dengue shock syndrome (DSS), caused by dengue virus (DENV) infection, are important public health problems in the tropical and subtropical regions. Abnormal hemostasis and plasma leakage are the main patho-physiological changes in DHF/DSS. A remarkably increased production of cytokines, the so called 'cytokine storm', is observed in the patients with DHF/DSS. A complex interaction between DENV proteins and the host immune response contributes to cytokine production. However, the molecular mechanism(s) by which DENV nonstructural protein 5 (NS5) mediates these responses has not been fully elucidated. In the present study, yeast two-hybrid assay was performed to identify host proteins interacting with DENV NS5 and a death-domain-associate protein (Daxx) was identified. The in vivo relevance of this interaction was suggested by co-immunoprecipitation and nuclear co-localization of these two proteins in HEK293 cells expressing DENV NS5. HEK293 cells expressing DENV NS5-K/A, which were mutated at the nuclear localization sequences (NLS), were created to assess its functional roles in nuclear translocation, Daxx interaction, and cytokine production. In the absence of NLS, DENV NS5 could neither translocate into the nucleus nor interact with Daxx to increase the DHF-associated cytokine, RANTES (CCL5) production. This work demonstrates the interaction between DENV NS5 and Daxx and the role of the interaction on the modulation of RANTES production.

  6. A single mutation in the envelope protein modulates flavivirus antigenicity, stability, and pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie Goo

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The structural flexibility or 'breathing' of the envelope (E protein of flaviviruses allows virions to sample an ensemble of conformations at equilibrium. The molecular basis and functional consequences of virus conformational dynamics are poorly understood. Here, we identified a single mutation at residue 198 (T198F of the West Nile virus (WNV E protein domain I-II hinge that regulates virus breathing. The T198F mutation resulted in a ~70-fold increase in sensitivity to neutralization by a monoclonal antibody targeting a cryptic epitope in the fusion loop. Increased exposure of this otherwise poorly accessible fusion loop epitope was accompanied by reduced virus stability in solution at physiological temperatures. Introduction of a mutation at the analogous residue of dengue virus (DENV, but not Zika virus (ZIKV, E protein also increased accessibility of the cryptic fusion loop epitope and decreased virus stability in solution, suggesting that this residue modulates the structural ensembles sampled by distinct flaviviruses at equilibrium in a context dependent manner. Although the T198F mutation did not substantially impair WNV growth kinetics in vitro, studies in mice revealed attenuation of WNV T198F infection. Overall, our study provides insight into the molecular basis and the in vitro and in vivo consequences of flavivirus breathing.

  7. SUMO-2 and PIAS1 modulate insoluble mutant huntingtin protein accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, Jacqueline Gire; Gareau, Jaclyn R; Ochaba, Joseph; Song, Wan; Raskó, Tamás; Reverter, David; Lee, John; Monteys, Alex Mas; Pallos, Judit; Mee, Lisa; Vashishtha, Malini; Apostol, Barbara L; Nicholson, Thomas Peter; Illes, Katalin; Zhu, Ya-Zhen; Dasso, Mary; Bates, Gillian P; Difiglia, Marian; Davidson, Beverly; Wanker, Erich E; Marsh, J Lawrence; Lima, Christopher D; Steffan, Joan S; Thompson, Leslie M

    2013-07-25

    A key feature in Huntington disease (HD) is the accumulation of mutant Huntingtin (HTT) protein, which may be regulated by posttranslational modifications. Here, we define the primary sites of SUMO modification in the amino-terminal domain of HTT, show modification downstream of this domain, and demonstrate that HTT is modified by the stress-inducible SUMO-2. A systematic study of E3 SUMO ligases demonstrates that PIAS1 is an E3 SUMO ligase for both HTT SUMO-1 and SUMO-2 modification and that reduction of dPIAS in a mutant HTT Drosophila model is protective. SUMO-2 modification regulates accumulation of insoluble HTT in HeLa cells in a manner that mimics proteasome inhibition and can be modulated by overexpression and acute knockdown of PIAS1. Finally, the accumulation of SUMO-2-modified proteins in the insoluble fraction of HD postmortem striata implicates SUMO-2 modification in the age-related pathogenic accumulation of mutant HTT and other cellular proteins that occurs during HD progression.

  8. VAMP-associated protein B (VAPB) promotes breast tumor growth by modulation of Akt activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Meghana; Song, Wenqiang; Jiang, Aixiang; Shyr, Yu; Lev, Sima; Greenstein, David; Brantley-Sieders, Dana; Chen, Jin

    2012-01-01

    VAPB (VAMP- associated protein B) is an ER protein that regulates multiple biological functions. Although aberrant expression of VAPB is associated with breast cancer, its function in tumor cells is poorly understood. In this report, we provide evidence that VAPB regulates breast tumor cell proliferation and AKT activation. VAPB protein expression is elevated in primary and metastatic tumor specimens, and VAPB mRNA expression levels correlated negatively with patient survival in two large breast tumor datasets. Overexpression of VAPB in mammary epithelial cells increased cell growth, whereas VAPB knockdown in tumor cells inhibited cell proliferation in vitro and suppressed tumor growth in orthotopic mammary gland allografts. The growth regulation of mammary tumor cells controlled by VAPB appears to be mediated, at least in part, by modulation of AKT activity. Overexpression of VAPB in MCF10A-HER2 cells enhances phosphorylation of AKT. In contrast, knockdown of VAPB in MMTV-Neu tumor cells inhibited pAKT levels. Pharmacological inhibition of AKT significantly reduced three-dimensional spheroid growth induced by VAPB. Collectively, the genetic, functional and mechanistic analyses suggest a role of VAPB in tumor promotion in human breast cancer.

  9. VAMP-associated protein B (VAPB promotes breast tumor growth by modulation of Akt activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghana Rao

    Full Text Available VAPB (VAMP- associated protein B is an ER protein that regulates multiple biological functions. Although aberrant expression of VAPB is associated with breast cancer, its function in tumor cells is poorly understood. In this report, we provide evidence that VAPB regulates breast tumor cell proliferation and AKT activation. VAPB protein expression is elevated in primary and metastatic tumor specimens, and VAPB mRNA expression levels correlated negatively with patient survival in two large breast tumor datasets. Overexpression of VAPB in mammary epithelial cells increased cell growth, whereas VAPB knockdown in tumor cells inhibited cell proliferation in vitro and suppressed tumor growth in orthotopic mammary gland allografts. The growth regulation of mammary tumor cells controlled by VAPB appears to be mediated, at least in part, by modulation of AKT activity. Overexpression of VAPB in MCF10A-HER2 cells enhances phosphorylation of AKT. In contrast, knockdown of VAPB in MMTV-Neu tumor cells inhibited pAKT levels. Pharmacological inhibition of AKT significantly reduced three-dimensional spheroid growth induced by VAPB. Collectively, the genetic, functional and mechanistic analyses suggest a role of VAPB in tumor promotion in human breast cancer.

  10. Modulation of Epstein–Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen 2-dependent transcription by protein arginine methyltransferase 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Cheng-Der; Cheng, Chi-Ping; Fang, Jia-Shih; Chen, Ling-Chih [Department of Life Sciences, Tzu-Chi University, 701 Chung-Yang Rd. Sec 3, Hualien 97004, Taiwan (China); Zhao, Bo; Kieff, Elliott [Department of Medicine and Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Channing Laboratory, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 181 Longwood Ave., Boston 02115, MA (United States); Peng, Chih-Wen, E-mail: pengcw@mail.tcu.edu.tw [Department of Life Sciences, Tzu-Chi University, 701 Chung-Yang Rd. Sec 3, Hualien 97004, Taiwan (China)

    2013-01-18

    Highlights: ► Catalytic active PRMT5 substantially binds to the EBNA2 RG domain. ► PRMT5 augments the EBNA2-dependent transcription. ► PRMT5 triggers the symmetric dimethylation of the EBNA2 RG domain. ► PRMT5 enhances the promoter occupancy of EBNA2 on its target promoters. -- Abstract: Epstein–Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen (EBNA) 2 features an Arginine–Glycine repeat (RG) domain at amino acid positions 335–360, which is a known target for protein arginine methyltransferaser 5 (PRMT5). In this study, we performed protein affinity pull-down assays to demonstrate that endogenous PRMT5 derived from lymphoblastoid cells specifically associated with the protein bait GST-E2 RG. Transfection of a plasmid expressing PRMT5 induced a 2.5- to 3-fold increase in EBNA2-dependent transcription of both the LMP1 promoter in AKATA cells, which contain the EBV genome endogenously, and a Cp-Luc reporter plasmid in BJAB cells, which are EBV negative. Furthermore, we showed that there was a 2-fold enrichment of EBNA2 occupancy in target promoters in the presence of exogenous PRMT5. Taken together, we show that PRMT5 triggers the symmetric dimethylation of EBNA2 RG domain to coordinate with EBNA2-mediated transcription. This modulation suggests that PRMT5 may play a role in latent EBV infection.

  11. Popeye domain containing proteins are essential for stress-mediated modulation of cardiac pacemaking in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froese, Alexander; Breher, Stephanie S; Waldeyer, Christoph; Schindler, Roland F R; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O; Rinné, Susanne; Wischmeyer, Erhard; Schlueter, Jan; Becher, Jan; Simrick, Subreena; Vauti, Franz; Kuhtz, Juliane; Meister, Patrick; Kreissl, Sonja; Torlopp, Angela; Liebig, Sonja K; Laakmann, Sandra; Müller, Thomas D; Neumann, Joachim; Stieber, Juliane; Ludwig, Andreas; Maier, Sebastian K; Decher, Niels; Arnold, Hans-Henning; Kirchhof, Paulus; Fabritz, Larissa; Brand, Thomas

    2012-03-01

    Cardiac pacemaker cells create rhythmic pulses that control heart rate; pacemaker dysfunction is a prevalent disorder in the elderly, but little is known about the underlying molecular causes. Popeye domain containing (Popdc) genes encode membrane proteins with high expression levels in cardiac myocytes and specifically in the cardiac pacemaking and conduction system. Here, we report the phenotypic analysis of mice deficient in Popdc1 or Popdc2. ECG analysis revealed severe sinus node dysfunction when freely roaming mutant animals were subjected to physical or mental stress. In both mutants, bradyarrhythmia developed in an age-dependent manner. Furthermore, we found that the conserved Popeye domain functioned as a high-affinity cAMP-binding site. Popdc proteins interacted with the potassium channel TREK-1, which led to increased cell surface expression and enhanced current density, both of which were negatively modulated by cAMP. These data indicate that Popdc proteins have an important regulatory function in heart rate dynamics that is mediated, at least in part, through cAMP binding. Mice with mutant Popdc1 and Popdc2 alleles are therefore useful models for the dissection of the mechanisms causing pacemaker dysfunction and could aid in the development of strategies for therapeutic intervention.

  12. Morphological adaptation and protein modulation of myotendinous junction following moderate aerobic training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curzi, Davide; Baldassarri, Valentina; De Matteis, Rita; Salamanna, Francesca; Bolotta, Alessandra; Frizziero, Antonio; Fini, Milena; Marini, Marina; Falcieri, Elisabetta

    2015-04-01

    Myotendinous junction is the muscle-tendon interface through which the contractile force can be transferred from myofibrils to the tendon extracellular matrix. At the ultrastructural level, aerobic training can modify the distal myotendinous junction of rat gastrocnemius, increasing the contact area between tissues. The aim of this work is to investigate the correlation between morphological changes and protein modulation of the myotendinous junction following moderate training. For this reason, talin, vinculin and type IV collagen amount and spatial distribution were investigated by immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy. The images were then digitally analyzed by evaluating fluorescence intensity. Morphometric analysis revealed a significant increased thickening of muscle basal lamina in the trained group (53.1 ± 0.4 nm) with respect to the control group (43.9 ± 0.3 nm), and morphological observation showed the presence of an electron-dense area in the exercised muscles, close to the myotendinous junction. Protein concentrations appeared significantly increased in the trained group (talin +22.2%; vinculin +22.8% and type IV collagen +11.8%) with respect to the control group. Therefore, our findings suggest that moderate aerobic training induces/causes morphological changes at the myotendinous junction, correlated to the synthesis of structural proteins of the muscular basal lamina and of the cytoskeleton.

  13. Modulation of Apoptotic Signaling by the Hepatitis B Virus X Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Bouchard

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Worldwide, an estimated 350 million people are chronically infected with the Hepatitis B Virus (HBV; chronic infection with HBV is associated with the development of severe liver diseases including hepatitis and cirrhosis. Individuals who are chronically infected with HBV also have a significantly higher risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC than uninfected individuals. The HBV X protein (HBx is a key regulatory HBV protein that is important for HBV replication, and likely plays a cofactor role in the development of HCC in chronically HBV-infected individuals. Although some of the functions of HBx that may contribute to the development of HCC have been characterized, many HBx activities, and their putative roles during the development of HBV-associated HCC, remain incompletely understood. HBx is a multifunctional protein that localizes to the cytoplasm, nucleus, and mitochondria of HBV‑infected hepatocytes. HBx regulates numerous cellular signal transduction pathways and transcription factors as well as cell cycle progression and apoptosis. In this review, we will summarize reports in which the impact of HBx expression on cellular apoptotic pathways has been analyzed. Although various effects of HBx on apoptotic pathways have been observed in different model systems, studies of HBx activities in biologically relevant hepatocyte systems have begun to clarify apoptotic effects of HBx and suggest mechanisms that could link HBx modulation of apoptotic pathways to the development of HBV-associated HCC.

  14. Mammalian verprolin CR16 acts as a modulator of ITSN scaffold proteins association with actin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kropyvko, Sergii; Gryaznova, Tetyana; Morderer, Dmytro; Rynditch, Alla

    2017-03-18

    Actin cytoskeleton rearrangements are required for normal cell functioning, and their deregulation leads to various pathologies. Members of two mammalian protein families - ITSNs (ITSN1 and ITSN2) and verprolins (WIP, CR16 and WIRE) are involved in Cdc42/N-WASP/Arp2/3 signaling pathway-mediated remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton. Recently we demonstrated that ITSNs interact with the actin-regulating protein WIP. Here, we show that other member of verprolin family, CR16, also forms complexes with ITSN1 and ITSN2 in human cell lines. The actin-binding protein CR16 modulates ITSN/β-actin association. Moreover, overexpressed CR16 promoted co-localization of ITSN1 with F-actin in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Our data demonstrated that CR16 mRNA is expressed in glioblastoma and breast tumors. These findings provide the basis for further functional investigations of the ITSN/CR16 complex that may play an important role in actin remodeling and cellular invasion.

  15. The modulation of platelet adhesion and activation by chitosan through plasma and extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Megan S; Cheng, Bill; McCarthy, Simon J; Jung, MoonSun; Whitelock, John M

    2011-10-01

    Chitosan has been shown to promote initial wound closure events to prevent blood loss. Platelet adhesion and activation are crucial early events in these processes after traumatic bleeding leading to thrombus formation. Platelet adhesion to chitosan was found to be enhanced in the presence of adsorbed plasma and extracellular matrix proteins and was found to be primarily mediated by α(IIb)β(3) integrins, while α(2)β(1) integrins were found to be involved in platelet adhesion to collagen and perlecan. Platelets were found to be activated by chitosan, as shown by an increase in the expression of α(IIb)β(3) integrins and P-selectin, while the extent of activation was modulated by the presence of proteins including perlecan and fibrinogen. Collagen-coated chitosan was found to activate platelets to the same extent as either chitosan or collagen alone. These data support the role of plasma and extracellular matrix proteins in promoting chitosan mediated platelet adhesion and activation supporting the hypothesis that chitosan promotes wound healing via these interactions.

  16. SUMO-2 and PIAS1 Modulate Insoluble Mutant Huntingtin Protein Accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Gire O’Rourke

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A key feature in Huntington disease (HD is the accumulation of mutant Huntingtin (HTT protein, which may be regulated by posttranslational modifications. Here, we define the primary sites of SUMO modification in the amino-terminal domain of HTT, show modification downstream of this domain, and demonstrate that HTT is modified by the stress-inducible SUMO-2. A systematic study of E3 SUMO ligases demonstrates that PIAS1 is an E3 SUMO ligase for both HTT SUMO-1 and SUMO-2 modification and that reduction of dPIAS in a mutant HTT Drosophila model is protective. SUMO-2 modification regulates accumulation of insoluble HTT in HeLa cells in a manner that mimics proteasome inhibition and can be modulated by overexpression and acute knockdown of PIAS1. Finally, the accumulation of SUMO-2-modified proteins in the insoluble fraction of HD postmortem striata implicates SUMO-2 modification in the age-related pathogenic accumulation of mutant HTT and other cellular proteins that occurs during HD progression.

  17. Raf kinase inhibitory protein: a signal transduction modulator and metastasis suppressor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alexey E Granovsky; Marsha Rich Rosner

    2008-01-01

    Cells have a multitude of controls to maintain their integrity and prevent random switching from one biological state to another. Raf Kinase Inhibitory Protein (RKIP), a member of the phosphatidylethanolamine binding protein (PEBP) family, is representative of a new class of modulators of signaling cascades that function to maintain the "yin yang" or balance of biological systems. RKIP inhibits MAP kinase (Raf-MEK-ERK), G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) kinase and NFkB signaling cascades. Because RKIP targets different kinases dependent upon its state of phosphorylation, RKIP also acts to integrate crosstalk initiated by multiple environmental stimuli. Loss or depletion of RKIP results in disruption of the normal cellular stasis and can lead to chromosomal abnormalities and disease states such as cancer. Since RKIP and the PEBP family have been reviewed previously, the goal of this analysis is to provide an update and highlight some of the unique features of RKIP that make it a critical player in the regulation of cellular signaling processes.

  18. A single mutation in the envelope protein modulates flavivirus antigenicity, stability, and pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goo, Leslie; VanBlargan, Laura A.; Dowd, Kimberly A.; Diamond, Michael S.

    2017-01-01

    The structural flexibility or ‘breathing’ of the envelope (E) protein of flaviviruses allows virions to sample an ensemble of conformations at equilibrium. The molecular basis and functional consequences of virus conformational dynamics are poorly understood. Here, we identified a single mutation at residue 198 (T198F) of the West Nile virus (WNV) E protein domain I-II hinge that regulates virus breathing. The T198F mutation resulted in a ~70-fold increase in sensitivity to neutralization by a monoclonal antibody targeting a cryptic epitope in the fusion loop. Increased exposure of this otherwise poorly accessible fusion loop epitope was accompanied by reduced virus stability in solution at physiological temperatures. Introduction of a mutation at the analogous residue of dengue virus (DENV), but not Zika virus (ZIKV), E protein also increased accessibility of the cryptic fusion loop epitope and decreased virus stability in solution, suggesting that this residue modulates the structural ensembles sampled by distinct flaviviruses at equilibrium in a context dependent manner. Although the T198F mutation did not substantially impair WNV growth kinetics in vitro, studies in mice revealed attenuation of WNV T198F infection. Overall, our study provides insight into the molecular basis and the in vitro and in vivo consequences of flavivirus breathing. PMID:28207910

  19. Heat Shock Protein 90 Modulates Lipid Homeostasis by Regulating the Stability and Function of Sterol Regulatory Element-binding Protein (SREBP) and SREBP Cleavage-activating Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuan, Yen-Chou; Hashidume, Tsutomu; Shibata, Takahiro; Uchida, Koji; Shimizu, Makoto; Inoue, Jun; Sato, Ryuichiro

    2017-02-17

    Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) are the key transcription factors that modulate lipid biosynthesis. SREBPs are synthesized as endoplasmic reticulum-bound precursors that require proteolytic activation in the Golgi apparatus. The stability and maturation of precursor SREBPs depend on their binding to SREBP cleavage-activating protein (SCAP), which escorts the SCAP-SREBP complex to the Golgi apparatus. In this study, we identified heat shock protein (HSP) 90 as a novel SREBP regulator that binds to and stabilizes SCAP-SREBP. In HepG2 cells, HSP90 inhibition led to proteasome-dependent degradation of SCAP-SREBP, which resulted in the down-regulation of SREBP target genes and the reduction in intracellular triglyceride and cholesterol levels. We also demonstrated in vivo that HSP90 inhibition decreased SCAP-SREBP protein, down-regulated SREBP target genes, and reduced lipids levels in mouse livers. We propose that HSP90 plays an indispensable role in SREBP regulation by stabilizing the SCAP-SREBP complex, facilitating the activation of SREBP to maintain lipids homeostasis.

  20. Metal Vector Manipulated Molecular Self-Assembly from Werner System to Cotton System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Shu-Yan; ZHANG Zhong-Xing; HUANG Hui; LI Sheng-Hui; HUANG Hai-Ping

    2004-01-01

    A definition of metal vector was given to coordinatively unsaturated metals or asymmetrically coordinated metal complexes in which the metal center is partly blocked by inert chelating ligand(s), thus possess specific reactivity and directionality, such as cis-coordinated square Pd(Ⅱ) or Pt(Ⅱ) complexes. Metal vectors have been extensively used in coordination catalysis and molecular assembly. In 1990, Fujita [ 1 ] first demonstrated the utility of cis-coordinated square Pd(Ⅱ)or Pt(Ⅱ) complexes as a right angular 2D metal vector in the formation of molecular square, a cyclic tetramer with nano-cavity and unique molecular recognition. So far, much attention has been paid to the use of the mononuclear coordination centers (Werner-type metal vectors) in molecular assembly.As late as 1999, Cotton et al. [2] reported the use of cis-coordinated metal-metal bonded dimetal units (Cotton-type metal vectors) to direct assembly of molecular squares.This presentation includes two parts: 1) Werner-type metal vector directed molecular assembly; [3]2) Cotton-type metal vector directed molecular assembly.[4]Firstly, the Werner-type metal vector, cis-coordinated Pd(Ⅱ) nitrate, was used to direct a 6-component self-assembly. This leads to the formation of a molecular bowl or crown with syn,syn,syn conformation. These structures are analogues of calix[3]arenes and can function as anion receptors. Interestingly, an nitrate is found to distort from a trigonal plane into a trigonal pyramid when binding to the bottom of the molecular bowl.Secondly, the Cotton-type metal vector, cis-diRh(Ⅱ, Ⅱ), was used to assemble di- or poly-carboxylate anions into neutral supermolecules. Most interestingly, a calixarene-based carceplex with four cis-diRh(Ⅱ, Ⅱ) fastners was obtained[5].All self-assembling entities were studied by both X-ray crystallographic analysis and solution NMR spectra, which are consistent with the presence of assembling structures even in solution.

  1. High expression of G-protein signaling modulator 2 in hepatocellular carcinoma facilitates tumor growth and metastasis by activating the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiao-Qin; Zhang, Yue-Feng; Yu, Jia-Jun; Gan, Yuan-Yuan; Han, Na-Na; Zhang, Mei-Xia; Ge, Wei; Deng, Jun-Jian; Zheng, Yong-Fa; Xu, Xi-Ming

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of G-protein signaling modulator 2 in the carcinogenesis and progression of hepatocellular carcinoma. We previously showed that G-protein signaling modulator 2 was upregulated in hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma tissues through a hierarchical clustering analysis. With this study, we first assessed the expression pattern of G-protein signaling modulator 2 in hepatocellular carcinoma specimens and adjacent noncancerous tissues; clinical data were analyzed, along survival times, utilizing the Kaplan-Meier method. Moreover, the functions of G-protein signaling modulator 2 were examined using small-interfering RNAs in vitro. The results showed that G-protein signaling modulator 2 was clearly overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma tissues and cell lines and that the G-protein signaling modulator 2 expression level was related to tumor size and hepatitis B virus infection. Furthermore, G-protein signaling modulator 2 knockdown studies suggested that G-protein signaling modulator 2 accelerates cell growth, cell cycle, migration, and invasion and inhibits apoptosis, acting as an oncogene in hepatocellular carcinoma. Western blotting indicated that silencing of G-protein signaling modulator 2 in HepG2 and SMMC-7721 cells increased the expression levels of Bax, caspase-3, and E-cadherin, while notably suppressing the cyclin-dependent kinase 4, cyclin-dependent kinase 6, CyclinD1, Snail1, Vimentin, and matrix metallopeptidase 9 expression levels, compared with that in the control groups. In addition, we found that G-protein signaling modulator 2 can affect the expression of key proteins involved in protein kinase B activation. In conclusion, high expression of G-protein signaling modulator 2 was involved in the pathological processes of hepatocellular carcinoma through activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B signaling pathway, which may provide an attractive potential diagnostic

  2. Modulation of heat shock protein response in SH-SY5Y by mobile phone microwaves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Emanuele; Calabrò; Salvatore; Condello; Monica; Currò; Nadia; Ferlazzo; Daniela; Caccamo; Salvatore; Magazù; Riccardo; Ientile

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate putative biological damage caused by GSM mobile phone frequencies by assessing electromagnetic fields during mobile phone working. METHODS: Neuron-like cells, obtained by retinoicacid-induced differentiation of human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, were exposed for 2 h and 4 h to microwaves at 1800 MHz frequency bands. RESULTS: Cell stress response was evaluated by MTT assay as well as changes in the heat shock protein expression (Hsp20, Hsp27 and Hsp70) and caspase-3 activity levels, as biomarkers of apoptotic pathway. Under our experimental conditions, neither cell viability nor Hsp27 expression nor caspase-3 activity was significantly changed. Interestingly, a significant decrease in Hsp20 expression was observed at both times of exposure, whereas Hsp70 levels were significantly increased only after 4 h exposure. CONCLUSION: The modulation of the expression of Hsps in neuronal cells can be an early response to radiofrequency microwaves.

  3. Modulation of CRISPR locus transcription by the repeat-binding protein Cbp1 in Sulfolobus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deng, Ling; Kenchappa, Chandra Shekar; Peng, Xu

    2012-01-01

    CRISPR loci are essential components of the adaptive immune system of archaea and bacteria. They consist of long arrays of repeats separated by DNA spacers encoding guide RNAs (crRNA), which target foreign genetic elements. Cbp1 (CRISPR DNA repeat binding protein) binds specifically to the multiple...... direct repeats of CRISPR loci of members of the acidothermophilic, crenarchaeal order Sulfolobales. cbp1 gene deletion from Sulfolobus islandicus REY15A produced a strong reduction in pre-crRNA yields from CRISPR loci but did not inhibit the foreign DNA targeting capacity of the CRISPR/Cas system....... Conversely, overexpression of Cbp1 in S. islandicus generated an increase in pre-crRNA yields while the level of reverse strand transcripts from CRISPR loci remained unchanged. It is proposed that Cbp1 modulates production of longer pre-crRNA transcripts from CRISPR loci. A possible mechanism...

  4. Module-based functional pathway enrichment analysis of a protein-protein interaction network to study the effects of intestinal microbiota depletion in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Zhen-Yi; Xia, Yang; Tong, Danian; Yao, Jing; Chen, Hong-Qi; Yang, Jun

    2014-06-01

    Complex communities of microorganisms play important roles in human health, and alterations in the intestinal microbiota may induce intestinal inflammation and numerous diseases. The purpose of this study was to identify the key genes and processes affected by depletion of the intestinal microbiota in a murine model. The Affymetrix microarray dataset GSE22648 was downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database, and differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified using the limma package in R. A protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was constructed for the DEGs using the Cytoscape software, and the network was divided into several modules using the MCODE plugin. Furthermore, the modules were functionally annotated using the PiNGO plugin, and DEG-related pathways were retrieved and analyzed using the GenMAPP software. A total of 53 DEGs were identified, of which 26 were upregulated and 27 were downregulated. The PPI network of these DEGs comprised 3 modules. The most significant module-related DEGs were the cytochrome P450 (CYP) 4B1 isozyme gene (CYP4B1) in module 1, CYP4F14 in module 2 and the tachykinin precursor 1 gene (TAC1) in module 3. The majority of enriched pathways of module 1 and 2 were oxidation reduction pathways (metabolism of xenobiotics by CYPs) and lipid metabolism-related pathways, including linoleic acid and arachidonic acid metabolism. The neuropeptide signaling pathway was the most significantly enriched functional pathway of module 3. In conclusion, our findings strongly suggest that intestinal microbiota depletion affects cellular metabolism and oxidation reduction pathways. In addition, this is the first time, to the best of our knowledge, that the neuropeptide signaling pathway is reported to be affected by intestinal microbiota depletion in mice. The present study provides a list of candidate genes and processes related to the interaction of microbiota with the intestinal tract.

  5. The Nicastrin-like protein Nicalin regulates assembly and stability of the Nicalin-nodal modulator (NOMO) membrane protein complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haffner, Christof; Dettmer, Ulf; Weiler, Timotheus; Haass, Christian

    2007-04-06

    The assembly of the gamma-secretase complex, an Alzheimer disease-related protease required for beta-amyloid generation, is tightly regulated and predominantly limited by the stoichiometrical availability of its components. We have identified a novel endoplasmic reticulum-located protein complex that is regulated in a similar fashion. It contains the recently identified Nodal signaling antagonists Nicalin (a distant homolog of the gamma-secretase component Nicastrin) and NOMO (Nodal modulator). Using an RNA interference approach, we found that Nicalin and NOMO became unstable in the absence of the respective binding partner, suggesting that complex formation has a stabilizing effect. Overexpression of Nicalin resulted in an increase in NOMO, whereas endogenous Nicalin was reduced below the detection limit. Both effects were shown to occur at a post-transcriptional level. Thus, NOMO is most likely produced in excess amounts and either stabilized by Nicalin or rapidly degraded. In contrast, Nicalin levels are limited independently of NOMO. We, therefore, propose that Nicalin controls the assembly and stability of the Nicalin-NOMO complex.

  6. The First Residue of the PWWP Motif Modulates HATH Domain Binding, Stability, and Protein-Protein Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Yi-Lin; Lee, Hsia-Ju; Jiang, Ingjye; Lin, Shang-Chi; Lo, Wei-Cheng; Lin, Yi-Jan; Sue, Shih-Che

    2015-07-01

    Hepatoma-derived growth factor (hHDGF) and HDGF-related proteins (HRPs) contain conserved N-terminal HATH domains with a characteristic structural motif, namely the PWWP motif. The HATH domain has attracted attention because of its ability to bind with heparin/heparan sulfate, DNA, and methylated histone peptide. Depending on the sequence of the PWWP motif, HRP HATHs are classified into P-type (Pro-His-Trp-Pro) and A-type (Ala-His-Trp-Pro) forms. A-type HATH is highly unstable and tends to precipitate in solution. We replaced the Pro residue in P-type HATHHDGF with Ala and evaluated the influence on structure, dynamics, and ligand binding. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) hydrogen/deuterium exchange and circular dichroism (CD) measurements revealed reduced stability. Analysis of NMR backbone (15)N relaxations (R1, R2, and nuclear Overhauser effect) revealed additional backbone dynamics in the interface between the β-barrel and the C-terminal helix bundle. The β1-β2 loop, where the AHWP sequence is located, has great structural flexibility, which aids HATH-HATH interaction through the loop. A-type HATH, therefore, shows a stronger tendency to aggregate when binding with heparin and DNA oligomers. This study defines the role of the first residue of the PWWP motif in modulating HATH domain stability and oligomer formation in binding.

  7. Herlyn Werner Wunderlich Syndrome with Hematocolpos: An Unusual Case Report of Full Diagnostic Approach and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohit Bhoil

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich (HWW syndrome is an uncommon combined müllerian duct anomalies (MDAs and mesonephric duct malformation of female urogenital tract characterized by uterus didelphys and obstructed hemi-vagina and ipsilateral renal agenesis (OHVIRA syndrome. We present a rare and unusual case of this syndrome in a 19 year-old female who suffered from hypomenorrhoea and abdominal pain. She had an obstructed hemi-vagina on right side which led to marked distention of ipsilateral cervix, while proximal hemi-vagina compressed the contralateral side causing its partial obstruction resulting in hypomenorrhoea. Understanding the imaging findings of this rare condition is important for early diagnosis in order to prevent complications which may lead to infertility.

  8. Aberrant DNA methylation profiles in the premature aging disorders Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria and Werner syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyn, Holger; Moran, Sebastian; Esteller, Manel

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation gradiently changes with age and is likely to be involved in aging-related processes with subsequent phenotype changes and increased susceptibility to certain diseases. The Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria (HGP) and Werner Syndrome (WS) are two premature aging diseases showing features of common natural aging early in life. Mutations in the LMNA and WRN genes were associated to disease onset; however, for a subset of patients the underlying causative mechanisms remain elusive. We aimed to evaluate the role of epigenetic alteration on premature aging diseases by performing comprehensive DNA methylation profiling of HGP and WS patients. We observed profound changes in the DNA methylation landscapes of WRN and LMNA mutant patients, which were narrowed down to a set of aging related genes and processes. Although of low overall variance, non-mutant patients revealed differential DNA methylation at distinct loci. Hence, we propose DNA methylation to have an impact on premature aging diseases. PMID:23257959

  9. Aberrant DNA methylation profiles in the premature aging disorders Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria and Werner syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyn, Holger; Moran, Sebastian; Esteller, Manel

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation gradiently changes with age and is likely to be involved in aging-related processes with subsequent phenotype changes and increased susceptibility to certain diseases. The Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria (HGP) and Werner Syndrome (WS) are two premature aging diseases showing features of common natural aging early in life. Mutations in the LMNA and WRN genes were associated to disease onset; however, for a subset of patients the underlying causative mechanisms remain elusive. We aimed to evaluate the role of epigenetic alteration on premature aging diseases by performing comprehensive DNA methylation profiling of HGP and WS patients. We observed profound changes in the DNA methylation landscapes of WRN and LMNA mutant patients, which were narrowed down to a set of aging related genes and processes. Although of low overall variance, non-mutant patients revealed differential DNA methylation at distinct loci. Hence, we propose DNA methylation to have an impact on premature aging diseases.

  10. Un'estrema solitudine la vita e l'opera di Werner Heisenberg

    CERN Document Server

    Cassidy, David C

    1996-01-01

    Il genio di Werner Heisenberg attraversa l'orizzonte della fisica del nostro secolo come una meteora. Testimoniano della fecondità e dell'originalità del suo pensiero non solo il Nobel che gli fu assegnato a soli 32 anni, ma soprattutto i decisivi impulsi da lui dati alla fisica quantistica, alla teoria delle particelle elementari, alla teoria del nucleo. Si deve a Heisenberg quel "principio di indeterminazione" che ha rivoluzionato non solo il corso della fisica ma il modo di concepire la posizione dell'uomo nell'universo. L'interesse del libro, però, vuole andare oltre la fisica, giacché il curriculum del "ragazzo di campagna dei biondi capelli" rispecchia in forma emblematica l'ambiguo rapporto della scienza col potere.

  11. Robustness measure of hybrid intra-particle entanglement, discord, and classical correlation with initial Werner state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, P.; Sarkar, D.

    2016-02-01

    Quantum information processing is largely dependent on the robustness of non-classical correlations, such as entanglement and quantum discord. However, all the realistic quantum systems are thermodynamically open and lose their coherence with time through environmental interaction. The time evolution of quantum entanglement, discord, and the respective classical correlation for a single, spin-1/2 particle under spin and energy degrees of freedom, with an initial Werner state, has been investigated in the present study. The present intra-particle system is considered to be easier to produce than its inter-particle counterpart. Experimentally, this type of system may be realized in the well-known Penning trap. The most stable correlation was identified through maximization of a system-specific global objective function. Quantum discord was found to be the most stable, followed by the classical correlation. Moreover, all the correlations were observed to attain highest robustness under initial Bell state, with minimum possible dephasing and decoherence parameters.

  12. Werner syndrome: a changing pattern of clinical manifestations in Japan (1917~2008).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, M; Ishikawa, Y; Sugimoto, M; Furuichi, Y

    2013-02-01

    As ~75% of the Werner syndrome (WS) patients recognized between 1904 and 2008 all over the world are of Japanese origin, the most case reports and clinical studies on WS has been published in Japanese journals. Thus, the detailed English-written clinical review on the recent WS case reports has been warranted. Although WS has been characterized by a variety of clinical manifestations mimicking premature aging, the recent longevity and delayed age-associated manifestations observed both from Japanese WS and general population may suggest a common environmental effect on some gene(s) other than WRN and may give us a newer pathophysiological look at WS and also natural aging through the molecular dysfunction of WRN.

  13. High-Redshift Star Formation in a Time-Dependent Lyman-Werner Background

    CERN Document Server

    Visbal, Eli; Terrazas, Bryan; Bryan, Greg L; Barkana, Rennan

    2014-01-01

    The first generation of stars produces a background of Lyman-Werner (LW) radiation which can photo-dissociate molecular hydrogen, increasing the mass of dark matter halos required to host star formation. Previous studies have determined the critical mass required for efficient molecular cooling with a constant LW background. However, the true background is expected to increase rapidly at early times. Neglecting this evolution could underestimate star formation in small halos that may have started to cool in the past when the LW intensity was much lower. Background evolution is a large source of uncertainty in pre-reionization predictions of the cosmological 21cm signal, which can be observed with future radio telescopes. To address this, we perform zero-dimentional one-zone calculations that follow the density, chemical abundances, and temperature of gas in the central regions of dark matter halos, including hierarchical growth and an evolving LW background. We begin by studying the physics of halos subjected...

  14. Genetics and aging; the Werner syndrome as a segmental progeroid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, G M

    1985-01-01

    The maximum lifespan potential is a constitutional feature of speciation and must be subject to polygenic controls acting both in the domain of development and in the domain of the maintenance of macromolecular integrity. The enormous genetic heterogeneity that characterizes our own species, the complexities of numerous nature-nurture interactions, and the quantitative and qualitative variations of the senescent phenotype that are observed suggest that precise patterns of aging in each of us may be unique. Patterns of aging may also differ sharply among species (for example, semelparous vs. multiparous mammals). Some potential common denominators, however, allow one to identify progeroid syndromes in man that could lead to the elucidation of important pathways of gene action. (The suffix "-oid" means "like"; it does not mean identity.) Unimodal progeroid syndromes (eg., familial dementia of the Alzheimer type, an autosomal dominant) can help us understand the pathogenesis of a particular aspect of the senescent phenotype of man. Segmental progeroid syndromes (eg. the Werner syndrome, an autosomal recessive) may be relevant to multiple aspects of the senescent phenotype. Some results of research on the Werner syndrome may be interpreted as support for "peripheral" as opposed to "central" theories of aging; they are consistent with the view that gene action in the domain of development (adolescence, in this instance) can set the stage for patterns of aging in the adult; they point to the importance of mesenchymal cell populations in the pathogenesis of age-related disorders; finally, they underscore the role of chromosomal instability, especially in the pathogenesis of neoplasia.

  15. Prematurely aged children: molecular alterations leading to Hutchinson-Gilford progeria and Werner syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Gerpe, Lourdes; Araújo-Vilar, David

    2008-12-01

    Ageing is thought to be a polygenic and stochastic process in which multiple mechanisms operate at the same time. At the level of the individual organism ageing is associated with a progressive deterioration of health and quality of life, sharing common features such as: alopecia and grey hair, loss of audition, macular degeneration, neurodegeneration, cardiovascular diseases, osteoporosis, cataract formation, type-2 diabetes, lipodystrophies; a generally increased susceptibility to infection, autoimmune disorders and diseases such as cancer; and an impaired ability to cope with stress. Recent studies of mechanisms involved in the ageing process are contributing to the identification of genes involved in longevity. Monogenic heritable disorders causing premature ageing, and animal models have contributed to the understanding of some of the characteristic organism-level features associated with human ageing. Werner syndrome and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome are the best characterized human disorders. Werner syndrome patients have a median life expectancy of 47 years with clinical conditions from the second decade of life. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome patients die at a median age of 11-13 years with clinical conditions appearing soon after birth. In both syndromes, alterations in specific genes have been identified, with mutations in the WRN and LMNA genes respectively being the most closely associated with each syndrome. Results from molecular studies strongly suggest an increase in DNA damage and cell senescence as the underlying mechanism of pathological premature ageing in these two human syndromes. The same general mechanism has also been observed in human cells undergoing the normal ageing process. In the present article the molecular mechanisms currently proposed for explaining these two syndromes, which may also partly explain the normal ageing process, are reviewed.

  16. Protein folding modulates the swapped dimerization mechanism of methyl-accepting chemotaxis heme sensors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta A Silva

    Full Text Available The periplasmic sensor domains GSU0582 and GSU0935 are part of methyl accepting chemotaxis proteins in the bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens. Both contain one c-type heme group and their crystal structures revealed that these domains form swapped dimers with a PAS fold formed from the two protein chains. The swapped dimerization of these sensors is related to the mechanism of signal transduction and the formation of the swapped dimer involves significant folding changes and conformational rearrangements within each monomeric component. However, the structural changes occurring during this process are poorly understood and lack a mechanistic framework. To address this issue, we have studied the folding and stability properties of two distinct heme-sensor PAS domains, using biophysical spectroscopies. We observed substantial differences in the thermodynamic stability (ΔG = 14.6 kJ.mol(-1 for GSU0935 and ΔG = 26.3 kJ.mol(-1 for GSU0582, and demonstrated that the heme moiety undergoes conformational changes that match those occurring at the global protein structure. This indicates that sensing by the heme cofactor induces conformational changes that rapidly propagate to the protein structure, an effect which is directly linked to the signal transduction mechanism. Interestingly, the two analyzed proteins have distinct levels of intrinsic disorder (25% for GSU0935 and 13% for GSU0582, which correlate with conformational stability differences. This provides evidence that the sensing threshold and intensity of the propagated allosteric effect is linked to the stability of the PAS-fold, as this property modulates domain swapping and dimerization. Analysis of the PAS-domain shows that disorder segments are found either at the hinge region that controls helix motions or in connecting segments of the β-sheet interface. The latter is known to be widely involved in both intra- and intermolecular interactions, supporting the view that it's folding

  17. Identification of the major proteins of an immune modulating fraction from adult Fasciola hepatica released by Nonidet P40.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morphew, Russell M; Hamilton, Clare M; Wright, Hazel A; Dowling, David J; O'Neill, Sandra M; Brophy, Peter M

    2013-01-31

    Fasciola hepatica NP-40 released protein extract (FhNPE) exhibits potent Th1 immunosuppressive properties in vitro and in vivo. However, the protein composition of this active fraction, responsible for Th1 immune modulatory activity, has yet to be resolved. Therefore, FhNPE, a Nonidet P-40 extract, was subjected to a proteomic analysis in order to identify individual protein components. This was performed using an in house F. hepatica EST database following 2D electrophoresis combined with de novo sequencing based mass spectrometry. The identified proteins, a mixture of excretory/secretory and membrane-associated proteins, are associated with stress response and chaperoning, energy metabolism and cytoskeletal components. The immune modulatory properties of these identified protein(s) are discussed and HSP70 from F. hepatica is highlighted as a potential host immune modulator for future study.

  18. The Dengue Virus NS5 Protein Intrudes in the Cellular Spliceosome and Modulates Splicing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Priya; Pozzi, Berta; Gebhard, Leopoldo G.; Mammi, Pablo; Yanovsky, Marcelo J.; Andino, Raul; Krogan, Nevan; Srebrow, Anabella; Gamarnik, Andrea V.

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus NS5 protein plays multiple functions in the cytoplasm of infected cells, enabling viral RNA replication and counteracting host antiviral responses. Here, we demonstrate a novel function of NS5 in the nucleus where it interferes with cellular splicing. Using global proteomic analysis of infected cells together with functional studies, we found that NS5 binds spliceosome complexes and modulates endogenous splicing as well as minigene-derived alternative splicing patterns. In particular, we show that NS5 alone, or in the context of viral infection, interacts with core components of the U5 snRNP particle, CD2BP2 and DDX23, alters the inclusion/exclusion ratio of alternative splicing events, and changes mRNA isoform abundance of known antiviral factors. Interestingly, a genome wide transcriptome analysis, using recently developed bioinformatics tools, revealed an increase of intron retention upon dengue virus infection, and viral replication was improved by silencing specific U5 components. Different mechanistic studies indicate that binding of NS5 to the spliceosome reduces the efficiency of pre-mRNA processing, independently of NS5 enzymatic activities. We propose that NS5 binding to U5 snRNP proteins hijacks the splicing machinery resulting in a less restrictive environment for viral replication. PMID:27575636

  19. Role of exercise-induced reactive oxygen species in the modulation of heat shock protein response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fittipaldi, S; Dimauro, I; Mercatelli, N; Caporossi, D

    2014-01-01

    The multiple roles that have been associated with heat shock proteins (HSPs), inside and outside cells are remarkable. HSPs have been found to play a fundamental role in multiple stress conditions and to offer protection from subsequent insults. Exercise, because of the physiological stresses associated with it, is one of the main stimuli associated with a robust increase of different HSPs in several tissues. Given the combination of physiological stresses induced by exercise, and the 'cross-talk' that occurs between signaling pathways in different tissues, it is likely that exercise induces the HSP expression through a combination of 'stressors', among which reactive oxygen species (ROS) could play a major role. Indeed, although an imbalance between ROS production and antioxidant levels results in oxidative stress, causing damage to lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids with a possible activation of the programed cell death pathway, at moderate concentrations ROS play an important role as regulatory mediators in signaling processes. Many of the ROS-mediated responses actually protect the cells against oxidative stress and re-establish redox homeostasis. The aim of this review is to provide a critical update on the role of exercise-induced ROS in the modulation of the HSP's response, focusing on experimental results from animal and human studies where the link between redox homeostasis and HSPs' expression in different tissues has been addressed.

  20. Distinct activities of Bartonella henselae type IV secretion effector proteins modulate capillary-like sprout formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheidegger, F; Ellner, Y; Guye, P; Rhomberg, T A; Weber, H; Augustin, H G; Dehio, C

    2009-07-01

    The zoonotic pathogen Bartonella henselae (Bh) can lead to vasoproliferative tumour lesions in the skin and inner organs known as bacillary angiomatosis and bacillary peliosis. The knowledge on the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in this pathogen-triggered angiogenic process is confined by the lack of a suitable animal model and a physiologically relevant cell culture model of angiogenesis. Here we employed a three-dimensional in vitro angiogenesis assay of collagen gel-embedded endothelial cell (EC) spheroids to study the angiogenic properties of Bh. Spheroids generated from Bh-infected ECs displayed a high capacity to form sprouts, which represent capillary-like projections into the collagen gel. The VirB/VirD4 type IV secretion system and a subset of its translocated Bartonella effector proteins (Beps) were found to profoundly modulate this Bh-induced sprouting activity. BepA, known to protect ECs from apoptosis, strongly promoted sprout formation. In contrast, BepG, triggering cytoskeletal rearrangements, potently inhibited sprouting. Hence, the here established in vitro model of Bartonella- induced angiogenesis revealed distinct and opposing activities of type IV secretion system effector proteins, which together with a VirB/VirD4-independent effect may control the angiogenic activity of Bh during chronic infection of the vasculature.

  1. Non-local effects of point mutations on the stability of a protein module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chwastyk, Mateusz; Vera, Andrés M.; Galera-Prat, Albert; Gunnoo, Melissabye; Thompson, Damien; Carrión-Vázquez, Mariano; Cieplak, Marek

    2017-09-01

    We combine experimental and theoretical methods to assess the effect of a set of point mutations on c7A, a highly mechanostable type I cohesin module from scaffoldin CipA from Clostridium thermocellum. We propose a novel robust and computationally expedient theoretical method to determine the effects of point mutations on protein structure and stability. We use all-atom simulations to predict structural shifts with respect to the native protein and then analyze the mutants using a coarse-grained model. We examine transitions in contacts between residues and find that changes in the contact map usually involve a non-local component that can extend up to 50 Å. We have identified mutations that may lead to a substantial increase in mechanical and thermodynamic stabilities by making systematic substitutions into alanine and phenylalanine in c7A. Experimental measurements of the mechanical stability and circular dichroism data agree qualitatively with the predictions provided the thermal stability is calculated using only the contacts within the secondary structures.

  2. Modulation of PDT-induced apoptosis by protein kinases and phosphatases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yu; Chang, Chi K.; Kessel, David

    1996-04-01

    Photodynamic therapy of neoplastic cell lines can lead to the rapid initiation of apoptosis, a mode of cell death that results in a characteristic pattern of cellular and DNA fragmentation. In this study, we examine the effects of protein tyrosine- and serine/threonine phosphatases and kinases on the fragmentation of DNA to 50 kb and photodynamic effects of lysosomal and mitochondrial photosensitizers on murine leukemia P388 cells. The data are consistent with the proposal that maintenance of phosphorylated tyrosine residues is essential for the PDT- induced processing of 50 kb DNA to nucleosomes, while maintenance of serine phosphorylation inhibits such processing. Factors involved in chromatin fragmentation to 50 kb particles have yet to be elucidated. Several agents which mediate membrane photodamage mimic the effect of protein serine/threonine phosphatase inhibitors, i.e., they inhibit further processing of the 50 kb DNA formed as a consequence of lysosomal or mitochondrial photodamage. These results indicate that even the rapid initiation of apoptosis by PDT is modulated by phosphatase and kinase activities.

  3. PRRT2 inhibits the proliferation of glioma cells by modulating unfolded protein response pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Guanghui; Yan, Jingfeng; Sun, Shuzhen; Qu, Xinhua

    2017-02-10

    Accumulating studies reported mutations in the gene encoding the proline-rich transmembrane protein 2 (PRRT2) to be causative for several paroxysmal neurological disorders, including paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD), PKD combined with infantile seizures (ICCA), and benign familial infantile seizures (BFIS). However, the impact of PRRT2 in tumorigenesis is not known. Based on a large-scale data analysis, we found that PRRT2 was down-regulated in glioma tumor tissues compared with normal brain tissue. Dysregulation of PRRT2 was not induced by mutation, copy number variation and epigenetic modification, but modulated by microRNA-30a-5p. Overexpression of PRRT2 strongly impaired the cell viability and promoted cell apoptosis and these anti-tumor effects could be largely reversed by microRNA-30a-5p. Mechanistically, PRRT2 expression was closely correlated genes involved in unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway and introduction of PRRT2 inhibited gene expression in the three branches of UPR, including PERK axis, IRE1 axis and ATF6 axis. Taken together, our findings identify PRRT2 as a tumor suppressor in glioma and provide a promising target for potential therapeutic intervention.

  4. A curated census of autophagy-modulating proteins and small molecules: candidate targets for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzi, Philip L; Claerhout, Sofie; Mills, Gordon B; Weinstein, John N

    2014-07-01

    Autophagy, a programmed process in which cell contents are delivered to lysosomes for degradation, appears to have both tumor-suppressive and tumor-promoting functions; both stimulation and inhibition of autophagy have been reported to induce cancer cell death, and particular genes and proteins have been associated both positively and negatively with autophagy. To provide a basis for incisive analysis of those complexities and ambiguities and to guide development of new autophagy-targeted treatments for cancer, we have compiled a comprehensive, curated inventory of autophagy modulators by integrating information from published siRNA screens, multiple pathway analysis algorithms, and extensive, manually curated text-mining of the literature. The resulting inventory includes 739 proteins and 385 chemicals (including drugs, small molecules, and metabolites). Because autophagy is still at an early stage of investigation, we provide extensive analysis of our sources of information and their complex relationships with each other. We conclude with a discussion of novel strategies that could potentially be used to target autophagy for cancer therapy.

  5. The Dengue Virus NS5 Protein Intrudes in the Cellular Spliceosome and Modulates Splicing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico A De Maio

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus NS5 protein plays multiple functions in the cytoplasm of infected cells, enabling viral RNA replication and counteracting host antiviral responses. Here, we demonstrate a novel function of NS5 in the nucleus where it interferes with cellular splicing. Using global proteomic analysis of infected cells together with functional studies, we found that NS5 binds spliceosome complexes and modulates endogenous splicing as well as minigene-derived alternative splicing patterns. In particular, we show that NS5 alone, or in the context of viral infection, interacts with core components of the U5 snRNP particle, CD2BP2 and DDX23, alters the inclusion/exclusion ratio of alternative splicing events, and changes mRNA isoform abundance of known antiviral factors. Interestingly, a genome wide transcriptome analysis, using recently developed bioinformatics tools, revealed an increase of intron retention upon dengue virus infection, and viral replication was improved by silencing specific U5 components. Different mechanistic studies indicate that binding of NS5 to the spliceosome reduces the efficiency of pre-mRNA processing, independently of NS5 enzymatic activities. We propose that NS5 binding to U5 snRNP proteins hijacks the splicing machinery resulting in a less restrictive environment for viral replication.

  6. Structures of a Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase Module Bound to MbtH-like Proteins Support a Highly Dynamic Domain Architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Bradley R.; Drake, Eric J.; Shi, Ce; Aldrich, Courtney C.; Gulick, Andrew M.

    2016-09-05

    Nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) produce a wide variety of peptide natural products. During synthesis, the multidomain NRPSs act as an assembly line, passing the growing product from one module to the next. Each module generally consists of an integrated peptidyl carrier protein, an amino acid-loading adenylation domain, and a condensation domain that catalyzes peptide bond formation. Some adenylation domains interact with small partner proteins called MbtH-like proteins (MLPs) that enhance solubility or activity. A structure of an MLP bound to an adenylation domain has been previously reported using a truncated adenylation domain, precluding any insight that might be derived from understanding the influence of the MLP on the intact adenylation domain or on the dynamics of the entire NRPS module. Here, we present the structures of the full-length NRPS EntF bound to the MLPs from Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. These new structures, along with biochemical and bioinformatics support, further elaborate the residues that define the MLP-adenylation domain interface. Additionally, the structures highlight the dynamic behavior of NRPS modules, including the module core formed by the adenylation and condensation domains as well as the orientation of the mobile thioesterase domain.

  7. Extract of Reishi polysaccharides induces cytokine expression via TLR4-modulated protein kinase signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hsien-Yeh; Hua, Kuo-Feng; Lin, Chun-Cheng; Lin, Chun-Hung; Hsu, Jason; Wong, Chi-Huey

    2004-11-15

    We have demonstrated that an extract of Ganoderma lucidum (Reishi or Ling-Zhi) polysaccharides (EORP) exerts immunomodulating activities by stimulating the expression of inflammatory cytokines from mouse spleen cells. Interestingly, via responding to LPS in genetic variation of murine macrophage HeNC2 and GG2EE cell lines, and using TLR4 Ab blockage in human blood-derived monocytic macrophages, we have found that the TLR4, but not complement receptor type 3, is a putative receptor of EORP, mediating the consequent immunomodulating events associated with IL-1 gene expression. Based on our studies of reactive oxygen species production, polymyxin B inhibition, and protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) activity, we ruled out the possibility of LPS contamination in EORP. We have found that EORP differentially modulates the protein kinase (PK)-mediated signal transduction pathways associated with inflammatory cytokine IL-1. In human macrophages and murine macrophage J774A.1 cells, EORP was found to up-regulate IL-1 secretion and pro-IL-1 (precursor of IL-1) as well as IL-1-converting enzyme expression. Specifically, EORP rapidly stimulates PTK-mediated phosphorylation, followed by induction of PKs and activation of MAPKs: ERK, JNK, and p38. Using PK inhibitors in the kinase activity assays, Western blot analyses and IL-1 ELISA, we have extensively examined and dissected the role of individual PK in the regulation of pro-IL-1/IL-1. Our findings establish that EORP-mediated signaling pathways are involved in the pro-IL-1/IL-1 regulation: PTK/protein kinase C/MEK1/ERK and PTK/Rac1/p21-activated kinase/p38.

  8. Autoantibodies against G-Protein-Coupled Receptors Modulate Heart Mast Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ludmila Okruhlicova; Rosemarie Morwinski; Wolfgang Schulze; Sabine Bartel; Peter Weismann; Narcisa Tribulova; Gerd Wallukat

    2007-01-01

    Mast cells are believed to be involved in myocardial tissue remodelling under pathophysiological conditions. We examined the effects of autoantibodies against G-protein-coupled receptors in sera of patients with heart diseases on myocardial mast cells in the cultured neonatal Sprague-Dawley rat heart cells. Cells collected at day 3 and 10 of the culture were preincubated with autoantibodies against α1-adrenoceptor and angiotensin Ⅱ AT1-receptor,agonist phenylephrine and angiotensin Ⅱ, and control IgG. The pretreated cultured cells were stained for selected mast cell markers tryptase, chymase and TNF-α. The cultured cells were also processed for observation with electron microscopy. The autoantibodies-treatment of the 3-day cultured cells caused both increased intensity of immunofluorescence (p<0.05) and their enlarged diameters of the mast cells when compared to age-matched ones.In contrast, the fluorescence of preincubated 10-day-old mast cells was decreased compared with controls (p<0.01).In control samples, the fluorescence of 10-day-old mast cells was significantly higher than that of 3-day-old ones (p<0.001). Results of electron microscopy examination demonstrated there was an increased granulation of treated 3-day-old mast cells, while a degranulation of mast cells at day 10 of application. The results suggest the modulation effect of the autoantibodies against G-protein-coupled receptors on mast cells, indicating a potential functional link between the autoantibodies against G-protein-coupled receptors and the mast cells in progression of heart disease.

  9. Modulation of the beta-catenin signaling pathway by the dishevelled-associated protein Hipk1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah H Louie

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Wnts are evolutionarily conserved ligands that signal through beta-catenin-dependent and beta-catenin-independent pathways to regulate cell fate, proliferation, polarity, and movements during vertebrate development. Dishevelled (Dsh/Dvl is a multi-domain scaffold protein required for virtually all known Wnt signaling activities, raising interest in the identification and functions of Dsh-associated proteins. METHODOLOGY: We conducted a yeast-2-hybrid screen using an N-terminal fragment of Dsh, resulting in isolation of the Xenopus laevis ortholog of Hipk1. Interaction between the Dsh and Hipk1 proteins was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation assays and mass spectrometry, and further experiments suggest that Hipk1 also complexes with the transcription factor Tcf3. Supporting a nuclear function during X. laevis development, Myc-tagged Hipk1 localizes primarily to the nucleus in animal cap explants, and the endogenous transcript is strongly expressed during gastrula and neurula stages. Experimental manipulations of Hipk1 levels indicate that Hipk1 can repress Wnt/beta-catenin target gene activation, as demonstrated by beta-catenin reporter assays in human embryonic kidney cells and by indicators of dorsal specification in X. laevis embryos at the late blastula stage. In addition, a subset of Wnt-responsive genes subsequently requires Hipk1 for activation in the involuting mesoderm during gastrulation. Moreover, either over-expression or knock-down of Hipk1 leads to perturbed convergent extension cell movements involved in both gastrulation and neural tube closure. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that Hipk1 contributes in a complex fashion to Dsh-dependent signaling activities during early vertebrate development. This includes regulating the transcription of Wnt/beta-catenin target genes in the nucleus, possibly in both repressive and activating ways under changing developmental contexts. This regulation is required to modulate gene

  10. A pair of mouse KRAB zinc finger proteins modulates multiple indicators of female reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, Christopher J; Robins, Diane M

    2010-04-01

    Krüppel-associated box-zinc finger proteins (KRAB-ZFPs) are the largest class of transcriptional regulators in mammals, yet few have been assigned biological roles. Cloning the genes underlying the regulator of sex-limitation (rsl) phenotype, in which the normally male-specific sex-limited protein (SLP) is expressed in female mice, identified two KRAB-ZFPs, Rsl1 and Rsl2, as influencing sexually dimorphic liver gene expression. Combined absence of both repressors in rsl mice leads to increased expression in female liver of major urinary proteins (MUPs) and certain enzymes of steroid metabolism, as well as SLP. We hypothesized that this altered gene expression might affect reproductive physiology in rsl females. Urinary MUP (uMUP) concentration varied with the estrous cycle in both wt and rsl females but was consistently higher in rsl urine. A behavioral odor test revealed that wild-type (wt) males preferred rsl to wt females, possibly due to elevated uMUPs providing greater pheromone presentation. To ascribe activity to Rsl1, Rsl2, or both, the genes were individually expressed as liver-specific transgenes. RSL2 overexpression accentuated uMUP fluctuations across the estrous cycle, whereas RSL1 overexpression did not. In addition, puberty onset, as indicated by vaginal opening (VO), occurred 2 days earlier in rsl females, and excess RSL2, but not RSL1, restored VO timing to wt. Hence, transcriptional repression by RSL in liver modifies female mouse reproduction via targets that likely impact both hormonal and pheromonal cues. The large and rapidly diversifying KRAB-ZFP family may modulate biological processes, including reproduction, to confer individual differences that may isolate populations and ultimately lead to speciation.

  11. The Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS-coronavirus 3a protein may function as a modulator of the trafficking properties of the spike protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Yee-Joo

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A recent publication reported that a tyrosine-dependent sorting signal, present in cytoplasmic tail of the spike protein of most coronaviruses, mediates the intracellular retention of the spike protein. This motif is missing from the spike protein of the severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus (SARS-CoV, resulting in high level of surface expression of the spike protein when it is expressed on its own in vitro. Presentation of the hypothesis It has been shown that the severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus genome contains open reading frames that encode for proteins with no homologue in other coronaviruses. One of them is the 3a protein, which is expressed during infection in vitro and in vivo. The 3a protein, which contains a tyrosine-dependent sorting signal in its cytoplasmic domain, is expressed on the cell surface and can undergo internalization. In addition, 3a can bind to the spike protein and through this interaction, it may be able to cause the spike protein to become internalized, resulting in a decrease in its surface expression. Testing the hypothesis The effects of 3a on the internalization of cell surface spike protein can be examined biochemically and the significance of the interplay between these two viral proteins during viral infection can be studied using reverse genetics methodology. Implication of the hypothesis If this hypothesis is proven, it will indicate that the severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus modulates the surface expression of the spike protein via a different mechanism from other coronaviruses. The interaction between 3a and S, which are expressed from separate subgenomic RNA, would be important for controlling the trafficking properties of S. The cell surface expression of S in infected cells significantly impacts viral assembly, viral spread and viral pathogenesis. Modulation by this unique pathway could confer certain advantages during the replication of the severe

  12. G Protein-Coupled Receptor 43 Modulates Neutrophil Recruitment during Acute Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, Alyce J.; Oliveira, Ana Carolina; Mason, Linda J.; Binge, Lauren; Mackay, Charles R.; Wong, Connie H. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Fermentation of dietary fibre in the gut yields large amounts of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs). SCFAs can impart biological responses in cells through their engagement of ‘metabolite-sensing’ G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). One of the main SCFA receptors, GPR43, is highly expressed by neutrophils, which suggests that the actions of GPR43 and dietary fibre intake may affect neutrophil recruitment during inflammatory responses in vivo. Using intravital imaging of the small intestine, we found greater intravascular neutrophil rolling and adhesion in Gpr43−/−mice in response to LPS at 1 h. After 4 h of LPS challenge, the intravascular rolling velocity of GPR43-deficient neutrophils was reduced significantly and increased numbers of neutrophils were found in the lamina propria of Gpr43−/−mice. Additionally, GPR43-deficient leukocytes demonstrated exacerbated migration into the peritoneal cavity following fMLP challenge. The fMLP-induced neutrophil migration was significantly suppressed in wildtype mice that were treated with acetate, but not in Gpr43−/−mice, strongly suggesting a role for SCFAs in modulating neutrophil migration via GPR43. Indeed, neutrophils of no fibre-fed wildtype mice exhibited elevated migratory behaviour compared to normal chow-fed wildtype mice. Interestingly, this elevated migration could also be reproduced through simple transfer of a no fibre microbiota into germ-free mice, suggesting that the composition and function of microbiota stemming from a no fibre diet mediated the changes in neutrophil migration. Therefore, GPR43 and a microbiota composition that allows for SCFA production function to modulate neutrophil recruitment during inflammatory responses. PMID:27658303

  13. D1 dopamine receptor signaling is modulated by the R7 RGS protein EAT-16 and the R7 binding protein RSBP-1 in Caenoerhabditis elegans motor neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khursheed A Wani

    Full Text Available Dopamine signaling modulates voluntary movement and reward-driven behaviors by acting through G protein-coupled receptors in striatal neurons, and defects in dopamine signaling underlie Parkinson's disease and drug addiction. Despite the importance of understanding how dopamine modifies the activity of striatal neurons to control basal ganglia output, the molecular mechanisms that control dopamine signaling remain largely unclear. Dopamine signaling also controls locomotion behavior in Caenorhabditis elegans. To better understand how dopamine acts in the brain we performed a large-scale dsRNA interference screen in C. elegans for genes required for endogenous dopamine signaling and identified six genes (eat-16, rsbp-1, unc-43, flp-1, grk-1, and cat-1 required for dopamine-mediated behavior. We then used a combination of mutant analysis and cell-specific transgenic rescue experiments to investigate the functional interaction between the proteins encoded by two of these genes, eat-16 and rsbp-1, within single cell types and to examine their role in the modulation of dopamine receptor signaling. We found that EAT-16 and RSBP-1 act together to modulate dopamine signaling and that while they are coexpressed with both D1-like and D2-like dopamine receptors, they do not modulate D2 receptor signaling. Instead, EAT-16 and RSBP-1 act together to selectively inhibit D1 dopamine receptor signaling in cholinergic motor neurons to modulate locomotion behavior.

  14. D1 dopamine receptor signaling is modulated by the R7 RGS protein EAT-16 and the R7 binding protein RSBP-1 in Caenoerhabditis elegans motor neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wani, Khursheed A; Catanese, Mary; Normantowicz, Robyn; Herd, Muriel; Maher, Kathryn N; Chase, Daniel L

    2012-01-01

    Dopamine signaling modulates voluntary movement and reward-driven behaviors by acting through G protein-coupled receptors in striatal neurons, and defects in dopamine signaling underlie Parkinson's disease and drug addiction. Despite the importance of understanding how dopamine modifies the activity of striatal neurons to control basal ganglia output, the molecular mechanisms that control dopamine signaling remain largely unclear. Dopamine signaling also controls locomotion behavior in Caenorhabditis elegans. To better understand how dopamine acts in the brain we performed a large-scale dsRNA interference screen in C. elegans for genes required for endogenous dopamine signaling and identified six genes (eat-16, rsbp-1, unc-43, flp-1, grk-1, and cat-1) required for dopamine-mediated behavior. We then used a combination of mutant analysis and cell-specific transgenic rescue experiments to investigate the functional interaction between the proteins encoded by two of these genes, eat-16 and rsbp-1, within single cell types and to examine their role in the modulation of dopamine receptor signaling. We found that EAT-16 and RSBP-1 act together to modulate dopamine signaling and that while they are coexpressed with both D1-like and D2-like dopamine receptors, they do not modulate D2 receptor signaling. Instead, EAT-16 and RSBP-1 act together to selectively inhibit D1 dopamine receptor signaling in cholinergic motor neurons to modulate locomotion behavior.

  15. Laboratory studies of UV emissions of H2 by electron impact - The Werner- and Lyman-band systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajello, J. M.; Srivastava, S. K.; Yung, Y. L.

    1982-01-01

    The vacuum ultraviolet electron-impact-induced fluorescence emissions of H2 were studied for the Lyman and Werner band systems in the range of 120-170 nm, using an optical system containing a photomultiplier and a spectrometer, over an energy range from threshold to 400 eV. The emission cross sections for the Lyman and Werner transitions at 100 eV are determined. The cross-section ratio is in excellent agreement with theoretical calculations and experimental data for the optical oscillator strengths. The cross-section for cascading to the B state is stated as a percentage of the total emission cross section at both 100 and 300 eV, increasing substantially at 20 eV. The vibrational population distribution of the B state is found to be a function of electron-impact energy as the importance of cascading relative to direct excitation changes with electron-impact energy.

  16. Nuclear envelope proteins modulate proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells during cyclic stretch application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Ying-Xin; Yao, Qing-Ping; Huang, Kai; Shi, Qian; Zhang, Ping; Wang, Guo-Liang; Han, Yue; Bao, Han; Wang, Lu; Li, Hai-Peng; Shen, Bao-Rong; Wang, Yingxiao; Chien, Shu; Jiang, Zong-Lai

    2016-05-10

    Cyclic stretch is an important inducer of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation, which is crucial in vascular remodeling during hypertension. However, the molecular mechanism remains unclear. We studied the effects of emerin and lamin A/C, two important nuclear envelope proteins, on VSMC proliferation in hypertension and the underlying mechano-mechanisms. In common carotid artery of hypertensive rats in vivo and in cultured cells subjected to high (15%) cyclic stretch in vitro, VSMC proliferation was increased significantly, and the expression of emerin and lamin A/C was repressed compared with normotensive or normal (5%) cyclic stretch controls. Using targeted siRNA to mimic the repressed expression of emerin or lamin A/C induced by 15% stretch, we found that VSMC proliferation was enhanced under static and 5%-stretch conditions. Overexpression of emerin or lamin A/C reversed VSMC proliferation induced by 15% stretch. Hence, emerin and lamin A/C play critical roles in suppressing VSMC hyperproliferation induced by hyperstretch. ChIP-on-chip and MOTIF analyses showed that the DNAs binding with emerin contain three transcription factor motifs: CCNGGA, CCMGCC, and ABTTCCG; DNAs binding with lamin A/C contain the motifs CVGGAA, GCCGCYGC, and DAAGAAA. Protein/DNA array proved that altered emerin or lamin A/C expression modulated the activation of various transcription factors. Furthermore, accelerating local expression of emerin or lamin A/C reversed cell proliferation in the carotid artery of hypertensive rats in vivo. Our findings establish the pathogenetic role of emerin and lamin A/C repression in stretch-induced VSMC proliferation and suggest mechanobiological mechanism underlying this process that involves the sequence-specific binding of emerin and lamin A/C to specific transcription factor motifs.

  17. Spinal translocator protein (TSPO) modulates pain behavior in rats with CFA-induced monoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernstadt, Hayley; Wang, Shuxing; Lim, Grewo; Mao, Jianren

    2009-08-25

    Translocator protein 18 kDa (TSPO), previously known as the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR), is predominantly located in the mitochondrial outer membrane and plays an important role in steroidogenesis, immunomodulation, cell survival and proliferation. Previous studies have shown an increased expression of TSPO centrally in neuropathology, as well as in injured nerves. TSPO has also been implicated in modulation of nociception. In the present study, we examined the hypothesis that TSPO is involved in the initiation and maintenance of inflammatory pain using a rat model of Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA)-induced monoarthritis of the tibio-tarsal joint. Immunohistochemistry was performed using Iba-1 (microglia), NeuN (neurons), anti-Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein, GFAP (astrocytes) and anti-PBR (TSPO) on Days 1, 7 and 14 after CFA-induced arthritis. Rats with CFA-induced monoarthritis showed mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia on the ipsilateral hindpaw, which correlated with the increased TSPO expression in ipsilateral laminae I-II on all experimental days. Iba-1 expression in the ipsilateral dorsal horn was also increased on Days 7 and 14. Moreover, TSPO was colocalized with Iba-1, GFAP and NeuN within the spinal cord dorsal horn. The TSPO agonist Ro5-4864, given intrathecally, dose-dependently retarded or prevented the development of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in rats with CFA-induced monoarthritis. These findings provide evidence that spinal TSPO is involved in the development and maintenance of inflammatory pain behaviors in rats. Thus, spinal TSPO may present a central target as a complementary therapy to reduce inflammatory pain.

  18. Habituation to low or high protein intake does not modulate basal or postprandial muscle protein synthesis rates: a randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorissen, S.H.; Horstman, Astrid; Franssen, Rinske; Kouw, I.W.; Wall, B.T.; Burd, N.A.; Groot, de C.P.G.M.; Loon, van L.J.C.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Muscle mass maintenance is largely regulated by basal muscle protein synthesis rates and the ability to increase muscle protein synthesis after protein ingestion. To our knowledge, no previous studies have evaluated the impact of habituation to either low protein intake (LOW PRO) or high

  19. Hypoxic tumor cell modulates its microenvironment to enhance angiogenic and metastatic potential by secretion of proteins and exosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung Eun; Tan, Hon Sen; Datta, Arnab; Lai, Ruenn Chai; Zhang, Huoming; Meng, Wei; Lim, Sai Kiang; Sze, Siu Kwan

    2010-06-01

    Under hypoxia, tumor cells produce a secretion that modulates their microenvironment to facilitate tumor angiogenesis and metastasis. Here, we observed that hypoxic or reoxygenated A431 carcinoma cells exhibited enhanced angiogenic and metastatic potential such as reduced cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix adhesion, increased invasiveness, and production of a secretion with increased chorioallantoic membrane angiogenic activity. Consistent with these observations, quantitative proteomics revealed that under hypoxia the tumor cells secreted proteins involved in angiogenesis, focal adhesion, extracellular matrix-receptor interaction, and immune cell recruitment. Unexpectedly, the secreted proteins were predominantly cytoplasmic and membrane proteins. Ultracentrifugation at 100,000 x g precipitated 54% of the secreted proteins and enriched for many exosome-associated proteins such as the tetraspanins and Alix and also proteins with the potential to facilitate angiogenesis and metastasis. Two tetraspanins, CD9 and CD81, co-immunoprecipitated. Together, these data suggested that tumor cells secrete proteins and exosomes with the potential to modulate their microenvironment and facilitate angiogenesis and metastasis.

  20. 降低成本 和Bosch Rexroth公司Werner Blaurock工程师的交谈

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    和消费领域一样,工业界也只想为它真正需要的技术付钱。这在今天意味着什么?Bosch Rexroth公司线性运动和装配技术部经理Werner Blaurock工程师就降低设计,生产和维修费用的问题谈了他的观点。

  1. A note on the paper "Minimizing total tardiness on parallel machines with preemptions" by Kravchenko and Werner [2010

    CERN Document Server

    Prot, D; Lahlou, C

    2011-01-01

    In this note, we point out two major errors in the paper "Minimizing total tardiness on parallel machines with preemptions" by Kravchenko and Werner [2010]. More precisely, they proved that both problems P|pmtn|sum(Tj) and P|rj, pj = p, pmtn|sum(Tj) are NP-Hard. We give a counter-example to their proofs, letting the complexity of these two problems open.

  2. G-protein-coupled inward rectifier potassium channels involved in corticostriatal presynaptic modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneses, David; Mateos, Verónica; Islas, Gustavo; Barral, Jaime

    2015-09-01

    Presynaptic modulation has been associated mainly with calcium channels but recent data suggests that inward rectifier potassium channels (K(IR)) also play a role. In this work we set to characterize the role of presynaptic K(IR) channels in corticostriatal synaptic transmission. We elicited synaptic potentials in striatum by stimulating cortical areas and then determined the synaptic responses of corticostriatal synapsis by using paired pulse ratio (PPR) in the presence and absence of several potassium channel blockers. Unspecific potassium channels blockers Ba(2+) and Cs(+) reduced the PPR, suggesting that these channels are presynaptically located. Further pharmacological characterization showed that application of tertiapin-Q, a specific K(IR)3 channel family blocker, also induced a reduction of PPR, suggesting that K(IR)3 channels are present at corticostriatal terminals. In contrast, exposure to Lq2, a specific K(IR)1.1 inward rectifier potassium channel, did not induce any change in PPR suggesting the absence of these channels in the presynaptic corticostriatal terminals. Our results indicate that K(IR)3 channels are functionally expressed at the corticostriatal synapses, since blockage of these channels result in PPR decrease. Our results also help to explain how synaptic activity may become sensitive to extracellular signals mediated by G-protein coupled receptors. A vast repertoire of receptors may influence neurotransmitter release in an indirect manner through regulation of K(IR)3 channels.

  3. Alzheimer's associated β-amyloid protein inhibits influenza A virus and modulates viral interactions with phagocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchell R White

    Full Text Available Accumulation of β-Amyloid (βA is a key pathogenetic factor in Alzheimer's disease; however, the normal function of βA is unknown. Recent studies have shown that βA can inhibit growth of bacteria and fungi. In this paper we show that βA also inhibits replication of seasonal and pandemic strains of H3N2 and H1N1 influenza A virus (IAV in vitro. The 42 amino acid fragment of βA (βA42 had greater activity than the 40 amino acid fragment. Direct incubation of the virus with βA42 was needed to achieve optimal inhibition. Using quantitative PCR assays βA42 was shown to reduce viral uptake by epithelial cells after 45 minutes and to reduce supernatant virus at 24 hours post infection. βA42 caused aggregation of IAV particles as detected by light transmission assays and electron and confocal microscopy. βA42 did not stimulate neutrophil H2O2 production or extracellular trap formation on its own, but it increased both responses stimulated by IAV. In addition, βA42 increased uptake of IAV by neutrophils. βA42 reduced viral protein synthesis in monocytes and reduced IAV-induced interleukin-6 production by these cells. Hence, we demonstrate for the first time that βA has antiviral activity and modulates viral interactions with phagocytes.

  4. Activation of unfolded protein response and autophagy during HCV infection modulates innate immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrabaud, Emilie; De Muynck, Simon; Asselah, Tarik

    2011-11-01

    Autophagy, a process for catabolizing cytoplasmic components, has been implicated in the modulation of interactions between RNA viruses and their host. However, the mechanism underlying the functional role of autophagy in the viral life cycle still remains unclear. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a single-stranded, positive-sense, membrane-enveloped RNA virus that can cause chronic liver disease. Here we report that HCV induces the unfolded protein response (UPR), which in turn activates the autophagic pathway to promote HCV RNA replication in human hepatoma cells. Further analysis revealed that the entire autophagic process through to complete autolysosome maturation was required to promote HCV RNA replication and that it did so by suppressing innate antiviral immunity. Gene silencing or activation of the UPR-autophagy pathway activated or repressed, respectively, IFN-β activation mediated by an HCV-derived pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP). Similar results were achieved with a PAMP derived from Dengue virus (DEV), indicating that HCV and DEV may both exploit the UPR-autophagy pathway to escape the innate immune response. Taken together, these results not only define the physiological significance of HCV-induced autophagy, but also shed light on the knowledge of host cellular responses upon HCV infection as well as on exploration of therapeutic targets for controlling HCV infection.

  5. Erythropoietin modulates the structure of bone morphogenetic protein 2-engineered cranial bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hongli; Jung, Younghun; Shiozawa, Yusuke; Taichman, Russell S; Krebsbach, Paul H

    2012-10-01

    The ideally engineered bone should have similar structural and functional properties to the native tissue. Although structural integrity is critical for functional bone regeneration, we know less about modulating the structural properties of the engineered bone elicited by bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) than efficacy and safety. Erythropoietin (Epo), a primary erythropoietic hormone, has been used to augment blood transfusion in orthopedic surgery. However, the effects of Epo on bone regeneration are not well known. Here, we determined the role of Epo in BMP2-induced bone regeneration using a cranial defect model. Epo administration improved the quality of BMP2-induced bone and more closely resembled natural cranial bone with a higher bone volume (BV) fraction and lower marrow fraction when compared with BMP2 treatment alone. Epo increased red blood cells (RBCs) in peripheral blood and also increased hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) populations in bone marrow. Consistent with our previous work, Epo increased osteoclastogenesis both in vitro and in vivo. Results from a metatarsal organ culture assay suggested that Epo-promoted osteoclastogenesis contributed to angiogenesis because angiogenesis was blunted when osteoclastogenesis was blocked by alendronate (ALN) or osteoprotegerin (OPG). Earlier calcification of BMP2-induced temporary chondroid tissue was observed in the Epo+BMP group compared to BMP2 alone. We conclude that Epo significantly enhanced the outcomes of BMP2-induced cranial bone regeneration in part through its actions on osteoclastogenesis and angiogenesis.

  6. Modulation of function of multidrug resistance associated-proteins by Kaempferia parviflora extracts and their components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patanasethanont, Denpong; Nagai, Junya; Matsuura, Chie; Fukui, Kyoko; Sutthanut, Khaetthareeya; Sripanidkulchai, Bung-orn; Yumoto, Ryoko; Takano, Mikihisa

    2007-07-02

    In this study, the effects of extracts and flavone derivatives from the rhizome of Kaempferia parviflora on multidrug resistance associated-proteins (MRP)-mediated transport in A549 cells were examined. The cells employed express MRP1 and MRP2, but not P-glycoprotein. The cellular accumulation of calcein, an MRP substrate, was significantly increased by various MRP inhibitors without being affected by verapamil, a typical P-glycoprotein inhibitor. Ethanol and aqueous extracts from K. parviflora rhizome increased the accumulation of calcein and doxorubicin in A549 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. The inhibitory potency of the ethanol extract for MRP function was greater than that of the aqueous extract. Among six flavone derivatives isolated from K. parviflora rhizome, 5,7-dimethoxyflavone exhibited a maximal stimulatory effect on the accumulation of doxorubicin in A549 cells. The accumulation of doxorubicin was increased by four flavone derivatives without 5-hydroxy group, but not by the other two flavone derivatives with 5-hydroxy group. In addition, 5,7-dimethoxyflavone and 3,5,7,3',4'-pentamethoxyflavone decreased resistance to doxorubicin in A549 cells. These findings indicate that extracts and flavone derivatives from the rhizome of K. parviflora suppress MRP function, and therefore may be useful as modulators of multidrug resistance in cancer cells.

  7. TMV-Cg Coat Protein stabilizes DELLA proteins and in turn negatively modulates salicylic acid-mediated defense pathway during Arabidopsis thaliana viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Maria Cecilia; Conti, Gabriela; Zavallo, Diego; Manacorda, Carlos Augusto; Asurmendi, Sebastian

    2014-08-03

    Plant viral infections disturb defense regulatory networks during tissue invasion. Emerging evidence demonstrates that a significant proportion of these alterations are mediated by hormone imbalances. Although the DELLA proteins have been reported to be central players in hormone cross-talk, their role in the modulation of hormone signaling during virus infections remains unknown. This work revealed that TMV-Cg coat protein (CgCP) suppresses the salicylic acid (SA) signaling pathway without altering defense hormone SA or jasmonic acid (JA) levels in Arabidopsis thaliana. Furthermore, it was observed that the expression of CgCP reduces plant growth and delays the timing of floral transition. Quantitative RT-qPCR analysis of DELLA target genes showed that CgCP alters relative expression of several target genes, indicating that the DELLA proteins mediate transcriptional changes produced by CgCP expression. Analyses by fluorescence confocal microscopy showed that CgCP stabilizes DELLA proteins accumulation in the presence of gibberellic acid (GA) and that the DELLA proteins are also stabilized during TMV-Cg virus infections. Moreover, DELLA proteins negatively modulated defense transcript profiles during TMV-Cg infection. As a result, TMV-Cg accumulation was significantly reduced in the quadruple-DELLA mutant Arabidopsis plants compared to wild type plants. Taken together, these results demonstrate that CgCP negatively regulates the salicylic acid-mediated defense pathway by stabilizing the DELLA proteins during Arabidopsis thaliana viral infection, suggesting that CgCP alters the stability of DELLAs as a mechanism of negative modulation of antiviral defense responses.

  8. PRO40 is a scaffold protein of the cell wall integrity pathway, linking the MAP kinase module to the upstream activator protein kinase C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Teichert

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathways are crucial signaling instruments in eukaryotes. Most ascomycetes possess three MAPK modules that are involved in key developmental processes like sexual propagation or pathogenesis. However, the regulation of these modules by adapters or scaffolds is largely unknown. Here, we studied the function of the cell wall integrity (CWI MAPK module in the model fungus Sordaria macrospora. Using a forward genetic approach, we found that sterile mutant pro30 has a mutated mik1 gene that encodes the MAPK kinase kinase (MAPKKK of the proposed CWI pathway. We generated single deletion mutants lacking MAPKKK MIK1, MAPK kinase (MAPKK MEK1, or MAPK MAK1 and found them all to be sterile, cell fusion-deficient and highly impaired in vegetative growth and cell wall stress response. By searching for MEK1 interaction partners via tandem affinity purification and mass spectrometry, we identified previously characterized developmental protein PRO40 as a MEK1 interaction partner. Although fungal PRO40 homologs have been implicated in diverse developmental processes, their molecular function is currently unknown. Extensive affinity purification, mass spectrometry, and yeast two-hybrid experiments showed that PRO40 is able to bind MIK1, MEK1, and the upstream activator protein kinase C (PKC1. We further found that the PRO40 N-terminal disordered region and the central region encompassing a WW interaction domain are sufficient to govern interaction with MEK1. Most importantly, time- and stress-dependent phosphorylation studies showed that PRO40 is required for MAK1 activity. The sum of our results implies that PRO40 is a scaffold protein for the CWI pathway, linking the MAPK module to the upstream activator PKC1. Our data provide important insights into the mechanistic role of a protein that has been implicated in sexual and asexual development, cell fusion, symbiosis, and pathogenicity in different fungal systems.

  9. Sowing Black Hole Seeds: Forming Direct Collapse Black Holes With Realistic Lyman-Werner Radiation Fields in Cosmological Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Dunn, Glenna; Bellovary, Jillian M.; Christensen, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Luminous quasars detected at redshifts z > 6 require that the first black holes form early and grow to ~109 solar masses within one Gyr. Our work uses cosmological simulations to study the formation and early growth of direct collapse black holes. In the pre-reionization epoch, molecular hydrogen (H2) causes gas to fragment and form Population III stars, but Lyman-Werner radiation can suppress H2 formation and allow gas to collapse directly into a massive black hole. The critical flux required to inhibit H2 formation, Jcrit, is hotly debated, largely due to the uncertainties in the source radiation spectrum, H2 self-shielding, and collisional dissociation rates. Here, we test the power of the direct collapse model in a non-uniform Lyman-Werner radiation field, using an updated version of the SPH+N-body tree code Gasoline with H2 non-equilibrium abundance tracking, H2 cooling, and a modern SPH implementation. We vary Jcrit from 30 to 104 J21 to study the effect on seed black holes, focusing on black hole formation as a function of environment, halo mass, metallicity, and proximity of the Lyman-Werner source. We discuss the constraints on massive black hole occupation fraction in the quasar epoch, and implications for reionization, high-redshift X-ray background radiation, and gravitational waves.

  10. Engineer medium and feed for modulating N-glycosylation of recombinant protein production in CHO cell culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Yuzhou; Kildegaard, Helene Faustrup; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam

    2017-01-01

    -glycosylation is crucial, as the structure of N-glycans can largely influence both biological and physicochemical properties of recombinant proteins. Protein N-glycosylation in CHO cell culture can be controlled and tuned by engineering medium, feed, culture process, as well as genetic elements of the cell......Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells have become the primary expression system for the production of complex recombinant proteins due to their long-term success in industrial scale production and generating appropriate protein N-glycans similar to that of humans. Control and optimization of protein N....... In this chapter, we will focus on how to carry out experiments for N-glycosylation modulation through medium and feed optimization. The workflow and typical methods involved in the experiment process will be presented....

  11. Changes in gravity affect gene expression, protein modulation and metabolite pools of arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampp, R.; Martzivanou, M.; Maier, R. M.; Magel, E.

    ), we investigated samples from sounding rocket experiments (5 min μ g) and show increased transcript levels for signalling proteins. By means of 2-dimensional SDS polyacrylamide gelelectrophoresis, coupled to spot identification after tryptic digest (MALDI-TOF), we further show that metabolic short-term responses can be adjusted by protein phosphorylation/dephosphorylation. Changes in gene expression / protein modulation are mirrored by respective alterations in metabolite pools. (Supported by a grant from the Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR, 50WB0143)).

  12. A calcium sensor - protein kinase signaling module diversified in plants and is retained in all lineages of Bikonta species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Linda; Edel, Kai H; Batistič, Oliver; Kudla, Jörg

    2016-08-19

    Calcium (Ca(2+)) signaling is a universal mechanism of signal transduction and involves Ca(2+) signal formation and decoding of information by Ca(2+) binding proteins. Calcineurin B-like proteins (CBLs), which upon Ca(2+) binding activate CBL-interacting protein kinases (CIPKs) regulate a multitude of physiological processes in plants. Here, we combine phylogenomics and functional analyses to investigate the occurrence and structural conservation of CBL and CIPK proteins in 26 species representing all major clades of eukaryotes. We demonstrate the presence of at least singular CBL-CIPK pairs in representatives of Archaeplastida, Chromalveolates and Excavates and their general absence in Opisthokonta and Amoebozoa. This denotes CBL-CIPK complexes as evolutionary ancient Ca(2+) signaling modules that likely evolved in the ancestor of all Bikonta. Furthermore, we functionally characterize the CBLs and CIPK from the parabasalid human pathogen Trichomonas vaginalis. Our results reveal strict evolutionary conservation of functionally important structural features, preservation of biochemical properties and a remarkable cross-kingdom protein-protein interaction potential between CBLs and CIPKs from Arabidopsis thaliana and T. vaginalis. Together our findings suggest an ancient evolutionary origin of a functional CBL-CIPK signaling module close to the root of eukaryotic evolution and provide insights into the initial evolution of signaling networks and Ca(2+) signaling specificity.

  13. A calcium sensor – protein kinase signaling module diversified in plants and is retained in all lineages of Bikonta species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Linda; Edel, Kai H.; Batistič, Oliver; Kudla, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) signaling is a universal mechanism of signal transduction and involves Ca2+ signal formation and decoding of information by Ca2+ binding proteins. Calcineurin B-like proteins (CBLs), which upon Ca2+ binding activate CBL-interacting protein kinases (CIPKs) regulate a multitude of physiological processes in plants. Here, we combine phylogenomics and functional analyses to investigate the occurrence and structural conservation of CBL and CIPK proteins in 26 species representing all major clades of eukaryotes. We demonstrate the presence of at least singular CBL-CIPK pairs in representatives of Archaeplastida, Chromalveolates and Excavates and their general absence in Opisthokonta and Amoebozoa. This denotes CBL-CIPK complexes as evolutionary ancient Ca2+ signaling modules that likely evolved in the ancestor of all Bikonta. Furthermore, we functionally characterize the CBLs and CIPK from the parabasalid human pathogen Trichomonas vaginalis. Our results reveal strict evolutionary conservation of functionally important structural features, preservation of biochemical properties and a remarkable cross-kingdom protein-protein interaction potential between CBLs and CIPKs from Arabidopsis thaliana and T. vaginalis. Together our findings suggest an ancient evolutionary origin of a functional CBL-CIPK signaling module close to the root of eukaryotic evolution and provide insights into the initial evolution of signaling networks and Ca2+ signaling specificity. PMID:27538881

  14. Binding specificity and in vivo targets of the EH domain, a novel protein-protein interaction module

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salcini, A E; Confalonieri, S; Doria, M;

    1997-01-01

    EH is a recently identified protein-protein interaction domain found in the signal transducers Eps15 and Eps15R and several other proteins of yeast nematode. We show that EH domains from Eps15 and Eps15R bind in vitro to peptides containing an asparagine-proline-phenylalanine (NPF) motif. Direct...

  15. Phospholipase D1 modulates protein kinase C-epsilon in retinal pigment epithelium cells during inflammatory response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenconi, Paula E; Giusto, Norma M; Salvador, Gabriela A; Mateos, Melina V

    2016-12-01

    Inflammation is a key factor in the pathogenesis of several retinal diseases. In view of the essential role of the retinal pigment epithelium in visual function, elucidating the molecular mechanisms elicited by inflammation in this tissue could provide new insights for the treatment of retinal diseases. The aim of the present work was to study protein kinase C signaling and its modulation by phospholipases D in ARPE-19 cells exposed to lipopolysaccharide. This bacterial endotoxin induced protein kinase C-α/βII phosphorylation and protein kinase-ε translocation to the plasma membrane in ARPE-19 cells. Pre-incubation with selective phospholipase D inhibitors demonstrated that protein kinase C-α phosphorylation depends on phospholipase D1 and 2 while protein kinase C-ε activation depends only on phospholipase D1. The inhibition of α and β protein kinase C isoforms with Go 6976 did not modify the reduced mitochondrial function induced by lipopolysaccharide. On the contrary, the inhibition of protein kinase C-α, β and ε with Ro 31-8220 potentiated the decrease in mitochondrial function. Moreover, inhibition of protein kinase C-ε reduced Bcl-2 expression and Akt activation and increased Caspase-3 cleavage in cells treated or not with lipopolysaccharide. Our results demonstrate that through protein kinase C-ε regulation, phospholipase D1 protects retinal pigment epithelium cells from lipopolysaccharide-induced damage.

  16. Phenotypic Screening Identifies Modulators of Amyloid Precursor Protein Processing in Human Stem Cell Models of Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip W. Brownjohn

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Human stem cell models have the potential to provide platforms for phenotypic screens to identify candidate treatments and cellular pathways involved in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. Amyloid precursor protein (APP processing and the accumulation of APP-derived amyloid β (Aβ peptides are key processes in Alzheimer's disease (AD. We designed a phenotypic small-molecule screen to identify modulators of APP processing in trisomy 21/Down syndrome neurons, a complex genetic model of AD. We identified the avermectins, commonly used as anthelmintics, as compounds that increase the relative production of short Aβ peptides at the expense of longer, potentially more toxic peptides. Further studies demonstrated that this effect is not due to an interaction with the core γ-secretase responsible for Aβ production. This study demonstrates the feasibility of phenotypic drug screening in human stem cell models of Alzheimer-type dementia, and points to possibilities for indirectly modulating APP processing, independently of γ-secretase modulation.

  17. Modulation of firing and synaptic transmission of serotonergic neurons by intrinsic G protein-coupled receptors and ion channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi eMaejima

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Serotonergic neurons project to virtually all regions of the CNS and are consequently involved in many critical physiological functions such as mood, sexual behavior, feeding, sleep/wake cycle, memory, cognition, blood pressure regulation, breathing and reproductive success. Therefore serotonin release and serotonergic neuronal activity have to be precisely controlled and modulated by interacting brain circuits to adapt to specific emotional and environmental states. We will review the current knowledge about G protein-coupled receptors and ion channels involved in the regulation of serotonergic system, how their regulation is modulating the intrinsic activity of serotonergic neurons and its transmitter release and will discuss the latest methods for controlling the modulation of serotonin release and intracellular signaling in serotonergic neurons in vitro and in vivo.

  18. Star Formation in the First Galaxies I: Collapse Delayed by Lyman-Werner Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Safranek-Shrader, Chalence; Federrath, Christoph; Dubey, Anshu; Milosavljevic, Milos; Bromm, Volker

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the process of metal-free star formation in the first galaxies with a high-resolution cosmological simulation. We consider the cosmologically motivated scenario in which a strong molecule-destroying Lyman-Werner (LW) background inhibits effective cooling in low-mass haloes, delaying star formation until the collapse or more massive haloes. Only when molecular hydrogen (H2) can self-shield from LW radiation, which requires a halo capable of cooling by atomic line emission, will star formation be possible. To follow the formation of multiple gravitationally bound objects, at high gas densities we introduce sink particles which accrete gas directly from the computational grid. We find that in a 1 Mpc^3 (comoving) box, runaway collapse first occurs in a 3x10^7 M_sun dark matter halo at z~12 assuming a background intensity of J21=100. Due to a runaway increase in the H2 abundance and cooling rate, a self-shielding, supersonically turbulent core develops abruptly with ~10^4 M_sun in cold gas availabl...

  19. Scoliosis in Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich syndrome: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zheng; Yu, Xin; Shen, Jianxiong; Liang, Jinqian

    2014-12-01

    Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich syndrome (HWWS) is a congenital Müllerian duct anomaly characterized by uterine didelphys, obstructed hemivagina, and ipsilateral renal agenesis. Little is reported about spinal deformity associated with this syndrome. This study presents a case of scoliosis occurring in the setting of HWWS and explores the possible association between the 2 diseases. A previously unreported scoliosis in HWWS is described. The patient is a 12-year-old Chinese female with scoliosis that underwent a posterior correction at thoracic 5-thoracic 12 (T5-T12) levels, using the Moss-SI (Johnson & Johnson, American) spinal system. At 24-month follow-up, the patient was clinically pain free and well balanced. Plain radiographs showed solid spine fusion with no loss of deformity correction. Six months after scoliosis correction surgery, the patient went to our clinics for the treatment of HWWS. She was performed a vaginal septum resection and detected with pyocolpos. Her follow-up was symptom free at the fourth postoperative month. The prevalence of scoliosis among patients with HWWS was 8.57% that is much higher than the incidence of congential scoliosis among general population (1/1000). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of HWWS with thoracic scoliosis. During surgery, surgeons and anesthesiologists must pay particular attention to the Müllerian duct anomaly and renal agenesis associated with HWWS. There is a potential association between congenital scoliosis and HWWS.

  20. Epigenetic Regulation of Werner Syndrome Gene in Age-Related Cataract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To examine the promoter methylation and histone modification of WRN (Werner syndrome gene, a DNA repair gene, and their relationship with the gene expression in age-related cataract (ARC lens. Methods. We collected the lenses after cataract surgery from 117ARC patients and 39 age-matched non-ARC. WRN expression, DNA methylation and histone modification around the CpG island were assessed. The methylation status of Human-lens-epithelium cell (HLEB-3 was chemically altered to observe the relationship between methylation and expression of WRN. Results. The WRN expression was significantly decreased in the ARC anterior lens capsules comparing with the control. The CpG island of WRN promoter in the ARC anterior lens capsules displayed hypermethylation comparing with the controls. The WRN promoter was almost fully methylated in the cortex of ARC and control lens. Acetylated H3 was lower while methylated H3-K9 was higher in ARC anterior lens capsules than that of the controls. The expression of WRN in HLEB-3 increased after demethylation of the cells. Conclusions. A hypermethylation in WRN promoter and altered histone modification in anterior lens capsules might contribute to the ARC mechanism. The data suggest an association of altered DNA repair capability in lens with ARC pathogenesis.

  1. Fluctuations in the High-Redshift Lyman-Werner and Lyman-alpha Radiation Backgrounds

    CERN Document Server

    Holzbauer, Lauren N

    2011-01-01

    We use a new method to model fluctuations of the Lyman-Werner (LW) and Lyman-alpha radiation backgrounds at high redshift. At these early epochs the backgrounds are symptoms of a universe newly lit with its first stars. LW photons (11.5-13.6 eV) are of particular interest because they dissociate molecular hydrogen, the primary coolant in the first minihalos. By using a variation of the halo model, we efficiently generate power spectra for any choice of radiation background. We find that the LW power spectrum typically traces the matter power spectrum at large scales but turns over at the scale corresponding to the effective `horizon' of LW photons (~100 comoving Mpc), unless the sources are extremely rare. The series of horizons that characterize the Lyman-alpha flux profile shape the fluctuations of that background in a similar fashion, though those imprints are washed out once one considers fluctuations in the brightness temperature of the 21-cm signal. The Lyman-alpha background strongly affects the redshi...

  2. Evaluating the Role of p38 MAPK in the Accelerated Cell Senescence of Werner Syndrome Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terence Davis

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Progeroid syndromes show features of accelerated ageing and are used as models for human ageing, of which Werner syndrome (WS is one of the most widely studied. WS fibroblasts show accelerated senescence that may result from p38 MAP kinase activation since it is prevented by the p38 inhibitor SB203580. Thus, small molecule inhibition of p38-signalling may be a therapeutic strategy for WS. To develop this approach issues such as the in vivo toxicity and kinase selectivity of existing p38 inhibitors need to be addressed, so as to strengthen the evidence that p38 itself plays a critical role in mediating the effect of SB203580, and to find an inhibitor suitable for in vivo use. In this work we used a panel of different p38 inhibitors selected for: (1 having been used successfully in vivo in either animal models or human clinical trials; (2 different modes of binding to p38; and (3 different off-target kinase specificity profiles, in order to critically address the role of p38 in the premature senescence seen in WS cells. Our findings confirmed the involvement of p38 in accelerated cell senescence and identified p38 inhibitors suitable for in vivo use in WS, with BIRB 796 the most effective.

  3. Ethnic differences in thermoregulatory responses during resting, passive and active heating: application of Werner's adaptation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joo-Young; Wakabayashi, Hitoshi; Wijayanto, Titis; Hashiguchi, Nobuko; Saat, Mohamed; Tochihara, Yutaka

    2011-12-01

    For the coherent understanding of heat acclimatization in tropical natives, we compared ethnic differences between tropical and temperate natives during resting, passive and active heating conditions. Experimental protocols included: (1) a resting condition (an air temperature of 28°C with 50% RH), (2) a passive heating condition (28°C with 50% RH; leg immersion in a hot tub at a water temperature of 42°C), and (3) an active heating condition (32°C with 70% RH; a bicycle exercise). Morphologically and physically matched tropical natives (ten Malaysian males, MY) and temperate natives (ten Japanese males, JP) participated in all three trials. The results saw that: tropical natives had a higher resting rectal temperature and lower hand and foot temperatures at rest, smaller rise of rectal temperature and greater temperature rise in bodily extremities, and a lower sensation of thirst during passive and active heating than the matched temperate natives. It is suggested that tropical natives' homeostasis during heating is effectively controlled with the improved stability in internal body temperature and the increased capability of vascular circulation in extremities, with a lower thirst sensation. The enhanced stability of internal body temperature and the extended thermoregulatory capability of vascular circulation in the extremities of tropical natives can be interpreted as an interactive change to accomplish a thermal dynamic equilibrium in hot environments. These heat adaptive traits were explained by Wilder's law of initial value and Werner's process and controller adaptation model.

  4. Telomerase Protects Werner Syndrome Lineage-Specific Stem Cells from Premature Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoi-Hung Cheung

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Werner syndrome (WS patients exhibit premature aging predominantly in mesenchyme-derived tissues, but not in neural lineages, a consequence of telomere dysfunction and accelerated senescence. The cause of this lineage-specific aging remains unknown. Here, we document that reprogramming of WS fibroblasts to pluripotency elongated telomere length and prevented telomere dysfunction. To obtain mechanistic insight into the origin of tissue-specific aging, we differentiated iPSCs to mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs and neural stem/progenitor cells (NPCs. We observed recurrence of premature senescence associated with accelerated telomere attrition and defective synthesis of the lagging strand telomeres in MSCs, but not in NPCs. We postulate this “aging” discrepancy is regulated by telomerase. Expression of hTERT or p53 knockdown ameliorated the accelerated aging phenotypein MSC, whereas inhibition of telomerase sensitized NPCs to DNA damage. Our findings unveil a role for telomerase in the protection of accelerated aging in a specific lineage of stem cells.

  5. Pitavastatin Differentially Modulates MicroRNA-Associated Cholesterol Transport Proteins in Macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haijun Zhang

    Full Text Available There is emerging evidence identifying microRNAs (miRNAs as mediators of statin-induced cholesterol efflux, notably through the ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1 in macrophages. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of an HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor, pitavastatin, on macrophage miRNAs in the presence and absence of oxidized-LDL, a hallmark of a pro-atherogenic milieu. Treatment of human THP-1 cells with pitavastatin prevented the oxLDL-mediated suppression of miR-33a, -33b and -758 mRNA in these cells, an effect which was not uniquely attributable to induction of SREBP2. Induction of ABCA1 mRNA and protein by oxLDL was inhibited (30% by pitavastatin, while oxLDL or pitavastatin alone significantly induced and repressed ABCA1 expression, respectively. These findings are consistent with previous reports in macrophages. miRNA profiling was also performed using a miRNA array. We identified specific miRNAs which were up-regulated (122 and down-regulated (107 in THP-1 cells treated with oxLDL plus pitavastatin versus oxLDL alone, indicating distinct regulatory networks in these cells. Moreover, several of the differentially expressed miRNAs identified are functionally associated with cholesterol trafficking (six miRNAs in cells treated with oxLDL versus oxLDL plus pitavastatin. Our findings indicate that pitavastatin can differentially modulate miRNA in the presence of oxLDL; and, our results provide evidence that the net effect on cholesterol homeostasis is mediated by a network of miRNAs.

  6. Protein kinase C epsilon is important in modulating organic-dust-induced airway inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Jill A; Romberger, Debra J; Bauer, Chris; Gleason, Angela M; Sisson, Joseph H; Oldenburg, Peter J; West, William W; Wyatt, Todd A

    2012-10-01

    Organic dust samples from swine confinement facilities elicit pro-inflammatory cytokine/chemokine release from bronchial epithelial cells and monocytes, dependent, in part, upon dust-induced activation of the protein kinase C (PKC) isoform, PKCε. PKCε is also rapidly activated in murine tracheal epithelial cells following in vivo organic dust challenges, yet the functional role of PKCε in modulating dust-induced airway inflammatory outcomes is not defined. Utilizing an established intranasal inhalation animal model, experiments investigated the biologic and physiologic responses following organic dust extract (ODE) treatments in wild-type (WT) and PKCε knock-out (KO) mice. We found that neutrophil influx increased more than twofold in PKCε KO mice following both a one-time challenge and 3 weeks of daily challenges with ODE as compared with WT mice. Lung pathology revealed increased bronchiolar and alveolar inflammation, lymphoid aggregates, and T cell influx in ODE-treated PKCε KO mice. Airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine increased in PKCε KO + ODE to a greater magnitude than WT + ODE animals. There were no significant differences in cytokine/chemokine release elicited by ODE treatment between groups. However, ODE-induced nitric oxide (NO) production differed in that ODE exposure increased nitrate levels in WT mice but not in PKCε KO mice. Moreover, ODE failed to upregulate NO from ex vivo stimulated PKCε KO lung macrophages. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that PKCε-deficient mice were hypersensitive to organic dust exposure and suggest that PKCε is important in the normative lung inflammatory response to ODE. Dampening of ODE-induced NO may contribute to these enhanced inflammatory findings.

  7. Yes-associated protein (YAP modulates oncogenic features and radiation sensitivity in endometrial cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Tsujiura

    Full Text Available Yes-associated protein (YAP is a transcriptional co-activator and regulates cell proliferation and apoptosis. We investigated the clinical and biological significance of YAP in endometrial cancer (EMCA.YAP expression in 150 primary tumor tissues from patients with EMCA was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and its association with clinicopathological data was assessed. The biological functions of YAP were determined in EMCA cell lines through knockdown/overexpression of YAP. The role of YAP in modulating radiation sensitivity was also investigated in EMCA cells.Increased nuclear YAP expression was significantly associated with higher grade, stage, lympho-vascular space invasion, postoperative recurrence/metastasis and overall survival in estrogen mediated EMCA, called type 1 cancer (p = 0.019,  = 0.028,  = 0.0008,  = 0.046 and  = 0.015, respectively. In multivariate analysis, nuclear YAP expression was confirmed as an independent prognostic factor for overall survival in type 1 EMCA. YAP knockdown by siRNA resulted in a significant decrease in cell proliferation (p<0.05, anchorage-dependent growth (p = 0.015 and migration/invasion (p<0.05, and a significant increase in the number of cells in G0/G1 phase (p = 0.002. Conversely, YAP overexpression promoted cell proliferation. Clonogenic assay demonstrated enhanced radiosensitivity by approximately 36% in YAP inhibited cells.Since YAP functions as a transcriptional co-activator, its differential localization in the nucleus of cancer cells and subsequent impact on cell proliferation could have important consequences with respect to its role as an oncogene in EMCA. Nuclear YAP expression could be useful as a prognostic indicator or therapeutic target and predict radiation sensitivity in patients with EMCA.

  8. Viral replication modulated by synthetic peptide derived from hepatitis B virus X protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang-Zheng Song; Qing-Wei Wang; Chang-Cheng Song; Zeng-Liang Bai

    2004-01-01

    AIM: A strategy for viral vaccine design is the use of conserved peptides to overcome the problem of sequence diversity. At present it is still unclear whether conserved peptide is safe as a candidate vaccine. We reported it here for the first time not only to highlight the biohazard issue and safety importance for viral peptide vaccine, but also to explore the effect of a fully conserved peptide on HBV replication within the carboxyl terminus of HBx.METHODS: We synthesized the fully conserved peptide (CP)with nine residues, FVLGGCRHK. HBV-producing 2.2.15 cells were treated with or without 3.5 μM CP for 36 hours.Quantitative detection of viral DNA was performed by realtime PCR. HBV antigens were determined by enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay (ELISA). Quantitative analyses of p53 and Bax proteins were based on immunofluorescence.Flow cytometry was performed to detect cell cycle and apoptosis.RESULTS: Both extracellular and intracellular copies of HBV DNA per ml were significantly increased atter incubation with 3.5 μM of CP. HBsAg and HBeAg in the cultured medium of CP-treatment cells were as abundant as untreated control cells. CP infiuenced negatively the extracellular viral gene products, and 3.5 μM CP could significantly inhibit intracellular HBsAg expression. In response to CP, intracellular HBeAg displayed an opposite pattern to that of HBsAg, and 3.5 μM CP could efficiently increase the level of intracellular HBeAg.Flow cytometric analyses exhibited no significant changes on cell cycle, apoptosis, p53 and Bax proteins in 2.2.15 cells with or without CP.CONCLUSION: Together with the resulte generated from the synthetic peptide, we address that the conserved region,a domain of HBx, may be responsible for modulating HBV replication. As conserved peptides from infectious microbes are used as immunogens to elicit immune responses, their latent biological hazard for human beings should be evaluated.

  9. Modulation of Active Site Electronic Structure by the Protein Matrix to Control [NiFe] Hydrogenase Reactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Dayle MA; Raugei, Simone; Squier, Thomas C.

    2014-09-30

    Control of the reactivity of the nickel center of the [NiFe] hydrogenase and other metalloproteins commonly involves outer coordination sphere ligands that act to modify the geometry and physical properties of the active site metal centers. We carried out a combined set of classical molecular dynamics and quantum/classical mechanics calculations to provide quantitative estimates of how dynamic fluctuations of the active site within the protein matrix modulate the electronic structure at the catalytic center. Specifically we focused on the dynamics of the inner and outer coordination spheres of the cysteinate-bound Ni–Fe cluster in the catalytically active Ni-C state. There are correlated movements of the cysteinate ligands and the surrounding hydrogen-bonding network, which modulate the electron affinity at the active site and the proton affinity of a terminal cysteinate. On the basis of these findings, we hypothesize a coupling between protein dynamics and electron and proton transfer reactions critical to dihydrogen production.

  10. Cell-type dependent modulation of Notch signaling by the amyloid precursor protein

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Oh, Sun Young; Chen, Ci-Di; Abraham, Carmela R

    2010-01-01

    The amyloid precursor protein is a ubiquitously expressed transmembrane protein that has been long implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease but its normal biological function has remained...

  11. Plasma protein corona modulates the vascular wall interaction of drug carriers in a material and donor specific manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Sobczynski

    Full Text Available The nanoscale plasma protein interaction with intravenously injected particulate carrier systems is known to modulate their organ distribution and clearance from the bloodstream. However, the role of this plasma protein interaction in prescribing the adhesion of carriers to the vascular wall remains relatively unknown. Here, we show that the adhesion of vascular-targeted poly(lactide-co-glycolic-acid (PLGA spheres to endothelial cells is significantly inhibited in human blood flow, with up to 90% reduction in adhesion observed relative to adhesion in simple buffer flow, depending on the particle size and the magnitude and pattern of blood flow. This reduced PLGA adhesion in blood flow is linked to the adsorption of certain high molecular weight plasma proteins on PLGA and is donor specific, where large reductions in particle adhesion in blood flow (>80% relative to buffer is seen with ∼60% of unique donor bloods while others exhibit moderate to no reductions. The depletion of high molecular weight immunoglobulins from plasma is shown to successfully restore PLGA vascular wall adhesion. The observed plasma protein effect on PLGA is likely due to material characteristics since the effect is not replicated with polystyrene or silica spheres. These particles effectively adhere to the endothelium at a higher level in blood over buffer flow. Overall, understanding how distinct plasma proteins modulate the vascular wall interaction of vascular-targeted carriers of different material characteristics would allow for the design of highly functional delivery vehicles for the treatment of many serious human diseases.

  12. Modulation of cartilage differentiation by melanoma inhibiting activity/cartilage-derived retinoic acid-sensitive protein (MIA/CD-RAP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Thomas; Schlegel, Jacqueline; Schmid, Rainer; Opolka, Alfred; Grassel, Susanne; Humphries, Martin; Bosserhoff, Anja-Katrin

    2010-03-31

    Melanoma inhibiting activity/cartilage-derived retinoic acid-sensitive protein (MIA/CD-RAP) is a small soluble protein secreted from malignant melanoma cells and from chondrocytes. Recently, we revealed that MIA/CD-RAP can modulate bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)2-induced osteogenic differentiation into a chondrogenic direction. In the current study we aimed to find the molecular details of this MIA/CD-RAP function. Direct influence of MIA on BMP2 by protein-protein-interaction or modulating SMAD signaling was ruled out experimentally. Instead, we revealed inhibition of ERK signaling by MIA/CD-RAP. This inhibition is regulated via binding of MIA/CD-RAP to integrin alpha5 and abolishing its activity. Active ERK signaling is known to block chondrogenic differentiation and we revealed induction of aggrecan expression in chondrocytes by treatment with MIA/CD-RAP or PD098059, an ERK inhibitor. In in vivo models we could support the role of MIA/CD-RAP in influencing osteogenic differentiation negatively. Further, MIA/CD-RAP-deficient mice revealed an enhanced calcified cartilage layer of the articular cartilage of the knee joint and disordered arrangement of chondrocytes. Taken together, our data indicate that MIA/CD-RAP stabilizes cartilage differentiation and inhibits differentiation into bone potentially by regulating signaling processes during differentiation.

  13. Small molecules, peptides and natural products: getting a grip on 14-3-3 protein-protein modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartel, Maria; Schäfer, Anja; Stevers, Loes M; Ottmann, Christian

    2014-05-01

    One of the proteins that is found in a diverse range of eukaryotic protein-protein interactions is the adaptor protein 14-3-3. As 14-3-3 is a hub protein with very diverse interactions, it is a good model to study various protein-protein interactions. A wide range of classes of molecules, peptides, small molecules or natural products, has been used to modify the protein interactions, providing both stabilization or inhibition of the interactions of 14-3-3 with its binding partners. The first protein crystal structures were solved in 1995 and gave molecular insights for further research. The plant analog of 14-3-3 binds to a plant plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase and this protein complex is stabilized by the fungal phytotoxin fusicoccin A. The knowledge gained from the process in plants was transferred to and applied in human models to find stabilizers or inhibitors of 14-3-3 interaction in human cellular pathways.

  14. Comparison of colorimetric assays with quantitative amino acid analysis for protein quantification of Generalized Modules for Membrane Antigens (GMMA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Omar; Maggiore, Luana; Necchi, Francesca; Koeberling, Oliver; MacLennan, Calman A; Saul, Allan; Gerke, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    Genetically induced outer membrane particles from Gram-negative bacteria, called Generalized Modules for Membrane Antigens (GMMA), are being investigated as vaccines. Rapid methods are required for estimating the protein content for in-process assays during production. Since GMMA are complex biological structures containing lipid and polysaccharide as well as protein, protein determinations are not necessarily straightforward. We compared protein quantification by Bradford, Lowry, and Non-Interfering assays using bovine serum albumin (BSA) as standard with quantitative amino acid (AA) analysis, the most accurate currently available method for protein quantification. The Lowry assay has the lowest inter- and intra-assay variation and gives the best linearity between protein amount and absorbance. In all three assays, the color yield (optical density per mass of protein) of GMMA was markedly different from that of BSA with a ratio of approximately 4 for the Bradford assay, and highly variable between different GMMA; and approximately 0.7 for the Lowry and Non-Interfering assays, highlighting the need for calibrating the standard used in the colorimetric assay against GMMA quantified by AA analysis. In terms of a combination of ease, reproducibility, and proportionality of protein measurement, and comparability between samples, the Lowry assay was superior to Bradford and Non-Interfering assays for GMMA quantification.

  15. Inhibition of Hsp70 by Methylene Blue Affects Signaling Protein Function and Ubiquitination and Modulates Polyglutamine Protein Degradation*

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Adrienne M; Morishima, Yoshihiro; Clapp, Kelly M.; Peng, Hwei-Ming; Pratt, William B.; Gestwicki, Jason E.; Osawa, Yoichi; Lieberman, Andrew P.

    2010-01-01

    The Hsp90/Hsp70-based chaperone machinery regulates the activity and degradation of many signaling proteins. Cycling with Hsp90 stabilizes client proteins, whereas Hsp70 interacts with chaperone-dependent E3 ubiquitin ligases to promote protein degradation. To probe these actions, small molecule inhibitors of Hsp70 would be extremely useful; however, few have been identified. Here we test the effects of methylene blue, a recently described inhibitor of Hsp70 ATPase activity, in three well est...

  16. The folding catalyst protein disulfide isomerase is constructed of active and inactive thioredoxin modules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemmink, J; Darby, NJ; Dijkstra, K; Nilges, M; Creighton, TE

    1997-01-01

    Background: Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), a multifunctional protein of the endoplasmic reticulum, catalyzes the formation, breakage and rearrangement of disulfide bonds during protein folding. Dissection of this protein into its individual domains has confirmed the presence of the a and a' doma

  17. The color of complexes and UV-vis spectroscopy as an analytical tool of Alfred Werner's group at the University of Zurich.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Thomas; Berke, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    Two PhD theses (Alexander Gordienko, 1912; Johannes Angerstein, 1914) and a dissertation in partial fulfillment of a PhD thesis (H. S. French, Zurich, 1914) are reviewed that deal with hitherto unpublished UV-vis spectroscopy work of coordination compounds in the group of Alfred Werner. The method of measurement of UV-vis spectra at Alfred Werner's time is described in detail. Examples of spectra of complexes are given, which were partly interpreted in terms of structure (cis ↔ trans configuration, counting number of bands for structural relationships, and shift of general spectral features by consecutive replacement of ligands). A more complete interpretation of spectra was hampered at Alfred Werner's time by the lack of a light absorption theory and a correct theory of electron excitation, and the lack of a ligand field theory for coordination compounds. The experimentally difficult data acquisitions and the difficult spectral interpretations might have been reasons why this method did not experience a breakthrough in Alfred Werner's group to play a more prominent role as an important analytical method. Nevertheless the application of UV-vis spectroscopy on coordination compounds was unique and novel, and witnesses Alfred Werner's great aptitude and keenness to always try and go beyond conventional practice.

  18. Peanut protein structure, polyphenol content and immune response to peanut proteins in vivo are modulated by laccase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mihajlovic, L; Radosavljevic, J; Nordlund, E; Krstic, M; Bohn, T; Smit, Joost; Buchert, J; Cirkovic Velickovic, T

    2016-01-01

    Food texture can be improved by enzyme-mediated covalent cross-linking of different food components, such as proteins and carbohydrates. Cross-linking changes the biological and immunological properties of proteins and may change the sensitizing potential of food allergens. In this study we applied

  19. Peanut protein structure, polyphenol content and immune response to peanut proteins in vivo are modulated by laccase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mihajlovic, L; Radosavljevic, J; Nordlund, E; Krstic, M; Bohn, T; Smit, Joost; Buchert, J; Cirkovic Velickovic, T

    2016-01-01

    Food texture can be improved by enzyme-mediated covalent cross-linking of different food components, such as proteins and carbohydrates. Cross-linking changes the biological and immunological properties of proteins and may change the sensitizing potential of food allergens. In this study we applied

  20. Habituation to low or high protein intake does not modulate basal or postprandial muscle protein synthesis rates: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorissen, Stefan Hm; Horstman, Astrid Mh; Franssen, Rinske; Kouw, Imre Wk; Wall, Benjamin T; Burd, Nicholas A; de Groot, Lisette Cpgm; van Loon, Luc Jc

    2017-02-01

    Muscle mass maintenance is largely regulated by basal muscle protein synthesis rates and the ability to increase muscle protein synthesis after protein ingestion. To our knowledge, no previous studies have evaluated the impact of habituation to either low protein intake (LOW PRO) or high protein intake (HIGH PRO) on the postprandial muscle protein synthetic response. We assessed the impact of LOW PRO compared with HIGH PRO on basal and postprandial muscle protein synthesis rates after the ingestion of 25 g whey protein. Twenty-four healthy, older men [age: 62 ± 1 y; body mass index (in kg/m(2)): 25.9 ± 0.4 (mean ± SEM)] participated in a parallel-group randomized trial in which they adapted to either a LOW PRO diet (0.7 g · kg(-1) · d(-1); n = 12) or a HIGH PRO diet (1.5 g · kg(-1) · d(-1); n = 12) for 14 d. On day 15, participants received primed continuous l-[ring-(2)H5]-phenylalanine and l-[1-(13)C]-leucine infusions and ingested 25 g intrinsically l-[1-(13)C]-phenylalanine- and l-[1-(13)C]-leucine-labeled whey protein. Muscle biopsies and blood samples were collected to assess muscle protein synthesis rates as well as dietary protein digestion and absorption kinetics. Plasma leucine concentrations and exogenous phenylalanine appearance rates increased after protein ingestion (P 0.05). Plasma exogenous phenylalanine availability over the 5-h postprandial period was greater after LOW PRO than after HIGH PRO (61% ± 1% compared with 56% ± 2%, respectively; P synthesis rates increased from 0.031% ± 0.004% compared with 0.039% ± 0.007%/h in the fasted state to 0.062% ± 0.005% compared with 0.057% ± 0.005%/h in the postprandial state after LOW PRO compared with HIGH PRO, respectively (P synthesis rates or increase postprandial muscle protein synthesis rates after ingestion of 25 g protein in older men. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01986842. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  1. Possible role of HIWI2 in modulating tight junction proteins in retinal pigment epithelial cells through Akt signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivagurunathan, Suganya; Palanisamy, Karthikka; Arunachalam, Jayamuruga Pandian; Chidambaram, Subbulakshmi

    2017-03-01

    PIWI subfamily of proteins is shown to be primarily expressed in germline cells. They maintain the genomic integrity by silencing the transposable elements. Although the role of PIWI proteins in germ cells has been documented, their presence and function in somatic cells remains unclear. Intriguingly, we detected all four members of PIWI-like proteins in human ocular tissues and somatic cell lines. When HIWI2 was knocked down in retinal pigment epithelial cells, the typical honeycomb morphology was affected. Further analysis showed that the expression of tight junction (TJ) proteins, CLDN1, and TJP1 were altered in HIWI2 knockdown. Moreover, confocal imaging revealed disrupted TJP1 assembly at the TJ. Previous studies report the role of GSK3β in regulating TJ proteins. Accordingly, phospho-kinase proteome profiler array indicated increased phosphorylation of Akt and GSK3α/β in HIWI2 knockdown, suggesting that HIWI2 might affect TJ proteins through Akt-GSK3α/β signaling axis. Moreover, treating the HIWI2 knockdown cells with wortmannin increased the levels of TJP1 and CLDN1. Taken together, our study demonstrates the presence of PIWI-like proteins in somatic cells and the possible role of HIWI2 in preserving the functional integrity of epithelial cells probably by modulating the phosphorylation status of Akt.

  2. Determining the Secondary Structure of Membrane Proteins and Peptides Via Electron Spin Echo Envelope Modulation (ESEEM) Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lishan; Mayo, Daniel J.; Sahu, Indra D.; Zhou, Andy; Zhang, Rongfu; McCarrick, Robert M.; Lorigan, Gary A.

    2016-01-01

    Revealing detailed structural and dynamic information of membrane embedded or associated proteins is challenging due to their hydrophobic nature which makes NMR and X-ray crystallographic studies challenging or impossible. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) has emerged as a powerful technique to provide essential structural and dynamic information for membrane proteins with no size limitations in membrane systems which mimic their natural lipid bilayer environment. Therefore, tremendous efforts have been devoted toward the development and application of EPR spectroscopic techniques to study the structure of biological systems such as membrane proteins and peptides. This chapter introduces a novel approach established and developed in the Lorigan lab to investigate membrane protein and peptide local secondary structures utilizing the pulsed EPR technique electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) spectroscopy. Detailed sample preparation strategies in model membrane protein systems and the experimental setup are described. Also, the ability of this approach to identify local secondary structure of membrane proteins and peptides with unprecedented efficiency is demonstrated in model systems. Finally, applications and further developments of this ESEEM approach for probing larger size membrane proteins produced by over-expression systems are discussed. PMID:26477255

  3. Conjugated Linoleic Acid Supplementation under a High-Fat Diet Modulates Stomach Protein Expression and Intestinal Microbiota in Adult Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaplin, Alice; Parra, Pilar; Serra, Francisca; Palou, Andreu

    2015-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract constitutes a physiological interface integrating nutrient and microbiota-host metabolism. Conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) have been reported to contribute to decreased body weight and fat accretion. The modulation by dietary CLA of stomach proteins related to energy homeostasis or microbiota may be involved, although this has not been previously analysed. This is examined in the present study, which aims to underline the potential mechanisms of CLA which contribute to body weight regulation. Adult mice were fed either a normal fat (NF, 12% kJ content as fat) or a high-fat (HF, 43% kJ content as fat) diet. In the latter case, half of the animals received daily oral supplementation of CLA. Expression and content of stomach proteins and specific bacterial populations from caecum were analysed. CLA supplementation was associated with an increase in stomach protein expression, and exerted a prebiotic action on both Bacteroidetes/Prevotella and Akkermansia muciniphila. However, CLA supplementation was not able to override the negative effects of HF diet on Bifidobacterium spp., which was decreased in both HF and HF+CLA groups. Our data show that CLA are able to modulate stomach protein expression and exert a prebiotic effect on specific gut bacterial species.

  4. Flavonoid Interaction with a Chitinase from Grape Berry Skin: Protein Identification and Modulation of the Enzymatic Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippi, Antonio; Petrussa, Elisa; Rajcevic, Uros; Čurin Šerbec, Vladka; Passamonti, Sabina; Renzone, Giovanni; Scaloni, Andrea; Zancani, Marco; Vianello, Angelo; Braidot, Enrico

    2016-09-28

    In the present study, an antibody raised against a peptide sequence of rat bilitranslocase (anti-peptide Ab) was tested on microsomal proteins obtained from red grape berry skin. Previously, this antibody had demonstrated to recognize plant membrane proteins associated with flavonoid binding and transport. Immuno-proteomic assays identified a number of proteins reacting with this particular antibody, suggesting that the flavonoid binding and interaction may be extended not only to carriers of these molecules, but also to enzymes with very different functions. One of these proteins is a pathogenesis-related (PR) class IV chitinase, whose in vitro chitinolytic activity was modulated by two of the most representative flavonoids of grape, quercetin and catechin, as assessed by both spectrophotometric and fluorimetric assays in grape microsomes and commercial enzyme preparations. The effect of these flavonoids on the catalysis and its kinetic parameters was also evaluated, evidencing that they determine a hormetic dose-dependent response. These results highlight the importance of flavonoids not only as antioxidants or antimicrobial effectors, but also as modulators of plant growth and stress response. Implications of the present suggestion are here discussed in the light of environment and pesticide-reduction concerns.

  5. Flavonoid Interaction with a Chitinase from Grape Berry Skin: Protein Identification and Modulation of the Enzymatic Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Filippi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, an antibody raised against a peptide sequence of rat bilitranslocase (anti-peptide Ab was tested on microsomal proteins obtained from red grape berry skin. Previously, this antibody had demonstrated to recognize plant membrane proteins associated with flavonoid binding and transport. Immuno-proteomic assays identified a number of proteins reacting with this particular antibody, suggesting that the flavonoid binding and interaction may be extended not only to carriers of these molecules, but also to enzymes with very different functions. One of these proteins is a pathogenesis-related (PR class IV chitinase, whose in vitro chitinolytic activity was modulated by two of the most representative flavonoids of grape, quercetin and catechin, as assessed by both spectrophotometric and fluorimetric assays in grape microsomes and commercial enzyme preparations. The effect of these flavonoids on the catalysis and its kinetic parameters was also evaluated, evidencing that they determine a hormetic dose-dependent response. These results highlight the importance of flavonoids not only as antioxidants or antimicrobial effectors, but also as modulators of plant growth and stress response. Implications of the present suggestion are here discussed in the light of environment and pesticide-reduction concerns.

  6. Sex Steroid Modulation of Fatty Acid Utilization and Fatty Acid Binding Protein Concentration in Rat Liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ockner, Robert K.; Lysenko, Nina; Manning, Joan A.; Monroe, Scott E.; Burnett, David A.

    1980-01-01

    The mechanism by which sex steroids influence very low density hepatic lipoprotein triglyceride production has not been fully elucidated. In previous studies we showed that [14C]oleate utilization and incorporation into triglycerides were greater in hepatocyte suspensions from adult female rats than from males. The sex differences were not related to activities of the enzymes of triglyceride biosynthesis, whereas fatty acid binding protein (FABP) concentration in liver cytosol was greater in females. These findings suggested that sex differences in lipoprotein could reflect a sex steroid influence on the availability of fatty acids for hepatocellular triglyceride biosynthesis. In the present studies, sex steroid effects on hepatocyte [14C]oleate utilization and FABP concentration were investigated directly. Hepatocytes from immature (30-d-old) rats exhibited no sex differences in [14C]oleate utilization. With maturation, total [14C]oleate utilization and triglyceride biosynthesis increased moderately in female cells and decreased markedly in male cells; the profound sex differences in adults were maximal by age 60 d. Fatty acid oxidation was little affected. Rats were castrated at age 30 d, and received estradiol, testosterone, or no hormone until age 60 d, when hepatocyte [14C]oleate utilization was studied. Castration virtually eliminated maturational changes and blunted the sex differences in adults. Estradiol or testosterone largely reproduced the appropriate adult pattern of [14C]oleate utilization regardless of the genotypic sex of the treated animal. In immature females and males, total cytosolic FABP concentrations were similar. In 60-d-old animals, there was a striking correlation among all groups (females, males, castrates, and hormone-treated) between mean cytosolic FABP concentration on the one hand, and mean total [14C]oleate utilization (r = 0.91) and incorporation into triglycerides (r = 0.94) on the other. In 30-d-old animals rates of [14C

  7. Spacial Logic of Architectural Color: Werner Spillmann and the Color Planning for German Township Kirchsteigfeld%建筑色彩的空间逻辑——Werner Spillmann和德国小镇Kirchsteigfeld色彩计划

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苟爱萍

    2007-01-01

    介绍了最早将色彩用于建筑设计的专家之一Werner Spillmann,他创立的概念色彩设计方法,即从心理学、社会学和文化学等方面对色彩进行评价与规划,并在实践中进行检验,以及德国Kirchsteigfeld的色彩计划,体现了他的设计思想.

  8. Discovery of a junctional epitope antibody that stabilizes IL-6 and gp80 protein:protein interaction and modulates its downstream signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Ralph; Burnley, Rebecca J.; Valenzano, Chiara R.; Qureshi, Omar; Doyle, Carl; Lumb, Simon; del Carmen Lopez, Maria; Griffin, Robert; McMillan, David; Taylor, Richard D.; Meier, Chris; Mori, Prashant; Griffin, Laura M.; Wernery, Ulrich; Kinne, Jörg; Rapecki, Stephen; Baker, Terry S.; Lawson, Alastair D. G.; Wright, Michael; Ettorre, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Protein:protein interactions are fundamental in living organism homeostasis. Here we introduce VHH6, a junctional epitope antibody capable of specifically recognizing a neo-epitope when two proteins interact, albeit transiently, to form a complex. Orthogonal biophysical techniques have been used to prove the “junctional epitope” nature of VHH6, a camelid single domain antibody recognizing the IL-6–gp80 complex but not the individual components alone. X-ray crystallography, HDX-MS and SPR analysis confirmed that the CDR regions of VHH6 interact simultaneously with IL-6 and gp80, locking the two proteins together. At the cellular level, VHH6 was able to alter the response of endothelial cells to exogenous IL-6, promoting a sustained STAT3 phosphorylation signal, an accumulation of IL-6 in vesicles and an overall pro-inflammatory phenotype supported further by transcriptomic analysis. Junctional epitope antibodies, like VHH6, not only offer new opportunities in screening and structure-aided drug discovery, but could also be exploited as therapeutics to modulate complex protein:protein interactions. PMID:28134246

  9. Stability and structure of the membrane protein transporter Ffh is modulated by substrates and lipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinau, Marika Ejby; Otzen, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    The cytosolic protein Ffh transports membrane proteins from the ribosome to the inner membrane in complex with 4.5S RNA. Here we show that native Ffh binds to the hydrophobic probe ANS in a 1 Ffh:3 ANS stoichiometry, revealing a hydrophobic binding site. Thermal precipitation of Ffh is shifted...... upwards by ∼10 °C by ANS or substrate protein, suggesting that the hydrophobic binding site makes the protein aggregation prone. Chemical denaturation confirm that Ffh is a rather unstable protein. 4.5S RNA destabilizes Ffh further, suggesting it keeps the protein in a more open conformation than...

  10. Interaction of Werner and Bloom syndrome genes with p53 in familial breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirtenberger, Michael; Frank, Bernd; Hemminki, Kari; Klaes, Rüdiger; Schmutzler, Rita K; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Meindl, Alfons; Kiechle, Marion; Arnold, Norbert; Weber, Bernhard H F; Niederacher, Dieter; Bartram, Claus R; Burwinkel, Barbara

    2006-08-01

    Mutations of the human RecQ helicase genes WRN and BLM lead to rare autosomal recessive disorders, Werner and Bloom syndromes, which are associated with premature ageing and cancer predisposition. We tested the hypothesis whether three polymorphic, non-conservative amino acid exchanges in WRN and BLM act as low-penetrance familial breast cancer risk factors. Moreover, we examined the putative impact of p53 MspI 1798G>A, which is completely linked to p53PIN3, a 16 bp insertion/duplication that has been associated with reduced p53 expression, on familial breast cancer risk. Genotyping analyses, performed on 816 BRCA1/2 mutation-negative German familial breast cancer patients and 1012 German controls, revealed a significant association of the WRN Cys1367Arg polymorphism with familial breast cancer (OR = 1.28, 95% CI 1.06-1.54) and high-risk familial breast cancer (OR = 1.32, 95% CI 1.06-1.65). The analysis of p53 MspI 1798G>A, which is completely linked to p53PIN3, showed a significantly increased familial breast cancer risk for carriers of the 16 bp insertion/duplication, following a recessive mode (OR = 2.15, 95% CI = 1.12-4.11). WRN Cys1367Arg, located in the C-terminus, the binding site of p53, is predicted to be damaging. The joint effect of WRN Cys1367Arg and p53 MspI resulted in an increased breast cancer risk compared to the single polymorphisms (OR = 3.39, 95% CI 1.19-9.71). In conclusion, our study indicates the importance of inherited variants in the WRN and p53 genes for familial breast cancer susceptibility.

  11. Frequency of Werner helicase 1367 polymorphism and age-related morbidity in an elderly Brazilian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A.C. Smith

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Werner syndrome (WS is a premature aging disease caused by a mutation in the WRN gene. The gene was identified in 1996 and its product acts as a DNA helicase and exonuclease. Some specific WRN polymorphic variants were associated with increased risk for cardiovascular diseases. The identification of genetic polymorphisms as risk factors for complex diseases affecting older people can improve their prevention, diagnosis and prognosis. We investigated WRN codon 1367 polymorphism in 383 residents in a district of the city of São Paulo, who were enrolled in an Elderly Brazilian Longitudinal Study. Their mean age was 79.70 ± 5.32 years, ranging from 67 to 97. This population was composed of 262 females (68.4% and 121 males (31.6% of European (89.2%, Japanese (3.3%, Middle Eastern (1.81%, and mixed and/or other origins (5.7%. There are no studies concerning this polymorphism in Brazilian population. These subjects were evaluated clinically every two years. The major health problems and morbidities affecting this cohort were cardiovascular diseases (21.7%, hypertension (83.7%, diabetes (63.3%, obesity (41.23%, dementia (8.0%, depression (20.0%, and neoplasia (10.8%. Their prevalence is similar to some urban elderly Brazilian samples. DNA was isolated from blood cells, amplified by PCR and digested with PmaCI. Allele frequencies were 0.788 for the cysteine and 0.211 for the arginine. Genotype distributions were within that expected for the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Female gender was associated with hypertension and obesity. Logistic regression analysis did not detect significant association between the polymorphism and morbidity. These findings confirm those from Europeans and differ from Japanese population.

  12. Turnover of sulfated glycosaminoglycans in fibroblasts derived from patients with Werner's syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowles, E.A.; Brauker, J.H.; Anderson, R.L.

    1987-02-01

    Fibroblasts derived from patients with Werner's syndrome (WS) were incubated with radioactive sulfate to study the incorporation of 35S into glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). The accumulation of cell-associated 35S radioactivity in the GAGs of WS fibroblasts was consistently higher than parallel accumulation in normal human fibroblasts, but was substantially less than in fibroblasts derived from patients with Hurler's syndrome (HS). However, when fibroblasts were labeled with 35SO4(2-), trypsinized to remove extracellular and pericellular radioactive GAGs, replated, and chased to follow the fate of the intracellular radioactivity, both WS and normal cells showed a rapid release of the intracellular 35S, while HS cells showed little or no loss of intracellular radioactivity. The radioactivity released from WS and normal cells was of low molecular weight (LMW), eluting from gel filtration columns at the same position as free sulfate. These results establish that WS cells degrade intracellular sulfated GAGs and argue against the hypothesis that a defect in GAG degradation pathways is the basis for the increased level of cell-associated GAGs. Other possible explanations for the increased cell-associated (35S)GAGs in WS cells as compared with normal cells were also considered: increased GAG sulfation; an increase in GAG chain length; an increased rate of GAG synthesis; and a decreased rate of shedding of cell surface proteoglycan into the medium. No difference between normal and WS fibroblasts in any of the above parameters was observed. These results strongly imply that the primary biochemical defect in WS fibroblasts does not involve sulfated GAG metabolism.

  13. A Gap Junction Protein, Inx2, Modulates Calcium Flux to Specify Border Cell Fate during Drosophila oogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Ritabrata; Deshpande, Girish

    2017-01-01

    Intercellular communication mediated by gap junction (GJ) proteins is indispensable during embryogenesis, tissue regeneration and wound healing. Here we report functional analysis of a gap junction protein, Innexin 2 (Inx2), in cell type specification during Drosophila oogenesis. Our data reveal a novel involvement of Inx2 in the specification of Border Cells (BCs), a migratory cell type, whose identity is determined by the cell autonomous STAT activity. We show that Inx2 influences BC fate specification by modulating STAT activity via Domeless receptor endocytosis. Furthermore, detailed experimental analysis has uncovered that Inx2 also regulates a calcium flux that transmits across the follicle cells. We propose that Inx2 mediated calcium flux in the follicle cells stimulates endocytosis by altering Dynamin (Shibire) distribution which is in turn critical for careful calibration of STAT activation and, thus for BC specification. Together our data provide unprecedented molecular insights into how gap junction proteins can regulate cell-type specification. PMID:28114410

  14. Alteration and modulation of protein activity by varying post-translational modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, David N.; Reed, David W.; Thompson, Vicki S.; Lacey, Jeffrey A.; Apel, William A.

    2016-07-12

    Embodiments of the invention include methods of altering the enzymatic activity or solubility of an extremophilic enzyme or post-translationally modifying a protein of interest via using isolated or partially purified glycosyltransferases and/or post-translational modification proteins, extracts of cells comprising glycosyltransferases and/or post-translational modification proteins, and/or in cells comprising one or more glycosyltransferases and/or post-translational modification proteins.

  15. Modulating carbohydrate–protein interactions through glycoengineering of monoclonal antibodies to impact cancer physiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiang, Austin W.T.; Li, Shangzhong; Spahn, Philipp N.

    2016-01-01

    Diverse glycans on proteins impact cell and organism physiology, along with drug activity. Since many protein-based biotherapeutics are glycosylated and these glycans have biological activity, there is a desire to engineer glycosylation for recombinant protein-based biotherapeutics. Engineered gl...

  16. Cell-type dependent modulation of Notch signaling by the amyloid precursor protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Sun Young; Chen, Ci-Di; Abraham, Carmela R

    2010-04-01

    The amyloid precursor protein is a ubiquitously expressed transmembrane protein that has been long implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease but its normal biological function has remained elusive despite extensive effort. We have previously reported the identification of Notch2 as an amyloid precursor protein interacting protein in E18 rat neurons. Here, we sought to reveal the physiologic consequences of this interaction. We report a functional relationship between amyloid precursor protein and Notch1, which does not affect Delta ligand binding. First, we observed interactions between the amyloid precursor protein and Notch in mouse embryonic stem cells lacking both presenilin 1 and presenilin 2, the active proteolytic components of the gamma-secretase complex, suggesting that these two transmembrane proteins can interact in the absence of presenilin. Next, we demonstrated that the amyloid precursor protein affects Notch signaling by using Notch-dependent luciferase assays in two cell lines, the human embryonic kidney 293 and the monkey kidney, COS7. We found that the amyloid precursor protein exerts opposing effects on Notch signaling in human embryonic kidney 293 vs. COS7 cells. Finally, we show that more Notch Intracellular Domain is found in the nucleus in the presence of exogenous amyloid precursor protein or its intracellular domain, suggesting the mechanism by which the amyloid precursor protein affects Notch signaling in certain cells. Our results provide evidence of potentially important communications between the amyloid precursor protein and Notch.

  17. Controlling the self-assembly of protein polymers via heterodimer-forming modules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Domeradzka, Natalia Eliza

    2016-01-01

    Supramolecular assemblies formed by protein polymers are attractive candidates for future biomaterials. Ideally, one would like to be able to define the nanostructure, in which the protein polymers should self-assemble, and then design protein polymer sequences that assemble exactly into such nanost

  18. The WWE domain: a common interaction module in protein ubiquitination and ADP ribosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravind, L

    2001-05-01

    Sequence profile analysis was used to detect a conserved globular domain in several proteins including deltex, Trip12 and poly-ADP-ribose polymerase homologs. It was named the WWE domain after its most conserved residues and is predicted to mediate specific protein-protein interactions in ubiquitin and ADP-ribose conjugation systems.

  19. Human protein status modulates brain reward responses to food cues1–3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Griffioen-Roose, S.; Smeets, P.A.M.; Heuvel, van den E.M.; Boesveldt, S.; Finlayson, G.; Graaf, de C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Protein is indispensable in the human diet, and its intake appears tightly regulated. The role of sensory attributes of foods in protein intake regulation is far from clear. Objective: We investigated the effect of human protein status on neural responses to different food cues with the

  20. Relation between initial conditions and entanglement sudden death for two-qubit extended Werner-like states

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Bai-Yuan; Fang Mao-Fa; Huang Jiang

    2013-01-01

    In this paper,the dynamical behavior of entanglement of an uncoupled two-qubit system,which interacts with independent identical amplitude damping environments and is initially prepared in the extended Werner-like (EWL) states,is investigated.The results show that whether entanglement sudden death (ESD) of an EWL state will occur or not depends on initial purity and concurrence.The boundaries between ESD states and ESD-free states for two kinds of EWL states are found to be different.Furthermore,some regions are shown where ESD states can be transformed into ESD-free states by local unitary operations.

  1. Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich Syndrome Consisting of Uterine Didelphys, Obstructed Hemivagina and Ipsilateral Renal Agenesis in a Newborn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsung-Hsin Wu

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich (HWW syndrome is a rare variant of Müllerian duct anomalies consisting of uterine didelphys, obstructed hemivagina, and ipsilateral renal agenesis. Patients with HWW syndrome are usually asymptomatic until menarche, when they present with acute lower abdominal pain. Here we report a case of a female newborn with right renal agenesis diagnosed during the pregnancy. The patient presented with a protruding mass over the vaginal introitus that was associated with an obstructed hemivagina and uterine didelphys.

  2. Werner Gaus:室内循环水养殖,中国还没读懂

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Werner Gaus认为目前中国政府主导的循环水养殖系统研究,还是多数建立在借鉴国外系统或者引用欧洲系统的部分原理,只是借鉴到皮毛,没有触及真正核心的原理与技术,这是很多设计和设备在欧洲系统里好用,而在国内应用时效果不理想的症结所在。

  3. F. Oliver Brachfeld y Werner Wolff: dos figuras en los inicios de la Sociedad Interamericana de Psicología

    OpenAIRE

    Ramón León

    2012-01-01

    F. Oliver Brachfeld (1908-1967) y Werner Wolff (1904-1957) fueron dos psicólogos europeos emigrados a América del Sur (Brachfeld) y a los Estados Unidos de Norteamérica (Wolff) que desempeñaron importantes funciones en los años iniciales de la Sociedad Interamericana de Psicología (SIP). Brachfeld fue su Presidente entre 1953 y 1955, en tanto que Wolff fue uno de los gestores de su creación (al lado de Oswaldo Robles, Guillermo Dávila y Rogelio Díaz-Guerrero), su primer Vicepresidente entre 1...

  4. Characterization of the mammalian YAP (Yes-associated protein) gene and its role in defining a novel protein module, the WW domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudol, M; Bork, P; Einbond, A; Kastury, K; Druck, T; Negrini, M; Huebner, K; Lehman, D

    1995-06-16

    We report cDNA cloning and characterization of the human and mouse orthologs of the chicken YAP (Yes-associated protein) gene which encodes a novel protein that binds to the SH3 (Src homology 3) domain of the Yes proto-oncogene product. Sequence comparison between mouse, human, and chicken YAP proteins showed an inserted sequence in the mouse YAP that represented an imperfect repeat of an upstream sequence. Further analysis of this sequence revealed a putative protein module that is found in various structural, regulatory, and signaling molecules in yeast, nematode, and mammals including human dystrophin. Because one of the prominent features of this sequence motif is two tryptophans (W), we named it the WW domain (Bork, P., and Sudol, M. (1994) Trends Biochem. Sci. 19, 531-533). Since its delineation, more proteins have been shown to contain this domain, and we report here on the widespread distribution of the WW module and present a discussion of its possible function. We have also shown that the human YAP gene is well conserved among higher eukaryotes, but it may not be conserved in yeast. Its expression at the RNA level in adult human tissues is nearly ubiquitous, being relatively high in placenta, prostate, ovary, and testis, but is not detectable in peripheral blood leukocytes. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization on human metaphase chromosomes and by analyzing rodent-human hybrids by Southern blot hybridization and polymerase chain reaction amplification, we mapped the human YAP gene to chromosome band 11q13, a region to which the multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 gene has been mapped.

  5. REEPs are membrane shaping adapter proteins that modulate specific g protein-coupled receptor trafficking by affecting ER cargo capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björk, Susann; Hurt, Carl M; Ho, Vincent K; Angelotti, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Receptor expression enhancing proteins (REEPs) were identified by their ability to enhance cell surface expression of a subset of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), specifically GPCRs that have proven difficult to express in heterologous cell systems. Further analysis revealed that they belong to the Yip (Ypt-interacting protein) family and that some REEP subtypes affect ER structure. Yip family comparisons have established other potential roles for REEPs, including regulation of ER-Golgi transport and processing/neuronal localization of cargo proteins. However, these other potential REEP functions and the mechanism by which they selectively enhance GPCR cell surface expression have not been clarified. By utilizing several REEP family members (REEP1, REEP2, and REEP6) and model GPCRs (α2A and α2C adrenergic receptors), we examined REEP regulation of GPCR plasma membrane expression, intracellular processing, and trafficking. Using a combination of immunolocalization and biochemical methods, we demonstrated that this REEP subset is localized primarily to ER, but not plasma membranes. Single cell analysis demonstrated that these REEPs do not specifically enhance surface expression of all GPCRs, but affect ER cargo capacity of specific GPCRs and thus their surface expression. REEP co-expression with α2 adrenergic receptors (ARs) revealed that this REEP subset interacts with and alter glycosidic processing of α2C, but not α2A ARs, demonstrating selective interaction with cargo proteins. Specifically, these REEPs enhanced expression of and interacted with minimally/non-glycosylated forms of α2C ARs. Most importantly, expression of a mutant REEP1 allele (hereditary spastic paraplegia SPG31) lacking the carboxyl terminus led to loss of this interaction. Thus specific REEP isoforms have additional intracellular functions besides altering ER structure, such as enhancing ER cargo capacity, regulating ER-Golgi processing, and interacting with select cargo proteins

  6. S-Nitrosothiols modulate G protein-coupled receptor signaling in a reversible and highly receptor-specific manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mönkkönen Kati S

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies indicate that the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR signaling machinery can serve as a direct target of reactive oxygen species, including nitric oxide (NO and S-nitrosothiols (RSNOs. To gain a broader view into the way that receptor-dependent G protein activation – an early step in signal transduction – might be affected by RSNOs, we have studied several receptors coupling to the Gi family of G proteins in their native cellular environment using the powerful functional approach of [35S]GTPγS autoradiography with brain cryostat sections in combination with classical G protein activation assays. Results We demonstrate that RSNOs, like S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO and S-nitrosocysteine (CysNO, can modulate GPCR signaling via reversible, thiol-sensitive mechanisms probably involving S-nitrosylation. RSNOs are capable of very targeted regulation, as they potentiate the signaling of some receptors (exemplified by the M2/M4 muscarinic cholinergic receptors, inhibit others (P2Y12 purinergic, LPA1lysophosphatidic acid, and cannabinoid CB1 receptors, but may only marginally affect signaling of others, such as adenosine A1, μ-opioid, and opiate related receptors. Amplification of M2/M4 muscarinic responses is explained by an accelerated rate of guanine nucleotide exchange, as well as an increased number of high-affinity [35S]GTPγS binding sites available for the agonist-activated receptor. GSNO amplified human M4 receptor signaling also under heterologous expression in CHO cells, but the effect diminished with increasing constitutive receptor activity. RSNOs markedly inhibited P2Y12 receptor signaling in native tissues (rat brain and human platelets, but failed to affect human P2Y12 receptor signaling under heterologous expression in CHO cells, indicating that the native cellular signaling partners, rather than the P2Y12 receptor protein, act as a molecular target for this action. Conclusion These in vitro studies

  7. Artificial proteins as allosteric modulators of PDZ3 and SH3 in two-domain constructs: A computational characterization of novel chimeric proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirubakaran, Palani; Pfeiferová, Lucie; Boušová, Kristýna; Bednarova, Lucie; Obšilová, Veronika; Vondrášek, Jiří

    2016-10-01

    Artificial multidomain proteins with enhanced structural and functional properties can be utilized in a broad spectrum of applications. The design of chimeric fusion proteins utilizing protein domains or one-domain miniproteins as building blocks is an important advancement for the creation of new biomolecules for biotechnology and medical applications. However, computational studies to describe in detail the dynamics and geometry properties of two-domain constructs made from structurally and functionally different proteins are lacking. Here, we tested an in silico design strategy using all-atom explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations. The well-characterized PDZ3 and SH3 domains of human zonula occludens (ZO-1) (3TSZ), along with 5 artificial domains and 2 types of molecular linkers, were selected to construct chimeric two-domain molecules. The influence of the artificial domains on the structure and dynamics of the PDZ3 and SH3 domains was determined using a range of analyses. We conclude that the artificial domains can function as allosteric modulators of the PDZ3 and SH3 domains. Proteins 2016; 84:1358-1374. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Modulation of valosin-containing protein by Kyoto University Substances (KUS as a novel therapeutic strategy for ischemic neuronal diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayuki Hata

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Retinal ischemia causes several vision-threatening diseases, including diabetic retinopathy, retinal artery occlusion, and retinal vein occlusion. Intracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP depletion and subsequent induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress are proposed to be the underlying mechanisms of ischemic retinal cell death. Recently, we found that a naphthalene derivative can inhibit ATPase activity of valosin-containing protein, universally expressed within various types of cells, including retinal neural cells, with strong cytoprotective activity. Based on the chemical structure, we developed novel valosin-containing protein modulators, Kyoto University Substances (KUSs, that not only inhibit intracellular ATP depletion, but also ameliorate ER stress. Suppressing ER stress by KUSs is associated with neural cell survival in animal models of several neurodegenerative diseases, such as glaucoma and retinal degeneration. Given that a major pathology of ischemic retinal diseases, other than intracellular ATP depletion, is ER stress-induced cell death, KUSs may provide a novel strategy for cell protection in ischemic conditions. Hence, we investigated the efficacy of KUS121 in a rat model of retinal ischemic injury. Intravitreal injections of KUS121, which is clinically preferable route of drug administration in retinal diseases, significantly suppressed inner retinal thinning and retinal cell death, and maintained visual functions. Valosin-containing protein modulation by KUS is a promising novel therapeutic strategy for ischemic retinal diseases.

  9. Proteomic profiling of SupT1 cells reveal modulation of host proteins by HIV-1 Nef variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reshu Saxena

    Full Text Available Nef is an accessory viral protein that promotes HIV-1 replication, facilitating alterations in cellular pathways via multiple protein-protein interactions. The advent of proteomics has expanded the focus on better identification of novel molecular pathways regulating disease progression. In this study, nef was sequenced from randomly selected patients, however, sequence variability identified did not elicited any specific mutation that could have segregated HIV-1 patients in different stages of disease progression. To explore the difference in Nef functionality based on sequence variability we used proteomics approach. Proteomic profiling was done to compare the effect of Nef variants in host cell protein expression. 2DGE in control and Nef transfected SupT1 cells demonstrated several differentially expressed proteins. Fourteen protein spots were detected with more than 1.5 fold difference. Significant down regulation was seen in six unique protein spots in the Nef treated cells. Proteins were identified as Cyclophilin A, EIF5A-1 isoform B, Rho GDI 1 isoform a, VDAC1, OTUB1 and α-enolase isoform 1 (ENO1 through LC-MS/MS. The differential expression of the 6 proteins was analyzed by Real time PCR, Western blotting and Immunofluorescence studies with two Nef variants (RP14 and RP01 in SupT1 cells. There was contrasting difference between the effect of these Nef variants upon the expression of these six proteins. Downregulation of α-enolase (ENO1, VDAC1 and OTUB1 was more significant by Nef RP01 whereas Cyclophilin A and RhoGDI were found to be more downregulated by Nef RP14. This difference in Nef variants upon host protein expression was also studied through a site directed mutant of Nef RP01 (55AAAAAAA61 and the effect was found to be reversed. Deciphering the role of these proteins mediated by Nef variants will open a new avenue of research in understanding Nef mediated pathogenesis. Overall study determines modulation of cellular protein

  10. Leptin modulated changes in adipose tissue protein expression in ob/ob mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Ambati, Suresh; Della-Fera, Mary Anne; Choi, Yang-Ho; Baile, Clifton A; Andacht, Tracy M

    2011-02-01

    Comparative proteomic analyses were performed in adipose tissue of leptin-deficient ob/ob mice treated with leptin or control buffer in order to identify the protein expression changes as the potential targets of leptin. Mice were treated with either phosphate-buffered saline (control) or 10 µg/day leptin for 14 days via subcutaneous osmotic minipumps. Total protein from white adipose tissue was extracted and labeled with different fluorescent cyanine dyes for analysis by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (DIGE). Spots that were differentially expressed and appeared to have sufficient material for mass spectrometry analysis were picked and digested with trypsin and subjected to MALDI-TOF MS for protein identification. Twelve functional protein groups were found differentially expressed in adipose tissue of leptin-treated vs. control ob/ob mice, including molecular chaperones and redox proteins such as calreticulin (CALR), protein disulfide isomerase-associated 3 (PDIA3), prohibitin (PHB), and peroxiredoxin-6 (PRDX6); cytoskeleton proteins such as β actin, desmin, and α-tubulin; and some other proteins. The mRNA levels of CALR, PDIA3, and PHB were measured by real-time reverse transcription-PCR and found to be upregulated (P leptin's effects on lipid metabolism and apoptosis may be mediated in part by alterations in expression of molecular chaperones and redox proteins for regulating endoplasmic reticulum stress and cytoskeleton proteins for regulating mitochondrial morphology.

  11. Calcium-dependent potassium channels as a target protein for modulation of the blood-brain tumor barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ningaraj, Nagendra S; Rao, Mamatha; Black, Keith L

    2003-06-01

    Even though the blood-brain tumor barrier (BTB) is more permeable than the blood-brain barrier (BBB), the BTB still significantly restricts the delivery of anticancer drugs to brain tumors. Brain tumor capillaries that form the BTB, however, express certain unique protein markers that are absent or barely detectable in normal brain capillaries. We were able to biochemically modulate one such protein marker, the calcium-dependent potassium (K(Ca)) channel, by using a specific K(Ca) channel agonist, NS-1619, to obtain sustained enhancement of selective drug delivery, including molecules of varying sizes, to tumors in rat syngeneic and xenograft brain tumor models. Immunolocalization and potentiometric studies showed increased K(Ca) channel distribution on tumor cells compared with normal cells, suggesting that tumor cell-specific signals might induce overexpression of K(Ca) channels in capillary endothelial cells, leading to increased BTB permeability. We also demonstrated that the cellular mechanism for K(Ca) channel-mediated BTB permeability increase is due to accelerated formation of pinocytotic vesicles, which can transport therapeutic molecules across the BTB. This concept was investigated by using NS-1619 to facilitate increased delivery of carboplatin to brain tumor leading to enhanced survival in rats with brain tumors. Additionally, we showed that K(Ca) channel modulation resulted in enhanced permeability to macromolecules, including Her-2 monoclonal antibody and green fluorescent protein-adenoviral vectors, in a human, primary brain-tumor xenograft model. Therefore, K(Ca) channels are a potential, promising target for biochemical modulation of BTB permeability to increase antineoplastic drug delivery selectively to brain tumors.

  12. Ribosome-dependent ATPase interacts with conserved membrane protein in Escherichia coli to modulate protein synthesis and oxidative phosphorylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Babu

    Full Text Available Elongation factor RbbA is required for ATP-dependent deacyl-tRNA release presumably after each peptide bond formation; however, there is no information about the cellular role. Proteomic analysis in Escherichia coli revealed that RbbA reciprocally co-purified with a conserved inner membrane protein of unknown function, YhjD. Both proteins are also physically associated with the 30S ribosome and with members of the lipopolysaccharide transport machinery. Genome-wide genetic screens of rbbA and yhjD deletion mutants revealed aggravating genetic interactions with mutants deficient in the electron transport chain. Cells lacking both rbbA and yhjD exhibited reduced cell division, respiration and global protein synthesis as well as increased sensitivity to antibiotics targeting the ETC and the accuracy of protein synthesis. Our results suggest that RbbA appears to function together with YhjD as part of a regulatory network that impacts bacterial oxidative phosphorylation and translation efficiency.

  13. Dynamic protein coronas revealed as a modulator of silver nanoparticle sulphidation in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miclăuş, Teodora; Beer, Christiane; Chevallier, Jacques; Scavenius, Carsten; Bochenkov, Vladimir E.; Enghild, Jan J.; Sutherland, Duncan S.

    2016-06-01

    Proteins adsorbing at nanoparticles have been proposed as critical toxicity mediators and are included in ongoing efforts to develop predictive tools for safety assessment. Strongly attached proteins can be isolated, identified and correlated to changes in nanoparticle state, cellular association or toxicity. Weakly attached, rapidly exchanging proteins are also present at nanoparticles, but are difficult to isolate and have hardly been examined. Here we study rapidly exchanging proteins and show for the first time that they have a strong modulatory effect on the biotransformation of silver nanoparticles. Released silver ions, known for their role in particle toxicity, are found to be trapped as silver sulphide nanocrystals within the protein corona at silver nanoparticles in serum-containing cell culture media. The strongly attached corona acts as a site for sulphidation, while the weakly attached proteins reduce nanocrystal formation in a serum-concentration-dependent manner. Sulphidation results in decreased toxicity of Ag NPs.

  14. Fludarabine nucleoside modulates nuclear "survival and death" proteins in resistant chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrich, Silke; Mactier, Swetlana; Best, Giles; Mulligan, Stephen P; Crossett, Ben; Christopherson, Richard Ian

    2011-12-01

    The nuclear mechanisms by which fludarabine nucleoside (F-ara-A) induces apoptosis have been investigated in human MEC1 cells derived from B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Upon treatment of cells with F-ara-A (100 μM, 72 hours), 15 nuclear proteins changed in abundance by more than 2-fold. Nuclear proteins up-regulated included calmodulin (4.3-fold), prohibitin (3.9-fold), β-actin variant (3.7-fold), and structure-specific recognition protein 1 (3.7-fold); those down-regulated included 60S ribosomal protein P2B (0.12-fold), fumarate hydratase (0.19-fold), splicing factor arginine/serine-rich 3 (0.35-fold), and replication protein A2 (0.42-fold). These changes in the levels of specific proteins promote survival or apoptosis; because the end result is apoptosis of MEC1 cells, apoptotic effects predominate.

  15. Megalencephalic leukoencephalopathy with subcortical cysts protein-1 modulates endosomal pH and protein trafficking in astrocytes: relevance to MLC disease pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brignone, Maria S; Lanciotti, Angela; Visentin, Sergio; De Nuccio, Chiara; Molinari, Paola; Camerini, Serena; Diociaiuti, Marco; Petrini, Stefania; Minnone, Gaetana; Crescenzi, Marco; Laudiero, Luisa Bracci; Bertini, Enrico; Petrucci, Tamara C; Ambrosini, Elena

    2014-06-01

    Megalencephalic leukoencephalopathy with subcortical cysts (MLC) is a rare leukodystrophy caused by mutations in the gene encoding MLC1, a membrane protein mainly expressed in astrocytes in the central nervous system. Although MLC1 function is unknown, evidence is emerging that it may regulate ion fluxes. Using biochemical and proteomic approaches to identify MLC1 interactors and elucidate MLC1 function we found that MLC1 interacts with the vacuolar ATPase (V-ATPase), the proton pump that regulates endosomal acidity. Because we previously showed that in intracellular organelles MLC1 directly binds Na, K-ATPase, which controls endosomal pH, we studied MLC1 endosomal localization and trafficking and MLC1 effects on endosomal acidity and function using human astrocytoma cells overexpressing wild-type (WT) MLC1 or MLC1 carrying pathological mutations. We found that WT MLC1 is abundantly expressed in early (EEA1(+), Rab5(+)) and recycling (Rab11(+)) endosomes and uses the latter compartment to traffic to the plasma membrane during hyposmotic stress. We also showed that WT MLC1 limits early endosomal acidification and influences protein trafficking in astrocytoma cells by stimulating protein recycling, as revealed by FITC-dextran measurement of endosomal pH and transferrin protein recycling assay, respectively. WT MLC1 also favors recycling to the plasma-membrane of the TRPV4 cation channel which cooperates with MLC1 to activate calcium influx in astrocytes during hyposmotic stress. Although MLC disease-causing mutations differentially affect MLC1 localization and trafficking, all the mutated proteins fail to influence endosomal pH and protein recycling. This study demonstrates that MLC1 modulates endosomal pH and protein trafficking suggesting that alteration of these processes contributes to MLC pathogenesis. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Genetic screens in C. elegans for new modulators of protein homeostasis, with relevance for conformational diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Maria Catarina Telo Baptista Lima da, 1982-

    2011-01-01

    Tese de doutoramento, Bioquímica (Genética Molecular), Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciências, 2012 Protein folding is an essential cellular process, required for proper molecular and cellular function. The cell has evolved as a sophisticated machinery that ensures the quality and stability of the proteome. The network of cellular processes that coordinates protein synthesis, folding, trafficking and clearance, and determines the fate of proteins that do not acquire a nativ...

  17. Significance of biofilm proteins in modulating cyprid metamorphosis of Balanus amphitrite (Cirripedia: Thoracica)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khandeparker, L.; KrishnaKumar, S.

    , algal spores and invertebrate larvae employ protein or glycoprotein polymers while attaching to surfaces (Cooksey & Cooksey 1995; Kamino 2001). Thus, it is expected that specific proteases would hydrolyze these proteins/glycoprotein’s thereby.... (1951) using Bovine serum albumin (BSA) as the standard. A protein concentration of 50 μg ml -1 of AE was prepared by diluting the AE in sterile filtered sea water and used for all assays and this was treated as positive control. Development...

  18. Identification of novel allosteric modulators for the G-protein coupled US28 receptor of human cytomegalovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kralj, Ana; Wetzel, Alexander; Mahmoudian, Shohreh; Stamminger, Thomas; Tschammer, Nuska; Heinrich, Markus R

    2011-09-15

    The highly constitutively active G-protein coupled receptor US28 of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is an interesting pharmacological target because of its implication on viral dissemination, cardiovascular diseases and tumorigenesis. We found that dihydroisoquinolinone and tetrahydroisoquinoline scaffolds may be promising lead structures for novel US28 allosteric inverse agonists. These scaffolds were rapidly synthesized by radical carboamination reactions followed by non-radical transformations. Our novel US28 allosteric modulators provide valuable scaffolds for further ligand optimization and may be helpful chemical tools to investigate molecular mechanisms of US28 constitutive signaling and its role in pathogenesis.

  19. Mycobacterium avium Subspecies paratuberculosis Recombinant Proteins Modulate Antimycobacterial Functions of Bovine Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannantine, John P; Stabel, Judith R; Laws, Elizabeth; D Cardieri, Maria Clara; Souza, Cleverson D

    2015-01-01

    It has been shown that Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (M. paratuberculosis) activates the Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) p38 pathway, yet it is unclear which components of M. paratuberculosis are involved in the process. Therefore, a set of 42 M. paratuberculosis recombinant proteins expressed from coding sequences annotated as lipoproteins were screened for their ability to induce IL-10 expression, an indicator of MAPKp38 activation, in bovine monocyte-derived macrophages. A recombinant lipoprotein, designated as MAP3837c, was among a group of 6 proteins that strongly induced IL-10 gene transcription in bovine macrophages, averaging a 3.1-fold increase compared to non-stimulated macrophages. However, a parallel increase in expression of IL-12 and TNF-α was only observed in macrophages exposed to a subset of these 6 proteins. Selected recombinant proteins were further analyzed for their ability to enhance survival of M. avium within bovine macrophages as measured by recovered viable bacteria and nitrite production. All 6 IL-10 inducing MAP recombinant proteins along with M. paratuberculosis cells significantly enhanced phosphorylation of MAPK-p38 in bovine macrophages. Although these proteins are likely not post translationally lipidated in E. coli and thus is a limitation in this study, these results form the foundation of how the protein component of the lipoprotein interacts with the immune system. Collectively, these data reveal M. paratuberculosis proteins that might play a role in MAPK-p38 pathway activation and hence in survival of this organism within bovine macrophages.

  20. The Arabidopsis CROWDED NUCLEI genes regulate seed germination by modulating degradation of ABI5 protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenming Zhao; Chunmei Guan; Jian Feng; Yan Liang; Ni Zhan; Jianru Zuo; Bo Ren

    2016-01-01

    In Arabidopsis, the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) plays a vital role in inhibiting seed germination and in post-germination seedling establishment. In the ABA signaling pathway, ABI5, a basic Leu zipper transcription factor, has important functions in the regulation of seed germination. ABI5 protein localizes in nuclear bodies, along with AFP, COP1, and SIZ1, and was degraded through the 26S proteasome pathway. However, the mechanisms of ABI5 nuclear body formation and ABI5 protein degradation remain obscure. In this study, we found that the Arabidopsis CROWDED NUCLEI (CRWN) proteins, predicted nuclear matrix proteins essential for maintenance of nuclear morphology, also participate in ABA-control ed seed germination by regulating the degradation of ABI5 protein. During seed germination, the crwn mutants are hypersensitive to ABA and have higher levels of ABI5 protein compared to wild type. Genetic analysis suggested that CRWNs act upstream of ABI5. The observation that CRWN3 colocalizes with ABI5 in nuclear bodies indicates that CRWNs might participate in ABI5 protein degrada-tion in nuclear bodies. Moreover, we revealed that the extreme C-terminal of CRWN3 protein is necessary for its function in the response to ABA in germination. Our results suggested important roles of CRWNs in ABI5 nuclear body organization and ABI5 protein degradation during seed germination.

  1. The Ginkgo biloba Extract EGb 761 Modulates Proteasome Activity and Polyglutamine Protein Aggregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Stark

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The standardized Ginkgo biloba extract EGb 761 has well-described antioxidative activities and effects on different cytoprotective signaling pathways. Consequently, a potential use of EGb 761 in neurodegenerative diseases has been proposed. A common characteristic feature of a variety of such disorders is the pathologic formation of protein aggregates, suggesting a crucial role for protein homeostasis. In this study, we show that EGb 761 increased the catalytic activity of the proteasome and enhanced protein degradation in cultured cells. We further investigated this effect in a cellular model of Huntington’s disease (HD by employing cells expressing pathologic variants of a polyglutamine protein (polyQ protein. We show that EGb 761 affected these cells by (i increasing proteasome activity and (ii inducing a more efficient degradation of aggregation-prone proteins. These results demonstrate a novel activity of EGb 761 on protein aggregates by enhancing proteasomal protein degradation, suggesting a therapeutic use in neurodegenerative disorders with a disturbed protein homeostasis.

  2. Antimicrobial action and cell agglutination by the eosinophil cationic protein are modulated by the cell wall lipopolysaccharide structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido, David; Moussaoui, Mohammed; Andreu, David; Nogués, M Victòria; Torrent, Marc; Boix, Ester

    2012-05-01

    Antimicrobial proteins and peptides (AMPs) are essential effectors of innate immunity, acting as a first line of defense against bacterial infections. Many AMPs exhibit high affinity for cell wall structures such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a potent endotoxin able to induce sepsis. Hence, understanding how AMPs can interact with and neutralize LPS endotoxin is of special relevance for human health. Eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) is an eosinophil secreted protein with high activity against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. ECP has a remarkable affinity for LPS and a distinctive agglutinating activity. By using a battery of LPS-truncated E. coli mutant strains, we demonstrate that the polysaccharide moiety of LPS is essential for ECP-mediated bacterial agglutination, thereby modulating its antimicrobial action. The mechanism of action of ECP at the bacterial surface is drastically affected by the LPS structure and in particular by its polysaccharide moiety. We have also analyzed an N-terminal fragment that retains the whole protein activity and displays similar cell agglutination behavior. Conversely, a fragment with further minimization of the antimicrobial domain, though retaining the antimicrobial capacity, significantly loses its agglutinating activity, exhibiting a different mechanism of action which is not dependent on the LPS composition. The results highlight the correlation between the protein's antimicrobial activity and its ability to interact with the LPS outer layer and promote bacterial agglutination.

  3. Golli Myelin Basic Proteins Modulate Voltage-Operated Ca(++) Influx and Development in Cortical and Hippocampal Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vt, Cheli; DA, Santiago González; V, Spreuer; V, Handley; At, Campagnoni; Pm, Paez

    2016-10-01

    The golli proteins, products of the myelin basic protein gene, are widely expressed in oligodendrocyte progenitor cells and neurons during the postnatal development of the brain. While golli appears to be important for oligodendrocyte migration and differentiation, its function in neuronal development is completely unknown. We have found that golli proteins function as new and novel modulators of voltage-operated Ca(++) channels (VOCCs) in neurons. In vitro, golli knock-out (KO) neurons exhibit decreased Ca(++) influx after plasma membrane depolarization and a substantial maturational delay. Increased expression of golli proteins enhances L-type Ca(++) entry and processes outgrowth in cortical neurons, and pharmacological activation of L-type Ca(++) channels stimulates maturation and prevents cell death in golli-KO neurons. In situ, Ca(++) influx mediated by L-type VOCCs was significantly decreased in cortical and hippocampal neurons of the golli-KO brain. These Ca(++) alterations affect cortical and hippocampal development and the proliferation and survival of neural progenitor cells during the postnatal development of the golli-KO brain. The CA1/3 sections and the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus were reduced in the golli-KO mice as well as the density of dendrites in the somatosensory cortex. Furthermore, the golli-KO mice display abnormal behavior including deficits in episodic memory and reduced anxiety. Because of the expression of the golli proteins within neurons in learning and memory centers of the brain, this work has profound implication in neurodegenerative diseases and neurological disorders.

  4. Multiple sensory G proteins in the olfactory, gustatory and nociceptive neurons modulate longevity in Caenorhabditis elegans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Lans (Hannes); G. Jansen (Gert)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThe life span of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is under control of sensory signals detected by the amphid neurons. In these neurons, C. elegans expresses at least 13 Galpha subunits and a Ggamma subunit, which are involved in the transduction and modulation of sensory signals. Here

  5. GABAA receptor associated protein (GABARAP) modulates TRPV1 expression and channel function and desensitization.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lainez, S.; Valente, P.; Ontoria-Oviedo, I.; Estevez-Herrera, J.; Camprubi-Robles, M.; Ferrer-Montiel, A.; Planells-Cases, R.

    2010-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV1) transduces noxious chemical and physical stimuli in high-threshold nociceptors. The pivotal role of TRPV1 in the physiopathology of pain transduction has thrust the identification and characterization of interacting partners that modulate its cellular f

  6. Rescue of F508del-CFTR by RXR motif inactivation triggers proteome modulation associated with the unfolded protein response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes-Alves, Patrícia; Couto, Francisco; Pesquita, Cátia; Coelho, Ana V; Penque, Deborah

    2010-04-01

    F508del-CFTR, the most common mutation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein, disrupts intracellular trafficking leading to cystic fibrosis (CF). The trafficking defect of F508del-CFTR can be rescued by simultaneous inactivation of its four RXR motifs (4RK). Proteins involved in the F508del-CFTR trafficking defect and/or rescue are therefore potential CF therapeutic targets. We sought to identify these proteins by investigating differential proteome modulation in BHK cells over-expressing wt-CFTR, F508del-CFTR or the revertant F508del/4RK-CFTR. By 2-dimensional electrophoresis-based proteomics and western blot approaches we demonstrated that over-expression of F508del/4RK-CFTR modulates the expression of a large number of proteins, many of which are reported interactors of CFTR and/or 14-3-3 with potential roles in CFTR trafficking. GRP78/BiP, a marker of ER stress and unfolded protein response (UPR), is up-regulated in cells over-expressing either F508del-CFTR or F598del/4RK-CFTR. However, over-expression of F508del/4RK-CFTR induces the up-regulation of many other UPR-associated proteins (e.g. GRP94, PDI, GRP75/mortalin) and, interestingly, the down-regulation of proteasome components associated with CFTR degradation, such as the proteasome activator PA28 (PSME2) and COP9 signalosome (COPS5/CSN5). Moreover, the F508del-CFTR-induced proteostasis imbalance, which involves some heat shock chaperones (e.g. HSP72/Hpa2), ER-EF-hand Ca(2+)-binding proteins (calumenin) and the proteasome activator PA28 (PSME2), tends to be 'restored', i.e., in BHK cells over-expressing F508del/4RK-CFTR those proteins tend to have expression levels similar to the wild-type ones. These findings indicate that a particular cellular environment orchestrated by the UPR contributes to and/or is compatible with F508del/4RK-CFTR rescue.

  7. 出版:沃纳·比肖夫(WERNER BISCHOF)纪念光盘出版

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    “如果不是沃纳比肖夫(Werner Bischof,1918-1954,瑞士人)的名字,便是他的照片在他去世以后闻名于世。在一个多世纪里他是最杰出的新闻记者之一。这是《美国ICP摄影百科全书》对比肖夫的评价,今年是比肖夫去世50周年纪念,2004年9月3日,在法国佩皮尼扬国际报道摄影节期间,为纪念这位杰出的摄影家特别举行了《沃纳·比肖夫:一位摄影师的生活和作品》(WERNER BISCHOF,Life and Work of a Photographer)纪念光盘的发行仪式。

  8. SOX2 O-GlcNAcylation alters its protein-protein interactions and genomic occupancy to modulate gene expression in pluripotent cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Samuel A; Peddada, Sailaja; Chatterjee, Nilanjana; Friedrich, Tara; Tomoda, Kiichrio; Krings, Gregor; Thomas, Sean; Maynard, Jason; Broeker, Michael; Thomson, Matthew; Pollard, Katherine; Yamanaka, Shinya; Burlingame, Alma L; Panning, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor SOX2 is central in establishing and maintaining pluripotency. The processes that modulate SOX2 activity to promote pluripotency are not well understood. Here, we show SOX2 is O-GlcNAc modified in its transactivation domain during reprogramming and in mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). Upon induction of differentiation SOX2 O-GlcNAcylation at serine 248 is decreased. Replacing wild type with an O-GlcNAc-deficient SOX2 (S248A) increases reprogramming efficiency. ESCs with O-GlcNAc-deficient SOX2 exhibit alterations in gene expression. This change correlates with altered protein-protein interactions and genomic occupancy of the O-GlcNAc-deficient SOX2 compared to wild type. In addition, SOX2 O-GlcNAcylation impairs the SOX2-PARP1 interaction, which has been shown to regulate ESC self-renewal. These findings show that SOX2 activity is modulated by O-GlcNAc, and provide a novel regulatory mechanism for this crucial pluripotency transcription factor. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10647.001 PMID:26949256

  9. Aerobic fitness does not modulate protein metabolism in response to increased exercise: a controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purpose: This study examined how a sudden increase in exercise energy expenditure affected whole body protein turnover and nitrogen balance in people of differing aerobic fitness. We hypothesized that whole-body protein turnover would be attenuated, and nitrogen balance would be preserved, in aerobi...

  10. MCT-1 protein interacts with the cap complex and modulates messenger RNA translational profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinert, Line; Shi, B; Nandi, S

    2006-01-01

    enzymes. Here, we established that MCT-1 protein interacts with the cap complex through its PUA domain and recruits the density-regulated protein (DENR/DRP), containing the SUI1 translation initiation domain. Through the use of microarray analysis on polysome-associated mRNAs, we showed that up...

  11. Proteins modulation in human skeletal muscle in the early phase of adaptation to hypobaric hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigano, A.; Ripamonti, M.; Palma, S. De;

    2008-01-01

    High altitude hypoxia is a paraphysiological condition triggering redox status disturbances of cell organization leading, via oxidative stress, to proteins, lipids, and DNA damage. In man, skeletal muscle, after prolonged exposure to hypoxia, undergoes mass reduction and alterations at the cellul......, whereas the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a marker of protein synthesis, was reduced Udgivelsesdato: 2008/11...

  12. Impact of Lactobacillus plantarum Sortase on Target Protein Sorting, Gastrointestinal Persistence, and Host Immune Response Modulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Remus, Daniela M.; Bongers, Roger S.; Meijerink, Marjolein; Fusetti, Fabrizia; Poolman, Bert; de Vos, Paul; Wells, Jerry M.; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Bron, Peter A.

    Sortases are transpeptidases that couple surface proteins to the peptidoglycan of Gram-positive bacteria, and several sortase-dependent proteins (SDPs) have been demonstrated to be crucial for the interactions of pathogenic and nonpathogenic bacteria with their hosts. Here, we studied the role of

  13. Ligand-Dependent Modulation of G Protein Conformation Alters Drug Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furness, Sebastian George Barton; Liang, Yi-Lynn; Nowell, Cameron James; Halls, Michelle Louise; Wookey, Peter John; Dal Maso, Emma; Inoue, Asuka; Christopoulos, Arthur; Wootten, Denise; Sexton, Patrick Michael

    2016-10-20

    G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling, mediated by hetero-trimeric G proteins, can be differentially controlled by agonists. At a molecular level, this is thought to occur principally via stabilization of distinct receptor conformations by individual ligands. These distinct conformations control subsequent recruitment of transducer and effector proteins. Here, we report that ligand efficacy at the calcitonin GPCR (CTR) is also correlated with ligand-dependent alterations to G protein conformation. We observe ligand-dependent differences in the sensitivity of the G protein ternary complex to disruption by GTP, due to conformational differences in the receptor-bound G protein hetero-trimer. This results in divergent agonist-dependent receptor-residency times for the hetero-trimeric G protein and different accumulation rates for downstream second messengers. This study demonstrates that factors influencing efficacy extend beyond receptor conformation(s) and expands understanding of the molecular basis for how G proteins control/influence efficacy. This has important implications for the mechanisms that underlie ligand-mediated biased agonism. VIDEO ABSTRACT.

  14. Inhibition of Hsp70 by Methylene Blue Affects Signaling Protein Function and Ubiquitination and Modulates Polyglutamine Protein Degradation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Adrienne M.; Morishima, Yoshihiro; Clapp, Kelly M.; Peng, Hwei-Ming; Pratt, William B.; Gestwicki, Jason E.; Osawa, Yoichi; Lieberman, Andrew P.

    2010-01-01

    The Hsp90/Hsp70-based chaperone machinery regulates the activity and degradation of many signaling proteins. Cycling with Hsp90 stabilizes client proteins, whereas Hsp70 interacts with chaperone-dependent E3 ubiquitin ligases to promote protein degradation. To probe these actions, small molecule inhibitors of Hsp70 would be extremely useful; however, few have been identified. Here we test the effects of methylene blue, a recently described inhibitor of Hsp70 ATPase activity, in three well established systems of increasing complexity. First, we demonstrate that methylene blue inhibits the ability of the purified Hsp90/Hsp70-based chaperone machinery to enable ligand binding by the glucocorticoid receptor and show that this effect is due to specific inhibition of Hsp70. Next, we establish that ubiquitination of neuronal nitric-oxide synthase by the native ubiquitinating system of reticulocyte lysate is dependent upon both Hsp70 and the E3 ubiquitin ligase CHIP and is blocked by methylene blue. Finally, we demonstrate that methylene blue impairs degradation of the polyglutamine expanded androgen receptor, an Hsp90 client mutated in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy. In contrast, degradation of an amino-terminal fragment of the receptor, which lacks the ligand binding domain and, therefore, is not a client of the Hsp90/Hsp70-based chaperone machinery, is enhanced through homeostatic induction of autophagy that occurs when Hsp70-dependent proteasomal degradation is inhibited by methylene blue. Our data demonstrate the utility of methylene blue in defining Hsp70-dependent functions and reveal divergent effects on polyglutamine protein degradation depending on whether the substrate is an Hsp90 client. PMID:20348093

  15. Dengue Virus Non-structural Protein 1 Modulates Infectious Particle Production via Interaction with the Structural Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Scaturro

    Full Text Available Non-structural protein 1 (NS1 is one of the most enigmatic proteins of the Dengue virus (DENV, playing distinct functions in immune evasion, pathogenesis and viral replication. The recently reported crystal structure of DENV NS1 revealed its peculiar three-dimensional fold; however, detailed information on NS1 function at different steps of the viral replication cycle is still missing. By using the recently reported crystal structure, as well as amino acid sequence conservation, as a guide for a comprehensive site-directed mutagenesis study, we discovered that in addition to being essential for RNA replication, DENV NS1 is also critically required for the production of infectious virus particles. Taking advantage of a trans-complementation approach based on fully functional epitope-tagged NS1 variants, we identified previously unreported interactions between NS1 and the structural proteins Envelope (E and precursor Membrane (prM. Interestingly, coimmunoprecipitation revealed an additional association with capsid, arguing that NS1 interacts via the structural glycoproteins with DENV particles. Results obtained with mutations residing either in the NS1 Wing domain or in the β-ladder domain suggest that NS1 might have two distinct functions in the assembly of DENV particles. By using a trans-complementation approach with a C-terminally KDEL-tagged ER-resident NS1, we demonstrate that the secretion of NS1 is dispensable for both RNA replication and infectious particle production. In conclusion, our results provide an extensive genetic map of NS1 determinants essential for viral RNA replication and identify a novel role of NS1 in virion production that is mediated via interaction with the structural proteins. These studies extend the list of NS1 functions and argue for a central role in coordinating replication and assembly/release of infectious DENV particles.

  16. Inhibition of hsp70 by methylene blue affects signaling protein function and ubiquitination and modulates polyglutamine protein degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Adrienne M; Morishima, Yoshihiro; Clapp, Kelly M; Peng, Hwei-Ming; Pratt, William B; Gestwicki, Jason E; Osawa, Yoichi; Lieberman, Andrew P

    2010-05-21

    The Hsp90/Hsp70-based chaperone machinery regulates the activity and degradation of many signaling proteins. Cycling with Hsp90 stabilizes client proteins, whereas Hsp70 interacts with chaperone-dependent E3 ubiquitin ligases to promote protein degradation. To probe these actions, small molecule inhibitors of Hsp70 would be extremely useful; however, few have been identified. Here we test the effects of methylene blue, a recently described inhibitor of Hsp70 ATPase activity, in three well established systems of increasing complexity. First, we demonstrate that methylene blue inhibits the ability of the purified Hsp90/Hsp70-based chaperone machinery to enable ligand binding by the glucocorticoid receptor and show that this effect is due to specific inhibition of Hsp70. Next, we establish that ubiquitination of neuronal nitric-oxide synthase by the native ubiquitinating system of reticulocyte lysate is dependent upon both Hsp70 and the E3 ubiquitin ligase CHIP and is blocked by methylene blue. Finally, we demonstrate that methylene blue impairs degradation of the polyglutamine expanded androgen receptor, an Hsp90 client mutated in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy. In contrast, degradation of an amino-terminal fragment of the receptor, which lacks the ligand binding domain and, therefore, is not a client of the Hsp90/Hsp70-based chaperone machinery, is enhanced through homeostatic induction of autophagy that occurs when Hsp70-dependent proteasomal degradation is inhibited by methylene blue. Our data demonstrate the utility of methylene blue in defining Hsp70-dependent functions and reveal divergent effects on polyglutamine protein degradation depending on whether the substrate is an Hsp90 client.

  17. Valproate, a mood stabilizer, induces WFS1 expression and modulates its interaction with ER stress protein GRP94.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chihiro Kakiuchi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Valproate is a standard treatment for bipolar disorder and a first-line mood stabilizer. The molecular mechanisms underlying its actions in bipolar disorder are unclear. It has been suggested that the action of valproate is linked to changes in gene expression and induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress-response proteins. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we show that valproate modulates the ER stress response through the regulation of WFS1, an important component for mitigating ER stress. Therapeutic concentrations of valproate induce expression of WFS1 mRNA and activate the WFS1 promoter. In addition, WFS1 forms a complex with GRP94, an ER stress-response protein, in which valproate dose-dependently enhances its dissociation from GRP94. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that the therapeutic effects of valproate in bipolar disorder may be mediated by WFS1 expression and its dissociation from GRP94.

  18. Distinct role of Arabidopsis mitochondrial P-type pentatricopeptide repeat protein-modulating editing protein, PPME, in nad1 RNA editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leu, Kuan-Chieh; Hsieh, Ming-Hsiun; Wang, Huei-Jing; Hsieh, Hsu-Liang; Jauh, Guang-Yuh

    2016-06-02

    The mitochondrion is an important power generator in most eukaryotic cells. To preserve its function, many essential nuclear-encoded factors play specific roles in mitochondrial RNA metabolic processes, including RNA editing. RNA editing consists of post-transcriptional deamination, which alters specific nucleotides in transcripts to mediate gene expression. In plant cells, many pentatricopeptide repeat proteins (PPRs) participate in diverse organellar RNA metabolic processes, but only PLS-type PPRs are involved in RNA editing. Here, we report a P-type PPR protein from Arabidopsis thaliana, P-type PPR-Modulating Editing (PPME), which has a distinct role in mitochondrial nad1 RNA editing via RNA binding activity. In the homozygous ppme mutant, cytosine (C)-to-uracil (U) conversions at both the nad1-898 and 937 sites were abolished, disrupting Arg(300)-to-Trp(300) and Pro(313)-to-Ser(313) amino acid changes in the mitochondrial NAD1 protein. NAD1 is a critical component of mitochondrial respiration complex I; its activity is severely reduced in the homozygous ppme mutant, resulting in significantly altered growth and development. Both abolished RNA editing and defective complex I activity were completely rescued by CaMV 35S promoter- and PPME native promoter-driven PPME genomic fragments tagged with GFP in a homozygous ppme background. Our experimental results demonstrate a distinct role of a P-type PPR protein, PPME, in RNA editing in plant organelles.

  19. STATE TRANSITION7-Dependent Phosphorylation Is Modulated by Changing Environmental Conditions, and Its Absence Triggers Remodeling of Photosynthetic Protein Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergner, Sonja Verena; Scholz, Martin; Trompelt, Kerstin; Barth, Johannes; Gäbelein, Philipp; Steinbeck, Janina; Xue, Huidan; Clowez, Sophie; Fucile, Geoffrey; Goldschmidt-Clermont, Michel; Fufezan, Christian; Hippler, Michael

    2015-06-01

    In plants and algae, the serine/threonine kinase STN7/STT7, orthologous protein kinases in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), respectively, is an important regulator in acclimation to changing light environments. In this work, we assessed STT7-dependent protein phosphorylation under high light in C. reinhardtii, known to fully induce the expression of light-harvesting complex stress-related protein3 (LHCSR3) and a nonphotochemical quenching mechanism, in relationship to anoxia where the activity of cyclic electron flow is stimulated. Our quantitative proteomics data revealed numerous unique STT7 protein substrates and STT7-dependent protein phosphorylation variations that were reliant on the environmental condition. These results indicate that STT7-dependent phosphorylation is modulated by the environment and point to an intricate chloroplast phosphorylation network responding in a highly sensitive and dynamic manner to environmental cues and alterations in kinase function. Functionally, the absence of the STT7 kinase triggered changes in protein expression and photoinhibition of photosystem I (PSI) and resulted in the remodeling of photosynthetic complexes. This remodeling initiated a pronounced association of LHCSR3 with PSI-light harvesting complex I (LHCI)-ferredoxin-NADPH oxidoreductase supercomplexes. Lack of STT7 kinase strongly diminished PSII-LHCII supercomplexes, while PSII core complex phosphorylation and accumulation were significantly enhanced. In conclusion, our study provides strong evidence that the regulation of protein phosphorylation is critical for driving successful acclimation to high light and anoxic growth environments and gives new insights into acclimation strategies to these environmental conditions. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Identification of antithrombin-modulating genes. Role of LARGE, a gene encoding a bifunctional glycosyltransferase, in the secretion of proteins?

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    María Eugenia de la Morena-Barrio

    Full Text Available The haemostatic relevance of antithrombin together with the low genetic variability of SERPINC1, and the high heritability of plasma levels encourage the search for modulating genes. We used a hypothesis-free approach to identify these genes, evaluating associations between plasma antithrombin and 307,984 polymorphisms in the GAIT study (352 individuals from 21 Spanish families. Despite no SNP reaching the genome wide significance threshold, we verified milder positive associations in 307 blood donors from a different cohort. This validation study suggested LARGE, a gene encoding a protein with xylosyltransferase and glucuronyltransferase activities that forms heparin-like linear polysaccharides, as a potential modulator of antithrombin based on the significant association of one SNPs, rs762057, with anti-FXa activity, particularly after adjustment for age, sex and SERPINC1 rs2227589 genotype, all factors influencing antithrombin levels (p = 0.02. Additional results sustained this association. LARGE silencing inHepG2 and HEK-EBNA cells did not affect SERPINC1 mRNA levels but significantly reduced the secretion of antithrombin with moderate intracellular retention. Milder effects were observed on α1-antitrypsin, prothrombin and transferrin. Our study suggests LARGE as the first known modifier of plasma antithrombin, and proposes a new role for LARGE in modulating extracellular secretion of certain glycoproteins.

  1. Phenotypic Screening Identifies Modulators of Amyloid Precursor Protein Processing in Human Stem Cell Models of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownjohn, Philip W; Smith, James; Portelius, Erik; Serneels, Lutgarde; Kvartsberg, Hlin; De Strooper, Bart; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Livesey, Frederick J

    2017-04-11

    Human stem cell models have the potential to provide platforms for phenotypic screens to identify candidate treatments and cellular pathways involved in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. Amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing and the accumulation of APP-derived amyloid β (Aβ) peptides are key processes in Alzheimer's disease (AD). We designed a phenotypic small-molecule screen to identify modulators of APP processing in trisomy 21/Down syndrome neurons, a complex genetic model of AD. We identified the avermectins, commonly used as anthelmintics, as compounds that increase the relative production of short Aβ peptides at the expense of longer, potentially more toxic peptides. Further studies demonstrated that this effect is not due to an interaction with the core γ-secretase responsible for Aβ production. This study demonstrates the feasibility of phenotypic drug screening in human stem cell models of Alzheimer-type dementia, and points to possibilities for indirectly modulating APP processing, independently of γ-secretase modulation. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Identification of Antithrombin-Modulating Genes. Role of LARGE, a Gene Encoding a Bifunctional Glycosyltransferase, in the Secretion of Proteins?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Morena-Barrio, María Eugenia; Buil, Alfonso; Antón, Ana Isabel; Martínez-Martínez, Irene; Miñano, Antonia; Gutiérrez-Gallego, Ricardo; Navarro-Fernández, José; Aguila, Sonia; Souto, Juan Carlos; Vicente, Vicente; Soria, José Manuel; Corral, Javier

    2013-01-01

    The haemostatic relevance of antithrombin together with the low genetic variability of SERPINC1, and the high heritability of plasma levels encourage the search for modulating genes. We used a hypothesis-free approach to identify these genes, evaluating associations between plasma antithrombin and 307,984 polymorphisms in the GAIT study (352 individuals from 21 Spanish families). Despite no SNP reaching the genome wide significance threshold, we verified milder positive associations in 307 blood donors from a different cohort. This validation study suggested LARGE, a gene encoding a protein with xylosyltransferase and glucuronyltransferase activities that forms heparin-like linear polysaccharides, as a potential modulator of antithrombin based on the significant association of one SNPs, rs762057, with anti-FXa activity, particularly after adjustment for age, sex and SERPINC1 rs2227589 genotype, all factors influencing antithrombin levels (p = 0.02). Additional results sustained this association. LARGE silencing inHepG2 and HEK-EBNA cells did not affect SERPINC1 mRNA levels but significantly reduced the secretion of antithrombin with moderate intracellular retention. Milder effects were observed on α1-antitrypsin, prothrombin and transferrin. Our study suggests LARGE as the first known modifier of plasma antithrombin, and proposes a new role for LARGE in modulating extracellular secretion of certain glycoproteins. PMID:23705025

  3. Module structure of interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein (IRBP may provide bases for its complex role in the visual cycle – structure/function study of Xenopus IRBP

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    Ghosh Debashis

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein's (IRBP remarkable module structure may be critical to its role in mediating the transport of all-trans and 11-cis retinol, and 11-cis retinal between rods, cones, RPE and Müller cells during the visual cycle. We isolated cDNAs for Xenopus IRBP, and expressed and purified its individual modules, module combinations, and the full-length polypeptide. Binding of all-trans retinol, 11-cis retinal and 9-(9-anthroyloxy stearic acid were characterized by fluorescence spectroscopy monitoring ligand-fluorescence enhancement, quenching of endogenous protein fluorescence, and energy transfer. Finally, the X-ray crystal structure of module-2 was used to predict the location of the ligand-binding sites, and compare their structures among modules using homology modeling. Results The full-length Xenopus IRBP cDNA codes for a polypeptide of 1,197 amino acid residues beginning with a signal peptide followed by four homologous modules each ~300 amino acid residues in length. Modules 1 and 3 are more closely related to each other than either is to modules 2 and 4. Modules 1 and 4 are most similar to the N- and C-terminal modules of the two module IRBP of teleosts. Our data are consistent with the model that vertebrate IRBPs arose through two genetic duplication events, but that the middle two modules were lost during the evolution of the ray finned fish. The sequence of the expressed full-length IRBP was confirmed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The recombinant full-length Xenopus IRBP bound all-trans retinol and 11-cis retinaldehyde at 3 to 4 sites with Kd's of 0.2 to 0.3 μM, and was active in protecting all-trans retinol from degradation. Module 2 showed selectivity for all-trans retinol over 11-cis retinaldehyde. The binding data are correlated to the results of docking of all-trans-retinol to the crystal structure of Xenopus module 2 suggesting two ligand-binding sites

  4. Cerebral Epiphyseal Proteins and Melatonin Modulate the Hepatic and Renal Antioxidant Defense of Rats

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    Vijay K. Bharti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The cerebral epiphysis (pineal gland secrets melatonin and number of other proteins and peptides. It was thus hypothesized that antioxidant properties of epiphyseal proteins and melatonin could potentially benefit from exogenous therapies. In view of the therapeutic potential of these proteins, the present experiment was conducted to investigate the effect of buffalo epiphyseal proteins (BEP, at 100 μg/kg BW, i.p. and melatonin (MEL, at 10 mg/kg BW, i.p on changes in hepatic and renal antioxidant enzymes of adult female Wistar rats. Buffalo epiphyseal proteins significantly (P<.05 increased hepatic lipid peroxidation (LPO, superoxide dismutase (SOD, glutathione reductase (GR, glutathione peroxidase (GPx, reduced glutathione (GSH, and renal LPO, catalase (CAT, GR, GSH, GPx levels as compared to control animals. Similarly, MEL treatment significantly (P<.05 up-regulated hepatic SOD and GPx activity, whereas CAT, GR, GPx, and GSH levels in renal tissues were increased while SOD and LPO remained unaffected. Buffalo epiphyseal protein treatment produced greater effects on hepatic GPx and renal CAT and GSH levels than did MEL. These findings support the conclusion that buffalo epiphyseal proteins and melatonin activate a number of antioxidant mechanisms in hepatic and renal tissues.

  5. Modulation of GDP-fucose level for generating proteins with reduced rate of fucosylation (WO2010141855).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taupin, Philippe

    2011-09-01

    The application (WO2010141855) is in the field of glycobiology, and involves the control of the rate of fucosylation of proteins by exogenous factors. It aims at controlling the rate of protein fucosylation with inhibitors (drugs or nucleic acid antagonists) of enzymes involved in the synthesis of GDP-fucose. Mammalian cell lines were cultured in the presence of inhibitors, for example, siRNA. The rates of GDP-fucose in cells and during protein fucosylation were characterized. The level of protein fucosylation decreases rapidly in response to a decrease in GDP-fucose level. The relationship between the rate of fucosylation of proteins and the level of GDP-fucose in a cell is non-linear. Reduction in the rate of protein fucosylation can be achieved with a minimal reduction of the level of GDP-fucose in cells. The paradigm may be used to synthesize proteins and antibodies, with a reduced rate of fucosylation. The application claims that the use of drugs or nucleic acid antagonists that inhibit the enzymes involved in GDP-fucose biosynthesis optimizes the level of GDP-fucose present in cells, and reduces the rate of fucosylation of glycoproteins.

  6. Structural Basis for Prereceptor Modulation of Plant Hormones by GH3 Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westfall, Corey S.; Zubieta, Chloe; Herrmann, Jonathan; Kapp, Ulrike; Nanao, Max H.; Jez, Joseph M. (WU); (EMBL); (ESRF)

    2013-04-08

    Acyl acid amido synthetases of the GH3 family act as critical prereceptor modulators of plant hormone action; however, the molecular basis for their hormone selectivity is unclear. Here, we report the crystal structures of benzoate-specific Arabidopsis thaliana AtGH3.12/PBS3 and jasmonic acid-specific AtGH3.11/JAR1. These structures, combined with biochemical analysis, define features for the conjugation of amino acids to diverse acyl acid substrates and highlight the importance of conformational changes in the carboxyl-terminal domain for catalysis. We also identify residues forming the acyl acid binding site across the GH3 family and residues critical for amino acid recognition. Our results demonstrate how a highly adaptable three-dimensional scaffold is used for the evolution of promiscuous activity across an enzyme family for modulation of plant signaling molecules.

  7. Mycobacterium avium Subspecies paratuberculosis Recombinant Proteins Modulate Antimycobacterial Functions of Bovine Macrophages.

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    John P Bannantine

    Full Text Available It has been shown that Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (M. paratuberculosis activates the Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK p38 pathway, yet it is unclear which components of M. paratuberculosis are involved in the process. Therefore, a set of 42 M. paratuberculosis recombinant proteins expressed from coding sequences annotated as lipoproteins were screened for their ability to induce IL-10 expression, an indicator of MAPKp38 activation, in bovine monocyte-derived macrophages. A recombinant lipoprotein, designated as MAP3837c, was among a group of 6 proteins that strongly induced IL-10 gene transcription in bovine macrophages, averaging a 3.1-fold increase compared to non-stimulated macrophages. However, a parallel increase in expression of IL-12 and TNF-α was only observed in macrophages exposed to a subset of these 6 proteins. Selected recombinant proteins were further analyzed for their ability to enhance survival of M. avium within bovine macrophages as measured by recovered viable bacteria and nitrite production. All 6 IL-10 inducing MAP recombinant proteins along with M. paratuberculosis cells significantly enhanced phosphorylation of MAPK-p38 in bovine macrophages. Although these proteins are likely not post translationally lipidated in E. coli and thus is a limitation in this study, these results form the foundation of how the protein component of the lipoprotein interacts with the immune system. Collectively, these data reveal M. paratuberculosis proteins that might play a role in MAPK-p38 pathway activation and hence in survival of this organism within bovine macrophages.

  8. Pharmacological modulation of protein kinases as a new approach to treat addiction to cocaine and opiates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Pardo, María Pilar; Roger-Sanchez, Concepción; Rodríguez-Arias, Marta; Miñarro, Jose; Aguilar, María Asunción

    2016-06-15

    Drug addiction shares brain mechanisms and molecular substrates with learning and memory processes, such as the stimulation of glutamate receptors and their downstream signalling pathways. In the present work we provide an up-to-date review of studies that have demonstrated the implication of the main memory-related calcium-dependent protein kinases in opiate and cocaine addiction. The effects of these drugs of abuse in different animal models of drug reward, dependence and addiction are altered by manipulation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family, particularly extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK), calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII), the protein kinase C (PKC) family (including PKMζ), cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA), cGMP-dependent protein kinase G (PKG), the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway and its downstream target mammalian target of Rapamycin (mTOR), cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5), heat-shock proteins (Hsp) and other enzymes and proteins. Research suggests that drugs of abuse induce dependence and addiction by modifying the signalling pathways that involve these memory-related protein kinases, and supports the idea that drug addiction is an excessive aberrant learning disorder in which the maladaptive memory of drug-associated cues maintains compulsive drug use and contributes to relapse. Moreover, the studies we review offer new pharmacological strategies to treat opiate and cocaine dependence based on the manipulation of these protein kinases. In particular, disruption of reconsolidation of drug-related memories may have a high therapeutic value in the treatment of drug addiction.

  9. Perceived thickness and creaminess modulates the short-term satiating effects of high-protein drinks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertenshaw, Emma J; Lluch, Anne; Yeomans, Martin R

    2013-08-28

    Previous research suggests that increasing beverage protein content enhances subsequent satiety, but whether this effect is entirely attributable to post-ingestive effects of protein or is partly caused by the distinct sensory characteristics imparted by the presence of protein remains unclear. To try and discriminate nutritive from sensory effects of added protein, we contrasted effects of three higher-energy (about 1·2 MJ) and one lower-energy (LE: 0·35 MJ) drink preloads on subsequent appetite and lunch intake. Two higher-energy drinks had 44% of energy from protein, one with the sensory characteristics of a juice drink (HP2, low-sensory protein) and the second a thicker and creamier (HPþ, high-sensory protein) drink. The high-carbohydrate preload (HCþ, high-sensory carbohydrate) was matched for thickness and creaminess to the HPþ drink. Participants (healthy male volunteers, n 26) consumed significantly less at lunch after the HPþ(566 g) and HCþ(572 g) than after HP2 (623 g) and LE (668 g) drinks, although the compensation for drink energy accounted for only 50% of extra energy at best. Appetite ratings indicated that participants felt significantly less hungry and more full immediately before lunch in HPþ and HCþ groups compared with LE, with HP2 being intermediate. The finding that protein generated stronger satiety in the context of a thicker creamier drink (HPþ but not HP2) and that an isoenergetic carbohydrate drink (HCþ), matched in thickness and creaminess to the HPþ drink, generated the same pattern of satiety as HPþ, both suggest an important role for these sensory cues in the development of protein-based satiety.

  10. Tianma modulates proteins with various neuro-regenerative modalities in differentiated human neuronal SH-SY5Y cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Umamaheswari; Manavalan, Arulmani; Sundaramurthi, Husvinee; Sze, Siu Kwan; Feng, Zhi Wei; Hu, Jiang-Miao; Heese, Klaus

    2012-06-01

    Tianma (Rhizoma gastrodiae) is the dried rhizome of the plant Gastrodia elata Blume (Orchidaceae family). As a medicinal herb in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) its functions are to control convulsions, pain, headache, dizziness, vertigo, seizure, epilepsy and others. In addition, tianma is frequently used for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders though the mechanism of action is widely unknown. Accordingly, this study was designed to examine the effects of tianma on the proteome metabolism in differentiated human neuronal SH-SY5Y cells to explore its specific effects on neuronal signaling pathways. Using an iTRAQ (isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation)-based proteomics research approach, we identified 2390 modulated proteins, out of which 406 were found to be altered by tianma in differentiated human neuronal SH-SY5Y cells. Based on the observed data, we hypothesize that tianma promotes neuro-regenerative signaling cascades by controlling chaperone/proteasomal degradation pathways (e.g. CALR, FKBP3/4, HSP70/90) and mobilizing neuro-protective genes (such as AIP5) as well as modulating other proteins (RTN1/4, NCAM, PACSIN2, and PDLIM1/5) with various regenerative modalities and capacities related to neuro-synaptic plasticity.

  11. Enterococcus faecium NCIMB 10415 Modulates Epithelial Integrity, Heat Shock Protein, and Proinflammatory Cytokine Response in Intestinal Cells

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    Shanti Klingspor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics have shown positive effects on gastrointestinal diseases; they have barrier-modulating effects and change the inflammatory response towards pathogens in studies in vitro. The aim of this investigation has been to examine the response of intestinal epithelial cells to Enterococcus faecium NCIMB 10415 (E. faecium, a probiotic positively affecting diarrhea incidence in piglets, and two pathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli strains, with specific focus on the probiotic modulation of the response to the pathogenic challenge. Porcine (IPEC-J2 and human (Caco-2 intestinal cells were incubated without bacteria (control, with E. faecium, with enteropathogenic (EPEC or enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC each alone or in combination with E. faecium. The ETEC strain decreased transepithelial resistance (TER and increased IL-8 mRNA and protein expression in both cell lines compared with control cells, an effect that could be prevented by pre- and coincubation with E. faecium. Similar effects were observed for the increased expression of heat shock protein 70 in Caco-2 cells. When the cells were challenged by the EPEC strain, no such pattern of changes could be observed. The reduced decrease in TER and the reduction of the proinflammatory and stress response of enterocytes following pathogenic challenge indicate the protective effect of the probiotic.

  12. Protein and peroxidase modulations in sunflower seedlings (Helianthus annuus L.) treated with a toxic amount of aluminium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouili, Hager; Bouazizi, Houda; El Ferjani, Ezzedine

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of aluminium treatment on peroxidases activities and protein content in both soluble and cell-wall-bound fractions of sunflower leaves, stems and roots. Fourteen-day-old seedlings, grown in a nutrient solution, were exposed to a toxic amount of aluminium (500 μM AlNO(3)) for 72 h. Under stress conditions, biomass production, root length and leaf expansion were significantly reduced. Also, our results showed modulations on soluble and ionically cell-wall-bound peroxidases activities. In soluble fraction, peroxidases activities were enhanced in all investigated organs. This stimulation was also observed in ionically cell-wall-bound fraction in leaves and stems. Roots showed a differential behaviour: peroxidase activity was severely reduced. Lignifying peroxidases activities assayed using coniferyl alcohol and H(2)O(2) as substrates were also modulated. Significant stimulation was shown on soluble fraction in leaves, stems and roots. In ionically cell-wall-bound fraction lignifying peroxidases were enhanced only in stems but severely inhibited in roots. Also, aluminium toxicity caused significant increase on cell wall protein content in sunflower roots.

  13. Red blood cell lysate modulates the expression of extracellular matrix proteins in dermal fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Amir; Li, Yunyuan; Kilani, Ruhangiz T; Ghahary, Aziz

    2012-11-01

    During the early stage of wound healing process, blood clots can be served as a temporary extracellular matrix (ECM) to let skin cell migration and proliferation. The red blood cells are generally thought as inert bystanders in the early and inflammatory phase of wound healing. Here, we provide evidence that red blood cells (RBC) also play an important role in modulation of key ECM components such as type-I collagen, α-smooth muscle actin, fibronectin, and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). In this study, we used western blot analysis and showed a significant increase in the level of MMP-1, 2, 3. Furthermore, we found that RBC lysate significantly down-regulates type-I collagen and α-smooth muscle actin while up-regulates fibronectin expression in dermal fibroblasts. To further explore the mechanism by which RBC lysate modulates MMP-1 expression, the effect of inhibitors for three MAPK signaling pathways on RBC inducing MMP-1 expression by dermal fibroblasts were tested. The result showed that the inhibitor of ERK1/2 could abrogate the stimulatory effect of RBC lysate on MMP-1 expression in dermal fibroblasts. Consistently, RBC treatment results in an increase of ERK1/2 phosphorylation in dermal fibroblast. In conclusion, these findings suggest that RBC lysate can modulate the expression of MMPs and key ECM components which are important in healing process.

  14. Bryostatin 1 modulates beta-catenin subcellular localization and transcription activity through protein kinase D1 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaggi, Meena; Chauhan, Subhash C; Du, Cheng; Balaji, K C

    2008-09-01

    In recent years, the use of natural products for cancer prevention and treatment has received considerable attention. Bryostatin 1 is a natural macrocyclic lactone and a protein kinase D (PKD) modulator with potent antineoplastic properties that has been used to treat human cancers in clinical trials with limited success. Further understanding the mechanistic basis of Bryostatin 1 action may provide opportunities to improve clinical results of treatment with Bryostatin 1. We identified that PKD1, founding member of PKD family of serine/threonine kinases, modulates E-cadherin/beta-catenin activity, which plays an important role in cell integrity, polarity, growth, and morphogenesis. An aberrant expression and localization of E-cadherin/beta-catenin has been strongly associated with cancer progression and metastasis. In this study, we examined the effect of Bryostatin 1 treatment on PKD1 activation, beta-catenin translocation and transcription activity, and malignant phenotype of prostate cancer cells. Initial activation of PKD1 with Bryostatin 1 leads to colocalization of the cytoplasmic pool of beta-catenin with PKD1, trans-Golgi network markers, and proteins involved in vesicular trafficking. Activation of PKD1 by Bryostatin 1 decreases nuclear beta-catenin expression and beta-catenin/TCF transcription activity. Activation of PKD1 alters cellular aggregation and proliferation in prostate cancer cells associated with subcellular redistribution of E-cadherin and beta-catenin. For the first time, we have identified that Bryostatin 1 modulates beta-catenin signaling through PKD1, which identifies a novel mechanism to improve efficacy of Bryostatin 1 in clinical settings.

  15. Complex interplay between the P-glycoprotein multidrug efflux pump and the membrane: its role in modulating protein function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frances Jane Sharom

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Multidrug resistance in cancer is linked to expression of the P-glycoprotein multidrug transporter (Pgp, ABCB1, which exports many structurally diverse compounds from cells. Substrates first partition into the bilayer and then interact with a large flexible binding pocket within the transporter’s transmembrane regions. Pgp has been described as a hydrophobic vacuum cleaner or an outwardly-directed drug/lipid flippase. Recent X-ray crystal structures have shed some light on the nature of the drug-binding pocket and suggested routes by which substrates can enter it from the membrane. Detergents have profound effects on Pgp function, and several appear to be substrates. Biochemical and biophysical studies in vitro, some using purified reconstituted protein, have explored the effects of the membrane environment. They have demonstrated that Pgp is involved in a complex relationship with its lipid environment, which modulates the behaviour of its substrates, as well as various functions of the protein, including ATP hydrolysis, drug binding and drug transport. Membrane lipid composition and fluidity, phospholipid headgroup and acyl chain length all influence Pgp function. Recent studies focusing on thermodynamics and kinetics have revealed some important principles governing Pgp-lipid and substrate-lipid interactions, and how these affect drug binding and transport. In some cells, Pgp is associated with cholesterol-rich microdomains which may modulate its functions. The relationship between Pgp and cholesterol remains an open question; however it clearly affects several aspects of its function in addition to substrate-membrane partitioning. The action of Pgp modulators appears to depend on their membrane permeability, and membrane fluidizers and surfactants reverse drug resistance, likely via an indirect mechanism. A detailed understanding of how the membrane affects Pgp substrates and Pgp’s catalytic cycle may lead to new strategies to combat

  16. The Protective Effects of Erythropoietin on Rat Glomerular Podocytes in Culture are Modulated by Extracellular Matrix Proteins

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    Jan Krtil

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Podocytes are typically cultured on collagen I; however, collagen I is absent from healthy glomerular basement membranes. Erythropoietin (EPO is thought to protect podocytes in vivo. Here, we studied how various types of extracellular matrix (ECM proteins and EPO affect podocytes in culture. Methods: Primary rat podocytes were replated on collagen I, collagen IV, whole ECM extract, laminin, or bare plastic. Cellular adhesion (8 hours after plating, proliferation (5 days, 10 % serum, and resistance to serum deprivation (3 days, 0.5 % serum were assessed. BrdU incorporation and expression of podocyte-specific markers were employed as measures of cellular proliferation and differentiation, respectively. qPCR was used to verify expression of EPO receptor in cultured podocytes. Results: Cellular adhesion was similar on all ECM proteins and unaffected by EPO. Proliferation was accelerated by laminin and the ECM extract, but the final cell density was similar on all ECM surfaces. Collagen IV supported the serum-deprived cells better than the other ECM proteins. EPO (2-20 ng/ml improved viability of serum-deprived podocytes on collagen I, collagen IV, and ECM, but not on laminin or bare plastic. The cells expressed mRNA for EPO receptor. Conclusion: The physiological ECM proteins are more supportive of primary podocytic cultures compared with collagen I. The protective effects of EPO during serum deprivation are modulated by the cultivation surface.

  17. Towards the Structure Determination of a Modulated Protein Crystal: The Semicrystalline State of Profilin:Actin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgstahl, G.; Lovelace, J.; Snell, E. H.; Bellamy, H.

    2003-01-01

    One of the remaining challenges to structural biology is the solution of modulated structures. While small molecule crystallographers have championed this type of structure, to date, no modulated macromolecular structures have been determined. Modulation of the molecular structures within the crystal can produce satellite reflections or a superlattice of reflections in reciprocal space. We have developed the data collection methods and strategies that are needed to collect and analyze these data. If the macromolecule's crystal lattice is composed of physiologically relevant packing contacts, structural changes induced under physiological conditions can cause distortion relevant to the function and biophysical processes of the molecule making up the crystal. By careful measurement of the distortion, and the corresponding three-dimensional structure of the distorted molecule, we will visualize the motion and mechanism of the biological macromolecule(s). We have measured the modulated diffraction pattern produced by the semicrystalline state of profilin:actin crystals using highly parallel and highly monochromatic synchrotron radiation coupled with fine phi slicing (0.001-0.010 degrees) for structure determination. These crystals present these crystals present a unique opportunity to address an important question in structural biology. The modulation is believed to be due to the formation of actin helical filaments from the actin beta ribbon upon the pH-induced dissociation of profilin. To date, the filamentous state of actin has resisted crystallization and no detailed structures are available. The semicrystalline state profilin:actin crystals provides a unique opportunity to understand the many conformational states of actin. This knowledge is essential for understanding the dynamics underlying shape changes and motility of eukaryotic cells. Many essential processes, such as cytokinesis, phagocytosis, and cellular migration depend upon the capacity of the actin

  18. FunMod: A Cytoscape Plugin for Identifying Functional Modules in Undirected Protein–Protein Networks

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    Massimo Natale

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The characterization of the interacting behaviors of complex biological systems is a primary objective in protein–protein network analysis and computational biology. In this paper we present FunMod, an innovative Cytoscape version 2.8 plugin that is able to mine undirected protein–protein networks and to infer sub-networks of interacting proteins intimately correlated with relevant biological pathways. This plugin may enable the discovery of new pathways involved in diseases. In order to describe the role of each protein within the relevant biological pathways, FunMod computes and scores three topological features of the identified sub-networks. By integrating the results from biological pathway clustering and topological network analysis, FunMod proved to be useful for the data interpretation and the generation of new hypotheses in two case studies.

  19. The CBS domain: a protein module with an emerging prominent role in regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baykov, Alexander A; Tuominen, Heidi K; Lahti, Reijo

    2011-11-18

    Regulatory CBS (cystathionine β-synthase) domains exist as two or four tandem copies in thousands of cytosolic and membrane-associated proteins from all kingdoms of life. Mutations in the CBS domains of human enzymes and membrane channels are associated with an array of hereditary diseases. Four CBS domains encoded within a single polypeptide or two identical polypeptides (each having a pair of CBS domains at the subunit interface) form a highly conserved disk-like structure. CBS domains act as autoinhibitory regulatory units in some proteins and activate or further inhibit protein function upon binding to adenosine nucleotides (AMP, ADP, ATP, S-adenosyl methionine, NAD, diadenosine polyphosphates). As a result of the differential effects of the nucleotides, CBS domain-containing proteins can sense cell energy levels. Significant conformational changes are induced in CBS domains by bound ligands, highlighting the structural basis for their effects.

  20. Temperature-Induced Protein Secretion by Leishmania mexicana Modulates Macrophage Signalling and Function

    OpenAIRE

    Kasra Hassani; Elisabeth Antoniak; Armando Jardim; Martin Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Protozoan parasites of genus Leishmania are the causative agents of leishmaniasis. These digenetic microorganisms undergo a marked environmental temperature shift (TS) during transmission from the sandfly vector (ambient temperature, 25-26°C) to the mammalian host (37°C). We have observed that this TS induces a rapid and dramatic increase in protein release from Leishmania mexicana (cutaneous leishmaniasis) within 4 h. Proteomic identification of the TS-induced secreted proteins revealed 72 p...

  1. Modulation of Decoding Fidelity by Ribosomal Proteins S4 and S5

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Ribosomal proteins S4 and S5 participate in the decoding and assembly processes on the ribosome and the interaction with specific antibiotic inhibitors of translation. Many of the characterized mutations affecting these proteins decrease the accuracy of translation, leading to a ribosomal-ambiguity phenotype. Structural analyses of ribosomal complexes indicate that the tRNA selection pathway involves a transition between the closed and open conformations of the 30S ribosomal subunit and requi...

  2. Muscarinic 2 Receptors Modulate Cardiac Proteasome Function in a Protein Kinase G-dependent Manner

    OpenAIRE

    Ranek, Mark J.; Kost, Curtis K.; Hu, Chengjun; Martin, Douglas S.; Wang, Xuejun

    2014-01-01

    Proteasome function insufficiency and inadequate protein quality control are strongly implicated in a large subset of cardiovascular disease and may play an important role in their pathogenesis. Protein degradation by the ubiquitin proteasome system can be physiologically regulated. Cardiac muscarinic 2 (M2) receptors were pharmacologically interrogated in intact mice and cultured neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs). Proteasome-mediated proteolysis was measured with a surrogate misfolde...

  3. Antifreeze protein modulates cell survival during cryopreservation: mediation through influence on ice crystal growth.

    OpenAIRE

    Carpenter, J F; Hansen, T N

    1992-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are extremely efficient at inhibiting ice recrystallization in frozen solutions. Knight and Duman [Knight, C. A. & Duman, J. G. (1986) Cryobiology 23, 256-263] have proposed that this may be an important function of the proteins in freeze-tolerant organisms. We have tested this proposal in vitro by characterizing the influence of AFP on the recovery of cryopreserved cells, which often can survive cooling and yet subsequently be damaged by ice crystal growth during w...

  4. Dynamic Lipid-dependent Modulation of Protein Topology by Post-translational Phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitrac, Heidi; MacLean, David M; Karlstaedt, Anja; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich; Jayaraman, Vasanthi; Bogdanov, Mikhail; Dowhan, William

    2017-02-03

    Membrane protein topology and folding are governed by structural principles and topogenic signals that are recognized and decoded by the protein insertion and translocation machineries at the time of initial membrane insertion and folding. We previously demonstrated that the lipid environment is also a determinant of initial protein topology, which is dynamically responsive to post-assembly changes in membrane lipid composition. However, the effect on protein topology of post-assembly phosphorylation of amino acids localized within initially cytoplasmically oriented extramembrane domains has never been investigated. Here, we show in a controlled in vitro system that phosphorylation of a membrane protein can trigger a change in topological arrangement. The rate of change occurred on a scale of seconds, comparable with the rates observed upon changes in the protein lipid environment. The rate and extent of topological rearrangement were dependent on the charges of extramembrane domains and the lipid bilayer surface. Using model membranes mimicking the lipid compositions of eukaryotic organelles, we determined that anionic lipids, cholesterol, sphingomyelin, and membrane fluidity play critical roles in these processes. Our results demonstrate how post-translational modifications may influence membrane protein topology in a lipid-dependent manner, both along the organelle trafficking pathway and at their final destination. The results provide further evidence that membrane protein topology is dynamic, integrating for the first time the effect of changes in lipid composition and regulators of cellular processes. The discovery of a new topology regulatory mechanism opens additional avenues for understanding unexplored structure-function relationships and the development of optimized topology prediction tools.

  5. Redox modulation of cellular metabolism through targeted degradation of signaling proteins by the proteasome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Squier, Thomas C.

    2006-02-01

    Under conditions of oxidative stress, the 20S proteasome plays a critical role in maintaining cellular homeostasis through the selective degradation of oxidized and damaged proteins. This adaptive stress response is distinct from ubiquitin-dependent pathways in that oxidized proteins are recognized and degraded in an ATP-independent mechanism, which can involve the molecular chaperone Hsp90. Like the regulatory complexes 19S and 11S REG, Hsp90 tightly associates with the 20S proteasome to mediate the recognition of aberrant proteins for degradation. In the case of the calcium signaling protein calmodulin, proteasomal degradation results from the oxidation of a single surface exposed methionine (i.e., Met145); oxidation of the other eight methionines has a minimal effect on the recognition and degradation of calmodulin by the proteasome. Since cellular concentrations of calmodulin are limiting, the targeted degradation of this critical signaling protein under conditions of oxidative stress will result in the downregulation of cellular metabolism, serving as a feedback regulation to diminish the generation of reactive oxygen species. The targeted degradation of critical signaling proteins, such as calmodulin, can function as sensors of oxidative stress to downregulate global rates of metabolism and enhance cellular survival.

  6. Adsorbed plasma proteins modulate the effects of single-walled carbon nanotubes on neutrophils in blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasova, Irina I; Mikhalchik, Elena V; Barinov, Nikolay A; Kostevich, Valeria A; Smolina, Natalia V; Klinov, Dmitry V; Sokolov, Alexey V

    2016-08-01

    Proteins adsorbed on a surface may affect the interaction of this surface with cells. Here, we studied the binding of human serum albumin (HSA), fibrinogen (FBG) and immunoglobulin G (IgG) to PEGylated single-walled carbon nanotubes (PEG-SWCNTs) and evaluated the impact of PEG-SWCNT treated by these proteins on neutrophils in whole blood samples. Measurements of adsorption parameters revealed tight binding of proteins to PEG-SWCNTs. AFM was employed to directly observe protein binding to sidewalls of PEG-SWCNTs. Fluorescein-labeled IgG was used to ascertain the stability of PEG-SWCNT-IgG complexes in plasma. In blood samples, all plasma proteins mitigated damage of neutrophils observed just after blood exposure to PEG-SWCNTs, while only treatment of PEG-SWCNTs with IgG resulted in dose- and time-dependent enhancement of CNT-induced neutrophil activation and in potentiation of oxidative stress. Our study demonstrates the ability of adsorbed plasma proteins to influence neutrophil response caused by PEG-SWCNTs in whole blood.

  7. Effect of the protein corona on nanoparticles for modulating cytotoxicity and immunotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee YK

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Yeon Kyung Lee,1,* Eun-Ju Choi,2,* Thomas J Webster,3 Sang-Hyun Kim,4 Dongwoo Khang1 1Department of Molecular Medicine, School of Medicine, Gachon University, Incheon, South Korea; 2Division of Sport Science, College of Science and Technology, Konkuk University, Chungju, South Korea; 3Department of Chemical Engineering and Program in Bioengineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USA; 4Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, South Korea *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Although the cytotoxicity of nanoparticles (NPs is greatly influenced by their interactions with blood proteins, toxic effects resulting from blood interactions are often ignored in the development and use of nanostructured biomaterials for in vivo applications. Protein coronas created during the initial reaction with NPs can determine the subsequent immunological cascade, and protein coronas formed on NPs can either stimulate or mitigate the immune response. Along these lines, the understanding of NP-protein corona formation in terms of physiochemical surface properties of the NPs and NP interactions with the immune system components in blood is an essential step for evaluating NP toxicity for in vivo therapeutics. This article reviews the most recent developments in NP-based protein coronas through the modification of NP surface properties and discusses the associated immune responses. Keywords: nanostructured biomaterials, blood response, cytotoxicity, immunotoxicity, protein corona

  8. A unique protein phosphatase with kelch-like domains (PPKL in Plasmodium modulates ookinete differentiation, motility and invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S Guttery

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation (catalysed by kinases and phosphatases, respectively are post-translational modifications that play key roles in many eukaryotic signalling pathways, and are often deregulated in a number of pathological conditions in humans. In the malaria parasite Plasmodium, functional insights into its kinome have only recently been achieved, with over half being essential for blood stage development and another 14 kinases being essential for sexual development and mosquito transmission. However, functions for any of the plasmodial protein phosphatases are unknown. Here, we use reverse genetics in the rodent malaria model, Plasmodium berghei, to examine the role of a unique protein phosphatase containing kelch-like domains (termed PPKL from a family related to Arabidopsis BSU1. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed that the family of BSU1-like proteins including PPKL is encoded in the genomes of land plants, green algae and alveolates, but not in other eukaryotic lineages. Furthermore, PPKL was observed in a distinct family, separate to the most closely-related phosphatase family, PP1. In our genetic approach, C-terminal GFP fusion with PPKL showed an active protein phosphatase preferentially expressed in female gametocytes and ookinetes. Deletion of the endogenous ppkl gene caused abnormal ookinete development and differentiation, and dissociated apical microtubules from the inner-membrane complex, generating an immotile phenotype and failure to invade the mosquito mid-gut epithelium. These observations were substantiated by changes in localisation of cytoskeletal tubulin and actin, and the micronemal protein CTRP in the knockout mutant as assessed by indirect immunofluorescence. Finally, increased mRNA expression of dozi, a RNA helicase vital to zygote development was observed in ppkl(- mutants, with global phosphorylation studies of ookinete differentiation from 1.5-24 h post-fertilisation indicating major changes

  9. On the presence of Bufo nasicus Werner in Guiana, with a redescription of the species on the basis of recently collected material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogmoed, M.S.

    1977-01-01

    During research on material recently collected in Guyana and in Venezuelan Guiana, several specimens of the rare toad Bufo nasicus Werner, thus far only known from the holotype without known origin, were discovered. On the basis of this material the species is redescribed and some notes on its natur

  10. Werner-Type Matrix Valued Rational Interpolation and Its Recurrence Algorithms%Werner型矩阵有理插值和递推算法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾传青; 王金波

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, a practical Werner-type continued fraction method for solving matrix valued rational interpolation problem is provided by using a generalized inverse of matrices. In order to reduce the continued fraction form to rational function form of the interpolants, an efficient forward recurrence algorithm is obtained.

  11. Werner综合征伴脑膜瘤一例并文献复习%Meningioma arising in Werner syndrome, a case report and literature review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝淑煜; 张力伟; 孙彦辉; 辛宇; 吴震; 张俊廷; 王忠诚

    2009-01-01

    Objective To report a case of Werner syndrome with meningioma in cavernous sinus and clivus, and review the relative literatures. Methods A pre-sigmoid sinus approach was performed for the meningioma, and we analyzed the genome sequence of the patient. Results According to her clinical features and result of genetic test of WRN, she was diagnosed as Werner's syndrome. The meningioma was totally removed. Conclusions This is the first case of Werner syndrome with meningioma in Chinese, we should emphasize further study of the associated genes of Werner syndrome and clinical manifestation.%目的 报告1例伴发海绵窦斜坡脑膜瘤的Werner综合征患者并文献复习.方法 通过乙状窦前入路切除肿瘤,并进行相关基因检查.结果 患者衰老面容,双眼白内障,硬皮病样皮肤改变及WRN基因检测结果 ,符合Werner综合征诊断,颅内肿瘤切除效果满意.结论 首次报告了中国人群中伴发脑膜瘤的Werner综合征病例,对Werner综合征相关基因及临床表现仍待进一步研究.

  12. The Historical Foundation of Learning Disabilities: A Quantitative Synthesis Assessing the Validity of Strauss and Werner's Exogenous versus Endogenous Distinction of Mental Retardation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavale, Kenneth A.; Forness, Steven R.

    1985-01-01

    The paper reviews research of A. Strauss and H. Werner on behavioral differences between exogeneous (brain injured) and endogeneous (familial-cultural) mental retardation using quantitative methods of research synthesis. Findings offer little empirical support for the presumed behavioral differences and reveal considerable overlap among the…

  13. Ethnic-Specific WRN Mutations in South Asian Werner Syndrome Patients: Potential Founder Effect in Patients with Indian or Pakistani Ancestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Bidisha; Lessel, Davor; Nampoothiri, Sheela; Rao, Anuradha S; Hisama, Fuki M; Peter, Dincy; Bennett, Chris; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Nürnberg, Peter; Martin, George M; Kubisch, Christian; Oshima, Junko

    2013-05-01

    Werner syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by multiple features consistent with accelerated aging. It is caused by mutations in the WRN gene, which encodes a RecQ type helicase. To date, more than 70 disease-causing mutations have been reported. While founder mutations and a corresponding relatively high incidence of WS have been reported in Japan and Sardinia, such mutations have not been previously described among patients of South Asian descent. Here we report two novel WRN mutations in three pedigrees. A homozygous c.561A>G mutation in exon 6 was identified both in a pedigree from Kerala, India and in a British patient of Pakistani ancestry. Although c.561A>G does not alter the corresponding amino acid (p.K187K), it creates a cryptic splice site resulting in a 98bp deletion at the mRNA level (r.557-654del98) followed by a frameshift (p.K187fs). These two cases shared the same haplotype across the WRN gene, and were distinct from another Indian Werner patient with a homozygous stop codon mutation, c.2855 C>A (p.S952*) in exon 24. As the Indian population increases and the awareness of Werner syndrome grows, we anticipate that more cases will be identified with these founder mutations among South Asian Werner syndrome patients.

  14. Fast and accurate method for identifying high-quality protein-interaction modules by clique merging and its application to yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chi; Liu, Song; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2006-04-01

    Molecular networks in cells are organized into functional modules, where genes in the same module interact densely with each other and participate in the same biological process. Thus, identification of modules from molecular networks is an important step toward a better understanding of how cells function through the molecular networks. Here, we propose a simple, automatic method, called MC(2), to identify functional modules by enumerating and merging cliques in the protein-interaction data from large-scale experiments. Application of MC(2) to the S. cerevisiae protein-interaction data produces 84 modules, whose sizes range from 4 to 69 genes. The majority of the discovered modules are significantly enriched with a highly specific process term (at least 4 levels below root) and a specific cellular component in Gene Ontology (GO) tree. The average fraction of genes with the most enriched GO term for all modules is 82% for specific biological processes and 78% for specific cellular components. In addition, the predicted modules are enriched with coexpressed proteins. These modules are found to be useful for annotating unknown genes and uncovering novel functions of known genes. MC(2) is efficient, and takes only about 5 min to identify modules from the current yeast gene interaction network with a typical PC (Intel Xeon 2.5 GHz CPU and 512 MB memory). The CPU time of MC(2) is affordable (12 h) even when the number of interactions is increased by a factor of 10. MC(2) and its results are publicly available on http://theory.med.buffalo.edu/MC2.

  15. Modulation of decoding fidelity by ribosomal proteins S4 and S5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Deepali; Kamath, Divya; Gregory, Steven T; O'Connor, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Ribosomal proteins S4 and S5 participate in the decoding and assembly processes on the ribosome and the interaction with specific antibiotic inhibitors of translation. Many of the characterized mutations affecting these proteins decrease the accuracy of translation, leading to a ribosomal-ambiguity phenotype. Structural analyses of ribosomal complexes indicate that the tRNA selection pathway involves a transition between the closed and open conformations of the 30S ribosomal subunit and requires disruption of the interface between the S4 and S5 proteins. In agreement with this observation, several of the mutations that promote miscoding alter residues located at the S4-S5 interface. Here, the Escherichia coli rpsD and rpsE genes encoding the S4 and S5 proteins were targeted for mutagenesis and screened for accuracy-altering mutations. While a majority of the 38 mutant proteins recovered decrease the accuracy of translation, error-restrictive mutations were also recovered; only a minority of the mutant proteins affected rRNA processing, ribosome assembly, or interactions with antibiotics. Several of the mutations affect residues at the S4-S5 interface. These include five nonsense mutations that generate C-terminal truncations of S4. These truncations are predicted to destabilize the S4-S5 interface and, consistent with the domain closure model, all have ribosomal-ambiguity phenotypes. A substantial number of the mutations alter distant locations and conceivably affect tRNA selection through indirect effects on the S4-S5 interface or by altering interactions with adjacent ribosomal proteins and 16S rRNA.

  16. Redox Modulation of Cellular Signaling and Metabolism Through Reversible Oxidation of Methionine Sensors in Calcium Regulatory Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bigelow, Diana J.; Squier, Thomas C.

    2005-01-17

    Adaptive responses associated with environmental stressors are critical to cell survival. These involve the modulation of central signaling protein functions through site-specific and enzymatically reversible oxidative modifications of methionines to coordinate cellular metabolism, energy utilization, and calcium signaling. Under conditions when cellular redox and antioxidant defenses are overwhelmed, the selective oxidation of critical methionines within selected protein sensors functions to down-regulate energy metabolism and the further generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Mechanistically, these functional changes within protein sensors take advantage of the helix-breaking character of methionine sulfoxide. Thus, depending on either the ecological niche of the organism or the cellular milieu of different organ systems, cellular metabolism can be fine-tuned to maintain optimal function in the face of variable amounts of collateral oxidative damage. The sensitivity of several calcium regulatory proteins to oxidative modification provides cellular sensors that link oxidative stress to cellular response and recovery. Calmodulin (CaM) is one such critical calcium regulatory protein, which is functionally sensitive to methionine oxidation. Helix destabilization resulting from the oxidation of either Met{sup 144} or Met{sup 145} results in the nonproductive association between CaM and target proteins. The ability of oxidized CaM to stabilize its target proteins in an inhibited state with an affinity similar to that of native (unoxidized) CaM permits this central regulatory protein to function as a cellular rheostat that down-regulates energy metabolism in response to oxidative stress. Likewise, oxidation of a methionine within a critical switch region of the regulatory protein phospholamban is expected to destabilize the phosphorylationdependent helix formation necessary for the release of enzyme inhibition, resulting in a down-regulation of the Ca-ATPase in

  17. Rat vas deferens SERCA2 is modulated by Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin protein kinase II-mediated phosphorylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, J.B.R.; Muzi-Filho, H. [Programa de Farmacologia e Inflamação, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Valverde, R.H.F. [Instituto de Biofísica Carlos Chagas Filho, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Quintas, L.E.M. [Programa de Farmacologia e Inflamação, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Noel, F. [Programa de Desenvolvimento de Fármacos, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Einicker-Lamas, M. [Instituto de Biofísica Carlos Chagas Filho, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia em Biologia Estrutural e Bioimagem, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Cunha, V.M.N. [Programa de Farmacologia e Inflamação, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-03-19

    Ca{sup 2+} pumps are important players in smooth muscle contraction. Nevertheless, little information is available about these pumps in the vas deferens. We have determined which subtype of sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase isoform (SERCA) is expressed in rat vas deferens (RVD) and its modulation by calmodulin (CaM)-dependent mechanisms. The thapsigargin-sensitive Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase from a membrane fraction containing the highest SERCA levels in the RVD homogenate has the same molecular mass (∼115 kDa) as that of SERCA2 from the rat cerebellum. It has a very high affinity for Ca{sup 2+} (Ca{sub 0.5} = 780 nM) and a low sensitivity to vanadate (IC{sub 50} = 41 µM). These facts indicate that SERCA2 is present in the RVD. Immunoblotting for CaM and Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) showed the expression of these two regulatory proteins. Ca{sup 2+} and CaM increased serine-phosphorylated residues of the 115-kDa protein, indicating the involvement of CaMKII in the regulatory phosphorylation of SERCA2. Phosphorylation is accompanied by an 8-fold increase of thapsigargin-sensitive Ca{sup 2+} accumulation in the lumen of vesicles derived from these membranes. These data establish that SERCA2 in the RVD is modulated by Ca{sup 2+} and CaM, possibly via CaMKII, in a process that results in stimulation of Ca{sup 2+} pumping activity.

  18. Sulindac modulates secreted protein expression from LIM1215 colon carcinoma cells prior to apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greening, David W; Ji, Hong; Kapp, Eugene A; Simpson, Richard J

    2013-11-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of mortality in Western populations. Growing evidence from human and rodent studies indicate that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) cause regression of existing colon tumors and act as effective chemopreventive agents in sporadic colon tumor formation. Although much is known about the action of the NSAID sulindac, especially its role in inducing apoptosis, mechanisms underlying these effects is poorly understood. In previous secretome-based proteomic studies using 2D-DIGE/MS and cytokine arrays we identified over 150 proteins released from the CRC cell line LIM1215 whose expression levels were dysregulated by treatment with 1mM sulindac over 16h; many of these proteins are implicated in molecular and cellular functions such as cell proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, angiogenesis and apoptosis (Ji et al., Proteomics Clin. Appl. 2009, 3, 433-451). We have extended these studies and describe here an improved protein/peptide separation strategy that facilitated the identification of 987 proteins and peptides released from LIM1215 cells following 1mM sulindac treatment for 8h preceding the onset of apoptosis. This peptidome separation strategy involved fractional centrifugal ultrafiltration of concentrated cell culture media (CM) using nominal molecular weight membrane filters (NMWL 30K, 3K and 1K). Proteins isolated in the >30K and 3-30K fractions were electrophoretically separated by SDS-PAGE and endogenous peptides in the 1-3K membrane filter were fractioned by RP-HPLC; isolated proteins and peptides were identified by nanoLC-MS-MS. Collectively, our data show that LIM1215 cells treated with 1mM sulindac for 8h secrete decreased levels of proteins associated with extracellular matrix remodeling (e.g., collagens, perlecan, syndecans, filamins, dyneins, metalloproteinases and endopeptidases), cell adhesion (e.g., cadherins, integrins, laminins) and mucosal maintenance (e.g., glycoprotein 340 and mucins 5AC, 6

  19. Modulation of NF-кB transcription factor activation by Molluscum contagiosum virus proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Struzik

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Molluscum contagiosum virus is a human and animal dermatotropic pathogen, which causes a severe disease in immunocompromised individuals. MCV belongs to the Poxviridae family whose members exert immunomodulatory effects on the host antiviral response. Poxviruses interfere with cell signaling pathways that lead to the activation of nuclear factor кB, a pleiotropic transcription factor which is crucial for regulation of the immune response, the cell cycle and apoptosis. In resting cells, NF-κB is present in the cytoplasm, where it is associated with inhibitor κB. Upon stimulation by activators, such as proinflammatory cytokines and bacterial or viral products, the inhibitory protein undergoes phosphorylation and proteasomal degradation. NF-κB, in turn, translocates to the nucleus, where it regulates the transcription of various genes that are essential for processes mentioned above. Since poxviruses replicate exclusively in the cell cytoplasm, NF-кB became a good target for poxviral immunomodulation. MCV encodes various proteins which interfere with the signaling pathways that lead to the activation of NF-κB. Ligand inhibitor encoded by MCV, MC54, binds interleukin-18 and inhibits interferon-γ production. Other MCV proteins, MC159 and MC160, belong to intracellular inhibitors of NF-κB and are members of viral FLICE-inhibitory proteins (vFLIPs. MC159 protein encoded by MCV was shown to inhibit apoptosis of virus-infected cells. Such interactions serve immune evasion and are responsible for the persistence of MCV.

  20. Plasmalemmal vesicle associated protein (PV1) modulates SV40 virus infectivity in CV-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Dan; Armstrong, David A; Oppenheim, Ariella; Kuksin, Dmitry; Norkin, Leonard; Stan, Radu V

    2011-08-26

    Plasmalemmal vesicle associated protein (Plvap/PV1) is a structural protein required for the formation of the stomatal diaphragms of caveolae. Caveolae are plasma membrane invaginations that were implicated in SV40 virus entry in primate cells. Here we show that de novo Plvap/PV1 expression in CV-1 green monkey epithelial cells significantly reduces the ability of SV40 virus to establish productive infection, when cells are incubated with low concentrations of the virus. However, in presence of high viral titers PV1 has no effect on SV40 virus infectivity. Mechanistically, PV1 expression does not reduce the cell surface expression of known SV40 receptors such as GM1 ganglioside and MHC class I proteins. Furthermore, PV1 does not reduce the binding of virus-like particles made by SV40 VP1 protein to the CV-1 cell surface and does not impact their internalization when cells are incubated with either high or low VLP concentrations. These results suggest that PV1 protein is able to block SV40 infectivity at low but not at high viral concentration either by interfering with the infective internalization pathway at the cell surface or at a post internalization step. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The quaternary structure of the recombinant bovine odorant-binding protein is modulated by chemical denaturants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga V Stepanenko

    Full Text Available A large group of odorant-binding proteins (OBPs has attracted great scientific interest as promising building blocks in constructing optical biosensors for dangerous substances, such as toxic and explosive molecules. Native tissue-extracted bovine OBP (bOBP has a unique dimer folding pattern that involves crossing the α-helical domain in each monomer over the other monomer's β-barrel. In contrast, recombinant bOBP maintaining the high level of stability inherent to native tissue bOBP is produced in a stable native-like state with a decreased tendency for dimerization and is a mixture of monomers and dimers in a buffered solution. This work is focused on the study of the quaternary structure and the folding-unfolding processes of the recombinant bOBP in the absence and in the presence of guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl. Our results show that the recombinant bOBP native dimer is only formed at elevated GdnHCl concentrations (1.5 M. This process requires re-organizing the protein structure by progressing through the formation of an intermediate state. The bOBP dimerization process appears to be irreversible and it occurs before the protein unfolds. Though the observed structural changes for recombinant bOBP at pre-denaturing GdnHCl concentrations show a local character and the overall protein structure is maintained, such changes should be considered where the protein is used as a sensitive element in a biosensor system.

  2. CFTR anion channel modulates expression of human transmembrane mucin MUC3 through the PDZ protein GOPC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelaseyed, Thaher; Hansson, Gunnar C

    2011-09-15

    The transmembrane mucins in the enterocyte are type 1 transmembrane proteins with long and rigid mucin domains, rich in proline, threonine and serine residues that carry numerous O-glycans. Three of these mucins, MUC3, MUC12 and MUC17 are unique in harboring C-terminal class I PDZ motifs, making them suitable ligands for PDZ proteins. A screening of 123 different human PDZ domains for binding to MUC3 identified a strong interaction with the PDZ protein GOPC (Golgi-associated PDZ and coiled-coil motif-containing protein). This interaction was mediated by the C-terminal PDZ motif of MUC3, binding to the single GOPC PDZ domain. GOPC is also a binding partner for cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) that directs CFTR for degradation. Overexpression of GOPC downregulated the total levels of MUC3, an effect that was reversed by introducing CFTR. The results suggest that CFTR and MUC3 compete for binding to GOPC, which in turn can regulate levels of these two proteins. For the first time a direct coupling between mucins and the CFTR channel is demonstrated, a finding that will shed further light on the still poorly understood relationship between cystic fibrosis and the mucus phenotype of this disease.

  3. Protein Corona Modulates Uptake and Toxicity of Nanoceria via Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzolini, Julie; Weber, Ralf J M; Chen, Hsueh-Shih; Khan, Abdullah; Guggenheim, Emily; Shaw, Robert K; Chipman, James K; Viant, Mark R; Rappoport, Joshua Z

    2016-08-01

    Particles present in diesel exhaust have been proposed as a significant contributor to the development of acute and chronic lung diseases, including respiratory infection and allergic asthma. Nanoceria (CeO2 nanoparticles) are used to increase fuel efficiency in internal combustion engines, are present in exhaust fumes, and could affect cells of the airway. Components from the environment such as biologically derived proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids can form a dynamic layer, commonly referred to as the "protein corona" which alters cellular nanoparticle interactions and internalization. Using confocal reflectance microscopy, we quantified nanoceria uptake by lung-derived cells in the presence and absence of a serum-derived protein corona. Employing mass spectrometry, we identified components of the protein corona, and demonstrated that the interaction between transferrin in the protein corona and the transferrin receptor is involved in mediating the cellular entry of nanoceria via clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Furthermore, under these conditions nanoceria does not affect cell growth, viability, or metabolism, even at high concentration. Alternatively, despite the antioxidant capacity of nanoceria, in serum-free conditions these nanoparticles induce plasma membrane disruption and cause changes in cellular metabolism. Thus, our results identify a specific receptor-mediated mechanism for nanoceria entry, and provide significant insight into the potential for nanoparticle-dependent toxicity.

  4. Resveratrol Modulation of Protein Expression in parkin-Mutant Human Skin Fibroblasts: A Proteomic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Vergara

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE and mass spectrometry (MS analysis the effects of resveratrol treatment on skin primary fibroblasts from a healthy subject and from a parkin-mutant early onset Parkinson’s disease patient. Parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, is the most frequently mutated gene in hereditary Parkinson’s disease. Functional alteration of parkin leads to impairment of the ubiquitin-proteasome system, resulting in the accumulation of misfolded or aggregated proteins accountable for the neurodegenerative process. The identification of proteins differentially expressed revealed that resveratrol treatment can act on deregulated specific biological process and molecular function such as cellular redox balance and protein homeostasis. In particular, resveratrol was highly effective at restoring the heat-shock protein network and the protein degradation systems. Moreover, resveratrol treatment led to a significant increase in GSH level, reduction of GSSG/GSH ratio, and decrease of reduced free thiol content in patient cells compared to normal fibroblasts. Thus, our findings provide an experimental evidence of the beneficial effects by which resveratrol could contribute to preserve the cellular homeostasis in parkin-mutant fibroblasts.

  5. Maize DELLA proteins dwarf plant8 and dwarf plant9 as modulators of plant development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawit, Shai J; Wych, Heidi M; Xu, Deping; Kundu, Suman; Tomes, Dwight T

    2010-11-01

    DELLA proteins are nuclear-localized negative regulators of gibberellin signaling found ubiquitously throughout higher plants. Dominant dwarfing mutations of DELLA proteins have been primarily responsible for the dramatic increases in harvest index of the 'green revolution'. Maize contains two genetic loci encoding DELLA proteins, dwarf plant8 (d8) and dwarf plant 9 (d9). The d8 gene and three of its dominant dwarfing alleles have been previously characterized at the molecular level. Almost 20 years after the initial description of the mutant, this investigation represents the first molecular characterization of d9 and its gibberellin-insensitive mutant, D9-1. We have molecularly, subcellularly and phenotypically characterized the gene products of five maize DELLA alleles in transgenic Arabidopsis. In dissecting the molecular differences in D9-1, a critical residue for normal DELLA function has been uncovered, corresponding to E600 of the D9 protein. The gibberellin-insensitive D9-1 was found to produce dwarfing and, notably, earlier flowering in Arabidopsis. Conversely, overexpression of the D9-1 allele delayed flowering in transgenic maize, while overexpression of the d9 allele led to earlier flowering. These results corroborate findings that DELLA proteins are at the crux of many plant developmental pathways and suggest differing mechanisms of flowering time control by DELLAs in maize and Arabidopsis.

  6. The SOL-2/Neto auxiliary protein modulates the function of AMPA-subtype ionotropic glutamate receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Mellem, Jerry E; Jensen, Michael; Brockie, Penelope J; Walker, Craig S; Hoerndli, Frédéric J; Hauth, Linda; Madsen, David M; Maricq, Andres V

    2012-09-06

    The neurotransmitter glutamate mediates excitatory synaptic transmission by gating ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs). AMPA receptors (AMPARs), a subtype of iGluR, are strongly implicated in synaptic plasticity, learning, and memory. We previously discovered two classes of AMPAR auxiliary proteins in C. elegans that modify receptor kinetics and thus change synaptic transmission. Here, we have identified another auxiliary protein, SOL-2, a CUB-domain protein that associates with both the related auxiliary subunit SOL-1 and with the GLR-1 AMPAR. In sol-2 mutants, behaviors dependent on glutamatergic transmission are disrupted, GLR-1-mediated currents are diminished, and GLR-1 desensitization and pharmacology are modified. Remarkably, a secreted variant of SOL-1 delivered in trans can rescue sol-1 mutants, and this rescue depends on in cis expression of SOL-2. Finally, we demonstrate that SOL-1 and SOL-2 have an ongoing role in the adult nervous system to control AMPAR-mediated currents.

  7. Phosphorylation of Puma modulates its apoptotic function by regulating protein stability

    OpenAIRE

    M. Fricker; O'Prey, J; Tolkovsky, A. M.; Ryan, K.M.

    2010-01-01

    Puma is a potent BH3-only protein that antagonises anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins, promotes Bax/Bak activation and has an essential role in multiple apoptotic models. Puma expression is normally kept very low, but can be induced by several transcription factors including p53, p73, E2F1 and FOXO3a, whereby it can induce an apoptotic response. As Puma can to bind and inactivate all anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family, its activity must be tightly controlled. We report here, for the first ...

  8. Neuroplasticity pathways and protein-interaction networks are modulated by vortioxetine in rodents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waller, Jessica A.; Nygaard, Sara Holm; Li, Yan

    2017-01-01

    . A subsequent qPCR study examining the expression of targets in the protein-protein interactome space in response to chronic vortioxetine treatment over a range of doses provides further biological validation that vortioxetine engages neuroplasticity networks. Thus, the same biology is regulated in different...... species and sexes, different brain regions, and in response to distinct routes of administration and regimens. Conclusions: A recurring theme, based on the present study as well as previous findings, is that networks related to synaptic plasticity, synaptic transmission, signal transduction...

  9. Scotopic vision in the monkey is modulated by the G protein-coupled receptor 55

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouskila, Joseph; Harrar, Vanessa; Javadi, Pasha

    2016-01-01

    The endogenous cannabinoid system plays important roles in the retina of mice and monkeys via their classic CB1 and CB2 receptors. We have previously reported that the G protein-coupled receptor 55 (GPR55), a putative cannabinoid receptor, is exclusively expressed in rod photoreceptors in the mon......The endogenous cannabinoid system plays important roles in the retina of mice and monkeys via their classic CB1 and CB2 receptors. We have previously reported that the G protein-coupled receptor 55 (GPR55), a putative cannabinoid receptor, is exclusively expressed in rod photoreceptors...

  10. The ubiquitin ligase human TRIM71 regulates let-7 microRNA biogenesis via modulation of Lin28B protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seo Hyun; Cho, Sungchan; Kim, M Sun; Choi, Kwangman; Cho, Jae Youl; Gwak, Ho-Shin; Kim, Youn-Jae; Yoo, Heon; Lee, Seung-Hoon; Park, Jong Bae; Kim, Jong Heon

    2014-05-01

    let-7 microRNA (miRNA) is implicated in various biological processes, and its downregulation essentially linked to human malignancy. Regulation of gene expression of the let-7 family is critically linked to RNA-binding proteins. For instance, Lin28B and its paralog, Lin28A, inhibit the pre-let-7 precursor from being processed to mature miRNA by recruiting terminal uridyltransferase, TUT4, which adds oligomeric U at the 3' end, suggesting that deregulation of Lin28B, together with Lin28A, may alter various biological processes through modulation of let-7 expression. Here, we showed that the Lin28B protein level is regulated via ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation, and identified the ubiquitin ligase as human TRIM-NHL domain-containing TRIM71. In cells, TRIM71 negatively regulates Lin28B protein stability by catalyzing polyubiquitination. Compared with its paralog, Lin28A, a C-terminal unique ~50 amino acid stretch of Lin28B is essential for TRIM71 interactions and subsequent polyubiquitination. Moreover, the N-terminal RING finger motif of TRIM71 is critical for protein-protein interactions and polyubiquitination of Lin28B, and consequent let-7 expression. Consistent with the let-7 stimulatory role of TRIM71 via Lin28B polyubiquitination, specific knockdown of TRIM71 led to downregulation of let-7 expression. Expression of one of the known let-7 targets, HMGA2, was derepressed after knockdown of TRIM71. We additionally showed that enhanced expression of let-7 is part of a feedback loop that targets TRIM71 3'UTR, which contains two conserved let-7 target sites. Our findings collectively reveal critical aspects of regulatory complexity of let-7 biogenesis at the posttranscriptional level. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Crystal Structure of an Integron Gene Cassette-Associated Protein from Vibrio cholerae Identifies a Cationic Drug-Binding Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deshpande, Chandrika N.; Harrop, Stephen J.; Boucher, Yan; Hassan, Karl A.; Di Leo, Rosa; Xu, Xiaohui; Cui, Hong; Savchenko, Alexei; Chang, Changsoo; Labbate, Maurizio; Paulsen, Ian T.; Stokes, H.W.; Curmi, Paul M.G.; Mabbutt, Bridget C. (MIT); (UT-Australia); (Macquarie); (Toronto); (New South)

    2012-02-15

    The direct isolation of integron gene cassettes from cultivated and environmental microbial sources allows an assessment of the impact of the integron/gene cassette system on the emergence of new phenotypes, such as drug resistance or virulence. A structural approach is being exploited to investigate the modularity and function of novel integron gene cassettes. We report the 1.8 {angstrom} crystal structure of Cass2, an integron-associated protein derived from an environmental V. cholerae. The structure defines a monomeric beta-barrel protein with a fold related to the effector-binding portion of AraC/XylS transcription activators. The closest homologs of Cass2 are multi-drug binding proteins, such as BmrR. Consistent with this, a binding pocket made up of hydrophobic residues and a single glutamate side chain is evident in Cass2, occupied in the crystal form by polyethylene glycol. Fluorescence assays demonstrate that Cass2 is capable of binding cationic drug compounds with submicromolar affinity. The Cass2 module possesses a protein interaction surface proximal to its drug-binding cavity with features homologous to those seen in multi-domain transcriptional regulators. Genetic analysis identifies Cass2 to be representative of a larger family of independent effector-binding proteins associated with lateral gene transfer within Vibrio and closely-related species. We propose that the Cass2 family not only has capacity to form functional transcription regulator complexes, but represents possible evolutionary precursors to multi-domain regulators associated with cationic drug compounds.

  12. N-MYC down-regulated-like proteins regulate meristem initiation by modulating auxin transport and MAX2 expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yashwanti Mudgil

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: N-MYC down-regulated-like (NDL proteins interact with the Gβ subunit (AGB1 of the heterotrimeric G protein complex and play an important role in AGB1-dependent regulation of lateral root formation by affecting root auxin transport, auxin gradients and the steady-state levels of mRNA encoding the PIN-FORMED 2 and AUXIN 1 auxin transport facilitators. Auxin transport in aerial tissue follows different paths and utilizes different transporters than in roots; therefore, in the present study, we analyzed whether NDL proteins play an important role in AGB1-dependent, auxin-mediated meristem development. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Expression levels of NDL gene family members need to be tightly regulated, and altered expression (both over-expression and down-regulation confers ectopic growth. Over-expression of NDL1 disrupts vegetative and reproductive organ development. Reduced expression of the NDL gene family members results in asymmetric leaf emergence, twinning of rosette leaves, defects in leaf formation, and abnormal silique distribution. Reduced expression of the NDL genes in the agb1-2 (null allele mutant rescues some of the abnormal phenotypes, such as silique morphology, silique distribution, and peduncle angle, suggesting that proper levels of NDL proteins are maintained by AGB1. We found that all of these abnormal aerial phenotypes due to altered NDL expression were associated with increases in basipetal auxin transport, altered auxin maxima and altered MAX2 expression within the inflorescence stem. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: NDL proteins, together with AGB1, act as positive regulators of meristem initiation and branching. AGB1 and NDL1 positively regulate basipetal inflorescence auxin transport and modulate MAX2 expression in shoots, which in turn regulates organ and lateral meristem formation by the establishment and maintenance of auxin gradients.

  13. Crystal structure of an integron gene cassette-associated protein from Vibrio cholerae identifies a cationic drug-binding module.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrika N Deshpande

    Full Text Available The direct isolation of integron gene cassettes from cultivated and environmental microbial sources allows an assessment of the impact of the integron/gene cassette system on the emergence of new phenotypes, such as drug resistance or virulence. A structural approach is being exploited to investigate the modularity and function of novel integron gene cassettes.We report the 1.8 Å crystal structure of Cass2, an integron-associated protein derived from an environmental V. cholerae. The structure defines a monomeric beta-barrel protein with a fold related to the effector-binding portion of AraC/XylS transcription activators. The closest homologs of Cass2 are multi-drug binding proteins, such as BmrR. Consistent with this, a binding pocket made up of hydrophobic residues and a single glutamate side chain is evident in Cass2, occupied in the crystal form by polyethylene glycol. Fluorescence assays demonstrate that Cass2 is capable of binding cationic drug compounds with submicromolar affinity. The Cass2 module possesses a protein interaction surface proximal to its drug-binding cavity with features homologous to those seen in multi-domain transcriptional regulators.Genetic analysis identifies Cass2 to be representative of a larger family of independent effector-binding proteins associated with lateral gene transfer within Vibrio and closely-related species. We propose that the Cass2 family not only has capacity to form functional transcription regulator complexes, but represents possible evolutionary precursors to multi-domain regulators associated with cationic drug compounds.

  14. A compact, multifunctional fusion module directs cholesterol-dependent homomultimerization and syncytiogenic efficiency of reovirus p10 FAST proteins.

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    Tim Key

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The homologous p10 fusion-associated small transmembrane (FAST proteins of the avian (ARV and Nelson Bay (NBV reoviruses are the smallest known viral membrane fusion proteins, and are virulence determinants of the fusogenic reoviruses. The small size of FAST proteins is incompatible with the paradigmatic membrane fusion pathway proposed for enveloped viral fusion proteins. Understanding how these diminutive viral fusogens mediate the complex process of membrane fusion is therefore of considerable interest, from both the pathogenesis and mechanism-of-action perspectives. Using chimeric ARV/NBV p10 constructs, the 36-40-residue ectodomain was identified as the major determinant of the differing fusion efficiencies of these homologous p10 proteins. Extensive mutagenic analysis determined the ectodomain comprises two distinct, essential functional motifs. Syncytiogenesis assays, thiol-specific surface biotinylation, and liposome lipid mixing assays identified an ∼25-residue, N-terminal motif that dictates formation of a cystine loop fusion peptide in both ARV and NBV p10. Surface immunofluorescence staining, FRET analysis and cholesterol depletion/repletion studies determined the cystine loop motif is connected through a two-residue linker to a 13-residue membrane-proximal ectodomain region (MPER. The MPER constitutes a second, independent motif governing reversible, cholesterol-dependent assembly of p10 multimers in the plasma membrane. Results further indicate that: (1 ARV and NBV homomultimers segregate to distinct, cholesterol-dependent microdomains in the plasma membrane; (