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Sample records for weltweite wirtschaftskrise renaissance

  1. Recycled Renaissance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    One of the author's goals this year was to turn all of the different pieces of research she has collected throughout the years into projects. This is when she thinks of bringing Renaissance quilling to her class. Quilling, or paper scrolling, uses strips of paper that are rolled up to create decorative designs. During the Renaissance, it was used…

  2. Medical Renaissance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo-Pereyra, Luis H

    2015-06-01

    The Medical Renaissance started as the regular Renaissance did in the early 1400s and ended in the late 1600s. During this time great medical personalities and scholar humanists made unique advances to medicine and surgery. Linacre, Erasmus, Leonicello and Sylvius will be considered first, because they fit the early classic Renaissance period. Andreas Vesalius and Ambroise Paré followed thereafter, making outstanding anatomical contributions with the publication of the "Human Factory" (1543) by Vesalius, and describing unique surgical developments with the publication of the "The Apologie and Treatise of Ambroise Paré." At the end of the Renaissance and beginning of the New Science, William Harvey, noted British medical doctor and cardiovascular researcher, discovered the general circulation. He published his findings in "The Motu Cordis" in 1628 (Figure 1). The Medical Renaissance, in summary, included a great number of accomplished physicians and surgeons who made especial contributions to human anatomy; Vesalius assembled detailed anatomical information; Paré advanced surgical techniques; and Harvey, a medical genius, detailed the circulatory anatomy and physiology.

  3. Psychology's Renaissance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Leif D; Simmons, Joseph; Simonsohn, Uri

    2018-01-04

    In 2010-2012, a few largely coincidental events led experimental psychologists to realize that their approach to collecting, analyzing, and reporting data made it too easy to publish false-positive findings. This sparked a period of methodological reflection that we review here and call Psychology's Renaissance. We begin by describing how psychologists' concerns with publication bias shifted from worrying about file-drawered studies to worrying about p-hacked analyses. We then review the methodological changes that psychologists have proposed and, in some cases, embraced. In describing how the renaissance has unfolded, we attempt to describe different points of view fairly but not neutrally, so as to identify the most promising paths forward. In so doing, we champion disclosure and preregistration, express skepticism about most statistical solutions to publication bias, take positions on the analysis and interpretation of replication failures, and contend that meta-analytical thinking increases the prevalence of false positives. Our general thesis is that the scientific practices of experimental psychologists have improved dramatically.

  4. Teologie en Renaissance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. van Wyk

    1990-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article some theological perspectives of the Renaissance period are highlighted and discussed. The conclusion arrived at is that we can hardly speak of a "theology of the Renaissance", and that much of the observations about and criticism of the Renaissance period consist of generalisations. Although the author has reservations concerning Renaissance thought in general, appreciation for certain facets is stated.

  5. 77 FR 23756 - Grant of Individual Exemption Involving Renaissance Technologies, LLC (Renaissance, or the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-20

    ...- 11655] Grant of Individual Exemption Involving Renaissance Technologies, LLC (Renaissance, or the... transactions involve Renaissance and certain of Renaissance's privately offered collective investment vehicles managed by Renaissance, comprised almost exclusively of proprietary funds. The individual exemption...

  6. The Renaissance Teacher

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Per Skafte

    2002-01-01

    The teacher of the new renaissance engineer must be able to draw on all of his or her possible resources, while inspiring students to do likewise. A somewhat pedestrian tabular method is proposed for analysing what skills and propensities are available or desirable and for managing their balanced...... embedding into the teaching activities. Also, to avoid the pitfall of intimidating students with the apparently massive renaissance-style demands, a method of camouflaging the learning tasks is outlined and briefly illustrated....

  7. The Metadiscourse of Renaissance Humanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    The case studies in this volume explore the Renaissance humanists' metadiscourse on translation, letter writing, Biblical criticism, poetry, and Latin grammar and composition. Especially, the papers examine the role played by metadiscourse in the dissemination of Renaissance humanism, and how...

  8. The Ionian Renaissance and Alexandria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Poul

    2008-01-01

    kulturelle epoke - nu ofte kaldet Den Ioniske Renaissance - ikke kun omfattede arkitekturen, men også filosofi, digtning og kunst, samt at den ioniske Renaissance var en af hovedkilderne for det hellenistiske Alexandrias kunst og kultur. Udforskningen af Den Ioniske Renaissance er således af central...

  9. Renaissance Learning Equating Study. Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewell, Julie; Sainsbury, Marian; Pyle, Katie; Keogh, Nikki; Styles, Ben

    2007-01-01

    An equating study was carried out in autumn 2006 by the National Foundation for Educational Research (NFER) on behalf of Renaissance Learning, to provide validation evidence for the use of the Renaissance Star Reading and Star Mathematics tests in English schools. The study investigated the correlation between the Star tests and established tests.…

  10. 'Psychosurgery' in renaissance art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, C G

    1999-10-01

    Hieronymus Bosch and other early Renaissance artists depicted 'stone operations' in which stones were supposedly surgically removed from the head as a treatment for mental illness. These works have usually been interpreted either as portraying a contemporary practice of medical charlatans or as an allegory of human folly, rather than a real event. As trepanation for head injury and mental disease was actually carried out in Europe at this time, another interpretation of these works is that they are derived from a common medical practice of the day.

  11. Renaissance and reformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. J. van der Walt

    1983-06-01

    Full Text Available I do hope that you are going to have the deepest appreciation for my contribution, because it really represents an attempt at the im­possible. To force a whale into a sardine tin is no mean feat, and here one is expected to force four whales(Renaissance, Humanism, the Stoa and Calvin into the same tin. The titanic effort assumes even more heroic proportions when one considers that I have exactly ten minutes at my disposal in which to commit this academic crime.

  12. Renaissance of the Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, M.

    2009-09-01

    The renaissance of the web has driven development of many new technologies that have forever changed the way we write software. The resulting tools have been applied to both solve problems and creat new ones in a wide range of domains ranging from monitor and control user interfaces to information distribution. This discussion covers which of and how these technologies are being used in the astronomical computing community. Topics include JavaScript, Cascading Style Sheets, HTML, XML, JSON, RSS, iCalendar, Java, PHP, Python, Ruby on Rails, database technologies, and web frameworks/design patterns.

  13. Estland und die Wirtschaftskrise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matti Raudjärv

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives a brief overview of the important changes that have taken place in 2007-2008 and by the beginning of 2009 and the resulting problems that have arisen in the Estonian economy (non-conformity between the increase in salaries and increase in labour efficiency, real estate boom and decrease in real estate prices, incorrect economic forecasts, budgeting difficulties, increase in taxes, etc.. The main factors which contributed to the economic crisis in Estonia are dwelt upon. A brief overview of the measures taken by several EU Member States for the alleviation of and getting out of the economic crisis are presented. Forecasts for 2009-2010 are discussed, also the opportunities and choices available to Estonia in the conditions of the crisis, and a few examples are given of the international political relations which have an additional effect on economic crises.

  14. Political Christianity in Renaissance Drama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Joulan, Nayef Ali

    2017-01-01

    Examining the following selected Renaissance dramas: Marlowe's "The Jew of Malta" (1585), Shakespeare's "The Merchant of Venice" (1596), Massinger's "The Renegado" (1624), Daborne's "A Christian Turn'd Turk" (1612), and Goffe's "The Raging Turk" (1656), this research investigates Renaissance…

  15. Nuclear Energy's Renaissance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadak, Andrew C.

    2006-10-01

    Nuclear energy is about to enter its renaissance. After almost 30 years of new plant construction dormancy, utilities are seriously preparing for ordering new plants in the next two years. This resurgence in interest is based on improved plant performance, new Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing processes, significant incentives introduced by Congress in the Energy Policy Act of 2005 to encourage new orders, and new technologies that are competitive, simpler to operate and safer. These new evolutionary light water reactors will pave the way to more advanced high temperature gas reactors such as the pebble bed or prismatic reactors that will provide improved efficiency and safety leading to more process heat applications in oil extraction or hydrogen production. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) also authorized by the Energy Policy act will provide the fundamental technical basis for the future of these technologies. Progress continues on the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste disposal site enabling this expansion. When coupled with the long term strategy of waste minimization through reprocessing and actinide destruction as proposed in the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership, the future of nuclear energy as part of this nation's energy mix appears to be assured.

  16. The macrolide antibiotic renaissance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinos, George P

    2017-09-01

    Macrolides represent a large family of protein synthesis inhibitors of great clinical interest due to their applicability to human medicine. Macrolides are composed of a macrocyclic lactone of different ring sizes, to which one or more deoxy-sugar or amino sugar residues are attached. Macrolides act as antibiotics by binding to bacterial 50S ribosomal subunit and interfering with protein synthesis. The high affinity of macrolides for bacterial ribosomes, together with the highly conserved structure of ribosomes across virtually all of the bacterial species, is consistent with their broad-spectrum activity. Since the discovery of the progenitor macrolide, erythromycin, in 1950, many derivatives have been synthesised, leading to compounds with better bioavailability and acid stability and improved pharmacokinetics. These efforts led to the second generation of macrolides, including well-known members such as azithromycin and clarithromycin. Subsequently, in order to address increasing antibiotic resistance, a third generation of macrolides displaying improved activity against many macrolide resistant strains was developed. However, these improvements were accompanied with serious side effects, leading to disappointment and causing many researchers to stop working on macrolide derivatives, assuming that this procedure had reached the end. In contrast, a recent published breakthrough introduced a new chemical platform for synthesis and discovery of a wide range of diverse macrolide antibiotics. This chemical synthesis revolution, in combination with reduction in the side effects, namely, 'Ketek effects', has led to a macrolide renaissance, increasing the hope for novel and safe therapeutic agents to combat serious human infectious diseases. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  17. Renaissance of the Plastic Age

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    GENERAL I ARTICLE. Renaissance of the Plastic Age. Discoverers of Conducting Polymers Honoured with the. Millenium Nobel Prize in Chemistry. T P Radhakrishnan is in the School of Chemistry,. University of Hyderabad,. Hyderabad 500 046. T P Radhakrishnan. Discovery and development of conducting polymers has.

  18. Renaissance Neurosurgery: Italy's Iconic Contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Anil; Khan, Imad Saeed; Apuzzo, Michael L

    2016-03-01

    Various changes in the sociopolitical milieu of Italy led to the increasing tolerance of the study of cadavers in the late Middle Ages. The efforts of Mondino de Liuzzi (1276-1326) and Guido da Vigevano (1280-1349) led to an explosion of cadaver-centric studies in centers such as Bologna, Florence, and Padua during the Renaissance period. Legendary scientists from this era, including Leonardo Da Vinci, Andreas Vesalius, Bartolomeo Eustachio, and Costanzo Varolio, furthered the study of neuroanatomy. The various texts produced during this period not only helped increase the understanding of neuroanatomy and neurophysiology but also led to the formalization of medical education. With increased understanding came new techniques to address various neurosurgical problems from skull fractures to severed peripheral nerves. The present study aims to review the major developments in Italy during the vibrant Renaissance period that led to major progress in the field of neurosurgery. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. 78 FR 16715 - Renaissance Capital Greenwich Funds, et al.; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-18

    ... COMMISSION Renaissance Capital Greenwich Funds, et al.; Notice of Application March 11, 2013. AGENCY... companies as the series to acquire Shares. Applicants: Renaissance Capital Greenwich Funds (``Trust''), Renaissance Capital LLC (``Adviser''), and Renaissance Capital Investments, Inc. (``Renaissance Capital...

  20. Brain 'imaging' in the Renaissance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paluzzi, Alessandro; Belli, Antonio; Bain, Peter; Viva, Laura

    2007-12-01

    During the Renaissance, a period of 'rebirth' for humanities and science, new knowledge and speculation began to emerge about the function of the human body, replacing ancient religious and philosophical dogma. The brain must have been a fascinating mystery to a Renaissance artist, but some speculation existed at that time on the function of its parts. Here we show how revived interest in anatomy and life sciences may have influenced the figurative work of Italian and Flemish masters, such as Rafael, Michelangelo and David. We present a historical perspective on the artists and the period in which they lived, their fascination for human anatomy and its symbolic use in their art. Prior to the 16th century, knowledge of the brain was limited and influenced in a dogmatic way by the teachings of Galen(1) who, as we now know, conducted his anatomical studies not on humans but on animals.(2) Nemesus, Bishop of Emesa, in around the year 400 was one of the first to attribute mental faculties to the brain, specifically to the ventricles. He identified two anterior (lateral) ventricles, to which he assigned perception, a middle ventricle responsible for cognition and a posterior ventricle for memory.(2,3) After a long period of stasis in the Middle Ages, Renaissance scholars realized the importance of making direct observations on dissected cadavers. Between 1504 and 1507, Leonardo da Vinci conducted experiments to reveal the anatomy of the ventricular system in the brain. He injected hot wax through a tube thrust into the ventricular cavities of an ox and then scraped the overlying brain off, thus obtaining, in a simple but ingenious way, an accurate cast of the ventricles.(2,4) Leonardo shared the belief promoted by scholarly Christians that the ventricles were the abode of rational soul. We have several examples of hidden symbolism in Renaissance paintings, but the influence of phrenology and this rudimentary knowledge of neuroanatomy on artists of that period is under

  1. The African Renaissance: Myth, Mask or Masquerade ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The African Renaissance, now a familiar theme in South Africa, has a longer history than general discourse seems to suggest. In the past, it has been approached from different perspectives: the political, ideological, and cultural. The African Renaissance was originally the ideology of Pan-Africanism. It was an ideological ...

  2. The renaissance of developmental biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Johnston, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    Since its heyday in the 1980s and 90s, the field of developmental biology has gone into decline; in part because it has been eclipsed by the rise of genomics and stem cell biology, and in part because it has seemed less pertinent in an era with so much focus on translational impact. In this essay, I argue that recent progress in genome-wide analyses and stem cell research, coupled with technological advances in imaging and genome editing, have created the conditions for the renaissance of a new wave of developmental biology with greater translational relevance.

  3. Nuclear power renaissance or demise?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dossani, Umair

    2010-09-15

    Nuclear power is going through a renaissance or demise is widely debated around the world keeping in mind the facts that there are risks related to nuclear technology and at the same time that is it environmentally friendly. My part of the argument is that there is no better alternative than Nuclear power. Firstly Nuclear Power in comparison to all other alternative fuels is environmentally sustainable. Second Nuclear power at present is at the dawn of a new era with new designs and technologies. Third part of the debate is renovation in the nuclear fuel production, reprocessing and disposal.

  4. The renaissance of coal; Die Renaissance der Kohle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schernikau, Lars [IchorCoal N.V., Berlin (Germany); HMS Bergbau AG, Berlin (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    There is hardly another energy resource where public opinion and reality lie as far apart as they do for coal. Many think of coal as an inefficient relic from the era of industrialisation. However, such views underestimate the significance of this energy resource both nationally and globally. In terms of global primary energy consumption coal ranks second behind crude oil, which plays a central role in the energy sector. Since global electricity use is due to rise further, coal, being the only energy resource that can meet a growing electricity demand over decades, stands at the beginning of a renaissance, and does so also in the minds of the political leadership. Coal is indispensable as a bridging technology until the electricity demand of the world population can be met primarily through renewable resources.

  5. Introduction. Defining the Renaissance in Music

    OpenAIRE

    Vendrix, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    [Début de l'article] The concept of the Renaissance as a period in the history of music does not appear, in a strict sense, until relatively late in writings on music by comparison with those on general history or art history. In 1868 A.W. Ambros gave the third volume of his encyclopaedic history of music the title "Geschichte der Musik im Zeitalter der Renaissance bis zu Palestrina" (Leipzig, 1862-1878). Even if the awareness of a renaissance had emerged as early as the end of the fifteenth ...

  6. Occlusion Issues in Early Renaissance Art

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gillam, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    .... Much has been written about perspective in art but little about occlusion. Here I examine some of the strategies for depicting occlusion used by early Renaissance painters in relation to ecological considerations and perceptual research...

  7. Shakespearience: A Schoolwide Celebration of the Renaissance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Angela F.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Describes across disciplines in the culture, literature, science, art, and music of the Renaissance. The program featured student exhibits, performances, projects, and demonstrations and a visit by a professional actor posing as William Shakespeare. (DB)

  8. Just Intonation in Renaissance Theory and Practice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Duffin, Ross W

    2006-01-01

    .... However, Renaissance music theorists are so unanimous in advocating the simple acoustical ratios of Just intonation that it seems clear that some reconciliation must have occurred between the theory and practice...

  9. A study in Renaissance psychotropic plant ointments.

    OpenAIRE

    Piomelli, D; Pollio, A

    1994-01-01

    Various historical sources from the Renaissance--including transcripts of trials for witchcraft, writings on demonology and textbooks of pharmaceutical botany--describe vegetal ointments prepared by women accused of witchcraft and endowed with marked psychoactive properties. Here, we examine the botanical composition and the possible pharmacological actions of these ointments. The results of our study suggest that recipes for narcotic and mind-altering salves were known to Renaissance folk he...

  10. The Renaissance in Library Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah E. Thomas

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available In the enthusiastic embrace of the digital library, with its anytime, anywhere characteristics, some people have assumed that physical libraries will become obsolete. Yet an examination of the behavior of students and faculty and of recent renovation and construction of academic and research libraries shows that brick and mortar buildings are enjoying a renaissance. Libraries have traditionally supported the housing of collections, reader services, and the staff who manage collections and provide services. These three components continue in the 21st century, but librarians, architects, and users are collaborating to produce elegant and functional designs that reflect new spatial allocations and new purposes. Modern libraries incorporate flexibility and comfort to create an environment that is welcoming and that supports a range of research and learning activities. This paper draws on examples from recent construction and reconfiguration of academic libraries in the United States to illustrate the changing scope of the physical library and the important role it plays in serving as a community hub within a university. Among the examples selected are several relating to the challenges of collection management, including the use of compact shelving and high-density storage facilities. The paper also traces the evolution of spaces from the catalog card era to the present state in which wireless access is a standard feature. Lastly, the author touches on new and expanded roles for librarians and the ways in which design advances the effectiveness of information professionals in fulfilling these new roles.

  11. The renaissance of clinical leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, M J

    2001-03-01

    The purpose of this work was to explore clinical nursing leadership. The research was based on a critical examination of the leadership themes derived from the nursing literature of the United Kingdom, the United States of America and Australia, between 1992 and 1997. The work was also influenced by the findings from semistructured interviews undertaken with five clinical leaders in nursing from the United Kingdom, and study tours to both the United States of America and Australia. The findings support a proposed leadership model as a basis for further exploration and as a framework for contemplating clinical leadership and leadership preparation. A model is presented that identifies factors which influence leadership styles, such as external environment, internal environment, experience and understanding. Four leadership styles are outlined: transactional, transformational, connective and renaissance. These leadership styles are linked to nursing care approaches. A second model provides a basis for considering power and its impact in the workplace. Based on these findings, the contents of a leadership preparation course are outlined.

  12. Renaissance architecture for Ground Data Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Dorothy C.; Zeigenfuss, Lawrence B.

    1994-01-01

    The Mission Operations and Data Systems Directorate (MO&DSD) has embarked on a new approach for developing and operating Ground Data Systems (GDS) for flight mission support. This approach is driven by the goals of minimizing cost and maximizing customer satisfaction. Achievement of these goals is realized through the use of a standard set of capabilities which can be modified to meet specific user needs. This approach, which is called the Renaissance architecture, stresses the engineering of integrated systems, based upon workstation/local area network (LAN)/fileserver technology and reusable hardware and software components called 'building blocks.' These building blocks are integrated with mission specific capabilities to build the GDS for each individual mission. The building block approach is key to the reduction of development costs and schedules. Also, the Renaissance approach allows the integration of GDS functions that were previously provided via separate multi-mission facilities. With the Renaissance architecture, the GDS can be developed by the MO&DSD or all, or part, of the GDS can be operated by the user at their facility. Flexibility in operation configuration allows both selection of a cost-effective operations approach and the capability for customizing operations to user needs. Thus the focus of the MO&DSD is shifted from operating systems that we have built to building systems and, optionally, operations as separate services. Renaissance is actually a continuous process. Both the building blocks and the system architecture will evolve as user needs and technology change. Providing GDS on a per user basis enables this continuous refinement of the development process and product and allows the MO&DSD to remain a customer-focused organization. This paper will present the activities and results of the MO&DSD initial efforts toward the establishment of the Renaissance approach for the development of GDS, with a particular focus on both the technical

  13. Perceptions of beauty in Renaissance art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haughton, Neil

    2004-12-01

    The Renaissance was a cultural revolution that spread from Florence, in 1400, throughout Italy and into the rest of Europe. Its impetus was the philosophy of Humanism, which strove to resurrect and emulate the literature and art of the ancient Greeks and Romans. Artists had previously been limited to formulaic religious iconography. They now began to reproduce descriptions of classical paintings and copy the antique statues that were being newly rediscovered. The Renaissance artist's perception of beauty was therefore determined by his philosophical environment, his visual experience (the 'period eye'), the demands of his patrons and by attempts to enhance his professional status in society to equal that of poets and architects. The image of Venus portrayed by Botticelli as the idealization of beauty in Renaissance Florence is significantly different from the Venus portrayed by the German artist, Lucas Cranach. The northern European Venus is much less voluptuous than her Italian counterpart but is still inspired by humanist principals and retains considerable sexuality. Raphael's paintings epitomise the idealization of female beauty of this period but, by his own admission they were rarely based on real models. Often the same facial type was repeated in many different paintings. Indeed Renaissance portrait artists tended to avoid realistic interpretation, emphasizing instead the positive attributes of their subjects, both physical and political. Thus, Bronzino's Portrait of a Young Man not only depicts his subject's idealized appearance but also his scholarship, background and potential. The depiction of beauty in Renaissance art is shown to be more complex than a mere photograph-like representation of sexuality or of a person's physical appearance. Instead, Renaissance art created physically perfect images resulting from scholarly expectation, the artist's ambitions and his developing skills.

  14. Economic Globalization and a Nuclear Renaissance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Thomas W.; Johnson, Wayne L.; Parker, Brian M.

    2001-10-22

    The phenomenon of globalization has become increasingly well recognized, documented, and analyzed in the last several years. Globalization, the integration of markets and intra-firm competition on a worldwide basis, involves complex behavioral and mindset changes within a firm that facilitate global competition. The changes revolve around efficient information flow and rapid deployment of technology. The objective of this report is to examine the probable characteristics of a global nuclear renaissance and its broad implications for industry structure and export control relative to nuclear technology. The question of how a modern renaissance would affect the trend toward globalization of the nuclear industry is addressed.

  15. Philadelphia's Renaissance Schools Initiative after Four Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratos, Kati; Wolford, Tonya; Reitano, Adrienne

    2015-01-01

    In 2010-2011, the School District of Philadelphia (the District) launched its Renaissance Schools Initiative, a program designed to dramatically improve student achievement in the District's lowest performing schools. Some schools became Promise Academies, based on the federal turnaround model, and remained District-operated neighborhood schools.…

  16. Liturgie, transformasie en die Afrika Renaissance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. de Klerk

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available The African Renaissance concerns the moral, cultural and spiritual transformation of the African human being. Liturgy has a decisive impact on the vision, aspirations and hopes of the believer. Therefore, liturgy can have a significant influence on the African Renaissance if it adheres to fixed liturgical principles, the response of the believers is culturally bound and liturgy attains an indigenous character. As liturgy has the ability to restore human dignity and bring about reconciliation, believers can consequently gain confidence to co-operate in the healing process of the continent. Aspects of African culture displaying a close resemblance to the Bible should be developed, for example celebrating the presence of God, utilising the power of Scripture reading in liturgy, delivering sermons full of imagery, establishing an ubuntu of faith, using symbols inherent both in the Gospel and African culture, creating space for movement, communion and festivity, as well as developing songs, music and dances in a creative way.

  17. Renaissance Music in Croatia, and beyond

    OpenAIRE

    Vasco Zara

    2010-01-01

    Depuis la fin de l’année 2009, la base de données Renaissance Music in Croatia [http://ricercar.cesr.univ-tours.fr/3-programmes/EMN/Croatie/] est désormais consultable en ligne, en accès libre. Il s’agit de l’issue finale d’un projet de recherche de longue haleine, mené depuis 2006 entre le Centre d’études supérieures de la Renaissance de Tours et l’Académie des sciences et des arts de Zagreb. Ce projet a été rendu possible grâce au soutien du Partenariat Hubert Curien, COGITO, du ministère d...

  18. Renaissance Music in Croatia, and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasco Zara

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Depuis la fin de l’année 2009, la base de données Renaissance Music in Croatia [http://ricercar.cesr.univ-tours.fr/3-programmes/EMN/Croatie/] est désormais consultable en ligne, en accès libre. Il s’agit de l’issue finale d’un projet de recherche de longue haleine, mené depuis 2006 entre le Centre d’études supérieures de la Renaissance de Tours et l’Académie des sciences et des arts de Zagreb. Ce projet a été rendu possible grâce au soutien du Partenariat Hubert Curien, COGITO, du ministère ...

  19. Literary Canon of Croatian Renaissance Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krešimir Šimić

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Croatian Renaissance literary culture did not form its literary in the same way as did the Italians. Therefore, the "canonical order" of sixteenth-century Croatian literary culture is usually associated with the nineteenth-century and twentieth-century synthetic literary history. However, if we have in mind the thesis of Harold Bloom that "canonical writers" are those in whose poetics exhibit "anticanonical elements," or in other words, that all great writers reading their predecessors face the fear of the impact and enable activities of their own imagination, then we can say – albeit very cautiously – that Croatian Renaissance literary culture has at least a few "canonical authors": Mavro Vetranović, Petar Zoranić, Petar Hektorović and Marin Držić

  20. Graves of Criminals in Renaissance Poland

    OpenAIRE

    Pokutta, Dalia; Obtulowicz, Lukasz

    2014-01-01

    In 2013, Mentor Consulting undertook the excavation of late medieval/early modern age cemetery located in central part of Gliwice city, Upper Silesia. The key discovery was a multi-period sequence of human activity on site dated from the Roman Iron Age until 17th century A.D. In the last chronological phases, graves of Renaissance convicts and criminals were recorded with unusual frequency within the cemetery. Particularly interesting were mortuary rituals such as decapitations and dismemberm...

  1. Consolations for Melancholy in Renaissance Humanism

    OpenAIRE

    Gowland, A. M. T.

    2012-01-01

    This essay explores the role of melancholy within the consolatory literature of Renaissance humanism. It begins (sections I-II) with a summary of the themes and methods of humanist consolationes and their classical models, with particular attention to their moral psychology, and addresses their relationship with scripture and Christian spiritual literature. It then turns to the position of melancholy within humanist consolations (sections III-VI). It is shown that whilst in many cases moralis...

  2. 76 FR 43349 - General Motors Corporation, Renaissance Center, including On-Site Leased Workers From Accretive...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-20

    ... Employment and Training Administration General Motors Corporation, Renaissance Center, including On-Site... 23, 2010, applicable to workers of General Motors Corporation, Renaissance Center, including on-site... Detroit, Michigan location of General Motors Corporation, Renaissance Center. The Department has...

  3. The Renaissance or the cuckoo clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pines, Jonathon; Hagan, Iain

    2011-12-27

    '…in Italy, for thirty years under the Borgias, they had warfare, terror, murder and bloodshed, but they produced Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci and the Renaissance. In Switzerland, they had brotherly love, they had five hundred years of democracy and peace-and what did that produce? The cuckoo clock'. Orson Welles as Harry Lime: The Third Man. Orson Welles might have been a little unfair on the Swiss, after all cuckoo clocks were developed in the Schwartzwald, but, more importantly, Swiss democracy gives remarkably stable government with considerable decision-making at the local level. The alternative is the battling city-states of Renaissance Italy: culturally rich but chaotic at a higher level of organization. As our understanding of the cell cycle improves, it appears that the cell is organized more along the lines of Switzerland than Renaissance Italy, and one major challenge is to determine how local decisions are made and coordinated to produce the robust cell cycle mechanisms that we observe in the cell as a whole.

  4. Brain ‘imaging’ in the Renaissance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paluzzi, Alessandro; Belli, Antonio; Bain, Peter; Viva, Laura

    2007-01-01

    During the Renaissance, a period of ‘rebirth’ for humanities and science, new knowledge and speculation began to emerge about the function of the human body, replacing ancient religious and philosophical dogma. The brain must have been a fascinating mystery to a Renaissance artist, but some speculation existed at that time on the function of its parts. Here we show how revived interest in anatomy and life sciences may have influenced the figurative work of Italian and Flemish masters, such as Rafael, Michelangelo and David. We present a historical perspective on the artists and the period in which they lived, their fascination for human anatomy and its symbolic use in their art. Prior to the 16th century, knowledge of the brain was limited and influenced in a dogmatic way by the teachings of Galen1 who, as we now know, conducted his anatomical studies not on humans but on animals.2 Nemesus, Bishop of Emesa, in around the year 400 was one of the first to attribute mental faculties to the brain, specifically to the ventricles. He identified two anterior (lateral) ventricles, to which he assigned perception, a middle ventricle responsible for cognition and a posterior ventricle for memory.2,3 After a long period of stasis in the Middle Ages, Renaissance scholars realized the importance of making direct observations on dissected cadavers. Between 1504 and 1507, Leonardo da Vinci conducted experiments to reveal the anatomy of the ventricular system in the brain. He injected hot wax through a tube thrust into the ventricular cavities of an ox and then scraped the overlying brain off, thus obtaining, in a simple but ingenious way, an accurate cast of the ventricles.2,4 Leonardo shared the belief promoted by scholarly Christians that the ventricles were the abode of rational soul. We have several examples of hidden symbolism in Renaissance paintings, but the influence of phrenology and this rudimentary knowledge of neuroanatomy on artists of that period is under

  5. The dawn of the third renaissance in surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackam, David J

    2015-08-01

    In this presidential address, I will share my belief that our proud and noble field stands at the dawn of a great renaissance. I further believe that this is the third such renaissance that has occurred in surgery. As described herein, the first renaissance in surgery occurred during the 1600s, which involved a transformation in operative care unlike anything that had been seen since Roman times. This first renaissance was triggered by tumultuous world events but was spurred on by the invention of the printing press. The second renaissance occurred during the 1980s and was triggered by the invention of the computer, which is of equal significance to the printing press 240 years earlier. I believe that this third renaissance shares with the earlier renaissances its transformative nature and its reaction to turmoil, both in the medical and nonmedical worlds. This is a renaissance driven by science, by creativity, and by innovation—resources that are never in short supply within our great profession. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Human Rights and the African Renaissance | Acheampong | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article examines the idea of African renaissance in relation to the teaching of human rights in African schools. It explores the connection between the African Renaissance and human rights, and whether there is a specific African concept of human rights. In the light of these discussions, the article sketches a perspective ...

  7. Two Renaissance Dominican processionals written for Bavarian nuns

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The 114 Medieval and Renaissance manuscripts in the Grey Collection of the National Library, Cape Town, form one of the most valuable parts of the collection and is the most beautiful. There are very few other Western manuscripts of these periods in Africa. In South Africa, a country without a Medieval or Renaissance ...

  8. The Relevance of (South African) Renaissance Studies | Wright ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper is part of a longer piece devoted to the elucidation of two related propositions. The first is that in South Africa the humanities in general, and Renaissance Studies in particular, are stymied by a lack of strategic thinking from those in the academy. The second is that the humanities, and Renaissance Studies, and ...

  9. Lessons from the Renaissance: The Power of Multiple Knowledge Bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmire, Kathleen; Beck, Joanna

    2010-01-01

    This article applies the Renaissance paradigm of "Homo universalis" to a 30-year retrospective of services provided in education settings to children and youth with language disorders. It also proposes directions to take for the future. The Renaissance ideal of "Homo universalis" refers to an individual who acquires learning in a wide variety of…

  10. Philadelphia's Renaissance Schools: Start up and Early Implementation. Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research for Action, 2011

    2011-01-01

    In April 2009, Superintendent Arlene Ackerman announced her reform plan for the School District of Philadelphia (the District)--"Imagine 2014". Among other major initiatives, "Imagine 2014" laid the groundwork for Philadelphia's Renaissance Schools Initiative. The Renaissance Initiative, set to enter its second year in 2011-12, is an effort to…

  11. The Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam and Ethiopia's Succession ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... change in the pertinence of the norms of international law nor to any altruistic revision of positions in the lower reaches of the river, but rather to its belated awakening in pursuing the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD) as a national project of multifarious impact. Key terms: The Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam, ...

  12. The thesaurus review, renaissance, and revision

    CERN Document Server

    Roe, Sandra K

    2013-01-01

    Use this single source to uncover the origin and development of the thesaurus! The Thesaurus: Review, Renaissance, and Revision examines the historical development of the thesaurus and the standards employed for thesaurus construction. This book provides both the history of thesauri and tutorials on usage to increase your understanding of thesaurus creation, use, and evaluation. This reference tool offers essential information on thesauri in the digital environment, including Web sites, databases, and software. For 50 years, the thesaurus has been a core reference book; The Thesaurus: Review,

  13. The Art of the Renaissance Capitalist State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebeka Vidrih

    2007-12-01

    This article also highlights the fact that the concept of art developed in Florence – a city-state that played an important role in the early-capitalist world of the Renaissance, but never assumed a leading role like Venice and Genoa. »Art« was thus created through Florence’s efforts to demonstrate its equality and importance and, although it failed to achieve this in the field of the (capitalist economy, it at least succeeded in the field of the (absolutist state that was subordinate to this economy.

  14. Occlusion issues in early Renaissance art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillam, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Early Renaissance painters innovatively attempted to depict realistic three-dimensional scenes. A major problem was to produce the impression of overlap for surfaces that occlude one another in the scene but are adjoined in the picture plane. Much has been written about perspective in art but little about occlusion. Here I examine some of the strategies for depicting occlusion used by early Renaissance painters in relation to ecological considerations and perceptual research. Perceived surface overlap is often achieved by implementing the principle that an occluding surface occludes anything behind it, so that occlusion perception is enhanced by a lack of relationship of occluding contour to occluded contours. Some well-known figure-ground principles are also commonly used to stratify adjoined figures. Global factors that assist this stratification include the placement of figures on a ground plane, a high viewpoint, and figure grouping. Artists of this period seem to have differed on whether to occlude faces and heads, often carefully avoiding doing so. Halos were either eliminated selectively or placed oddly to avoid such occlusions. Finally, I argue that the marked intransitivity in occlusion by architecture in the paintings of Duccio can be related to the issue of perceptual versus cognitive influences on the visual impact of paintings. PMID:23145262

  15. Occlusion issues in early Renaissance art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillam, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Early Renaissance painters innovatively attempted to depict realistic three-dimensional scenes. A major problem was to produce the impression of overlap for surfaces that occlude one another in the scene but are adjoined in the picture plane. Much has been written about perspective in art but little about occlusion. Here I examine some of the strategies for depicting occlusion used by early Renaissance painters in relation to ecological considerations and perceptual research. Perceived surface overlap is often achieved by implementing the principle that an occluding surface occludes anything behind it, so that occlusion perception is enhanced by a lack of relationship of occluding contour to occluded contours. Some well-known figure-ground principles are also commonly used to stratify adjoined figures. Global factors that assist this stratification include the placement of figures on a ground plane, a high viewpoint, and figure grouping. Artists of this period seem to have differed on whether to occlude faces and heads, often carefully avoiding doing so. Halos were either eliminated selectively or placed oddly to avoid such occlusions. Finally, I argue that the marked intransitivity in occlusion by architecture in the paintings of Duccio can be related to the issue of perceptual versus cognitive influences on the visual impact of paintings.

  16. The Postsynthetic Renaissance in Porous Solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Seth M

    2017-03-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have rapidly grown into a major area of chemical research over the last two decades. MOFs represent the development of covalent chemistry "beyond the molecule" and into extended structures. MOFs also present an unprecedented scaffold for performing heterogeneous organic transformations in the solid state, allowing for deliberate and precise preparation of new materials. The development of these transformations has given rise to the "postsynthetic renaissance", a suite of methods by which these materials can be transformed in a single-crystal-to-single-crystal manner. Postsynthetic modification, postsynthetic deprotection, postsynthetic exchange, postsynthetic insertion, and postsynthetic polymerization have exploited the unique features of both the organic and inorganic components of MOFs to create crystalline, porous solids of unique complexity and functionality.

  17. The Centrosome, a Multitalented Renaissance Organelle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertii, Anastassiia; Hehnly, Heidi; Doxsey, Stephen

    2016-12-01

    The centrosome acts as a microtubule-organizing center (MTOC) from the G 1 to G 2 phases of the cell cycle; it can mature into a spindle pole during mitosis and/or transition into a cilium by elongating microtubules (MTs) from the basal body on cell differentiation or cell cycle arrest. New studies hint that the centrosome functions in more than MT organization. For instance, it has recently been shown that a specific substructure of the centrosome-the mother centriole appendages-are required for the recycling of endosomes back to the plasma membrane. This alone could have important implications for a renaissance in our understanding of the development of primary cilia, endosome recycling, and the immune response. Here, we review newly identified roles for the centrosome in directing membrane traffic, the immunological synapse, and the stress response. Copyright © 2016 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  18. The Network Metaphor & the New Renaissance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foresta, Don

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This article is about art and science and a certain parallelism between them in the evolution of Western culture, particularly over the last 150 years. I will try to describe what changes have taken place in our society’s operational schema and our shared paradigm. My construct will be one of art, though a strong influence from science will be evident. I propose that we have been living through a second renaissance provoked by a profound change in the definition and representation of reality by both art and science. Throughout the 20th century, the ideas put forth by both have been extremely unconventional and the two have interacted in ways not always obvious, providing new metaphors, new patterns for defining the future shape of our culture.

  19. Thyroid swellings in the art of the Italian Renaissance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterpetti, Antonio V; De Toma, Giorgio; De Cesare, Alessandro

    2015-09-01

    Thyroid swellings in the art of the Italian Renaissance are sporadically reported in the medical literature. Six hundred paintings and sculptures from the Italian Renaissance, randomly selected, were analyzed to determine the prevalence of personages with thyroid swellings and its meaning. The prevalence of personages with thyroid swellings in the art of Italian Renaissance is much higher than previously thought. This phenomenon was probably secondary to iodine deficiency. The presence of personages with thyroid swelling was related to specific meanings the artists wanted to show in their works. Even if the function and the role of the thyroid were discovered only after thyroidectomy was started to be performed, at the beginning of the 19th century, artists of the Italian Renaissance had the intuition that thyroid swellings were related to specific psychological conditions. Artistic intuition and sensibility often comes before scientific demonstration, and it should be a guide for science development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Analytical Raman spectroscopic discrimination between yellow pigments of the Renaissance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Howell G. M.

    2011-10-01

    The Renaissance represented a major advance in painting techniques, subject matter, artistic style and the use of pigments and pigment mixtures. However, most pigments in general use were still mineral-based as most organic dyes were believed to be fugitive; the historical study of artists' palettes and recipes has assumed importance for the attribution of art works to the Renaissance period. Although the application of diagnostic elemental and molecular spectroscopic techniques play vital and complementary roles in the analysis of art works, elemental techniques alone cannot definitively provide the data needed for pigment identification. The advantages and limitations of Raman spectroscopy for the definitive diagnostic characterisation of yellow pigments that were in use during the Renaissance is demonstrated here in consideration of heavy metal oxides and sulphides; these data will be compared with those obtained from analyses of synthetic yellow pigments that were available during the eighteenth and nineteenth Centuries which could have been used in unrecorded restorations of Renaissance paintings.

  1. Renaissance Africaine: l'environnement Juridique | Diakhaté | Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lorsque l'on pose la thématique de la renaissance africaine, le droit y trouve nécessairement sa place comme révélateur et moteur de culture. De là à avancer le postulat suivant lequel la renaissance africaine suppose l'émergence de systèmes juridiques en phase avec les cultures de l'Afrique, il y a une distance qu'il faut ...

  2. An abbreviated history of the ear: from Renaissance to present.

    OpenAIRE

    Hachmeister, Jorge E.

    2003-01-01

    In this article we discuss important discoveries in relation to the anatomy and physiology of the ear from Renaissance to present. Before the Renaissance, there was a paucity of knowledge of the anatomy of the ear, because of the relative inaccessibility of the temporal bone and the general perception that human dissections should not be conducted. It was not until the sixteenth century that the middle ear was described with detail. Further progress would be made between the sixteenth and eig...

  3. A RENAISSANCE PROMOTER OF MODERN SURGERY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velenciuc, I; Minea, Raluca; Duceac, Letiţia; Vlad, T

    2016-01-01

    The present paper aims, exploring the history of Renaissance medicine, to evoke the figure and work of the priest, surgeon and anatomist, Guido Guidi (Vidus Vidius) (1509-1569). The XVIth century is considered a period marked by artistic and scientific effervescence in the western part of Europe and Guido Guidi was a first order personality, grandson of Domenico Ghirlandaio and friend of Benvenuto Cellini. He was appointed by the King Francis I the first professor of anatomy and surgery at the newly founded College de France. On demand of the King, he wrote Chirurgia j Graeco in Latinum conversa Vido Vidio Florentino interprete, cum nonnullis eiusdem Vidii comentariis (1544), a beautifully illustrated original surgery book that became for the following two centuries the main source in teaching surgery. Our study realized a detailed assessment of the book and especially of its illustrations belonging to Francesco Salviati. Exploring the life of Guido Guidi, we were also able to point out other significant contributions in the field of anatomy and clinical medicine as De anatome the first book where are presented disarticulated, the bones of the skull base and also the discovery of the chickenpox. Some surgical personalities attributed to him both the elaboration of the term appendix vermiformis and the first description of an aneurysm, he treated with the help of Fallopio. Although forgotten today, Guido Guidi was a leading figure of the Renais sance medicine both in France and Italy.

  4. Depicting Occlusion in Early Renaissance Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillam, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    The artist attempting to give the impression of three-dimensional relationships must convey somehow that one surface is in front of another. There is a large and venerable literature in Psychology on this subject, showing how figure-ground, border ownership and amodal completion and continuation are determined but there is almost no discussion of how artist's have recruited these and other principles to create convincing impressions of occlusion. Even Gombrich (Art & Illusion 1960) only considers the situation in which a figure has to be imagined from very partial cues, not how juxtaposed elements in art are parsed perceptually into occluding and occluded surfaces. In this paper I shall discuss approaches to occlusion present in early Renaissance art and the degree to which the principles now well-known to Psychologists were discovered and used, as artists increasingly depicted naturalistic scenes. Among the preoccupations of these artists, as indicated by their work, were whether and how much to occlude faces (and the related issue of the management of haloes), occlusion of and by architectural features, and the importance or otherwise of transitivity in occlusion relationships within the scene. They also clearly used the ground plane, high viewpoints and arrangements of contour terminations, as well as more conventional figural cues, to disambiguate perceived occlusion or to avoid the confusion of multiple surfaces.

  5. Drivers for the renaissance of coal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steckel, Jan Christoph; Edenhofer, Ottmar; Jakob, Michael

    2015-07-21

    Coal was central to the industrial revolution, but in the 20th century it increasingly was superseded by oil and gas. However, in recent years coal again has become the predominant source of global carbon emissions. We show that this trend of rapidly increasing coal-based emissions is not restricted to a few individual countries such as China. Rather, we are witnessing a global renaissance of coal majorly driven by poor, fast-growing countries that increasingly rely on coal to satisfy their growing energy demand. The low price of coal relative to gas and oil has played an important role in accelerating coal consumption since the end of the 1990s. In this article, we show that in the increasingly integrated global coal market the availability of a domestic coal resource does not have a statistically significant impact on the use of coal and related emissions. These findings have important implications for climate change mitigation: If future economic growth of poor countries is fueled mainly by coal, ambitious mitigation targets very likely will become infeasible. Building new coal power plant capacities will lead to lock-in effects for the next few decades. If that lock-in is to be avoided, international climate policy must find ways to offer viable alternatives to coal for developing countries.

  6. Depicting Occlusion in Early Renaissance Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Gillam

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The artist attempting to give the impression of three-dimensional relationships must convey somehow that one surface is in front of another. There is a large and venerable literature in Psychology on this subject, showing how figure-ground, border ownership and amodal completion and continuation are determined but there is almost no discussion of how artist's have recruited these and other principles to create convincing impressions of occlusion. Even Gombrich (Art & Illusion 1960 only considers the situation in which a figure has to be imagined from very partial cues, not how juxtaposed elements in art are parsed perceptually into occluding and occluded surfaces. In this paper I shall discuss approaches to occlusion present in early Renaissance art and the degree to which the principles now well-known to Psychologists were discovered and used, as artists increasingly depicted naturalistic scenes. Among the preoccupations of these artists, as indicated by their work, were whether and how much to occlude faces (and the related issue of the management of haloes, occlusion of and by architectural features, and the importance or otherwise of transitivity in occlusion relationships within the scene. They also clearly used the ground plane, high viewpoints and arrangements of contour terminations, as well as more conventional figural cues, to disambiguate perceived occlusion or to avoid the confusion of multiple surfaces.

  7. The Darker Side of the Renaissance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Mignolo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The Darker Side of the Renaissance focuses on coloniality rather than on Europe’s witch and alchemist hunt. Today I would dare to say also that this expression refers us to the historical foundation of coloniality. At the same time, coloniality statement is called into question, as well as the distinction between the known object and the knowing subject, an assumption on which the Eurocentric project of “modernity” and “modernization” disciplines lie. The preface marks the enunciation with which the statement is stated. That is, it rejects the "point zero epistemology" denounced by Santiago Castro-Gómez. This means the reader should be always pay attention to the ennunciation s/he states him/herself, to the hand drawing the hand. Those of us dwelling at Abya-Yala/America are surrounded by the historical foundation of modernity/coloniality, we are a living part of that process, which only “scientific” alignment can make us believe we are looking at something (e.g., colonization touching what we are today

  8. Translation and Manipulation in Renaissance England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Denton

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This supplementary volume to JEMS is part of an ongoing research project which began with a series of articles published by the author in the 1990s on the translation of Classical historical texts in Renaissance England. The methodology followed is that of Descriptive Translation Studies as developed by scholars such as Lefevere and Hermans with the accent on manipulation of the source text in line with the ideological stance of the translator and the need to ensure that readers of the translation received the ‘correct’ moral lessons.  Particular attention is devoted to a case study of the strategies followed in Thomas North’s domesticating English translation of Jacques Amyot’s French translation of Plutarch’s Lives and the consequences for Shakespeare’s perception of Plutarch.Biography John Denton was associate professor of English Language and Translation at the University of Florence until retirement in 2015. He  has published on contrastive analysis, history of translation (with special reference to the Early Modern England, religious discourse, literary and audiovisual translation. 

  9. CONSOLATIONS FOR MELANCHOLY IN RENAISSANCE HUMANISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angus GOWLAND

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This essay explores the role of melancholy within the consolatoryliterature of Renaissance humanism. It begins (sections I-II with a summary of thethemes and methods of humanist consolationes and their classical models, with particularattention to their moral psychology, and addresses their relationship with scripture andChristian spiritual literature. It then turns to the position of melancholy within humanistconsolations (sections III-VI. It is shown that whilst in many cases moralists andspiritual writers were reluctant invade the territory of the physicians by analysing ortreating a fundamentally somatic condition, discussions of the accidentia animi in Galenicmedicine provided the conceptual environment within which a moral-consolatorytherapy for melancholy could be formulated and applied. Here the role of theimagination was crucial: as the primarily affected part in the disease, it was the faculty ofthe soul that was primarily responsible for melancholic passions, but also the faculty thatpresented the physician and moralist with the opportunity to dispel or alleviate thosepassions. Hence, the imagination was at the centre of a moral psychology of melancholy.The final sections of the essay (V-VI show that the fullest implementation of thisapproach to the treatment of melancholy was in Robert Burton’s ‘ConsolatoryDigression’ in The Anatomy of Melancholy (1621, which both synthesises the various moral,spiritual and psychological elements of the humanist consolatory tradition, and contains anumber of idiosyncratic and paradoxical features.

  10. 78 FR 68134 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Renaissance to Goya...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``Renaissance to Goya: Prints and... ``Renaissance to Goya: Prints and Drawings from Spain,'' imported from abroad for temporary exhibition within...

  11. 75 FR 55613 - General Motors Corporation, Renaissance Center, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Accretive...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-13

    ... Employment and Training Administration General Motors Corporation, Renaissance Center, Including On-Site... of General Motors Corporation, Renaissance Center, including on-site leased workers from Accretive... location of General Motors Corporation, Renaissance Center. The Department has determined that on-site...

  12. Ideas on Moral and Civil Upbringing of Personality in Italian and Ukrainian Pedagogy during the Renaissance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petruk, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    Important aspects of moral and civic upbringing of personality based on studying the experience of humanist pedagogy establishment in the Italian Renaissance in XIV-XV centuries and the Ukrainian Renaissance in XVI-XVII centuries have been reviewed in the article. It has been found out that under the influence of Renaissance in XVI-XVII centuries…

  13. 75 FR 61232 - RIEF RMP LLC and Renaissance Technologies LLC; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-04

    ... COMMISSION RIEF RMP LLC and Renaissance Technologies LLC; Notice of Application September 28, 2010. AGENCY... formed for the benefit of eligible employees of Renaissance Technologies LLC (``RTC'') and its affiliates... in condition 3. \\3\\ The investment objectives and program of one such Third Party Fund, Renaissance...

  14. Renaissance and religion: the Bible in a time of radical change | De ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article investigates how perspectives on religion in Renaissance thought affected their interpretation of the Bible. After a first section on the relevance of seminal characteristics and the social context of the Renaissance to this topic, three approaches to religion by Renaissance s are outlined. In each of the discussions of ...

  15. Brain, mind, and body: interactions with art in renaissance Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginn, Sheryl R; Lorusso, Lorenzo

    2008-01-01

    The Renaissance saw the first systematic anatomical and physiological studies of the brain and human body because scientists, for the first time in centuries, were allowed to dissect human bodies for study. Renaissance artists were frequently found at dissections and their attention to detail can be observed in their products. Scientists themselves were increasingly artistic, and they created astonishing anatomical models and illustrations that can still be studied. The cross-fertilization of art and science in the Renaissance resulted in more scientific analyses of neuroanatomy as well as more creative ways in which such analyses could be depicted. Both art and science benefited from the reciprocal ways in which the two influenced each other even as they provided new ways of explaining the mysteries of the human body and mind.

  16. The first translations of Harlem renaissance poetry in Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerneja Petrič

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available From the present-day perspective Harlem Renaissance poetry represents an epoch-making contribution by America's black authors to the mainstream literature. However, in the post World War 1 era black authors struggled for recognition in their homeland. The publication of a German anthology Afrika singt in the late 1920s agitated Europe as well as the German-speaking authors in Slovenia. Mile Klopčič, a representative of the poetry of Social Realism, translated a handful of Har­ lem Renaissance poems into Slovene using, except in two cases, the German anthology as a source text. His translations are formally accomplished but fail to reproduce the cultural significance of the Harlem Renaissance poetry.

  17. Reading the Stars of the Renaissance. Fritz Saxl and Astrology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rembrandt Duits

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses Fritz Saxl’s publications on astrological images from the western Middle Ages and Renaissance, from his early study on the representation of the planets (1912, via his catalogues of astrological and mythological manuscripts (1915 and 1927 and his contributions on the depiction of the children of the planets (1919, 1923, 1927 to his booklet on the astrological ceiling in the Villa Farnesina in Rome (1934. It aims to assess the importance of Saxl’s work and to show his development from a close follower of Aby Warburg to an independent theorist, with his own method and approach and his own answer to one of the central issues Warburg had raised – how the integrate the old image of the Renaissance as the revival of classical Antiquity with the new picture of the Renaissance as the birth of the modern rational world presented by Burckhardt during the nineteenth century.

  18. Ökologischer Landbau weltweit

    OpenAIRE

    Willer, Helga; Yussefi, Minou

    2007-01-01

    Der ökologische Landbau entwickelt sich nach wie vor in vielen Ländern sehr schnell. Zertifizierten Biolandbau gibt es in über 120 Ländern der Welt. Nicht nur auf einzelstaatlicher Ebene erhält der Biolandbau mehr Unterstützung, auch internationale Organisationen wie die Welthandels- und Entwicklungskonferenz UNCTAD oder die Welternährungsorganisation FAO wenden sich vermehrt dem Bio-landbau zu. Dieser Beitrag fasst die wesentlichen Ergebnisse der Ausgabe 2007 des Jahrbuchs zum weltweiten...

  19. Philadelphia's Renaissance Schools Initiative: 18 Month Interim Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Eva; Norton, Michael H.; Good, Deborah; Levin, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    This report presents Year One (2010-11) school level achievement and attendance outcomes and case study findings from fall 2011 that focused on school leadership and instruction. Thirteen schools were included in the first year of Philadelphia's Renaissance Schools Initiative (2010-11). Of these schools: (1) Four K-8 schools were…

  20. The 4th Century BC 'Ionian Renaissance' and Karian Identity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Poul

    2013-01-01

    , arkaiske kultur. Der argumenteres for, at der nok skete en opblomstring af den lokale kariske kultur, men at den genoplivede, arkaiske, græske kultur var det vigtigste, overordnede træk i Den ioniske Renaissance og at dette kom til at præge den arkaiske og klassisk græske kulturs efterliv i hellenistisk og...

  1. The "Renaissance Child": High Achievement and Gender in Late Modernity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelton, Christine; Francis, Becky

    2012-01-01

    This paper draws on the concept of the "Renaissance Child" to illustrate the ways in which gender influences the opportunities and possibilities of high-achieving pupils. Using data from a study of 12-13-year high-achieving boys and girls based in schools in England, the paper considers the ways in which a group of popular boys was able…

  2. Analytical Raman spectroscopic discrimination between yellow pigments of the Renaissance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Howell G M

    2011-10-01

    The Renaissance represented a major advance in painting techniques, subject matter, artistic style and the use of pigments and pigment mixtures. However, most pigments in general use were still mineral-based as most organic dyes were believed to be fugitive; the historical study of artists' palettes and recipes has assumed importance for the attribution of art works to the Renaissance period. Although the application of diagnostic elemental and molecular spectroscopic techniques play vital and complementary roles in the analysis of art works, elemental techniques alone cannot definitively provide the data needed for pigment identification. The advantages and limitations of Raman spectroscopy for the definitive diagnostic characterisation of yellow pigments that were in use during the Renaissance is demonstrated here in consideration of heavy metal oxides and sulphides; these data will be compared with those obtained from analyses of synthetic yellow pigments that were available during the eighteenth and nineteenth Centuries which could have been used in unrecorded restorations of Renaissance paintings. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Towards an African cultural renaissance | Kanu | Sophia: An African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The match towards an African cultural renaissance is not a speculation that should be left hanging on an ivory tower but rather a reality that is praxis oriented. The call for a cultural revolution does not mean a call to primitivism; it is not a call back to cultural practices such as the killing of twins, patriarchy, human sacrifices nor ...

  4. African Renaissance in the Global Trap | Oguntade | Africa Insight

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Renaissance in the Global Trap. Olufemi Oguntade. Abstract. Africa Insight Vol.33(3) 2003: 20-27. http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/ai.v33i3.22329 · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors. OTHER RESOURCES... Journal Quality · for Researchers · for Journals ...

  5. Extension and advisory services: the African renaissance | Zwane ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These organisations can be considered as a source of renaissance in agricultural advisory services. They have facilitated the development of structures that advocate for extension and advisory services. These organisations have brought focus, and initiated debate on the concept of extension. The importance of such ...

  6. The African Renaissance in the Age of Globalization | Nabudere ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This cultural project is traced from the early-fifteenth century when Europe sought to make Christianity a universal religion and in order to contain Islam, African ... The key pillars of the African renaissance are socio-cultural, political, economic regeneration and improvement of Africa's geo-political standing in world affairs.

  7. A Brief Historical Development of Classical Mathematics before the Renaissance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, Lokenath

    2011-01-01

    This article deals with a short history of mathematics and mathematical scientists during the ancient and medieval periods. Included are some major developments of the ancient, Indian, Arabic, Egyptian, Greek and medieval mathematics and their significant impact on the Renaissance mathematics. Special attention is given to many results, theorems,…

  8. Journeying through the Arts into the Harlem Renaissance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfannenstiel, Gennie; Dickinson, Jean; Chandler, Sadie; Whitney, Cheris

    2003-01-01

    Discusses collaborative explorations of collage, drama, and poetry with visiting artists, teachers, and students. Describes a project in which the picture book, "I Live in Music," was shared with students in Jean Dickinson's class as an extension of a study of the Harlem Renaissance. Presents a script that reflects the authors' story of…

  9. Renaissance Art, Education, and History: An Art Historian's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Brian D.

    1993-01-01

    Contends lack of appropriate instructional materials and demands of studio art production may keep some teachers from incorporating art history and art appreciation into secondary art education courses. Presents two lesson plans focusing on art from European Renaissance period. Concludes that the integration of art history, criticism, and…

  10. Rail renaissance based on strategic market segmentation principles

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    rail renaissance, market segmentation, South Africa, state of logistics, modal shift, freight flows ... Stellenbosch 2010; Barloworld Logistics 2011) and put forward in national policy frameworks (RSA Presidency ... in local consumption (Hanival & Maia 2010), as well as trade liberalisation, which resulted in both increased ...

  11. Did Portugal Have a Twelfth-Century Renaissance?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vitória, A.

    2013-01-01

    Over the seventy-five years since its publication, scholars have continued to adjust and refine Professor Charles Haskins' classic historiographical label ‘Renaissance of the twelfth century’. Nevertheless, the concept remains a useful springboard with which to approach, understand, and explain the

  12. African Renaissance – A Call to Reality: Southern African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mbeki's own definition of the African Renaissance embraces “marriage of memory and dream, of past and future”. His objective is to free the African mind from the enslavement that colonialism brought, which almost crushed the African soul and distorted, banished, and almost destroyed this memory. It is in this context that I ...

  13. Rediscovering Renaissance Research: Information Literacy Strategies for Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilchrist, Sarah Burns

    2016-01-01

    While remaining cognizant of several aspects of current information literacy (IL) instruction methods, including threshold concepts, the author re-created experiences shared by students as she searched for, analyzed, and compiled resources pertaining to the Renaissance. Good IL instruction supports education of the whole person, develops new modes…

  14. Rail renaissance based on strategic market segmentation principles

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    rail renaissance, market segmentation, South Africa, state of logistics, modal shift, freight flows. Dr J.H. Havenga is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Logistics and Director of the Centre for Supply Chain. Management at the .... costs and improve the country's competitiveness, (2) sound business principles for investment ...

  15. BOOK REVIEW: Galileo's Muse: Renaissance Mathematics and the Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Mark; Sterken, Christiaan

    2013-12-01

    Galileo's Muse is a book that focuses on the life and thought of Galileo Galilei. The Prologue consists of a first chapter on Galileo the humanist and deals with Galileo's influence on his student Vincenzo Viviani (who wrote a biography of Galileo). This introductory chapter is followed by a very nice chapter that describes the classical legacy: Pythagoreanism and Platonism, Euclid and Archimedes, and Plutarch and Ptolemy. The author explicates the distinction between Greek and Roman contributions to the classical legacy, an explanation that is crucial for understanding Galileo and Renaissance mathematics. The following eleven chapters of this book arranged in a kind of quadrivium, viz., Poetry, Painting, Music, Architecture present arguments to support the author's thesis that the driver for Galileo's genius was not Renaissance science as is generally accepted but Renaissance arts brought forth by poets, painters, musicians, and architects. These four sets of chapters describe the underlying mathematics in poetry, visual arts, music and architecture. Likewise, Peterson stresses the impact of the philosophical overtones present in geometry, but absent in algebra and its equations. Basically, the author writes about Galileo, while trying to ignore the Copernican controversy, which he sees as distracting attention from Galileo's scientific legacy. As such, his story deviates from the standard myth on Galileo. But the book also looks at other eminent characters, such as Galileo's father Vincenzo (who cultivated music and music theory), the painter Piero della Francesca (who featured elaborate perspectives in his work), Dante Alighieri (author of the Divina Commedia), Filippo Brunelleschi (who engineered the dome of the Basilica di Santa Maria del Fiore in Florence, Johannes Kepler (a strong supporter of Galileo's Copernicanism), etc. This book is very well documented: it offers, for each chapter, a wide selection of excellent biographical notes, and includes a fine

  16. NEO-RENAISSANCE AND REVITALIZATION OF VOTIC – WHO CARES?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margit Kuusk

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the reason for the decline of the Votic language and neo-renaissance and revitalization of the Votic.The reason for the decline of the Votic language are the small number of people, traditionally sparse population and the assimilation – the speakers of Votic have always lived in the sphere of influence of the Russian language and culture. The reasons for neo-renaissance are the collapse of the Soviet Union, a general trend to look for one’s roots, enthusiastic votophiles and the local activities. In the earlier times Votic national movement originated from local people, but recently there has been interest in the Votic affairs on the state level.The plans for the near future are under common title the Votic project.

  17. RAILROAD RENAISSANCE: THE POST-1970 SHORT LINE MOVEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Landry

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Since 1970 and especially since railroad deregulation in 1980, there has been a proliferation of hundreds of new short line rail companies. These railroads range in length from about a mile to more than a thousand miles (those over 350 miles are called “regionals”. They were mainly formed when major Class 1 rail systems spun off marginal trackage. This paperdiscusses the reasons for the short line renaissance.

  18. The Ionian Renaissance and the Hellenistic Architecture of Kos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Poul

    2015-01-01

    I artiklen påvises det, at både det gamle og det nye tempel i helligdommen for lægeguden Asklepios på den græske ø Kos har tekniske særegenheder (det karisk-ioniske løftehul), som viser at de to templer blev bygget af håndværkere fra det vestlige Lilleasien, som arbejdede i den ioniske renaissances...

  19. Is There a Renaissance of Glucocorticoids in Rheumatoid Arthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirwan, J R; Gunasekera, Wma

    2017-10-01

    The first therapeutic use of glucocorticoids was in a patient with severe rheumatoid arthritis and the symptomatic benefit was astounding. Adverse effects from increasingly large doses led to them being overshadowed, dismissed as inappropriate treatment, and ignored for 20 years - but in the last 2 decades, the accumulating evidence and clinical practice suggest there is a justified renaissance in their use as a first-line treatment. © 2017 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  20. Truth and Fibble-Fable in Renaissance Satire

    OpenAIRE

    Branko Madžarevič

    2011-01-01

    Throughout the years of my close involvement with wor(l)ds’ transactions, as a translator, in the triangle of the Renaissance doctors Rabelais, Montaigne, and, yes, Louis-Ferdinand Céline, the French author of the novel Journey to the End of Night (1932), their views on satire can be considered from a rather unconventional angle. By means of an imaginary morbid epistolary medical council, the impromptu introduction tries to entangle this peculiar trio in a freewheeling alliance, leading to th...

  1. Decisions in the Nuclear Renaissance; Decisiones ante el Renacimiento Nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carelli, J.

    2007-07-01

    Taking into consideration the existing revitalization of nuclear projects, the author highlights some of the barriers that the industry will face in the initial phases of the new era. There are some issues such as the many different requirements imposed for a design to be licensed country by country, or the bottlenecks that may appear in this globalized industry. Thus, it is advisable that the Utilities make decisions in the long term, in order to assure their position in the Nuclear renaissance. (Author)

  2. Truth and Fibble-Fable in Renaissance Satire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Branko Madžarevič

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Throughout the years of my close involvement with wor(lds’ transactions, as a translator, in the triangle of the Renaissance doctors Rabelais, Montaigne, and, yes, Louis-Ferdinand Céline, the French author of the novel Journey to the End of Night (1932, their views on satire can be considered from a rather unconventional angle. By means of an imaginary morbid epistolary medical council, the impromptu introduction tries to entangle this peculiar trio in a freewheeling alliance, leading to the assumption that every translation defies the interpretational ambiguities of the utopian Thelema motto “Do as you will”. In the satirical context of all source and target faces, it is always acting on the verge of the paradoxical encomium, the hypothetical pasticcio, and obscurantist reversals of the original text. Of course, the issue at stake here is one of the convolutions of Erasmus’ Praise of Folly, Rabelais’ utopian Thelema Abbey, and the German Epistles of Obscure Men in pathetically wretched Latin. This paper deals with Renaissance and humanist satire, focusing on Rabelais’ five books of Gargantua and Pantagruel (1532–1564 and the interplay between the ideas of truth, truthfulness, and seriousness. In addition, the paper deals with how the Renaissance spirit of this satirical contemporary and ally of ours challenges the issue of verbal boundaries and the materiality of language.

  3. Readings of Platonic Virtue Theories from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Catana, Leo

    2014-01-01

    It is commonly known that ancient schools of ethics were revived during the Renaissance: The texts pertaining to Platonic, Aristotelian, Stoic and Epicurean ethics were edited, translated and discussed in this period. It is less known that the Renaissance also witnessed a revival of Plotinian...

  4. Renaissance Schools Fund-Supported Schools: Early Outcomes, Challenges, and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Viki M.; Humphrey, Daniel C.; Wang, Haiwen; Bosetti, Kristin R.; Cassidy, Lauren; Wechsler, Marjorie E.; Rivera, Elizabeth; Murray, Samantha; Schanzenbach, Diane Whitmore

    2009-01-01

    Chicago's Renaissance 2010 seeks to create 100 new and autonomous schools by 2010. These new schools are expected to increase choice for parents and students, enact innovative practices, and help create a portfolio of schools designed to make the Chicago Public Schools (CPS) more diversified, responsive, and effective. Renaissance Schools Fund…

  5. What Works Clearinghouse Quick Review: "Philadelphia's Renaissance Schools Initiative: 18 Month Interim Report"

    Science.gov (United States)

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The study examined the effectiveness of Philadelphia's Renaissance Schools Initiative after one year of implementation. The Renaissance Schools Initiative, which began in the 2010-11 school year, aimed at improving low-performing schools by providing new management, additional resources, and new educational strategies. The study reported that…

  6. Program Fidelity and Teacher Decisions: A Case Study of the Renaissance Learning Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam, Jennifer D.

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation was designed to examine the degree to which the fidelity of implementation of the Renaissance Learning program impacts teacher instruction, as well as teacher perception of student reading motivation and achievement. The teachers at a western North Carolina elementary school used the Renaissance Learning program for over 15…

  7. Philadelphia's Renaissance Schools: A Report on Start up and Early Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Eva; Good, Deborah; Robertson-Kraft, Claire; Callahan, M. Kate

    2011-01-01

    In April 2009, Superintendent Arlene Ackerman announced her reform plan for the School District of Philadelphia (the District)--"Imagine 2014". Among other major initiatives, "Imagine 2014" laid the groundwork for Philadelphia's Renaissance Schools Initiative. The Renaissance Initiative, set to enter its second year in 2011-12,…

  8. “PASANTIAN”IN BALI AND ITS RENAISSANCE IN GLOBALIZATION ERA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Komang Sudirga

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Pasantian, which means reading and reciting a literary work, is growing, developing and resurrecting resistively in the life of the Balinese community in the globalization era. This study tries to answer the following questions: (1 what was the renaissance of pasantian in the globalization era in Bali like; (2 what factors contributed to the renaissance of pasantian in the globalization era in Bali; (3 what was the meaning of the renaissance of pasantian in the globalization era in Bali? This study in which qualitative method was used. It was intended to identify the existence of pasantian and its dynamism through its renaissance in the globalization era. The theory of deconstruction (Derrida, in Norris, 2008, the theory of practice (Bourdieu in Takwin, 2009 and Fashri, 2007, the theory of postmodern (Piliang, 2004, and Piliang, 2004a, and the theory of hegemony (Gramsci, in Barker, 2005 were eclectically used to analyze the data. The result showed that the renaissance of pasantian took place in three periods; the initial renaissance took place from 1979 to 1990, the second from 1991 to 1998, and the third from 1999 to 2010s. Such a renaissance was supported by cultural factors. In addition, political and economic factors also contributed to the renaissance of pasantian. It had socio-cultural, and economic effects, which led to multi-meanings such as educational meaning, entertainment meaning, the meaning of politics of image, the meaning of hypermorality, and the meaning of maintenance of socio-cultural meanings.

  9. The Renaissance Culture and the Arts. Grades 3-6, The Time Traveler Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pofahl, Jane

    This resource guide encourages grade 3-6 students to explore the social structure, government, culture and art forms, scientific discoveries, and historic personalities of the European Renaissance. The work is organized into 10 topics: (1) The Renaissance; (2) Art; (3) Leonardo da Vinci; (4) The Medicis; (5) Michelangelo; (6) Printing; (7) Music;…

  10. A Multicultural Curriculum for Middle Schoolers: The Perspective of the Harlem Renaissance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otis-Wilborn, Amy; Terrell, Darrell; Hnat, Catherine; Lemmen, Linda L.; Jefferson, Malvice

    1999-01-01

    Describes the process of developing and implementing a multicultural curriculum through a unit designed for eighth graders that focuses on the Harlem Renaissance. The unit explores cultural diversity using a Discipline-Based Art Education curriculum model with the 1920's Harlem Renaissance movement as the springboard. (SLD)

  11. The Renaissance academies between science and the humanities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeely, Ian F

    2009-01-01

    The scientific academies of early modern Europe have long been recognized for their critical role in incubating and legitimating the Scientific Revolution. So also, academies dedicated to vernacular literature and language, opera and ballet, art and design, and speculative philosophy all contributed greatly to the emergence of new humanistic art forms. Rarely, though, have scholars asked whether a common institutional culture united the scientific and humanistic academies across disciplinary divides that "Renaissance men" famously refused to acknowledge. This essay, an interdisciplinary synthesis of existing scholarship, attempts just that, discerning a move toward practices of "objectivity" across the entire academy movement.

  12. Africa's Quest for Developmental States: 'renaissance' for whom?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaw, Timothy Milton

    2012-01-01

    . The continent displays innovations in terms of sources of finance, new regionalisms & transnational governance leading to distinctive insights for analysis & policy, both state & non-state. Its potential for renaissance is reinforced by South Africa's accession as the fifth of the BRICS at the dawn......After a generally disappointing half-century since recapturing formal independence, at the turn of the second decade of the 21st century, Africa(s) may now be able to seize unanticipated emerging opportunities to move from `fragile' or `failed' towards `developmental' political economies...

  13. Nuclear renaissance, the challenge; Renacimiento Nuclear, Los desafios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carelli, J.; Aycart, J.

    2009-07-01

    The Nuclear Industry has been able to get prepared for the Renaissance by overcoming many different challenges. Most of them related to shortage in capabilities and resources. However, as new builds approach, new challenges appear in the horizon. Now, those are mostly related to the risk management embedded in huge projects like these. This Article provides a vision on how to face those new challenges, so that the industry will not be damaged in its credibility by lack of commitments or failed executions. (Author)

  14. Anatomy and the Body in Renaissance Protestant Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cellamare, Davide

    2014-01-01

    This article addresses the use of anatomical knowledge in Renaissance works on the soul produced at northern European universities, as well as the notions of 'body' and 'soul' that emerge from them. It examines specifically Philip Melanchthon's and Rudolph Snell van Royen's treatises on the soul. This analysis shows that a number of Protestant professors of arts and medicine generally considered the anatomical study of the body--which they conceived of as a teleologically organised machina (machine)--to be instrumental in studying the human soul. This article will, however, also document that the reasons motivating this conception were not uniform.

  15. Foot deformities in Renaissance paintings. A mystery of symbolism, artistic licence, illusion and true representation in five renowned Renaissance painters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzeri, D; Castello, M F; Grassetti, L; Dashti, T; Zhang, Y X; Persichetti, P

    2015-01-01

    Although Renaissance artists were skilled in representing normal anatomy, a close look at some paintings reveals anatomical variations in the depiction of the feet of human figures. A systematic review has identified 25 paintings by five artists in which the presumptive medico-artistic diagnosis of congenital or acquired foot deformity seems to be varyingly present. The connection between these five painters and what factors have influenced artists' style in the depiction of such deformities is discussed. The possible iconography and medical-historical meaning of such variations, as well as the possibility of artistic licence and real representation that drove the painters to depict these deformities, is explored and debated.

  16. Global CO{sub 2} emissions 2015. Trend reversion is still waiting, despite hopeful approaches; Weltweite CO{sub 2}-Emissionen 2015. Trendwende laesst trotz hoffnungsvoller Ansaetze nach wie vor auf sich warten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziesing, Hans-Joachim

    2016-10-15

    By 2015, global CO{sub 2} emissions were virtually unchanged from 2014 according to provisional calculations. On the whole, a slight increase may have resulted, which has slowed the growth of the past few years. In the previous year alone, the weakest growth since the beginning of the century had been recorded, with only 0.7% of the upturn (with the exception of the crises in 2008/2009). As a result, CO{sub 2} emissions in 2015 were only slightly higher than in the previous year, at 33.1 billion tonnes. A global trend reversal is still likely, but the CO{sub 2} emissions have declined in many countries, particularly in some industrialized countries. [German] Im Jahr 2015 haben sich die weltweiten CO{sub 2}-Emissionen nach vorlaeufigen Berechnungen gegenueber 2014 praktisch nicht veraendert. Insgesamt duerfte sich allenfalls ein leichtes Plus ergeben haben, womit der Zuwachs der vergangenen Jahre erneut gebremst wurde. Schon im Vorjahr war mit einem Plus von nur 0,7 % der bis dahin (mit Ausnahme der Krisenjahre 2008/2009) schwaechste Anstieg seit Beginn des Jahrhunderts zu verzeichnen gewesen. Im Ergebnis blieben die CO{sub 2}-Emissionen 2015 mit reichlich 33,1 Mrd. t nur geringfuegig ueber dem Niveau des Vorjahres. Eine weltweite Trendwende steht wohl noch nach wie vor aus, doch sind immerhin die CO{sub 2}-Emissionen in zahlreichen Laendern, insbesondere in etlichen Industrielaendern, gesunken.

  17. Breastfeeding and weaning in renaissance Italy: the Medici children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuffra, Valentina; Fornaciari, Gino

    2013-06-01

    Abstract Exploration of the Medici Chapels in the Basilica of San Lorenzo in Florence, Italy, revealed the burials of nine infantile members of the Medici family. Eight children were found in the intact tomb of the last Grand Duke GianGastone (1671-1737), and another child was exhumed from the Chapel of Grand Duke Ferdinando I (1549-1609). Skeletal ages ranged from newborn to 5 years, suggesting an identification with infantile members of the family. A paleonutritional study has been performed on the bone samples of all members of the Medici family exhumed so far. Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope analysis of bone collagen was used to detect the timing of the weaning process in this population. The (15)N values of the Medici children are significantly higher than those of adults, indicating that these infants were breastfed for a long time period. In particular, the levels of (15)N are high before the second year but decrease in older children, evidently after weaning, reaching the levels of adults. During the Renaissance, it was the common opinion that children should not be weaned before the second year of life. Archival documents suggest that the Medici children were never weaned before that age and, in most cases, even some months later. Combination of paleonutritional data and historical sources allowed reconstruction of the breastfeeding and weaning patterns of this aristocratic Renaissance class.

  18. Sappho's shifting fortunes from antiquity to the early Renaissance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penrose, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Although Sappho was revered as the greatest woman poet of all time by the Greeks, in later antiquity and the Middle Ages, her love of women was considered shameful and overshadowed her excellent reputation. She was also called a prostitute, and fictional accounts of her affairs with men further "tarnished" her reputation. Dual representations of Sappho existed within two centuries of her death. On the one hand, she was a role model for other poets to follow in their quest for fame, on the other she was the quintessential representation of female vice, which, at least by the Roman period, brought her infamy. Late antique and medieval Christian authors inherited this latter view, and vilified Sappho's sexuality, while church authorities, at least according to legend, had her works publicly burned. In the initial stages of the Renaissance, then, the humanist desire to reconnect with the pagan past had to proceed in the context of late medieval Christianity. Sappho's homoeroticism was erased, ultimately, in order that her skill could be lauded to fight misogyny. Hence, the humanists "rehabilitated" Sappho's virtue in a Christian context where same-sex love was considered an "unmentionable" vice. In order to argue that women were smart and capable, the humanists needed Sappho. She was perhaps the most famous, and most skilled, woman who had ever lived, and her example was used in an attempt to improve the lot of women in the early Renaissance.

  19. Reconstruction of skull defects in the middle ages and renaissance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missori, Paolo; Currà, Antonio; Paris, Harry S; Peschillo, Simone; Fattapposta, Francesco; Paolini, Sergio; Domenicucci, Maurizio

    2015-06-01

    In Egyptian, Greco-Roman, and Arabic medicine, the closure of a skull defect was not provided at the end of a therapeutic trepanation or in cases of bone removal. The literature from the Middle Ages and Renaissance disclosed some striking and forgotten practices. Gilbertus Anglicus (c. 1180 to c. 1250) cites the use of a piece of a cup made from wooden bowl (ciphum or mazer) or a gold sheet to cover the gap and protect the brain in these patients; this citation probably reflected a widely known folk practice. Pietro d'Argellata introduced the use of a fixed piece of dried gourd for brain protection to reconstruct a skull defect. In the late Renaissance, the negative folklore describing this outlandish practice likely led to the use of silver and lead sheets. Nevertheless, for centuries, large numbers of surgeons preferred to leave the dura mater uncovered after bone removal, and failed to apply any brain protection. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. On Architectural Practice and Arithmetic Abilities in Renaissance Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Ceriani Sebregondi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the figure of the architect at work in Renaissance Italy, when a major change occurred in the practice of design with the spread of arithmetic. This deep scientific, technical, methodological, and cultural shift involved the image of the architect and his profession, his relationship with the patron, as well as the cultural conception of architecture. The essay, crossing disciplinary boundaries, analyses some technical aspects of architectural design in early modern Italy only marginally investigated. If proportional systems and architecture’s theoretical questions have been amply studied, the practical culture, the daily professional practice and its working tools, such as the operative arithmetic actually known to architects, have been only sporadically analysed. During the Renaissance, especially in Italy, an important development of mathematics occurred and arithmetic was clarified and simplified so to allow its diffusion, but at the same time those disciplines remained essentially despised by aristocratic and intellectual elites. What was the architects’ role in this moment of deep change? Which was the arithmetic usually employed by them in the design process? When did Hindu-Arabic numbers and fractions became familiar in the field of architecture? In the secular battle between geometry and arithmetic, which system was used in what professional cases? The essay illustrates how architects with different backgrounds responded to this change, through a comparative analysis of all the architectural drawings containing numbers and calculations made by Michelangelo Buonarroti (1475–1564, Baldassarre Peruzzi (1481–1536, and Antonio da Sangallo the Younger (1484–1546.

  1. Interstitial brachycurie therapy, renaissance of a radiooncological method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sauer, R.; Thiel, H.J.; Mueller, R.

    1982-06-10

    In the past years there is a worldwide renaissance in interstitial low dose-rate implantation of tumors in many sites of origin. This renaissance is due to the development of new artifical radioisotopes (Au-198, Ir-192 and particularly I-125), the refinement of application techniques with after-loading devices and the introduction of computerized dosimetry. It is the opinion of a number of widely experienced radiotherapists that interstitial implants represent the treatment of choice 'par excellence' and one of the ways to overcome the treatment resistance of inoperable malignant tumors. For this reason we have introduced the method of permanent and removable implantation of inoperable brain tumors, head and neck cancers and prostate carcinomas with /sup 125/I-seeds at the University of Erlangen-Nuernberg. Our first clinical impressions are very encouraging. The techniques of implantation used, the properties and advantages of /sup 125/I-seeds, dosimetric considerations and problems related to radiation protection are described.

  2. Renaissance philosophers’ ideas about ways of ordering chaos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Kulik

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Two philosophical strategies of chaos ordering that were offered by Renaissance philosophers are analyzed: Ordering by means of mind and ordering by means of love. It is reasoned that both of these studies dates back to Antique philosophers’ ideas. Such supporters of ordering by mind doctrine as Coluccio Salutati, Giannozzo Manetti are pointed out. These thinkers believed that a person is able to cope with disorder of reality efficiently when he follows his mind. Among supporters of ordering by love idea such philosophers as Marsilio Ficino, Giovanni Pico della Mirandola are singled out. These thinkers treated love as one of cosmogonical basis. They wrote that love is brought to birth by chaos as its inner striving to self­organization, to transformation into harmony.  It is also claimed that in Renaissance the strategy of scientific comprehension of chaos appears. It is grounded that this strategy is not identical to philosophical strategies of chaos ordering, though it is close to them. Among representatives of this approach to studying chaos such thinkers as Paracelsus, Leonardo da Vinci are pointed out.

  3. The Renaissance and the universal surgeon: Giovanni Andrea Della Croce, a master of traumatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Matteo, Berardo; Tarabella, Vittorio; Filardo, Giuseppe; Viganò, Anna; Tomba, Patrizia; Marcacci, Maurilio

    2013-12-01

    All the medical knowledge of all time in one book, the universal and perfect manual for the Renaissance surgeon, and the man who wrote it. This paper depicts the life and works of Giovanni Andrea della Croce, a 16th Century physician and surgeon, who, endowed with true spirit of Renaissance humanism, wanted to teach and share all his medical knowledge through his opus magnum, titled "Universal Surgery Complete with All the Relevant Parts for the Optimum Surgeon". An extraordinary book which truly represents a defining moment and a founding stone for traumatology, written by a lesser known historical personality, but nonetheless the Renaissance Master of Traumatology.

  4. The Material and Symbolic Value of Renaissance Lace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Else de F. Albuquerque

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The municipality of Camalaú, in the Paraiban Cariri, is known for its production of renaissance lace. This activity is of great economic importance in the region, evidenced by, among other things, the quantity of women who work in the lace production. Data from the Banco do Nordeste (Northeastern Bank report four thousand women dedicated simultaneously to family farming and crafts. Because of factors such as lack of public policies for family farms, land tenure concentration and the worsening of conditions for the reproduction of agriculture in drought periods, craft production has increased in the region. Observation shows that men have a relevant participation in lace production, even though it is considered a women’s activity. This article examines craftwork as an income source, wrought with meanings from gender relations, emphasizing that the activity is of men and women whose daily activities link work, child socialization and play.

  5. The Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam: Source of cooperation or contention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teferi Taye, Meron; Tadesse, Tsegaye; Senay, Gabriel; Block, Paul

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the challenges and benefits of the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD), which is under construction and expected to be operational on the Blue Nile River in Ethiopia in a few years. Like many large-scale projects on transboundary rivers, the GERD has been criticized for potentially jeopardizing downstream water security and livelihoods through upstream unilateral decision making. In spite of the contentious nature of the project, the authors argue that this project can provide substantial benefits for regional development. The GERD, like any major river infrastructure project, will undeniably bring about social, environmental, and economic change, and in this unique case has, on balance, the potential to achieve success on all fronts. It must be stressed, however, that strong partnerships between riparian countries are essential. National success is contingent on regional cooperation.

  6. Sampling theory, a renaissance compressive sensing and other developments

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    Reconstructing or approximating objects from seemingly incomplete information is a frequent challenge in mathematics, science, and engineering. A multitude of tools designed to recover hidden information are based on Shannon’s classical sampling theorem, a central pillar of Sampling Theory. The growing need to efficiently obtain precise and tailored digital representations of complex objects and phenomena requires the maturation of available tools in Sampling Theory as well as the development of complementary, novel mathematical theories. Today, research themes such as Compressed Sensing and Frame Theory re-energize the broad area of Sampling Theory. This volume illustrates the renaissance that the area of Sampling Theory is currently experiencing. It touches upon trendsetting areas such as Compressed Sensing, Finite Frames, Parametric Partial Differential Equations, Quantization, Finite Rate of Innovation, System Theory, as well as sampling in Geometry and Algebraic Topology.

  7. Structured non-coding RNAs and the RNP Renaissance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogg, J. Robert; Collins, Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    Summary Non-protein-coding (nc) RNAs are diverse in their modes of synthesis, processing, assembly, and function. The inventory of transcripts known or suspected to serve their biological roles as RNA has increased dramatically in recent years. Although studies of ncRNA function are only beginning to match the pace of ncRNA discovery, some principles are emerging. Here we focus on a framework for understanding functions of ncRNAs that have evolved in a protein-rich cellular environment, as distinct from ncRNAs that arose originally in the ancestral RNA World. The folding and function of ncRNAs in the context of ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes provide myriad opportunities for ncRNA gain of function, leading to a modern-day RNP Renaissance. PMID:18950732

  8. Pharmacy, Testing, and the Language of Truth in Renaissance Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugliano, Valentina

    2017-01-01

    This article examines the role of testing and innovation in sixteenthcentury Italian pharmacy. I argue that apothecaries were less concerned with testing drugs for efficacy or creating novel products than with reactivating an older Mediterranean pharmacological tradition and studying the materials on which it relied. Their practice was not driven by radical experimentation but by a "culture of tweaking"-of minute operational changes to existing recipes and accommodation of their textual variants-which was rooted in the guild economy fostering incremental over radical innovation and in a humanist reevaluation of past autorities. Workshop practice was also increasingly driven by a new ideal of staying true to nature fostered by the period's botanical renaissance. This led to an emphasis on ingredients over processes in the shop, and found clearest expression in the elaboration of a taxonomic "language of truth" that helped apothecaries discern between authentic and inauthentic materia medica and harness their sincerity in lieu of testing effectiveness.

  9. RENAISSANCE IN SPAIN: EMERGENCE OF NATIONAL LANGUAGE AND NATIONAL IDENTITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raevskaya, M.M.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is to describe the attitude of the Spaniards to their native language. The turn of the 16th century saw a considerable growth of interest in the languages spoken by the majority of the population in European countries. It was at that time that the Spanish-speaking community first recognized the value of their mother tongue and saw its merits as equal to those of Latin and Greek. As a result it is proved that in the Spanish mindset of the 16th century the recognition of the priority of the Spanish Castilian took shape. It should be emphasized that this comprehension is politically grounded in a concrete historical situation. The role of the works written by the Renaissance humanists and the professional grammarians in the emergence of the national identity sense of the Spaniards is shown.

  10. Raman spectroscopic study of "The Malatesta": a Renaissance painting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Howell G M; Vandenabeele, Peter; Benoy, Timothy J

    2015-02-25

    Raman spectroscopic analysis of the pigments on an Italian painting described as a "Full Length Portrait of a Gentleman", known also as the "Malatesta", and attributed to the Renaissance period has established that these are consistent with the historical research provenance undertaken earlier. Evidence is found for the early 19th Century addition of chrome yellow to highlighted yellow ochre areas in comparison with a similar painting executed in 1801 by Sir Thomas Lawrence of John Kemble in the role of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark. The Raman data are novel in that no analytical studies have previously been made on this painting and reinforces the procedure whereby scientific analyses are accompanied by parallel historical research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. MS PHD'S Professional Development Program: A Scientific Renaissance in Cyberspace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, J. M.; Williamson, V. A.; Griess, C. A.; Pyrtle, A. J.

    2004-12-01

    This study is a component of a four-year investigation of MS PHD'S Professional Development Program's virtual community through the lenses of underrepresented minority students in Earth system science and engineering fields. In this presentation, the development, assessment and projected utilization of the ongoing study will be discussed. The overall goal of this study is to examine the effectiveness of virtual team building methods and understand how the development of a communal cyberinfrastructure acts as an integral part of the emergence of a Scientific Renaissance. The exemplar, Minorities Striving and Pursuing Higher Degrees of Success in Earth System Science (MS PHD'S), provides professional development experiences to facilitate the advancement of students of color achieving outstanding Earth system careers. Undergraduate and graduate students are supported through access to scientific conferences, mentorship and virtual community building. Framed by critical theory, this ethnographic exploration uses a mixed methods research design to record, observe, and analyze both the processes and products of the website, listserv and synchronous web-based dialogue. First, key findings of the formative evaluation and annual reports of the successfully implemented 2003 MS PHD'S Pilot Project are presented. These findings inform future evaluations of the use of technological resources and illustrate how this public space provides peer support and enriched research opportunities. Quantitative methods such as statistical analysis, academic and professional tracking and evaluative tools for scientific content and competency are complimented by qualitative methods that include observations, heuristic case studies and focus group interviews. The findings of this ongoing investigation will provide insight on how national organizations, higher education practitioners, community-based support systems and underrepresented minorities in the sciences promote diversity by developing

  12. Tatiana Kaptereva and Her Contribution into Spanish Renaissance Studies in Russia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Natalia Vasilievna Antonova; Makhabbat Gumerovna Yunusova

    2017-01-01

    .... The approaches and instruments employed by T.P. Kaptereva are viewed in the historical context of the epoch, thus presenting her notion of Spanish Renaissance art integrated into the general historiographic background...

  13. Sabuco's suco nerveo and the origins of neurochemistry in the Spanish Renaissance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Martin Araguz, A; Bustamante Martinez, C; Fernandez Armayor, V

    2003-01-01

    In the 16th century, at the height of the Spanish Renaissance, Bachiller Miguel Sabuco revolutionised medical theories about brain physiology with the publication of his work Nueva Filosof a in 1587...

  14. Renaissance Architecture of Central Scheme: Jerónimo Quijano and his Immediate Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Antonio Luis López González

    2015-01-01

    [EN] Throughout History, many large burial chapels (religious or memorial) with centralized floor plan and independent character have arisen. Jerónimo Quijano, Renaissance Spanish architect, posited certain dual approach; on the one hand, the Renaissance ideal of central scheme and, on the other hand, the direct integration of the duo header-nave without added interstitial element. In this scope, two clear examples of the evolution of Quijano’s architectural proposal in the ancient Cartagena ...

  15. The occurrence of phi in dento-facial beauty of fine art from antiquity through the Renaissance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiener, R Constance; Wiener Pla, Regina M

    2012-01-01

    External beauty is a complex construct that influences lives and may be impacted by dentists. Beauty is not easily quantified, but one cited anthropometric of beauty is the ratio phi, the number 1.618033(...). This study examined phi as a measure of female frontal facial beauty in classic Western art, using pre- Renaissance (N = 30), and Renaissance (N = 30) artwork. Four horizontal and five vertical ratios were determined in the works of art, which were then compared with the phi ratio. All horizontal ratios for both pre-Renaissance and Renaissance artwork were similar to each other, but did not contain the phi ratio (P Renaissance and Renaissance art-work did contain the phi ratio within their confidence intervals with the exception of the vertical ratio, "intereye point to soft tissue menton/ intereye point to stomion", that was found to be less than phi in the Renaissance group. The study provides evidence of the presence of the phi ratio in vertical aspect of females in artwork from pre-Renaissance through the Renaissance demonstrating consistent temporal preferences. Therefore, the phi ratio seems to be an important consideration in altering vertical facial dimensions in full mouth rehabilitation and reconstructive orthognathic surgery involving females.

  16. Reformation and/or Renaissance? A comparison between John Calvin’s and Thabo Mbeki’s ideas of renewal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.J. van der Walt

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available This essay compares the differences and similarities between the European Renaissance (±1300 – ±1600 and the African Renaissance in order to determine what an apposite Christian attitude would be. The first section describes the European Renaissance as a reaction to the Middle Ages and a return to the original sources of Western civilisation. Two different trends are distinguished, viz. classical humanism and evangelical humanism. The ideas of the great Renaissance thinker and evangelical humanist, John Calvin, about reformation receive special attention in this regard. He learned much from his contemporaries, but did so in a critical, independent way. From the five different Christian worldviews which crystallised during the Renaissance epoch, his Reformational worldview was the most strongly biblically founded one. The second main part of the essay first asks some critical questions about the African Renaissance and then provides a brief historical survey of past efforts at an African Renaissance, followed by an exposition and evaluation of Thabo Mbeki’s ideas about an African Renaissance. The third main section of the essay poses the question as to what role Christianity can and should play in the African Renaissance. Similar to the attitude of Calvin, we should both learn from it and contribute to it from the perspective of a Christian worldview.

  17. Patient-Reported Safety Information: A Renaissance of Pharmacovigilance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Härmark, Linda; Raine, June; Leufkens, Hubert; Edwards, I Ralph; Moretti, Ugo; Sarinic, Viola Macolic; Kant, Agnes

    2016-10-01

    The role of patients as key contributors in pharmacovigilance was acknowledged in the new EU pharmacovigilance legislation. This contains several efforts to increase the involvement of the general public, including making patient adverse drug reaction (ADR) reporting systems mandatory. Three years have passed since the legislation was introduced and the key question is: does pharmacovigilance yet make optimal use of patient-reported safety information? Independent research has shown beyond doubt that patients make an important contribution to pharmacovigilance signal detection. Patient reports provide first-hand information about the suspected ADR and the circumstances under which it occurred, including medication errors, quality failures, and 'near misses'. Patient-reported safety information leads to a better understanding of the patient's experiences of the ADR. Patients are better at explaining the nature, personal significance and consequences of ADRs than healthcare professionals' reports on similar associations and they give more detailed information regarding quality of life including psychological effects and effects on everyday tasks. Current methods used in pharmacovigilance need to optimise use of the information reported from patients. To make the most of information from patients, the systems we use for collecting, coding and recording patient-reported information and the methodologies applied for signal detection and assessment need to be further developed, such as a patient-specific form, development of a severity grading and evolution of the database structure and the signal detection methods applied. It is time for a renaissance of pharmacovigilance.

  18. MUC1 Story: Great Expectations, Disappointments and the Renaissance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubtsov, Mikhail A; Syrkina, Marina S; Vassetzky, Yegor S

    2017-08-17

    In the course of studying human mucin MUC1, an attitude towards this molecule has been changing time and again. Initially, the list of presumable functions of MUC1 was restricted to protecting and lubricating epithelium. To date, it is assumed to play an important role in cell signaling as well as in all stages of oncogenesis, from malignant cell transformation to tumor dissemination. The story of MUC1 is full of hopes and disappointments. However, the scientific interest to MUC1 has never waned, and the more profoundly it has been investigated, the clearer its hidden potential turned to be disclosed. The therapeutic potential of mucin MUC1 has already been noted by various scientific groups at the early stages of research. Over forty years ago the first insights into MUC1 functions became a strong grounds for considering this molecule as potential target for anticancer therapy. Therefore, this direction of research has always been of particular interest and practical importance. More than 200 papers on MUC1 were published in 2016; the majority of them are dedicated to MUC1-related anticancer diagnostics and therapeutics. Here we review the history of MUC1 studies from the very first attempts to reveal its functions to the ongoing renaissance. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  19. Pseudobulbar paralysis in the Renaissance: Cosimo I de' Medici case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arba, F; Inzitari, D; Lippi, D

    2014-07-01

    Cosimo I de' Medici (1519-1574) was the first Grand Duke of Tuscany. He was one of the most important members of the Medici family. He was an excellent conqueror and a good politician. Moreover, he was able to attract and encourage artists, scientists and architects to promote Florence as the cultural capital of the Italian Renaissance. Historical chronicles report that he suffered from a stroke when he was 49 years old. Together with the acute manifestation of stroke, he displayed peculiar symptoms. He had gait disturbances and sphincter dysfunctions. His language became poor and hard to understand. His mood was very fluctuating and in the last years of his life he was a short-tempered man. In addition, he had a characteristic symptom, so-called pathological laughing and crying. The course of his disease was slow and stuttering. Taken together, these data seem to be one of the first reports of pseudobulbar paralysis. The disease of Cosimo I was probably due to a chronic cerebral vasculopathy, known as small vessels disease. We discuss this hypothesis regarding an ancient clinical case, with the support of current studies.

  20. PIXE measurements of Renaissance silverpoint drawings at VERA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milota, Petra; Reiche, Ina; Duval, Alain; Forstner, Oliver; Guicharnaud, Hélène; Kutschera, Walter; Merchel, Silke; Priller, Alfred; Schreiner, Manfred; Steier, Peter; Thobois, Elisabeth; Wallner, Anton; Wünschek, Barbara; Golser, Robin

    2008-05-01

    Silverpoint drawings from the Renaissance are among the most precious and rarest treasures of graphical art. Our research group is particularly interested in the analysis of silverpoint drawings by Albrecht Dürer (1471-1528). A very sensitive and non-destructive analytical method, either spatially resolved synchrotron-radiation induced X-ray fluorescence (SY-XRF) or proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE), is needed to determine the chemical composition of the very faint silver marks on such drawings. Dürer drawings from the collection of the Albertina, Vienna, were analyzed to amend existing data on Dürer drawings. For this purpose an external-beam PIXE setup was installed at the Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator (VERA). It allows to analyze a spot of ∼0.15 mm on the object in air with 3 MeV protons, and to detect the emitted X-rays that are characteristic for the chemical composition with very good sensitivity and without harming the precious objects. After successful measurements on artificial test samples, four original silverpoint drawings were investigated: two portraits from Albrecht Dürer's very early period (self-portrait and portrait of his father) and two drawings from Dürer's sketch book of his travel to the Netherlands 1520/21.

  1. PIXE measurements of Renaissance silverpoint drawings at VERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milota, Petra [Faculty of Physics, Isotope Research, University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Reiche, Ina; Duval, Alain [Centre de recherche et de restauration des musees de France (C2RMF), CNRS UMR 171, Palais du Louvre, F-75001 Paris (France); Forstner, Oliver [Faculty of Physics, Isotope Research, University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Guicharnaud, Helene [Centre de recherche et de restauration des musees de France (C2RMF), CNRS UMR 171, Palais du Louvre, F-75001 Paris (France); Kutschera, Walter [Faculty of Physics, Isotope Research, University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Merchel, Silke [Centre Europeen de Recherche et d' Enseignement des Geosciences de l' Environnement (CEREGE), CNRS UMR 6635, F-13545 Aix en Provence (France); Priller, Alfred [Faculty of Physics, Isotope Research, University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Schreiner, Manfred [Institute of Science and Technology in Art, Academy of Fine Arts Vienna, A-1010 Vienna (Austria); Steier, Peter [Faculty of Physics, Isotope Research, University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Thobois, Elisabeth [Albertina, Albertinaplatz 1, A-1010 Vienna (Austria); Wallner, Anton; Wuenschek, Barbara [Faculty of Physics, Isotope Research, University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Golser, Robin [Faculty of Physics, Isotope Research, University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: robin.golser@univie.ac.at

    2008-05-15

    Silverpoint drawings from the Renaissance are among the most precious and rarest treasures of graphical art. Our research group is particularly interested in the analysis of silverpoint drawings by Albrecht Duerer (1471-1528). A very sensitive and non-destructive analytical method, either spatially resolved synchrotron-radiation induced X-ray fluorescence (SY-XRF) or proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE), is needed to determine the chemical composition of the very faint silver marks on such drawings. Duerer drawings from the collection of the Albertina, Vienna, were analyzed to amend existing data on Duerer drawings. For this purpose an external-beam PIXE setup was installed at the Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator (VERA). It allows to analyze a spot of {approx}0.15 mm on the object in air with 3 MeV protons, and to detect the emitted X-rays that are characteristic for the chemical composition with very good sensitivity and without harming the precious objects. After successful measurements on artificial test samples, four original silverpoint drawings were investigated: two portraits from Albrecht Duerer's very early period (self-portrait and portrait of his father) and two drawings from Duerer's sketch book of his travel to the Netherlands 1520/21.

  2. Renaissance CFO emerges in response to market pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-08-01

    A 1995 survey of chief financial officers (CFOs) in healthcare organizations finds that as the healthcare industry reshapes itself through mergers, acquisitions, and downsizing, the CFOs of the mid-1990s also are reshaping themselves into "Renaissance CFOs." They are acquiring new skills and expertise beyond the traditional area of finance. About one-third of the CFOs who took part in the February 1995 survey, which updates similar surveys in 1992 and 1990, said they are working to enhance their knowledge of managed care because they expect to assume responsibility for managed care as part of their expanding CFO responsibilities. Other new areas survey respondents said they expect to oversee before the decade's end are financial costing and pricing and physician relations. The 1995 CFO survey was commissioned by HFMA and Executive Risk Management Associates, Inc., and was conducted by Elrick & Lavidge, Inc. Previous CFO profile surveys have included analysis of CFO compensation data. This year, however, a separate, more indepth survey of CFO compensation was commissioned by HFMA; the findings of this survey will be presented in the October issue of HFM.

  3. Microchemical investigation on Renaissance coins minted at Gubbio (Central Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingo, G. M.; de Caro, T.; Padeletti, G.; Chiozzini, G.

    The bulk and surface chemical composition of Renaissance coins minted at Gubbio (Central Italy) from 1508 to 1516 and from 1521 to 1538 by Francesco Maria della Rovere is investigated by means of the combined use of different analytical techniques such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS), and optical microscopy (OM). The aim of the work is to determine the bulk chemical composition of these commonly used coins at Gubbio, to ascertain their surface nature and if they were coated by a thin film of silver or other white metals similar to silver. The results indicate that the coins were produced by coating a copper core with a thin film of silver and antimony, and also with lead whose thickness is of a few microns which is now scarcely present because the original silvered surface was almost entirely removed by degradation phenomena. Furthermore, the SEM+EDS results show that the surface content of silver and antimony cannot be attributed to long-term selective corrosion phenomena leaving the coin slightly silver or antimony enriched. Therefore, the presence of silver or apparently silver-like metals i.e. antimony and lead, could be considered as a deliberate surface finishing of the coins obtained via inverse segregation or intentional selective corrosion based on pickling solutions or a combination of them. From a historical point of view the presence of a Ag or Sb film on the surface of the coins discloses the occurrence of a period of economic difficulties.

  4. The ``Nuclear Renaissance'' and the Spread of Nuclear Weapons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyman, Edwin S.

    2007-05-01

    As interest grows around the world in nuclear power as an energy source that could help control greenhouse gas emissions, some have proclaimed the arrival of a ``nuclear renaissance.'' But can the increased risks of more nuclear power be managed? The political crisis surrounding Iran's pursuit of uranium enrichment has exposed weaknesses in the nuclear nonproliferation regime. Also, al Qaeda's declared interest in weapons of mass destruction raises the concern that terrorists could acquire nuclear weapons by stealing materials from poorly secured facilities. Growth of nuclear energy would require the construction of many additional uranium enrichment plants. And the generation of more spent nuclear fuel without a credible waste disposal strategy would increase political support for reprocessing, which separates large quantities of weapon-usable plutonium from spent fuel. There is little evidence that the various institutional arrangements and technical schemes proposed to mitigate the security risks of a major nuclear expansion would be effective. This talk will focus on the measures necessary to allow large-scale global growth of nuclear power without resulting in an unacceptably high risk of nuclear proliferation and nuclear terrorism, and will discuss the feasibility of such measures. To cite this abstract, use the following reference: http://meetings.aps.org/link/BAPS.2007.OSS07.E1.2

  5. Suitable classification of mortars from ancient Roman and Renaissance frescoes using thermal analysis and chemometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomassetti, Mauro; Marini, Federico; Campanella, Luigi; Positano, Matteo; Marinucci, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Literature on mortars has mainly focused on the identification and characterization of their components in order to assign them to a specific historical period, after accurate classification. For this purpose, different analytical techniques have been proposed. Aim of the present study was to verify whether the combination of thermal analysis and chemometric methods could be used to obtain a fast but correct classification of ancient mortar samples of different ages (Roman era and Renaissance). Ancient Roman frescoes from Museo Nazionale Romano (Terme di Diocleziano, Rome, Italy) and Renaissance frescoes from Sistine Chapel and Old Vatican Rooms (Vatican City) were analyzed by thermogravimetry (TG) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). Principal Component analysis (PCA) on the main thermal data evidenced the presence of two clusters, ascribable to the two different ages. Inspection of the loadings allowed to interpret the observed differences in terms of the experimental variables. PCA allowed differentiating the two kinds of mortars (Roman and Renaissance frescoes), and evidenced how the ancient Roman samples are richer in binder (calcium carbonate) and contain less filler (aggregate) than the Renaissance ones. It was also demonstrated how the coupling of thermoanalytical techniques and chemometric processing proves to be particularly advantageous when a rapid and correct differentiation and classification of cultural heritage samples of various kinds or ages has to be carried out. Graphical abstractPCA analysis of TG data allows differentiating mortar samples from different ages (Roman era and Renaissance).

  6. Renaissance plays as a useful source for the comparison between English and Croatian early modern medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atalic, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    This paper evaluates the differences between English and Croatian views of early modern medicine through the respective Renaissance plays. As Renaissance made no particular distinction between arts and sciences, plays of that time provide a very common source of medical narrative. During Renaissance both languages produced high literary achievements, which makes them exemplars among their Germanic and Slavic counterparts, and justifies this comparison, regardless of their significant differences. One should bear in mind that while England was a unified kingdom, with London as the major cultural centre, Croatia's division among the neighbouring powers produced several prominent cultural centres such as Zadar, Šibenik, Split, Hvar, Korčula, and the most important one, Dubrovnik. One should also bear in mind that the golden age of Croatian Renaissance plays had finished as early as 1567 with the death of Marin DrŽić, before it even started in England with the foundation of the first permanent theatrical companies in 1576. Along these lines, this paper compares their early modern attitudes toward medicine in general and men and women practitioners in particular. In this respect, it evaluates the influences of the origin, patronage, and religion of their authors. Special attention is given to William Shakespeare (1564-1616) and Marin DrŽić (1508-1567) as the exemplars of English and Croatian Renaissance literature.

  7. ‘The 19th-century construction of the Renaissance’: Katherine Wheeler, Victorian Perceptions of Renaissance Architecture, Farnham England and Burlington, Vermont: Ashgate, 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medina Lasansky

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Katherine Wheeler’s Victorian Perceptions of Renaissance Architecture provides a study of the architecture profession and the history of Renaissance architecture in nineteenth century England. Establishing a canon of Renaissance architectural history was key to the rise of architectural professionalism as well as the education of the architect. As we discover, the study of the Renaissance influenced design in England on all scales while also influencing the design of the architect himself.

  8. Molybdenum Metallopharmaceuticals Candidate Compounds - The "Renaissance" of Molybdenum Metallodrugs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurowska, Anna; Jurowski, Kamil; Szklarzewicz, Janusz; Buszewski, Boguslaw; Kalenik, Tatiana; Piekoszewski, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Metal-based drugs, also called "metallopharmaceuticals" or "metallodrugs", are examples of sophisticated compounds that have been used in inorganic medicinal chemistry as therapeutic agents for a long time. Few of them have shown substantially promising results and many of them have been used in different phases of clinical trials. The Mo-based metallodrugs were successfully applied in the past for treating conditions such as anemia or Wilson's disease. Moreover, Mo complexes are supposed to exert their effect by intercalation/ cleavage of DNA/RNA, arrest of the cell cycle, and alteration of cell membrane functions. However, in the current literature, there are no reliable and in-depth reviews about the hypothetical therapeutic applications of all of the known molybdenum complexes as metallopharmaceuticals/ metallodrugs. The main emphasis was on the in-depth review of the potential applications of Mo-based complexes in medicinal chemistry as metallopharmaceuticals in treating diseases such as cancer and tumors, Wilson's disease, diabetes mellitus, Huntington's disease, atherosclerosis, and anemia. It must be emphasized that today the development of innovative and new Mo-based metalo-pharmaceuticals is not rapid, and hence the aim of this paper was also to inspire colleagues working in the field of Mo compounds who are trying to find "signpost" for research. The authors hope that this article will increase interest and initiate the Renaissance of Mo-compounds among medicinal inorganic chemists. This paper is the first review article in the literature that refers to and emphasizes many different and complex aspects of possible applications and capabilities of Mo-based metallodrugs.

  9. Truffle renaissance in Poland - history, present and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa-Gruszecka, Aleksandra; Hilszczańska, Dorota; Gil, Wojciech; Kosel, Bogusław

    2017-06-15

    The use of truffles in Poland has a long tradition, yet due to some historical aspects, this knowledge was lost. Currently, truffles and truffle orchards are again receiving attention, and thanks to, e.g., historical data, they have solid foundations to be established. Publications relating to truffles between 1661 and 2017 were searched for in international and national databases, such as the database of PhD theses, Google Scholar, and catalogues of the National Library of Poland, the Jagiellonian Digital Library, the University Library of J. Giedroyc in Bialystok and the Lower Silesian Digital Library (DBC). A very meticulous survey of the literature on truffles showed that truffles have been known since at least 1661. In the 18th century, the fungi were considered a non-timber forest product. It is interesting to mention the impact of Polish Count Michał Jan Borch in understanding the nature of truffles. The whitish truffle (Tuber borchii) is named after him. The greatest number of publications regarding truffles can be observed at the first half of the 19th and 20th centuries. The fungi were present not only in cookbooks but also in scientific literature, and aspects of their ecology and medicinal use are considered. The "dark ages" for truffles, mainly for social reasons, occurred after the Second World War. In tough times, when Poland was under Soviet communist control (1945-1989), truffles as a luxurious product have been completely forgotten. However, at the end of the 20th century, truffles started receiving attention in Polish society. Yet, the real awakening began in the first decade of the twenty-first century when the first truffle orchards were established. One of them has already produced the first fruit bodies of summer truffle (Tuber aestivum). Truffles have been present in Polish culture for centuries. Their renaissance indicates the need for fostering sustainable agroforestry-centred initiatives aimed at helping truffle growers in growing the

  10. Vesalius and the emergence of veridical representation in Renaissance anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Gül A

    2013-01-01

    The Renaissance marks the introduction of veridical representation of anatomical structure into printed books. For centuries, anatomy that had relied solely on textual description and the authority of the written word was transformed. An existing graphic tradition only visualized function within a humoral theory, schematically "naming the parts" or mapping the "uses of the parts" for mnemonic purposes. In the sixteenth century, anatomists and artist began to apply their knowledge and skills to present the "fabric" of the dissected human body with increasing detail and accuracy, exemplified by the naturalistic illustrations of the brain in Vesalius' De humani corporis fabrica (Basel, 1543). How did this transformation occur? Among the causal factors, the importance the humanist textual scholarship will be shown not only in the recovery of the anatomical writings of Galen (129-ca. 216), in particular, but also in providing a model in establishing anatomical "truth" by a method of "comparison." It will be argued that Vesalius' comparative approach in dissection, using both human and animal preparations against Galen's textual description, paved the way for cumulative observations of greater detail, which in turn required the representational skills of artists. An analysis of Vesalius' views between 1538 and 1543 shows a shift in the use of illustrations from serving as a visual record to compensate for limited access to cadavers in teaching, to becoming an indispensable tool to accurately convey detailed anatomical structure through the medium of printing. With the Fabrica, morphology became divorced from humoral function and enduring paradigms established that dominated until the nineteenth century. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Entrepreneurial renaissance cities striving towards an era of rebirth and revival

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book explores the parallels between the Renaissance during the 14th to 16th centuries and the upheavals in human and physical sciences in the 21st Century that herald an insurgent entrepreneurial renaissance. The first Renaissance, conceived and developed in an urban environment, with the Medici family in Florence as pioneers, was a melting pot of art, culture, science and technology. It is in that context that entrepreneurship derived from artisan tradition and, hence, customized, was born to meet the demands and anticipate the needs of individual consumers. Starting with the mechanical technologies of the first industrial revolution, art, culture and science became separated from entrepreneurship. The latter took on Fordist features which depersonalized and, therefore, standardized the producer-consumer relationship. The emerging model of entrepreneurship returns to its origins in customization (e.g., 3D printing technologies, sharing/on-demand economy) strongly linked to the sequence "art-culture-scie...

  12. Andreas Vesalius as a renaissance innovative neuroanatomist: his 5th centenary of birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Marleide da Mota; Moscovici, Mauricio; Engelhardt, Eliasz

    2015-02-01

    Andreas Vesalius (1514-1564) is considered the Father of Modern Anatomy, and an authentic representative of the Renaissance. His studies, founded on dissection of human bodies, differed from Galeno, who based his work on dissection of animals, constituted a notable scientific advance. Putting together science and art, Vesalius associated himself to artists of the Renaissance, and valued the images of the human body in his superb work De Humani Corporis Fabrica.This paper aims to honor this extraordinary European Renaissance physician and anatomist, who used aesthetic appeal to bind text and illustration, science and art. His achievements are highlighted, with an especial attention on neuroanatomy. Aspects about his personal life and career are also focused.

  13. Gout in Duke Federico of Montefeltro (1422-1482): a new pearl of the Italian Renaissance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornaciari, Antonio; Giuffra, Valentina; Armocida, Emanuele; Caramella, Davide; Rühli, Frank J; Galassi, Francesco Maria

    2018-01-01

    The article examines the truthfulness of historical accounts claiming that Renaissance Duke Federico of Montefeltro (1422-1482) suffered from gout. By direct paleopathological assessment of the skeletal remains and by the philological investigation of historical and documental sources, primarily a 1461 handwritten letter by the Duke himself to his personal physician, a description of the symptoms and Renaissance therapy is offered and a final diagnosis of gout is formulated. The Duke's handwritten letter offers a rare testimony of ancient clinical self-diagnostics and Renaissance living-experience of gout. Moreover, the article also shows how an alliance between historical, documental and paleopathological methods can greatly increase the precision of retrospective diagnoses, thus helping to shed clearer light onto the antiquity and evolution of diseases.

  14. Applying the World Water and Agriculture Model to Filling Scenarios for the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villa, Daniel L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Tidwell, Vincent C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Passell, Howard D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Roberts, Barry L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-11-01

    The World Water and Agriculture Model has been used to simulate water, hydropower, and food sector effects in Egypt, Sudan, and Ethiopia during the filling of the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam reservoir. This unique capability allows tradeoffs to be made between filling policies for the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam reservoir. This Nile River Basin study is presented to illustrate the capacity to use the World Water and Agriculture Model to simulate regional food security issues while keeping a global perspective. The study uses runoff data from the Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change Coupled Model Inter-comparison Project Phase 5 and information from the literature in order to establish a reasonable set of hydrological initial conditions. Gross Domestic Product and population growth are modelled exogenously based on a composite projection of United Nations and World Bank data. The effects of the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam under various percentages of water withheld are presented.

  15. Res aut res publica: The Evidence from Italian Renaissance Manuscripts and Their Owners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M. McManamon

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines a key tension in Renaissance culture as reflected in the origin and provenance of manuscript books. Were Renaissance manuscripts the private property of individual owners or the common wealth of a lettered public? Even an officially public library could not escape that tension, whether through abuse of borrowing privileges or plundering of vulnerable holdings. Market forces encouraged theft, while impoverished scholars used their knowledge to supplement meager incomes. Alternatively, a sense of common wealth is reflected in an ex-libris indicating that a codex belonged to an individual “and his friends.” Book collecting, finally, becomes a helpful clue in discerning to what a scholar is committed. Some Renaissance clergymen used culture as a way to promote their ecclesiastical careers, while others collected and shared manuscripts as a way to promote tolerance.

  16. Andreas Vesalius as a renaissance innovative neuroanatomist: his 5th centenary of birth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marleide da Mota Gomes

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Andreas Vesalius (1514-1564 is considered the Father of Modern Anatomy, and an authentic representative of the Renaissance. His studies, founded on dissection of human bodies, differed from Galeno, who based his work on dissection of animals, constituted a notable scientific advance. Putting together science and art, Vesalius associated himself to artists of the Renaissance, and valued the images of the human body in his superb work De Humani Corporis Fabrica.This paper aims to honor this extraordinary European Renaissance physician and anatomist, who used aesthetic appeal to bind text and illustration, science and art. His achievements are highlighted, with an especial attention on neuroanatomy. Aspects about his personal life and career are also focused.

  17. Forschung weltweit anerkannt: lernen von Europa

    CERN Multimedia

    Lorbeere, K

    2006-01-01

    Europa is better than its reputation. On one hand, the old continent, with the CERN, has the most modern research center for particle physics of the world; in addition, international groupings of companies as Microsoft use the research laboratories in Europe and thus use the know-how of the European scientists

  18. The New Saudi Educational Renaissance: In between the "Capacity to Aspire" and the "Capacity to Remember"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavan, Annalisa

    2014-01-01

    In the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia investments in higher education have increased exponentially in recent years, and the New Saudi Educational Renaissance is attracting the attention of international academia. The purpose of this study is to draw on Saudi sources, with the aim of allowing Saudi voices to introduce their strategies for the design of a…

  19. Renaissance or a Backward Step? Disparities and Tensions in Two New Swedish Pathways in VET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglund, Ingrid; Loeb, Ingrid Henning

    2013-01-01

    This article builds on results from studies of two new pathways in Swedish upper secondary VET. A major reform was launched in 2011 and the restructuring was presented by the Minister of Education as a "renaissance for VET education". The conclusion of the Upper Secondary Commission is that "students shall be more specialised within…

  20. WWC Review of the Report "Philadelphia's Renaissance Schools Initiative: 18 Month Interim Report"

    Science.gov (United States)

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The study reviewed in this report examined the effects of Philadelphia's "Renaissance Schools Initiative" on students in K-8 schools after one year of implementation. Schools were selected for participation based on their School Performance Index (SPI) at the start of the 2010-11 school year. The SPI rates every school in Philadelphia…

  1. Origin of the cannula for tracheotomy during the middle ages and Renaissance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missori, Paolo; Brunetto, Giacoma M; Domenicucci, Maurizio

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this article was to trace the historical origin of the inserted cannula during tracheotomy. Tracheotomy is mentioned in most ancient medical texts, but the origin of cannula insertion into the windpipe is unclear. We reviewed the incunabula and Renaissance texts reporting the utilization of surgical cannulas and tracheotomy. The incunabula disclosed extended use of surgical cannulas during the middle ages and Renaissance. Although tracheotomy was advocated in acutely suffocating patients for a disease of the throat termed squinantia or angina, the first report of the procedure was found only at the end of the middle ages and a second during the middle Renaissance. The introduction of cannula use in tracheotomy was supported by a semantic misinterpretation by Antonio Musa Brasavola. The historical origin for tracheotomy in the middle ages and Renaissance is conflicting. Antonio Brasavola wrongly interpreted Avicenna's oral cannula introduced into the windpipe for angina. This misinterpretation allowed Giulio Casserio to draw the first curved cannula introduced for used during tracheotomy.

  2. Heralding a Renaissance for Corporate America--Relying on the People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss

    1984-01-01

    The key to an American corporate renaissance is the development of "participation management" skills and environments that allow for the full use of ideas that arise from within the corporation itself. Companies must relearn to trust their people and encourage them to use neglected creative capacities. (Author/MLW)

  3. Technical Writing for Women of the English Renaissance: Technology, Literacy, and the Emergence of a Genre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tebeaux, Elizabeth

    1993-01-01

    Examines technical books for women of the English renaissance as a microcosm for studying connections among the emergence of technical writing as a genre, the rise of literacy, expansion of knowledge and technology, and replacement of orality by textuality as a result of increasing knowledge. (SR)

  4. Art Appreciation, Farming, Measurement, Reading & Phonics, Renaissance: Daily Life, Sound & Light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Web Feet, 2002

    2002-01-01

    This annotated subject guide to Web sites for grades K-8 focuses on art appreciation, farming, measurement, reading and phonics, renaissance daily life, sound and light, and calendar connections for June observances. Specific grade levels are indicated for each annotation. (LRW)

  5. The Dutch Renaissance in a straightjacket: recent research on Netherlandish Art and Architecture in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ronnes, H.; Witte, A.

    2015-01-01

    During the last decade, research on Renaissance art and architecture in the northern Netherlands has tried to overcome persistent late nineteenth-century concepts connected to the nation-state, and started to adopt more dynamic ideas of culture and the arts in the period between 1450 and 1620.

  6. Multiple identifications and the dialogical self: Maori youngsters and the cultural renaissance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijl, A.H.M. van

    2006-01-01

    The renaissance of Maori culture and tradition has played a significant role in the political campaigns of New Zealand's indigenous population over the past few decades. At the same time, however, it has brought to light that many Maori youngsters are unable to construct a cultural identity in terms

  7. Ideas on Moral and Civil Upbringing of Personality in Italian and Ukrainian Pedagogy During the Renaissance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petruk Natalia

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Important aspects of moral and civic upbringing of personality based on studying the experience of humanist pedagogy establishment in the Italian Renaissance in XIV-XV centuries and the Ukrainian Renaissance in XVI-XVII centuries have been reviewed in the article. It has been found out that under the influence of Renaissance in XVI-XVII centuries Ukrainian pedagogy progressed not only in the Orthodox Christian paradigm of thinking, but was greatly enriched by the humanistic ideas of European origin as well and the matter of a person, a bright personality, endowed with unique personality traits, high ethical and Christian virtues, active and dynamic, was crucial for the forming of humanistic pedagogy. This resulted in increasing interest of Ukrainian philosophers to human problems, establishment of the value of personality, awareness of the importance of education and science in life. Intellect, education, moral virtues and work became the greatest personal qualities in works of Italian and Ukrainian humanists. Pedagogical culture during the Renaissance was also determined by ideas of civil humanism, need for patriotic education and personal action for the common good. Formation of civic sense and responsibility for own actions were of great importance.

  8. Renaissance Architecture of Central Scheme: Jerónimo Quijano and his Immediate Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Luis López González

    2015-10-01

    As references to Quijano´s architectural approach in his Hispanic environment, it should reflect upon certain reminiscences to Renaissance works in Eastern Andalusia, his direct influence in the Government of Orihuela and subsequently some of his possible influences in the Valencian territory.

  9. The Gaze of the Soul and of the Angel in the Renaissance Philosophy of Marsilio Ficino

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Uršič

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The Renaissance rediscovered the soul as the focus of the universe. Marsilio Ficino calls the soul the “bond of the world” (copula mundi, because it connects the earth and the heaven, immanence and transcendence, time and eternity. On the other hand, the centre of the world becomes more and more relative during the Renaissance period, and individual souls live more and more in their particular times and spaces. In Renaissance paintings, a soul's point of view is determined by perspective, as developed by Masaccio, Fra Angelico, Piero della Francesca et al., and the very position of the eye also features as a “symbolic form” (Erwin Panofsky. However, above each individual and “mobile” soul there are the wings of the “motionless” angel: super animam mobilem est immobilis angelus, as Ficino says in his renaissance Christianity, in reviewing the Platonic-Gnostic myth of the omnipresent angelic gaze. In the archetype of the angel Ficino perceives a metaphor for the all-knowing Intellect, towards which the human soul ascends. Following the iconology of Ernst Gombrich, this paper also takes notice of the influence of Ficino's philosophy on Botticelli's paintings.

  10. The Renaissance Art Academies: Implications for Leadership Education Practices and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Taking the perspective that leadership education is similar to art education created a bridge connecting the leadership education literature with the large and rich body of literature on art education and art history. A survey of the more prominent Renaissance art academies was employed to illuminate the education practices of that extraordinary…

  11. De harp van David: een pleidooi voor de vergeten schrijvers uit de renaissance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kempers, B.

    2007-01-01

    De kunstwerken van Rafael en Michelangelo zijn na hun ontstaan in de vroege zestiende eeuw wereldberoemd geworden. De uitvoerige theologische verhandelingen van hun tijdgenoten zijn daarentegen in de vergetelheid geraakt. Toch vormt de katholieke theologie van de renaissance de sleutel tot een goed

  12. Organization and Regulation of Fencing in the Realm of France in the Renaissance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dupuis Olivier

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available During the nineteenth century, many sources were published about the regulation of fencing in Renaissance France. Comparing those sources shows significant though incomplete uniformity in the formalities observed in the training of students of fencing, particularly in the process followed by the neophyte in his passage to mastery of the art of defence.

  13. The art in Abel Salazar's life (1889-1946)--a Portuguese Renaissance spirit of the twentieth century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabais, João-Maria

    2008-12-01

    Abel Salazar was a true renaissance spirit, scientist, doctor, humanist, artist and writer. His paintings combined realism with a very strong social sense. This article looks at his art and the influence that he had through it on his contemporaries.

  14. ‘A fare bella’: the visual and material culture of cosmetics in Renaissance Italy (1450-1540)

    OpenAIRE

    Spicer, Jacqueline Nicole

    2015-01-01

    This thesis maps out the roles of cosmetic use in Renaissance Italy from the period c.1450-1540, using books containing cosmetic recipes as the primary source material. Their content, dissemination, and use is explored as a means of creating a new understanding of a practice central to daily life and integral to ongoing arguments about the body. Recent scholarship has seen a rise in interest in books of recipes and secrets in the Renaissance and Early Modern periods, but there ...

  15. A Declining Region: Provincial Renaissance Revisited (Case of Volgograd Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drozdova Yuliya

    2014-12-01

    context the author suggests changing the trajectory of development, building a positive image of the Volgograd region, enhancing the investment attractiveness of the region, improving the quality of life, building on the advantageous geographic and historical situation (the region’s past, natural and climatic conditions, natural resources, economic and geographic situation, agrarian conditions, prestigious universities, building trust in the authorities due to the efforts on the part of regional and municipal administration and improving the reputation of public servants, which would promote the strategy of adjusting inter-regional inequality and a renaissance of a provincial region.

  16. Report from the field: Overview of the Sixth Annual Vaccine Renaissance Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spero, Denice; Levitz, Lauren; De Groot, Anne S

    2013-07-01

    The Sixth Annual Vaccine Renaissance Conference, hosted by the Institute for Immunology and Informatics (iCubed) at the University of Rhode Island (URI), took place on October 15-17, 2012. This conference provides a forum for the review of current progress in the discovery and development of vaccines, and creates an environment for the exchange of ideas. Dr. Joel McCleary opened the conference with a warning about the importance of preparing for well-defined biowarfare threats, including tularemia and Staphylococcal enterotoxin B. Following the keynote address, sessions explored biodefense and preparation for pandemic and biowarfare threats; vaccines for emerging and re-emerging neglected tropical diseases; animal vaccines and human health; and vaccine vectors and the human microbiome. In this issue of Human Vaccines and Immunotherapeutics, seven Vaccine Renaissance Conference speakers will showcase their work; here, we describe a few of the conference highlights.

  17. History of spine biomechanics: part II--from the Renaissance to the 20th century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naderi, Sait; Andalkar, Niteen; Benzel, Edward C

    2007-02-01

    Spine biomechanics provide the foundation for the disciplines of spine medicine and spine surgery. Although modern spine biomechanics emerged during the second half of the last century, it has many ancient, medieval, and post-Renaissance roots. In Part I of this series, the ancient and medieval roots of spine biomechanics were reviewed. In Part II, the effects of post-Renaissance scientists on the development of modern spine biomechanics, as well as the studies on gait, bone, and muscles performed before the 20th century, are reviewed. Subsequently, war-related studies performed in the 20th century contributed to the formation of modern biomechanics. The first biomechanics-related organizations and scientific publications did not emerge until the second half of the 20th century. These events provided the final bricks in the foundation that facilitated the emergence of modern spine biomechanics research.

  18. Renaissance bookbindings on Slovene reformation prints from the Slovene National Museum in Ljubljana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Svoljšak

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Four of these prints: two Dalmatin’s Bibles, Dalmatin’s Lepe karszhanske molitve and Trubar’s Hishna postilla have leather stiff board decorative renaissance bindings while Bohorič’s Arcticae horulae succisivae has a stiff board vellum binding.A short overview of the European renaissance bookbindnig characteristics and decorative motives development is presented in the first part, followed by the codicological census. The second part of the research consists of decorative tools and motives clasiffication and an individual motive analysis. An overview of the decorative motives on four decorative reformation bindings in the context of the European reformation book decoration styles with special emphasis on the Wittemberg reformation book decoration style is given in the final analysis.

  19. The body republic: social order and human body in Renaissance medical thought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barona, J L

    1993-01-01

    The representation of the human body built by medicine had historical references and analogical relations with other compounds of the culture of each particular period. The organic model, the coordinated and hierarchical dependence of the body parts, its subordination to a prevailing element (the brain or the heart, depending on the authors and times) guided directly by a soul infused by God... These are some of the aspects which reflect the relation between the image of the body and the justification of the ideological and social order, as a natural one. Among the numerous sources of Renaissance medicine that could bring significant facts about this theme, the present work is based on anatomical treatises and books of natural philosophy like those written by Bernardino Montaña de Monserrate, Alonso de Fuentes, Realdo Colombo, Hieronimus Montaltus, Andrea Cesalpino and Miguel Sabuco, all of whom are good exponents of Renaissance anatomy and physiological thought.

  20. Some Renaissance, Baroque, and contemporary cultural elaborations of the art of memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bimler, David L

    2013-12-01

    The target article addresses historical and present-day mnemotechnics as a practice. It also deserves scrutiny as culture writ small. For would-be Hermetic adepts of the Renaissance and Baroque, the ancient art of memory (AAOM) provided both an iconography and a projective-test vision of possibilities. In contemporary fiction, Memory Palaces become a metaphor for the workings of mind, of culture, and of information technology.

  1. THE REGISTRY OF SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS PATIENTS, A EURASIAN COHORT (RENAISSANCE)

    OpenAIRE

    E. A. Aseeva; A. I. Dubikov; L. A. Levasheva; G. M. Koilubaeva; M. K. Dzhetybaeva; V. T. Eralieva; E. R. Karimova; B. G. Isaeva; M. B. Kalykova; M. M. Saparbaeva; S. M. Isaeva; Zh. I. Omarbekova; E. S. Solovyeva; T M Reshetnyak; N G Klyukvina

    2016-01-01

    The article presents the data of international registries and cohort studies of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). It justifies the purpose and objectives of the international registry of SLE patients, a Eurasian cohort (RENAISSANCE), which was launched in 2012 and amalgamated the leading rheumatology centers of the Russian Federation (V.A. Nasonova Research Institute of Rheumatology; Department of Rheumatology,  Pacific State Medical University), Kazakhstan (Department of Rheumatology,  S.D...

  2. Renaissance culture at the court of James V, 1528-1542

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Andrea Susan

    1997-01-01

    This study of the cultural activities of the Scottish court in the adult reign of King James V reveals a vibrant, sophisticated and confident outlook, which was more closely integrated with the developments of the northern-European Renaissance than has been apparent hitherto. James V utilised the limited resources at his disposal to good effect, and his cultural patronage propagated multi-layered images of royal power. Continuity with the traditions established by his Stewart forbears, especi...

  3. Francis Bacon and the "Interpretation of Nature" in the late Renaissance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serjeantson, Richard

    2014-12-01

    The "interpretation of nature" (interpretatio naturae) is the leading idea in Francis Bacon's natural philosophy. But by contrast with his ideas about method, induction, or experiment, the significance of the "interpretation of nature" has received very little scholarly attention. This essay tests the originality of Bacon's idea by means of a focused survey of existing forms of Renaissance natural knowledge-Aristotelian and anti-Aristotelian natural philosophy, Galenic and Paracelsian medicine, natural magic, physiognomy, natural history-before turning to consider the much more prominent place of "interpretation" in the fields of Renaissance logic, revealed and natural theology, and law. It finds that Bacon's application of the idea of "interpretation" to nature was highly original, but also that certain important aspects of his conception have analogies in Renaissance civil law. The essay concludes by exploring the implications of these findings for a recent body of scholarship in the history of the sciences that invokes the notion of the "interpretation of nature" to characterize pre-Baconian natural philosophy more generally.

  4. From pain to pleasure: The troping of elegy in the renaissance Italian madrigal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medić Milena

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the Renaissance period, melancholia emerged as a dramatic cultural phenomenon among the intellectual and artistic elites, with a locus in elegy it gave form to the Renaissance poetics of loss, pain and shedding of tears, expressing essentially the fantasy about death as a prerequisite for revival. The possibilities of confronting the threats of death were being found in its very nature whose inherent ambiguity was determined by the principles of Thanatos and Eros. The creative act of the troping of elegy proved to be an effective literary and musical strategy for the transcendence of death including the procedures of homeopathization, pastoralization, heroization and erotization of elegy. The elegiac tropic transcendence of death found its most complex expression in the madrigal which in turn added to its basic polyphonic procedure the opposing stylistic elements of the pastoral genres (canzonettas and villanellas or heroic solo or choral recitations and it consequently acquired a hybrid form in the last decades of the 16th century, and thereby proved to be a cultural trope itself. The aim of this article is to examine the musical implications of the tropic strategies of facing death within Francesco Petrarch’s, Torquato Tasso’s, and Battista Gurini’s poetic models of the art of loving death, using the remarkable examples of the Italian madrigal practice of the late Renaissance. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. 177019: Identities of Serbian Music in the World Cultural Context

  5. A psychoanalytic appreciation of Giotto's mode of artistic representation and its implications for Renaissance art and science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatt, S J

    1994-01-01

    This paper applies developmental psychoanalytic and cognitive psychological principles to an evaluation of Giotto's Padua frescoes as pivotal in the transition from a medieval to a Renaissance mode of thought. The formulation stresses the importance of the emergence of triadic or operational thinking involving the coordination of multiple dimensions and the capacity for transforming them with reversibility, reciprocity, and conservation. This developmental achievement also results in an expanded sense of time and space. These concepts provide a basis for appreciating more fully the transition from the dyadic classical and medieval artistic representations to the triadic representations of Renaissance art, especially the contributions of Giotto's Padua frescoes to the development of the concept of infinity in nature, a concept central to both Renaissance art and science. The development of this concept in Renaissance thought raises a question about the relation of art and science. Two major modes of encoding or representing experiences are discussed--a sequential lexical and a nonsequential nonverbal mode (or word and thing representations). These formulations lead to the identification of a process that suggests that developments in art often precede those in science and thereby contribute to a fuller appreciation of Giotto's Padua frescoes as a landmark contribution with implications for the entirety of Renaissance thought.

  6. The Renaissance. Grade 7 Model Lesson for Standard 7.8. World History and Geography: Medieval and Early Modern Times. California History-Social Science Course Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachlod, Michelle, Ed.

    California State Standard 7.8 is delineated in the following manner: "Students analyze the origins, accomplishments, and diffusion of the Renaissance," in terms of the way in which the revival of classical learning and the arts affected a new interest in humanism; the importance of Florence in the early stages of the Renaissance and the…

  7. Da Vinci Coding? Using Renaissance Artists’ Depictions of the Brain to Engage Student Interest in Neuroanatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Todd D.

    2013-01-01

    This report describes a pair of brief, interactive classroom exercises utilizing Renaissance artists’ depictions of the brain to help increase student interest in learning basic neuroanatomy. Undergraduate students provided anonymous quantitative evaluations of both exercises. The feedback data suggest that students found both exercises engaging. The data also suggest that the first exercise increased student interest in learning more about neuroanatomy in general, while the second provided useful practice in identifying major neuroanatomical structures. Overall, the data suggest that these exercises may be a useful addition to courses that introduce or review neuroanatomical concepts. PMID:23805058

  8. Heather Clark. The Ulster Renaissance - Poetry in Belfast 1962-1972

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryvonne BOISSEAU

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The idea of what has been termed an Ulster Renaissance to refer to the surge of new poetry in the North of Ireland in the late 1960s and 1970s together with what is known as the Belfast Group is often dismissed by the poets themselves and serious critics as a mere shorthand and inaccurate way to describe the vitality of that decade. Heather Clark’s study, originally a PhD dissertation, challenges this and argues for the significant impact of Hobsbaum’s group, later Heaney’s group, as well as ...

  9. Palaeopathology of the earlobe crease (Frank's sign): New insights from Renaissance art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galassi, Francesco M; Borghi, Claudio; Ballestriero, Roberta; Habicht, Michael E; Henneberg, Maciej; Rühli, Frank J

    2017-06-01

    Several studies have associated the earlobe crease sign, discovered by Sanders T. Frank in 1973, with cardiovascular pathology, yet very few studies have focused on the antiquity of this trait, with the most ancient one thought to date back to the Roman Emperor Hadrian (76-138CE). This article presents two more cases from the Italian Renaissance in the works of the artist Andrea Mantegna (1431-1506) and examines them in a multidisciplinary fashion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. [Burn treatment in the renaissance by Fabricius Hildanus--a historical appraisal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennekampff, H-O

    2009-12-01

    A first comprehensive textbook on burns treatment was written in 1607 by Fabry of Hilden (Fabricius Hildanus). This monograph describes cause, diagnosis, treatment, and complications of burn injuries. Besides a variety of topical ointments with promising herbal ingredients like onion and camphor, surgical procedures like necrectomies, escharotomies and syndactely treatment are described for the first time ever. Scar management including splinting devices is another interesting topic. Some of the therapeutic procedures are still valid today. Thus this renaissance piece of medical writing belongs to the pedigree of surgery.

  11. Renaissance des études afromexicaines et production de nouvelles identités ethniques

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffmann, Odile

    2005-01-01

    Renaissance des études afromexicaines et production de nouvelles identités ethniques. Les travaux sur les populations noires au Mexique ont longtemps été cantonnés au cercle restreint de quelques spécialistes, principalement historiens. Depuis quelques années, les études se multiplient et abordent des thématiques contemporaines concernant ces populations certes minoritaires mais qui commencent à exprimer publiquement des revendications d’ordre culturel et, plus timidement, politique. La révis...

  12. [Projected shadows in the renaissance. Can a cultural feature be revived ?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquesson, François

    2011-01-01

    The history of art reveals that painters have rarely tried to depict projected shadows. They appeared in the art of ancient Greece, in Greco-roman art, and then disappeared until the 15(th) century. None can be found in Asian art or any other non European art. Yet to date, no scholar has reflected on this troubled history, one that provides a specific link between the Renaissance and classical antiquity. This paper seeks to fill this gap by studying projected shadows as "cultural markers" with a specific history.

  13. Da vinci coding? Using renaissance artists' depictions of the brain to engage student interest in neuroanatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Todd D

    2013-01-01

    This report describes a pair of brief, interactive classroom exercises utilizing Renaissance artists' depictions of the brain to help increase student interest in learning basic neuroanatomy. Undergraduate students provided anonymous quantitative evaluations of both exercises. The feedback data suggest that students found both exercises engaging. The data also suggest that the first exercise increased student interest in learning more about neuroanatomy in general, while the second provided useful practice in identifying major neuroanatomical structures. Overall, the data suggest that these exercises may be a useful addition to courses that introduce or review neuroanatomical concepts.

  14. Surgically repaired cleft lips depicted in paintings of the late Gothic period and the Renaissance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirsig, W; Haase, S; Palm, F

    2001-04-01

    Paintings and drawings by Lucas Moser, Leonardo da Vinci, Albrecht Dürer, and Jacob Cornelisz van Oostsanen suggest that they employed people who had had cleft lips operated on as models for their works of art. Created between 1431 and 1520, the portraits show diagnostic facial profiles with a curved nasal dorsum, short columella, maxillary retrusion, and pseudoprogenia. The first medical illustration of cleft lip surgery was published in 1564 by Ambroise Paré. It was therefore late Gothic and Renaissance artists who depicted the conspicuous signs of surgically treated patients with cleft lip more than 130 years before the surgeons. Copyright 2001 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons.

  15. Corps, apparences vestimentaires et identités en France à la Renaissance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Paresys

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Un corps vêtu spécifique émerge à la Renaissance en France et particulièrement à la Cour. Le vêtement impose sa marque sur le corps, accentue le dimorphisme sexuel des apparences, et donne à celles-ci rectitude ou distorsion, transformant le corps en une surface décorative sur laquelle peut s’exprimer la magnificence des souverains et celle de leur cour. Ce corps vêtu résulte de l’influence de modes européennes et de nouvelles normes de civilité qui construisent la présentation de soi. Elles trouvent leur pleine expression à la cour où le corps de mode aristocratique affiche une éloquence distinctive et cosmopolite. Dans le même temps, les identités qu’inculque le vêtement au corps paraissent menacées par les transferts de pratiques vestimentaires entre les sexes, entre les groupes sociaux et entre les nations, entraînant un malaise envers ce brouillage des apparences qui prend une couleur particulière durant les guerres civiles quand se pose de manière sanglante la question des identités et de la conscience nationale.Body, Dress and Identities in Renaissance France. A specific type of clothed body emerged in 16th century France especially at Court. Clothing put its mark on the body, accentuating sexual dimorphism, imposing either Renaissance rectitude or distortions, transforming the body into a decorative surface for displaying magnificence. Its specificity resulted from the influence of various vestimentary and decorative fashions, starting with the new kinds of civility circulating in Renaissance Europe, which fashioned self-presentation. It found its fullest expression on the bodies of cosmopolitan aristocrats seeking a distinctive eloquence for their particular identity. At the same time, the identities which clothes imprinted on their wearer seemed threatened by transfers of vestimentary practices between sexes, sexual groups, and/or nations. The unease created by this mixture of appearances reflects that of

  16. The renaissance begins with you ... the search is on for best practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingston, M E

    1998-01-01

    A new spirit of innovation is arising in health care. Just as the historical renaissance opened new frontiers of European art, architecture, science, and literature, we have the opportunity to release a new wave of innovation that will revolutionize healthcare delivery. The means are near at hand. Never before has our knowledge been so deep, technology so powerful, or communications so fast and wide. Yet, like medieval scholars, isolated in our monasteries, we have so far had limited effect in positively changing the system. Real change begins today--as soon as we begin talking to one another, comparing our experiences, sharing our problems, devising solutions, and imagining the future together.

  17. A pair of little gilded shoes: commission, cost, and meaning in Renaissance footwear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on women's luxury footwear to examine issues of economic, material, and familial life in Renaissance Italy. It uses graphic work by Albrecht Dürer to explore footwear design, and draw from disparate sources to propose a new method for evaluating its cost. The article argues that sumptuous footwear was available for a range of prices that are not reflected in surviving payment records, and that it was largely less expensive than moralists and legislators implied. In conclusion, it employs Minerbetti documentation to consider the role particular shoes may have played in developing personal subjectivity.

  18. NAPLES, 1629: BUREAUCRACY, WAR FINANCE AND THE “RENAISSANCE STATE”

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    Antonio Calabria

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This essay examines the financial situation of the Kingdom of Naples in 1629 through an analysis of the state budget for that year. It details the difficult condition of the exchequer in Naples on the cusp of the economic crisis of the seventeenth century and of the all-consuming hostilities of the Thirty Years’ War. It highlights the idiosyncratic link between bureaucracy and warfinance in Naples and shows that strong elements of tradition and innovation were tightly entwined in the workings of the “Renaissance state”.

  19. Analisys Of The Main Character In Oliver Bowden’s Novel Assassin’s Creed Renaissance

    OpenAIRE

    Fadillah, Tengku Danu Rizky

    2013-01-01

    This paper entitled “The Analysis of Main Characters In Oliver Bowden’s Novel Assassin’s Creed Renaissance. This novel tells the story of a boy who did everything possible to defend the dignity of his family who had been in slander and sentenced to death. There are four main characters in the novel “Assassin’s Creed Renaissance” namely: Ezio Auditore da Firenze, Cristina Calfucci, Leonardo da Vinci, and Rodrigo Borgia. Ezio is the son of Giovanni Auditore who is the owner of the largest banks...

  20. The Renaissance of Nuclear Energy in the Shadow of Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conolley, Heather L.

    In the last decade, nuclear energy has experienced a renaissance of interest across the globe. Even in the wake of the Fukushima disaster, numerous countries have reaffirmed their commitment to building nuclear reactors. Why? Why are countries willing to take on the risk of nuclear energy production, given the potential devastation that can result from nuclear catastrophes, the increased risk of nuclear weapons proliferation, and unresolved issues of radioactive waste disposal? What determines a country's nuclear energy policy, and more specifically, is climate change a major driver of the renaissance? This dissertation offers a multi-method approach to answering these questions, with particular emphasis on the relationship between nuclear energy and climate change. A look at the history of nuclear energy worldwide reveals a remarkable consistency of issues, actors and events that have shaped the nuclear debate. Concerns about energy security and the need to meet growing electricity demand have been enduring motivations since the 1950s -- as have clandestine desires for acquiring nuclear weapons capabilities. Unique to the contemporary period are concerns about global warming. Yet despite the popular and widespread assertion that climate change is a driver of the renaissance, the search for evidence produces mixed results. Ultimately, this study uses quantitative statistical methods to determine the factors that influence nuclear energy policy. The results indicate that climate change mitigation is not a primary motivation for most countries to pursue nuclear energy, but mitigation may be a driver for those countries already in the advanced planning and construction phases of nuclear reactors since 2005. Other factors are important as well, including future energy needs, level of development, desalination, export development strategies, and whether or not the country has a strategic rival. Climate change is the global issue of our time. Yet in using nuclear energy

  1. 'Epidemic' of hand deformities in the French Renaissance paintings of Jean and François Clouet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisz, G M; Albury, W R; Matucci-Cerinic, M; Lazzeri, D

    2016-09-01

    This article analyses the nature of the multiple finger anomalies found in portraits by the French Renaissance artistic dynasty, the Clouets. The multiplicity of finger anomalies could be either innocent congenital variants, or pathological and traumatic deformities. In view of the presence of such `beautifying variations' in the works of other Renaissance artists, the authors decided that these features were not the result of an epidemic of deformities, but instead represented a stylistic approach in paintings of this period at the French Court. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Association of Physicians. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. The Oculist's Eye: Connections between Cataract Couching, Anatomy, and Visual Theory in the Renaissance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Tawrin

    2017-01-01

    We now know that cataract couching involves depressing an occluded crystalline lens to the bottom of the vitreous chamber, but from the time of Galen until the seventeenth-century cataracts were thought to be separate concretions arising between the crystalline lens and the pupil. From Antiquity through the Renaissance, the combination of visual theory in which the crystalline humor is the author of vision, and surgical experience—that couching cataracts restored some degree of sight—resulted in anatomists depicting a large space between the crystalline lens and the pupil. In the Renaissance, oculists—surgical specialists with little higher education or connections to learned surgery or medicine—overwhelmingly performed eye surgeries. This article examines how the experience and knowledge of oculists, of barber-surgeons, and of learned surgeons influenced one another on questions of anatomy, visual theory, and surgical experience. By analyzing the writings of the oculist George Bartisch (c. 1535–1607), the barber-surgeon Ambroise Paré (1510–1590), and the learned surgeon Hieronymus Fabricius ab Aquapendente (1533–1619), we see that the oculists’ understanding of the eye—an eye constructed out of the probing, tactile experience of eye surgery—slowly lost currency among the learned toward the beginning of the seventeenth century.

  3. [Brief history of lead poisoning: from Egyptian civilization to the Renaissance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles-Osorio, María Ludivina; Sabath, Ernesto

    2014-01-01

    The exposition to lead in the Antiquity is one of the first environmental health risks in the history of the mankind. In the ancient cultures of Egypt, Crete and Sumer there was no reports of an important exposition to this metal. The first clinical data is described in the Corpus Hipocraticcus, however was Nicandrus of Colophon the first to make a thorough description of the clinical manifestations of this disease. There was an increase in the exposition to this metal in times of the Roman empire and even some researchers propose that Julius Cesar and Octavio had clinical manifestations associated with lead poisoning. Paul of Aegina in the 7th century (a.C.) describes the first epidemic associated with lead intoxication, however in the Middle Ages the use of lead decrease until the Renaissance period in which lead poisoning affects mostly painters, metal-smithers and miners. Some studies done in the ice-layers of Greenland showed that the environmental pollution by lead during the Roman empire and the Renaissance was important.

  4. The ReNAissanCe of mRNA-based cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Lint, Sandra; Renmans, Dries; Broos, Katrijn; Dewitte, Heleen; Lentacker, Ine; Heirman, Carlo; Breckpot, Karine; Thielemans, Kris

    2015-02-01

    About 25 years ago, mRNA became a tool of interest in anticancer vaccination approaches. However, due to its rapid degradation in situ, direct application of mRNA was confronted with considerable skepticism during its early use. Consequently, mRNA was for a long time mainly used for the ex vivo transfection of dendritic cells, professional antigen-presenting cells known to stimulate immunity. The interest in direct application of mRNA experienced a revival, as researchers became aware of the many advantages mRNA offers. Today, mRNA is considered to be an ideal vehicle for the induction of strong immune responses against cancer. The growing numbers of preclinical trials and as a consequence the increasing clinical application of mRNA as an off-the-shelf anticancer vaccine signifies a renaissance for transcript-based antitumor therapy. In this review, we highlight this renaissance using a timeline providing all milestones in the application of mRNA for anticancer vaccination.

  5. Adipocyte Liver Kinase b1 Suppresses Beige Adipocyte Renaissance Through Class IIa Histone Deacetylase 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yangmeng; Paulo, Esther; Wu, Dongmei; Wu, Yixuan; Huang, Wendong; Chawla, Ajay; Wang, Biao

    2017-12-01

    Uncoupling protein 1 + beige adipocytes are dynamically regulated by environment in rodents and humans; cold induces formation of beige adipocytes, whereas warm temperature and nutrient excess lead to their disappearance. Beige adipocytes can form through de novo adipogenesis; however, how "beiging" characteristics are maintained afterward is largely unknown. In this study, we show that beige adipocytes formed postnatally in subcutaneous inguinal white adipose tissue lost thermogenic gene expression and multilocular morphology at the adult stage, but cold restored their beiging characteristics, a phenomenon termed beige adipocyte renaissance. Ablation of these postnatal beige adipocytes inhibited cold-induced beige adipocyte formation in adult mice. Furthermore, we demonstrated that beige adipocyte renaissance was governed by liver kinase b1 and histone deacetylase 4 in white adipocytes. Although neither presence nor thermogenic function of uncoupling protein 1 + beige adipocytes contributed to metabolic fitness in adipocyte liver kinase b1-deficient mice, our results reveal an unexpected role of white adipocytes in maintaining properties of preexisting beige adipocytes. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  6. Building an urban 'renaissance': fragmented services and the production of inequality in Greater Downtown Detroit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucet, Brian; Smit, Edske

    2016-01-01

    Downtown Detroit has been undergoing a renaissance in recent years which is in stark contrast to the economic and social situation in much of the rest of the city. This renaissance has been taking place despite the city's ability to provide good municipal services such as streetlights, security, public space and transport. This article focuses on how four areas which constitute part of Greater Downtown Detroit have relied on different combinations of actors to create and provide the services and amenities deemed necessary for capital investment and middle-class consumption. Each area has its own initiatives and actors who implement them, further fragmenting the city between its core and periphery. Renewed public spaces, private police forces and resident initiatives in middle-class neighborhoods have been created to serve specific needs of the small areas they serve. Rather than being unique, Detroit is an extreme example of fragmented and polarized urbanism which is part and parcel of contemporary cities. We argue that rather than passively reflecting existing socio-spatial divides, these private initiatives in Greater Downtown Detroit actively contribute to the production of sociospatial inequalities across the city.

  7. Breast cancer surgery: an historical narrative. Part I. From prehistoric times to Renaissance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakorafas, George H; Safioleas, Michael

    2009-11-01

    Cancer was known as a disease since prehistoric times. Management of breast cancer evolved slowly through centuries in the ancient world up to the Renaissance. This period is marked by the absence of any scientifically verifiable understanding of the true nature of cancer and its natural history and consequently by a lack of effective treatment. Breast has been considered as a symbol of femininity, fertility and beauty. Hippocrates proposed that breast cancer, among other neoplasms, was a 'systemic disease' caused by an excess of black bile. The humoral theory was further supported by Galen and dominated for centuries in medicine. Fulguration and breast amputation by using various instruments to achieve a rapid operation were widely used up to the 18th century. The Renaissance was a revolutionary period, since it stimulated medical practice; at that time physicians started to scientifically study medicine. Vesalius greatly contributed in the advancement of surgery, and he vigorously opposed Galen's doctrines. Many great surgeons of that time (including Paré, Cabrol, Servetto, Scultetus, Tulp, Fabry von Hilded, etc.) advanced the science of surgery. Interestingly, Bartoleny Gabrol (1590) in Montpellier advocated radical mastectomy, which was popularised by Halsted, 300 years later. However, the lack of anaesthesia and the problem of wound infections (due to the lack of the aseptic techniques) generated significance and often problems for the surgeons of that time. Surgery was often 'heroic' but primitive and even inhumane by current standards. Therapeutic nihilism was the prevailing altitude regarding breast cancer, at least among the vast majority of surgeons.

  8. The beginnings of education of the deaf persons: Renaissance Europe (XIV-XVI century

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    Radić-Šestić Marina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to indicate a turnover of the society towards deaf persons which was brought by the historic Renaissance period, from the XIV to XVI century. It is well known fact that handicapped persons were marginalized in the Middle Ages by the broader social community and that charitable care within churches and monasteries was considered to be the only legitimate form of help to those who were designated by God to expiate the sins of their ancestors. The weakening of the church authority and the improvement of science in the XV century lead to increased interest in medicine, that has also reflected on the attitudes of experts towards deaf people who started to be more actively interested in them. The Renaissance has begotten the first teachers of the deaf, as well as the first deaf artists who have been recognized and revered by society, and that had a crucial impact on the change of comprehension of deafness and attitudes towards the possibilities of the deaf. All this contributed to laying the foundations for more organized work with the deaf, which has occurred in Europe in the XVIII century.

  9. Bioprospecting the African Renaissance: The new value of muthi in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reihling, Hanspeter CW

    2008-01-01

    This article gives an overview of anthropological research on bioprospecting in general and of available literature related to bioprospecting particularly in South Africa. It points out how new insights on value regimes concerning plant-based medicines may be gained through further research and is meant to contribute to a critical discussion about the ethics of Access and Benefit Sharing (ABS). In South Africa, traditional healers, plant gatherers, petty traders, researchers and private investors are assembled around the issues of standardization and commercialization of knowledge about plants. This coincides with a nation-building project which promotes the revitalization of local knowledge within the so called African Renaissance. A social science analysis of the transformation of so called Traditional Medicine (TM) may shed light onto this renaissance by tracing social arenas in which different regimes of value are brought into conflict. When medicinal plants turn into assets in a national and global economy, they seem to be manipulated and transformed in relation to their capacity to promote health, their market value, and their potential to construct new ethics of development. In this context, the translation of socially and culturally situated local knowledge about muthi into global pharmaceuticals creates new forms of agency as well as new power differentials between the different actors involved. PMID:18371221

  10. Cultural relations between Hungary and Albania during the period of Humanism and Renaissance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhamet Mala

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Cultural Hungarian-Albanian relations during the Middle Ages are characterized by a relatively poor intensity. Actually, relations between these two countries are more intense in the political field and especially through the partnership between Gjergj Kastrioti Skanderbeg and John Hunyadi. Regarding the origin, the Hungarian culture identity is rather distinct from the Albanian one. Lack of cultural contacts, among others, was conditioned also by the fact that these relations were held under war circumstances and their primary aim was the common defense from Ottoman attacks. Actually, the Albanian medieval culture remained a Mediterranean culture with elements of Byzantine influence in the continental and southern areas. Meanwhile, Hungary belonged to Central Europe, which, even though far away from Mediterranean cultural mainstream, sought to be influenced by this culture, namely by the Renaissance that emanated exactly in the Mediterranean region. It was Matthias Corvinus effort, regarding the cultural influence of the Mediterranean and Renaissance in Hungary but also the fact that Hungary possessed some of the most important towns of the Adriatic coast and particularly Ragusa. This city was the center where cultural relations between Albanian and Hungary started and became intensified in the religious, intellectual and human field.

  11. Characterisation and reproduction of yellow pigments used in central Italy for decorating ceramics during Renaissance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bultrini, G.; Fragalà, I.; Ingo, G. M.; Lanza, G.

    2006-06-01

    This study presents the characterisation of prototypical yellow pigments used during the Renaissance period in Italy and the successful reproduction of homologous materials in accordance with the ancient recipes. Moreover, a large number of yellow decorative layers of Sicilian ceramic artefacts dated back from 13th to the 19th century have been selected and the main chemical, structural and minero-petrografic features have been studied by X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectrometry. These results have been compared with literature data of some yellow decorations of Renaissance ceramics made in central Italy. Comparison has also been made with homologous materials that have been successfully reproduced in accordance with ancient recipes described by Cipriano Piccolpasso in the textbook: “I Tre Libri dell’Arte del Vasaio” using the same ingredients proposed by this artist. Such yellow materials reproduce the typical yellow colorants used by craftsmen of relevant sites for ceramic fabrication in central Italy, namely Città di Castello, Urbino and Castel Durante, during the 16th century. Comparative arguments have shown some intriguing differences that are indicators of both technological transfer processes between central and southern Italy as well as of some local implementations likely due to specific raw materials locally available.

  12. Renaissance Scientists: Collaboration across disciplines to meet the world's water-related challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwelle, M. C.

    2014-12-01

    Water is the source for pressures throughout the world as supplies of freshwater become more scarce and stressed. These pressures can be realized through the lens of water science, policy, geopolitics, food security, and even military conflicts. Combined with a boom in global population, these pressures provide wide-reaching problems that need to be addressed presently and in the future across many disciplines including the sciences, engineering, economics, and policy. These issues lead to a complex system of problems that cannot be addressed without a multidisciplinary approach. As we enter a world where regions of water scarcity become the norm, water scientists and engineers need to be at the table - with experts in other fields - shaping solutions in the areas of policy, disaster response, and management. I will argue that, as early-career scientists, there are exciting new challenges that are open, or will be opening, to us as experts in our respective fields. I will also provide my insights and opinions as to what we can do to position ourselves to impact these issues. These beliefs form the basis of the "Renaissance scientist," taking its name from the polymaths of the Renaissance and Enlightenment. The name suggests that we need to not only leverage our own area expertise, but also be able to effectively learn from and communicate with experts in seemingly diverse fields to meet the world's water-related challenges.

  13. Educational Thought of Ukraine and Poland within Renaissance Culture: From the History of Intellectual Discourse of XVI-XVII Centuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petruk, Natalia

    2014-01-01

    The article deals with the peculiarities of formation of pedagogical thought in Ukraine and Poland during the propagation of Renaissance ideas into pedagogical culture of 16th-17th centuries. It has been emphasized that founders of humanistic pedagogical culture in Ukraine were such outstanding scientists as Grygoriy Sanotskyi, Yuriy Drogobych,…

  14. Re-Orienting Ethiopia's Educational Policy in the Classical Humanist Perspectives of Renaissance Utopias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debele, Meskerem L.

    2018-01-01

    Ethiopia has launched a grand scheme of renaissance to realise fast-paced economic growth. The two Growth and Transformation Plans spanning five years each (2010/11-2015/16 and 2016/17- 2020/21) outlined major targets towards which the country intends to mobilise all its resources. In the education sector, this vision is understood as producing a…

  15. Renaissance Science and Literature: Benedetti, Ovid and the Transformations of Phaeton's Myth after Copernicus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omodeo, Pietro Daniel

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims at showing the close ties between Renaissance literature and science as emerge from the use and the transformation, in a post-Copernican context, of the myth of Phaeton--according to Greek mythology: the boy who tried to conduct the chariot of the Sun and died in this attempt. G.B. Benedetti's analysis and criticism of…

  16. On the origin of patterning in movable Latin type : Renaissance standardisation, systematisation, and unitisation of textura and roman type

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blokland, F.E.

    2016-01-01

    This PhD-research is conducted to test the hypothesis that Gutenberg and consorts developed a standardised and even unitised system for the production of textura type, and that this system was extrapolated for the production of roman type in Renaissance Italy. For roman type, Humanistic handwriting

  17. The Emergence of the Feminine Voice, 1526-1640: The Earliest Published Books by English Renaissance Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tebeaux, Elizabeth; Lay, Mary M.

    1995-01-01

    Outlines the historical development of female authorship in Great Britain during the years of the European Renaissance. Details the rhetorical strategies used by these authors to address a primarily hostile male audience. Considers the writing differences between the sexes in historical context. (HB)

  18. United Kingdom from past leadership to the renaissance of nuclear industry; Le Royaume-Uni: a l'avant-garde de la renaissance du nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capdevila, J.M. [CEA/Ambassade de France a Londres (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-15

    United-Kingdom has developed a long tradition of know-how in the domain of nuclear energy since 1956 when the first power reactor entered into service at Calder Hall site. From 1956 till now 45 reactors have been successively connected to the grid. All the sectors of nuclear industry were developed: uranium conversion, enrichment, fuel fabrication, MOX fabrication, spent fuels reprocessing and radioactive waste management. Now British nuclear industry is slowly getting out of a 20 year long period of lethargy due mainly to the lost competition with the oil and gas from the North sea fields. Since 2008 and because the North sea resources are waning, U.K. has become again an oil importer. The new energy policy of the government is to favor renewable energies and to support at least the renewal of the today's reactors. 19 reactors are operating but most are old: 14 reactors will have to be stopped by 2018 unless service life extensions are allowed. The French EDF company who purchased British-Energy in 2009 has announced the construction of 4 EPR by 2025. The renaissance of the nuclear industry in U.K. is all the easier as the past was glorious. (A.C.)

  19. The feasibility of a nuclear renaissance: A cost-benefit analysis of nuclear energy as a source of electricity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andries Lodewikus Lombaard

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This article evaluates a possible global nuclear renaissance in the provision of electrical energy.Problem investigated: Several countries, such as South Africa, are experiencing problems in the provision of electricity and the maintenance of the infrastructure to answer growing demand. This article investigates an alternative, which was popular in the 1970s and provides clean energy.Methodology: The study firstly evaluates the main arguments set by anti-nuclear activists critically. It concerns negative public sentiment, human life and environmental endangerment, alternative energy, cost effectiveness and waste disposal concerns. The study focuses on the cost of nuclear power, as the benefits of electricity are assumed homogeneous. The second part of the article reports on an empirical cost-benefit analysis conducted by the authors to estimate the value and likeliness of a nuclear renaissance.Findings and implications: The empirical analysis indicated that nuclear energy is mostly cost-efficient. The research shows that there might be a slight increase in the use of nuclear power-producing technologies in future.Originality and value of the research: This study makes a positive contribution to the electrical power and nuclear energy debate. It assesses the possibility of a nuclear renaissance objectively. The environment, global energy shortage and different cost structures of various modes of energy production were considered.Conclusion: The study concluded that a nuclear renaissance is possible, but that despite the advantages to costs and the environment, this would not yet be statistically significant enough to cause a nuclear renaissance.

  20. The environmental education in the Italian Renaissance: the geoethical model of Machiavelli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liserre, Battista; De Pascale, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    The importance of the environmental and geoethical education is also present in the thought of one of the greatest intellectuals of the Italian Renaissance: the philosopher Niccolò Machiavelli (1469-1527). In the "Discorsi" of Machiavelli, the natural character of the place where a city is built is a determining factor in the overall measure of the need on the character of the citizens; but the barren place, if can keep away the people from idleness, and thereby constitute an essential tool of virtuous civic life, prevents the development of the power which can be fostered only by the fertility of the site. It may give rise own laziness which hinders the development of virtue; and then, according to Machiavelli, laws must be to impose the need to produce good behavior through education. Already in the Renaissance, Machiavelli recognized the importance of establishing a harmonious relationship between man and environment and suggested that the institutions should give a virtuous model of environmental education. The physiognomy of the geographical and natural environment conditions in an essential way the exercise of civil life and the development of virtues. If the Rome's model imposes the primacy of fertile places, it happens, however, that, in his general conception of virtue and of historical dialectic, Machiavelli tended toward ultimately to increased functionality of the desolate places, which make difficult the life, and through the exercise of the need, make men more virtuous, keeping them away from the destructive threat of idleness. This aspect emerges from a different perspective, but convergent in "Asino" of Machiavelli (Chapter V). The link between the natural places and civic life that takes place isn't something absolutely default. Men's work, orders underpinning their collective life, laws that place the compulsion of necessity by the behavior of citizens, change the data of nature. Although the structure of a territory unequally, according to

  1. "Renaissance Man"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Susan

    2012-01-01

    A photo gallery of noteworthy graduates stretches across two walls in the office of the Community College Leadership Program, or CCLP, at the University of Texas at Austin. Dr. John Roueche, the director of CCLP, points to the photos with pride, listing the accomplishments of his former students. Scanning the portraits, one of his greatest…

  2. A Renaissance in Nepovirus Research Provides New Insights Into Their Molecular Interface With Hosts and Vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, M; Schmitt-Keichinger, C; Sanfaçon, H

    2017-01-01

    Nepoviruses supplied seminal landmarks to the historical trail of plant virology. Among the first agriculturally relevant viruses recognized in the late 1920s and among the first plant viruses officially classified in the early 1970s, nepoviruses also comprise the first species for which a soil-borne ectoparasitic nematode vector was identified. Early research on nepoviruses shed light on the genome structure and expression, biological properties of the two genomic RNAs, and mode of transmission. In recent years, research on nepoviruses enjoyed an extraordinary renaissance. This resurgence provided new insights into the molecular interface between viruses and their plant hosts, and between viruses and dagger nematode vectors to advance our understanding of some of the major steps of the infectious cycle. Here we examine these recent findings, highlight ongoing work, and offer some perspectives for future research. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Exorcisms used for treatment of urinary tract diseases in Greece during the Middle Ages and Renaissance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamandopoulos, A

    1999-01-01

    Using an unpublished 16th century manuscript as a pilot case, we examined the role of the formal Christian rituals and of hybrid semi-Christian semi-pagan exorcistic writings in curing renal ailments. It was found that in spite of the changing religious and cultural orthodoxy in the lands around the Eastern Mediterranean Basin, people did adhere to their belief in divine intervention when they were suffering from renal and/or other afflictions. We traced the origin of these beliefs at least to the preclassical period, and its continuation well beyond the Renaissance. The same practice applied both to nephrological diseases of humans (clergy and laymen alike) and of animals. We also present several interesting works of art from the palaeo-Christian to the post-Byzantine era supporting our theses.

  4. Raman spectroscopic study of “The Malatesta”: A Renaissance painting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Howell G. M.; Vandenabeele, Peter; Benoy, Timothy J.

    2015-02-01

    Raman spectroscopic analysis of the pigments on an Italian painting described as a "Full Length Portrait of a Gentleman", known also as the "Malatesta", and attributed to the Renaissance period has established that these are consistent with the historical research provenance undertaken earlier. Evidence is found for the early 19th Century addition of chrome yellow to highlighted yellow ochre areas in comparison with a similar painting executed in 1801 by Sir Thomas Lawrence of John Kemble in the role of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark. The Raman data are novel in that no analytical studies have previously been made on this painting and reinforces the procedure whereby scientific analyses are accompanied by parallel historical research.

  5. Transient Astronomical Events as Inspiration Sources of Medieval and Renaissance Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incerti, M.; Bònoli, F.; Polcaro, V. F.

    2011-06-01

    It is known long since that a number of exceptional and highly impressive astronomical events have been represented in Medieval artworks. We just remember the Bayeux Tapestry and Giotto's The Adoration of the Magi in the Scrovegni Chapel in Padua, representing the P/Halley comet transits of 1067 and 1301, respectively, while The Apparition of Star to Magi fresco in the San Pietro in Valle Abbey in Ferentillo (1182) has been suggested to represent the 1181 supernova. However, no systematic survey of figurative Medieval and Renaissance art has been performed to date, in order to analyzing the role of transient astronomical events as inspiration sources of artworks in these epochs. In this work, we analyze a significant number of artworks, dated between the 9th and 16th century and representing figurative elements in some way connected with astronomy, in order to evaluate if they have been influenced by coeval extraordinary astronomical events.

  6. Spatial vision anomalies in Renaissance art: Raphael, Giorgione, Dürer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weale, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Two-dimensional views of three-dimensional space are based on conventions. Renaissance perspectival drawing invented by Brunelleschi is one of them. It caused difficulties to fifteenth and sixteenth century and later artists, although readily taken up by those understanding mathematics. Raphael was amongst those who did not seem to have understood some of its elements: this is illustrated in the first section. The second addresses the question of whether a squint may manifest in an artist's work. Giorgione's ocular anomaly was well documented by several of his self-portraits, and reference is made to some of his paintings with a special analysis of The Tempest. The final section deals with chromatic stereoscopy, with particular reference to the work of Dürer. His apparently anomalous spatial sense is tentatively explained with the suggestion that he may have suffered from a defect of colour vision (protanomaly).

  7. The Trattato as Textbook: Francesco di Giorgio’s Vision for the Renaissance Architect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Mays Merrill

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In fifteenth-century Italy, the architect’s role lacked definition. The classical conception of the architect — the distinguished professional lauded by Vitruvius and Cicero, as theoretically versed as he was technically skilled — had faded in the medieval period. Even the term ‘'architectus'’, with its powerful connotations of creation and authorship, had fallen out of use (Kostof 1977: 60–61. Furthermore, there was no standard of training or apprenticeship for the architect. Depending on the context, the engineer, carpenter, patron, or building administrator might be considered the building’s architect (Hollingsworth 1984: 385–410. On the role of the architect in the Italian Renaissance and the development of an architectural profession, see Ackerman 1991, Ettlinger 1977, and Wilkinson 1977. But beginning around 1400, numerous artists, scholars, and patrons began to express the need for an established architectural profession.

  8. Shakespeare and other English Renaissance authors as characterized by Information Theory complexity quantifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosso, Osvaldo A.; Craig, Hugh; Moscato, Pablo

    2009-03-01

    We introduce novel Information Theory quantifiers in a computational linguistic study that involves a large corpus of English Renaissance literature. The 185 texts studied (136 plays and 49 poems in total), with first editions that range from 1580 to 1640, form a representative set of its period. Our data set includes 30 texts unquestionably attributed to Shakespeare; in addition we also included A Lover’s Complaint, a poem which generally appears in Shakespeare collected editions but whose authorship is currently in dispute. Our statistical complexity quantifiers combine the power of Jensen-Shannon’s divergence with the entropy variations as computed from a probability distribution function of the observed word use frequencies. Our results show, among other things, that for a given entropy poems display higher complexity than plays, that Shakespeare’s work falls into two distinct clusters in entropy, and that his work is remarkable for its homogeneity and for its closeness to overall means.

  9. "Being the world eternal ..." the age of the Earth in Renaissance Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Prete, Ivano

    2014-06-01

    Scholarship on the early modern period assumes that the Creation story of Genesis and its chronology were the only narratives openly available in Renaissance Europe. This essay revisits the topic by exploring a wide range of literature on the age and nature of the Earth in early modern Italy. It suggests that, contrary to received notions, in the early 1500s an Aristotelian ancient world characterized by slow geological change was a common assumption in discourse on the Earth. These notions were freely disseminated by popularizations and didactic literature in the vernacular, which made them available to a large readership. Counter-Reformation cultural policies eventually called for a tighter integration of theology and natural philosophy; however, the essay argues that even then the creation of the world was usually placed in a remote and undetermined past, not necessarily tied to the short timescales of contemporary chronology.

  10. Myths of Male Same-Sex Love in the Art of the Italian Renaissance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Haughton

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Visual culture has much to contribute to an understanding of the history of sexuality. Yet, to date, the depiction of pederasty in the art of the Renaissance has not been covered adequately by dominant theoretical paradigms. Moreover, the interpretive approach of traditional art historical discourse has been both limited and limiting in its timidity toward matters concerning the representation of sexual proclivity between males. This article will address the ways in which Italian Renaissance artistic depictions of some mythological narratives were enmeshed with the period’s attitudes toward sexual and social relationships between men.Particular attention is paid here to the manner in which, under the veneer of a mythological narrative, certain works of art embodied a complex set of messages that encoded issues of masculine behaviour and performance in the context of intergenerational same-sex erotic relationships.  The primary case studies under investigation for these concerns of gender and sexuality in this particular context are Benvenuto Cellini’s marble Apollo and Hyacinth (1545, and Giulio Romano’s drawing of Apollo and Cyparissus (1524. By incorporating pictorial analysis, social history, and gender and sexuality studies, new possibilities will be offered for evaluating these artworks as visual chronicles of particular sexual and cultural mores of the period. Furthermore, this article will consider how visual representation of these mythic narratives of erotic behaviour between males conformed to the culturally defined sexual and social roles relating to the articulation of power that permeated one of the greatest milestones in art history.

  11. The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) at Renaissance College (University of New Brunswick): A Case Study of SoTL at the Faculty Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengel, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    This chapter presents the case study of Renaissance College at the University of New Brunswick, discussing the faculty's achievements, challenges, and outlook for the future in the context of the scholarship of teaching and learning in Canada.

  12. Un diálogo diaspórico: el lugar del Harlem Renaissance en el pensamiento racial e intelectual afrocolombiano (1920-1948)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Francisco Javier Flórez Bolívar

    2015-01-01

      This article aims to analyze the use that various Afro-Colombian sectors made of the racial ideas developed by Afro-Colombian activists linked to the cultural movement known as the Harlem Renaissance...

  13. Un dialogo diaspórico: el lugar del Harlem Renaissance en el pensamiento racial e intelectual afrocolombiano (1920-1948)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Francisco Javier Flórez Boívar

    2015-01-01

    This article aims to analyze the use that various Afro-Colombian sectors made of the racial ideas developed by Afro-Colombian activists linked to the cultural movement known as the Harlem Renaissance...

  14. Un diálogo diaspórico: el lugar del Harlem Renaissance en el pensamiento racial e intelectual afrocolombiano (1920-1948)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Francisco Javier Flórez Bolívar

    2015-01-01

    This article aims to analyze the use that various Afro-Colombian sectors made of the racial ideas developed by Afro-Colombian activists linked to the cultural movement known as the Harlem Renaissance...

  15. Matte Svart Kristiansen & Kate Giles (eds., Dwellings, Identities and Homes. European Housing Culture from the Viking Age to the Renaissance (Hojbjerg: Jutland Archeological Society, 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Hoeren

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Book review of: Matte Svart Kristiansen & Kate Giles (eds., Dwellings, Identities and Homes. European Housing Culture from the Viking Age to the Renaissance (Hojbjerg: Jutland Archeological Society, 2014

  16. Assessment of hydrological changes in the Nile River due to the construction of Renaissance Dam in Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed El Bastawesy

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper assesses impact of the Renaissance Dam on Ethiopia; on the Nile discharge ultimately reaches Egypt downstream. The Landsat-8 satellite images of 2013 were obtained and interpreted to identify locations for the construction sites for the Renaissance Dam. Then the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM data were obtained and processed to create a digital elevation model (DEM for the Blue Nile upstream areas that will be submerged. Different scenarios for the dams’ heights and resulting storages were simulated to estimate the resulting abstraction of the Blue Nile flows until completion of the project and the annual losses due to evaporation thereafter. The current site (506 m asl for the Renaissance Dam allows the creation of a 100 m deep reservoir with a total storage of 17.5 km3; overflows will occur at that lake’s level (606 m asl from the north western part of the developed lake into Rosaires downstream. Construction of the spillway dam to control the overflow area can allow the creation of a 180 m deep lake that store up to 173 km3 in a lake that will cover 3130 km2. The analysis of Tropical Rainfall Monitoring Mission (TRMM suggests that the variation of total annual rainfall could reach 20%, thus the resulting hydrological fluctuations could affect the estimated filling time, the operational functions and discharge downstream. The negative hydrological impacts of the Renaissance Dam will increase by increasing the height of its spillway dam, as increasing the storage capacity could affect the strategic storage for the reservoirs in Egypt and Sudan. It is strongly recommended that an agreement should be reached to compromise the storage capacities and water supplies for all dams on the Nile to thoroughly satisfy the necessary needs.

  17. Raman microscopy and x-ray fluorescence analysis of pigments on medieval and Renaissance Italian manuscript cuttings

    OpenAIRE

    Burgio, Lucia; Clark, Robin J. H.; Hark, Richard R.

    2010-01-01

    Italian medieval and Renaissance manuscript cuttings and miniatures from the Victoria and Albert Museum were analyzed by Raman microscopy to compile a database of pigments used in different periods and different Italian regions. The palette identified in most manuscripts and cuttings was found to include lead white, gypsum, azurite, lazurite, indigo, malachite, vermilion, red lead, lead tin yellow (I), goethite, carbon, and iron gall ink. A few of the miniatures, such as the historiated capit...

  18. Renal artery stenting with noninvasive duplex ultrasound follow-up: 3-year results from the RENAISSANCE renal stent trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha-Singh, Krishna; Jaff, Michael R; Lynne Kelley, E

    2008-11-15

    The multicenter, single-arm RENAISSANCE trial evaluated outcomes in patients with progressive atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (ARAS) treated with the Express Renal Premounted Stent System (Boston Scientific, Natick, MA). Renal artery stenting may prevent the morbidity and mortality of surgical revascularization and high restenosis rates of percutaneous renal angioplasty (PTRA). Renal artery duplex ultrasonography (DUS) offers an alternative to traditional invasive poststenting angiographic surveillance, though concordance with angiography for in-stent restenosis has yet to be validated independently. RENAISSANCE enrolled 100 patients (117 lesions) with de novo or restenotic ostial atherosclerotic lesions or=4.0 and or=70%. The primary endpoint, 9-month binary restenosis, was compared to an objective performance criterion (OPC) of 40% for published PTRA results. Follow-up was conducted through 3 years. Technical and procedural success was both 99%. Follow-up angiography, triggered clinically or by ultrasonography, revealed 21.3% binary restenosis at 9 months, which was superior to the OPC (P RENAISSANCE demonstrates that renal artery stenting is superior to the prespecified OPC at 9 months, and also shows that DUS can accurately identify in-stent restenosis. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. [The neuroanatomy of Juan Valverde de Amusco and medicine at the time of the Spanish renaissance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín Araguz, A; Bustamante Martínez, C; Toledo León, D; López Gómez, M; Moreno Martínez, J M

    Juan Valverde de Amusco (c. 1525-c. 1564) is considered to have been the most important Spanish anatomist of the XVI century. A follower of Vesalius, he increased and divulged knowledge of anatomy during the Renaissance and his book The history of the composition of the human body was printed in Rome in 1556. The objective of this paper is to study the neuroanatomy in this book and present unpublished biographical data and describe the main contributions of this Castilian doctor to the neurosciences, in the context of Spanish medicine during the Renaissance period. He was born in the town of Hamusco (today Amusco) in the province of Palencia, which belonged to the Crown of Castile. Juan Valverde emigrated to Italy to improve his scientific knowledge. He carried out anatomical studies using the then revolutionary method of direct observation, as opposed to the Galenic criteria of authority inherited from the Medieval period. He trained in Padua under Realdo Colombo and lived in Rome where he practiced medicine until his death, becoming deservedly famous. He did not return to Spain since in the Spanish universities of the time there was a mentality which was reactionary to modern anatomy. His works, published in Italy but in the Spanish language, give an idea of the power of the Crown of Castile in the Europe of that period. The book is profusely illustrated with the first illustrations ever published in the history of printing, drawn by Nicolas Beatrizet. The book was sold widely and was translated and reedited on many occasions, until well into the XVIII century. For the first time Valverde made precise references to the minor circulation. He was the first anatomist to describe the muscles for movement of the eye correctly and the intracranial course of the carotid arteries. In his work he made the first drawing of the stapes, described by the Valencian Luis Collado. Vesalius and Valverde contributed decisively to the beginnings of modern neuroanatomy. Thanks to

  20. Late Pop III Star Formation During the Epoch of Reionization: Results from the Renaissance Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hao; Norman, Michael L.; O'Shea, Brian W.; Wise, John H.

    2016-06-01

    We present results on the formation of Population III (Pop III) stars at redshift 7.6 from the Renaissance Simulations, a suite of extremely high-resolution and physics-rich radiation transport hydrodynamics cosmological adaptive-mesh refinement simulations of high-redshift galaxy formation performed on the Blue Waters supercomputer. In a survey volume of about 220 comoving Mpc3, we found 14 Pop III galaxies with recent star formation. The surprisingly late formation of Pop III stars is possible due to two factors: (I) the metal enrichment process is local and slow, leaving plenty of pristine gas to exist in the vast volume; and (II) strong Lyman-Werner radiation from vigorous metal-enriched star formation in early galaxies suppresses Pop III formation in (“not so”) small primordial halos with mass less than ˜3 × 107 M ⊙. We quantify the properties of these Pop III galaxies and their Pop III star formation environments. We look for analogs to the recently discovered luminous Ly α emitter CR7, which has been interpreted as a Pop III star cluster within or near a metal-enriched star-forming galaxy. We find and discuss a system similar to this in some respects, however, the Pop III star cluster is far less massive and luminous than CR7 is inferred to be.

  1. The 21st century psychedelic renaissance: heroic steps forward on the back of an elephant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessa, Ben

    2018-02-01

    Given the plethora of new studies and published papers in the scientific press and the increasingly emerging presence of articles about positive psychedelic experiences appearing in the popular media, there is little doubt that we are in the midst of a Psychedelic Renaissance. The classical psychedelic drugs LSD and psilocybin and the entactogen MDMA are showing promise as tools to assist psychotherapy for a wide range of mental disorders, with multiple pilot studies demonstrating their safety and efficacy. In this article, the author describes how MDMA in particular has inherent characteristics that make it well suited for assisting trauma-focused psychotherapy in a population of patients who have experienced child abuse. But despite these advances, there remain many obstacles ahead of the widespread mainstream acceptance of psychedelic medicines. The author argues that the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971 is one such obstacle. Other impediments include a prevailing attitude of pseudoscience and rigidity from within the non-scientific psychedelic community itself. Resolution of these conflicts must be sought if medicine and society are to see psychedelics gaining a place in mainstream culture and science.

  2. Projectile motion in Diego Hurtado de Mendoza's Mecánica and new Renaissance dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iommi Echeverría, Virginia

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This article considers Diego Hurtado de Mendoza’s translation of the Aristotelian Mechanics in relation to the humanistic and scientific Italian environment of the Renaissance. From the analysis of the last problems on dynamics, it demonstrates the affinity with the works of Piccolomini and Cardano. It also shows the originality of the exegesis made by the Spanish author of Problem XXXIV, in which he combines latemedieval physics with the Aristotelian explanation.Este artículo examina la traducción hecha por Diego Hurtado de Mendoza de la Mecánica aristotélica en el contexto del ambiente científico-humanista italiano de mediados del siglo XVI. A partir del análisis de los últimos problemas sobre dinámica, se demuestra su estrecha relación con las obras de Piccolomini y Cardano; sugiriéndose además la originalidad de la interpretación hecha por el autor español del problema XXXIV basada en la combinación de la física tardomedieval y la explicación aristotélica.

  3. The Coming Nuclear Renaissance for Next Generation Safeguards Specialists--Maximizing Potential and Minimizing the Risks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eipeldauer, Mary D [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    This document is intended to provide an overview of the workshop entitled 'The Coming Nuclear Renaissance for the Next Generation Safeguards Experts-Maximizing Benefits While Minimizing Proliferation Risks', conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in partnership with the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) and the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This document presents workshop objectives; lists the numerous participant universities and individuals, the nuclear nonproliferation lecture topics covered, and the facilities tours taken as part of the workshop; and discusses the university partnership sessions and proposed areas for collaboration between the universities and ORNL for 2009. Appendix A contains the agenda for the workshop; Appendix B lists the workshop attendees and presenters with contact information; Appendix C contains graphics of the evaluation form results and survey areas; and Appendix D summarizes the responses to the workshop evaluation form. The workshop was an opportunity for ORNL, Y-12, and SRNL staff with more than 30 years combined experience in nuclear nonproliferation to provide a comprehensive overview of their expertise for the university professors and their students. The overall goal of the workshop was to emphasize nonproliferation aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle and to identify specific areas where the universities and experts from operations and national laboratories could collaborate.

  4. Continuum mechanics through the ages from the renaissance to the twentieth century : from hydraulics to plasticity

    CERN Document Server

    Maugin, Gérard A

    2016-01-01

    Mixing scientific, historic and socio-economic vision, this unique book complements two previously published volumes on the history of continuum mechanics from this distinguished author. In this volume, Gérard A. Maugin looks at the period from the renaissance to the twentieth century and he includes an appraisal of the ever enduring competition between molecular and continuum modelling views. Chapters trace early works in hydraulics and fluid mechanics not covered in the other volumes and the author investigates experimental approaches, essentially before the introduction of a true concept of stress tensor. The treatment of such topics as the viscoelasticity of solids and plasticity, fracture theory, and the role of geometry as a cornerstone of the field, are all explored. Readers will find a kind of socio-historical appraisal of the seminal contributions by our direct masters in the second half of the twentieth century. The analysis of the teaching and research texts by Duhem, Poincaré and Hilbert on cont...

  5. Joining the Nuclear Renaissance with the Engineering Business Unit of AREVA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubert, Nathalie; Menguy, Stephane [SGN, AREVA Group, 1 rue des Herons, 78182 Saint-Quentin en Yvelines Cedex (France); Valery, Jean-Francois [AREVA NC, AREVA Group, Tour AREVA, 1 place de la Coupole, 92084 Paris La Defense Cedex (France)

    2008-07-01

    The reality of the nuclear renaissance is no longer a question. All over the world, new nuclear plants are going to be deployed; the whole fuel cycle has to be adjusted to fulfil their needs, the front-end to produce the fuel and the back-end to properly manage radioactive waste. AREVA fuel cycle engineering teams have been involved in the design of a variety of industrial plants covering the entire fuel cycle for 50 years. The consistency of the French nuclear policy has been a major factor to acquire and renew the competencies and workforce of AREVA Engineering Business Unit. Our partnership with our customers, French ones but also Japanese, Americans and from other countries, has led us to develop a comprehensive approach of the services that we can deliver, in order to give them the best answer. SGN teams have been involved in the R and D phases in order to take into account the industrialisation aspects as early as possible, and our work does not end with the delivery of the plants; it includes assistance to the operators to optimise and keep their facilities in line with the changing rules and constraints, which ensures the integration of a wide operational experience feedback and the ability to design flexible facilities. This paper will present through our experience how this global approach has been developed and continuously improved and how we are preparing our teams to be ready to answer to the coming needs. (authors)

  6. Babson, Bahnson, the DeWitts and the General Relativity Renaissance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Hamilton

    2012-03-01

    During the 1950s the efforts of an unlikely group composed of two colorful businessmen, a handful of physicists, and Air Force representatives helped to create a renaissance in general relativity research. Industrialist Agnew Bahson was an air conditioning magnate with connections to leading scientists, and the Air Force. In addition to his contribution to ``respectable'' physics, his life and death are shrouded in a cloak of UFO and anti-gravity conspiracy theories. Business theorist Roger Babson was driven to search for a solution to anti-gravity after first his sister and later his grandson drowned tragically as children. This presentation tells of the globe spanning, harrowing adventure of mountainside crashes, an international love affair, physicists masquerading as secretaries, the founding of Les Houches, the development of the first radar defense system and how Bahnson and Babson became benefactors of mainstream physics, leading to the creation of the Institute of Field Physics at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill led by Cecile and Bryce DeWitt and ultimately to the groundbreaking research that predicted the Higgs boson.

  7. The Renaissance Kidney-Nephrology in and about the Sixteenth Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eknoyan, Garabed

    2012-07-01

    The endeavor to understand the workings of the human body is as old as civilization; but it is in the intellectual movement of the Renaissance that its actual scientific study began in earnest and has not ceased growing since then. It was in the 16th century that the study of organs was launched and with it that of the kidney, which was then conceived as an accessory organ to clear the excess water ingested with food. The study of the structural basis of kidney function was launched by Bartolomeo Eustachio (1514-1574); the elements of its physiology and pathology were promulgated by Jean Fernel (1497-1558), and that of the chemical study of urine and of the principal cause of kidney disease then, calculi, instigated by Joan Baptista Van Helmont (1577-1644). The methodological approaches of these and their contemporary investigators, which were crystallized and formulated by Francis Bacon (1561-1626), opened the gates of the Scientific Revolution that followed in the 17th century, beginning with that of describing the circulation in 1628 by William Harvey (1564-1657) that would finally free the kidney from the shackles imposed on it as a mere accessory organ to the liver in Galen's physiology. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. The Anonymous Plotter in the Routines of Renaissance Theatre and Drama

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Pugliatti

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Renaissance theatre, both in England and Italy, was a commercial enterprise and, therefore, it utilized procedures of division of labour to meet the challenge of the market. One of these procedures was the compilation of preparatory texts of various kinds. But, while about one thousand scenari of the commedia dell’arte (some anonymous, some with the author’s name survive, of the ‘plots’ compiled by the English ‘plotters’ in preparation of plays to be written only one incomplete specimen and a few fragments have been preserved; their nature, therefore, remains dubious. Furthermore, anonymous documents of a different nature, also confusingly called ‘plots’, but compiled as reminders for the actors’ entrances during performance, have survived in six, mostly fragmentary, manuscripts. This article discusses these three kinds of preparatory texts in order to characterize their different nature and argues that, although suggestive, the idea of a derivation of the two kinds of English ‘plots’ from the scenari appears unconvincing; indeed, the compilation, in both contexts, of preparatory texts was simply an obvious and necessary measure in order to speed up procedures.

  9. Our unacknowledged ancestors: dream theorists of antiquity, the middle ages, and the renaissance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupprecht, C S

    1990-06-01

    Exploring the dream world from a modern, or post-modern, perspective, especially through the lens of contemporary technologies, often leads us as researchers to see ourselves as engaged in a new and revolutionary discourse. In fact, this self-image is a profoundly ahistorical one, because it ignores the contributions of ancient, medieval and Renaissance oneirologists who wrote extensively, albeit in different terms and images of lucidity, prerecognition, day residue, wish fulfillment, incubation, problem solving, REM, obe, and the collective unconscious. There are also analogues in these early accounts to anxiety, recurrent, mirror, telepathic, shared, flying, and death dreams. Dream interpretation through music, analysis of dream as narrative, sophisticated theories about memory and language and symbolization are all part of the tradition. Further, early texts pose many issues in sleep and dream research which are not currently being pursued. We dream workers of the late twentieth century should therefore fortify ourselves with knowledge of the oneiric past as one important way to enhance our dream work in the twenty-first century.

  10. Frauen im Netz weltweit – ausgegrenzt und mittendrin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigrid Peuker

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Mit dem Global Center for Women’s Studies and Politics (GLOW ist das Feministische Institut der Heinrich-Böll-Stiftung 1998 online gegangen. Mit diesem Schritt wurden Fragen nach den Möglichkeiten und Grenzen sowie nach den Gestaltungsräumen virtueller Kommunikation für Frauen zentral. Mit feminist_spaces. Frauen im Netz. Diskurse – Communities – Visionen, legt die Heinrich-Böll-Stiftung zusammen mit dem Feministischen Institut Antworten aus internationaler Perspektive vor. Das Buch geht auf die gleichnamige zweitätige Konferenz in Berlin im November 2001 zurück.

  11. Books authored/co-authored and edited/co-edited by members of staff of the Department of Medieval/Medieval and Renaissance Archaeology, Aarhus University, 1971-2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roesdahl, Else

    2015-01-01

    Chronologically organized list of books authored/co-authored and edited/co-edited by members of staff of the Department of Medieval and Renaissance Archaeology, Aarhus University, 1971-2014......Chronologically organized list of books authored/co-authored and edited/co-edited by members of staff of the Department of Medieval and Renaissance Archaeology, Aarhus University, 1971-2014...

  12. Style and non-style in anatomical illustration: From Renaissance Humanism to Henry Gray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Style is a familiar category for the analysis of art. It is less so in the history of anatomical illustration. The great Renaissance and Baroque picture books of anatomy illustrated with stylish woodcuts and engravings, such as those by Charles Estienne, Andreas Vesalius and Govard Bidloo, showed figures in dramatic action in keeping with philosophical and theological ideas about human nature. Parallels can be found in paintings of the period, such as those by Titian, Michelangelo and Hans Baldung Grien. The anatomists also claimed to portray the body in an objective manner, and showed themselves as heroes of the discovery of human knowledge. Rembrandt’s painting of Dr Nicholas Tulp is the best-known image of the anatomist as hero. The British empirical tradition in the 18th century saw William Cheselden and William Hunter working with techniques of representation that were intended to guarantee detailed realism. The ambition to portray forms life-size led to massive volumes, such as those by Antonio Mascagni. John Bell, the Scottish anatomist, criticized the size and pretensions of the earlier books and argued for a plain style adapted to the needs of teaching and surgery. Henry Gray’s famous Anatomy of 1858, illustrated by Henry Vandyke Carter, aspired to a simple descriptive mode of functional representation that avoided stylishness, resulting in a style of its own. Successive editions of Gray progressively saw the replacement of Gray’s method and of all his illustrations. The 150th anniversary edition, edited by Susan Standring, radically re-thinks the role of Gray’s book within the teaching of medicine. PMID:20447244

  13. First light: exploring the spectra of high-redshift galaxies in the Renaissance Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, Kirk S. S.; Wise, John H.; Norman, Michael L.; O'Shea, Brian W.; Xu, Hao

    2017-08-01

    We present synthetic observations for the first generations of galaxies in the Universe and make predictions for future deep field observations for redshifts greater than 6. Due to the strong impact of nebular emission lines and the relatively compact scale of H II regions, high-resolution cosmological simulations and a robust suite of analysis tools are required to properly simulate spectra. We created a software pipeline consisting of fsps, hyperion, cloudy and our own tools to generate synthetic IR observations from a fully three-dimensional arrangement of gas, dust, and stars. Our prescription allows us to include emission lines for a complete chemical network and tackle the effect of dust extinction and scattering in the various lines of sight. We provide spectra, 2D binned photon imagery for both HST and JWST IR filters, luminosity relationships, and emission-line strengths for a large sample of high-redshift galaxies in the Renaissance Simulations. Our resulting synthetic spectra show high variability between galactic haloes with a strong dependence on stellar mass, metallicity, gas mass fraction, and formation history. Haloes with the lowest stellar mass have the greatest variability in [O III]/Hβ, [O III], and C III], while haloes with higher masses are seen to show consistency in their spectra and [O III] equivalent widths between 1 and 10 Å. Viewing angle accounted for threefold difference in flux due to the presence of ionized gas channels in a halo. Furthermore, JWST colour plots show a discernible relationship between redshift, colour, and mean stellar age.

  14. The Renaissance of Transcervical Balloon Catheters for Cervical Ripening and Labour Induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, W; Kehl, S

    2015-11-01

    Due to rising rates of labour induction in industrialised countries, safe and effective methods of induction have once again become a focus of interest and research. Prostaglandins are effective for cervical ripening and induction of uterine contractions. They do, however, cause overstimulation of the uterus in up to 20 % of cases, sometimes causing changes in fetal heart rate. Transcervical balloon catheters provide an alternative to prostaglandins for labour induction and have been used for this purpose for almost 50 years. This induction method has experienced a recent renaissance in clinical practice that is reflected in an annually rising number of publications on its use. Balloon catheters allow gentle ripening of the cervix without causing uterine overstimulation. The two catheters available are the Foley catheter (off-label use) and the double balloon catheter, which is licensed for use in induction of labour. Both are as effective as prostaglandins, and do not increase the risk of infection to mother or child. Catheter induction also requires less monitoring compared to prostaglandins resulting in improved patient satisfaction. Balloon catheters provide a useful and promising option to achieve vaginal delivery despite failed prostaglandin induction. Intravenous oxytocin is nevertheless required in up to 85 % of cases for adequate induction/augmentation of contractions. Balloon catheters, vaginal PGE 2 and misoprostol are equally effective in the context of an unripe/unfavourable cervix, the rate of uterine hyperstimulation being significantly lower, and the need for oxytocin significantly higher for catheters. Balloon catheters are increasingly being used in combination or sequentially with oral/vaginal misoprostol, although there is currently inadequate published data on the subject. International guidelines recommend the use of balloon catheters for labour induction with an unripe cervix (also following previous caesarean section) as an alternative

  15. Stroke in Renaissance time: the case of Francesco I de' Medici.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arba, Francesco; Inzitari, Domenico; Barnett, Henry Joseph Macaulay; Lippi, Donatella

    2012-01-01

    Francesco I de' Medici (1541-1587), the second Grand Duke of Tuscany, was one of the members of the Medici family who ruled Florence during the centuries of the Renaissance. When, in 1857, all members of the Medici family were exhumed and definitively buried in the place where they still lie buried today, a painter, Giuseppe Moricci (Florence 1806-1879), who attended the ceremony, depicted the corpse of Francesco I in a perfect state of preservation. The painting shows a right spastic hemiparesis with a facial droop, a claw-hand appearance, the right shoulder internally rotated, the calf muscle wasted and the clubfoot confirmed by an orthopedic footwear in the coffin. The hemiparesis and consequent disability were likely concealed when Francesco I was alive, since in official portraits the Grand Duke appeared in perfect physical condition. However, chronicles reported that he had suffered from malaria and syphilis. Later in his life, temper and behavioral changes as well as emotional instability were documented, together with handwriting deterioration and seizures. We postulate that Francesco I had suffered from a stroke consequent to syphilis, a new aggressive and rapidly spreading infectious disease at that time in Italy. Francesco's governmental skills were presumably altered due to these diseases. Disability consequent to stroke was likely concealed by official portrayers and biographers of Francesco I during his life, consistent with the King's two bodies theory common since the Middle Ages: while the King's physical body is destined to die, the political one is everlasting. Infectious diseases have remained a leading cause of stroke in underdeveloped countries until recently, but noncommunicable causes are now prevailing worldwide. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. A vaccinia virus renaissance: new vaccine and immunotherapeutic uses after smallpox eradication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verardi, Paulo H; Titong, Allison; Hagen, Caitlin J

    2012-07-01

    In 1796, Edward Jenner introduced the concept of vaccination with cowpox virus, an Orthopoxvirus within the family Poxviridae that elicits cross protective immunity against related orthopoxviruses, including smallpox virus (variola virus). Over time, vaccinia virus (VACV) replaced cowpox virus as the smallpox vaccine, and vaccination efforts eventually led to the successful global eradication of smallpox in 1979. VACV has many characteristics that make it an excellent vaccine and that were crucial for the successful eradication of smallpox, including (1) its exceptional thermal stability (a very important but uncommon characteristic in live vaccines), (2) its ability to elicit strong humoral and cell-mediated immune responses, (3) the fact that it is easy to propagate, and (4) that it is not oncogenic, given that VACV replication occurs exclusively within the host cell cytoplasm and there is no evidence that the viral genome integrates into the host genome. Since the eradication of smallpox, VACV has experienced a renaissance of interest as a viral vector for the development of recombinant vaccines, immunotherapies, and oncolytic therapies, as well as the development of next-generation smallpox vaccines. This revival is mainly due to the successful use and extensive characterization of VACV as a vaccine during the smallpox eradication campaign, along with the ability to genetically manipulate its large dsDNA genome while retaining infectivity and immunogenicity, its wide mammalian host range, and its natural tropism for tumor cells that allows its use as an oncolytic vector. This review provides an overview of new uses of VACV that are currently being explored for the development of vaccines, immunotherapeutics, and oncolytic virotherapies.

  17. Style and non-style in anatomical illustration: From Renaissance Humanism to Henry Gray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Martin

    2010-02-01

    Style is a familiar category for the analysis of art. It is less so in the history of anatomical illustration. The great Renaissance and Baroque picture books of anatomy illustrated with stylish woodcuts and engravings, such as those by Charles Estienne, Andreas Vesalius and Govard Bidloo, showed figures in dramatic action in keeping with philosophical and theological ideas about human nature. Parallels can be found in paintings of the period, such as those by Titian, Michelangelo and Hans Baldung Grien. The anatomists also claimed to portray the body in an objective manner, and showed themselves as heroes of the discovery of human knowledge. Rembrandt's painting of Dr Nicholas Tulp is the best-known image of the anatomist as hero. The British empirical tradition in the 18th century saw William Cheselden and William Hunter working with techniques of representation that were intended to guarantee detailed realism. The ambition to portray forms life-size led to massive volumes, such as those by Antonio Mascagni. John Bell, the Scottish anatomist, criticized the size and pretensions of the earlier books and argued for a plain style adapted to the needs of teaching and surgery. Henry Gray's famous Anatomy of 1858, illustrated by Henry Vandyke Carter, aspired to a simple descriptive mode of functional representation that avoided stylishness, resulting in a style of its own. Successive editions of Gray progressively saw the replacement of Gray's method and of all his illustrations. The 150th anniversary edition, edited by Susan Standring, radically re-thinks the role of Gray's book within the teaching of medicine.

  18. Medieval and Renaissance anatomists: the printing and unauthorized copying of illustrations, and the dissemination of ideas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanska, Douglas J; Lanska, John Robert

    2013-01-01

    The vanguard that began to question Galenic anatomical dogma originated in northern Italy in the latter half of the thirteenth century, and not coincidentally this was where human dissection was introduced, which in turn eventually fostered the origins of realistic anatomical illustration in the late fifteenth century. With the advent of the printing press and moveable type at this time, printed books began to supersede hand-copied medieval manuscripts, and labor-intensive techniques were soon developed to integrate text and illustrations on the printed page. The same technology was used to pirate the illustrations of prior authors with varying fidelity. Specific medieval and Renaissance anatomical illustrations can often be traced from their inceptions through different stages of development to the final printed images, and then through subsequent pirated versions in various abridgements or other compendia. The most important milestone in the development of anatomy and anatomical illustration was the publication in 1543 by Andreas Vesalii of De humani corporis fabrica (On the Fabric of the Human Body), commonly referred to simply as the Fabrica. With this work, Vesalii succeeded in coordinating a publication production team (author, artists, block cutters, publisher, and typesetters) to achieve an unprecedented integration of scientific discourse, medical illustration, and typography. However, despite Vesalii's valiant efforts to prevent unauthorized duplication, the illustrations from the Fabrica were extensively plagiarized. Although Vesalii found such piracy frustrating and annoying, the long-term effect was to make Vesalii's ideas known to a wider readership and to help solidify his own revolutionary contributions to anatomy. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. [Sabuco's suco nerveo and the origins of neurochemistry in the Spanish Renaissance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin Araguz, A; Bustamante Martinez, C; Fernandez Armayor, V

    In the 16th century, at the height of the Spanish Renaissance, Bachiller Miguel Sabuco revolutionised medical theories about brain physiology with the publication of his work Nueva Filosof a in 1587. This work, which is mysteriously attributed to his daughter Luisa Oliva, presents a surprisingly gynocentric ideology for its time and has been reprinted on numerous occasions since its first edition saw the light. Sabuco s ideas have been plagiarised by such renowned authors as Descartes, Willis and Glisson. In stark contrast to the Arabized galenism based on the criterion of authority that predominated the medical practice of his time, Nueva Filosof a empirically promoted a modern approach to neurophysiology. This becomes even more worthy of merit if we bear in mind that Sabuco was not trained as a doctor but instead worked as an apothecary in Alcaraz (Albacete, Spain). The Bachiller granted the brain a commanding role over the organisation of the body for the first time in the history of medicine. He not only developed the surprising theory of succo nervoso (the nervous sap, or original neurotransmitting substance), but also an elegant digression on human nature that puts forward solid arguments about the dualist relation between mind and brain. He examined the association between emotional and physical health and explained how the emotions can impair health and lead to early death, which means he was also a pioneer in the development of psychosomatic medicine. Besides constituting the most illustrious forerunner of modern day neurochemistry, Sabuco s work also encourages doctors to treat their patients in an integral manner, with equal attention being given to the body, mind and soul. It comes as no surprise, then, that many aspects of his work can still be compared to modern medical and philosophical thought.

  20. [Antoniana Margarita: Gómez Pereira, Francisco Lobato and the antecedents of cerebral mechanicism during the Spanish renaissance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Araguz, A; Bustamante-Martínez, C; Fernández-Armayor Ajo, V; Moreno-Martínez, J M; Olmedilla-González, N; García De La Rocha, M L; Sierra-Sierra, I

    The year 2000 is the fifth century of the birth, in Medina del Campo (Vallodolid, Spain) of licenciado Perea (Gomez Perea or Pereira). A man of the Renaissance, he was an outstanding doctor, humanist, theologist, nominalist philosopher, naturalist and practical engineer. He developed the first modern theory of behavior, based purely on mechanicistic principles, describing his ideas in a text known by the curious title of Antoniana Margarita. The objective of this paper is to pay him homage on the fifth centenary of his birth, making a historiographic study of Gomez Perea and his works, with particular emphasis on the ideological basis and its relationship with Renaissance hydraulic engineering, collaborating with his colleague Francisco Lobato, author of one of the only two pretechnological codices of sixteenth century Spain. The book Antoniana Margarita is written in Renaissance Latin and was published in Medina del Campo in 1554. It represents the first truly modern approach to brain function which excludes the providencialist concepts of Galen involving the soul and the spirit, in vogue until then, transmitted through the Arab and Scholastic tradition. Analyzing his theory of the automatism of animals Perea made the first description ever of the reflex arc and the conditioned reflex. He also established a topographical model of the brain in which he sketched the functioning of the prefrontal cortex and neurophysiology of memory. Perea was the immediate forerunner of Neuropsychology and of the methodology and organicist thought which predominates in modern Neurobiology. He was also a visionary of the Evolution of Darwin and of modern aetiology.

  1. Under a Starry Vault. Warburg, Jung and the Renaissance of Ancient Paganisms at the Beginning of the 20th Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Pallotto Strickland

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper tackles the controversial question of the affinities between the work of Aby Warburg and Carl Gustav Jung. Instead of focussing her interest exclusively on the concepts of collective memory and primordial images, though, the author critically compares the different ways Warburg and Jung looked at the renaissance of ancient practices of Paganism at the beginning of the Twentieth century, and questions the extent to which the cultural crisis heralded by Modernity, and the challenges brought about by secularisation influenced their reading of the revivals.

  2. Quand la relation biographique vole en éclats. Renaissances. Vivre avec Joyce, Aquin, Yourcenar de Guylaine Massoutre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frances Fortier

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available L’ouvrage récent de Guylaine Massoutre, Renaissances. Vivre avec Joyce, Aquin, Yourcenar présente, à la faveur d’une prose échevelée et lyrique, volontiers baroque, le parcours d’une biographe fictive, elle-même personnage d’une fiction d’Aquin, sur les traces des figures littéraires qui ont déclenché son envie d’écrire. L’étude entend montrer comment cet ouvrage joue avec finesse des ancrages générique, énonciatif, culturel et esthétique de l’exercice biographique. With the help of an unbridled and lyrical prose that is wilfully baroque, the recent work of Guylaine Massoutre, entitled Renaissances. Vivre avec Joyce, Aquin, Yourcenar, presents the course of a fictitious biographer, herself a character of an Aquinian fiction, as she follows the traces of the literary figures who inspired her desire to write. This study intends to show the way in which the work plays ingeniously upon the generic, enunciative, cultural and aesthetic foundations of the biographical endeavour.

  3. In search of Leonardo: computer-based facial image analysis of Renaissance artworks for identifying Leonardo as subject

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Christopher W.; Smith, William A. P.; Stork, David G.

    2012-03-01

    One of the enduring mysteries in the history of the Renaissance is the adult appearance of the archetypical "Renaissance Man," Leonardo da Vinci. His only acknowledged self-portrait is from an advanced age, and various candidate images of younger men are difficult to assess given the absence of documentary evidence. One clue about Leonardo's appearance comes from the remark of the contemporary historian, Vasari, that the sculpture of David by Leonardo's master, Andrea del Verrocchio, was based on the appearance of Leonardo when he was an apprentice. Taking a cue from this statement, we suggest that the more mature sculpture of St. Thomas, also by Verrocchio, might also have been a portrait of Leonardo. We tested the possibility Leonardo was the subject for Verrocchio's sculpture by a novel computational technique for the comparison of three-dimensional facial configurations. Based on quantitative measures of similarities, we also assess whether another pair of candidate two-dimensional images are plausibly attributable as being portraits of Leonardo as a young adult. Our results are consistent with the claim Leonardo is indeed the subject in these works, but we need comparisons with images in a larger corpora of candidate artworks before our results achieve statistical significance.

  4. Did the great masters "cheat" using optics? Image analysis of Renaissance masterpieces sheds light on a bold theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stork, David

    2006-12-01

    In 2001, artist David Hockney and scientist Charles Falco stunned the art world with a controversial theory that, if correct, would profoundly alter our view of the development of image making. They claimed that as early as 1420, Renaissance artists employed optical devices such as concave mirrors to project images onto their canvases, which they then traced or painted over. In this way, the theory attempts to explain the newfound heightened naturalism or "opticality" of painters such as Jan van Eyck, Robert Campin, Hans Holbein the Younger, and many others. This talk will describe the application of rigorous computer image analysis to masterpieces adduced as evidence for this theory. It covers basic geometrical optics of image projection, the analysis of perspective, curved surface reflections, shadows, lighting and color. While there remain some loose ends, such analysis of the paintings, infra-red reflectograms, modern reenactments, internal consistency of the theory, and alternate explanations allows us to judge with high confidence the plausibility of this bold theory. You may never see Renaissance paintings the same way again.

  5. The political uses of astrology: predicting the illness and death of princes, kings and popes in the Italian Renaissance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzolini, Monica

    2010-06-01

    This paper examines the production and circulation of astrological prognostications regarding the illness and death of kings, princes, and popes in the Italian Renaissance (ca. 1470-1630). The distribution and consumption of this type of astrological information was often closely linked to the specific political situation in which they were produced. Depending on the astrological techniques used (prorogations, interrogations, or annual revolutions), and the media in which they appeared (private letters or printed prognostica) these prognostications fulfilled different functions in the information economy of Renaissance Italy. Some were used to legitimise the rule of a political leader, others to do just the opposite. Astrological prorogations and interrogations were often used to plan military and political strategies in case of the illness or death of a political leader, while astrological prognostications were generally written to promote certain political leaders while undermining others. While certainly often partisan to this game, astrologers, for their part, worked within a very well established tradition that gave authority to their forecasts. This paper argues that, as indicators of deeper political tensions otherwise not always explicitly manifest, these prognostications are privileged sources of information providing a better understanding of the political history of the period.

  6. Comets, meteors, and eclipses: Art and science in early Renaissance Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, R. J. M.; Pasachoff, J. M.

    2002-11-01

    We discuss eight trecento (fourteenth century) paintings containing depictions of astronomical events to reveal the revolutionary advances made in both astronomy and naturalistic painting in early Renaissance Italy, noting that an artistic interest in naturalism predisposed these pioneering painters to make their scientific observations. In turn, the convincing representations of their observations of astronomical phenomena in works of art rendered their paintings more believable, convincing. Padua was already a renowned center for mathematics and nascent astronomy (which was separating from astrology) when Enrico Scrovegni commissioned the famous Florentine artist Giotto di Bondone to decorate his lavish family chapel (circa 1301-1303). Giotto painted a flaming comet in lieu of the traditional Star of Bethlehem in the Adoration of the Magi scene. Moreover, he painted a historical apparition that he recently had observed with a great accuracy even by modern standards. Halley's Comet of 1301 (Olson, 1979). While we do not know the identity of the artist's theological advisor, we discuss the possibility that Pietro d'Abano, the Paduan medical doctor and "astronomer" who wrote on comets, might have been influential. We also compare Giotto's blazing comet with two others painted by the artist's shop in San Francesco at Assisi (before 1316) and account for the differences. In addition, we discuss Giotto's pupil, Taddeo Gaddi, reputed to have been partially blinded by a solar eclipse, whose calamity may find expression in his frescoes in Santa Croce, Florence (1328-30; 1338?). Giotto also influenced the Sienese painter Pietro Lorenzetti, two of whose Passion cycle frescoes at Assisi (1316-20) contain dazzling meteor showers that reveal the artist's observed astronomical phenomena, such as the "radiant" effect of meteor showers, first recorded by Alexander von Humboldt in 1799 and only accepted in the nineteenth century. Lorenzetti also painted sporadic, independent

  7. Comets, Meteors, and Eclipses: Art and Science in Early Renaissance Italy (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, R. J. M.; Pasachoff, J. M.

    1999-09-01

    We discuss several topics relating artists and their works with actual astronomical events in early Renaissance Italy to reveal the revolutionary advances made in both astronomy and naturalistic painting. Padua, where Galileo would eventually hold a chair at the University, was already by the fourteenth century (trecento) a renowned center for mathematics and nascent astronomy (which was separating from astrology). It is no wonder that when Enrico Scrovegni commissioned the famous Florentine artist Giotto di Bondone to decorate his lavish family chapel (c. 1303) that in the scene of the Adoration of the Magi Giotto painted a flaming comet in lieu of the traditional Star of Bethlehem. Moreover, he painted an historical apparition he recently had observed with a great understanding of its scientific structure: Halley's Comet of 1301 (since Olson's first publication of this idea in Scientific American we have expanded the argument in several articles and talks). While we do not know the identity of the artist's theological advisor, we discuss the possibility that Pietro d'Abano, the Paduan medical doctor and ``astronomer" who wrote on comets, might have been influential. We also compare Giotto's blazing comet with two others painted by the artist's shop in San Francesco at Assisi (before 1316) and account for the differences. In addition, we tackle the question how Giotto's pupil, Taddeo Gaddi, who is documented as having been partially blinded by lengthy unprotected observation of the partial phase of an annular solar eclipse, reflects his observations in his frescoes in Santa Croce, Florence (1328-30). Giotto also influenced the Sienese painter Pietro Lorenzetti, two of whose Passion cycle frescoes at Assisi (1316-20), contain dazzling meteor showers that hold important symbolic meanings in the cyle's argument but more importantly reveal that the artist observed astronomical phenomena, such as the ``radiant" effect, which was first recorded by Alexander von Humboldt

  8. Renaissance Epyllions: A Comparative Reading of Christopher Marlowe's "Hero and Leander," Thomas Lodge's "Scylla's Metamorphosis" and Francis Beaumont's "Salmacis and Hermaphroditus"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudi, Yazdan

    2016-01-01

    The present paper is supposed to compare and contrast three of these masterpieces written the Renaissance period. The epyllions under study are Christopher Marlowe's "Hero and Leander," Thomas Lodge's "Scylla's Metamorphosis" and Francis Beaumont's "Salmacis and Hermaphroditus." Bush believes that "the influence…

  9. Non-invasive Florentine Renaissance Panel Painting Replica Structures Investigation by Using Terahertz Time-Domain Imaging (THz-TDI) Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dandolo, Corinna Ludovica Koch; Picollo, Marcello; Cucci, Costanza

    2016-01-01

    The potentials of the Terahertz Time-Domain Imaging (THz-TDI) technique for a non-invasive inspection of panel paintings have been considered in detail. The THz-TD data acquired on a replica of a panel painting made in imitation of Italian Renaissance panel paintings were processed in order to pr...

  10. Die spätmittelalterliche grosse Wirtschaftskrise in Europa - war auch Livland davon betroffen? / Ivar Leimus

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Leimus, Ivar, 1953-

    2005-01-01

    Oluliste kaupade kallinemiseest, mille põhjustas tõenäoliselt (maaelanike) arvu märgatav vähenemine. Järgnenud reaalhindade languse põhjustas arvatavasti münditootmise oluline vähenemine. Pöördepunkt Liivimaa majanduses saabus 15. saj. viimasel veerandil

  11. Historical and Epistemological Reflections on the Culture of Machines around the Renaissance: How Science and Technique Work?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Pisano

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper is divided into two parts, this being the first one. The second is entitled ‘Historical and Epistemological Reflections on the Culture of Machines around Renaissance: Machines, Machineries and Perpetual Motion’ and will be published in Acta Baltica Historiae et Philosophiae Scientiarum in 2015. Based on our recent studies, we provide here a historical and epistemological feature on the role played by machines and machineries. Ours is an epistemological thesis based on a series of historical examples to show that the relations between theoretical science and the construction of machines cannot be taken for granted, a priori. Our analysis is mainly based on the culture of machines around 15th and 17th centuries, namely the epoch of Late Renaissance and Early Modern Age. For this is the period of scientific revolution and this age offers abundant interesting material for researches into the relations of theoretical science/construction of machines as well. However, to prove our epistemological thesis, we will also exploit examples of machines built in other historical periods. Particularly, a discussion concerning the relationship between science theory and the development of science art crafts produced by non-recognized scientists in a certain historical time is presented. The main questions are: when and why did the tension between science (physics, mathematics and geometry give rise to a new scientific approach to applied discipline such as studies on machines and machineries? What kind of science was used (if at all for projecting machines and machineries? Was science at the time a necessary precondition to build a machine? In the first part we will focus on the difference between Aristotelian-Euclidean and Archimedean approaches and we will outline the heritage of these two different approaches in late medieval and Renaissance science. In the second part, we will apply our reconstructions to some historical and epistemological

  12. Historical and Epistemological Reflections on the Culture of Machines around the Renaissance: Machines, Machineries and Perpetual Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Pisano

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper is the second part of our recent paper ‘Historical and Epistemological Reflections on the Culture of Machines around the Renaissance: How Science and Technique Work’ (Pisano & Bussotti 2014a. In the first paper—which discussed some aspects of the relations between science and technology from Antiquity to the Renaissance—we highlighted the differences between the Aristotelian/Euclidean tradition and the Archimedean tradition. We also pointed out the way in which the two traditions were perceived around the Renaissance. The Archimedean tradition is connected with machines: its relationship with science and construction of machines should be made clear. It is enough to think that Archimedes mainly dealt with three machines: lever, pulley and screw (and a correlated principle of mechanical advantage. As underlined in the first part, our thesis is that many machines were constructed by people who ignored theory, even though, in other cases, the knowledge of the Archimedean tradition was a precious help in order to build machines. Hence, an a priori idea as to the relations between the Archimedean tradition and construction of machines cannot exist. In this second part we offer some examples of functioning machines constructed by people who ignored any physical theory, whereas, in other cases, the ignorance of some principles—such as the impossibility of a perpetuum mobile—induced the attempt to construct impossible machines. What is very interesting is that these machines did not function, of course, as a perpetuum mobile, but anyway had their functioning and were useful for certain aims, although they were constructed on an idea which is completely wrong from a theoretical point of view. We mainly focus on the Renaissance and early modern period, but we also provide examples of machines built before and after this period. We have followed a chronological order in both parts, starting from the analysis of the situation in

  13. The view at nuclear renaissance via actual European and Slovak approach to nuclear education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slugen, Vladimir [Slovak University of Technology, FEI STU, Ilkovicova 3, 812 19 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2010-07-01

    tools. The high level nuclear education is very important also due to permanent increasing of nuclear experts age. To replace some of them are not easy. Beside this, the nuclear community needs some internal dynamic, which is connected to the young people activities. The problem is that the amount of students taking these lectures is low. Proper education at the university is a source of knowledge and attitudes for the whole life. Theoretical and practical experiences, professional approach and consistency are very important also from the safety culture point of view. University lectures and seminars are basically opened for public and this academic field can be made better use of in public relations. It is an investment mainly to young generation. During discussions with students, teachers can form their professional orientation according to their abilities and needs. Good teacher encourages also the growth of student and shapes his personality. Graduated students have to learn to take responsibility for their decisions and their academic level of education. Unfortunately, there was not real interest for educated nuclear engineers from industry till know. Although oral declaration how these graduates are necessary for NPP operators, in reality the nuclear industry does not attract young specialist. About 50 percent of graduates of specialized nuclear power engineering study at STU Bratislava went completely out from this area. Hopefully next years connected to the commissioning of Mochovce 3, 4 will change this approach. The actual status of education and training in nuclear power engineering is the real cause for concern. This education has to be based on the serious long term basis organised and guaranteed by high quality academic institution. It is a duty of educated and responsible people to highlight the necessity for a renaissance in nuclear education and training and recommend the following points: We must act now; Strategic Role of Governments; The Challenges

  14. The Life of a Renaissance Gunmaker: Bonaccorso Ghiberti and the Development of Florentine Artillery in the Late Fifteenth Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansani, Fabrizio

    This article examines the technological development of artillery production in Florence during the last two decades of the fifteenth century, before and after the assimilation of the most efficient French ordnance into Italian warfare. The study starts from the notes, drawings, accounts, and guns produced by Bonaccorso di Vettorio Ghiberti (1451-1516), the heir of the foundry of his illustrious ancestor Lorenzo di Cione (1378-1455). Data have been collected from the historical archives of the Istituto degli Innocenti, from the Biblioteca Nazionale Centrale of Florence, and from the Florentine State Archive. This article demonstrates the existence of a lively and reactive war-related industry in Renaissance Italy, which was aware of new ideas and new techniques. The article highlights, moreover, the leading role of public demand in fostering military innovations.

  15. Universal Principles of Depicting Oneself across the Centuries: From Renaissance Self-Portraits to Selfie-Photographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbon, Claus-Christian

    2017-01-01

    Selfie-photography is generally thought of as a cultural mass phenomenon of the early 21st century, inseparably related to the development and triumph of the smartphone with integrated camera. Western culture, however, has been highly familiar with self-depictions since the Renaissance days. Putting the contemporary selfie into this historic context covering more than five centuries of cultural development from Dürer's (1500) famous "Self-Portrait at 28" (also known as "Selbstbildnis im Pelzrock") to today's Instagram galleries allows for identifying central parallels concerning the technical and social antecedents as well as common underlying psychological factors and shared properties of different kinds of self-depiction. The article provides an overview of the types of contemporary photographic selfies and compares them with painted self-portraits. Finally, this historic perspective leads us to the insight that self-portraits as well as selfies are both referring to nothing less than the "conditio humana."

  16. Raman microscopy and x-ray fluorescence analysis of pigments on medieval and Renaissance Italian manuscript cuttings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgio, Lucia; Clark, Robin J H; Hark, Richard R

    2010-03-30

    Italian medieval and Renaissance manuscript cuttings and miniatures from the Victoria and Albert Museum were analyzed by Raman microscopy to compile a database of pigments used in different periods and different Italian regions. The palette identified in most manuscripts and cuttings was found to include lead white, gypsum, azurite, lazurite, indigo, malachite, vermilion, red lead, lead tin yellow (I), goethite, carbon, and iron gall ink. A few of the miniatures, such as the historiated capital "M" painted by Gerolamo da Cremona and the Petrarca manuscript by Bartolomeo Sanvito, are of exceptional quality and were analyzed extensively; some contained unusual materials. The widespread usage of iron oxides such as goethite and hematite as minor components of mixtures with azurite is particularly notable. The use of a needle-shaped form of iron gall ink as a pigment rather than a writing material was established by both Raman microscopy and x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy for the Madonna and Child by Franco de' Russi.

  17. The value of Apologética historia sumaria in the analysis of neologisms in Renaissance Astronomy and Cosmography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Carriscondo Esquivel

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of Apologética historia sumaria by Brother Bartolomé de las Casas might be useful to prove the first appearance of various terms that have to do with the Renaissance concept of Astronomy and Cosmography. This appearance is in accordance with the neological work of this Dominican scholar during all his production. Although there are some problems that might thwart the value of his work, it is true that its analysis proves how this field of lexis is an aid for the author to justify the physical determinism that he applies in his defence of the human plenitude of the native people of the New World.

  18. Nuclear power: renaissance or relapse? Global climate change and long-term Three Mile Island activists' narratives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culley, Marci R; Angelique, Holly

    2010-06-01

    Community narratives are increasingly important as people move towards an ecologically sustainable society. Global climate change is a multi-faceted problem with multiple stakeholders. The voices of affected communities must be heard as we make decisions of global significance. We document the narratives of long-term anti-nuclear activists near the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear power plant who speak out in the dawn of a nuclear renaissance/relapse. While nuclear power is marketed as a "green" solution to global warming, their narratives reveal three areas for consideration; (1) significant problems with nuclear technology, (2) lessons "not" learned from the TMI disaster, and (3) hopes for a sustainable future. Nuclear waste, untrustworthy officials and economic issues were among the problems cited. Deceptive shaping of public opinion, nuclear illiteracy, and an aging anti-nuclear movement were reasons cited for the lessons not learned. However, many remain optimistic and envision increased participation to create an ecologically-balanced world.

  19. Non-destructive identification of green and yellow pigments: the case of some Sicilian Renaissance glazed pottery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crupi, V.; Majolino, D.; Venuti, V.; Barone, G.; Mazzoleni, P.; Pezzino, A.; La Russa, M. F.; Ruffolo, S. A.; Bardelli, F.

    2010-09-01

    Selected decorated Renaissance ceramic fragments, found during the excavation of a Sicilian archaeological site (Caltagirone, Sicily, South Italy), have been studied by combining scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS), and X-ray absorbance spectroscopy (XAS). The study was aimed at providing microchemical and microstructural characterization of the colored glazed coatings in order to elucidate the nature of the pigments in the decorative layers, and in the glaze itself. From the obtained results, the general perspective has been the identification of information to be used for a reliable recognition of the production techniques. In particular, XAS measurements, performed using synchrotron radiation (SR) as the source at the Cu K-edge, in the case of green decorations, provided structural information of the oxidation states and the local chemical environment of copper (neighboring atoms and bond distances).

  20. The Tragedy of the Unexamined Cat: Why K-12 and University Education Are Still in the Dark Ages and How Citizen Science Allows for a Renaissance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Robert R; Urban, Julie; Cavelier, Darlene; Cooper, Caren B

    2016-03-01

    At the end of the dark ages, anatomy was taught as though everything that could be known was known. Scholars learned about what had been discovered rather than how to make discoveries. This was true even though the body (and the rest of biology) was very poorly understood. The renaissance eventually brought a revolution in how scholars (and graduate students) were trained and worked. This revolution never occurred in K-12 or university education such that we now teach young students in much the way that scholars were taught in the dark ages, we teach them what is already known rather than the process of knowing. Citizen science offers a way to change K-12 and university education and, in doing so, complete the renaissance. Here we offer an example of such an approach and call for change in the way students are taught science, change that is more possible than it has ever been and is, nonetheless, five hundred years delayed.

  1. Les langues à la cour de Danemark à la Renaissance et l’italianisme à l’époque de Christian IV (1577-1648)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftgaard, Anders

    2016-01-01

    À la cour de Danemark à la Renaissance, l’administration était trilingue : allemand, danois, latin. Vers la fin du XVIe siècle l’enseignement de langue faisait partie de la formation du roi et des nobles, et dans les sources de l’époque les officiers de la cour danoise étaient souvent loués pour...

  2. Un dialogo diaspórico: el lugar del Harlem Renaissance en el pensamiento racial e intelectual afrocolombiano (1920-1948)

    OpenAIRE

    Francisco Javier Flórez Boívar

    2015-01-01

    This article aims to analyze the use that various Afro-Colombian sectors made of the racial ideas developed by Afro-Colombian activists linked to the cultural movement known as the Harlem Renaissance. It suggests that between 1920 and 1948 black workers and students from the Pacific and Caribbean coasts of Colombia entered into contact with the racial ideas developed by various leaders of said movement. This contact was fundamental in the racial position assumed by several writers of African ...

  3. The Comparison of the Baroque and Renaissance Aesthetics Paintings of “The Last Supper” by Caravaggio and Leonardo da Vinci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Wayan Kun Adnyana

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paintings of Caravaggio’s and Leonardo da Vinci’s The Last Supper are two iconic artworks from two maestros in a different era. Caravaggio is one of the fame Baroque’s artists and da Vinci is the most famous Renaissance man, who created the same theme of a painting, The Last Supper. The theme represents the story of Christ’s supper. Through an inductive view, this comparative study analyzes the aesthetic structures of both paintings, by using Feldman’s perspective in Art as Image and Idea (1967. The analysis includes visual structures, including line, form, darkness-lightness; elements of the organization, including unity, balance, rhythm, and proportion; and elements of perception and aesthetic, inclu- ding empathy and a psychic distance. The result of this research discovers two different perspectives of aesthetic characteristics of Baroque and Renaissance paintings.   Keywords: baroque, Caravaggio, Leonardo da Vinci, renaissance, the last supper

  4. The rise and fall of the autochthonous self: from Italian Renaissance art and Shakespeare to Heidegger, Lacan, and intersubjectivism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chessick, Richard D

    2010-01-01

    This article addresses the unresolved question of the existence of a private core autochthonous self, as it has been described by Winnicott, Modell, and others. The postmodern version of the self has eliminated this concept entirely, relegating the self to a changing and unstable display, or regarding it as totally chaotic, or even an illusion. The question is raised whether by returning to the origins of this notion of a private self and then tracing its apparent dissolution it might be possible to discover some evidence that it still exists. The methodology used is that of obtaining knowledge directly through the arts and the claim is made that because empirical science has clamored to be the only source of knowledge, we have lost what could be obtained by direct intuitive seeing and experiencing the works of creative geniuses. To explore the rise of the autochthonous self this article provides an examination of the shift from Gothic art to Italian Renaissance art, a time which engendered the origin of "man" with his or her elusive private individual self that then became expressed in changing works of art. As this spread north, Shakespeare appeared and similarly invented and illustrated in his characters the private individual self, a concept not appreciated or recognized before the renaissance. But as science arose and Western civilization began to decline, a corresponding disillusionment with "man" took place. The self began to be viewed as solely a social construction with no core except perhaps a genetic endowment. This was accompanied by a reduction in the concept of the human as a valuable and precious living being and was replaced by regarding the human as an object of control and exploitation. After the Second World War a movement in contemporary United States psychoanalysis gradually replaced the ideas of Freud and his emphasis on the "I" in the psychoanalytic process, with forms of relational therapy, assuming that the self was ab initio

  5. Considerations in Managing the Fill Rate of the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam Reservoir Using a System Dynamics Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Bruce; Ford, David N.; Horton, Radley M.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate simulated fill rate scenarios for the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam while taking into account plausible climate change outcomes for the Nile River Basin. The region lacks a comprehensive equitable water resource management strategy, which creates regional security concerns and future possible conflicts. We employ climate estimates from 33 general circulation models within a system dynamics model as a step in moving toward a feasible regional water resource management strategy. We find that annual reservoir fill rates of 8-15% are capable of building hydroelectric capacity in Ethiopia while concurrently ensuring a minimum level of stream flow disruption into Egypt before 2039. Insofar as climate change estimates suggest a modest average increase in stream flow into the Aswan, climate changes through 2039 are unlikely to affect the fill rate policies. However, larger fill rates will have a more detrimental effect on stream flow into the Aswan, particularly beyond a policy of 15%. While this study demonstrates that a technical solution for reservoir fill rates is feasible, the corresponding policy challenge is political. Implementation of water resource management strategies in the Nile River Basin specifically and Africa generally will necessitate a national and regional willingness to cooperate.

  6. History of clubfoot treatment, part I: From manipulation in antiquity to splint and plaster in Renaissance before tenotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernigou, Philippe; Huys, Maxime; Pariat, Jacques; Jammal, Sibylle

    2017-08-01

    Idiopathic clubfoot is one of the most common problems in paediatric orthopaedics. The treatment is controversial and continues to be one of the challenges in paediatric orthopaedics. The aim of this review is to assess the different methods of clubfoot treatment used over the years in light of the documentation present in the literature and art paintings from the antiquity to the end of the 19th century. The aim of this paper is to review all treatment methods of the clubfoot over the years that were proposed to provide patients a functional, pain-free, normal-looking foot, with good mobility, without calluses, and requiring no special shoes. Hippocrates was the first to write references about treatment methods of clubfoot. After the Middle Ages and the Renaissance where patients were treated by barber-surgeons, quacks and charlatans, bonesetters, and trussmakers, there were more detailed studies on the disease, with the help of famous names in medicine such as Venel and Scarpa.

  7. How the masters in Umbria, Italy, generated and used nanoparticles in art fabrication during the Renaissance period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padeletti, G.; Fermo, P.

    Lustre was one of the most sophisticated techniques for the decoration of majolicas during the Renaissance period. Lustre consists of a thin metallic film containing silver, copper and other substances like iron oxide and cinnabar applied in a reducing atmosphere on a previously glazed ceramic. In this way, beautiful iridescent reflections of different colours (in particular gold and ruby-red) are obtained. The characterisation and the study of lustre-decorated majolicas is of great interest for archaeologists, but also offers possibilities for producing pottery with outstanding decoration today, following ancient examples, since nowadays Italian artisans are interested in the reproduction of the ancient recipes and procedures. Moreover, it can even suggest new procedures for obtaining uniform thin metallic films for technological applications. A study has been carried out on ancient lustre layers using numerous different analytical techniques such as XRD, SEM-EDX, TEM-EDX-SAED, ETAAS, ICP-OES, UV-vis reflectance spectroscopy and SAXS. Lustre films were shown to be formed by copper and silver clusters of nanometric dimension. The colour and the properties of the lustre films depend on the elemental composition of the impasto applied to the ceramic surface as well as on other factors like the metallic nanocluster dimension, the firing conditions, the underlying glaze composition and the procedure used.

  8. Averroës in The school of Athens: a Renaissance man and his contribution to Western thought and neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belen, Deniz; Bolay, Hayrunnisa

    2009-02-01

    The European Renaissance was a revolutionary movement in human history. In this era of the rebirth of humanity, a great number of valuable artworks were created. One of these masterpieces is the magnificent wall painting The School of Athens, by Raphael, which is also known as a "visualization of knowledge." Raphael depicted almost all ancient Greek philosophers in this fresco. The painting displays one noticeable figure among the scholars: the philosopher/scientist Averroës from Andalusia. Western thought was greatly influenced by Averroës' philosophy. Averroës was as extraordinary a physician as he was a philosopher. His medical works presented novel concepts such as the discovery of the photoreceptor function of the retina, describing symptoms and signs of Parkinson's disease, and proposing a cardiac/vascular origin of cerebral stroke. In this article, we aimed to introduce Averroës' works and his contribution to neuroscience in the context of art, framed particularly with Raphael's masterwork The School of Athens.

  9. Lituanie: Renaissance francaise (Lithuania: French Renaissance).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bascoulergue, Claudine

    1996-01-01

    Since Lithuania's exit from the Soviet bloc and because of its desire to associate more with the West, a revolution is occurring in its system of second-language education. Greater emphasis is being placed on English, German, and French instruction. The image of France is very positive in Lithuania, French cultural groups are active, and…

  10. A counting renaissance: combining stochastic mapping and empirical Bayes to quickly detect amino acid sites under positive selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemey, Philippe; Suchard, Marc A.

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Statistical methods for comparing relative rates of synonymous and non-synonymous substitutions maintain a central role in detecting positive selection. To identify selection, researchers often estimate the ratio of these relative rates () at individual alignment sites. Fitting a codon substitution model that captures heterogeneity in across sites provides a reliable way to perform such estimation, but it remains computationally prohibitive for massive datasets. By using crude estimates of the numbers of synonymous and non-synonymous substitutions at each site, counting approaches scale well to large datasets, but they fail to account for ancestral state reconstruction uncertainty and to provide site-specific estimates. Results: We propose a hybrid solution that borrows the computational strength of counting methods, but augments these methods with empirical Bayes modeling to produce a relatively fast and reliable method capable of estimating site-specific values in large datasets. Importantly, our hybrid approach, set in a Bayesian framework, integrates over the posterior distribution of phylogenies and ancestral reconstructions to quantify uncertainty about site-specific estimates. Simulations demonstrate that this method competes well with more-principled statistical procedures and, in some cases, even outperforms them. We illustrate the utility of our method using human immunodeficiency virus, feline panleukopenia and canine parvovirus evolution examples. Availability: Renaissance counting is implemented in the development branch of BEAST, freely available at http://code.google.com/p/beast-mcmc/. The method will be made available in the next public release of the package, including support to set up analyses in BEAUti. Contact: philippe.lemey@rega.kuleuven.be or msuchard@ucla.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:23064000

  11. Schizophrenia, genetic retrenchment, and epidemiologic renaissance. The Sixth Biennial Winter Workshop on Schizophrenia, Badgastein, Austria, January 26-February 1, 1992.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddington, J L; Weller, M P; Crow, T J; Hirsch, S R

    1992-12-01

    A distinctive feature of these workshops, in addition to those noted in the introductory overview, is the selection of a relatively isolated location for a 1-week period. This, together with a rich and varied program and an ethos of informality, encourages participants to discuss not only the work presented but also their unpublished work and their intuitions based on preliminary data and analyses. Such an interchange is of inestimable value to the schizophrenia research community. In scientific terms, a panel of concluding discussants (Drs Kendell, Torrey, and Waddington) were in some measure of agreement that genetics, particularly molecular genetics, appears to be experiencing a period of retrenchment, while epidemiology is experiencing something of a renaissance. Maternal influenza was a prominent theme, although the data were far from consistent. It was argued by Dr Wessely that risk for schizophrenia putatively attributable to maternal influenza might be 5% to 10% of all cases, indicating a modest effect. Eclectically, Dr Kendell believed the effect to be "real" but slight and fragile, it being sought against large aggregates that almost inevitably result in differing findings from differing countries or from different data bases within a given country. Gender differences were also among the more prominent themes, not just in an epidemiologic context but also in a variety of other studies. This points anew to disturbances in schizophrenia of factors that regulate, or are intimately associated with, sexual dimorphism in brain development. Abnormalities in cerebral asymmetry continue to pervade a variety of research findings and point further to neurodevelopmental anomalies.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. In-situ fluorimetry: A powerful non-invasive diagnostic technique for natural dyes used in artefacts. Part II. Identification of orcein and indigo in Renaissance tapestries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clementi, C.; Miliani, C.; Romani, A.; Santamaria, U.; Morresi, F.; Mlynarska, K.; Favaro, G.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, three Renaissance tapestries depicting scenes painted by Raffaello Sanzio, conserved at the Vatican Museum, were investigated using in-situ UV-Visible fluorimetric measurements. The results show that this technique is suitable for the detection of natural organic colorants used for dyeing the threads woven in these tapestries. The emission signals detected on red-purple colours were assigned to the colorant orcein and those on different nuances of blue and green colours to indigo by comparison with data from reference laboratory samples. The assignments were supported by chromatographic experiments carried out on threads taken from the back side of the tapestry in the same points analysed by spectrofluorimentry.

  13. Non-invasive Florentine Renaissance Panel Painting Replica Structures Investigation by Using Terahertz Time-Domain Imaging (THz-TDI) Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch Dandolo, Corinna L.; Picollo, Marcello; Cucci, Costanza; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2016-11-01

    The potentials of the Terahertz Time-Domain Imaging (THz-TDI) technique for a non-invasive inspection of panel paintings have been considered in detail. The THz-TD data acquired on a replica of a panel painting made in imitation of Italian Renaissance panel paintings were processed in order to provide insights as to the limits and potentials of the technique in detecting different kinds of underdrawings and paint layers. Constituent layers, construction techniques, and anomalies were identified and localized by interpreting the extracted THz dielectric stratigraphy.

  14. Hans Rose, Commentary to Heinrich Wölfflin, Renaissance and Baroque, fourth edition, Munich: Bruckmann, 1926, 181-328, translation by Arnold Witte and Andrew Hopkins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnold Witte

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Commentary by Hans Rose was published as an appendix to the fourth edition of Heinrich Wölfflin’s Renaissance und Barock - eine Untersuchung über Wesen und Entstehung des Barockstils in Italien, published in 1926. It was almost as long as the original text by Wölfflin and intended to discuss the new approaches on the Italian Baroque developed in German academia in the 1920s. It was divided up into four sections of unequal length, which discuss Subjectivism, Material and Colour, Urban Planning, and St Peter’s respectively.

  15. Review of: Carol M. Richardson, Kim W. Woods and Michael W. Franklin (eds, Renaissance Art Reconsidered: An Anthology of Primar y Sources,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenia Drakopoulou

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The title of this volume refers to the course of the Open University entitled Renaissance Art Reconsidered and more particularly to its three course books, which reflect three reference fields in the modern history of art: the method and arduous work of making works of art; the centres of art production, the trade networks and the relations between artists and clients; and the means of viewing art, whether in the context of religious practice, theory or patronage, during the fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries.

  16. Entre renaissance culturelle et persistance de la question méridionale. Le cas de l’essor touristique du Salento contemporain (Italie Between cultural renaissance and the lingering Southern issue. The case of tourist development in contemporary Salento (Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elina Caroli

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Cet article étudie la confrontation des constructions identitaires locales et du tourisme culturel dans le Salento, une région des Pouilles où, depuis une dizaine d’années, des politiques culturelles et un marketing territorial avisés ont relancé le tourisme. Ce processus a vu le jour à partir de la revalorisation de la langue locale d’origine grecque (le griko et de la patrimonialisation de la tradition ethnologique du tarentisme et de la musique qui accompagnait le rite d’autrefois, la pizzica. Le succès de cette « renaissance » est pourtant ambigu et sa rançon pourrait être la vitrification et la vitrinification d’une société offerte aux touristes de façon esthétisante et exotisante. Les images proposées aux touristes et réappropriées par ces derniers finissent en fait par réintroduire les préjugés d’une terre hors du temps et de l’histoire qui séduit par son caractère primitif. Or les problèmes sociaux restent et demandent une prise en compte sérieuse alors que le nombre de touristes et de résidences secondaires augmente.This paper studies the link between local identity reconstructions and the spread of cultural and ethnic tourism in Salento (Apulia, where, during the last ten years, cultural politics and territorial marketing have rekindled tourism. This process stemmed from the revalorization of the local Greek-based language (griko and from the heritage policies concerning tarantism and the pizzica, the music formerly used during the rituals. The success of this so-called “renaissance” is nonetheless ambiguous and its ransom could very well be the showcasing of a society offered to tourists in an aesthetic and exotic fashion. The images offered to and internalized by tourists, actually end up reinforcing the prejudices of a timeless, a-historical land, appealing because of its primitive nature. However, social problems do remain and call for serious consideration, while tourist flows and the

  17. The Tragedy of the Unexamined Cat: Why K–12 and University Education Are Still in the Dark Ages and How Citizen Science Allows for a Renaissance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Robert R.; Urban, Julie; Cavelier, Darlene; Cooper, Caren B.

    2016-01-01

    At the end of the dark ages, anatomy was taught as though everything that could be known was known. Scholars learned about what had been discovered rather than how to make discoveries. This was true even though the body (and the rest of biology) was very poorly understood. The renaissance eventually brought a revolution in how scholars (and graduate students) were trained and worked. This revolution never occurred in K–12 or university education such that we now teach young students in much the way that scholars were taught in the dark ages, we teach them what is already known rather than the process of knowing. Citizen science offers a way to change K–12 and university education and, in doing so, complete the renaissance. Here we offer an example of such an approach and call for change in the way students are taught science, change that is more possible than it has ever been and is, nonetheless, five hundred years delayed. PMID:27047580

  18. From Renaissance art to contemporary electron microscopy: DeGroft's rediscovery of Titian's "lost" portrait of Federico II Gonzaga, Duke of Mantua, of 1539-40.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, J Allan; DeGroft, Aaron H

    2002-01-01

    At the Ultrapath X meeting in Florence, the regular session opened with a presentation of Aaron DeGroft's engrossing story of investigating the authenticity of a portrait of Federico II Gonzaga, Duke of Mantua. In the early 1900s, this work had been deemed to be an authentic production by Titian, a great artist of the Italian Renaissance. A respected art historian, however, discovered a conflict of dates that led to the conclusion that this work was not authentic. In a process sometimes analogous to the practice of surgical pathology, Dr. DeGroft pursued a review of the original materials that refutes this seeming contradiction of dates. Dr. DeGroft also undertook an extensive art historical examination and scientific analysis, including the use of electron microscopy, to persuasively conclude that this portrait is authentic. Further, his work provided a bridge from the conference setting in Florence, rich in Renaissance art, to the contemporary update on ultrastructural pathology provided by the conference.

  19. Hygiene, sport and humanism in the Spanish Renaissance Higiene, deporte y humanismo en el renacimiento español

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conrad VILANOU TORRANO

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Starting with the medieval canon of the six non-natural things that maintain and prolong health, this paper analyses some of the hygienic aspects (air and life in the towns, the body and bathing, noble sports, the physic exercises, moderation in diet and way of life, the passions of the soul and spiritual exercises that were considered important during the Late Middle Ages and Renaissance. Furthermore, viewing the history of teaching as a process that spansmany centuries, the author argues that education has perpetuated, from Antiquity to the modern period, a series of commonplaces about bodily health that extol - in line with Aristotelian and Galenic tradition - the importance of a balanced, moderate life, which aligns with the virtue of temperance. It is also stated that hygiene ?in its public and private dimensions? has a history that goes back before the Enlightenment and the liberalism of the 19th century.A partir del canon medieval de las seis cosas no naturales para mantener y prolongar la salud, se analizan algunos de los aspectos higiénicos (el aire y el régimen de las ciudades, el cuerpo y el baño, los deportes caballerescos, los ejercicios físicos, la moderación en la dieta y en la manera de vivir, las pasiones del alma y los ejercicios espirituales que dejaron sentir su influencia durante el período bajomedieval y renacentista. Además, al considerar la historia de la pedagogía como un proceso de larga duración, el autor sostiene que la educación ha mantenido, desde la época clásica y hasta la modernidad, una serie de tópicos en torno al cuidado corporal que exaltan - de acuerdo con la tradición aristotélica y galénica - la importancia de una vida equilibrada y moderada, que responde a la virtud de la templanza. Igualmente, se constata que la higiene - en su doble dimensión privada y pública - posee una trayectoria histórica anterior a la Ilustración y al liberalismo del siglo XIX.

  20. François Dosse, Renaissance de l’événement. Un défi pour l’historien: entre sphinx e phénix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachele Branchini

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Per poter introdurne la renaissance è necessario chiarire sin da principio cosa significhi événement. Il concetto attorno al quale ruota la riflessione di François Dosse è infatti poliforme e difficilmente traducibile: si potrebbe parlare di fatto minuto, così come di trauma, e in nessun caso si sarebbe fornita una traduzione errata.

  1. A Special Collection Renaissance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holck, Jakob Povl

    Forskellige projekter relateret til Herlufsholm-samlingen på SDUB giver i dag anledning til at søge at tænke digitaliserede materialer ind i en moderne markedsføringskontekst. Forudsætningen er Herlufsholm-samlingens mange skatte!...

  2. The Recess Renaissance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeler, Rusty

    2015-01-01

    The author tells of his work around the country and world on transforming how schools do recess, free play, and outside time by transforming their outdoor spaces to match. Instead of a playground of fixed structures like traditional school grounds, newer spaces are filled with loose materials that children can use to build forts, dens, and tree…

  3. DDT: A Renaissance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devlin, Robert M.

    1974-01-01

    A critical review is made of the literature linking DDT to harmful effects on animal life. Implications of a ban on the use of DDT are discussed and studies which have found relatively no harmful effect on non-insect life are cited. (JP)

  4. Architekturzeichnungen der deutschen Renaissance

    OpenAIRE

    Fitzner, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    Architekturzeichnungen sind nicht nur Medien zur Planung und Visualisierung von Architektur, sondern bedeutende Quellen historischer Entwurfstheorien, Entwurfspraktiken und Wissensproduktion. Während italienische Architekturzeichnungen etablierte Quellen der Renaissanceforschung sind, wird hier erstmals der Blick auf bislang vernachlässigte Zeichnungen der ›deutschen Renaissance‹ gelegt. Die vorliegende Studie untersucht sowohl die zeichnerischen Darstellungstechniken und Theorien als auch ih...

  5. Renaissance of the Film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellone, Julius, Ed.

    The post-World War II period was one of the liveliest in the history of the cinema. This is a collection of 33 critical articles on some of the best films of the perd. Most of the essays explicate the themes and symbols of the films. The essays deal with these films: "The Apu Trilogy,""L'Avventura,""Balthazar,""Blow-Up,""Bonnie and Clyde," Citizen…

  6. Financing the Nuclear Renaissance

    OpenAIRE

    NUTTALL, William J.; Taylor, S

    2008-01-01

    This paper considers the key economic risks associated with nuclear power. The authors observe that the bulk of the risks of a nuclear power station project fall during the roughly five year period of plant construction. This window of risk follows a lengthy siting process and comes before power station operations lasting up to sixty years. As a consequence of the nature of the economic risks, operational nuclear power plants are more attractive targets for initial investment than new build p...

  7. Disciplining the tongue: Archbishop Antoninus, the Opera a ben vivere and the regulation of women’s speech in renaissance Florence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa Flanigan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In circa 1454, the Florentine Archbishop Antonino Pierozzi (later St. Antoninus composed a spiritual guidebook, called Opera a ben vivere (A Work to Live Well by, for an elite Florentine laywoman, presumed to be Dianora Tornabuoni. Contained within this book are instructions to his female reader for how to protect her soul from vice and, therefore, ‘live well’ by controlling her sensual appetite, especially her desire for speech. In this text, Antoninus singles out three types of speech as particularly harmful if performed by his female reader. These sinful types of speech are excessive talk, idle talk (i.e. gossip, and intemperate laughter. This article analyses Antoninus’s argument for the regulation of his female reader’s sensual appetite for speech by contextualising it within early renaissance penitential culture and relative to Aristotelian and Christian notions about the nature of women.

  8. A comparative analysis of literary depictions of social violence in two important 16th Century autobiographies, from the perspective of the fencing manuals of the Renaissance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandler Jean

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In the late 16th century two interesting individuals made substantial contributions to the relatively new genre of the autobiography. In 1595 Bartholomäus Sastrow (1520–1603, a north German burgher, notary, diplomat, and eventually burgomeister of the Hanseatic City of Stralsund, penned his life story. Benvenuto Cellini (1500–1571, goldsmith, soldier, musician and famous Renaissance artist from Florence, wrote his memoir between 1558 and 1563. Though they were born twenty years apart, both men had similar backgrounds. Both were from the lower-middle strata of society but rose to high status, both were widely traveled and directly acquainted with the most powerful individuals of their time (as well as some of the most lowly and both experienced firsthand some of the most dramatic and important political and military events of the mid-16th century.

  9. ["This wide sea of proprietary medicines...": the status of pharmacy and the image in the apothecary in Renaissance medical prefaces (1528-1628)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koźluk, Magdalena

    2008-07-01

    Renaissance authors of medical treatises do not stay silent on the issue of the pre-eminence of medicine over surgery and pharmacy and on questions of hierarchy between the three "medici naturae ministri". This article examines how in their prefaces, a number of authors of medical treatises published between 1528 and 1628, come to the defence of the eminence of pharmacy, by emphasizing what distinguishes the apothecary from the other two professions. The prefaces of these treatises provide their authors with an arena where in rhetorical as well as scientific language, they can argue in favour of and give praise to the art of pharmacy and come to the defence of its practitioners. In this way, during the period, polemics about the status of pharmacy, combining elogium with criticism, participate in the construction of the professional identity of the pharmacist.

  10. 'Royal' pediculosis in Renaissance Italy: lice in the mummy of the King of Naples Ferdinand II of Aragon (1467-1496).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornaciari, Gino; Giuffra, Valentina; Marinozzi, Silvia; Picchi, Malayka Samantha; Masetti, Massimo

    2009-07-01

    Pediculosis seems to have afflicted humans since the most ancient times and lice have been found in several ancient human remains. Examination of the head hair and pubic hair of the artificial mummy of Ferdinand II of Aragon (1467-1496), King of Naples, revealed a double infestation with two different species of lice, Pediculus capitis, the head louse, and Pthirus pubis, the pubic louse. The hair samples were also positive for the presence of mercury, probably applied as an anti-pediculosis therapy. This is the first time that these parasites have been found in the hair of a king, demonstrating that even members of the wealthy classes in the Renaissance were subject to louse infestation.

  11. Nuclear renaissance or premature try?; Renacimiento nuclearo o aborto prematuro? Los multiples interrogantes de la opcion nuclear presagian su incierto futuro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coderch, M.

    2008-07-01

    After the economic failure of the 70's and not having been able to solve for decades its multiple problems, the nuclear industry was suffering a slow but inescapable agony. However, the need to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions and the likely arrival of the worldwide peak of oil production have infused new life to the nuclear option, and it has again become one of the main topics of discussion in the worldwide energy debate. But in this debate we tend to forget that the causes of the abrupt end of the first nuclear era have not disappeared, and that for this reason it may well be that we are lead to a repetition of the events that induced its first demise. The much talked nuclear renaissance is thus likely to end up as a premature miscarriage. (Author)

  12. The dramatics of the misa de amores: parody and desacralized ritual in the gestation of Spanish religious theater of the early Renaissance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Cocozzella

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paramount role of the mass in the birth of Spanish theater of the late Middle Ages or early Renaissance has been duly recognized by authoritative critics and historians. These scholars, however, have paid little or no attention to the centrality of the Eucharist in the gestation phase of that theater. The present essay is focused on the process of adapting the rite of transubstantiation to a dramatic plot on the way to an eventual transmutation into a full-fledged theatrical representation. At issue here are the only four extant specimens of the so-called misa de amores of the fifteenth century. These daring parodies of the Mass include Francesc Moner’s most ingenious rendition of the genre. On the basis of Linda Hutcheon’s innovative theory, one may envisage a parodic mode that conditions the distinctive traits of a “desacralized” ritual, the very matrix of the transmutation in question.

  13. Un dialogo diaspórico: el lugar del Harlem Renaissance en el pensamiento racial e intelectual afrocolombiano (1920-1948

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Javier Flórez Boívar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to analyze the use that various Afro-Colombian sectors made of the racial ideas developed by Afro-Colombian activists linked to the cultural movement known as the Harlem Renaissance. It suggests that between 1920 and 1948 black workers and students from the Pacific and Caribbean coasts of Colombia entered into contact with the racial ideas developed by various leaders of said movement. This contact was fundamental in the racial position assumed by several writers of African descent in Colombia, and it shaped a diasporic dialogue that enabled them to participate in the debates and struggles that other Afro-descendent sectors were carrying out in other parts of the Americas.

  14. Proposal for the virtual and material reconstruction through anastylosis of the archaeological remains of the Patio of the Renaissance Palace of the Ambassador Vich in Valencia, Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes Galiana Agulló

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Ambassador Vich’s palace in Valencia (1526-1858 was one of the first examples of renaissance architecture in Spain. After its demolition, part of the courtyard’s marbles was conserved, gathered, after a century and a half of pilgrimage in a unifying intervention in the Museum of Fine Arts of San Pío V in 2006. The recovery of the spatial, composite and material essence of the monument remains incomplete, as the cornices and frames that decorated the surrounding lower gallery are missing; archaeological remains made with grey Italian limestone, Pietra Serena, which together with the white Carrara marble, created the typical two-colour of these, such “Brunelleschian” composite games. The virtual anastylosis allows a proposal to be launched for the material recovery of the emblematic monument, favouring as such the correct reading of the same.

  15. [The examination of men's wits by Juan Huarte de San Juan, and the dawn of the neurobiology of intelligence in the Spanish renaissance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Araguz, A; Bustamante-Martínez, C

    The Spanish renaissance doctor Juan Huarte de San Juan (1529-1588) was the author of a unique and immortal work, The Examination of Men's Wits, the edition princeps of which was printed in Baeza in 1575. Since then it has been reprinted at least 80 times and translated into seven languages, which makes it the most influential Spanish contribution to medicine ever published. In this paper we review the unjustly little-known figure of Huarte as the founder of Neuropsychology, and we also analyse his works from a historical and neuroscientific point of view. Huarte's writings deal with the problem of the organic relations between the brain and understanding, and accept the possible influences exerted by temper on the will within the field of the Neurobiology of Intelligence. Thus, over four centuries ago Huarte became the founder of Differential or Physiological Psychology, Neuropsychology, Eugenics and Career Guidance. Huarte's work not only played a fundamental role in the history and development of the body of neuroscientific knowledge, but has also been a clear (although not always cited) influence on scientists, philosophers and men of letters such as Alarcón, Bacon, Cabanis, Cervantes (whose Don Quixote was inspired by him), Charron, Chomsky, Gall, Goethe, Hume, Kant, Kretchmer, Lessing, Lope de Vega, Montaigne, Montesquieu, Nietzsche, Quevedo, Rousseau, Schopenhauer, Thomasius, Tirso de Molina and Ziegler. In the middle of the 16th century, Huarte and his Examination of Men's Wits, together with the works of the naturalist philosophers Gómez Pereira (Antoniana Margarita, 1554) and Miguel Sabuco (New Philosophy, 1587), constituted the prestigious triumvirate of Spanish Renaissance scholars who, for the first time in history, contemplated the workings of the brain from a point of view that had more to do with science than the supernatural.

  16. Chronologie de la renaissance du vitrail à Paris au XIXe siècle : L’exemple de l’église Saint-Laurent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence de Finance

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available L’église Saint-Laurent, à Paris, offre un bon examen de la renaissance du vitrail au XIXe siècle. Trois commandes passées successivement entre 1846 et 1888 à des artistes de renom témoignent de l’évolution de cet art depuis les premières recherches vers 1820 jusqu’à la parfaite maîtrise d’une technique, perdue au siècle précédent faute de commande. L’iconographie de ces trois séries de verrières, dont l’évolution stylistique est à mettre en parallèle avec les autres arts, reflètent les différentes dévotions d’une société liée aux pratiques gallicanes avant de rallier le courant ultramontain. Enfin, des différences au niveau des signatures témoignent de l’évolution de la perception du métier de peintre verrier par leurs contemporains.The Saint-Laurent church in Paris is a good example of how stained glass witnessed a renaissance during the nineteenth century. Three commissions signed between 1846 and 1888 with stained glass artists of renown bear witness to the evolution of this art from early researches in the 1820s to complete technical mastery, lost during the preceding century for lack of commands. The iconography of the three series of stained glass windows, which is to be compared with the evolution in other arts, reflects the different devotional features of a society linked to Gallican practices before going over to more ultramontain tendencies. Differences in the importance accorded to the signature of the artist also gives an indication of how the status of the stained glass artist was perceived by their contemporaries.

  17. Publication of Renaissance architectural treatises in the Soviet Union in the 1930s: Alexander Gabrichevsky's contribution to the theory and history of architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadejda Podzemskaia

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available : In just a couple of years in the second half of the 1930s, a considerable corpus of architectural treatises, mostly written in the Renaissance, was translated and published with detailed commentaries in the USSR. This great publishing program was conceived of as part of a new system of architectural training. This article formulates the question of the historical and cultural significance of this publishing project in the wider artistic and political context of the 1920s and 1930s. In discussions about the destiny of classical heritage, two majors tendencies, constructivism, represented by Moisei Ginzburg, and classicism, advocated by Ivan Zholtovsky, show not only their differences, but also their shared positions, such as the criticism of eclecticism. The paper concentrates on the collaboration between Zholtovsky and the art historian and theorist Aleksandr Gabrichevsky. This was a true meeting of minds based on profound mutual understanding and common basic notions of art (such as the ambiguous concept of 'classical art’. Because of the language barrier, Gabrichevsky and his works have remained little known to scholars who work in West-European languages. A disciple of Paul Frankl, during the 1920s he researched the problems of space and time in a broader theoretical and philosophical context at the GAKhN. His main work of the time, The Morphology of Art, demonstrates influences of Friedrich Schelling, Johann Wolfgang Goethe, Henri Bergson and, above all, Georg Simmel. This work could not have been completed nor published at the time. Its recent publication revealed the profound philosophical foundations of Gabrichevsky’s studies of architecture as well as of the project of publishing Renaissance architectural treatises that he organized.

  18. Were optical projections used in early Renaissance painting? A geometric image analysis of Jan van Eyck's "Arnolfini Portrait" and Robert Campin's "Merode Altarpiece"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stork, David G.

    2004-04-01

    It has recently been claimed that some painters in the early Renaissance employed optical devices, specifically concave mirrors, to project images onto their canvas or other support (paper, oak panel, etc.) which they then traced or painted over. In this way, according to the theory, artists achieved their newfound heightened realism. We apply geometric image analysis to the parts of two paintings specifically adduced as evidence supporting this bold theory: the splendid, meticulous chandelier in Jan van Eyck's "Portrait of Arnolfini and his wife," and the trellis in the right panel of Robert Campin's "Merode Altarpiece." It has further been claimed that this trellis is the earliest surviving image captured using the projection of any optical device - a claim that, if correct, would have profound import for the histories of art, science and optical technology. Our analyses show that the Arnolfini chandelier fails standard tests of perspective coherence that would indicate an optical projection. Or more specifically, for the physical Arnolfini chandelier to be consistent with an optical projection, that chandelier would have to be implausibly irregular, as judged in comparison to surviving chandeliers and candelabras from the same 15th-century European schools. We find that had Campin painted the trellis using projections, he would have performed an extraordinarily precise and complex procedure using the most sophisticated optical system of his day (for which there is no documentary evidence), a conclusion supported by an attempted "re-enactment." We provide a far more simple, parsimonious and plausible explanation, which we demonstrate by a simple experiment. Our analyses lead us to reject the optical projection theory for these paintings, a conclusion that comports with the vast scholarly consensus on Renaissance working methods and the lack of documentary evidence for optical projections onto a screen.

  19. Marie-Laure Legay, Histoire de l’argent à l’époque moderne. De la renaissance à la Révolution. Paris, Armand Colin, 2014, 221 pages.

    OpenAIRE

    Deblock, Christian

    2015-01-01

    L’ouvrage traite de l’argent dans la France de l’ancien régime, plus précisément comme le titre l’indique, de la Renaissance à la Révolution. De nombreux ouvrages ont été consacrés au sujet ; ce qui fait l’originalité de celui-ci et en même temps le rend aussi passionnant que plaisant à lire, du début à la fin, c’est qu’il nous montre comment l’argent, de rare qu’il pouvait être avant la Renaissance devient progressivement courant, recherché à défaut d’être abondant au fur et à mesure que se ...

  20. Optical or mechanical aids to drawing in the early Renaissance? A geometric analysis of the trellis work in Robert Campin's Mérode Altarpiece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Ashutosh; Stork, David G.

    2009-02-01

    A recent theory claims that some Renaissance artists, as early as 1425, secretly traced optically projected images during the execution of some passages in some of their works, nearly a quarter millennium before historians of art and of optics have secure evidence anyone recorded an image this way. Key evidence adduced by the theory's proponents includes the trelliswork in the right panel of Robert Campin's Merode altarpiece triptych (c. 1425-28). If their claim were verified for this work, such a discovery would be extremely important to the history of art and of image making more generally: the Altarpiece would be the earliest surviving image believed to record the projected image of an illuminated object, the first step towards photography, over 400 years later. The projection theory proponents point to teeny "kinks" in the depicted slats of one orientation in the Altarpiece as evidence that Campin refocussed a projector twice and traced images of physically straight slats in his studio. However, the proponents rotated the digital images of each slat individually, rather than the full trelliswork as a whole, and thereby disrupted the relative alignment between the images of the kinks and thus confounded their analysis. We found that when properly rotated, the kinks line up nearly perfectly and are consistent with Campin using a subtly kinked straightedge repeatedly, once for each of the slats. Moreover, the proponents did not report any analysis of the other set of slats-the ones nearly perpendicular to the first set. These perpendicular slats are straight across the break line of the first set-an unlikely scenario in the optical explanation. Finally, whereas it would have been difficult for Campin to draw the middle portions of the slats perfectly straight by tracing a projected image, it would have been trivially simple had he used a straightedge. Our results and the lack of any contemporaneous documentary evidence for the projection technique imply that

  1. Short Article The Use of Mercury against Pediculosis in the Renaissance: The Case of Ferdinand II of Aragon, King of Naples, 1467–96

    Science.gov (United States)

    FORNACIARI, GINO; MARINOZZI, SILVIA; GAZZANIGA, VALENTINA; GIUFFRA, VALENTINA; PICCHI, MALAYKA SAMANTHA; GIUSIANI, MARIO; MASETTI, MASSIMO

    2011-01-01

    The hair samples of Ferdinand II of Aragon (1467–1496), King of Naples, whose mummy is preserved in the Basilica of San Domenico Maggiore in Naples, showed a high content of mercury, with a value of 827ppm. Furthermore, examination using a stereomicroscope and a scanning electron microscope (SEM) of head and pubic hairs of Ferdinand II, revealed a lice infestation. The reasons for the massive presence of the mercury in the king's hair are discussed and contemporary literature regarding the use of this metal in medical therapies and in cosmetic practices is analysed. As a result, the high value of mercury in the hair of Ferdinand II can be attributed to antipediculosis therapy, applied as a topic medicament. This case represents an important finding for the history of medicine, because demonstrates that in the Renaissance mercury was applied locally not only to treat syphilis, as well attested by direct and indirect sources, but also to prevent or eliminate lice infestation. PMID:23752867

  2. Extraction of a bladder stone in a child as described by the renaissance physician Cristóbal Méndez.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Martín, F M; Hostalot, A M; Santillana, J M; Angerri, O; Millán, F; Villavicencio, H

    2014-09-01

    in his Libro del exercicio y de sus provechos (Book of exercise and profits), the Spanish Renaissance physician Christopher Mendez (1500-1553) describes extracting a bulk stone from the bladder of a child younger than 5 years in the land of colonial Mexico. This is the first description of a surgical procedure in America. Biographical data were collected on Christopher Mendez. The electronic facsimile of the Book of exercise and profits was read. The historical aspects of perineal lithotomy and etiology of bladder stones were analyzed. In chapter seven of the third treatise (page 120), Mendez speaks about the removal of a bladder stone in a boy named «Villaseñor». It uses the word «open» to describe the procedure, corresponding to a lithotomy more than a necropsy. It attributes the etiology of excess movements after ingestion and suggests a possible hereditary etiology. Perineal lithotomy was a common practice in ancient times for children due to the high incidence of bladder stones. The technique was very invasive and was improved over the centuries. The surgery described by Mendez for the child called Villaseñor most likely corresponds to a perineal lithotomy. A congenital cause could play a role in its etiology. Copyright © 2013 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. On the Time of the Intellect: The Interpretation of De Anima 3.6 (43ob 7-20) in Renaissance and Early Modern Italian Philosophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubouclez, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    This article argues that an original debate over the relationship between time and the intellect took place in Northern Italy in the second half of the sixteenth century, which was part of a broader reflection on the temporality of human mental acts. While human intellectual activity was said to be 'above time' during the Middle Ages, Renaissance scholars such as Marcantonio Genua (1491-1563), Giulio Castellani (1528-1586), Antonio Montecatini (1537-1599) and Francesco Piccolomini (1520-1604), greatly influenced by the Simplician and Alexandrist interpretations of Aristotle's works, proposed alterna- tive conceptions based on the interpretation of De anima 3.6 (430b 7-20) according to which intellectual acts happen in a both 'undivided' and 'divisible time'. In order to explain Aristotle's puzzling claim, they were led to conceive of intellectual activity as a process similar to sensation, corresponding to a certain lapse of time (Castellani), an instant (Montecatini), or a mix of instantaneousness and concrete duration (Piccolomini), depending on their theoretical options.

  4. Weltweit grösste experimentieranlage am CERN kurz vor dem start

    CERN Multimedia

    von Einsiedel, Silvia

    2007-01-01

    The european organisation for nuclear physics (CERN) in Geneva is the most important research center in the world. With 24 member states, it developed since 1954 the establishment of an outstanding model of European co-operation in the physical basic research at major items of equipment. (1 page)

  5. Die weltweit erste Messung einer Lotabweichung in der L\\"ange

    CERN Document Server

    Schrimpf, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    During the summer of 1837 Christian Ludwig Gerling, a former student of Carl Friedrich Gauss, organized the world wide first determination of a vertical deflection in longitude. From a mobile observatory at the Frauenberg close to Marburg (Hessen) he measured the astronomical longitude difference between the observatory of C.F. Gauss at G\\"ottingen and the observatory of F.G.B. Nicolai at Mannheim. By comparing these astronomical results with the geodetic determined longitude differences, which he just had measured as a part of the triangulation of Kurhessen, he was able to extract a combined value of the vertical deflection of G\\"ottingen and Mannheim. His results are in very good agreement with modern vertical deflection data.

  6. New hydro possibilities in Europe and worldwide; Neue Wasserkraft. Moeglichkeiten in Europa und weltweit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harreiter, Herfried; Rabitsch, Herwig [VERBUND Hydro Power GmbH, Wien (Austria)

    2015-05-01

    Hydropower is the largest single renewable electricity source today. In industrialised countries, especially in Europe, growth will be considerably low due to the current market distortions, most of the growth will come from large projects in emerging economics and developing countries in Africa, Asia and Latin America. Due to these projects, the IEA roadmap foresees by 2050 a doubling of global capacity. Upgrading or redevelopment of existing plants or innovative applications can also deliver additional benefits.

  7. Nuclear materials transport worldwide. Greenpeace report 2. Der weltweite Atomtransport. Greenpeace Report 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stellpflug, J.

    1987-01-01

    This Greenpeace report shows: nuclear materials transport is an extremely hazardous business. There is no safe protection against accidents, kidnapping, or sabotage. Any moment of a day, at any place, a nuclear transport accident may bring the world to disaster, releasing plutonium or radioactive fission products to the environment. Such an event is not less probable than the MCA at Chernobyl. The author of the book in hand follows the secret track of radioactive materials around the world, from uranium mines to the nuclear power plants, from reprocessing facilities to the waste repositories. He explores the routes of transport and the risks involved, he gives the names of transport firms and discloses incidents and carelessness, tells about damaged waste drums and plutonium that 'disappeared'. He also tells about worldwide, organised resistance to such nuclear transports, explaining the Greenpeace missions on the open sea, or the 'day X' operation at the Gorleben site, informing the reader about protests and actions for a world freed from the threat of nuclear energy.

  8. The Different Western Perception of the Oriental Moor in the Renaissance and the Twentieth Century: Shakespeare's Othello and Tayeb Salih's Season of Migration to the North: A Post-Colonial Critique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein A. Alhawamdeh

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper comparatively explores the different experience of the Muslim Orient - namely, Othello in Shakespeare's Othello (1604 and Mustafa Saeed and the narrator in Salih's Season of Migration to the North (1966 - in the West. It aims at relocating the transformation of the discourse of Orientalism from Renaissance, as represented by Shakespeare's Othello, to the post-eighteenth century, as represented by Salih's Season of Migration to the North. By contrasting the West and the Crescent, from power relations' vantage, this study highlights the historical difference of the western perception of the Orient from a colonizer, liberator, and guide to the West, as in Shakespeare's Othello, to a colonized subject, as in the characters of Mustafa Saeed and the narrator in Season of Migration. This paper bridges the gap left by modern scholarship which either focuses only on applying post-colonial theory on Salih's novel or neglects its resonance to Shakespeare's Othello in terms of power relations' vantage. Salih's novel laments, rather than deconstructs, the Renaissance Shakespearean powerful Moor, as represented by Othello in Shakespeare's Othello.

  9. Florentine Renaissance Resources. Online Tratte of Office Holders 1282-1532, Ed. by D. Herlihy, R. Burr Litchfield, A. Molho, R. Barducci, 2000. Online Catasto of 1427, Ed. by D. Herlihy, C. Klapisch-Zuber, Vers. 1.2., Brown University, Providence, R.I.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Bicchierai

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Florentine Renaissance Resources. - Online Tratte of Office Holders 1282-1532, Edited by David Herlihy, R. Burr Litchfield, Anthony Molho and Roberto Barducci , 2000 - Online Catasto of 1427, Edited by David Herlihy, Christiane Klapisch-Zuber, Version 1.2., Brown University, Providence, R.I. , 1996

  10. Peddling Pablo: Escobar's Cultural Renaissance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pobutsky, Aldona Bialowas

    2013-01-01

    Nearly two decades after his death, Pablo Escobar has reemerged in a number of autobiographical publications that revisit the era of the Medellín cartel and its most infamous capo. Rather than providing strictly historical information, these texts adopt an anecdotal and intimate angle from the positions of Escobar's hitman, his lover, his…

  11. Interstate-35 bridge instrumentation renaissance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    An updated, accelerometer-based, sensor and data acquisition system was installed and verified on the I-35 Walnut Creek Bridge in Purcell, Oklahoma. The data collection system also includes a microwave communication system to move sensor and video da...

  12. Irrational "Coefficients" in Renaissance Algebra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oaks, Jeffrey A

    2017-06-01

    Argument From the time of al-Khwārizmī in the ninth century to the beginning of the sixteenth century algebraists did not allow irrational numbers to serve as coefficients. To multiply by x, for instance, the result was expressed as the rhetorical equivalent of . The reason for this practice has to do with the premodern concept of a monomial. The coefficient, or "number," of a term was thought of as how many of that term are present, and not as the scalar multiple that we work with today. Then, in sixteenth-century Europe, a few algebraists began to allow for irrational coefficients in their notation. Christoff Rudolff (1525) was the first to admit them in special cases, and subsequently they appear more liberally in Cardano (1539), Scheubel (1550), Bombelli (1572), and others, though most algebraists continued to ban them. We survey this development by examining the texts that show irrational coefficients and those that argue against them. We show that the debate took place entirely in the conceptual context of premodern, "cossic" algebra, and persisted in the sixteenth century independent of the development of the new algebra of Viète, Decartes, and Fermat. This was a formal innovation violating prevailing concepts that we propose could only be introduced because of the growing autonomy of notation from rhetorical text.

  13. The renaissance of complement therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricklin, Daniel; Mastellos, Dimitrios C; Reis, Edimara S; Lambris, John D

    2018-01-01

    The increasing number of clinical conditions that involve a pathological contribution from the complement system - many of which affect the kidneys - has spurred a regained interest in therapeutic options to modulate this host defence pathway. Molecular insight, technological advances, and the first decade of clinical experience with the complement-specific drug eculizumab, have contributed to a growing confidence in therapeutic complement inhibition. More than 20 candidate drugs that target various stages of the complement cascade are currently being evaluated in clinical trials, and additional agents are in preclinical development. Such diversity is clearly needed in view of the complex and distinct involvement of complement in a wide range of clinical conditions, including rare kidney disorders, transplant rejection and haemodialysis-induced inflammation. The existing drugs cannot be applied to all complement-driven diseases, and each indication has to be assessed individually. Alongside considerations concerning optimal points of intervention and economic factors, patient stratification will become essential to identify the best complement-specific therapy for each individual patient. This Review provides an overview of the therapeutic concepts, targets and candidate drugs, summarizes insights from clinical trials, and reflects on existing challenges for the development of complement therapeutics for kidney diseases and beyond.

  14. Lagina and the Ionian Renaissance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Poul

    2012-01-01

    I artiklen argumenteres for at en verserende teori om, at Hekate templet i Lagina har to byggefaser, understøttes af, at der er anvendt en ældre type løftehuller i templets cella-søjler end i den omgivende søjlerække, peristylen....

  15. Art Renaissance in South Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Jim

    1990-01-01

    South Carolina's requirement that school districts identify and serve artistically gifted/talented students in grades 3-12 has led the State Department of Education to develop support activities, as establishing curriculum guidelines, showcasing successful programs, and creating leadership roles for the South Carolina Arts Commission and the…

  16. Virgilian fandom in the Renaissance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balaka Basu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Considered as fan works, early modern homages to, derivations from, and continuations of classical texts can help contemporary readers better understand the past and potential future of fan fiction as a queer, emotional, and affectionate investment in the universe of a text. Demonstrating that Sir Philip Sidney's queer, fractured Arcadia can be understood as fan fiction of Virgil's Eclogues shows how readers have always responded to the notion of beloved texts held in the creative commons with traditional fan practices such as subversive slash subtexts, inserted selves, feminine communities of reader-writers, and carefully orchestrated gift economies, whether in ancient Rome, Tudor England, or our own digital era.

  17. Successful change: renaissance without revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Y T; Whitaker, C

    1994-12-01

    Change does not have to be painful. In fact, with careful planning it can even be liberating, empowering, and fun. Creating a vision, establishing trust, and encouraging participation are all critical steps in the process of change. Additionally, understanding the organizational culture, effective communication and assessing readiness are necessary in managing the change process and setting the stage for success. A case presentation describing the development and implementation of a staff on-call program is presented to illustrate the important steps in planning for a successful change process.

  18. The renaissance of complement therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricklin, Daniel; Mastellos, Dimitrios C.; Reis, Edimara S.; Lambris, John D.

    2018-01-01

    The increasing number of clinical conditions that involve a pathological contribution from the complement system — many of which affect the kidneys — has spurred a regained interest in therapeutic options to modulate this host defence pathway. Molecular insight, technological advances, and the first decade of clinical experience with the complement-specific drug eculizumab, have contributed to a growing confidence in therapeutic complement inhibition. More than 20 candidate drugs that target various stages of the complement cascade are currently being evaluated in clinical trials, and additional agents are in preclinical development. Such diversity is clearly needed in view of the complex and distinct involvement of complement in a wide range of clinical conditions, including rare kidney disorders, transplant rejection and haemodialysis-induced inflammation. The existing drugs cannot be applied to all complement-driven diseases, and each indication has to be assessed individually. Alongside considerations concerning optimal points of intervention and economic factors, patient stratification will become essential to identify the best complement-specific therapy for each individual patient. This Review provides an overview of the therapeutic concepts, targets and candidate drugs, summarizes insights from clinical trials, and reflects on existing challenges for the development of complement therapeutics for kidney diseases and beyond. PMID:29199277

  19. Will our Current Data Rescue, Curation and Preservation Practices bring us out of the Digital Dark Ages and into the Renaissance of Multi-Source Science? (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyborn, L. A.

    2013-12-01

    evolutions of both hardware and software. The move to data intensive science has driven the realisation that we need to put more effort and resources into rescuing, curating and preserving data and properly preserved data sets are now being use to resolve the real world issues of today. However, as the capacity of computational systems increases relentlessly we need to question if our current efforts in data curation and preservation will scale to these ever growing systems. For Earth and Space Sciences to come out of the digital dark ages and into the renaissance of multi-source science, it is time to take stock and question our current data rescue, curation and preservation initiatives. Will the data store I am using be around in 50 years' time? What measures is this data store taking to avoid bit-rot and/or deal with software and hardware obsolescence. Is my data self-describing? Have I paid enough attention to cross domain data standards so my data can be reused and repurposed for the current decadal challenges? More importantly, as the capacity of computational systems scale beyond exascale to zettascale and yottascale, will my data sets that I have rescued, curated and preserved in my lifetime, no matter whether they are small or large, be able to contribute to addressing the decadal challenges that are as yet undefined.

  20. A stable regulatory frame, a key for the health and safety in nuclear renaissance; Un marco regulador estable, clave para la salud y la seguridad en el renacimiento nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, D.

    2008-07-01

    Thirty one nations currently operate 439 reactors, and there are 34 reactors under construction in 11 nations. In addition, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) estimates that in a little more than two decades, 55 countries will operate 630 reactors and that by mid-century, 86 countries could have operating commercial reactors. Any measure, a nuclear renaissance is upon us. According to U.S. government estimates, within the next two decades 24 countries will be building and operating nuclear reactors for the first time. One concern for me is that many of these nations have neither a nuclear infrastructure nor nuclear experience. The current nuclear resurgence brings with it the unique opportunity to enhance the safety and security of the new reactors. (Author)

  1. Quand les châteaux étaient peints When châteaux were painted or The decoration of facades and roofs in French mansions and stately homes from the Renaissance to the classical period

    OpenAIRE

    Jacques Moulin

    2009-01-01

    L’architecture française a la réputation d’avoir toujours privilégié la mise en œuvre de matériaux laissés dans leur état naturel. Or, une observation plus détaillée des monuments fait apparaître que, dès leur construction, les façades et toitures de la Renaissance et de l’époque classique firent souvent l’objet de finitions peintes qui leur donnaient l’aspect réellement souhaité par leurs maîtres d’œuvre. Cette redécouverte amène une véritable relecture de certains des monuments français les...

  2. Austeritätspolitik in Estland: die Reaktionen der Wähler auf die Genommene Sparmassnhamen Während der Finanz – und Wirtschaftskrise 2008-2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liina Kulu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available During the latest global financial crisis, austerity as a concept has been described as the best possible and inevitable solution to achieve fiscal consolidation in Europe and in the euro zone. But even considering austerity as an economically rational measure, the politicians of most EU member states’ have introduced the austerity measures only to a limited extent or have chosen less stressful and politically less risky strategies. Estonian politicians, having earlier shock therapy experience from the years of re-independence, were among few European governments, who decided to adopt austerity measures with its economic and social consequences. Against all theoretical and rhetorical expectations they remained in power. The aim of the article is to analyze why austerity has not triggered negative political reaction of citizens, as expected in theoretical models as well feared by politicians, and was it caused by specific socio-cultural factors or well-planned strategy of government

  3. Introduction: commentaries and author's response to "The rise and fall of the autochthonous self: from Italian Renaissance Art and Shakespeare to Hediegger, Lacan, and Intersubjectivism" by Richard D. Chessick.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leffert, Mark; Schwartz, Scott C; Chessick, Richard D

    2011-01-01

    This article addresses the unresolved question of the existence of a private core autochthonous self, as it has been described by Winnicott, Modell, and others. The postmodern version of the self has eliminated this concept entirely, relegating the self to a changing and unstable display, or regarding it as totally chaotic, or even an illusion. The question is raised whether by returning to the origins of this notion of a private self and then tracing its apparent dissolution it might be possible to discover some evidence that it still exists. The methodology used is that of obtaining knowledge directly through the arts and the claim is made that because empirical science has clamored to be the only source of knowledge, we have lost what could be obtained by direct intuitive seeing and experiencing the works of creative geniuses. To explore the rise of the autochthonous self this article provides an examination of the shift from Gothic art to Italian Renaissance art, a time which engendered the origin of "man" with his or her elusive private individual self that then became expressed in changing works of art. As this spread north, Shakespeare appeared and similarly invented and illustrated in his characters the private individual self, a concept not appreciated or recognized before the Renaissance. But as science arose and Western civilization began to decline, a corresponding disillusionment with "man" took place. The self began to be viewed as solely a social construction with no core except perhaps a genetic endowment. This was accompanied by a reduction in the concept of the human as a valuable and precious living being and was replaced by regarding the human as an object of control and exploitation. After the Second World War a movement in contemporary United States psychoanalysis gradually replaced the ideas of Freud and his emphasis on the "I" in the psychoanalytic process, with forms of relational therapy, assuming that the self was ab initio

  4. Post Fukushima change of energy policy. German special way or worldwide example?; Energiewende nach Fukushima. Deutscher Sonderweg oder weltweites Vorbild?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennicke, Peter; Welfens, Paul J.J.

    2012-07-01

    Based on a critical evaluation of the nuclear power discussion the authors show a reasonable way for nuclear phase-out or change to alternative energy sources. Germany has a historically unique key role to show that a climate protecting energy policy without nuclear power can evolve economic and social advantages, in case the right measures are selected and realized. The Fukushima accidents could trigger a paradigm change for the power industry with a worldwide effect toward industrial ecology and democracy. The worldwide underinsurance of nuclear power plants is a trick to reduce the nuclear power cost. Without subsidization of nuclear power there is no need for subsidization of renewable energy sources.

  5. Energy efficient elevators. Guideline VDI 4707, Worldwide discussions are suggested; Energieeffiziente Aufzuege. Richtlinie VDI 4707. Weltweite Diskussionen werden angeregt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meermann, Friedhelm [AC GmbH - Anlagen-Contracting fuer Foerdertechnik, Herbolzheim (Germany)

    2010-11-15

    The discussion to measures in the area of energy efficiency with elevators has a long tradition. With the publication of the Swiss regulation SIA 380/4, the German guideline VDI 4707 and the ISO 25745 it is now indisputable to measure the energy consumption values with elevators under material conditions. The savings of an energy-efficient elevator can amount to 25 to 60 %.

  6. Frauen im Netz weltweit – ausgegrenzt und mittendrin Women in the World Wide Web—Both excluded and central

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothea Lüdke

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Mit dem Global Center for Women’s Studies and Politics (GLOW ist das Feministische Institut der Heinrich-Böll-Stiftung 1998 online gegangen. Mit diesem Schritt wurden Fragen nach den Möglichkeiten und Grenzen sowie nach den Gestaltungsräumen virtueller Kommunikation für Frauen zentral. Mit feminist_spaces. Frauen im Netz. Diskurse – Communities – Visionen, legt die Heinrich-Böll-Stiftung zusammen mit dem Feministischen Institut Antworten aus internationaler Perspektive vor. Das Buch geht auf die gleichnamige zweitätige Konferenz in Berlin im November 2001 zurück.The Feminist Institute of the Heinrich-Böll Foundation went online with the Global Center for Women’s Studies and Politics (GLOW in 1998. In this way, questions concerning the possibilities and boundaries, as well as the shaping of virtual communication for women, became central. With feminist_spaces: Discourses, Communities and Visions for women in the Net the Heinrich-Böll Foundation provides, together with the Feminist Institute, answers from an international perspective. The book originates from the two-day conference of the same name which took place in Berlin in November 2001.

  7. John Piper et Benjamin Britten : le renouveau de l’opéra anglais et ses décors John Piper and Benjamin Britten: backdrops to the renaissance of english opera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Aymès

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available From 1946 the artist John Piper designed sets for eight of Benjamin Britten’s operas. In this article, John Piper’s contribution to the renaissance of English opera is considered in the wider context of the artistic and political reconstruction of England after the Second World War. During the War, Piper was one of the artists who redefined Englishness. As an abstract artist turned architectural painter, he created a pastoral vision of the national heritage whose preservation had become necessary. The designs form a part of Piper’s pictorial work whose logical conclusion found expression in stained-glass windows. From the architectural designs for The Rape of Lucretia to the window he designed for the new Coventry Cathedral and to the last opera sets for Death in Venice, he created backdrops for Britten’s works that provided a sense of aesthetic continuity whilst reflecting the contradictions of opera as a social form of art in post-war Britain.

  8. Renaissance of Aeroelasticity and Its Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedmann, Peretz P.

    1999-01-01

    The primary objective of this paper is to demonstrate that the field of aeroelasticity continues to play a critical role in the design of modern aerospace vehicles, and several important problems are still far from being well understood. Furthermore, the emergence of new technologies, such as the use of adaptive materials (sometimes denoted as smart structures technology), providing new actuator and sensor capabilities, has invigorated aeroelasticity, and generated a host of new and challenging research topics that can have a major impact on the design of a new generation of aerospace vehicles.

  9. Mourning the African Renaissance | Distiller | Shakespeare in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    No Abstract. Shakespeare in Southern Africa Vol. 18 2006: pp. 49-56. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms ...

  10. The renaissance of hydrides as energy materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohtadi, Rana; Orimo, Shin-Ichi

    2017-02-01

    Materials based on hydrides have been the linchpin in the development of several practical energy storage technologies, of which the most prominent example is nickel-metal hydride batteries. Motivated by the need to meet the future's energy demand, the past decade has witnessed substantial advancements in the research and development of hydrides as media for hydrogen energy storage. More recently, new and rapidly evolving discoveries have positioned hydrides as highly promising materials for future electrochemical energy storage, such as electrolytes for mono- and divalent batteries, and anodes for lithium-ion batteries. In addition, the potential of hydrides in efficient power transmission has been recently revealed. In this Review, we highlight key advances and illustrate how the versatility of hydrides has not only yielded a meaningful past, but also ensures a very bright future.

  11. Perry: American renaissance of an ancient beverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgeoning world interest in cider and perry (pear cider, which is an alcoholic beverage) has created a strong demand for unique perry pear (Pyrus L.) cultivars. The history of perry dates to the ancient Romans. This beverage has been very popular through the centuries in Europe. The U.S. Department...

  12. Renaissance of leptin for obesity therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quarta, Carmelo; Sánchez-Garrido, Miguel A; Tschöp, Matthias H

    2016-01-01

    Diet-induced obesity and its metabolic comorbidities constitute an overwhelming health crisis and there is an urgent need for safe and effective pharmacological interventions. Being largely shelved for decades, scientists are now revisiting the anti-obesity virtues of leptin. Whereas it remains e...

  13. The scientific renaissance 1450-1630

    CERN Document Server

    Hall, Marie Boas

    1994-01-01

    Stimulating, illuminating, and thoughtfully presented, this study explores the early stages of the scientific revolution. A noted historian of science examines the Copernican revolution, the anatomical work of Vesalius, the work of Paracelsus, Harvey's discovery of the circulatory system, the effects of Galileo's telescopic discoveries, and much more.

  14. Depicting Occlusion in Early Renaissance Art

    OpenAIRE

    Barbara Gillam

    2011-01-01

    The artist attempting to give the impression of three-dimensional relationships must convey somehow that one surface is in front of another. There is a large and venerable literature in Psychology on this subject, showing how figure-ground, border ownership and amodal completion and continuation are determined but there is almost no discussion of how artist's have recruited these and other principles to create convincing impressions of occlusion. Even Gombrich (Art & Illusion 1960) only consi...

  15. Japan's Renaissance and Its Effect to ASEAN

    OpenAIRE

    Hidayat, Syafril

    2014-01-01

    Japan has developed a new security policy against China in East China Sea, which has increased tension in that region. Japan's new leadership under Shinzo Abe, who has conservative political view, has unbeatable policy against China's hegemony. Abe revised Japan Self-Defence Forces role in the Japanese Constitution by making critical amendments on particular articles, which should be seen as Japan's bargaining power against China. The two major powers in East China Sea can be seen as security...

  16. Rhazes in the Renaissance of Andreas Vesalius

    OpenAIRE

    Compier, Abdul Haq

    2012-01-01

    Andreas Vesalius' (1514–64) first publication was a Paraphrasis of the ninth book of the Liber ad Almansorem, written by the Arab–Persian physician and alchemist Rhazes (854–925). The role of Rhazes in Vesalius' oeuvre has thus far been much disregarded. The different ways Rhazes recurs reveal an intellectual evolution in Vesalius' work. In the Paraphrasis, Vesalius subjects Rhazes to the authority of Galen in the context of the early sixteenth-century humanist campaign for the substitution o...

  17. Rhazes in the renaissance of Andreas Vesalius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compier, Abdul Haq

    2012-01-01

    Andreas Vesalius' (1514-64) first publication was a Paraphrasis of the ninth book of the Liber ad Almansorem, written by the Arab-Persian physician and alchemist Rhazes (854-925). The role of Rhazes in Vesalius' oeuvre has thus far been much disregarded. The different ways Rhazes recurs reveal an intellectual evolution in Vesalius' work. In the Paraphrasis, Vesalius subjects Rhazes to the authority of Galen in the context of the early sixteenth-century humanist campaign for the substitution of Arab influences by Greek 'originals'. Over the years Vesalius continues his work on Rhazes, but his approach becomes more internationalistic. Ultimately, Vesalius criticises Galen while expressing sympathy for the Arab author. This may be the more significant as Rhazes could have influenced Vesalius in the act of criticising Galen - critical discussions of Galen were available to Vesalius in Latin translations of Rhazes's Liber Continens. Although Vesalius never refers to the work, it is hardly possible he was unaware of it: similarities in structure, rhetoric and form between the Continens and the De humani corporis fabrica could support this hypothesis.

  18. THE GREAT LEAP OUTWARD: CHINA'S MARITIME RENAISSANCE

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Howard J. Dooley

    2012-01-01

    ...; rise in the global shipbuilding market; and efforts to develop a "blue water" navy. This paper will examine how, starting with Deng Xiaoping's reforms in 1978, China has developed a comprehensive strategy for maritime growth...

  19. Medicine and the Renaissance world of learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siraisi, Nancy G

    2004-01-01

    This article considers aspects of the relation of medicine with other learned disciplines during the sixteenth century and presents some examples of the contribution of medical authors of that period to such diverse fields as natural philosophy, physiognomy, alchemy, travel writing, the art of memory, and the study of antiquities.

  20. ARISE: American renaissance in science education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-14

    The national standards and state derivatives must be reinforced by models of curricular reform. In this paper, ARISE presents one model based on a set of principles--coherence, integration of the sciences, movement from concrete ideas to abstract ones, inquiry, connection and application, sequencing that is responsive to how people learn.

  1. Post-polio syndrome: renaissance of poliomyelitis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Andre Barbosa de Lira

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Poliomyelitis is an acute and infectious viral disease, transmitted primarily through oral-fecal contact or directly, person to person. Approximately 90% of the individuals infected by the polio virus do not present symptoms; however, the affected individuals can show a variety of symptoms if the virus reaches the bloodstream. In up to 2% of cases, the virus reaches the central nervous system  preferably infecting and destroying the motor neurons, resulting in muscular weakness and acute flaccid paralysis. Despite the expressive reduction in the number of cases, many people live with the consequences of the acute illness, thus representing a burden to the public healthcare systems. Many of these people present new manifestations as signs and symptoms that are called post-polio syndrome. It can be defined and characterized by new neuromuscular symptoms, which occur at least 15 years after a period of clinical and functional stability in patients with previous history of symptomatic poliomyelitis. The signs and symptoms characterizing the post-polio syndrome include new muscular weakness, muscular fatigue and atrophy, pain in joints and muscles, sleep disorders, intolerance to cold, respiratory and swallowing difficulties, and recent weight gain. Therefore, the aim of this review is to present the physiological changes caused by the new manifestation of symptoms in individuals with poliomyelitis.

  2. Nutritional Renaissance and Public Health Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, T C

    2017-01-01

    The science of nutrition has long been entrapped in reductionist interpretation of details, a source of great confusion. However, if nutrition is defined as the integration of countless nutrient factors, metabolic reactions and outcomes, biologically orchestrated as in symphony, its relevance for personal and public health would be less confusing and more productive. This more wholistic interpretation may be observed at the cellular and physiological levels and may be described, in part, by the concept of pleiotropy (multiple cell-based effects from one nutrient source), together with its more expansive cousin, epitropy (multiple cell-based effects from multiple nutrients). There are many consequences. First, wholistic interpretation helps to explain the profound but little-known health benefits of whole plant-based foods (not vegan or vegetarian) when compared with whole animal-based foods and/or with the nutritionally variable convenience foods (generally high in fat, salt, refined carbohydrates and low in complex carbohydrates). Second, wholistic interpretation explains why the U.S. Dietary Guidelines and related public policies, which are primarily conceived from reductionist reasoning, serve political agendas so effectively. If diet and health advisories were to acknowledge the biological complexity of nutrition, then make greater use of deductive (top down) instead of inductive (bottom up) reasoning, there would be less confusion. Third, wholistic nutrition, if acknowledged, could greatly help to resolve the highly-polarized, virtually intractable political debate on health care. And fourth, this definition tells why nutrition is rarely if ever offered in medical school training, is not one of the 130 or so medical specialties, and does not have a dedicated research institute at U.S. National Institutes of Health. Nutrition is a wholistic science whereas medical practice is reductionist, a serious mismatch that causes biased judgement of nutrition. But this dichotomy would not exist if the medical practice profession were to understand and adopt wholistic interpretation. Reductionist research, however, is crucially important because its findings provide the granular structure for wholistic interpretation-these two philosophies are inescapably interdependent. Evidence obtained in this manner lends strong support to the suggestion that nutrition is more efficacious and far more affordable in maintaining and restoring (treating) health than all the pills and procedures combined. Admittedly, this is a challenging paradigm for the domain of medical science itself.

  3. Renaissance: Series of problems as varietas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cifoletti Giovanna

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper I wish to discuss three texts published by two mathematical authors, Oronce Fine and his student Jean Borrel. These three texts are typical of the time and are examples of the transformation occurring in the genres of mathematical books. This had direct consequences on the ways and the purpose of presenting series of problems followed by further mathematical authors. Oronce Fine's contribution has been to present commercial problems as Euclidean problems on proportions, as well as to replace the university quadrivium by four practical disciplines: practical arithmetic, practical geometry, cosmography, sundials. The two books by his disciple Borrel reflect the view on mathematics promoted by Oronce Fine: we can recognize mathematics in every aspect of the world. Borrel is also very concerned with distinctions in the human world: variety in the Opera geometrica and in the Logistica corresponds to redefinition of professional roles according to Fine's program. In particular, Borrel wants to stress the role of a new category of mathematicians, specialized in the practical disciplines Fine taught at the Collège Royal, the geometers. They dealt with practical problems by using classical humanistic education and practical mathematics, exactly what jurists did: Through the crucial rhetorical notion of varietas he is able to illustrate, in the Opera geometrica, the multifarious mathematical competence required for jurists. Among geometers, Borrel distinguishes a group of people, the logisticians, dealing in particular with the computational side. The readership of his Logisticawas also, by and large, constituted by jurists. In fact many jurists were logisticians or needed competence in this art, and many logisticians had a training in law. The texts by the two authors examined here show a use of series of problems as varieties at two levels: the level of the presentation of examples for a rule, mostly in the main part of the text, and the level of a list of cases at the end on the book.

  4. Finding values for a cultural renaissance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Gianotti

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Negli ultimi trenta anni Bologna ha perso un quarto dei suoi cittadini, perlopiù artigiani, pensionati e famiglie a basso reddito. Per i primi ci sono pesanti restrizioni nell’utilizzo dei mezzi di trasporto e le politiche di accesso al centro si sono dimostrate sempre più miopi per chi deve lavorare; i “meno abbienti” se ne sono dovuti andare perché i valori immobiliari sono diventati proibitivi per una politica di restauro e di conservazione di quell’area definita “centro storico” che ha favorito un aumento artificioso dei valori immobiliari. Tutti e due sono la conseguenza di una politica parossistica di valorizzazione degli edifici entro le mura. Per queste categorie infine - e forse anche per altre - l’irragionevole aumento dei costi degli spazi urbani è stata dunque la logica conseguenza – probabilmente non voluta ma implicita - dell’eliminazione delle attività umane a favore della conservazione della facciata della città che l’ha trasformata via via in un luogo privo di quella cultura “vera” che derivava dai traffici, dai commerci, dal lavoro degli artigiani.

  5. Globalisation and African renaissance: prospects and challenges ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The nation- state in Africa seemed doomed from the beginning as the colonial powers carved up Africa with little regard to logical boundaries based on communities of similar language and culture. The liberation movements, filled with noble ideals, assumed political power using the colonially imposed nation- state as the ...

  6. Globalisation, the African Renaissance and Sustainable Development

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... comes to an end permanently. They must themselves be responsible for the answers to this question so that they recognise the obligation to themselves to take such actions as may result from the answers they will have provided themselves. (Indilinga: African Journal of Indigenous Knowledge Systems: 2002 1: 49-60) ...

  7. Jean-Pierre Luminet: Renaissance Communicator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullen, L.; Russo, P.

    2009-02-01

    As science communicators dealing with astronomy we often find a strong interest amongst the public in astrology - how the stars and planets directly affect our individual lives. Nowadays astrology is at odds with the scientific nature of astronomy, but this has not always been the case. Presented here is a background to astrology, to give a deeper understanding of where it has come from and why it has such an enduring place in all forms of global media.

  8. Les rites de la mort à Bornéo : séparation ou renaissance ? Actualité de Robert Hertz Death Rites in Borneo: Separation or Rebirth? Robert Hertz’ Legacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Couderc

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available La publication récente par le Borneo Research Council d’un ouvrage collectif sur la mort fournit l’occasion de réévaluer l’apport de Robert Hertz à la compréhension des rites funéraires à Bornéo. Si la traduction en anglais, dans les années 1960, de l’essai de Hertz sur la représentation collective de la mort avait consacré, grâce notamment aux travaux de Peter Metcalf sur les Berawan, la puissance du modèle analytique hertzien, ce nouvel ouvrage semble signaler que le moment de la célébration finale est venu, où les héritiers se libèrent de l’emprise spirituelle du défunt. Tout en conservant une grande part de sa valeur comme théorie du deuil, le paradigme transitionnel ou « réactif » de Hertz révèle ses limites, mises ici en lumière par des données ethnographiques encore peu connues ou inédites, qui démontrent, par exemple, l’existence d’une circulation des composantes de la personne par delà l’opposition entre la vie et la mort, ou encore l’influence directe des secondes funérailles sur la renaissance des défunts. Cet article aborde le dépassement du modèle hertzien en retournant à la lettre de l’essai, dont il met en relief l’intelligence ethnographique et la finesse théorique.The recent publication by the Borneo Research Council of a collection of essays on death provides an opportunity to reassess the heritage of Robert Hertz, whose theory of the double obsequies relies heavily on the ethnography of the Ngaju and other Borneo peoples. The translation of Hertz’s essay on the collective representation of death in the 1960s, prompting in particular Peter Metcalf’s work on the Berawan, has consecrated the explanatory power of Hertz’s model. With this new book, however, time seems to have come for the final celebration that marks the heirs’ liberation from the deceased’s spiritual influence. While still largely valid as a general theory of mourning, Hertz’s paradigm of

  9. Dupont Anne-Laure, Ğurğī Zaydān (1861-1914, Ecrivain réformiste et témoin de la Renaissance arabe, Institut Français du Proche-Orient, Damas, 2006, 760 p.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Jacquemond

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Dans le panthéon de la Renaissance (nahda arabe, la figure de Ğurğī Zaydān (désormais, plus simplement, Jurji Zaydan est longtemps restée au second plan. L’histoire littéraire juge avec quelque condescendance ses nombreux romans historiques, et l’histoire intellectuelle n’est guère plus indulgente vis-à-vis du reste de son œuvre. « Jacques Berque, par exemple, n’avait que mépris pour le ‘cosmopolitisme emplumé d’arabisme’ » de Jurji Zaydan, rappelle Anne-Laure Dupont (désormais A.-L.D. dan...

  10. The RENAISSANCE (AIO-FLOT5) trial: effect of chemotherapy alone vs. chemotherapy followed by surgical resection on survival and quality of life in patients with limited-metastatic adenocarcinoma of the stomach or esophagogastric junction - a phase III trial of the German AIO/CAO-V/CAOGI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Batran, Salah-Eddin; Goetze, Thorsten O; Mueller, Daniel W; Vogel, Arndt; Winkler, Michael; Lorenzen, Sylvie; Novotny, Alexander; Pauligk, Claudia; Homann, Nils; Jungbluth, Thomas; Reissfelder, Christoph; Caca, Karel; Retter, Steffen; Horndasch, Eva; Gumpp, Julia; Bolling, Claus; Fuchs, Karl-Hermann; Blau, Wolfgang; Padberg, Winfried; Pohl, Michael; Wunsch, Andreas; Michl, Patrick; Mannes, Frank; Schwarzbach, Matthias; Schmalenberg, Harald; Hohaus, Michael; Scholz, Christian; Benckert, Christoph; Knorrenschild, Jorge Riera; Kanngießer, Veit; Zander, Thomas; Alakus, Hakan; Hofheinz, Ralf-Dieter; Roedel, Claus; Shah, Manish A; Sasako, Mitsuru; Lorenz, Dietmar; Izbicki, Jakob; Bechstein, Wolf O; Lang, Hauke; Moenig, Stefan P

    2017-12-28

    Historical data indicate that surgical resection may benefit select patients with metastatic gastric and gastroesophageal junction cancer. However, randomized clinical trials are lacking. The current RENAISSANCE trial addresses the potential benefits of surgical intervention in gastric and gastroesophageal junction cancer with limited metastases. This is a prospective, multicenter, randomized, investigator-initiated phase III trial. Previously untreated patients with limited metastatic stage (retroperitoneal lymph node metastases only or a maximum of one incurable organ site that is potentially resectable or locally controllable with or without retroperitoneal lymph nodes) receive 4 cycles of FLOT chemotherapy alone or with trastuzumab if Her2+. Patients without disease progression after 4 cycles are randomized 1:1 to receive additional chemotherapy cycles or surgical resection of primary and metastases followed by subsequent chemotherapy. 271 patients are to be allocated to the trial, of which at least 176 patients will proceed to randomization. The primary endpoint is overall survival; main secondary endpoints are quality of life assessed by EORTC-QLQ-C30 questionnaire, progression free survival and surgical morbidity and mortality. Recruitment has already started; currently (Feb 2017) 22 patients have been enrolled. If the RENAISSANCE concept proves to be effective, this could potentially lead to a new standard of therapy. On the contrary, if the outcome is negative, patients with gastric or GEJ cancer and metastases will no longer be considered candidates for surgical intervention. The article reports of a health care intervention on human participants and is registered on October 12, 2015 under ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02578368 ; EudraCT: 2014-002665-30.

  11. Europäische Verschuldung- und Wirtschaftskrise 2008- 2012: die Analyse der Krisenmassnahmen aus der Sicht von den Beteiligten. Zusammenfassung:Eurotsooni majandus- ja finantskriisi lahendusmeetmed ja valikud mõjugruppide seisukohast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viljar Veebel

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The European financial crisis in recent years (2008–2012 and economic challenges in long-term perspective, have initiated intensive debates among politicians, academic circles and media. The intensity of the debate has been related to the amplitude of the crisis and to the possible interests, influence and costs of the social stakeholders. The aim of this research is to analyze the interests of crisis management and policy actions from the perspective of social stakeholders (political actors, economic actors, voters and supranational institutions such as European Central Bank. Process tracking and narrative analysis will be used as methodological approaches. The research will first focus on the challenges and dilemmas of the European financial crisis and interests of social stakeholders. The second part of the research will analyze how the social stakeholders managed to influence the policy decisions related to the Eurozone crisis management, which measures were taken and why supranational institutions have been most successful in decision making process.

  12. The future prospects of coal worldwide and the geopolitical situation of coal utilisation; Rolle der Kohle fuer die wirtschaftliche Entwicklung weltweit - die geopolitische Situation der Kohlenutzung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wellmer, F.W.; Barthel, F. [Bundesanstalt fuer Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe, Hannover (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    Although the world has vast coal reserves, about 60 % of the reserves are concentrated in just three countries, of which Germany is one. The future prospects of the German coal industry are gone into. [German] In 85 Laendern der Welt sind Kohlereserven von ca. 558 Mrd. t SKE vorhanden. Sie reichen fuer eine lange Zeit aus, um eine angemessene Versorgung zu gewaehrleisten. Allerdings sind 60% der Reserven auf drei Laender konzentriert, womit die Kohle den hoechsten Grad bei allen Energierohstoffen erreicht. Die wichtigsten Kohlelaender und deren Foerderung werden vorgestellt. Kennzeichnend ist bei der Foerderung eine Konzentration von ueber 60% auf drei Laender bei der Steinkohle und von ca. 40% bei der Braunkohle mit Deutschland an erster Stelle. Die weltweiten Mergers und Acquisitions grosser Bergbaugesellschaften hat auch bei der Kohle zu einer Fokussierung des Lagerstaettenbesitzes und der Foerderanteile gefuehrt. Abgesehen von den staatlich kontrollierten Kohlegesellschften vereinigen die drei groessten privaten Kohlegesellschaften fast 1/4 der Kohlefoerderung auf sich. Die deutsche RAG Coal International befindet sich darunter. Fuer die deutsche Versorgung spielen die Importe eine zunehmende Rolle bei gleichzeitig sinkender einheimischer Foerderung. (orig.)

  13. China's large-scale LNG project. First project ever with FEF insulation; Chinas LNG-Grossprojekt. Weltweit erstmals mit FEF (Flexibler Elastomer-Schaum) isoliert

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2009-06-29

    The ''Shanghai Peak-Shaving Extension LNG Terminal'' is the first of its kind on China's mainland. It comprises an offshore platform with gas wells, a 400 km underwater natural gas pipeline, a LNG pumping system, a 120 km distribution pipeline grid, and a LNG control unit. It is also the first LNG terminal project world-wide with exclusively closed-cell, flexible thermal insulation of foamed elastomer (100 % caoutchouc). (orig.)

  14. MRI in patients with pacemakers? First global consensus recommendations from radiologists and cardiologists; Mit Schrittmacher ins MRT? Weltweit erste konsentierte Handlungsempfehlung von Radiologen und Kardiologen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heindel, Walter; Kugel, Harald [University Hospital Muenster (Germany). Dept. of Clinical Radiology

    2017-03-15

    Under the title ''MR Imaging in Patients with Cardiac Pacemakers and Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators'', this issue of Roefo - simultaneously with the journal of the German Cardiac Society ''Der Kardiologe'' - presents a consensus paper of the German Roentgen Society and the German Cardiac Society [1] [2] that was jointly written by the authors in radiology and cardiology but does not exclusively address cardiac MRI. This publication relates to MR imaging of all regions of the body. In Germany and internationally the number of MRI examinations is increasing: 1,008,944 examinations were performed on patients receiving inpatient treatment in 2005 while 1,767,005 examinations were performed in 2013 (DRG hospitals). This development can be attributed to our aging population as well as to new indications for MRI including: Analyses of tissue composition and function, for example in the liver [3] [4] and the heart [5] [6]; multiparametric analyses of MR perfusion, e.g. in treated brain tumors [7]; new organs such as the lung [8]; dedicated examinations for intervention planning and operation monitoring [9] [10] [11]; as well as MRI-guided interventions [12] [13] [14] [15] [16]. Implants must always be considered in all of these MRI examinations even if the reason for the examination request is not related to an implant. The involvement of cardiology in this case is not based on the medical issue but rather on the type of implant. Expertise in cardiology is required when dealing with cardiac pacemakers (PM) and implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD).

  15. The world's biggest dam construction project at the Yangtze river. The Three Gorges project; Weltweit groesster Staudamm entsteht am Jangtse. Three-Gorges-Projekt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreher, G.

    2002-02-11

    The author, having seen the Three Gorges Project model exhibited at the Expo 2000 in Hannover, went there to get an impression of the real dimensions of this gigantic project. His report also contains personal impressions but primarily gives a picture of the engineering, landscaping, and social aspects and implications, also referring to relevant technical information obtained on site.(orig./CB) [German] Der Autor hat den Stand der Arbeiten am Three-Gorges-Projekt (TGP) anhand eines im China-Pavillon auf der Expo 2000 in Hannover detailliert vorgestellten Planungsprojektes zum Anlass genommen, sich vor Ort vom Fortgang der Arbeiten zu ueberzeugen. Vor allem war das Interesse zum heute noch sichtbaren urspruenglichen Landschaftsbild und den sich danach in vielen Bereichen ergebenden Veraenderungen in der Region geweckt. Im Folgenden sollen ein Bild der persoenlichen Eindruecke, eine Einschaetzung des Verfassers zur Situation vor Ort und zeitnahe Aussagen von zugaenglichen Quellen widergespiegelt werden. (orig.)

  16. Estrogen-related receptor β (ERRβ) - renaissance receptor or receptor renaissance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divekar, Shailaja D; Tiek, Deanna M; Fernandez, Aileen; Riggins, Rebecca B

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen-related receptors (ERRs) are founding members of the orphan nuclear receptor (ONR) subgroup of the nuclear receptor superfamily. Twenty-seven years of study have yet to identify cognate ligands for the ERRs, though they have firmly placed ERRα and ERRγ at the intersection of cellular metabolism and oncogenesis. The pace of discovery for novel functions of ERRβ, however, has until recently been somewhat slower than that of its family members. ERRβ has also been largely ignored in summaries and perspectives of the ONR literature. Here, we provide an overview of established and emerging knowledge of ERRβ in mouse, man, and other species, highlighting unique aspects of ERRβ biology that set it apart from the other two estrogen-related receptors, with a focus on the impact of alternative splicing on the structure and function of this receptor.

  17. Patient-Reported Safety Information : A Renaissance of Pharmacovigilance?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Härmark, Linda; Raine, June; Leufkens, Bert; Edwards, I Ralph; Moretti, Ugo; Sarinic, Viola Macolic; Kant, Agnes

    2016-01-01

    The role of patients as key contributors in pharmacovigilance was acknowledged in the new EU pharmacovigilance legislation. This contains several efforts to increase the involvement of the general public, including making patient adverse drug reaction (ADR) reporting systems mandatory. Three years

  18. Radiotherapy for renal cell carcinoma: renaissance of an overlooked approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siva, Shankar; Kothari, Gargi; Muacevic, Alexander; Louie, Alexander V; Slotman, Ben J; Teh, Bin S; Lo, Simon S

    2017-09-01

    Conventional radiotherapy previously had a limited role in the definitive treatment of renal cell carcinoma (RCC), owing to the disappointing outcomes of several trials and the perceived radioresistance of this type of cancer. In this context, radiotherapy has been relegated largely to the palliation of symptoms in patients with metastatic disease, with variable rates of response. Following the availability of newer technologies that enable safe delivery of high-dose radiotherapy, stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) has become increasingly used in patients with RCC. Preclinical evidence demonstrates that RCC cells are sensitive to ablative doses of radiotherapy (≥8-10 Gy). Trials in the setting of intracranial and extracranial oligometastases, as well as primary RCC, have demonstrated excellent tumour control using this approach. Additionally, an awareness of the capacity of high-dose radiation to stimulate antitumour immunity has resulted in novel combinations of SABR with immunotherapies. Here we describe the historical application of conventional radiotherapy, the current biological understanding of the effects of radiation, and the clinical evidence supporting the use of ablative radiotherapy in RCC. We also explore emerging opportunities to combine systemic targeted agents or immunotherapies with radiation. Radiotherapy, although once an overlooked approach, is moving towards the forefront of RCC treatment.

  19. Pan-Africanism: Beyond survival to renaissance | mama | New ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    New Agenda: South African Journal of Social and Economic Policy. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 53 (2014) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Open Access ...

  20. Glycoproteomic profile in wine: a 'sweet' molecular renaissance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palmisano, Giuseppe; Antonacci, Donato; Larsen, Martin Røssel

    2010-01-01

    Glycoproteins are believed to be important in several technological, oenological and allergological processes due to their physicochemical properties. The knowledge of the protein glycosylation status in wine will aid in the understanding of these processes. A multiplexed glycopeptide enrichment ...

  1. The rise, the fall and the renaissance of vitamin E

    Science.gov (United States)

    This review deals with the expectations of vitamin E ability of preventing or curing, as a potent antioxidant, alleged oxidative stress based ailments including cardiovascular disease, cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, cataracts, macular degeneration and more. The results obtained with clinical in...

  2. The renaissance of non-aqueous uranium chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liddle, Stephen T. [School of Chemistry, University of Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-20

    Prior to the year 2000, non-aqueous uranium chemistry mainly involved metallocene and classical alkyl, amide, or alkoxide compounds as well as established carbene, imido, and oxo derivatives. Since then, there has been a resurgence of the area, and dramatic developments of supporting ligands and multiply bonded ligand types, small-molecule activation, and magnetism have been reported. This review (1) introduces the reader to some of the specialist theories of the area, (2) covers all-important starting materials, (3) surveys contemporary ligand classes installed at uranium, including alkyl, aryl, arene, carbene, amide, imide, nitride, alkoxide, aryloxide, and oxo compounds, (4) describes advances in the area of single-molecule magnetism, and (5) summarizes the coordination and activation of small molecules, including carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, nitric oxide, dinitrogen, white phosphorus, and alkanes. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. Sexy again: the renaissance of neutrophils in psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schön, Michael P; Broekaert, Sigrid M C; Erpenbeck, Luise

    2017-04-01

    Notwithstanding their prominent presence in psoriatic skin, the functional role of neutrophilic granulocytes still remains somewhat enigmatic. Sparked by exciting scientific discoveries regarding neutrophil functions within the last years, the interest in these short-lived cells of the innate immune system has been boosted recently. While it had been known for some time that neutrophils produce and respond to a number of inflammatory mediators, recent research has linked neutrophils with the pathogenic functions of IL-17, possibly in conjunction with the formation of NETs (neutrophil extracellular traps). Antipsoriatic therapies exert their effects, at least in part, through interference with neutrophils. Neutrophils also appear to connect psoriasis with comorbid diseases. However, directly tampering with neutrophil functions is not trivial as evinced by the failure of therapeutic approaches targeting redundantly regulated cellular communication networks. It has also become apparent that neutrophils link important pathogenic functions of the innate and the adaptive immune system and that they are intricately involved in regulatory networks underlying the pathophysiology of psoriasis. In order to advocate intensified research into the role of this interesting cell population, we here highlight some features of neutrophils and put them into perspective with our current view of the pathophysiology of psoriasis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. African Renaissance in the New Millennium? From Anarchy to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The political economy of Africa is at the crossroads. The centrally controlled economies are giving way to global liberalism. Yet many of the continent\\'s economies are still suffering from the residual effects of centralism, while poorly adjusting to the new dispensation. In the meantime, regionalism as a development strategy ...

  5. Citron kinase - renaissance of a neglected mitotic kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Avino, Pier Paolo

    2017-05-15

    Cell division controls the faithful segregation of genomic and cytoplasmic materials between the two nascent daughter cells. Members of the Aurora, Polo and cyclin-dependent (Cdk) kinase families are known to regulate multiple events throughout cell division, whereas another kinase, citron kinase (CIT-K), for a long time has been considered to function solely during cytokinesis, the last phase of cell division. CIT-K was originally proposed to regulate the ingression of the cleavage furrow that forms at the equatorial cortex of the dividing cell after chromosome segregation. However, studies in the last decade have clarified that this kinase is, instead, required for the organization of the midbody in late cytokinesis, and also revealed novel functions of CIT-K earlier in mitosis and in DNA damage control. Moreover, CIT-K mutations have recently been linked to the development of human microcephaly, and CIT-K has been identified as a potential target in cancer therapy. In this Commentary, I describe and re-evaluate the functions and regulation of CIT-K during cell division and its involvement in human disease. Finally, I offer my perspectives on the open questions and future challenges that are necessary to address, in order to fully understand this important and yet unjustly neglected mitotic kinase. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. Landmarks of Poetic Renaissance in the Works of Selected African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study is a survey of critical perspectives on a selection of modern African poets who concerned themselves with the socio-political problems in their various local setups and countries. The commonest thing to all of them is the belief and practice in the poet's activist role in the African polity. This group of writers believes ...

  7. Renaissance in tumor immunotherapy: possible combination with phototherapy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamblin, Michael R.

    2016-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) uses the combination of non-toxic dyes and harmless visible light to produce highly toxic reactive oxygen species that destroy tumors. The ideal cancer treatment should target both the primary tumor and the metastases with minimal toxicity. This is best accomplished by educating the body's immune system to recognize the tumor as foreign so that after the primary tumor is destroyed, distant metastases will also be eradicated. PDT may accomplish this feat and stimulate long-term, specific anti-tumor immunity. PDT causes an acute inflammatory response, the rapid induction of large amounts of necrotic and apoptotic tumor cells, induction of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPS) including heat-shock proteins, stimulates tumor antigen presentation to naïve T-cells, and generation of cytotoxic T-cells that can destroy distant tumor metastases. By using various syngeneic mouse tumors in immunocompetent mice, we have studied specific PDT regimens related to tumor type as well as mouse genotype and phenotype. We have investigated the role of tumor-associated antigens in PDT-induced immune response by choosing mouse tumors that express: model defined antigen, naturally-occurring cancer testis antigen, and oncogenic virus-derived antigen. We studied the synergistic combination of low-dose cyclophosphamide and PDT that unmasks the PDT-induced immune response by depleting the immunosuppressive T-regulatory cells. PDT combined with immunostimulants (toll-like receptor ligands) can synergistically maximize the generation of anti-tumor immunity by activating dendritic cells and switching immunosuppressive macrophages to a tumor rejection phenotype. Tumors expressing defined tumor-associated antigens with known MHC class I peptides allows anti-tumor immunity to be quantitatively compared.

  8. The renaissance man of burn surgery: Basil A. Pruitt Jr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capek, Karel D; Foncerrada, Guillermo; Clayton, R Patrick; Sljivich, Michaela; Voigt, Charles D; Hundeshagen, Gabriel; Cambiaso-Daniel, Janos; Porter, Craig; Guillory, Ashley; Herndon, David N

    2017-07-08

    Dr. Basil A. Pruitt Jr., a consummate clinical and translational surgeon-scientist, has been spent over half a century at the forefront of an advancing standard of burn care. Commanding the US Army Institute for Surgical Research in San Antonio, he trained generations of leading burn clinicians and allied scientists. At his direction, there were forged discoveries in resuscitation from shock, treatment of inhalation injury, control of burn-related infections, prevention of iatrogenic complications, and understanding the sympathetic, endocrine, and immune responses to burn injury. Most consequentially, this team was among the first recognize and define alterations in the basal metabolic rate and thermoregulation consequent to burn injury. These investigations prompted groundbreaking insights into the coordinated nervous, autonomic, endocrine, immune, and metabolic outflows that a severely-burned patient uses to remain alive and restore homeostasis. Marking his scientific consequence, many of his reports continue bear fruit when viewed through a contemporary lens. This paper summarizes some of the major findings of his career thus far, and is intended to complement a Festschrift recently held in his honor. Not applicable.

  9. Micro Language Planning and Cultural Renaissance in Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimi, Modupe M.

    2016-01-01

    Many African countries exhibit complex patterns of language use because of linguistic pluralism. The situation is often compounded by the presence of at least one foreign language that is either the official or second language. The language situation in Botswana depicts this complex pattern. Out of the 26 languages spoken in the country, including…

  10. The renaissance of radio astronomy: towards the Square Kilometre Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, C.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, I will give a brief overview of the largest radio telescope in the world, the Square Kilometre Array (SKA). The history of this instrument, its development as a huge international project, as well as its main scientific goals, will be summarised. I will then focus on a particular science case by presenting how the first phase of the SKA (SKA1), whose observations are expected to start in the early 2020's, will change our radio view of the largest gravitationally bound structures of the Universe: galaxy clusters.

  11. The Impending Renaissance in Discovery & Development of Natural Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, Sandip V; Ho, Joe C H; Yadav, Ganapati D; Yadav, Vikramaditya G

    2017-01-01

    Antibiotics are wonder drugs. Unfortunately, owing to overuse, antibiotic resistance is now a serious problem. Society now finds itself in the post-antibiotic era, and the threat of infectious diseases is on the rise. New antibiotics are sorely needed. There is strong evidence that suggests natural products are an attractive source of new antimicrobials. They posses desirable structural and chemical properties that make them potent thearpeutics. However, steep tehnological challenges associated with screening and manufacturing these molecules has stifled the discovery, development and marketing of new antimicrobials. To this end, two recent scientific developments are poised to redress this situation. The recent development of metagenomics and ancillary high-throughput screening technologies has exponentiated the volume of useful genetic sequence information that can be screened for antimicrobial discovery. These approaches have been instrumental in the discovery of new antibiotics from soil and marine environments. Secondly, a new manufacturing paradigm employing metabolic engineering as its engine has greatly accelerated the path to market for these molecules, in addition to improving the atom and energy economy of antimicrobial manufacturing. We outine these developments in this review, and provide a perspective on integrating next-generation approaches such as metagenomics and metabolic engineering with traditional methodologies for discovering and manufacturing antimicrobial natural products in order to unleash a rennaissance in the discovery and development of antimicrobials.

  12. General Thomas Dresser White: Renaissance Man in a Dark Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    admitted to the US Military Academy at the age of 16. Relinquishing his dream of joining the Naval Academy, White decided upon the Army because West...his accomplishments as set forth in a clipping from his home Podunk. Life was no long, sweet dream for him in summer camp.”28 White would not...while at West Point.37 Prophetically , the yearbook foretold of his future endeavors, “The echo of a steamboat whistle never fails to awaken in him

  13. Andreas Vesalius 500 years - A Renaissance that revolutionized cardiovascular knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evandro Tinoco Mesquita

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe history of medicine and cardiology is marked by some geniuses who dared in thinking, research, teaching and transmitting scientific knowledge, and the Italian Andreas Vesalius one of these brilliant masters. His main scientific work "De Humani Corporis Fabrica" is not only a landmark study of human anatomy but also an artistic work of high aesthetic quality published in 1543. In the year 2014 we celebrated 500 years since the birth of the brilliant professor of Padua University, who with his courage and sense of observation changed the understanding of cardiovascular anatomy and founded a school to date in innovative education and research of anatomy. By identifying "the anatomical errors" present in Galen's book and speech, he challenged the dogmas of the Catholic Church, the academic world and the doctors of his time. However, the accuracy of his findings and his innovative way to disseminate them among his students and colleagues was essential so that his contributions are considered by many the landmark of modern medicine. His death is still surrounded by mysteries having different hypotheses, but a certainty, suffered sanctions of the Catholic Church for the spread of their ideas. The cardiologists, cardiovascular surgeons, interventional cardiologists, electrophysiologists and cardiovascular imaginologists must know the legacy of genius Andreas Vesalius that changed the paradigm of human anatomy.

  14. The rise, the fall and the renaissance of vitamin E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzi, Angelo; Meydani, Simin Nikbin; Meydani, Mohsen; Zingg, Jean Marc

    2016-04-01

    This review deals with the expectations of vitamin E ability of preventing or curing, as a potent antioxidant, alleged oxidative stress based ailments including cardiovascular disease, cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, cataracts, macular degeneration and more. The results obtained with clinical intervention studies have highly restricted the range of effectiveness of this vitamin. At the same time, new non-antioxidant mechanisms have been proposed. The new functions of vitamin E have been shown to affect cell signal transduction and gene expression, both in vitro and in vivo. Phosphorylation of vitamin E, which takes place in vivo, results in a molecule provided with functions that are in part stronger and in part different from those of the non-phosphorylate compound. The in vivo documented functions of vitamin E preventing the vitamin E deficiency ataxia (AVED), slowing down the progression of non-alcoholic steato-hepatitis (NASH), decreasing inflammation and potentiating the immune response are apparently based on these new molecular mechanisms. It should be stressed however that vitamin E, when present at higher concentrations in the body, should exert antioxidant properties to the extent that its chromanol ring is unprotected or un-esterified. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Renaissance of protein crystallization and precipitation in biopharmaceuticals purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Raquel; Carvalho, Ana Luísa; Roque, A Cecília A

    The current chromatographic approaches used in protein purification are not keeping pace with the increasing biopharmaceutical market demand. With the upstream improvements, the bottleneck shifted towards the downstream process. New approaches rely in Anything But Chromatography methodologies and revisiting former techniques with a bioprocess perspective. Protein crystallization and precipitation methods are already implemented in the downstream process of diverse therapeutic biological macromolecules, overcoming the current chromatographic bottlenecks. Promising work is being developed in order to implement crystallization and precipitation in the purification pipeline of high value therapeutic molecules. This review focuses in the role of these two methodologies in current industrial purification processes, and highlights their potential implementation in the purification pipeline of high value therapeutic molecules, overcoming chromatographic holdups. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The renaissance of tramways and urban redevelopment in France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boquet Yves

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Tramways have made a remarkable comeback in France since the 1980s. An organization of public transport based on the decentralized administration system set up in the early 1980s has allowed local urban authorities to make their own choices to develop public transport networks in the context of automobile domination. As in many other countries, worries about fossil fuel dependency and demands concerning sustainable urban development appear as strong elements in favour of urban light rail. However, in France, tramways are not just technical solutions for traffic congestion, they have also become a symbol of a cultural mutation in urban development planning. Coupled with a national political push for a more inclusive city in social terms, tramways are the backbone of contemporary urban policies, in a French version of transit-oriented development (TOD, especially for mid-size cities.

  17. Ball lightning: a Renaissance account from Zafra (Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Vaquero

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available An analysis is given of the account of a globe of fire observed in Zafra (Spain in the middle of the 16th century. During a strong storm, Conde Don Pedro observed what he described as a globe of fire that was directed against the city and abruptly changed course. He attributed the change in course to a miracle. He described neither any damage nor sound.

  18. A renaissance of neural networks in drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskin, Igor I; Winkler, David; Tetko, Igor V

    2016-08-01

    Neural networks are becoming a very popular method for solving machine learning and artificial intelligence problems. The variety of neural network types and their application to drug discovery requires expert knowledge to choose the most appropriate approach. In this review, the authors discuss traditional and newly emerging neural network approaches to drug discovery. Their focus is on backpropagation neural networks and their variants, self-organizing maps and associated methods, and a relatively new technique, deep learning. The most important technical issues are discussed including overfitting and its prevention through regularization, ensemble and multitask modeling, model interpretation, and estimation of applicability domain. Different aspects of using neural networks in drug discovery are considered: building structure-activity models with respect to various targets; predicting drug selectivity, toxicity profiles, ADMET and physicochemical properties; characteristics of drug-delivery systems and virtual screening. Neural networks continue to grow in importance for drug discovery. Recent developments in deep learning suggests further improvements may be gained in the analysis of large chemical data sets. It's anticipated that neural networks will be more widely used in drug discovery in the future, and applied in non-traditional areas such as drug delivery systems, biologically compatible materials, and regenerative medicine.

  19. A renaissance for mining research in South Africa?

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Vogt, D

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available that the fixed period was renewed, and later made open ended. It is still in operation today as the Coaltech Research Association (Coaltech, 2011) and funded research to a value of R 7.8 million in 2008/2009. ? PlatMine was established in 2003 to undertak e... research supporting mechanisation in the platinum industry. Unlike the previous collaboratives, PlatMine never atte mpted to obtain THRIP funding, and was funded 50% by industry and 50% by the CSIR. PlatMine is still in operation, though with a limited...

  20. The Arab world: is the economic renaissance possible?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey V. Fedorchenko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The structural change of international relations system at the end of the Cold war has resulted in US becoming the sole superpower or hyperpower. The US took advantage of this position and strived to build a hegemonic world order based on US military-strategic superiority and soft-power. Implementation of this strategy results in “imperial overstrain” a serious revision of US strategic planning in 2010 and 2015. In the context of the continuing decline in the power of the United States (economic, technological and military relative to other centers of power, it is nonmilitary political methods and instruments that, together with “soft power” and military pressure, increasingly come to the fore in US realizing global geopolitical aspirations. The new imperative of US strategy is deterrence of Russia and China, which could result only in the crisis of global hegemony and the rise of conflicts in world politics.

  1. Backwards Into the Light. Cultural Modernity and the Renaissance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R.G. Spiller

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article looks at the textual practices used by humanist and  Reformation writers to modernise their textual legacies from classical and Biblical antiquity. By a process which I have called “textual proclamation” these writers were able to distinguish past from future and at the same time establish continuity. The problems faced by Reformation writers working with Biblical texts regarded as eternal are briefly discussed.  It is argued that this was a process of modernisation which had to respect the continuity of authority, and that thus their modernitas differs from our own modernity, though linked culturally to it.

  2. Visions of Transmodernity: A New Renaissance of our Human History?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Ateljevic

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I will engage with a broad range of literature that provides us with many signals and evidence of an emerging and significant paradigm shift in human evolution. In doing so, I will offer the concept of transmodernity as an umbrella term that connotes the emerging socio-cultural, economic, political and philosophical shift. My research across boundaries of many different fields such as critical economics, philosophy, subaltern and postcolonial studies, social anthropology and psychology, cultural studies, political science and social activism literature will illustrate how an integrated approach and dialogue is urgently needed, indeed more than ever before. Different authors use a variety of terms to capture what can essentially be described as the synchronised phenomenon of emerging higher collective consciousness—transmodernity paradigm (Ghisi; transmodern philosophy of political liberation (Dussel; Hegelian dialectical triad of thesis, antithesis and synthesis (Magda; the reflective/living-systems paradigm (Elgin; the partnership model of caring economics (Eisler; the relational global consciousness of biosphere politics (Rifkin; love ethics (hooks; the circularity paradigm of interdependence (Steinem. With a reference to a variety of authors I will argue that the reason we do not hear much about this movement is because it is not centralised and coordinated under a single unifying name. ‘Transmodernity’ ropes together many concepts/tenets of other writings that do not necessarily use the same term, but I chose it in order to communicate the overall idea of the emerging paradigm shift as the next cultural and material development in human history. I have opted to use the concept as a medium to convey humanity’s unified synchronicity, which is part of a transformation that can be claimed to be ‘the new renaissance’ of human history.

  3. The renaissance of radio detection of cosmic rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huege, Tim, E-mail: tim.huege@kit.edu [IKP, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe, (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    Nearly 50 years ago, the first radio signals from cosmic ray air showers were detected. After many successful studies, however, research ceased not even 10 years later. Only a decade ago, the field was revived with the application of powerful digital signal processing techniques. Since then, the detection technique has matured, and we are now in a phase of transition from small-scale experiments accessing energies below 1018 eV to experiments with a reach for energies beyond 1019 eV. We have demonstrated that air shower radio signals carry information on both the energy and the mass of the primary particle, and current experiments are in the process of quantifying the precision with which this information can be accessed. All of this rests on solid understanding of the radio emission processes, which can be interpreted as a coherent superposition of geomagnetic emission, Askaryan charge-excess radiation, and Cherenkov-like coherence effects arising in the density gradient of the atmosphere. In this article, I highlight the “state of the art” of radio detection of cosmic rays and briefly discuss its perspectives for the next few years. (author)

  4. Renaissance, Sharing, and Belonging: A Messy Language of Hope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Guzman, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Background/Context: This essay is a part of a special issue that emerges from a year-long faculty seminar at Teachers College, Columbia University. The seminar's purpose has been to examine in fresh terms the nexus of globalization, education, and citizenship. Participants come from diverse fields of research and practice, among them art…

  5. The Renaissance of Radio Detection of Cosmic Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huege, Tim

    2014-10-01

    Nearly 50 years ago, the first radio signals from cosmic ray air showers were detected. After many successful studies, however, research ceased not even 10 years later. Only a decade ago, the field was revived with the application of powerful digital signal processing techniques. Since then, the detection technique has matured, and we are now in a phase of transition from small-scale experiments accessing energies below 10 18 eV to experiments with a reach for energies beyond 10 19 eV. We have demonstrated that air shower radio signals carry information on both the energy and the mass of the primary particle, and current experiments are in the process of quantifying the precision with which this information can be accessed. All of this rests on solid understanding of the radio emission processes which can be interpreted as a coherent superposition of geomagnetic emission, Askaryan charge-excess radiation, and Cherenkov-like coherence effects arising in the density gradient of the atmosphere. In this article, I highlight the "state of the art" of radio detection of cosmic rays and briefly discuss its perspectives for the next few years.

  6. The art of human anatomy: Renaissance to 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hee, Robrecht; Wells, F C; Ballestriero, Roberta; Richardson, Ruth; Mazzarello, Paolo; Cani, Valentina; Catani, Marco

    2014-01-01

    This session examines the relationship between the art and science of anatomy from the time of Vesalius to the present with particular emphasis on the role of the medical artist and the changing nature of anatomical illustration over the last five centuries. Pivotal changes in the art of anatomy will be examined including the evolution of media and brain imaging from Golgi to Geschwind.

  7. [The bodies of dwarfs in Italian art during the Renaissance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portmann, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Agnolo Bronzino's painting of Nano Morgante depicts for the first time the anatomy of a dwarf. This image testifies Cosimo's special interest for this dwarf. In Antonio Francesco Grazzini's poem written in Nano Morgante's honor, we underline some interesting aspects of his physical deformities and his small height, which are highly praised as we can see them on the painting.

  8. [Endoscopic nucleotomy - Renaissance of a procedure. State of the art].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leu, H

    2011-02-01

    Since the introduction of percutaneous nucleotomy two lines of development have been followed. On the one hand the blindly driven intradiscal tissue active methods and on the other hand endoscopically controlled minimally invasive tissue methods. The first group diminished the acceptance of intradiscal applications due to few reproducible results. Due to high resolution endoscopy with coaxial endoscopes, the second group developed into effective minimally invasive forms of surgery with well defined indications and reproducible results and challenges conventional techniques in the range of intradiscal and extradiscal indications.

  9. Raphael's Poetics: Art and Poetry in High Renaissance Rome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijser, D.

    2012-01-01

    De relatie tussen woord en beeld, de twee hoofddragers van onze culturele traditie, vormt het speerpunt van Raphael's Poetics, dat zich concentreert op het werk van de schilder Raphael uit Urbino (1483-1520) en de literatuur die in zijn kringen werd gelezen en geproduceerd. Waar de Neolatijnse

  10. Three saints with deformed extremities in an Italian Renaissance altarpiece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albury, W R; Weisz, G M

    2017-03-01

    A fifteenth-century Florentine altarpiece painted by the Pollaiuolo brothers, Antonio (1433-1498) and Piero (1443-1496), shows three saints with evident deformities of the hands and feet. The pathologies concerned are tentatively identified, and various rationales for their presence in the painting are discussed. Of particular importance is the location of the altarpiece in a chapel which houses the tomb of the Cardinal of Portugal, Prince James of Lusitania (1433-1459). It is argued that both the artistic style of the day and the religious symbolism of the Cardinal's funeral chapel contributed to the artists' decision to portray the saints with deformities. An unnatural curvature of the fifth finger was apparently considered elegant in fifteenth-century paintings, and the depiction of bare feet with hallux valgus gave them a shape which approximated and could have been caused by fashionable pointed shoes. But in addition, deformities in religious art could be symbolic of suffering and martyrdom, a theme which the Cardinal's chapel emphasised in a number of ways. It is suggested therefore that the Pollaiuolo altarpiece reconciles these two disparate factors, portraying genuine deformities in a way that was artistically stylish and symbolically meaningful.

  11. Some Oriental Pseudo-Inscriptions in Renaissance Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barasch, Moshe

    1989-01-01

    Identifies two major groups of pseudoinscriptions: distinguished inscriptions which do not convey text but appear to be real things; and proper pseudoinscriptions which may have clearly delineated individual letters that taken together make no sense. Identifies Venice and the Netherlands as centers of Arabic and Hebrew pseudoinscriptions in the…

  12. Andreas Vesalius 500 years - A Renaissance that revolutionized cardiovascular knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; de Souza Júnior, Celso Vale; Ferreira, Thiago Reigado

    2015-01-01

    The history of medicine and cardiology is marked by some geniuses who dared in thinking, research, teaching and transmitting scientific knowledge, and the Italian Andreas Vesalius one of these brilliant masters. His main scientific work "De Humani Corporis Fabrica" is not only a landmark study of human anatomy but also an artistic work of high aesthetic quality published in 1543. In the year 2014 we celebrated 500 years since the birth of the brilliant professor of Padua University, who with his courage and sense of observation changed the understanding of cardiovascular anatomy and founded a school to date in innovative education and research of anatomy. By identifying "the anatomical errors" present in Galen's book and speech, he challenged the dogmas of the Catholic Church, the academic world and the doctors of his time. However, the accuracy of his findings and his innovative way to disseminate them among his students and colleagues was essential so that his contributions are considered by many the landmark of modern medicine. His death is still surrounded by mysteries having different hypotheses, but a certainty, suffered sanctions of the Catholic Church for the spread of their ideas. The cardiologists, cardiovascular surgeons, interventional cardiologists, electrophysiologists and cardiovascular imaginologists must know the legacy of genius Andreas Vesalius that changed the paradigm of human anatomy. PMID:26107459

  13. Stem Cells: A Renaissance in Human Biology Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jun; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos

    2016-06-16

    The understanding of human biology and how it relates to that of other species represents an ancient quest. Limited access to human material, particularly during early development, has restricted researchers to only scratching the surface of this inherently challenging subject. Recent technological innovations, such as single cell "omics" and human stem cell derivation, have now greatly accelerated our ability to gain insights into uniquely human biology. The opportunities afforded to delve molecularly into scarce material and to model human embryogenesis and pathophysiological processes are leading to new insights of human development and are changing our understanding of disease and choice of therapy options. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Ball lightning: a Renaissance account from Zafra (Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaquero, José M.

    2017-06-01

    An analysis is given of the account of a globe of fire observed in Zafra (Spain) in the middle of the 16th century. During a strong storm, Conde Don Pedro observed what he described as a globe of fire that was directed against the city and abruptly changed course. He attributed the change in course to a miracle. He described neither any damage nor sound.

  15. A Renaissance in Engineering PhD Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akay, Adnan

    2008-01-01

    This paper addresses the role of engineering PhD education and its relationship to innovation and technology, and the need to reconsider how we educate PhD engineers. Much of the effort on engineering education in the last two decades focused on undergraduate education with a few exceptions that relate to master degree programs. Doctoral education…

  16. The Iconography of Chaos in a Renaissance Painting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zausner, Tobi

    Titian's Presentation of the Virgin to the Temple (1534-38) is a large oil painting on canvas (11' x 25'4"), hanging in the Gallerie dell' Accademiain Venice. Underneath its overt Christian imagery, the painting appears to have a hidden humanist symbolism encoding self-transformation through initiation. Humanist disciplines such as Neoplatonism, the ancient mystery religions, Graeco-Roman paganism, and the Jewish Kaballah are suggested in Titian's painting. Certain figures and groups of figures appear to symbolize the underworld and the period of chaos necessary for transformation. Additional evidence for the chaos in self-transformation is found in the painting's geometry and in its astronomical references.

  17. Newton's apple Isaac Newton and the English scientific renaissance

    CERN Document Server

    Aughton, Peter

    2003-01-01

    In the aftermath of the English Civil War, the Restoration overturned England's medieval outlook and a new way of looking at the world allowed the genius of Isaac Newton (b. 1642) and his contemporaries to flourish. Newton had a long and eventful life apart from his scentific discoveries. He was born at the beginnings of the Civil War, his studies were disrupted by the twin disasters of the Great Plague and the Fire of London; a brilliant and enigmatic genius, Newton dabbled in alchemy, wrote over a million words on the Bible, quarrelled with his contemporaries and spent his last years as Master of the Royal Mint as well as President of the Royal Society. This book sets Newton's life and work against this dramatic intellectual rebirth; among his friends and contemporaries were Samuel Pepys, the colourful diarist, John Evelyn, the eccentric antiquarian, the astronomers Edmund Halley and John Flamsteed, and Christopher Wren, the greatest architect of his age. They were all instrumental in the founding of the Ro...

  18. Image analysis is driving a renaissance in growth measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalding, Edgar P; Miller, Nathan D

    2013-02-01

    The domain of machine vision, in which digital images are acquired automatically in a highly structured environment for the purpose of computationally measuring features in the scene, is applicable to the measurement of plant growth. This article reviews the quickly growing collection of reports in which digital image-processing has been used to measure plant growth, with emphasis on the methodology and adaptations required for high-throughput studies of populations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. the evolution of hospitals from antiquity to the renaissance 1.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Specialised institutions like leper houses also originated at this time. During the ... that hospitals as we know them today did not appear until the 4th century AD. ... We know very little about the nature and function of these institutions, but the great Indian king, Asoka, is credited with the construction of hospitals for humans.

  20. Rail renaissance based on strategic market segmentation principles ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Southern African Business Review. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 16, No 1 (2012) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  1. Hydroidfest 2016: celebrating a renaissance in hydrozoan research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Dupre

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hydroidfest 2016 took place on September 23–25 at the UC Davis Bodega Marine Laboratory in Bodega Bay, CA. The meeting brought together cnidarian researchers, with an emphasis on those studying hydrozoans, from North America and other parts of the world. The scientific topics discussed were diverse, including sessions focused on development, regeneration, aging, immunology, symbiosis, and neurobiology. Thanks to the application of modern biological technologies, hydrozoans and other cnidarians are now fertile ground for research in numerous disciplines. Moreover, their amenability to comparative approaches is a powerful asset that was repeatedly showcased during the meeting. Here, we give a brief account of the work that was presented and the opportunities that emerged from the ensuing discussions.

  2. The evolution of hospitals from antiquity to the Renaissance | Retief ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... like leper houses also originated at this time. During the Golden Age of Islam the Muslim world was clearly more advanced than its Christian counterpart with regard to the magnificent hospitals which were built in various countries, institutions which eventually became the true forerunners of the modern teaching hospital.

  3. Integrating "Renaissance," a Television Film Series, into College Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabb, Theodore K.

    This final report describes the activities and accomplishments of a three-year grant which enabled the Medici Foundation to organize a series of workshops at which groups of history faculty from small four-year colleges, community colleges, and high schools explored uses of film materials in classroom teaching, especially use of the 5-part public…

  4. Development and Dissemination: Deliberations on Spanish Renaissance Music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsey E. Pfeifer

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Every musical culture grows and developed under a specific set of influences, whether political, philosophical, or geographical. Varying sets of influences create likewise varying types of music. Spanish music, in particular, enjoyed an especially unique array of influences during the fifteenth century. My presentation explores these influences. How did the interaction of Spain’s three major religions—Christianity, Islam, and Judaism—affect musical development? How did the newly unified government, ruled by Ferdinand II of Aragon and Isabella I of Castile, influence the musical culture? How did Spain’s discovery and conquest of the New World facilitate the spread of Spanish music beyond its borders? These three factors made Spain distinct from other Western nations during the fifteenth century. In my presentation, I first describe the interaction of Christianity, Islam, and Judaism. This synergy created a rich, collaborative community of shared musical ideas, prompting the development of both sacred and secular genres. Next, I address the influence that Spain’s unified government exerted on the musical culture. Historically, politics have played a substantial role in the development of music. Spain is distinctive in this respect because most other nations during this time were not unified under one ruler, whereas Spain was. This unique governmental structure in turn affected the musical culture. Lastly, I will explain how the spread of Spanish music and its interaction with native tribes in America impacted its development, both within and outside Spain’s borders. Spain was particularly poised to both exert their influence and be influenced by the different people groups they encountered in the New World. These three factors would create a uniquely Spanish music culture.

  5. A Black Literary Guide to the Harlem Renaissance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valade, Roger M., III

    1996-01-01

    Presents a directory of some of the leading black intellectuals of the 20th century who are considered significant contributors to American literature, music, and the arts. A brief biographical sketch and career highlights are provided for each entry. (GR)

  6. Medieval and Renaissance Riches: Overlooked Early Music for Small Ensembles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Grady, Terence J.

    1978-01-01

    The author reviews major styles of secular Western music from the early Middle Ages through the sixteenth century, pointing out features that would appeal to a modern audience. A selected list of published collections of early music is appended. (SJL)

  7. Rail renaissance based on strategic market segmentation principles ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... locally generated electricity (currently coalbased, but partially switchable to renewable energy in the future). The critical requirement, however, is to determine exactly how much freight, and specifically which freight, can switch to rail. In order to identify the freight flows that will exploit rail's economic fundamentals, a market ...

  8. the evolution of hospitals from antiquity to the renaissance 1.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Christian control developed into hospitals in the modern sense of the word. In Rome itself, the first hospital was built in the ..... established Roman fort architecture and were usually placed near the outer wall in a quiet part of the .... It was said that Islamic hospital design greatly influenced the construction of the first of these ...

  9. Micro-computer tomography and a renaissance of insect morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Frank; Beutel, Rolf G.

    2008-08-01

    The use of new technologies, especially computer-based three dimensional reconstructions and micro-computer tomography (μ-CT) have greatly improved and facilitated the detailed investigation of insect anatomy. Optimal results in morphological work aiming at phylogenetic reconstruction can be obtained with a combined application of different techniques such as histology, scanning electron microscopy, and μ-CT. The use of μ-CT greatly enhances the efficiency of the acquisition of detailed anatomical data and allows a broad taxon sampling in phylogenetic studies partly or entirely based on morphological characters. A disadvantage of phase contrasted μ-CT images is the poor differentiation of different tissue types. This problem can be overcome by the use of stable low energy photon beams as available at the beamline BW2 of the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron in Hamburg (DESY). Synchrotron-radiation-based μ-CT data (SR μ-CT) obtained with this approach are an ideal basis for highly efficient three dimensional reconstructions of high quality.

  10. The evolution of hospitals from antiquity to the Renaissance | Retief ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... BC in ancient Mesopotamia. In India the monastic system created by the Buddhist religion led to institutionalised health care facilities as early as the 5th century BC, and with the spread of Buddhism to the east, nursing facilities, the nature and function of which are not known to us, also appeared in Sri Lanka, China and ...

  11. The urban vernacular of Late Medieval and Renaissance Bristol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gordon, M.S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/372824870

    2017-01-01

    Although the development of Standard English has received considerable scholarly attention, many questions as to its emergence and the processes involved in its spread remain unsolved. Traditional accounts of the development of written Standard English tend to trace its beginnings back to a single

  12. the evolution of hospitals from antiquity to the renaissance 1.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    During a disaster which took place in a small town near Rome when an amphitheatre ... though Woodhead (1952:245) suggests that doctors' tabernaeoften evolved into sanatoria and small house-hospitals ... the evolution of the public hospital — they were established for a par- ticular purpose and for a particular class of ...

  13. La relecture du romancero par les vihuelistes de la Renaissance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Martel

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Les romances espagnols de la Reconquête relataient sur le mode épique des faits passés sur une mélodie récurrente qui servait surtout d’outil mnémotechnique pour réciter de longues narrations. Lorsque Diego Pisador reprend un romance, il n’en prend que quelques vers : du coup, le rapport entre les mots et les notes se fait plus étroit. D’un poème épique, il élabore une amplification lyrique, une véritable composition musicale, opère un véritable changement d’esthétique : le passage de la longue narration sur un thème musical bref et récurrent qui caractérisait le romance médiéval de la Reconquista, à une forme musico-littéraire plus brève mais plus élaborée, propre à introduire la vibration lyrique dans la matière épique. Familier de la Cour, il entend ainsi servir les desseins politiques de Philippe Il à qui il dédie son œuvre : le compositeur vihueliste qu’était Pisador en effet participe à l’effort de l’intégration du Maure poursuivi par la politique de la Maison d’Autriche. Mais les noces n’eurent pas lieu et les Maures furent au contraire expulsés en 1609. L’analyse de cette chanson nous donne l’occasion de découvrir les moyens employés par le musicien pour se livrer à une véritable amplification lyrique d’un simple récit par la musique. La chanson savante n’est pas non plus une composition dans laquelle la mélodie traduirait simplement en musique le texte poétique de façon tout à fait parallèle : la musique n’est pas qu’une répétition, sous une autre forme, de la parole, ou bien l’image sonore d’un texte. Musique et poésie constituent deux moyens autonomes d’expression mais qui, dans une chanson, concourent à un même but : ces deux moyens d’expression tantôt se rejoignant, tantôt s’émancipant l’un de l’autre, de sorte que le propre de la chanson réside justement dans cette tension constante entre ses deux composantes. La mise en musique d’un texte poétique implique donc de la part du compositeur une certaine lecture interprétative du texte puisqu’il privilégie certains éléments de celui-ci pour les traduire, ou pour les amplifier parfois, par la mélodie qu’il leur attribuera.Spanish romances, at the time of the Reconquista, used to tell about past events in the epic mode, on a melodious rhythm which made it easier for the minstrel to store up long narratives in his memory. When Diego Pisador took up a romance, he merely kept a few lines from it. As a result, there is a closer relationship between the words and the notes. On the basis of an epic poem, he made a genuine musical composition through lyrical amplification. He brought about a real aesthetic change, passing from the long narrative based on a short recurrent musical theme, which characterized the medieval romance of the Reconquista, onto a shorter and more elaborate form which blends lyrical vibration and epic contents. As a member of the Royal Court, he intended to serve Felipe II’s interests, and dedicated his work to him. As a vihuelist composer, Pisador contributed to the Moor’s integration, in accordance with the policy which was being implemented by the House of Austria. But the wedding did not take place, and the Moors were expelled in 1609. An analysis of the song clearly reveals how the musician could provide real lyrical amplification to a simple tale through music. The new piece does not simply put music on a poetical text, the music does not simple parallel words, it is not only the musical image of a text. The music and the poem are two autonomous means of expression which, within the song, aim at the same objective. Sometimes they get very close to each other, at other times, each of them follows its own free movement, so that the song is precisely characterized by the permanent tension between its two components. Thus, setting poetry to music implies a certain degree of interpretation on the part of the composer, since he selects those elements which will be translated or amplified by the melody.Los romances españoles de la época de la Reconquista solían contar en el modo épico hechos pasados sobre una melodía que servía ante todo como medio mnemotécnico para contar largas narraciones. Cuando Pisador emplea a su vez un romance, sólo emplea algunos versos: en consecuencia, la relación entre la letra y las notas de la melodía resulta más estrecha. A partir de un poema épico, elabora una amplificación lírica, una verdadera composición musical, efectúa un verdadero cambio estético: el pasar de la larga narración sobre un tema musical corto y recurrente que caracterizaba el romance medieval de la Reconquista hacia una forma más corta pero asimismo más elaborada, idónea para introducir la vibración lírica en la materia épica. Familiar de la Corte, tiene el propósito de servir los objetivos politicos de Felipe II a quien dedica su obra: el compositor vihuelista, que era Pisador en efecto, participa del esfuerzo de integración del Moro que trataba de llevar a cabo la Casa de Austria. Pero no se celebraron dichas bodas y por el contrario los Moros fueron expulsados en 1609. El análisis de esa canción nos da la oportunidad de descubrir los medios que empleó el músico para crear una verdadera amplificación lírica de una mera narración gracias a la música. La canción culta tampoco consiste en una composición en la cual la música se contentaría con repetir bajo otra forma la letra o la imagen sonora de un texto. Música y poesía constituyen dos medios autónomos de expresión los cuales, sin embargo, en una canción, concurren a una misma meta: bien coincidiendo, bien emancipándose el uno del otro, de forma que lo propio de la canción consiste justamente en esta tensión constante entre sus dos componientes. El poner en música un texto poético implica pues por parte del compositor cierta lectura interpretativa del texto ya que privilegia ciertos elementos de dicho texto para traducirlos, o para amplificarlos a veces por la melodía que va a atribuirles.

  14. GPR Prospecting and Endoscopic Investigation in a Renaissance Church

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persico, Raffaele; Matera, Loredana; Bianco, Nadia; Masini, Nicola; Leopizzi, Giuseppe

    2015-04-01

    GPR prospecting in areas of cultural interest can reveal interesting secrets of the past history of the probed monument. In particular, tombs and crypts under the floor of the churches can be revealed [1-2], but also tracks of past restorations and architectural changes occurred in the centuries, or features internal to the walls and the columns as cracks, metallic hinges, walled ciboria and hidden gaps [1, 3-5]. In this contribution, the case history of the church of the Humility in Parabita (Lecce, Italy) is proposed. The church of the Humility is a small and indeed not much well preserved church, deconsecrated many years ago and reused in other ways that have changed its original structure. Nowadays, it is undergoing a further transformation. However, before starting the works, a GPR prospecting has been committed to the Institute for Archaeological and Monumental Heritage IBAM-CNR. The prospecting has been performed with a pulsed Ris Hi-mode system equipped with a double antenna with central frequencies at 200 and 600 MHz, respectively. A first set of measures has been taken along two sets of B-scan, directed after the axis of the (unique) nave and along the orthogonal direction to this. The distance between the lines has been of the order of 40 cm, but some unmovable obstacles have not allowed a constant transect between any two adjacent lines. A second set of measures has been gathered in the area of the altar (not any longer present), here, due to the shape of the area to be prospected, the data have been gathered along a unique direction, but the interline spacing has been chosen equal to 30 cm. Please note that there is a step between the area of the altar and that of the nave, as usual in ancient churches, and this prevented from executing a unique C-scan including the entire floor of the church. The data have been processed according to a standard procedure based on zero timing, background removal, gain variable vs. the depth, one dimensional filtering and migration in time domain. The propagation velocity of the electromagnetic waves has been estimated from the diffraction hyperbolas. The processing has been performed making use of the commercial code GPRslice, thanks to which also horizontal slices have been retrieved. As a less conventional aspect, moreover, some ground truthing has been performed on the basis of the horizontal slices by means of a drill with an extension and of an endoscopic survey within the holes made with the drill. This has allowed a more refined interpretation of some of the anomalies, as will be shown at the conference. The noticeable point is that this kind of ground truthing is minimally invasive, much faster than an excavation and of course much cheaper, and so it can be an alternative to it, when possible. References [1] F. Gabellone, G. Leucci, N. Masini, R. Persico, G. Quarta, F. Grasso, Nondestructive Prospecting and virtual reconstruction of the chapel of the Holy Spirit in Lecce, Italy, Near Surface Geophysics, vol. 11, n. 2, pp. 231-238, April 2013. [2] E. Utsi, The shrine of edward the confessor: A study in multi-frequency gpr investigation, proc. of 13th International Conference on Ground Penetrating Radar, DOI: 10.1109/ICGPR.2010.5550263. [3] N. Masini, R. Persico, E. Rizzo, A. Calia, M. T. Giannotta, G. Quarta, A. Pagliuca, "Integrated Techniques for Analysis and Monitoring of Historical Monuments: the case of S.Giovanni al Sepolcro in Brindisi (Southern Italy)." Near Surface Geophysics, vol. 8 (5), pp. 423-432, 2010. [4] G. Leucci, N. Masini, R. Persico, F. Soldovieri." GPR and sonic tomography for structural restoration : the case of the Cathedral of Tricarico", Journal of Geophysics and Engineering, vol. 8, pp. S76-S92, Aug. 2011. [5] M. Pieraccini, L. Noferini, D. Mecatti, C. Atzeni, R. Persico, F. Soldovieri, Advanced Processing Techniques for Step-frequency Continuous-Wave Penetrating Radar: the Case Study of "Palazzo Vecchio" Walls (Firenze, Italy), Research on Nondestructive Evaluation, vol. 17, pp. 71-83, 200

  15. The Role of Rhetoric in the Twelfth Century Renaissance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliese, John

    The medieval study of classical rhetoric reached its zenith in the twelfth century. Rhetoric in its medieval phase can be divided into four distinct subdisciplines: "ars praedicandi," or the preaching art; "ars dictaminis," or the art of letter writing; "ars poetriae," which focused on style and developed elaborate theories of versification; and…

  16. African Renaissance: The Politics of Return | More | African Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Political Science. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 7, No 2 (2002) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  17. Benedictus Pererius: Renaissance Culture at the Origins of Jesuit Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Paul Richard

    2006-01-01

    Benedictus Pererius (1535-1610) published in 1576 his most successful book "De principiis," after he had taught philosophy at the Roman College of the Jesuits. It will be shown that parts of this book are actually based on his lectures. But the printed version was intended as a contribution to the debate within his Order on how science should be…

  18. The Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam and Ethiopia's Succession ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tadesse Kassa Woldetsadik

    2013-06-01

    Jun 1, 2013 ... Tadesse Kassa Woldetsadik (LLB, LLM, Ph.D), Assistant Professor of Law and Human. Rights, Addis Ababa ... factors –relating to fiscal and technical limitations, governmental procrastination and want of ...... the civil aviation industry and an eastwards expansion of modern farming, labelled the study report ...

  19. Ayi Kwei Armah’s Intellectuals of the African Renaissance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fouad Mami

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Ayi Kwei Armah is a living Ghanaian novelist and cultural activist. His life and body of novelistic experiments show a meticulous preoccupation with Africa’s present cultural crisis. His seven novels to date, in addition to his autobiography entitled The Eloquence of the Scribes (2006, all illustrate a relentless intellectual campaign for articulating the ways in which the ”right” and committed intellectuals can be singled out from what he takes as multitudes of pseudo- or parvenu academics. For Armah, a carefully devised and administered educational system should form the basis for a reformed African ethos. This article explores Armah’s call for renovating the present educational philosophy that aims to promote a new idea of Africa. Constructing an authentic educational system is justified by him through the need to supersede the devastating effects imposed by and instituted through colonial education. Below is an attempt to debate Armah’s deconstructive approach of the colonial educational pattern. Similarly, viable prospects of a change of perspective are reviewed. In founding schools throughout Africa and granting scholarships in metropolitan universities to African students, Armah thinks, colonial powers only meant to maintain control, even after the end of their direct occupation.Ayi Kwei Armah é um romancista e activista cultural ganês. A sua vida e o conjunto dos seus romances revelam uma profunda preocupação com a actual crise cultural africana. Os sete romances publicados até à data e a sua autobiografia, intitulada The Eloquence of the Scribes (2006, ilustram um incansável activismo intelectual na procura de um compromisso entre os intelectuais “verdadeiros” e engajados que os destaquem daquilo que considera serem as multidões de arrivistas pseudo intelectuais. Para Armah, um sistema educacional assente numa planificação e administração cuidadas deveria constituir a base para um renovado ethos africano. Este artigo explora o apelo de Armah para uma renovação da filosofia do sistema educativo com vista à promoção de uma nova ideia de África. Armah justifica a construção de um autêntico sistema de ensino pela necessidade de superar os efeitos devastadores que foram impostos e instituídos pela educação colonial. Este artigo constitui uma tentativa de debater a abordagem desconstrutivista de Armah do modelo de ensino colonial. Simultaneamente abordam-se as propostas que advogam uma mudança de perspectiva na área do ensino. Na opinião de Armah as potências coloniais, ao inaugurarem escolas em todo o continente africano e ao concederem a estudantes africanos bolsas de estudo para universidades europeias, pretenderam manter o controlo sobre as populações colonizadas mesmo após o fim da ocupação efectiva.

  20. Science journalists learn of scientific renaissance at Doha conference

    CERN Document Server

    James Gillies

    2011-01-01

    Last week, over 700 science journalists from around the world made their way to Doha, Qatar, for the World Conference of Science Journalists. This meeting takes place every two years, and is the largest gathering of science writers in the world. Established in the early 1990s, this is the first time that a Middle Eastern country has hosted the conference, and it was quite an eye opener.   American-Egyptian Nobel Prize winner Ahmed Zewail delivers a keynote address at the World Conference of Science Journalists. Firstly, the large number of participants shows clearly that reports of the demise of science journalism seem to have been widely exaggerated. But it’s not only the number or participants that’s impressive: it’s also where they came from. Thanks in part to grants from the Qatar Foundation, 90 countries were represented with around 50% of participants coming from the developing world. One real eye-opener was the state of science in the Middle East. Originally s...

  1. Twists and Turns: the Stratagems of Discourse in Renaissance England

    OpenAIRE

    Alatorre, Sophie; Barros, Paula; Berton-Charrière, Danièle; Blanc, Pauline; Caillet, Pascal; Camard, Christophe; Coffin, Charlotte; Costantini-Cornède, Anne-Marie; Drouet, Pascale; Geoffroy-Piscou, Anne; Ginestet, Gaëlle; Guéron, Claire; Guidicelli, Carole; Jérémie, Christian; Jusdado-Mollmann, Sandra

    2008-01-01

    Le présent volume est l’aboutissement d’une série de rencontres, principalement dans le cadre de l’atelier XVIe- XVIIe siècles des Congrès de la Société des Anglicistes de l’Enseignement Supérieur (SAES) : « Parcours/Détours » (Université de Versailles-St Quentin, 2004), « Texte, Contexte, Hors-Texte » (Université de Toulouse 2-le Mirail, 2005), « Etrange/Etranger » (Université de Nantes, 2006) et « L’Envers du décor » (Université d’Avignon, 2007). Pour autant, il ne s’agissait pas pour nous ...

  2. Injection therapy for prostatic disease: A renaissance concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash M Saemi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Initially conceived as an intervention for prostatic infection, injection therapy has been used to alleviate urinary retention, and is now primarily investigated for the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH. For over a century, intraprostatic injection has been used as a minimally invasive surgical therapy (MIST, and is on the verge of a rebirth. This review will familiarize the reader with the origins and history of intraprostatic injection, and its evolution using transperineal, transrectal and transurethral routes with multiple injectants. Materials and Methods: A MEDLINE review of the literature on intraprostatic injections published between 1966 and 2007 was performed, augmented with articles and documents dating back to 1832. Results: Transperineal and transurethral injections have the most systematic evaluation in patients. There are advantages and disadvantages associated with each route. Most injectants consistently produce localized coagulative necrosis and gland volume reduction with varying degrees of LUTS relief. Anhydrous ethanol (AE is the most extensively studied injected agent to date. Conclusions: Injection therapy is a promising minimally invasive treatment option for various prostatic conditions and has been examined for over 100 years. Further experience in systematic laboratory research and completion of currently ongoing clinical trials is necessary before widespread clinical application.

  3. Generating the option of a two-stage nuclear renaissance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, Robin W; Nuttall, William J

    2010-08-13

    Concerns about climate change, security of supply, and depleting fossil fuel reserves have spurred a revival of interest in nuclear power generation in Europe and North America, while other regions continue or initiate an expansion. We suggest that the first stage of this process will include replacing or extending the life of existing nuclear power plants, with continued incremental improvements in efficiency and reliability. After 2030, a large-scale second period of construction would allow nuclear energy to contribute substantially to the decarbonization of electricity generation. For nuclear energy to be sustainable, new large-scale fuel cycles will be required that may include fuel reprocessing. Here, we explore the opportunities and constraints in both time periods and suggests ways in which measures taken today might, at modest cost, provide more options in the decades to come. Careful long-term planning, along with parallel efforts aimed at containing waste products and avoiding diversion of material into weapons production, can ensure that nuclear power generation remains a carbon-neutral option.

  4. the evolution of hospitals from antiquity to the renaissance 1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tially built to shelter pilgrims and messengers between various bishops, were under. Christian control developed into hospitals in ... primarily intended for accommodating pilgrims. Today a hospice usu- ally indicates a .... and performed the occasional surgical. Figure 32: Remains of the sanctuary of Asclepius, Epidaurus.

  5. From the Renaissance to the Modern World—Introduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Iver Kaufman

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available On November 11 and 12, 2011, a symposium held at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill honored John M. Headley, Emeritus Professor of History. The organizers, Professor Melissa Bullard—Headley’s colleague in the department of history at that university—along with Professors Paul Grendler (University of Toronto and James Weiss (Boston College, as well as Nancy Gray Schoonmaker, coordinator of the Program in Medieval and Early Modern Studies—assembled presenters, respondents, and dozens of other participants from Western Europe and North America to celebrate the career of their prolific, versatile, and influential colleague whose publications challenged and often changed the ways scholars think about Martin Luther, Thomas More, the Habsburg empire, early modern Catholicism, globalization, and multiculturalism. [...

  6. Nuclear power: Is the renaissance real or a mirage?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogner, H.-Holger; McDonald, Alan

    2010-09-15

    In 2009, in the midst of the global financial and economic crises that began in 2008, and as the nuclear power industry posted its first two-year decline in installed capacity in history, the IAEA revised its projections for future nuclear power growth upwards. This paper summarizes the status of nuclear power in the world today and the status of all steps in the nuclear fuel cycle. It summarizes nuclear power's prospects and important trends in key factors. It explains the reasons for optimism and rising expectations about nuclear power's future, and it acknowledges that there is, nonetheless, much uncertainty.

  7. [Renaissance of pedicled flaps in oral and maxillofacial surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twieg, M; Reich, W; Dempf, R; Eckert, A W

    2014-06-01

    A retrospective analysis in the period 2007 to 2011 included 71 surgically treated patients for carcinoma of the head and neck region and subsequent reconstruction with 36 pedicled distant flaps and 47 free flaps. Patient specific parameters of data collection with SPSS 17.0 were age and sex distribution, TNM stage and treatment. The specific type of flap reconstruction, duration of surgery, complications, intensive care and inpatient treatment were recorded. The results showed that the healing process was uneventful in 26 (72.2 %) pedicled flaps, 14 (38.9 %) pedicled flaps were transplanted in a preoperatively irradiated area of the head and neck region and in 86.0 % with a positive healing process. Tumor stage, general physical condition of the patient and type of therapy are the key parameters for the choice of reconstruction.

  8. Fear for nuclear energy contributes to the renaissance of sustainability; Vrees voor kernenergie draagt bij tot renaissance duurzaamheid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leone, T. [ed.

    2000-08-01

    Forecasts of the German 'Internationalen Wirtschaftsforum Regenerative Energien' (IWR or International Economic Forum Renewable Energies) with respect to the developments and use of renewable energy sources are briefly outlined and discussed.

  9. Raw material monitoring assists companies. German Mineral Resources Agency at BGR provides information on global developments in resource markets; Rohstoffmonitoring hilft Unternehmen. Die Deutsche Rohstoffagentur in der BGR informiert ueber weltweite Entwicklungen auf den Rohstoffmaerkten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-05-15

    Germany is dependent on imports for its metalliferous natural resources. Although prices have been declining significantly in recent months, numerous raw materials such as platinum, cobalt and rare earth elements continue to be exposed to price and supply risks. To ensure that German industry can respond better to this situation in their procurement activities, the German Mineral Resources Agency (DERA) at BGR has developed a raw material monitoring system on behalf of the German government. DERA experts have con figured a screening method for the early identification of possible procurement risks. This is the platform which enables German companies to gain the specific advice they require. All of the most important information on this issue is bundled within DERA 's internet portal (www.deutsche-rohstoffagentur.de). BGR also provides its expertise in other important fields with great societal relevance. BGR has been advising the national commission on ''Storage of High-level Radioactive Waste'' since 2014. Due to their comprehensive research activities in the field of radioactive waste disposal, BGR scientists are important technical experts to which the commission can turn to for geological information and advice.

  10. Skincancer-screening in Schleswig-Holstein; Hautkrebs-Screening in Schleswig-Holstein. Erste Ergebnisse der weltweit groessten Screening Massnahme im Bereich nicht-ionisierender Strahlung (NIR). Konsequenzen fuer den Strahlenschutz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breitbart, E.W.; Schernikau, R.; Volkmer, B.; Greinert, R. [Dermatologisches Zentrum Buxtehude, Elbe Kliniken, Klinikum Buxtehude (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    Skin cancer is the most frequent cancer worldwide. It is scientifically accepted that UV-radiation is the main risk factor for carcinogenesis of the skin. In Germany 100.000 - 150.000 new cases of skin cancer are registered per year. Incidence rates are doubling every 10-15 year. To counteract this tendency strategies of primary and secondary prevention have to be developed. By order of the federal board of physicians and health insurance the Association of Dermatological Prevention (ADP), supported by German Cancer Aid (DKH), has therefore performed a skin cancer screening in Schleswig-Holstein in order to prepare an organized early detection program in Germany professionally and logistically. It is shown that a 2-step screening on the basis of a combination of mass- and risk-group-screening is practicable (about 400.000 people have been screened in Schleswig-Holstein). Methods and first evaluations of the skin cancer screening are introduced in this contribution. Our first results already seem to indicate that skin cancer incidence is still under-estimated in Germany. (orig.)

  11. 'Radiating' victims. The US uranium industry, the American Indians and the worldwide struggle for survival. 'Strahlende' Opfer. Amerikas Uranindustrie, Indianer und weltweiter Ueberlebenskampf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hensel, G.

    1987-01-01

    There is no other continent the uranium and nuclear power industry is as closely connected with as with North America and so incurably entangled with as with the very United States. The extraction and processing of radiating materials in reservations or nearby makes the American Indians living on the Colorado plateau in the southwest, in the State of Washington or in the surroundings of the Black Hills suffer a lot. Oekozid extra reports on the injuries, the protest and dying of the victims, the radioactive devastation of the landscape, the cynical practice of the responsible political organs and the complicity of the Federal Republic of Germany. The author appeals for a new consciousness as regards to the dimension of human action and the knowledge of the fact that any anti-nuclear power/plutonium policy has to include putting a stop to uranium extraction and uranium processing. Warnings and admonitions the traditional Indians have been giving since 1948, have been ignored so far.

  12. Global CO{sub 2} emissions 2017. Still no breakthrough can be seen, but the signs of a trend reversal are increasing; Weltweite CO{sub 2}-Emissionen 2017. Noch kein Durchbruch erkennbar, doch mehren sich die Zeichen einer Trendumkehr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziesing, Hans-Joachim

    2017-09-15

    In 2016 global CO{sub 2} emissions according to provisional calculations rose only slightly compared to 2015 with 0.4%. As a result, the average long-term growth of 1.7% (from 1990 to 2015) was once again clearly slowed down as in the previous year. As a result, CO{sub 2} emissions in 2016 reached a new peak of 33.3 billion tonnes. Although this still does not signal a trend reversal, but CO{sub 2} emissions have declined in many countries, particularly in some industrialized countries. For example. CO{sub 2} emissions in the Annex I countries were reduced by a total of 0.7% or around 94 million tonnes. This is mainly attributed to developments in the USA (-1.7% or 90.0 million tonnes), Russia (-2.0% or 32.6 million tonnes), Great Britain (-5.5% or 23.0 million tonnes) and Japan (-1.5% or 18.0 million tonnes). Encouraging is also the fact that CO{sub 2} emissions in China, the country with by far the highest emissions, have declined in 2016 as in the previous year - albeit with 0.2% quite weakly. It is less positive that CO{sub 2} emissions in the EU-28 have increased again, with the exception of Great Britain, Portugal, Spain and Bulgaria, contrary to EU-wide targets. [German] Im Jahr 2016 sind die weltweiten CO{sub 2}-Emissionen nach vorlaeufigen Berechnungen gegenueber 2015 mit 0,4 % nur schwach gestiegen. Damit wurde der langfristige Zuwachs von jahresdurchschnittlich 1,7 % (von 1990 bis 2015) wie schon im Vorjahr erneut deutlich gebremst. Im Ergebnis erreichten die CO{sub 2}-Emissionen 2016 mit reichlich 33,3 Mrd. t einen neuen Spitzenwert. Das signalisiert zwar noch keine Trendwende, doch sind die CO{sub 2}-Emissionen in zahlreichen Laendern, insbesondere in etlichen Industrielaendern, gesunken. Bspw. wurden die CO{sub 2}-Emissionen in den Annex-I-Laendern gesamthaft um 0,7 % oder rund 94 Mio. t reduziert. Dies ist vor allem auf die Entwicklung in den USA (-1,7 % oder 90,0 Mio. t), Russland (-2,0 % oder 32,6 Mio. t), Grossbritannien (-5,5 % oder 23,0 Mio. t) und Japan (-1,5 % oder 18,0 Mio. t) zurueckzufuehren. Ermutigend ist auch die Tatsache, dass die CO{sub 2}-Emissionen in China, dem Land mit den mit Abstand hoechsten Emissionen, im Jahr 2016 wie schon im Vorjahr abermals - wenn auch mit 0,2 % recht schwach - gesunken sind. Weniger positiv ist es, dass die CO{sub 2}-Emissionen in der EU-28 mit Ausnahme von Grossbritannien, Portugal, Spanien und Bulgarien entgegen der EU-weiten Zielsetzungen wieder leicht zugelegt haben.

  13. Worldwide CO{sub 2} emissions 2014. Shimmer of hope to turnaround reinforce - but no all-clear signal; Weltweite CO{sub 2}-Emissionen 2014. Hoffnungsschimmer auf Trendwende verstaerken sich - aber noch keine Entwarnung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziesing, Hans-Joachim

    2015-09-15

    In 2014, global CO{sub 2} emissions increase according to initial calculations by 0.5%. Apart from the two crisis years 2008/2009 was the weakest increase since the beginning of the century. As a result, CO{sub 2} emissions reached about 32.6 billion tonnes a new climax. A turnaround this is not yet, but the CO{sub 2} emissions in many countries, particularly in industrialized countries declined. Thus, the CO{sub 2} emissions have declined in the Annex I countries overall by 1.8%. For this particular contributed the development in the EU, in almost without exception, all Member States have experienced an emission reduction. Of the major countries, this also applies to the Ukraine, Japan, Russia and Australia. In contrast, there was an increase in the US, although this turned out very moderate with an increase of just under 1%. If the global CO{sub 2} emissions have increased despite the decline in the group of Annex I countries again, this is primarily a result of the increase in developing countries. Here, CO{sub 2} emissions were by around the year 2014 415 million tons or 2.4% higher than 2013. Since 2008, China occupied top position ahead of the US in 2014 was not expanded because for many years here was the increase for the first time below 1%. By contrast, CO{sub 2} emissions increased significantly in India by approx. 8% and in Brazil as in the Middle East by about 4%. [German] Im Jahr 2014 stiegen die weltweiten CO{sub 2}-Emissionen nach ersten Berechnungen um 0,5 %. Abgesehen von den beiden Krisenjahren 2008/2009 war dies der schwaechste Anstieg seit Beginn des Jahrhunderts. Im Ergebnis erreichten die CO{sub 2}-Emissionen mit etwa 32,6 Mrd. t einen neuen Hoehepunkt. Eine Trendwende ist dies noch nicht, doch sind die CO{sub 2}-Emissionen in zahlreichen Laendern, insbesondere in Industriestaaten, gesunken. So sind die CO{sub 2}-Emissionen in den Annex I-Laendern gesamthaft um 1,8 % zurueckgegangen. Dazu trug insbesondere die Entwicklung in der EU bei, in der nahezu ausnahmslos alle Mitgliedstaaten eine Emissionsminderung verzeichnen konnten. Von den grossen Laendern trifft dies auch auf die Ukraine, Japan, Russland und Australien zu. Demgegenueber kam es in den USA zu einem Zuwachs, wenngleich dieser mit einem Plus von knapp 1 % sehr moderat ausfiel. Wenn die weltweiten CO{sub 2}-Emissionen trotz der ruecklaeufigen Entwicklung in der Gruppe der Annex I-Laender abermals zugenommen haben, so ist dies primaer eine Folge des Anstiegs in den Schwellen- und Entwicklungslaendern. Hier waren die CO{sub 2}-Emissionen im Jahr 2014 um rd. 415 Mio. t oder um 2,4 % hoeher als 2013. Die seit 2008 von China eingenommene Spitzenposition vor den USA wurde 2014 jedoch nicht weiter ausgebaut, weil hier die Zunahme erstmalig seit vielen Jahren unter 1 % lag. Dagegen legten die CO{sub 2}-Emissionen in Indien um rd. 8 % und in Brasilien wie im Mittleren Osten jeweils um etwa 4 % deutlich zu.

  14. Coal's role in worldwide energy supply. Reaching the climate protection goals with renewable energies and coal as a partner; Die Rolle der Kohle fuer die weltweite Energieversorgung. Klimaschutzziele erreichen mit erneuerbaren Energien und Kohle als Partner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiffer, Hans-Wilhelm [World Energy Council, London (United Kingdom). World Energy Resources; Thielemann, Thomas [RWE Power AG, Koeln (Germany)

    2016-04-01

    In 2014, coal covered 30 % of the global consumption of primary energy. More than 40 % of the worldwide electricity production were based on coal. This makes coal the second most important source for primary energy - after oil. Looking at the types of energy sources used for electricity production, coal ranks first, before gas and renewables. The latter two both have a share of 23 % each. Coal is thus making a key contribution to the security of energy supply and to the affordability of energy. Coal is securing the competitiveness of industry. With the use of advanced technologies, coal can contribute to the compatibility of energy supply with the goals of environmental and climate protection.

  15. The present global financial and economic crisis and the oil crises of the 1970s. Opposite turning points in the development of economic growth, energy supply, and the role of nuclear power?; Die gegenwaertige globale Finanz- und Wirtschaftskrise und die Oelkrisen der 1970er-Jahre. Gegensaetzliche Trendwenden in der Entwicklung von Wirtschaftswachstum, Energieversorgung und Rolle der Kernenergie?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmann, Dieter

    2012-08-15

    After decades of extensive economic growth, the oil crises in the 1970s enforced the transition to intensive growth in a manner conserving resources, combined with a fundamental turnaround in the development of global energy supply and the role of nuclear power. Meanwhile, the world has changed considerably as a result of population growth, technical progress, and globalization - and it is in the throes of another crisis. The contribution shows, on the basis of empirical indicators, that higher commodity prices halted the period of intense growth already in late 2007. The following global financial and economic crisis can be interpreted plausibly as a return to extensive economic growth worldwide. This is likely to have far-reaching consequences for the future development of global energy supply and the role of nuclear power. (orig.)

  16. Juan Valverde de Amusco (1525-1588): an eminent anatomist of the renaissance or a plagiarist of Vesalius? His work and its impact in renaissance anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markatos, Konstantinos; Arkoudi, Konstantina; Androutsos, Georgios

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to review and summarize the life and work of Juan Valverde de Amusco (1525-1588), his impact on the anatomy of the sixteenth century and focus on his controversy with Andreas Vesalius. A thorough search of the literature was undertaken in PubMed and Google Scholar as well as in history books through the internet and in History and Medical University libraries. Valverde took almost directly from Andreas Vesalius 38 pictures. Occasionally, however, Valverde corrected Vesalius' images, as in his depictions of the muscles of the eyes, nose and larynx. Valverde copied the work of Vesalius in many instances. Nevertheless, he had his fair share of contribution in the history of Anatomy; he managed to popularize and spread the new anatomy of the Rennaissance through his work which was far more cheaper than that of Vesalius; furthermore, his anatomic discoveries like the first depiction of the intracranial course of the carotid arteries (several decades before Willis's description), the extrinsic ocular muscles and the middle ear bones contribute to the spirit of the Scientific Revolution.

  17. Book Review: Europe Renaissance. Essaying European Civil Society – Europa-Renaissance. Die europäische Bürgergesellschaft auf dem Prüfstand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner Müller-Pelzer

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The texts of the present volume represent the result of a conference held at Dortmund University of Applied Sciences and Arts in 2014. With their contributions, researchers and students from different fields of investigation from several European countries invite the reader to focus on the perspective of European citizens to which less attention has been paid, compared to the institutional crisis of European Union. In contrast to its increased political and economic power, the EU has not succeeded in incorporating an authority able to communicate to its citizens the feeling of belonging together and to struggle for a common goal. In this sense the title “Europe Renaissance” is meant to push the search for a “good life” back to centre stage. From 2014 to 2016, the situation of the European Union has so clearly deteriorated that a well-known German expert in constitutional and public law Dieter Grimm comes to the result of an alarming democratic failure (Dieter Grimm, 2016, Europa ja – aber welches? Zur Verfassung der europäischen Demokratie, München: C.H. Beck. The political scientist Ulrike Guérot supports this analysis with a fresh manifesto (Ulrike Guérot, 2016, Warum Europa eine Republik warden muss! Eine politische Utopie, Bonn: Dietz.

  18. SBB-Studie: Benzinpreis und Bahnnutzung

    OpenAIRE

    Weis, Claude; Axhausen, Kay W.

    2013-01-01

    Selbst nachdem im Zuge der aktuellen Wirtschaftskrise die massiven Ölpreissteigerungen der vergangenen Monate gebremst worden sind, sind in mittelbarer Zukunft Benzinpreise von 4.- CHF pro Liter und mehr durchaus vorstellbar. Dies warf zum Zeitpunkt des Beginns der Studie die Frage auf, wie sich die Nachfrage im motorisierten Individualverkehr sowie im öffentlichen Verkehr als Reaktion auf diese vorher nie dagewesenen Preisstrukturen verändern würde. Die Studie ergänzt und erweitert die Ergeb...

  19. Traditionelle Budgetierung versus Beyond Budgeting: Darstellung und Wertung anhand eines Praxisbeispiels

    OpenAIRE

    Held, Bärbel

    2009-01-01

    Die traditionelle Budgetsteuerung ist überholt und verursacht mehr Schaden als Nutzen. Die klassische Budgetsteuerung ist zu zeitaufwändig, zu unflexibel, zu bürokratisch und verhindert heute die Nutzung des vollen Potentials eines Unternehmens. [Daum, H./2006]. Trotz dieser These findet man in der Unternehmenspraxis auch heute noch mehrheitlich die traditionelle Budgetierung vor, wie das Fallbeispiel zeigt. Nun kommen, bedingt durch die derzeitige Finanz- und Wirtschaftskrise, vermehrt Anfra...

  20. The Role of HEIs in an Entrepreneurial Renaissance in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, Gideon J. P.; Herrington, Mike

    2011-01-01

    For decades, entrepreneurs have been identified as critical change agents in socio-economic development. It is probably safe to say that some countries have had more success than others in the promotion of entrepreneurship; and in that context it can be argued that South Africa's successes are not yet clear. The promotion of entrepreneurship…

  1. Historical Perspective on the Current Renaissance for Hematopoietic Stem Cell Gene Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, Donald B

    2017-10-01

    Gene therapy using hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) has developed over the past 3 decades, with progressive improvements in the efficacy and safety. Autologous transplantation of HSC modified with murine gammaretroviral vectors first showed clinical benefits for patients with several primary immune deficiencies, but some of these patients suffered complications from vector-related genotoxicity. Lentiviral vectors have been used recently for gene addition to HSC and have yielded clinical benefits for primary immune deficiencies, metabolic diseases, and hemoglobinopathies, without vector-related complications. Gene editing using site-specific endonucleases is emerging as a promising technology for gene therapy and is moving into clinical trials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Architectural Relations between Karia and Lykia at the time of the Ionian Renaissance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Poul

    2013-01-01

    Det er i forskningen almindeligt antaget at Maussollæet i Halikarnassos - et af Antikken Syv Underværker - er skabt under direkte inspiration fra Nereidemonumentet i Lykien. I artiklen analyseres sammenlignelige elementer fra de to monumenter i detaljer, og det konkluderes, at der må være en insp...

  3. Renaissance des Dorfladens oder Versorgungswüsten?. Erfahrungen und Lernpotenziale am Beispiel Schleswig-Holstein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jürgens, Ulrich

    2017-06-01

    It has become more and more complicated for the customers to make their food shopping in local environments because smaller shops close down and the distances to supermarkets and discount stores have increased, especially in rural areas. The paper will discuss which alternatives of food retailing exist outside the supermarket world and analyzes the strengths and weaknesses of shop formats on the micro level. The statements are based on a conscious selection of different shop formats and expert interviews in rural areas of the province of Schleswig-Holstein.

  4. Medical capsule robots: A renaissance for diagnostics, drug delivery and surgical treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapara, Sanyat S; Patravale, Vandana B

    2017-09-10

    The advancements in electronics and the progress in nanotechnology have resulted in path breaking development that will transform the way diagnosis and treatment are carried out currently. This development is Medical Capsule Robots, which has emerged from the science fiction idea of robots travelling inside the body to diagnose and cure disorders. The first marketed capsule robot was a capsule endoscope developed to capture images of the gastrointestinal tract. Today, varieties of capsule endoscopes are available in the market. They are slightly larger than regular oral capsules, made up of a biocompatible case and have electronic circuitry and mechanisms to capture and transmit images. In addition, robots with diagnostic features such as in vivo body temperature detection and pH monitoring have also been launched in the market. However, a multi-functional unit that will diagnose and cure diseases inside the body has not yet been realized. A remote controlled capsule that will undertake drug delivery and surgical treatment has not been successfully launched in the market. High cost, inadequate power supply, lack of control over drug release, limited space for drug storage on the capsule, inadequate safety and no mechanisms for active locomotion and anchoring have prevented their entry in the market. The capsule robots can revolutionize the current way of diagnosis and treatment. This paper discusses in detail the applications of medical capsule robots in diagnostics, drug delivery and surgical treatment. In diagnostics, detailed analysis has been presented on wireless capsule endoscopes, issues associated with the marketed versions and their corresponding solutions in literature. Moreover, an assessment has been made of the existing state of remote controlled capsules for targeted drug delivery and surgical treatment and their future impact is predicted. Besides the need for multi-functional capsule robots and the areas for further research have also been highlighted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The Study of Africa: A challenge for the African Renaissance | Koka ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Movement” and not as an institution which is an entity within itself. It is a movement whose main objective is the restoration of the creative Afrikan genius that once created world civilizations and cultures; a genius that produced the ancient 'pagan' ...

  6. Letters & Arms Literary Language, Power and Nation in Renaissance Italy and France 1300-1600

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftgaard, Anders

    2005-01-01

    Sprog, litteratur, filologi, national identitet, Joachim Du Bellay, Jean Lemaire de Belges, Henri Estienne, Sperone Speroni, Pietro Bembo, Dante Alighieri, Frans den første (af Frankrig), Anthony D. Smith, Liah Greenfeld...

  7. La renaissance du temps pour en finir avec la crise de la physique

    CERN Document Server

    Smolin, Lee

    2014-01-01

    La question du Temps est au coeur de toutes les problématiques scientifiques, de la cosmologie à la mécanique quantique. L’un des plus grands physiciens d’aujourd’hui, Lee Smolin, expose sa conception du Temps et ses implications sur la perception de notre environnement. Le Temps est-il une illusion qui cache une vérité éternelle, ou une réalité physique de notre Univers ? Lee Smolin opte pour la réalité du Temps, s’opposant en cela à la majorité des penseurs, physiciens ou philosophes, inspirés pour les uns par la théorie de la Relativité d’Einstein et pour les autres par les idées platoniciennes.

  8. The renaissance of lipoprotein(a): Brave new world for preventive cardiology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Katrina L; Boffa, Michael B; Sahebkar, Amirhossein; Koschinsky, Marlys L; Watts, Gerald F

    2017-10-01

    Lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] is a highly heritable cardiovascular risk factor. Although discovered more than 50 years ago, Lp(a) has recently re-emerged as a major focus in the fields of lipidology and preventive cardiology owing to findings from genetic studies and the possibility of lowering elevated plasma concentrations with new antisense therapy. Data from genetic, epidemiological and clinical studies have provided compelling evidence establishing Lp(a) as a causal risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Nevertheless, major gaps in knowledge remain and the identification of the mechanistic processes governing both Lp(a) pathobiology and metabolism are an ongoing challenge. Furthermore, the complex structure of Lp(a) presents a major obstacle to the accurate quantification of plasma concentrations, and a universally accepted and standardized approach for measuring Lp(a) is required. Significant progress has been made in the development of novel therapeutics for selectively lowering Lp(a). However, before these therapies can be widely implemented further investigations are required to assess their efficacy, safety, and cost-efficiency in the prevention of cardiovascular events. We review recent advances in molecular and biochemical aspects, epidemiology, and pathobiology of Lp(a), and provide a contemporary update on the significance of Lp(a) in clinical medicine. "Progress lies not in enhancing what is, but in advancing toward what will be." (Khalil Gibran). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The renaissance of anti-neoplastic immunity from tumor cell demise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yuting; Pitt, Jonathan M; Li, Qingqing; Yang, Heng

    2017-11-01

    Cancer therapies can temporarily reduce tumor burdens by inducing malignant cell death. However, cancer cure is still far from realization because tumors often gain resistance to current treatment and eventually relapse. Accumulating evidence suggests that successful cancer interventions require anti-tumor immunity. Therapy-induced cell stress responses ultimately result in one or more cell death modalities, including apoptosis, autophagy, necroptosis, and pyroptosis. These irreversible dying processes are accompanied by active or passive release of cell death-associated molecular patterns (CDAMPs), which can be sensed by corresponding pattern recognition receptors (PRR) on tumor-infiltrating immune cells. This crosstalk with the immune system can reawaken immune surveillance in the tumor microenvironment (TME). This review focuses on immune-modulatory properties of anti-cancer regimens and CDAMP-mediated communications between cell stress responses and the immune contexture of TME. In addition, we describe how immunogenic cell death can elicit strong and durable anti-tumor immune responses. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Atmospheric pressure MALDI for the noninvasive characterization of carbonaceous ink from Renaissance documents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, Giuseppe; Calcagno, Marzia; Rapisarda, Alessandro; D'Agata, Roberta; Spoto, Giuseppe

    2017-06-01

    The analytical methods that are usually applied to determine the compositions of inks from ancient manuscripts usually focus on inorganic components, as in the case of iron gall ink. In this work, we describe the use of atmospheric pressure/matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry (AP/MALDI-MS) as a spatially resolved analytical technique for the study of the organic carbonaceous components of inks used in handwritten parts of ancient books for the first time. Large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (L-PAH) were identified in situ in the ink of XVII century handwritten documents. We prove that it is possible to apply MALDI-MS as a suitable microdestructive diagnostic tool for analyzing samples in air at atmospheric pressure, thus simplifying investigations of the organic components of artistic and archaeological objects. The interpretation of the experimental MS results was supported by independent Raman spectroscopic investigations. Graphical abstract Atmospheric pressure/MALDI mass spectrometry detects in situ polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the carbonaceous ink of XVII century manuscripts.

  11. Lateral femoral cutaneous nerve transposition: Renaissance of an old concept in the light of new anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Amgad S

    2017-04-01

    Meralgia paresthetica causes pain in the anterolateral thigh. Most surgical procedures involve nerve transection or decompression. We conducted a cadaveric study to determine the feasibility of lateral femoral cutaneous nerve (LFCN) transposition. In three cadavers, the LFCN was exposed in the thigh and retroperitoneum. The two layers of the LFCN canal superficial and deep to the nerve were opened. The nerve was then mobilized medially away from the ASIS, by cutting the septum medial to sartorius. It was possible to mobilize the nerve for 2 cm medial to the ASIS. The nerve acquired a much straighter course with less tension. A new technique of LFCN transposition is presented here as an anatomical feasibility study. The surgical technique is based on the new understanding of the LFCN canal. Clin. Anat. 30:409-412, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. [Interatrial block and its clinical relevance. Renaissance of an ECG change].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomcsányi, János

    2018-01-01

    Interatrial block involves conduction delay between the right and left atria during sinus rhythm. The review describes the classification, pathomechanism and clinical significance of this under-recognised ECG sign, nominated Bayés syndrome. The presented ECGs help to recognise the differentypes of interatrial blocks. Orv Hetil. 2018; 159(3): 91-95.

  13. Synthetic Organic Electrochemical Methods Since 2000: On the Verge of a Renaissance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ming; Kawamata, Yu; Baran, Phil S

    2017-11-08

    Electrochemistry represents one of the most intimate ways of interacting with molecules. This review discusses advances in synthetic organic electrochemistry since 2000. Enabling methods and synthetic applications are analyzed alongside innate advantages as well as future challenges of electroorganic chemistry.

  14. Copper(II) Chlorate Complexes - the Renaissance of a Forgotten and Misjudged Energetic Anion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurzenberger, Maximilian H H; Szimhardt, Norbert; Stierstorfer, Jörg

    2018-02-16

    A convenient synthetic route toward new copper(II) chlorate complexes with potential use in modern advanced igni-tion or initiation systems is described. Obtained compounds were not only accurately characterized (XRD, IR, UV/Vis EA and DTA) but also investigated for their energetic character (sensitivities, initiation capability and laser ignition). The copper 4-aminotriazolyl chlorate complex showed excellent initiation of PETN, while also being thermally stable and safe to handle. Solid-state UV-Vis measurements were performed to get a possible insight toward the laser initia-tion mechanism. In contrast to expectations, the presented copper(II) chlorate energetic coordination compounds show manageable sensitivities that can be tamed or boosted by the appropriate choice of nitrogen-rich ligands.

  15. Historical Perspective of Traditional Indigenous Medical Practices: The Current Renaissance and Conservation of Herbal Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Si-Yuan; Gao, Si-Hua; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Yu, Zhi-Ling; Chen, Hou-Qi; Zhang, Shuo-Feng; Tang, Min-Ke; Sun, Jian-Ning; Ko, Kam-Ming

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, increasing numbers of people have been choosing herbal medicines or products to improve their health conditions, either alone or in combination with others. Herbs are staging a comeback and herbal “renaissance” occurs all over the world. According to the World Health Organization, 75% of the world's populations are using herbs for basic healthcare needs. Since the dawn of mankind, in fact, the use of herbs/plants has offered an effective medicine for the treatment of illnesses. Moreover, many conventional/pharmaceutical drugs are derived directly from both nature and traditional remedies distributed around the world. Up to now, the practice of herbal medicine entails the use of more than 53,000 species, and a number of these are facing the threat of extinction due to overexploitation. This paper aims to provide a review of the history and status quo of Chinese, Indian, and Arabic herbal medicines in terms of their significant contribution to the health promotion in present-day over-populated and aging societies. Attention will be focused on the depletion of plant resources on earth in meeting the increasing demand for herbs. PMID:24872833

  16. Aristotle's Educational Politics and the Aristotelian Renaissance in Philosophy of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curren, Randall

    2010-01-01

    This paper assesses the historical meaning and contemporary significance of Aristotle's educational ideas. It begins with a broad characterisation of the project of Aristotle's "Nicomachean Ethics" and "Politics", which he calls "political science" ("he politike episteme"), and the central place of education in his vision of statesmanship. It…

  17. Africanising the philosophy curriculum through teaching African culture modules: An African Renaissance act

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sesanti, Simphiwe

    2016-01-01

    Often, when the concept "African culture" arises in philosophical discourses among Africans, debates tend to be characterised by a dichotomous line between those who insist on the existence of "one...

  18. The role of health services research in the renaissance of the dental profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grembowski, D

    1997-01-01

    Health services research may play a critical role in achieving the recommendations of the IOM study. Toward this end, the field of health services research is defined. Applications of health services research to health outcomes, patient care, and other IOM directives are reviewed. Alternative approaches to building the capacities of dental schools to conduct health services research are presented.

  19. "On the Verge of a Renaissance": Arkansas Schools, Curricula, and Teachers during the Great Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Sherry L.; Bauml, Michelle; Bellows, M. Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    This article is the third in a larger study of schooling during the Great Depression that seeks to elucidate specific examples of elementary social studies teaching and learning in the South during this time, particularly in Arkansas. Responding to Christine Woyshner's (2009) concern that histories of social studies should look beyond national…

  20. The Walking Renaissance: A Longitudinal Analysis of Walking Travel in the Greater Los Angeles Area, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Joh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Promoting walking travel is considered important for reducing automobile use and improving public health. Recent U.S. transportation policy has incentivized investments in alternative, more sustainable transportation modes such as walking, bicycling and transit in auto-oriented cities such as Los Angeles. Although many past studies have analyzed changes in walking travel across the U.S., there is little clarity on the drivers of change. We address this gap by conducting a longitudinal analysis of walking travel in the greater Los Angeles area from 2001 to 2009. We use travel diary and household data from regional and national surveys to analyze changes in walking trip shares and rates across our study area. Results show that walking has significantly increased across most of Los Angeles, and that increases in walking trips generally correspond with increases in population, employment, and transit service densities. Estimates from fixed-effects regression analysis generally suggest a positive association between population density and walking, and that higher increases in transit stop density are correlated with increased walking trips to and from transit stops. These findings illustrate how regional planning efforts to pursue a coordinated land use-transit planning strategy can help promote walking in auto-oriented or vehicle adopting cities.

  1. The renaissance of iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis: on the multifaceted catalyst deactivation behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Smit, Emiel; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2008-12-01

    Iron-based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, which are applied in the conversion of CO and H2 into longer hydrocarbon chains, are historically amongst the most intensively studied systems in heterogeneous catalysis. Despite this, fundamental understanding of the complex and dynamic chemistry of the iron-carbon-oxygen system and its implications for the rapid deactivation of the iron-based catalysts is still a developing field. Fischer-Tropsch catalysis is characterized by its multidisciplinary nature and therefore deals with a wide variety of fundamental chemical and physical problems. This critical review will summarize the current state of knowledge of the underlying mechanisms for the activation and eventual deactivation of iron-based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts and suggest systematic approaches for relating chemical identity to performance in next generation iron-based catalyst systems (210 references).

  2. The Digital Renaissance of the Audiobook as lit-to-go

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Have, Iben; Pedersen, Birgitte Stougaard

    of the written text is inscribed in the general transformation and mediatization of the printed book these years but offers radically different affordances than visually percieved e-books. New portable, digital audio media changes the act of reading, moving it towards fields of social practice where reading has......In this paper we wish to analyse the audiobook as a technological, aesthetical/perceptual and sociological medium and discuss some of the social and cultural changes that may follow from the increasing use of audiobooks due to digital technological development in the last decade. The sonification...

  3. The dream image as erotic fetish: Lyrics of the Renaissance in Italy and Spain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Acucella

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Il tema del sogno dell’amata, oggetto di particolare interesse nell’ispanistica (Palley 1983; Maurier 1990; Alatorre 2003, lega, spesso attraverso dirette filiazioni testuali, i poeti iberici del Siglo de Oro ai lirici del petrarchismo italiano, sia al livello dell’inventio e sia al livello dell’elocutio. Il presente studio prende in esame alcuni casi in cui la lirica petrarchista, tra Italia e Spagna, esprime la dialettica tra il desiderio per la donna reale, ritrosa e irraggiungibile, e il suo fantasma onirico, al contrario compiacente e consolatorio. Ci si sofferma, in particolare, sul rapporto tra eros e memoria del corpo dell’amata, sul concetto del sogno quale inganno, una novità del Rinascimento, e su un caso particolare di imitatio tra Tasso e Góngora, relativo alle dinamiche con cui il sogno si fa artefice della costruzione di un’immagine ‘sostitutiva’ dell’amata. Mediante l’analisi comparata di alcuni componimenti, lo studio mette in risalto le costanti e le varianti con cui il tema del fantasma onirico dell’amata viene declinato in ambito petrarchista, considerando non solo gli scarti che il petrarchismo italiano e spagnolo operano rispetto ai RVF di Petrarca ma anche le modalità con cui il petrarchismo spagnolo rilegge e arricchisce il tema dei ‘maestros italianos’.

  4. To have and to hold: possessing the sacred in the late renaissance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin E. Benay

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Private devotional art of the early 17th century often found its place in the galleries of noblemen and women whose diverse collections were symbols not only of stylistic taste, but of their owners’ exhaustive curiosity. In these domestic settings, boundaries between sacred and secular were permeable, as the unprecedented physical intimacy portrayed in popular religious subjects such as St Matthew and the Angel, the Stigmatisation of St Francis, or Christ’s Agony in the Garden reveal. Representations of the latter reminded viewers of Christ’s human, corporal suffering and suggested a model of resolve strengthened by prayer. The Agony in the Garden appears on the interior of Jacopo Ligozzi’s virtuosic Portable Altar with Carrying Case (1608, likely a Medici gift presented to the Austrian court in anticipation of the marriage of archduchess Maria Maddalena to soon-to-be grand duke Cosimo II. Adorned with lavish botanical motifs on its exterior, the Altar’s potency as a sacred possession was redoubled by the owner’s tactile revelation of the portrayal of Christ supported by an Angel contained inside the case. Comprised of wood, oil on copper, and pietre dure inlay, it is an object intended to be held, opened, and experienced. This paper suggests that Ligozzi’s selective combination of sumptuous materials and choice of subject matter – botanical illustration and Christological iconography – allowed the object to appeal to the full sensorium, and therefore to function as efficaciously as a devotional aid as it did as a curiosity among other rare collectibles.

  5. Metal Stable Isotope Tagging: Renaissance of Radioimmunoassay for Multiplex and Absolute Quantification of Biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rui; Zhang, Shixi; Wei, Chao; Xing, Zhi; Zhang, Sichun; Zhang, Xinrong

    2016-05-17

    The unambiguous quantification of biomolecules is of great significance in fundamental biological research as well as practical clinical diagnosis. Due to the lack of a detectable moiety, the direct and highly sensitive quantification of biomolecules is often a "mission impossible". Consequently, tagging strategies to introduce detectable moieties for labeling target biomolecules were invented, which had a long and significant impact on studies of biomolecules in the past decades. For instance, immunoassays have been developed with radioisotope tagging by Yalow and Berson in the late 1950s. The later languishment of this technology can be almost exclusively ascribed to the use of radioactive isotopes, which led to the development of nonradioactive tagging strategy-based assays such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, fluorescent immunoassay, and chemiluminescent and electrochemiluminescent immunoassay. Despite great success, these strategies suffered from drawbacks such as limited spectral window capacity for multiplex detection and inability to provide absolute quantification of biomolecules. After recalling the sequences of tagging strategies, an apparent question is why not use stable isotopes from the start? A reasonable explanation is the lack of reliable means for accurate and precise quantification of stable isotopes at that time. The situation has changed greatly at present, since several atomic mass spectrometric measures for metal stable isotopes have been developed. Among the newly developed techniques, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry is an ideal technique to determine metal stable isotope-tagged biomolecules, for its high sensitivity, wide dynamic linear range, and more importantly multiplex and absolute quantification ability. Since the first published report by our group, metal stable isotope tagging has become a revolutionary technique and gained great success in biomolecule quantification. An exciting research highlight in this area is the development and application of the mass cytometer, which fully exploited the multiplexing potential of metal stable isotope tagging. It realized the simultaneous detection of dozens of parameters in single cells, accurate immunophenotyping in cell populations, through modeling of intracellular signaling network and undoubted discrimination of function and connection of cell subsets. Metal stable isotope tagging has great potential applications in hematopoiesis, immunology, stem cells, cancer, and drug screening related research and opened a post-fluorescence era of cytometry. Herein, we review the development of biomolecule quantification using metal stable isotope tagging. Particularly, the power of multiplex and absolute quantification is demonstrated. We address the advantages, applicable situations, and limitations of metal stable isotope tagging strategies and propose suggestions for future developments. The transfer of enzymatic or fluorescent tagging to metal stable isotope tagging may occur in many aspects of biological and clinical practices in the near future, just as the revolution from radioactive isotope tagging to fluorescent tagging happened in the past.

  6. "Route of astronomical observatories'' project: classical observatories from the Renaissance to the rise of astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfschmidt, Gudrun

    2015-08-01

    Observatories offer a good possibility for serial transnational applications. A well-known example for a thematic programme is the Struve arc, already recognized as World Heritage.I will discuss what has been achieved and show examples, like the route of astronomical observatories or the transition from classical astronomy to modern astrophysics (La Plata, Hamburg, Nice, etc.), visible in the architecture, the choice of instruments, and the arrangement of the observatory buildings in an astronomy park. This corresponds to the main categories according to which the ``outstanding universal value'' (UNESCO criteria ii, iv and vi) of the observatories have been evaluated: historic, scientific, and aesthetic. This proposal is based on the criteria of a comparability of the observatories in terms of the urbanistic complex and the architecture, the scientific orientation, equipment of instruments, authenticity and integrity of the preserved state, as well as in terms of historic scientific relations and scientific contributions.Apart from these serial transnational applications one can also choose other groups like baroque or neo-classical observatories, solar physics observatories or a group of observatories equipped with the same kind of instruments and made by the same famous firm. I will also discuss why the implementation of the Astronomy and World Heritage Initiative is difficult and why there are problems to nominate observatories for election in the national Tentative Lists

  7. A renaissance in library metadata? The importance of community collaboration in a digital world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Bull

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This article summarizes a presentation given by Sarah Bull as part of the Association of Learned and Professional Society Publishers (ALPSP seminar ‘Setting the Standard’ in November 2015. Representing the library community at the wide-ranging seminar, Sarah was tasked with making the topic of library metadata an engaging and informative one for a largely publisher audience. With help from co-author Amanda Quimby, this article is an attempt to achieve the same aim! It covers the importance of library metadata and standards in the supply chain and also reflects on the role of the community in successful standards development and maintenance. Special emphasis is given to the importance of quality in e-book metadata and the need for publisher and library collaboration to improve discovery, usage and the student experience. The article details the University of Birmingham experience of e-book metadata from a workflow perspective to highlight the complex integration issues which remain between content procurement and discovery.

  8. Herbert Falk: a vital force in the renaissance of bile acid research and bile acid therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Alan F

    2011-01-01

    Herbert Falk died on August 8, 2008, after a long illness. It was his vision that initiated the Bile Acid Meetings and brought to market chenodeoxycholic acid and ursodeoxycholic acid for the dissolution of cholesterol gallstones as well as the successful treatment of cholestatic liver disease. The 1st Bile Acid Meeting was a small workshop held at the University Hospital of Freiburg in 1970. Great interest in the topic was evident at that small meeting and led to a larger meeting in 1972, whose scope included both the basic and clinical aspects of bile acids. These meetings have continued at biennial intervals, the 2010 meeting being the 21st. The program has always included discussions of the most fundamental aspects of bile acid biosynthesis and metabolism as well as clinical applications of bile acid therapy. The meetings featured brief presentations, ample time for discussion, and imaginative social programs. They have always been flawlessly organized. Social programs usually included a hike through the beautiful countryside of the Black Forest followed by dinner in a rustic restaurant. Herbert Falk took part in these programs, personally welcoming every participant. In the warm glow of the 'Badische' hospitality, friendships developed, and scientific collaborations were often arranged. From a scientific standpoint, there has been enormous progress in understanding the chemistry and biology of bile acids. Herbert Falk established the Windaus Prize in 1978, and the prize has been given to individuals whose contributions moved the field forward. These bile acid meetings have been marvelous, rewarding experiences. We must all be grateful to Herbert Falk's vision in establishing the Falk Foundation that has so generously sponsored these meetings. We also express our gratitude to his widow, Ursula Falk, who continues this worthy tradition. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Invenzione e Fantasia: The (Re)Birth of Imagination in Renaissance Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailin, Sharon

    2005-01-01

    The notion of imagination is central to our contemporary western conception of and valuing of art. Yet the conception of imagination upon which this valuing rests is based on certain assumptions about art-making and about persons. Imagination refers to the creation of an idea or artifact from the mind of the creator. That a work of art arises from…

  10. Microbial genome mining for accelerated natural products discovery: is a renaissance in the making?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Brian O; Van Lanen, Steven G; Baltz, Richard H

    2014-02-01

    Microbial genome mining is a rapidly developing approach to discover new and novel secondary metabolites for drug discovery. Many advances have been made in the past decade to facilitate genome mining, and these are reviewed in this Special Issue of the Journal of Industrial Microbiology and Biotechnology. In this Introductory Review, we discuss the concept of genome mining and why it is important for the revitalization of natural product discovery; what microbes show the most promise for focused genome mining; how microbial genomes can be mined; how genome mining can be leveraged with other technologies; how progress on genome mining can be accelerated; and who should fund future progress in this promising field. We direct interested readers to more focused reviews on the individual topics in this Special Issue for more detailed summaries on the current state-of-the-art.

  11. Andreas Vesalius 500 years--A Renaissance that revolutionized cardiovascular knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Souza Júnior, Celso Vale de; Ferreira, Thiago Reigado

    2015-01-01

    The history of medicine and cardiology is marked by some geniuses who dared in thinking, research, teaching and transmitting scientific knowledge, and the Italian Andreas Vesalius one of these brilliant masters. His main scientific work "De Humani Corporis Fabrica" is not only a landmark study of human anatomy but also an artistic work of high aesthetic quality published in 1543. In the year 2014 we celebrated 500 years since the birth of the brilliant professor of Padua University, who with his courage and sense of observation changed the understanding of cardiovascular anatomy and founded a school to date in innovative education and research of anatomy. By identifying "the anatomical errors" present in Galen's book and speech, he challenged the dogmas of the Catholic Church, the academic world and the doctors of his time. However, the accuracy of his findings and his innovative way to disseminate them among his students and colleagues was essential so that his contributions are considered by many the landmark of modern medicine. His death is still surrounded by mysteries having different hypotheses, but a certainty, suffered sanctions of the Catholic Church for the spread of their ideas. The cardiologists, cardiovascular surgeons, interventional cardiologists, electrophysiologists and cardiovascular imaginologists must know the legacy of genius Andreas Vesalius that changed the paradigm of human anatomy.

  12. Renaissance of the ~ 1-TeV Fixed-Target Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, T.; /Florida State U.; Appel, J.A.; /Fermilab; Arms, K.E.; /Minnesota U.; Balantekin, A.B.; /Wisconsin U., Madison; Conrad, J.M.; /MIT; Cooper, P.S.; /Fermilab; Djurcic, Z.; /Columbia U.; Dunwoodie, W.; /SLAC; Engelfried, J.; /San Luis Potosi U.; Fisher, P.H.; /MIT; Gottschalk, Erik Edward; /Fermilab; de Gouvea, A.; /Northwestern U.; Heller, K.; /Minnesota U.; Ignarra, C.M.; Karagiorgi, G.; /MIT; Kwan, S.; /Fermilab; Loinaz, W.A.; /Amherst Coll.; Meadows, B.; /Cincinnati U.; Moore, R.; Morfin, J.G.; /Fermilab; Naples, D.; /Pittsburgh U. /St. Mary' s Coll., Minnesota /New Mexico State U. /Michigan U. /Wayne State U. /South Carolina U. /Florida U. /Carnegie Mellon U. /Cincinnati U. /Columbia U. /Columbia U. /Northwestern U. /Yale U. /Fermilab /Argonne /Northwestern U. /APC, Paris

    2011-12-02

    This document describes the physics potential of a new fixed-target program based on a {approx}1 TeV proton source. Two proton sources are potentially available in the future: the existing Tevatron at Fermilab, which can provide 800 GeV protons for fixed-target physics, and a possible upgrade to the SPS at CERN, called SPS+, which would produce 1 TeV protons on target. In this paper we use an example Tevatron fixed-target program to illustrate the high discovery potential possible in the charm and neutrino sectors. We highlight examples which are either unique to the program or difficult to accomplish at other venues.

  13. Renaissance of the ~1 TeV Fixed-Target Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, T.; /Florida State U.; Appel, Jeffrey A.; /Fermilab; Arms, Kregg Elliott; /Minnesota U.; Balantekin, A.B.; /Wisconsin U., Madison; Conrad, Janet Marie; /MIT; Cooper, Peter S.; /Fermilab; Djurcic, Zelimir; /Columbia U.; Dunwoodie, William M.; /SLAC; Engelfried, Jurgen; /San Luis Potosi U.; Fisher, Peter H.; /MIT; Gottschalk, E.; /Fermilab /Northwestern U.

    2009-05-01

    This document describes the physics potential of a new fixed-target program based on a {approx} TeV proton source. Two proton sources are potentially available in the future: the existing Tevatron at Fermilab, which can provide 800 GeV protons for fixed-target physics, and a possible upgrade to the SPS at CERN, called SPS+, which would produce 1 TeV protons on target. In this paper we use an example Tevatron fixed-target program to illustrate the high discovery potential possible in the charm and neutrino sectors. We highlight examples which are either unique to the program or difficult to accomplish at other venues.

  14. The Formation of a Renaissance Nobleman: William Cecil, 2nd Earl of Salisbury 1591-1668.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danushevskaya, Anna V.

    2002-01-01

    Focuses on the humanist ideal of nobility and humanist views about the type of education that would produce noblemen. Details the life and education of William Cecil, also known as Viscount Cranborne, as it pertains to humanist education culture established in the 16th and 17th centuries. (KDR)

  15. ‘Travelling Artists in Medieval and Renaissance Europe: An Introduction’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Cardarelli

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This collection of articles draws from papers presented at the session on Travelling Artists at the annual conference of the Association of Art Historians in 2012. They question the reasons that caused artists to expand their activity beyond their city, and the consequences that ensued, the change of patrons, country and political or religious focus to re-evaluate the role of the artist in this process and that of the creation of the work of art. In this context these contributions work towards identifying notions of value in artistic practice and production across Italy and Northern Europe between the 15th and the 16th centuries. It features contributions from Katja Fält, Sandra Cardarelli, Michelle Moseley-Christian and Cinzia Sicca.

  16. Seismic behavior of an Italian Renaissance Sanctuary: Damage assessment by numerical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clementi, Francesco; Nespeca, Andrea; Lenci, Stefano

    2016-12-01

    The paper deals with modelling and analysis of architectural heritage through the discussion of an illustrative case study: the Medieval Sanctuary of Sant'Agostino (Offida, Italy). Using the finite element technique, a 3D numerical model of the sanctuary is built, and then used to identify the main sources of the damages. The work shows that advanced numerical analyses could offer significant information for the understanding of the causes of existing damage and, more generally, on the seismic vulnerability.

  17. More Vision than Renaissance: Arabic as a Language of Science in the UAE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, William Robert Amilan

    2017-01-01

    Since its unification in 1971, the United Arab Emirates has experienced tremendous growth. Wealth generated by the oil industry has helped the country rapidly develop all levels of the educational system along with the economy (Davidson in "After the Sheikhs: the coming collapse of the Gulf monarchies," Hurst, London, 2013). English has…

  18. Renaissance Possibilities Of The Village By Practicing Rural Tourism And Farm Tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan Petroman

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Rural and farm tourism has as coordinates three essential elements, rural area, people, and products offered for sale to the visitors and refers to all the activities caused by spending a determined period of time in rural area, the means for housing being both the pension as well as the farm or peasant household and other accommodation spaces, inns, stops. The village cans reborn being an important place for townspeople, because it means human dimension, social intimacy, and local animation. Villages with tourist vocation are preserving of traditions and a rich historical content, besides administrative, cultural and economic, functions through tourism can regenerate developing through the implementation of measures which to improve infrastructure, attracting young people in villages by creating new jobs in tourism activity, promoting traditional village. In developing strategies for the regeneration of villages do not have to start from the premise that the village should be a closed community, but a supplier of raw materials and human resources, producer of goods and services for urban communities.

  19. [From the racemate to the eutomer: (S)-ketamine. Renaissance of a substance?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, H A; Werner, C

    1997-12-01

    The pharmacological profile of ketamine: Until recently, clinically available ketamine was a racemic mixture containing equal amounts of two enantiomers, (S)- and (R)-ketamine. The pharmacological profile of racemic ketamine is characterized by the so called dissociative anesthetic state and profound sympathomimetic properties. Among the different sites of action, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-receptor antagonism is considered to be the most important neuropharmacological mechanism of ketamine. Effects on opiate receptors, monoaminergic and cholinergic transmitters, and local anesthetic effects are obvious as well. Following intravenous administration, a rapid onset of action is seen within 1 min, lasting for about 10 min. The anaesthetic state is terminated due to redistribution, followed by hepatic and renal elimination with a half-life period of 2-3 h. For alternative administration, the intramuscular and oral route is also appropriate. The most important adverse effects are hallucinations and excessive increases in blood pressure and heart rate. These reactions can be attenuated or avoided by combining of ketamine with sedative or hypnotic drugs like midazolam and/or propofol. During controlled ventilation, increases in intracranial pressure are unlikely to occur. The special pharmacological profile of (S)-ketamine: In general, the pharmacological properties of (S)-ketamine are comparable to the racemic compound. On the different sites of action, qualitatively comparable effects were found, but significant quantitative differences also became obvious. When compared with (R)-ketamine and the racmic mixture, the analgesic and anesthetic potency of (S)-ketamine is threefold or twofold higher. Thus, a 50% reduction of dosage is possible to achieve comparable clinical results. Because of the faster elimination of (S)-ketamine, better control of anesthesia will be provided. In summary, the pharmacokinetic improvements of (S)-ketamine are characterized by a reduced drug load, along with more rapid recovery. The clinical use of (S)-ketamine: The clinical use of (S)-ketamine depends on its analgesic and sympathomimetic properties, whereas the anaesthetic potency remains in the background. In clinical anesthesiology, (S)-ketamine, especially in combination with midazolam and/or propofol, can be used for short procedures with preserved spontaneous ventilation, for induction of anesthesia in patients with shock or asthmatic disorders, and for induction and maintenance of anesthesia in caesarean sections. Additional indications are repeated anesthesia, for example, in burn patients, analgesia during delivery and diagnostic procedures and intramuscular administration in uncooperative patients. The value of (S)-ketamine as an analgesic component for total intravenous anesthesia has not been defined yet. In comparison with opioides, the advantages are related to improved hemodynamic stability and reduced postoperative respiratory depression. When (S)-ketamine, especially in combination with midazolam, is used for analgosedation in intensive care medicine, a reduction of exogenous catecholamine demand can be expected. Moreover, the effects on intestinal motility are superior to opioids. In combination with midazolam and propofol, excellent control of analgosedation was found, making both combinations suitable for situations in which repeated neurological assessment of patients is necessary. In emergency and disaster medicine, (S)-ketamine is of outstanding importance because of its minimal logistic requirements, the chance for intramuscular administration and the broad range of use for analgesia, anaesthesia and analgosedation as well. Further perspectives of (S)-ketamine may be the treatment of chronic pain and the assumed neuroprotective action of the substance.

  20. The Reaffirmation of Education — The Alpha and Omega of the Pedagogical Renaissance

    OpenAIRE

    Vukasović, Ante

    2013-01-01

    This rather brief discussion has arisen that it may serve as a contribution to the public debate on the indoctrinated and forcefully introduced (by the Social Democratic Party government) programme of so–called “sexual education” into primary and secondary schools. The article argues and proves that this “sexual education” is not education at all, but rather anti–education; that it is not scientifically–based, but rather is the ideological fallout of secular–atheist and feminist–homosexual id...