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Sample records for wells fairfax foster

  1. Investigation and evaluation of geopressured-geothermal wells. Fairfax Foster Sutter No. 2 well, St. Mary Parish, Louisiana. Volume I. Completion and testing. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willits, M.H.; McCoy, R.L.; Dobson, R.J.; Hartsock, J.H.

    1979-12-01

    The Fairfax Foster Sutter No. 2 well, located in the East Franklin area of St. Mary Parish, Louisiana, is the first successful test of a geopressured-geothermal aquifer under the Well-of-Opportunity program. The section tested was the MA-6 sand of lower Miocene age which has produced large quantities of gas from the adjacent but structurally separated Garden City field. In the subject well the observed temperature was 270{sup 0}F (132{sup 0}C) and the measured gradient was 0.77 psi/ft. The gross sand thickness was 270 feet, the net sand thickness 190 feet, and the tested interval 58 net feet. The temperatures and pressures encountered approached the limits of the surface-recording bottomhole pressure gauge and particularly the single-conductor cables on which the gauges were run. The objectives of the tests were all accomplished, and data were obtained which will contribute to the overall assessment of the geopressured-geothermal resource of the Upper Gulf of Mexico basin. In general, the gas solubility (22.8 scf/bbl) was as expected for the temperature, pressure, and salinity of the brine. The produced water was more saline than expected (160,000 mg/l). The high concentrations of dissolved solids, coupled with the evolution of CO{sub 2} from these waters during production, created a scaling problem in the tubular goods and surface equipment that will have to be addressed in future tests.

  2. The euonymus leaf-notcher, Pryeria sinica Moore (Lepidoptera: Zygaenidae) - alive and well in Fairfax County, Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryeria sinica Moore, a species native to the eastern Palearctic, was first detected in North America in 2001, where the conspicuous, gregariously-feeding larvae were noticed on ornamental Euonymous (Celastraceae) in a residential area of Fairfax County, Virginia. Although the species was moderatel...

  3. Support and Conflict in the Foster Family and Children's Well-Being: A Comparison between Foster and Birth Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denuwelaere, Mieke; Bracke, Piet

    2007-01-01

    Data on 96 foster families with a foster child and a birth child between the ages of 10 and 21 years were used to analyze the association between support and conflict processes within the foster family and youths' reports on four indexes of well-being: self-esteem, self-efficacy, emotional problems, and behavioral problems. The self-esteem of…

  4. The Economic Well-Being of Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Youth Transitioning Out of Foster Care.

    OpenAIRE

    Amy Dworsky

    2013-01-01

    The brief describes the characteristics and economic well-being of young people aging out of foster care who identify themselves as lesbian, gay, or bisexual (LGB). It also compares their economic self-sufficiency with that of their heterosexual peers also aging out of care. The analysis uses data from the Midwest Study of Adult Functioning of Former Foster Youth, a longitudinal study that followed a sample of young people from Illinois, Iowa, and Wisconsin as they transitioned out of foster ...

  5. The Economic WellBeing of Lesbian Gay and Bisexual Youth Transitioning Out of Foster Care

    OpenAIRE

    Amy Dworsky

    2013-01-01

    The brief describes the characteristics and economic well-being of young people aging out of foster care who identify themselves as lesbian, gay, or bisexual (LGB). It also compares their economic self-sufficiency with that of their heterosexual peers also aging out of care. The analysis uses data from the Midwest Study of Adult Functioning of Former Foster Youth, a longitudinal study that followed a sample of young people from Illinois, Iowa, and Wisconsin as they transitioned out of foster ...

  6. Flood-plain delineation for Cub Run basin, Fairfax County, Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soule, Pat LeRoy

    1978-01-01

    Flood-plain delineation for Cub Run basin water-surface profiles of the 25-, 50-, and 100-year recurrence interval discharges have been computed for all streams and reaches of channels in Fairfax County, Virginia having a drainage area greater than 1 square mile except for Dogue Creek, Little Hunting Creek, and that part of the Cameron Run above Lake Barcroft. Maps having a 2-foot contour interval and a horizontal scale of 1 inch equals 100 feet have been used for base on which flood boundaries were delineated for 25-, 50-, and 100-year floods to be expected in each basin under ultimate development conditions. This report is one of a series and presents a discussion of techniques employed in computing discharges and profiles as well as the flood profiles and maps on which flood boundaries have been delineated for the Cub Run basin in Fairfax County. 

  7. Cheating fosters species co-existence in well-mixed bacterial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinweber, Anne; Fredrik Inglis, R; Kümmerli, Rolf

    2017-05-01

    Explaining the enormous biodiversity observed in bacterial communities is challenging because ecological theory predicts that competition between species occupying the same niche should lead to the exclusion of less competitive community members. Competitive exclusion should be particularly strong when species compete for a single limiting resource or live in unstructured habitats that offer no refuge for weaker competitors. Here, we describe the 'cheating effect', a form of intra-specific competition that can counterbalance between-species competition, thereby fostering biodiversity in unstructured habitats. Using experimental communities consisting of the strong competitor Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) and its weaker counterpart Burkholderia cenocepacia (BC), we show that co-existence is impossible when the two species compete for a single limiting resource, iron. However, when introducing a PA cheating mutant, which specifically exploits the iron-scavenging siderophores produced by the PA wild type, we found that biodiversity was preserved under well-mixed conditions where PA cheats could outcompete the PA wild type. Cheating fosters biodiversity in our system because it creates strong intra-specific competition, which equalizes fitness differences between PA and BC. Our study identifies cheating - typically considered a destructive element - as a constructive force in shaping biodiversity.

  8. Enhancing the Safety, Permanency, and Well-Being of Infants and Toddlers in Foster Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, Brenda Jones

    2018-01-01

    Maltreated infants and toddlers are more likely to be placed into foster care than any other age group of children. They also remain in foster care longer and are less likely to be reunified with their birth families. Thus, it is important that child welfare and other practitioners use the best strategies available to ensure children's expeditious…

  9. Fostering Resilience: Protective Agents, Resources, and Mechanisms for Adolescent Refugees’ Psychosocial Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weine, Stevan Merrill; Ware, Norma; Hakizimana, Leonce; Tugenberg, Toni; Currie, Madeleine; Dahnweih, Gonwo; Wagner, Maureen; Polutnik, Chloe; Wulu, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    Background Adolescent refugees face many challenges but also have the potential to become resilient. The purpose of this study was to identify and characterize the protective agents, resources, and mechanisms that promote their psychosocial well-being. Methods Participants included a purposively sampled group of 73 Burundian and Liberian refugee adolescents and their families who had recently resettled in Boston and Chicago. The adolescents, families, and their service providers participated in a two-year longitudinal study using ethnographic methods and grounded theory analysis with Atlas/ti software. A grounded theory model was developed which describes those persons or entities who act to protect adolescents (Protective Agents), their capacities for doing so (Protective Resources), and how they do it (Protective Mechanisms). Protective agents are the individuals, groups, organizations, and systems that can contribute either directly or indirectly to promoting adolescent refugees’ psychosocial well-being. Protective resources are the family and community capacities that can promote psychosocial well-being in adolescent refugees. Protective mechanisms are the processes fostering adolescent refugees’ competencies and behaviors that can promote their psychosocial well-being. Results Eight family and community capacities were identified that appeared to promote psychosocial well-being in the adolescent refugees. These included 1) finances for necessities; 2) English proficiency; 3) social support networks; 4) engaged parenting; 5) family cohesion; 6) cultural adherence and guidance; 7) educational support; and 8) faith and religious involvement. Nine protective mechanisms identified were identified and grouped into three categories: 1) Relational (supporting, connecting, belonging); 2) Informational (informing, preparing), and; 3) Developmental (defending, promoting, adapting). Conclusions To further promote the psychosocial well-being of adolescent refugees

  10. Adverse childhood experiences and psychosocial well-being of women who were in foster care as children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruskas, Delilah; Tessin, Dale H

    2013-01-01

    Research has shown that many children in foster care later have psychosocial problems as adults; this is often attributed to cumulative adversities and a lack of supportive caregivers. The risk factors associated with foster care, such as maternal separation and multiple placements, often counteract many protective factors that can ameliorate the effects of childhood adversities. This study assessed the relationship between adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and psychosocial well-being in women who were in foster care as children. A total of 101 women aged 18-71 years (mean, 36.83 [12.95] years) completed an anonymous online survey based on the 10-item ACE Questionnaire, the Sense of Coherence questionnaire, and the General Health Questionnaire. More than 56% of respondents were identified as experiencing current psychological distress. Sense of coherence scores (mean, 54.26 [15.35]) showed a significant inverse association with both General Health Questionnaire (mean, 14.83 [5.88]) and ACE (mean, 5.68 [2.90]) scores (r = -0.64 and -0.31, respectively) and 97% reported at least 1 ACE, 70% reported ≥ 5 and 33% reported ≥ 8. Linear regressions indicated that ACEs reported to occur before foster care were associated with lower levels of sense of coherence (8%) and higher levels of psychological distress (6%). Physical neglect and living in a dysfunctional household (parental loss, maternal abuse, or household member associated with substance abuse or prison) significantly decreased during foster care by 16 and 19 percentage points, respectively. Rates of emotional and physical abuse did not change. The number of ACEs was associated with the level of psychological distress. Our findings suggest that children entering the foster care system are already vulnerable and at risk of experiencing ACEs during foster care and psychological distress during adulthood. Measures implemented to protect children must not cause more harm than good. Social services that preserve

  11. Risk and Protective Factors Contributing to the Longitudinal Psychosocial Well-Being of Adopted Foster Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmel, Cassandra

    2007-01-01

    This study is based on a statewide longitudinal sample of adopted foster youth and explores the relationship between early pre-adoption risk factors and subsequent elevated levels of psychopathology symptomatology. One central goal of the study was to evaluate the impact of preadoption stressors (prenatal drug/nicotine exposure, early…

  12. Recidivism rates as a measure of the effectiveness of the rehabilitation and treatment countermeasure of the Fairfax, Virginia, ASAP, 1972.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    The rehabilitation countermeasure of the Fairfax, Virginia, ASAP is concerned primarily with four modes of treatment: (1) the Fairfax Driver Improvement Schools, (2) the Community Alcohol Center Clinic of the Division of Alcohol Services, (3) the Fai...

  13. Fostering critical thinking skills: a strategy for enhancing evidence based wellness care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamison Jennifer R

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chiropractic has traditionally regarded itself a wellness profession. As wellness care is postulated to play a central role in the future growth of chiropractic, the development of a wellness ethos acceptable within conventional health care is desirable. This paper describes a unit which prepares chiropractic students for the role of "wellness coaches". Emphasis is placed on providing students with exercises in critical thinking in an effort to prepare them for the challenge of interfacing with an increasingly evidence based health care system. Methods This case study describes how health may be promoted and disease prevented through development of personalized wellness programs. As critical thinking is essential to the provision of evidence based wellness care, diverse learning opportunities for developing and refining critical thinking skills have been created. Three of the learning opportunities are an intrinsic component of the subject and, taken together, contributed over 50% of the final grade of the unit. They include a literature review, developing a client wellness contract and peer evaluation. In addition to these 3 compulsory exercises, students were also given an opportunity to develop their critical appraisal skills by undertaking voluntary self- and unit evaluation. Several opportunities for informal self-appraisal were offered in a structured self-study guide, while unit appraisal was undertaken by means of a questionnaire and group discussion at which the Head of School was present. Results Formal assessment showed all students capable of preparing a wellness program consistent with current thinking in contemporary health care. The small group of students who appraised the unit seemed to value the diversity of learning experiences provided. Opportunities for voluntary unit and self-appraisal were used to varying degrees. Unit evaluation provided useful feedback that led to substantial changes in unit structure

  14. Fostering critical thinking skills: a strategy for enhancing evidence based wellness care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamison, Jennifer R

    2005-01-01

    Chiropractic has traditionally regarded itself a wellness profession. As wellness care is postulated to play a central role in the future growth of chiropractic, the development of a wellness ethos acceptable within conventional health care is desirable. This paper describes a unit which prepares chiropractic students for the role of "wellness coaches". Emphasis is placed on providing students with exercises in critical thinking in an effort to prepare them for the challenge of interfacing with an increasingly evidence based health care system. Methods This case study describes how health may be promoted and disease prevented through development of personalized wellness programs. As critical thinking is essential to the provision of evidence based wellness care, diverse learning opportunities for developing and refining critical thinking skills have been created. Three of the learning opportunities are an intrinsic component of the subject and, taken together, contributed over 50% of the final grade of the unit. They include a literature review, developing a client wellness contract and peer evaluation. In addition to these 3 compulsory exercises, students were also given an opportunity to develop their critical appraisal skills by undertaking voluntary self- and unit evaluation. Several opportunities for informal self-appraisal were offered in a structured self-study guide, while unit appraisal was undertaken by means of a questionnaire and group discussion at which the Head of School was present. Results Formal assessment showed all students capable of preparing a wellness program consistent with current thinking in contemporary health care. The small group of students who appraised the unit seemed to value the diversity of learning experiences provided. Opportunities for voluntary unit and self-appraisal were used to varying degrees. Unit evaluation provided useful feedback that led to substantial changes in unit structure. Conclusion Students have demonstrated

  15. Technology-Based Innovations to Foster Personalized Healthy Lifestyles and Well-Being: A Targeted Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanakis, Emmanouil G; Santana, Silvina; Tsiknakis, Manolis; Marias, Kostas; Sakkalis, Vangelis; Teixeira, António; Janssen, Joris H; de Jong, Henri; Tziraki, Chariklia

    2016-06-24

    New community-based arrangements and novel technologies can empower individuals to be active participants in their health maintenance, enabling people to control and self-regulate their health and wellness and make better health- and lifestyle-related decisions. Mobile sensing technology and health systems responsive to individual profiles combined with cloud computing can expand innovation for new types of interoperable services that are consumer-oriented and community-based. This could fuel a paradigm shift in the way health care can be, or should be, provided and received, while lessening the burden on exhausted health and social care systems. Our goal is to identify and discuss the main scientific and engineering challenges that need to be successfully addressed in delivering state-of-the-art, ubiquitous eHealth and mHealth services, including citizen-centered wellness management services, and reposition their role and potential within a broader context of diverse sociotechnical drivers, agents, and stakeholders. We review the state-of-the-art relevant to the development and implementation of eHealth and mHealth services in critical domains. We identify and discuss scientific, engineering, and implementation-related challenges that need to be overcome to move research, development, and the market forward. Several important advances have been identified in the fields of systems for personalized health monitoring, such as smartphone platforms and intelligent ubiquitous services. Sensors embedded in smartphones and clothes are making the unobtrusive recognition of physical activity, behavior, and lifestyle possible, and thus the deployment of platforms for health assistance and citizen empowerment. Similarly, significant advances are observed in the domain of infrastructure supporting services. Still, many technical problems remain to be solved, combined with no less challenging issues related to security, privacy, trust, and organizational dynamics. Delivering

  16. Technology-Based Innovations to Foster Personalized Healthy Lifestyles and Well-Being: A Targeted Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Silvina; Tsiknakis, Manolis; Marias, Kostas; Sakkalis, Vangelis; Teixeira, António; Janssen, Joris H; de Jong, Henri; Tziraki, Chariklia

    2016-01-01

    Background New community-based arrangements and novel technologies can empower individuals to be active participants in their health maintenance, enabling people to control and self-regulate their health and wellness and make better health- and lifestyle-related decisions. Mobile sensing technology and health systems responsive to individual profiles combined with cloud computing can expand innovation for new types of interoperable services that are consumer-oriented and community-based. This could fuel a paradigm shift in the way health care can be, or should be, provided and received, while lessening the burden on exhausted health and social care systems. Objective Our goal is to identify and discuss the main scientific and engineering challenges that need to be successfully addressed in delivering state-of-the-art, ubiquitous eHealth and mHealth services, including citizen-centered wellness management services, and reposition their role and potential within a broader context of diverse sociotechnical drivers, agents, and stakeholders. Methods We review the state-of-the-art relevant to the development and implementation of eHealth and mHealth services in critical domains. We identify and discuss scientific, engineering, and implementation-related challenges that need to be overcome to move research, development, and the market forward. Results Several important advances have been identified in the fields of systems for personalized health monitoring, such as smartphone platforms and intelligent ubiquitous services. Sensors embedded in smartphones and clothes are making the unobtrusive recognition of physical activity, behavior, and lifestyle possible, and thus the deployment of platforms for health assistance and citizen empowerment. Similarly, significant advances are observed in the domain of infrastructure supporting services. Still, many technical problems remain to be solved, combined with no less challenging issues related to security, privacy, trust, and

  17. Time well spent: the duration of foster care and early adult labor market, educational, and health outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallesen, Peter

    2013-12-01

    Individuals who spent time in foster care as children fare on average worse than non-placed peers in early adult life. Recent research on the effect of foster care placement on early adult life outcomes provides mixed evidence. Some studies suggest negative effects of foster care placement on early adult outcomes, others find null effects. This study shows that differences in the average duration of foster care stays explain parts of these discordant findings and then test how foster care duration shapes later life outcomes using administrative data on 7220 children. The children experienced different average durations of foster care because of differences in exposure to a reform. Later born cohorts spent on average 3 months longer in foster care than earlier born cohorts. Isolating exogenous variation in duration of foster care, the study finds positive effects of increased duration of foster care on income and labor market participation. Copyright © 2013 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Foster Care and Child Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDavid, Lolita M

    2015-10-01

    Children in foster care need more from health providers than routine well-child care. The changes in legislation that were designed to prevent children from languishing in foster care also necessitate a plan that works with the child, the biological family, and the foster family in ensuring the best outcome for the child. This approach acknowledges that most foster children will return to the biological family. Recent research on the effect of adverse childhood experiences across all socioeconomic categories points to the need for specifically designed, focused, and coordinated health and mental health services for children in foster care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A Celebration of Foster Care: a special edition of the Irish Journal of Applied Social Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Hogan, Fergus

    2002-01-01

    This special edition of IJASS A Celebration of Foster Care brings together a collection of essays on from fostering social workers, foster care researchers, foster care legal experts as well as foster carers, children who grew up in foster care and children who care. An international focus on foster care with essays focus on foster care in Ireland, Scotland, Uganda, Australia and Canada.

  20. Prioritizing Possibilities for Child and Family Health: An Agenda to Address Adverse Childhood Experiences and Foster the Social and Emotional Roots of Well-being in Pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethell, Christina D; Solloway, Michele R; Guinosso, Stephanie; Hassink, Sandra; Srivastav, Aditi; Ford, David; Simpson, Lisa A

    A convergence of theoretical and empirical evidence across many scientific disciplines reveals unprecedented possibilities to advance much needed improvements in child and family well-being by addressing adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), promoting resilience, and fostering nurturance and the social and emotional roots of healthy child development and lifelong health. In this article we synthesize recommendations from a structured, multiyear field-building and research, policy, and practice agenda setting process to address these issues in children's health services. Between Spring of 2013 and Winter of 2017, the field-building and agenda-setting process directly engaged more than 500 individuals and comprised 79 distinct agenda-setting and field-building activities and processes, including: 4 in-person meetings; 4 online crowdsourcing rounds across 10 stakeholder groups; literature and environmental scans, publications documenting ACEs, resilience, and protective factors among US children, and commissioning of this special issue of Academic Pediatrics; 8 in-person listening forums and 31 educational sessions with stakeholders; and a range of action research efforts with emerging community efforts. Modified Delphi processes and grounded theory methods were used and iterative and structured synthesis of input was conducted to discern themes, priorities, and recommendations. Participants discerned that sufficient scientific findings support the formation of an applied child health services research and policy agenda. Four overarching priorities for the agenda emerged: 1) translate the science of ACEs, resilience, and nurturing relationships into children's health services; 2) cultivate the conditions for cross-sector collaboration to incentivize action and address structural inequalities; 3) restore and reward for promoting safe and nurturing relationships and full engagement of individuals, families, and communities to heal trauma, promote resilience, and prevent

  1. Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal program summary report compilation. Volume 2-A: Resource description, program history, wells tested, university and company based research, site restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John, C.J.; Maciasz, G.; Harder, B.J.

    1998-06-01

    The US Department of Energy established a geopressured-geothermal energy program in the mid 1970`s as one response to America`s need to develop alternate energy resources in view of the increasing dependence on imported fossil fuel energy. This program continued for 17 years and approximately two hundred million dollars were expended for various types of research and well testing to thoroughly investigate this alternative energy source. This volume describes the following studies: Geopressured-geothermal resource description; Resource origin and sediment type; Gulf Coast resource extent; Resource estimates; Project history; Authorizing legislation; Program objectives; Perceived constraints; Program activities and structure; Well testing; Program management; Program cost summary; Funding history; Resource characterization; Wells of opportunity; Edna Delcambre No. 1 well; Edna Delcambre well recompletion; Fairfax Foster Sutter No. 2 well; Beulah Simon No. 2 well; P.E. Girouard No. 1 well; Prairie Canal No. 1 well; Crown Zellerbach No. 2 well; Alice C. Plantation No. 2 well; Tenneco Fee N No. 1 well; Pauline Kraft No. 1 well; Saldana well No. 2; G.M. Koelemay well No. 1; Willis Hulin No. 1 well; Investigations of other wells of opportunity; Clovis A. Kennedy No. 1 well; Watkins-Miller No. 1 well; Lucien J. Richard et al No. 1 well; and the C and K-Frank A. Godchaux, III, well No. 1.

  2. Helping foster parents understand the foster child's perspective: a relational learning framework for foster care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Wendy; Salmon, Karen

    2014-10-01

    The behaviour of children in foster care is influenced by a variety of factors including previous experiences of maltreatment and adverse parenting, as well as the impact of separation from birth parents and placement in care. These factors make it difficult for foster parents to accurately interpret the child's behavioural cues, a necessary precursor to sensitive parenting. The relational learning framework introduced in this article, drawing on attachment theory, facilitates the foster parents' access to some features of the child's mental representations, or internal working model, which may be pivotal in understanding the child's behaviour and therefore successfully managing it. Recent studies suggest that parents' ability to understand the child's psychological perspective, or mental state, is related to the child's cognitive and social development. This article presents a method to enhance the foster parents' understanding of the child's psychological perspective. The model is currently being evaluated for use with foster parents, mental health and social work practitioners. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Adoption & Foster Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Family Life > Family Dynamics > Adoption & Foster Care Adoption & Foster Care Article Body ​Each year, many children join families through adoption and foster care. These families may face unique challenges. The acceptance ...

  4. Streamflow, water quality, and aquatic macroinvertebrates of selected streams in Fairfax County, Virginia, 2007-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastram, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Efforts to mitigate the effects of urbanization on streams rely on best management practices (BMPs) that are implemented with the intent of reducing and retaining stormwater runoff. A cooperative monitoring effort between the U.S. Geological Survey and Fairfax County, Virginia, was initiated in 2007 to assess the condition of county streams and document watershed-scale responses to the implementation of BMPs. Assessment of the data collected during the first 5 years of this monitoring program focused on characterizing the hydrologic and ecological condition of 14 monitored streams. Hydrologic, chemical, and macroinvertebrate community conditions in the streams monitored were found to be consistent, overall, with conditions commonly observed in urban streams. Hydrologically, the monitored streams were found to be flashy, with flashiness positively related to road cover in the watershed. Typical pH values of streams throughout the network centered around neutrality (pH = 7) with strong daily fluctuations apparent in the continuous data. Patterns in specific conductance were largely representative of anthropogenic disturbances—watersheds having the greatest percentage of open space and estate residential land-use had the lowest typical specific conductance values, and specific conductance variability was less than what is observed in watersheds that are more intensively developed. In watersheds having greater road coverage, and more development in general, increases in specific conductance over several orders of magnitude were observed during winter months as a result of the application of de-icing salts on impervious surfaces. Dissolved oxygen conditions were typically within the range required to support healthy biological communities, although occasional departures during summer months at some sites fell below the impairment threshold for streams in Virginia. Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P), concentration patterns were largely consistent across the network, with

  5. 75 FR 23557 - National Foster Care Month, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-04

    ...;#0; #0; #0;Title 3-- #0;The President ] Proclamation 8505 of April 28, 2010 National Foster Care... children and youth are in foster care in America, all entering the system through no fault of their own. During National Foster Care Month, we recognize the promise of children and youth in foster care, as well...

  6. Preventing re-entry to foster care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnochan, Sarah; Rizik-Baer, Daniel; Austin, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Re-entry to foster care generally refers to circumstances in which children who have been discharged from foster care to be reunified with their family of origin, adopted, or provided kinship guardianship are returned to foster care. In the context of the federal performance measurement system, re-entry refers specifically to a return to foster care following an unsuccessful reunification. The federal Children and Family Services Review measures re-entry to foster care with a single indicator, called the permanency of reunification indicator, one of four indicators comprising the reunification composite measure. This review focuses on research related to the re-entry indicator, including the characteristics of children, caregivers and families, as well as case and child welfare services that are associated with a higher or lower risk of re-entry to foster care. Promising post-reunification services designed to prevent re-entry to foster care are described.

  7. Impact of the parenting style of foster parents on the behaviour problems of foster children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, M J; Salas, M D; Bernedo, I M; García-Martín, M A

    2015-09-01

    Few studies have analysed the effects of the parenting style used by foster carers on children's behaviour problems. This study examines the role played by the quality of the emotional relationship with foster carers and the kind of discipline they use as regard internalizing and externalizing problems among foster children. Participants were 104 foster children (56 boys and 48 girls) and their respective foster families. The Child Behaviour Checklist, the Affect and Communication Scale, and the Rules and Demands Scale were completed by foster parents. A series of linear regression analyses were performed using the stepwise method. The main findings were as follows: an authoritarian parenting style explained the internalizing problems presented by foster children (11% of the variance); criticism/rejection, authoritarian parenting and permissive parenting explained externalizing problems (37% of the variance); and criticism/rejection and authoritarian parenting explained total problems (29% of the variance). These results indicate that criticism/rejection on the part of foster parents, as well as the use of inappropriate parenting styles (authoritarian and permissive), has an important effect in relation to the behaviour problems of foster children. This highlights the key role that foster carers play in terms of tackling the behaviour problems that foster children present. The findings also suggest that preparation for fostering should focus especially on ways of helping foster parents both to acquire positive parenting strategies and to avoid authoritarian and permissive parenting. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. 77 FR 5186 - Medical Foster Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-02

    ... the home continues to meet the requirements of this part, as well as oversight and medical foster home... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 17 RIN 2900-AN80 Medical Foster Homes AGENCY: Department of Veterans Affairs. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This document amends the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) ``Medical...

  9. 77 FR 26909 - National Foster Care Month, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-07

    ...;#0; ] Proclamation 8814 of May 2, 2012 National Foster Care Month, 2012 By the President of the... sense of well-being and give them hope for the future. During National Foster Care Month, we recognize the promise of America's children and youth in foster care, and we commend the devotion and...

  10. Adolescent in foster care regards to the identity of an individual

    OpenAIRE

    Svobodová, Petra

    2013-01-01

    The diploma thesis "Adolescent in Foster Care" deals with an adolescent growing up in foster care, with regard to the development of one's identity. The theoretical part includes preview on adolescent, foster care, identity and also the issues of deprivation. The research part is focused on opinion and attitudes of adolescents to issues like children's biological family, foster family and identity, as well as attitudes of foster parents to identical topics. Keywords Adolescent, foster care, d...

  11. Placement breakdown in foster care: Reducing risks by a foster parent training program?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maaskant, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis started by focusing on Dutch foster children’s well-being, emotional and behavioral functioning and placement stability. Subsequently, we attempted to identify how foster families who are considered to be at a high risk of placement breakdown could be given effective support. The

  12. University of Geneva honours LHC project leader Lyn Evans at 450th anniversary ceremony. The honorary degrees, which recognize endeavours in human rights and in fostering dialogue between nations, were also awarded to Mary Robinson, Desmond Tutu, as well as Pascal Lamy .

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2009-01-01

    University of Geneva honours LHC project leader Lyn Evans at 450th anniversary ceremony. The honorary degrees, which recognize endeavours in human rights and in fostering dialogue between nations, were also awarded to Mary Robinson, Desmond Tutu, as well as Pascal Lamy .

  13. [The Relationship Between Attachment Representations of Foster Parents and Foster Children and the Role of the Child's Sex].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowacki, Katja; Kliewer-Neumann, Josephine; Bovenschen, Ina; Lang, Katrin; Zimmermann, Janin; Spangler, Gottfried

    2015-01-01

    Children who have been placed in foster care after having experienced difficult family situations need to experience secure relationships. The development of a secure attachment model is regarded as a key protective factor for a healthy development. The present study examines predictors of attachment representations in a sample of 37 foster children aged three to eight years. Children's attachment representations were assessed using the Attachment Story Completion Task, and foster parents' attachment representations with the Adult Attachment Interview. Female foster children scored higher in secure attachment representations than males. Attachment representations of male foster children were positively influenced by a secure attachment representation of their primary foster parent and slightly by the duration of placement in the foster family as well as their age of placement but differently than expected. These results suggest that male foster children may be more vulnerable in their development of attachment representations and that foster parents' state of mind regarding attachment as well as the duration of the placement seem to have an impact on the development of attachment patterns in their foster children. This should be considered in the choice and counseling of foster parents.

  14. Development of an intervention for foster parents of young foster children with externalizing behavior: theoretical basis and program description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanschoonlandt, Femke; Vanderfaeillie, Johan; Van Holen, Frank; De Maeyer, Skrällan

    2012-12-01

    Foster parents are often faced with serious externalizing behaviors of their foster child. These behavioral problems may induce family stress and are related to less effective parenting and often increase. Foster children with behavioral problems are also more at risk of placement breakdown. An intervention to support foster parents of young foster children with externalizing behaviors is necessary to improve the effectiveness of foster placements. Based on research on effective parenting interventions and special needs of foster children, a treatment protocol was developed. This paper describes theoretical foundations for the content and form of the intervention and gives an overview of the modular treatment protocol. Preliminary outcomes of this intervention as well as challenges and future developments and research activities are discussed.

  15. Fostering Creativity in Students

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fostering Creativity in Students. A Short Synthesis Proiect for the Organic Chemistry Laboratory. Mary M Mader and Charles A Liberko. A short, two step synthesis project for students in organic chemistry provides practical experience in scale up, purification, iselation, and modification of synthetic procedures. Introduction.

  16. Multidimension Treatment Foster Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pontoppidan, Maiken; Hansen, Helle; Deding, Mette

    2014-01-01

    Dette notat er en kort opsamling af den nyeste forskning af effekterne af Multidimension Treatment Foster Care (herefter MTFC). SFI lavede i 2010 en oversigt over forskningen om effekterne af MTFC i forbindelse med udarbejdelsen af en projektbeskrivelse. Dette notat sammenfatter den nyeste...

  17. Recognizing and Fostering Resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Kimberly A.; Coscarelli, William C.

    1996-01-01

    Defines resilience as displaying competence despite adversity and discusses its place in the work environment. Highlights include sample scenarios of employees reacting to stress; ingredients of resilience; individual characteristics affecting resilience; environmental stressors and self-esteem; and fostering resilience through environment. (LRW)

  18. The Fostering Hope Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rider, Steven; Winters, Katie; Dean, Joyce; Seymour, Jim

    2014-01-01

    The Fostering Hope Initiative is a neighborhood-based Collective Impact initiative that promotes optimum child and youth development by supporting vulnerable families, encouraging connections between neighbors, strengthening systems to ensure collective impact, and advocating for family-friendly public policy. This article describes the…

  19. Kinship foster care and foster care in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strijker, J.; Zandberg, Tj.; Van der Meulen, B.F.

    2003-01-01

    This study examines the similarities and differences between foster parents and kinship foster parents in the Netherlands. Both parents and caseworkers have filled out questionnaires for the purpose of this study. No evidence has been found to support the argument that kinship foster care holds

  20. Prospect of Foster Family by Foster Children with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslamazova, Liliya Arturovna; Yurina, Alla Anatolievna; Kochenkova, Lyubov Pavlovna; Krasnova, Ludmila Vyacheslavovna

    2016-01-01

    This article deals with child-parent relationships in foster families, who bring up foster children with disabilities. The research was conducted in Republic of Adygheya (the Russian Federation). We have found out that, according to a child's view, interfamily relationships can be very ambivalent. On the one hand, foster children say that they…

  1. Lithuania 1940 / Herbert Foster Anderson

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Foster Anderson, Herbert

    2004-01-01

    Stseenid Leedu ennesõjaaegsest pealinnast Kaunasest briti ärimehe H. Foster Andersoni silme läbi 1940. aastal. Lühikokkuvõte raamatust: Foster Anderson, Herbert. Borderline Russia. London : Cresset press, 1942

  2. Intergenerational pathways leading to foster care placement of foster care alumni's children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson Foster, Lovie J; Beadnell, Blair; Pecora, Peter J

    2015-02-01

    This study examined a path model that postulated intergenerational relationships between biological parent psychosocial functioning and foster care alumni mental health, economic status, and social support; and from these to the likelihood of children of foster care alumni being placed in foster care. The sample included 742 adults who spent time in foster care as children with a private foster care agency and who reported having at least one biological child. A full pathway was found between poorer father's functioning to greater alumni depression, which was in turn associated with negative social support, and then a greater likelihood of child out of home placement. Other parent to alumni paths were that poorer father functioning was associated with alumni anxiety and PTSD, and poorer mother's mental health was associated with PTSD; however, anxiety and PTSD were not implicated as precursors of foster care placement of the child. Findings support the need for increased practice and policy support to address the mental health needs of parents of children in or at risk of foster care, as well as the children themselves, as family history may have a lasting influence on quality of life, even when children are raised apart from biological parents.

  3. Intergenerational pathways leading to foster care placement of foster care alumni’s children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beadnell, Blair; Pecora, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined a path model that postulated intergenerational relationships between biological parent psychosocial functioning and foster care alumni mental health, economic status, and social support; and from these to the likelihood of children of foster care alumni being placed in foster care. The sample included 742 adults who spent time in foster care as children with a private foster care agency and who reported having at least one biological child. A full pathway was found between poorer father’s functioning to greater alumni depression, which was in turn associated with negative social support, and then a greater likelihood of child out of home placement. Other parent to alumni paths were that poorer father functioning was associated with alumni anxiety and PTSD, and poorer mother’s mental health was associated with PTSD; however, anxiety and PTSD were not implicated as precursors of foster care placement of the child. Findings support the need for increased practice and policy support to address the mental health needs of parents of children in or at risk of foster care, as well as the children themselves, as family history may have a lasting influence on quality of life, even when children are raised apart from biological parents. PMID:25729315

  4. FLOODPLAIN, FAIRFAX COUNTY, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  5. Fairfax County Contours

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — This layer contains contours that were derived from the digital terrain model made up of irregularly spaced mass points and breaklines. The contours are 5 foot...

  6. Familialization in Welfare State Arrangements: Foster Families in the Life Course of Foster Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Götzö

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Currently enforced discourses on the significance of familial resources as a precondition for education, employability and social mobility reveal aspects of the interplay between state and families in terms of social integration. Foster families are of special interest when studying the drifts in discourses toward a familialization of life course regimes. The research on foster family care highlights the ambiguous negotiations on responsibilities, competencies, expertise and professionalisation, as well as the call to not colonise the intimate familial context. The authors analyse the interplay of the involved persons in the everyday practices, such as local authorities, legal guardians, therapists, parents of origin, foster parents and foster children. In the article, the beginning and the end of the child protection measure is discussed to see how trajectories and transitions are shaped by those involved, and how their acting can be interpreted in terms of life course regimes

  7. Mental health of foster children: do biological fathers matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanschoonlandt, Femke; Vanderfaeillie, Johan; Van Holen, Frank; De Maeyer, Skrällan; Andries, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    The high prevalence of mental health problems in foster children is well-documented (e.g., Armsden, Pecora, Payne, & Szatkiewicz, 2000; Tarren-Sweeney, 2008). From an ecological perspective, it can be expected that several factors in different systems (e.g., foster child, foster family, biological parents, and community) influence foster children's behavioral problems. Mainly, the influence of pre-care experiences, such as a history of maltreatment (Oswald, Heil, & Goldbeck, 2010), and in-care experiences, such as the number of out-of-home placements (Newton, Litrownik, & Landsverk, 2000), is investigated and confirmed. Although the body of research on predictive factors of foster children's behavioral problems is growing (McWey, Acock, & Porter, 2010), the possible influence of one important party is being neglected: biological fathers. This is remarkable given the central role of birth parents in family foster care (O'Donnell, 2001), and even more striking given the growing evidence of the influence of fathers on developmental outcomes of children (Lamb, 2010). This study reports on the involvement of birth fathers during foster care placement of their child and their association with the foster child's well-being. First, we review the literature on the influence of parents on foster children's mental health and discuss the limited research on fathers' involvement. Next, the results of our study are presented and discussed.

  8. Improving Educational Outcomes for Children in Foster Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Christina; Kabler, Brenda

    2012-01-01

    Recent statistics estimate that there are 783,000 children living in foster care in the United States. This vulnerable population is at risk for academic failure as well as internalizing and externalizing behavioral problems. Compared to their peers, foster youth face significant educational difficulties, including lower levels of academic…

  9. Fostering Corporate Entrepreneurship | Arthi | Ethiopian Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Corporate entrepreneurship is a powerful source for change and innovation, fostering creativity and a constant search for new solutions to all kinds of problems. It can help organizations meet several challenges and can transform firms into revolutionary comparn es. It can improve corporate competitive positions as well as ...

  10. Fostering Creative Engineers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Chunfang

    2012-01-01

    . As the literature demonstrates, this paper reveals the understanding of complexity in engineering practice and the roles of creativity in engineering practice. In addition, the barriers to creativity in current engineering education and some implications of pedagogic strategies will be discussed. So this paper...... that engineering students should master. This paper aims to illustrate deeply why engineering education needs to foster creative students to face the challenges of complex engineering work. So a literature review will be provided by focusing on the necessity of developing creativity in engineering education...... contributes to rethinking the engineering profession in a social context and a link between creativity research and engineering education....

  11. Somebody's Children or Nobody's Children? How the Sociological Perspective Could Enliven Research on Foster Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildeman, Christopher; Waldfogel, Jane

    2014-07-01

    Social scientists have long been concerned about how the fortunes of parents affect their children, with acute interest in the most marginalized children. Yet little sociological research considers children in foster care. In this review, we take a three-pronged approach to show why this inattention is problematic. First, we provide overviews of the history of the foster care system and how children end up in foster care, as well as an estimate of how many children ever enter foster care. Second, we review research on the factors that shape the risk of foster care placement and foster care caseloads and how foster care affects children. We close by discussing how a sociological perspective and methodological orientation-ranging from ethnographic observation to longitudinal mixed methods research, demographic methods, and experimental studies-can foster new knowledge around the foster care system and the families it affects.

  12. Foster children's attachment security and behavior problems in the first six months of placement: associations with foster parents' stress and sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabler, S; Bovenschen, I; Lang, K; Zimmermann, J; Nowacki, K; Kliewer, J; Spangler, G

    2014-01-01

    Both traumatic experiences in their birth families and multiple placement histories lead to increased mental health problems in foster children. The formation of secure attachments to new caregivers could be a protective factor for foster children. The current study focused on the associations between foster parents' sensitivity, parenting stress and foster children's attachment behavior as well as behavior problems. The sample consists of 48 children (aged from 1 to 6 years) and their foster caregivers. Attachment behavior and sensitivity were observed during home visits. Furthermore, caregiver reports were used to assess parenting stress and children's behavior problems. Compared to normative data, foster children showed lower levels of attachment security and more behavior problems. Foster children's attachment security and behavior problems were predicted significantly or marginally by foster parents' stress and supportive presence.

  13. Gamification in Fostering Creativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Kalinauskas

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose – to analyze gamification, as the method for fostering creativity.Design/methodology/approach – Author analyses the precognitions, which allowed gamification to attract mainstream attention, the diversity of understandings about the phenomenon, and the possible relations between usage of gamified platform and the development of creativity. The paper is based on the comparative analysis of scientific literature and related sources from sociology, business, and entertainment. The engagement is analyzed through the theories of self-determination and the “flow”. Creativity is understood as “any act, idea, or product that changes an existing domain, or that transforms an existing domain into a new one” (Csikszentmihalyi, 1996. Gamification is analyzed as “use of game design elements in non-game context” (Deterding, Dixon, Khaled, and Nacke (2011. Findings – Although the gamification is gaining more public attention, there is a lack of studies which would reveal its relations in fostering creativity. One of the main goals of any gamified platform is to raise the engagement of the participant while keeping subject interested in the process or activity. In some cases, there is a relation between “flow” and creativity. However, the strength of this relationship depends from the users of gamified content and the domain of interest.Research limitations / implications – There are very few empirical studies which would support correlation between experiencing the “flow” state and a raise of creativity. This issue requires more surveys, which would ground the idea.Practical implications – By developing further research in usage of gamification while fostering creativity it is possible to determine, whether or not the “creative domains” should apply more measures of gamification in their activities.Value – The article emphasizes on theoretical analysis of gamification and its applicability in fostering creativity

  14. The impact of fostering a child on biological children of foster parents

    OpenAIRE

    Večeřová, Štěpánka

    2014-01-01

    The diploma thesis discusses the impact of foster care on biological children of foster parents from the perspective of foster parents, biological children of foster parents and experts in their work with the issue of foster care encounter. Aim of this work is to propose options for social work with biological children of applicants for foster care in the way they are not negatively affected. Key words: foster care, biological children of foster parents, accompanying foster families, preparin...

  15. Fostering collective intelligence education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Meza

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available New educational models are necessary to update learning environments to the digitally shared communication and information. Collective intelligence is an emerging field that already has a significant impact in many areas and will have great implications in education, not only from the side of new methodologies but also as a challenge for education. This paper proposes an approach to a collective intelligence model of teaching using Internet to combine two strategies: idea management and real time assessment in the class. A digital tool named Fabricius has been created supporting these two elements to foster the collaboration and engagement of students in the learning process. As a result of the research we propose a list of KPI trying to measure individual and collective performance. We are conscious that this is just a first approach to define which aspects of a class following a course can be qualified and quantified.

  16. Factors associated with the adjustment of foster children in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strijker, J.; Knorth, E.J.

    Information obtained from 419 case files was used to investigate the associations between the foster child's adjustment to the foster family and factors in the histories of the child and the parents, as well as factors in the relationship between foster children and their biological parents while

  17. Educating Students in Foster Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffernan, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Students who are in foster care need principals who are informed about policy, aware of their needs, and willing to be advocates for them. Multiple school placements often result in significant gaps in the education of students in foster care. If they also have disabilities, they may lose special programs and services when they change placements.…

  18. Foster dams rear fighters: strain-specific effects of within-strain fostering on aggressive behavior in male mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly H Cox

    Full Text Available It is well known that genes and environment interact to produce behavioral phenotypes. One environmental factor with long-term effects on gene transcription and behavior is maternal care. A classic paradigm for examining maternal care and genetic interactions is to foster pups of one genetic strain to dams of a different strain ("between-strain fostering". In addition, fostering to a dam of the same strain ("within-strain fostering" is used to reduce indirect effects, via behavioral changes in the dams, of gestation treatments on offspring. Using within-and between-strain fostering we examined the contributions of genetics/prenatal environment, maternal care, and the effects of fostering per se, on adult aggressive behavior in two inbred mouse strains, C57BL/6J (B6 and DBA/2J (DBA. We hypothesized that males reared by dams of the more aggressive DBA strain would attack intruders faster than those reared by B6 dams. Surprisingly, we found that both methods of fostering enhanced aggressive behavior, but only in B6 mice. Since all the B6 offspring are genetically identical, we asked if maternal behavior of B6 dams was affected by the relatedness of their pups. In fact, B6 dams caring for foster B6 pups displayed significantly reduced maternal behaviors. Finally, we measured vasopressin and corticotrophin releasing hormone mRNA in the amygdalae of adult B6 males reared by foster or biological dams. Both genes correlated with aggressive behavior in within-strain fostered B6 mice, but not in mice reared by their biological dams. In sum, we have demonstrated in inbred laboratory mice, that dams behave differently when rearing their own newborn pups versus pups from another dam of the same strain. These differences in maternal care affect aggression in the male offspring and transcription of Avp and Crh in the brain. It is likely that rearing by foster dams has additional effects and implications for other species.

  19. Reflection of Foster Parents on Caring for Foster and Adopted Children and Their Suggestions to Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak-Fabrykowski, Krystyna; Helinski, Monica; Buchstein, Fred

    2009-01-01

    In this research project we investigated the process of adoption of foster children by foster parents and the foster parents' ideas of how to help foster children going through the process of adoption or those who have been adopted. We sent questionnaires to 200 foster parents living in the Cleveland area, but just 23 foster parents replied.…

  20. Treatment Foster Care Pre-Service Trainings: Changes in Parenting Attitudes and Fostering Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickler, Amy; Trunzo, Annette C.; Kaelin, Michael S.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Pre-service training of treatment parents is a requirement for all foster care models to ensure safety and well-being of children in care. Researchers theorize treatment parents benefit more from enhanced pre-service trainings; however, no rigorous studies exist indicating the effectiveness of these trainings for treatment parents.…

  1. Successful Academic Achievement among Foster Children: What Did the Foster Parents Do?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skilbred, Dag Tore; Iversen, Anette Christine; Moldestad, Bente

    2017-01-01

    Children who spend part of their childhood in foster homes have, as a group, lower academic achievement than their peers. However, some of these children do well and succeed in higher education. Resilience is about positive development enhanced by protective factors despite adversity. Protective factors may be both positive qualities in the…

  2. Attachment Theory, Foster Parents and Diversity Tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Kenny, Michael; Fleming, Ted

    2009-01-01

    relevance to attachment within the biological and foster family. Yet every foster parent has a childhood attachment history that influences their interpersonal relationships in adulthood. The primary concern of the foster parent and their supports is with the foster child. But as a result the foster parent may distract or block reflection on their own attachment history. This presentation will focus on attachment theory and the adult, with particular reference to the foster parent. The pre...

  3. Public awareness and attitudes towards naval sonar mitigation for cetacean conservation: a preliminary case study in Fairfax County, Virginia. (the DC Metro area).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirbel, K; Balint, P; Parsons, E C M

    2011-01-01

    The potential impacts of naval sonar on cetaceans has led to a series of court cases and statements of concern by international organizations. However, there has been no research conducted on attitudes of the general public with respect to this issue. To investigate this, a preliminary public survey was conducted in Fairfax, Virginia (the Washington, DC Metro region). The majority of the public sampled believed that naval sonar impacted marine mammals (51.3%), that the US Navy should not be exempt from environmental regulations in time of peace (75.2%), and that sonar use should be moderated if it impacts cetaceans (75.8%). Individuals who were conservative, Republican, and have served in the military were more likely to believe the Navy should be exempt from marine mammal protection regulations. In addition, expert interviews were conducted to gain opinions on the potential ramifications of the recent US Supreme Court case on naval sonar mitigation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Foster parents' state of mind with respect to attachment: concordance with their foster children's attachment patterns at 2 and 3 years of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Heidi; Ivarsson, Tord; Wentzel-Larsen, Tore; Smith, Lars; Moe, Vibeke

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated the possible differences between foster and comparison parents' state of mind with respect to attachment, and the concordance between caregiver state of mind and child attachment classifications among 60 foster children, all placed before the age of 2 years, as well as 42 comparison children. Caregiver state of mind was measured when the children were 2 years old (Time 1) while child attachment classifications were assessed at age 2 and again at age 3 years (Time 2). The associations between foster children's attachment, age at first and final placements, number of placements, and reasons for placement also were investigated. Descriptive analyses, including cross-tabulations, and independent sample t tests were used. The results showed that the majority of the foster parents had an autonomous state of mind, and no significant group difference between foster and comparison parents was identified. At both time points, most foster children who were classified as secure had autonomous foster parents, as also was the case for the comparison children. The present results are encouraging, suggesting that placing foster children with autonomous foster parents early in life may help them to remain secure over time. Furthermore, focusing on the recruitment of autonomous foster parents is important when working with young foster children. © 2014 Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health.

  5. Can Medicaid Claims Validly Ascertain Foster Care Status?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Ramesh; Brown, Derek S; Allaire, Benjamin T

    2017-08-01

    Medicaid claims have been used to identify populations of children in foster care in the current literature; however, the ability of such an approach to validly ascertain a foster care population is unknown. This study linked children in the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being-I to their Medicaid claims from 36 states using their Social Security numbers. Using this match, we examined discordance between caregiver report of foster care placement and the foster care eligibility code contained in the child's Medicaid claims. Only 73% of youth placed in foster care for at least a year displayed a Medicaid code for foster care eligibility. Half of all youth coming into contact with child welfare displayed discordance between caregiver report and Medicaid claims. Children with emergency department utilization, and those in primary care case management health insurance arrangements, had the highest odds of accurate ascertainment. The use of Medicaid claims to identify a cohort of children in foster care results in high rates of underascertainment. Supplementing administrative data with survey data is one way to enhance validity of ascertainment.

  6. Open Government Data: Fostering Innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Bedini

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The provision of public information contributes to the enrichment and enhancement of the data produced by the government as part of its activities, and the transformation of heterogeneous data into information and knowledge. This process of opening changes the operational mode of public administrations, leveraging the data management, encouraging savings and especially in promoting the development of services in subsidiary and collaborative form between public and private entities. The demand for new services also promotes renewed entrepreneurship centred on responding to new social and territorial needs through new technologies. In this sense we speak of Open Data as an enabling infrastructure for the development of innovation and as an instrument to the development and diffusion of Innovation and Communications Technology (ICT in the public system as well as creating space for innovation for businesses, particularly SMEs, based on the exploitation of information assets of the territory. The Open Data Trentino Project has initiated and fosters the process of opening of public information and develops as a natural consequence of this process of openness, the creation of innovative services for and with the citizens. In this paper we present how our project acts on long-chain, from raw data till reusable meaningful and scalable knowledge base that leads to the production of data reuse through the implementation of services that will enhance and transform the data into information capable of responding to specific questions efficiency and innovation.

  7. Child development in foster family care - what really counts?

    OpenAIRE

    Kekoni, Taru; Miettinen, Janissa; Häkälä, Niina; Savolainen, Anssi

    2017-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that children who grow up in foster family care – along with other child welfare recipients – manage less well in adulthood compared to those children who do not. Given this challenge, this integrative literature review locates the critical factors that either positively or negatively affect a child’s development in foster family care. The articles were analysed using theory-driven content classification in relation to Bronfenbrenner’s bioecological framewor...

  8. 76 FR 28917 - Medical Foster Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-19

    ... home, VA will provide inspections of the home, oversight, and medical foster home caregiver training... oversight and medical foster home caregiver training. If a medical foster home does not meet VA's criteria... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 17 RIN 2900-AN80 Medical Foster Homes AGENCY: Department of Veterans Affairs. ACTION...

  9. Somebody’s Children or Nobody’s Children? How the Sociological Perspective Could Enliven Research on Foster Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildeman, Christopher; Waldfogel, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Social scientists have long been concerned about how the fortunes of parents affect their children, with acute interest in the most marginalized children. Yet little sociological research considers children in foster care. In this review, we take a three-pronged approach to show why this inattention is problematic. First, we provide overviews of the history of the foster care system and how children end up in foster care, as well as an estimate of how many children ever enter foster care. Second, we review research on the factors that shape the risk of foster care placement and foster care caseloads and how foster care affects children. We close by discussing how a sociological perspective and methodological orientation—ranging from ethnographic observation to longitudinal mixed methods research, demographic methods, and experimental studies—can foster new knowledge around the foster care system and the families it affects. PMID:25431518

  10. Assessment of problem behaviour by foster parents and their foster children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strijker, Johan; van Oijen, Simon; Knot-Dickscheit, Jana

    This study investigates the level of agreement between foster parents and foster children about problem behaviour and how this is associated with the breakdown of a foster care placement. The study took a sample of foster parents and their foster children (n = 60), who were aged 11-17 years, and

  11. "How Can You Know? You're Not a Foster Child":

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warming, H.

    2006-01-01

    Based on Axel Honneth's Theoty of Recognition and an empirical action research project entitled "Børnetinget" (Children's Parliament), conducted in Denmark by the author, this article discuss dilemmas and possibilities of giving voice to children in foster care. The Børnetinget project aimed...... to give voice to foster children so that their knowledge about "the life as a child in foster care" could find its way to social workers and foster parents as well as politicians, thus influencing, democratizing and qualifying social work with children and youth in foster care. "Børneting" was established...... with a core group of 15 foster children, aged 10-13, and a web-based "foster children's public forum". This article focuses on learning about participation from the Børnetinget experience, both as a model of participatory research practice and for the insights it provides in relation to how we understand...

  12. Changing Unit Culture and Fostering Well-being of Staff

    OpenAIRE

    Launder, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The key role of healthcare leaders is to create and sustain an environment that optimizes high-quality, safe, and effective patient-centered care. The leader's role is to ensure the best possible physical environment and provide a culture that supports healthcare team members in the stressful work of providing direct care. A positive approach is to empower nurses and other health team members with effective skills and techniques to help them transform stressful situations into m...

  13. Fostering Self-Discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bear, George G.; Duquette, Jeffrey F.

    2008-01-01

    From its inception, a primary goal of public education has been to develop self-discipline among students, best seen as them exhibiting socially and morally responsible behavior. This goal coincides with another important educational imperative, as well as an alternative meaning of the term "discipline": to correct misbehavior to create and…

  14. Supporting Students in Foster Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, Lauren E.; La Salle, Tamika P.

    2017-01-01

    Students living in foster care are at risk for experiencing many challenges in school, spanning domains of social-emotional, behavioral, and academic functioning. They are twice as likely to be absent from school and to have received and out-of-school suspension and up to three and a half times more likely to receive special education services.…

  15. Fostering Creativity through Personalized Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munakata, Mika; Vaidya, Ashwin

    2013-01-01

    This article focuses on the philosophy of creativity and its enhancement through an undergraduate research experience. In this paper we offer suggestions for infusing the undergraduate mathematics and science curriculum with research experiences as a way of fostering creativity in our students. We refer to the term "research" broadly,…

  16. Fostering Ethical Dialogues across Campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Sharon

    1991-01-01

    The Ethics Forum at Buffalo State College (New York), a program in which new ideas for addressing long-standing problems are fostered among faculty and staff, is described in the framework of a situational leadership model. The model allows analysis of the groups's highly directed, coaching, supporting, and autonomous activities. (MSE)

  17. Strategies for recruiting foster families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lopez Lopez, Monica; Del Valle, J.F.; Bravo, Amaia

    2010-01-01

    Fostering provides children with an opportunity to grow and develop in a family environment until the source of separation from their families is resolved, they are adopted or they emancipate on reaching the age of majority. Finding families ready to look after those children is one of the most

  18. Fostering Significant Learning in Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deksissa, Tolessa; Liang, Lily R.; Behera, Pradeep; Harkness, Suzan J.

    2014-01-01

    The new global economy depends on workforce competencies in science, technology, engineering and mathematics more than ever before. To prepare a strong workforce, attracting and educating underrepresented minority students in science is a challenge within our traditional American educational approach. To meet this challenge, fostering significant…

  19. Fostering Cooperation in Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thursday, June 25, 2015 Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) was signed between US National Cancer Institute and three agencies of the Indian government - the Department of Biotechnology, the Indian Council of Medical Research, and the Indian National Cancer Institute, a part of the All India Institute of Medical Sciences to foster cooperation in cancer research.

  20. The developing relationship between recently placed foster infants and toddlers and their foster carers: Do demographic factors, placement characteristics and biological stress markers matter?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Andel, H.W.H.; Post, W.J.; Jansen, L.M.C.; Kamphuis, J.S.; v.d. Gaag, R.J.; Knorth, E.J.; Grietens, H.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Infants and toddlers often react to a foster family placement with avoidant behavior. Foster carers may interpret this as if the child is adapting quite well to the new family. This misunderstanding may lead to stress in the child and create a risk for an enduring relationship.

  1. Planned and unplanned terminations of foster care placements in the Netherlands: Relationships with characteristics of foster children and foster placements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rooij, F.; Maaskant, A.; Weijers, I.; Weijers, D.; Hermanns, J.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the role of placement and child characteristics in the unplanned termination of foster placements. Data were used from 169 foster children aged 0 to 20. Results showed that 35% of all foster placement terminations were unplanned. Outcomes of logistic regression analyses

  2. Foster Creative Engineers by PBL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Chunfang; Nielsen, Jens Frederik Dalsgaard; Kolmos, Anette

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, Problem and Project Based Learning (PBL) has been employed by a growing number of educational institutions to foster creative engineers. This paper aims to explore how PBL can develop creativity in engineering education. Accordingly, a qualitative case study was carried out...... with a student satellite project (AAUSAT3) in the department of electronic systems at Aalborg University in Denmark. Multiple methods including interviews and observation were employed. The analysis of the empirical data leads to the findings and discussions that PBL can foster creative engineers by providing...... conditions of problem analysis and solving, the shift from teaching to learning and team based projects. This research therefore contributes to both theory and practice in the PBL setting of engineering education....

  3. Predictors of Early Childbirth Among Female Adolescents in Foster Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Bryn; Van Wert, Melissa

    2017-08-01

    Placement into foster care is driven by a number of factors, many of which are associated with adolescent childbirth. Yet, there are few studies that identify the experiences and characteristics that predict adolescent childbirth among girls who spend time in foster care. A longitudinal, population-based data set was constructed by probabilistically matching California child protective service records for female foster youth to maternal information available on vital birth records for children born between 2001 and 2010. Rates of childbirth among girls in foster care after their 10th birthday were generated. Chi-square tests assessed differences and survival models were specified to determine the rate of childbearing across key characteristics. Among the 30,339 girls who spent time in foster care as adolescents, 18.3% (5,567) gave birth for the first time before their 20th birthday. At a bivariate level, significant differences (p foster care placement experiences. In the fully adjusted survival model, the highest birth rates were observed among girls who entered care between ages 13 and 16 years; had been in care for relatively short periods of time; lived in congregate care at the estimated date of conception; had a history of running away; and were Latina, black, or Native American. The results suggest that there are identifiable risk factors associated with early childbirth among girls in foster care, which can help determine the timing and location of reproductive health services to minimize unintended pregnancy and maximize adolescent health and well-being. Copyright © 2017 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Foster care in Croatia from the perspective of foster parents and professionals

    OpenAIRE

    Teodor Sabolić; Lucija Vejmelka

    2015-01-01

    In many official documents of the Croatian Government and relevant government departments concerning the process of deinstitutionalization, foster care is cited as a priority form of non-institutional care. The purpose of this paper is to describe the process of foster care for children in Croatia and to present the results of research conducted with foster parents and experts, in the form of improving foster care. The entering into foster care process begins with a motivation and a decision ...

  5. Antipsychotic treatment among youth in foster care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosreis, Susan; Yoon, Yesel; Rubin, David M; Riddle, Mark A; Noll, Elizabeth; Rothbard, Aileen

    2011-12-01

    Despite national concerns over high rates of antipsychotic medication use among youth in foster care, concomitant antipsychotic use has not been examined. In this study, concomitant antipsychotic use among Medicaid-enrolled youth in foster care was compared with disabled or low-income Medicaid-enrolled youth. The sample included 16 969 youths younger than 20 years who were continuously enrolled in a Mid-Atlantic state Medicaid program and had ≥1 claim with a psychiatric diagnosis and ≥1 antipsychotic claim in 2003. Antipsychotic treatment was characterized by days of any use and concomitant use with ≥2 overlapping antipsychotics for >30 days. Medicaid program categories were foster care, disabled (Supplemental Security Income), and Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF). Multicategory involvement for youths in foster care was classified as foster care/Supplemental Security Income, foster care/TANF, and foster care/adoption. We used multivariate analyses, adjusting for demographics, psychiatric comorbidities, and other psychotropic use, to assess associations between Medicaid program category and concomitant antipsychotic use. Average antipsychotic use ranged from 222 ± 110 days in foster care to only 135 ± 101 days in TANF (P foster care only and 24% in foster care/adoption compared with foster care system.

  6. Students in Foster Care: Individualized School-Based Supports for Successful Lives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neiheiser, Linda M.

    2015-01-01

    Foster care is a government-based, temporary system of support for children and adolescents whose biologic parents are either unwilling or unable to parent them. Variability exists with regard to the type of foster care continuity of services offered as well as to the placement homes themselves, and--of the nearly half-million youth currently…

  7. Educational Policy and Foster Youths: The Risks of Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustavsson, Nora; MacEachron, Ann E.

    2012-01-01

    Recent child welfare legislation requires agencies to address the educational well-being of foster youths. Schools face new accountability standards through No Child Left Behind and the Obama "Blueprint for Reform" as they move toward the goal of ensuring that all children receive a quality education. Both of these pieces of legislation…

  8. Economic incentives and foster child adoption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argys, Laura; Duncan, Brian

    2013-06-01

    Every year, a large number of children in the United States enter the foster care system. Many of them are eventually reunited with their biological parents or quickly adopted. A significant number, however, face long-term foster care, and some of these children are eventually adopted by their foster parents. The decision by foster parents to adopt their foster child carries significant economic consequences, including for feiting foster care payments while also assuming responsibility for medical, legal, and educational expenses, to name a few. Since 1980, U.S. states have begun to offer adoption subsidies to offset some of these expenses, significantly lowering the cost of adopting a child who is in the foster care system. This article presents empirical evidence of the role that these economic incentives play in foster parents' decision of when, or if, to adopt their foster child. We find that adoption subsidies increase adoptions through two distinct price mechanisms: by lowering the absolute cost of adoption, and by lowering the relative cost of adoption versus long-term foster care.

  9. Fostering Communicative Competence through Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Aslam Sipra

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The article explores the use of technology in EFL classes to promote communicative competence. It elucidates communicative competence and explicates obstructions in communicative tasks. Moreover, it interprets the use of technology in fostering and supporting the development of communicative competence and explains how it is pragmatic in maintaining learners’ level of motivation and interest in learning a foreign language. The present article identifies the significance and use of mobile phone, camera, computer and internet, tape recorder, projector, and language labs in EFL classes. Besides, it discusses the use of technology as an educational tool in language teaching and learning.

  10. Effects of PMTO in Foster Families with Children with Behavior Problems: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maaskant, Anne M; van Rooij, Floor B; Overbeek, Geertjan J; Oort, Frans J; Arntz, Maureen; Hermanns, Jo M A

    2017-01-01

    The present randomized controlled trial examined the effectiveness of Parent Management Training Oregon for foster parents with foster children (aged 4-12) with severe externalizing behavior problems in long-term foster care arrangements. Foster children's behavior problems are challenging for foster parents and increase the risk of placement breakdown. There is little evidence for the effectiveness of established interventions to improve child and parent functioning in foster families. The goal of Parent Management Training Oregon, a relatively long and intensive (6-9 months, with weekly sessions) parent management training, is to reduce children's problem behavior through improvement of parenting practices. We specifically investigated whether Parent Management Training Oregon is effective to reduce foster parenting stress. A significant effect of Parent Management Training Oregon, compared to Care as Usual was expected on reduced parenting stress improved parenting practices, and on reduced child behavior problems. Multi-informant (foster mothers, foster fathers, and teachers) data were used from 86 foster families (46 Parent Management Training Oregon, 40 Care as Usual) using a pre-posttest design. Multilevel analyses based on the intention to treat principle (retention rate 73 %) showed that Parent Management Training Oregon, compared to Care as Usual, reduced general levels of parenting stress as well as child related stress and parent-related stress (small to medium effect sizes). The clinical significance of this effect was, however, limited. Compared to a decrease in the Care as Usual group, Parent Management Training Oregon helped foster mothers to maintain parental warmth (small effect size). There were no other effects of Parent Management Training Oregon on self-reported parenting behaviors. Child behavior problems were reduced in both conditions, indicating no additive effects of Parent Management Training Oregon to Care as Usual on child

  11. Foster care assessment: A study of the placement decision process in Flanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderfaeillie, Johan; Pijnenburg, Huub; Damen, Harm; Van Holen, Frank

    2015-11-01

    Family foster care placement decision-making has a weak scientific underpinning. Mostly a 'variable-oriented approach' is taken, which requires a lot of information that is not always available. The identification of clusters of foster children with similar characteristics may be a more viable decision strategy. In this study we investigated if foster children could indeed be clustered, which problems were identified at the time of placement, and the influence of placement history. It proved possible to group foster children into two clusters: (1) young children with familial problems and few behavioral problems, and (2) older children with prominent child problems and behavioral problems. For foster children with and without placement history, problems associated with placement proved identical. Considering that a foster care placement did not result in fundamental change in the problems present at time of placement, the importance is stressed of approaching foster care assessment as part of a decision making process which looks back as well as forward. Placement decisions should be based on an appraisal of the appropriateness of foster placement as a solution for the child. In conjunction with this appraisal a decision is required on how parents can be supported toward reunification. Or--if this is not an option--whether long term foster care is the best option for the child and if so, what conditions need to be met. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. [Fostering LGBT-friendly healthcare services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Han-Ting; Chen, Mu-Hong; Ku, Wen-Wei

    2015-02-01

    LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender) patients suffer from stigma and discrimination when seeking healthcare. A large LGBT healthcare survey revealed that 56% of gay patients and 70% of transgender patients suffered some type of discrimination while seeking healthcare in 2014. The fostering of LGBT-friendly healthcare services is not just an advanced step of gender mainstreaming but also a fulfillment of health equality and equity. Additionally, LGBT-friendly healthcare services are expected to provide new opportunities for healthcare workers. Therefore, proactive government policies, education, research, and clinical practice should all encourage the development of these healthcare services. We look forward to a well-developed LGBT-friendly healthcare system in Taiwan.

  13. How do foster carers manage the oral health of children in foster care? A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muirhead, Vanessa; Subramanian, Sri-Kavi; Wright, Desmond; Wong, Ferranti S L

    2017-12-01

    This qualitative study explored how the foster family environment influenced children's oral health. It also aimed to better understand foster carers' oral health knowledge, attitudes and experiences of managing foster children's oral health behaviours and oral health care. An interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) study design was used to recruit a purposive sample of foster carers in Tower Hamlets, United Kingdom, from a range of backgrounds (maximum variation sampling). Participants were aged 21 years and older and provided full-time foster care for children for a minimum of 1 year. The foster carers took part in focus groups that were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data analysis followed a five-step IPA process, which included reading the transcripts, note taking, identifying emerging themes, connecting related themes and writing up the final themes. Iterative data gathering and analysis continued to reach thematic saturation. Three focus groups were conducted, involving a total of 12 foster carers. Eight of the 12 participants had fostered children for more than 10 years and they were currently fostering 22 children aged five to 18 years old. Four themes emerged from within the context of the supportive and nurturing foster family environment that described how foster carers' responded to and managed the oral health of their foster children. Foster carers had adopted an oral health caregiving role, "in loco parentis" responding to the poor oral health of their vulnerable foster children. They were hypervigilant about establishing and monitoring children's oral health routines and taking their children to see a dentist; these were seen as an integral part of being good foster carers. They were knowledgeable about the causes of children's oral ill health, gained from their own dental experiences and from looking after their own children. Foster carers had experienced tensions while adopting this oral health caregiving role with dentists who had

  14. The attachments of children in foster care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, R F

    1991-11-01

    Subjects for this research were 52 foster children (mean ages 7 years, 11 months) and their natural and foster parents. Case history files provided information concerning reasons for placing the children in foster care. Foster parents completed the Parent/Child Reunion Inventory (Marcus, 1988) measuring the "quality of reunion behavior" following separation. Foster mothers also completed the Child Behavior Checklist (Achenbach & Edelbrock, 1983), and measures of adult empathy were collected from both foster parents. Foster care workers rated the quality and intensity of attachment between the child and all parents. Finally, foster children were interviewed concerning their social supports, perception of affection from adults, and the quality of their relationships with adults and friends. Results showed that behavior and school achievement problems were predictable from measures of the quality of attachment with parents. The mean number of behavior problems of foster children were found to be midway between clinical and nonclinical norm groups. Children's perceptions of friends' behavior and degree of control over friends were related to their adjustment. Case history variables were also related to behavior problems and attachment.

  15. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder among Foster Care Alumni: The Role of Race, Gender, and Foster Care Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Lovie J.; O'Brien, Kirk; Pecora, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in adult alumni of foster care and its demographic and contextual correlates. This is one of the first studies to report on racial/ethnic and gender differences and the influence of foster care experiences (i.e., revictimization during foster care, placement change rate,…

  16. Cultivating Resilience in Families Who Foster: Understanding How Families Cope and Adapt Over Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lietz, Cynthia A; Julien-Chinn, Francie J; Geiger, Jennifer M; Hayes Piel, Megan

    2016-12-01

    Families who foster offer essential care for children and youth when their own parents are unable to provide for their safety and well-being. Foster caregivers face many challenges including increased workload, emotional distress, and the difficulties associated with health and mental health problems that are more common in children in foster care. Despite these stressors, many families are able to sustain fostering while maintaining or enhancing functioning of their unit. This qualitative study applied an adaptational process model of family resilience that emerged in previous studies to examine narratives of persistent, long-term, and multiple fostering experiences. Data corroborated previous research in two ways. Family resilience was again described as a transactional process of coping and adaptation that evolves over time. This process was cultivated through the activation of 10 family strengths that are important in different ways, during varied phases. © 2016 Family Process Institute.

  17. Indicators for placement in foster care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strijker, J.; Zandberg, Tj.; Van der Meulen, B.F.

    In order to develop a typology of indicators for long-term treatment in foster care, a cluster analysis has been carried out on the items of a standardized questionnaire which is used by foster care centres in the province of Zuid-Holland. Two types of indication for placement have emerged from the

  18. Sleep Disruption in Young Foster Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tininenko, Jennifer R.; Fisher, Philip A.; Bruce, Jacqueline; Pears, Katherine C.

    2010-01-01

    In the current study, sleep actigraphy and parent-report measures were used to investigate differences in sleeping behavior among four groups of 3- to 7-year-olds (N = 79): children in regular foster care (n = 15); children receiving a therapeutic intervention in foster care (n = 17); low income community children (n = 18); and upper middle income…

  19. Perceptions of coparenting in foster care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Lourdes Oriana; Rhodes, Jennifer; Montalto, Daniela

    2010-12-01

    Although literature supports the association between harmonious coparenting practices and lowered child problems, little is known about coparenting influences among family constellations in the foster care system. Via a compilation of a new coparenting practices measure, we examined similarities and differences on foster parent-derived perceptions of support/flexibility, shared communication, conflict/triangulation, and total coparenting between foster and biological parents and their independent contribution to child internalizing and externalizing problems. Self-reports were gathered from foster parents (N=80) in 2 groups: kin and nonkin. As compared with nonkin, kin foster parents reported higher perceived support/flexibility, shared communication, and total coparenting. A tendency for higher conflict/triangulation among kin foster parents was also found. After considering foster parent group, psychological distress, and harsh discipline, hierarchical regression analyses revealed that perceived total coparenting and conflict/triangulation contributed to child internalizing and externalizing problems. Results support the linkage between perceptions of coparenting and child problems among caregivers (foster and biological alike) in kin and nonkin arrangements and highlight training in coparenting in general, and conflict management in particular, as an important intervention focus to reduce the high level of child problems in this vulnerable population. 2010 © FPI, Inc.

  20. Nurturing Development of Foster and Adopted Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak-Fabrykowski, Krystyna Teresa

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study is to investigate early childhood teachers' perspective of teaching foster and adopted children. The main purpose is to seek suggestions how teachers can nurture the development of foster and adopted children. A 6 question survey was sent to 44 teachers pursuing graduate studies in early childhood education. Of this 50%…

  1. Addressing the mental health needs of looked after children in foster care: the experiences of foster carers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, W; Jones, J

    2017-03-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: In the UK and internationally, the number of looked after children is increasing year on year. Mental health problems among looked after children are significantly higher than in the general population, and the uptake of mental health services for these children is low. There is a poor prognosis for children with untreated mental health problems; this is further compounded if the child is within the care system. WHAT DOES THIS PAPER ADD TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: This study adds to our understanding of foster carers' experiences of the mental health needs of looked after children and demonstrates some of the challenges associated with accessing appropriate and timely mental health services. New knowledge derived from this research is that the barriers to accessing Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) are not at the time of initial referral as previously reported, but later, once within the mental health system with long waiting times experienced particularly for specialist services. This study provides new insights into the experience of being a foster carer and the levels of support and resources needed that directly relate to the viability of the placement. The majority of the foster carers interviewed were from a Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) background, previously under-represented in this research area. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: A number of areas in current CAMHS provision need addressing with a focus on accessibility, consultation and support for foster carers. Waiting times need to be addressed, and improved communication with other agencies is also highlighted. CAMHS nurses are well placed to develop and deliver a comprehensive care package to foster carers, offering more tailored support to them whilst enabling the children and young people in their care to access and engage more effectively with mental health services. Introduction Despite well-documented vulnerabilities to mental health problems

  2. Creativity fostering teacher behaviour around the world: Annotations of studies using the CFTIndex

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Soh, Kaycheng

    2015-01-01

    Teachers play a critical role in the development of student creativity. How well they play this role depends on whether they demonstrate creativity fostering behaviour when interacting with their students...

  3. The wellbeing of foster children and their relationship with foster parents and biological parents : a child’s perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maaskant, A.M.; van Rooij, F.B.; Bos, H.M.W.; Hermanns, J.M.A.

    2016-01-01

    Most Dutch foster children live permanently in foster families. It is often assumed that foster children have ambivalent loyalties and attachments to their birth parents and foster parents and are torn between the two. In this study 59 children between 10 and 18 years placed in long term foster care

  4. Successful Foster Parent Recruiting: A Voluntary Agency Effort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Eve P.; Gutheil, Robert H.

    1988-01-01

    Emphasizes that foster parent recruiting is becoming increasingly difficult. Describes a successful alternative foster parent recruitment effort which includes the provision of fiscal incentives for foster parent recruiters. (Author/RWB)

  5. Permanency and the Foster Care System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, Katie K; Friedman, Susan; Christian, Cindy W

    2015-10-01

    Each year over 20,000 youth age out of the child welfare system without reaching a permanent placement in a family. Certain children, such as those spending extended time in foster care, with a diagnosed disability, or adolescents, are at the highest risk for aging out. As young adults, this population is at and increased risk of incarceration; food, housing, and income insecurity; unemployment; educational deficits; receipt of public assistance; and mental health disorders. We reviewed the literature on foster care legislation, permanency, outcomes, and interventions. The outcomes of children who age out of the child welfare system are poor. Interventions to increase permanency include training programs for youth and foster parents, age extension for foster care and insurance coverage, an adoption tax credit, and specialized services and programs that support youth preparing for their transition to adulthood. Future ideas include expanding mentoring, educational support, mental health services, and post-permanency services to foster stability in foster care placements and encourage permanency planning. Children in the child welfare system are at a high risk for physical, mental, and emotional health problems that can lead to placement instability and create barriers to achieving permanency. Failure to reach the permanency of a family leads to poor outcomes, which have negative effects on the individual and society. Supporting youth in foster care throughout transitions may mediate the negative outcomes that have historically followed placement in out-of-home care. Copyright © 2015 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Rumination fosters indecision in dysphoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Randenborgh, Annette; de Jong-Meyer, Renate; Hüffmeier, Joachim

    2010-03-01

    This study investigated the effects of rumination on indecision, assessed as high levels of perceived decision difficulty, low confidence in a decision, and decision latency. Dysphoric and nondysphoric participants were assigned to either a rumination or a distraction induction. Subsequently, they made four decisions with alleged real-life consequences. As predicted, rumination exhibited a negative effect on dysphoric participants' decision-making process. They experienced the decisions as more difficult and had less confidence in their choices. No effects emerged on the measure of decision time. Mediation analyses revealed that increased difficulty of the decisions was due to self-focused thinking as a cognitive consequence of rumination, while reduced confidence in the decisions was partly mediated by negative affect that resulted from rumination. The finding that rumination affects the important life domain of decision making by fostering indecision in dysphoric individuals is a central extension of previous studies on rumination's consequences. In addition, these results provide insight into the depressive symptom of indecisiveness by revealing its underlying mechanisms. Copyright 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Health Service Utilization of Children in Delaware Foster Care, 2013-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Erin K; McDuffie, May Joan; Gifford, Katie; Zorc, Catherine

    2016-02-01

    Children in foster care represent some of the most vulnerable children in the U.S. Their higher prevalence of a range of physical and behavioral health problems can lead to greater health care utilization and higher costs. However, many children in foster care have undiagnosed conditions and unmet needs. The purpose of this study was to provide a description of health services accessed by children in foster care in Delaware. The data serves as a baseline and informs current efforts to improve the health care of children in foster care. We analyzed rates of emergency room visits, behavioral health visits, hospitalizations, and costs of care for children in foster care and made comparisons with other children participating in Medicaid. We also looked at utilization before and after entry into care and assessed rates of appropriate medical screening for children on entering foster care. This study was conducted as part of a larger analysis guided by the Delaware Task Force on the Health of Children in Foster Care with funding appropriated by the Delaware General Assembly. Using a unique identification number, we linked Medicaid claims data with demographic information and characteristics associated with foster care from the Delaware Department of Services for Children, Youth and Their Families. We examined diagnoses, patterns of utilization, and costs for children in foster care (n = 1,458) and a comparable cohort of other children in Medicaid (n = 124,667) during fiscal years 2013 and 2014. Compared with other children in Medicaid, children in foster care had similar rates of emergency department utilization, but relatively high rates of outpatient behavioral health visits. Similarly, compared with other children in Medicaid, those in foster care had particularly high rates of psychotropic drug utilization. Entry into foster care was associated with increased utilization of overall health care services, including receipt of well-child care. However, just 31 percent

  8. Time well spent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fallesen, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Individuals who spent time in foster care as children fare on average worse than non-placed peers in early adult life. Recent research on the effect of foster care placement on early adult life outcomes provides mixed evidence. Some studies suggest negative effects of foster care placement on early...... adult outcomes, others find null effects. This study shows that differences in the average duration of foster care stays explain parts of these discordant findings and then test how foster care duration shapes later life outcomes using administrative data on 7 220 children. The children experienced...... different average durations of foster care because of differences in exposure to a reform. Later born cohorts spent on average 3 months longer in foster care than earlier born cohorts. Isolating exogenous variation in duration of foster care, the study finds positive effects of increased duration of foster...

  9. Fostering Critical Thinking, Reasoning, and Argumentation Skills through Bioethics Education

    OpenAIRE

    Chowning, Jeanne Ting; Griswold, Joan Carlton; Kovarik, Dina N.; Collins, Laura J.

    2012-01-01

    Developing a position on a socio-scientific issue and defending it using a well-reasoned justification involves complex cognitive skills that are challenging to both teach and assess. Our work centers on instructional strategies for fostering critical thinking skills in high school students using bioethical case studies, decision-making frameworks, and structured analysis tools to scaffold student argumentation. In this study, we examined the effects of our teacher professional development an...

  10. CURRENT STATUS AND POLICY IMPLICATIONS FOR FOSTERING SOCIAL ENTREPRENEUR

    OpenAIRE

    Yoon-Doo Kim; Seok Yoon

    2012-01-01

    In this study, problems in current status of social entrepreneurs in Korea were examined and further policy issues for them were suggested as well. For the methodology, the study analyzed the drawbacks and policy implication of fostering social entrepreneurs through Focus Group Interview (FGI) on analysis of present condition of incubating social entrepreneur and programs for it. First, it should escape from personnel expense-centered one and convert to ecosystem-centered or division-centered...

  11. Transitioning to Adulthood from Foster Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Terry; Morgan, Wynne

    2017-04-01

    Transitional age foster youth do not typically receive the types of family supports their nonfoster peers enjoy. Many foster youth experience multiple adversities and often fare worse than nonfoster peers on long-term functional outcomes. Governments increasingly recognize their responsibility to act as parents for state dependents transitioning to adulthood and the need to provide services to address social/emotional supports, living skills, finances, housing, education, employment, and physical and mental health. More research is needed to inform the development of effective programs. Transitional age foster youth benefit from policies promoting a developmentally appropriate, comprehensive, and integrated transition system of care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Preventing rapid repeat pregnancy and promoting positive parenting among young mothers in foster care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finigan-Carr, Nadine M; Murray, Kantahyanee W; O'Connor, Julia M; Rushovich, Berenice R; Dixon, Desyree A; Barth, Richard P

    2015-01-01

    Young mothers in foster care face considerable challenges above and beyond that of their non-foster care peers. Child welfare workers have few resources to guide them in the selection of evidence-informed programs, models, and strategies that address the unique risk factors and needs of youth in foster care who are at risk for rapid repeat pregnancy and inadequate parenting practices. Workers need knowledge of the evidence about which programs are most likely to improve key health and well-being outcomes. The article assesses the evidence-based programs identified and yields a list that reflects the best evidence for efficacy and effectiveness.

  13. Mental Health Issues in Foster Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohr, W David; Jones, V Faye

    2016-10-01

    Children in foster care have exceptional needs due to their histories of abuse, neglect, and increased exposure to violence. The rates of psychiatric symptoms and disorders, such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, and reactive attachment disorder, are much higher in children in foster care; furthermore, the rate of these children receiving psychotropic medications is 3 times that of children who are not in foster care. Pediatricians, in their role of providing a medical home, play a central role in safeguarding the physical and mental health of these children. By taking a trauma-informed approach to understanding the unique needs and gaps in their health care, pediatricians can improve the mental health and maximize outcome for children in foster care. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(10):e342-e348.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. Fostering the Battered and Abused Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFadden, Emily Jean

    1980-01-01

    This article describes a 20-hour, eight-week course for experienced foster parents. Goals include understanding the causes of child abuse, understanding the consequences of child abuse, and understanding the interaction patterns which provoke child abuse. (Author/DB)

  15. Fostering Accountability and Justice: Opportunities for Records ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... have a possibility of fostering accountability during times of change. Records that support justifiable transformation should be accurate, adequate, authentic, complete, comprehensive, usable, complaint, reliable and systematic as advocated by the University of Pittsburgh's Recordkeeping Functional Requirements (1996).

  16. Fostering secure attachment: experiences of animal companions in the foster home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Sam; Rockett, Ben

    2017-06-01

    This study sought to use attachment theory as a lens through which to explore children's relationships with animal companions in the context of long-term foster care. Inductive and deductive thematic analyses of longitudinal case study data from eight children and their foster families suggested (a) that children's relationships with animal companions satisfied attachment-related functions in their own right and (b) that animal companions also helped to soften perceptions of foster caregivers, facilitating opportunities for the development of closeness. Animals in the foster home may therefore play an important part in helping children to find and develop secure, warm, and loving relationships.

  17. Psychiatric disorders and treatment among newly homeless young adults with histories of foster care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Ronald G; Hasin, Deborah

    2012-09-01

    Although foster care placement is often preceded by stressful events such as child abuse, foster care itself often exposes children to additional severe stressors. A history of foster care, as well as the childhood abuse that often precedes it, is common among homeless young adults. This study examined whether a history of foster care was associated with psychiatric disorders, prior psychiatric counseling, prescription of psychiatric medications, and prior psychiatric hospitalization among newly homeless young adults. A consecutive sample of 423 adults aged 18 to 21 years who sought emergency shelter for the first time between October 1, 2007, and February 29, 2008, were assessed at intake. Logistic regression analyses determined the associations between foster care and any psychiatric disorder (affective, anxiety, personality, and psychotic) and psychiatric treatment. The analyses adjusted for demographic characteristics, childhood abuse, substance use, prior arrest, unemployment, lack of high school diploma, and histories of psychiatric disorders and drug abuse among biological relatives. Homeless young adults with histories of foster care were 70% more likely than those without such histories to report any psychiatric disorder. They were more than twice as likely to have received mental health counseling for a psychiatric disorder, to have been prescribed psychiatric medication, and to have been hospitalized for psychiatric problems. Histories of foster care among homeless young adults should trigger screening for psychiatric disorders to aid in the provision of treatment (counseling, medication, and hospitalization) tailored to the psychiatric needs of this highly vulnerable population.

  18. Enhancing executive functioning among toddlers in foster care with an attachment-based intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Teresa; Lee Raby, K; Caron, E B; Roben, Caroline K P; Dozier, Mary

    2017-05-01

    Young children in foster care often experience adversity, such as maltreatment and lack of stability in early caregiving relationships. As a result, these children are at risk for a range of problems, including deficits in executive functioning. The Attachment and Biobehavioral Catch-up for Toddlers (ABC-T) intervention was designed to help foster parents behave in ways that promote the development of young children's emerging self-regulatory capabilities. Participants included 173 parent-toddler dyads in three groups: foster families that were randomly assigned to receive either the ABC-T intervention (n = 63) or a control intervention (n = 58), as well as low-risk parent-toddler dyads from intact families (n = 52). At a follow-up conducted when children were approximately 48 months old, children's executive functioning abilities were assessed with the attention problems scale of the Child Behavior Checklist (Achenbach & Rescorla, 2000) and a graded version of the Dimensional Change Card Sort developed for preschoolers (Beck, Schaefer, Pang, & Carlson, 2011). Results showed that foster children whose parents received the ABC-T intervention and low-risk children never placed in foster care had fewer parent-reported attention problems and demonstrated greater cognitive flexibility during the Dimensional Change Card Sort than foster children whose parents received the control intervention. These results indicate that an attachment-based intervention implemented among toddlers in foster care is effective in enhancing children's executive functioning capabilities.

  19. Allowing Family to be Family: End-of-Life Care in Veterans Affairs Medical Foster Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manheim, Chelsea E; Haverhals, Leah M; Jones, Jacqueline; Levy, Cari R

    2016-01-01

    The Medical Foster Home program is a unique long-term care program coordinated by the Veterans Health Administration. The program pairs Veterans with private, 24-hour a day community-based caregivers who often care for Veterans until the end of life. This qualitative study explored the experiences of care coordination for Medical Foster Home Veterans at the end of life with eight Veterans' family members, five Medical Foster Home caregivers, and seven Veterans Health Administration Home-Based Primary Care team members. A case study, qualitative content analysis identified these themes addressing care coordination and impact of the Medical Foster Home model on those involved: (a) Medical Foster Home program supports Veterans' families; (b) Medical Foster Home program supports the caregiver as family; (c) Veterans' needs are met socially and culturally at the end of life; and (d) the changing needs of Veterans, families, and caregivers at Veterans' end of life are addressed. Insights into how to best support Medical Foster Home caregivers caring for Veterans at the end of life were gained including the need for more and better respite options and how caregivers are compensated in the month of the Veteran's death, as well as suggestions to navigate end-of-life care coordination with multiple stakeholders involved.

  20. Fostering the educational value of candidate evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothstein, Arden

    2017-12-01

    Approaches to fostering the educational value of candidate evaluation are presented, in view of the plethora of intra-psychic challenges that combine with many other complexities of learning to work as an analyst. Four integrally interrelated practices have been found to address sensitivities inherent in candidates' experience of training in general, and being evaluated in particular. When applied in concert, the institute's evaluative process not only becomes more considered, but also better promotes a psychoanalytic attitude and minimizes the intrusion of evaluators' personal responses. The first is defining and employing in synergy criteria for clinical immersion based on demonstration of the development and deepening of an analytic process, as well as the development of psychoanalytic competencies. The second is mandating institute-wide application of guidelines for assessment of progression/graduation that are clearly explicated to all candidates and faculty. The third is transparent and timely communication between candidates and their supervisors and progression advisors regarding progress essential to a sense of collaboration. Fourth the progression review process must be systematic and in-depth, with built-in consultative relationships serving as checks and balances on personal elements. The implementation and educational impact of these practices are considered in the case of one candidate. Copyright © 2016 Institute of Psychoanalysis.

  1. Social Capital Theory: Another Lens for School Social Workers to Use to Support Students Living in Foster Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fram, Maryah Stella; Altshuler, Sandra J.

    2009-01-01

    Schools have a wide range of connections with the child welfare system, with common interests in the care, well-being, and future life opportunities of children living in foster care. Children in foster care are often the most vulnerable students in the school system, and school social workers often serve as important resources for these children.…

  2. Fostering Emotion Expression and Affective Involvement with Communication Partners in People with Congenital Deafblindness and Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Marga A. W.; Janssen, Marleen J.; Ruijssenaars, Wied A. J. J. M.; Huisman, Mark; Riksen-Walraven, J. Marianne

    2017-01-01

    Background: Recent studies have shown that it is possible to foster affective involvement between people with congenital deafblindness and their communication partners. Affective involvement is crucial for well-being, and it is important to know whether it can also be fostered with people who have congenital deafblindness and intellectual…

  3. 76 FR 25519 - National Foster Care Month, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-05

    ...#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8661 of April 29, 2011 National Foster Care Month, 2011 By the President of the... children. For nearly half a million youth in foster care across our country, the best path to success we... National Foster Care Month, we renew our commitment to ensuring a brighter future for foster youth, and we...

  4. Strengthening Foster Parent-Adolescent Relationships through Filial Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capps, Jennifer E.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explore the application of filial therapy as a means of strengthening relationships between foster parents and adolescent foster children. Adolescents in foster care experience a number of placement disruptions and while a number of therapeutic interventions are implemented to assist adolescents in foster care,…

  5. Identifying Divergent Foster Care Careers for Danish Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fallesen, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Foster care children who experience placement disruption and foster care instability are at elevated risk for a host of poor outcomes, yet little work considers what these unstable foster care careers look like or what causes them. In this article, I start by using previous studies on foster care...

  6. Development and piloting of a treatment foster care program for older youth with psychiatric problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillen, J Curtis; Narendorf, Sarah Carter; Robinson, Debra; Havlicek, Judy; Fedoravicius, Nicole; Bertram, Julie; McNelly, David

    2015-01-01

    Older youth in out-of-home care often live in restrictive settings and face psychiatric issues without sufficient family support. This paper reports on the development and piloting of a manualized treatment foster care program designed to step down older youth with high psychiatric needs from residential programs to treatment foster care homes. A team of researchers and agency partners set out to develop a treatment foster care model for older youth based on Multi-dimensional Treatment Foster Care (MTFC). After matching youth by mental health condition and determining for whom randomization would be allowed, 14 youth were randomized to treatment as usual or a treatment foster home intervention. Stakeholders were interviewed qualitatively at multiple time points. Quantitative measures assessed mental health symptoms, days in locked facilities, employment and educational outcomes. Development efforts led to substantial variations from the MTFC model and a new model, Treatment Foster Care for Older Youth was piloted. Feasibility monitoring suggested that it was difficult, but possible to recruit and randomize youth from and out of residential homes and that foster parents could be recruited to serve them. Qualitative data pointed to some qualified clinical successes. Stakeholders viewed two team roles - that of psychiatric nurse and skills coaches - very highly. However, results also suggested that foster parents and some staff did not tolerate the intervention well and struggled to address the emotion dysregulation issues of the young people they served. Quantitative data demonstrated that the intervention was not keeping youth out of locked facilities. The intervention needed further refinement prior to a broader trial. Intervention development work continued until components were developed to help address emotion regulation problems among fostered youth. Psychiatric nurses and skills coaches who work with youth in community settings hold promise as important

  7. Identifying divergent foster care careers for Danish children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallesen, Peter

    2014-11-01

    Foster care children who experience placement disruption and foster care instability are at elevated risk for a host of poor outcomes, yet little work considers what these unstable foster care careers look like or what causes them. In this article, I start by using previous studies on foster care drift, instability, and placement disruptions to define the unstable foster care career as a subset of foster care careers. I then use administrative data on 30,239 Danish children born 1982-1987 who entered foster care to generate nine foster care careers, two of which meet the criteria for an unstable career. Children with a high number of risk factors associated with foster care entry were also the most likely to enter an unstable career. I end by discussing implications for recent studies of the effect of foster care on children's later life outcomes and the relevance of the findings for practitioners. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Optimizing foster family placement for infants and toddlers : A randomized controlled trial on the effect of the Foster Family Intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Andel, Hans; Post, Wendy; Jansen, Lucres; Van der Gaag, Rutger Jan; Knorth, Erik; Grietens, Hans

    The relationship between foster children and their foster carers comes with many risks and may be very stressful both for parents and children. We developed an intervention (foster family intervention [FFI]) to tackle these risks. The intervention focuses on foster children below the age of 5 years.

  9. Development of an Intervention for Foster Parents of Young Foster Children with Externalizing Behavior: Theoretical Basis and Program Description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanschoonlandt, Femke; Vanderfaeillie, Johan; Van Holen, Frank; De Maeyer, Skrallan

    2012-01-01

    Foster parents are often faced with serious externalizing behaviors of their foster child. These behavioral problems may induce family stress and are related to less effective parenting and often increase. Foster children with behavioral problems are also more at risk of placement breakdown. An intervention to support foster parents of young…

  10. Optimizing foster family placement for infants and toddlers: A randomized controlled trial on the effect of the foster family intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andel, H. Van; Post, W.; Jansen, L.; Gaag, R.J. van der; Knorth, E.; Grietens, H.

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between foster children and their foster carers comes with many risks and may be very stressful both for parents and children. We developed an intervention (foster family intervention [FFI]) to tackle these risks. The intervention focuses on foster children below the age of 5 years.

  11. Exiting Foster Care: A Case Study of Former Foster Children Enrolled in Higher Education in Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwandt, Jamie R.

    2013-01-01

    In the United States, foster care is provided to children to avert maltreatment and abuse of children in distressed families by providing a temporary home or a foster home. Courts with jurisdiction over families have been charged by Congress to find appropriate homes when necessary circumstances occur. In fiscal year 2009, there were 423,773…

  12. Foster Care Experiences and Educational Outcomes of Young Adults Formerly Placed in Foster Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havalchak, Anne; White, Catherine Roller; O'Brien, Kirk; Pecora, Peter J.; Sepulveda, Martin

    2009-01-01

    This study contributes to the body of research on the educational outcomes of young adults who were formerly placed in foster care. Telephone interviews were conducted with 359 young adults (a 54.6% response rate). Participants must have been served for at least one year by one private foster care agency in one of its twenty-two offices. Results…

  13. Foster Care and College: The Educational Aspirations and Expectations of Youth in the Foster Care System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Chris M.; Lewis, Rhonda K.; Nilsen, Corinne; Colvin, Deltha Q.

    2013-01-01

    Despite an overall increase in college attendance, low-income youth and particularly those in the foster care system are less likely to attend college (Wolanin, 2005). Although youth in foster care report high educational aspirations, as little as 4% obtain a 4-year college degree (Nixon & Jones, 2007). The purpose of this study is to explore…

  14. An Exploration of How Foster Parents Educationally Assist Foster Children: A Qualitative Phenomenological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarate, Grace

    2013-01-01

    Foster children are academically at risk as a result of abuse, neglect and family disruptions. Findings from previous studies have underscored the critical role played by foster parents in monitoring the academic progress of the children placed in the home. The purpose of this qualitative phenomenological research study was to identify the skill…

  15. Adaptation Issues in Disabled Children Deprived of Parental Care, Living in Foster Families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shulga T.I.

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on revealing psychological issues in the adaptation of children, including the ones with disabilities, which are deprived of parental care and are raised in foster families. The paper describes psychological features of relative caregivers, outlines the specifics, dynamics and contributing factors of anxiety in children deprived of parental care as well as in biological children of foster carers. Also, the paper reviews the specifics of relationships between relative carers and children with disabilities, the former’s approaches to raising a disabled child. Much attention is drawn to the difficulties in childrearing and teaching experienced by the caregivers. The paper concludes that there is a strong need for support from social workers and family intervention specialists. Supported within the framework of the state task FGAU "FIRO", research topics of the 25.304.2016/NM "Complex social-psychological support of foster families who foster orphans and children left without parental care, including children with disabilities"

  16. Conceptualizing the Step-Down for Foster Youth Approaching Adulthood: Perceptions of Service Providers, Caseworkers, and Foster Parents

    OpenAIRE

    Havlicek, Judy; McMillen, J. Curtis; Fedoravicius, Nicole; McNelly, David; Robinson, Debra

    2012-01-01

    Studies find considerable movement between residential treatment and less restrictive foster home settings, with approximately half of foster youth who are stepped down eventually returning to a higher level of care. Very little is known about the step down for foster youth who are approaching adulthood in locked residential facilities. A qualitative study of stepping down a small sample of foster youth, as perceived by team members delivering a model of treatment foster care, is presented. T...

  17. Anticipatory child fostering and household economic security in Malawi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Bachan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: While there is a rich literature on the practice of child fostering in sub-Saharan Africa, little is known about how fostering impacts receiving households, as few studies consider household conditions both before and after fostering. Despite the fact that circumstancessurrounding fostering vary, the literature's key distinction of fostering is often drawn along the simple line of whether or not a household is fostering a child. This paper argues that anticipation of fostering responsibilities, in particular, is a useful dimension to distinguish fostering experiences for receiving households. Objective: This paper examines the relationship between receiving a foster child and subsequent changes in household wealth. Particular emphasis is placed on how these changes are conditioned by differing levels of anticipation of the fostering event. Methods: This study uses data from Tsogolo la Thanzi (TLT, a longitudinal survey in Balaka, Malawi. Using data from 1754 TLT respondents, fixed effects pooled time-series models are estimated to assess whether and how receiving a foster child changes household wealth. Results: This paper demonstrates the heterogeneity of fostering experiences for receiving households.The results show that households that anticipate fostering responsibilities experience a greater increase in household wealth than both households that do not foster and those that are surprised by fostering. Conclusions: Households that anticipate fostering responsibilities exhibit the greatest increase in householdwealth. While fostering households that do not anticipate fostering responsibilities may not experience these gains, there is no evidence to indicate that such households are negatively impacted relative to households that do not foster. This finding suggests that additional childcare responsibilities may not be as detrimental to African households as some researchers have feared.

  18. Fostering Innovation Through Robotics Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Certification (REC) for the LEGO and VEX hardware platforms. The certification test measures content knowledge as well as a teacher’s pedagogical ...2011, June).Calculational versus mechanistic mathematics in propelling the development of physical knowledge . Paper to be presented at the41st annual

  19. Screening Foster Children for Mental Disorders: Properties of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Stine; Heiervang, Einar R.; Havik, Toril; Havik, Odd E.

    2014-01-01

    Background High prevalence of mental disorders among foster children highlight the need to examine the mental health of children placed out of home. We examined the properties of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) in screening school-aged foster children for mental disorders. Methods Foster parents and teachers of 279 foster children completed the SDQ and the diagnostic interview Developmental and Well-Being Assessment (DAWBA). Using the diagnoses derived from the DAWBA as the standard, we examined the performance of the SDQ scales as dimensional measures of mental health problems using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses. Recommended cut-off scores were derived from ROC coordinates. The SDQ predictive algorithms were also examined. Results ROC analyses supported the screening properties of the SDQ Total difficulties and Impact scores (AUC = 0.80–0.83). Logistic regression analyses showed that the prevalence of mental disorders increased linearly with higher SDQ Total difficulties scores (X2 = 121.47, df = 13, pscreening foster children for mental health problems. Cut-off values for both scales are suggested. The SDQ multi-informant algorithms are not recommended for mental health screening of foster children in Norway. PMID:25006669

  20. Medicaid Managed Care and the Health Care Utilization of Foster Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Makayla; Marton, James; Yelowitz, Aaron; Talbert, Jeffery

    2017-01-01

    A recent trend in state Medicaid programs is the transition of vulnerable populations into Medicaid managed care (MMC) who were initially carved out of such coverage, such as foster children or those with disabilities. The purpose of this article is to evaluate the impact of the transition of foster children from fee-for-service Medicaid coverage to MMC coverage on outpatient health care utilization. There is very little empirical evidence on the impact of managed care on the health care utilization of foster children because of the recent timing of these transitions as well as challenges associated with finding data sets large enough to contain a sufficient number of foster children for such analysis. Using administrative Medicaid data from Kentucky, we use retrospective difference-in-differences analysis to compare the outpatient utilization of foster children transitioned to MMC in one region of the state with foster children in the rest of the state who remained in fee-for-service coverage. We find that the transition to MMC led to a 4 percentage point reduction in the probability of having any monthly outpatient utilization. We also estimate that MMC leads to a reduction in outpatient spending.

  1. How dual-identity processes foster creativity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goclowska, M.A.; Crisp, R.J.

    2014-01-01

    We propose a theoretical model explaining when and why possessing 2 inconsistent social identities can foster superior creativity. The framework describes how during cultural adaptation individuals (a) alternate their identities across contexts, (b) integrate elements of their distinct (i.e., remote

  2. Fostering structural change? China's divergence and convergence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper analyses the divergence and convergence of the characteristics of China's economic relationships with Africa – trade, investment and aid – with Africa's 'traditional' partners, i.e. Western industrialised countries. It argues that these relationships may foster structural transformation of African economies. The latter ...

  3. Strategies for Fostering Creativity Among Business Education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was designed to find out the strategies for fostering creativity among business education graduates in Nigeria. The instrument that was used to collect the data for this study was a questionnaire. The study sample comprised all the 71 Business Education lecturers in the universities and colleges of Education in ...

  4. Merconet: Strengthening Economic Research and Fostering ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Merconet: Strengthening Economic Research and Fostering Entrepreneurship in South America. The Mercosur Economic Research Network (Merconet) was created in 1999 to generate knowledge to inform the Mercosur regional integration process. Although the regional integration agenda has stalled, the network has ...

  5. Effectiveness of Mindfulness Training in Fostering Tobacco ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated the impact of mindfulness training in fostering tobacco cessation among undergraduates in a Nigerian university. It also observed the moderating effect of self-efficacy on the causal link between mindfulness training and tobacco cessation. Participants were 57 students randomly assigned to ...

  6. Fostering a Culture of Innovation in Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Noruzi

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available In an increasingly turbulent and hyper-competitive globalized economy, organizations must find ways to innovate in order to survive. Organizations need to take a proactive strategic approach to fostering and implementing strategies for greater organizational innovation. The aim of this paper is to explore the features and characteristics of innovative organizations.

  7. Prereading Deficits in Children in Foster Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pears, Katherine C.; Heywood, Cynthia V.; Kim, Hyoun K.; Fisher, Philip A.

    2011-01-01

    Reading skills are core competencies in children's readiness to learn and may be particularly important for children in foster care, who are at risk for academic difficulties and higher rates of special education placement. In this study, prereading skills (phonological awareness, alphabetic knowledge, and oral language ability) and kindergarten…

  8. Foster Family Resources, Psychosocial Functioning, and Retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Kathryn W.; Orme, John G.; Cox, Mary Ellen; Buehler, Cheryl

    2003-01-01

    This longitudinal study examined the effect of family resources and psychosocial problems on retention for foster families. Almost 50 percent of families who started preservice training did not complete it. Families with more psychosocial problems and fewer resources were more likely to express uncertainly about continuing. These results have…

  9. Creative Stories: A Storytelling Game Fostering Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koukourikos, Antonis; Karampiperis, Pythagoras; Panagopoulos, George

    2014-01-01

    The process of identifying techniques for fostering creativity, and applying these theoretical constructs in real-world educational activities, is, by nature, multifaceted and not straightforward, pertaining to several fields such as cognitive theory and psychology. Furthermore, the quantification of the impact of different activities on…

  10. Fostering reflective practice with mobile technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tabuenca, Bernardo; Verpoorten, Dominique; Ternier, Stefaan; Westera, Wim; Specht, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Tabuenca, B., Verpoorten, D., Ternier, S., Westera, W., & Specht, M. (2012). Fostering reflective practice with mobile technologies. In A. Moore, V. Pammer, L. Pannese, M. Prilla, K. Rajagopal, W. Reinhardt, Th. D. Ullman, & Ch. Voigt (Eds.), Proceedings of the 2nd Workshop on Awareness and

  11. Fostering Adolescents' Interpersonal Behaviour: An Empirical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated the effect of enhanced thinking skills (ETS) and social skill training (SST) in fostering interpersonal behaviour among Nigerian adolescents. A pre- and post-test experimental-control group design with a 3x2 factorial matrix was employed for the study. Gender which was used as a moderator variable ...

  12. Measuring Parent Engagement in Foster Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpert, Lily T.; Britner, Preston A.

    2009-01-01

    Today, child welfare agencies widely endorse a family-centered approach to foster care casework. This approach centers on a collaborative parent-caseworker relationship as a mechanism for maintaining parents' engagement in services and presumes that continued engagement will propel parents toward reunification. However, despite the importance of…

  13. Foster parenting, human imprinting and conventional handling ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of human imprinting and foster parenting by adult ostriches on the survival and growth performance of ostrich chicks were compared to conventional chick-rearing practices in two separate experiments. In the first experiment, the growth rate and survival of chicks imprinted onto humans were compared with those ...

  14. Foster parenting, human imprinting and conventional handling ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    p2492989

    Abstract. The effects of human imprinting and foster parenting by adult ostriches on the survival and growth performance of ostrich chicks were compared to conventional chick-rearing practices in two separate experiments. In the first experiment, the growth rate and survival of chicks imprinted onto humans were compared ...

  15. Fostering Preservice Reflection through Response Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Icy

    2008-01-01

    Journal writing is a kind of reflective writing that requires prospective teachers to construct knowledge through questioning their own assumptions about teaching and learning, and hence in line with the general direction of education reform in Hong Kong. This article describes a study that uses response journals as a tool for fostering reflection…

  16. Hanford wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGhan, V.L.; Damschen, D.W.

    1977-06-01

    The Hanford Site contains about 2200 wells constructed from pre-Hanford Works days to the present. As of June 1977, about 1900 wells still exist, and about 850 of these existing wells were drilled to the ground-water table. About 700 of these wells (including about 24 farm wells) still contain water. The others have become dry through infiltration of sediments or a general lowering of the water table in their vicinity. This report, providing the most complete documentation of wells in and adjacent to the Hanford Site, supersedes all previous compilations of Hanford wells.

  17. Homelessness during the transition from foster care to adulthood

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dworsky, Amy; Napolitano, Laura; Courtney, Mark

    2013-01-01

    .... Using data from the Midwest Evaluation of the Adult Functioning of Former Foster Youth, a longitudinal study of youths aging out of foster care in 3 Midwestern states, and a bounds approach, we...

  18. The Influence of Perception on Maternal Sensitivity in Foster Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponciano, Leslie

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the association between perceptions of children's care needs and maternal sensitivity with 76 dyads in foster care. Foster mothers were more sensitive to typically developing children perceived as requiring easier care and were less sensitive to children with developmental delays. Adopting foster mothers were sensitive with…

  19. Re-Imagining Language, Culture, and Family in Foster Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puig, Victoria I.

    2013-01-01

    Nearly half a million children in the United States are currently being served by the foster care system. Infants and toddlers represent the largest single group entering foster care. While these very young children are at the greatest peril for physical, mental health, and developmental issues and tend to spend the longest time in the foster care…

  20. The Loneliest Babies: Foster Care in the Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicker, Sheryl

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses an ignored problem--the plight of infants and toddlers in foster care who find themselves hospitalized. A majority of the children in foster care will be hospitalized for medical treatment while in foster care because they are more likely to have serious medical problems or developmental disabilities than their age peers.…

  1. 78 FR 26219 - National Foster Care Month, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-03

    ...;#0; ] Proclamation 8968 of April 30, 2013 National Foster Care Month, 2013 By the President of the.... Thanks to those efforts, the number of young people in foster care is falling and fewer children are... services that strengthen the foster care system and encourage adoption. We will keep working to ensure...

  2. An Investigation of Empathy of Foster Families, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vural, Bilgin Kiray; Körükçü, Özlem; Aral, Neriman; Körükçü, Gökhan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: empathy brings people closer and facilitates communication in almost all the fields of daily life. Having been an important dimension of foster care, empathetic skills should be developed in a foster family. In this study, we aimed to determine the empathic level of the foster families. Methods: this cross-sectional study on foster…

  3. The Use of Online Social Support by Foster Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Jerry; Kerman, Ben

    2004-01-01

    The extent to which foster families utilize social support on the Internet is examined in a sample of 34 foster families in a digital divide intervention program and a comparison sample of 30 foster families who were not part of the program. In spite of increased Internet access, the frequency of using online social support is low. A minority of…

  4. Child Welfare Professionals' Attitudes toward Kinship Foster Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeman, Sandra; Boisen, Laura

    1999-01-01

    Surveyed 261 urban, metropolitan, and rural Minnesota child welfare professionals regarding their perceptions of kinship foster care. Found that most had generally positive perceptions of kinship foster parents' motivations and competence and of kinship foster care. Participants also believed that kinship placements were more difficult to…

  5. Project Iris - Caring for a sexually abused foster child.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wubs, Dorijn; Grietens, Hans; Batstra, Laura

    2014-01-01

    The traumatizing effects of child sexual abuse are generally acknowledged. Successfully fostering a child with a history of sexual abuse requires specific skills and knowledge. What expertise do foster families caring for these vulnerable children have? What do they need to succeed? What do foster

  6. Hanford wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGhan, V.L.; Myers, D.A.; Damschen, D.W.

    1976-03-01

    The Hanford Reservation contains about 2100 wells constructed from pre-Hanford Works to the present. As of Jan. 1976, about 1800 wells still exist, 850 of which were drilled to the groundwater table; 700 still contain water. This report provides the most complete documentation of these wells and supersedes all previous compilations, including BNWL-1739. (DLC)

  7. Hanford wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGhan, V.L.

    1989-06-01

    The Site Characterization and Assessment Section of the Geosciences Department at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has compiled a list of wells located on or near the Hanford Site. Information has been updated on wells existing from the days before construction of the Hanford Works to the present. This work was funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE). The list of wells will be used by DOE contractors who need condensed, tabular information on well location, construction, and completion dates. This report does not include data on lithologic logs and ground-water contamination. Moreover, the completeness of this list is limited because of new well construction and existing well modifications, which are continually under way. Despite these limitations, this list represents the most complete description possible of data pertaining to wells on or adjacent to the Hanford Site. 7 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  8. Fostering International Practising of Higher Education Students

    OpenAIRE

    Laurikainen, Marja; Niittymäki, Seppo; Nylund, Turo; Tenhunen, Lauri

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we describe a system which can be used to foster the international practicing of higher education students. The system has been successfully piloted during a EU project called SPRING to Work. The SPRING to Work system for international traineeships defines the roles of the participants precisely enough to better utilize the potential benefits from each practicing period from the point of view of all the participants, especially the students. The system introduces a four corn...

  9. How foreign-born workers foster exports

    OpenAIRE

    Marchal, Léa; Nedoncelle, Clément

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the export-enhancing effect of foreign workers at the firm level. We first develop a theoretical framework of heterogeneous firms, assuming that foreign workers allow for productivity gains and convey valuable information on foreign markets. We illustrate that foreign workers foster exports at the extensive and the intensive margins. This effect can be decomposed in a general effect - to which any foreign worker contributes - and a destination-specific effect - to which only fo...

  10. Strategies for retaining adolescent foster children in school

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    M.A. South Africa is facing a high rate of children in need of care due to high escalation of the HIV/AIDS related illness. The children are being left without biological parents, and they are eventually placed in the foster care custody of their extended families. Sometimes there are challenges that are experienced by the foster parents and the adolescents’ foster children, as a result the adolescents’ foster children end up leaving school. Foster care learners who stay away from school o...

  11. Hanford wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGhan, V.L.; Mitchell, P.J.; Argo, R.S.

    1985-02-01

    The report is comprised of a list of wells located on or near the Hanford Site. Information on location, construction and completion dates has been updated on wells existing from the days before construction of the Hanford Works to the present. 4 refs. (ACR)

  12. Attitude, interest, and motivation for adoption and foster care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyebjee, Tyzoon

    2003-01-01

    This survey compares prospective foster and adoptive parents' attitudes, willingness, and motivations, and discusses implications for media campaigns. The results show that demographic profiles of targets for adoption and foster placements are the same, an opportunity exists to shape positive attitudes toward foster care in immigrant populations, the most compelling way to attract parents is to focus on the child in need, and testimonials of personal experiences of foster and adoptive parents should address perceived barriers to adopting or fostering. Political, religious, and environmental ideology were unrelated to attitudes or willingness to adopt or foster. Respondents with strong identifications with gay or lesbian lifestyles exhibited a higher than average willingness to adopt or foster.

  13. Hanford wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chamness, M.A.; Merz, J.K.

    1993-08-01

    Records describing wells located on or near the Hanford Site have been maintained by Pacific Northwest Laboratory and the operating contractor, Westinghouse Hanford Company. In support of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project, portions of the data contained in these records have been compiled into the following report, which is intended to be used by those needing a condensed, tabular summary of well location and basic construction information. The wells listed in this report were constructed over a period of time spanning almost 70 years. Data included in this report were retrieved from the Hanford Envirorunental Information System (HEIS) database and supplemented with information not yet entered into HEIS. While considerable effort has been made to obtain the most accurate and complete tabulations possible of the Hanford Site wells, omissions and errors may exist. This document does not include data on lithologic logs, ground-water analyses, or specific well completion details.

  14. Use of the Hydrological Simulation Program-FORTRAN and Bacterial Source Tracking for Development of the fecal coliform Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) for Accotink Creek, Fairfax County, Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyer, Douglas; Hyer, Kenneth

    2003-01-01

    Impairment of surface waters by fecal coliform bacteria is a water-quality issue of national scope and importance. Section 303(d) of the Clean Water Act requires that each State identify surface waters that do not meet applicable water-quality standards. In Virginia, more than 175 stream segments are on the 1998 Section 303(d) list of impaired waters because of violations of the water-quality standard for fecal coliform bacteria. A total maximum daily load (TMDL) will need to be developed by 2006 for each of these impaired streams and rivers by the Virginia Departments of Environmental Quality and Conservation and Recreation. A TMDL is a quantitative representation of the maximum load of a given water-quality constituent, from all point and nonpoint sources, that a stream can assimilate without violating the designated water-quality standard. Accotink Creek, in Fairfax County, Virginia, is one of the stream segments listed by the State of Virginia as impaired by fecal coliform bacteria. Watershed modeling and bacterial source tracking were used to develop the technical components of the fecal coliform bacteria TMDL for Accotink Creek. The Hydrological Simulation Program?FORTRAN (HSPF) was used to simulate streamflow, fecal coliform concentrations, and source-specific fecal coliform loading in Accotink Creek. Ribotyping, a bacterial source tracking technique, was used to identify the dominant sources of fecal coliform bacteria in the Accotink Creek watershed. Ribotyping also was used to determine the relative contributions of specific sources to the observed fecal coliform load in Accotink Creek. Data from the ribotyping analysis were incorporated into the calibration of the fecal coliform model. Study results provide information regarding the calibration of the streamflow and fecal coliform bacteria models and also identify the reductions in fecal coliform loads required to meet the TMDL for Accotink Creek. The calibrated streamflow model simulated observed

  15. Foster home placements and the probability of family reunification: Does licensing matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Joseph P; Perron, Brian E; Moore, Andrew; Victor, Bryan; Evangelist, Michael

    2016-09-01

    The concept of foster care has been widely studied in child welfare. The literature is well developed with regard to the risk of initial placement, length of stay in care, placement stability, exits to permanency, and emancipation. Yet, the literature is woefully underdeveloped when it comes to understanding if variations in the types and characteristics of foster homes impact important child welfare outcomes. The current study utilizes entry cohorts pulled from statewide administrative data (N=17,960) to investigate the association between types of foster care and the probability of reunification. We focus specifically on the licensing status of foster homes. Reflecting federal benchmarks, we examined the odds of reunification at one- and two-year intervals. Propensity score analysis was used to reduce selection bias. Adjusted logistic regression models revealed that youth placed in licensed relative care (LRC) homes were the least likely to achieve reunification compared with youth placed in licensed non-relative care (LNC) homes and unlicensed relative care (URC) homes. Conversely, youth placed in URC homes were more likely to achieve reunification as compared with youth placed in LRC and LNC homes. These findings will help states to efficiently target scarce resources to specific types of foster homes that may be impacting federal reunification benchmarks. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Probation foster care as an outcome for children exiting child welfare foster care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonson-Reid, Melissa; Barth, Richard P

    2003-07-01

    Little research has been done to help us understand what happens to children who exit child welfare foster care for reasons other than emancipation. Almost no research exists to help us understand out-of-home placement supervised by other providers of children's social services such as juvenile probation or mental health. This study examined school-age children who entered out-of-home placement supervised by probation departments after they left child welfare foster or group care. Instability in child welfare placements significantly increased the risk of a transition to probation foster care. Among the children exiting child welfare placements, those who had entered their first spell in care at ages 12 through 14 or were first removed because of sexual abuse or neglect were at greater risk of probation out-of-home placement. Implications for social work policy and services are discussed.

  17. Revisionisms and the Story of Ireland: From Sean O’Faolain to Roy Foster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred Markey

    2005-03-01

    In 1994 Foster delivered a lecture to the University of Oxford entitled “The Story of Ireland” in which he looked in depth at the history of the traditional narrative through books of the same title. Of these he only briefly mentioned a particularly interesting example of the genre, The Story of Ireland, written by Sean O’Faolain, for many Ireland’s first revisionist. In this paper I consider the importance of this omission and through a look at both texts, as well as at other influential contributions to the revisionist debate, I suggest that O’Faolain and Foster practice fundamentally different revisionisms.

  18. 45 CFR 1356.71 - Federal review of the eligibility of children in foster care and the eligibility of foster care...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... foster care and the eligibility of foster care providers in title IV-E programs. 1356.71 Section 1356.71..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION ON CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES, FOSTER CARE... § 1356.71 Federal review of the eligibility of children in foster care and the eligibility of foster care...

  19. Conceptualizing the Step-Down for Foster Youth Approaching Adulthood: Perceptions of Service Providers, Caseworkers, and Foster Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havlicek, Judy; McMillen, J Curtis; Fedoravicius, Nicole; McNelly, David; Robinson, Debra

    2012-12-01

    Studies find considerable movement between residential treatment and less restrictive foster home settings, with approximately half of foster youth who are stepped down eventually returning to a higher level of care. Very little is known about the step down for foster youth who are approaching adulthood in locked residential facilities. A qualitative study of stepping down a small sample of foster youth, as perceived by team members delivering a model of treatment foster care, is presented. These findings reveal the dimensions of stepping down foster youth at the onset of adulthood, and highlight the importance of providing foster youth with developmental opportunities to engage in the social roles and tasks of late adolescence and/or early adulthood. Implications for further refining the concept of stepping down from a developmental perspective are discussed.

  20. "I Am Not a Format": Teachers' Experiences with Fostering Creativity in the Era of Accountability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivant, Katie F.

    2015-01-01

    This phenomenological study examined the experience of fostering creativity and creative thinking in the classroom under high-stakes testing conditions, as described by teachers at a magnet elementary school in Central California. The tensions between standardization and professionalism, as well as performativity and creativity, served as the…

  1. A Tale of Three Cities: Fostering Intrinsic Motivation for Information Seeking in Children of Diverse Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Sherry R.; Kastello, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the research was to increase understanding of the experiences in the lives of upper elementary-aged students that foster an intrinsic motivation to seek information, as well as to compare and contrast the experiences of intrinsically motivated students from an individualist culture (Colorado Springs, Colorado, U.S.), a collectivist…

  2. Re-examining Social Work Roles and Tasks with Foster Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulcher, Leon C.; McGladdery, Suzanne

    2011-01-01

    In order to promote developmental outcomes with children and young people and to nurture their positive health and well-being in foster care, social workers and case managers are required to direct professional attention toward both the child or young person and her/his daily living environment(s)--at home, at school, and in the local…

  3. Changes in Externalizing and Internalizing Problems of Adolescents in Foster Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWey, Lenore M.; Cui, Ming; Pazdera, Andrea L.

    2010-01-01

    Using a developmental psychopathology framework, this study aimed to examine changes in externalizing and internalizing problems of adolescents in foster care and to determine whether type of maltreatment, gender, and age influenced trajectories. Authors used 3 waves of data from the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being. Growth-curve…

  4. Program of Adaptation Assistance in Foster Families and Particular Features of Its Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakirova, Venera G.; Gaysina, Guzel I.; Zhumabaeva, Asia

    2015-01-01

    Relevance of the problem stated in the article, conditioned by the fact that the successful adaptation of orphans in a foster family requires specialized knowledge and skills, as well as the need of professional support. Therefore, this article aims at substantiation of the effectiveness of the developed pilot program psycho-pedagogical support of…

  5. Fostering Students' Moderation Competence: The Interplay between Social Relatedness and Perceived Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bürgermeister, Anika; Ringeisen, Tobias; Raufelder, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Using a longitudinal design, the present study examined whether two teaching concepts that varied in their capacity to foster students' self-determination affected students' sense of social relatedness and their perceived moderation competence, as well as the interplay between these two components and the students' performance during a moderation…

  6. Cross-fostering in gray wolves (Canis lupus lupus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharis, Inger; Amundin, Mats

    2015-01-01

    Cross-fostering in canids, with captive-bred pups introduced into endangered wild populations, might aid conservation efforts by increasing genetic diversity and lowering the risk of inbreeding depression. The gray wolf (Canis lupus lupus) population in Scandinavia suffers from severe inbreeding due to a narrow genetic base and geographical isolation. This study aimed at evaluating the method to cross-foster wolf pups from zoo-born to zoo-born litters. The following was assessed: female initial acceptance of foster pups, growth rate in relation to age difference between foster pups and pups in recipient litters and survival over the first 33 weeks. The study included four litters added by two foster pups in each. The age differences between the foster pups and the recipient litters were 2-8 days. After augmentation, all four females accepted the foster pups, demonstrated by her moving the entire litter to a new den site. Growth rate was dependent on the age difference of the pups in the foster litters, with a considerably slower growth rate in the 8 days younger pups. However, these pups later appeared to be at no disadvantage. Foster pups had a higher survival rate than females' pups, however, the causes of death were probably not kin or non-kin related. The results indicate that cross-fostering works in gray wolves and that this might be a plausible way to increase genetic variation in the wild population. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Fostering Creative Problem Solvers in Higher Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Chunfang

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have emphasized issues of social emergence based on thinking of societies as complex systems. The complexity of professional practice has been recognized as the root of challenges for higher education. To foster creative problem solvers is a key response of higher education in order...... to meet such challenges. This chapter aims to illustrate how to understand: 1) complexity as the nature of professional practice; 2) creative problem solving as the core skill in professional practice; 3) creativity as interplay between persons and their environment; 4) higher education as the context...... of societies, creative problem solving skills, and higher education development in one theoretical framework....

  8. Creating environments that foster academic integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tippitt, Michelle Pixley; Ard, Nell; Kline, Juanita Reese; Tilghman, Joan; Chamberlain, Barbara; Meagher, P Gail

    2009-01-01

    A number of studies related to academic dishonesty within the nursing student population have been published; however, little has been written in the nursing literature regarding academic integrity and means of promoting this value. In addition to the many short-term solutions to prevent cheating and dissuade academic misconduct that are offered, solutions that promote long-term affective changes underlying the acquisition of academic integrity are needed. This article provides a context for discussions related to academic integrity, explores issues facing faculty when dealing with this challenge, and offers short-term and long-term strategies for creating environments that foster academic integrity.

  9. Attempts for fostering researches on information compilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Mitsunori; Kato, Tsuneaki

    Information compilation is a novel research topic which aims to compile various information intelligently, and to make it easy to comprehend/access. The information compilation is emphasized by two characteristics. The first one is a cross-modalitiness achieved by cooperation between non-linguistic information and linguistic information, and the second one is a continuousness in supporting all aspects of information utilization. To foster researches related to the information compilation, we conducted three attempts: installation of a reference model on information compilation, distribution of annotated corpus and a visualization platform as boundary objects, and deployment of an evaluation workshop. The paper describes current efforts of the attempts.

  10. Wellness Matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arteaga, Brenda

    2011-01-01

    Creating a healthier school in today's world of budget cuts and seemingly endless to-do lists is not only possible, but it is also imperative. Beyond the health implications, one of the most compelling reasons for creating healthier schools is that wellness serves as a power booster for learning. Numerous studies have documented what educators…

  11. Werable wellness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rozycki, Bartosz

    2015-01-01

    We live in a world full of rush and a ‘relaxed state of being’ might increasingly play a role in today’s fast paced society to overcome contemporary stress and related illnesses such as burn-outs. The Sleephones concept is a wearable wellness device that aims to support relaxation by combing music...

  12. Behavior problems, foster home integration, and evidence-based behavioral interventions: What predicts adoption of foster children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leathers, Sonya J; Spielfogel, Jill E; Gleeson, James P; Rolock, Nancy

    2012-05-01

    Adoption is particularly important for foster children with special mental health needs who are unable to return home, as adoption increases parental support often critically needed by youth with mental health issues. Unfortunately, significant behavior problems frequently inhibit foster parents from adopting, and little is known about factors that predict adoption when a child has behavior problems. Previous research suggests that foster parent behavioral training could potentially increase rates of successful adoptions for pre-school-aged foster children with behavior problems (Fisher, Kim, & Pears, 2009), but this has not been previously tested in older samples. In older children, effective treatment of behavior problems might also increase adoption by reducing the interference of behavior problems and strengthening the child's foster home integration. This pilot study focused on this question by testing associations between behavior problems, foster home integration, an evidence-based foster parent intervention, and adoption likelihood. This study used an intent-to-treat design to compare foster home integration and adoption likelihood for 31 foster children with histories of abuse and neglect whose foster parents received a foster behavioral parenting intervention (see Chamberlain, 2003) or usual services. Random effect regression analyses were used to estimate outcomes across four time points. As expected, externalizing behavior problems had a negative effect on both integration and adoption, and foster home integration had an independent positive effect on adoption. Internalizing behavior problems (e.g., depression/anxiety) were not related to adoption or integration. However, the intervention did not have a direct effect on either foster home integration or adoption despite its positive effect on behavior problems. Results from this preliminary study provide further evidence of the negative effect of externalizing behavior problems on adoption. Its findings

  13. The Empirical Ties between Religious Motivation and Altruism in Foster Parents: Implications for Faith-Based Initiatives in Foster Care and Adoption

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Michael Howell-Moroney

    2014-01-01

    .... This paper uses data from the National Survey of Current and Former Foster Parents to examine the associations between religious motivations for fostering, altruism and various measures of foster...

  14. Fostering Health: The Affordable Care Act, Medicaid, and Youth Transitioning from Foster Care. Policy Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Simmons, Renée; Dworsky, Amy; Tongue, Denzel; Hulbutta, Marikate

    2016-01-01

    The Affordable Care Act includes language that requires states to provide Medicaid coverage to youth who were in foster care in their state before aging out of the child welfare system. However, most states have interpreted the law differently for youth who move to their state after aging out, determining that automatic Medicaid coverage is an…

  15. The Potential for Successful Family Foster Care: Conceptualizing Competency Domains for Foster Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehler, Cheryl; Rhodes, Kathryn W.; Orme, John G.; Cuddeback, Gary

    2006-01-01

    The potential to foster successfully starts with developing and supporting competency in 12 domains: (1) providing a safe and secure environment; (2) providing a nurturing environment; (3) promoting educational attainment and success; (4) meeting physical and mental healthcare needs; (5) promoting social and emotional development; (6) supporting…

  16. Optimizing foster family placement for infants and toddlers: A randomized controlled trial on the effect of the foster family intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Andel, Hans; Post, Wendy; Jansen, Lucres; Van der Gaag, Rutger Jan; Knorth, Erik; Grietens, Hans

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between foster children and their foster carers comes with many risks and may be very stressful both for parents and children. We developed an intervention (foster family intervention [FFI]) to tackle these risks. The intervention focuses on foster children below the age of 5 years. The objective was to investigate the effects of FFI on the interactions between foster parents and foster children. A randomized control trial was carried out with a sample of 123 preschool aged children (mean age 18.8 months; 51% boys) and their foster carers. A pretest was carried out 6 to 8 weeks after placement and a posttest one half year later. Interactions were videotaped and coded using the Emotional Availability Scales (EAS). Foster carers were asked to fill in the Dutch version of the Parenting Stress Index. Morning and evening samples of children's salivary cortisol were taken. In the posttest, significantly positive effects were found on the following EAS subscales: Sensitivity, Structuring, Nonintrusiveness, and Responsiveness. We found no significant differences on stress levels of foster carers and children (Nijmeegse Ouderlijke Stress Index domains and salivary cortisol). This study shows that the FFI has a significant positive effect on parenting skills as measured with EAS and on Responsiveness of the foster child. Findings are discussed in terms of impact and significance relating to methodology and design of the study and to clinical relevance. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Caffeine fostering of mycoparasitic fungi against phytopathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Akifumi; Sano, Cecile M; Yazaki, Kazufumi; Sano, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Caffeine (1,3,7-trimethixanthine) is a typical purine alkaloid produced in more than 80 plant species. Its biological role is considered to strengthen plant's defense capabilities, directly as a toxicant to biotic attackers (allelopathy) and indirectly as an activator of defense system (priming). Caffeine is actively secreted into rhizosphere through primary root, and possibly affects the structure of microbe community nearby. The fungal community in coffee plant rhizosphere is enriched with particular species, including Trichoderma family, a mycoparasite that attacks and kills phytopathogens by coiling and destroying their hyphae. In the present study, the caffeine response of 8 filamentous fungi, 4 mycoparasitic Trichoderma, and 4 prey phytopathogens, was examined. Results showed that allelopathic effect of caffeine on fungal growth and development was differential, being stronger on pathogens than on Trichoderma species. Upon confronting, the prey immediately ceased the growth, whereas the predator continued to grow, indicating active mycoparasitism to have occurred. Caffeine enhanced mycoparasitism up to 1.7-fold. Caffeine thus functions in a double-track manner against fungal pathogens: first by direct suppression of growth and development, and second by assisting their natural enemy. These observations suggest that caffeine is a powerful weapon in the arms race between plants and pathogens by fostering enemy's enemy, and we propose the idea of "caffeine fostering" as the third role of caffeine.

  18. Fostering and managing diversity in schools of pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkansah, Nancy T; Youmans, Sharon L; Agness, Chanel F; Assemi, Mitra

    2009-12-17

    Organizational benefits of diversity in the workplace have been well documented. In health professions, however, diversity-related research traditionally has focused on the effect of diversity on health care disparities. Few tools exist describing the benefits of diversity from an organizational standpoint to guide pharmacy administrators and faculty members in nurturing and developing a culture of diversity. Given the scarcity of pharmacy specific data, experience from other academic areas and national/international diversity reports were incorporated into this manuscript to supplement the available pharmacy evidence base. This review summarizes the benefits of diversity from an academic organizational standpoint, discusses the issues administrators and faculty members must consider when developing programs, and provides guidance on best practices in fostering and managing diversity.

  19. Efficient Triple Helix collaboration fostering local niche innovation projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brem, Alexander; Radziwon, Agnieszka

    2017-01-01

    Collaboration between universities and their local stakeholders is becoming a key success factor for the growth of regional entrepreneurial ecosystems. Efficient energy solutions are often facing challenges in innovation diffusion, which is in contrast to the growing demand for providing answers...... to key ecological problems. In order to present how an efficient Triple Helix collaboration could foster and support niche innovations, an applied research project is introduced. This unique university-industry-government cooperation brings a students' idea to a proof-of-concept project thus covers...... the entire innovation process. The selected case offers insights of how and why such initiative could emerge, as well as discusses its implications for future technological innovations and in particular those that are about to emerge in regional entrepreneurial ecosystems. Networking, win...

  20. Effects of cross-fostering on play and anxiety in juvenile Fischer 344 and Lewis rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siviy, Stephen M; Eck, Samantha R; McDowell, Lana S; Soroka, Jennifer

    2017-02-01

    A cross-fostering design was used to assess the relative involvement of genetic variability and early postnatal experiences on differential levels of playfulness in juvenile Fischer 344 (F344) and Lewis (LEW) rats and the extent to which strain differences in anxiety may influence play in these two strains. F344 dams were found to lick and groom their pups less than LEW dams and this was not dependent upon the strain of the pups in the litter. As expected, F344 rats were less playful than LEW rats as demonstrated by fewer playful contacts directed to the nape of a Sprague-Dawley (SD) partner and a decreased likelihood of rotating completely to a supine position when their nape was contacted by the SD partner. These differences could not be readily explained by parallel strain differences in anxiety. The pattern of effects on play as a function of cross-fostering depended on both the genetic background of the pup and the motivational state of the pup prior to testing. Whereas in-fostered LEW pups solicited more play as isolation prior to testing increased from 4 to 24h, cross-fostered pups of both strains as well as in-fostered F344 pups were relatively insensitive to the motivational modulation of play solicitation. Responsiveness to play solicitations in pups of both strains reared by F344 dams was insensitive to prior isolation whereas pups reared by LEW dams were less likely to respond with a complete rotation to a supine position when solicited as isolation increased from 4 to 24h prior to testing. These data suggest that the overall level of playfulness in a particular strain of rat is fairly resistant to cross-fostering and may be particularly sensitive to genetic variation whereas how this urge is titrated and modified by motivational factors may be influenced more by epigenetic factors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Children in foster care: a vulnerable population at risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruskas, Delilah

    2008-05-01

    Nationally, 542,000 children are in foster care. Many of these children have prior histories of maltreatment such as abuse and neglect, with neglect being the most common form of maltreatment and the reason for many children requiring foster care services. Painful experiences associated with maltreatment and the trauma of being removed from one's parents (foster care) may affect the developmental and mental health of children. This paper synthesizes the experiences associated with foster care and reveals foster care outcomes obtained through a literature search of published research. Specifically, the notions of oppression and domination defined by Young (1990) experienced by children in foster are explored. Review of the literature and clinical practice. Most children in foster care, if not all, experience feelings of confusion, fear, apprehension of the unknown, loss, sadness, anxiety, and stress. Such feelings and experiences must be addressed and treated early to prevent or decrease poor developmental and mental health outcomes that ultimately affect a child's educational experience and the quality of adulthood. Systemic orientation for all children entering foster care is proposed as a preventative intervention that addresses associated experiences of children in foster care.

  2. Fostering Creativity in Tablet-Based Interactive Classrooms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hye Jeong Kim; Ji Hyeon Park; Sungae Yoo; Hyeoncheol Kim

    2016-01-01

    .... This discussion focuses on classroom interaction systems and technologies that can foster creativity, including tablets, electronic blackboards, interaction management solutions, and high-speed wireless internet...

  3. Foster Care Outcomes for Children With Intellectual Disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slayter, Elspeth M

    2016-10-01

    The promotion of speedy, permanent outcomes for foster children is a central child welfare policy goal. However, while children with intellectual disability (ID) are at greater risk for child welfare involvement, little is known about their case outcomes. This cross-sectional national study explores between-group foster care outcomes. Foster children with intellectual disability were more likely to have experienced an adoption disruption or dissolution but less likely to be reunified with a parent, primary caretaker or other family member. Implications for interagency collaboration in support of pre and post-foster care discharge support services are discussed.

  4. Maltreatment, Coping, and Substance Use in Youth in Foster Care: Examination of Moderation Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielli, Joy; Jackson, Yo; Huffhines, Lindsay; Stone, Katie

    2017-01-01

    Child maltreatment is associated with negative outcomes such as substance use (SU). This study tested relations among maltreatment history, coping behavior, and SU behavior in youth residing in foster care. Participants were 210 youth ( Mage = 12.71 years; SD = 2.95) in foster care who completed self-report measures through an audio computer-assisted self-interview program. Using a structural equation modeling framework and latent measurement constructs, positive associations were identified between maltreatment at baseline and coping behavior outcomes as well as SU behavior outcome approximately 4.5 months later. Specifically, greater severity and chronicity of maltreatment was associated with greater SU behavior as well as indirect action, prosocial, and asocial coping behavior. Maltreatment was not significantly related to direct action coping behavior. In moderation tests, only asocial coping provided a significant interaction effect for SU behavior outcomes; SU behavior did not moderate pathways between maltreatment and coping behavior. For youth in foster care, the coping approach may be varied and relate differentially to SU behavior outcomes, with asocial approaches to coping acting as a buffer for the maltreatment/SU relation. Additionally, SU remains an important target for intervention and prevention in youth residing in foster care.

  5. Experiences of the foster care process in the Republic of Ireland: retrospective accounts from biological children of foster carers

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, David

    2014-01-01

    This thesis examines the experiences of the biological children of foster carers. In particular it explores their experiences in relation to inclusion, consultation and decision-making. The study also examines the support and training needs of birth children in foster families. Using a qualitative methodology in-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with fifteen birth children of foster carers aged between 18 and 30 years. The research findings show that for the majority of birth c...

  6. Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms in Preschool Children in Foster Care: The Influence of Placement and Foster Family Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasileva, Mira; Petermann, Franz

    2017-10-01

    Children in foster care often experience traumatic events which increase their risk for posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS). Until now, no research has investigated the developmentally sensitive PTSS criteria for preschoolers among children in foster care. The current study estimated the prevalence of potentially traumatic experiences and clinical PTSS in German foster care children aged 3 to 7 years. The foster parents of 324 children completed questionnaires about children's PTSS, foster parental stress, parenting, and family functioning. Linear regression models tested trauma-related variables, placement history, and foster family characteristics as predictors of PTSS. Approximately 45.4% of the foster children had experienced at least one traumatic event and 15.4% had clinical PTSS. Physical abuse, β = .34, p < .001; hospitalization, β = -.17, p = .026; witnessing someone being hurt, β = -.15, p = .047; and parental stress, β = .43, p < .001, were significantly associated with PTSS. Results demonstrate the impact the foster family has on children who are coping with trauma, and suggest the necessity of trauma-sensitive trainings for foster parents, with stress management as an important component. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies.

  7. Reducing sibling conflict in maltreated children placed in foster homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, L Oriana; Jimenez, Jessica; Nesci, Cristina; Pearson, Eva; Beller, Sarah; Edwards, Nancy; Levin-Rector, Alison

    2015-02-01

    Sibling aggression among maltreated children placed in foster homes is linked to other externalizing problems and placement disruption. The reduction of sibling conflict and aggression may be achieved via a multicomponent ecologically focused intervention for families in the foster care system. The focus of the study is to evaluate the feasibility and short-term effectiveness of a transtheoretical intervention model targeting sibling pairs and their foster parent that integrates family systems, social learning theory, and a conflict mediation perspective. In this pilot study, sibling pairs (N = 22) and their foster parent were randomized into a three-component intervention (n = 13) or a comparison (n = 9) group. Promoting Sibling Bonds (PSB) is an 8-week prevention intervention targeting maltreated sibling pairs ages 5-11 years placed together in a foster home. The siblings, parent, and joint components were delivered in a program package at the foster agency by a trained two-clinician team. Average attendance across program components was 73 %. Outcomes in four areas were gathered at pre- and postintervention: observed sibling interaction quality (positive and negative) including conflict during play, and foster parent reports of mediation strategies and sibling aggression in the foster home. At postintervention, adjusting for baseline scores and child age, intervention pairs showed higher positive (p Foster parents in the intervention group reported a higher number of conflict mediation strategies than those in the comparison group (p Foster parents in the intervention group reported lower sibling physical aggression from the older toward the younger child than those in the comparison group (p foster home.

  8. Fostering Nautical Tourism in the Balearic Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María J. Moreno

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to determine pillars for fostering nautical tourism based on the beliefs and attitudes that professionals in the sector have towards the particularities and difficulties that the market is going through. To achieve these goals, in-depth interviews structured around 37 questions were carried out with agents of associations and nautical firms, public institutions, and the Chamber of Commerce. The qualitative analysis program NVIVO 11 was used to analyze the content of the gathered data. The findings reveal that the main difficulties are related to normative issues and taxation, illegal supply, and a lack of definition of the nautical tourist profile. This absence of definition causes a vagueness when estimating the total number of nautical tourists that visit a destination. Thus, this affects evaluation of the economic, social, and environmental impact of nautical tourism.

  9. Leadership behaviours that foster nursing group power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieloff, Christina Leibold

    2004-07-01

    Today's health care environment presents many challenges to nursing groups as they seek to achieve their goals. All resources must be recognized and effectively utilized. Power, defined as the capacity to achieve goals (Sieloff 1995), is a valuable resource that can assist nursing groups in the achievement of their goals. The leader of a nursing group can make a significant difference in a group's ability to actualize their power capacity. The purpose of this article is to identify and discuss the use of a tool (Sieloff-King Assessment of Group Power within Organizations) to identify the nurse leader/group power variables that can be used to improve a nursing group's power as a resource in the achievement of its goals. Using behaviours related to a Nurse Leader's Power Competency and Power Perspective variables, identified in the Theory of Group Power within Organizations (Sieloff 1999), a nurse leader can foster a nursing group's power.

  10. What fosters entrepreneurs at university colleges?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Mette Lindahl

    2014-01-01

    of the following paper is to what extent the knowledge generated at the universities can be transferred directly to a university college context? The second question raised is centered on the “what” of entrepreneurship education relating to content: How can educational elements that enable and promote...... educational institutions have been imposed to foster entrepreneurs, a need for knowledge in terms of the Where, What, When, Who and How of entrepreneurship education (Hindle, 2007) has emerged. In the light of the context dependency of entrepreneurship education (Hannon P. D., 2006), the first main question...... entrepreneurship at university colleges be identified in order to solidify the entrepreneurial education? If cases where students have become entrepreneurs are studied, as a method to identify entrepreneurship supporting and enabling educational elements, a future research question is raised: “How do student...

  11. Behavior problems of children in foster care: Associations with foster mothers' representations, commitment, and the quality of mother-child interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois-Comtois, Karine; Bernier, Annie; Tarabulsy, George M; Cyr, Chantal; St-Laurent, Diane; Lanctôt, Anne-Sophie; St-Onge, Janie; Moss, Ellen; Béliveau, Marie-Julie

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated different environmental and contextual factors associated with maltreated children's adjustment in foster care. Participants included 83 children (52 boys), ages 1-7 years, and their foster caregivers. Quality of interaction with the foster caregiver was assessed from direct observation of a free-play situation; foster caregiver attachment state of mind and commitment toward the child were assessed using two interviews; disruptive behavior symptoms were reported by foster caregivers. Results showed that quality of interaction between foster caregivers and children were associated with behavior problems, such that higher-quality interactions were related to fewer externalizing and internalizing problems. Foster caregivers' state of mind and commitment were interrelated but not directly associated with behavior problems of foster children. Type of placement moderated the association between foster caregiver commitment and foster child behavior problems. Whereas greater foster caregiver commitment was associated with higher levels of adjustment for children in foster families (kin and non-kin), this was not the case in foster-to-adopt families. Finally, the associations between foster child behavior problems and history of maltreatment and placement related-risk conditions fell below significance after considering child age and quality of interaction with the foster caregiver. Findings underscore the crucial contribution of the foster caregiver-child relationship to fostering child adjustment and, thereby, have important implications for clinical services offered to this population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Adverse childhood experiences, mental health, and quality of life of Chilean girls placed in foster care: An exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, Annina; Kohler, Stefanie; Ruf-Leuschner, Martina; Landolt, Markus A

    2016-03-01

    In Latin America, little research has been conducted regarding exposure to adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), mental health, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among foster children. This study examined the association between ACEs and mental health, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and HRQoL in Chilean foster girls relative to age-matched Chilean family girls. Data were obtained from 27 Chilean foster girls and 27 Chilean girls ages 6 to 17 years living in family homes. Standardized self- and proxy-report measures were used. Foster girls reported more ACEs than controls in terms of familial and nonfamilial sexual abuse and both emotional and physical neglect. Girls living in foster care had a significantly higher rate of PTSD, displayed greater behavioral and emotional problems, and reported a lower HRQoL. Analysis confirmed the well-known cumulative risk hypothesis by demonstrating a significant positive association between the number of ACEs and PTSD symptom severity and a significant negative association with HRQoL. Chilean foster girls endured more ACEs that impair mental health and HRQoL than age-matched peers living with their families. These findings have implications for out-of-home care services in Latin America, highlighting the need to implement not only appropriate trauma-focused treatments but also appropriate prevention strategies. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. The influence of caregiver depression on children in non-relative foster care versus kinship care placements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Antonio; O'Reilly, Amanda; Matone, Meredith; Kim, Minseop; Long, Jin; Rubin, David M

    2015-03-01

    Little is known about how the challenges faced by caregivers influence the variation in social, emotional, and behavioral (SEB) outcomes of youth placed in kinship versus non-relative foster care. This study examined SEB symptoms among youth in kinship and non-relative foster care settings, hypothesizing that changes in caregiver depression would modify children's change in behavior over time. Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) assessments of 199 children placed with kinship and non-relative foster care providers in a Mid-Atlantic city were conducted at time of placement and 6-12 months post-placement. Linear regression estimated CBCL change scores for youth across placement type and caregiver depression trajectories. Kinship caregivers were more likely to become depressed or remained depressed than non-relative foster caregivers. Youth in kinship care always exhibited better change in SEB outcomes than youth in non-relative foster care, but these positive outcomes were principally observed among families where caregivers demonstrated a reduction in depression over time or were never depressed. Adjusted change scores for non-relative foster care youth were always negative, with the most negative scores among youth whose caregivers became depressed over time. Caregiver well-being may modify the influence of placement setting on SEB outcomes for youth placed into out-of-home care. Findings lend to policy relevance for child welfare systems that seek kinship settings as a panacea to the challenges faced by youth, without allocating resources to address caregiver needs.

  14. Supportive Housing in Foster Care: The Views of Young People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinkkonen, Hanna-Maija; Kyttälä, Minna

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated Finnish young people's experiences of supportive housing. Supportive housing is an after-care programme that should support the transition from foster care to independent adulthood. It is directed mainly at young people who have been taken into foster care by social workers. The sample consisted of 39 young people (23…

  15. Expanded Medical Home Model Works for Children in Foster Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaudes, Paula Kienberger; Champagne, Vince; Harden, Allen; Masterson, James; Bilaver, Lucy A.

    2012-01-01

    The Illinois Child Welfare Department implemented a statewide health care system to ensure that children in foster care obtain quality health care by providing each child with a medical home. This study demonstrates that the Medical Home model works for children in foster care providing better health outcomes in higher immunization rates. These…

  16. Promoting Smooth School Transitions for Children in Foster Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laviolette, Ghyslyn T.

    2011-01-01

    Children in foster care move two times per year on average. School records are not always transferred in a timely manner, which leads to a lack of services. Schools often are not aware of the legal issues surrounding foster care, such as who has legal rights to sign field trip permission slips or consent for educational evaluations. This study led…

  17. From Foster Care to College: Student Stories of Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, Tory

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to understand the different factors that empower young adults that were in foster care to be successful in a college environment. It has been documented that foster youth have significant challenges during secondary education (Conger & Rebeck, 2001; Geenen & Powers, 2006). Due to these challenges,…

  18. Engaging Adolescent Youth in Foster Care through Photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Karen; Girvin, Heather; Primak, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Older youth in foster care are particularly vulnerable because they are poorly prepared for the transition from foster care to independent adulthood. Interventions designed to assist in this transition rarely engage youth directly; plans are made for youth rather than with them. Photographs can serve as an externalised medium for the expression of…

  19. Foster Care Involvement among Medicaid-Enrolled Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cidav, Zuleyha; Xie, Ming; Mandell, David S.

    2018-01-01

    The prevalence and risk of foster care involvement among children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) relative to children with intellectual disability (ID), children with ASD and ID, and typically developing children were examined using 2001-2007 Medicaid data. Children were followed up to the first foster care placement or until the end of 2007;…

  20. Trajectories of Depression Symptoms among Older Youths Exiting Foster Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munson, Michelle R.; McMillen, Curtis

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the trajectories of depressive symptoms as older youths from the foster care system mature while also examining the correlates of these trajectories. Data came from a longitudinal study of 404 youths from the foster care system in Missouri, who were interviewed nine times between their 17th and 19th…

  1. Does Money Matter? Foster Parenting and Family Finances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smithgall, Cheryl; DeCoursey, Jan; Goerge, Robert

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents findings from a longitudinal qualitative study of Illinois foster parents that revealed a connection between how they view their financial situation and the ways in which they understand and carry out their roles as foster parents. The study illuminates the child welfare and family system dynamics that underlie the experiences…

  2. Factors associated with family reunification for children in foster care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    López, Mónica; del Valle, Jorge F.; Montserrat, Carme; Bravo, Amaia

    In this paper, we analyse reunification processes from family foster care, both kinship and non-kinship, and the variables associated with them in a Spanish sample. Data collection was carried out after a review of child protection and foster care files, and those responsible for the cases were also

  3. Problem-Solving Communication in Foster Families and Birthfamilies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuchinich, Sam; Ozretich, Rachel A.; Pratt, Clara C.; Kneedler, Blythe

    2002-01-01

    Assessed child behavior problems and parent-child communication behaviors during problem solving in three groups of families with adolescents: foster families, birthfamilies with a child at risk for behavior problems, and birthfamilies with a child not at risk. Found that levels of positive and negative communication behaviors in foster families…

  4. Service Needs of Foster Families with Children Who Have Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jason D.; Moraes, Sabrina; Mayhew, Janet

    2005-01-01

    We examined the service needs of foster families with children who have disabilities. Foster parents in a large Canadian city were asked "What services or supports would be helpful to you?" The responses to this question were edited for clarity and to eliminate redundancies, and sorted into piles of like statements by a group of 15…

  5. A Case Study of a Lithuanian Foster Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bankauskiene, Nijole; Staskeviciene, Vilma

    2005-01-01

    The authors discuss the problems of children's foster care in Lithuania in the context of European dimensions. The article consists of two parts. The first part presents the main changes in the children's care system in Lithuania. The first part reveals the discussion of the paradigm of children's foster care in both the Western and Lithuanian…

  6. Food in Foster Families: Care, Communication and Conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Alyson; Holland, Sally; Pithouse, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    This study explores the significance of food and mealtimes in relation to the transition into foster care and the therapeutic settling of the child in a new family. In doing so, we draw upon an in-depth, qualitative case study of 10 experienced foster families in the UK focusing on what helped them to be successful. At the time of the study, there…

  7. Children, Families, and Foster Care: Analysis and Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, Sandra; Shields, Margie K.; Behrman, Richard E.

    2004-01-01

    This paper focuses on the challenges of helping children after abuse and neglect has occurred by strengthening the web of supports for children and families in foster care. It examines the current state of the foster care system and finds that it is really not a cohesive system but a combination of many overlapping and interacting agencies, all…

  8. The New York Court Review of Children in Foster Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Festinger, Trudy Bradley

    1975-01-01

    Presents a study which investigated three areas: (1) factors related to the court's determination of foster care status or availability of children for adoption; (2) the extent of agreement between agency recommendations and court orders; and (3) the impact of the court review on moving children out of foster care. (SDH)

  9. Matching children with foster carers : A literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeijlmans, Kirti; López, Monica; Grietens, Hans; Knorth, Erik J.

    Matching in family foster care is a form of complex decision-making influenced by more than case factors alone. Organizational, contextual, and decision-maker factors also contribute to the process. This scoping review has synthesized the empirical literature on matching decisions in family foster

  10. Precursors and sequelae of attachment in foster children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterman, M.; Schuengel, C.

    2008-01-01

    This study focused on attachment of foster children by examining factors associated with attachment relationships of children raised from birth by the same parents. The sample included 61 children between 26 to 88 months of age and their foster caregivers. Attachment security and caregiver

  11. 33 FOSTERING THE EASE OF CALVING: PELVIC AREA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Fostering calving ease, pelvic area assessment, Bunaji, Rahaji. Abstract. Pelvic area (P.A.) assessment may be used as management tool to reduce the risks associated with dystocia and foster calving ease. Relationship between cow's P.A. and age can aid pre- breeding culling decisions. This study used 100 ...

  12. The Economics of Adoption of Children from Foster Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Mary Eschelbach; Hansen, Bradley A.

    2006-01-01

    Federal initiatives since 1996 have intensified the efforts of states to achieve adoption for children in foster care. For many waiting children, the path to adoption is long. The authors offer an economic analysis of adoption from foster care, with an emphasis on the reasons why achieving the goal of adoption for all waiting children may be so…

  13. Complexity, Usefulness, and Optimality: A Response to Foster (2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widaman, Keith F.; Dogan, Shannon J.; Stockdale, Gary D.; Conger, Rand D.

    2010-01-01

    In his commentary, Foster (2010) made arguments at 2 levels, offering a broad critique of statistical or methodological approaches in developmental psychology in general together with critical comments that applied only to our recent article (Dogan, Stockdale, Widaman, & Conger, 2010). Certain criticisms by Foster aimed at the field as a whole…

  14. Depression among Alumni of Foster Care: Decreasing Rates through Improvement of Experiences in Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Catherine Roller; O'Brien, Kirk; Pecora, Peter J.; English, Diana; Williams, Jason R.; Phillips, Chereese M.

    2009-01-01

    The Northwest Foster Care Alumni Study examined the relation between experiences in foster care and depression among young adults who spent at least a year in foster care as adolescents. Results indicate that preparation for leaving foster care, nurturing supports from the foster family, school stability, access to tutoring, access to therapeutic…

  15. Poverty among Foster Children: Estimates Using the Supplemental Poverty Measure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pac, Jessica; Waldfogel, Jane; Wimer, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    We use data from the Current Population Survey and the new Supplemental Poverty Measure (SPM) to provide estimates for poverty among foster children over the period 1992 to 2013. These are the first large-scale national estimates for foster children who are not included in official poverty statistics. Holding child and family demographics constant, foster children have a lower risk of poverty than other children. Analyzing income in detail suggests that foster care payments likely play an important role in reducing the risk of poverty in this group. In contrast, we find that children living with grandparents have a higher risk of poverty than other children, even after taking demographics into account. Our estimates suggest that this excess risk is likely linked to their lower likelihood of receiving foster care or other income supports. PMID:28659651

  16. Health care of youth aging out of foster care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Youth transitioning out of foster care face significant medical and mental health care needs. Unfortunately, these youth rarely receive the services they need because of lack of health insurance. Through many policies and programs, the federal government has taken steps to support older youth in foster care and those aging out. The Fostering Connections to Success and Increasing Adoptions Act of 2008 (Pub L No. 110-354) requires states to work with youth to develop a transition plan that addresses issues such as health insurance. In addition, beginning in 2014, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 (Pub L No. 111-148) makes youth aging out of foster care eligible for Medicaid coverage until age 26 years, regardless of income. Pediatricians can support youth aging out of foster care by working collaboratively with the child welfare agency in their state to ensure that the ongoing health needs of transitioning youth are met.

  17. Children in foster care: what forensic nurses need to know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornor, Gail

    2014-01-01

    Children living in foster care are a unique population with specialized healthcare needs. This article will assist forensic nurses and advanced practice forensic nurses, particularly those working in pediatrics, in understanding the needs of children in foster care and implementing a practice plan to better meet their healthcare needs. To that end, a basic understanding of the foster care system is crucial and involves an appreciation of the interface between the legal system and the child welfare system. Most important to providing care to children in foster care is a true understanding of trauma exposure and its potential effects on the lives of children: physically, developmentally, emotionally, and psychologically. This article will assist forensic nurses working with pediatric populations to more fully understand the needs of children in foster care and to develop innovative interventions to appropriately meet their unique needs.

  18. Informal Kinship-Based Fostering Around the World: Anthropological Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinaweaver, Jessaca

    2014-09-01

    Anthropological research around the world has documented informal, kinship-based foster care cross culturally. That research suggests that children are more likely to benefit from informal kinship-based fostering in cultural contexts where fostering expands the pool of relatives rather than substituting one parent for another, fostering is expected to provide children with positive opportunities for learning and development, and/or children are granted some autonomy or decision-making power. However, informal kinship-based fostering seems to place children at risk in cultural contexts where the process of children's attachment to caregivers resembles the Western child development model, communities are highly stratified along socioeconomic lines, and/or exploitation of children is permitted. The article concludes with a discussion of implications for both research and policy.

  19. Poverty among Foster Children: Estimates Using the Supplemental Poverty Measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pac, Jessica; Waldfogel, Jane; Wimer, Christopher

    2017-03-01

    We use data from the Current Population Survey and the new Supplemental Poverty Measure (SPM) to provide estimates for poverty among foster children over the period 1992 to 2013. These are the first large-scale national estimates for foster children who are not included in official poverty statistics. Holding child and family demographics constant, foster children have a lower risk of poverty than other children. Analyzing income in detail suggests that foster care payments likely play an important role in reducing the risk of poverty in this group. In contrast, we find that children living with grandparents have a higher risk of poverty than other children, even after taking demographics into account. Our estimates suggest that this excess risk is likely linked to their lower likelihood of receiving foster care or other income supports.

  20. Being a Foster Family in Portugal—Motivations and Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisete Diogo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Foster care is an almost absent component in the child care system and scientific research conducted in Portugal foster comprises 3.2%1 of out-of-home care in Portugal. This research aims to contribute to a deeper visibility of the care phenomena, giving specific attention to the foster families themselves. This research adopted a qualitative analytical approach, inspired by Grounded Theory. Foster families’ motivation is rooted in altruism, affection for children, and sensitivity to maltreatment. Personal and professional biography or past contact with out-of-home care can also induce predisposition to become a carer. The experience of being a carer2 is one of traversing through a life of many challenges and rewards. Considering the recognition from the stakeholders, it is a rewarding task. The quality of the service provided and the performance of the care professionals are both key elements to foster care.

  1. Swedish population-based study of pupils showed that foster children faced increased risks for ill health, negative lifestyles and school failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engh, Lisbet; Janson, Staffan; Svensson, Birgitta; Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf; Eriksson, Ulla-Britt

    2017-10-01

    This population-based study explored whether foster children faced a higher risk of health problems than children of the same age who were not in foster care. Data for 13 739 pupils aged 10, 13 and 16 years were obtained from the Pupil Health Database in the county of Värmland, Sweden, for the school years 2012/2013 and 2013/2014. These included data on school performance, health, lifestyle and social relationships, based on children's interviews with school nurses. Of all the pupils, 171 (1.2%) were in foster care. Children in foster care were generally unhealthier than other children. Both girls and boys were at higher risk of chronic health problems, daily smoking, use of drugs and school failure. When the girls in foster care were compared to other girls, we found that they faced a higher risk of psychological and psychosomatic symptoms. This difference was not found for boys. Foster children were also more likely to express a more negative view on life. We confirmed earlier studies that children in foster care tended to have inferior health and well-being than other children. These findings emphasise that health, risky behaviour and school performance should be considered together when assessing foster children. ©2017 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. FOSTER FAMILY AS A FORM OF UNITS FOR ORPHANS AND CHILDREN WITHOUT PARENTAL CARE (CASE STUDY OF SARATOV AND BELGOROD REGIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oksana Vladimirovna Besschetnova

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the development and functioning of foster families, one of the priority interventions for children without parental care in Russia and abroad. The paper analyzes the current official statistics on the problem of child abandonment in Russia as a whole and in the Saratov and Belgorod regions of Russia in particular. The mechanism of social adaptation of children in foster care is based on the qualitative and quantitative methods (surveys and interviews of foster parents and foster children. The author identifies obstacles to the development of social institutions in the regions and the necessity of its active implementation in domestic social practices. The study found that foster care has been successful in areas where accepted legal basis allowed the recruiting, selecting candidates for adoptive parents, and foster care maintenance are carried out by social services. In addition, in order to reduce risk factors such as the secondary abandonment of foster children it is necessarily to increase assistance from the social guardianship bodies and professionals as well as building trusting parent-child relationships that use the democratic parenting style by foster parents.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-8-8

  3. Homelessness and Aging Out of Foster Care: A National Comparison of Child Welfare-Involved Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Patrick J; Marcal, Katherine E; Zhang, Jinjin; Day, Orin; Landsverk, John

    2017-06-01

    The present study represents the first large-scale, prospective comparison to test whether aging out of foster care contributes to homelessness risk in emerging adulthood. A nationally representative sample of adolescents investigated by the child welfare system in 2008 to 2009 from the second cohort of the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-being Study (NSCAW II) reported experiences of housing problems at 18- and 36-month follow-ups. Latent class analyses identified subtypes of housing problems, including literal homelessness, housing instability, and stable housing. Regressions predicted subgroup membership based on aging out experiences, receipt of foster care services, and youth and county characteristics. Youth who reunified after out-of-home placement in adolescence exhibited the lowest probability of literal homelessness, while youth who aged out experienced similar rates of literal homelessness as youth investigated by child welfare but never placed out of home. No differences existed between groups on prevalence of unstable housing. Exposure to independent living services and extended foster care did not relate with homelessness prevention. Findings emphasize the developmental importance of families in promoting housing stability in the transition to adulthood, while questioning child welfare current focus on preparing foster youth to live.

  4. Child welfare services involvement among the children of young parents in foster care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworsky, Amy

    2015-07-01

    Despite the high rate of early parenthood among youth in foster care as well as the increased risk of child maltreatment among children whose adolescent parents have been neglected or abused, very little is known about child welfare services involvement among children whose parents were in foster care when they were born. This study uses administrative data from the Illinois Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS) to examine the occurrence of child abuse and neglect investigations, indicated reports and out of home care placements among the children of youth in foster. Thirty-nine percent of the children were the subject of at least one CPS investigation, 17 percent had at least one indicated report and 11 percent were placed in out of home care at least once before their 5th birthday. Cox proportional hazard models are also estimated to identify characteristics of parenting foster youth and their placement histories associated with the risk of child welfare services involvement. Implications of the findings for policy and practice are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Is higher placement stability in kinship foster care by virtue or design?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Font, Sarah A

    2015-04-01

    Prior research has repeatedly documented higher placement stability for children who enter kinship care rather than non-relative foster care. However, little is known about why, and under what circumstances, kinship care is more stable. This study uses longitudinal state administrative data to explore possible explanations. Results suggest that, while children in non-relative foster care are indeed at higher risk of any placement move than their peers in kinship care, this appears to be partly driven by child selection factors and policy preferences for kinship care. That is, the gap is not explained primarily by different rates of caregiver-requested moves. However, the gap was sizably smaller among select high-risk subgroups of foster children, suggesting that higher stability in kinship care may be partly explained by differences in the characteristics of children entering kinship care (versus non-relative foster care). Moreover, a large portion of the gap is explained by children in non-relative care being moved into kinship care; a move that is likely the result of policy preferences for kinship care rather than a defect in the initial placement. In sum, these results suggest that kinship care provides only a limited stability advantage, and the reasons for that advantage are not well understood. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Supporting Resilience in Foster Families: A Model for Program Design that Supports Recruitment, Retention, and Satisfaction of Foster Families Who Care for Infants with Prenatal Substance Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcellus, Lenora

    2010-01-01

    As the health, social, and developmental needs of infants in foster care become more complex, foster families are challenged to develop specialized knowledge to effectively address these needs. The goal of this qualitative research study was to identify the process of becoming a foster family and providing family foster caregiving within the…

  7. The needs of foster children : A Q-sort study on the differences between the psychosocial needs of foster children with and without a history of sexual abuse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbakkers, Anne; van der Steen, Steffie; Ellingsen, Ingunn T.; Grietens, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Children in family foster care have a specific set of psychosocial needs, stemming from previous caregiving, (traumatic) experiences, and living in a foster family. Foster parents are expected to learn about these needs and incorporate them into their parenting and nurturing. When foster children

  8. Placement History of Foster Children : A Study of Placement History and Outcomes in Long-Term Family Foster Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strijker, Johan; Knorth, Erik J.; Knot-Dickscheit, Jana

    2008-01-01

    The files of 419 children in family foster care and kinship foster care were used in a retrospective longitudinal design study that examined their placement histories in child welfare. Significant associations were found between the number of placements on one hand, and the prevalence of attachment

  9. Placement History of Foster Children: A Study of Placement History and Outcomes in Long-Term Family Foster Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strijker, Johan; Knorth, Erik J.; Knot-Dickscheit, Jana

    2008-01-01

    The files of 419 children in family foster care and kinship foster care were used in a retrospective longitudinal design study that examined their placement histories in child welfare. Significant associations were found between the number of placements on one hand, and the prevalence of attachment disorders, severity of behavioral problems, and…

  10. Mental health and associated risk factors of Dutch school aged foster children placed in long-term foster care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maaskant, A.M.; van Rooij, F.B.; Hermanns, J.M.A.

    2014-01-01

    More than 20,000 children in the Netherlands live in foster families. The majority are in long-term foster family placements, which are intended to provide a stable rearing environment until the children reach adulthood. International studies have shown, however, that compared to children in the

  11. 'To talk or not to talk?' : Foster youth's experiences of sharing stories about their past and being in foster care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbakkers, Anne; van der Steen, Steffie; Grietens, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Sharing stories about the past and about being in care, can help adolescents placed in foster families to make meaning of their experiences and connect with their conversation partner. However, what obstacles and opportunities for sharing stories are experienced by foster youth has not been

  12. Risk Factors, Superior Adaptive Capacity, and Characteristics of the Foster Home as Predictors of Maintenance of Foster Placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, James A.; And Others

    The purpose of this study was to predict maintenance of foster home placement. Fifty-one foster children comprised the sample; 47 were involved in the Casey Family Program in Montana, and four were past participants. Case files provided the first and major data base. Caseworker ratings, a second data source, were obtained on children's personal…

  13. Effects of Multidimensional Treatment Foster Care for Preschoolers (MTFC-P) for Young Foster Children with Severe Behavioral Disturbances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonkman, Caroline S.; Schuengel, Carlo; Oosterman, M.; Lindeboom, Robert; Boer, Frits; Lindauer, Ramon J L

    2017-01-01

    Multidimensional Treatment Foster Care for Preschoolers (MTFC-P) has thus far only been tested for diminishing behavior problems in the US. This study tested relative efficacy of MTFC-P on multiple outcomes against treatment as usual in the Netherlands (TAU; Study I), and regular foster care (Study

  14. Fostering Social and Emotional Skills for Well-Being and Social Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Koji; Huerta, Maria C.; Kubacka, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Children need a balanced set of cognitive, social and emotional capabilities to adapt to today's demanding, changing and unpredictable world. OECD countries and partner economies recognise the importance on the holistic development of individuals. However, there are big gaps between stakeholders' knowledge, expectations and practices on how to…

  15. Positive emotion communication: Fostering well-being at end of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrill, Alexandra L; Ellington, Lee; John, Kevin K; Latimer, Seth; Xu, Jiayun; Reblin, Maija; Clayton, Margaret F

    2017-11-28

    Little is known about positive emotion communication (PEC) in end-of-life care. This study aims to identify types and patterns of PEC among hospice nurses, caregivers, and patients. A coding system based on positive psychology theory was applied as a secondary analysis to audio recordings of hospice nurse home visits with cancer patients and family caregivers, collected as part of a prospective longitudinal study. Eighty recordings (4 visits from 20 triads) were coded for humor, connection, praise, positive focus, gratitude, taking joy/savoring, and perfunctory statements. Descriptive statistics revealed the greatest proportion of PEC was made by nurses. Humor was most frequently used across all speakers. Cluster analysis revealed four PEC visit types: Savor/Take Joy; Humor; Perfunctory; and Other-focused Expressions of Positive Emotions. Linear mixed effect regression was used to estimate the trajectory of PEC over time, but no significant change was found. We found that positive emotions are common in nurse, caregiver and patient communication at end-of-life and do not decline closer to death. This study is among the first to explore PEC at end-of-life, and offers a way to bring strengths-based approaches into end of life communication research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Explaining the paradox : How pro-environmental behaviour can both thwart and foster well-being

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venhoeven, Leonie; Bolderdijk, J.W; Steg, L.

    Although pro-environmental behaviour is often believed to be difficult, aggravating, and potentially threatening one's quality of life, recent studies suggest that people who behave in a more pro-environmental way are actually more satisfied with their lives. In this manuscript, we aim to explain

  17. Fostering First-Year Students' Engagement and Well-Being through Visual Narratives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, Michele C.

    2017-01-01

    This article reports on a qualitative study that explored the learning outcomes from an innovative instructional method, visual narratives, used in a first-year seminar. Fifty-three students enrolled in a mandatory first semester student success course were instructed to use visual images to tell the story of the first-year experience. Data…

  18. Take a Paws: Fostering Student Wellness with a Therapy Dog Program at Your University Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lannon, Amber; Harrison, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    Therapy dogs are trained and socialized to provide comfort to individuals who are ill or experiencing stress. The following article explores therapy dog outreach programs in academic libraries by describing a successful venture at McGill University Library. Background, planning advice, assessment results, and recommendations are presented with an…

  19. Advocacy for Child Wellness in High-Poverty Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Carol A.

    2014-01-01

    Child wellness needs to be understood holistically so that children and youth from high-poverty environments can succeed in schooling and life. Teachers who foster advocacy in themselves are well equipped to teach students to take ownership of their own well-being. Such advocacy can enrich the classroom curriculum and mitigate the negative effects…

  20. 5 CFR 894.306 - Are foster children eligible as family members?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Are foster children eligible as family....306 Are foster children eligible as family members? Yes, foster children may be eligible for coverage as family members under FEDVIP. ...

  1. Sexual behavior and pregnancy among adolescents in foster family homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Weihai; Smith, Susan R; Warner, Lynette C; North, Fred; Wilhelm, Sara; Nowak, Amanda

    2017-10-13

    Objective To examine the prevalence of and factors associated with sexual behavior and pregnancy involvement among adolescents in foster family homes. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among a random sample of children living in foster family homes. Logistic regression with Firth's correction was used to determine factors associated with sexual risk behavior and pregnancy involvement (i.e. having been pregnant or gotten someone pregnant). Results About half of adolescents (aged 13-18 years) in foster family homes ever had sex, of whom, one third had first sex before the age of 14 and one sixth had two or more sexual partners in the past 3 months. Of adolescents in the study, 9% had ever been pregnant or gotten someone pregnant. Although adolescents in foster family homes had higher rates of sex initiation and pregnancy involvement than those in the general population, the two groups had comparable rates of current sexual risk behavior. Being placed in kin/fictive kin foster homes [odds ratio (OR): 3.04; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.18-7.80] and number of placement settings (OR: 1.20; 95% CI: 1.02-1.42) were associated with multiple sexual partners, while a history of running away from a foster home (OR: 7.64; 95% CI: 1.87-31.18) was associated with pregnancy involvement. Conclusions Efforts targeting placement stability including prevention of running away may reduce sexual risk behavior and pregnancy involvement among adolescents in foster family homes.

  2. Fostering Formal Commutativity Knowledge with Approximate Arithmetic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Maria Hansen

    Full Text Available How can we enhance the understanding of abstract mathematical principles in elementary school? Different studies found out that nonsymbolic estimation could foster subsequent exact number processing and simple arithmetic. Taking the commutativity principle as a test case, we investigated if the approximate calculation of symbolic commutative quantities can also alter the access to procedural and conceptual knowledge of a more abstract arithmetic principle. Experiment 1 tested first graders who had not been instructed about commutativity in school yet. Approximate calculation with symbolic quantities positively influenced the use of commutativity-based shortcuts in formal arithmetic. We replicated this finding with older first graders (Experiment 2 and third graders (Experiment 3. Despite the positive effect of approximation on the spontaneous application of commutativity-based shortcuts in arithmetic problems, we found no comparable impact on the application of conceptual knowledge of the commutativity principle. Overall, our results show that the usage of a specific arithmetic principle can benefit from approximation. However, the findings also suggest that the correct use of certain procedures does not always imply conceptual understanding. Rather, the conceptual understanding of commutativity seems to lag behind procedural proficiency during elementary school.

  3. How FOSTER supports training Open Science in the GeoSciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Astrid

    2016-04-01

    FOSTER (1) is about promoting and facilitating the adoption of Open Science by the European research community, and fostering compliance with the open access policies set out in Horizon 2020 (H2020). FOSTER aims to reach out and provide training to the wide range of disciplines and countries involved in the European Research Area (ERA) by offering and supporting face-to-face as well as distance training. Different stakeholders, mainly young researchers, are trained to integrate Open Science in their daily workflow, supporting researchers to optimise their research visibility and impact. Strengthening the institutional training capacity is achieved through a train-the-trainers approach. The two-and-half-year project started in February 2014 with identifying, enriching and providing training content on all relevant topics in the area of Open Science. One of the main elements was to support two rounds of trainings, which were conducted during 2014 and 2015, organizing more than 100 training events with around 3000 participants. The presentation will explain the project objectives and results and will look into best practice training examples, among them successful training series in the GeoSciences. The FOSTER portal that now holds a collection of training resources (e.g. slides and PDFs, schedules and design of training events dedicated to different audiences, video captures of complete events) is presented. It provides easy ways to identify learning materials and to create own e-learning courses based on the materials and examples. (1) FOSTER is funded through the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme for research, technological development and demonstration under grant agreement no 612425. http://fosteropenscience.eu

  4. Mechanisms Fostering Social Entrepreneurship as Potential Instruments for Economic Development: The Eastern Partnership Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plotnieks Dāvis

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available With its plan to assign 600 million euros through the European Neighbourhood Instrument for Eastern Partnership countries, the European Union intended to increase the efficiency of institutions, attenuate social problems, and create an environment that fosters economic growth and human well-being in Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Moldova, and Ukraine. A few scholars have criticized the amount of funding and planned initiatives of the European Neighbourhood Instrument as insufficient and suggested that in order to foster cooperation and support reforms in its Eastern Partnership countries, more action should be taken. In times when European Commission budget is under constraints of consolidation and increase of aid for supporting European Neighbourhood countries is hardly possible, alternative solutions for tempering social problems need to be assessed. Various scientists, philanthropists and entrepreneurs see social entrepreneurship as a tool for solving social problems in a sustainable way where business thinking is being combined with non-profit philosophy. Contrary to government support and intervention for solving social problems, social entrepreneurship is already being used as tool that initially addresses joint needs--solve social problems and create revenue that provides much needed income for sustainable business initiatives. This paper analyzes the concept of social entrepreneurship, examples where social entrepreneurship is solving social problems, and mechanisms that can foster these phenomena. The aim of this paper is to examine different mechanisms of how governments can foster the creation and development of social entrepreneurship. Unique survey data derived from a project examining social entrepreneurship in Europe is used. It is concluded that by adopting mechanisms proven in various developed countries, the Eastern Partnership countries can stimulate social entrepreneurship, thus attenuating social problems and

  5. Dimensions of Health in Young People in Foster Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Steven M.; Norbeck, Jane S.; Robbins, Nancy R.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To describe the dimensions of health and illness from the perspective of adolescents in foster care. Methods Descriptive analyses of dimensions of health were conducted on N=105 adolescents in foster care. Differences among demographic (age, gender, race/ethnicity) and foster care placement (age at first placement, reason(s) for foster care placement, length of time in care, number, and types of placement) variables and the dimensions and subdimensions of health (Child Health and Illness Profile- Adolescent Edition) were determined using T-tests and ANOVA. Results Most were placed in long-term foster care ( x̄ =6.46 years; SD=4.86) during adolescence (38%), with multiple placements ( x̄ =3.99; SD=3.8). All domains of health were self-reported to be average to low average, with poorer findings in specific risk and resilience subdomains. There were no significant differences by age or race/ethnicity. Girls had lower satisfaction with health and self esteem and more physical and emotional discomfort. Preplacement adverse experiences were associated with increased risks. Conclusions Adolescent self-report of the domains of health for those in foster care was better than expected, based on literature review and qualitative data for the larger study. Potential explanations for this inflation of status and functioning include the need for self-protection in foster care, the familiarity of testing regimes by children in foster care with some social desirability effect, and their paradoxical responses to preplacement problems. Data including qualitative and significant other-reported data may be necessary to gain an accurate portrayal of the health status of adolescents in foster care. PMID:19702202

  6. How to Strengthen Positive Organizational Behaviors Fostering Experiential Learning? The Case of Military Organizations

    OpenAIRE

    Lis, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to study the challenges concerning organizational behaviors crucial for Lessons Learned capabilities in military organizations as well as to indentify the solutions and recommendations to develop and strengthen positive organizational culture, climate and behaviors fostering experiential learning. The attention is focused around positive behaviors recognized by NATO as the key success factors for Lessons Learned capabilities such as: the engagement of le...

  7. Student Centered Learning – An Approach to Fostering Democracy in Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Jacobs

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available After an opening anecdote about a well-functioning small group of students, the article discusses concepts related to democracy. Next, the article defines student centered learning (SCL and some SCL elements, linking these elements to concepts in democracy. The following section offers various means of implementing SCL. Subsequently, the article looks at issues raised about the use of SCL. To conclude the article, the authors maintain that SCL not only promotes learning but that SCL also fosters democracy

  8. Does membership in civil society organizations foster social integration?: the case of Danish voluntary sport organizations

    OpenAIRE

    Østerlund, Karste; Seippel, Ørnulf

    2013-01-01

    Voluntary organizations are generally perceived as important arenas in which social integration can be fostered. There is, however, no consensus on the meaning of such integration, and the empirical evidence for the claim is lacking. This article studies social integration within voluntary sport organizations, which make up a significant element of civil society in most Western societies. The article provides a theoretical framework well suited for the study of social integration, which diffe...

  9. Language delays among foster children: implications for policy and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Carol D; Fisher, Philip A

    2006-01-01

    This article highlights the centrality of language in early childhood development and the potential for language delays to negatively affect long-term outcomes in educational and social domains. Given the high rate of language delays in the foster care population, an emphasis should be placed on assessing language skills among children ages 6 and younger entering foster care. The authors describe several existing approaches to assessing language skills and discuss obstacles to the widespread implementation of systematic evaluation among foster children. Finally, the authors discuss the need for research and programming to establish evidence-based practices that encourage the remediation of language delays in this highly vulnerable population.

  10. Can Machine Learning Create an Advocate for Foster Youth?

    OpenAIRE

    Brindley, Meredith; Heyes, James; Booker, Darrell

    2017-01-01

    Statistics are bleak for youth aging out of the United States foster care system. They are often left with few resources, are likely to experience homelessness, and are at increased risk of incarceration and exploitation. The Think of Us platform is a service for foster youth and their advocates to create personalized goals and access curated content specific to aging out of the foster care system. In this paper, we propose the use of a machine learning algorithm within the Think of Us platfo...

  11. Fostering Psychotropic Medication Oversight for Children in Foster Care: A National Examination of States' Monitoring Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackie, Thomas I; Hyde, Justeen; Palinkas, Lawrence A; Niemi, Emily; Leslie, Laurel K

    2017-03-01

    To describe state responses to psychotropic medication safety concerns among children in foster care, this study proposes a taxonomy for state-level psychotropic medication monitoring mechanisms and highlights state variations. Seventy-two key informants, representing state child-serving agencies within the 50 states and DC, completed semi-structured interviews. We employed modified grounded theory to develop the taxonomy, and then generated state-specific summaries that were validated by key informants. Nationally, 88.2 % of the states employed at least one of seven mechanisms. For the most frequently implemented mechanisms (collegial secondary review, prior authorization, database review), over half were implemented between January 2011 and July 2013.

  12. How can science education foster students' rooting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Østergaard, Edvin

    2015-06-01

    The question of how to foster rooting in science education points towards a double challenge; efforts to prevent (further) uprooting and efforts to promote rooting/re-rooting. Wolff-Michael Roth's paper discusses the uprooting/rooting pair of concepts, students' feeling of alienation and loss of fundamental sense of the earth as ground, and potential consequences for teaching science in a rooted manner. However, the argumentation raises a number of questions which I try to answer. My argumentation rests on Husserl's critique of science and the "ontological reversal", an ontological position where abstract models from science are considered as more real than the everyday reality itself, where abstract, often mathematical, models are taken to be the real causes behind everyday experiences. In this paper, measures towards an "ontological re-reversal" are discussed by drawing on experiences from phenomenon-based science education. I argue that perhaps the most direct and productive way of promoting rooting in science class is by intentionally cultivating the competencies of sensing and aesthetic experience. An aesthetic experience is defined as a precognitive, sensuous experience, an experience that is opened up for through sensuous perception. Conditions for rooting in science education is discussed against three challenges: Restoring the value of aesthetic experience, allowing time for open inquiry and coping with curriculum. Finally, I raise the question whether dimensions like "reality" or "nature" are self-evident for students. In the era of constructivism, with its focus on cognition and knowledge building, the inquiry process itself has become more important than the object of inquiry. I argue that as educators of science teachers we have to emphasize more explicitly "the nature of nature" as a field of exploration.

  13. Foster Care Involvement Among Medicaid-Enrolled Children with Autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cidav, Zuleyha; Xie, Ming; Mandell, David S

    2017-09-19

    The prevalence and risk of foster care involvement among children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) relative to children with intellectual disability (ID), children with ASD and ID, and typically developing children were examined using 2001-2007 Medicaid data. Children were followed up to the first foster care placement or until the end of 2007; a discrete time logistic regression analysis was conducted. Both the prevalence and risk of foster care involvement were greatest for children with ASD, and the prevalence increased substantially over the study period among children with ASD. Continued examination of the factors contributing to the higher risk of foster placement is warranted to unravel the complex circumstances facing these vulnerable children and their families.

  14. Vision status among foster children in NYC: a research note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Festinger, Trudy; Duckman, Robert H

    2004-01-01

    A summary of the results of research on the vision status of foster children. Results indicate that the vision screenings being provided at mandated annual physical examinations are not sufficiently identifying children's vision dysfunctions.

  15. Ian Foster named 2003 Innovator of the Year

    CERN Multimedia

    Studt, T

    2003-01-01

    "From his roots in New Zealand to his joint positions at the Univ. of Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory, Foster has set the standards for how distributed computing systems should work" (2 pages).

  16. Fostering Information Problem Solving Skills Through Completion Problems and Prompts

    OpenAIRE

    Frerejean, Jimmy; Brand-Gruwel, Saskia; Paul A. Kirschner

    2012-01-01

    Frerejean, J., Brand-Gruwel, S., & Kirschner, P. A. (2012, September). Fostering Information Problem Solving Skills Through Completion Problems and Prompts. Poster presented at the EARLI SIG 6 & 7 "Instructional Design" and "Learning and Instruction with Computers", Bari, Italy.

  17. Fostering information problem solving skills through completion problems and prompts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frerejean, Jimmy; Brand-Gruwel, Saskia; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    Frerejean, J., Brand-Gruwel, S., & Kirschner, P. A. (2012, November). Fostering information problem solving skills through completion problems and prompts. Poster presented at the ICO Fall School 2012, Girona, Spain.

  18. The effect of foster care placement on paternal welfare dependency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fallesen, Peter

    The arrival of a child profoundly alters the life-course for men. Yet, children could change men's lives not only by arriving in them, but also by departing from them. In this article, I test how one such departure-foster care placement-affects men's labor market attachment, and in so doing I...... provide a novel parallel to existing research on how fatherhood affects men, which focuses almost exclusively on a child's arrival. Using population panel data from Denmark that include all first time fathers whose children were placed in foster care from 1995-2005, I find that having a child placed...... in foster care is associated with up to a 12 percentage point increase in welfare dependency. This result persists in analyses that control for individual and family level fixed effects, unobserved heterogeneity, and selection into having a child placed in foster care....

  19. NOAA Ship Nancy Foster Underway Meteorological Data, Near Real Time

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Ship Nancy Foster Underway Meteorological Data (Near Real Time, updated daily) are from the Shipboard Automated Meteorological and Oceanographic System (SAMOS)...

  20. Creativity and organizational learning as means to foster sustainability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lozano, Rodrigo|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/36412380X

    This article argues that creativity and organizational learning can help to challenge the traditional Newtonian and Cartesian mental models and foster more sustainable societies. The recognition and acceptance of creativity by individuals, groups, organizations, and finally society can create new

  1. NOAA Ship Nancy Foster Underway Meteorological Data, Quality Controlled

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Ship Nancy Foster Underway Meteorological Data (delayed ~10 days for quality control) are from the Shipboard Automated Meteorological and Oceanographic System...

  2. Weight changes in children in foster care for 1 year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneiderman, Janet U; Smith, Caitlin; Arnold-Clark, Janet S; Fuentes, Jorge; Duan, Lei

    2013-10-01

    The aims of this study of predominately racial/ethnic minority children in foster care (N=360, birth to 19 years old) in Los Angeles, CA were to examine the (1) prevalence of obesity (≥ 95 percentile) and overweight/obese (≥ 85 percentile) upon entrance to foster care (T1) and after 1 year in foster care (T2); (2) comparison of high weight categories to national statistics; (3) relationship of changes in weight status to age, reason for entry into foster care, and placement. Chi-square test and McNemar test comparing paired proportions were used to determine whether there were significant changes in the proportion of high weight categories between T1 and T2. Chi-square test or Fisher's exact test were used to evaluate the association between age, placement, and reason for foster care with the change in weight category. Changes in weight were categorized as (1) decreased in weight, (2) remained at overweight or obese, (3) increased in weight, or (4) remained normal. The proportion of obese and obese/overweight children between ages 2 and 5 were significantly lower at T2 than T1. There were no significant changes in the prevalence of obesity for the total population at T2. Children age 6 or older had a higher prevalence of obesity and overweight/obesity compared to national statistics. Of children at all ages, 64.7% of children of all ages entered foster care with a normal weight and stayed in the normal range during their first year in foster care, 12.2% decreased their weight, 15.4% remained overweight or obese, and 7.7% increased their weight. Age and parental substance use was related to change in weight category from T1 to T2. Children did not become more overweight or obese in foster care; however 28% of the children were obese or overweight upon entry into foster care. Children who are 6 years or older and obese upon entering foster care should be targeted for weight reduction. The pediatric community and child welfare system need to work together by

  3. Homelessness and the transition from foster care to adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworsky, Amy; Courtney, Mark E

    2009-01-01

    Prior research suggests that homelessness is a significant problem among young people aging out of foster care. However, these studies have not attempted to identify potential risk or protective factors that might affect the likelihood of becoming homeless during the transition to adulthood. This paper uses data from a longitudinal study to examine both the occurrence and predictors of homelessness among a sample of young people from three Midwestern states who recently aged out of foster care.

  4. Biomedical wellness challenges and opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangney, John F.

    2012-06-01

    The mission of ONR's Human and Bioengineered Systems Division is to direct, plan, foster, and encourage Science and Technology in cognitive science, computational neuroscience, bioscience and bio-mimetic technology, social/organizational science, training, human factors, and decision making as related to future Naval needs. This paper highlights current programs that contribute to future biomedical wellness needs in context of humanitarian assistance and disaster relief. ONR supports fundamental research and related technology demonstrations in several related areas, including biometrics and human activity recognition; cognitive sciences; computational neurosciences and bio-robotics; human factors, organizational design and decision research; social, cultural and behavioral modeling; and training, education and human performance. In context of a possible future with automated casualty evacuation, elements of current science and technology programs are illustrated.

  5. Voices of foster youths: problems and ideas for change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Rita I

    2007-10-01

    Foster care youth are innocent victims of both abusive parents and the foster care system that inadequately prepares them to transition to independent living in adulthood. The purpose of this study was to identify the characteristics leading to a lack of self-sufficiency and economic independence as perceived by foster care youths. This grounded theory study involved structured and unstructured interviews with 16 persons who had aged out of the foster care system and were living independently. Constant comparative analysis of responses to open-ended questions allowed for identifying and coding of emerging themes, and the relationships among categories associated with the foster care experience. Five major themes emerged from the analysis of the data, including It's From My Past, No Place to Call Home, Broken Promises, The System Failed Us, and Ideas for Change. The unique perspectives and observations of foster care youth should serve as the basis for developing policies and programs that can assist in acquiring knowledge and skills critical for their successful transition to independence.

  6. Sexual imprinting on continuous variation: do female zebra finches prefer or avoid unfamiliar sons of their foster parents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schielzeth, H; Burger, C; Bolund, E; Forstmeier, W

    2008-09-01

    Sexual imprinting on discrete variation that serves the identification of species, morphs or sexes is well documented. By contrast, sexual imprinting on continuous variation leading to individual differences in mating preferences within a single species, morph and sex has been studied only once (in humans). We measured female preferences in a captive population of wild-type zebra finches. Individual cross-fostering ensured that all subjects grew up with unrelated foster parents and nest mates. Females from two cohorts (N = 113) were given a simultaneous choice between (two or four) unfamiliar males, one of which was a genetic son of their foster parents (SFP). We found no significant overall preference for the SFP (combined effect size d = 0.14 +/- 0.15). Additionally, we tested if foster parent traits could potentially explain between-female variation in preferences. However, neither the effectiveness of cooperation between the parents nor male contribution to parental care affected female preferences for the son of the foster father. We conclude that at least in zebra finches sexual imprinting is not a major source of between-individual variation in mating preferences.

  7. Fostering Employee Engagement Through Gamification: AirBaltic Forecaster Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiga Ergle

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Next to the employee productivity or indicators for staff turnover and absenteeism in organizations, Employee Engagement stands out as one of the most significant measurements for Human Resource Management efficiency. With younger generation representatives joining the workforce companies are bound to investigate and pursue some of the new tools and techniques that respond more effectively to engagement triggers of generations Y and Z. At AirBaltic Corporation in Riga, Latvia, management has been trying to foster engagement of the workforce through introduction of a business game, called Forecaster. According to management belief, in addition to improved internal communication, Forecaster has potential to save up to 1 million eur annually due to the resulting better quality management decisions. Within the article author looks at the theory and research related to application and effects of gamification within corporate settings, as well as reviews workplace environment at AirBaltic Corporation. Further in the article, Forecaster game is described in more detail and its impact on employee engagement and organizational performance is analysed. Finally, recommendations are drawn for organizations to consider when gamifying people management processes in their organizations.

  8. Psychometric properties of the Transitions from Foster Care Key Leader Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Amy M; Brown, Eric C; Monahan, Kathryn C; Catalano, Richard F

    2016-04-01

    This study summarizes the development and piloting of the Transitions from Foster Care Key Leader Survey (TFC-KLS), an instrument designed to measure change in systems serving young people transitioning from foster care to adulthood. The Jim Casey Youth Opportunity Initiative's logic model was used as a basis for instrument development. The instrument was piloted with 119 key leaders in six communities. Seven of eight latent scales performed well in psychometric testing. The relationships among the 24 measures of system change were explored. A CFA testing overall model fit was satisfactory following slight modifications. Finally, a test of inter-rater reliability between two raters did not find reliable reporting of service availability in a supplemental portion of the survey. The findings were generally positive and supported the validity and utility of the instrument for measuring system change, following some adaptations. Implications for the field are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Substance Use Among Current and Former Foster Youth: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braciszewski, Jordan M; Stout, Robert L

    2012-12-01

    Substance use tends to escalate across adolescence and into young adulthood, and can be intensified by experiences with trauma and maltreatment, mental illness, and exposure to parental alcohol and drug use. Despite the disproportionately high levels of these variables among youth placed in the foster care system, relatively few studies have focused on the measurement of substance use in this vulnerable population. The current review summarizes the published literature on alcohol and drug outcomes for current and former foster youth. Specifically, prevalence of use and diagnoses are presented separately, as well as a review of risk and protective factors. Discussion of results addresses limitations and suggestions for improvement in the measurement of these outcome variables.

  10. Health Care Issues for Children and Adolescents in Foster Care and Kinship Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Children and adolescents who enter foster care often do so with complicated and serious medical, mental health, developmental, oral health, and psychosocial problems rooted in their history of childhood trauma. Ideally, health care for this population is provided in a pediatric medical home by physicians who are familiar with the sequelae of childhood trauma and adversity. As youth with special health care needs, children and adolescents in foster care require more frequent monitoring of their health status, and pediatricians have a critical role in ensuring the well-being of children in out-of-home care through the provision of high-quality pediatric health services, health care coordination, and advocacy on their behalves. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  11. Cross-fostering between two species of marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) and Callithrix penicillata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, R F; Takase, E; Santos, C V

    1998-11-01

    Cross-fostering technique can be defined as adoption of infants by adults of other species. This phenomenon is poorly investigated because very young animals have few opportunities to interact peacefully with non-conspecific adults, either in captivity or in natural conditions. This study describes the induction of cross-fostering in captivity between white tufted-ear (Callithrix jacchus) and black tufted-ear marmosets (Callithrix penicillata). We conclude that this technique can be very useful for preserving the life of rejected by parents or orphan infants, mainly in the case of species with low reproduction rate in captivity or those threatened by extinction, as well for investigating the environmental effects on the typical behavior of species (courtship, food preference, vocalization patterns, e.g.).

  12. Fostering Eco-Cultural Literacies for Social, Cultural and Ecological Justice: A Perspective from Aotearoa (New Zealand)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, Jenny

    2017-01-01

    Pedagogies that reflect the eco-cultural literacies of local Indigenous peoples have potential to foster young children's empathy for our planet as well as for other humans and for more-than-human kin such as mountains, rivers, forests, plants, fish, insects and animals. This article explores some ways in which early years educators can implement…

  13. In-Home Treatment of Reactive Attachment Disorder in a Therapeutic Foster Care System: A Case Example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheperis, Carl J.; Renfro-Michel, Edina L.; Doggett, R. Anthony

    2003-01-01

    When trauma precedes a child's placement in the foster care system, it can lead to lasting mental health difficulties. Often, children who experience extreme, chronic trauma prior to age 5 develop Reactive Attachment Disorder (RAD). This article discusses the characteristics of RAD as well as diagnostic criteria and possible etiology. (Contains 26…

  14. Health of children adopted from Guatemala: comparison of orphanage and foster care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Laurie; Chan, Wilma; Comfort, Kathleen; Tirella, Linda

    2005-06-01

    significant medical diagnoses, including congenital anomalies and ocular, neurologic, and orthopedic problems, were found in 14%. Most children were doing well developmentally (80-92% of expected performance), but 14% had global developmental delays. Cognition, expressive and receptive language, and activities of daily living skills correlated inversely with age at arrival for children who were younger than 2 years at adoption. Among the 50 matched children, those who resided in foster care before adoption had better measurements for height, weight, and head circumference at arrival to the United States. Moreover, those who resided in foster care scored significantly better for cognitive skills than those who had previously resided in orphanages (96.3% of age-expected compared with 88.3% of age-expected); other skills did not differ between the 2 groups. No differences were found between the 2 groups of children related to prevalence of medical diagnoses or phenotypic evidence suggesting prenatal alcohol exposure. Guatemalan adoptees display similar overall patterns of growth and developmental delays as seen in other groups of internationally adopted children, although not as severe. Younger children had better growth and development (cognition, language, and activities of daily living skills) than older children, regardless of location of residence before adoption. Among children who were matched for age, gender, and interval from adoption to evaluation, those who had resided in foster care had better growth and cognitive scores than children who had resided in orphanages before adoption. These findings support the need for timely adoptive placement of young infants and support the placement of children in attentive foster care rather than orphanages when feasible.

  15. Foster care assessment: An exploratory study of the placement assessment process in Flanders and the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanderfaeillie, J.; Damen, H.R.; Pijnenburg, H.M.P.H.M.; Bergh, P.M. van den; Holen, F. van

    2016-01-01

    Family foster care placement decision-making has a weak scientific underpinning. The identification of clusters of foster children (groups of foster children with similar characteristics) can help improve decision quality. In this study, we investigated if foster children could indeed be clustered,

  16. A Critical Reflection: Foster Care Youth Experiences at a Four Year Postsecondary Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Renada D.

    2016-01-01

    Foster care youth face significant challenges to postsecondary educational success, especially while enrolled at four-year institutions. Foster care youth are absent of family support that their non-foster peers receive throughout the college experience. Without family support, foster care youth encounter greater challenges to persevere through…

  17. 25 CFR 20.507 - What requirements must foster care providers meet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What requirements must foster care providers meet? 20.507... ASSISTANCE AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Child Assistance Foster Care § 20.507 What requirements must foster care providers meet? If a child needs foster care, the social services worker must select care that...

  18. "Couch Surfing" of Latino Foster Care Alumni: Reliance on Peers as Social Capital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Beatrix F.; Romo, Harriett D.

    2011-01-01

    Youth exiting foster care often experience difficulties transitioning into adulthood. This paper focuses on Latino foster care youth in a major southwestern U.S. city and addresses the importance of peer networks as a crucial form of social capital as youth leave foster care. Case studies illustrate experiences of foster care alumni ranging in age…

  19. Psychosocial functioning in Dutch foster children: The relationship with child, family, and placement characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goemans, Anouk; van Geel, Mitch; Vedder, Paul

    2016-06-01

    Foster care is the preferred alternative for out-of-home care, but not necessarily beneficial for foster children's psychosocial functioning. This dilemma leaves researchers with a challenge to find out more about the factors related to foster children's social and emotional functioning. In a sample of 446 Dutch foster children we examined the extent to which three clusters of characteristics, those akin to the foster child, the foster family, or foster placement, were related to foster children's functioning at the time of research. Multivariate three-step hierarchical regression analyses were performed for three outcome variables: externalizing problems, internalizing problems, and prosocial behavior. We found that all three clusters of foster care characteristics were significantly related to foster children's functioning. Foster placement characteristics, in particular interventions aimed at foster children, explained the largest amount of variance in behavior problems. Children receiving interventions had more externalizing and internalizing problems. A possible explanation is that interventions are indicated for those foster children who are in the highest need of additional support. Prosocial behavior was particularly related to foster family characteristics. The results were mostly in line with international research. Careful screening and monitoring of the social and emotional functioning of foster children may help to identify problems at an early stage. In addition (preventive) support should be offered to those foster children and families who are in need of it. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Resiliency in Children and Youth in Kinship Care and Family Foster Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Jed

    2008-01-01

    This study examined self-concept, resiliency and social support in 107 children and youth placed in foster care in New York City. Of the children and youth, 55 were placed in family foster care, while the remaining 52 children and youth were placed in a kinship foster home. Significantly more of mothers of the kinship foster care children and…

  1. Searching for effective interventions for young foster children under stress : A meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Andel, Hans W.H.; Grietens, Hans; Strijker, Johan; Van der Gaag, Rutger J.; Knorth, Erik J.

    Foster children experience a lot of stress because of their life histories and changes in their family circumstances, such as foster care placement. It is important that foster parents recognize the early signs of stress in foster children and learn how to act in a non-threatening and understanding

  2. 5 CFR 870.303 - Eligibility of foster children under Option C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ....303 Eligibility of foster children under Option C. (a) Effective October 30, 1998, foster children are eligible for coverage as family members under Option C. (b) To qualify for coverage as a foster child, the... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Eligibility of foster children under...

  3. Effects of PMTO in foster families with children with behavior problems : A Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maaskant, A.M.; van Rooij, F.B.; Overbeek, G.J.; Oort, F.J.; Arntz, M.; Hermanns, J.M.A.

    The present randomized controlled trial examined the effectiveness of Parent Management Training Oregon for foster parents with foster children (aged 4–12) with severe externalizing behavior problems in long-term foster care arrangements. Foster children’s behavior problems are challenging for

  4. Studies of the Maintenance of Subsidized Foster Placements in the Casey Family Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, James A.; Walsh, Roberta A.

    1990-01-01

    Studies placements and placement outcomes in a large voluntary foster care agency system, the Casey Family Program. Focuses on prediction of maintenance of foster placement when foster children have been matched with foster parents in what is intended to be a long-term, stable relationship. (BB)

  5. THE DESIGN OF A PROTOCOL FOR ASSESSING PROSPECTIVE FOSTER PARENTS IN SOUTH AFRICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carter, Juliet

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the development of a contextually appropriate protocol in social work for the assessment of prospective foster parents in South Africa. The protocol was designed in two stages using Thomas’s developmental research process and participatory action research methodologies. First, we designed a model of the competencies of effective foster families (determining “what” constitutes a good foster parent and developing a model of the “ideal” foster parents. Second, we designed and developed an assessment protocol with which to assess prospective foster families (specifying “how” one determines if foster parents meet the model’s criteria of the ideal foster parents.

  6. Developmental health of infants and children subsequent to foster care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruskas, Delilah

    2010-11-01

    every day, the United States child welfare system is entrusted with the care of over 400,000 children through foster care. The majority of children entering this social setting are infants, the most developmentally vulnerable. bronfenbrenner's human health ecology model and Bowlby's attachment theory are used to delineate the social setting of foster care and its impact on developmental health, and elucidates the relationship between childhood experiences and the overall continuum of health. Additionally, the notion of inherited genes and environmental influences or epigenetics toward gene expression will be explored. research points out that what happens in childhood matters; the consequences of not addressing childhood adversity and the associated risk factors of foster care increase a child's risk for poor developmental health and other major illnesses noted later in life such as cardiac disease, depression, and even premature death. Healthcare providers and others charged with caring for this vulnerable population who understand the social setting of foster care and its impact on developmental health may help identify and treat developmental problems earlier, thus potentially reducing long-term effects of abuse and neglect. improvement plans that promote best practice for child welfare must include those that directly address the unique developmental needs of all infants and children in foster care itself. Such plans will ensure that foster care as an intervention to protect vulnerable children at risk does not create more harm by reducing the associated risks and maximizing benefits while in foster care, and ensures that those born genetically vulnerable and disproportionately susceptible to poor outcomes in adversity are also protected and provided opportunities that promote optimal developmental health.

  7. Pathways to Preventing Substance Use Among Youth in Foster Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyoun K; Buchanan, Rohanna; Price, Joseph M

    2017-07-01

    Substance use problems are highly prevalent among youth in foster care. Such problems in adolescence have long-lasting implications for subsequent adjustment throughout adulthood and even across generations. Although several programs have demonstrated positive results in reducing substance use in at-risk youth, few studies have systemically examined how such programs work for foster youth and whether they are effective for both genders. This study examined the efficacy of KEEP SAFE, a family-based and skill-focused program designed to prevent substance use and other related health risking behaviors among youth in foster care. We hypothesized that improving the caregiver-youth relationship would lead to later reductions in youths' involvement with deviant peers, which subsequently would lead to less substance use, and that this mechanism would work comparably for both genders. A sample of 259 youth (154 girls, ages 11-17 years) in foster care and their caregivers participated in a randomized controlled trial and was followed for 18 months post-baseline. Results indicated that the intervention significantly reduced substance use in foster youth at 18 months post-baseline and that the intervention influenced substance use through two processes: youths' improved quality of relationships with caregivers at 6 months post-baseline and fewer associations with deviant peers at 12 months post-baseline. This suggests that these two processes may be fruitful immediate targets in substance use prevention programs for foster youth. We also found little gender differences in direct and mediating effects of the intervention, suggesting KEEP SAFE may be effective for both genders in foster care.

  8. Foster Caregivers' Perspectives on the Medical Challenges of Children Placed in Their Care: Implications for Pediatricians Caring for Children in Foster Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiner, Mary V; Ross, Jennifer; Brown, Courtney M; Beal, Sarah J; Sherman, Susan N

    2015-08-01

    To investigate, using qualitative methodology, foster caregivers' perspectives related to the medical needs of children placed in their care. Fifteen foster caregivers were individually interviewed using a semistructured open-ended question guide. Data were coded, and the analysis was conducted in an inductive manner, allowing themes to emerge from the interviews. The following 4 themes were identified: (1) the fragmented histories provided to foster caregivers and difficulty in obtaining information; (2) the unique medical complications that children in foster care experience; (3) the difference between "doing what is expected" and becoming a proactive foster caregiver; and (4) the support needs of foster caregivers. Foster caregivers receive insufficient information despite the evidence that these children are likely to have complex needs. It is, therefore, necessary for the pediatrician to recognize existing medical problems, identify new medical problems, educate foster caregivers, and communicate with the multidisciplinary team. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Fostering critical thinking, reasoning, and argumentation skills through bioethics education.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanne Ting Chowning

    Full Text Available Developing a position on a socio-scientific issue and defending it using a well-reasoned justification involves complex cognitive skills that are challenging to both teach and assess. Our work centers on instructional strategies for fostering critical thinking skills in high school students using bioethical case studies, decision-making frameworks, and structured analysis tools to scaffold student argumentation. In this study, we examined the effects of our teacher professional development and curricular materials on the ability of high school students to analyze a bioethical case study and develop a strong position. We focused on student ability to identify an ethical question, consider stakeholders and their values, incorporate relevant scientific facts and content, address ethical principles, and consider the strengths and weaknesses of alternate solutions. 431 students and 12 teachers participated in a research study using teacher cohorts for comparison purposes. The first cohort received professional development and used the curriculum with their students; the second did not receive professional development until after their participation in the study and did not use the curriculum. In order to assess the acquisition of higher-order justification skills, students were asked to analyze a case study and develop a well-reasoned written position. We evaluated statements using a scoring rubric and found highly significant differences (p<0.001 between students exposed to the curriculum strategies and those who were not. Students also showed highly significant gains (p<0.001 in self-reported interest in science content, ability to analyze socio-scientific issues, awareness of ethical issues, ability to listen to and discuss viewpoints different from their own, and understanding of the relationship between science and society. Our results demonstrate that incorporating ethical dilemmas into the classroom is one strategy for increasing student

  10. Fostering Critical Thinking, Reasoning, and Argumentation Skills through Bioethics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowning, Jeanne Ting; Griswold, Joan Carlton; Kovarik, Dina N.; Collins, Laura J.

    2012-01-01

    Developing a position on a socio-scientific issue and defending it using a well-reasoned justification involves complex cognitive skills that are challenging to both teach and assess. Our work centers on instructional strategies for fostering critical thinking skills in high school students using bioethical case studies, decision-making frameworks, and structured analysis tools to scaffold student argumentation. In this study, we examined the effects of our teacher professional development and curricular materials on the ability of high school students to analyze a bioethical case study and develop a strong position. We focused on student ability to identify an ethical question, consider stakeholders and their values, incorporate relevant scientific facts and content, address ethical principles, and consider the strengths and weaknesses of alternate solutions. 431 students and 12 teachers participated in a research study using teacher cohorts for comparison purposes. The first cohort received professional development and used the curriculum with their students; the second did not receive professional development until after their participation in the study and did not use the curriculum. In order to assess the acquisition of higher-order justification skills, students were asked to analyze a case study and develop a well-reasoned written position. We evaluated statements using a scoring rubric and found highly significant differences (p<0.001) between students exposed to the curriculum strategies and those who were not. Students also showed highly significant gains (p<0.001) in self-reported interest in science content, ability to analyze socio-scientific issues, awareness of ethical issues, ability to listen to and discuss viewpoints different from their own, and understanding of the relationship between science and society. Our results demonstrate that incorporating ethical dilemmas into the classroom is one strategy for increasing student motivation and

  11. Fostering critical thinking, reasoning, and argumentation skills through bioethics education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowning, Jeanne Ting; Griswold, Joan Carlton; Kovarik, Dina N; Collins, Laura J

    2012-01-01

    Developing a position on a socio-scientific issue and defending it using a well-reasoned justification involves complex cognitive skills that are challenging to both teach and assess. Our work centers on instructional strategies for fostering critical thinking skills in high school students using bioethical case studies, decision-making frameworks, and structured analysis tools to scaffold student argumentation. In this study, we examined the effects of our teacher professional development and curricular materials on the ability of high school students to analyze a bioethical case study and develop a strong position. We focused on student ability to identify an ethical question, consider stakeholders and their values, incorporate relevant scientific facts and content, address ethical principles, and consider the strengths and weaknesses of alternate solutions. 431 students and 12 teachers participated in a research study using teacher cohorts for comparison purposes. The first cohort received professional development and used the curriculum with their students; the second did not receive professional development until after their participation in the study and did not use the curriculum. In order to assess the acquisition of higher-order justification skills, students were asked to analyze a case study and develop a well-reasoned written position. We evaluated statements using a scoring rubric and found highly significant differences (pethical issues, ability to listen to and discuss viewpoints different from their own, and understanding of the relationship between science and society. Our results demonstrate that incorporating ethical dilemmas into the classroom is one strategy for increasing student motivation and engagement with science content, while promoting reasoning and justification skills that help prepare an informed citizenry.

  12. Gamification in Fostering Creativity: Player Type Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Kalinauskas

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose – to analyze gamification, as the method for promoting creativity in individual and collective levels with the respect to player types.Design/methodology/approach – This research serves as a general review/viewpoint which seeks to examine collective creativity as a phenomenon and gamification as the tool for promoting individual and collective creativity. The paper is based on the comparative analysis of scientific literature and related sources from game design, psychology, business and entertainment.Findings – Although the gamification is gaining more public attention, there is a lack of studies which would reveal its relations in fostering individual and collective creativity. One of the main goals of any gamified content is to raise the engagement into activities in non-game contexts. The objective of creative work is to come up with some ideas, methods or tools which would be significantly new and innovative in the case of a certain issue. The theory of “flow” is used widely in explaining the working principles of gamification. In this state, the information absorption rates are increased and the group or individual is immersed into performed activities. This may lead to prolonged periods while accumulating knowledge, and thus, improving creative capabilities in the specific domain. However, creative performance in different fields has various approaches. It is also related to personal characteristics. The success of gamification is also dependent on the types of “players” which participate in the activity. Having the common picture of personality type in creative performance and in game based tasks may allow creating gamification strategy for optimal engagement into creative work according to the features of a person.Research limitations/implications – There are very few empirical studies which would support correlation between experiencing the “flow” state and a raise of creativity. The idea of unified

  13. Fostering Understanding between Scientists and the Public.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daoyi, Zhang

    1988-01-01

    Describes how well-known scientists in China are attempting to win the understanding and trust of the general public as well as gaining prestige and social influence while promoting the cause of science. Measures employed include: the establishment of science institutions; professional organizations; events; the media; and science promotion…

  14. Kinship foster care among African American youth: Interaction effects at multiple contextual levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rufa, Anne K.; Fowler, Patrick J.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of kinship foster care on mental health outcomes among African American youth. Longitudinal data were used from a nationally representative sample of children and adolescents who were the subject of child protective services investigation from 1999 to 2000 (n=5,501). The secondary analyses focused on African American youth (n=225) placed into foster care. In structured interviews, current caregivers reported on youth internalizing and externalizing behaviors immediately following placement into out-of-home care and 18-months later. Path analysis tested a theoretical model that compared placements with kin to other formal out-of-home arrangements in context of setting characteristics, including aspects of caregiver and neighborhood disorder. Results suggested significant increases in internalizing symptoms over time for youth with more baseline mental health problems, as well as those placed in more distressed neighborhoods. Increased externalizing symptoms occurred among youth with greater baseline behavior problems, those placed in more problematic neighborhoods, and youth who experienced a placement change between assessments. Additionally, a combination of placement characteristics predicted increases in externalizing problems; youth placed in kinship foster care with older caregivers in poorer health exhibited greater increases in externalizing problems. Findings highlighted important contextual considerations for out-of-home placement among African American youth. PMID:26924865

  15. A shifting paradigm: Teachers' beliefs and methods for fostering ecological literacy in two public charter schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, Evan P.

    Ecological literacy is measured by a person's ability to understand the natural systems that make life on earth possible and how to live in accordance with those systems. The emergence of the pedagogies of place- and community-based education during the past two decades provides a possible avenue for fostering ecological literacy in schools. This thesis explores the following research questions: 1) How is ecological literacy fostered in two Alaskan public charter schools? 2) What are teachers' beliefs in these two schools about the way children and youth develop ecological literacy? 3) What are effective teaching methods and what are the challenges in engaging students in ecological literacy? Semi-structured interviews were conducted with six K--12 teachers in two public charter schools in Alaska in order to investigate these questions, and relevant examples of student work were collected for study as well. Qualitative data analysis revealed several emergent themes: the need for real-world connections to curriculum; the necessity of time spent outdoors at a young age; the long-term and holistic nature of ecological literacy development; and the importance of family and community role models in developing connections with the natural world. Based upon the research findings, several recommendations are made to support the efforts of teachers in these schools and elsewhere for fostering ecological literacy in children and youth.

  16. Indonesian Fintech Business: New Innovations or Foster and Collaborate in Business Ecosystems?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Teja

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. There are many innovative products fail to reach minimum critical mass adopter and cease to exist. New financial technology products are not an exception because the current financial technology to facilitate transactions, whether payment, investment, and insurance still function remarkably well. Since new financial technology products have features to better serve low to middle-level customers in the form of higher convenience level and lower costs than the current financial technology products, the initiatives to ensure their success is imperative. Thus, the purpose of this study is to present propositions based on a literature review to encourage companies to simultaneously have two competencies, first competencies in new product development and second, competencies to foster and collaborate with other companies in within and across business ecosystems. The implications of this paper are companies with higher competencies to foster and collaborate with other companies, even though they start with relatively basic innovative product, have higher probability to reach minimum critical mass of adopter and higher probability to become leader in their business ecosystem and government need to maintain their active role to foster collaboration within and across business ecosystem. Keywords: Business ecosystem, business ecosystems leader, collaboration, fintech (financial technology, new product development.

  17. Challenges of Assessing Maltreated Children Coming into Foster Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Pritchett

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Children who have experienced early adversity have been known to be at risk of developing cognitive, attachment, and mental health problems; therefore, it is crucial that children entering foster care can be properly assessed as early as possible. There are known difficulties in assessing children in foster care, for example, in finding a reliable informant. An ongoing randomised controlled trial in Glasgow, Scotland, recruiting infants entering foster care, provides a unique opportunity to explore some of the issues which need to be considered when assessing these children. The assessment data of 70 infants entering care is described while exploring the reliability of foster carers as informants and the importance of infant engagement with tasks. This group of infants was shown to be having more problems than children from the general population. While correlations were found between a carer’s level of concern about a child and the severity of a child’s problem, there were still a number of children displaying worrying problem scores whom foster carers did not report concern. The child’s engagement in the cognitive task showed associations with the child’s attainment on the task. Findings emphasise the importance of a holistic assessment for these children and all should be considered as potential cases with Maltreatment-Associated Psychiatric Problems (MAPP.

  18. Predicting Homelessness among Emerging Adults Aging Out of Foster Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Melissa Ford; Liu, Qinghua; Mark Eddy, J; Barkan, Susan; Marshall, David; Mancuso, David; Lucenko, Barbara; Huber, Alice

    2017-09-01

    This study examines risk and protective factors associated with experiencing homelessness in the year after "aging out" of foster care. Using a state-level integrated administrative database, we identified 1,202 emerging adults in Washington State who exited foster care between July 2010 and June 2012. Initial bivariate analyses were conducted to assess the association between candidate predictive factors and an indicator of homelessness in a 12-month follow-up period. After deploying a stepwise regression process, the final logistic regression model included 15 predictive factors. Youth who were parents, who had recently experienced housing instability, or who were African American had approximately twice the odds of experiencing homelessness in the year after exiting foster care. In addition, youth who had experienced disrupted adoptions, had multiple foster care placements (especially in congregate care settings), or had been involved with the juvenile justice system were more likely to become homeless. In contrast, youth were less likely to experience homelessness if they had ever been placed with a relative while in foster care or had a high cumulative grade point average relative to their peers. © Society for Community Research and Action 2016.

  19. Cumulative risks of foster care placement for Danish children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Fallesen

    Full Text Available Although recent research suggests that the cumulative risk of foster care placement is far higher for American children than originally suspected, little is known about the cumulative risk of foster care placement in other countries, which makes it difficult to gauge the degree to which factor foster care placement is salient in other contexts. In this article, we provide companion estimates to those provided in recent work on the US by using Danish registry data and synthetic cohort life tables to show how high and unequally distributed the cumulative risk of foster care placement is for Danish children. Results suggest that at the beginning of the study period (in 1998 the cumulative risk of foster care placement for Danish children was roughly in line with the risk for American children. Yet, by the end of the study period (2010, the risk had declined to half the risk for American children. Our results also show some variations by parental ethnicity and sex, but these differences are small. Indeed, they appear quite muted relative to racial/ethnic differences in these risks in the United States. Last, though cumulative risks are similar between Danish and American children (especially at the beginning of the study period, the age-specific risk profiles are markedly different, with higher risks for older Danish children than for older American children.

  20. The physical and mental health of children in foster care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, Pietro; Romani, Lorenza; Bottaro, Giorgia; Ianniello, Francesca; Fabrizio, Giovanna Carmela; Chiaretti, Antonio; Alvaro, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate physical and mental health in children in foster care and comparison with general population. The study is carried out between September 2011 and April 2012 into nine group homes in Rome. It involved 112 children ranging in age 2-17 years, living in temporary care facilities or institutes. All data came out of clinical history and physical exams, validated by a pediatrician. Such data were being then compared with samples of general population. Significant themes were high percentage of children with psychiatric disorders in foster care (22.3%); high percentage of psychiatric disorders diagnosed immediately while arriving at the foster care (56%); no significant differences in weight, height and BMI between children in foster care and general population; significant differences (Pfoster care and general population. The results suggest that the physical health of children in group homes is no worse than that of children living care in their own homes and that the foster care provides necessary conditions to support the growth of the children and their physical, mental and social needs.

  1. Homelessness during the transition from foster care to adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworsky, Amy; Napolitano, Laura; Courtney, Mark

    2013-12-01

    We estimated the incidence of homelessness during the transition to adulthood and identified the risk and protective factors that predict homelessness during this transition. Using data from the Midwest Evaluation of the Adult Functioning of Former Foster Youth, a longitudinal study of youths aging out of foster care in 3 Midwestern states, and a bounds approach, we estimated the cumulative percentage of youths who become homeless during the transition to adulthood. We also estimated a discrete time hazard model that predicted first reported episode of homelessness. Youths aging out of foster care are at high risk for becoming homeless during the transition to adulthood. Between 31% and 46% of our study participants had been homeless at least once by age 26 years. Running away while in foster care, greater placement instability, being male, having a history of physical abuse, engaging in more delinquent behaviors, and having symptoms of a mental health disorder were associated with an increase in the relative risk of becoming homeless. Policy and practice changes are needed to reduce the risk that youths in foster care will become homeless after aging out.

  2. Cumulative risks of foster care placement for Danish children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallesen, Peter; Emanuel, Natalia; Wildeman, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Although recent research suggests that the cumulative risk of foster care placement is far higher for American children than originally suspected, little is known about the cumulative risk of foster care placement in other countries, which makes it difficult to gauge the degree to which factor foster care placement is salient in other contexts. In this article, we provide companion estimates to those provided in recent work on the US by using Danish registry data and synthetic cohort life tables to show how high and unequally distributed the cumulative risk of foster care placement is for Danish children. Results suggest that at the beginning of the study period (in 1998) the cumulative risk of foster care placement for Danish children was roughly in line with the risk for American children. Yet, by the end of the study period (2010), the risk had declined to half the risk for American children. Our results also show some variations by parental ethnicity and sex, but these differences are small. Indeed, they appear quite muted relative to racial/ethnic differences in these risks in the United States. Last, though cumulative risks are similar between Danish and American children (especially at the beginning of the study period), the age-specific risk profiles are markedly different, with higher risks for older Danish children than for older American children.

  3. Challenges of Assessing Maltreated Children Coming into Foster Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchett, Rachel; Hockaday, Harriet; Anderson, Beatrice; Davidson, Claire; Gillberg, Christopher; Minnis, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Children who have experienced early adversity have been known to be at risk of developing cognitive, attachment, and mental health problems; therefore, it is crucial that children entering foster care can be properly assessed as early as possible. There are known difficulties in assessing children in foster care, for example, in finding a reliable informant. An ongoing randomised controlled trial in Glasgow, Scotland, recruiting infants entering foster care, provides a unique opportunity to explore some of the issues which need to be considered when assessing these children. The assessment data of 70 infants entering care is described while exploring the reliability of foster carers as informants and the importance of infant engagement with tasks. This group of infants was shown to be having more problems than children from the general population. While correlations were found between a carer's level of concern about a child and the severity of a child's problem, there were still a number of children displaying worrying problem scores whom foster carers did not report concern. The child's engagement in the cognitive task showed associations with the child's attainment on the task. Findings emphasise the importance of a holistic assessment for these children and all should be considered as potential cases with Maltreatment-Associated Psychiatric Problems (MAPP).

  4. [Methods for selecting foster families for psychiatric family care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Michel, P O; Konrad, M; Krüger, M

    1989-11-01

    Psychiatric foster family care of no more than two patients living in the foster family can be seen as a therapeutic setting, where longterm chronic patients can improve in their social functioning. Recent studies found the family characteristics as decisive for potential therapeutic effects. So the question arises how to select adequate foster family applicants. In an empirical study with 105 applicant-families we have tried to uncover the selection-procedures and mechanism of the foster care team that finally lead to adequate/non-adequate distinction. The results of the study show that the differences between the two applicant groups (selected vs non selected) are not identical with the intended selection criteria of the team members. Some major differences were found in areas that were totally independent from the team-criteria: the selected-as-adequate-families had a more intensive exchange with the outside world, educated more children and were therefore assumed to be socially more competent than the not selected applicant group. So selecting foster families comes up as a complicated decision making process that goes beyond checking up some criteria.

  5. Age-related trends in psychotropic medication use among very young children in foster care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dosReis, Susan; Tai, Ming-Hui; Goffman, David; Lynch, Sean E; Reeves, Gloria; Shaw, Terry

    2014-12-01

    The specific objectives were to investigate changes in the prevalence of psychotropic medication use for each year increase in age from three to six years old among children in foster care and to examine time-varying odds of longer duration of use by each year of age. A retrospective analysis of data on mental health and pharmacy services was conducted for 1,491 children age six and younger who were in foster care in 2010 and had at least 365 days in foster care during 2009-2011. A total of 178 children received at least one psychotropic medication from 2009 through 2011. Psychotropic prevalence and average days of use were calculated for each therapeutic class. Longitudinal regression models assessed the time-varying relationship between year of age and duration of use, controlling for demographic and clinical covariates. Approximately 12% of children age six and younger in foster care for 365 days or more received at least one psychotropic medication over the three-year study period. Prevalence of ADHD medication and antipsychotic medication and duration increased with each year of age (p<.001). In adjusted longitudinal models, each year increase in age was associated with a nearly twofold higher likelihood of longer duration of antipsychotic and ADHD medication use. Young children who initiated antipsychotic and ADHD medications before the age of six continued to receive them for longer periods of time. There is a critical need for long-term studies to evaluate the effect of chronic exposure on children's health and well-being.

  6. The relative safety of paternal, maternal, and traditional foster care placements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helton, Jesse J; Boutwell, Brian B; DiBernardo, Michael

    2017-08-01

    When children are placed into foster care the caseworker must give preference to an adult relative, many of whom are grandparents, over an unrelated caregiver. This kinship preference is based in evolutionary biology, which suggests that the imperative to care for a child should be greater for kin versus non-kin. However, not all kin are related to a child in the same way, and level of paternity uncertainty may influence level of care provided. For instance, maternal grandparents can be assured that they share genetic material with their grandchild, while paternal grandparents may not have the same level of certainty. Owing to the possibility of paternity uncertainty, we hypothesize that out-of-home placements with paternal grandparents will be at a greater risk of subsequent investigations than placements with maternal grandparents or with foster parents. We secured data on placements n=560 of children ages 1.5 to 17 following a maltreatment investigation from a merger of the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being NSCAW II and the National Child Abuse and Neglect Data System NCANDS. Kaplan-Meier and multivariate Cox regression were used to examine the difference in time to the first new investigation by type of out-of-home placement while controlling for covariates. Consistent with our hypothesis, placements with paternal grandparents were at a higher risk of a subsequent investigations than placements with maternal grandparents or non-kin foster parents. Results suggest a need for further considerations of child safety in foster care based on genetic relatedness of caregivers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. History of foster care among homeless adults with mental illness in Vancouver, British Columbia: a precursor to trajectories of risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Michelle L; Moniruzzaman, Akm; Somers, Julian M

    2015-02-26

    It is well documented that a disproportionate number of homeless adults have childhood histories of foster care placement(s). This study examines the relationship between foster care placement as a predictor of adult substance use disorders (including frequency, severity and type), mental illness, vocational functioning, service use and duration of homelessness among a sample of homeless adults with mental illness. We hypothesize that a history of foster care predicts earlier, more severe and more frequent substance use, multiple mental disorder diagnoses, discontinuous work history, and longer durations of homelessness. This study was conducted using baseline data from two randomized controlled trials in Vancouver, British Columbia for participants who responded to a series of questions pertaining to out-of-home care at 12 months follow-up (n = 442). Primary outcomes included current mental disorders; substance use including type, frequency and severity; physical health; duration of homelessness; vocational functioning; and service use. In multivariable regression models, a history of foster care placement independently predicted incomplete high school, duration of homelessness, discontinuous work history, less severe types of mental illness, multiple mental disorders, early initiation of drug and/or alcohol use, and daily drug use. This is the first Canadian study to investigate the relationship between a history of foster care and current substance use among homeless adults with mental illness, controlling for several other potential confounding factors. It is important to screen homeless youth who exit foster care for substance use, and to provide integrated treatment for concurrent disorders to homeless youth and adults who have both psychiatric and substance use problems. Both trials are registered with the International Standard Randomized Control Trial Number Register and were assigned ISRCTN57595077 (Vancouver At Home Study: Housing First plus

  8. Developing a Health Care System for Children in Foster Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiner, Mary V; Beal, Sarah J

    2017-09-01

    In 2012, the Comprehensive Health Evaluations for Cincinnati's Kids (CHECK) Center was launched at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center to provide health care for over 1,000 children placed into foster care each year in the Cincinnati community. This consultation model clinical program was developed because children in foster care have been difficult to manage in the traditional health care setting due to unmet health needs, missing medical records, cumbersome state mandates, and transient and impoverished social settings. This case study describes the history and creation of the CHECK Center, demonstrating the development of a successful foster care health delivery system that is inclusive of all community partners, tailored for the needs and resources of the community, and able to adapt and respond to new information and changing systems.

  9. Good caring and vocabularies of motive among foster carers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Doyle

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Employing C. Wright Mills’ concept of vocabulary of motives, this article examines the motives and attitudes of people who volunteer to foster children with high support needs. Data is drawn from a larger qualitative study involving indepth interviewing of 23 carers. When asked why they had become foster carers participants produced conventional accounts of child-centred altruistic motives–an acceptable vocabulary of motives which satisfied institutional and cultural expectations regarding caregiving. However, closer examination of participants’ experiences and attitudes revealed the likelihood that economic motives were also factors in decisions to foster. It is argued that participants chose to exclude economic motives from their accounts so as to avoid the risk of being seen to be ‘doing it for the money’.

  10. Attachment states of mind among internationally adoptive and foster parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raby, K Lee; Yarger, Heather A; Lind, Teresa; Fraley, R Chris; Leerkes, Esther; Dozier, Mary

    2017-05-01

    The first aim of the current study was to examine the latent structure of attachment states of mind as assessed by the Adult Attachment Interview (AAI) among three groups of parents of children at risk for insecure attachments: parents who adopted internationally (N = 147), foster parents (N = 300), and parents living in poverty and involved with Child Protective Services (CPS; N = 284). Confirmatory factor analysis indicated the state of mind rating scales loaded on two factors reflecting adults' preoccupied and dismissing states of mind. Taxometric analyses indicated the variation in adults' preoccupied states of mind was more consistent with a dimensional than a categorical model, whereas results for dismissing states of mind were indeterminate. The second aim was to examine the degree to which the attachment states of mind of internationally adoptive and foster parents differ from those of poverty/CPS-referred parents and low-risk parents. After controlling for parental age, sex, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status, (a) internationally adoptive parents had lower scores on the dismissing dimension than the sample of community parents described by Haltigan, Leerkes, Supple, and Calkins (2014); (b) foster parents did not differ from community parents on either the dismissing or the preoccupied AAI dimension; and (c) both internationally adoptive and foster parents had lower scores on the preoccupied dimension than poverty/CPS-referred parents. Analyses using the traditional AAI categories provided convergent evidence that (a) internationally adoptive parents were more likely to be classified as having an autonomous state of mind than low-risk North American mothers based on Bakermans-Kranenburg and van IJzendoorn's (2009) meta-analytic estimates, (b) the rates of autonomous states of mind did not differ between foster and low-risk parents, and (c) both internationally adoptive and foster parents were less likely to be classified as having a preoccupied state of

  11. Attachment states of mind among internationally adoptive and foster parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    RABY, K. LEE; YARGER, HEATHER A.; LIND, TERESA; FRALEY, R. CHRIS; LEERKES, ESTHER; DOZIER, MARY

    2017-01-01

    The first aim of the current study was to examine the latent structure of attachment states of mind as assessed by the Adult Attachment Interview (AAI) among three groups of parents of children at risk for insecure attachments: parents who adopted internationally (N = 147), foster parents (N = 300), and parents living in poverty and involved with Child Protective Services (CPS; N = 284). Confirmatory factor analysis indicated the state of mind rating scales loaded on two factors reflecting adults’ preoccupied and dismissing states of mind. Taxometric analyses indicated the variation in adults’ preoccupied states of mind was more consistent with a dimensional than a categorical model, whereas results for dismissing states of mind were indeterminate. The second aim was to examine the degree to which the attachment states of mind of internationally adoptive and foster parents differ from those of poverty/CPS-referred parents and low-risk parents. After controlling for parental age, sex, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status, (a) internationally adoptive parents had lower scores on the dismissing dimension than the sample of community parents described by Haltigan, Leerkes, Supple, and Calkins (2014); (b) foster parents did not differ from community parents on either the dismissing or the preoccupied AAI dimension; and (c) both internationally adoptive and foster parents had lower scores on the preoccupied dimension than poverty/CPS-referred parents. Analyses using the traditional AAI categories provided convergent evidence that (a) internationally adoptive parents were more likely to be classified as having an autonomous state of mind than low-risk North American mothers based on Bakermans-Kranenburg and van IJzendoorn’s (2009) meta-analytic estimates, (b) the rates of autonomous states of mind did not differ between foster and low-risk parents, and (c) both internationally adoptive and foster parents were less likely to be classified as having a preoccupied state

  12. Explaining variations in state foster care maintenance rates and the implications for implementing new evidence-based programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldhaber-Fiebert, Jeremy D; Babiarz, Kimberly S; Garfield, Rachel L; Wulczyn, Fred; Landsverk, John; Horwitz, Sarah M

    2014-04-01

    U.S. Child Welfare systems are involved in the lives of millions of children, and total spending exceeds $26 billion annually. Out-of-home foster care is a critical and expensive Child Welfare service, a major component of which is the maintenance rate paid to support housing and caring for a foster child. Maintenance rates vary widely across states and over time, but reasons for this variation are not well understood. As evidence-based programs are disseminated to state Child Welfare systems, it is important to understand what may be the important drivers in the uptake of these practices including state spending on core system areas. We assembled a unique, longitudinal, state-level panel dataset (1990-2008) for all 50 states with annual data on foster care maintenance rates and measures of child population in need, poverty, employment, urbanicity, proportion minority, political party control of the state legislature and governorship, federal funding, and lawsuits involving state foster care systems. All monetary values were expressed in per-capita terms and inflation adjusted to 2008 dollars. We used longitudinal panel regressions with robust standard errors and state and year fixed effects to estimate the relationship between state foster care maintenance rates and the other factors in our dataset, lagging all factors by one year to mitigate the possibility that maintenance rates influenced their predictors. Exploratory analyses related maintenance rates to Child Welfare outcomes. State foster care maintenance rates have increased in nominal terms, but in many states, have not kept pace with inflation, leading to lower real rates in 2008 compared to those in 1991 for 54% of states for 2 year-olds, 58% for 9 year-olds, and 65% for 16 year-olds. In multivariate analyses including socioeconomic, demographic, and political factors, monthly foster care maintenance rates declined $15 for each 1% increase in state unemployment and declined $40 if a state's governorship

  13. Explaining variations in state foster care maintenance rates and the implications for implementing new evidence-based programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldhaber-Fiebert, Jeremy D.; Babiarz, Kimberly S.; Garfield, Rachel L.; Wulczyn, Fred; Landsverk, John; Horwitz, Sarah M.

    2013-01-01

    Background U.S. Child Welfare systems are involved in the lives of millions of children, and total spending exceeds $26 billion annually. Out-of-home foster care is a critical and expensive Child Welfare service, a major component of which is the maintenance rate paid to support housing and caring for a foster child. Maintenance rates vary widely across states and over time, but reasons for this variation are not well understood. As evidence-based programs are disseminated to state Child Welfare systems, it is important to understand what may be the important drivers in the uptake of these practices including state spending on core system areas. Data and methods We assembled a unique, longitudinal, state-level panel dataset (1990–2008) for all 50 states with annual data on foster care maintenance rates and measures of child population in need, poverty, employment, urbanicity, proportion minority, political party control of the state legislature and governorship, federal funding, and lawsuits involving state foster care systems. All monetary values were expressed in per-capita terms and inflation adjusted to 2008 dollars. We used longitudinal panel regressions with robust standard errors and state and year fixed effects to estimate the relationship between state foster care maintenance rates and the other factors in our dataset, lagging all factors by one year to mitigate the possibility that maintenance rates influenced their predictors. Exploratory analyses related maintenance rates to Child Welfare outcomes. Findings State foster care maintenance rates have increased in nominal terms, but in many states, have not kept pace with inflation, leading to lower real rates in 2008 compared to those in 1991 for 54% of states for 2 year-olds, 58% for 9 year-olds, and 65% for 16 year-olds. In multivariate analyses including socioeconomic, demographic, and political factors, monthly foster care maintenance rates declined $15 for each 1% increase in state unemployment and

  14. Effect of Foster Care on Young Children's Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windsor, Jennifer; Benigno, Joann P.; Wing, Christine A.; Carroll, Patrick J.; Koga, Sebastian F.; Nelson, Charles A.; Fox, Nathan A.; Zeanah, Charles H.

    2014-01-01

    This report examines 174 young children's language outcomes in the Bucharest Early Intervention Project, the first randomized trial of foster placement after institutional care. Age of foster placement was highly correlated with language outcomes. Placement by 15 months led to similar expressive and receptive language test scores as typical age peers at 30 and 42 months. Placement from 15 to 24 months also led to dramatic language improvement. In contrast, children placed after 24 months had the same severe language delays as children in institutional care. Language samples at 42 months confirmed that placement after 24 months led to lower expressive skill. PMID:21679171

  15. Foster care and healing from complex childhood trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forkey, Heather; Szilagyi, Moira

    2014-10-01

    Children enter foster care with many forms of adversity and trauma beyond maltreatment that impact their short- and long-term physical, mental, and developmental health and their adaptation to their new care environment. Applying an understanding of the impact of toxic stress on the developing brain and body allows the health care provider to understand findings in this vulnerable population. Complex trauma alters immune response, neurodevelopment, and the genome, resulting in predictable and significant cognitive, behavioral, and physical consequences. Pediatric care of children in foster care must be trauma informed to meet their medical, mental health, and developmental needs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Medical Foster Homes: Can the Adult Foster Care Model Substitute for Nursing Home Care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Cari; Whitfield, Emily A

    2016-12-01

    To compare characteristics, healthcare use, and costs of care of veterans in the rapidly expanding Veterans Health Administration (VHA) medical foster home (MFH) with those of three other VHA long-term care (LTC) programs. Descriptive, unmatched study. VHA MFHs, home-based primary care (HBPC), community living centers (CLCs), and community nursing homes (CNHs). Veterans newly enrolled in one of the four LTC settings in calendar years 2010 or 2011. Using VA and Medicare data from fiscal years 2010 and 2011, demographic characteristics, healthcare use, and costs of 388 veterans in MFHs were compared with 26,037 of those in HBPC, 5,355 in CLCs, and 5,517 in CNHs in the year before and the year after enrollment. Veterans enrolled in the MFH program were more likely to be unmarried than those in other LTC programs and had higher levels of comorbidity and frailty than veterans receiving HBPC but had similar levels of comorbidity, frailty, and healthcare use as those in CLCs and CNHs. MFH veterans incurred lower costs than those in CNHs and CLCs. MFHs served a distinct subset of veterans with levels of comorbidity and frailty similar to those of veterans cared for in CLCs and CNHs at costs that were comparable to or lower than those of the VHA. Propensity-matched comparisons will be necessary to confirm these findings. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  17. Fostering Local Economic Development through Community ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The skills included information system analysis and development, computing as well as web developing. The case study employed a Community Informatics approach which is the application of information and communications technologies (ICTs) to enable community processes such as local economic development.

  18. Fostering Early Language with Infants and Toddlers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honig, Alice Sterling

    2014-01-01

    This articles describes the learning process of infants and toddlers and provides tips that parents and caregivers can use to promote the development of rich language skills, as well as an abiding passion for learning. From the earliest days, talking with babies encourages their knowledge of words. Singing and reading books increases their…

  19. Fostering Research and Publication in Academic Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassen, Catherine; Wahl, Diane

    2014-01-01

    This study concerns administrative support provided to encourage the research and publishing activities of academic librarians working in Association of Research Libraries member libraries. Deans and directors of these libraries were asked to respond to an online survey concerning the support measures that their libraries provide, as well as their…

  20. School Characteristics that Foster Organizational Citizenship Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiPaola, Michael F.; Hoy, Wayne K.

    2005-01-01

    After a theoretical analysis of the concept of organizational citizenship is elaborated, we complete an analysis of the characteristics of school organization that promote citizenship behaviors. We assume that the leadership of the principal is critical in such an endeavor as well as the trust that colleagues have in each other and the extent to…

  1. The use of self-determination theory to foster environmental motivation in an environmental biology course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darner, Rebekka

    A scientifically literate person is one who understands the nature of science, its processes, products, and their appropriate application to decision-making contexts. The impetus to make informed decisions about environmental issues is environmental motivation. I examined students' environmental motivation, its relationship to scientific knowledge, and how environmental motivation can be fostered in a science classroom. This study took place in a college-level environmental biology course in which the instructor attempted to support students' basic psychological needs, as defined by self-determination theory (SDT). The first question was to what extent does an SDT-guided environmental biology course differ from a non-SDT-guided course in the degree to which it fostered self-determined motivation toward the environment. The administration of a well-validated scale to two sections before, after, and six months following the end of the course indicated that SDT-guided instruction is a plausible way to foster environmental motivation in the classroom. The second question was what are the multiple influences on fostering self-determined motivation toward the environment in an SDT-guided course. Path analysis indicated that environmental motivation can be partially accomplished in an environmental biology course by conveying to students that they are cared for, are connected to others, and can trust others while solving environmental problems. The third question sought to characterize students' scientific conceptualizations as they solve environmental problems and the extent to which their conceptualizations relate to the satisfaction of their need for competence. Students were videotaped during in-class problem-solving, after which stimulated-recall interviews were conducted. Grounded theory and an established coding scheme were combined to analyze these data, which resulted in three grounded hypotheses about what characterizes students' scientific knowledge when they

  2. Foster family care review by judicial-citizen panels: an evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, E W; Wodarski, J S

    1986-01-01

    The findings of this study are mixed. In general, after one year of judicial-citizen review, there is no clear indication that this alternative to internal case review has led to more positive outcomes for children in foster care. This finding should be heartening to public child welfare agency personnel whose motivation for accountability has been called into question by proponents of external foster care review. At least when compared with a new citizen review system, the already existing internal review system measured up quite well. Although the study did not indicate a clear pattern of more positive outcomes for the study group, there is evidence of some favorable characteristics of CRPs that may show promise for the future. With additional training in developing behaviorally measurable and time-limited parental objectives, citizen panels may be able to maintain some of their initial strength in this area. Increased involvement of juvenile court judges in cases where little or no progress is made could motivate some parents to meet specified objectives and speed up the process of terminating parental rights when no progress has been demonstrated within specified time periods. The data also indicate a need for some adjustment to the process used to involve parents in case reviews. Another potentially positive outcome was highlighted during interviews with the juvenile court judges and the DFCS staff in the three study counties. Many of these respondents believed that the process had the potential for moving children out of foster care more quickly than does the internal review process. In addition to this primary goal, however, respondents were excited about the potential for heightened community awareness and education as citizens come to understand more about the plight of foster children and family conditions that can lead to placement. Interviews with panel members themselves indicated a definite belief that the community needed to accept more

  3. Building Community Capacity and Fostering Disaster Resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Rivas, Virginia; Kilmer, Ryan P

    2016-12-01

    To describe, within an ecologically grounded framework, key principles, and recommendations for community-level intervention to build community capacity and promote disaster resilience. Using an ecological framework, this article describes community resilience and related constructs and key principles for community-level disaster preparedness and response. Current research suggests the importance of focusing on bolstering resources that promote wellness and facilitate individual and community resilience in the face of disaster. We advocate for using an ecological framework grounded in such values as collaboration, social justice, empowerment, and an appreciation of diversity to guide disaster work with communities. We highlight the need to: (a) focus on building community-specific capacity for disaster preparedness, response, and recovery; (b) emphasize increasing the capacity and supportive potential of community members' natural settings to promote wellness; (c) address power and resource inequities; and (d) enhance capacity to ensure contextually and culturally appropriate structures, methods, and interventions. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Fostering Creativity in Students A Short Synthesis Project for the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 1. Fostering Creativity in Students A Short Synthesis Project for the Organic Chemistry Laboratory. Mary M Mader Charles A Liberko. General Article Volume 2 Issue 1 January 1997 pp 53-59 ...

  5. Fostering Creativity in Tablet-Based Interactive Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye Jeong; Park, Ji Hyeon; Yoo, Sungae; Kim, Hyeoncheol

    2016-01-01

    This article aims to examine the effects of an instructional model that leverages innovative technologies in the classroom to cultivate collaboration that improves students' comprehension, fosters their creativity, and enables them to better express and communicate their ideas through drawing. This discussion focuses on classroom interaction…

  6. Evaluation of Michigan's Foster Care Case Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kristen; Wagner, Dennis

    2005-01-01

    Objective: In 1997, Michigan's Family Independence Agency piloted case management procedures designed to expedite permanency and improve services to children in foster care. Method: A 3-year evaluation examined outcomes in nine pilot and nine comparison counties to determine if children in the pilot counties achieved permanency, either returned…

  7. What Global Perspective Does Our University Foster in Our Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shephard, Kerry; Bourk, Michael; Mirosa, Miranda; Dulgar, Pete

    2017-01-01

    We used a modified circuit of culture enquiry to explore processes of production, representation and consumption of global perspective at our university, in the context of fostering this perspective as a graduate attribute. We identified four frame packages by which this perspective is understood and communicated. Global perspective is framed…

  8. Strategies to Foster Emotional Intelligence in Christian Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gliebe, Sudi Kate

    2012-01-01

    This article proposes five initiatives to foster emotional intelligence (EI) education throughout institutions of Christian higher education. Goleman (1995) identifies self-awareness, managing emotions, motivation, empathy, and social intelligence as the hallmark skills of emotional intelligence. The importance of mastering these skills and their…

  9. Graduate Induction Training Techniques: A New Model for Fostering Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Education & Training, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Describes research into the way graduates are inducted into an organization. Investigates, in particular, the extent to which organizations encourage innovation among their future managers. Contends that, while there is much talk about fostering innovation, creativity and entrepreneurship, the approaches used tend to be counter-productive. Puts…

  10. Intervention Targets for Youth with Disabilities in Foster Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwick, Robin; Tyre, Ashli; Beisse, Kay; Thomas, Cathy

    2015-01-01

    This article will focus on students with disabilities in foster care to help school psychologists identify effective school-based interventions for these students. We will report our findings from three independent studies and then apply the findings to suggest targeted interventions for these students that are intended to improve educational and…

  11. Beginning Teacher Challenges Instructing Students Who Are in Foster Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zetlin, Andrea; MacLeod, Elaine; Kimm, Christina

    2012-01-01

    Children in foster care compose a population of students very vulnerable to school failure. Placement and school instability and lack of collaboration between the school and child welfare agency are some of the barriers that impede their school performance. This study focused on the classroom context and questioned beginning general and special…

  12. Everyday Miracles: Supporting Parents of Infants in Foster Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wotherspoon, Evelyn; McInnis, Jan

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a model for supporting parents and their infants during separations due to temporary foster care. Using a case example, the authors describe a model for visit coaching, including their process for assessment and strategies used for intervention. The lessons learned are: (a) that individual parents can present very…

  13. Modern Family: Adoption and Foster Care in Children's Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meese, Ruth Lyn

    2012-01-01

    Teachers often have no preparation for handling the questions and conversations that arise in the classroom when discussing literature having adoption or foster care themes. Instead of relying on personal experiences or stereotypes portrayed through the media, teachers are advised to understand the developmental tasks of children from families…

  14. Prior Trauma Exposure for Youth in Treatment Foster Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorsey, Shannon; Burns, Barbara J.; Southerland, Dannia G.; Cox, Julia Revillion; Wagner, H. Ryan; Farmer, Elizabeth M. Z.

    2012-01-01

    Very little research has focused on rates of trauma exposure for youth in treatment foster care (TFC). Available research has utilized record review for assessing exposure, which presents limitations for the range of trauma types examined, as records are predominantly focused on abuse and neglect. The current study examines exposure rates and…

  15. Fostering Kinship with Animals: Animal Portraiture in Humane Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalof, Linda; Zammit-Lucia, Joe; Bell, Jessica; Granter, Gina

    2016-01-01

    Visual depictions of animals can alter human perceptions of, emotional responses to, and attitudes toward animals. Our study addressed the potential of a slideshow designed to activate emotional responses to animals to foster feelings of kinship with them. The personal meaning map measured changes in perceptions of animals. The participants were…

  16. Counselling as a psychological approach to fostering appropriate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The focus of this paper is on counselling as a psychological approach to fostering appropriate learning behaviour in Nigerian secondary school students. The paper drew attention to the confrontation, mentoring, behavioural, appraisal, and standards blending models to appeal to the consciences of students with ...

  17. Adapting Practices of Science Journalism to Foster Science Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polman, Joseph L.; Newman, Alan; Saul, Ellen Wendy; Farrar, Cathy

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the authors describe how the practices of expert science journalists enable them to act as "competent outsiders" to science. We assert that selected science journalism practices can be used to design reform-based science instruction; these practices not only foster science literacy that is useful in daily life, but also…

  18. Fostering an Informal Learning Community of Computer Technologies at School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Lu; Carroll, John M.

    2007-01-01

    Computer technologies develop at a challenging fast pace. Formal education should not only teach students basic computer skills to meet current computer needs, but also foster student development of informal learning ability for a lifelong learning process. On the other hand, students growing up in the digital world are often more skilled with…

  19. The Role of Traditional Leaders in Fostering Democracy, Justice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article examines the role of chiefs in fostering democracy, human rights and peace in Zimbabwe. It argues that in the precolonial era, chiefs had knowledge of grassroots democracy as they made consultations with their council machinery before taking any decision. It also argues that the pre-colonial chiefs were ...

  20. Decision Making in Foster Care: A Training Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Theodore J.; Gambrill, Eileen D.

    This manual was designed for use in training students and child welfare practitioners in case management methods that would help to reduce the number of children in long-term foster placement by intervening to help the child's own family cope with their problems. The first two sections describe the process of assessment, the formulation of…

  1. Fostering critical thinking in initial teacher education curriculums: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Drawing from literature since 2000, this review examines the strategies for fostering critical thinking in initial teacher education curriculums. Many educational researchers and practitioners are in agreement that critical thinking is an important cognitive skill to be incorporated across the curriculum in teacher education.

  2. Fostering Critical Thinking Practices at Primary Science Classrooms in Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Kamal Prasad

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the socio-cultural activities that have direct and indirect impacts on critical thinking practices in primary science classrooms and what kinds of teachers' activities help to foster the development of critical thinking practices in children. Meanwhile, the constructivist and the socio-cultural theoretical dimensions have…

  3. Fostering Students' Reflection: Examining Relations between Elements of Teachers' Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tigelaar, Dineke; Sins, Patrick; van Driel, Jan

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the knowledge that experienced teachers draw on when fostering students' reflections. Reflective skills are crucial for advancing students' learning. In order to promote students' reflection productively, extensive support and scaffolding from teachers is indispensible. However, teachers are in need of more guidance in this…

  4. Indexing Creativity Fostering Teacher Behaviour: Replication and Modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikici, Ayhan; Soh, Kaycheng

    2015-01-01

    Many measurement tools on creativity are available in the literature. One of these scales is Creativity Fostering Teacher Behaviour Index (CFTIndex) developed for Singaporean teacher originally. It was then translated into Turkish and trialled on teachers in Nigde province with acceptable reliability and factorial validity. The main purpose of…

  5. Fostering Creativity & Effective Communication With Interaction Design Students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merritt, Timothy; Nørgaard, Mie

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents our experiences introducing, developing, and teaching master and bachelor level design courses at a Danish computer science faculty with the central aims of fostering creativity and maturing the students’ abilities to engage in professional discussions about design and design...... develop and teach courses in creative topics....

  6. Independent Living Services and the Educational Motivation of Foster Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriamiatoe, Osarumen Rachel

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine the components of independent living training and services to determine their effectiveness in preparing foster youth in Tennessee for adulthood, and whether the youth's perceived effectiveness of these services affected their educational motivation. Support factors (i.e., family, financial,…

  7. Caregiver Commitment to Foster Children: The Role of Child Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindhiem, Oliver; Dozier, Mary

    2007-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to examine the association between child behavior problems and caregiver commitment to their child in a group of young foster children. Method: The sample consisted of 102 caregiver-child dyads from the greater Baltimore area. Child behavior was assessed using the Child Behavior Checklist [CBCL; Achenbach, T. M. (1991).…

  8. Strategies for Fostering the Efficacy of School-Based Management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study examined community participation in the School-Based Management Committees (SBMC), the challenges hindering participation, and strategies for fostering efficacy of the School Based Management Committee. The number 340 schools were selected from the population of 2543 public primary schools in ...

  9. How incomplete contracts foster innovation in inter-organizational relationships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sumo, R.; van der Valk, Wendy; van Weele, A.J.; Duijsters, Geert

    2016-01-01

    Relative to relational governance, research into the use and effects of formal governance is scarce. Recent contributions suggest that a specific type of contract that has intentionally been left incomplete, the performance-based contract (PBC), fosters innovation. However, it is unknown how this

  10. Emerging Trends in Fostering and Child Adoption Practices among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper examines emerging trends in child fostering and adoption practices among the Igbo in time perspective. It discusses traditional practices that served as alternatives to child adoption in the pre-colonial period, child adoption practice which is one of the legacies of British colonial administration and the various ...

  11. Project ReConnect: Fostering Resilience within Disconnected Youths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethea, James; Robsinson, Unseld

    2007-01-01

    This qualitative research study identifies protective factors that foster resilience in disconnected youths (ages 16-18) who are participants in Project ReConnect, an alternative education program in New York City. Observations, participant observations, interviews, and focus groups were utilized to collect data from ten participants. Findings…

  12. A Structure to Foster Creativity: An Industrial Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moukwa, Mosongo

    1995-01-01

    A structure to foster creativity in a research and development environment is described. Features of the system include an emphasis on selection of the right mix of employees, collaboration within and between groups, encouragement for risk-taking, viewing problems from new angles, and an understanding by management of many different aspects of…

  13. Fostering Learning Outcomes in Fraternity and Sorority Involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Charlene; Lutovsky, Brenda

    2001-01-01

    Asserts that as institutional support of student affairs areas becomes increasingly tied to learning outcomes, the effect of fraternity and sorority involvement on intellectual development is critical to its continued support. Addresses learning outcomes of fraternity and sorority membership, fostering improved learning outcomes, changing…

  14. Trauma exposure and PTSD among older adolescents in foster care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Amy M; Keller, Thomas E; Gowen, L Kris; Courtney, Mark E

    2013-04-01

    Youth in foster care represent a highly traumatized population. However, trauma research on this population has focused primarily on maltreatment rather than the full spectrum of trauma experiences identified within the DSM-IV. The current study aims to fill this gap by reporting the prevalence of exposure to specific types of traumatic events for a large sample of youth with foster care experience. The study also reports the likelihood of lifetime PTSD diagnoses associated with each specific type of trauma. Data are from a longitudinal panel study of 732 adolescents aged 17 and 18 who were in foster care. Lifetime trauma exposure and PTSD diagnosis were assessed using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Statistical comparisons were made using logistic regressions. The majority of respondents had experienced at least one trauma in their lifetime. While overall trauma prevalence did not differ by gender, males were more likely to experience interpersonal violence and environmental trauma, while females were more likely to experience sexual trauma. Caucasian participants reported higher rates of trauma exposure than African-American participants did. The types of trauma associated with the highest probability of a lifetime PTSD diagnosis were rape, being tortured or a victim of terrorists, and molestation. Youth in foster care are a highly traumatized population and meet diagnostic criteria for PTSD at higher rates than general youth populations. The ongoing impact of trauma may be particularly problematic for these young people given their abrupt transition to independence.

  15. Reconsidering the Role of Stephen Foster in the Music Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forness, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    The place of Stephen Foster and the music of American minstrelsy should be reconsidered for the music classroom. Some of this repertoire can be offensive because of its historical context and racially insensitive language. Critical theory can provide a framework for choosing repertoire that creates dialogue about racial structures in music. The…

  16. The fostering role of information technology on SMEs' strategic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Scholarly concerns about the fostering role of information technology (IT) in supply chain management have increased dramatically over the past decades. Nevertheless, there are significant issues yet to be addressed and resolved, one of which relates to the influences of IT on strategic purchasing, logistics integration and ...

  17. Optimization of Hydroacoustic Equipment Deployment at Foster Dam, 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, James S.; Johnson, Gary E.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hennen, Matthew J.; Fischer, Eric S.; Zimmerman, Shon A.

    2013-03-01

    The goal of the study was to optimize performance of the fixed-location hydroacoustic systems at Foster Dam (FOS) by determining deployment and data acquisition methods that minimized structural, electrical, and acoustic interference. Optimization of the hydroacoustic systems will establish methodology for sampling by active acoustic methods during this year-long evaluation of juvenile salmonid passage at FOS.

  18. Fostering cooperation through the enhancement of own vulnerability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kopányi-Peuker, A.; Offerman, T.; Sloof, R.

    2012-01-01

    We consider the possibility that cooperation in a prisoner's dilemma is fostered by people's voluntarily enhancement of their own vulnerability. The vulnerability of a player determines the effectiveness of possible punishment by the other. In the "Gradual" mechanism, players may condition their

  19. Fostering cooperation through the enhancement of own vulnerability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kopányi-Peuker, A.; Offerman, T.; Sloof, R.

    2013-01-01

    We consider the possibility that cooperation in a prisoner's dilemma is fostered by people's voluntary enhancement of their own vulnerability. The vulnerability of a player determines the effectiveness of possible punishment by the other. In the "Gradual" mechanism, players may condition their

  20. Fostering cooperation through the enhancement of own vulnerability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kopányi-Peuker, A.; Offerman, T.; Sloof, R.

    We consider the possibility that cooperation in a prisoner's dilemma is fostered by people's voluntary enhancement of their own vulnerability. The vulnerability of a player determines the effectiveness of possible punishment by the other. In the "Gradual" mechanism, players may condition their

  1. OSUL2013: Fostering Organizational Change through a Grassroots Planning Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlosser, Melanie

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides background on planning and organizational culture change in libraries and describes a grassroots planning process taking place at the Ohio State University Libraries. Now in its third phase, the process aims to create a long-term plan for the organization while fostering a more collaborative, innovative culture.

  2. Enhancing the Empowerment of Youth in Foster Care: Supportive Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Sandra J.; Skolnik, Louise; Turnbull, Ayme

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews the research on youth empowerment in seven child welfare programmatic areas. A lack of studies specifically focused on the empowerment of youth in foster care was found. Conceptual perspectives and existing data, however, suggest that the empowerment of youth in and transitioning out of care is essential and should be overtly…

  3. Fostering Spiritual Formation of Millennials in Christian Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horan, Anne Puidk

    2017-01-01

    Christian education seeks to foster millennials' spiritual formation to equip them for future challenges and to benefit society. Using nonexperimental mixed methods, 504 secondary educators revealed what spiritual formation programs their schools implement and their perceptions about millennial spiritual formation. Descriptive analysis showed that…

  4. ‘The Use of Social Media to Foster Trust, Mentorship, and Collaboration in Scientific Organizations

    OpenAIRE

    Murthy, Dhiraj; Mawrie, Somya A.; Hastings, Calla M.

    2014-01-01

    Many domains are well known for their resistance to social media. Currently, there is a dearth of literature that explores social media use in these contexts. This study seeks to help address this gap by evaluating the use of social media within a scientific organization (anonymized as SciCity) that has a strong virtual presence and quarterly face-to-face meet-ups. We evaluated SciCity’s use of social media to foster trust, collaboration, and mentorship. We found that the prominent social med...

  5. The motor development of orphaned children with and without HIV: Pilot exploration of foster care and residential placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferguson Gillian

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The AIDS epidemic has lead to an increase in orphaned children who need residential care. It is known that HIV leads to delayed motor development. However, the impact of place of residence on motor function has not been investigated in the South African context. The aim of the study was therefore to establish if children in institutionalised settings performed better or worse in terms of gross motor function than their counterparts in foster care. A secondary objective was to compare the performance of children with HIV in these two settings with those of children who were HIV negative. Methods Forty-four children both with and without HIV, were recruited from institutions and foster care families in Cape Town. The Peabody Development Motor Scale (PDMS II was used to calculate the total motor quotient (TMQ at baseline and six months later. Comparisons of TMQ were made between residential settings and between children with and without HIV. Results Twenty-one children were infected with HIV and were significantly delayed compared to their healthy counterparts. Antiretroviral therapy was well managed among the group but did not appear to result in restoration of TMQ to normal over the study period. HIV status and place of residence emerged as a predictor of TMQ with children in residential care performing better than their counterparts in foster care. All children showed improvement over the six months of study. Conclusions Foster parents were well supported administratively in the community by social welfare services but their children might have lacked stimulation in comparison to those in institutional settings. This could have been due to a lack of resources and knowledge regarding child development. The assumption that foster homes provide a better alternative to institutions may not be correct in a resource poor community and needs to be examined further.

  6. The motor development of orphaned children with and without HIV: Pilot exploration of foster care and residential placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelsma, Jennifer; Davids, Nailah; Ferguson, Gillian

    2011-02-07

    The AIDS epidemic has lead to an increase in orphaned children who need residential care. It is known that HIV leads to delayed motor development. However, the impact of place of residence on motor function has not been investigated in the South African context. The aim of the study was therefore to establish if children in institutionalised settings performed better or worse in terms of gross motor function than their counterparts in foster care. A secondary objective was to compare the performance of children with HIV in these two settings with those of children who were HIV negative. Forty-four children both with and without HIV, were recruited from institutions and foster care families in Cape Town. The Peabody Development Motor Scale (PDMS II) was used to calculate the total motor quotient (TMQ) at baseline and six months later. Comparisons of TMQ were made between residential settings and between children with and without HIV. Twenty-one children were infected with HIV and were significantly delayed compared to their healthy counterparts. Antiretroviral therapy was well managed among the group but did not appear to result in restoration of TMQ to normal over the study period. HIV status and place of residence emerged as a predictor of TMQ with children in residential care performing better than their counterparts in foster care. All children showed improvement over the six months of study. Foster parents were well supported administratively in the community by social welfare services but their children might have lacked stimulation in comparison to those in institutional settings. This could have been due to a lack of resources and knowledge regarding child development. The assumption that foster homes provide a better alternative to institutions may not be correct in a resource poor community and needs to be examined further.

  7. Breakdown of foster care placements in Flanders: incidence and associated factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderfaeillie, Johan; Van Holen, Frank; Carlier, Elke; Fransen, Hanne

    2017-08-07

    In Flanders, family foster care is increasingly the option of choice for children in need of out-of-home care. Foster care is however an assailable intervention as is shown by the high number of placement disruptions. Knowledge regarding breakdown in Flanders remains scant. This study aimed at investigating the incidence of placement breakdown in Flemish long-term foster care and exploring the association of breakdown with foster child, foster family and case characteristics. Case files of 309 Flemish foster children were analysed. After 6 years, 208 placements had terminated: 90 placements broke down and 118 placements ended positively. Foster child's behavioural problems, conflicts between birth and foster parents and parenting problems of the foster parents were the main causes of placement disruption. Foster children with behavioural problems at admission, older foster children and foster children who denied treatment were more at risk of breakdown. Consideration of these factors is important in view of the appropriateness of family foster care placements.

  8. Pregnancy Risk Among Older Youth Transitioning Out Of Foster Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Karen M Matta; Narendorf, Sarah Carter; McMillen, J Curtis

    2013-10-01

    Youth served in the foster care system have higher rates of pregnancy than general population youth; yet we have little information about risk and protective factors to target in order to prevent early pregnancy in this population. We assessed early pregnancy risk and protective factors known for general population adolescents for their relevance to youth in the foster care system. Using data from a longitudinal study of 325 older youth from the foster care system, we examined bivariate and multivariate relationships between these factors and pregnancy between age 17 and 19 using logistic regression. Models examined risk for early parenting separately by gender. The pregnancy rate increased by 300% between ages 17 and 19. At 19, 55% of females had been pregnant, while 23% of males had fathered a child. Although this study assessed multiple known factors, few were significant for this high risk group. Females who were not sexually active at age 17 were less likely to become pregnant, but those who reported using birth control were as likely to become pregnant as those who did not. Also, females with a history of arrest were more likely to have a pregnancy between 17 and 19. Males who left the foster care system before their 19(th) birthday were more likely to make someone pregnant. Youth from the foster care system are at exceptional risk of early pregnancy, no matter their maltreatment history, religiosity, school connectedness, or academic achievement, particularly in the years between 17 and 19. This high risk group needs pregnancy prevention interventions and access to effective birth control.

  9. Issues of Shared Parenting of LGBTQ Children and Youth in Foster Care: Preparing Foster Parents for New Roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig-Oldsen, Heather; Craig, J. Ann; Morton, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Foster parents have increasingly assumed new and challenging roles during the past decade. Meeting the developmental, attachment, and grieving needs of children and youth in out of home care is challenging by itself, but can become even more difficult with the issues that arise when the child is lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or questioning…

  10. "Every child that is a foster child is marked from the beginning": The home-school communication experiences of foster parents of children with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mires, Carolyn B; Lee, David L; McNaughton, David

    2018-01-01

    This study investigated the perceptions of foster parents of children with disabilities concerning their interactions with school personnel. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 7 foster parents of 6 children with disabilities (age range=5-16). A qualitative analysis of the interviews resulted in the identification of five thematic areas, including foster parent perceptions of: (a) the role of the foster parent, (b) the efficacy of the foster parent in helping the child learn, (c) invitations to involvement from the school (d) invitations to involvement from the child, and (e) foster child experiences in the school system. Marked differences were found in the perceptions of the perceptions in foster parents of elementary and secondary age students. It is clear that foster parents who take on an active role in their child's education experienced positive relationships with their child's school. Foster parents who take a passive role in their partnerships with the schools experienced increased difficulty maintaining motivation to continue in their efforts to increase collaboration and involvement with the schools. They indicated a sense of anger, distrust, and even hostility towards the schools. Based on the findings, recommendations are provided for improving home-school relationships, and addressing obstacles to successful school partnerships with foster families. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Youth in foster care with adult mentors during adolescence have improved adult outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, Kym R; DuBois, David Lane; Richardson, Laura P; Fan, Ming-Yu; Lozano, Paula

    2008-02-01

    The goal of this study was to determine whether youth in foster care with natural mentors during adolescence have improved young adult outcomes. We used data from waves I to III of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (1994-2002). Individuals who reported that they had ever been in foster care at wave III were included. Youth were considered mentored when they reported the presence of a nonparental adult mentor in their life after they were 14 years of age and reported that the relationship began before 18 years of age and had lasted for at least 2 years. Outcomes were assessed at wave III and included measures of education/employment, psychological well-being, physical health, and participation in unhealthy behaviors as well as a summary measure representing the total number of positive outcomes. A total of 310 youth met the inclusion criteria; 160 youth were mentored, and 150 youth were nonmentored. Demographic characteristics were similar for mentored and nonmentored youth. Mentored youth were more likely to report favorable overall health and were less likely to report suicidal ideation, having received a diagnosis of a sexually transmitted infection, and having hurt someone in a fight in the past year. There was also a borderline significant trend toward more participation in higher education among mentored youth. On the summary measure, mentored youth had, on average, a significantly greater number of positive outcomes than nonmentored youth. CONCLUSIONS; Mentoring relationships are associated with positive adjustment during the transition to adulthood for youth in foster care. Strategies to support natural mentoring relationships for this population should be developed and evaluated.

  12. Empowerment Foster Children Youth Education Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Szafrańska

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Youth Educational Centers (YEC are open social rehabilitation institutions for socially maladjusted adolescents who are placed in such centres by court order. The wards who become self-dependent and return to their usual destructive upbringing environments give cause for concern. There is a risk that various social rehabilitation and educational measures taken in the center will be undone. If a person is to function well, they need to be provided with necessary assistance during the so-called self-empowerment process that will prepare them to function in society. This article is to draw attention to the impact of the YEC aiming at the self-empowerment of wards, exampled by the “Trampolina” project by the Orionist Farthers (YEC, Barska Street in Warsaw and the project of forming and running the “Damy radę” (We will manage empowerment group at the YEC in Radzionków.

  13. Fostering Sustainable Nutrition Behavior through Gamification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena Berger

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The food choices consumers make have considerable consequences for the environment. In the Western world, about one-third of all negative environmental impact is directly related to food consumption. Although many consumers are concerned about environmental issues, this frequently has little effect on actual nutritional behavior and new approaches are needed to convert good intentions into action. Gamification could be a possible way to encourage both self-efficacy on the part of the consumer as well as normalizing such behavior socially. In this paper, central elements of the behavioral change model HAPA (health action process approach are introduced to a gamification concept. The underlying frameworks of both concepts are then analyzed in order to develop propositions for use in the design of an effective gamification setting to promote sustainable nutritional behavior (SNB.

  14. Development and piloting of a treatment foster care program for older youth with psychiatric problems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McMillen, J Curtis; Narendorf, Sarah Carter; Robinson, Debra; Havlicek, Judy; Fedoravicius, Nicole; Bertram, Julie; McNelly, David

    2015-01-01

    .... This paper reports on the development and piloting of a manualized treatment foster care program designed to step down older youth with high psychiatric needs from residential programs to treatment foster care homes...

  15. Cumulative Risks of Foster Care Placement for Danish Children: e109207

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peter Fallesen; Natalia Emanuel; Christopher Wildeman

    2014-01-01

      Although recent research suggests that the cumulative risk of foster care placement is far higher for American children than originally suspected, little is known about the cumulative risk of foster...

  16. Fostering human rights through TalkBank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacWhinney, Brian; Fromm, Davida; Rose, Yvan; Bernstein Ratner, Nan

    2018-02-01

    In accord with articles 19 and 27 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, people with speech and language disorders have the right to receive maximal benefit from academic research on speech and language acquisition and disorders. To evaluate the diverse nature of speech and language disorders, this research must have access to large datasets, as well as to refined tools for the systematic analysis of these datasets. The TalkBank system addresses this need by providing researchers with thousands of hours of open-access database archives of digital audio, video and transcript files documenting typical and disordered language use in dozens of languages and cultures. In this paper, we review the TalkBank system, with an emphasis on the AphasiaBank, PhonBank and FluencyBank databases. We describe how specialised assessment tools can be used to study issues in speech and language acquisition and disorders recorded within these databases. We then provide illustrations of how assessments support the needs of researchers, clinicians, developers, and educators, whose combined work contributes solutions for people with speech, language and language learning disorders worldwide.

  17. Defining the doula's role: fostering relational autonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadow, Sandra L

    2015-12-01

    Training organizations as well as academic and popular literature provide ambiguous or ethically contentious characterizations of the role of the birth doula, a non-clinical role assisting women in pregnancy and birth with information and physical and emotional support. Doulas have been criticized for attempting to impose their own agendas on their clients and for interfering with the relationship between women and their medical caregivers. To develop a theoretically grounded model of the birth doula's role to guide constructive practice and refute some training organizations' and doulas' adoption of an active 'advocacy' role with clients that can lead to inappropriate practices. Apply the theoretical framework of relational autonomy to the components of the work that doulas perform with their clients. The conceptual framework of relational autonomy recognizes the social context in which women make choices about their care in pregnancy and birth, instead of assuming that autonomy is exercised in isolation. To support this understanding of autonomy, a relational model emphasizes women's skills development, self-confidence and recognition of the social context for decisions. Highlighting these aspects of exercising autonomy reduces the potential for the doula to seek to influence her client. The doula's role is reframed as one of facilitating patient engagement and shared decision-making. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Fostering literacy learning in supportive contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palincsar, A S; Klenk, L

    1992-04-01

    Young children with learning disabilities typically encounter difficulty with academic tasks requiring intentional effort and effective use of metacognitive skills--qualities that competent readers and writers possess. In response to these difficulties, special educators often modify literacy instruction, isolating the "basic skills" of literacy (such as decoding and penmanship) from meaningful reading and writing activities. Such instruction contributes to impoverished notions of literacy and exacerbates problems of metacognition. The two research programs reported here challenge the conventional literacy instruction provided to many young students with LD. The programs are rooted in developmental and cognitive theory and research, as well as emergent literacy theory. The social nature of learning is emphasized, with a focus on the role of the teacher, the form of discourse, and the role of text in literacy instruction. Results show that children with learning disabilities benefit from strategy instruction occurring within classroom cultures that support collaborative discourse, the flexible application of comprehension strategies, and appropriate, meaningful opportunities for reading and writing.

  19. Lifelong Education for Subjective Well-Being: How Do Engagement and Active Citizenship Contribute?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zepke, Nick

    2013-01-01

    This article addresses the question: how can lifelong education contribute to subjective well-being by engaging learners and fostering active citizenship? The question arises due to the fact that governments in the western world have identified well-being as an important policy driver. Well-being research suggests that subjective well-being,…

  20. Fostering renewable energy markets in North America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Jeremy [North American Comission for Environmental Cooperation (CEC), (United States)

    2007-06-15

    This presentation describes projects, programs and other issues addressed in order to promote renewable energy markets in North America. These are carried out by the North American Commission for Environmental Cooperation (CEC). In the first part of this presentation, there are going to be found some of the rules imposed by the North American Agreement on Environmental Cooperation (NAAEC). Then, it is shown the structure of the CEC as well as its programs, besides, there are presented the environment projects and the objectives along with their respective trades. There are described both benefits environmental and non-environmental. Also, there are shown the issues which the CEC is working in. And finally, it is shown a list mentioning the aspects that would change if: the expansion of the Mexico's Federal Commission of Electricity (CFE), happens, the grid-interconnected and the self supply of Renewable Electricity increase. [Spanish] En esta presentacion se describen los proyectos, los programas y otras cuestiones, cuyo objetivo es impulsar los mercados de energia renovable en America del Norte, realizadas por la North American Commission for Environmental Cooperation. En la primera parte, se encuentran algunas de las reglas impuestas por el Acuerdo de Cooperacion Ambiental de America del Norte (ACAAN). Enseguida, se muestra la estructura y los programas de la Comision para la Cooperacion Ambiental (CCA). Asimismo, se describen los proyectos ambientales, los objetivos junto con sus correspondientes tratados. Mas adelante, se explican tanto los beneficios ambientales como aquellos que no lo son. Igualmente, explican las cuestiones que podrian cambiar de: suceder la expansion de la Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE), incrementarse el auto- suministro de la energia renovable y los sistemas interconectados.

  1. The relationship of placement experience to school absenteeism and changing schools in young, school-aged children in foster care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorc, Catherine S; O'Reilly, Amanda Lr; Matone, Meredith; Long, Jin; Watts, Caroline L; Rubin, David

    2013-05-01

    Chronic school absenteeism and frequent school changes, particularly among younger children, may be antecedents for the high rates of school failure and subsequent dropout among youth in foster care. However, the relationship of foster care experience to absenteeism and school change has not been well studied. This study examined the association of placement experience with absenteeism and changing schools among 209 urban children in foster care enrolled in public elementary schools. A cohort of children aged 5 to 8 years who entered non-relative or kinship foster care from 2006-2008 were followed longitudinally for 2 years from entry into foster care. Children residing in foster care were categorized at the end of the study as early stable, late stable, or unstable, if they achieved a permanent placement prior to 45 days, between 45 days and 9 months, or failed to do so within 9 months, respectively. Children who reunified home were classified as a fourth category. Poisson regression, controlling for baseline factors, was used to compare days absent and number of schools attended across categories of placement experience. Among the 209 children, 51% were male, 79% were African American, and 55% were initially placed with kin. One third of children reunified home; among children who did not reunify, one half was early stable, and a third was unstable. Adjusted rates of school absenteeism increased in stepwise fashion as children's placements became more unstable; children with unstable placements were 37% more likely to be absent than those with early placement stability (p=0.029). Children who reunified during the study demonstrated the highest rates of absenteeism; however, there was no significant difference in absenteeism before or after reunification. Number of schools attended increased as stability worsened, with the standardized rate of schools attended reaching 3.6 schools (95% CI 3.1-4.1) over a two year period among children in unstable placements. The

  2. A Growth Curve Analysis of Housing Quality among Transition-Aged Foster Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyrell, Fanita A.; Yates, Tuppett M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Procuring safe housing is a salient developmental task during emerging adulthood, one that is especially challenging for emancipated foster youth. Yet, little is known about factors that influence foster youths' housing experiences. Objective: This investigation documented changes in foster youth's housing quality during the first…

  3. Distinct Subgroups of Former Foster Youth during Young Adulthood: Implications for Policy and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Mark E.; Hook, Jennifer L.; Lee, JoAnn S.

    2012-01-01

    The Fostering Connections to Success and Increasing Adoptions Act of 2008 ("Fostering Connections Act") fundamentally changed the nature of federal support for young people in state care by extending entitlement funding under Title IV-E of the Social Security Act to age 21 beginning in FY2011. While the Fostering Connections Act provides…

  4. Intervening with Foster Parents to Enhance Biobehavioral Outcomes among Infants and Toddlers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dozier, Mary; Bick, Johanna; Bernard, Kristin

    2011-01-01

    Children in foster care face a number of challenges that threaten their ability to form attachment relationships with foster parents and to regulate their behavior and biology. The authors describe the Attachment and Biobehavioral Catch-Up (ABC) intervention, an evidence-based intervention aimed at helping foster children develop trusting…

  5. 45 CFR 1355.40 - Foster care and adoption data collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Foster care and adoption data collection. 1355.40... FAMILIES, FOSTER CARE MAINTENANCE PAYMENTS, ADOPTION ASSISTANCE, AND CHILD AND FAMILY SERVICES GENERAL § 1355.40 Foster care and adoption data collection. (a) Scope of the data collection system. (1) Each...

  6. 25 CFR 20.506 - What information is required in the foster care case file?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What information is required in the foster care case file... FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Child Assistance Foster Care § 20.506 What information is required in the foster care case file? At a minimum the following information is required: (a) Tribal...

  7. How Can State Law Support School Continuity and Success for Students in Foster Care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    First Focus, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This brief is authored by The Legal Center for Foster Care and Education, a collaboration between the American Bar Association Center on Children and the Law, Education Law Center (PA), and Juvenile Law Center. The federal Fostering Connections Act of 2008 and the McKinney-Vento Act both provide education stability for children in foster care,…

  8. 29 CFR 825.121 - Leave for adoption or foster care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Leave for adoption or foster care. 825.121 Section 825.121... Leave for adoption or foster care. (a) General rules. Eligible employees are entitled to FMLA leave for placement with the employee of a son or daughter for adoption or foster care as follows: (1) Employees may...

  9. 45 CFR 1356.22 - Implementation requirements for children voluntarily placed in foster care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... voluntarily placed in foster care. 1356.22 Section 1356.22 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public... ADMINISTRATION ON CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES, FOSTER CARE MAINTENANCE PAYMENTS, ADOPTION ASSISTANCE, AND CHILD... children voluntarily placed in foster care. (a) As a condition of receipt of Federal financial...

  10. Preparing Students in Foster Care for Emancipation, Employment, and Postsecondary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherr, Tracey G.

    2015-01-01

    Students preparing to emancipate from the foster care system face multiple challenges. For many formerly fostered teens, outcomes are relatively poor. Others have shown incredible resilience in the face of adversity. School psychologists can help address obstacles to postsecondary success for students living in foster care preventively while they…

  11. 45 CFR 233.110 - Foster care maintenance and adoption assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Foster care maintenance and adoption assistance... SERVICES COVERAGE AND CONDITIONS OF ELIGIBILITY IN FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS § 233.110 Foster care... Security Act, and operates a foster care maintenance and adoption assistance program in conformity with...

  12. Meaningful Change for Children in Foster Care: Much More than Just Reunification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Amy B.; Callahan, Kristin L.; Osofsky, Joy D.

    2016-01-01

    The youngest children in foster care suffer disproportionately. The Adoption and Safe Families Act (1997) attempted to provide greater safeguards for children, which led courts to push for earlier reunifications between foster children and their biological families. Although no one wants young children to languish in the foster care system, early…

  13. The Effect of Foster Care Experience and Characteristics on Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calix, Alexandra

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the effect of foster care experience and characteristics on educational outcomes. The typical strategy in examining the effect foster care has on educational outcomes is to compare the educational achievement of youth with foster care experience to that of their peers or to national norms. This strategy fails to take selection…

  14. 45 CFR 1356.21 - Foster care maintenance payments program implementation requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Foster care maintenance payments program... ON CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES, FOSTER CARE MAINTENANCE PAYMENTS, ADOPTION ASSISTANCE, AND CHILD AND FAMILY SERVICES REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO TITLE IV-E § 1356.21 Foster care maintenance payments program...

  15. Teacher's Understanding, Perceptions, and Experiences of Students in Foster Care: A Forgotten Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson-Davis, Darneika

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine elementary teacher's understanding, perceptions, and experiences of working with students in foster care. The researcher examined whether teachers are informed about students in foster care, determined teacher's understanding of the foster care system, and how their students are affected. The results…

  16. From Foster Care to College: The Seita Scholars Program at Western Michigan University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unrau, Yvonne A.

    2011-01-01

    More than 32,000 young people in the United States exit the foster care system in a typical year by aging out to independence (Child Welfare Information Gateway, 2011). Despite available financial support for post-secondary education through the Foster Care Independence Act of 1999, only 20% of college-qualified foster youth attend college and…

  17. Responding to the Needs of Foster Teens in a Rural School District

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGarmo, John Nelson

    2012-01-01

    As more children are placed under foster care, schools often have difficulty in responding to newly placed foster teens. Foster teens often exhibit both academic and behavioral adjustment issues, leading to disciplinary problems and high failure, and dropout rates. Attachment theory related to placement disruptions, school performance and…

  18. Foster carer experience in Spain : Analysis of the vulnerabilities of a permanent model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    López López, Mónica; Del Valle, Jorge F

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The voice of foster families is a valuable tool in the development and improvement of foster family services. Regularly evaluating the satisfaction of foster carers can facilitate the early identification of a range of problems that might pose a risk to the placement. METHOD: This

  19. Who Is Caring for Our Most Vulnerable Children? The Motivation to Foster in Child Welfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodger, Susan; Cummings, Anne; Leschied, Alan W.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Responding to the need for more foster families to provide care for increasing numbers of children coming into care, this study was designed to understand the motivations and needs of foster parents in order to improve recruitment and retention. To meet this goal, the study identified characteristics of current foster families,…

  20. An Examination of the Protective Factors That Facilitate Motivation and Educational Attainment among Foster Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Amy

    2016-01-01

    In the United States, there are approximately 400,000 foster youth. The state of California accounts for approximately 20% percent of youth placed in the foster care system. As a whole, this population is exposed to a multitude of risk factors while placed in the foster care system and as they emancipate. Re-victimization is not uncommon as youth…

  1. An Ecological Understanding of Kinship Foster Care in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jun Sung; Algood, Carl L.; Chiu, Yu-Ling; Lee, Stephanie Ai-Ping

    2011-01-01

    We review empirical studies on kinship foster care in the United States. We conceptualize kinship foster care within the context of Urie Bronfenbrenner's (1994) most recent ecological systems theory. Because there are multiple levels of influences on the developmental outcomes of children placed in kinship foster home, understanding the…

  2. Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements.: Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A)

    OpenAIRE

    Delgado,Paulo; Vânia S. Pinto

    2011-01-01

    Based on a literature review, this article frames different stages of the foster care process, identifying a set of standardized measures in the American and Portuguese contexts which, if implemented, could contribute towards higher levels of foster success. The article continues with the presentation of a comparative study, based on the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A) questionnaire, in the aforementioned contexts. Taking a comparative analyses o...

  3. The Empirical Ties between Religious Motivation and Altruism in Foster Parents: Implications for Faith-Based Initiatives in Foster Care and Adoption

    OpenAIRE

    Howell-Moroney, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Amidst a crisis shortage of foster homes in the child welfare system, a number of innovative faith-based collaborations aimed at recruiting foster parents have recently emerged. It has been suggested that these collaborations offer a unique opportunity to recruit committed and altruistic parents as caregivers, providing much needed capacity to an overloaded child welfare system. This paper uses data from the National Survey of Current and Former Foster Parents to examine the associations betw...

  4. Foster care as a form of family support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Flaga

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The foster care system in Poland has recently undergone many changes on the basis of new legislation. It has been presented as a part of the work with the child and its family towards reintegration of the child’s family. However, in order for the aim of foster care to be achieved in this form, it is necessary to integrate work with the child and its family with all the elements of the local environment. Similar assumptions are the basis of the pedagogical concept of the environmental educational system by Stanisław Kowalski. The article presents how to implement pedagogical objectives through legal solutions, which emphasize the integration of the local environment.

  5. Adoption and Foster Care Analysis and Reporting System. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-14

    The Social Security Act (the Act) requires that ACF regulate a national data collection system that provides comprehensive demographic and case-specific information on children who are in foster care and adopted. This final rule replaces existing Adoption and Foster Care Analysis and Reporting System (AFCARS) regulations and the appendices to require title IV-E agencies to collect and report data to ACF on children in out-of-home care, and who exit out-of-home care to adoption or legal guardianship, children in out-of-home care who are covered by the Indian Child Welfare Act, and children who are covered by a title IV-E adoption or guardianship assistance agreement.

  6. Guess the Score, fostering collective intelligence in the class

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep M. Monguet

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes the use of serious games as a tool to enhance collective intelligence of undergraduate and graduate students. The development of social skills of individuals in a group is related to the performance of the collective intelligence of the group manifested through the shared and collaborative development of intellectual tasks [1]. Guess the Score GS, is a serious game implemented by means of an online tool, created to foster the development, collaboration and engagement of students. It's has been designed with the intention of facilitating the development of individual’s social skills in a group in order to promote education of collective intelligence. This paper concludes that the design of learning activities using serious games as a support tool in education, generate awareness about of utilities of gaming in the collective learning environment and the fostering of collective intelligence education.

  7. Fostering engagement during termination: Applying attachment theory and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmarosh, Cheri L

    2017-03-01

    Therapists often struggle to determine the most important things to focus on during termination. Reviewing the treatment, identifying plans for the future, summarizing positive gains, and saying goodbye receive the most attention. Despite our best intentions, termination can end up becoming intellectualized. Attachment theory and recent developments in neuroscience offer us a road map for facilitating endings that address client's underlying relational needs, direct us to foster engagement, and help us facilitate new relational experience that can be transformative for clients. We argue that endings in therapy activate client's and therapist's attachments and these endings trigger emotion regulating strategies that can elicit client's engagement or more defensiveness. The current paper will highlight through de-identified case examples how clients automatically respond termination and how therapists can foster rich relational experiences in the here-and-now that clients can take with them. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Fostering Collaborative and Interdisciplinary Research in Adult Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Anne Erichsen

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The article investigates the interdisciplinary nature of research in adult education and suggests interactive research guides and other interactive resources for fostering collaboration and interdisciplinary inquiry. The purpose is to foster the development of a more functional literacy for information seeking as expressed across disciplines and the thoughtful integration of such information into academic and practical research projects within the field of adult education. Studies of researcher behavior are utilized to suggest some techniques and resources that could be employed more widely in conducting literature searches, including the creation and use of interactive resource guides. Some trends in libraries that offer promise for knowledge discovery and sharing, such as federated searching, customizable workspaces, and user-generated content, are also explored. Finally, tools and resources currently available to promote collaboration and interdisciplinary research are also noted.

  9. The Empirical Ties between Religious Motivation and Altruism in Foster Parents: Implications for Faith-Based Initiatives in Foster Care and Adoption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Howell-Moroney

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Amidst a crisis shortage of foster homes in the child welfare system, a number of innovative faith-based collaborations aimed at recruiting foster parents have recently emerged. It has been suggested that these collaborations offer a unique opportunity to recruit committed and altruistic parents as caregivers, providing much needed capacity to an overloaded child welfare system. This paper uses data from the National Survey of Current and Former Foster Parents to examine the associations between religious motivations for fostering, altruism and various measures of foster home utilization and longevity. The empirical results demonstrate that religiously motivated foster parents are more likely to have altruistic reasons for fostering, and scored higher than the non-religiously motivated group on an index of altruism. A separate empirical analysis shows that the interaction of high levels of altruism and religious motivation is associated with higher foster home utilization. No association was found between religious altruism and the parent’s expressed intent to continue providing foster care. The implications of these findings for current faith-based collaboration in the child welfare arena are discussed.

  10. Fostering Entrepreneurship in Kenya: The Role of Association

    OpenAIRE

    Ngoze M.L.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents some empirical findings on fostering entrepreneurship through association, Sambut Self Help Group (SSHG) in Uasin Gishu in Kenya. Using a sample of fifty (n=50), the paper specifically hypothesizes, entrepreneurship among members of SSHG involves achievement need, autonomy, innovativeness, propensity for risk, locus of control, tolerance for ambiguity and confidence; association such as SSHG promote entrepreneurship among its members; and associations such as SSHG are only...

  11. FOSTERING THE ENTREPRENEURIAL CULTURE, A PILLAR FOR REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela STET

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The potential of SME in the development of economy makes it necessary to find solutions to expand the role of entrepreneurship in the economy. Fostering it and the development of an entrepreneurial culture represents levers for solving some problems such as: unemployment, the economic growth in regions less developed, achieving a sustainable development of UE member states. There have been revealed the main problems facing SME and measures that can be taken to support entrepreneurship, including population groups considered disadvantaged.

  12. Guess the score, fostering collective intelligence in the class

    OpenAIRE

    Monguet, Josep M.; Jaime Meza

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes the use of serious games as a tool to enhance collective intelligence of undergraduate and graduate students. The development of social skills of individuals in a group is related to the performance of the collective intelligence of the group manifested through the shared and collaborative development of intellectual tasks [1]. Guess the Score GS, is a serious game implemented by means of an online tool, created to foster the development, collaboration and engagement of st...

  13. Digital network of writers helps to foster spirit of collaboration.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Klimas, J

    2015-07-29

    Nurse Liz Charalambous has shown how a Facebook group can help boost writing (careers, June 3). We would like to take this idea one step further and argue that, contrary to a commonly held notion, \\'too many cooks do not spoil the broth\\' when it comes to group writing. Instead, this approach fosters collaboration between writers, as Ms Charalambous suggests, and which has also been our experience.

  14. Parental Book Reading and Social-Emotional Outcomes for Head Start Children in Foster Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyunghee; Lee, Jung-Sook

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the associations between parental book reading and social-emotional outcomes for Head Start children in foster care. Despite no main Head Start impact on parental book reading, subgroup effects were found. Foster parents in Head Start provided more book reading for children with disabilities but less for children with low preacademic scores. Head Start enhanced social-emotional outcomes for children in foster care. The positive impacts of Head Start on children's social-emotional outcomes were greater when parents read books frequently. Head Start should include more foster families and provided parenting skills to enhance social-emotional outcomes for children in foster care.

  15. 'Am I damaging my own family?': Relational changes between foster carers and their birth children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Hayley; McPherson, Susan; Marsland, Louise

    2016-01-01

    Foster placements are more likely to break down where the foster carers already have birth children. Studies that explore the impact of fostering on foster carers and their birth children have suggested that relational changes occur, but these changes have not been examined in depth. This study aimed to explore the impact of fostering on parent-child relationships within foster families. Nine foster carers (including three couples) were interviewed separately, and the data were analysed using constructivist grounded theory methods. Analysis indicated that birth children may attribute particular importance to their position in the family (e.g. oldest child, youngest child) and that this is a key element of the way in which they relate to their parents. Emotional security and parent-child relationships can therefore be strained by a foster placement not taking this into account. Foster children also introduce significant competition for parental resources, putting a strain on relationships. Foster carers seem to prioritise, consciously or not, the preservation of relationships within the biological family. Reflecting on relationships and making changes to maximise potential improvements in relationships can lead to positive outcomes, and this can have an impact on whether families continue fostering or not. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. Effects of Multidimensional Treatment Foster Care for Preschoolers (MTFC-P) for Young Foster Children with Severe Behavioral Disturbances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonkman, Caroline S; Schuengel, Carlo; Oosterman, Mirjam; Lindeboom, Robert; Boer, Frits; Lindauer, Ramon J L

    2017-01-01

    Multidimensional Treatment Foster Care for Preschoolers (MTFC-P) has thus far only been tested for diminishing behavior problems in the US. This study tested relative efficacy of MTFC-P on multiple outcomes against treatment as usual in the Netherlands (TAU; Study I), and regular foster care (Study II). The sample included 55 children that received MTFC-P, 23 children received TAU and 30 children from regular foster care (RFC). Changes in behavioral and relationship functioning, trauma symptoms, hypothalamic-adrenal-pituitary (HPA-) axis functioning, and caregiving stress were assessed via questionnaires, interviews, and salivary cortisol. Outcomes of Study I were evaluated using a randomized controlled design and quasi-experimental design, outcomes of Study II according to non-equivalent group comparison. No evidence was found for relative efficacy of MTFC-P over TAU. A treatment effect was found on trauma symptoms, in favor of TAU. Outcomes of Study II revealed that whereas caregiving stress and secure base distortions were significantly more severe at baseline in MTFC-P compared to RFC, post treatment differences were no longer significant. However, percentages of symptoms of disinhibited attachment and attachment disorder were nearly equal between groups at baseline, while post treatment percentages indicated significantly more symptoms in MTFC. In addition, results revealed a significant difference in the severity of externalizing problems post treatment, in favor of RFC. The results obtained within this study indicate that children in MTFC-P and usual treatment foster care in the Dutch context improved similarly, thus not showing the same advantages that MTFC-P has demonstrated in the US. Results should be interpreted with caution due to lower than planned power. Findings underscore the challenges of testing novel treatments across contexts with highly different child welfare provisions.

  17. Foster Care History and HIV Infection among Drug-Using African American Female Sex Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surratt, Hilary L.; Kurtz, Steven P.

    2011-01-01

    Foster care has been associated with increased HIV risk behaviors among youth, yet long-term association with HIV infection has not been examined. This study explored the associations between foster placement, victimization, mental health, onset of sex work and HIV infection among highly vulnerable female sex workers. 562 drug-involved African American women were enrolled into an intervention study to increase health services utilization and reduce HIV risk. Seventeen percent reported a history of foster placement. Foster history was associated with significantly lower educational attainment, higher victimization, and more severe mental health problems. Women with foster histories reported significantly earlier entry into paid sex work, with some 62% active in the sex trade before age 18. Multivariate analyses found that foster care was independently associated with HIV seropositivity, and that early sex work partially mediated this association. The potential long-term health vulnerabilities associated with foster placement are understudied and warrant additional research. PMID:21818654

  18. Strategies for fostering basic psychological needs support in high quality youth leadership programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean, Corliss; Harlow, Meghan; Kendellen, Kelsey

    2017-04-01

    Youth leadership programming has become an increasingly common context to foster basic psychological needs and promote youth development. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore strategies involved in fostering youth needs support within six leadership programs. Two leaders and 30 youth participated in semi-structured interviews to better understand the strategies used to foster needs support. Findings revealed that leaders were able to foster a sense of relatedness among youth through building trusting adult-youth relationships and nurturing an inclusive environment. Maximizing choice and negotiating youth voice helped to foster youth's autonomy. Finally, creating a task-oriented climate and providing intentional opportunities for skill-building helped to foster youth's competence. Findings suggest that training for leaders is critical in understanding what, and how strategies should be employed to help foster youth needs support in leadership programming. Limitations and future directions are outlined. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Adversity and Adjustment in Children in Institutions, Family Foster Care, and Adoption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Morago, Jesús M; León, Esperanza; Román, Maite

    2015-06-22

    This study's objective was to identify the adversity profiles of children in different childcare placements, and to analyze their relationship with subsequent psychological adjustment. We studied a group of 230 children 4 to 10 years old indifferent childcare placements (international adoption, institutional care, non-kin foster care, and kinship care), as well as a control group. Information was collected from parent or caregiver interviews and the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ). The results showed that children in the child welfare system had experienced significant adversity before their current placement, especially among institutional care cases and international adoptees. Meanwhile, children in kinship care had experienced less adversity (p .50 to d > .80). After a period of time in their respective placements, children's psychological adjustment was generally positive, but children living in institutional care exhibited the most problems and difficulties, followed by non-kin foster care cases (p .50 to d > .80). Finally, we found that children's early adversity levels (p < .05; r = .16), age of current placement (p < .01; r = .23), and duration of current placement (p < .05: r = -.19) were all tied to current psychological adjustment.

  20. Fostering creativity, empathy and self-regulation through story-based educational role-play

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjedde, Lisa

    Fostering creativity, empathy and self-regulation through story-based educational role-playThe educational demands of the 21st. century calls for developing learning approaches and designs that are engaging to learners with different strenghts and challenges. In order to raise the percentage......, collaboration and creative problem-solving as well as empathy and self-regulation.The project has used a mixed-methods approach which combined case-studies and surveys.This presentation will present prelimininary findings from the study that indicate the neuro-educational potentials to be achieved, through...... engaging the learners in narrative educational role-play. These include how the learners engagement in role-play can afford emotionally encoded memory, socially and contextually anchored interactions with the learning material as well as empathy and self-regulation.Based on the findings from the R...

  1. Laser induced augmentation of silver nanospheres to nanowires in ethanol fostered by Poly Vinyl Pyrrolidone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sebastian, Suneetha, E-mail: sunikutty@gmail.com; Linslal, C.L.; Vallabhan, C.P.G.; Nampoori, V.P.N.; Radhakrishnan, P.; Kailasnath, M.

    2014-11-30

    Highlights: • Silver nanospheres are synthesised in ethanol containing Poly Vinyl Pyrrolidone which acts as a polymeric capping agent to nanoparticles thus improving its stability. • Laser irradiation onto the colloidal solution of silver nanoparticles produced well defined nanowires through ripening mechanism promoted by Poly Vinyl Pyrrolidone. • Nanowires so formed are having an average length of 8.7 μm and width of 160 nm. - Abstract: Stable uniform silver nanospheres having an average diameter of 45 nm are synthesised in ethanol containing Poly Vinyl Pyrrolidone using Laser Ablation in Liquid technique. Further irradiation of the nanocolloidal solution by focussed laser beam produced stable well defined silver nanowires through ripening mechanism fostered by the presence of Poly Vinyl Pyrrolidone. Confirmation of the mechanism is obtained from Transmission Electron Microscopic images of the nanocolloidal solution irradiated for different time durations.

  2. Psychosocial screening and monitoring for children in foster care: Psychometric properties of the Brief Assessment Checklist in a Dutch population study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goemans, Anouk; Tarren-Sweeney, Michael; van Geel, Mitch; Vedder, Paul

    2017-05-01

    Children in foster care experience higher levels and rates of psychosocial difficulties than children from the general population. Governments and child welfare services have a responsibility to identify those children in care who have need for therapeutic services. This can be achieved through systematic screening and monitoring of psychosocial difficulties among all children in foster care. However, general screening and assessment measures such as the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) and Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) might not adequately screen for the range of difficulties experienced by foster children. The Brief Assessment Checklists for Children (BAC-C) and Brief Assessment Checklists for Adolescents (BAC-A) are measures designed to screen for and monitor attachment- and trauma-related difficulties among child welfare populations. This article reports psychometric properties of the BAC-C and BAC-A, estimated in a population study of 219 Dutch foster children. The results suggest the BAC-C and BAC-A perform both screening and monitoring functions well. Their screening accuracy, internal reliability and concurrent validity are comparable to those estimated for the SDQ within the same child and adolescent sample. Future research is needed to assess the value of the Brief Assessment Checklists (BAC) compared to other measures and to validate cut-points for the BAC. This study further establishes the BAC-A and BAC-C as valid and useful mental health screening and monitoring measures for use with children and adolescents in foster care.

  3. The Impact of Continued Contact with Biological Parents upon the Mental Health of Children in Foster Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWey, Lenore M.; Acock, Alan; Porter, Breanne

    2010-01-01

    This study examined depression and externalizing problems of children in foster care using a subsample of data (N = 362) from the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being. Our findings indicated that more frequent contact with the biological mother was marginally associated with lower levels depression and significantly associated with lower externalizing problem behaviors. The association with externalizing problem behavior was significant even after controlling for gender and exposure to violence. Further, differences with regard to gender were revealed. Specifically, girls had higher depression scores than boys even after controlling for exposure to violence. Results suggest that supporting frequent, consistent, visitation may impact the levels of depression and externalizing programs children in foster care exhibit. PMID:20802844

  4. Geopressured-geothermal aquifers. Final contract report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-08-01

    Task 1 is to provide petrophysical and reservoir analysis of wells drilled into geopressured-geothermal aquifers containing dissolved methane. The list of Design Wells and Wells of Opportunity analyzed: Fairfax Foster Sutter No. 2 (WOO), Pleasant Bayou No. 2 (Design), Amoco Fee No. 1 (Design), G.M. Koelemay No. 1 (WOO), Gladys McCall No. 1 (Design), P.R. Girouard No. 1 (WOO), and Crown Zellerbach No. 2 (WOO). Petrophysical and reservoir analysis of the above wells were performed based on availability of data. The analysis performed on each well, the assumptions made during simulation, and conclusions reached.

  5. Wellness in South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    make to move toward optimal health. • Wellness is a way of life - a lifestyle you design to achieve your highest potential for well-being. • Wellness is a process - a developing awareness that there is no end point,. Figure 1: The Iceberg Model of Wellness. Figure 2: The Illness-Wellness Continuum. Moving towards Wellness.

  6. The intervention model for affective involvement and its effectiveness: Fostering affective involvement between persons who are congenitally deafblind and their communication partners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, M.A.W.

    2014-01-01

    Can one share emotions with someone who can’t hear and see well? This dissertation addresses the effectiveness of a training for professionals to foster affective involvement or the mutual sharing of emotions with people who are congenitally deafblind. People with congenital deafblindness are

  7. 75 FR 43187 - Request for Public Comment and Consultation Meetings on the Adoption and Foster Care Analysis and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-23

    ... Meetings on the Adoption and Foster Care Analysis and Reporting System (AFCARS) AGENCY: Department of... Adoption and Foster Care Analysis and Reporting System (AFCARS). SUMMARY: Section 479 of the Social... foster care. The resultant Adoption and Foster Care Analysis and Reporting System (AFCARS) has been...

  8. Foster carer experience in Spain: Analysis of the vulnerabilities of a permanent model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López López, Mónica; Del Valle, Jorge F

    2016-05-01

    The voice of foster families is a valuable tool in the development and improvement of foster family services. Regularly evaluating the satisfaction of foster carers can facilitate the early identification of a range of problems that might pose a risk to the placement. This article reports the experience of 200 Spanish foster families (kinship and non-kinship) with foster services in relation to motivation for becoming foster carers, sources of stress and reward, satisfaction with the services and needs. Semi-structured interviews were performed. The aims of the research are principally of a descriptive character, so each group of variables was examined using frequency analysis. The foster carers interviewed demonstrated a high degree of satisfaction with the foster programs, although some areas seem more problematic, such as financial compensation, information provided about the fostered child, contact with the birth family and the sensitivity of professionals. This study reveals several differences with regard to international literature, that are related to particularities of the Spanish child care system. The results may be extremely useful for the implementation of policy changes which could contribute to raised levels of satisfaction for the foster carers, and increased effectiveness of the programs.

  9. Fostering Scientific Literacy: Establishing Social Relevance via the Grand Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyford, M. E.; Myers, J. D.; Buss, A.

    2010-12-01

    Numerous studies and polls suggest the general public’s understanding of science and scientific literacy remain woefully inadequate despite repeated calls for improvement over the last 150 years. This inability to improve scientific literacy significantly is a complex problem likely driven by a number of factors. However, we argue that past calls and efforts for improving scientific literacy have failed to: 1) articulate a truly meaningful justification for society to foster a scientifically literate public; 2) provide a rationale that motivates individuals of diverse backgrounds to become scientifically literate; 3) consider the impact of personal perspective, e.g. values, beliefs, attitudes, etc., on learning; and 4) offer a relevant and manageable framework in which to define scientific literacy. For instance, past calls for improving scientific literacy, e.g. the U.S. is behind the Soviets in the space race, U.S students rank below country X in math and science, etc., have lacked justification, personal motivation and a comprehensive framework for defining scientific literacy. In these cases, the primary justification for improving science education and scientific literacy was to regain international dominance in the space race or to advance global standing according to test results. These types of calls also articulate short-term goals that are rendered moot once they have been achieved. At the same time, teaching practices have commonly failed to consider the perspectives students bring to the classroom. Many STEM faculty do not address issues of personal perspective through ignorance or the desire to avoid controversial subjects, e g. evolution, climate change. We propose that the ‘grand challenges’ (e.g., energy, climate change, antibacterial resistance, water, etc.) humankind currently faces provides a compelling framework for developing courses and curricula well-suited for improving scientific literacy. A grand challenge paradigm offers four

  10. Stormwater Drainage Wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provides information for identifying stormwater drainage wells, learn how to comply with regulations for storm water drainage wells, and how to reduce the threat to ground water from stormwater injection wells.

  11. Predicting risk of entry into foster care from early childhood experiences: A survival analysis using LONGSCAN data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Diana J; Thompson, Richard; White, Catherine Roller

    2015-07-01

    This study examined whether a multi-domain model of maltreatment informed by an ecological framework-including factors related to the child, caregiver, family, neighborhood, and dimensions of maltreatment experience-predicted entry into foster care between the ages of 4 and 18 among children with no prior foster care experience. To determine which factors predict entry into foster care, secondary data analyses were conducted utilizing a sub-sample from LONGSCAN (Longitudinal Studies of Child Abuse and Neglect) of 942 children and their primary caregivers. Results demonstrate that there are important predictors for entry into out-of-home placement across multiple ecological domains. Characteristics related to child, caregiver, and family characteristics, and neighborhood context, as well as dimensions of maltreatment (particularly emotional maltreatment), predicted risk of placement in out-of-home care. Implications for child welfare practice are discussed. This examination of the effects of multiple ecological domains adds to our understanding of children's risk of removal and entry into out-of-home placement. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Institutional predictors of developmental outcomes among racially diverse foster care alumni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Antonio R; Pecora, Peter J; Harachi, Tracy; Aisenberg, Eugene

    2012-10-01

    Child welfare practitioners are confronted with the responsibility of relying on best practice to ensure children in foster care transition successfully into adulthood after leaving the foster care system. Yet, despite recent reforms and efforts to address their needs, research clearly shows that foster care alumni are still more likely to experience negative developmental outcomes compared to adults in the general population. The purpose of this study was to better understand how child-serving systems of care adequately prepare racially diverse foster care alumni to thrive. Controlling for gender, age, placement instability, and circumstances of exit from foster care, study findings highlighted salient racial and ethnic differences relative to which factors predicted the odds of mental health, education, and employment outcomes. Implications for developing and implementing culturally sensitive, evidence-based prevention and intervention programs to promote positive developmental outcomes among racially diverse foster care alumni are discussed. © 2012 American Orthopsychiatric Association.

  13. Where do youth in foster care receive information about preventing unplanned pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Angela L

    2012-10-01

    Adolescents in foster care are at risk for unplanned pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections, including HIV infection. A study using a qualitative method was conducted to describe how and where foster youth receive reproductive health and risk reduction information to prevent pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections. Participants also were asked to describe their relationship with their primary health care provider while they were in foster care. Nineteen young adults, recently emancipated from foster care, participated in individual interviews. Using grounded theory as the method of analysis, three thematic categories were generated: discomfort visiting and disclosing, receiving and not receiving the bare essentials, and learning prevention from community others. Recommendations include primary health care providers providing a confidential space for foster youth to disclose sexual activity and more opportunities for foster youth to receive reproductive and risk prevention information in the school setting. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Principles for fostering the transdisciplinary development of assistive technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boger, Jennifer; Jackson, Piper; Mulvenna, Maurice; Sixsmith, Judith; Sixsmith, Andrew; Mihailidis, Alex; Kontos, Pia; Miller Polgar, Janice; Grigorovich, Alisa; Martin, Suzanne

    2017-07-01

    Developing useful and usable assistive technologies often presents complex (or "wicked") challenges that require input from multiple disciplines and sectors. Transdisciplinary collaboration can enable holistic understanding of challenges that may lead to innovative, impactful and transformative solutions. This paper presents generalised principles that are intended to foster transdisciplinary assistive technology development. The paper introduces the area of assistive technology design before discussing general aspects of transdisciplinary collaboration followed by an overview of relevant concepts, including approaches, methodologies and frameworks for conducting and evaluating transdisciplinary working and assistive technology design. The principles for transdisciplinary development of assistive technologies are presented and applied post hoc to the COACH project, an ambient-assisted living technology for guiding completion of activities of daily living by older adults with dementia as an illustrative example. Future work includes the refinement and validation of these principles through their application to real-world transdisciplinary assistive technology projects. Implications for rehabilitation Transdisciplinarity encourages a focus on real world 'wicked' problems. A transdisciplinary approach involves transcending disciplinary boundaries and collaborating with interprofessional and community partners (including the technology's intended users) on a shared problem. Transdisciplinarity fosters new ways of thinking about and doing research, development, and implementation, expanding the scope, applicability, and commercial viability of assistive technologies.

  15. Expresionismo tecnológico: Norman Foster en Hampstead

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Solé Bravo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available En 1978, Norman y Wendy Foster proyectan su propia vivienda en el barrio londinense de Hampstead. A caballo entre el Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts y el Banco de Hong Kong, esta casa, que no llegó a realizarse, representa el primer y único intento de aplicación en el campo de la arquitectura doméstica de un modelo, “la nave bien servida”, desarrollado por el Team 4 y posteriormente por Foster Associates durante los años sesenta y setenta. La casa de los arquitectos —como en tantos otros casos— permite rastrear, mejor que ninguna otra obra, los referentes, las obsesiones, los sueños y las frustraciones de sus autores. El desarrollo del proyecto refleja la evolución del estudio, inmerso en un intenso debate entre el funcionalismo fabril de “la nave bien servida” y el expresionismo tecnológico del denominado movimiento High-Tech.

  16. Suicidality among preadolescent maltreated children in foster care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taussig, Heather N; Harpin, Scott B; Maguire, Sabine A

    2014-02-01

    This study sought to determine the prevalence of suicidal ideation, plans, and attempts among 515 preadolescent (aged 9-11 years) maltreated children who entered foster care within the prior year. Over a quarter (26.4%) of the children had a history of suicidality according to their own and/or their caregiver's report, 4.1% of whom were imminently suicidal. In bivariate analyses, children at higher risk of suicidality tended to be younger, non-Hispanic, abused, and to have experienced multiple types of maltreatment, more referrals to child welfare, more household transitions, and a longer length of time in foster care. There were no gender differences. Multiple regression analyses found physical abuse and chronicity of maltreatment to be the most robust predictors of suicidality. It is critically important that these high-risk children are screened for suicidality before adolescence and that caregivers and professionals are informed of their risk status so that they may implement mental health treatment, monitoring, and harm reduction measures.

  17. FOSTERING STUDENT PARTICIPATION THROUGH INTERACTIVE TEACHING IN BASIC ENGLISH CLASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siane Indriani

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to examine the 1st semester teacher college students’ perceptions of the interaction between them and their teacher in Basic English class through class discussion interactive teaching in Basic English class. To create a successful and effective teaching, cooperation between teacher and students is needed. An effective teacher must be able to present their material, effectively manage their classroom according to the lesson they’ve planned, accommodate their students’ needs, and enhance their students’ participation in the learning activities. Participants were 25 students who reported their perceptions on the interactive teaching in addition to their learning process. Result suggested that the interactive teaching fostered student participation during the learning activities. Teaching method such as class discussion that involved the whole class participation to raise questions and discuss about the answer or solution would require interaction between teacher and students more intensively. This interactive teaching method could be implemented for college students, especially because they were expected to participate more actively in the learning activities and become more independent learners. This study could also be an alternative for any educational practitioners who would like to foster their students’ participation.

  18. Conference: Diversity in the Workplace - How to Capitalise on Differences to Foster Innovation

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    Diversity in the Workplace: How to Capitalise on Differences to Foster Innovation, by Cristina Bianchi.   Tuesday 19 June 2012 – 12 noon to 2 p.m. Brasserie Restaurant 2 Diversity Lunch : Lunchtime conference organised by the CERN Diversity Programme. Diversity is an acknowledged source of creativity and innovation that can improve performance and ultimately create a definite advantage for the Organization. However, if not managed well both at team and individual level, it can become a source of misunderstanding, interpersonal tensions and conflict. The speaker will share concrete strategies and approaches to capitalise on a diverse workforce and create the right environment where differences become an asset that leads to creativity, idea generation and, ultimately, innovation. Cristina Bianchi is specialised in conflict management, cross-cultural relations and effective communication and has acquired valuable experience working in sensitive areas such as Palestine and Kosovo. Her se...

  19. Fostering Reading Comprehension and Self-Directed Learning in a Collaborative Strategic Reading (CSR Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Mendieta

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This research project was carried out at five public educational institutions by a group of English teacher-researchers based in different regions of Colombia. Due to a shared concern about the development of reading skills and self-regulation in the L2 classroom, a multiple case action research study was designed to examine whether the use of Collaborative Strategic Reading (CSR (Klingner, Vaughn & Schumm, 1998; Klingner & Vaughn, 1998 could foster reading comprehension in learners and at the same time help them become self-directed learners. Student pre and post questionnaires, reading tests and learning logs, as well as teacher's journals constituted the data collection methods used during the study. Results indicate that the use of CSR impacted participants' learning attitudes and habits positively.

  20. [Human capital vs. manpower: fostering a greater global perspective within the nursing profession in Taiwan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Yen; Chou, Shieu-Ming

    2014-04-01

    Nursing today is an occupation greatly influenced and shaped by global standards and internationally recognized standard practices and requirements. Therefore, cultivating nursing capital and ensuring nursing manpower requires an international perspective. Nursing migration is currently a popular approach used by many developed countries to address domestic shortfalls in nursing manpower. These international medical services have had a great impact on nursing education. Being able to communicate in English and to adapt transculturally have thus become increasingly important. Ability to communicate well in English is one effective way both to minimize nurse-patient misunderstandings and to increase the quality of care available to foreign patients. In addition, transcultural communication underscores the value of respecting cultural diversity. Fostering and enhancing these abilities will enhance and expand the role of Taiwanese nurses in the professional global movement and increase their contributions to the internal medical community.

  1. Noise analysis of broadband active metamaterials with non-Foster loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yifeng; Rajab, Khalid Z.; Hao, Yang

    2013-06-01

    Active metamaterials loaded with non-Foster inclusions may exhibit broadband and low-loss material properties, as compared to their passive counterparts. However, the study of their noise performance still remains to be explored. In addition to the Johnson-Nyquist noise from lossy conductors, nonlinear materials used for the design of negative impedance converters (NICs) will give rise to noise as well. In this paper, a general analytical model is developed for the prediction of the noise performance of broadband, stable active metamaterials based on NICs. The noise performance is analyzed in relation to stability, and the effective material properties. The techniques developed in this paper can be applied generally to metamaterials for which equivalent circuit models exist, and results are shown demonstrating the power spectral density and the noise figure of the specific case of an active metamaterial consisting of loaded loop arrays. Results are compared to and verified with circuit simulations.

  2. Placement into foster care and the interplay of urbanicity, child behavior problems, and poverty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Richard P; Wildfire, Judy; Green, Rebecca L

    2006-07-01

    Child welfare involvement is related to involvement with poverty, but the dimensions of that relationship have not been fully explored. Data from the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being were used to test the relationship between poverty indicators and placement into foster care. Poverty, ages of children, urban or nonurban settings, and the presence of mental health disorders interact to contribute to placement decisions. In urban areas, poverty is strongly associated with involvement with child welfare services, but children's mental health problems are not. In nonurban areas, children's mental health problems are a far greater contributor to child welfare involvement than poverty. Implications for understanding the dual functions of child welfare placements are provided. Child welfare services continue to address the needs of families with children with substantial behavioral problems--yet, federal child welfare policy includes no recognition of this important role. 2006 APA, all rights reserved

  3. Multidimensional Treatment Foster Care: An Alternative to Residential Treatment for High Risk Children and Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip A. Fisher

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the Multidimensional Treatment Foster Care program (MTFC, an evidence based approach for providing psychotherapeutic treatment for very troubled children and adolescents that is an alternative to residential care. Versions of the MTFC program have been developed and validated for young children with a history of maltreatment as well as for older children and adolescents who are involved with the youth justice system. In the paper we describe the development of the MTFC program and its foundations in the social learning model that originated at the Oregon Social Learning Center in the 1960's and 70's. We present information about program elements. We then review the research that has been conducted on MTFC.

  4. The volunteer programs that support child in adoption or foster care

    OpenAIRE

    HLADÍKOVÁ, Alena

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the thesis Volunteer programs that support child in adoption or foster care is to monitor the offer of volunteer programs for children in adoption foster care in the Czech Republic and to show possibilities of support which volunteer program could bring to children, including demonstrations of experience from similar programs abroad. The theoretical part of thesis describes the foster care system with respect to the child's needs and ways of support that are available to them in bo...

  5. Child Protection and Adult Crime: Using Investigator Assignment to Estimate Causal Effects of Foster Care

    OpenAIRE

    Joseph J. Doyle, Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Nearly 20% of young prison inmates spent part of their youth in foster care - the placement of abused or neglected children with substitute families. Little is known whether foster care placement reduces or increases the likelihood of criminal behavior. This paper uses the placement frequency of child protection investigators as an instrument to identify causal effects of foster care placement on adult arrest, conviction, and imprisonment rates. A unique dataset that links child abuse investi...

  6. Adoption and Foster Care by Gay and Lesbian Parents in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Gates, Gary J.; Badgett, M.V. Lee; Macomber, Jennifer Ehrle; Chambers, Kate

    2007-01-01

    Discussion and debate about adoption and foster care by gay, lesbian, and bisexual (GLB) parents occurs frequently among child welfare policymakers, social service agencies, and social workers. They all need better information about GLB adoptive and foster parents and their children as they make individual and policy-level decisions about placement of children with GLB parents. This report provides new information on GLB adoption and foster care from the U.S. Census 2000, the National Survey ...

  7. The perception adolescents in kinship foster care have of their own needs

    OpenAIRE

    Mateos Inchaurrondo, Ainoa; Balsells, M. Àngels; Molina, María Cruz; Fuentes-Peláez, Núria

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the most important findings concerning the socialeducational needs as expressed by adolescents in kinship foster care (KFC) in the study carried out I+D SEJ-026575 in Spain between 2005 and 2008. The data for the study was collected from discussion groups with adolescents in kinship foster care AFE (n=57) from different autonomous communities in Spain. In the needs assessment the data was collected in the following categories: characteristics of Foster care in kinship fa...

  8. Dynamic reservoir well interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sturm, W.L.; Belfroid, S.P.C.; Wolfswinkel, O. van; Peters, M.C.A.M.; Verhelst, F.J.P.C.M.

    2004-01-01

    In order to develop smart well control systems for unstable oil wells, realistic modeling of the dynamics of the well is essential. Most dynamic well models use a semi-steady state inflow model to describe the inflow of oil and gas from the reservoir. On the other hand, reservoir models use steady

  9. The effect of medical treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) on foster care caseloads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fallesen, Peter; Wildeman, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Since the early 2000s, foster care caseloads have decreased in many wealthy democracies, yet the causes of these declines remain, for the most part, a mystery. This article uses administrative data on all Danish municipalities (N = 277) and a 10% randomly drawn sample of all Danish children (N...... = 157,938) in the period from 1998 to 2010 to show that increasing medical treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) accounts for a substantial share of the decrease in foster care caseloads. According to our estimates, the decline in foster care caseloads during this period would...... problems could also have a powerful effect on foster care caseloads....

  10. Against the odds: foster carers' perceptions of family, commitment and belonging in successful placements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oke, Nicholas; Rostill-Brookes, Helen; Larkin, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This study examines carer attributes associated with placement stability for teenagers growing up in long term foster care, focusing on unexpected placement success. We explored experiences and perceptions relating to family, belonging and commitment in a group of foster carers providing a stable placement for a young person who had not been expected to settle. These placements showed positive outcome, despite factors in the child's history that might have predicted otherwise. Seven foster carers were interviewed following a semi-structured guide, which covered their ideas about their relationship with the child in question, about the foster family, and the child's sense of belonging in foster and birth family. Analysis of carers' accounts of placements which had succeeded 'against the odds' revealed four major themes, described under the headings My Child--emotional bonding, the carers' enlarged view of family and their parental regard for the young person; Jam in the Sandwich--working within a 'compromised space' between Local Authority and birth family; Repair and Rebuild--the craft of fostering including managing the foster/birth family boundary; Sticking with It--resilience, tenacity and maintaining hopefulness. The carers' accounts offer pointers towards the ingredients of successful placements and prompt reflection on how these may be supported and promoted. They also highlight tensions inherent in the foster carer task relating to carers' parental functioning for young people in long-term foster care.

  11. [Beliefs of foster parents regarding the children in their care and their natural parents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgie, C; Ricard, N; Pelchat, D

    1998-01-01

    This exploratory research has been conducted with the objective of identifying the beliefs of foster parents towards children in their care and their natural families. Results show that foster parents have a number of beliefs that can harm the optimal exercise of their mandate. The major issues raised concern their initial motivation, their perceptions of the children's needs, their educational strategies, the nuances regarding usual parental role and their positions regarding the natural parents of foster children. This research constitutes a foundation for more adaptative interventions with regards to the context of placement, especially for the development of support and education services for foster parents.

  12. Personal Wellness Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Clubhouse at FacingUs.org is home to a wealth of customizable, personal wellness tools to help you ... DBSA envisions wellness for people who live with depression and bipolar disorder. Because DBSA was created for ...

  13. The wellness syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mik-Meyer, Nanna

    2015-01-01

    Klumme. Wellness er blevet et syndrom, og dets symptomer er angst, selvbebrejdelser og skyldfølelse. Kommentar med udgangspunkt i: Carl Cederström & Andre Spicer, "The Wellness Syndrome" (Polity Books, 2015. 200 p.).......Klumme. Wellness er blevet et syndrom, og dets symptomer er angst, selvbebrejdelser og skyldfølelse. Kommentar med udgangspunkt i: Carl Cederström & Andre Spicer, "The Wellness Syndrome" (Polity Books, 2015. 200 p.)....

  14. Total well dominated trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finbow, Arthur; Frendrup, Allan; Vestergaard, Preben D.

    cardinality then G is a total well dominated graph. In this paper we study composition and decomposition of total well dominated trees. By a reversible process we prove that any total well dominated tree can both be reduced to and constructed from a family of three small trees....

  15. Salivary cortisol: a possible biomarker in evaluating stress and effects of interventions in young foster children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Andel, Hans W H; Jansen, Lucres M C; Grietens, Hans; Knorth, Erik J; van der Gaag, Rutger Jan

    2014-01-01

    Young foster children undergo an early separation from their caregiver(s) and often experience severe stress before placement. However, a considerable part of the children do not show apparent signs of distress, making it difficult for the foster carer to be aware of the amount of stress in their foster child. Potential evidence for using salivary cortisol levels as a dimension to evaluate the amount of stress in young foster children is reviewed. Moreover, the applicability of salivary cortisol in the evaluation of stress-reducing interventions for young foster children is discussed. A systematic review was performed using the databases Medline, Psychinfo, Embase, Ebscohost, and Academic Search Premier. Nine studies were traced in which salivary cortisol was used to measure stress in children placed in family foster care or in adoptive families. Stress in general but also neglect, early loss of a caregiver, a younger age at first placement, and a higher number of placements were associated with an altered hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function in foster children. Moreover, four studies on the effect of stress-reducing interventions on HPA-axis functioning of young foster children were found. These studies suggest that caregiver-based interventions can actually help to normalize the HPA-axis function in foster children, and that such changes co-occur with improved behavioral functioning. Although the results from the papers discussed in this review suggest that diurnal cortisol with a wake up and a bedtime measurement may be a relevant tool to evaluate stress in young foster children, this cannot yet be concluded from the present studies, because statistical data from the studies on foster care and adoption in this review were not robust and researchers used different methods to collect the salivary cortisol. Still, it is noteworthy that all studies did find the same pattern of reduced levels in relation to chronic stress (caused by maltreatment and

  16. International experience of Foster Wheeler in the incineration of urban solid wastes; Experiencia internacional de Foster Wheeler en el campo de la incineracion de residuos solidos urbanos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisen, C.; Florez, J. M.

    1996-12-01

    The enterprise Foster Wheeler presents its experience on incineration or urban solid wastes. The main examples of construction in the international area are the Camden and the Valorsul plants. (Author)

  17. Learning Incubator: an instrument to foster entrepreneurship in Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backes, Dirce Stein; Obem, Marielle Kulakowski; Pereira, Simone Barbosa; Gomes, Carine Alves; Backes, Marli Terezinha Stein; Erdmann, Alacoque Lorenzini

    2015-01-01

    this study aimed to know the contributions of the Learning Incubator to the process of lifelong education in health. this is a qualitative field research whose data was collected from August to December 2014 by the focus group technique. The research had 34 employees of a Teaching Hospital in the central region of the state of Rio Grande do Sul that participated previously in the incubation process. from the data encoded by content analysis, three themes were selected: Learning Incubator - welcoming and integrating space; An instigating instrument that enhances possibilities; Continuous and lifelong education strategy. the Learning Incubator is an important instrument to foster entrepreneurship in nursing and other health areas due to its capacity of rethinking mechanized practices, to the possibility of instigating new ways of being and acting, and to the ability of creating and developing new ideas based on individual and institutional needs.

  18. Patterns of Movement in Foster Care: An Optimal Matching Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havlicek, Judy

    2011-01-01

    Placement instability remains a vexing problem for child welfare agencies across the country. This study uses child welfare administrative data to retrospectively follow the entire placement histories (birth to age 17.5) of 474 foster youth who reached the age of majority in the state of Illinois and to search for patterns in their movement through the child welfare system. Patterns are identified through optimal matching and hierarchical cluster analyses. Multiple logistic regression is used to analyze administrative and survey data in order to examine covariates related to patterns. Five distinct patterns of movement are differentiated: Late Movers, Settled with Kin, Community Care, Institutionalized, and Early Entry. These patterns suggest high but variable rates of movement. Implications for child welfare policy and service provision are discussed. PMID:20873020

  19. Fostering Entrepreneurship at the University: A Spanish Empirical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis VÁZQUEZ

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to suggest best practices for improving the effectiveness of entrepreneurship education programs in the European area, based on their impact on expected attitudes of undergraduate students towards business startup as a career choice. Particularly, the paper presents some results from a study carried out in two Spanish universities aimed at validating a structure of entrepreneurship education based on a double component of curricular teaching and extracurricular support, and to analyze their effect upon undergraduates’ entrepreneurial selfefficacy and outcome expectations as immediate antecedents of entrepreneurial intentions and behaviors. Sample was comprised of 800 university students, and statistical treatment of data was based on factorial and regression analyses. Findings underline the very limited involvement of Spanish universities in entrepreneurship education as perceived by students, together with the existence of different effects of curricular and extracurricular elements when fostering entrepreneurial careers among future graduates. Implications of these results and limitations of the study are discussed.

  20. Methods Used in Game Development to Foster FLOW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeppsen, Isaac Ben

    2010-01-01

    Games designed for entertainment have a rich history of providing compelling experiences. From consoles to PCs, games have managed to present intuitive and effective interfaces for a wide range of game styles to successfully allow users to "walk-up-and-play". Once a user is hooked, successful games artfully present challenging experiences just within reach of a user's ability, weaving each task and achievement into a compelling and engaging experience. In this paper, engagement is discussed in terms of the psychological theory of Flow. I argue that engagement should be one of the primary goals when developing a serious game and I discuss the best practices and techniques that have emerged from traditional video game development which help foster the creation of engaging, high Flow experiences.

  1. Hal Foster (Ed., L’antiestetica. Saggi sulla cultura postmoderna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Agamennoni

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available La notevole distanza temporale che separa la prima edizione, nel 1983, della raccolta di saggi curata da Hal Foster e intitolata The Anti-Aesthetics e la recentissima pubblicazione di quest'ultima nella sua traduzione italiana, L'antiestetica, da parte di Postmedia Books costituisce una circostanza singolare per un'opera di così ampia e diffusa risonanza internazionale da essere definita da Ester Coen, nella sua postfazione, come il «vademecum di un'intera generazione» (187. A poco più di trent'anni di distanza questo testo ci appare per molti versi come un documento postumo, manifesto di un progetto – il postmodernismo – già esauritosi, riproposto «quando ormai la discussione si volge piuttosto altrove, alla consunzione di questo termine e, in definitiva, all'epilogo di una fase» (ibid..

  2. Washington state foster care: dental utilization and expenditures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melbye, Molly L R; Chi, Donald L; Milgrom, Peter; Huebner, Colleen E; Grembowski, David

    2014-01-01

    To identify factors associated with dental utilization and expenditures for children enrolled in Washington State (WA) foster care (FC). This cross-sectional study used 2008 Medicaid enrollment and claims files for children ages Foster Home Care, Kinship Care, Group Care, Other), and urbanicity. Only 43 percent of the children utilized any dental care; the adjusted mean expenditure was $198.35 [95% confidence interval (CI) $181.35, $215.36]. Fewer utilized diagnostic (41 percent), preventive (39 percent), restorative (11 percent), or complex (5 percent) services. Associated with utilization (P ≤ 0.01) were: female [ARR = 1.05, 95% CI(1.01, 1.10)]; 0-2 years [ARR = 0.18, 95% CI(0.15, 0.21)], [3-5 years ARR = 0.78, 95% CI(0.74, 0.83)]; Native American [ARR = 0.85, 95% CI(0.80, 0.91)]; SSI [ARR = 1.10, 95% CI(1.04, 1.17)]; Kinship Care [ARR = 0.94, 95% CI(0.90, 0.98)]; Group Care [ARR = 1.25 95% CI(1.15, 1.37)]; and urban/rural urbanicity with population Care [$28.57 95% CI($14.00, $43.15)]. Most children enrolled in WA FC for ≥11 months during 2008 did not receive dental care. Research is needed to determine the level of unmet need among children in FC and interventions to improve access to oral health of the children. Enforcement of existing federal legislation is needed. © 2013 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  3. Fostering change within organizational participants of multisectoral health care alliances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearld, Larry R; Alexander, Jeffrey A; Mittler, Jessica N

    2012-01-01

    A touted advantage of multisectoral health care alliances is their ability to coordinate diverse constituencies and pursue community health goals in ways that allow them to make greater progress than each constituency could independently. However, participating organizations may have goals that do not entirely overlap or necessarily align with the alliance's goals, which can weaken or undermine an alliance's efforts. Fostering changes within participating organizations in ways that are consistent with the alliance's goals (i.e., alliance-oriented change) may be one mechanism by which alliances can coordinate diverse activities and improve care in their local communities. We examined whether alliance-oriented change within participating organizations is associated with alliance decision-making and conflict management style, level of participation, perceptions of alliance participation benefits and costs, and awareness of alliance activities within participating organizations. The study used two rounds of survey data collected from organizational participants of 14 alliances participating in the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's Aligning Forces for Quality program. Alliance participants generally reported low levels of alliance-oriented change within their organizations as a result of the alliance and its activities. However, participants reporting higher levels of internal change in response to alliance activities had more positive perceptions of alliance decision-making style, higher levels of participation in alliance activities, more positive perceptions of alliance participation benefits relative to costs, and greater awareness of alliance activities across multiple levels of their respective organizations. Despite relatively low levels of alliance-oriented change within participating organizations, alliances may still have the means to align the goal orientations of a diverse membership and foster change that may extend the reach of the alliance in the community.

  4. Development and testing of a multimedia internet-based system for fidelity and monitoring of multidimensional treatment foster care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feil, Edward G; Sprengelmeyer, Peter G; Davis, Betsy; Chamberlain, Patricia

    2012-10-16

    The fields of mental health, child welfare, and juvenile justice are jointly faced with the challenge of reducing the prevalence of antisocial behavior among adolescents. In the last 20 years, conduct disorders have moved from being considered intractable difficulties to having complex but available solutions. The treatments for even long-standing offending behavior among adolescents are now well documented and supported by a growing and compelling body of evidence. These empirically validated interventions are being widely disseminated, but the replication of the results from clinical trials in community settings has yet to be documented. The treatments, which produced impressive effects in a research context, are difficult to replicate without intensive monitoring of fidelity by the developers. Such monitoring is a barrier toward adoption; as the distance between the adopter and developer increases, so does cost. At the same time, states, communities, and agencies are under increasing pressure to implement those intervention services that have been shown to be most effective. The use of the Internet offers a potential solution in that existing reporting and data collection by clinicians can be subject to remote supervision. Such a system would have the potential to provide dissemination teams with more direct access to higher-quality data and would make adopters more likely to be able to implement services at the highest possible conformity to research protocols. To create and test such an innovative system for use with the Multidimensional Treatment Foster Care (MTFC) program, which is an in-home treatment (alternative to a residential- or group-home setting) for antisocial youths. This research could advance the knowledge base about developing innovative infrastructures in community settings to disseminate empirically validated treatments. The fidelity system was used and reviewed by parent and professional users: 20 foster parent users of the Parent Daily

  5. The Lifenet View: Fostering Contextual Understanding in the Professional Education Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Jan

    2010-01-01

    The work described in this article represents an effort to foster a contextual understanding of human development in culturally and developmentally diverse classrooms through autobiographical reflection and reflexive inquiry. The author's goal is to use the exercise to foster "deep learning" about human development and to develop a classroom…

  6. Using performance-based contracts to foster innovation in outsourced service delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sumo, Regien; van der Valk, Wendy; Duijsters, Geert; van Weele, Arjan

    2016-01-01

    While many scholars claim that Performance-based Contracts (PBCs) foster supplier-led innovation, empirical research into their actual use and effects remains limited. We therefore explore two cases of IT outsourcing through such contracts to see whether, and if so how, PBCs foster innovation. Our

  7. Foster Care Placement, Poor Parenting, and Negative Outcomes among Homeless Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Kimberly A.; Melander, Lisa A.

    2010-01-01

    Although homeless youth with and without foster care histories both face adverse life circumstances, little is known about how these two groups compare in terms of their early histories and whether they face similar outcomes. As such, we compared those with and without a history of foster care placement to determine if the associations between a…

  8. Does Extending Foster Care beyond Age 18 Promote Postsecondary Educational Attainment? Chapin Hall Issue Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworsky, Amy; Courtney, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Although foster youth approaching the transition to adulthood have postsecondary educational aspirations similar to those of young people in the general population, for too many foster youth with these aspirations, a college education remains an unfulfilled dream. Previous analyses of data from the Midwest Evaluation of the Adult Functioning of…

  9. Assessing and Addressing the Needs of Former Foster Youth in a College Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Misty Glasgow

    2017-01-01

    Research indicated that former foster youth encounter unique challenges in pursuit of degree completion in higher education. Degree completion has the potential to promote self-sufficiency skills for former foster youth, decrease dependency on social services, and increase the likelihood of successful transition into adulthood roles. By aiding…

  10. ESSA and Students in Foster Care. Policy Update. Vol. 23, No. 22

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, Sarah-Jane

    2016-01-01

    For years, students in foster care have been among the most transient in the nation, enduring sudden, sometimes frequent school changes as they move from home to home. The lack of school stability contributes to those children's academic struggles: Students in foster care are more likely than their peers to score lower on assessments and less…

  11. The Foster Care Baby Boom Revisited: What Do the Numbers Tell Us?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulczyn, Fred; Chen, Lijun; Collins, Linda; Ernst, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    The Center for State Foster Care and Adoption Data, operated by Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, supports child welfare agencies in using longitudinal data to improve outcomes for children. For the purposes of this article, the authors analyzed data for 14 states from 2000 through 2008 to examine trends in foster care placement, length of…

  12. Placement in Foster Care Enhances Quality of Attachment among Young Institutionalized Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyke, Anna T.; Zeanah, Charles H.; Fox, Nathan A.; Nelson, Charles A.; Guthrie, Donald

    2010-01-01

    This study examined classifications of attachment in 42-month-old Romanian children (N = 169). Institutionalized since birth, children were assessed comprehensively, randomly assigned to care as usual (CAU) or to foster care, and compared to family-reared children. Attachment classifications for children in foster care were markedly different from…

  13. Who's Who and What's What? Special Education Services for Foster Care Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palladino, John M.

    2011-01-01

    This case describes the educational experiences of a foster care student named Chad. His foster parents and teacher notice educational deficits and express concern about gaps in the student's cumulative educational record. The principal and special education director must guide all constituents to adhere to special education mandates and at the…

  14. Caregiver Involvement in the Education of Youth in Foster Care: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beisse, Kay; Tyre, Ashli

    2013-01-01

    This study was an exploratory investigation of caregiver involvement in the education of youth in foster care. In this study, foster caregivers reported that they are involved in the education of children in their care and participate in at-home involvement activities more often than at-school involvement activities. Caregivers in this study…

  15. Special Education Administrators' Response to the Educational Needs of Foster Care Youth: Collaborative or Disjointed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palladino, John; Haar, Jean

    2011-01-01

    Although the literature discusses the deleterious educational outcomes that foster care students endure, little attention has focused on school personnel's responses to the phenomenon. Despite the documented relationship between foster care and special education, a missing contribution is the voice of special education administrators. In turn, the…

  16. Postsecondary Strengths, Challenges, and Supports Experienced by Foster Care Alumni College Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Amy M.; Jones, Kevin R.; Emerson, John C.; Mucha, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    Young people transitioning from foster care to college experience unique identities and circumstances that make being successful in college especially challenging. We used qualitative survey data from 248 college graduates who were formerly in foster care to explore the strengths, challenges, and supports they experienced while in college that…

  17. An Analysis of Foster Care Placement History and Post-Secondary Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Angelique; Dworsky, Amy; Feng, Wenning

    2013-01-01

    Prior research has document significant disparities in post-secondary educational attainment between young adults who had been in foster care and their peers in the general population. This study uses survival analysis to compare the four-year college graduation rate of students who had been in foster care to the graduation rate of first…

  18. A child brought up in foster family [Dziecko wychowywane w rodzinie zastępczej

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danuta WOSIK-KAWALA

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In a situation when a family does not care about the child and does not fulfil its educational duties to its child, and even where the support given does not result in an improvement of the situation, then the child may be placed in foster care. This leads to the child’s coexistence in two families: the biological one and foster one. In accordance with the law in force in Poland on family support and the foster care system of 20 September 2012, foster care becomes a supplement to parental care-giving and does not replace it. This article is an attempt to show the complexity of the issues concerning the upbringing of a child in two families. Particular attention is paid to the difficult situation of the child, who periodically, by the court’s decision is sent to foster care and functions in a new unrelated family, while maintaining contact with their biological parents, with whom they share a legal bond. This situation raises a number of difficulties experienced by the child – dilemmas and problems with identification and belonging to the foster or biological family. The temporary nature of foster care, its subsidiary character, causes that nowadays the goal of foster families is not to establish ties with the child similar to those resulting from a parent-like attitude but to support, help in the care and upbringing of the child. The article also highlights the resulting threats to the proper functioning of the child

  19. Reducing Transfers of Children in Family Foster Care through Onsite Mental Health Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, Carmen; Levine, Paul

    2007-01-01

    This article describes a successful pilot project in New York City that effectively reduced the number of transfers or replacements of children in family foster care through the placement of mental health clinicians onsite at two foster care agencies. (Contains 2 tables and 2 footnotes.)

  20. Family narratives on fostering a child with a history of sexual abuse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wubs, Susanna; Grietens, Hans; Batstra, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The impact of a history of sexual abuse on foster families has been studied, although never from a multilevel family perspective. Therefore, in Project Iris narratives are collected on the expertise, needs and experiences of family members in foster families concerning the care for a child with a