WorldWideScience

Sample records for wellheads

  1. Wellhead compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrington, Joe [Sertco Industries, Inc., Okemah, OK (United States); Vazquez, Daniel [Hoerbiger Service Latin America Inc., Deerfield Beach, FL (United States); Jacobs, Denis Richard [Hoerbiger do Brasil Industria de Equipamentos, Cajamar, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Over time, all wells experience a natural decline in oil and gas production. In gas wells, the major problems are liquid loading and low downhole differential pressures which negatively impact total gas production. As a form of artificial lift, wellhead compressors help reduce the tubing pressure resulting in gas velocities above the critical velocity needed to surface water, oil and condensate regaining lost production and increasing recoverable reserves. Best results come from reservoirs with high porosity, high permeability, high initial flow rates, low decline rates and high total cumulative production. In oil wells, excessive annulus gas pressure tends to inhibit both oil and gas production. Wellhead compression packages can provide a cost effective solution to these problems by reducing the system pressure in the tubing or annulus, allowing for an immediate increase in production rates. Wells furthest from the gathering compressor typically benefit the most from wellhead compression due to system pressure drops. Downstream compressors also benefit from higher suction pressures reducing overall compression horsepower requirements. Special care must be taken in selecting the best equipment for these applications. The successful implementation of wellhead compression from an economical standpoint hinges on the testing, installation and operation of the equipment. Key challenges and suggested equipment features designed to combat those challenges and successful case histories throughout Latin America are discussed below.(author)

  2. Wellhead with non-ferromagnetic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinson, Richard A [Houston, TX; Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX

    2009-05-19

    Wellheads for coupling to a heater located in a wellbore in a subsurface formation are described herein. At least one wellhead may include a heater located in a wellbore in a subsurface formation; and a wellhead coupled to the heater. The wellhead may be configured to electrically couple the heater to one or more surface electrical components. The wellhead may include at least one non-ferromagnetic material such that ferromagnetic effects are inhibited in the wellhead. Systems and methods for using such wellheads for treating a subsurface formation are described herein.

  3. Wellhead and tree standards updated

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dach, A.J. Jr.; Haeberle, T.

    1996-01-01

    Revisions in the API 6A, 17th Edition, have resolved a number of long-term problems and expanded its scope and coverage of wellhead and christmas tree equipment. The 17th Edition, Feb. 1, 1996, represents the state-of-the-art in international requirements for wellhead and christmas tree equipment. The design, materials, and quality control aspects of API 6A have all been improved with an emphasis on making the document more acceptable around the world. However, there are unresolved issues that raise many questions about the future direction of efforts aimed at international standardization of wellhead and christmas tree equipment. Unfortunately, these unresolved issues confuse both manufacturers and companies purchasing this equipment. This ultimately increases wellhead and christmas tree costs, so it is to everyone's advantage to resolve these issues. This article describes the significant revisions that are included in API 6A, 17th Edition. Also discussed are the regulatory, standardization, and customer acceptance issues that cloud the future of API 6A, 17th Edition

  4. Wellhead bowl protector and retrieving tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes improvement in a wellhead protection system including a wear bushing and a retrieving tool. The improvement comprises a wear bushing supported within the wellhead, wherein the wear bushing includes an enlarged upper end having an external support shoulder for engagement with an internal support shoulder formed in the wellhead; wherein the wear bushing further includes an internal circumferential slot intersected by at least one vertically extending slot, the vertical slot extending from the circumferential slot to the upper end of the wear bushing; a retrieving tool having at least one outwardly biased, retractable lug member mounted thereon; and wherein the retrieving tool includes an enlarged portion adapted to be received within the enlarged upper end of the wear bushing. This patent also describes a method of retrieving a wear bushing from a wellhead comprising the steps of: lowering a retrieving tool into the wellhead for locking engagement with the wear bushing; aligning the retrieving tool with the wear bushing for automatically forcing lug members carried by the retrieving tool outwardly into locking engagement with the wear bushing; monitoring drill string weight for determining engagement of the retrieving tool with the wear bushing, wherein a substantial decrease in drill string weight is an indication that the retrieving tool is engaged with the wear bushing; and removing the wear bushing from the wellhead

  5. New regulations foster wellhead protection efforts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lennox, J.

    1993-01-01

    Groundwater contamination can have disastrous consequences: closed wellfields, insufficient temporary water supplies, and costly, prolonged clean-up. Realizing that it is more prudent to protect water wells than to wait for contamination to occur, many states are issuing regulations designed to protect the surface and subsurface areas surrounding public water system wells. The states have been prompted in part by the federal Safe Drinking Water Act Amendments of 1986, which provide grants and technical guidance to state wellhead protection programs. The Act does not impose regulations itself, but leaves it to the states to create and manage protection programs. Accordingly, regulations may differ dramatically from state to state, reflecting distinct hydrogeology and land uses. In every program, however, the starting point is the determination of wellhead protection areas. The protection area can range from a few hundred feet to several miles from a well. The characteristics of the aquifers surrounding the well and the amount of pumping are factors in delineating the protected area's boundaries. This article examines methods for determining the protection area

  6. 30 CFR 250.617 - Tubing and wellhead equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tubing and wellhead equipment. 250.617 Section... Tubing and wellhead equipment. The lessee shall comply with the following requirements during well-workover operations with the tree removed: (a) No tubing string shall be placed in service or continue to...

  7. 30 CFR 250.517 - Tubing and wellhead equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tubing and wellhead equipment. 250.517 Section... Tubing and wellhead equipment. (a) No tubing string shall be placed in service or continue to be used unless such tubing string has the necessary strength and pressure integrity and is otherwise suitable for...

  8. 30 CFR 250.1626 - Tubing and wellhead equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tubing and wellhead equipment. 250.1626 Section... GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Sulphur Operations § 250.1626 Tubing and wellhead equipment. (a) No tubing string shall be placed into service or continue to be used unless such...

  9. External gamma radiation survey for oil wellheads in Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nassar, Rafat M.; Mously, Khalid A.; Cowie, Michael I.

    2008-01-01

    Naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) is known to be associated with oil and gas extraction. As part of a comprehensive NORM management strategy, Saudi Aramco needed to determine the extent of NORM contamination associated with their oil and gas operations. As part of that strategy, this study focused on external gamma survey of oil producing wellheads at various locations. The study aimed to: 1-) Identify wellheads with elevated gamma radiation dose rate; 2-) Specify the exact locations of the high dose rates on the wellheads; 3-) Identify the radioisotopes responsible for the high dose rates; and 4-) Propose worker protection requirements during maintenance. The majority (∼92%) of the surveyed wellheads showed no enhanced gamma dose-rate above background level. From the remaining ∼8%, only a few wellheads showed dose rates between 1,000-3,700 n Sv/h. The study revealed that NORM contamination tends to accumulate at turns of the pipes, around pipe diameter changes, the joints, the back of valves, and at the base of the wellhead. Also, for a given location, NORM build up on the interior of pipework varies over time and continues to migrate down stream until it reaches the Gas and Oil Separation Plants (GOSP). There NORM is expected to accumulate and reside in the form of sludge. Gamma spectroscopy analysis revealed that 226 Ra and its progeny are responsible for the high radiation dose rates detected. It was concluded that NORM will not pose significant radiation hazards to workers as long as the tubing and piping are not opened. (author)

  10. Simulating the effect of hydrate dissociation on wellhead stability during oil and gas development in deepwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingchao; Cheng, Yuanfang; Zhang, Huaiwen; Yan, Chuanliang; Liu, Yuwen

    2018-02-01

    It is well known that methane hydrate has been identified as an alternative resource due to its massive reserves and clean property. However, hydrate dissociation during oil and gas development (OGD) process in deep water can affect the stability of subsea equipment and formation. Currently, there is a serious lack of studies over quantitative assessment on the effects of hydrate dissociation on wellhead stability. In order to solve this problem, ABAQUS finite element software was used to develop a model and to evaluate the behavior of wellhead caused by hydrate dissociation. The factors that affect the wellhead stability include dissociation range, depth of hydrate formation and mechanical properties of dissociated hydrate region. Based on these, series of simulations were carried out to determine the wellhead displacement. The results revealed that, continuous dissociation of hydrate in homogeneous and isotropic formations can causes the non-linear increment in vertical displacement of wellhead. The displacement of wellhead showed good agreement with the settlement of overlying formations under the same conditions. In addition, the shallower and thicker hydrate formation can aggravate the influence of hydrate dissociation on the wellhead stability. Further, it was observed that with the declining elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio, the wellhead displacement increases. Hence, these findings not only confirm the effect of hydrate dissociation on the wellhead stability, but also lend support to the actions, such as cooling the drilling fluid, which can reduce the hydrate dissociation range and further make deepwater operations safer and more efficient.

  11. Wellhead gas compression extends life of beam-pumped wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherry, M.J.; Fairchild, P.W.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that operators of marginal oil and gas wells often can avoid having to shut them in by compressing gas from the back side of the casing at the well head and delivering it into the flowline. This process can reduce the back pressure at the face of the producing formation, which allows additional oil and gas to be produced and extends the economical reserves. Small, low-horsepower stationary compressors or a walking beam compressor (WBC) may be used for this purpose. A portable compressor test unit recently has been employed to evaluate wells that are possible candidates for wellhead compression as another cost cutting measure

  12. GASCAP: Wellhead Gas Productive Capacity Model documentation, June 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The Wellhead Gas Productive Capacity Model (GASCAP) has been developed by EIA to provide a historical analysis of the monthly productive capacity of natural gas at the wellhead and a projection of monthly capacity for 2 years into the future. The impact of drilling, oil and gas price assumptions, and demand on gas productive capacity are examined. Both gas-well gas and oil-well gas are included. Oil-well gas productive capacity is estimated separately and then combined with the gas-well gas productive capacity. This documentation report provides a general overview of the GASCAP Model, describes the underlying data base, provides technical descriptions of the component models, diagrams the system and subsystem flow, describes the equations, and provides definitions and sources of all variables used in the system. This documentation report is provided to enable users of EIA projections generated by GASCAP to understand the underlying procedures used and to replicate the models and solutions. This report should be of particular interest to those in the Congress, Federal and State agencies, industry, and the academic community, who are concerned with the future availability of natural gas

  13. Wellhead deliverabilty of natural gas - assembling the evidence. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, W.R.

    1995-09-01

    This report presents information about the wellhead delivery of natural gas--the amount of gas the supply industry can produce and deliver to the pipeline. It is designed to help power industry planners evaluate essential aspects of gas supply as part of their overall assessment and utilization of gas-fired power generation. Low prices caused by excess deliverability have led to minimal exploration for new supplies, with the open-quotes bubbleclose quotes of excess deliverability ending. The report examines the facts pertinent to assessing the outlook for deliverability over the intermediate term. It develops deliverability concepts and relates deliverability to reserves and resources. It assesses the available information for measuring and monitoring availability and suggests improvements in available data. The regional outlook for deliverability growth in the Gulf of Mexico and other leading producing regions is also discussed. The report reviews the historical background of present deliverability trends and discusses the industry dynamics that affect development of future deliverability: lead times for increasing deliverability, the declining base of skilled exploration manpower, advancing gas supply technology, and prices required to encourage exploration and development

  14. 77 FR 71788 - Notice of Change to the Publication of Natural Gas Wellhead Prices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-04

    ... Act (Pub. L. 95-91, 42 U.S.C. 7101 et seq.) require the EIA to carry out a centralized, comprehensive... disseminates information on energy resource reserves, production, demand, technology, and related economic... gas wellhead price using a time-series econometric model, which incorporates data from historical...

  15. Marine magnetic studies over a lost wellhead in Palk Bay, Cauvery Basin, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramana, M.V.; Subrahmanyam, V.; Sarma, K.V.L.N.S.; Seshavataram, B.T.V.

    Close grid marine magnetic surveys in the vicinity of a drill well site PH 9-1 in Palk Bay revealed that the area is characterized by smooth magnetic field except for a local anomaly caused by a lost wellhead. The smooth magnetic field is attributed...

  16. A Lift-Off-Tolerant Magnetic Flux Leakage Testing Method for Drill Pipes at Wellhead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jianbo; Fang, Hui; Li, Long; Wang, Jie; Huang, Xiaoming; Kang, Yihua; Sun, Yanhua; Tang, Chaoqing

    2017-01-21

    To meet the great needs for MFL (magnetic flux leakage) inspection of drill pipes at wellheads, a lift-off-tolerant MFL testing method is proposed and investigated in this paper. Firstly, a Helmholtz coil magnetization method and the whole MFL testing scheme are proposed. Then, based on the magnetic field focusing effect of ferrite cores, a lift-off-tolerant MFL sensor is developed and tested. It shows high sensitivity at a lift-off distance of 5.0 mm. Further, the follow-up high repeatability MFL probing system is designed and manufactured, which was embedded with the developed sensors. It can track the swing movement of drill pipes and allow the pipe ends to pass smoothly. Finally, the developed system is employed in a drilling field for drill pipe inspection. Test results show that the proposed method can fulfill the requirements for drill pipe inspection at wellheads, which is of great importance in drill pipe safety.

  17. A Lift-Off-Tolerant Magnetic Flux Leakage Testing Method for Drill Pipes at Wellhead

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianbo Wu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To meet the great needs for MFL (magnetic flux leakage inspection of drill pipes at wellheads, a lift-off-tolerant MFL testing method is proposed and investigated in this paper. Firstly, a Helmholtz coil magnetization method and the whole MFL testing scheme are proposed. Then, based on the magnetic field focusing effect of ferrite cores, a lift-off-tolerant MFL sensor is developed and tested. It shows high sensitivity at a lift-off distance of 5.0 mm. Further, the follow-up high repeatability MFL probing system is designed and manufactured, which was embedded with the developed sensors. It can track the swing movement of drill pipes and allow the pipe ends to pass smoothly. Finally, the developed system is employed in a drilling field for drill pipe inspection. Test results show that the proposed method can fulfill the requirements for drill pipe inspection at wellheads, which is of great importance in drill pipe safety.

  18. Optimization of Wellhead Piping Design for Production Wells at Development of Steam-Water Geothermal Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.N. Shulyupin

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available At present, the exploitation of geothermal resources develops in a fair competition with other types of energy resources. This leads to actuality of questions which associated with the more efficient use of existing wells, because cost of their drilling is a significant share of geothermal projects. In domestic practice of development of geothermal resources the steam-water wells have greatest energy potential. One way to improve the performance of these wells is a providing of smooth change of direction of motion of steam-water mixture from the vertical, in the well, to the horizontal, in steam gathering system. Typical wellhead piping of domestic steam-water wells involves the removal of the mixture through a cross bar at a right angle. Cross bar can generate considerable pressure loss that increases the operating pressure at the mouth of the well and reduces flow rate. It seems reasonable to substitute the typical cross bar by smooth pipe bend. This reduces wellhead resistance coefficient by more than on 2. Increase of curvature radius of pipe bend reduces the pressure loss to a local resistance but increases the friction pressure loss. There is an optimal curvature radius of pipe bend for minimum pressure loss in view of a local resistance and friction in the pipe bend. Calculations have shown that the optimum value for the radius of curvature is found in the range from 1.4 to 4.5 tube internal diameters. However, for technological reasons it is recommended to choose the radius of curvature from 1.4 to 2.4 diameters. Mounting of smooth pipe bend on the wellhead can provide significant economic benefits. For Mutnovka field (Kamchatka, this effect is estimated at 17.5 million rubles in year.

  19. A Lift-Off-Tolerant Magnetic Flux Leakage Testing Method for Drill Pipes at Wellhead

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Jianbo; Fang, Hui; Li, Long; Wang, Jie; Huang, Xiaoming; Kang, Yihua; Sun, Yanhua; Tang, Chaoqing

    2017-01-01

    To meet the great needs for MFL (magnetic flux leakage) inspection of drill pipes at wellheads, a lift-off-tolerant MFL testing method is proposed and investigated in this paper. Firstly, a Helmholtz coil magnetization method and the whole MFL testing scheme are proposed. Then, based on the magnetic field focusing effect of ferrite cores, a lift-off-tolerant MFL sensor is developed and tested. It shows high sensitivity at a lift-off distance of 5.0 mm. Further, the follow-up high repeatabilit...

  20. Automatic crude oil handling through a pressurized system from the wellhead to the refinery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, W.B.; Truman, P.W.; Groeneman, A.R.

    1967-01-01

    Production from 51 wells completed in the 3 unitized formations of the Lost Soldier Field, Sweetwater Co., Wyoming, is brought to a central point through individual flow lines. Here the fluids are directed through separate automatic well testing and oil treating facilities, one for each formation. After separation of oil, gas and water, the oil goes to pressurized surge tanks and then to lease automatic custody transfer units. There is one surge tank and one LACT unit for each formation. The oil is automatically transferred to the Sinclair Pipe Line Co. for delivery to Sinclair's refinery at Sinclair, Wyoming, through a closed pipe line system. A central console provides: (1) supervisory control from the wellheads through the LACT units, (2) well test and production data logging, and (3) monitoring by activating alarms for abnormal conditions of flow, liquid levels, temperatures and pressures.

  1. Probabilistic risk analysis and fault trees: Initial discussion of application to identification of risk at a wellhead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodak, C.; Silliman, S.

    2012-02-01

    Wellhead protection is of critical importance for managing groundwater resources. While a number of previous authors have addressed questions related to uncertainties in advective capture zones, methods for addressing wellhead protection in the presence of uncertainty in the chemistry of groundwater contaminants, the relationship between land-use and contaminant sources, and the impact on health of the receiving population are limited. It is herein suggested that probabilistic risk analysis (PRA) combined with fault trees (FT) provides a structure whereby chemical transport can be combined with uncertainties in source, chemistry, and health impact to assess the probability of negative health outcomes in the population. As such, PRA-FT provides a new strategy for the identification of areas of probabilistically high human health risk. Application of this approach is demonstrated through a simplified case study involving flow to a well in an unconfined aquifer with heterogeneity in aquifer properties and contaminant sources.

  2. Human health tradeoffs in wellhead drinking water treatment: Comparing exposure reduction to embedded life cycle risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifford, Mac; Chester, Mikhail; Hristovski, Kiril; Westerhoff, Paul

    2018-01-01

    Treatment of drinking water decreases human health risks by reducing pollutants, but the required materials, chemicals, and energy emit pollutants and increase health risks. We explored human carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic disease tradeoffs of water treatment by comparing pollutant dose-response curves against life cycle burden using USEtox methodology. An illustrative wellhead sorbent groundwater treatment system removing hexavalent chromium or pentavalent arsenic serving 3200 people was studied. Reducing pollutant concentrations in drinking water from 20 μg L -1 to 10 μg L -1 avoided 37 potential cancer cases and 64 potential non-cancer disease cases. Human carcinogenicity embedded in treatment was 0.2-5.3 cases, and non-carcinogenic toxicity was 0.2-14.3 cases, depending on technology and degree of treatment. Embedded toxicity impacts from treating Cr(VI) using strong-base anion exchange were 90% of the toxicity impacts for treatment options requiring pH control. In scenarios where benefits exceeded burdens, tradeoffs still existed. Benefits are experienced by a local population but burdens are born externally where the materials and energy are produced, thus exporting the health risks. Even when burdens clearly exceeded benefits, cost considerations may still drive selecting a detrimental treatment level or technology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Nine steps to risk-informed wellhead protection and management: Methods and application to the Burgberg Catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, W.; Enzenhoefer, R.; Bunk, T.

    2013-12-01

    Wellhead protection zones are commonly delineated via advective travel time analysis without considering any aspects of model uncertainty. In the past decade, research efforts produced quantifiable risk-based safety margins for protection zones. They are based on well vulnerability criteria (e.g., travel times, exposure times, peak concentrations) cast into a probabilistic setting, i.e., they consider model and parameter uncertainty. Practitioners still refrain from applying these new techniques for mainly three reasons. (1) They fear the possibly cost-intensive additional areal demand of probabilistic safety margins, (2) probabilistic approaches are allegedly complex, not readily available, and consume huge computing resources, and (3) uncertainty bounds are fuzzy, whereas final decisions are binary. The primary goal of this study is to show that these reservations are unjustified. We present a straightforward and computationally affordable framework based on a novel combination of well-known tools (e.g., MODFLOW, PEST, Monte Carlo). This framework provides risk-informed decision support for robust and transparent wellhead delineation under uncertainty. Thus, probabilistic risk-informed wellhead protection is possible with methods readily available for practitioners. As vivid proof of concept, we illustrate our key points on a pumped karstic well catchment, located in Germany. In the case study, we show that reliability levels can be increased by re-allocating the existing delineated area at no increase in delineated area. This is achieved by simply swapping delineated low-risk areas against previously non-delineated high-risk areas. Also, we show that further improvements may often be available at only low additional delineation area. Depending on the context, increases or reductions of delineated area directly translate to costs and benefits, if the land is priced, or if land owners need to be compensated for land use restrictions.

  4. Transient flow conditions in probabilistic wellhead protection: importance and ways to manage spatial and temporal uncertainty in capture zone delineation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enzenhoefer, R.; Rodriguez-Pretelin, A.; Nowak, W.

    2012-12-01

    "From an engineering standpoint, the quantification of uncertainty is extremely important not only because it allows estimating risk but mostly because it allows taking optimal decisions in an uncertain framework" (Renard, 2007). The most common way to account for uncertainty in the field of subsurface hydrology and wellhead protection is to randomize spatial parameters, e.g. the log-hydraulic conductivity or porosity. This enables water managers to take robust decisions in delineating wellhead protection zones with rationally chosen safety margins in the spirit of probabilistic risk management. Probabilistic wellhead protection zones are commonly based on steady-state flow fields. However, several past studies showed that transient flow conditions may substantially influence the shape and extent of catchments. Therefore, we believe they should be accounted for in the probabilistic assessment and in the delineation process. The aim of our work is to show the significance of flow transients and to investigate the interplay between spatial uncertainty and flow transients in wellhead protection zone delineation. To this end, we advance our concept of probabilistic capture zone delineation (Enzenhoefer et al., 2012) that works with capture probabilities and other probabilistic criteria for delineation. The extended framework is able to evaluate the time fraction that any point on a map falls within a capture zone. In short, we separate capture probabilities into spatial/statistical and time-related frequencies. This will provide water managers additional information on how to manage a well catchment in the light of possible hazard conditions close to the capture boundary under uncertain and time-variable flow conditions. In order to save computational costs, we take advantage of super-positioned flow components with time-variable coefficients. We assume an instantaneous development of steady-state flow conditions after each temporal change in driving forces, following

  5. Updated API document 6A will close API-ISO 9000 gap. [Oil and gas wellhead standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, S.

    1993-10-01

    The 17th edition of the American Petroleum Institute's (API) document 6A, covering wellheads and their components, is due early next year. As the API vs. International Standards Organization (ISO) 9000 struggle continues, this edition of 6A eliminates some unnecessary specifications, clarifies others, and includes metric specifications accepted by the ISO. The 17th edition will clarify some of the interpretations from earlier editions and further advise users how to acquire the API monogram. The goal of this edition is to make 6A acceptable to ISO as an international document so API can maintain control over petroleum equipment specifications and provide input and guidance in future regulations.

  6. Model for economical analysis of oil and gas deepwater production concepts : Comparisons of life cycle cost of subsea production systems vs. floating structures with dry wellheads.

    OpenAIRE

    Romero Mata, Omar

    2010-01-01

    Master's thesis in Offshore technology The scope of the work was to create a model that will allow the comparison of Life Cycle Costs (LCC) for subsea production systems and floating structures with dry wellheads for the Mexican territorial waters of the Gulf of Mexico. To give validity to the model, an empirical comparison on the resulting recovery factor based on data of the US Gulf of Mexico was included. This comparison is intended to answer ¿Is there a significant diffe...

  7. Probabilistic Risk Analysis and Fault Trees as Tools in Improving the Delineation of Wellhead Protection Areas: An Initial Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodak, C. M.; Silliman, S. E.

    2010-12-01

    Delineation of a wellhead protection area (WHPA) is a critical component of managing / protecting the aquifer(s) supplying potable water to a public water-supply well. While a number of previous authors have addressed questions related to uncertainties in advective capture zones, methods for assessing WHPAs in the presence of uncertainty in the chemistry of groundwater contaminants, the relationship between land-use and contaminant sources, and the impact on health risk within the receiving population are more limited. Probabilistic risk analysis (PRA) combined with fault trees (FT) addresses this latter challenge by providing a structure whereby four key WHPA issues may be addressed: (i) uncertainty in land-use practices and chemical release, (ii) uncertainty in groundwater flow, (iii) variability in natural attenuation properties (and/or remediation) of the contaminants, and (iv) estimated health risk from contaminant arrival at a well. The potential utility of PRA-FT in this application is considered through a simplified case study involving management decisions related both to regional land use planning and local land-use zoning regulation. An application-specific fault tree is constructed to visualize and identify the events required for health risk failure at the well and a Monte Carlo approach is used to create multiple realizations of groundwater flow and chemical transport to a well in a model of a simple, unconfined aquifer. Model parameters allowed to vary during this simplified case study include hydraulic conductivity, probability of a chemical spill (related to land use variation in space), and natural attenuation through variation in rate of decay of the contaminant. Numerical results are interpreted in association with multiple land-use management scenarios as well as multiple cancer risk assumptions regarding the contaminant arriving at the well. This case study shows significant variability of health risk at the well, however general trends were

  8. Weighted Average Cost of Retail Gas (WACORG) highlights pricing effects in the US gas value chain: Do we need wellhead price-floor regulation to bail out the unconventional gas industry?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weijermars, Ruud

    2011-01-01

    The total annual revenue stream in the US natural gas value chain over the past decade is analyzed. Growth of total revenues has been driven by higher wellhead prices, which peaked in 2008. The emergence of the unconventional gas business was made possible in part by the pre-recessional rise in global energy prices. The general rise in natural gas prices between 1998 and 2008 did not lower overall US gas consumption, but shifts have occurred during the past decade in the consumption levels of individual consumer groups. Industry's gas consumption has decreased, while power stations increased their gas consumption. Commercial and residential consumers maintained flat gas consumption patterns. This study introduces the Weighted Average Cost of Retail Gas (WACORG) as a tool to calculate and monitor an average retail price based on the different natural gas prices charged to the traditional consumer groups. The WACORG also provides insight in wellhead revenues and may be used as an instrument for calibrating retail prices in support of wellhead price-floor regulation. Such price-floor regulation is advocated here as a possible mitigation measure against excessive volatility in US wellhead gas prices to improve the security of gas supply. - Highlights: → This study introduces an average retail price, WACORG. → WACORG can monitor price differentials for the traditional US gas consumer groups. → WACORG also provides insight in US wellhead revenues. → WACORG can calibrate retail prices in support of wellhead price-floor regulation. → Gas price-floor can improve security of gas supply by reducing price volatility.

  9. Delineation of a wellhead protection zone and determination of flowpaths from potential groundwater contaminant source areas at Camp Ripley, Little Falls, Minnesota.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinn, J. J.; Environmental Science Division

    2006-12-22

    Groundwater at Camp Ripley, Minnesota, is recharged both on post and off site and discharged to rivers, wetlands, and pumping wells. The subsurface geologic materials have a wide range of permeabilities and are arranged in a complex fashion as a result of the region's multiple glacial advances. Correlation of individual glacial geologic units is difficult, even between nearby boreholes, because of the heterogeneities in the subsurface. This report documents the creation of a numerical model of groundwater flow for Camp Ripley and hydrologically related areas to the west and southwest. The model relies on a hydrogeological conceptual model built on the findings of a University of Minnesota-Duluth drilling and sampling program conducted in 2001. Because of the site's stratigraphic complexity, a geostatistical approach was taken to handle the uncertainty of the subsurface correlation. The U.S. Geological Survey's MODFLOW code was used to create the steady-state model, which includes input data from a variety of sources and is calibrated to water levels in monitoring wells across much of the site. This model was used for several applications. Wellhead protection zones were delineated for on-site production wells H, L, and N. The zones were determined on the basis of a probabilistic assessment of the groundwater captured by these wells; the assessment, in turn, had been based on multiple realizations of the study area's stratigraphy and groundwater flowfield. An additional application of the model was for estimating flowpaths and times of travel for groundwater at Camp Ripley's range areas and waste management facilities.

  10. Reliability, resilience and vulnerability criteria for the evaluation of time-dependent health risks: A hypothetical case study of wellhead protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodak, C. M.; Silliman, S. E.; Bolster, D.

    2012-12-01

    consideration of potential health impact, allows for more informed, health-based decisions regarding zoning for wellhead protection.

  11. A GIS policy approach for assessing the effect of fertilizers on the quality of drinking and irrigation water and wellhead protection zones (Crete, Greece).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourgialas, Nektarios N; Karatzas, George P; Koubouris, Georgios C

    2017-03-15

    (wells) are located, this study highlights an analytic method for delineation wellhead protection zones. All these approaches were incorporated in a useful GIS decision support system that aids decision makers in the difficult task of protection groundwater resources. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Special technology with high safety-related standards for the repair of the wellhead damage of a gas filled cavern at storage site Stassfurt; Spezialtechnologie mit hohen Sicherheitsvorkehrungen zur Beseitigung des Bohrlochkopfschadens einer Gaskaverne des Kavernenspeichers Stassfurt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walden, S.; Klafki, M. [ESK-Erdgasspeicher Kalle GmbH, Freiberg (Germany)

    2008-11-15

    For the completion of the cavern Stassfurt S 106 which was leached by the so called ''solution mining under gas'' technology, the leaching strings 6 5/8''-4 1/2'' should be pulled out by using a snubbing unit. Due to an unexpected damage at the wellhead, the job could not be realized as projected. Therefore the snubbing work was stopped. For solving the technical damage different repair concepts were investigated, for example partial flooding of the cavern with brine or water, sealing of wellhead components by freezing or cutting of the lower leaching string section and setting plugs afterwards. All concepts had been evaluated concerning feasibility and risks. The most favourable technology was selected on the basis of a comparison of pros and cons and was planned for realization according to a detailed working programme. The specialized contractors as well as the fire brigade have guaranteed the required safety measures. The essential planning and working steps will be described as well as the acquired experiences will be explained in the following section. Finally, it can be stated that all jobs were realized according to the projected programme and all involved persons perfectly worked with the special technologies. (orig.)

  13. Wellhead to wire utilization of remote gas resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, R.A.; Hines, T.L.

    1998-01-01

    Utilization of remote gas resources in developing countries continues to offer challenges and opportunities to producers and contractors. The Aguaytia Gas and Power Project is an example where perseverance and creativity resulted in successful utilization of natural gas resources in the Ucayali Region of Central Peru, a country which previously had no natural gas infrastructure. The resource for the project was first discovered by Mobil in 1961, and remained undeveloped for over thirty years due to lack of infrastructure and markets. Maple Gas won a competitively bid contract to develop the Aguaytia gas reserves in March of 1993. The challenges facing Maple Gas were to develop downstream markets for the gas, execute contracts with Perupetro S.A. and other Peruvian government entities, raise financing for the project, and solicit and execute engineering procurement and construction (EPC) contracts for the execution of the project. The key to development of the downstream markets was the decision to generate electric power and transmit the power over the Andes to the main electrical grid along the coast of Peru. Supplemental revenue could be generated by gas sales to a small regional power plant and extraction of LPG and natural gasoline for consumption in the Peruvian market. Three separate lump sum contracts were awarded to Asea Brown Boveri (ABB) companies for the gas project, power project and transmission project. Each project presented its unique challenges, but the commonalities were the accelerated schedule, high rainfall in a prolonged wet season and severe logistics due to lack of infrastructure in the remote region. This presentation focuses on how the gas plant contractor, ABB Randall, working in harmony with the developer, Maple Gas, tackled the challenges to monetize a remote gas resource

  14. Estimation of production characteristic curves of geothermal wells and of the permeability of rocky formations through one single mass flow-pressure-enthalpy (W-P-h) measurement at the wellhead; Estimacion de curvas caracteristicas de produccion de pozos geotermicos y de permeabilidades de formaciones rocosas a partir de una sola medicion flujo masico-presion- entalpia (W-P-h) a boca de pozo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L Moya, Sara; Aragon, Alfonso [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1997-12-31

    The proposed methodology described ahead (Moya et al.,1996; Moya et al.,1997a, 1997b and 1997c) simplifies the construction of production characteristic curves of geothermal wells and of its associated thermal productivity, in requiring one single measurement of mass flow-pressure-enthalpy (W-P-h) at the wellhead. Therefore it is an ecological option, technically and economically more feasible. On the other hand, the methodology also allows to diagnose the rocky formation absolute permeability in the well feeding zone. This permeability is usually determined through well bottom pressure tests, than in some cases are difficult to interpret. The permeability inferred by means of the proposed technology represents a complementary tool for these field tests and for the laboratory measurements on drilling cores. [Espanol] La metodologia propuesta que se describe a continuacion [Moya et al., 1995d; Moya et al., 1996; Moya et al., 1997a, 1997b y 1997c] simplifica la construccion de curvas caracteristicas de produccion de pozos geotermicos y de su productividad termica asociada al requerir solo una medicion de flujo masico-presion-entalpia (W-P-h) a boca de pozo. Es por tanto una alternativa ecologica, tecnica y economicamente mas factible. Por otra parte, la metodologia tambien permite diagnosticar el valor de la permeabilidad absoluta de la formacion rocosa en la zona de alimentacion al pozo. Esta permeabilidad se determina usualmente a partir de pruebas de presion a fondo de pozo que en algunos casos son dificiles de interpretar. La permeabilidad inferida mediante la metodologia propuesta representa una herramienta complementaria a estas pruebas de campo y a las mediciones de laboratorio sobre nucleos de perforacion.

  15. Estimation of production characteristic curves of geothermal wells and of the permeability of rocky formations through one single mass flow-pressure-enthalpy (W-P-h) measurement at the wellhead; Estimacion de curvas caracteristicas de produccion de pozos geotermicos y de permeabilidades de formaciones rocosas a partir de una sola medicion flujo masico-presion- entalpia (W-P-h) a boca de pozo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L Moya, Sara; Aragon, Alfonso [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1998-12-31

    The proposed methodology described ahead (Moya et al.,1996; Moya et al.,1997a, 1997b and 1997c) simplifies the construction of production characteristic curves of geothermal wells and of its associated thermal productivity, in requiring one single measurement of mass flow-pressure-enthalpy (W-P-h) at the wellhead. Therefore it is an ecological option, technically and economically more feasible. On the other hand, the methodology also allows to diagnose the rocky formation absolute permeability in the well feeding zone. This permeability is usually determined through well bottom pressure tests, than in some cases are difficult to interpret. The permeability inferred by means of the proposed technology represents a complementary tool for these field tests and for the laboratory measurements on drilling cores. [Espanol] La metodologia propuesta que se describe a continuacion [Moya et al., 1995d; Moya et al., 1996; Moya et al., 1997a, 1997b y 1997c] simplifica la construccion de curvas caracteristicas de produccion de pozos geotermicos y de su productividad termica asociada al requerir solo una medicion de flujo masico-presion-entalpia (W-P-h) a boca de pozo. Es por tanto una alternativa ecologica, tecnica y economicamente mas factible. Por otra parte, la metodologia tambien permite diagnosticar el valor de la permeabilidad absoluta de la formacion rocosa en la zona de alimentacion al pozo. Esta permeabilidad se determina usualmente a partir de pruebas de presion a fondo de pozo que en algunos casos son dificiles de interpretar. La permeabilidad inferida mediante la metodologia propuesta representa una herramienta complementaria a estas pruebas de campo y a las mediciones de laboratorio sobre nucleos de perforacion.

  16. Marine magnetic studies over a lost wellhead in Palk Bay, Cauvery Basin, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramana, M.V.; Subrahmanyam, V.; Sarma, K.V.L.N.S.; Seshavataram, B.T.V.

    to the deep burial of Precambrian granitic basement devoid of any charnockite intrusions. The seismic reflection records of the study area show greater than 3200 m thick sediments over the basement...

  17. An automatic, stagnation point based algorithm for the delineation of Wellhead Protection Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosco, Tiziana; Sethi, Rajandrea; di Molfetta, Antonio

    2008-07-01

    Time-related capture areas are usually delineated using the backward particle tracking method, releasing circles of equally spaced particles around each well. In this way, an accurate delineation often requires both a very high number of particles and a manual capture zone encirclement. The aim of this work was to propose an Automatic Protection Area (APA) delineation algorithm, which can be coupled with any model of flow and particle tracking. The computational time is here reduced, thanks to the use of a limited number of nonequally spaced particles. The particle starting positions are determined coupling forward particle tracking from the stagnation point, and backward particle tracking from the pumping well. The pathlines are postprocessed for a completely automatic delineation of closed perimeters of time-related capture zones. The APA algorithm was tested for a two-dimensional geometry, in homogeneous and nonhomogeneous aquifers, steady state flow conditions, single and multiple wells. Results show that the APA algorithm is robust and able to automatically and accurately reconstruct protection areas with a very small number of particles, also in complex scenarios.

  18. A first: U.S. natural gas wellhead value tops oil's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    The value of natural gas production in the US in 1993 exceeded that of crude oil output for the first time in history. The reversal owes as much to trends in price as in production and, most recently, record frigid weather in much of the US. Another key factor is a newly revitalized, restructured gas industry operating in the most unfettered regulatory environment in recent memory. The industry's sterling performance in accommodating the surge in demand caused by the arctic cold that steamrolled across North America early in the 1993--94 winter strengthens the natural gas case for reliability. And that can only enhance the industry's prospects for adding more long term supply contracts. Looming on the immediate horizon is the prospect of an extended slump in oil prices, which could mean that natural gas dominance in US petroleum industry revenues will be short lived if low cost oil recaptures market share from gas. While that may temporarily dethrone natural gas from its new top slot, the reversal in 1993 represents what is likely to be a long term trend for the US petroleum industry

  19. Rio Blanco gas composition: preproduction testing of the RBE-01 wellhead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, C.F.; Fontanilla, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    The chemical composition and radionuclide concentration of Rio Blanco gas samples collected prior to the production testing of the RBE-01 well and analyzed at LLL are presented. The analytical procedures and their uncertainties are briefly summarized. Information that associates the analytical data with the field operations is included

  20. Variation in well-head gamma radiation levels at the Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Journal of Physics. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 18, No 1 (2006) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  1. Variation in well-head gamma radiation levels at the Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It was generally observed that the level of radiation around the well heads is less than 20x 10-12mSv/hr, which is in agreement with the International Atomic Energy Agency\\'s standard on ionizing radiation background level. Keywords: Radiation, crude oil, radionuclide, contaminant, exposure. Nigerian Journal of Physics ...

  2. 41 CFR 101-26.602-5 - Procurement of natural gas from the wellhead and other supply sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Procurement of natural... Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS SUPPLY AND PROCUREMENT 26-PROCUREMENT SOURCES AND PROGRAM 26.6-Procurement Sources Other Than GSA § 101...

  3. Capturing the biofuel wellhead and powerhouse: the chloroplast and mitochondrial genomes of the leguminous feedstock tree Pongamia pinnata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazakoff, Stephen H; Imelfort, Michael; Edwards, David; Koehorst, Jasper; Biswas, Bandana; Batley, Jacqueline; Scott, Paul T; Gresshoff, Peter M

    2012-01-01

    Pongamia pinnata (syn. Millettia pinnata) is a novel, fast-growing arboreal legume that bears prolific quantities of oil-rich seeds suitable for the production of biodiesel and aviation biofuel. Here, we have used Illumina® 'Second Generation DNA Sequencing (2GS)' and a new short-read de novo assembler, SaSSY, to assemble and annotate the Pongamia chloroplast (152,968 bp; cpDNA) and mitochondrial (425,718 bp; mtDNA) genomes. We also show that SaSSY can be used to accurately assemble 2GS data, by re-assembling the Lotus japonicus cpDNA and in the process assemble its mtDNA (380,861 bp). The Pongamia cpDNA contains 77 unique protein-coding genes and is almost 60% gene-dense. It contains a 50 kb inversion common to other legumes, as well as a novel 6.5 kb inversion that is responsible for the non-disruptive, re-orientation of five protein-coding genes. Additionally, two copies of an inverted repeat firmly place the species outside the subclade of the Fabaceae lacking the inverted repeat. The Pongamia and L. japonicus mtDNA contain just 33 and 31 unique protein-coding genes, respectively, and like other angiosperm mtDNA, have expanded intergenic and multiple repeat regions. Through comparative analysis with Vigna radiata we measured the average synonymous and non-synonymous divergence of all three legume mitochondrial (1.59% and 2.40%, respectively) and chloroplast (8.37% and 8.99%, respectively) protein-coding genes. Finally, we explored the relatedness of Pongamia within the Fabaceae and showed the utility of the organellar genome sequences by mapping transcriptomic data to identify up- and down-regulated stress-responsive gene candidates and confirm in silico predicted RNA editing sites.

  4. Capturing the biofuel wellhead and powerhouse: the chloroplast and mitochondrial genomes of the leguminous feedstock tree Pongamia pinnata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen H Kazakoff

    Full Text Available Pongamia pinnata (syn. Millettia pinnata is a novel, fast-growing arboreal legume that bears prolific quantities of oil-rich seeds suitable for the production of biodiesel and aviation biofuel. Here, we have used Illumina® 'Second Generation DNA Sequencing (2GS' and a new short-read de novo assembler, SaSSY, to assemble and annotate the Pongamia chloroplast (152,968 bp; cpDNA and mitochondrial (425,718 bp; mtDNA genomes. We also show that SaSSY can be used to accurately assemble 2GS data, by re-assembling the Lotus japonicus cpDNA and in the process assemble its mtDNA (380,861 bp. The Pongamia cpDNA contains 77 unique protein-coding genes and is almost 60% gene-dense. It contains a 50 kb inversion common to other legumes, as well as a novel 6.5 kb inversion that is responsible for the non-disruptive, re-orientation of five protein-coding genes. Additionally, two copies of an inverted repeat firmly place the species outside the subclade of the Fabaceae lacking the inverted repeat. The Pongamia and L. japonicus mtDNA contain just 33 and 31 unique protein-coding genes, respectively, and like other angiosperm mtDNA, have expanded intergenic and multiple repeat regions. Through comparative analysis with Vigna radiata we measured the average synonymous and non-synonymous divergence of all three legume mitochondrial (1.59% and 2.40%, respectively and chloroplast (8.37% and 8.99%, respectively protein-coding genes. Finally, we explored the relatedness of Pongamia within the Fabaceae and showed the utility of the organellar genome sequences by mapping transcriptomic data to identify up- and down-regulated stress-responsive gene candidates and confirm in silico predicted RNA editing sites.

  5. Capturing the Biofuel Wellhead and Powerhouse: The Chloroplast and Mitochondrial Genomes of the Leguminous Feedstock Tree Pongamia pinnata

    OpenAIRE

    Kazakoff, Stephen H.; Imelfort, Michael; Edwards, David; Koehorst, Jasper; Biswas, Bandana; Batley, Jacqueline; Scott, Paul T.; Gresshoff, Peter M.

    2012-01-01

    Pongamia pinnata (syn. Millettia pinnata) is a novel, fast-growing arboreal legume that bears prolific quantities of oil-rich seeds suitable for the production of biodiesel and aviation biofuel. Here, we have used Illumina® 'Second Generation DNA Sequencing (2GS)' and a new short-read de novo assembler, SaSSY, to assemble and annotate the Pongamia chloroplast (152,968 bp; cpDNA) and mitochondrial (425,718 bp; mtDNA) genomes. We also show that SaSSY can be used to accurately assemble 2GS data,...

  6. Comparison of stochastic and regression based methods for quantification of predictive uncertainty of model-simulated wellhead protection zones in heterogeneous aquifers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Steen; Moore, C.; Doherty, J.

    2006-01-01

    accurate and required a few hundred model calls to be computed. (b) The linearized regression-based interval (Cooley, 2004) required just over a hundred model calls and also appeared to be nearly correct. (c) The calibration-constrained Monte-Carlo interval (Doherty, 2003) was found to be narrower than......For a synthetic case we computed three types of individual prediction intervals for the location of the aquifer entry point of a particle that moves through a heterogeneous aquifer and ends up in a pumping well. (a) The nonlinear regression-based interval (Cooley, 2004) was found to be nearly...... the regression-based intervals but required about half a million model calls. It is unclear whether or not this type of prediction interval is accurate....

  7. Deepwater Horizon MC252 incident wellhead location and bathymetry data from the Environmental Resource Management Application (ERMA) collected between 2010-06-01 to 2010-07-31 in the Northern Gulf of Mexico (NCEI Accession 0163804)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This Archival Information Package (AIP) contains three Environmental Resource Management Application (ERMA) GIS layers that depict the Mississippi Canyon 252...

  8. 30 CFR 250.516 - Blowout preventer system tests, inspections, and maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... seal in the wellhead or BOP stack assembly; (e) Postponing BOP tests. You may postpone a BOP test if... sea conditions permit. You may use television cameras to inspect this equipment. The District Manager...

  9. Comparison of several EPA-recommended US and German well ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2005-07-15

    Jul 15, 2005 ... well-head protection area delineation methods in agricultural settings ... Due to the higher threat of contamination of non-public wells in agricultural settings .... a minor part of the heifer containment area. Using the chosen.

  10. 77 FR 49489 - Oil and Natural Gas Sector: New Source Performance Standards and National Emission Standards for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-16

    ..., centrifugal compressors, reciprocating compressors, pneumatic controllers and storage vessels. This action... organic compound (VOC) emissions from gas wells, centrifugal compressors, reciprocating compressors... emissions from wet seal centrifugal compressors located between the wellhead and the point at which the gas...

  11. Conclusions and Recommendations Regarding the Deep Sea Hybrid Power Systems Initial Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    proton-exchange membrane fuel cells ( PEMFC ) powered with hydrogen and oxygen, similar to that used on proven subsurface vessels; (2) fuel-cells...AND STORAGE OPTIONS CONSIDERED FOR INITIAL STUDY NO. NOMENCLATURE DESCRIPTION 1 PWR Nuclear Reactor + Battery 2 FC1 PEMFC + Line for surface O2...Wellhead Gas + Reformer + Battery 3 FC2 PEMFC + Stored O2 + Wellhead Gas + Reformer + Battery 4 SV1 PEMFC + Submersible Vehicle for O2 Transport

  12. AGA answers complaints on burner tip prices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that the American Gas Association has rebutted complaints that natural gas prices have dropped at the wellhead but not at the burner tip. AGA Pres. Mike Baly the an association study of the issue found that all classes of customers paid less for gas in 1991 than they did in 1984, when gas prices were at their peak. He the, the study also shows that 100% of the wellhead price decline has been passed through to natural gas consumers in the form of lower retail prices. Baly the the average cost of gas delivered to all customers classes fell by $1.12/Mcf from 1984 to 1991, which exceeds the $1.10/Mcf decline in average wellhead prices during the same period

  13. Impulse pumping modelling and simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierre, B; Gudmundsson, J S

    2010-01-01

    Impulse pumping is a new pumping method based on propagation of pressure waves. Of particular interest is the application of impulse pumping to artificial lift situations, where fluid is transported from wellbore to wellhead using pressure waves generated at wellhead. The motor driven element of an impulse pumping apparatus is therefore located at wellhead and can be separated from the flowline. Thus operation and maintenance of an impulse pump are facilitated. The paper describes the different elements of an impulse pumping apparatus, reviews the physical principles and details the modelling of the novel pumping method. Results from numerical simulations of propagation of pressure waves in water-filled pipelines are then presented for illustrating impulse pumping physical principles, and validating the described modelling with experimental data.

  14. Gas revenue increasingly significant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megill, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    This paper briefly describes the wellhead prices of natural gas compared to crude oil over the past 70 years. Although natural gas prices have never reached price parity with crude oil, the relative value of a gas BTU has been increasing. It is one of the reasons that the total amount of money coming from natural gas wells is becoming more significant. From 1920 to 1955 the revenue at the wellhead for natural gas was only about 10% of the money received by producers. Most of the money needed for exploration, development, and production came from crude oil. At present, however, over 40% of the money from the upstream portion of the petroleum industry is from natural gas. As a result, in a few short years natural gas may become 50% of the money revenues generated from wellhead production facilities

  15. BX in situ oil shale project. Annual technical progress report, March 1, 1979-February 29, 1980 and quarterly technical progress report, December 1, 1979-February 29, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dougan, P.M.

    1980-03-20

    During the year, design, construction and installation of all project equipment was completed, and continuous steam injection began on September 18, 1979 and continued until February 29, 1980. In the five-month period of steam injection, 235,060 barrels of water as steam at an average wellhead pressure of 1199 psig and an average wellhead temperature of 456/sup 0/F were injected into the eight project injection wells. Operation of the project at design temperature and pressure (1000/sup 0/F and 1500 psig) was not possible due to continuing problems with surface equipment. Environmental monitoring at the project site continued during startup and operation.

  16. Variation of heavy metal levels in the tissues of Periophthalmus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Variation of heavy metal levels in the tissues of Periophthalmus papillio from the mangrove swamps of the Bukuma oilfield, Rivers State. ... Generally elevated metal levels in both tissues were recorded at the stations with wellheads, implicating oil-related activities as the main source of contamination. However, the levels in ...

  17. Physical and ionic characteristics in water soluble fraction (WSF) of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The values of ionic and physical characteristics at 25, 50 and 100% water soluble fraction (WSF) of Olomoro well-head crude oil before and after exposure to Azolla africana were investigated. The WSF values before and after exposure to the plants showed that more ions were available after the introduction of the test plant.

  18. Towards a universal scaling for broadband turbulent noise in internal flow devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, A.T. de; Golliard, J.

    2013-01-01

    An investigation is performed on the scalability of broadband noise sources from separated flows in internal pipe systems. Broadband sources from for example wellhead chokes, bends and valves can potentially excite subsea manifolds through fluid acoustic coupling and fluid structural coupling. The

  19. Mouse-resistant insulated covers keep pipes from freezing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2010-01-15

    Fabric wellhead covers and insulated blankets are commonly used at well sites in the Wyoming coalbed methane field to keep surface pipes from freezing. These materials are often chewed up by mice who build nests close to the warm pipes. The mice attract rattlesnakes, a potentially serious problem for the workmen who check the wells daily. Kennon Products of Sheridan, Wyoming solved this problem by making a flexible covering material that has a coating of hardened guard plates that prevents mice from chewing through it. More than a hundred of Kennon's mouse-resistant wellhead covers have been used successfully in the gas fields for over a year. They can be installed in less than 30 minutes and cost only a fraction of what a fiberglass hut costs to purchase and install. Huts are being discouraged for use on federal lands because they alter the nesting patterns of eagles, who perch upon them to hunt rodents. Huts also trap methane gas, which is a potential safety hazard. Kennon's mouse-resistant wellhead covers are lower than the fiberglass huts and blend into the landscape. The company is working on camouflage colours to make wellheads less noticeable. In the future, the company plans to insulate water pipes. 1 fig.

  20. 26 CFR 1.907(c)-3 - FOGEI and FORI taxes (for taxable years beginning after December 31, 1982).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... such a percentage of value solely for purposes of making the tax allocation in paragraph (a)(4) of this... creditable taxes under section 901, that the fair market value of the oil at the port is $10 per barrel, and... added to the oil beyond the well-head which is part of Y's tax base ($10-$9). (v) The royalty deductions...

  1. METHANE EMISSIONS FROM THE NATURAL GAS INDUSTRY VOLUME 15: GAS-ASSISTED GLYCOL PUMPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The 15-volume report summarizes the results of a comprehensive program to quantify methane (CH4) emissions from the U.S. natural gas industry for the base year. The objective was to determine CH4 emissions from the wellhead and ending downstream at the customer's meter. The accur...

  2. METHANE EMISSIONS FROM THE NATURAL GAS INDUSTRY VOLUME 13: CHEMICAL INJECTION PUMPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The 15-volume report summarizes the results of a comprehensive program to quantify methane (CH4) emissions from the U.S. natural gas industry for the base year. The objective was to determine CH4 emissions from the wellhead and ending downstream at the customer's meter. The accur...

  3. Indicators used to monitor subsurface oil during the Deepwater Horizon Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Gulf of Mexico Deepwater Horizon oil spill was the largest accidental marine spill in the history of the petroleum industry. The spill was also unprecedented due to the extreme depth of the wellhead leak within the ocean, posing unique challenges to the monitoring efforts, w...

  4. APPARENT 85KRYPTON AGES OF GROUNDWATER WITHIN THE ROYAL WATERSHED, MAINE, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    85Kr activities were determined in 264 domestic and municipal wells from 2002-2004 in the Royal watershed (361 km2), Maine. Gas extraction for 85Kr from wells was effected directly via a well-head methodology permitting efficient widespread analys...

  5. Chemical dispersants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rahsepar, Shokouhalsadat; Smit, Martijn P.J.; Murk, Albertinka J.; Rijnaarts, Huub H.M.; Langenhoff, Alette A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Chemical dispersants were used in response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, both at the sea surface and the wellhead. Their effect on oil biodegradation is unclear, as studies showed both inhibition and enhancement. This study addresses the effect of Corexit on oil

  6. --No Title--

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locations Recycling Sludge/Biosolids Solid Waste Watershed Protection Nonpoint Source Pollution Total Watershed Protection Wellhead Protection Funding Water and Waste Funding Drinking Water Funding Sanitary and Permit Oil and Gas Waste Management Water Rights All Permits/Forms (Alphabetical) All Permits/Forms (by

  7. swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locations Recycling Sludge/Biosolids Solid Waste Watershed Protection Nonpoint Source Pollution Total Watershed Protection Wellhead Protection Funding Water and Waste Funding Drinking Water Funding Sanitary and Permit Oil and Gas Waste Management Water Rights All Permits/Forms (Alphabetical) All Permits/Forms (by

  8. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 201 - 229 of 229 ... Vol 16, No 2 (2004), The deposition of magnesium fluoride (MGF2) thin films by chemical bath deposition (CBD) technique: their characterization and ... Vol 18, No 1 (2006), Variation in well-head gamma radiation levels at the Nigerian Petroleum Development Company oil field, Ologbo, Edo State, ...

  9. METHANE EMISSIONS FROM THE NATURAL GAS INDUSTRY VOLUME 1: EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

    Science.gov (United States)

    The 15-volume report summarizes the results of a comprehensive program to quantify methane (CH4) emissions from the U.S. natural gas industry for the base year. The objective was to determine CH4 emissions from the wellhead and ending downstream at the customer's meter. The accur...

  10. Steam injection for heavy oil recovery: Modeling of wellbore heat efficiency and analysis of steam injection performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, Hao; Cheng, Linsong; Huang, Shijun; Li, Bokai; Shen, Fei; Fang, Wenchao; Hu, Changhao

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A comprehensive mathematical model was established to estimate wellbore heat efficiency of steam injection wells. • A simplified approach of predicting steam pressure in wellbores was proposed. • High wellhead injection rate and wellhead steam quality can improve wellbore heat efficiency. • High wellbore heat efficiency does not necessarily mean good performance of heavy oil recovery. • Using excellent insulation materials is a good way to save water and fuels. - Abstract: The aims of this work are to present a comprehensive mathematical model for estimating wellbore heat efficiency and to analyze performance of steam injection for heavy oil recovery. In this paper, we firstly introduce steam injection process briefly. Secondly, a simplified approach of predicting steam pressure in wellbores is presented and a complete expression for steam quality is derived. More importantly, both direct and indirect methods are adopted to determine the wellbore heat efficiency. Then, the mathematical model is solved using an iterative technique. After the model is validated with measured field data, we study the effects of wellhead injection rate and wellhead steam quality on steam injection performance reflected in wellbores. Next, taking cyclic steam stimulation as an example, we analyze steam injection performance reflected in reservoirs with numerical reservoir simulation method. Finally, the significant role of improving wellbore heat efficiency in saving water and fuels is discussed in detail. The results indicate that we can improve the wellbore heat efficiency by enhancing wellhead injection rate or steam quality. However, high wellbore heat efficiency does not necessarily mean satisfactory steam injection performance reflected in reservoirs or good performance of heavy oil recovery. Moreover, the paper shows that using excellent insulation materials is a good way to save water and fuels due to enhancement of wellbore heat efficiency

  11. Temperature and redox effect on mineral colonization in Juan de Fuca Ridge flank subsurface crustal fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Paul eBaquiran

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available To examine microbe-mineral interactions in subsurface oceanic crust, we evaluated microbial colonization on crustal minerals that were incubated in borehole fluids for one year at the seafloor wellhead of a crustal borehole observatory (IODP Hole U1301A, Juan de Fuca Ridge flank as compared to an experiment that was not exposed to subsurface crustal fluids (at nearby IODP Hole U1301B. In comparison to previous studies at these same sites, this approach allowed assessment of the effects of temperature, fluid chemistry, and/or mineralogy on colonization patterns of different mineral substrates, and an opportunity to verify the approach of deploying colonization experiments at an observatory wellhead at the seafloor instead of within the borehole. The Hole U1301B deployment did not have biofilm growth, based on microscopy and DNA extraction, thereby confirming the integrity of the colonization design against bottom seawater intrusion. In contrast, the Hole U1301A deployment supported biofilms dominated by Epsilonproteobacteria (43.5% of 370 16S rRNA gene clone sequences and Gammaproteobacteria (29.3%. Sequence analysis revealed overlap in microbial communities between different minerals incubated at the Hole U1301A wellhead, indicating that mineralogy did not separate biofilm structure within the one-year colonization experiment. Differences in the Hole U1301A wellhead biofilm community composition relative to previous studies from within the borehole using similar mineral substrates suggest that temperature and the diffusion of dissolved oxygen through plastic components influenced the mineral colonization experiments positioned at the wellhead. This highlights the capacity of low abundance crustal fluid taxa to rapidly establish communities on diverse mineral substrates under changing environmental conditions such as from temperature and oxygen.

  12. Impact of exploratory offshore drilling on benthic communities in the Minerva gas field, Port Campbell, Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Currie, D.R.; Isaacs, L.R. [Central Queensland Univ., Gladstone (Australia). Centre for Environmental Management

    2005-04-01

    Changes to benthic infauna caused by exploratory gas drilling operations in the Minerva field were examined experimentally using a BACI (before, after, control, impact) design. Analysis of 72 x 0.1 m{sup 2} Smith-McIntyre grab samples obtained from one pre-drilling and three post-drilling periods yielded a diverse fauna consisting of 196 invertebrate species and 5035 individuals. Changes to benthic community structure were assessed using ANOVA and nonmetric multidimensional scaling (MDS). The abundances of two common species (Apseudes sp. 1 and Prionospio coorilla) decreased significantly at the well-head site immediately after drilling. The size of these reductions in abundance ranged between 71% and 88%, and persisted for less than 4 months after drilling. A third common species (Katlysia sp. 1) increased in abundance 200 m east of the well-head following drilling. Most species occurred at densities too low to be analysed individually and so were pooled at higher taxonomic levels. Changes in the abundance of species aggregated by phylum varied, but significant declines in the most abundant phyla (Crustaceans and Polychaetes) of 45-73% were observed at all sites within a 100 m radius of the well-head following drilling. In most cases these changes became undetectable four months after drilling following species recruitments. MDS ordinations confirm that drilling related changes to benthic community structure are most pronounced at stations located closest to the well-head. Additionally, the ordinations indicate that modified communities persist at the well-head for more than 11 months following exploratory drilling. (author)

  13. Factors affecting seasonal gas prices: Analysis of trends and R and D implications. Final report, November 1990-February 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denhardt, R.C.

    1992-02-01

    Three economic factors were identified which influence the seasonality of gas prices: fuel switching, storage, and utilization of wellhead deliverability. Also, contract structures will have an influence on the seasonality of natural gas prices. Increases in the utilization of wellhead deliverability tends to increase the seasonality of gas prices. Price-induced fuel switching capability is too small to significantly influence the seasonality of gas prices. If there is adequate deliverability, the cost of interruptible storage, including carry cost, will place a ceiling on the seasonability of gas prices. This cost is about $.70 per MMBtu. If deliverability tightens, then the cost of firm storage or producer shut-ins will place a ceiling on gas prices. The ceiling would range from $1.00 to $1.20 per MMBtu. There is concern about whether the current market structure will provide for a smooth return to full cycle pricing. The current premiums for new contracts are inadequate to achieve this objective

  14. Natural gas 1995: Issues and trends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    Natural Gas 1995: Issues and Trends addresses current issues affecting the natural gas industry and markets. Highlights of recent trends include: Natural gas wellhead prices generally declined throughout 1994 and for 1995 averages 22% below the year-earlier level; Seasonal patterns of natural gas production and wellhead prices have been significantly reduced during the past three year; Natural gas production rose 15% from 1985 through 1994, reaching 18.8 trillion cubic feet; Increasing amounts of natural gas have been imported; Since 1985, lower costs of producing and transporting natural gas have benefitted consumers; Consumers may see additional benefits as States examine regulatory changes aimed at increasing efficiency; and, The electric industry is being restructured in a fashion similar to the recent restructuring of the natural gas industry.

  15. Basewide Groundwater Operable Unit. Groundwater Operable Unit Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Report. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-06-01

    units would be reused in the remedy. Contingency measures to be included in the remedy are potential metals removal prior to water end use, potential...onbase reuse of a portion of the water, and wellhead treatment on offbase supply wells. The contingency measures will only be implemented if necessary...94 LEGEND Ouatmar aluvi dposts agua Frmaion(cosoldatd aluval epoits W iead rdetilnsMhte omtin(neitccnlmeae ansoe9ndkeca F 70 Quvatei-lernayalvu e pk

  16. Conference on natural gas use state regulation and market dynamics in the Post 636/Energy Policy Act Era: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Reports in this Record of Proceedings explore a wide variety of issues related to the regulation of natural gas and its future role as one of the critical fuels that powers the economy of the United States. The focus is mainly on problems, obstacles, barriers, and the incredibly complex system created to bring a fuel from wellhead to burner tip. Individual papers have been cataloged separately

  17. Conference on natural gas use state regulation and market dynamics in the Post 636/Energy Policy Act Era: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-01

    Reports in this Record of Proceedings explore a wide variety of issues related to the regulation of natural gas and its future role as one of the critical fuels that powers the economy of the United States. The focus is mainly on problems, obstacles, barriers, and the incredibly complex system created to bring a fuel from wellhead to burner tip. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  18. A study of flow behaviour of dense phase at low concentrations in pipes

    OpenAIRE

    Koguna, Aminu Ja'Afar Abubakar

    2016-01-01

    Offshore production fluids from the reservoir are often transported in pipelines from the wellheads to the platform and from the platform to process facilities. At low flow velocity water, sand or liquids like condensate could settle at the bottom of pipelines that may lead to grave implications for flow assurance. During shutdown the settled heavy liquid (e.g. water), could result in corrosion in pipelines, while following restart stages the settled water could form water plugs that could da...

  19. Testing of the Pleasant Bayou Well through October 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randolph, P.L.; Hayden, C.G.; Mosca, V.L.; Anhaiser, J.L.

    1992-08-01

    Pleasant Bayou location was inactive from 1983 until the cleanout of the production and disposal wells in 1986. The surface facilities were rehabilitated and after shakedown of the system, additional repair of wellhead valves, and injection of an inhibitor pill, continuous long-term production was started in 1988. Over two years of production subsequent to that are reviewed here, including: production data, brine sampling and analysis, hydrocarbon sampling and analysis, solids sampling and analysis, scale control and corrosion monitoring and control.

  20. METHOD OF CALCULATING THE OPTIMAL HEAT EMISSION GEOTHERMAL WELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Akaev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a simplified method of calculating the optimal regimes of the fountain and the pumping exploitation of geothermal wells, reducing scaling and corrosion during operation. Comparative characteristics to quantify the heat of formation for these methods of operation under the same pressure at the wellhead. The problem is solved graphic-analytical method based on a balance of pressure in the well with the heat pump. 

  1. Data Base Management Plan for the remedial investigation of Waste Area Grouping 10, Operable Unit 3, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-10-01

    This Data Base Management Plan describes the gathering, verifying, analyzing, reporting, and archiving of data generated during the remedial investigation of Waste Area Grouping 10, Operable Unit 3. This investigation will produce data documenting wellhead surveys, well headspace gas pressure measurements, geophysical surveys, water level measurements, and borehole geophysical logs. Close Support Laboratory analyses will be performed on well headspace gas and well water samples

  2. Vertical integration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antill, N.

    1999-01-01

    This paper focuses on the trend in international energy companies towards vertical integration in the gas chain from wellhead to power generation, horizontal integration in refining and marketing businesses, and the search for larger projects with lower upstream costs. The shape of the petroleum industry in the next millennium, the creation of super-major oil companies, and the relationship between size and risk are discussed. The dynamics of vertical integration, present events and future developments are considered. (UK)

  3. Industry's turnaround looks real

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1997-01-01

    The paper discusses the industry outlook for North American gas and oil industries. In a robust Canada, land sales are setting records, drilling is up, and output is rising beyond last year's 21% growth. A perception among US operators that wellhead prices will remain stable is translating to increased spending. The USA, Canada, Mexico, Cuba are evaluated separately, with brief evaluations of Greenland, Guatemala, Belize, and Costa Rico. Data are presented on drilling activities

  4. Shale gas technology innovation rate impact on economic Base Case – Scenario model benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weijermars, Ruud

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Cash flow models control which technology is affordable in emerging shale gas plays. • Impact of technology innovation on IRR can be as important as wellhead price hikes. • Cash flow models are useful for technology decisions that make shale gas plays economic. • The economic gap can be closed by appropriate technology innovation. - Abstract: Low gas wellhead prices in North America have put its shale gas industry under high competitive pressure. Rapid technology innovation can help companies to improve the economic performance of shale gas fields. Cash flow models are paramount for setting effective production and technology innovation targets to achieve positive returns on investment in all global shale gas plays. Future cash flow of a well (or cluster of wells) may either improve further or deteriorate, depending on: (1) the regional volatility in gas prices at the wellhead – which must pay for the gas resource extraction, and (2) the cost and effectiveness of the well technology used. Gas price is an externality and cannot be controlled by individual companies, but well technology cost can be reduced while improving production output. We assume two plausible scenarios for well technology innovation and model the return on investment while checking against sensitivity to gas price volatility. It appears well technology innovation – if paced fast enough – can fully redeem the negative impact of gas price decline on shale well profits, and the required rates are quantified in our sensitivity analysis

  5. Water Sources and Their Protection from the Impact of Microbial Contamination in Rural Areas of Beijing, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hairong Li

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial contamination of drinking water is a major public health problem in rural China. To explore bacterial contamination in rural areas of Beijing and identify possible causes of bacteria in drinking water samples, water samples were collected from wells in ten rural districts of Beijing, China. Total bacterial count, total coliforms and Escherichia coli in drinking water were then determined and water source and wellhead protection were investigated. The bacterial contamination in drinking water was serious in areas north of Beijing, with the total bacterial count, total coliforms and Escherichia coli in some water samples reaching 88,000 CFU/mL, 1,600 MPN/100 mL and 1,600 MPN/100 mL, respectively. Water source types, well depth, whether the well was adequately sealed and housed, and whether wellhead is above or below ground were the main factors influencing bacterial contamination levels in drinking water. The bacterial contamination was serious in the water of shallow wells and wells that were not closed, had no well housing or had a wellhead below ground level. The contamination sources around wells, including village dry toilets and livestock farms, were well correlated with bacterial contamination. Total bacterial counts were affected by proximity to sewage ditches and polluting industries, however, proximity to landfills did not influence the microbial indicators.

  6. Four Years of Chemical Measurements from the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill Define the Deep Sea Sediment footprint and Subsequent Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, P.

    2016-02-01

    Chemical data acquired during and after the DWHOS showed that several mechanisms were responsible for transport of oil from the water column to the sediments in the deep sea off the continental shelf. Three primary pathways were identified:Sorption onto and sinking of drilling mud particles during "Top Kill" response activity, highly scattered deposition of residuesfrom in situ burns, and deposition of oil combined with microbial organic matter from diffuse oil plumes ("marine snow"). Data collected during 2010, 2011 and 2014 were used to define the oil footprint and estimate time to recovery. More than 1200 stations were sampled. Of these, 27 stations were visited all three years, providing a time series from which recovery rates were calculated using the loss of total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (TPAH) over time fit to first order kinetics. Results showed that the footprint of the oil was limited to the area around the wellhead and in patches to the southwest. Mostsamples had returned to background levels by 2015, with some exceptions close to the wellhead. Deposition to the northeast (DeSoto Canyon) was minor as evidenced by the absence of oil in sediments in that area. Samples with the longest recovery times were within 2 nautical miles of the wellhead, and often contained drilling mud, as shown by olefin signatures on the GC/FID chromatogram. Detailed chemistry data evaluation and chemical fingerprinting provided evidence that oil was being degraded in situ.

  7. Deep Panuke offshore gas development comprehensive study report : Executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-10-01

    A project was proposed by EnCana Corporation (EnCana) for the development of the Deep Panuke Offshore Gas Development Project. Located offshore the Scotian Shelf, approximately 175 kilometres southeast of Goldboro, Nova Scotia and 250 kilometres southeast of Halifax, the development of this natural gas reservoir would allow EnCana to derive economic benefit from licences issued under the Canada-Nova Scotia Offshore Petroleum Resources Accord Implementation Act and the Canada-Nova Scotia Offshore Petroleum Resources Accord Implementation (Nova Scotia) Act. The Canadian Environmental Assessment Act required that a comprehensive study report be prepared, and the results were presented in this document. Consisting of three bottom-founded platforms in a water depth of approximately 40 metres, the wellhead platform would be used for dry wellheads, wellhead control system, and production manifolds. All power generation and processing equipment would be located on the production platform, and the accommodations platform would consist of the utilities, helicopter landing pad, refueling station and crew accommodations. It was determined that the Deep Panuke project was unlikely to result in adverse environmental effects. The offshore oil and gas industry in Atlantic Canada would benefit from this development as a result of the establishment of a viable facility and operation

  8. Concentration of saline produced water from coalbed methane gas wells in multiple-effect evaporator using waste heat from the gas compressor and compressor drive engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadler, L.Y.; George, O.

    1995-01-01

    The use of heat of compression from the gas compressor and waste heat from the diesel compressor drive engine in a triple-effect feed forward evaporator was studied as a means of concentrating saline produced water to facilitate its disposal. The saline water, trapped in deeply buried coal seams, must be continuously pumped from coalbed natural gas wells so that the gas can desorb from the coal and make its way to the wellbore. Unlike conventional natural gas which is associated with petroleum and usually reaches the wellhead at high pressure, coalbed natural gas reaches the wellhead at low pressure, usually around 101 kPa (1 atm), and must be compressed near the well site for injection into gas transmission pipelines. The water concentration process was simulated for a typical 3.93 m 3 /s (500 MCF/h), at standard conditions (101 kPa, 289K), at the gas production field in the Warrior Coal Basin of Alabama, but has application to the coalbed gas fields being brought into production throughout the world. It was demonstrated that this process can be considered for concentrating saline water produced with natural gas in cases where the gas must be compressed near the wellhead for transportation to market. 9 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  9. Fiscal 1998 geothermal development promotion research. Survey in Akinomiya area (N9-AY-3 short-term blowout test report); 1998 nendo chinetsu kaihatsu sokushin chosa. Akinomiya chiiki chosa (N9-AY-3 tanki funshutsu shiken hokokusho)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    As a part of the fiscal 1998 geothermal development promotion survey in Akinomiya area, this test was carried out to obtain the fumarolic gas characteristics and fluid properties of N9-AY-3 test well by air reaction method. Blowout hot water was reinjected to N8-AY-1 test well drilled in fiscal 1996 to confirm its reinjection capacity. The fumarolic gas test result showed a steam volume of 35.0t/h and hot water volume of 160.8t/h (wellhead pressure equivalent) at a wellhead secondary valve opening of 33.7% and wellhead pressure of 15.3kg/cm{sup 2}G. The whole hot water volume of 30,214m{sup 3} is equivalent to nearly 320 times more than a well volume. Hot water showed pH7.7-8.6, an electric conductivity of 3,960-7,070{mu}S/cm, and chlorine ion concentration of 1,050 mg/l. Alkalescent Na-Cl system hot water showed a geochemical temperature of 283 degreesC. A steam gas concentration including CO{sub 2} as main component was 0.12-0.19vol%. Blowout hot water was continuously reinjected into N8-AY-1 well from a pit by pump to confirm its reinjection capacity. The reinjection capacity of hot water in fumarolic gas was 110t/h without any problem. (NEDO)

  10. Savings times: approaching of two technologies; Racionalizacao do tempo: uma integracao de tecnologias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Migueis, Carlos Otavio; Eppinghaus, Guilherme; Ferreira, Ipojucan; Alfano, Pedro Paulo; Campello, Sergio [Vetcogray, Macae, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    As the result of merging both wellhead and production subsea systems technologies, a new concept of flowbases and tubing hangers has been developed. This new generation of equipment will allow a significant reduction in rig time during drilling and completion operations just processing at the same time steps that before were supposed to be done separately. In order to implement this merge of technologies, concepts and techniques already well known in drilling and completion will be used. One of the main modifications is to adopt in the internal upper half profile of the flowbase the same profile used in the wellheads. This will allow the use of existent cam type running tools, wear bushing running tools and BOP test tools. Also the casing hanger pack-off (CVU) sealing and locking technology will be used to lock and seal the tubing hanger. The new method of running the flowbase, using a cam type running tool, became possible due to the adoption of the technology for landing the wellhead with the support of an ROV. In the other hand, the tubing hanger was fully redesigned using as reference the existent casing hangers. The new concept is an evolution for the actual concept and will allow the time reduction in rig operations, enhancing the performance of the unlocking system of the tubing hanger during its retrieval. During the development of this new flowbase and tubing hanger system, it was necessary the development of a set of new tools, such as: one trip pack-off landing, energizing/deenergizing, test and tubing hanger retrieving tool; one trip pack-off unlocking and tubing hanger retrieving tool. In order to confirm the viability of the concepts, a series of design reviews were conducted involving different Vetco Gray SDS and SPS experts from various departments such as product engineering and service. Doing this it became possible to fully evaluate the operation from drilling to completion also checking if the applicability of the current equipment that today

  11. Lossy transmission line model of hydrofractured well dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patzek, T.W. [Department of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA (United States); De, A. [Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-01-01

    The real-time detection of hydrofracture growth is crucial to the successful operation of water, CO{sub 2} or steam injection wells in low-permeability reservoirs and to the prevention of subsidence and well failure. In this paper, we describe propagation of very low frequency (1-10 to 100 Hz) Stoneley waves in a fluid-filled wellbore and their interactions with the fundamental wave mode in a vertical hydrofracture. We demonstrate that Stoneley-wave loses energy to the fracture and the energy transfer from the wellbore to the fracture opening is most efficient in soft rocks. We conclude that placing the wave source and receivers beneath the injection packer provides the most efficient means of hydrofracture monitoring. We then present the lossy transmission line model of wellbore and fracture for the detection and characterization of fracture state and volume. We show that this model captures the wellbore and fracture geometry, the physical properties of injected fluid and the wellbore-fracture system dynamics. The model is then compared with experimentally measured well responses. The simulated responses are in good agreement with published experimental data from several water injection wells with depths ranging from 1000 ft to 9000 ft. Hence, we conclude that the transmission line model of water injectors adequately captures wellbore and fracture dynamics. Using an extensive data set for the South Belridge Diatomite waterfloods, we demonstrate that even for very shallow wells the fracture size and state can be adequately recognized at wellhead. Finally, we simulate the effects of hydrofracture extension on the transient response to a pulse signal generated at wellhead. We show that hydrofracture extensions can indeed be detected by monitoring the wellhead pressure at sufficiently low frequencies.

  12. Impacts of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill on deep-sea coral-associated sediment communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demopoulos, Amanda W.J.; Bourque, Jill R.; Cordes, Erik E.; Stamler, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    Cold-water corals support distinct populations of infauna within surrounding sediments that provide vital ecosystem functions and services in the deep sea. Yet due to their sedentary existence, infauna are vulnerable to perturbation and contaminant exposure because they are unable to escape disturbance events. While multiple deep-sea coral habitats were injured by the 2010 Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill, the extent of adverse effects on coral-associated sediment communities is unknown. In 2011, sediments were collected adjacent to several coral habitats located 6 to 183 km from the wellhead in order to quantify the extent of impact of the DWH spill on infaunal communities. Higher variance in macrofaunal abundance and diversity, and different community structure (higher multivariate dispersion) were associated with elevated hydrocarbon concentrations and contaminants at sites closest to the wellhead (MC294, MC297, and MC344), consistent with impacts from the spill. In contrast, variance in meiofaunal diversity was not significantly related to distance from the wellhead and no other community metric (e.g. density or multivariate dispersion) was correlated with contaminants or hydrocarbon concentrations. Concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) provided the best statistical explanation for observed macrofaunal community structure, while depth and presence of fine-grained mud best explained meiofaunal community patterns. Impacts associated with contaminants from the DWH spill resulted in a patchwork pattern of infaunal community composition, diversity, and abundance, highlighting the role of variability as an indicator of disturbance. These data represent a useful baseline for tracking post-spill recovery of these deep-sea communities.

  13. Exergoenvironmental analysis for a geothermal district heating system: An application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keçebaş, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Energy sources are of great importance in relation to pollution of the world. The use of renewable energy resources and the creation of more efficient energy systems make great contributions to the prevention of greenhouse gases. Recently, many studies indicate that the energy conversion systems have many advantages in terms of technical and economic point of view. In near future, environmental impact is going to play an important role in the selection/design of such energy resources and systems. In this study, the Afyon GDHS (geothermal district heating system) having actual operating conditions is investigated at the component level in terms of environmental impact by using exergoenvironmental analysis. Moreover, the effects of ambient and wellhead temperatures on the environmental impacts of the system are discussed. The results show that a great part of total environmental impact of the system occurs from the exergy destructions of the components. Therefore, the environmental impacts can be reduced by improving their exergetic efficiencies instead of design changes of the system components. The environmental impacts of the system are reduced when the ambient temperature decreases and the wellhead temperature increases. Thus, it might not be necessary to conduct separately the exergoenvironmental analysis for different ambient temperatures. - Highlights: • Using exergoenvironmental analysis in a geothermal district heating for the first time. • Evaluating environmental impact of a geothermal district heating system. • Discussing the effects of ambient and wellhead temperatures on the environmental impact. • Total environmental impact of the system occurs from exergy destructions of components. • The exergoenvironmental analysis can be done only once for all the ambient temperatures.

  14. Catwell and Sherdaps for deep-water production fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopper, H.P.; Rey, R. [Cameron, 34 - Beziers (France)

    2000-07-01

    The names Catwell and SherDaps are derived from: - Catenary Well - Subsea Horizontal Extended Reach Drilling And Production System. Both systems use the technique of being able to drill a well in deep-water either through a platform catenary carrier pipe or a catenary drilling riser. They also offer, in addition, significant advantages when drilling into shallow reservoirs and the ability to enhance production using platform artificial lift systems or easily serviceable pumps either in the well or at the mud-line. Catwell is a platform system with surface wellheads/trees whereas SherDaps uses a group of subsea wellheads/trees/BOP's that are accessible from one permanent catenary drilling riser. Both systems allow drilling/completing and future well intervention from a central location that otherwise would have required several drilling centres (i.e. platforms or subsea) if the conventional approach was followed. It is envisaged that well targets close to a platform will use well conductors possibly with mud-line wellheads, then Catwell to reach the medium range well targets and SherDaps for long range wells. It is considered that this arrangement would allow a single surface drilling/ production centre to have access to well targets giving a foot print range of up to a 20 km diameter. The total Capex savings on a Deep-water Field Development could be in the region of $200 m on a $1 billion development. Opex will be lower with the ability from the drilling center to quickly access any problem well and rectify any faults, minimising lost production. (authors)

  15. Deep-sea benthic footprint of the deepwater horizon blowout.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul A Montagna

    Full Text Available The Deepwater Horizon (DWH accident in the northern Gulf of Mexico occurred on April 20, 2010 at a water depth of 1525 meters, and a deep-sea plume was detected within one month. Oil contacted and persisted in parts of the bottom of the deep-sea in the Gulf of Mexico. As part of the response to the accident, monitoring cruises were deployed in fall 2010 to measure potential impacts on the two main soft-bottom benthic invertebrate groups: macrofauna and meiofauna. Sediment was collected using a multicorer so that samples for chemical, physical and biological analyses could be taken simultaneously and analyzed using multivariate methods. The footprint of the oil spill was identified by creating a new variable with principal components analysis where the first factor was indicative of the oil spill impacts and this new variable mapped in a geographic information system to identify the area of the oil spill footprint. The most severe relative reduction of faunal abundance and diversity extended to 3 km from the wellhead in all directions covering an area about 24 km(2. Moderate impacts were observed up to 17 km towards the southwest and 8.5 km towards the northeast of the wellhead, covering an area 148 km(2. Benthic effects were correlated to total petroleum hydrocarbon, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and barium concentrations, and distance to the wellhead; but not distance to hydrocarbon seeps. Thus, benthic effects are more likely due to the oil spill, and not natural hydrocarbon seepage. Recovery rates in the deep sea are likely to be slow, on the order of decades or longer.

  16. The Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill: Ecogenomics of the Deep-Sea Plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazen, T. C.

    2012-12-01

    The explosion on April 20, 2010 at the BP-leased Deepwater Horizon drilling rig in the Gulf of Mexico off the coast of Louisiana, resulted in oil and gas rising to the surface and the oil coming ashore in many parts of the Gulf, it also resulted in the dispersment of an immense oil plume 4,000 feet below the surface of the water. Despite spanning more than 600 feet in the water column and extending more than 10 miles from the wellhead, the dispersed oil plume was gone within weeks after the wellhead was capped - degraded and diluted to undetectable levels. Furthermore, this degradation took place without significant oxygen depletion. Ecogenomics enabled discovery of new and unclassified species of oil-eating bacteria that apparently lives in the deep Gulf where oil seeps are common. Using 16s microarrays, functional gene arrays, clone libraries, lipid analysis and a variety of hydrocarbon and micronutrient analyses we were able to characterize the oil degraders. Metagenomic sequence data was obtained for the deep-water samples using the Illumina platform. In addition, single cells were sorted and sequenced for the some of the most dominant bacteria that were represented in the oil plume; namely uncultivated representatives of Colwellia and Oceanospirillum. In addition, we performed laboratory microcosm experiments using uncontaminated water collected from The Gulf at the depth of the oil plume to which we added oil and COREXIT. These samples were characterized by 454 pyrotag. The results provide information about the key players and processes involved in degradation of oil, with and without COREXIT, in different impacted environments in The Gulf of Mexico. We are also extending these studies to explore dozens of deep sediment samples that were also collected after the oil spill around the wellhead. This data suggests that a great potential for intrinsic bioremediation of oil plumes exists in the deep-sea and other environs in the Gulf of Mexico.

  17. The pricing of natural gas in US markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, S.P.A.; Yucel, M.K.

    1993-01-01

    Our econometric evidence indicates that changes in natural gas prices are unequal in the long run. Nonetheless, all downstream prices change by at least as much as the average well-head price. Statistically, residential and commercial prices change as much as the city gate price. In the face of persistent shocks, however, market institutions and market dynamics can lead to lengthy periods in which the residential and commercial prices of natural gas adjust less than the wellhead or city gate prices. Electrical and industrial users of natural gas rely heavily on spot supplies and can switch fuels easily. Their ability to switch fuels may be related to the development of a spot market to serve them. Reliance on the spot market may explain why these end users have seen a greater reduction in natural gas prices than have the LDCs over the past seven years. The ability to switch fuels may account for electrical and industrial prices being the source of shocks in their relationships with the wellhead price. It also may explain why prices in these end-sue markets are quick to adjust. Commercial and residential customers cannot switch fuels easily and rely heavily on LDCs for their natural gas. The inability of these end users to switch fuels probably contributes to the reluctance of LDCs to purchase spot supplies of gas. Reliance on contract supplies may explain why the city gate price has not declined as much as electrical and industrial prices of natural gas over the past seven years. Furthermore, the LDCs administer prices in the commercial and residential markets under state regulation

  18. Slender wells and new subsea solutions for increased oil recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faanes, Audun; Myhre, Erling; Vinge, Torstein; Stroem, Steinar

    2010-07-01

    Statoil has identified cost effective subsea wells as one of our major challenges. To achieve such solutions it is required to look at all sides of a subsea development. This presentation will cover how a slim wellhead, BOP and riser system will contribute to a less costly subsea development. The focus will be on all aspects of a subsea development. The effect on the drilling rig will be discussed based on the fact that the drilling rig is the major cost driver in subsea well developments. (Author)

  19. Deregulated gas in 1985 seen costly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaffer, P.

    1980-05-05

    Deregulation of natural gas wellhead prices will mean higher prices for nonboiler industrial users, according to an Energy and Environmental Analysis Inc. (EEA) study. The price increases of high-sulfur residual fuel oil will exceed inflation rates, but low-sulfur residual oil and distillate oil will have smaller increases because of upgraded refineries. Te economc imact analysis is broken down by region and includes estimates of gas, high-sulfur coal, and low-sulfur coal prices thrugh 1995. Free copies of the report are available from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Office of Public Information. (DCK)

  20. Measuring depth in boreholes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodson, G.M.

    1979-01-01

    This invention relates to a method of determining the depth of rock strata and other features of a borehole. It may be employed with particular advantage when access to the top of the borehole is difficult, for example in underwater operations. A radioactive marker, such as a source of gamma rays, is positioned near the top of the riser of a sub-sea wellhead structure. A radiation detector is lowered between the marker and a radioactive stratum and the length of line supplied is measured on the floating platform. This enables the depth of the stratum to be measured irrespective of tidal variations of the height of the platform. (U.K.)

  1. Electronic techniques for subsea oil exploration and extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-01-01

    Subsea oil exploration and extraction is becoming increasingly difficult, costly, and dangerous. Electronics is contributing to make offshore work easier and safer. It is used for positioning ships or oil rigs, for remotely controlling well-heads and tool reentry operations, for pipelaying operations, and for monitoring underwater equipment. It is also tending to replace men in diving operations. The specific achievements of THOMPSON--CSF in this field are described. Fully automated operation of the winches on the ETPM 1601 barge proved successful during a recent pipelaying operation. The technique used by THOMPSON--CSF in this venture allowed a single operator to control all the maneuvers. These are briefly described. (MCW)

  2. Safety protection suggestion of naturally occurring radioactive materials in the oil and gas industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Xiaojian; Zhou Qifu; Wang Xiaotao; Xu Zhongyang; Song Peifeng

    2014-01-01

    It's not enough concern about the naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) of oil and gas industry in China. NORM with radium and radon mainly exist in the scale, sludge and production water, and they tend to deposit on the pipe wall, wellhead equipment and so on. These materials are a threat to the health of workers, so it is very important to have the safe disposal of them. This paper introduces the radioactive hazards and puts for-ward the safe disposal measures so as to provide the reference for the safe disposal of radioactive materials. Some management and technical advices are presented too. (authors)

  3. On ad valorem taxation of nonrenewable resource production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowse, John

    1997-01-01

    Taxing a nonrenewable resource typically shifts production through time, compresses the economically recoverable resource base and shrinks social welfare. But by how much? In this paper a computational model of natural gas use, representing numerous demand and supply features believed important for shaping efficient intertemporal allocations, is utilized to answer this question under different ad valorem royalty taxes on wellhead production. Proportionate social welfare losses from fixed royalties up to 30% are found to be small and the excess burden stands at less than 6.5% for a 30% royalty. This result replicates findings of several earlier studies and points to a general conclusion

  4. Effects of geothermal energy utilization on stream biota and water quality at The Geysers, California. Final report. [Big Sulphur, Little Sulphur, Squaw, and Pieta Creeks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LeGore, R.S.

    1975-01-01

    The discussion is presented under the following section headings: biological studies, including fish, insects, and microbiology; stream hydrology; stream water quality, including methods and results; the contribution of tributaries to Big Sulphur Creek, including methods, results, and tributary characterization; standing water at wellheads; steam condensate quality; accidental discharges; trout spawning bed quality; major conclusions; list of references; and appendices. It is concluded that present operational practices at Geysers geothermal field do not harm the biological resources in adjacent streams. The only effects of geothermal development observed during the study were related to operational accidents. (JGB)

  5. Natural gas marketing II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    This book covers all aspects of gas marketing, from the basic regulatory structure to the latest developments in negotiating agreements and locating markets. Topics include: Federal regulation of the gas industry; Fundamentals of gas marketing contracts; FERC actions encouraging competitive markets; Marketing conditions from the pipelines' perspective; State non-utility regulation of natural gas production, transportation, and marketing; Natural gas wellhead agreements and tariffs; Natural gas processing agreements; Effective management of producer's natural gas contracts; Producer-pipeline litigation; Natural gas purchasing from the perspective of industrial gas users; Gas marketing by co-owners: problems of disproportionate sales, gas balancing, and accounting to royalty owners; Alternatives and new directions in marketing

  6. Evaluation and Ranking of Geothermal Resources for Electrical Generation or Electrical Offset in Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington. Volume II.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloomquist, R. Gordon

    1985-06-01

    This volume contains appendices on: (1) resource assessment - electrical generation computer results; (2) resource assessment summary - direct use computer results; (3) electrical generation (high temperature) resource assessment computer program listing; (4) direct utilization (low temperature) resource assessment computer program listing; (5) electrical generation computer program CENTPLANT and related documentation; (6) electrical generation computer program WELLHEAD and related documentation; (7) direct utilization computer program HEATPLAN and related documentation; (8) electrical generation ranking computer program GEORANK and related documentation; (9) direct utilization ranking computer program GEORANK and related documentation; and (10) life cycle cost analysis computer program and related documentation. (ACR)

  7. The Effect of Hydrostatic Pressure on Enrichments of Hydrocarbon Degrading Microbes From the Gulf of Mexico Following the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marietou, Angeliki; Chastain, Roger; Beulig, Felix; Scoma, Alberto; Hazen, Terry C; Bartlett, Douglas H

    2018-01-01

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill was one of the largest and deepest oil spills recorded. The wellhead was located at approximately 1500 m below the sea where low temperature and high pressure are key environmental characteristics. Using cells collected 4 months following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill at the Gulf of Mexico, we set up Macondo crude oil enrichments at wellhead temperature and different pressures to determine the effect of increasing depth/pressure to the in situ microbial community and their ability to degrade oil. We observed oil degradation under all pressure conditions tested [0.1, 15, and 30 megapascals (MPa)], although oil degradation profiles, cell numbers, and hydrocarbon degradation gene abundances indicated greatest activity at atmospheric pressure. Under all incubations the growth of psychrophilic bacteria was promoted. Bacteria closely related to Oleispira antarctica RB-8 dominated the communities at all pressures. At 30 MPa we observed a shift toward Photobacterium , a genus that includes piezophiles. Alphaproteobacterial members of the Sulfitobacter , previously associated with oil-degradation, were also highly abundant at 0.1 MPa. Our results suggest that pressure acts synergistically with low temperature to slow microbial growth and thus oil degradation in deep-sea environments.

  8. Environmental protection for subsea wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diehl, R.J.; Osborne, R.S.; Elwood, J.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes an apparatus for receiving and containing surplus fluid from a subsea well installation on the ocean floor including a subsea wellhead assembly disposed in an enclosed protective chamber. It comprises a fluid-carrying conduit connected to the exterior of the protective chamber in fluid communication with the interior of the protective chamber; an inflatable dracon disposed upon and against the ocean floor in protective relation thereto when deflated and releasably connected in fluid communication to an outlet of the conduit; and pressure-balanced relief valve means disposed in the conduit between the outlet and the protective chamber for communicating surplus fluid from the interior of such chamber to the dracon when the fluid pressure within such chamber exceeds a predetermined value. This patent describes a method of completing an underwater well. It comprises installing a hollow cylindrical silo body with attached conductor guide casing into the sea floor; drilling and casing a well through the silo body and conductor guide casing; installing a wellhead assembly on top of the drilled and cased well inside of the silo body; installing a pressure-containing lid on top of the silo body, forming an enclosed protective chamber and isolating the interior of the chamber from the surrounding hydrostatic head of the sea water

  9. SPR Hydrostatic Column Model Verification and Validation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettin, Giorgia [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lord, David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rudeen, David Keith [Gram, Inc. Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-10-01

    A Hydrostatic Column Model (HCM) was developed to help differentiate between normal "tight" well behavior and small-leak behavior under nitrogen for testing the pressure integrity of crude oil storage wells at the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve. This effort was motivated by steady, yet distinct, pressure behavior of a series of Big Hill caverns that have been placed under nitrogen for extended period of time. This report describes the HCM model, its functional requirements, the model structure and the verification and validation process. Different modes of operation are also described, which illustrate how the software can be used to model extended nitrogen monitoring and Mechanical Integrity Tests by predicting wellhead pressures along with nitrogen interface movements. Model verification has shown that the program runs correctly and it is implemented as intended. The cavern BH101 long term nitrogen test was used to validate the model which showed very good agreement with measured data. This supports the claim that the model is, in fact, capturing the relevant physical phenomena and can be used to make accurate predictions of both wellhead pressure and interface movements.

  10. Analysis on the nitrogen drilling accident of Well Qionglai 1 (I: Major inducement events of the accident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingfeng Meng

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen drilling in poor tight gas sandstone should be safe because of very low gas production. But a serious accident of fire blowout occurred during nitrogen drilling of Well Qionglai 1. This is the first nitrogen drilling accident in China, which was beyond people's knowledge about the safety of nitrogen drilling and brought negative effects on the development of gas drilling technology still in start-up phase and resulted in dramatic reduction in application of gas drilling. In order to form a correct understanding, the accident was systematically analyzed, the major events resulting in this accident were inferred. It is discovered for the first time that violent ejection of rock clasts and natural gas occurred due to the sudden burst of downhole rock when the fractured tight gas zone was penetrated during nitrogen drilling, which has been named as “rock burst and blowout by gas bomb”, short for “rock burst”. Then all the induced events related to the rock burst are as following: upthrust force on drilling string from rock burst, bridging-off formed and destructed repeatedly at bit and centralizer, and so on. However, the most direct important event of the accident turns out to be the blockage in the blooie pipe from rock burst clasts and the resulted high pressure at the wellhead. The high pressure at the wellhead causes the blooie pipe to crack and trigged blowout and deflagration of natural gas, which is the direct presentation of the accident.

  11. Analysis on the nitrogen drilling accident of Well Qionglai 1 (II: Restoration of the accident process and lessons learned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingfeng Meng

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available All the important events of the accident of nitrogen drilling of Well Qionglai 1 have been speculated and analyzed in the paper I. In this paper II, based on the investigating information, the well log data and some calculating and simulating results, according to the analysis method of the fault tree of safe engineering, the every possible compositions, their possibilities and time schedule of the events of the accident of Well Qionglai 1 have been analyzed, the implications of the logging data have been revealed, the process of the accident of Well Qionglai 1 has been restored. Some important understandings have been obtained: the objective causes of the accident is the rock burst and the induced events form rock burst, the subjective cause of the accident is that the blooie pipe could not bear the flow burden of the clasts from rock burst and was blocked by the clasts. The blocking of blooie pipe caused high pressure in wellhead, the high pressure made the blooie pipe burst, natural gas came out and flared fire. This paper also thinks that the rock burst in gas drilling in fractured tight sandstone gas zone is objective and not avoidable, but the accidents induced from rock burst can be avoidable by improving the performance of the blooie pipe, wellhead assemblies and drilling tool accessories aiming at the downhole rock burst.

  12. Oil release from Macondo well MC252 following the Deepwater Horizon accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Stewart K

    2012-05-15

    Oil flow rates and cumulative discharge from the BP Macondo Prospect well in the Gulf of Mexico are calculated using a physically based model along with wellhead pressures measured at the blowout preventer (BOP) over the 86-day period following the Deepwater Horizon accident. Parameters appearing in the model are determined empirically from pressures measured during well shut-in and from pressures and flow rates measured the preceding day. This methodology rigorously accounts for ill-characterized evolution of the marine riser, installation and removal of collection caps, and any erosion at the wellhead. The calculated initial flow rate is 67,100 stock-tank barrels per day (stbd), which decays to 54,400 stbd just prior to installation of the capping stack and subsequent shut-in. The calculated cumulative discharge is 5.4 million stock-tank barrels, of which 4.6 million barrels entered the Gulf. Quantifiable uncertainties in these values are -9.3% and +7.5%, yielding a likely total discharge in the range from 4.9 to 5.8 million barrels. Minimum and maximum credible values of this discharge are 4.6 and 6.2 million barrels. Alternative calculations using the reservoir and sea-floor pressures indicate that any erosion within the BOP had little affect on cumulative discharge.

  13. Gulf team delivers on DP drillship promise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flatern, R von

    2001-06-01

    The technological achievements of the project by Amoco and BP to complete a deepwater subsea well in the Gulf of Mexico from a dynamically positioned (DP) vessel are described. In 2000, the dual activity drillship, Discoverer Enterprise (owned by Transocean Sedco Forex), completed the Nile well in the Viosca Knoll area and then the King Well in Mississippi Canyon Block 85. Stringent safety and environmental protection criteria imposed by Amoco and BP drove the design of the Dril-Quip subsea wellhead to ensure that the wellhead profile and connector coped with the worst case scenario. BP also specified a disconnect system that would secure the well in less than a minute. The SenTREE 7 and Commander telemetry systems developed by Schlumberger, the components of the work string and test work with the Nile well to ensure BP conditions were met and that the perforation and surge procedure proceeded successfully are explained. The time reduction achieved by using large DP drillships and future BP plans are outlined.

  14. The multi-task barge: a floating deep-sea production, storage and unloading unit, with surface production heads and drilling installations; La barge multifonctions: une unite flottante de production, de stockage et dechargement en eau profonde, avec tetes de production en surface et installations de forage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valenchon, C; Rossig, J H [Bouygues Offshore (France); Pouget, G [Sedco-Forex (France); Biolley, F [Institut Francais du Petrole, 92 - Rueil-Malmaison (France)

    1998-05-01

    The multi-task barge is devoted to the exploitation of deep-sea fields in rather good conditions. It has been designed to bring together within a single installation, a production, storage and unloading unit and the necessary means for the drilling, the connecting and the work-over of wells. Thus submarine well-heads and well-head platforms are no longer needed. When the field configuration or the use of oriented drillings allows to group several wells together, the multi-task platform allows to use more economical surface production heads installed on steel rigid risers. This concept requires less investments thanks to less expensive drilling operations and restricted submarine installations, and to easier well operations and lower exploitation costs. Crude oil storage is ensured to up to about 2 millions of barrels. This paper presents the design aspects and the dynamical analysis of risers with the methods used. The tensioning and mooring system is examined and the advantages of the cylindrical float system is underlined and compared to the classical hydro-pneumatic systems. (J.S.) 11 refs.

  15. FY 1999 report on the comprehensive analysis of the geothermal development promotion survey. Forth. No.C-3 Akinomiya area (Separate volume 1: Forth survey); 1999 nendo chinetsu kaihatsu sokushin chosa sogo kaiseki hokokusho. No. C-3 Akinomiya chiiki (Dai 4 ji) - Bessatsu 1 (Dai 4 ji chosa)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-01-01

    The paper reported the results of the long-term jetting test, etc. which were carried out as the forth survey of the geothermal development promotion survey in the Akinomiya area, Ogachi town, Akita prefecture. The jetting induction and the situation of production/reduction were described as follows. N9-AY-3 began to well spontaneously after being induced by sending air up to wellhead pressure of 4.8 MpaG. Damping was recognized for a month or so after the start of jetting. After that, however, no damping was recognized, nor was recognized the deterioration of the fluid enthalpy with age. The pH of geothermal water was definite, approximately 8, and the electric conductivity and Cl concentration were 8,500 {mu}S/cm and 2,600 mg/L, respectively. The maximum jetting capacity of N10-AY-8 was 10.4t/h in steam and 8.9t/h in geothermal water at wellhead pressure of 0.24 MPaG, and after that, it showed a tendency to lower. The flow rate of reduction of N8-AY-1 changed from 80-90t/h at the beginning to 60-70t/h. With the continued reduction, the lowering of reduction capacity was recognized. In the test, the following were carried out: temperature/pressure/spinner logging, test on pressure transition, survey of fluid properties, survey of jetting microseisms, etc. (NEDO)

  16. Gas analysis modeling system forecast for the Energy Modeling Forum North American Natural Gas Market Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mariner-Volpe, B.; Trapmann, W.

    1989-01-01

    The Gas Analysis Modeling System is a large computer-based model for analyzing the complex US natural gas industry, including production, transportation, and consumption activities. The model was developed and first used in 1982 after the passage of the NGPA, which initiated a phased decontrol of most natural gas prices at the wellhead. The categorization of gas under the NGPA and the contractual nature of the natural gas market, which existed at the time, were primary factors in the development of the basic structure of the model. As laws and regulations concerning the natural gas market have changed, the model has evolved accordingly. Recent increases in competition in the wellhead market have also led to changes in the model. GAMS produces forecasts of natural gas production, consumption, and prices annually through 2010. It is an engineering-economic model that incorporates several different mathematical structures in order to represent the interaction of the key groups involved in the natural gas market. GAMS has separate supply and demand components that are equilibrated for each year of the forecast by means of a detailed transaction network

  17. Post injection pressures in well treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, G

    1967-06-05

    Behavior of wellhead pressure immediately after injection of liquids or slurries in well completion and workover treatments can often indicate the success of the operation. Since the rate of wellhead pressure build-down after injection is related to the permeability of the exposed formation to the treating fluid, interpretation of success or failure of the fluid to communicate with the reservoir is possible. Treatments designed to plug-up or clean-out formation flow channels can both be evaluated. Early appreciation can speed completion and workover operations. An explanation of the phenomena of increasing bottomhole treating pressure during fracture-type treatments, and the change in it throughout the life of a well, will result in better understanding of basic fracturing mechanics. On-the-job observations of decreasing rate of pressure build-down after increments of stage squeeze cementing will help the well-site engineer to vary the volume of increments of slurry and the duration of each stage.

  18. Energetic and exergetic Improvement of geothermal single flash cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navid Nazari

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a detailed analysis of a new method for improving energetic and exergetic efficiencies of single flash cycle. The thermodynamic process of the new method consists of extracting a fraction of hot wellhead geothermal brine for the purpose of superheating saturated steam entering the turbine. Computer programming scripts were developed and optimized based on mathematical proposed models for the different components of the systems. The operating parameters such as separator temperature, geofluid wellhead enthalpy and geothermal source temperature are varied to investigate their effects on both net power output and turbine exhaust quality of the systems. Also, full exergy assessment was performed for the new design. The results of separator temperature optimization revealed that specific net power output of the new design can be boosted up to 8% and turbine exhaust quality can be diminished up to 50% as compared to common single flash cycle. In addition, for wells with higher discharge enthalpy, superheating process improve specific net power output even up to 10%. Finally, it was observed that the overall system exergy efficiency was approximately raised 3%. Article History: Received January 5th 2016; Received in revised form June 25th 2016; Accepted July 3rd 2016; Available online How to Cite This Article: Nazari, N. and Porkhial, S. (2016. Energetic and Exergetic Improvement of Geothermal Single Flash Cycle. Int. Journal of Renewable Energy Development, 5(2,129-138. http://dx.doi.org/10.14710/ijred.5.2.129-138 

  19. "Tepid" Geysers above salt caverns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bérest, Pierre; Brouard, Benoît; Zakharov, Vassily

    2018-06-01

    The formation of a brine geyser erupting from the wellhead of a large underground salt cavern is described. In most cases, the brine outflow from an opened cavern is slow; it results from the cavern creep closure and the thermal expansion of the cavern brine. These two processes are smooth; however, the brine outflow often is bumpy, as it is modulated by atmospheric pressure variations that generate an elastic increase (or decrease) of both cavern and brine volumes. In addition, when the flow is fast enough, the brine thermodynamic behavior in the wellbore is adiabatic. The cold brine expelled from the cavern wellhead is substituted with warm brine entering the borehole bottom, resulting in a lighter brine column. The brine outflow increases. In some cases, the flow becomes so fast that inertia terms must be taken into account. A geyser forms, coming to an end when the pressure in the cavern has dropped sufficiently. A better picture is obtained when head losses are considered. A closed-form solution can be reached. This proves that two cases must be distinguished, depending on whether the cold brine initially contained in the wellbore is expelled fully or not. It can also be shown that geyser formation is a rare event, as it requires both that the wellbore be narrow and that the cavern be very compressible. This study stemmed from an actual example in which a geyser was observed. However, scarce information is available, making any definite interpretation difficult. xml:lang="fr"

  20. Shallow gas incident in 3-ELPS-15D-SPS well; Incidente com shallow gas no poco 3-ELPS-15D-SPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Rubens Fausto [Agencia Nacional do Petroleo, Gas Natural e Biocombustiveis (ANP), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    One of the concerns during the planning phase of an exploratory offshore well drilling is the possibility of occurrence of a shallow gas accumulation. In spite of being a rare event, taking into account that an event like this can have disastrous consequences, the cares to work with that type of incident cannot be despised. As example, in 2003, during the operations in the extension well 3-ELPS-15D-SPS, it happened the uncontrolled influx of water and gas to the bottom of the sea: the annular space between the 30'' and 13 3/8'' casings was not filled out with cement, allowing the flow from a shallow permeable interval to the bottom of the sea through the wellhead's cement return orifices, generating the need of an corrective action to make the abandonment of the well in accordance with the Regulation of Abandonment of Wells existent in Brazil. This work presents the mechanical conditions of the interval close to the wet wellhead of the 3-ELPS-15D-SPS, enumerating the sequence of operations accomplished to solve the problem. (author)

  1. CEO's guide to world business costs : oil and gas equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a detailed study of wellhead equipment manufacturing costs in 11 countries in North America, Europe and Asia-Pacific. According to the Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU), Canada has a 5 per cent cost advantage and will be the best country in the world to do business between 2004 to 2008 because of its foreign trade policies, high quality infrastructure and market opportunities within the North American marketplace. KPMG Consulting developed a web-based cost model that allows investors to examine the costs involved in setting up and operating a business in more than 120 cities in Canada, the United States, the United Kingdom, France, Germany, Italy, Iceland, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Japan and Australia. According to the model, a comparison of annual costs for oil and gas wellhead equipment manufacturing was presented for the 11 countries with reference to revenues, costs, and profits before and after income tax. In addition, Canada's research and development (R and D) cost advantage compared to the United States was presented, with reference to tax credits, expenditures, salaries, contracts, capital equipment, volume-based tax credits, and research studies. This report also includes a brief summary of 3 oil and gas companies that came to Canada and prospered. tabs., figs

  2. Vertical seismic profiling and integration with reflection seismic studies at Laxemar, 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juhlin, C.; Bergman, B. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden); Cosma, C.; Keskinen, J.; Enescu, N. [Vibrometric Oy, Helsinki (Finland)

    2002-02-01

    Vertical seismic profile (VSP) data were acquired in October 2000 in the 1700 m deep KLX02 borehole, near Laxemar in southeastern Sweden. The objectives of the VSP were to image reflectors in the borehole for correlation with surface seismic and borehole data, study the signal penetration of explosive versus mechanical sources and determine the seismic velocity as a function of depth. Five principal source points were used, one located close to the KLX02 wellhead and 4 others that were offset by about 200 m to 400 m. An explosive source was only used at the wellhead and consisted of 15 grams of dynamite in 90 cm deep shot holes in bedrock. A swept impact seismic source (SIST) was also used at the wellhead, as well as at the other four offset source points. The primary SIST source consisted of a computer controlled mechanical hammer mounted on a tractor. By activating the hammer over a 15 second sweep length, the total energy transferred to the ground is on the same order as that produced by the dynamite. The recorded data are then processed to generate seismic records that are equivalent to a single impact source. A smaller hand held SIST source was also tested at the wellhead. Tests of both the tractor mounted source and dynamite were made at a location offset somewhat from the wellhead at a site containing loose sediments at the surface. Full waveform sonic, resistivity and gamma logs were also acquired in conjunction the VSP survey. A comparison between the explosive and large SIST source shows that comparable energy levels are produced by the two methods. The SIST source appears to be more stable in terms of the energy level, although the frequency content of data are somewhat lower. However, its most significant advantage is the low cost of preparation of the source points and the speed of the acquisition. Numerous reflections are observed on the VSP, as is the case on the surface seismic, implying a complex structure in the vicinity of the KLX02 borehole

  3. Vertical seismic profiling and integration with reflection seismic studies at Laxemar, 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juhlin, C.; Bergman, B.; Cosma, C.; Keskinen, J.; Enescu, N.

    2002-02-01

    Vertical seismic profile (VSP) data were acquired in October 2000 in the 1700 m deep KLX02 borehole, near Laxemar in southeastern Sweden. The objectives of the VSP were to image reflectors in the borehole for correlation with surface seismic and borehole data, study the signal penetration of explosive versus mechanical sources and determine the seismic velocity as a function of depth. Five principal source points were used, one located close to the KLX02 wellhead and 4 others that were offset by about 200 m to 400 m. An explosive source was only used at the wellhead and consisted of 15 grams of dynamite in 90 cm deep shot holes in bedrock. A swept impact seismic source (SIST) was also used at the wellhead, as well as at the other four offset source points. The primary SIST source consisted of a computer controlled mechanical hammer mounted on a tractor. By activating the hammer over a 15 second sweep length, the total energy transferred to the ground is on the same order as that produced by the dynamite. The recorded data are then processed to generate seismic records that are equivalent to a single impact source. A smaller hand held SIST source was also tested at the wellhead. Tests of both the tractor mounted source and dynamite were made at a location offset somewhat from the wellhead at a site containing loose sediments at the surface. Full waveform sonic, resistivity and gamma logs were also acquired in conjunction the VSP survey. A comparison between the explosive and large SIST source shows that comparable energy levels are produced by the two methods. The SIST source appears to be more stable in terms of the energy level, although the frequency content of data are somewhat lower. However, its most significant advantage is the low cost of preparation of the source points and the speed of the acquisition. Numerous reflections are observed on the VSP, as is the case on the surface seismic, implying a complex structure in the vicinity of the KLX02 borehole

  4. Cost analysis of ground-water supplies in the North Atlantic region, 1970

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cederstrom, Dagfin John

    1973-01-01

    The cost of municipal and industrial ground water (or, more specifically, large supplies of ground water) at the wellhead in the North Atlantic Region in 1970 generally ranged from 1.5 to 5 cents per thousand gallons. Water from crystalline rocks and shale is relatively expensive. Water from sandstone is less so. Costs of water from sands and gravels in glaciated areas and from Coastal Plain sediments range from moderate to very low. In carbonate rocks costs range from low to fairly high. The cost of ground water at the wellhead is low in areas of productive aquifers, but owing to the cost of connecting pipe, costs increase significantly in multiple-well fields. In the North Atlantic Region, development of small to moderate supplies of ground water may offer favorable cost alternatives to planners, but large supplies of ground water for delivery to one point cannot generally be developed inexpensively. Well fields in the less productive aquifers may be limited by costs to 1 or 2 million gallons a day, but in the more favorable aquifers development of several tens of millions of gallons a day may be practicable and inexpensive. Cost evaluations presented cannot be applied to any one specific well or specific site because yields of wells in any one place will depend on the local geologic and hydrologic conditions; however, with such cost adjustments as may be necessary, the methodology presented should have wide applicability. Data given show the cost of water at the wellhead based on the average yield of several wells. The cost of water delivered by a well field includes costs of connecting pipe and of wells that have the yields and spacings specified. Cost of transport of water from the well field to point of consumption and possible cost of treatment are not evaluated. In the methodology employed, costs of drilling and testing, pumping equipment, engineering for the well field, amortization at 5% percent interest, maintenance, and cost of power are considered. The

  5. Distinct bacterial communities in surficial seafloor sediments following the 2010 Deepwater Horizon blowout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingting Yang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A major fraction of the petroleum hydrocarbons discharged during the 2010 Macondo oil spill became associated with and sank to the seafloor as marine snow flocs. This sedimentation pulse induced the development of distinct bacterial communities. Between May 2010 and July 2011, full-length 16S rRNA gene clone libraries demonstrated bacterial community succession in oil-polluted sediment samples near the wellhead area. Libraries from early May 2010, before the sedimentation event, served as the baseline control. Freshly deposited oil-derived marine snow was collected on the surface of sediment cores in September 2010, and was characterized by abundantly detected members of the marine Roseobacter cluster within the Alphaproteobacteria. Samples collected in mid-October 2010 closest to the wellhead contained members of the sulfate-reducing, anaerobic bacterial families Desulfobacteraceae and Desulfobulbaceae within the Deltaproteobacteria, suggesting that the oil-derived sedimentation pulse triggered bacterial oxygen consumption and created patchy anaerobic microniches that favored sulfate-reducing bacteria. Phylotypes of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading genus Cycloclasticus, previously found both in surface oil slicks and the deep hydrocarbon plume, were also found in oil-derived marine snow flocs sedimenting on the seafloor in September 2010, and in surficial sediments collected in October and November 2010, but not in any of the control samples. Due to the relative recalcitrance and stability of polycyclic aromatic compounds, Cycloclasticus represents the most persistent microbial marker of seafloor hydrocarbon deposition that we could identify in this dataset. The bacterial imprint of the DWH oil spill had diminished in late November 2010, when the bacterial communities in oil-impacted sediment samples collected near the Macondo wellhead began to resemble their pre-spill counterparts and spatial controls. Samples collected in summer

  6. Experience curve for natural gas production by hydraulic fracturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukui, Rokuhei; Greenfield, Carl; Pogue, Katie; Zwaan, Bob van der

    2017-01-01

    From 2007 to 2012 shale gas production in the US expanded at an astounding average growth rate of over 50%/yr, and thereby increased nearly tenfold over this short time period alone. Hydraulic fracturing technology, or “fracking”, as well as new directional drilling techniques, played key roles in this shale gas revolution, by allowing for extraction of natural gas from previously unviable shale resources. Although hydraulic fracturing technology had been around for decades, it only recently became commercially attractive for large-scale implementation. As the production of shale gas rapidly increased in the US over the past decade, the wellhead price of natural gas dropped substantially. In this paper we express the relationship between wellhead price and cumulative natural gas output in terms of an experience curve, and obtain a learning rate of 13% for the industry using hydraulic fracturing technology. This learning rate represents a measure for the know-how and skills accumulated thus far by the US shale gas industry. The use of experience curves for renewable energy options such as solar and wind power has allowed analysts, practitioners, and policy makers to assess potential price reductions, and underlying cost decreases, for these technologies in the future. The reasons for price reductions of hydraulic fracturing are fundamentally different from those behind renewable energy technologies – hence they cannot be directly compared – and hydraulic fracturing may soon reach, or maybe has already attained, a lower bound for further price reductions, for instance as a result of its water requirements or environmental footprint. Yet, understanding learning-by-doing phenomena as expressed by an industry-wide experience curve for shale gas production can be useful for strategic planning in the gas sector, as well as assist environmental policy design, and serve more broadly as input for projections of energy system developments. - Highlights: • Hydraulic

  7. Appraisal of transport and deformation in shale reservoirs using natural noble gas tracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heath, Jason E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kuhlman, Kristopher L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Robinson, David G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bauer, Stephen J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gardner, William Payton [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Univ. of Montana, Missoula, MT (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This report presents efforts to develop the use of in situ naturally-occurring noble gas tracers to evaluate transport mechanisms and deformation in shale hydrocarbon reservoirs. Noble gases are promising as shale reservoir diagnostic tools due to their sensitivity of transport to: shale pore structure; phase partitioning between groundwater, liquid, and gaseous hydrocarbons; and deformation from hydraulic fracturing. Approximately 1.5-year time-series of wellhead fluid samples were collected from two hydraulically-fractured wells. The noble gas compositions and isotopes suggest a strong signature of atmospheric contribution to the noble gases that mix with deep, old reservoir fluids. Complex mixing and transport of fracturing fluid and reservoir fluids occurs during production. Real-time laboratory measurements were performed on triaxially-deforming shale samples to link deformation behavior, transport, and gas tracer signatures. Finally, we present improved methods for production forecasts that borrow statistical strength from production data of nearby wells to reduce uncertainty in the forecasts.

  8. Natural gas 1992: Issues and trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-03-01

    This report provides an overview of the natural gas industry in 1991 and 1992, focusing on trends in production, consumption, and pricing of natural gas and how they reflect the regulatory and legislative changes of the past decade (Chapter 1). Also presented are details of FERC Order 636 and the Energy Policy Act of 1992, as well as pertinent provisions of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (Chapter 2). In addition, the report highlights a range of issues affecting the industry, including: Trends in wellhead prices and natural gas supply activities (Chapter 3); Recent rate design changes for interstate pipeline companies (Chapter 4); Benefits to consumers from the more competitive marketplace (Chapter 5); Pipeline capacity expansions during the past 2 years (Chapter 6); Increasing role of the natural gas futures market (Chapter 7)

  9. The universal modular platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    North, R.B.

    1995-01-01

    A new and patented design for offshore wellhead platforms has been developed to meet a 'fast track' requirement for increased offshore production, from field locations not yet identified. The new design uses modular construction to allow for radical changes in the water depth of the final location and assembly line efficiency in fabrication. By utilizing high strength steels and structural support from the well conductors the new design accommodates all planned production requirements on a support structure significantly lighter and less expensive than the conventional design it replaces. Twenty two platforms based on the new design were ready for installation within 18 months of the project start. Installation of the new platforms began in 1992 for drilling support and 1993 for production support. The new design has become the Company standard for all future production platforms. Large saving and construction costs have been realized through its light weight, flexibility in both positioning and water depth, and its modular construction

  10. High-rate injection is associated with the increase in U.S. mid-continent seismicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingarten, Matthew; Ge, Shemin; Godt, Jonathan W.; Bekins, Barbara A.; Rubinstein, Justin L.

    2015-01-01

    An unprecedented increase in earthquakes in the U.S. mid-continent began in 2009. Many of these earthquakes have been documented as induced by wastewater injection. We examine the relationship between wastewater injection and U.S. mid-continent seismicity using a newly assembled injection well database for the central and eastern United States. We find that the entire increase in earthquake rate is associated with fluid injection wells. High-rate injection wells (>300,000 barrels per month) are much more likely to be associated with earthquakes than lower-rate wells. At the scale of our study, a well’s cumulative injected volume, monthly wellhead pressure, depth, and proximity to crystalline basement do not strongly correlate with earthquake association. Managing injection rates may be a useful tool to minimize the likelihood of induced earthquakes.

  11. Dual swing-up elevator well drilling apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, H.; Vorarittinapa, T.

    1984-09-18

    A well drilling apparatus includes a first swing-up elevator platform on which the mast structure is pivotally mounted. After the mast structure has been raised to its erect position, the first elevator platform is elevated to carry the mast structure to a high operational level. A second swing-up elevator platform is provided to carry the drawworks to the same high level at which the two elevator platforms are coupled together to form the working floor. All of the raising and elevating operations can be accomplished with power supplied by the drawworks. The elevator platforms may be lowered after the drilling operation has been accomplished without interfering with any control valve structures that have been placed on the wellhead while the structure was at its raised operational level; the swing-up elevator platforms swing down in opposite directions over any such valve structure.

  12. Experimental geothermal well at Bad Schinznach. First results; Geothermiebohrung Bad Schinznach. Erste Resultate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haering, M O [Haering Geo-Project, Steinmaur (Switzerland)

    1997-12-01

    The spa of Bad Schinznach (Canton Argovia, Switzerland) endeavours to cover its heating requirements with geothermal energy. A recently drilled well to a depth of 890 meters encountered the regional acquifer of thermal water (Oberer Muschelkalk, Triassic) in three levels. Preliminary results indicate a productive aquifer in the uppermost level with a wellhead temperature of 42 C. An additional exploitation of the bottomhole formation temperature of 63 C is envisaged. (orig.) [Deutsch] Das Bad Schinznach (Kanton Aargau, Schweiz) moechte im Rahmen der wirtschaftlichen Moeglichkeiten seinen Waermebedarf mit der Nutzung des Thermalwassers aus dem Oberen Muschelkalk (Trias) decken. Eine neulich abgeteufte Bohrung bis auf 890 Meter Tiefe hat die Formation auf drei Niveaus angetroffen. Erste Resultate deuten auf ein nutzbares Vorkommen im obersten Horizont mit einer Austrittstemperatur von 42 C. Eine zusaetzliche Nutzung der hohen Formationstemperatur von 63 C auf Endtiefe wird erwogen. (orig.)

  13. Subsea HIPPS design procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaroe, R.; Lund, B.F.; Onshus, T.

    1995-01-01

    The paper is based on a feasibility study investigating the possibilities of using a HIPPS (High Integrity Pressure Protection System) to protect a subsea pipeline that is not rated for full wellhead shut-in pressure. The study was called the Subsea OPPS Feasibility Study, and was performed by SINTEF, Norway. Here, OPPS is an acronym for Overpressure Pipeline Protection System. A design procedure for a subsea HIPPS is described, based on the experience and knowledge gained through the ''Subsea OPPS Feasibility Study''. Before a subsea HIPPS can be applied, its technical feasibility, reliability and profitability must be demonstrated. The subsea HIPPS design procedure will help to organize and plan the design activities both with respect to development and verification of a subsea HIPPS. The paper also gives examples of how some of the discussed design steps were performed in the Subsea OPPS Feasibility Study. Finally, further work required to apply a subsea HIPPS is discussed

  14. Assessment of radioisotope heaters for remote terrestrial applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uherka, K.L.

    1987-05-01

    This paper examines the feasibility of using radioisotope byproducts for special heating applications at remote sites in Alaska and other cold regions. The investigation included assessment of candidate radioisotope materials for heater applications, identification of the most promising cold region applications, evaluation of key technical issues and implementation constraints, and development of conceptual heater designs for candidate applications. Strontium-90 (Sr-90) was selected as the most viable fuel for radioisotopic heaters used in terrestrial applications. Opportunities for the application of radioisotopic heaters were determined through site visits to representative Alaska installations. Candidate heater applications included water storage tanks, sludge digesters, sewage lagoons, water piping systems, well-head pumping stations, emergency shelters, and fuel storage tank deicers. Radioisotopic heaters for water storage tank freeze-up protection and for enhancement of biological waste treatment processes at remote sites were selected as the most promising applications

  15. Alberta producers' gas export prices slip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandrasekharaiah, M.N.; Dubben, G.; Kolster, B.H.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that Alberta gas producers have approved a new contract with California buyers that includes slightly lower wellhead prices and more flexible pricing terms. The 1 year agreement, will apply a flexible price formula to gas sales. A basic volume of 212 MMcfd will receive $1.52 (U.S.)/Mcf. A and S also will buy 200 MMcfd at prices paid for other Alberta gas in the California market. It will have the right to buy added volumes at prices indexed to gas sold into California from the U.S. Southwest. Ballots cast by producers were to be verified by regulatory agencies in Alberta and British Columbia. The more flexible price terms in the new contract are seen as a positive development for negotiations in a dispute over long term contracts

  16. Benchmark West Texas Intermediate crude assayed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhodes, A.K.

    1994-01-01

    The paper gives an assay of West Texas Intermediate, one of the world's market crudes. The price of this crude, known as WTI, is followed by market analysts, investors, traders, and industry managers around the world. WTI price is used as a benchmark for pricing all other US crude oils. The 41 degree API < 0.34 wt % sulfur crude is gathered in West Texas and moved to Cushing, Okla., for distribution. The WTI posted prices is the price paid for the crude at the wellhead in West Texas and is the true benchmark on which other US crudes are priced. The spot price is the negotiated price for short-term trades of the crude. And the New York Mercantile Exchange, or Nymex, price is a futures price for barrels delivered at Cushing

  17. Inhibitor selection for internal corrosion control of pipelines: experience with field monitoring and measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demoz, A.; Michaelian, K.H.; Donini, J. [Natural Resources Canada, CANMET Western Research Centre, Devon, AB (Canada); Papavinasam, S.; Revie, R.W. [Natural Resources Canada, CANMET Materials Technology Laboratory, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    1999-07-01

    A loop of pipe consisting of pipe segments of 3 inches, 6 inches and 10 inches that could take the full flow of a production well was designed, constructed and put in-line close to a wellhead. The loop was able to simulate multiphase pipelines and had ports for coupons, some of which were used for electrochemical monitoring. Various techniques including electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), electrochemical noise (ECN), and linear polarization resistance (LPR) were employed, all of which gave corrosion rates that depended on the position of the coupons inside the loop (increasing from top to bottom, reflecting the media and flow to which coupons were exposed in a multiphase producing well). Results indicated that the general corrosion rates obtained were dependent on the method used for measurement, but following the relative trend of LPR>weight loss>EIS>ECN. 20 refs., 8 figs.

  18. Steam-assisted gravity drainage technology enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durkin, S.; Menshikova, I.

    2018-05-01

    A hydrodynamic model of a region of Yaregskoye heavy oilfield was build. The results of the simulation have shown that injection capacity along the wellbore of a horizontal well is not uniform. It is determined by the geological heterogeneity of the formation. Therefore, there is importance of enhancing SAGD technology for Yaregskoye oilfield. A new technology was created. The efficiency of the technology is proved by numerical modelling. Horizontal injector and two-wellhead production wells penetrate the formation. Horizontal sections of the wells are located one above the other in the payzone. Wells are divided into two sections. Those sections work simultaneously and independently of one another. This technology allows to increase oil recovery of the oilfield.

  19. Three dimensional simulation for bayou choctaw strategic petroleum reserve (SPR).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehgartner, Brian L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Park, Byoung Yoon; Lee, Moo Yul

    2006-12-01

    Three dimensional finite element analyses were performed to evaluate the structural integrity of the caverns located at the Bayou Choctaw (BC) site which is considered a candidate for expansion. Fifteen active and nine abandoned caverns exist at BC, with a total cavern volume of some 164 MMB. A 3D model allowing control of each cavern individually was constructed because the location and depth of caverns and the date of excavation are irregular. The total cavern volume has practical interest, as this void space affects total creep closure in the BC salt mass. Operations including both cavern workover, where wellhead pressures are temporarily reduced to atmospheric, and cavern enlargement due to leaching during oil drawdowns that use water to displace the oil from the caverns, were modeled to account for as many as the five future oil drawdowns in the six SPR caverns. The impacts on cavern stability, underground creep closure, surface subsidence, infrastructure, and well integrity were quantified.

  20. Thermal-Economic Modularization of Small, Organic Rankine Cycle Power Plants for Mid-Enthalpy Geothermal Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yodha Y. Nusiaputra

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The costs of the surface infrastructure in mid-enthalpy geothermal power systems, especially in remote areas, could be reduced by using small, modular Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC power plants. Thermal-economic criteria have been devised to standardize ORC plant dimensions for such applications. We designed a modular ORC to utilize various wellhead temperatures (120–170 °C, mass flow rates and ambient temperatures (−10–40 °C. A control strategy was developed using steady-state optimization, in order to maximize net power production at off-design conditions. Optimum component sizes were determined using specific investment cost (SIC minimization and mean cashflow (MCF maximization for three different climate scenarios. Minimizing SIC did not yield significant benefits, but MCF proved to be a much better optimization function.

  1. Process for running scrapers, particularly for subsea petroleum well lines; Fremgangsmaate ved kjoering av skrapere, saerlig for undervannspetroleumbroenn-roerledninger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Jose Eduardo Mendonca da; Herdeiro, Marco Antonio Nogueira; Capplonch, Ricardo Wagner; Miranda, Luiz Vicente Auler Passos

    1997-09-29

    The invention relates to a cleaning method of offshore pipelines. A process for running scrapers for subsea petroleum well lines has, according to a first embodiment, launching a scraper through the line towards the wellhead on a step-by-step basis. The operation proceeds by sending the scraper along successively larger sections via reversing flow through the obstructed line to limit passage of the scraper to that obstructed line, until the whole line is swept. Furthermore, according to a second embodiment, the process consists of the launching of one or more scrapers from a chamber installed in the subsea production system, towards the platform, sweeping only the whole obstructed line, all at once. Once cleaning of the obstructed line is completed, new scrapers may be sent from the platform to the subsea equipment chamber where they are stored until a further cleaning operation is required. The chamber installed in the subsea equipment may serve more than one obstructed line

  2. Drinking Water Program 1992 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, B.D.; Peterson-Wright, L.J.

    1993-08-01

    EG ampersand G Idaho, Inc., initiated a monitoring program for drinking water in 1988 for the US Department of Energy at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. EG ampersand G Idaho structured this monitoring program to ensure that they exceeded the minimum regulatory requirements for monitoring drinking water. This program involves tracking the bacteriological, chemical, and radiological parameters that are required for a open-quotes community water systemclose quotes (maximum requirements). This annual report describes the drinking water monitoring activities conducted at the 17 EG ampersand G Idaho operated production wells and 11 distribution systems. It also contains all of the drinking water parameters that were detected and the regulatory limits that were exceeded during 1992. In addition, ground water quality is discussed as it relates to contaminants identified at the wellhead for EG ampersand G Idaho production wells

  3. BX in-situ oil-shale project. Quarterly technical progress report, June 1, 1981-August 31, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dougan, P.M.

    1981-09-20

    June 1, 1981-August 31, 1981 was the third consecutive quarter of superheated steam injection at the BX In Situ Oil Shale Project. Injection was continuous except for the period of July 14th to August 1st when the injection was suspended during the drilling of core hole BX-37. During the quarter, 99,760 barrels of water as superheated steam were injected into Project injection wells at an average well head temperature of 752/sup 0/F and an average wellhead pressure of 1312 PSIG. During the same period, 135,469 barrels of fluid were produced from the Project production wells for a produced to injected fluid ratio of 1.36 to 1.0. Net oil production during the quarter was 38 barrels.

  4. Methane flux to the atmosphere from the Deepwater Horizon oil disaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yvon-Lewis, Shari A.; Hu, Lei; Kessler, John

    2011-01-01

    The sea-to-air flux of methane from the blowout at the Deepwater Horizon was measured with substantial spatial and temporal resolution over the course of seven days in June 2010. Air and water concentrations were analyzed continuously from a flowing air line and a continuously flowing seawater equilibrator using cavity ring-down spectrometers (CRDS) and a gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector (GC-FID). The results indicate a low flux of methane to the atmosphere (0.024 μmol m-2 d-1) with atmospheric and seawater equilibrium mixing ratios averaging 1.86 ppm and 2.85 ppm, respectively within the survey area. The oil leak, which was estimated to contain 30.2% methane by weight, was not a significant source of methane to the atmosphere during this study. Most of the methane emitted from the wellhead was dissolved in the deep ocean.

  5. Oil Characterization and Distribution in Florida Estuary Sediments Following the Deepwater Horizon Spill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mace G. Barron

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Barrier islands of Northwest Florida were heavily oiled during the Deepwater Horizon spill, but less is known about the impacts to the shorelines of the associated estuaries. Shoreline sediment oiling was investigated at 18 sites within the Pensacola Bay, Florida system prior to impact, during peak oiling, and post-wellhead capping. Only two locations closest to the Gulf of Mexico had elevated levels of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH and total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs. These samples showed a clear weathered crude oil signature, pattern of depletion of C9 to C19 alkanes and C0 to C4 naphthalenes, and geochemical biomarker ratios in concordance with weathered Macondo crude oil. All other locations and sample times showed only trace petroleum contamination. The results of this study are consistent with available satellite imagery and visual shoreline survey data showing heavy shoreline oiling limited to sandy beaches near the entrance to Pensacola Bay and shorelines of Santa Rosa Island.

  6. Monitoring of deposits in pipelines using pressure pulse technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gudmundsson, Jon S.; Celius, Harald K.

    2005-07-01

    The basis of pressure pulse technology is presented in terms of the water hammer equation, the pipeline pressure drop equation and the equation for speed of sound in multiphase mixtures. The technology can be used for a range of applications, from on-line monitoring of flowing conditions to on-demand measurements and analysis to locate and quantify deposits in wells and pipelines. While pressure pulse measurements are low-cost and easy to implement, the commercial use of pressure pulse technology has resulted from extensive field experience and substantial in-house software development. Simulation tools were used to illustrate the effect of a 2 mm thick deposit, 500 m long and located 375 m from a quick-acting valve. The simulation conditions used are typical for multiphase gas-oil flow along a horizontal 2 km long pipeline from wellhead to manifold. (Author)

  7. Sampling and analysis methods for geothermal fluids and gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shannon, D. W.

    1978-01-01

    The data obtained for the first round robin sample collected at Mesa 6-2 wellhead, East Mesa Test Site, Imperial Valley are summarized. Test results are listed by method used for cross reference to the analytic methods section. Results obtained for radioactive isotopes present in the brine sample are tabulated. The data obtained for the second round robin sample collected from the Woolsey No. 1 first stage flash unit, San Diego Gas and Electric Niland Test Facility are presented in the same manner. Lists of the participants of the two round robins are given. Data from miscellaneous analyses are included. Summaries of values derived from the round robin raw data are presented. (MHR)

  8. Hydrogeology of the Krafla geothermal system, northeast Iceland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pope, Emily Catherine; Bird, D. K.; Arnórsson, S.

    2016-01-01

    The Krafla geothermal system is located in Iceland's northeastern neovolcanic zone, within the Krafla central volcanic complex. Geothermal fluids are superheated steam closest to the magma heat source, two-phase at higher depths, and sub-boiling at the shallowest depths. Hydrogen isotope ratios...... of geothermal fluids range from -87‰, equivalent to local meteoric water, to -94‰. These fluids are enriched in 18O relative to the global meteoric line by +0.5-3.2‰. Calculated vapor fractions of the fluids are 0.0-0.5 wt% (~0-16% by volume) in the northwestern portion of the geothermal system and increase...... the benefits of combining phase segregation effects in two-phase systems during analysis of wellhead fluid data with stable isotope values of hydrous alteration minerals when evaluating the complex hydrogeology of volcano-hosted geothermal systems....

  9. Blowout brought under control in Gulf of Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that Greenhill Petroleum Corp., Houston, killed a well blowout Oct. 9 and began cleaning up oil spilled into Timbalier Bay off La Fourche Parish, La. Development well No. 250 in Timbalier Bay field blew out Sept. 29 while Blake Drilling and Workover Co., Belle Chasse, La., was trying to recomplete it in a deeper zone. Fire broke out as Boots and Coots Inc., Houston, was positioning control equipment at the wellhead. State and federal oil spill response officials estimated the uncontrolled flow of well No. 250 at 1,400 b/d of oil. Coast Guard officials on Oct. 8 upgraded the blowout to a major spill, after deciding that at least 2,500 bbl of oil had gone into the water

  10. Chance of success and its use in petroleum exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, P.R.

    1992-01-01

    For a given prospect, geologists can assess the likelihood of key geological factors (reservoir rock, hydrocarbon charge, etc.) recognized as essential for an accumulation of petroleum to exist in the subsurface. This leads to estimating the change of hydrocarbon presence-or geological success-as described in this paper. A second issue concerns the quality of the accumulation (reserve volumes and production rates) in relation to costs and wellhead revenues. However, many exploratory wells that are completed do not repay the costs of completing them, or even finding them. So a third consideration is the commerciality of the completed well and the accumulation it discovered. Techniques are available, however, to make useful predictions of success, but only if we use consistent and strict definitions

  11. TransCanada PipeLines Limited 1998 annual report : TransCanada energy solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Financial information from TransCanada PipeLines Limited and a review of the company's 1998 operations was made available for the benefit of shareholders. TransCanada's pipeline system transports natural gas and crude oil from Western Canada Sedimentary Basin to North America's major energy markets. Net earnings from continuing operations for 1998, before unusual charges, were $575 million ($ 355 million after unusual charges) compared to $522 million for 1997. Solid performances from the energy transmission and international business, when compared to 1997, were more than offset by a decreased contribution from energy processing. TransCanada recorded integration costs of $166 million, after tax, related to the merger with NOVA in 1998, which was the major operational accomplishment during the year, creating a seamless economic energy delivery, processing and marketing system from the wellhead to the market. tabs., figs

  12. Large scale oil lease automation and electronic custody transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, C.R.; Elmer, D.C.

    1995-01-01

    Typically, oil field production operations have only been automated at fields with long term production profiles and enhanced recovery. The automation generally consists of monitoring and control at the wellhead and centralized facilities. However, Union Pacific Resources Co. (UPRC) has successfully implemented a large scale automation program for rapid-decline primary recovery Austin Chalk wells where purchasers buy and transport oil from each individual wellsite. This project has resulted in two significant benefits. First, operators are using the system to re-engineer their work processes. Second, an inter-company team created a new electronic custody transfer method. This paper will describe: the progression of the company's automation objectives in the area; the field operator's interaction with the system, and the related benefits; the research and development of the new electronic custody transfer method

  13. Rock Springs Site 12 hydraulic/explosive true in situ oil shale fracturing experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parrish, R.L.; Boade, R.R.; Stevens, A.L.; Long, A. Jr.; Turner, T.F.

    1980-06-01

    The experiment plan involved the creation and characterization of three horizontal hydraulic fractures, followed by the insertion and simultaneous detonation of slurry explosive in the two lower fractures. Core analyses, wellbore logging, and airflow and /sup 85/Kr tracer tests were used for site characterization and assessment of the hydraulic and explosive fracturing. Tiltmeters, wellhead pressure and flow gages, and in-formation pressure, flow and crack-opening sensors were used to monitor hydrofracture creation and explosive insertion. Explosive detonation diagnostic data were taken with stress and time-of-arrival gages and surface and in-formation accelerometers. The post-fracturing assessments indicated that: (1) hydrofracture creation and explosive insertion and detonation were accomplished essentially as planned; (2) induced fractures were randomly distributed through the shale with no extensively fractured regions or dislocation of shale; and (3) enhancement of permeability was limited to enlargement of the explosive-filled fractures.

  14. Innovative on-site treatment cuts frac flowback water costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-11-15

    Water is an essential component of the drilling and hydraulic fracturing or fracking process and so the natural gas industry is a heavy user of water. Learning from other industries, gas producers are now employing mobile service providers with the latest integrated treatment systems (ITS) to clean flowback and produced water from fracturing operations at the wellhead. This paper presents a novel on-site treatment for frac water. ITS are pre-fabricated on moveable skids or a truck trailer with all the necessary controls, piping, valves, instrumentation, pumps, mixers and chemical injection modules. They remove oil and other hydrocarbons, suspended solids, and dissolved metals from the frac water using the tightly controlled chemistry, separation and filtration technology. This method can cut the average cost of treating produced water by 50%, simultaneously allowing drillers to maximize their efforts and manpower on generating oil and gas profits, rather than on water treatment.

  15. Geologic considerations for the subsurface injection of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM): A case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladle, G.H.

    1995-01-01

    NORM waste consists of naturally occurring radioactive material associated with oil and gas operations as scale deposited in tubulars, surface piping, pumps, and other producing and processing equipment. NORM also occurs as sludge and produced sands at wellheads, transport vessels and tank bottoms. For disposal, NORM scale and sludge are separated from the tubulars and tank bottoms and ground to less than 100 microns and mixed into a slurry at the surface facility for disposal into a deep well injection interval below the Underground Sources of Drinking Water zone. This paper addresses two primary considerations: (1) subsurface geologic investigations which identify specific geologic horizons that have sufficient porosity and permeability to accept NORM slurries containing high total suspended solids concentrations, and (2) surface facility requirements. Generic and specific information, criteria, and examples are included in the paper to allow the application of the geologic principles to other areas or regions

  16. Tritium as an indicator of venues for nuclear tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyakhova, O N; Lukashenko, S N; Mulgin, S I; Zhdanov, S V

    2013-10-01

    Currently, due to the Treaty on the Non-proliferation of Nuclear Weapons there is a highly topical issue of an accurate verification of nuclear explosion venues. This paper proposes to consider new method for verification by using tritium as an indicator. Detailed studies of the tritium content in the air were carried in the locations of underground nuclear tests - "Balapan" and "Degelen" testing sites located in Semipalatinsk Test Site. The paper presents data on the levels and distribution of tritium in the air where tunnels and boreholes are located - explosion epicentres, wellheads and tunnel portals, as well as in estuarine areas of the venues for the underground nuclear explosions (UNE). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Enhancement of a stand-alone photovoltaic system's performance: Reduction of soft and hard shading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamont, Lisa A.; El Chaar, Lana [Petroleum Institute, Electrical Engineering Department, P.O. Box 2533, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)

    2011-04-15

    A stand-alone photovoltaic (PV) system is the most promising solution to supply electric power to meet energy demand in isolated locations. This technology can offer an interesting alternative to other currently existing sources of energy. Due to space constraint in the remote offshore oil and gas industry, a stand-alone system is used for cathodic protection, telemetry and valve control. However in such an environment, dust accumulation and bird droppings have been critical issues to the operation of off-grid solar devices. These factors do not only reduce the available power of the modules but also makes the cost of solar devices ineffective since cleaning, especially on well-head towers, is very expensive due to the location. Hence this paper presents two technical solutions that have shown promising results in reducing the impact of these factors. (author)

  18. The technology for lifting of liquid during the development and exploitation of gas wells in tubing string of big diameters; La technologie pour l'elevation du liquide pendant la mise en valeur et l'exploitation des gisements a gaz par tubing de grand diametre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chouliatikov, I.V.; Sidorov, S.N.; Sidorova, S.A.; Chouliatikov, V.I. [OAO ' ' Gazprom' ' , VNIIGAZ (Russian Federation)

    2000-07-01

    A new direction of effective removing liquid from the gas wells and improving of traditional gas-lift technologies for oil wells considered in this report. This direction merges the advantages of traditional methods such as gas-lift, plunger lift and swabbing, and it wide the range of application. Such a technology importantly decreases capital costs to installing wellhead and submerged equipment (it does not require the stopping of a well, trip and special conversion of tubing). It is ecology safe and does require minimal exploitation costs. A new technology derived a name - 'Combigaslift'. Combigaslift is the process of lilting of liquid from wells, in which it occurs by gas is been moving non-hermetic plunger-valve divider by wire and hoist. During a heaving a gas upflow does not allow to drain liquid under the divider. Tests of Combigaslift were made in gas and oil wells of different diameters. (author)

  19. Distributed generation with photovoltaic systems: A utility perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vigotti, R.

    1998-01-01

    Today PV power systems are already cost-effective and commonly employed in a wide range of remote applications such as electricity supply to isolated users and small communities; water pumping and desalination; powering of service equipment such as radio repeaters; pipelines and well-heads cathodic protection. PV systems can easily cover a broad range of power requirements, allowing them to take advantage of new niche markets as they develop. Besides such applications a ''non-power'', low performance, consumer market also exists (watches, calculators, gadgets) that has already reached a stable growth condition. In the last decade, an increase has been experienced of about three times in the amount of module shipments (103 MW expected in 1997), a more balanced regional manufacturer share has developed, crystalline technology has maintained its lead, and a more market-oriented application share has appeared (at present most applications are for stand-alone)

  20. Prepared remarks of Martin L. Allday

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allday, M.L.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the need for removing needless regulatory obstacles to natural gas industry which prevents competitiveness with other energy sources. The author presents three points which he believes will help reach this goal. The first point is to remove all regulatory pricing controls on wellhead prices. The second point is the development of a good distribution system, especially pipelines, which can quickly respond to serve new or emerging market areas. Finally, the author promotes pipeline rates that promote efficiency, allow for reasonable stability in long-term delivery, and send the right signals to the construction industry. The paper goes on to discuss the deregulation needed to promote pipeline construction activities and allow for transportation of natural gas to become competitive among the various transportation sectors

  1. In situ leaching of a nuclear rubblized copper ore body. Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-06-01

    This volume contains detailed descriptions of technical and economical evaluations undertaken for the feasibility study. A summary of these results can be found in Vol. 1 along with the conclusions derived from the feasibility study and the recommendations tendered for future work. The sections of this study are presented in process order, and each section is complete in itself. The form of the presentation, hopefully, is logical and in a manner suitable for design purposes. As a further aid, each section has its own table of contents. The sections presented include method of attack, reference case, description of concept, nuclear rubblization, blasting plan, underground plumbing, fluid circulation, leaching technology, wellhead plant and pipeline, process plant, material and heat balance, hydrology, radioactivity, seismic, economics, sensitivity analysis, guide for environmental studies, exploration, and recommended experimental program. (U.S.)

  2. Stimulation and reservoir engineering of geothermal resources. Second annual report, July 1, 1978-September 30, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, P.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.

    1979-09-01

    Individual projects are grouped under four main areas of study: energy extraction, bench-scale flow experiments, radon tracer techniques, and well test analysis. The energy extraction experiments concern the efficiency with which the in-place heat and fluids can be produced in the most economical manner. The bench-scale flow experiments cover the results of three models used to examine the properties of flow through porous media at elevated temperature and pressures. Random tracer techniques describe accelerated efforts to field test several geothermal reservoirs by both transient and transect test procedures. The well test analysis section describes several new developments: analysis of earth-tide effects, pressure transient analysis of multilayered systems, interference testing with storage and skin effects, determination of steam-water relative permeability from wellhead data, well test analysis for wells produced at constant pressure, the parallelepiped model, slug test DST analysis, and pressure transient behavior in naturally fractured reservoirs. (MHR)

  3. Sharing risk and reward - floating production contractorship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gisvold, K.M.

    1994-01-01

    The conference paper summarizes the contractual experience so far gained on Petrojarl 1 floating production system and the associated shuttling services on the Norwegian continental shelf. The paper attempts to draw some lines into the future with respect to development of the business format and the evolution of the relationship between the contractor and the various oil companies in question. Turnkey production services as well as transport and project services to the oil industry are provided. The scope of these services ranges from top of the sea bed wellhead to quayside at the refinery, and is based on ownership control of the employed vessels as well as complete manning of all services. 7 figs

  4. Carbon tetrachloride ERA soil-gas baseline monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fancher, J.D.

    1994-01-01

    From December 1991 through December 1993, Westinghouse Hanford Company performed routine baseline monitoring of selected wells ad soil-gas points twice weekly in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. This work supported the carbon Tetrachloride Expedited Response Action (ERA) and provided a solid baseline of volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations in wells and in the subsurface at the ERA site. As site remediation continues, comparisons to this baseline can be one means of measuring the success of carbon tetrachloride vapor extraction. This report contains observations of the patterns and trends associated with data obtained during soil-gas monitoring at the 200 West Area: Monitoring performed since late 1991 includes monitoring soil-gas probes ad wellheads for volatile organic compounds (VOCs). This report reflects monitoring data collected from December 1991 through December 1993

  5. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Source Water Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sehlke, G.

    2003-03-17

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) covers approximately 890 square miles and includes 12 public water systems that must be evaluated for Source water protection purposes under the Safe Drinking Water Act. Because of its size and location, six watersheds and five aquifers could potentially affect the INEEL's drinking water sources. Based on a preliminary evaluation of the available information, it was determined that the Big Lost River, Birch Creek, and Little Lost River Watersheds and the eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer needed to be assessed. These watersheds were delineated using the United States Geologic Survey's Hydrological Unit scheme. Well capture zones were originally estimated using the RESSQC module of the Environmental Protection Agency's Well Head Protection Area model, and the initial modeling assumptions and results were checked by running several scenarios using Modflow modeling. After a technical review, the resulting capture zones were expanded to account for the uncertainties associated with changing groundwater flow directions, a this vadose zone, and other data uncertainties. Finally, all well capture zones at a given facility were merged to a single wellhead protection area at each facility. A contaminant source inventory was conducted, and the results were integrated with the well capture zones, watershed and aquifer information, and facility information using geographic information system technology to complete the INEEL's Source Water Assessment. Of the INEEL's 12 public water systems, three systems rated as low susceptibility (EBR-1, Main Gate, and Gun Range), and the remainder rated as moderate susceptibility. No INEEL public water system rated as high susceptibility. We are using this information to develop a source water management plan from which we will subsequently implement an INEEL-wide source water management program. The results are a very robust set of wellhead

  6. INEEL Source Water Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sehlke, Gerald

    2003-03-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) covers approximately 890 mi2 and includes 12 public water systems that must be evaluated for Source water protection purposes under the Safe Drinking Water Act. Because of its size and location, six watersheds and five aquifers could potentially affect the INEEL’s drinking water sources. Based on a preliminary evaluation of the available information, it was determined that the Big Lost River, Birch Creek, and Little Lost River Watersheds and the eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer needed to be assessed. These watersheds were delineated using the United States Geologic Survey’s Hydrological Unit scheme. Well capture zones were originally estimated using the RESSQC module of the Environmental Protection Agency’s Well Head Protection Area model, and the initial modeling assumptions and results were checked by running several scenarios using Modflow modeling. After a technical review, the resulting capture zones were expanded to account for the uncertainties associated with changing groundwater flow directions, a thick vadose zone, and other data uncertainties. Finally, all well capture zones at a given facility were merged to a single wellhead protection area at each facility. A contaminant source inventory was conducted, and the results were integrated with the well capture zones, watershed and aquifer information, and facility information using geographic information system technology to complete the INEEL’s Source Water Assessment. Of the INEEL’s 12 public water systems, three systems rated as low susceptibility (EBR-I, Main Gate, and Gun Range), and the remainder rated as moderate susceptibility. No INEEL public water system rated as high susceptibility. We are using this information to develop a source water management plan from which we will subsequently implement an INEEL-wide source water management program. The results are a very robust set of wellhead protection areas that will

  7. Lagrangian-based Backtracking of Oil Spill Dynamics from SAR Images: Application to Montara Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautama, Budhi Gunadharma; Mercier, Gregoire; Fablet, Ronan; Longepe, Nicolas

    2016-08-01

    Within the framework of INDESO project (Infrastructure Development Space Oceanography), we address the issue of oilspill and aim at developing an operational SAR- based system for monitoring this issue in Indonesian waters from space. In this work, we focus on the backtrack- ing of an oilspill detected from SAR observations. As a case-study, we consider one large oil spill event that happened in Indonesian waters in 2009, referred to as the Montara oilspill. On 21 August 2009, the Montara Wellhead Platform had an uncontrolled release of hydrocarbons from one of the platform wells. It was estimated that 400 barrels (or approximately 64 tonnes) of crude oil were being lost per day. The uncontrolled release continued until 3 November 2009 and response operations continued until 3 December 2009. In this work, we develop a Langragian analysis and associated numerical inversion tools with a view to further analyzing the oil spread due to the Montara Wellhead Platform. Our model relies on a 2D Lagrangian transport model developed by CLS (Collecte Localisation Satellite). Our model involves four main parameters : the weights of wind- related and current-related advection, the origin and the duration of the oil leakage. Given SAR oilspill detections, we propose a numerical inversion of the parameters of the Lagrangian model, so that the simulated drift match the SAR observations of the oil spill. We demonstrate the relevance of the proposed model and numerical scheme for the Montara oilspill and further discuss their operational interest for the space-based oilspill backtracking and forecasting.

  8. Natural gas productive capacity for the lower 48 States, 1980 through 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to analyze monthly natural gas wellhead productive capacity in the lower 48 States from 1980 through 1992 and project this capacity from 1993 through 1995. For decades, natural gas supplies and productive capacity have been adequate to meet demand. In the 1970's the capacity surplus was small because of market structure (split between interstate and intrastate), increasing demand, and insufficient drilling. In the early 1980's, lower demand, together with increased drilling, led to a large surplus capacity as new productive capacity came on line. After 1986, this large surplus began to decline as demand for gas increased, gas prices fell, and gas well completions dropped sharply. In late December 1989, the decline in this surplus, accompanied by exceptionally high demand and temporary weather-related production losses, led to concerns about the adequacy of monthly productive capacity for natural gas. These concerns should have been moderated by the gas system's performance during the unusually severe winter weather in March 1993 and January 1994. The declining trend in wellhead productive capacity is expected to be reversed in 1994 if natural gas prices and drilling meet or exceed the base case assumption. This study indicates that in the low, base, and high drilling cases, monthly productive capacity should be able to meet normal production demands through 1995 in the lower 48 States (Figure ES1). Exceptionally high peak-day or peak-week production demand might not be met because of physical limitations such as pipeline capacity. Beyond 1995, as the capacity of currently producing wells declines, a sufficient number of wells and/or imports must be added each year in order to ensure an adequate gas supply

  9. Natural gas productive capacity for the lower 48 states, 1982--1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to analyze monthly natural gas wellhead productive capacity and project this capacity for 1992 and 1993, based upon historical production data through 1991. Productive capacity is the volume of gas that can be produced from a well, reservoir, or field during a given period of time against a certain wellhead back-pressure under actual reservoir conditions excluding restrictions imposed by pipeline capacity, contracts, or regulatory bodies. For decades, natural gas supplies and productive capacity have been adequate, although in the 1970's the capacity surplus was small because of market structure (both interstate and intrastate), increasing demand, and insufficient drilling. In the early 1980's, lower demand together with increased drilling led to a large surplus of natural gas capacity. After 1986, this large surplus began to decline as demand for gas increased, gas prices dropped, and gas well completions dropped sharply. In late December 1989, this surplus decline, accompanied by exceptionally high demand and temporary weather-related production losses, led to concerns about the adequacy of monthly productive capacity for natural gas. This study indicates that monthly productive capacity will drop sharply during the 1992-1993 period. In the low gas price, low drilling case, gas productive capacity and estimated production demand will be roughly equal in December 1993. In base and high drilling cases, monthly productive capacity should be able to meet normal production demands through 1993 in the lower 48 States. Exceptionally high peak-day or peak-week production demand might not be met because of physical limitations. Beyond 1993, as the capacity of currently producing wells declines, a sufficient number of wells and/or imports must be added each year in order to ensure an adequate gas supply

  10. Natural gas productive capacity for the lower 48 states 1984 through 1996, February 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This is the fourth wellhead productive capacity report. The three previous ones were published in 1991, 1993, and 1994. This report should be of particular interest to those in Congress, Federal and State agencies, industry, and the academic community, who are concerned with the future availability of natural gas. The EIA Dallas Field Office has prepared five earlier reports regarding natural gas productive capacity. These reports, Gas Deliverability and Flow Capacity of Surveillance Fields, reported deliverability and capacity data for selected gas fields in major gas producing areas. The data in the reports were based on gas-well back-pressure tests and estimates of gas-in-place for each field or reservoir. These reports use proven well testing theory, most of which has been employed by industry since 1936 when the Bureau of Mines first published Monograph 7. Demand for natural gas in the United States is met by a combination of natural gas production, underground gas storage, imported gas, and supplemental gaseous fuels. Natural gas production requirements in the lower 48 States have been increasing during the last few years while drilling has remained at low levels. This has raised some concern about the adequacy of future gas supplies, especially in periods of peak heating or cooling demand. The purpose of this report is to address these concerns by presenting a 3-year projection of the total productive capacity of natural gas at the wellhead for the lower 48 States. Alaska is excluded because Alaskan gas does not enter the lower-48 States pipeline system. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) generates this 3-year projection based on historical gas-well drilling and production data from State, Federal, and private sources. In addition to conventional gas-well gas, coalbed gas and oil-well gas are also included

  11. Hydrocarbons in Deep-Sea Sediments following the 2010 Deepwater Horizon Blowout in the Northeast Gulf of Mexico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel C Romero

    Full Text Available The Deepwater Horizon (DWH spill released 4.9 million barrels of oil into the Gulf of Mexico (GoM over 87 days. Sediment and water sampling efforts were concentrated SW of the DWH and in coastal areas. Here we present geochemistry data from sediment cores collected in the aftermath of the DWH event from 1000-1500 m water depth in the DeSoto Canyon, NE of the DWH wellhead. Cores were analyzed at high-resolution (at 2 mm and 5 mm intervals in order to evaluate the concentration, composition and input of hydrocarbons to the seafloor. Specifically, we analyzed total organic carbon (TOC, aliphatic, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs, and biomarker (hopanes, steranes, diasteranes compounds to elucidate possible sources and transport pathways for deposition of hydrocarbons. Results showed higher hydrocarbon concentrations during 2010-2011 compared to years prior to 2010. Hydrocarbon inputs in 2010-2011 were composed of a mixture of sources including terrestrial, planktonic, and weathered oil. Our results suggest that after the DWH event, both soluble and highly insoluble hydrocarbons were deposited at enhanced rates in the deep-sea. We proposed two distinct transport pathways of hydrocarbon deposition: 1 sinking of oil-particle aggregates (hydrocarbon-contaminated marine snow and/or suspended particulate material, and 2 advective transport and direct contact of the deep plume with the continental slope surface sediments between 1000-1200 m. Our findings underline the complexity of the depositional event observed in the aftermath of the DWH event in terms of multiple sources, variable concentrations, and spatial (depth-related variability in the DeSoto Canyon, NE of the DWH wellhead.

  12. Origins of and countermeasures for the abnormal pressures in well production of the Ojarly gas field in the Right Bank of the Amu-Darya River, Turkmenistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peijun Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Ojarly gas field, the major supplier of the Project Phase Ⅱ of the Right Bank of the Amu Darya River, is just small but valuable like a golden bean, although it has good reservoir properties and a high gas production capacity, the occurrence of continuous sharp decline of pressure in the well production shows a great difference from the previous well test program. In view of this, an integrated analysis method was established for the whole gas well production process to discover the three main reasons causing the abnormal well pressure. First, the formation energy and pressure dropped so fast that the wellhead pressure also fell over the period. Second, there was abnormal fluids pressure drop in the wellbore tube and throttling effect might occur in the production tube, so the pressure drop became abnormally increased. Third, due to the abnormally-increasing gas-yield pressure drop and unusually-decreasing gas productivity, the wellhead oil pressure dropped significantly. Also, through dynamic monitoring and in-depth analysis, it is also considered that due to the high density of drilling fluids and well-developed pores and caverns in the reservoirs, more and more barites separated from the fluids would be settled down covering the pay zones, so both the gas-generating capacity and production pressure significantly decreased. On this basis, some technical countermeasures were taken such as re-stimulation of reservoirs, removal of gas-producing channels, increase of seepage capacity, etc. In addition, by use of sand-flushing and acidizing, both the comprehensive skin factor and the production pressure drop were reduced to improve the well gas production capacity and maintain high productivity effectively. This study provides a technical support for long-term sustainable development and production of this gas field.

  13. Used tires prove a major solution to oil and gas spills in Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2009-01-15

    Approximately 5 to 15 per cent of the material recycled from tires cannot be used for any type of application. This waste material is either sent to a landfill or to an incinerator to be burnt for fuel. For every 200 worn out tires, between 10 and 30 of them end up in landfills or will be used in furnaces, leaving a future generation to deal with the residual negative effect of the landfill or how to clean the polluted air. An Alberta-based company, ESSI International, has found a unique use for this unwanted material. The company has used 100 per cent of this unwanted material to clean or re-mediate oil and gas spills, both on land and offshore. ESSI International has 6 patents pending on its processes. It has developed both large scale commercial filtration systems for field use, indoor filtration systems, and packaged products that are proactive, preventive, easy to use, and economically competitive. Once utilized, the material is recycled to recover the collected hydrocarbons and then the material itself is used as a replacement for sand and gravel in the production of ultra light weight concrete. In addition, ESSI International has developed a line of manufactured products that include wellhead and containment bag systems that proactively prevent hydrocarbons from contaminating the earth around the wellhead and adjacent areas. The article also discussed ESSI International's development of the containment system called bag in a barrel. It was concluded that where other products end up in a landfill or used to fuel incinerators, ESSI International uses its used and then recycled filter material in concrete. The filter material replaces sand and gravel and results in a lightweight product that can be used for driveways, side walks, sound barriers, road dividers. 1 ref., 3 figs.

  14. Evolution of the Macondo well blowout: simulating the effects of the circulation and synthetic dispersants on the subsea oil transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Claire B; Hénaff, Matthieu Le; Aman, Zachary M; Subramaniam, Ajit; Helgers, Judith; Wang, Dong-Ping; Kourafalou, Vassiliki H; Srinivasan, Ashwanth

    2012-12-18

    During the Deepwater Horizon incident, crude oil flowed into the Gulf of Mexico from 1522 m underwater. In an effort to prevent the oil from rising to the surface, synthetic dispersants were applied at the wellhead. However, uncertainties in the formation of oil droplets and difficulties in measuring their size in the water column, complicated further assessment of the potential effect of the dispersant on the subsea-to-surface oil partition. We adapted a coupled hydrodynamic and stochastic buoyant particle-tracking model to the transport and fate of hydrocarbon fractions and simulated the far-field transport of the oil from the intrusion depth. The evaluated model represented a baseline for numerical experiments where we varied the distributions of particle sizes and thus oil mass. The experiments allowed to quantify the relative effects of chemical dispersion, vertical currents, and inertial buoyancy motion on oil rise velocities. We present a plausible model scenario, where some oil is trapped at depth through shear emulsification due to the particular conditions of the Macondo blowout. Assuming effective mixing of the synthetic dispersants at the wellhead, the model indicates that the submerged oil mass is shifted deeper, decreasing only marginally the amount of oil surfacing. In this scenario, the oil rises slowly to the surface or stays immersed. This suggests that other mechanisms may have contributed to the rapid surfacing of oil-gas mixture observed initially. The study also reveals local topographic and hydrodynamic processes that influence the oil transport in eddies and multiple layers. This numerical approach provides novel insights on oil transport mechanisms from deep blowouts and on gauging the subsea use of synthetic dispersant in mitigating coastal damage.

  15. Ultra-Deepwater Gulf of Mexico Oil and Gas: Energy Return on Financial Investment and a Preliminary Assessment of Energy Return on Energy Investment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Moerschbaecher

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to calculate the energy return on financial investment (EROFI of oil and gas production in the ultra-deepwater Gulf of Mexico (GoM in 2009 and for the estimated oil reserves of the Macondo Prospect (Mississippi Canyon Block 252. We also calculated a preliminary Energy Return on Investment (EROI based on published energy intensity ratios including a sensitivity analysis using a range of energy intensity ratios (7 MJ/$, 12 MJ/$, and 18 MJ/$. The EROFI for ultra-deepwater oil and gas at the well-head, ranged from 0.019 to 0.022 barrels (BOE, or roughly 0.85 gallons, per dollar. Our estimates of EROI for 2009 ultra-deepwater oil and natural gas at the well-head ranged from 7–22:1. The independently-derived EROFI of the Macondo Prospect oil reserves ranged from 0.012 to 0.0071 barrels per dollar (i.e., $84 to $140 to produce a barrel and EROI ranged from 4–16:1, related to the energy intensity ratio used to quantify costs. We believe that the lower end of these EROI ranges (i.e., 4 to 7:1 is more accurate since these values were derived using energy intensities averaged across the entire domestic oil and gas industry. Time series of the financial and preliminary EROI estimates found in this study suggest that the extraction costs of ultra-deepwater energy reserves in the GoM come at increasing energetic and economic cost to society.

  16. Numerical modeling of injection, stress and permeability enhancement during shear stimulation at the Desert Peak Enhanced Geothermal System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, David; Kelkar, Sharad; Davatzes, Nick; Hickman, Stephen H.; Moos, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Creation of an Enhanced Geothermal System relies on stimulation of fracture permeability through self-propping shear failure that creates a complex fracture network with high surface area for efficient heat transfer. In 2010, shear stimulation was carried out in well 27-15 at Desert Peak geothermal field, Nevada, by injecting cold water at pressure less than the minimum principal stress. An order-of-magnitude improvement in well injectivity was recorded. Here, we describe a numerical model that accounts for injection-induced stress changes and permeability enhancement during this stimulation. In a two-part study, we use the coupled thermo-hydrological-mechanical simulator FEHM to: (i) construct a wellbore model for non-steady bottom-hole temperature and pressure conditions during the injection, and (ii) apply these pressures and temperatures as a source term in a numerical model of the stimulation. In this model, a Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion and empirical fracture permeability is developed to describe permeability evolution of the fractured rock. The numerical model is calibrated using laboratory measurements of material properties on representative core samples and wellhead records of injection pressure and mass flow during the shear stimulation. The model captures both the absence of stimulation at low wellhead pressure (WHP ≤1.7 and ≤2.4 MPa) as well as the timing and magnitude of injectivity rise at medium WHP (3.1 MPa). Results indicate that thermoelastic effects near the wellbore and the associated non-local stresses further from the well combine to propagate a failure front away from the injection well. Elevated WHP promotes failure, increases the injection rate, and cools the wellbore; however, as the overpressure drops off with distance, thermal and non-local stresses play an ongoing role in promoting shear failure at increasing distance from the well.

  17. Operation and Performance of a Biphase Turbine Power Plant at the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field (Final Report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hays, Lance G. [Douglas Energy Company, Placentia, CA (United States)

    2000-09-01

    A full scale, wellhead Biphase turbine was manufactured and installed with the balance of plant at Well 103 of the Cerro Prieto geothermal resource in Baja, California. The Biphase turbine was first synchronized with the electrical grid of Comision Federal de Electricidad on August 20, 1997. The Biphase power plant was operated from that time until May 23, 2000, a period of 2 years and 9 months. A total of 77,549 kWh were delivered to the grid. The power plant was subsequently placed in a standby condition pending replacement of the rotor with a newly designed, higher power rotor and replacement of the bearings and seals. The maximum measured power output of the Biphase turbine, 808 kWe at 640 psig wellhead pressure, agreed closely with the predicted output, 840 kWe. When combined with the backpressure steam turbine the total output power from that flow would be increased by 40% above the power derived only from the flow by the present flash steam plant. The design relations used to predict performance and design the turbine were verified by these tests. The performance and durability of the Biphase turbine support the conclusion of the Economics and Application Report previously published, (Appendix A). The newly designed rotor (the Dual Pressure Rotor) was analyzed for the above power condition. The Dual Pressure Rotor would increase the power output to 2064 kWe by incorporating two pressure letdown stages in the Biphase rotor, eliminating the requirement for a backpressure steam turbine. The power plant availability was low due to deposition of solids from the well on the Biphase rotor and balance of plant problems. A great deal of plant down time resulted from the requirement to develop methods to handle the solids and from testing the apparatus in the Biphase turbine. Finally an online, washing method using the high pressure two-phase flow was developed which completely eliminated the solids problem. The availability of the Biphase turbine itself was 100

  18. Hydraulic Shearing and Hydraulic Jacking Observed during Hydraulic Stimulations in Fractured Geothermal Reservoir in Pohang, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, K. B.; Park, S.; Xie, L.; Kim, K. I.; Yoo, H.; Kim, K. Y.; Choi, J.; Yoon, K. S.; Yoon, W. S.; Lee, T. J.; Song, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) relies on sufficient and irreversible enhancement of reservoir permeability through hydraulic stimulation and possibility of such desirable change of permeability is an open question that can undermine the universality of EGS concept. We report results of first hydraulic stimulation campaign conducted in two deep boreholes in fractured granodiorite geothermal reservoir in Pohang, Korea. Borehole PX-1, located at 4.22 km, was subjected to the injection of 3,907 m3 with flow rate of up to 18 kg/s followed by bleeding off of 1,207 m3. The borehole PX-2, located at 4.35 km, was subjected to the injection of 1,970 m3 with flow rate of up to 46 kg/sIn PX-1, a sharp distinct decline of wellhead pressure was observed at around 16 MPa of wellhead pressure which was similar to the predicted injection pressure to induce hydraulic shearing. Injectivity interpretation before and after the hydraulic shearing indicates that permanent increase of permeability was achieved by a factor of a few. In PX-2, however, injectivity was very small and hydraulic shearing was not observed due possibly to the near wellbore damage made by the remedying process of lost circulation such as using lost circulation material during drilling. Flow rate of larger than 40 kg/s was achieved at very high well head pressure of nearly 90 MPa. Hydraulic jacking, that is reversible opening and closure of fracture with change of injection pressure, was clearly observed. Although sharp increase of permeability due to fracture opening was achieved with elevated injection pressure, the increased permeability was reversed with decreased injection pressure.Two contrasting response observed in the same reservoir at two different boreholes which is apart only 600 m apart provide important implication that can be used for the stimulation strategy for EGS.This work was supported by the New and Renewable Energy Technology Development Program of the Korea Institute of Energy Technology

  19. Rational risk-based decision support for drinking water well managers by optimized monitoring designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enzenhöfer, R.; Geiges, A.; Nowak, W.

    2011-12-01

    Advection-based well-head protection zones are commonly used to manage the contamination risk of drinking water wells. Considering the insufficient knowledge about hazards and transport properties within the catchment, current Water Safety Plans recommend that catchment managers and stakeholders know, control and monitor all possible hazards within the catchments and perform rational risk-based decisions. Our goal is to supply catchment managers with the required probabilistic risk information, and to generate tools that allow for optimal and rational allocation of resources between improved monitoring versus extended safety margins and risk mitigation measures. To support risk managers with the indispensable information, we address the epistemic uncertainty of advective-dispersive solute transport and well vulnerability (Enzenhoefer et al., 2011) within a stochastic simulation framework. Our framework can separate between uncertainty of contaminant location and actual dilution of peak concentrations by resolving heterogeneity with high-resolution Monte-Carlo simulation. To keep computational costs low, we solve the reverse temporal moment transport equation. Only in post-processing, we recover the time-dependent solute breakthrough curves and the deduced well vulnerability criteria from temporal moments by non-linear optimization. Our first step towards optimal risk management is optimal positioning of sampling locations and optimal choice of data types to reduce best the epistemic prediction uncertainty for well-head delineation, using the cross-bred Likelihood Uncertainty Estimator (CLUE, Leube et al., 2011) for optimal sampling design. Better monitoring leads to more reliable and realistic protection zones and thus helps catchment managers to better justify smaller, yet conservative safety margins. In order to allow an optimal choice in sampling strategies, we compare the trade-off in monitoring versus the delineation costs by accounting for ill

  20. Assessing the reactivation potential of pre-existing fractures in the southern Karoo, South Africa: Evaluating the potential for sustainable exploration across its Critical Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhansay, Taufeeq; Navabpour, Payman; de Wit, Maarten; Ustaszewski, Kamil

    2017-10-01

    Understanding the kinematics of pre-existing fractures under the present-day stress field is an indispensable prerequisite for hydraulically increasing fracture-induced rock permeability, i.e. through hydraulic stimulation, which forms the basis of economically viable exploitation of resources such as natural gas and geothermal energy. Predicting the likelihood of reactivating pre-existing fractures in a target reservoir at particular fluid injection pressures requires detailed knowledge of the orientations and magnitudes of the prevailing stresses as well as pore fluid pressures. In the absence of actual in-situ stress measurements, e.g. derived from boreholes, as is mostly the case in previously underexplored ;frontier areas;, such predictions are often difficult. In this study, the potential of reactivating pre-existing fractures in a likely exploration region of the southern Karoo of South Africa is investigated. The orientations of the present-day in-situ stresses were assessed from surrounding earthquake focal mechanisms, implying c. NW-SE oriented maximum horizontal stress and a stress regime changing between strike-slip and normal faulting. A comparison with paleo-stress axes derived from inverted fault-slip data suggests that the stress field very likely did not experience any significant reorientation since Cretaceous times. Maximum possible in-situ stress magnitudes are estimated by assuming that these are limited by frictional strength on pre-existing planes and subsequently, slip and dilation tendency calculations were performed, assuming hydrostatic pore fluid pressures of c. 32 MPa at targeted reservoir depth. The results suggest that prevalent E-W and NW-SE oriented sub-vertical fractures are likely to be reactivated at wellhead pressures exceeding hydrostatic pore fluid pressures by as little as 2-5 MPa, while less prevalent sub-horizontal and moderately inclined fractures require higher wellhead pressures that are still technically feasible

  1. Potential for offshore geothermal developments using deep gas wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teodoriu, C.; Falcone, G. [Technische Univ. Clausthal, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany). ITE

    2013-08-01

    The development of geothermal resources is steadily increasing as operators meet the challenge of maximising the temperature difference between production and injection wells, while minimising the wellhead temperature of the latter. At present, the minimum working wellhead temperature reported for the heat-to-electricity conversion cycles is limited to about 80 C. The cycle efficiency can be improved by reducing the injection temperature, which is the temperature at which the fluid exits the process. This paper evaluates the potential for generating electricity with a subsea geothermal plant using the difference between downhole reservoir temperature and that of the cold seawater at the mud line. The temperature in the world's oceans is relatively constant, ranging from 0 to 4 C at around 400 meters water depth. The use of these lower offshore water temperatures may help boost geothermal energy development. Deep gas resources are considered to be held within reservoirs below 4600 meters (15000 feet) and are relatively undeveloped as the risks and costs involved in drilling and producing such resources are extremely high. These deep resources have high reservoir temperatures, which offer an opportunity for geothermal exploitation if a new development concept can be formulated. In particular, the well design and reservoir development plan should consider reutilising existing well stock, including dry and plugged and abandoned wells for geothermal application once the gas field has been depleted. The major risks considered in this study include alternative uses of wells in no flow or rapid depletion situations. Reutilisation of the wells of depleted gas reservoirs will invariably lead to lower geothermal development costs compared with starting a geothermal campaign by drilling new wells. In particular, the well design and reservoir development plan should consider reutilising existing well stock, including dry and plugged and abandoned wells for geothermal

  2. Analysis of the Thermal and Hydraulic Stimulation Program at Raft River, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, Jacob; McLennan, John; Moore, Joseph; Podgorney, Robert; Plummer, Mitchell; Nash, Greg

    2017-05-01

    The Raft River geothermal field, located in southern Idaho, roughly 100 miles northwest of Salt Lake City, is the site of a Department of Energy Enhanced Geothermal System project designed to develop new techniques for enhancing the permeability of geothermal wells. RRG-9 ST1, the target stimulation well, was drilled to a measured depth of 5962 ft. and cased to 5551 ft. The open-hole section of the well penetrates Precambrian quartzite and quartz monzonite. The well encountered a temperature of 282 °F at its base. Thermal and hydraulic stimulation was initiated in June 2013. Several injection strategies have been employed. These strategies have included the continuous injection of water at temperatures ranging from 53 to 115 °F at wellhead pressures of approximately 275 psi and three short-term hydraulic stimulations at pressures up to approximately 1150 psi. Flow rates, wellhead and line pressures and fluid temperatures are measured continuously. These data are being utilized to assess the effectiveness of the stimulation program. As of August 2014, nearly 90 million gallons have been injected. A modified Hall plot has been used to characterize the relationships between the bottom-hole flowing pressure and the cumulative injection fluid volume. The data indicate that the skin factor is decreased, and/or the permeability around the wellbore has increased since the stimulation program was initiated. The injectivity index also indicates a positive improvement with values ranging from 0.15 gal/min psi in July 2013 to 1.73 gal/min psi in February 2015. Absolute flow rates have increased from approximately 20 to 475 gpm by February 2 2015. Geologic, downhole temperature and seismic data suggest the injected fluid enters a fracture zone at 5650 ft and then travels upward to a permeable horizon at the contact between the Precambrian rocks and the overlying Tertiary sedimentary and volcanic deposits. The reservoir simulation program FALCON developed at the Idaho National

  3. Accuracy improvements of gyro-based measurement-while-drilling surveying instruments by a laser testing method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rong; Zhao, Jianhui; Li, Fan

    2009-07-01

    Gyroscope used as surveying sensor in the oil industry has been proposed as a good technique for measurement-whiledrilling (MWD) to provide real-time monitoring of the position and the orientation of the bottom hole assembly (BHA).However, drifts in the measurements provided by gyroscope might be prohibitive for the long-term utilization of the sensor. Some usual methods such as zero velocity update procedure (ZUPT) introduced to limit these drifts seem to be time-consuming and with limited effect. This study explored an in-drilling dynamic -alignment (IDA) method for MWD which utilizes gyroscope. During a directional drilling process, there are some minutes in the rotary drilling mode when the drill bit combined with drill pipe are rotated about the spin axis in a certain speed. This speed can be measured and used to determine and limit some drifts of the gyroscope which pay great effort to the deterioration in the long-term performance. A novel laser assembly is designed on the wellhead to count the rotating cycles of the drill pipe. With this provided angular velocity of the drill pipe, drifts of gyroscope measurements are translated into another form that can be easy tested and compensated. That allows better and faster alignment and limited drifts during the navigation process both of which can reduce long-term navigation errors, thus improving the overall accuracy in INS-based MWD system. This article concretely explores the novel device on the wellhead designed to test the rotation of the drill pipe. It is based on laser testing which is simple and not expensive by adding a laser emitter to the existing drilling equipment. Theoretical simulations and analytical approximations exploring the IDA idea have shown improvement in the accuracy of overall navigation and reduction in the time required to achieve convergence. Gyroscope accuracy along the axis is mainly improved. It is suggested to use the IDA idea in the rotary mode for alignment. Several other

  4. Evaluation of hydrocarbon-liquid disposition. Topical report, July 1990-November 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbs, J.E.; Tannehill, C.C.

    1991-08-01

    The report examines the current practice and technology used in natural gas liquids (NGL) extraction in small scale gas processing facilities. The removal of NGLs from a natural gas stream is driven by two factors: (1) hydrocarbon dew point and heating value control; and (2) economic recovery of the NGLs. Wellhead condensates are purchased at a price per barrel adjusted for transportation costs. Water is disposed of by truck at an approximate cost of $1.00 per barrel. Natural gas with a BTU content greater than 1150 normally will require NGL extraction prior to pipeline delivery. NGL recovery, if not required for hydrocarbon dew point or heating value control, must be justified by the value of the liquids exceeding the sum of the following costs: BTU value of the liquids; fuel consumed in the process; operating costs for the plant; and return of the plant investment capital. Liquids are purchased based on component posted prices with the cost of transportation, component fractionation and marketing subtracted. Rich gas in small quantities is normally processed in a straight refrigeration plant. Leaner gas in larger quantities is normally processed in a cryogenic expansion plant. With current technology, there is not sufficient margin to treat lean gases on a small scale

  5. Gas inventory charges and peak-load reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, T.P.; Hackett, S.C.

    1990-01-01

    The natural gas industry has historically been organized through a vertical sequence of long-term contracts, the first between wellhead producer and pipeline, and the second between pipeline and local distribution company (LDC). These long-term contracts contained provisions, variously called take-or-pay (TOP) clauses or minimum bills, that required buyers to pay for a minimum level of supply in all later time periods, regardless of the buyers' actual demand requirements. As a result, the pipeline's purchase obligation was typically offset by the distributor's purchase obligation, so that the pipeline essentially passed the minimum purchase requirement directly from producer to distributor. The authors focus on the role GICs (Gas Inventory Charges) can play in the provision of peak-load reliability, and the effects of GICs and their treatment by regulators on pipeline system design. In particular, they compare the various options available to local distribution companies (LDCs) for providing peak-load reliability, emphasizing the alternative downstream storage. They find that the ratemaking decisions of state regulators may distort LDC choices between different gas supply options, inducing what may be an inefficient demand for new storage facilities. GICs, when competitively prices, offer state regulators a means of circumventing these distortions

  6. Natural gas prices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, W.A.

    1990-01-01

    Since the 1970s, many electric utilities and industrial boiler fuel users have invested in dual fuel use capability which has allowed them to choose between natural gas, residual fuel oil, and in some instances, coal as boiler fuels. The immediate reason for this investment was the need for security of supply. Wellhead regulation of natural gas prices had resulted in shortages during the 1970s. Because many industrial users were given lowest priority in pipeline curtailments, these shortages affected most severely boiler fuel consumption of natural gas. In addition, foreign supply disruptions during the 1970s called into question the ready availability of oil. Many boiler fuel users of oil responded by increasing their ability to diversify to other sources of energy. Even though widespread investment in dual fuel use capability by boiler fuel users was initially motivated by a need for security of supply, perhaps the most important consequence of this investment was greater substitutability between natural gas and resid and a more competitive boiler fuel market. By the early 1980s, most boiler fuel users were able to switch from one fuel to another and often did for savings measured in pennies per MMBtu. Boiler fuel consumption became the marginal use of both natural gas and resid, with coal a looming threat on the horizon to both fuels

  7. [Various report forms and letters regarding Rorabaugh A-12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Various

    2007-08-16

    The documents described here and the following may be found at the Website of the State of California Department of Conservation, Division of Oil, Gas & Geothermal Resources, http://www.consrv.ca.gov/DOG/geothermal/unit_15/Unit15.htm. GEO Operator Corporation (formerly Thermogenics, Inc. and Geothermal Resources International Operator Corporation) drilled steam production and injection wells in the northwestern portion of The Geysers geothermal field from 1967 to 1985. These wells produced steam that was sold to PG&E's power plant 15. In 1989, the plant stopped operating so the wells stopped producing and GEO Operator Corporation went bankrupt. In 1997-1998, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources, with funding from the California Energy Commission, plugged and abandoned most of these idle wells because of severe wellhead corrosion. Technical data and well cuttings were salvaged from an abandoned warehouse on the GEO Operator Corporation lease. These data have recently been scanned and added to the Division's existing scanned well records. The data are unique because GEO Operator Corporation performed an unusually high number of studies, well tests, and analyses. A total of over 10,300 pages and over 340 logs are included in the scans. The reservoir engineering section alone contains over 3,300 pages of reservoir characterization, well testing, and related studies. These data will be useful to the operators at The Geysers Geothermal field, as well as the public and researchers worldwide.

  8. [Various report forms and letters regarding Rorabaugh A-22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Various

    2007-08-16

    The documents described here and the following may be found at the Website of the State of California Department of Conservation, Division of Oil, Gas & Geothermal Resources, http://www.consrv.ca.gov/DOG/geothermal/unit_15/Unit15.htm. GEO Operator Corporation (formerly Thermogenics, Inc. and Geothermal Resources International Operator Corporation) drilled steam production and injection wells in the northwestern portion of The Geysers geothermal field from 1967 to 1985. These wells produced steam that was sold to PG&E's power plant 15. In 1989, the plant stopped operating so the wells stopped producing and GEO Operator Corporation went bankrupt. In 1997-1998, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources, with funding from the California Energy Commission, plugged and abandoned most of these idle wells because of severe wellhead corrosion. Technical data and well cuttings were salvaged from an abandoned warehouse on the GEO Operator Corporation lease. These data have recently been scanned and added to the Division's existing scanned well records. The data are unique because GEO Operator Corporation performed an unusually high number of studies, well tests, and analyses. A total of over 10,300 pages and over 340 logs are included in the scans. The reservoir engineering section alone contains over 3,300 pages of reservoir characterization, well testing, and related studies. These data will be useful to the operators at The Geysers Geothermal field, as well as the public and researchers worldwide.

  9. [Various report forms and letters regarding Rorabaugh A-18

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Various

    2007-08-16

    The documents described here and the following may be found at the Website of the State of California Department of Conservation, Division of Oil, Gas & Geothermal Resources, http://www.consrv.ca.gov/DOG/geothermal/unit_15/Unit15.htm. GEO Operator Corporation (formerly Thermogenics, Inc. and Geothermal Resources International Operator Corporation) drilled steam production and injection wells in the northwestern portion of The Geysers geothermal field from 1967 to 1985. These wells produced steam that was sold to PG&E's power plant 15. In 1989, the plant stopped operating so the wells stopped producing and GEO Operator Corporation went bankrupt. In 1997-1998, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources, with funding from the California Energy Commission, plugged and abandoned most of these idle wells because of severe wellhead corrosion. Technical data and well cuttings were salvaged from an abandoned warehouse on the GEO Operator Corporation lease. These data have recently been scanned and added to the Division's existing scanned well records. The data are unique because GEO Operator Corporation performed an unusually high number of studies, well tests, and analyses. A total of over 10,300 pages and over 340 logs are included in the scans. The reservoir engineering section alone contains over 3,300 pages of reservoir characterization, well testing, and related studies. These data will be useful to the operators at The Geysers Geothermal field, as well as the public and researchers worldwide.

  10. [Various report forms and letters regarding Rorabaugh A-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Various

    2007-08-16

    The documents described here and the following may be found at the Website of the State of California Department of Conservation, Division of Oil, Gas & Geothermal Resources, http://www.consrv.ca.gov/DOG/geothermal/unit_15/Unit15.htm. GEO Operator Corporation (formerly Thermogenics, Inc. and Geothermal Resources International Operator Corporation) drilled steam production and injection wells in the northwestern portion of The Geysers geothermal field from 1967 to 1985. These wells produced steam that was sold to PG&E's power plant 15. In 1989, the plant stopped operating so the wells stopped producing and GEO Operator Corporation went bankrupt. In 1997-1998, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources, with funding from the California Energy Commission, plugged and abandoned most of these idle wells because of severe wellhead corrosion. Technical data and well cuttings were salvaged from an abandoned warehouse on the GEO Operator Corporation lease. These data have recently been scanned and added to the Division's existing scanned well records. The data are unique because GEO Operator Corporation performed an unusually high number of studies, well tests, and analyses. A total of over 10,300 pages and over 340 logs are included in the scans. The reservoir engineering section alone contains over 3,300 pages of reservoir characterization, well testing, and related studies. These data will be useful to the operators at The Geysers Geothermal field, as well as the public and researchers worldwide.

  11. [Various report forms and letters regarding Rorabaugh A-14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Various

    2007-08-16

    The documents described here and the following may be found at the Website of the State of California Department of Conservation, Division of Oil, Gas & Geothermal Resources, http://www.consrv.ca.gov/DOG/geothermal/unit_15/Unit15.htm. GEO Operator Corporation (formerly Thermogenics, Inc. and Geothermal Resources International Operator Corporation) drilled steam production and injection wells in the northwestern portion of The Geysers geothermal field from 1967 to 1985. These wells produced steam that was sold to PG&E's power plant 15. In 1989, the plant stopped operating so the wells stopped producing and GEO Operator Corporation went bankrupt. In 1997-1998, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources, with funding from the California Energy Commission, plugged and abandoned most of these idle wells because of severe wellhead corrosion. Technical data and well cuttings were salvaged from an abandoned warehouse on the GEO Operator Corporation lease. These data have recently been scanned and added to the Division's existing scanned well records. The data are unique because GEO Operator Corporation performed an unusually high number of studies, well tests, and analyses. A total of over 10,300 pages and over 340 logs are included in the scans. The reservoir engineering section alone contains over 3,300 pages of reservoir characterization, well testing, and related studies. These data will be useful to the operators at The Geysers Geothermal field, as well as the public and researchers worldwide.

  12. [Various report forms and letters regarding Rorabaugh A-9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Various

    2007-08-16

    The documents described here and the following may be found at the Website of the State of California Department of Conservation, Division of Oil, Gas & Geothermal Resources, http://www.consrv.ca.gov/DOG/geothermal/unit_15/Unit15.htm. GEO Operator Corporation (formerly Thermogenics, Inc. and Geothermal Resources International Operator Corporation) drilled steam production and injection wells in the northwestern portion of The Geysers geothermal field from 1967 to 1985. These wells produced steam that was sold to PG&E's power plant 15. In 1989, the plant stopped operating so the wells stopped producing and GEO Operator Corporation went bankrupt. In 1997-1998, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources, with funding from the California Energy Commission, plugged and abandoned most of these idle wells because of severe wellhead corrosion. Technical data and well cuttings were salvaged from an abandoned warehouse on the GEO Operator Corporation lease. These data have recently been scanned and added to the Division's existing scanned well records. The data are unique because GEO Operator Corporation performed an unusually high number of studies, well tests, and analyses. A total of over 10,300 pages and over 340 logs are included in the scans. The reservoir engineering section alone contains over 3,300 pages of reservoir characterization, well testing, and related studies. These data will be useful to the operators at The Geysers Geothermal field, as well as the public and researchers worldwide.

  13. [Various report forms and letters regarding Rorabaugh A-17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Various

    2007-08-16

    The documents described here and the following may be found at the Website of the State of California Department of Conservation, Division of Oil, Gas & Geothermal Resources, http://www.consrv.ca.gov/DOG/geothermal/unit_15/Unit15.htm. GEO Operator Corporation (formerly Thermogenics, Inc. and Geothermal Resources International Operator Corporation) drilled steam production and injection wells in the northwestern portion of The Geysers geothermal field from 1967 to 1985. These wells produced steam that was sold to PG&E's power plant 15. In 1989, the plant stopped operating so the wells stopped producing and GEO Operator Corporation went bankrupt. In 1997-1998, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources, with funding from the California Energy Commission, plugged and abandoned most of these idle wells because of severe wellhead corrosion. Technical data and well cuttings were salvaged from an abandoned warehouse on the GEO Operator Corporation lease. These data have recently been scanned and added to the Division's existing scanned well records. The data are unique because GEO Operator Corporation performed an unusually high number of studies, well tests, and analyses. A total of over 10,300 pages and over 340 logs are included in the scans. The reservoir engineering section alone contains over 3,300 pages of reservoir characterization, well testing, and related studies. These data will be useful to the operators at The Geysers Geothermal field, as well as the public and researchers worldwide.

  14. [Various reort forms and letters regarding Rorabaugh A-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Various

    2007-08-16

    The documents described here and the following may be found at the Website of the State of California Department of Conservation, Division of Oil, Gas & Geothermal Resources, http://www.consrv.ca.gov/DOG/geothermal/unit_15/Unit15.htm. GEO Operator Corporation (formerly Thermogenics, Inc. and Geothermal Resources International Operator Corporation) drilled steam production and injection wells in the northwestern portion of The Geysers geothermal field from 1967 to 1985. These wells produced steam that was sold to PG&E's power plant 15. In 1989, the plant stopped operating so the wells stopped producing and GEO Operator Corporation went bankrupt. In 1997-1998, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources, with funding from the California Energy Commission, plugged and abandoned most of these idle wells because of severe wellhead corrosion. Technical data and well cuttings were salvaged from an abandoned warehouse on the GEO Operator Corporation lease. These data have recently been scanned and added to the Division's existing scanned well records. The data are unique because GEO Operator Corporation performed an unusually high number of studies, well tests, and analyses. A total of over 10,300 pages and over 340 logs are included in the scans. The reservoir engineering section alone contains over 3,300 pages of reservoir characterization, well testing, and related studies. These data will be useful to the operators at The Geysers Geothermal field, as well as the public and researchers worldwide.

  15. [Various report forms and letters regarding MSR Abril 5B-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Various

    2007-08-16

    The documents described here and the following may be found at the Website of the State of California Department of Conservation, Division of Oil, Gas & Geothermal Resources, http://www.consrv.ca.gov/DOG/geothermal/unit_15/Unit15.htm. GEO Operator Corporation (formerly Thermogenics, Inc. and Geothermal Resources International Operator Corporation) drilled steam production and injection wells in the northwestern portion of The Geysers geothermal field from 1967 to 1985. These wells produced steam that was sold to PG&E's power plant 15. In 1989, the plant stopped operating so the wells stopped producing and GEO Operator Corporation went bankrupt. In 1997-1998, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources, with funding from the California Energy Commission, plugged and abandoned most of these idle wells because of severe wellhead corrosion. Technical data and well cuttings were salvaged from an abandoned warehouse on the GEO Operator Corporation lease. These data have recently been scanned and added to the Division's existing scanned well records. The data are unique because GEO Operator Corporation performed an unusually high number of studies, well tests, and analyses. A total of over 10,300 pages and over 340 logs are included in the scans. The reservoir engineering section alone contains over 3,300 pages of reservoir characterization, well testing, and related studies. These data will be useful to the operators at The Geysers Geothermal field, as well as the public and researchers worldwide.

  16. [Various report forms and letters regarding Rorabaugh A-7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Various

    2007-08-16

    The documents described here and the following may be found at the Website of the State of California Department of Conservation, Division of Oil, Gas & Geothermal Resources, http://www.consrv.ca.gov/DOG/geothermal/unit_15/Unit15.htm. GEO Operator Corporation (formerly Thermogenics, Inc. and Geothermal Resources International Operator Corporation) drilled steam production and injection wells in the northwestern portion of The Geysers geothermal field from 1967 to 1985. These wells produced steam that was sold to PG&E's power plant 15. In 1989, the plant stopped operating so the wells stopped producing and GEO Operator Corporation went bankrupt. In 1997-1998, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources, with funding from the California Energy Commission, plugged and abandoned most of these idle wells because of severe wellhead corrosion. Technical data and well cuttings were salvaged from an abandoned warehouse on the GEO Operator Corporation lease. These data have recently been scanned and added to the Division's existing scanned well records. The data are unique because GEO Operator Corporation performed an unusually high number of studies, well tests, and analyses. A total of over 10,300 pages and over 340 logs are included in the scans. The reservoir engineering section alone contains over 3,300 pages of reservoir characterization, well testing, and related studies. These data will be useful to the operators at The Geysers Geothermal field, as well as the public and researchers worldwide.

  17. [Various report forms and letters regarding Abril 1-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Various

    2007-08-16

    The documents described here and the following may be found at the Website of the State of California Department of Conservation, Division of Oil, Gas & Geothermal Resources, http://www.consrv.ca.gov/DOG/geothermal/unit_15/Unit15.htm. GEO Operator Corporation (formerly Thermogenics, Inc. and Geothermal Resources International Operator Corporation) drilled steam production and injection wells in the northwestern portion of The Geysers geothermal field from 1967 to 1985. These wells produced steam that was sold to PG&E's power plant 15. In 1989, the plant stopped operating so the wells stopped producing and GEO Operator Corporation went bankrupt. In 1997-1998, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources, with funding from the California Energy Commission, plugged and abandoned most of these idle wells because of severe wellhead corrosion. Technical data and well cuttings were salvaged from an abandoned warehouse on the GEO Operator Corporation lease. These data have recently been scanned and added to the Division's existing scanned well records. The data are unique because GEO Operator Corporation performed an unusually high number of studies, well tests, and analyses. A total of over 10,300 pages and over 340 logs are included in the scans. The reservoir engineering section alone contains over 3,300 pages of reservoir characterization, well testing, and related studies. These data will be useful to the operators at The Geysers Geothermal field, as well as the public and researchers worldwide.

  18. [Various report forms and letters regarding Rorabaugh A-4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Various

    2007-08-16

    The documents described here and the following may be found at the Website of the State of California Department of Conservation, Division of Oil, Gas & Geothermal Resources, http://www.consrv.ca.gov/DOG/geothermal/unit_15/Unit15.htm. GEO Operator Corporation (formerly Thermogenics, Inc. and Geothermal Resources International Operator Corporation) drilled steam production and injection wells in the northwestern portion of The Geysers geothermal field from 1967 to 1985. These wells produced steam that was sold to PG&E's power plant 15. In 1989, the plant stopped operating so the wells stopped producing and GEO Operator Corporation went bankrupt. In 1997-1998, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources, with funding from the California Energy Commission, plugged and abandoned most of these idle wells because of severe wellhead corrosion. Technical data and well cuttings were salvaged from an abandoned warehouse on the GEO Operator Corporation lease. These data have recently been scanned and added to the Division's existing scanned well records. The data are unique because GEO Operator Corporation performed an unusually high number of studies, well tests, and analyses. A total of over 10,300 pages and over 340 logs are included in the scans. The reservoir engineering section alone contains over 3,300 pages of reservoir characterization, well testing, and related studies. These data will be useful to the operators at The Geysers Geothermal field, as well as the public and researchers worldwide.

  19. [Various report forms and letters regarding Filley 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Various

    2007-08-16

    The documents described here and the following may be found at the Website of the State of California Department of Conservation, Division of Oil, Gas & Geothermal Resources, http://www.consrv.ca.gov/DOG/geothermal/unit_15/Unit15.htm. GEO Operator Corporation (formerly Thermogenics, Inc. and Geothermal Resources International Operator Corporation) drilled steam production and injection wells in the northwestern portion of The Geysers geothermal field from 1967 to 1985. These wells produced steam that was sold to PG&E's power plant 15. In 1989, the plant stopped operating so the wells stopped producing and GEO Operator Corporation went bankrupt. In 1997-1998, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources, with funding from the California Energy Commission, plugged and abandoned most of these idle wells because of severe wellhead corrosion. Technical data and well cuttings were salvaged from an abandoned warehouse on the GEO Operator Corporation lease. These data have recently been scanned and added to the Division's existing scanned well records. The data are unique because GEO Operator Corporation performed an unusually high number of studies, well tests, and analyses. A total of over 10,300 pages and over 340 logs are included in the scans. The reservoir engineering section alone contains over 3,300 pages of reservoir characterization, well testing, and related studies. These data will be useful to the operators at The Geysers Geothermal field, as well as the public and researchers worldwide.

  20. [Report forms and letters regarding Rorabaugh 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Various

    2007-08-16

    The documents described here and the following may be found at the Website of the State of California Department of Conservation, Division of Oil, Gas & Geothermal Resources, http://www.consrv.ca.gov/DOG/geothermal/unit_15/Unit15.htm. GEO Operator Corporation (formerly Thermogenics, Inc. and Geothermal Resources International Operator Corporation) drilled steam production and injection wells in the northwestern portion of The Geysers geothermal field from 1967 to 1985. These wells produced steam that was sold to PG&E's power plant 15. In 1989, the plant stopped operating so the wells stopped producing and GEO Operator Corporation went bankrupt. In 1997-1998, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources, with funding from the California Energy Commission, plugged and abandoned most of these idle wells because of severe wellhead corrosion. Technical data and well cuttings were salvaged from an abandoned warehouse on the GEO Operator Corporation lease. These data have recently been scanned and added to the Division's existing scanned well records. The data are unique because GEO Operator Corporation performed an unusually high number of studies, well tests, and analyses. A total of over 10,300 pages and over 340 logs are included in the scans. The reservoir engineering section alone contains over 3,300 pages of reservoir characterization, well testing, and related studies. These data will be useful to the operators at The Geysers Geothermal field, as well as the public and researchers worldwide.

  1. A world-wide perspective of gas in the 21st century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerche, I.

    2003-01-01

    Current availability of gas and current distribution of gas are examined in relation to potential gas discoveries, their likely worldwide distributions, and the present-day markets for gas. Current demands for gas in relation to future likely demands are also evaluated in respect of traditional gas uses. Strategies for evaluating likely new disciplines for gas usage are related to government policies and national security interests. The economic concerns of well-head price, pipelines, and liquefaction are considered in relation to evolving technologies for extracting known reserves, predicting the discoverability of unknown fields, and setting trends for exploration beyond the year 2000. The relation of gas to oil is also considered. The up-shot of all of these factors, evaluated in an integrated manner, would seem to imply that, through about the first third of this century, adequate proven and potential supplies of gas will be available; by the middle of the century there are likely to be local to regional shortages of both reserves of gas as well as supplies of gas in relation to domestic and industrial consumption. By the last third of the century it would appear that gas will not be a dominant energy source in relation to oil, solar, nuclear fusion or other alternatives. Continued industrialization of nations will shorten these lifetime estimates as well as raise significantly the price of gas on a competitive market demand basis. (Author)

  2. Effect of growth conditions on the biodegradation kinetics of toluene by P. putida 54G in a vapor phase bioreactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirpuri, R.; Jones, W.; Krieger, E.; McFeters, G.

    1994-01-01

    Biodegradation of volatile organic compounds such as petroleum hydrocarbons and xenobiotic agents in the vapor phase is a promising new concept in well-head and end-of-pipe treatment which may have wide application where in-situ approaches are not feasible. The microbial degradation of the volatile organics can be carried out in vapor phase bioreactors which contain inert packing materials. Scale-up of these reactors from a bench scale to a pilot plant can best be achieved by the use of a predictive model, the success of which depends on accurate estimates of parameters defined in the model such as biodegradation kinetic and stoichiometric coefficients. The phenomena of hydrocarbon stress and injury may also affect performance of a vapor phase bioreactor. Batch kinetic studies on the biodegradation of toluene by P. Putida 54G will be compared to those obtained from continuous culture studies for both suspended and biofilm cultures of the same microorganism. These results will be compared to the activity of the P. putida 54G biofilm in a vapor phase bioreactor to evaluate the impact of hydrocarbon stress and injury on biodegradative processes

  3. Deep Unconventional Geothermal Resources: a major opportunity to harness new sources of sustainable energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fridleifsson, G.O.; Albertsson, A.; Stefansson, B.; Gunnlaugsson, E.; Adalsteinsson, H.

    2007-07-01

    The Iceland Deep Drilling Project (IDDP) is a long-term program to improve the efficiency and economics of geothermal energy by harnessing Deep Unconventional Geothermal Resources (DUGR). Its aim is to produce electricity from natural supercritical hydrous fluids from drillable depths. Producing supercritical fluids will require drilling wells and sampling fluids and rocks to depths of 3.5 to 5 km, and at temperatures of 450-600{sup o}C. The long-term plan is to drill and test a series of such deep boreholes in Iceland at the Krafla, the Hengill, and the Reykjanes high temperature geothermal systems. Beneath these three developed drill fields temperatures should exceed 550-650{sup o}C, and the occurrence of frequent seismic activity below 5 km, indicates that the rocks are brittle and therefore likely to be permeable. Modeling indicates that if the wellhead enthalpy is to exceed that of conventionally produced geothermal steam, the reservoir temperature must be higher than 450{sup o}C. A deep well producing 0.67 m3/sec steam ({approx}2400 m3/h) from a reservoir with a temperature significantly above 450{sup o}C could yield enough high-enthalpy steam to generate 40-50 MW of electric power. This exceeds by an order of magnitude the power typically obtained from conventional geothermal wells. (auth)

  4. Apparent 85Kr ages of groundwater within the Royal watershed, Maine, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidle, W C

    2006-01-01

    Specific 85Kr activity is mapped from 264 domestic and municipal wells sampled during 2002-2004 in the Royal watershed (361 km2), Maine. Gas samples are collected at 20 m, 40 m, and > 50 m interval depths within the unconfined aquifers. Gas extraction for 85Kr from wells is obtained directly via a wellhead methodology avoiding conventional collection of large sample volumes. Atmospheric 85Kr input to the recharge environment is estimated at 1.27 Bq m(-3) by time-series analyses of weighted monthly precipitation (2001-2004). Numerical simulation of Kr gas transport through the variable unsaturated zones to the water table suggests up to 12-year time lags locally, thus biasing the 85Kr groundwater ages. Apparent 85Kr ages suggest that approximately 70% of groundwater near 20 m depth was recharged less than 30 years BP (2004). Mass-age transport modeling suggests that post mid-1950s recharge penetrates to part of the basin's floor and that older groundwater seeps from the underlying fractured bedrock may occur.

  5. US firms still restructuring, cutting costs under oil price uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koen, A.D.

    1994-01-01

    Despite more than a decade of downsizing, continuing uncertainty in oil markets is forcing US petroleum companies into another round of cutting and restructuring operations. Wellhead gas prices in the US, although still volatile, in the past 2 years have risen to levels adequate to allow profits for most producers in that sector. Higher gas reserves valuations have strengthened producers' overall balance sheets. But the slide in oil prices from the middle of fourth quarter 1993 until the recent upswing the past month has withered producers' financial performances and reserves values. With little prospect of significantly higher oil prices anytime soon, US companies feel they have little choice but to continue pressing cost cutting moves in order to sustain profits in the near term while at the same time earnings a higher return on investment in the long term. Petroleum company executives are overlooking almost no operating or investment strategy thought capable of bolstering the bottom line. Because no two US oil and gas companies are alike, each profit protection plan is a unique mix of similar solutions. Oil and gas production companies most often try to lower operating costs by vigorously selling noncore properties or business units and reducing staff. The paper discusses measures taken by oil and gas companies to lower costs

  6. High-performance intrinsically microporous dihydroxyl-functionalized triptycene-based polyimide for natural gas separation

    KAUST Repository

    Alaslai, Nasser Y.; Ghanem, Bader; Alghunaimi, Fahd; Pinnau, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    A novel polyimide of intrinsic microporosity (PIM-PI) was synthesized from a 9,10-diisopropyl-triptycene-based dianhydride (TPDA) and dihydroxyl-functionalized 4,6-diaminoresorcinol (DAR). The unfunctionalized TPDA-m-phenylenediamine (mPDA) polyimide derivative was made as a reference material to evaluate the effect of the OH group in TPDA-DAR on its gas transport properties. Pure-gas permeability coefficients of He, H2, N2, O2, CH4, and CO2 were measured at 35 °C and 2 atm. The BET surface area based on nitrogen adsorption of dihydroxyl-functionalized TPDA-DAR (308 m2g-1) was 45% lower than that of TPDA-mPDA (565 m2g-1). TPDA-mPDA had a pure-gas CO2 permeability of 349 Barrer and CO2/CH4 selectivity of 32. The dihydroxyl-functionalized TPDA-DAR polyimide exhibited enhanced pure-gas CO2/CH4 selectivity of 46 with a moderate decrease in CO2 permeability to 215 Barrer. The CO2 permeability of TPDA-DAR was ∼30-fold higher than that of a commercial cellulose triacetate membrane coupled with 39% higher pure-gas CO2/CH4 selectivity. The TPDA-based dihydroxyl-containing polyimide showed good plasticization resistance and maintained high mixed-gas selectivity of 38 when tested at a typical CO2 natural gas wellhead CO2 partial pressure of 10 atm.

  7. Investigation of the potential influence of production treatment chemicals on produced water toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stine, E.R.; Gala, W.R.; Henry, L.R.

    1993-01-01

    Production treatment chemicals represent a diverse collection of chemical classes, added at various points from the wellhead to the final flotation cell, to prevent operational upsets and enhance the separation of oil from water. Information in the literature indicates that while many treatment chemicals are thought to partition into oil and not into the produced water, there are cases where a sufficiently water soluble treatment chemical is added at high enough concentrations to suggest that the treatment chemical may add to the aquatic toxicity of the produced water. A study was conducted to evaluate the potential effect of production treatment chemicals on the toxicity of produced waters using the US EPA Seven-day Mysidopsis bahia Survival, Growth and Fecundity Test. Samples of produced water were collected and tested for toxicity from three platforms under normal operating conditions, followed by repeated sampling and testing after a 72-hour period in which treatment chemical usage was discontinued, to the degree possible. Significant reductions in produced water toxicity were observed for two of the three platforms tested following either cessation of treatment chemical usage, or by comparing the toxicity of samples collected upstream and downstream of the point of treatment chemical addition

  8. Understanding ground water investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, P.E.; Ward, W.D.

    1990-01-01

    An orientation manual for groundwater has been developed for small-to-medium-sized businesses who can ill-afford full-time groundwater specialists in their organizations, but who must and wish to comply with the increasingly-complicated environmental laws. Basic themes and information are highlighted, with the hope that these businesses, their counsel, local and regional officials, and government agencies that must make decisions will find their concerns illuminated, and, if necessary, can seek specialized help. The manual is organized into thirteen short chapters which address such discrete issues as: who uses groundwater and how, patterns and trends, and resource value; basic groundwater science and how contaminants reach and move in groundwater; sources of groundwater contamination, particularly light industry and commercial sources; federal regulatory programs for monitoring, protecting, and cleaning up groundwater; state, local, and regional rules for groundwater, focusing on wellhead protection; monitoring groundwater quality and detecting contamination; deciding how significant the contamination is and how much cleanup is necessary; cleanup strategies and techniques; corporate groundwater programs; contingency planning for responding to contamination incidents and replacing contaminated groundwater supplies; a peek into the crystal ball of federal groundwater law; and the cost of cleaning up groundwater. The book concludes with a glossary of terms and acronyms likely to be unfamiliar to the general reader

  9. New tube fitting range can slash assembly time, reduce tube material costs and eliminate hot work

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2008-09-15

    Parker Instrumentation has developed a permanent tube connection technology known as Phastite for use in high pressure applications such as in the offshore oil and gas sector. The Phastite push-fit connector offers major savings over traditional permanent and higher pressure connection techniques such as welded or cone-and-thread tube fittings. It also reduces assembly times by 20-fold or more and eliminates the need for hot work permits. The fittings are designed to withstand working pressures up to 1,379 bar. Phastite tube fittings can be used on offshore platforms, as well as on support vessels,, subsea equipment and ROVs such as hydraulic systems for wellhead control, emergency shut down, chemical injection, pumping packages, gas booster systems and test equipment. The connectors offer considerable savings in material cost and weight because they do not need to be used with more expensive tubing with extra thickness to accommodate a thread. Phastite is also resistant to vibration and does not need any anti-vibration accessories. A joint can be made in a matter of seconds with a simple handheld hydraulic tool that makes the push-fit connection. A sealing mechanism based on a series of defined internal ridges creates a secure seal by radial compression. The ridges grip in a way that retains all of the tubing's strength. An additional characteristic is the maintenance free nature of the Phastite connection. 1 fig.

  10. The domestic supply outlook, how the producing industry is reacting, and the challenge to regulators and policy makers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, C.A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper addresses three main topics which include an overview of the nation's natural gas reserves; a discussion of the challenges the natural gas industry faces in extracting these reserves in the realm of regulations and cost-effective extraction; and a discussion on how the industry, regulators, and policy makers can work together to extract these reserves in an economic manner while effectively operating within existing regulations. The paper also promotes methods to update and change regulations when necessary as a result of technological change or advancement. The results of the reserve study have shown that there are over 2,000 trillion cubic feet of natural gas still available in the US and Canada, not including undiscovered or additional extraction brought about by new technology. The paper goes on to discuss the historical wellhead pricing of natural gas and what these new reserve figures mean to future natural gas costs. The paper then discusses the adequacy of current distribution systems to meet an increasing demand for natural gas. Finally the paper discusses the need for more deregulation of the gas industry to make it more competitive and keep the development of these resources alive in this country. The author presents information on the decline of exploration and development in this country as a result of increased regulation

  11. 2000 Western Canada activity forecast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuntz, D.L.

    1999-10-01

    All wells drilled in Western Canada during the first nine months of 1999 are listed and sorted into 12 geographical areas used in the Petroleum Services Association of Canada (PSAC) well cost study. Each area represents wells of common drilling, production and depth characteristics. Area totals for well counts and meters drilled were determined from the sorting process. Previous years' activities are reviewed and various operators and PSAC members contacted to review upcoming programs. In addition, trends and other projections were consulted to develop an estimate of drilling activity for the rest of 1999 as well as a projection of drilling activity for 2000. The historical and projected drilling activities were tabulated and plotted for each area. Average drilling costs for each area were determined, and the total expenditures were calculated for each area by multiplying the the projected meterage by the adjusted drilling costs. All costs were allocated to various services and products utilizing percentages determined in the Well Cost Study. During the sorting process, a list was developed of the major operators in each area, which list is included in the report along with average depths and types of wells drilled by the various operators in each area. The costs included in the report include only drilling and completion operations, starting with the building of the location prior to drilling, and ending with the installation of the wellhead after construction. 5 tabs

  12. [Various report forms and letters regarding Filley 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Various

    2007-08-16

    The documents described here and the following may be found at the Website of the State of California Department of Conservation, Division of Oil, Gas & Geothermal Resources, http://www.consrv.ca.gov/DOG/geothermal/unit_15/Unit15.htm. GEO Operator Corporation (formerly Thermogenics, Inc. and Geothermal Resources International Operator Corporation) drilled steam production and injection wells in the northwestern portion of The Geysers geothermal field from 1967 to 1985. These wells produced steam that was sold to PG&E's power plant 15. In 1989, the plant stopped operating so the wells stopped producing and GEO Operator Corporation went bankrupt. In 1997-1998, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources, with funding from the California Energy Commission, plugged and abandoned most of these idle wells because of severe wellhead corrosion. Technical data and well cuttings were salvaged from an abandoned warehouse on the GEO Operator Corporation lease. These data have recently been scanned and added to the Division's existing scanned well records. The data are unique because GEO Operator Corporation performed an unusually high number of studies, well tests, and analyses. A total of over 10,300 pages and over 340 logs are included in the scans. The reservoir engineering section alone contains over 3,300 pages of reservoir characterization, well testing, and related studies. These data will be useful to the operators at The Geysers Geothermal field, as well as the public and researchers worldwide.

  13. [Various report forms and letters regarding Filley 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Various

    2007-08-16

    The documents described here and the following may be found at the Website of the State of California Department of Conservation, Division of Oil, Gas & Geothermal Resources, http://www.consrv.ca.gov/DOG/geothermal/unit_15/Unit15.htm. GEO Operator Corporation (formerly Thermogenics, Inc. and Geothermal Resources International Operator Corporation) drilled steam production and injection wells in the northwestern portion of The Geysers geothermal field from 1967 to 1985. These wells produced steam that was sold to PG&E's power plant 15. In 1989, the plant stopped operating so the wells stopped producing and GEO Operator Corporation went bankrupt. In 1997-1998, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources, with funding from the California Energy Commission, plugged and abandoned most of these idle wells because of severe wellhead corrosion. Technical data and well cuttings were salvaged from an abandoned warehouse on the GEO Operator Corporation lease. These data have recently been scanned and added to the Division's existing scanned well records. The data are unique because GEO Operator Corporation performed an unusually high number of studies, well tests, and analyses. A total of over 10,300 pages and over 340 logs are included in the scans. The reservoir engineering section alone contains over 3,300 pages of reservoir characterization, well testing, and related studies. These data will be useful to the operators at The Geysers Geothermal field, as well as the public and researchers worldwide.

  14. [Various report forms and letters regarding Rorabaugh 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Various

    2007-08-16

    The documents described here and the following may be found at the Website of the State of California Department of Conservation, Division of Oil, Gas & Geothermal Resources, http://www.consrv.ca.gov/DOG/geothermal/unit_15/Unit15.htm. GEO Operator Corporation (formerly Thermogenics, Inc. and Geothermal Resources International Operator Corporation) drilled steam production and injection wells in the northwestern portion of The Geysers geothermal field from 1967 to 1985. These wells produced steam that was sold to PG&E's power plant 15. In 1989, the plant stopped operating so the wells stopped producing and GEO Operator Corporation went bankrupt. In 1997-1998, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources, with funding from the California Energy Commission, plugged and abandoned most of these idle wells because of severe wellhead corrosion. Technical data and well cuttings were salvaged from an abandoned warehouse on the GEO Operator Corporation lease. These data have recently been scanned and added to the Division's existing scanned well records. The data are unique because GEO Operator Corporation performed an unusually high number of studies, well tests, and analyses. A total of over 10,300 pages and over 340 logs are included in the scans. The reservoir engineering section alone contains over 3,300 pages of reservoir characterization, well testing, and related studies. These data will be useful to the operators at The Geysers Geothermal field, as well as the public and researchers worldwide.

  15. The Ikhil Gas Project: developing the first commercial natural gas project north of the Arctic Circle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malin, G. [AltaGas Services Inc., AB (Canada)

    2001-07-01

    Development of the Ikhil Natural Gas Project by the Inuvialuit Petroleum Corporation in partnership with Enbridge and AltaGas Services are described in a step-by-step fashion. A minimum of 11 Bcf of recoverable natural gas reserves have been established to date. The Northwest Territories Power Corporation is committed under a 15-year take-or-pay contract to take the gas, and the Town of Inuvik also has a franchise agreement with the project owners for a 15-year period. Challenges faced and overcome in adapting to the regulatory process, the engineering problems that required special solutions (e.g. ice/snow roads, gravel pad to support wellhead and production facilities, reducing temperature of gas to avoid disturbing the permafrost, sand-padding pipeline to supplement high ice/content material), converting a diesel town to a natural gas town, and installing an underground distribution system in ground that is constantly shifting due to permafrost, are some of the examples discussed. Benefits accruing to local people and businesses during construction and the production phases of the project are described, along with details of an assessment and discussion of lessons learned after two years of operation. Overall, the project is considered to have been an engineering success. Financially, it is too early to judge, but it is expected that with economic development in Inuvik taking off, demand for natural gas and electricity will develop and justify the confidence of the developers.

  16. Fingerprinting Deepwater Horizon Oil in the northern Gulf of Mexico using biomarkers and Gas Chromatography-Triple Quadrupole Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS/MS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, P. L.; Overton, E. B.; Maiti, K.; Wong, R. L.

    2016-02-01

    Petroleum biomarkers such as hopanes, steranes, and triaromatic steroids are more persistent than alkanes and aromatic compounds. Thus, they are often used to track spilled oil in the environments and as a proxy for weathering processes. The present study utilizes water samples, suspended and sinking particles, and seafloor sediments collected during 2011-2013 from various locations of the northern Gulf of Mexico with wide range of contaminated oil for Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil fingerprinting. The MC252 source oil along with the samples collected in this study were analyzed using a gas chromatography coupled with a triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC/MS/MS) in Multiple Reaction Monitoring (MRM) mode and the results were compared with results from commonly used GC/MS selective ion monitoring (SIM) method. The results indicate that the MRM method separates interfering ions from interfering compounds and can be a powerful analytical strategy for a reliable identification and determination of trace levels of biomarkers in complex matrices. Source indicators such as the MRM fragment ion chromatograms of the biomarkers and their diagnostic ratios in samples were compared with the MC252 source oil. The preliminary results show that the biomarkers were below detection limits in dissolved samples. However, in few particulate and seafloor sediment samples, primarily from the immediate vicinity of the Macondo wellhead, contained their patterns. The results also illustrate that these biomarker compounds have been weathered within 1-3 years following the oil spill, and their DWH oil signature in some of these samples reflects this weathering.

  17. Subterranean stress engineering experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, J.R.; Colgate, S.A.; Wheat, B.M.

    1980-01-01

    The state of stress in a subterranean rock mass has classically been assumed to be constant at best. In soil with a high clay content, preconsolidation and drainage methods can lead to more stable foundation material, but methods for engineering the stresses in large masses of rock are not well known. This paper shows the results from an experiment designed to alter the in situ rock stress field in an oil shale mine. This was done by hydrofracturing the rock by use of a packed-well injection system and then propping the crack open with a thixotropic gel, which slowly hardened to the consistency of cement. Successive hydrofracture and high-pressure grouting resulted in an overstressed region. Well-head injection pressures, surface tilts, injection rates, and subterranean strains were measured and recorded on floppy disk by a Z-80 microprocessor. The results were then transmitted to the large computer system at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL). To put the data in a more useful form, computer-generated movies of the tilts and strains were made by use of computer graphics developed at LASL. The purpose of this paper is to present results from the Single Large Instrumented Test conducted in the Colony Oil Shale Mine near Rifle, Colorado. 13 figures

  18. Differences in microbial community composition between injection and production water samples of water flooding petroleum reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. K. Gao

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Microbial communities in injected water are expected to have significant influence on those of reservoir strata in long-term water flooding petroleum reservoirs. To investigate the similarities and differences in microbial communities in injected water and reservoir strata, high-throughput sequencing of microbial partial 16S rRNA of the water samples collected from the wellhead and downhole of injection wells, and from production wells in a homogeneous sandstone reservoir and a heterogeneous conglomerate reservoir were performed. The results indicate that a small number of microbial populations are shared between the water samples from the injection and production wells in the sandstone reservoir, whereas a large number of microbial populations are shared in the conglomerate reservoir. The bacterial and archaeal communities in the reservoir strata have high concentrations, which are similar to those in the injected water. However, microbial population abundance exhibited large differences between the water samples from the injection and production wells. The number of shared populations reflects the influence of microbial communities in injected water on those in reservoir strata to some extent, and show strong association with the unique variation of reservoir environments.

  19. Fiscal terms for gas need improvement in many countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meurs, A.P.H. van; Seck, A.

    1997-01-01

    It would be logical to assume that many governments in the world would have more favorable fiscal terms for gas than for oil in order to stimulate gas development. The economics of gas is often less attractive than oil. In many countries gas markets are limited, often causing delays in gas development or restricting the level of production. Expensive gas pipeline and distribution systems need to be installed in order to deliver gas from the fields to markets. Prices for gas at the wellhead are usually lower than for oil on an energy equivalent basis. Gas is a desirable fuel for environmental reasons. Domestic gas development could result in a lower level of oil imports or increased oil exports. Low cost gas could be used in many ways to stimulate the development of certain industries. Finally, improved terms for gas could result in better overall petroleum exploration economics which often results in the discovery of more oil as well as gas. However, a comparative analysis of the government take for oil and for gas for the same concessions and contracts indicates that most governments still require identical fiscal terms for gas and oil. Only a few governments are stimulating gas development with more attractive fiscal terms

  20. Stimulation of deep gas wells using HCl/formic acid system : lab studies and field application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasr-El-Din, H.A.; Al-Mutairi, S.; Al-Malki, B. [Saudi Aramco (Saudi Arabia); Metcalf, S.; Walters, W. [BJ Services Co USA, Houston, TX (United States)

    2002-06-01

    Well stimulation in the deep carbonate Khuff reservoirs in eastern Saudi Arabia is needed to remove drilling mud filter cakes and to enhance reservoir permeability. A non associated gas is being produced from the reservoirs. This gas is associated with the hydrogen sulfide content that varies from 0 to 10-mol per cent. The average reservoir temperature is 275 degrees F and initial reservoir pressure is 7,000 psi. A special system is needed to stimulate the carbonate reservoir because of this high bottomhole temperature and the corrosive nature of hydrochloric acid (HCl) at high temperature. A rotating disk method was used to determine the reaction rate of an HCl/formic acid system with reservoir rocks. Results from coreflood tests showed that the acid system creates deep wormholes in tight reservoir cores. Corrosion tests showed that the well tubulars could tolerate the acid system. A gelled 15-wt per cent HCl/9-wt per cent formic acid system successfully fractured 3 vertical wells in deep sour gas reservoirs without any operational problems. The treatment resulted in significant increases in gas production and flowing wellhead pressures. In addition, overflush of the treatment successfully eliminated the return of live acid after the treatment. 37 refs., 10 tabs., 17 figs.

  1. [Various report forms and letters regarding Rorabaugh 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Various

    2007-08-16

    The documents described here and the following may be found at the Website of the State of California Department of Conservation, Division of Oil, Gas & Geothermal Resources, http://www.consrv.ca.gov/DOG/geothermal/unit_15/Unit15.htm. GEO Operator Corporation (formerly Thermogenics, Inc. and Geothermal Resources International Operator Corporation) drilled steam production and injection wells in the northwestern portion of The Geysers geothermal field from 1967 to 1985. These wells produced steam that was sold to PG&E's power plant 15. In 1989, the plant stopped operating so the wells stopped producing and GEO Operator Corporation went bankrupt. In 1997-1998, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources, with funding from the California Energy Commission, plugged and abandoned most of these idle wells because of severe wellhead corrosion. Technical data and well cuttings were salvaged from an abandoned warehouse on the GEO Operator Corporation lease. These data have recently been scanned and added to the Division's existing scanned well records. The data are unique because GEO Operator Corporation performed an unusually high number of studies, well tests, and analyses. A total of over 10,300 pages and over 340 logs are included in the scans. The reservoir engineering section alone contains over 3,300 pages of reservoir characterization, well testing, and related studies. These data will be useful to the operators at The Geysers Geothermal field, as well as the public and researchers worldwide.

  2. W. Canada boom to outshine second half U.S. drilling rise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petzet, G.A.; Beck, R.J.

    1994-01-01

    Drilling in the US will pick up slightly during second half 1994, but the first half to second half increase proportionally will not be as large as in Canada. Operators appear likely to drill nearly half as many wells this year in western Canada as they will drill in the US. Oil and Gas Journal estimates that drilling and completion spending will total $9.511 billion in the US this year, up about one third of 1% from spending in 1993. This steady investment is forecast despite a 2.3% drop in expected wellhead revenue to $72.53 billion. Highlights to OGJ's midyear drilling forecast for 1994 include: operators will drill 24,705 wells, compared with the 26,840 OGJ estimated in its early year forecast before the slump in crude oil prices; the active rotary rig count will average 810 rigs, 7% higher than in 1993; operators will drill about 3,684 wildcats, down from the 4,170 that OGJ predicted in January; the surveyed group of major operators will drill 3,091 wells in the US, including 246 exploratory wells; and drilling in western Canada will total a year record 11,531 wells, dwarfing the 4,654 wells drilled in 1992

  3. U.S. petroleum industry adjusts to tough economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koen, A.D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that oil and gas companies in the US are curbing costs and redirecting spending to survive the worst decline of petroleum industry activity on record. Persistently weak US natural gas prices and shaky oil prices worldwide have put pressure on domestic companies to become low cost producers. Efforts to cut exploration and development costs have depressed activity in the US, one of the world's most mature oil and gas provinces. International E and D hot spots include the UK North Sea, Yemen, Thailand, Myanmar, Pakistan, and Latin America. Prospects in the Commonwealth of Independent States also continue to generate considerable enthusiasm. Operators struggling to survive or searching for funds to spend on non-US prospects are trying to shuck noncore US assets. Other favored cost cutting strategies include reducing and restructuring debt, operating and administrative staffs, and internal organizations. Major integrated companies are able to add value by refocusing refining, petrochemical, or marketing operations. But independents must adapt operations close to the wellhead to become low cost producers. Whatever tactics are used to mitigate effects of low US activity, no domestic company --- from the largest integrated major to the smallest independent producer --- has proven to be immune from the downturn

  4. Second half work to boost 1991 drilling in the U.S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petzet, G.A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that U.S. well completions in 1991 will increase about 8% compared with 1990 if operators stick with present spending plans during the second half. Operators are expected to realize $76.4 billion in wellhead revenues this year, 10.7% less than the 1990 estimate. However, they are expected to invest a larger share of those revenues in drilling this year than they did in 1990. With less than half the year remaining, here is Oil and Gas Journal's updated look at 1991 U.S. drilling: The rotary rig count will average 1,050, up from last year's average of 1,010. Operators will drill about 31,654 oil wells, gas wells, and dry holes compared with an estimated 29,170 drilled in 1990. Exploratory drilling will decline to 5,711 wildcats. Total footage drilled will exceed 152 million ft of hole; average well depth is expected to be about 4,805 ft. Major oil companies drilled 2,602 wells in the U.S. during first half 1991 and plan to drill 2,569 the rest of this year. Meanwhile, drilling in western Canada will likely total 5,900 wells this year

  5. Evaluation of groundwater pollution in a mining area using analytical solution: a case study of the Yimin open-pit mine in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tianxin; Li, Li; Song, Hongqing; Meng, Linglong; Zhang, Shuli; Huang, Gang

    2016-01-01

    This study focused on using analytical and numerical models to develop and manage groundwater resources, and predict the effects of management measurements in the groundwater system. Movement of contaminants can be studied based on groundwater flow characteristics. This study can be used for prediction of ion concentration and evaluation of groundwater pollution as the theoretical basis. The Yimin open-pit mine is located in the northern part of the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region of China. High concentrations of iron and manganese are observed in Yimin open-pit mine because of exploitation and pumping that have increased the concentration of the ions in groundwater. In this study, iron was considered as an index of contamination, and the solute model was calibrated using concentration observations from 14 wells in 2014. The groundwater flow model and analytical solutions were used in this study to forecast pollution concentration and variation trend after calibration. With continuous pumping, contaminants will migrate, and become enriched, towards the wellhead in the flow direction. The concentration of the contaminants and the range of pollution increase with the flow rate increased. The suitable flow rate of single well should be open-pit for the standard value of pollution concentration.

  6. Opportunities in the United States' gas processing industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, H.S.; Leppin, D.

    1997-01-01

    To keep up with the increasing amount of natural gas that will be required by the market and with the decreasing quality of the gas at the well-head, the gas processing industry must look to new technologies to stay competitive. The Gas Research Institute (GR); is managing a research, development, design and deployment program that is projected to save the industry US dollar 230 million/year in operating and capital costs from gas processing related activities in NGL extraction and recovery, dehydration, acid gas removal/sulfur recovery, and nitrogen rejection. Three technologies are addressed here. Multivariable Control (MVC) technology for predictive process control and optimization is installed or in design at fourteen facilities treating a combined total of over 30x10 9 normal cubic meter per year (BN m 3 /y) [1.1x10 12 standard cubic feet per year (Tcf/y)]. Simple pay backs are typically under 6 months. A new acid gas removal process based on n-formyl morpholine (NFM) is being field tested that offers 40-50% savings in operating costs and 15-30% savings in capital costs relative to a commercially available physical solvent. The GRI-MemCalc TM Computer Program for Membrane Separations and the GRI-Scavenger CalcBase TM Computer Program for Scavenging Technologies are screening tools that engineers can use to determine the best practice for treating their gas. (au) 19 refs

  7. Technological contribution of production engineering for national self-sufficiency in petroleum; Contribuicao tecnologica da engenharia de producao para a auto-suficiencia nacional

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lara, Anelise Quintao [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). E e P Engenharia de Producao. Gerencia de Engenharia de Reservatorios], e-mail: alara@petrobras.com.br; Pinto, Antonio Carlos Capeleiro [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). E e P Engenharia de Producao. Gerencia de Pre-Projetos de Desenvolvimento da Producao], e-mail: acc@petrobras.com.br; Lage, Antonio Carlos Vieira Martins [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES). Gerencia de Tecnologia e Engenharia de Poco], e-mail: antoniolage@petrobas.com.br; Del Vecchio, Cesar Jose Moraes [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES). Programa Tecnologico de Transporte (PROTRAN)], e-mail: cdv@petrobras.com.br; Masetti, Isaias Quaresma [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES). Gerencia de Metodos Cientificos], e-mail: masetti@petrobras.com.br; Formigli Filho, Jose Miranda [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). E e P Engenharia de Producao. Gerencia Executiva de Engenharia de Producao; Fagundes Netto, Jose Roberto [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES). Gerencia de Tecnologia de Elevacao, Escoamento e Processamento], e-mail: rfagundes@petrobras.com.br; Beltrao, Ricardo Luis Carneiro [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES). Gerencia Geral de Producao], e-mail: rbeltrao@petrobras.com.br

    2006-06-15

    This paper presents a retrospective of some of PETROBRAS' main technological advances that contributed for Brazil to reach petroleum production self-sufficiency. The impact of the corporate strategy to invest in training and qualifying human resources in the development of critical technologies for the Company's business is discussed. From the mid-seventies, there has been a significant increase in the effort directed to research and development (R and D) in the Exploration and Production (E and P) segment. Motivated by challenges imposed by ever increasing water depths (WD) and the early production of discovered fields, technological developments accelerated. A few of the topics discussed herein include the competition between wet subsea systems and atmospheric systems, the first floating production units based on semi-submersible drilling platforms and on adapted tankers, the development of wellhead systems, risers and production lines. Beginning in the mid-eighties, PETROBRAS successively broke world records in terms of water depth with its wells and production and off loading facilities. In order to support this leadership, new technologies were developed and adapted, in partnership with vendors and scientific and technological institutions, in the country and abroad. This paper discusses the technologies developed for maintaining the production of mature fields, increasing the production capacity and managing the integrity of installed units, managing great volumes of produced water as a function of mechanisms adopted for the maintenance of reservoir pressure and managing production projects. In conclusion, the main solutions currently in development are described. (author)

  8. Canadian petroleum industry review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feick, R. M.

    1997-01-01

    A wide ranging discussion about the factors that have influenced oil and natural gas prices, the differences of the Canadian market from international markets, the differences between eastern and western Canadian markets, and shareholders' perspectives on recent commodity price developments was presented. Developments in the OPEC countries were reviewed, noting that current OPEC production of 25 mmbbls is about 60 per cent higher than it was in 1985. It is expected that OPEC countries will continue to expand capacity to meet expected demand growth and the continuing need created by the UN embargo on Iraqi oil sales. Demand for natural gas is also likely to continue to rise especially in view of the deregulation of the electricity industry where natural gas may well become the favored fuel for incremental thermal generation capacity. Prices of both crude oil and natural gas are expected to hold owing to unusually low storage levels of both fuels. The inadequacy of infrastructure, particularly pipeline capacity as a key factor in the Canadian market was noted, along with the dynamic that will emerge in the next several years that may have potential consequences for Canadian production - namely the reversal of the Sarnia to Montreal pipeline. With regard to shareholders' expectations the main issues are (1) whether international markets reach back to the wellhead, hence the producer's positioning with respect to transportation capacity and contract portfolios, and (2) whether the proceeds from increased prices are invested in projects that are yielding more than the cost of capital. 28 figs

  9. Application of Fiscal Incentives for Development of East Natuna Gas Field for Long-Term National Natural Gas Demand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwan Batubara

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available East Natuna gas field, which has proven reserves of 46 trillion cubic feet, is projected to meet long-term natural gas needs. However, CO2-content of the gas reserves reaches 71%, leading to expensive development costs. This research investigates the feasibility of the field based on several fiscal incentives. Firstly, gas supply-demand until year 2040 was analyzed. Then, based on the analysis, the field was developed using high CO2 gas separation technology to produce gas of 1300 MMSCFD in 2023, 2600 MMSCFD in 2031, and 3900 MMSCFD in 2039. Finally, the economic feasibility was assessed using cash flow analysis in accordance with Indonesia’s production sharing contract scheme. The results show that the supply-demand gap continues to increase and thus the development is urgently needed. The development cost is estimated around US$ 27.59 billion. The gas selling prices are assumed at US$ 8/MMBTU for wellhead, US$ 11/MMBTU for pipelines, and US$ 11/MMBTU for LNG. To achieve minimum IRR value of 12%, the government needs to offer incentives of 30-year contract period, profit sharing of 55%: 45%, first tranche petroleum to 10%, and tax holiday of 10 years. Toll fee for Natuna-Cirebon pipeline is US$ 2.3/MMBTU at IRR of 12.6%.

  10. National Energy Strategy: Executive Summary. First edition, 1991/1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-02-01

    The National Energy Strategy lays the foundation for a more efficient, less vulnerable, and environmentally sustainable energy future. It defines international, commercial, regulatory, and technological policy tools that will substantially diversify US sources of energy supplies and offer more flexibility and efficiency in the way energy is transformed and used. Specifically, it will spur more efficiency and competition throughout the energy sector, expand the fuel and technology choices available to the Nation, improve US research and development (R ampersand D), and support the international leadership the United States exercises in energy, economic, security, and environmental policy. The Strategy builds upon a number of Bush Administration initiatives. These include the following: (1) the 1990 revisions to the Clean Air Act; (2) natural gas wellhead decontrol legislation in 1989; (3) incentives provided to domestic renewable and fossil energy producers in the fiscal year 1991 budget agreement; (4) the uprecedented international consensus forged in the wake of the Persian Gulf crisis; (5) the fiscal year 1991 and 1992 realignments of the Department of Energy's research and program priorities; (6) the Administration's domestic energy supply and demand measures adopted in response to the Iraqi oil disruption; and (7) the science and mathematics education initiatives by the Secretary of Energy

  11. Experimental study of oil-water with paraffin precipitation in submarine pipelines; Estudo experimental do escoamento oleo-agua com precipitacao de parafinas em dutos submarinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordalo, Sergio N.; Oliveira, Rafael de Castro [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (FEM/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Mecanica. Dept. de Engenharia de Petroleo], e-mail: bordalo@dep.fem.unicamp.br, e-mail: rafael@dep.fem.unicamp.br

    2006-07-01

    The deposition of paraffins in submarine pipelines poses a serious problem for the offshore petroleum production. Paraffins precipitate off oily solutions due to a temperature decrease according to the phase equilibrium conditions of the liquid-solid system. After some time, the continuous precipitation leads to deposits in the internal walls of the pipe, clogging the lines and promoting an increase in the head loss of the flow. Consequently, there is an increase in the pressure gradient required to maintain the flow, and the flow rate is reduced. A complete obstruction of the pipeline may occur. In the present work, this phenomenon was studied in a simulation of the subsea operational conditions, where the oil pipelines laying on the seabed are subjected to low temperatures, just a little above the freezing point of water. The pipeline behaves as a heat exchanger and the hot oil from the underground reservoir emerging from the wellhead is effectively cooled down to the point where paraffin precipitation occurs somewhere along the line. An experimental apparatus was built for a 25.4 mm (1 in) diameter pipe-flow model with 13 m of length, submerged in a chilling bath of near frozen water. Stream wise pressure and temperature gradients were measured, in order to evaluate the differences in the behavior of paraffin deposition between one-phase oil flow and two-phase oil-water flow. (author)

  12. High-performance intrinsically microporous dihydroxyl-functionalized triptycene-based polyimide for natural gas separation

    KAUST Repository

    Alaslai, Nasser Y.

    2016-03-22

    A novel polyimide of intrinsic microporosity (PIM-PI) was synthesized from a 9,10-diisopropyl-triptycene-based dianhydride (TPDA) and dihydroxyl-functionalized 4,6-diaminoresorcinol (DAR). The unfunctionalized TPDA-m-phenylenediamine (mPDA) polyimide derivative was made as a reference material to evaluate the effect of the OH group in TPDA-DAR on its gas transport properties. Pure-gas permeability coefficients of He, H2, N2, O2, CH4, and CO2 were measured at 35 °C and 2 atm. The BET surface area based on nitrogen adsorption of dihydroxyl-functionalized TPDA-DAR (308 m2g-1) was 45% lower than that of TPDA-mPDA (565 m2g-1). TPDA-mPDA had a pure-gas CO2 permeability of 349 Barrer and CO2/CH4 selectivity of 32. The dihydroxyl-functionalized TPDA-DAR polyimide exhibited enhanced pure-gas CO2/CH4 selectivity of 46 with a moderate decrease in CO2 permeability to 215 Barrer. The CO2 permeability of TPDA-DAR was ∼30-fold higher than that of a commercial cellulose triacetate membrane coupled with 39% higher pure-gas CO2/CH4 selectivity. The TPDA-based dihydroxyl-containing polyimide showed good plasticization resistance and maintained high mixed-gas selectivity of 38 when tested at a typical CO2 natural gas wellhead CO2 partial pressure of 10 atm.

  13. NORM management in the oil and gas industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowie, Michael; Mously, Khalid; Fageeha, Osama; Nassar, Rafat

    2008-01-01

    It has been established that Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM) may accumulate at various locations along the oil/gas production process. Components such as wellheads, separation vessels, pumps, and other processing equipment can become NORM contaminated, and NORM can accumulate in the form of sludge, scale, scrapings and other waste media. This can create a potential radiation hazard to workers, general public and the environment if certain controls are not established. Saudi Aramco has developed NORM management guidelines and is implementing a comprehensive strategy to address all aspects of NORM management which aim towards enhancing: NORM monitoring; Control of NORM contaminated equipment; Control over NORM waste handling and disposal; Workers protection, awareness, and training. The benefits of shared knowledge, best practice and, experience across the oil and gas industry are seen as key to the establishment of common guidance. This paper outlines Saudi Aramco's experience in the development of a NORM management strategy and its goals of establishing common guidance throughout the oil and gas industry. (author)

  14. Long-term outlook for world gas trade: 1920-2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDougall, M.W.; Linder, P.T.

    1992-01-01

    The World Gas Trade Model (WGTM) was designed to simulate the economic relationships of world and regional gas markets. Using the data gathered for supply, transportation and demand, the model calculated a consistent set of prices and quantities that, through time, would simultaneously satisfy all physical, behavioural and financial relations embodied in the model network. Three sensitivity cases were examined. The first one examined the effects on world gas supply, demand and trade with oil prices remaining constant throughout the study period. The second sensitivity case examined the effects of lower costs of new liquefied natural gas (LNG) liquefaction facilities. The third sensitivity case examined the effects of policy shifts in favour of natural gas over other fossil fuels for environmental reasons. During the 25-year period of the study, global production of natural gas was projected to almost double, with the overall level of final consumption being very similar to production. Results indicated that natural gas would remain predominantly a regionally traded commodity. The relatively high cost of natural gas transportation was shown to provide a substantial competitive advantage to local producers compared to more distant competitors. The cost of new liquefaction facilities was not considered to be competitive with long distance pipeline transportation. The model also indicated that reducing transportation costs or increasing the wellhead price differential between exporting and importing regions would accelerate the development of global natural gas trade. figs., tabs., refs

  15. Gaz de France annual report 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    A leader in the natural gas market in Europe, Gaz de France is an integrated group active in all sectors of the natural gas industry. In exploration and production, trading of natural gas, transmission, storage, distribution, energy management, air conditioning and heating, the Group has developed recognized skills and know-how both upstream and down to assure its customers of diversified, efficient and competitive services. A leader in liquefied natural gas, storage and distribution technologies, the Gaz de France Group has strong positions in Europe and operates throughout the world by promoting a strategy of alliances and partnerships at all levels of the gas industry. The goal of the Gaz de France Group is to continue to expand and develop its activities from the wellhead to the burner tip, and to seize, in France and throughout the world, the best opportunities offered to capitalize on its strengths. This activity report presents: the corporate profile, the financial highlights, the principal subsidiaries and affiliates, the major European trunk lines the responsive, customer-focused services (exploration-production, trading, transmission, distribution, services), the actions to ensure performance (productive research, comprehensive quality assurance, mobilized workforce ready for the opening of the markets)

  16. Approximate solutions for radial travel time and capture zone in unconfined aquifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yangxiao; Haitjema, Henk

    2012-01-01

    Radial time-of-travel (TOT) capture zones have been evaluated for unconfined aquifers with and without recharge. The solutions of travel time for unconfined aquifers are rather complex and have been replaced with much simpler approximate solutions without significant loss of accuracy in most practical cases. The current "volumetric method" for calculating the radius of a TOT capture zone assumes no recharge and a constant aquifer thickness. It was found that for unconfined aquifers without recharge, the volumetric method leads to a smaller and less protective wellhead protection zone when ignoring drawdowns. However, if the saturated thickness near the well is used in the volumetric method a larger more protective TOT capture zone is obtained. The same is true when the volumetric method is used in the presence of recharge. However, for that case it leads to unreasonableness over the prediction of a TOT capture zone of 5 years or more. © 2011, The Author(s). Ground Water © 2011, National Ground Water Association.

  17. Heavy oils clean up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collitt, R.

    1997-01-01

    High production, transport and refining costs have long led oil companies to shun heavy crude oils. Advances in the technology of upgrading heavy oils, however, are likely to reduce transport costs and improve the refinery output. Research and development by Venezuela's state oil company, Petroleos de Venezuela (PDVSA), has resulted in a process called Aquaconversion which permits the upgrading of heavy crude oils using a catalyst and the hydrogen from steam. This may be carried out at the wellhead in small low-pressure and relatively inexpensive units. In addition, higher distillate yields of higher value could be produced by revamping the thermal cracking units of refineries to incorporate the new technology. This has generated considerable interest in Venezuela's large extra-heavy crude oil reserves and has led multinational oil companies along with PDVSA to pledge $17 billion to their development. Even at a $2 to $3 per barrel upgrading cost, Venezuela's extra heavy crudes are competitive with lighter oils from other countries. Other major markets for the new technology are likely to be China and Russia, given their own large heavy crude reserves. (UK)

  18. Metabolic and spatio-taxonomic response of uncultivated seafloor bacteria following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Handley, K. M.; Piceno, Y. M.; Hu, P.; Tom, L. M.; Mason, O. U.; Andersen, G. L.; Jansson, J. K.; Gilbert, J. A.

    2017-08-04

    The release of 700 million liters of oil into the Gulf of Mexico over a few months in 2010 produced dramatic changes in the microbial ecology of the water and sediment. Here, we reconstructed the genomes of 57 widespread uncultivated bacteria from post-spill deep-sea sediments, and recovered their gene expression pattern across the seafloor. These genomes comprised a common collection of bacteria that were enriched in heavily affected sediments around the wellhead. Although rare in distal sediments, some members were still detectable at sites up to 60 km away. Many of these genomes exhibited phylogenetic clustering indicative of common trait selection by the environment, and within half we identified 264 genes associated with hydrocarbon degradation. Alkane degradation ability was near ubiquitous among candidate hydrocarbon degraders, whereas just three harbored elaborate gene inventories for the degradation of alkanes and aromatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Differential gene expression profiles revealed a spill-promoted microbial sulfur cycle alongside gene upregulation associated with PAH degradation. Gene expression associated with alkane degradation was widespread, although active alkane degrader identities changed along the pollution gradient. Analyses suggest that a broad metabolic capacity to respond to oil inputs exists across a large array of usually rare indigenous deep-sea bacteria.

  19. Case study of a gas plant alliance at Zama Lake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, S.

    1998-01-01

    The definition of gas processing effectiveness varies according to whether a producer emphasizes maximized production, or the greatest wellhead netback, or the greatest return on investment. The producer's vision and objectives can change over time, depending on his financial needs, changes in the investment market, shareholder perceptions, or management motivation. This article describes how a third party processor like Novagas Canada Limited (NCL) can help a producer achieve his objectives. The case of NCL's Zama Lake investment and alliance with Phillips Petroleum is used to illustrate the process. Based on this example, a third party processor can provide important midstream services such as raw gas gathering, field compression, gas processing, sales gas transmission, natural gas liquids recovery, transportation and fractionation. In addition, they can provide access to associated energy industries such as oil and electricity, or any combination of the above, by structuring their services to suit the individual needs of each producer. A third party producer can also reduce risk and cost, provide increased reliability, add new processing capacity, and increased netback. Details of how the alliance between NCL and Phillips Petroleum came about and the advantages that each partner derived from the partnership are described. By entering into an alliance with NCL, Phillips Petroleum gained value by divesting risk and acquiring low cost midstream services, while NCL gained by increasing its presence and by adding economies of scale and greater flexibility in its investment decisions

  20. Natural gas for electric power generation: Strategic issues, risks and opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linderman, C.

    1992-01-01

    Natural gas is again being regarded as a significant fuel for electric power generation. It was once a predominant fuel for utilities in gas-producing areas, but natural gas consumption declined greatly after the 1973 oil shock because of reduced electricity demand and increased coal and nuclear generation. Moreover, wellhead price and other forms of regulation produced gas shortages in the 1970s. The resurgence of natural gas in future resource plans stems from its inherent ideal fuel characteristics: short lead time; low capital costs; small increments of modular capacity; delivered close to load centers; environmentally benign, preferable to oil and coal; and potential for high thermal efficiency in gas turbines. Natural gas, if available and attractively priced, is an ideal fuel for electric power generation. No other fuel shares these attractive characteristics, and utilities, facing higher than expected load growth, are relying on an increasing proportion of gas-fired combustion turbines, combined cycle plants, and cogeneration to meet a growing, yet uncertain, future demand for electricity. Despite these desirable operating characteristics, the varied past and uncertain future of natural gas markets raise legitimate concerns about the riskiness of current utility natural gas strategies. This report, which summarizes the major findings from research efforts, is intended to help utility decision-makers understand the full range of risks they face with natural gas electric power generation and to identify actions they can take to mitigate those risks

  1. Bridging operation and design. The encounter between practical and discipline-based knowledge in offshore platform design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Husemoen, Mette Suzanne

    1998-12-31

    This thesis investigates the relationship between operations and design and the design process, taking as case studies the two new platforms of Phillips Petroleum Company Norway on Ekofisk II, the Ekofisk 2/4 X drilling and wellhead platform and the Ekofisk 2/4 J processing and transportation platform. The emphasis has been on how to take into account operational experience in design. The two research questions are: (1) Are operations and design two communities-of-practice based on different kinds of knowledge?, and (2) What are the conditions for bridging knowledge in operations and design? From the theory reviewed and the field data presented the study concludes that physical closeness and integration of operations and design personnel, experience from the other community-of-practice, and mutual sympathy, trust, and respect, are important factors in bridging knowledge of the operations and design communities-of-practice and creating innovative solutions in design which transcend the existing knowledge in operations and design. 66 refs., 28 figs., 8 tabs.

  2. An omitted variable in OECD oil supply forecasting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynch, M.C.

    1990-01-01

    An earlier paper argued that, based on analysis of existing fields, non-OPEC production seems destined to begin declining soon. However, the author's rate of change for fields in production is about -10%/yr., and if it were adjusted based on this paper's findings, an actual increase in non-OPEC production would be observed. More work is needed to estimate coefficients for production from existing fields, incorporating 1) age of field (which would help indicate technology in place from inception) 2) viscosity of the deposit, 3) porosity of rock, 4) size of production, 5) measured remaining reserves, and 6) price paid at the wellhead. This would obviously be a formidable task. There does appear to be a persistent bias in forecasting competitive supply at the macro level, and the results here seem to suggest that at the micro level, it is due to the omission of additional investment in existing fields. This may help to explain why forecasts of non-OPEC supply have been consistently too pessimistic for at least the past decade, and implies that current forecasts of stronger markets may continue this error

  3. The Future of Foreign Direct Liability? Exploring the International Relevance of the Dutch Shell Nigeria Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liesbeth Enneking

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In January 2013, The Hague District Court in the Netherlands rendered a groundbreaking verdict in a civil liability suit against Royal Dutch Shell and its Nigerian subsidiary (SPDC. The lawsuit had been brought before it by four Nigerian farmers and the Dutch NGO Milieudefensie, in response to a number of oil-spill incidents from SPDC-operated pipelines in the Nigerian Niger Delta. Although the majority of the claims were dismissed, the district court in its ruling did grant one claim that related to spills from an abandoned wellhead, ordering SPDC to pay compensation for the resulting loss. This judgment has international relevance, as this Dutch Shell Nigeria case forms part of a worldwide trend towards foreign direct liability cases. Growing numbers of similar lawsuits have been brought before the courts in other Western societies, but judgments on the merits have so far remained scarce. The relevance of the case has further increased with the US Supreme Court’s April 2013 ruling in the case of Kiobel v. Royal Dutch Petroleum Co., which has significantly limited the scope of the Alien Tort Statute. This article explores The Hague District Court’s decision in the Dutch Shell Nigeria case, and places the case within the socio-legal context of the contemporary trend towards foreign direct liability cases, the international debates on corporate accountability and business & human rights, and the Supreme Court's judgment in the Kiobel case.

  4. Gaz de France annual report 2000; Gaz de France rapport annuel 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    A leader in the natural gas market in Europe, Gaz de France is an integrated group active in all sectors of the natural gas industry. In exploration and production, trading of natural gas, transmission, storage, distribution, energy management, air conditioning and heating, the Group has developed recognized skills and know-how both upstream and down to assure its customers of diversified, efficient and competitive services. A leader in liquefied natural gas, storage and distribution technologies, the Gaz de France Group has strong positions in Europe and operates throughout the world by promoting a strategy of alliances and partnerships at all levels of the gas industry. The goal of the Gaz de France Group is to continue to expand and develop its activities from the wellhead to the burner tip, and to seize, in France and throughout the world, the best opportunities offered to capitalize on its strengths. This activity report presents: the corporate profile, the financial highlights, the principal subsidiaries and affiliates, the major European trunk lines the responsive, customer-focused services (exploration-production, trading, transmission, distribution, services), the actions to ensure performance (productive research, comprehensive quality assurance, mobilized workforce ready for the opening of the markets)

  5. A multiloop geothermal energy supply system for the town of Denizli; Ein aus verschiedenen Kreislaeufen zusammengesetztes, geothermisches Energiesystem fuer die Stadt Denizli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilkis, B I [GEOENERGY for State of Art Geothermal Technologies, Springfield, MO (United States)

    1997-12-01

    Denizli is a town of 400,000 inhabitants. At Kizildere, 31 km from the city center, a geothermal system with a rated capacity of 17 MW{sub e} and a real capacity of 10 MW{sub e} was commissioned in 1994. The wellhead temperature is 212 C and the production rate 830 t/h. The brine, with a temperature of 145 C, is discharged into a nearby river without making use of the available thermal energy of 110 MW{sub t} (375 MBtu/h). In 1994, Pamukkale University held a symposium at Denizli in order to investigate the feasibility of heat recovery for district heating and cooling and the available technologies. (orig.) [Deutsch] Denizli hat fast 400 000 Einwohner. In Kizildere, 31 km vom Stadtzentrum, ist seit 1984 eine geothermische Produktionsanlage mit einer Sollleistung von 17 MW{sub e} in Betrieb. Die tatsaechliche Leistung liegt bei 10 MW{sub e}. Die Temperatur an der Quelle betraegt 212 C und die Produktionsrate 830 t/h. Der in Betrieb befindliche Separator liefert 80 t/h Dampf. Die verbleibende Sole wird derzeit mit einer Temperatur von etwa 145 C in einen nahegelegenen Fluss abgeleitet, ohne die verfuegbare geothermische Energie von 110 MW{sub t} (375 MBtu/h) zu nutzen. 1994 wurde von der Pamukkale Universitaet in Denizli ein Symposium veranstaltet, um die Zweckmaessigkeit und die verschiedenen Moeglichkeiten der Abwaermerueckgewinnung durch ein Fernwaerme- und Kuehlungssystem in Denizli zu eroertern. (orig.)

  6. How wireless remote technology reduces cost, boosts productivity and improves safety in upstream oil and gas operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wommack, K. [Viatran, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2009-09-15

    This article demonstrated how wireless communications can help oil and gas producers obtain the most current information on the status of their operations to help optimize operations and protect workers and equipment. Wireless communication can provide benefits at nearly every phase of upstream production. When combined with pressure, temperature, flow, level and other sensing devices, wireless communications provide an effective and economical way to deliver data on well or pipeline operations to site managers; optimize well-production, minimize workovers and prevent blowdowns at the wellhead; track oil and water production; measure differential pressure, line pressure and line temperature; and monitor the motorized choke and control valve position. Wireless technology offers significant savings through improved maintenance efficiency. With wireless systems in remote locations, there are seldom problems in the transmission path. Wireless technology makes it much easier and affordable to manage well operations from a safe distance. By eliminating the need for wires in a fracing operation, wireless can help fracing companies maintain a safe operating distance from their target wells, and move operations from well to well with ease. A wireless communication system for transmitting process data from field sensors to a field processing device consists of radio transmitters, a communications gateway and a user interface. The communications hub receives encrypted messages from the remote devices and transmits them to a flow computer, SCADA system, or Distributed Control System. Data is then transmitted to a central office. 1 fig.

  7. Hydrogeochemistry and reservoir model of Fuzhou geothermal field, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, H. F.; Goff, Fraser

    1986-03-01

    Fuzhou geothermal field is a low- to intermediate-temperature geothermal system consisting of meteoric water that circulates deeply along faults. The area of the field is about 9 km 2 but it is elongated in a NNW-trending direction. Fluids in the field are controlled by a series of four NNW extensional faults in Cretaceous granitic basement (Fuzhou fault zone). These faults feed warm waters into overlying permeable Quaternary sediments. The hydrothermal system consists of north and south parts whose chemical compositions are subtly different. In the northern part the system discharges sulfate/chloride waters with relatively low chloride concentrations, but in the south the system discharges chloride waters having relatively high chloride concentrations. Maximum wellhead temperatures are 97°C, which agrees with the chalcedony geothermometer in many cases. Based on the solubility of quartz, the deep-reservoir temperature cannot exceed 123 to 131°C. From heat and mass balance calculations, we conclude that the present total extracted capacity of fluid from the reservoir (20,000 tons/day) could be doubled without noticeable drawdown. We estimate the recoverable heat in the reservoir to be about 1.71 × 10 11 MJ.

  8. Bridging operation and design. The encounter between practical and discipline-based knowledge in offshore platform design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Husemoen, Mette Suzanne

    1997-12-31

    This thesis investigates the relationship between operations and design and the design process, taking as case studies the two new platforms of Phillips Petroleum Company Norway on Ekofisk II, the Ekofisk 2/4 X drilling and wellhead platform and the Ekofisk 2/4 J processing and transportation platform. The emphasis has been on how to take into account operational experience in design. The two research questions are: (1) Are operations and design two communities-of-practice based on different kinds of knowledge?, and (2) What are the conditions for bridging knowledge in operations and design? From the theory reviewed and the field data presented the study concludes that physical closeness and integration of operations and design personnel, experience from the other community-of-practice, and mutual sympathy, trust, and respect, are important factors in bridging knowledge of the operations and design communities-of-practice and creating innovative solutions in design which transcend the existing knowledge in operations and design. 66 refs., 28 figs., 8 tabs.

  9. Preliminary assessment of the Velocity Pump Reaction Turbine as a geothermal total-flow expander

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demuth, O.J.

    1985-01-01

    A preliminary evaluation was made of the Velocity Pump Reaction Turbine (VPRT) as a total flow expander in a geothermal-electric conversion cycle. Values of geofluid effectiveness of VPRT systems were estimated for conditions consisting of: a 360/sup 0/F geothermal resource, 60/sup 0/F wet-bulb ambient temperature, zero and 0.003 mass concentrations of dissolved noncondensible gas in the geofluid, 100 and 120/sup 0/F condensing temperature, and engine efficiencies ranging from 0.4 to 1.0. Achievable engine efficiencies were estimated to range from 0.47 to 0.77, with plant geofluid effectivenss values ranging as high as 9.5 Watt hr/lbm geofluid. This value is competitive with magnitudes of geofluid effectiveness projected for advanced binary plants, and is on the order of 40% higher than estimates for dual-flash steam systems and other total flow systems reviewed. Because of its potentially high performance and relative simplicity, the VPRT system appears to warrant further investigation toward its use in a well-head geothermal plant. 13 refs., 5 figs.

  10. Chemical Tool Peer Review Summary.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cashion, Avery Ted [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Cieslewski, Grzegorz [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Chemical tracers are commonly used to characterize fracture networks and to determine the connectivity between the injection and production wells. Currently, most tracer experiments involve injecting the tracer at the injection well, manually collecting liquid samples at the wellhead of the production well, and sending the samples off for laboratory analysis. While this method provides accurate tracer concentration data, it does not provide information regarding the location of the fractures conducting the tracer between wellbores. The goal of this project is to develop chemical sensors and design a prototype tool to help understand the fracture properties of a geothermal reservoir by monitoring tracer concentrations along the depth of the well. The sensors will be able to detect certain species of the ionic tracers (mainly iodide) and pH in-situ during the tracer experiment. The proposed high-temperature (HT) tool will house the chemical sensors as well as a standard logging sensor package of pressure, temperature, and flow sensors in order to provide additional information on the state of the geothermal reservoir. The sensors and the tool will be able to survive extended deployments at temperatures up to 225 °C and high pressures to provide real-time temporal and spatial feedback of tracer concentration. Data collected from this tool will allow for the real-time identification of the fractures conducting chemical tracers between wellbores along with the pH of the reservoir fluid at various depths.

  11. [Various report forms and letters regarding Rorabaugh A-3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Various

    2007-08-16

    The documents described here and the following may be found at the Website of the State of California Department of Conservation, Division of Oil, Gas & Geothermal Resources, http://www.consrv.ca.gov/DOG/geothermal/unit_15/Unit15.htm. GEO Operator Corporation (formerly Thermogenics, Inc. and Geothermal Resources International Operator Corporation) drilled steam production and injection wells in the northwestern portion of The Geysers geothermal field from 1967 to 1985. These wells produced steam that was sold to PG&E's power plant 15. In 1989, the plant stopped operating so the wells stopped producing and GEO Operator Corporation went bankrupt. In 1997-1998, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources, with funding from the California Energy Commission, plugged and abandoned most of these idle wells because of severe wellhead corrosion. Technical data and well cuttings were salvaged from an abandoned warehouse on the GEO Operator Corporation lease. These data have recently been scanned and added to the Division's existing scanned well records. The data are unique because GEO Operator Corporation performed an unusually high number of studies, well tests, and analyses. A total of over 10,300 pages and over 340 logs are included in the scans. The reservoir engineering section alone contains over 3,300 pages of reservoir characterization, well testing, and related studies. These data will be useful to the operators at The Geysers Geothermal field, as well as the public and researchers worldwide.

  12. Availability/reliability of gas supplies are concerns for utilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.J.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that long-term economical and reliable fuel contracts are imperative for increased use of natural gas. Demand for natural gas grew by 3.3% in 1991 to 19.3 trillion cubic feet (tcf) according to the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration (EIA). during 1992, EIA expects natural gas demand to grow about 1.8%. However, EIA predicts that natural gas demand will be down slightly in the electric power sector. This is despite the potential for continuing lower gas prices and availability. wellhead prices for natural gas fell by more than 9% in 1991. Although EIA forecasts a decline in natural gas use by electric utilities, a study undertaken by ICF Resources for Enron Power Services, Inc. expects natural gas consumption in the power industry to increase in the 1990s. ICF says that the growth will occur because many new plants will be gas-fired, many existing electric utility power plants designed for oil and/or natural gas operation will use natural gas, and about half of new non-utility power plants will be gas-fired

  13. Natural gas industry optimistic for U.S. and Canadian supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2000-01-01

    According to a survey conducted by the Ziff Energy Group, industry insiders are optimistic about natural gas supply and demand during 2000. The survey, which was designed to provide an integrated description of the North American gas industry from wellhead to burner tip, covered 124 companies across North America. Slightly more than half of the U.S. respondents expect to produce at least five per cent more natural gas in 2000 than the previous year, while 19 per cent of the respondents expect production increases to exceed 15 per cent. Among Canadian respondents, some 70 per cent expect production to increase five per cent; another 25 per cent anticipate increases in production to reach or exceed 15 per cent. Canadian natural gas export to the United States are expected to grow by up to 700 million cubic feet per day by almost 50 per cent of Canadian respondents; one third of the respondents expect exports to increase by 700 to 900 million cubic feet per day. Growth in U.S. demand for natural gas are predicted to be moderate in 2000, and increase somewhat in 2001. Canadian growth in sales is expected to be in the one-to-two per cent range. Few of the respondents expect gas prices to decline, and few are concerned that gas prices may put sales at risk. The majority of respondents believe that gas supply growth poses the greatest challenge to increasing pipeline capacity

  14. Can deployment of renewable energy put downward pressure on natural gas prices?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2007-01-01

    High and volatile natural gas prices have increasingly led to calls for investments in renewable energy. One line of argument is that deployment of these resources may lead to reductions in the demand for and price of natural gas. Many recent US-based modeling studies have demonstrated that this effect could provide significant consumer savings. In this article we evaluate these studies, and benchmark their findings against economic theory, other modeling results, and a limited empirical literature. We find that many uncertainties remain regarding the absolute magnitude of this effect, and that the reduction in natural gas prices may not represent an increase in aggregate economic wealth. Nonetheless, we conclude that many of the studies of the impact of renewable energy on natural gas prices appear to have represented this effect within reason, given current knowledge. These studies specifically suggest that a 1% reduction in US natural gas demand could lead to long-term average wellhead price reductions of 0.8-2%, and that each megawatt-hour of renewable energy may benefit natural gas consumers to the tune of at least $7.5-20

  15. Can deployment of renewable energy put downward pressure on natural gas prices?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiser, R.; Bolinger, M.

    2007-01-01

    High and volatile natural gas prices have increasingly led to calls for investments in renewable energy. One line of argument is that deployment of these resources may lead to reductions in the demand for and price of natural gas. Many recent US-based modeling studies have demonstrated that this effect could provide significant consumer savings. In this article we evaluate these studies, and benchmark their findings against economic theory, other modeling results, and a limited empirical literature. We find that many uncertainties remain regarding the absolute magnitude of this effect, and that the reduction in natural gas prices may not represent an increase in aggregate economic wealth. Nonetheless, we conclude that many of the studies of the impact of renewable energy on natural gas prices appear to have represented this effect within reason, given current knowledge. These studies specifically suggest that a 1% reduction in US natural gas demand could lead to long-term average wellhead price reductions of 0.8-2%, and that each megawatt-hour of renewable energy may benefit natural gas consumers to the tune of at least $7.5-20. [Author

  16. Seawater capacitance – a promising proxy for mapping and characterizing drifting hydrocarbon plumes in the deep ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Fleming

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydrocarbons released into the deep ocean are an inevitable consequence of natural seep, seafloor drilling, and leaking wellhead-to-collection-point pipelines. The Macondo 252 (Deepwater Horizon well blowout of 2010 was even larger than the Ixtoc event in the Gulf of Campeche in 1979. History suggests it will not be the last accidental release, as deepwater drilling expands to meet an ever-growing demand. For those who must respond to this kind of disaster, the first line of action should be to know what is going on. This includes knowing where an oil plume is at any given time, where and how fast it is moving, and how it is evolving or degrading. We have experimented in the laboratory with induced polarization as a method to track hydrocarbons in the seawater column and find that finely dispersed oil in seawater gives rise to a large distributed capacitance. From previous sea trials, we infer this could potentially be used to both map and characterize oil plumes, down to a ratio of less than 0.001 oil-to-seawater, drifting and evolving in the deep ocean. A side benefit demonstrated in some earlier sea trials is that this same approach in modified form can also map certain heavy placer minerals, as well as communication cables, pipelines, and wrecks buried beneath the seafloor.

  17. Persistent impacts to the deep soft-bottom benthos one year after the Deepwater Horizon event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagna, Paul A; Baguley, Jeffrey G; Cooksey, Cynthia; Hyland, Jeffrey L

    2017-03-01

    In fall 2010, several months after the Deepwater Horizon blowout was capped, zones of moderate and severe impacts to deep-sea, soft-bottom benthos were identified that together extended over an area of 172 km 2 . A subset of stations sampled in 2010 was resampled in May and June 2011, 10 to 11 months after the event, to determine whether the identified adverse effects were persisting. The design compared 20 stations from the combined moderate and severe impact zone to 12 stations in the reference zone that were sampled in both years. There were no statistically significant differences in contaminant concentrations between the impact and nonimpact zones from 2010 to 2011, which indicates contaminants persisted after 1 y. Whereas there were some signs of recovery in 2011 (particularly for the meiofauna abundance and diversity), there was evidence of persistent, statistically significant impacts to both macrofauna and meiofauna community structure. Macrofaunal taxa richness and diversity in 2011 were still 22.8% and 35.9% less, respectively, in the entire impact zone than in the surrounding nonimpact area, and meiofaunal richness was 28.5% less in the entire impact zone than in the surrounding area. The persistence of significant biodiversity losses and community structure change nearly 1 y after the wellhead was capped indicates that full recovery had yet to have occurred in 2011. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2017;13:342-351. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  18. Constraining the Spatial Extent of Marine Oil Snow Sedimentation and Flocculent Accumulation Following the Deepwater Horizon Event Using an Excess 210Pb Flux Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwing, P T; Brooks, G R; Larson, R A; Holmes, C W; O'Malley, B J; Hollander, D J

    2017-06-06

    Following the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) event in 2010, there were several lines of evidence indicating the presence of marine oil snow sedimentation and flocculent accumulation (MOSSFA). A significant amount of marine oil snow formed in the water column of the northern Gulf of Mexico (nGoM), settled rapidly, and ultimately accumulated in the sediments of the nGoM. This study utilized a commonly used radioisotope tracer (excess 210 Pb, 210 Pb xs ) from 32 sediment cores collected from 2010 to 2013 to characterize the spatial extent of MOSSFA on the seafloor. Relative to pre-DWH conditions, an increase in 210 Pb xs flux occurred in two distinct regions: (1) in the western portion of the study area on an east-northeast to west-southwest axis, stretching 230 km southwest and 140 km northeast of the DWH wellhead, and (2) in the eastern portion of the study area on a 70 km northeast to southwest axis near the DeSoto Canyon. The total sedimentary spatial extent of MOSSFA, as calculated by increased 210 Pb xs flux after 2010, ranged from 12 805 to 35 425 km 2 . 210 Pb xs flux provides a valuable tool for documenting the spatial extent of MOSSFA following DWH and will continue to aid in the determination of advective transport and ultimate depocenters of MOSSFA material.

  19. DTS technology: evaluation in steam injection pilots in PETROBRAS; Tecnologias DTS: avaliacao em pilotos de injecao de vapor na PETROBRAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Triques, Adriana Lucia Cerri; Rodrigues, Renato Cunha; Souza, Carlos Francisco Sales de; Izetti, Ronaldo Goncalves [Petroleo Brasileiro S.A. (PETROBRAS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    In oil and gas industry, downhole pressure and temperature distributed sensors can provide strategic information for production optimization throughout the field. Upon the successful implementation of a pilot for optical fiber distributed temperature monitoring of observer wells in a steam injection field, two new pilots have been implemented to also monitor injectors and producers in both cyclic and continuous injection fields strongly influenced by H2S. The pilots demonstrated that this technology is suitable to monitor producers in onshore fields under the conditions above without risks to the production. The sensors did not prove to be suitable for long term monitoring of injectors under continuous steam injection if fiber is installed inside the injection tubing. For cyclic injection applications, the development of steam injection packers is needed to guarantee casing integrity during the injection cycle. The application of the technology in offshore wells is nowadays restricted to dry completion situation. The potential applicability in submarine wells is tightly linked to the development of downhole and wellhead wet mate optical fiber connectors. (author)

  20. Methane Flux to the Atmosphere from the Deepwater Horizon Oil Leak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yvon-Lewis, S. A.; Hu, L.; Kessler, J. D.; Garcia Tigreros, F.; Chan, E. W.; Du, M.

    2010-12-01

    The unfortunate blowout at the BP Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil rig on April 20, which killed 11 people, was releasing oil and methane at an average rate of 58,000 barrels per day into the deep ocean, until it was recently capped resulting in a total of 4.9 million barrels released (National Incident Command Report, 2010). The methane component of the emission was estimated at 40-60%. As part of a NSF funded RAPID award, the sea-to-air flux of methane from the blowout at the Deepwater Horizon was measured on board the R/V Cape Hatteras from June 11-20 with substantial spatial and temporal resolution over the course of seven days in June 2010. Air and water concentrations were analyzed continuously from a flowing air line and a continuously flowing seawater equilibrator using cavity ring-down spectrometers (CRDS) and a gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector (GC-FID). The results indicate a low flux of methane to the atmosphere (0.024 μmol m^{-2} d^{-1}) with atmospheric and seawater equilibrium mixing ratios averaging 1.86 ppm and 2.85 ppm, respectively within the survey area. Most of the methane emitted from the wellhead was not emitted to the atmosphere. It dissolved into the water column at depth.

  1. Simulation of the landfall of the Deepwater Horizon oil on the shorelines of the Gulf of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boufadel, Michel C; Abdollahi-Nasab, Ali; Geng, Xiaolong; Galt, Jerry; Torlapati, Jagadish

    2014-08-19

    We conducted simulations of oil transport from the footprint of the Macondo Well on the water surface throughout the Gulf of Mexico, including deposition on the shorelines. We used the U.S. National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) model General NOAA Operational Modeling Environment (GNOME) and the same parameter values and input adopted by NOAA following the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) blowout. We found that the disappearance rate of oil off the water surface was most likely around 20% per day based on satellite-based observations of the disappearance rate of oil detected on the sea surface after the DWH wellhead was capped. The simulations and oil mass estimates suggest that the mass of oil that reached the shorelines was between 10,000 and 30,000 tons, with an expected value of 22,000 tons. More than 90% of the oil deposition occurred on the Louisiana shorelines, and it occurred in two batches. Simulations revealed that capping the well after 2 weeks would have resulted in only 30% of the total oil depositing on the shorelines, while capping after 3 weeks would have resulted in 60% deposition. Additional delay in capping after 3 weeks would have averted little additional shoreline oiling over the ensuing 4 weeks.

  2. Challenges and Opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foster, J.B.

    1999-01-01

    A series of overhead viewgraphs accompanied this presentation. The viewgraphs presented 1998 year-end predictions of oil and gas prices. Comparisons of projected versus actual values for 1998 for natural gas consumption, production, imports and wellhead prices for the United States were also presented. A comparison of projected versus actual consumption values for 1998 in the residential, commercial, industrial and electric generation sectors was included. In many cases actual versus projected values were quite different. The importance of storage to balancing the market was illustrated. Graphs depicting gas production, workover rigs, reserve life comparisons, and GOM natural gas rig count and production for the U.S. were described. Drilling activity in the Gulf of Mexico was summarized. The total wells drilled in 1997 was 1223 compared to 1019 in 1998. The factors affecting deliverability additions on the Gulf of Mexico shelf include smaller new discoveries, diminishing completion opportunities in older fields, few productive zones in new discoveries and a rapid decline rate resulting from smaller reservoirs. 6 tabs., 13 figs

  3. Newberry EGS Demonstration: Phase 2.2 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cladouhos, Trenton T. [AltaRock Energy, Seattle, WA (United States); Petty, Susan [AltaRock Energy, Seattle, WA (United States); Swyer, Mike W. [AltaRock Energy, Seattle, WA (United States); Nordin, Yini [AltaRock Energy, Seattle, WA (United States); Garrison, Geoff [AltaRock Energy, Seattle, WA (United States); Uddenberg, Matt [AltaRock Energy, Seattle, WA (United States); Grasso, Kyla [AltaRock Energy, Seattle, WA (United States); Stern, Paul [PLS Environmental, Boulder, CO (United States); Sonnenthal, Eric [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Foulger, Gillian [Foulger Consulting, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Julian, Bruce [Foulger Consulting, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2015-07-03

    The Newberry Volcano EGS Demonstration is a five year field project designed to demonstrate recent technological advances for engineered geothermal systems (EGS) development. Advances in reservoir stimulation, diverter, and monitoring are being tested in a hot (>300 ºC), dry well (NWG 55-29) drilled in 2008. In the fall of 2014, 9,500m3 (2.5 million gallons) of groundwater were injected at a maximum wellhead pressure of 195 bar (2850 psi) over 4 weeks of hydraulic stimulation. Injectivity changes, thermal profiles and seismicity indicate that fracture permeability in well NWG 55-29 was enhanced. The fifteen-station microseismic array (MSA) located 398 seismic events, ranging in magnitude from M 0 to M 2.26. The next step is to drill a production well into the EGS reservoir. Advanced analysis of the microseismic data including hand picking of first arrivals, moment tensors, relative relocations, and velocity model improvements have resulted new higher-quality microseismic catalogs. These catalogs have been combined by relative weighting and gridding of seismic densities, resulting in probability-based maps and cross-sections, which have been used to plan a production well trajectory. The microseismic locations and times were also used to develop a reservoir diffusivity model, which can be used to evaluate stimulation plans such as dual-well stimulation.

  4. Geopressured-geothermal test of the EDNA Delcambre No. 1 well, Tigre Lagoon Field, Vermilion Parish, Louisiana: analysis of water an dissolved natural gas. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hankins, B.E.; Karkalits, O.C.

    1978-09-01

    The Edna Delcambre et al. No. 1 gas well, shut-in since June 1975, was made available for the project. Two geopressured sand-bed aquifers were tested: sand No. 3 at a depth of 12,900 feet and sand No. 1 at a depth of 12,600 feet. Each aquifer was subjected to flow tests which lasted approximately three weeks in each case. Water samples were obtained during flow testing of the two geopressured aquifers. The water contained 11.3 to 13.3% dissolved solids. Several radioactive species were measured. Radium-226 was found to be approximately 10 times more concentrated than the average amount observed in surface waters. No appreciable amount of heavy metals was detected. Recombination studies at bottom-hole conditions indicate the solubility of natural gas per barrel of water to be about 24 SCF. The methane content was 93 to 95%, and the gas had a heating value in the range of 1020 to 1070 Btu/cu.ft. During the flow tests, the gas/water ratio at the well-head was observed to be 45 to 88 SCF/Bbl water produced. (MHR)

  5. Results of investigation at the Miravalles geothermal field, Costa Rica. Resultados de las investigaciones en el campo geotermico de Miravalles, Costa Rica; Parte 2, Muestreo de fluidos pozo abajo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigsby, C.O.; Goff, F.; Trujillo, P.E. Jr.; Counce, D.A.; Dennis, B.; Kolar, J.; Corrales, R. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA); Instituto Costarricense de Electricidad, San Jose (Costa Rica))

    1989-10-01

    Samples of the geothermal fluids in the Miravalles, Costa Rica, geothermal system were collected from production wellbores using downhole fluid samplers, from flowing wellheads using miniseparators, and from hot springs that discharge in the area. The reservoir fluid at Miravalles is a neutral-chloride-type water, but fumaroles and acid-sulfate springs are present within the main thermal area, and there are bicarbonate-rich hot springs that are clearly related to the neutral-chloride reservoir fluids. Dissolved gases are primarily a mixture of CO{sub 2} with air, but samples collected in the fumarolic areas also contain H{sub 2}S. Water-stable isotope analyses suggest local meteoric recharge, and the reservoir fluid shows oxygen isotopic shifts of about 2.5% due to high-temperature oxygen exchange between water and rock. Chemical geothermometer temperatures are consistent with the measured downhole temperature of 220{degrees} to 255{degrees}C. This pattern of neutral-chloride reservoir fluids with acid-sulfate springs near the source region and bicarbonate-rich chloride hot springs at the periphery of the system suggests a lateral outflow type of hydrothermal system. In addition to the geochemical evidence, temperature profiles from several of the wells show temperature reversals that are characteristic of lateral outflow plumes. We find no evidence for the underlying, higher temperature (300{degrees}C) system, which has been suggested by other investigators. 24 refs., 14 figs., 6 tabs.

  6. The history and significance of the Hawaii geothermal project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, D.M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports that the Hawaii Geothermal Project, since its initiation in 1972, has not only demonstrated that there is a viable geothermal resource present on the Kilauea East Rift Zone, it has also produced a wealth of information about the characteristics of the resource and the operational requirements that must be met to generate electrical power on a long term reliable basis. The HGP-A well demonstrated that a high-temperature hydrothermal system was present on the East Rift Zone; the HGP-A Wellhead Generator Facility showed that electrical power could be generated on a long-term basis from the geothermal reservoir with an availability factor of more than 90%; and research at the facility tested several types of systems for control of hydrogen sulfide and scale deposition. The results of the Hawaii Geothermal Project have helped resolve many uncertainties about the reservoir and will provide guidance to private and regulatory interests as a commercial geothermal development comes on line in Hawaii

  7. EMF 9 scenario design (EMF WP 9.4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the specifications of the scenarios selected by the EMF 9 Working Group, which is focusing on North American natural gas markets. The four first-round scenarios include: (1) an upper oil price path, (2) a lower oil price path, (3) a lower resource base, and (4) a higher gas demand due to policies and technologies affecting the electric utility sector. Each scenario represents a combination of market and regulatory environments. For example, the upper oil price scenario combines an upper oil price trend with a reference set of resource and demand conditions and with a pro-competitive regulatory environment. This scenario also serves as a control case for comparing the other scenarios, which specify a change in one of the environments for oil prices, resources, or demand. The regulatory environment has been maintained constant across these first-round scenarios but may be changed depending upon the later recommendations of the regulatory policy and market structure study group. The next section describes the detailed specifications for modelers in simulating the upper oil price scenario. Guidance is offered for energy prices, economic activity, and resource base estimates. The next three sections describe the other three scenarios that involve changes in these inputs from their values in the upper oil price scenario. Special wellhead price assumptions for stand-alone supply models and plans for developing inputs for Canadian models are then discussed. The final section describes the output variables to be reported to the EMF staff for comparing model results

  8. Financial instruments help producers hedge gas deals in volatile market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawnin, J.N.; Kupiec, S.L.

    1993-01-01

    The Natural Gas Policy Act (NGPA) of 1978 and more recently the U.S. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Order 636 have changed gas marketing from a totally regulated industry to one that responds to free-market forces. The stable but controlled market in which producers once sold gas has become highly competitive and more efficient. Consequently, prices have become more volatile; they respond more quickly than they did before to changes in supply of and demand for natural gas. Prior to deregulation of the natural gas industry, producers had fewer marketing options than they do today. Under a typical gas sales contract, producers sold gas to the nearest pipeline at regulated prices, which remained relatively stable along the interstate distribution chain. The system, however, failed to generate adequate supply of gas. In an effort to realign supply and demand, Congress initiated the deregulation of natural gas with NGPA, which phased out most wellhead price controls. A series of FERC actions culminating in Order 636 extended the process. Now, independent producers can sell gas directly to end users. Under Order 636, interstate pipelines no longer offer merchant services to gas customers. The paper discusses the change in risk profiles, price protection, futures and options, hedged exposure, setting price floors, off-exchange contracts, risk considerations, types of risks, business controls, back office controls, and credit monitoring

  9. Expansion analyses of strategic petroleum reserve in Bayou Choctaw : revised locations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehgartner, Brian L.; Park, Byoung Yoon

    2010-11-01

    This report summarizes a series of three-dimensional simulations for the Bayou Choctaw Strategic Petroleum Reserve. The U.S. Department of Energy plans to leach two new caverns and convert one of the existing caverns within the Bayou Choctaw salt dome to expand its petroleum reserve storage capacity. An existing finite element mesh from previous analyses is modified by changing the locations of two caverns. The structural integrity of the three expansion caverns and the interaction between all the caverns in the dome are investigated. The impacts of the expansion on underground creep closure, surface subsidence, infrastructure, and well integrity are quantified. Two scenarios were used for the duration and timing of workover conditions where wellhead pressures are temporarily reduced to atmospheric pressure. The three expansion caverns are predicted to be structurally stable against tensile failure for both scenarios. Dilatant failure is not expected within the vicinity of the expansion caverns. Damage to surface structures is not predicted and there is not a marked increase in surface strains due to the presence of the three expansion caverns. The wells into the caverns should not undergo yield. The results show that from a structural viewpoint, the locations of the two newly proposed expansion caverns are acceptable, and all three expansion caverns can be safely constructed and operated.

  10. Bioremediation evaluation of surface soils contaminated with organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tezak, J.; Miller, J.A.; Lawrence, A.W.; Keffer, R.E.; Weightman, R.; Hayes, T.D.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents background information on bioremediation; information on biotechnologies that have been proven in other industries and that may be applicable to the natural gas industry; a protocol for assessing the feasibility of bioremediation; and, some preliminary results on some soils that were evaluated using the protocol. Background information related to natural gas production and processing sites and chemicals that are typically used are presented because both are important preliminary feasibility screening criteria. Applications of bioremediation to sites with similar chemicals such as refineries, wood treating plants, and former manufactured gas plants (MGP's) have been used for approximately 30 years, however bioremediation is not widely used to treat wellhead sites or natural gas production and processing sites. Examples of applications of bioremediation to non-natural gas industry sites are presented and the similarities, primarily chemical, are presented. The GRI developed an Accelerated Biotreatability Protocol for former MGP sites and it is currently being modified for application to the Exploration and Production (E and P) industry. The Accelerated Treatability Protocol is a decision-making framework to evaluate the potential full-scale biological treatment options. Preliminary results from some soils collected and evaluated using the protocol are presented

  11. Bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soils using soil vapor extraction: Case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, R.J.; Peterson, R.M.

    1994-01-01

    Soils contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons are being remediated in situ at a site in Lakewood, New Jersey by bioremediation in conjunction with soil vapor extractions (SVE) and nutrient addition. The contaminants were from hydraulic oils which leaked from subsurface hydraulic lifts, waste oil from leaking underground storage tanks (USTs), an aboveground storage tank, and motor oil from a leaking UST. The oils contaminated subsurface soils at the site to a depth of 25 feet. Approximately 900 cubic yards of soil were contaminated. Soil sample analyses showed total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) concentrations up to 31,500 ppm. The design of the remedial system utilized the results of a treatability study which showed that TPH degrading microorganisms, when supplied with oxygen and nutrients, affected a 14% reduction in TPH in 30 days. A SVE system was installed which used three wells, each installed to a depth of 25 feet below grade. The SVE system was operated to achieve an extracted air flow of approximately 20 to 30 scfm from each well. Bioremediation of the TPH was monitored by measuring CO 2 and O 2 concentrations at the wellheads and vapor monitoring probes. After four months of remediation, CO 2 concentrations were at a minimum, at which point the subsurface soils were sampled and analyzed for TPH. The soil analyses showed a removal of TPH by biodegradation of up to 99.8% after four months of remediation

  12. [Various report forms and letters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Various

    2007-08-16

    The documents described here and the following may be found at the Website of the State of California Department of Conservation, Division of Oil, Gas & Geothermal Resources, http://www.consrv.ca.gov/DOG/geothermal/unit_15/Unit15.htm. GEO Operator Corporation (formerly Thermogenics, Inc. and Geothermal Resources International Operator Corporation) drilled steam production and injection wells in the northwestern portion of The Geysers geothermal field from 1967 to 1985. These wells produced steam that was sold to PG&E's power plant 15. In 1989, the plant stopped operating so the wells stopped producing and GEO Operator Corporation went bankrupt. In 1997-1998, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources, with funding from the California Energy Commission, plugged and abandoned most of these idle wells because of severe wellhead corrosion. Technical data and well cuttings were salvaged from an abandoned warehouse on the GEO Operator Corporation lease. These data have recently been scanned and added to the Division's existing scanned well records. The data are unique because GEO Operator Corporation performed an unusually high number of studies, well tests, and analyses. A total of over 10,300 pages and over 340 logs are included in the scans. The reservoir engineering section alone contains over 3,300 pages of reservoir characterization, well testing, and related studies. These data will be useful to the operators at The Geysers Geothermal field, as well as the public and researchers worldwide.

  13. Study of the effect of injecting cold or hot water on the operation of an oil field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gusein-Zade, M A; Kolosovskaya, A K; Lebedev, V V; Chicherov, L G

    1968-11-01

    Several Soviet reservoirs contain either highly paraffinic or viscous crude oils, where recovery by an ordinary waterflood is poor. Under such circumstances, hot water injection appears to be advantageous. Hot water injection is advisable when: (1) the reservoir is heterogeneous and contains low-permeability sections; (2) the oil is saturated with paraffin at reservoir temperature; and (3) reservoir pressure is only slightly higher than static pressure. In Uzen field, hot water injection should recover 1.5 times more oil than would be recovered with cold water. Various problems involved with hot water injection such as equipment and methods of heating the water, transportation of the water of the wellhead, heat losses in transport of hot water, and well equipment for handling hot water are discussed. Calculations indicate that it should be possible to transport 100/sup 0/C water through a 5 km pipeline with a 4/sup 0/ to 6/sup 0/C temperature drop; then deliver to the well bottom at a temperature of 90/sup 0/ to 92/sup 0/C.

  14. And another thing - flags of convenience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flatern, R. von

    2002-01-01

    Crude oil being shipped around the world, when spilled, is a threat to the environment unlike any other commodity, save perhaps for radioactive materials. Therefore, if the oil industry expects to be taken seriously in its role of protecting the environment, it must assume responsibility for its product from wellhead to consumer. Whilst there are many operators paying considerable attention to transportation issues - the largest of them using their own double-hulled tanker fleets - there still too many using ships unsuitable for the purpose, either because of age or the fact that they are single hulled vessels. These derelicts are kept in business by owners who have registered them in country's where inspections are a local joke, registration requires only a fraction of the fee charged by more conscientious nations, and taxes are low. Ships flying flags of convenience have no ties to any country, including the ones in which they are registered. The author says that it is up to the oil industry to clean up their act, for instance they could refuse to use ships that sail under a flag of convenience or single hulled vessels to move their product. The major and large independent companies learned some time ago that taking care of the environment is very much in their interest, and further that only they can do it effectively

  15. Development of a downhole tool measuring real-time concentration of ionic tracers and pH in geothermal reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Ryan F.; Boyle, Timothy J.; Limmer, Steven; Yelton, William G.; Bingham, Samuel; Stillman, Greg; Lindblom, Scott; Cieslewski, Grzegorz

    2014-06-01

    For enhanced or Engineered Geothermal Systems (EGS) geothermal brine is pumped to the surface via the production wells, the heat extracted to turn a turbine to generate electricity, and the spent brine re-injected via injection wells back underground. If designed properly, the subsurface rock formations will lead this water back to the extraction well as heated brine. Proper monitoring of these geothermal reservoirs is essential for developing and maintaining the necessary level of productivity of the field. Chemical tracers are commonly used to characterize the fracture network and determine the connectivity between the injection and production wells. Currently, most tracer experiments involve injecting the tracer at the injection well, manually collecting liquid samples at the wellhead of the production well, and sending the samples off for laboratory analysis. While this method provides accurate tracer concentration data at very low levels of detection, it does not provide information regarding the location of the fractures which were conducting the tracer between wellbores. Sandia is developing a high-temperature electrochemical sensor capable of measuring tracer concentrations and pH downhole on a wireline tool. The goal of this effort is to collect real-time pH and ionic tracer concentration data at temperatures up to 225 °C and pressures up to 3000 psi. In this paper, a prototype electrochemical sensor and the initial data obtained will be presented detailing the measurement of iodide tracer concentrations at high temperature and pressure in a newly developed laboratory scale autoclave.

  16. Oil production system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballantyne, J F

    1983-12-21

    A new oil producing system is proposed which consists of a group of underwater wells, an underwater riser and a floating storage facility for the production of the wells. The group of wells and the riser are interconnected through a manifold system in such a way that the production from any well or from the entire group of wells go to the base (foundation) of the riser. From above the riser is connected with the floating storage facility which is equipped, besides tanks for storing the well products, with a separation device for separating the oil and the accompanying gas. The gas is used as a fuel for producing electric power required by the dynamic positioning systems. The products from each well are tested by means of a regulable coupling controlled by means of a cable, which is passed from the surface through the riser. The wellhead equipment for the unslanted wells is mounted on a template previously installed on the sea floor. From the template the well products enter the riser through the manifold unit system.

  17. North American pipelines supply/demand update: challenges and opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopal, J.

    2002-01-01

    The author began the presentation by providing a little definition of forecasting supply, demand and price as applied to the natural gas industry, indicating that it is both science and art. An integrated grid in North America, the natural gas sector modeling relates to supply basins, demand centers and pipes includes the United States, Canada and Mexico. Some of the considerations are: huge demand from proposed power generation, conservation, and drilling impacts, as well as pipeline capacity. A chart displaying the North American model was explained. The author discussed the technically recoverable natural gas resources as well as the estimates in both Canada and the United States. The next section deals with exploration and development of frontier resources and power plant licensing, with emphasis on power plants in California. The generation assumptions for the Western Systems Coordinating Council from the Energy Commission are reviewed, placing the numbers in their proper perspective. California natural gas supply by source is examined, followed by regional natural gas spot price. The wellhead natural gas prices for North America and for the Lower 48 states are presented. The author indicates that additional pipeline capacity is required to meet the growing demand. Several factors have to be considered: the number of power plants, when and where; pipeline capacity (how much); regulations; slack capacity; cost of slack capacity, and supply. The concluding remarks touched upon the availability of gas resources, the environmental issues that affect demand, hub services that enhance service flexibility and reliability, and pipeline capacity and storage. 2 tabs., 15 figs

  18. Effect of inlet and outlet flow conditions on natural gas parameters in supersonic separation process.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Yang

    Full Text Available A supersonic separator has been introduced to remove water vapour from natural gas. The mechanisms of the upstream and downstream influences are not well understood for various flow conditions from the wellhead and the back pipelines. We used a computational model to investigate the effect of the inlet and outlet flow conditions on the supersonic separation process. We found that the shock wave was sensitive to the inlet or back pressure compared to the inlet temperature. The shock position shifted forward with a higher inlet or back pressure. It indicated that an increasing inlet pressure declined the pressure recovery capacity. Furthermore, the shock wave moved out of the diffuser when the ratio of the back pressure to the inlet one was greater than 0.75, in which the state of the low pressure and temperature was destroyed, resulting in the re-evaporation of the condensed liquids. Natural gas would be the subsonic flows in the whole supersonic separator, if the mass flow rate was less than the design value, and it could not reach the low pressure and temperature for the condensation and separation of the water vapor. These results suggested a guidance mechanism for natural gas supersonic separation in various flow conditions.

  19. Controlled PVTS oil and gas production stimulation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ospina-Racines, E

    1970-02-01

    By completing oil- or gas-producing wells according to the PVTS method and energizing the flow of the oil-gas fluids in the reservoir with a small horse-power gas compressor at the wellhead, the following oil and gas production features are attained: (1) Original reservoir story energy conditions are restored, improved, used, and conserved while producing oil and/or gas. (2) The flow of oil or gas in the pay formation to the well bore is stimulated by gas compressor energy, outside of the reservoir system. The pressure drawdown is developed by gas-compressor energy in the well casing and not in the pay formation. (3) The stored energy of the reservoir is conserved while producing oil or gas. The potential energy (pressure) of the reservoir can be used to advantage up to bubble point of the virgin crude. (4) Producible reserves are increased from 4-to 5-fold by the conservation of reservoir energy. Present-day primary oil production practice yields a maximum of 20% of the oil in place by depleting the original reservoir energy. The PVTS system will yield over 80% + of oil in place. (5) Producible gas reserves can be increased greatly by establishing a low abandonment pressure at will. The principal features of the PVTS well mechanism and energy injection method are illustrated by a schematic diagram.

  20. Pump-and-treat is not the only solution to aquifer remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odermatt, J.R.

    1994-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently surveyed remediation technologies used at petroleum-contaminated sites in 22 states. About 96 percent of underground storage tank (UST) corrective action sites used some form of pump-and-treat technology to remediate contaminated groundwater. However, using only pump-and-treat technology is not a cost-effective approach to aquifer remediation. Pump-and-treat may be more appropriate for containing plumes or for use in initial emergency response actions at sites and massive NAPL releases to groundwater. As of 1990, 68 percent of Superfund records of decision selected pump-and-treat as the final remedy for aquifer remediation. However, of 13 sites where the remedial alternative objective was to restore the aquifer to health-based levels, only one pump-and-treat method has succeeded. Except in cases where human health and the environment are threatened, long-term active technologies, such as pump-and-treat, may not be warranted. Groundwater monitoring and possible wellhead treatment may be perceived as time-consuming processes; however, at many sites, this long-term approach may be far less costly and just as effective as other long-term strategies based on exclusive use of pump-and-treat technology

  1. Determination of naturally occurring radionuclides in scales produced in oil industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Masri, M S; Ali, A F; Kitue, M; Kawash, A [Atomic Energy Commission, Dept. of Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic)

    1997-04-01

    Scales produced by Oil production operations contain relatively high concentrations of natural radionuclides especially radium isotopes (Ra-226, Ra-228, Ra-224) and their daughters. These scales deposit in oil surface equipment such as separator tanks, tubular, and storage tanks. In this work, naturally occurring radionuclides and radiation exposure levels in some Syrian oil lines have been determined. Radiation measurements have shown high radiation exposure in some production sites and reached about 23 {mu}Sv/hr (production wellhead) which is higher than the normal background (0.09 - 012 {mu}Sv/hr). The highest value of the exposure around storage tanks was about o.5 {mu}Sv/hr. Moreover, the highest concentration of radionuclides in scales were found to be 47000 Bq/Kg and 55000 Bq/Kg for Ra-226 and Ra-228 respectively while in sludge samples, the Ra-226 concentration was about 24.2 Bq/Kg, a relatively very low activity. In addition, results have shown that soil contamination can occur by disposal of produced water to the surrounding environment. Furthermore, the present paper shows some of protection procedures, which should be followed by workers for radiation protection. (author). 10 refs., 4 tabs.

  2. [Various report forms and letters regarding Rorabaugh 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Various

    2007-08-16

    The documents described here and the following may be found at the Website of the State of California Department of Conservation, Division of Oil, Gas & Geothermal Resources, http://www.consrv.ca.gov/DOG/geothermal/unit_15/Unit15.htm. GEO Operator Corporation (formerly Thermogenics, Inc. and Geothermal Resources International Operator Corporation) drilled steam production and injection wells in the northwestern portion of The Geysers geothermal field from 1967 to 1985. These wells produced steam that was sold to PG&E's power plant 15. In 1989, the plant stopped operating so the wells stopped producing and GEO Operator Corporation went bankrupt. In 1997-1998, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources, with funding from the California Energy Commission, plugged and abandoned most of these idle wells because of severe wellhead corrosion. Technical data and well cuttings were salvaged from an abandoned warehouse on the GEO Operator Corporation lease. These data have recently been scanned and added to the Division's existing scanned well records. The data are unique because GEO Operator Corporation performed an unusually high number of studies, well tests, and analyses. A total of over 10,300 pages and over 340 logs are included in the scans. The reservoir engineering section alone contains over 3,300 pages of reservoir characterization, well testing, and related studies. These data will be useful to the operators at The Geysers Geothermal field, as well as the public and researchers worldwide.

  3. [Various report forms and letters regarding Rorabaugh A-31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Various

    2007-08-16

    The documents described here and the following may be found at the Website of the State of California Department of Conservation, Division of Oil, Gas & Geothermal Resources, http://www.consrv.ca.gov/DOG/geothermal/unit_15/Unit15.htm. GEO Operator Corporation (formerly Thermogenics, Inc. and Geothermal Resources International Operator Corporation) drilled steam production and injection wells in the northwestern portion of The Geysers geothermal field from 1967 to 1985. These wells produced steam that was sold to PG&E's power plant 15. In 1989, the plant stopped operating so the wells stopped producing and GEO Operator Corporation went bankrupt. In 1997-1998, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources, with funding from the California Energy Commission, plugged and abandoned most of these idle wells because of severe wellhead corrosion. Technical data and well cuttings were salvaged from an abandoned warehouse on the GEO Operator Corporation lease. These data have recently been scanned and added to the Division's existing scanned well records. The data are unique because GEO Operator Corporation performed an unusually high number of studies, well tests, and analyses. A total of over 10,300 pages and over 340 logs are included in the scans. The reservoir engineering section alone contains over 3,300 pages of reservoir characterization, well testing, and related studies. These data will be useful to the operators at The Geysers Geothermal field, as well as the public and researchers worldwide.

  4. [Various report forms and letters regarding Rorabaugh A-5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Various

    2007-08-16

    The documents described here and the following may be found at the Website of the State of California Department of Conservation, Division of Oil, Gas & Geothermal Resources, http://www.consrv.ca.gov/DOG/geothermal/unit_15/Unit15.htm. GEO Operator Corporation (formerly Thermogenics, Inc. and Geothermal Resources International Operator Corporation) drilled steam production and injection wells in the northwestern portion of The Geysers geothermal field from 1967 to 1985. These wells produced steam that was sold to PG&E's power plant 15. In 1989, the plant stopped operating so the wells stopped producing and GEO Operator Corporation went bankrupt. In 1997-1998, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources, with funding from the California Energy Commission, plugged and abandoned most of these idle wells because of severe wellhead corrosion. Technical data and well cuttings were salvaged from an abandoned warehouse on the GEO Operator Corporation lease. These data have recently been scanned and added to the Division's existing scanned well records. The data are unique because GEO Operator Corporation performed an unusually high number of studies, well tests, and analyses. A total of over 10,300 pages and over 340 logs are included in the scans. The reservoir engineering section alone contains over 3,300 pages of reservoir characterization, well testing, and related studies. These data will be useful to the operators at The Geysers Geothermal field, as well as the public and researchers worldwide.

  5. [Various report forms and letters regarding Abril 1-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Various

    2007-08-16

    The documents described here and the following may be found at the Website of the State of California Department of Conservation, Division of Oil, Gas & Geothermal Resources, http://www.consrv.ca.gov/DOG/geothermal/unit_15/Unit15.htm. GEO Operator Corporation (formerly Thermogenics, Inc. and Geothermal Resources International Operator Corporation) drilled steam production and injection wells in the northwestern portion of The Geysers geothermal field from 1967 to 1985. These wells produced steam that was sold to PG&E's power plant 15. In 1989, the plant stopped operating so the wells stopped producing and GEO Operator Corporation went bankrupt. In 1997-1998, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources, with funding from the California Energy Commission, plugged and abandoned most of these idle wells because of severe wellhead corrosion. Technical data and well cuttings were salvaged from an abandoned warehouse on the GEO Operator Corporation lease. These data have recently been scanned and added to the Division's existing scanned well records. The data are unique because GEO Operator Corporation performed an unusually high number of studies, well tests, and analyses. A total of over 10,300 pages and over 340 logs are included in the scans. The reservoir engineering section alone contains over 3,300 pages of reservoir characterization, well testing, and related studies. These data will be useful to the operators at The Geysers Geothermal field, as well as the public and researchers worldwide.

  6. Natural gas industry faces more uncertainty in the upcoming decade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steffes, D.W.

    1995-01-01

    The monumental discontinuity of the past decade in the natural gas industry was the change of the interstate gas pipeline industry from serving as a merchant function to a common carrier function. The main reason this change could come about was a past strategic error on the part of the interstate pipeline companies. In the early 1980s, they misread the gas supply signals and entered into uneconomical take or pay contracts at unreasonably high prices. This strategic mistake essentially bankrupted all of the pipeline companies. Their submittal to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) forced them to allow open access on their pipelines. The FERC then allowed them to buy their way out of their bad take or pay contracts. The method of pricing natural gas at the wellhead was the other big change. Instead of the major interstate pipeline continuing with a form of mandating area rates, each producer can now deal directly with anyone wanting to purchase the gas. The transportation is available due to these pipelines becoming common carriers. These two discontinuities allowed new paper interstate pipelines to come into existence

  7. 1994 Environmental monitoring drinking water and nonradiological effluent programs annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, B.D.; Brock, T.A.; Meachum, T.R.

    1995-10-01

    EG ampersand G Idaho, Inc., initiated monitoring programs for drinking water in 1988 and for nonradiological parameters and pollutants in liquid effluents in 1985. These programs were initiated for the facilities operated by EG ampersand G Idaho for the US Department of Energy at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. On October 1, 1994, Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company (LITCO) replaced EG ampersand G Idaho as the prime contractor at the INEL and assumed responsibility for these programs. Section I discusses the general site characteristics, the analytical laboratories, and sampling methodology general to both programs. Section 2, the Drinking Water Program, tracks the bacteriological, chemical, and radiological parameters required by State and Federal regulations. This section describes the drinking water monitoring activities conducted at 17 LITCO-operated production wells and 11 distribution systems. It also contains all of the drinking water parameters detected and the regulatory limits exceeded during calendar year 1994. In addition, groundwater quality is discussed as it relates to contaminants identified at the wellhead for LITCO production wells. Section 3 discusses the nonradiological liquid effluent monitoring results for 27 liquid effluent streams. These streams are presented with emphasis on calendar year 1994 activities. All parameter measurements and concentrations were below the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act toxic characteristics limits

  8. Challenges and solutions for installing an intelligent completion in offshore deepwater Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes, Alfonso R. [WellDynamics, Spring, TX (United States); Arias, Jose Luiz [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    This paper describes an atypical and challenging Intelligent Well Completion (IWC) installed in ultra deep water (1500-2000 m), offshore Brazil. The well is a water injector designed to selectively control the injection flow rate in to two stacked gravel pack zones. The field is Roncador, approximately 150 kilometers offshore the North-Eastern coast of the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. This application is an atypical IWC due to the long distance ({approx}15 Km) from the production platform to the well. Intelligent wells have been installed at such distances previously but never with a direct control umbilical. Previous completions used a Subsea Control Module (SCM) or pod located in the wellhead. Reduced intervention costs are the typical driver for IWC in deep water applications, but water management is becoming an increasingly common application. The Roncador field development team has taken a novel approach by using IWC to manage water injection in an ultra deep water development. The challenge for the project team was to design an IWC system, which would accommodate the field infrastructure constraint, require minimal modification to the existing subsea hardware and ensure the necessary flexibility to locate surface equipment without the need for modification to the production facilities. The solution adopted for Roncador 35 is mainly based on an emerging ISO standard for the integration of IWC into Subsea Production Systems. The modular and expandable approach will enable extension of this solution to other wells in the Roncador field. (author)

  9. New subsea X tree generation brings innovative features providing efficiency for ultra deep waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Gustavo Bellot de Almeida; Labes, Alan Zaragoza [FMC Technologies, Houston, TX (United States)

    2008-07-01

    The EVDT has been developed for global applications. Based upon the widely field proven 10 K Vertical Tree and 15 K HPHT Tree, the system has incorporated the latest technological advancements. The Tubing Hanger System and installation tooling are available up to a 7 inch bore for 10,000 psi applications and a 5 inch bore for 15,000 psi applications. The Tubing Hanger can be installed using a Tubing Head when flexibility for sequencing of events is required during offshore installations. Or it can simply land into the wellhead, eliminating the Tubing Head. This allows for a more efficient installation when completion and drilling operations are conducted without retrieving the Sub sea Blow Out Preventer (BOP) and Riser. The EVDT incorporates a retrievable Flow Module downstream of the wing valve that can be configured to project specific variances such as production, gas injection and water injection service. The Flow Module can also be configured to include Multi-Phase Flow Meters, sensors, and gauges. This allows an upgrade sub sea without having to pull and re-run the entire Tree system. These features allowed the system to hit the mark regarding what the industry needs today and also allowed to accommodate technologies that will arise in the years to come. (author)

  10. Improvement in Sachdeva's multiphase choke flow model using field data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, B.; Ghalambor, A. [Louisiana Univ. at Lafayette, LA (United States); Al-Bemani, A.S. [Sultan Qaboos Univ., Muscat (Oman)

    2002-06-01

    To control fluid production rates from wells, to maintain stable pressure downstream from the choke, and to provide the required backpressure to a reservoir to avoid formation damage from excessive drawdown, oil and gas producers use wellhead chokes. The prediction of critical-subcritical boundary and liquid and gas flow rates for multiphase crude systems has been accomplished using the Sachdeva choke flow model. Based on data from 239 oil wells and 273 gas condensate wells in Southwest Louisiana, the authors evaluated the accuracy of the Sachdeva choke model, which had been found lacking in some applications. The authors concluded from a comparison of the results obtained from measurements and model calculations that the accuracy of the model was better in the case of oil wells rather than gas condensate wells. The use of different values of choke discharge coefficient could lead to the minimization of the error of the model. The choke discharge coefficient to be used for oil wells was determined to be 1.08 for liquid rate predictions, and 0.78 for gas rate predictions. In the case of gas condensate wells, a coefficient of 1.07 was recommended for gas prediction rates, while a coefficient of 1.53 was recommended by the authors for liquid rate predictions. 30 refs., 1 tab., 13 figs.

  11. Steam heating of local well bore area in light crude oil horizons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikerin, B P

    1968-02-01

    Beneficial results were obtained from a series of small steam injection treatments of oil producing wells in Asfaltov field. In this field, spacing between producing wells is 200 m, well depth is about 450 m, formation temperature is 27$C, oil gravity is 0,845 g/cu cm, and oil viscosity is 6-10 Hz. In every treatment, 200 g of ''disolvan'' was added per ton of steam, to minimize clay swelling in the formation. Form treatment results it is concluded that: (1) steam stimulation gives positive results 65% of the time; (2) best results were obtained in compact sand formations, 5-6 m thick; (3) positive results last up to one yr after steam soak; (4) with repeated treatments oil production increases 1.5-2 times; (5) temperature of steam during flow from wellhead to well bottom at 350 m, is decreased by 25%; and (6) about 1.3 million kcal were used per 1 m of net sand thickness.

  12. Comparative risk assessment of spill response options for a deepwater oil well blowout: Part III. Stakeholder engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Ann Hayward; Scholz, Debra; McPeek, Melinda; French-McCay, Deborah; Rowe, Jill; Bock, Michael; Robinson, Hilary; Wenning, Richard

    2018-05-25

    This paper describes oil spill stakeholder engagement in a recent comparative risk assessment (CRA) project that examined the tradeoffs associated with a hypothetical offshore well blowout in the Gulf of Mexico, with a specific focus on subsea dispersant injection (SSDI) at the wellhead. SSDI is a new technology deployed during the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill response. Oil spill stakeholders include decision makers, who will consider whether to integrate SSDI into future tradeoff decisions. This CRA considered the tradeoffs associated with three sets of response strategies: (1) no intervention; (2) mechanical recovery, in-situ burning, and surface dispersants; and, (3) SSDI in addition to responses in (2). For context, the paper begins with a historical review of U.S. policy and engagement with oil spill stakeholders regarding dispersants. Stakeholder activities throughout the project involved decision-maker representatives and their advisors to inform the approach and consider CRA utility in future oil spill preparedness. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Challenging the myths: the mid-stream asset provider's view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Findlay, R.

    1996-01-01

    The term 'mid-stream asset business' implies custom processing and gathering, meaning that a gas producer sells his gas at the wellhead, thereby transferring the business of gathering, processing and marketing of the gas and liquids to a third party. The concept is popular in the United States, but is not yet common in Canada. In Canada, producers own the gas gathering and processing systems. The mid-stream asset business was claimed to be more user friendly than the old custom processing business. Three myths about the mid-stream asset business were challenged: (1) all the risk is on the producer, the processor takes no risk, (2) the mid-stream asset business is an expensive means of financing further exploration, and (3) owning and operating gathering and processing facilities is an integral part of a producer's business. Arguments were brought forth to dispel these myths and to emphasize that a processor should be prepared to accept risks associated with the commodity, prices, production and operations. To be operationally effective, the producer's flexibility and strategic advantages must approach the same level as if he were the owner of the facility

  14. Industrial Raman gas sensing for real-time system control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buric, M.; Mullen, J.; Chorpening, B.; Woodruff, S.

    2014-06-01

    Opportunities exist to improve on-line process control in energy applications with a fast, non-destructive measurement of gas composition. Here, we demonstrate a Raman sensing system which is capable of reporting the concentrations of numerous species simultaneously with sub-percent accuracy and sampling times below one-second for process control applications in energy or chemical production. The sensor is based upon a hollow-core capillary waveguide with a 300 micron bore with reflective thin-film metal and dielectric linings. The effect of using such a waveguide in a Raman process is to integrate Raman photons along the length of the sample-filled waveguide, thus permitting the acquisition of very large Raman signals for low-density gases in a short time. The resultant integrated Raman signals can then be used for quick and accurate analysis of a gaseous mixture. The sensor is currently being tested for energy applications such as coal gasification, turbine control, well-head monitoring for exploration or production, and non-conventional gas utilization. In conjunction with an ongoing commercialization effort, the researchers have recently completed two prototype instruments suitable for hazardous area operation and testing. Here, we report pre-commercialization testing of those field prototypes for control applications in gasification or similar processes. Results will be discussed with respect to accuracy, calibration requirements, gas sampling techniques, and possible control strategies of industrial significance.

  15. New insights into microbial responses to oil spills from the Deepwater Horizon incident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mason, O.U.; Hazen, T.C.

    2011-06-15

    On April 20, 2010, a catastrophic eruption of methane caused the Deepwater Horizon exploratory drill rig drilling the Macondo Well in Mississippi Canyon Block 252 (MC252) to explode. The Deepwater Horizon oil spill was unprecendeted for several reasons: the volume of oil released; the spill duration; the well depth; the distance from the shore-line (77 km or about 50 miles); the type of oil (light crude); and the injection of dispersant directly at the wellhead. This study clearly demonstrated that there was a profound and significant response by certain members of the in situ microbial community in the deep-sea in the Gulf of Mexico. In particular putative hydrocarbon degrading Bacteria appeared to bloom in response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, even though the temperature at these depths is never >5 C. As the plume aged the shifts in the microbial community on a temporal scale suggested that different, yet metabolically important members of the community were able to respond to a myriad of plume constituents, e.g. shifting from propane/ethane to alkanes and finally to methane. Thus, the biodegradation of hydrocarbons in the plume by Bacteria was a highly significant process in the natural attenuation of many compounds released during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

  16. Can Deployment of Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency PutDownward Pressure on Natural Gas Prices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2005-06-01

    High and volatile natural gas prices have increasingly led to calls for investments in renewable energy and energy efficiency. One line of argument is that deployment of these resources may lead to reductions in the demand for and price of natural gas. Many recent U.S.-based modeling studies have demonstrated that this effect could provide significant consumer savings. In this article we evaluate these studies, and benchmark their findings against economic theory, other modeling results, and a limited empirical literature. We find that many uncertainties remain regarding the absolute magnitude of this effect, and that the reduction in natural gas prices may not represent an increase in aggregate economic wealth. Nonetheless, we conclude that many of the studies of the impact of renewable energy and energy efficiency on natural gas prices appear to have represented this effect within reason, given current knowledge. These studies specifically suggest that a 1% reduction in U.S. natural gas demand could lead to long-term average wellhead price reductions of 0.8% to 2%, and that each megawatt-hour of renewable energy and energy efficiency may benefit natural gas consumers to the tune of at least $7.5 to $20.

  17. Isotopic geothermometers in geothermal areas. A comparative experimental study in Larderella, Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuti, S.; Panichi, C.

    1979-06-01

    The stable isotope composition of some geothermal fluid components has been determined in view of evaluating the temperature at depth in Italian geothermal fields (Larderello, Mt. Amiata, Travale). The isotopic systems used are: 13 C(CO 2 -CH 4 ), 18 O(CO 2 -H 2 O), D(H 2 -CH 4 ) and D(H 2 O-H 2 ), for which the isotopic equilibrium variation with temperature are known either experimentally or theoretically. The 18 O(CO 2 -H 2 O) geothermometer gives temperatures similar to those observed at the well-head, and provides therefore useful information on the physical state of water (steam or evaporating liquid water) at the well bottom. On the contrary, all other geothermometers produce too high temperatures which can be explained by incomplete equilibration or lack of equilibrium between components and, perhaps in some cases, by the insufficient knowledge of the fractionation factors. The comparison between the different isotopic geothermometers, along with some chemical and physico-chemical evidence, suggests that the reaction already proposed, i.e. CO 2 +4H 2 =CH 4 +2H 2 O, is unable to explain the isotopic composition observed. On the contrary, the water dissociation reaction (H 2 O=H 2 +1/2O 2 ) and the synthesis reaction of methane (C+2H 2 =CH 4 ) and carbon dioxide (C+O 2 =CO 2 ) seem able to provide an appropriate explanation of the isotopic behaviour of the geothermal field fluid components

  18. [Various report forms and letters regarding Rorabaugh A-19

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Various

    2007-08-16

    The documents described here and the following may be found at the Website of the State of California Department of Conservation, Division of Oil, Gas & Geothermal Resources, http://www.consrv.ca.gov/DOG/geothermal/unit_15/Unit15.htm. GEO Operator Corporation (formerly Thermogenics, Inc. and Geothermal Resources International Operator Corporation) drilled steam production and injection wells in the northwestern portion of The Geysers geothermal field from 1967 to 1985. These wells produced steam that was sold to PG&E's power plant 15. In 1989, the plant stopped operating so the wells stopped producing and GEO Operator Corporation went bankrupt. In 1997-1998, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources, with funding from the California Energy Commission, plugged and abandoned most of these idle wells because of severe wellhead corrosion. Technical data and well cuttings were salvaged from an abandoned warehouse on the GEO Operator Corporation lease. These data have recently been scanned and added to the Division's existing scanned well records. The data are unique because GEO Operator Corporation performed an unusually high number of studies, well tests, and analyses. A total of over 10,300 pages and over 340 logs are included in the scans. The reservoir engineering section alone contains over 3,300 pages of reservoir characterization, well testing, and related studies. These data will be useful to the operators at The Geysers Geothermal field, as well as the public and researchers worldwide.

  19. Industrial natural gas supply options in British Columbia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    Information is provided on the availability and cost of natural gas in British Columbia for use by firms interested in establishing gas-intensive industrial facilities in the province. British Columbia has an abundant supply of natural gas, originating mainly from deposits in the westernmost part of the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin in the northeast part of the province. Recoverable resources in British Columbia are estimated at 1,000-1,400 billion m 3 . Over 200 producers compete to sell natural gas for both domestic and export markets. Gathering, processing, and transmission of the gas is undertaken mainly by the Westcoast Energy pipeline system, and distribution is undertaken by several distribution utilities. At present, all large industrial gas users buy their firm gas requirements directly from gas producers, often using gas marketers or brokers to assist in purchasing. Regulation of the gas industry is performed by the British Columbia Utilities Commission, which sets rules for energy supply contracts, and by the National Energy Board, which sets tolls for gathering, processing, and transporting gas. Factors affecting gas pricing are discussed, with reference to both the wellhead price and the cost of gathering, processing, and transportation. Firm gas costs for two hypothetical industrial loads in British Columbia are illustrated. Potential intensive uses of natural gas in the province are outlined, including power generation, liquefaction for export, manufacturing, production of direct reduced iron, and as petrochemical feedstocks. 5 figs., 2 tabs

  20. Developing an equitable fee structure for gas processing services: JP-90 and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kingsbury, J.D.; Moller, I.

    1996-01-01

    The Joint Industry Gas Processing Fee Task Force Report, JP-90, was designed to promote negotiation of gas processing fees that are based on principles of equity and fairness for both natural gas producers and processors. Another purpose of the JP-90 was to develop an effective dispute resolution process for use in those cases where negotiations have failed. At its inception, JP-90 was the only guideline for unregulated fee practices in the oil and gas sector in North America. Today PJVA-95, the revised version of JP-90, is in its final draft. It addresses the changing focus of the gas processing business, and changing regulatory roles in Alberta and British Columbia. A number of other fee mechanisms also have been described, such as the jumping pound formula, fixed fees, fees based on price, wellhead purchases, and others. These mechanisms developed over time to allow the processor and the producer to share the price risk. The changing role of regulatory agencies in fee dispute resolution was also discussed briefly

  1. Simulación de Facies mediante un Modelo Geoestadístico integrado para el desarrollo de un campo petrolero ecuatoriano.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Portilla

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available La construcción de un modelo geoestadístico a partir de la integración de datos geofísicos, registros de pozos, información litológica, facies interpretadas, topes estratigráficos, coordenadas de pozos, surveys, wellheaders,los cuales son esenciales para determinar la ubicación de potenciales yacimientos de hidrocarburos y poder determinar el volumen de petróleo original en el sitio (POES. Para lo cual se recopilará información de campo para crear una base de datos la misma que se ingresará a la plataforma de trabajo Openworks, que a su vez, serán cargados a sesiones individuales en el Software Decision Space Geoscience (DSG, lo cual permitirá crear modelos de las diferentes realizaciones geoestadísticas que consisten en modelos de facies utilizando los algoritmos de Simulación Secuencial Indicadora y Simulación Plurigaussiana, además tomando en cuenta las propiedades petrofísicas nos permitirá seleccionar la que más se asemeje a la realidad geológica del campo y de esta manera realizar la estimación de reservas. Los métodos de simulación numérica de yacimientos que se aplican en el software DSG permiten generar datos en las zonas que no cuentan con información, a partir de técnicas o algoritmos de interpolación para cada modelo que se generará, los cuales serán estudiados en el presente proyecto.   Abstract   The objective of this research is to build a geostatistical model from the integration of geophysical data, logging wells and lithology information to determine the location of potential hydrocarbon deposits and know the POES of field. For which we have to collect information about field according to coordinates of wells, surveys, wellheaders, logging wells, facies interpreted stratigraphic tops and a database to be input in the platform OpenWorks, those data will be charged in individual sessions in the Software Decision Space Geoscience (DSG, which will create models of different Geostatistical

  2. “Can LUSI be stopped? - A case study and lessons learned from the relief wells”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutrisna, E.

    2009-12-01

    Since May 2006, in East Java, Indonesia, the LUSI mud volcano has been erupting huge volumes of mixture of predominately mud and water, with little sign of slowing down. It has disrupted social and economic life in this highly populated region. Most geologists believe LUSI is a naturally-occurring mud volcano (MV), like other MV in the Java island of particular interest are the MV along the Watukosek fault, such as, Kalang Anyar, Pulungan, Gunung Anyar, and Socah MV. All of these MV lie in the vicinity of the SSW/NNE trending Watukosek fault that passes through LUSI. The Porong collapse structure is an ancient MV closest to LUSI approx. 7 km away, which on seismic sections demonstrate its complex multi-branching plumbing system. Assuming that the mudflow passed through the wellbore due to an underground blowout, relief wells (RW) were planned to kill the mudflow and carried out in 3 stages, these were: 1. Re-entering the original Banjarpanji-1 (BJP-1) well to obtain accurate survey data so the relief wells could be steered into intersect this original well. 2. Drilling a monitoring well (M-1) to ascertain whether the soil had sufficient strength to support relief wells. 3. Drilling RW-1 and RW-2. Both RW-1 and RW-2 suffered of surface and subsurface problems never achieved their objectives and had to be aborted. Numbers of good lessons were learned from the relief well initiative, such as: 1. No gas or liquid flowed from the wellhead area when it was excavated one month after the eruption started. The wellhead remained intact and totally dead suggesting that the mud flowed to surface through a fault zone or a fracture network instead of up the wellbore. 2. The ‘fish’ in BJP-1 wellbore was found at its original location and not eroded away. This suggests that the mud flow did not pass through the wellbore. 3. The Temperature log showed lower temp. than surface mud temp. The Sonan log response was quiet. These results suggest that there was no near casing mudflow

  3. Stable large-scale CO2 storage in defiance of an energy system based on renewable energy - Modelling the impact of varying CO2 injection rates on reservoir behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannach, Andreas; Hauer, Rene; Martin, Streibel; Stienstra, Gerard; Kühn, Michael

    2015-04-01

    behaviour. The cyclic injection operation has an impact on the requirements of the facility design. To define the design basis for the aboveground installations only wellhead pressures are to be considered. For this reason the calculated bottom hole pressures need to be transferred into wellhead pressures. This is done by the application of thermodynamic models which include all relevant processes associated with the fluid flow through production or injection strings. Finally, a commercial analysis is carried out which is based on a total cost estimate (CAPEX & OPEX). The outcome of this analysis demonstrates required certificate prices to reach the common return targets of an industrial project. References DNV GL, " CO2 Transport Infrastructure in Germany - Necessity and Boundary Conditions up to 2050", IZ Klima, Berlin, 2014, http://www.iz-klima.de/.

  4. The Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative: Managing a Multidisciplinary Data Explosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, M. K.; Gibeaut, J. C.; Reed, D.

    2011-12-01

    On April 20, 2010 the Deepwater Horizon drilling unit located in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico, experienced a catastrophic wellhead blowout. Roughly 5 billion barrels of oil and 1 million U.S. gallons of dispersant were released near the wellhead over the next three months. Within weeks of the blowout, BP announced the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (GRI) and pledged 50M/yr over 10 years for independent scientific research on the spill's impact on the ecosystem. Two months after the blowout three institutions were awarded a total of 25M in fast-track grants (Louisiana State University, Northern Gulf Institute, and Florida Institute of Oceanography). Soon after the Alabama Marine Environmental Sciences Consortium and the National Institutes of Health were awarded 5M and 10M, respectively. These five institutions began to generate data almost immediately. First year grants funded 100's of researchers from nearly 100 research units. Their activities included numerical modeling, field data collection, and laboratory experiments. Measured parameters included those associated with chemical analyses of oil, gas, and dispersants, studies of bacteria, plants and animals -from phytoplankton to marsh grasses, from zooplankton to cetaceans. Studies were conducted from estuaries to the deep Gulf, from atmosphere to sediments. Parameters from physical oceanography, marine meteorology, and biogeochemistry were measured in abundance. Additionally, impact studies on human mental, physical health and businesses were made. Proposals for years 2-4 of the program were to be awarded in August 2011 supporting 4-8 research consortia. Consortia may have up to 20 named researchers. In aggregate, these studies yielded a multidisciplinary data explosion. Following the fast-track awards the GRI Administrative Unit (AU) was established and a data management activity initiated. That activity became the GRI Information and Data Cooperative (GRIIDC). "Cooperative" emphasizes the

  5. Methods for Finding Legacy Wells in Residential and Commercial Areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammack, Richard W. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Veloski, Garret A. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States)

    2016-06-16

    In 1919, the enthusiasm surrounding a short-lived gas play in Versailles Borough, Pennsylvania resulted in the drilling of many needless wells. The legacy of this activity exists today in the form of abandoned, unplugged gas wells that are a continuing source of fugitive methane in the midst of a residential and commercial area. Flammable concentrations of methane have been detected near building foundations, which have forced people from their homes and businesses until methane concentrations decreased. Despite mitigation efforts, methane problems persist and have caused some buildings to be permanently abandoned and demolished. This paper describes the use of magnetic and methane sensing methods by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to locate abandoned gas wells in Versailles Borough where site access is limited and existing infrastructure can interfere. Here, wells are located between closely spaced houses and beneath buildings and parking lots. Wells are seldom visible, often because wellheads and internal casing strings have been removed, and external casing has been cut off below ground level. The magnetic survey of Versailles Borough identified 53 strong, monopole magnetic anomalies that are presumed to indicate the locations of steel-cased wells. This hypothesis was tested by excavating the location of one strong, monopole magnetic anomaly that was within an area of anomalous methane concentrations. The excavation uncovered an unplugged gas well that was within 0.2 m of the location of the maximum magnetic signal. Truck-mounted methane surveys of Versailles Borough detected numerous methane anomalies that were useful for narrowing search areas. Methane sources identified during truck-mounted surveys included strong methane sources such as sewers and methane mitigation vents. However, inconsistent wind direction and speed, especially between buildings, made locating weaker methane sources (such as leaking wells) difficult. Walking surveys with

  6. Optimizing the air flotation water treatment process. Final report, May 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnett, B.

    1998-09-01

    The injection water for the Nelson Project is a combination of produced and make-up water, typical of many Eastern Kansas operations. The make-up water is a low-salinity salt water from the Arbuckle Formation and contains dissolved minerals and sulfides. The produced water contains suspended oil, suspended clay and silt particles, along with a combination of other dissolved minerals. The combination of the two waters causes several undesirable reactions. The suspended solids load contained in the combined waters would plug a 75-micron plant bag filter within one day. Wellhead filters of 75-micron size were also being used on the injection wells. The poor water quality resulted in severe loss of injectivity and frequent wellbore cleaning of the injection wells. Various mechanical and graded-bed filtration methods were considered for cleaning the water. These methods were rejected due to the lack of field equipment and service availability. A number of vendors did not even respond to the author`s request. The air flotation process was selected as offering the best hope for a long-term solution. The objective of this work is to: increase the cost effectiveness of the process through optimizing process design factors and operational parameters. A vastly modified air flotation system is the principal tool for accomplishing the project objective. The air flotation unit, as received from manufacturer Separation Specialist, was primarily designed to remove oil from produced water. The additional requirement for solids removal necessitated major physical changes in the unit. Problems encountered with the air flotation unit and specific modifications are detailed in the body of the report.

  7. Digging deep: Burlington extracts enormous wealth from enormous depths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, M.

    2003-05-01

    Production successes achieved by Burlington Resources Inc., from the deepest operating onshore gas field in the Rocky Mountain region are discussed. The wells in question are located in the Wind River Basin of Wyoming; they are over 25,000-feet deep; they are not only the deepest, but at 290 mmcf of gas per day, the handful of six producing wells are responsible for about 0.5 per cent of total U.S.gas output. Value of the monthly output per well is estimated in the millions of dollars at current natural gas prices; based on estimated reserves of better than 2.8 tcf, the wells are expected to keep flowing for at least two decades. The area is considered to be the harshest operating environment in the industry: searing temperatures of up to 430 degrees F are combined with pressures of 10,400 lbs/sq in, and corrosive concentrations of 12 per cent hydrogen sulfide in an unusual combination with 19 per cent carbon dioxide. To add to the challenges on both the drilling and producing sides, there is also ammonia, unusual in itself, and atypically high pressures in formations above the producing formation. Cost cutting innovations introduced by Burlington in wellbore and casing design and other new approaches, including oil-based drilling fluids, drilling bit improvements, and reverse cementing, all of which were key to the company's success, are also reviewed. On the production side, there is a brief description of the special metallurgy, double-walled pipeline and highly corrosion-resistant alloy tubular products that were developed to deal with the highly corrosive gas stream flowing at wellhead temperatures in excess of 300 degrees F.

  8. Minimizing transient influence in WHPA delineation: An optimization approach for optimal pumping rate schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Pretelin, A.; Nowak, W.

    2017-12-01

    For most groundwater protection management programs, Wellhead Protection Areas (WHPAs) have served as primarily protection measure. In their delineation, the influence of time-varying groundwater flow conditions is often underestimated because steady-state assumptions are commonly made. However, it has been demonstrated that temporary variations lead to significant changes in the required size and shape of WHPAs. Apart from natural transient groundwater drivers (e.g., changes in the regional angle of flow direction and seasonal natural groundwater recharge), anthropogenic causes such as transient pumping rates are of the most influential factors that require larger WHPAs. We hypothesize that WHPA programs that integrate adaptive and optimized pumping-injection management schemes can counter transient effects and thus reduce the additional areal demand in well protection under transient conditions. The main goal of this study is to present a novel management framework that optimizes pumping schemes dynamically, in order to minimize the impact triggered by transient conditions in WHPA delineation. For optimizing pumping schemes, we consider three objectives: 1) to minimize the risk of pumping water from outside a given WHPA, 2) to maximize the groundwater supply and 3) to minimize the involved operating costs. We solve transient groundwater flow through an available transient groundwater and Lagrangian particle tracking model. The optimization problem is formulated as a dynamic programming problem. Two different optimization approaches are explored: I) the first approach aims for single-objective optimization under objective (1) only. The second approach performs multiobjective optimization under all three objectives where compromise pumping rates are selected from the current Pareto front. Finally, we look for WHPA outlines that are as small as possible, yet allow the optimization problem to find the most suitable solutions.

  9. The effects of the lodgepole sour gas well blowout on coniferous tree growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, K.A.

    1991-01-01

    A dendrochronological study was used to evaluate growth impacts on White Spruce (Picea glauca (Moench) resulting from the 1982 Lodgepole sour gas well blowout. Stem analysis was evaluated from four ecologically similar monitoring sites located on a 10 kilometre downwind gradient and compared to a control site. Incremental volume was calculated, standardized using running mean filters and analyzed using one-way ANOVA. Pre and post-blowout growth trends were analyzed between sites and were also evaluated over a height profile in order to assess growth impact variability within individual trees. Growth reductions at the two sites closest the wellhead were statistically significant for five post-blowout years. Growth at these condensate impacted sites was reduced to 9.8% and 38.1% in 1983. Differences in growth reductions reflect a gradient of effects and a dose-response relationship. Recovery of surviving trees has been rapid but is leveling off at approximately 80% of pre-blowout growth. growth reductions were greater and recovery rates slower than those previously predicted by other authors. Statistically significant differences in height profile growth responses were limited to the upper portions of the trees. Growth rates over a tree height profile ranged from 10% less to 50% more than growth rates observed at a 1.3 metres. Analytical methodologies detected and described growth differences over a height profile but a larger sample size was desirable. As is always the case in catastrophic events, obtaining pre-event baseline data is often difficult. Dendrochronological methods described in this paper offer techniques for determining pre-blowout growth and monitoring impacts and recovery in forested areas

  10. Two-stream Convolutional Neural Network for Methane Emissions Quantification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.; Ravikumar, A. P.; McGuire, M.; Bell, C.; Tchapmi, L. P.; Brandt, A. R.

    2017-12-01

    Methane, a key component of natural gas, has a 25x higher global warming potential than carbon dioxide on a 100-year basis. Accurately monitoring and mitigating methane emissions require cost-effective detection and quantification technologies. Optical gas imaging, one of the most commonly used leak detection technology, adopted by Environmental Protection Agency, cannot estimate leak-sizes. In this work, we harness advances in computer science to allow for rapid and automatic leak quantification. Particularly, we utilize two-stream deep Convolutional Networks (ConvNets) to estimate leak-size by capturing complementary spatial information from still plume frames, and temporal information from plume motion between frames. We build large leak datasets for training and evaluating purposes by collecting about 20 videos (i.e. 397,400 frames) of leaks. The videos were recorded at six distances from the source, covering 10 -60 ft. Leak sources included natural gas well-heads, separators, and tanks. All frames were labeled with a true leak size, which has eight levels ranging from 0 to 140 MCFH. Preliminary analysis shows that two-stream ConvNets provides significant accuracy advantage over single steam ConvNets. Spatial stream ConvNet can achieve an accuracy of 65.2%, by extracting important features, including texture, plume area, and pattern. Temporal stream, fed by the results of optical flow analysis, results in an accuracy of 58.3%. The integration of the two-stream ConvNets gives a combined accuracy of 77.6%. For future work, we will split the training and testing datasets in distinct ways in order to test the generalization of the algorithm for different leak sources. Several analytic metrics, including confusion matrix and visualization of key features, will be used to understand accuracy rates and occurrences of false positives. The quantification algorithm can help to find and fix super-emitters, and improve the cost-effectiveness of leak detection and repair

  11. Dry tree semisubmersible platform: from 'technology accepted' to 'project ready'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Roger; Wang, Tao; Nygaard, Magne; Bendiksen, Rolf [Aker Solutions, Oslo (Norway)

    2012-07-01

    Development of new technologies for application of dry tree solutions on semi-submersible hull production platforms opens up new flexible and cost efficient solutions for oil and gas fields in deep and ultra deep water. Aker Solutions has brought the technology through the last steps to a project ready stage. Top tension risers allow for shifting the Christmas tree from seabed to topside, and enables drilling and production from the same unit. By shifting the wellhead and Christmas tree from seabed to platform deck, well maintenance is simplified, and makes the Dry Tree Semi relevant to consider for the Brazilian pre-salt reservoirs. Easy access to the wells for maintenance gives a potential for a higher recovery rate for the field. Future development of ultra deep water oil and gas fields demands solutions overcoming the limitations set by the TLP and the Spar buoy. Combining knowledge from already proven solutions, and a limited addition of new technology, these limitations are overcome with Aker Solutions' Dry Tree Semi. It is designed and proven for Gulf of Mexico environmental conditions. It is verified for conditions with a significant wave height of 14 meters, and able to withstand 100-year extreme weather and 1000-years survival conditions. A conventional semi-submersible platform, but with a deeper draft to further reduce the already low motions, makes the basis for the concept. Top tensioned risers (TTR) with vertical motion compensation stroke of up to 10 meters, makes it possible to shift the Christmas tree from seabed to platform deck. The deep draft design of the hull reduces the wave force excitation on the pontoons, reducing both the roll and pitch dynamics. The Dry Tree Semi represents several major benefits, including low sensitivity to water depth, reduced hull and topside weight, and flexibility in transportation, mooring, and decommissioning. (author)

  12. 2016 Groundwater Monitoring and Inspection Report Gnome-Coach, New Mexico, Site January 2017

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreie, Ken [USDOE Office of Legacy Management, Washington, DC (United States); Findlay, Rick [Navarro Research and Engineering, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The Gnome-Coach, New Mexico, Site was the location of an underground nuclear test in 1961 and a groundwater tracer test in 1963. Residual contamination remaining in the subsurface from these events requires long-term oversight. The Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the site describes the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management’s (LM’s) plan for monitoring groundwater (radiochemical sampling and hydraulic head measurements), inspecting the site, maintaining the site’s institutional controls, evaluating and reporting data, and documenting the site’s records and data management processes. Groundwater monitoring and site inspection activities are conducted annually. This report summarizes the results of these activities conducted during the October 2015 through September 2016 reporting period. The site inspection and annual sampling were conducted on January 27, 2016. At the time of the site inspection, the signs installed near the emplacement shaft, near well USGS-1, and around the perimeter of the site were observed as being in good condition, as were the roads, wellheads, and Project Gnome monument. No new groundwater extraction wells or oil and gas wells were installed during this reporting period on the site or in the sections that surround the site. One new application was received by the New Mexico Oil Conservation Division to install a salt water disposal well approximately 0.8 miles northeast of the Project Gnome monument. The proposed well has a planned completion depth of 15,500 feet below ground surface, but as of November 2016 a drill date has not been established.

  13. Microbial response to oil enrichment in Gulf of Mexico sediment measured using a novel long-term benthic lander system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth N. Orcutt

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Weathered crude oil sank to the seafloor following the 'Deepwater Horizon' disaster in 2010, removing this oil from further physical and photo-chemical degradation processes and leaving benthic processes as the mechanisms for altering and remediating this hydrocarbon source. To quantify potential microbial oil degradation rates at the seafloor, and associated changes in sediment microbial community structure and pore fluid composition, we used a benthic lander system to deploy novel sediment flow-through chambers at a natural hydrocarbon seep in the Gulf of Mexico (at a depth of 1226 m in lease block GC600 roughly 265 km southwest of the 'Deepwater Horizon' wellhead (at 1500 m depth. Sediment amended with 20% unweathered crude oil had elevated rates of sulfate reduction over the course of the 5-month-long experiment as compared to an unamended control, yielding potential rates of sulfate reduction (600–800 mmol m–2 d–1 among the highest measured in hydrocarbon-influenced seafloor sediment. Oil amendment also stimulated methane production towards the end of the experiment, and led to slightly higher cell densities without significant changes in microbial community structure, based on 16S rRNA gene sequence libraries and fatty acid profiles. Assuming a link between sulfate reduction and hydrocarbon degradation, these results suggest that electron acceptor availability may become limiting in heavily oiled deep-sea environments, resulting in minimal degradation of deposited oil. This study provides unique data on seafloor sediment responses to oil deposition, and reveals the value of using observatories to fill the gap in understanding deep-sea microbial processes, especially for ephemeral and stochastic events such as oil spills.

  14. Modelling geothermal conditions in part of the Szczecin Trough - the Chociwel area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miecznik, Maciej; Sowiżdżał, Anna; Tomaszewska, Barbara; Pająk, Leszek

    2015-09-01

    The Chociwel region is part of the Szczecin Trough and constitutes the northeastern segment of the extended Szczecin-Gorzów Synclinorium. Lower Jurassic reservoirs of high permeability of up to 1145 mD can discharge geothermal waters with a rate exceeding 250 m3/h and temperatures reach over 90°C in the lowermost part of the reservoirs. These conditions provide an opportunity to generate electricity from heat accumulated in geothermal waters using binary ORC (Organic Rankine Cycle) systems. A numerical model of the natural state and exploitation conditions was created for the Chociwel area with the use of TOUGH2 geothermal simulator (i.e., integral finite-difference method). An analysis of geological and hydrogeothermal data indicates that the best conditions are found to the southeast of the town of Chociwel, where the bottom part of the reservoir reaches 3 km below ground. This would require drilling two new wells, namely one production and one injection. Simulated production with a flow rate of 275 m3/h, a temperature of 89°C at the wellhead, 30°C injection temperature and wells being 1.2 km separated from each other leads to a small temperature drop and moderate requirements for pumping power over a 50 years' time span. The ORC binary system can produce at maximum 592.5 kW gross power with the R227ea found as the most suitable working fluid. Geothermal brine leaving the ORC system with a temperature c. 53°C can be used for other purposes, namely mushroom growing, balneology, swimming pools, soil warming, de-icing, fish farming and for heat pumps.

  15. Investigation of Natural Gas Fugitive Leak Detection Using an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, S.; Talbot, R. W.; Frish, M. B.; Golston, L.; Aubut, N. F.; Zondlo, M. A.

    2017-12-01

    The U.S is now the world's largest natural gas producer, of which methane (CH4) is the main component. About 2% of the CH4 is lost through fugitive leaks. This research is under the DOE Methane Observation Networks with Innovative Technology to Obtain Reductions (MONITOR) program of ARPA-E. Our sentry measurement system is composed of four state-of-the-art technologies centered around the RMLDTM (Remote Methane Leak Detector). An open path RMLDTM measures column-integrated CH4 concentration that incorporates fluctuations in the vertical CH4 distribution. Based on Backscatter Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy and Small Unmanned Aerial Vehicles, the sentry system can autonomously, consistently and cost-effectively monitor and quantify CH4 leakage from sites associated with natural gas production. This system provides an advanced capability in detecting leaks at hard-to-access sites (e.g., wellheads) compared to traditional manual methods. Automated leak detecting and reporting algorithms combined with wireless data link implement real-time leak information reporting. Early data were gathered to set up and test the prototype system, and to optimize the leak localization and calculation strategies. The flight pattern is based on a raster scan which can generate interpolated CH4 concentration maps. The localization and quantification algorithms can be derived from the plume images combined with wind vectors. Currently, the accuracy of localization algorithm can reach 2 m and the calculation algorithm has a factor of 2 accuracy. This study places particular emphasis on flux quantification. The data collected at Colorado and Houston test fields were processed, and the correlation between flux and other parameters analyzed. Higher wind speeds and lower wind variation are preferred to optimize flux estimation. Eventually, this system will supply an enhanced detection capability to significantly reduce fugitive CH4 emissions in the natural gas industry.

  16. Challenges in Implementing a Multi-Partnership Geothermal Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gosnold, Will; Mann, Michael [Universit of North Dakota; Salehfar, Hossein

    2017-03-02

    The UND-CLR binary geothermal power plant project is a piggyback operation on a secondary-recovery water-flood project in the Cedar Hills oil field in the Williston Basin. Two open-hole horizontal wells at 2,300 m and 2,400 m depths with lateral lengths of 1,290 m and 860 m produce water at a combined flow of 51 l s -1 from the Lodgepole formation (Miss.) for injection into the Red River formation (Ordovician). The hydrostatic head for the Lodgepole is at ground surface and the pumps, which are set at 650 m depth, have run continuously since 2009. Water temperature at the wellhead is 103 °C and CLR passes the water through two large air-cooled heat exchangers prior to injection. In all aspects, the CLR water flood project is ideal for demonstration of electrical power production from a low-temperature geothermal resource. However, implementation of the project from concept to power production was analogous to breaking trail in deep snow in an old growth forest. There were many hidden bumps, detours, and in some instances immoveable barriers. Problems with investors, cost share, contracts with CLR, resistance from local industry, cost of installation, delays by the ORC supplier, and the North Dakota climate all caused delays and setbacks. Determination and problem solving by the UND team eventually overcame most setbacks, and in April 2016, the site began generating power. Figure 1: Schematic of the water supply well at the UND CLR binary geothermal power plant REFERENCES Williams, Snyder, and Gosnold, 2016, Low Temperature Projects Evaluation and Lesson Learned, GRC Transactions, Vol. 40, 203-210 Gosnold, LeFever, Klenner, Mann, Salehfar, and Johnson, 2010, Geothermal Power from Coproduced Fluids in the Williston Basin, GRC Transactions, Vol. 34, 557-560

  17. U.S. national issues on environmental hydrology and hydrogeology - Local and emerging global perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharp, J.M. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    In the US, hydrologic considerations have risen to the forefront of a number of important national issues. These issues focus on aspects of water availability and quality, but also impact other environmental, economic, and social situations. Surface-water resources in the US are essentially allocated and new socioenvironmental concerns may limit further surface-water exploitation. Ground-water use is increasing, but availability is not uniform. Some areas suffer from ground-water depletion and associated social and economic hardships. The quality of US coastal waters, rivers, lakes, and ground-water resources has seriously deteriorated in the last fifty years. Pollution is ubiquitous; vast sums of money have been spent in attempts at remediation. New methods for the disposal of sewage, industrial wastes, and nuclear wastes and for water treatment must be developed. Furthermore, the widespread agricultural contamination of ground water is just now being documented. This is leading to development of well-head protection criteria, a small but important venture into land-use planning. It is in comprehensive land-use planning that hydrology and hydrogeology should be of greatest value. The loss of prime agricultural lands and wildlife habitat as well as localized problems, such as flooding, subsidence, and pollution of water resources are problems which require vigorous emerging global issues will place great reliance on hydrologists and hydrogeologists of the future. Potential climate changes may alter our water resources base; population growth and third-world development will stress global water resources; aerosols are polluting water resources; and pollution does not stop at national boundaries. How to solve these newly emerging global problems is also an important US national issue

  18. Vertical Strain Measured in the Mississippi River Delta Using Borehole Optical Fiber Strainmeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatfield, W.; Allison, M. A.; Bridgeman, J.; Dixon, T. H.; Elliott, D.; Steckler, M. S.; Tornqvist, T. E.; Williams, K.; Wyatt, F. K.; Zumberge, M. A.

    2017-12-01

    Three boreholes in the Mississippi River Delta, at a site 2 km from the river near Myrtle Grove, Louisiana, have been instrumented with optical fiber strainmeters. The boreholes extend to depths of 9 m, 24 m, and 37 m. Each contains an optical fiber strainmeter that records the displacement between a steel surface casing and a termination fixture cemented into the bottom of each borehole. The strainmeters consist of an optical fiber cable stretched to a length 0.2% longer than its unstressed condition. An optical interferometer is formed between each sensing fiber and a second optical fiber of equal length wrapped on a reference mandrel housed in a sonde in the wellhead casing. This arrangement relaxes stability requirements on the light source. A signal processing unit samples the interference fringe signals 50,000 times per second and calculates the optical phase shift, providing a displacement record precise to a few nm or strain sensitivity of better than 1 nanostrain. The sensors operate from solar power and transmit the data (decimated to 20 samples per second) to an archiving system via a cell phone modem. To mitigate against the effects of temperature variations, a second optical fiber sensor with a different temperature is operated in parallel with the first, sharing the same cable and processing sonde. Records from the two fibers allow the separation of optical length changes caused by temperature from the earth strain. The three individual systems provide an unprecedented measure of soil compaction. Over short periods we observe sub-micron signals such as teleseisms, and over the long term we have observed stability at the tenths of a mm level. The site has shown no compaction or subsidence greater than a few tenths of a mm over the last year, highlighting the value of strainmeters over other techniques that can not resolve such small signals. Two of the sensors began operating in July of 2016, the third began operation in May of 2017.

  19. [Various report forms and letters regarding Rorabaugh 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Various

    2007-08-16

    The document(s) described here and the following may be found at the Website of the State of California Department of Conservation, Division of Oil, Gas & Geothermal Resources, http://www.consrv.ca.gov/DOG/geothermal/unit_15/Unit15.htm. GEO Operator Corporation (formerly Thermogenics, Inc. and Geothermal Resources International Operator Corporation) drilled steam production and injection wells in the northwestern portion of The Geysers geothermal field from 1967 to 1985. These wells produced steam that was sold to PG&E's power plant 15. In 1989, the plant stopped operating so the wells stopped producing and GEO Operator Corporation went bankrupt. In 1997-1998, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources, with funding from the California Energy Commission, plugged and abandoned most of these idle wells because of severe wellhead corrosion. Technical data and well cuttings were salvaged from an abandoned warehouse on the GEO Operator Corporation lease. These data have recently been scanned and added to the Division's existing scanned well records. The data are unique because GEO Operator Corporation performed an unusually high number of studies, well tests, and analyses. A total of over 10,300 pages and over 340 logs are included in the scans. The reservoir engineering section alone contains over 3,300 pages of reservoir characterization, well testing, and related studies. These data will be useful to the operators at The Geysers Geothermal field, as well as the public and researchers worldwide.

  20. Review of flow rate estimates of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNutt, Marcia K.; Camilli, Rich; Crone, Timothy J.; Guthrie, George D.; Hsieh, Paul A.; Ryerson, Thomas B.; Savas, Omer; Shaffer, Frank

    2012-01-01

    The unprecedented nature of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill required the application of research methods to estimate the rate at which oil was escaping from the well in the deep sea, its disposition after it entered the ocean, and total reservoir depletion. Here, we review what advances were made in scientific understanding of quantification of flow rates during deep sea oil well blowouts. We assess the degree to which a consensus was reached on the flow rate of the well by comparing in situ observations of the leaking well with a time-dependent flow rate model derived from pressure readings taken after the Macondo well was shut in for the well integrity test. Model simulations also proved valuable for predicting the effect of partial deployment of the blowout preventer rams on flow rate. Taken together, the scientific analyses support flow rates in the range of ~50,000–70,000 barrels/d, perhaps modestly decreasing over the duration of the oil spill, for a total release of ~5.0 million barrels of oil, not accounting for BP's collection effort. By quantifying the amount of oil at different locations (wellhead, ocean surface, and atmosphere), we conclude that just over 2 million barrels of oil (after accounting for containment) and all of the released methane remained in the deep sea. By better understanding the fate of the hydrocarbons, the total discharge can be partitioned into separate components that pose threats to deep sea vs. coastal ecosystems, allowing responders in future events to scale their actions accordingly.

  1. Preoperational Subsurface Conditions at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Service Waste Disposal Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ansley, Shannon Leigh

    2002-02-01

    The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) Service Wastewater Discharge Facility replaces the existing percolation ponds as a disposal facility for the INTEC Service Waste Stream. A preferred alternative for helping decrease water content in the subsurface near INTEC, closure of the existing ponds is required by the INTEC Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Record of Decision (ROD) for Waste Area Group 3 Operable Unit 3-13 (DOE-ID 1999a). By August 2002, the replacement facility was constructed approximately 2 miles southwest of INTEC, near the Big Lost River channel. Because groundwater beneath the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is protected under Federal and State of Idaho regulations from degradation due to INEEL activities, preoperational data required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 were collected. These data include preexisting physical, chemical, and biological conditions that could be affected by the discharge; background levels of radioactive and chemical components; pertinent environmental and ecological parameters; and potential pathways for human exposure or environmental impact. This document presents specific data collected in support of DOE Order 5400.1, including: four quarters of groundwater sampling and analysis of chemical and radiological parameters; general facility description; site specific geology, stratigraphy, soils, and hydrology; perched water discussions; and general regulatory requirements. However, in order to avoid duplication of previous information, the reader is directed to other referenced publications for more detailed information. Documents that are not readily available are compiled in this publication as appendices. These documents include well and borehole completion reports, a perched water evaluation letter report, the draft INEEL Wellhead Protection Program Plan, and the Environmental Checklist.

  2. Quaternary sediments in Rybalsryi quarry of Dnipropetrovsk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manyuk V.V.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The results of a study of the typical section of Quaternary sediments in the Rybalske quarry and first time been reported to shift to the South boundary of the spread of the Dneprovian ice cover. Long-term observation of the geological structure subaerial and subaqueous deposits in Quaternary escarpment quarry clearly demonstrates the exceptional value, integrity, and at the same time, a certain exclusivity individual elements Quaternary section. Middle-upper Pleistocene section of substantially exceeds disclosed in Sazhovka draw, where the stratotype Kodatskiy fossil soil and elevated section of Quaternary sediments. If old Kodak can see only fragments section, an opened side by deep ravines and conditions of use cleared, the Rybalske quarry ledge submitted in one complete section alternation fossil soil horizons and loess - loess from the Dnieper to the modern black soil, and another ledge next to, well the rest of the section is exposed (from Tilihulske to Shyrokynske klimatolite. Established that among the many famous sections subaerial deposits located in the Middle Dnieper in the north-eastern part of the Dnieper-Donets basin, in the Black Sea and the Crimea and studied by the author in different years, and described loess and soil horizons (from the Black Sea to the Dnieper differ markedly lack of connectivity, flowability and friability. It is logical to assume that lithofacies conditions of the thicker subaerial deposits in the wellhead part Samara, where the Rybalske quarry markedly different from existing in these areas. Despite the obvious influence of the Dnieper glacier, direct signs which surround Dnipropetrovs’k north must be other reasons not yet explored. It is worth noting another important feature of the section of Quaternary sediments in fishing career. The above section is characteristic of the north-eastern part of the quarry, while the north, at higher marks of the watershed in the lower parts of thicker Quaternary

  3. The role of duplex stainless steels for downhole tubulars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, R.

    1993-01-01

    In sour conditions there is an increasing trend to turn to corrosion resistant alloys for downhole tubulars. The most commonly used CRA tubular is 13Cr, and there are thousands of feet in service. However, there are limits to the use of 13Cr, ie., the risk of sulphide stress corrosion cracking at high H 2 S levels, and the possibility of pitting or high corrosion rates in waters with high chloride contents. Where the service conditions are felt to be too severe for 13Cr alloys it has been traditional to switch to nickel base alloys such as alloys 825 and C-276 (UNS N08825 and N10276). The alloys are much more expensive than 13Cr, and in recent years the duplex stainless steels have been selected as alloys with superior corrosion and SSCC resistance compared with 13Cr, and having lower cost than nickel alloys. Originally the 22Cr duplex alloy (UNS 31803) was used, but more recently the 25Cr super duplex alloys (UNS S32760 and S32750) have become more available. The present paper reviews the data available for 13Cr and the limits of applicability. Data is also presented for laboratory tests for both the 22Cr and 25Cr super duplex alloys. There is extensive service experience with both 22Cr and 25Cr super duplex in the North Sea, covering both downhole tubulars, manifold and post wellhead equipment. Data is presented showing some of the sour condition being experienced in the North Sea by super duplex alloys. These results show that there is a substantial gap between the limits of use for 13Cr and the 25Cr super duplex stainless steel alloys. This means that in many sour environments super duplex stainless steel provides a cost effective alternative to nickel-base alloys

  4. Sweet smell of success -- and safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, L.

    2005-02-01

    Gas scavenger is a commonly used term for a product that reacts with hydrogen sulfide and converts it to another form that no longer presents the same toxicity. This paper describes the DVS 6000, a non-flammable, non-corrosive zinc-based product that converts hydrogen sulfide mostly to zinc sulfide, a harmless substance in the form of a very fine precipitate. It is used to to eliminate hydrogen sulfide and mercaptans in gas streams in truck-mounted scrubbers, bubble towers, contaminated storage tanks and vessels, and for direct injections into gas streams. The resulting zinc sulfide is more environmentally friendly than hydrogen sulfide, or other competing scavenger products, and can be disposed of downhole, as with any other scavenger. It has a freezing point below -- 45 degrees C, therefore it is usable in the Arctic. It can be transported by air, sea, or land (i.e. it is not subject to regulation under the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act), and can be used right at the wellhead or at the gas plant. DVS 6000 is a clear amber-coloured liquid, has a mild odour, and is safer to use than ammonia (used in other scavenger products) since it does much less damage to the lungs and nasal passages if inhaled. Developers of DVS 6000, Diversified Industries Ltd., are currently conducting field trials in conjunction with major end-users for application of the product in steam purging and cleaning, direct injection into pipelines, downhole drilling fluids and treatment of stored reserves in liquid hydrocarbons containing hydrogen sulfide. Indications are that DVS 6000 will be in high demand domestically and internationally.

  5. Description and application of capture zone delineation for a wellfield at Hilton Head Island, South Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landmeyer, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    Ground-water capture zone boundaries for individual pumped wells in a confined aquffer were delineated by using groundwater models. Both analytical and numerical (semi-analytical) models that more accurately represent the $round-water-flow system were used. All models delineated 2-dimensional boundaries (capture zones) that represent the areal extent of groundwater contribution to a pumped well. The resultant capture zones were evaluated on the basis of the ability of each model to realistically rapresent the part of the ground-water-flow system that contributed water to the pumped wells. Analytical models used were based on a fixed radius approach, and induded; an arbitrary radius model, a calculated fixed radius model based on the volumetric-flow equation with a time-of-travel criterion, and a calculated fixed radius model derived from modification of the Theis model with a drawdown criterion. Numerical models used induded the 2-dimensional, finite-difference models RESSQC and MWCAP. The arbitrary radius and Theis analytical models delineated capture zone boundaries that compared least favorably with capture zones delineated using the volumetric-flow analytical model and both numerical models. The numerical models produced more hydrologically reasonable capture zones (that were oriented parallel to the regional flow direction) than the volumetric-flow equation. The RESSQC numerical model computed more hydrologically realistic capture zones than the MWCAP numerical model by accounting for changes in the shape of capture zones caused by multiple-well interference. The capture zone boundaries generated by using both analytical and numerical models indicated that the curnmtly used 100-foot radius of protection around a wellhead in South Carolina is an underestimate of the extent of ground-water capture for pumped wetis in this particular wellfield in the Upper Floridan aquifer. The arbitrary fixed radius of 100 feet was shown to underestimate the upgradient

  6. Methane emissions from the natural gas industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, M.R.; Cowgill, R.M.; Campbell, L.M.; Lott, R.A.

    1993-01-01

    The U.S. EPA and the United Nation's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) have suggested that global warming could be reduced if more energy was generated using natural gas rather than fuels such as coal. An increased use of natural gas instead of coal would decrease global warming since methane emits less carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) than any fossil fuel. However, methane is a more potent as a greenhouse gas than CO 2 , and leakage from the gas system could reduce or eliminate the inherent advantage of natural gas. For this reason, methane emissions must be quantified before a national policy on preferred fuels is developed. Therefore, GRI and EPA have developed this confunded program to quantify methane emissions from the U.S. gas industry. This paper presents, for general industry review, the approach and methodology that the project is using to determine the emissions. The study will measure or calculate all gas industry methane emissions - from production at the wellhead, through the system, to the customer's meter. When these data are combined with data from other studies, a definitive comparison of the relative environmental impact of using methane versus other fuels will be possible. The study will also provide data that can be used by the industry to identify cost-effective mitigation techniques to reduce losses. The methane emissions project is being conducted in three phases: the first two phases have identified and ranked all known potential methane-emitting sources and established methods for measuring, calculating, and extrapolating emissions from those sources. The third phase, which is currently in progress, will gather sufficient data to achieve the accuracy goal. This paper briefly summarizes the methodology being used for the completion of the third phase

  7. Monitoring Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in real-time on oil and natural gas production sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupardus, R.; Franklin, S. B.

    2017-12-01

    Oil and Natural Gas (O&NG) development, production, infrastructure, and associated processing activities can be a substantial source of air pollution, yet relevant data and real-time quantification methods are lacking. In the current study, O&NG fugitive emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) were quantified in real-time and used to determine the spatial and temporal windows of exposure for proximate flora and fauna. Eleven O&NG sites on the Pawnee National Grassland in Northeastern Colorado were randomly selected and grouped according to production along with 13 control sites from three geographical locations. At each site, samples were collected 25 m from the wellhead in NE, SE, and W directions. In each direction, two samples were collected with a Gasmet DX4040 gas analyzer every hour from 8:00 am to 2:00 pm (6 hours total), July to October, 2016 (N=864). VOC concentrations generally increased during the 6 hr. day with the exception of N2O and were predominately the result of O&NG production and not vehicle exhaust. Thirteen of 24 VOCs had significantly different levels between production groups, frequently above reference standards and at biologically relevant levels for flora and fauna. The most biologically relevant VOCs, found at concentrations exceeding time weighted average permissible exposure limits (TWA PELs), were benzene and acrolein. Generalized Estimating Equations (GEEs) measured the relative quality of statistical models predicting benzene concentrations on sites. The data not only confirms that O&NG emissions are impacting the region, but also that this influence is present at all sites, including controls. Increased real-time VOC monitoring on O&NG sites is required to identify and contain fugitive emissions and to protect human and environmental health.

  8. Preoperational Subsurface Conditions at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Service Wastewater Discharge Facility; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansley, Shannon L.

    2002-01-01

    The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) Service Wastewater Discharge Facility replaces the existing percolation ponds as a disposal facility for the INTEC Service Waste Stream. A preferred alternative for helping decrease water content in the subsurface near INTEC, closure of the existing ponds is required by the INTEC Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Record of Decision (ROD) for Waste Area Group 3 Operable Unit 3-13 (DOE-ID 1999a). By August 2002, the replacement facility was constructed approximately 2 miles southwest of INTEC, near the Big Lost River channel. Because groundwater beneath the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is protected under Federal and State of Idaho regulations from degradation due to INEEL activities, preoperational data required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 were collected. These data include preexisting physical, chemical, and biological conditions that could be affected by the discharge; background levels of radioactive and chemical components; pertinent environmental and ecological parameters; and potential pathways for human exposure or environmental impact. This document presents specific data collected in support of DOE Order 5400.1, including: four quarters of groundwater sampling and analysis of chemical and radiological parameters; general facility description; site specific geology, stratigraphy, soils, and hydrology; perched water discussions; and general regulatory requirements. However, in order to avoid duplication of previous information, the reader is directed to other referenced publications for more detailed information. Documents that are not readily available are compiled in this publication as appendices. These documents include well and borehole completion reports, a perched water evaluation letter report, the draft INEEL Wellhead Protection Program Plan, and the Environmental Checklist

  9. The effects of the Rulison event on buildings and other surface structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Lloyd A.; Skjei, Roger E.

    1970-01-01

    Project RULISON is a joint experiment sponsored, by Austral Oil Company Incorporated, Houston, Texas, the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission and the Department of the Interior, with the Program Management provided by CER Geonuclear Corporation of Las Vegas, Nevada under contract to Austral. Its purpose is to study the economic and technical feasibility of using underground nuclear explosions to stimulate production of natural gas from the low productivity, gas bearing Mesaverde formation in the RULISON Field. The nuclear explosive for Project RULISON was detonated successfully at 3:00 p.m. plus 0.1 seconds Mountain Daylight Time, September 10, 1969, at a depth of 8425.5 feet below ground level and was completely contained. Preliminary results indicate that the RULISON device behaved about as expected; i.e., with a yield of about 40 kt. The wellhead of the emplacement well, Hayward 25-95A, is at an elevation of 8154 feet above mean sea level (MSL) and is located 1976.31 feet east of west line and 1813.19 feet north of south line of Section 25, Township 7 South, Range 95 west of 6th P.M., Garfield County, Colorado which corresponds to geodetic coordinates of longitude 107 deg. 56'53'' west and latitude 39 deg. 24'21'' north. John A. Blume and Associates Research Division, under contract with the Nevada Operations Office of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, has been assigned responsibility for structural inventories in the range of probable damage, structural response and damage predictions, surface earth structure hazard evaluations, and recommendations for safety measures in these particular aspects. The predictions were based on field data, office studies, ground motion predictions from the Environmental Research Corporation (ERC), and pertinent published information. This paper is essentially an interim report of currently available data. Studies are continuing to further develop the relationship of ground motion, structural properties, and damage. (author)

  10. Modelling geothermal conditions in part of the Szczecin Trough – the Chociwel area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miecznik Maciej

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Chociwel region is part of the Szczecin Trough and constitutes the northeastern segment of the extended Szczecin-Gorzów Synclinorium. Lower Jurassic reservoirs of high permeability of up to 1145 mD can discharge geothermal waters with a rate exceeding 250 m3/h and temperatures reach over 90°C in the lowermost part of the reservoirs. These conditions provide an opportunity to generate electricity from heat accumulated in geothermal waters using binary ORC (Organic Rankine Cycle systems. A numerical model of the natural state and exploitation conditions was created for the Chociwel area with the use of TOUGH2 geothermal simulator (i.e., integral finite-difference method. An analysis of geological and hydrogeothermal data indicates that the best conditions are found to the southeast of the town of Chociwel, where the bottom part of the reservoir reaches 3 km below ground. This would require drilling two new wells, namely one production and one injection. Simulated production with a flow rate of 275 m3/h, a temperature of 89°C at the wellhead, 30°C injection temperature and wells being 1.2 km separated from each other leads to a small temperature drop and moderate requirements for pumping power over a 50 years’ time span. The ORC binary system can produce at maximum 592.5 kW gross power with the R227ea found as the most suitable working fluid. Geothermal brine leaving the ORC system with a temperature c. 53°C can be used for other purposes, namely mushroom growing, balneology, swimming pools, soil warming, de-icing, fish farming and for heat pumps.

  11. The Present and Future of Szigetvár Spa – An Economic Analysis of Geothermal Energy Investment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judit Pálné Schreiner

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In Hungary, geothermal energy has proved to be an economical source of energy for direct use. It highlights the pros and cons of including renewable energy in the power generation mix of Hungary, and the pros and cons of local application. This paper looks at the operation of Szigetvár Spa from both economic and social aspects. In this study, qualitative analysis is used for the basic economic and social introduction of the Spa, and then real options, based on quantitative methods, are described to identify the long-term financial consequences of the project. In 1966, thermal water was found in Szigetvár. In 1997, this thermal water was certified as medicinal water. The wellhead temperature of Szigetvár thermal water is 62°C in the 790 metres deep thermal well. It is used as so-called domestic hot water in the Szent István housing estate and in Szigetvár Spa. One of the problems with the project is that it is based on single stage thermal water utilization, another problem is that the waste water is too hot. This can be solved by exploiting the heat energy of thermal water more intensively. This way, maximum benefits can be gained from geothermal energy with minimum use of energy. Static and dynamic investment analyses were carried out to examine the spa from a financial aspect. The methods used include static payback period, average rate of return, levelized cost of electricity, net present value, profitability index, dynamic payback period, internal rate of return and real options. By pricing geothermal technology, it is possible to identify the strategic value of flexibility, to quantify what was previously left unquantified, and thus to show that geothermal investments are profitable not only from a social but also from a financial aspect as well.

  12. The Prototype Plume Busters Software: A New Tool for Exploring Issues Related to Environmental Policy in Undergraduate-level Earth and Environmental Science Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macfarlane, P. A.

    2006-12-01

    Students seldom have an opportunity to explore the issues related to the environmental impact of contamination on water resources. With NSF support we have developed the prototype Plume Busters, in which students take on the role of an environmental consultant. The software consists of an interactive, Java application and accompanying HTML linked pages. Following a pipeline spill, the environmental consultant is hired by the pipeline owner to locate the resulting plume created by the spill and remediate the contaminated aquifer at minimum monetary and time cost. The contamination must be removed from the aquifer before it reaches the river and eventually a downstream public water supply. The application simulates movement of a plume from a pipeline break through a shallow alluvial aquifer towards the river upstream from a municipal water supply intake. To locate the plume, the student places observation wells on a gridded map of the study area and the simulation returns the contaminant concentrations at those locations on the appropriate sample dates. Once the plume is located, the student is able to site pumping and injection wells on the map for aquifer remediation using a simple pump-and-treat technique. The simulation then computes the movement of particles to the pumping wells and returns the cumulative mass removed by the production remediation well. Plume Busters also provides teachers with a means to initiate student exploration of a wide range of environmental issues, including (1) source-water assessment and ground-water and wellhead protection zones, (2) the impact of human activities and technology on the hydrosphere and the biosphere, (3) the role of technology in the resolution of environmental issues (4) legal, social, political, and economic implications of environmental issues, and (5) risk assessment resulting from human activities.

  13. Transparency in natural gas prices in Western Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vrieling, E.B.; Munksgaard, J.; Hopper, R.J.

    1989-11-01

    The present situation on price transparency in Western Europe and North america within the context of the European internal gas market is analyzed. In chapter one the ideas and policy proposals put forward by the European Commission are discussed. Special attention is paid to the situation of the large industrial consumers. It is argued that price transparency needs to be extended to more upstream price aspects. This includes information on city-gates prices, transmission and handling charges in addition to wellhead and import prices. In Western Europe (chapter two) two pricing principles can be distinguished at the final consumer level: pricing according to costs and prices according to market value. The first principle is applied in France, Belgium, the United Kingdom and Austria, as some cost elements are included in the tariff calculations in Italy. Countries where a market-evaluation methodology is applied are Denmark, the Netherlands, Germany, Spain and Switzerland. In North America (chapter three) price transparency is extensive and part of the necessary conditions of an open access contract carriage market. In order to integrate the aspect of price transparency in the broader framework of the internal gas market a model of an integrated natural gas market is described in chapter four. The model specifies the preconditions of a truly integrated gas market, i.e. accessible market entry at all levels of the gas sector and for all market players, equal market opportunity and a regulatory oversight system. A brief comparison between the model and the actual market situation in Western Europe showed that hardly any of these preconditions are met. The comparison points out which actions need to be taken to implement an internal gas market in Western Europe. 9 appendices

  14. High radiogenic heat-producing Caenozoic granites: implications for the origin of Quman geothermal field in Taxkorgan, northwestern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuai, W.; Shihua, Q.

    2017-12-01

    As a new found geothermal field, Quman geothermal field (Taxkorgan, China) holds a wellhead temperature of 144 ° and a shallow buried depth of heat reservoir. The heat source of the geothermal field is thought to be the heat flow from the upper mantle, which is disputable with the average Pamir Moho depth of 70 km. The new geochemical data of Taxkorgan alkaline complex, which is located to the west of the geothermal field and is exposed for 60 km along the western side of the Taxkorgan Valley, shed a light on the origin of Quman geothermal field. Together with the lithological association, the geochemical results present that Taxkorgan alkaline complex are mainly composed of alkaline syenites and subalkaline granitoids. Based on the contents of Th, U and K of 25 rock samples, the average radioactive heat generation of the complex (9.08 μW/m3) is 2 times of the standard of high heat production granites (HHPGs) (5 μW/m3), and 4 times of the average upper continental crust (UCC) heat production (2.7 μW/m3). According to U-Pd dating of zircon in aegirine-augite syenite, the crystallization age of the complex is 11 Ma. The complex has incompatible element abundances higher than generally observed for the continental crust, therefore a mantle source should be considered. The results of apatite fission track ange and track length of the complex indicate a low uplift rate (0.11 mm/a) in 3 5 Ma and a high uplift rate (2 3 mm/a) since ca. 2Ma, which indicates a low exposed age of the complex. Therefore, combined with previous studies, we propose that radioactive heat production of the complex and afterheat of magma cooling are the heat source of Quman geothermal field. With a shallow buried heat source, the geothermal field is potential for EGS development.

  15. Etude comparative de tubes en matériaux composites en vue de l'application à l'exploitation des hydrocarbures en mer profonde Comparative Study of Composite-Material Tubes with a View to Their Use for Deep Offshore Hydrocarbon Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonavent G.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Les prévisions de développement de la production pétrolière en mer profonde font apparaître de nouveaux besoins en tubes légers et à haute résistance pour les liaisons verticales entre les têtes de puits sous-marines et les plates-formes flottantes, et les conduites immergées par grand fond. Certains matériaux composites peuvent répondre à ces besoins et présentent en outre l'avantage d'une excellente résistance à la corrosion dans l'environnement marin. Toutefois, les choix sont imposés essentiellement par des contraintes d'ordre mécanique. On cherche ici à comparer, par rapport à l'acier, les avantages de deux types de matériaux composites - les composites acier-résine - les composites fibres-résine dont on résume les principales caractéristiques et les domaines d'applications possibles en fonction des spécifications pétrolières Development forecosts for deep offshore petroleum production bring out new needs for light tubes for vertlcaf linksbetween subsea wellheads and floating piatforms as well as for subsea pipelines ut great depths. Some composite materials moy meet such requirements while also hoving the advantoge of high résistance ta corrosion in a marine environment. However, the choices are mainly governed by stresses of a mechanical nature. Compared with steel, this article seeks ta describe the advantages of the following two types of composite materials : (il steel-resin composites, and (ii fiber-resin composites. The leading properties and the possible arecs of application are summed up as a function of petroleum specifications.

  16. Use of geothermal heat for crop drying and related agricultural applications. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, T.J.; Wright, T.C.; Fein, E.; Munson, T.R.; Richmond, R.C.

    1978-03-01

    Observations led to the selection of the alfalfa dehydration industry for in-depth analysis of the application of moderate-temperature geothermal heat. Six geothermal heat exchanger/dryer configurations were examined. A low-temperature conveyor dryer using geothermal water to supply all required heat was chosen for site-specific analysis, the retrofitting of a large alfalfa dehydration plant within the Heber KGRA in the Imperial Valley, California. Even in the most favorable scenario--sharing a geothermal pipeline with the neighboring fertilizer plant--geothermal retrofitting would increase the price of the alfalfa ''dehy'' about 40 percent. The geothermal brine is estimated to cost $2.58/million Btu's compared with a 1977 natural gas cost of $1.15. Capital cost for heat exchangers and the new dryers is estimated at $3.3 million. The Heber plant appeared to offer the only good opportunity for geothermal retrofitting of an existing alfalfa dehydration plant. Construction of new plants at geothermal resource sites cannot be justified due to the uncertain state of the ''dehy'' industry. Use of geothermal heat for drying other crops may be much more promising. The potato dehydration industry, which is concentrated in the geothermal-rich Snake River Valley of Idaho, appears to offer good potential for geothermal retrofitting; about 4.7 x 10{sup 12}Btu's are used annually by plants within 50 miles of resources. Drying together at the geothermal wellhead several crops that have interlocking processing seasons and drying-temperature requirements may be quite attractive. The best ''multicrop drying center'' site identified was at Power Ranch Wells, Arizona; 34 other sites were defined. Agricultural processing applications other than drying were investigated briefly.

  17. Reserves in western basins: Part 1, Greater Green River basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-01

    This study characterizes an extremely large gas resource located in low permeability, overpressured sandstone reservoirs located below 8,000 feet drill depth in the Greater Green River basin, Wyoming. Total in place resource is estimated at 1,968 Tcf. Via application of geologic, engineering and economic criteria, the portion of this resource potentially recoverable as reserves is estimated. Those volumes estimated include probable, possible and potential categories and total 33 Tcf as a mean estimate of recoverable gas for all plays considered in the basin. Five plays (formations) were included in this study and each was separately analyzed in terms of its overpressured, tight gas resource, established productive characteristics and future reserves potential based on a constant $2/Mcf wellhead gas price scenario. A scheme has been developed to break the overall resource estimate down into components that can be considered as differing technical and economic challenges that must be overcome in order to exploit such resources: in other words, to convert those resources to economically recoverable reserves. Total recoverable reserves estimates of 33 Tcf do not include the existing production from overpressured tight reservoirs in the basin. These have estimated ultimate recovery of approximately 1.6 Tcf, or a per well average recovery of 2.3 Bcf. Due to the fact that considerable pay thicknesses can be present, wells can be economic despite limited drainage areas. It is typical for significant bypassed gas to be present at inter-well locations because drainage areas are commonly less than regulatory well spacing requirements.

  18. Membrane solid-phase extraction: Field application for isolation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from water samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furlong, E.T.; Koleis, J.C.; Gates, P.M.

    1995-01-01

    Solid-phase extraction (SPE) membranes (M-SPE) were used to isolate microgram-per-liter to nanogram-per-liter quantities of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in 4- to 8-liter ground-water samples from a crude-oil-contaminated ground-water site near Bemidji, Minnesota. The M-SPE method was evaluated (1) under laboratory conditions using reagent water fortified with individual PAH at 1.23 micrograms per liter, and (2) at the Bemidji site. At the site, ground-water samples were processed and PAH isolated using a M-SPE system connected directly to the well pump. Following sample isolation, all M-SPE samples were extracted using dichloromethane and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with selected-ion monitoring. Operationally, the M-SPE method provided a simple means to isolate PAH on site at the wellhead, particularly for anoxic water samples. Acceptable recoveries, ranging from 56 to over 100 percent, were observed for lower molecular weight PAH (naphthalene to pyrene) using the M-SPE method. Recoveries using M-SPE were somewhat lower, but reproducible, for higher molecular weight PAH (chrysene to benzo[ghi]perylene), ranging from 18 to 56 percent. M-SPE provides the capability to collect and field isolate PAH from a sufficiently large number of samples to identify environmental chemical processes occurring at individual compound concentrations of 50 to 1,200 nanograms per liter. Using M-SPE, the potential for facilitated transport of PAH by in situ-derived dissolved organic carbon (DOC) was evaluated at the site. Plots comparing DOC and PAH concentrations indicate that PAH concentrations increase exponentially with linear increases in DOC concentrations

  19. The impact on the fishing industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchan, G.; Allan, R.

    1992-01-01

    When the first signs of the oil boom manifested themselves on the Scottish business and community scene in the early 1970's those in the fishing industry in particular had no idea of the magnitude of the impact that it would have on their way of life or the manner in which they had traditionally earned their living. Some 20 years on from that emerging scenario, the reality must e faced that the fishing industry has a very formidable and still growing competitor in the North Sea, which has at times threatened to overwhelm fishing, in terms of its sheer technical, economic and political muscle and know-how. This chapter examines the individual aspects of the interaction between the fishing industry and the oil resource development process that contribute to the overall impact. These include: lack of consultation with the fishing industry by the government when granting exploration licences; the location of platforms, drilling rigs, subsea installations and suspended well-heads; damage occurring when fishing gear makes contact with pipelines lying proud on the seabed in traditional fishing grounds; the amount of debris dumped by the oil and gas industry; economic loss suffered by the fishing industry as a result of its exclusion from many traditional areas; concern over decommissioned and abandoned off-shore installations. Nevertheless, it is acknowledged that the fishing industry has derived significant benefits from the presence of the oil industry in the North Sea, particularly from the readiness of platform personnel to respond to needs and emergencies on any fishing vessels. (UK)

  20. TruckWeight wireless onboard scale helps oilfield services fleet find profit, compliance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2007-05-15

    This article presented a wireless scale that measures temperature and pressure changes in a vehicle's air suspension. The instrument is being used by Alberta-based Rusch Inc., an operator of tank trucks and pup trailers which haul potassium chloride solution, methanol, frac oil, crude oil and other fluids. Made by TruckWeight Inc., the Smart Scale relays data to a handheld receiver using a low-powered safe radio transmitter. It is designed so its power output is not high enough to ignite gases in the atmosphere near wellheads. The information from the Smart Scale is interpreted by a small computer in a handheld receiver. The axle weight and gross vehicle weight measurement is accurate to within 150 pounds. Rusch trucks operate on steep grades all year, encountering soft ground in the summer, and frozen terrain in the winter. When loading is done in the bush, it is impossible to reliably weigh the trucks, whose licensed gross combination weight is 51,300 kilograms. In Alberta, an overweight fine can trigger an audit of a company's safety record and operating practices. Running overweight also places stress on axles, suspensions, wheel-end components tires and brakes. Therefore, adhering to the rated weight is essential. In 2006, Rusch Inc. installed the Smart Scale wireless on-board scale for trucks, tractors and trailers with air suspension. The scale includes a sensor with an integrated antenna and DOT fittings for the vehicle's airline. While the truck is being loaded, the scale produces readings every 3 seconds. This maintenance-free instrument is accurate in temperature extremes ranging from -40 F to 158 F and uses common AA batteries. It is waterproof, weatherproof, shock resistant and non-corrosive. The cost to equip a tractor and trailer with a Smart Scale is $1,590 US, half the cost of a hard-wired scale. 5 figs.

  1. A decline in benthic foraminifera following the deepwater horizon event in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwing, Patrick T; Romero, Isabel C; Brooks, Gregg R; Hastings, David W; Larson, Rebekka A; Hollander, David J

    2015-01-01

    Sediment cores were collected from three sites (1000-1200 m water depth) in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico from December 2010 to June 2011 to assess changes in benthic foraminiferal density related to the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) event (April-July 2010, 1500 m water depth). Short-lived radioisotope geochronologies (²¹⁰Pb, ²³⁴Th), organic geochemical assessments, and redox metal concentrations were determined to relate changes in sediment accumulation rate, contamination, and redox conditions with benthic foraminiferal density. Cores collected in December 2010 indicated a decline in density (80-93%). This decline was characterized by a decrease in benthic foraminiferal density and benthic foraminiferal accumulation rate (BFAR) in the surface 10 mm relative to the down-core mean in all benthic foraminifera, including the dominant genera (Bulimina spp., Uvigerina spp., and Cibicidoides spp.). Cores collected in February 2011 documented a site-specific response. There was evidence of a recovery in the benthic foraminiferal density and BFAR at the site closest to the wellhead (45 NM, NE). However, the site farther afield (60 NM, NE) recorded a continued decline in benthic foraminiferal density and BFAR down to near-zero values. This decline in benthic foraminiferal density occurred simultaneously with abrupt increases in sedimentary accumulation rates, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) concentrations, and changes in redox conditions. Persistent reducing conditions (as many as 10 months after the event) in the surface of these core records were a possible cause of the decline. Another possible cause was the increase (2-3 times background) in PAH's, which are known to cause benthic foraminifera mortality and inhibit reproduction. Records of benthic foraminiferal density coupled with short-lived radionuclide geochronology and organic geochemistry were effective in quantifying the benthic response and will continue to be a valuable tool in determining the long

  2. Sedimentation Pulse in the NE Gulf of Mexico following the 2010 DWH Blowout.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregg R Brooks

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the impacts of the Deepwater Horizon (DWH oil discharge at the seafloor as recorded in bottom sediments of the DeSoto Canyon region in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. Through a close coupling of sedimentological, geochemical, and biological approaches, multiple independent lines of evidence from 11 sites sampled in November/December 2010 revealed that the upper ~1 cm depth interval is distinct from underlying sediments and results indicate that particles originated at the sea surface. Consistent dissimilarities in grain size over the surficial ~1 cm of sediments correspond to excess (234Th depths, which indicates a lack of vertical mixing (bioturbation, suggesting the entire layer was deposited within a 4-5 month period. Further, a time series from four deep-sea sites sampled up to three additional times over the following two years revealed that excess (234Th depths, accumulation rates, and (234Th inventories decreased rapidly, within a few to several months after initial coring. The interpretation of a rapid sedimentation pulse is corroborated by stratification in solid phase Mn, which is linked to diagenesis and redox change, and the dramatic decrease in benthic formanifera density that was recorded in surficial sediments. Results are consistent with a brief depositional pulse that was also reported in previous studies of sediments, and marine snow formation in surface waters closer to the wellhead during the summer and fall of 2010. Although sediment input from the Mississippi River and advective transport may influence sedimentation on the seafloor in the DeSoto Canyon region, we conclude based on multidisciplinary evidence that the sedimentation pulse in late 2010 is the product of marine snow formation and is likely linked to the DWH discharge.

  3. Power and compression : both high-tech and low-tech combos succeed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budd, G.

    2006-05-15

    Recently commercialized compressors were discussed. The Gas Hog is a low-horsepower compressor with a piston rod that is driven by 2 sheaves with a wrist pin. The piston has a huge 48 inch stroke which operates at only 45 revolutions per minute (RPM), which cuts down on mechanical wear and tear. There are fewer strokes per cubic foot of gas compressed, meaning that there is less waste of compression. There are currently 100 Gas Hog units in the field, as its suction/discharge profile is well suited to coalbed methane activities. The Gas Hog also has a muffler to reduce exhaust noise, and its engine compartment can be insulated. The new range of gas compressors from Brahma is designed to provide greater precision for greater energy efficiency. Varying screw speeds enhance production, allowing operators to manually adjust speeds. Scroll compressor technology has gained widespread acceptance over the last 15 years in the air conditioning and refrigeration industry, and is now being applied to oil and gas applications in vapour recovery, casing pressure modification, conventional gas and coalbed methane. The compressors can be run for a year without maintenance and can react within milliseconds to pressure change. The electric motor shaft, main bearing, counterweights and scroll are housed within a sealed unit. There are no external or internal shafts and seals to check or lubricate. There are no leaks, and no need for periodic alignment of belts. It was concluded that localized power sources will remain a key to the expanding wellhead compressor sector, due to the high cost of installing power lines for electricity. 1 fig.

  4. Environment and fuel choice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellerman, A.D.

    1992-01-01

    The efficacy of environmental regulation as a determinant of fossil fuel choice is examined, with a focus on coal and natural gas in the United States market. It is thought that with the current concern over greenhouse gas emissions, gas would become the fuel of choice and would benefit from measures such as emission trading and carbon taxes. In the USA, in spite of environmental regulations set forth in the Clean Air Act, coal consumption has not decreased with respect to gas because coal is successfully competing on an economic and environmental level. Coal mine productivity has increased over the past 15 years and significant progress has been made in both reducing the emission forming materials in coal through better processing and reducing stack emissions via pollution control devices. An economic analysis of the premium that should attach to natural gas as compared to coal for power generation shows that an emissions trading premium on gas is not sufficient to compensate for the lower cost of coal. The advantages of natural gas for power generation lie in the lower capital and operating costs for combined cycle generation technology and the good prospects for a low, long-term equilibrium price for natural gas. Lower wellhead prices and combined cycle technology will cause gas to have a larger share of the electric utility market than coal in areas where transport economics are favorable. However, the economics of existing coal-fired plants favor continued use of coal, and the increase in gas use will depend on the rate at which new plants are built. 4 figs

  5. Geomechanical Simulation of Bayou Choctaw Strategic Petroleum Reserve - Model Calibration.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Byoung [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-02-01

    A finite element numerical analysis model has been constructed that consists of a realistic mesh capturing the geometries of Bayou Choctaw (BC) Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) site and multi - mechanism deformation ( M - D ) salt constitutive model using the daily data of actual wellhead pressure and oil - brine interface. The salt creep rate is not uniform in the salt dome, and the creep test data for BC salt is limited. Therefore, the model calibration is necessary to simulate the geomechanical behavior of the salt dome. The cavern volumetric closures of SPR caverns calculated from CAVEMAN are used for the field baseline measurement. The structure factor, A 2 , and transient strain limit factor, K 0 , in the M - D constitutive model are used for the calibration. The A 2 value obtained experimentally from the BC salt and K 0 value of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) salt are used for the baseline values. T o adjust the magnitude of A 2 and K 0 , multiplication factors A2F and K0F are defined, respectively. The A2F and K0F values of the salt dome and salt drawdown skins surrounding each SPR cavern have been determined through a number of back fitting analyses. The cavern volumetric closures calculated from this model correspond to the predictions from CAVEMAN for six SPR caverns. Therefore, this model is able to predict past and future geomechanical behaviors of the salt dome, caverns, caprock , and interbed layers. The geological concerns issued in the BC site will be explained from this model in a follow - up report .

  6. The specifics of operating minor deposits (as given by the examples of gas condensate deposits of the Northern Caucasus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Р. А. Гасумов

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important directions in upgrading well productivity in the process of mining hydrocarbons consists in fighting with salt formation and salt deposition. Solving that problem becomes especially actual when operating deposits that are in their final stage of exploitation in complex mining and geological conditions accompanied by deposition of salts in the well foot area of oil bed and their sedimentation on the sub-surface and surface equipment. It provokes a drop in well productivity and results in off-schedule repair works. Specifics are considered of exploiting minor gas condensate deposits of the Northern Caucasus that are operated under complicated mining and geological conditions of anomalously high bed pressures, high temperatures, strong depressions on the beds and inflow of mineralized water from water saturated seams.Processes are studied of salt deposition from heavy hydrocarbons in the well foot and the bed area surrounding it. Water sample analyses data from different wells have demonstrated that the main salts carrier is the associated water, and the principal sedimenting agents are corrosion products, as confirmed by the results of microscopic studies. The dynamics is presented of salt deposition in the “well foot – wellhead – separator” system retrieved from the results of studies of reaction products in the well foot zone of oil bed.It is demonstrated that the efficiency of struggling with salt deposition in the course of mining hydrocarbons depends on comprehensive approach to the problem, the principal thrust lying with prevention of such deposition.Possible ways are considered to prevent precipitation of ferric compounds in the course of operating gas condensate wells, a way is suggested to intensify gas inflow.

  7. Restructuring local distribution services: Possibilities and limitations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duann, D.J.

    1994-08-01

    The restructuring of local distribution services is now the focus of the natural gas industry. It is the last major step in the ``reconstitution`` of the natural gas industry and a critical clement in realizing the full benefits of regulatory and market reforms that already have taken place in the wellhead and interstate markets. It could also be the most important regulatory initiative for most end-use customers because they are affected directly by the costs and reliability of distribution services. Several factors contribute to the current emphasis on distribution service restructuring. They include the unbundling and restructuring of upstream markets, a realization of the limitations of supply-side options (such as gas procurement oversight), and the increased diversity and volatility of gas demand facing local distribution companies. Local distribution service is not one but a series of activities that start with commodity gas procurement and extend to transportation, load balancing, storage, and metering and billing of services provided. There are also considerable differences in the economies of scale and scope associated with these various activities. Thus, a mixture of supply arrangements (such as a competitive market or a monopoly) is required for the most efficient delivery of local distribution services. A distinction must be made between the supply of commodity gas and the provision of a bundled distribution service. This distinction and identification of the best supply arrangements for various distribution service components are the most critical factors in developing appropriate restructuring policies. For most state public utility commissions the criteria for service restructuring should include pursuing the economies of scale and scope in gas distribution, differentiating and matching gas service reliability and quality with customer requirements, and controlling costs associated with the search, negotiation, and contracting of gas services.

  8. Coal seam gas-supply and impact on U.S. markets and Canadian producers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelafant, J.

    1992-01-01

    The basic ways in which coalbed methane differs from natural gas are described. Coalbed methane is stored at a higher capacity in the coal seam, has a different production curve, and exploration costs are lower. Comparing a conventional gas well having 2 billion ft 3 reserves with coalbed methane wells in the San Juan and Warrior basins, gas from the conventional well costs $1.90 per 1,000 ft 3 and methane from the San Juan and Warrior wells costs $1.50 and $2.40 per 1,000 ft 3 respectively. A 90 cent per 1,000 ft 3 tax credit on coalbed methane reduces the two latter costs significantly and is without doubt the driving force behind the coalbed methane industry in some areas. Examples from the Warrior and San Juan basins are described to illustrate the technology driven economics of coalbed methane. Substantial improvements in gas production can be achieved by such means as multiple seam completion technologies, improved well stimulation, optimum well spacing, and the use of cavitation completion. Technically recoverable coalbed methane resources in the USA are estimated at 145 trillion ft 3 , concentrated in the western coal basins. At a wellhead price of $2 per 1,000 ft 3 , the economically recoverable potential is ca 13 trillion ft 3 . Examining future production potential, by developing new technologies or bringing more basins on stream, production could be increased to ca 3 billion ft 3 /d in the late 1990s. It is suggested that the increased volumes of coalbed methane have had minimal impact on gas prices. 9 figs., 12 tabs

  9. Estimation of methane emission from California natural gas industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Jeff; Hicks, Travis C; Drake, Brian; Chan, Tat Fu

    2015-07-01

    Energy generation and consumption are the main contributors to greenhouse gases emissions in California. Natural gas is one of the primary sources of energy in California. A study was recently conducted to develop current, reliable, and California-specific source emission factors (EFs) that could be used to establish a more accurate methane emission inventory for the California natural gas industry. Twenty-five natural gas facilities were surveyed; the surveyed equipment included wellheads (172), separators (131), dehydrators (17), piping segments (145), compressors (66), pneumatic devices (374), metering and regulating (M&R) stations (19), hatches (34), pumps (2), and customer meters (12). In total, 92,157 components were screened, including flanges (10,101), manual valves (10,765), open-ended lines (384), pressure relief valves (358), regulators (930), seals (146), threaded connections (57,061), and welded connections (12,274). Screening values (SVs) were measured using portable monitoring instruments, and Hi-Flow samplers were then used to quantify fugitive emission rates. For a given SV range, the measured leak rates might span several orders of magnitude. The correlation equations between the leak rates and SVs were derived. All the component leakage rate histograms appeared to have the same trend, with the majority of leakage ratesGas Research Institute (EPA/GRI) study. Twenty-five natural gas facilities in California were surveyed to develop current, reliable, and California-specific source emission factors (EFs) for the natural gas industry. Screening values were measured by using portable monitoring instruments, and Hi-Flow samplers were then used to quantify fugitive emission rates. The component-level average EFs derived in this study are often smaller than the corresponding ones in the 1996 EPA/GRI study. The smaller EF values from this study might be partially attributable to the employment of the leak detection and repair program by most, if not all

  10. FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF A MEMBRANE PROCESS TO RECOVER HEAVY HYDROCARBONS AND TO REMOVE WATER FROM NATURAL GAS; F

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unknown

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this project is to design, construct and field demonstrate a 3-MMscfd membrane system to recover natural gas liquids (NGL) and remove water from raw natural gas. The gas processed by the membrane system will meet pipeline specifications for dew point and Btu value, and the process is likely to be significantly less expensive than glycol dehydration followed by propane refrigeration, the principal competitive technology. The BP-Amoco gas processing plant in Pascagoula, MS was finalized as the location for the field demonstration. Detailed drawings of the MTR membrane skid (already constructed) were submitted to the plant in February, 2000. However, problems in reaching an agreement on the specifications of the system compressor delayed the project significantly, so MTR requested (and was subsequently granted) a no-cost extension to the project. Following resolution of the compressor issues, the goal is to order the compressor during the first quarter of 2002, and to start field tests in mid-2002. Information from potential users of the membrane separation process in the natural gas processing industry suggests that applications such as fuel gas conditioning and wellhead gas processing are the most promising initial targets. Therefore, most of our commercialization effort is focused on promoting these applications. Requests for stream evaluations and for design and price quotations have been received through MTR's web site, from direct contact with potential users, and through announcements in industry publications. To date, about 90 commercial quotes have been supplied, and orders totaling about$1.13 million for equipment or rental of membrane units have been received

  11. Resource planning for gas utilities: Using a model to analyze pivotal issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busch, J.F.; Comnes, G.A.

    1995-11-01

    With the advent of wellhead price decontrols that began in the late 1970s and the development of open access pipelines in the 1980s and 90s, gas local distribution companies (LDCs) now have increased responsibility for their gas supplies and face an increasingly complex array of supply and capacity choices. Heretofore this responsibility had been share with the interstate pipelines that provide bundled firm gas supplies. Moreover, gas supply an deliverability (capacity) options have multiplied as the pipeline network becomes increasing interconnected and as new storage projects are developed. There is now a fully-functioning financial market for commodity price hedging instruments and, on interstate Pipelines, secondary market (called capacity release) now exists. As a result of these changes in the natural gas industry, interest in resource planning and computer modeling tools for LDCs is increasing. Although in some ways the planning time horizon has become shorter for the gas LDC, the responsibility conferred to the LDC and complexity of the planning problem has increased. We examine current gas resource planning issues in the wake of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission`s (FERC) Order 636. Our goal is twofold: (1) to illustrate the types of resource planning methods and models used in the industry and (2) to illustrate some of the key tradeoffs among types of resources, reliability, and system costs. To assist us, we utilize a commercially-available dispatch and resource planning model and examine four types of resource planning problems: the evaluation of new storage resources, the evaluation of buyback contracts, the computation of avoided costs, and the optimal tradeoff between reliability and system costs. To make the illustration of methods meaningful yet tractable, we developed a prototype LDC and used it for the majority of our analysis.

  12. Hydraulic Fracture Induced Seismicity During A Multi-Stage Pad Completion in Western Canada: Evidence of Activation of Multiple, Parallel Faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, S.; Garrett, D.; Huang, J.; Usher, P.; Mamer, P.

    2017-12-01

    Following reports of injection induced seismicity in the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin, regulators have imposed seismic monitoring and traffic light protocols for fracturing operations in specific areas. Here we describe a case study in one of these reservoirs, the Montney Shale in NE British Columbia, where induced seismicity was monitored with a local array during multi-stage hydraulic fracture stimulations on several wells from a single drilling pad. Seismicity primarily occurred during the injection time periods, and correlated with periods of high injection rates and wellhead pressures above fracturing pressures. Sequential hydraulic fracture stages were found to progressively activate several parallel, critically-stressed faults, as illuminated by multiple linear hypocenter patterns in the range between Mw 1 and 3. Moment tensor inversion of larger events indicated a double-couple mechanism consistent with the regional strike-slip stress state and the hypocenter lineations. The critically-stressed faults obliquely cross the well paths which were purposely drilled parallel to the minimum principal stress direction. Seismicity on specific faults started and stopped when fracture initiation points of individual injection stages were proximal to the intersection of the fault and well. The distance ranges when the seismicity occurs is consistent with expected hydraulic fracture dimensions, suggesting that the induced fault slip only occurs when a hydraulic fracture grows directly into the fault and the faults are temporarily exposed to significantly elevated fracture pressures during the injection. Some faults crossed multiple wells and the seismicity was found to restart during injection of proximal stages on adjacent wells, progressively expanding the seismogenic zone of the fault. Progressive fault slip is therefore inferred from the seismicity migrating further along the faults during successive injection stages. An accelerometer was also deployed close

  13. High-resolution AUV mapping and sampling of a deep hydrocarbon plume in the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, J. P.; Zhang, Y.; Thomas, H.; Rienecker, E.; Nelson, R.; Cummings, S.

    2010-12-01

    During NOAA cruise GU-10-02 on the Ship Gordon Gunter, the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) Dorado was deployed to map and sample a deep (900-1200 m) volume centered approximately seven nautical miles southwest of the Deepwater Horizon wellhead. Dorado was equipped to detect optical and chemical signals of hydrocarbons and to acquire targeted samples. The primary sensor reading used for hydrocarbon detection was colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) fluorescence (CF). On June 2 and 3, ship cast and subsequent AUV surveys detected elevated CF in a layer between 1100 and 1200 m depth. While the deep volume was mapped in a series of parallel vertical sections, the AUV ran a peak-capture algorithm to target sample acquisition at layer signal peaks. Samples returned by ship CTD/CF rosette sampling and by AUV were preliminarily examined at sea, and they exhibited odor and fluorometric signal consistent with oil. More definitive and detailed results on these samples are forthcoming from shore-based laboratory analyses. During post-cruise analysis, all of the CF data were analyzed to objectively define and map the deep plume feature. Specifically, the maximum expected background CF over the depth range 1000-1200 m was extrapolated from a linear relationship between depth and maximum CF over the depth range 200 to 1000 m. Values exceeding the maximum expected background in the depth range 1000-1200 m were interpreted as signal from a hydrocarbon-enriched plume. Using this definition we examine relationships between CF and other AUV measurements within the plume, illustrate the three-dimensional structure of the plume boundary region that was mapped, describe small-scale layering on isopycnals, and examine short-term variations in plume depth, intensity and hydrographic relationships. Three-dimensional representation of part of a deep hydrocarbon plume mapped and sampled by AUV on June 2-3, 2010.

  14. A structural comparison of the responses of US natural gas models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huntington, H.G.

    1989-01-01

    The EMF 9 scenarios were designed to elicit insights about possible future natural gas market conditions under alternative resource, demand, and oil price trends. These cases are also useful for probing the models themselves because the reported results for the different scenarios reveal important information about the behavioral responses represented in each model. This paper compares these responses in order to explain why they differ and what are the implications of these differences for analyzing gas markets. The integrating framework for this model comparison is a rudimentary supply-demand analysis of market forces that has been successfully applied to many commodity markets. A central theme in this approach is that supply and demand imbalances will eventually be rectified through an adjustment in prices that eliminates excess supply or demand. While this approach abstracts from the important regulatory and institutional constraints, it focuses attention on the growing importance of price determination in a gas market that has fast become integrated nationally as well as internationally. The recently signed and ratified Canadian-US Free Trade Agreement commits both governments not to restrict energy imports or exports or to impose minimum export price requirements, except under special conditions. As competitive forces become more important within the gas industry, this paradigm appears appropriate for probing key long-term relationships critical to this fuel's future. This paper focuses on the responses in total consumption, production, average wellhead price, and average delivered price in the United States for the eight models reporting these variables. Results are reported for 2000, which represent mid- to long-term adjustments for the most part. Responses for other years are shown in Appendix B and those for Canada in Appendix D

  15. Review of flow rate estimates of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNutt, Marcia K; Camilli, Rich; Crone, Timothy J; Guthrie, George D; Hsieh, Paul A; Ryerson, Thomas B; Savas, Omer; Shaffer, Frank

    2012-12-11

    The unprecedented nature of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill required the application of research methods to estimate the rate at which oil was escaping from the well in the deep sea, its disposition after it entered the ocean, and total reservoir depletion. Here, we review what advances were made in scientific understanding of quantification of flow rates during deep sea oil well blowouts. We assess the degree to which a consensus was reached on the flow rate of the well by comparing in situ observations of the leaking well with a time-dependent flow rate model derived from pressure readings taken after the Macondo well was shut in for the well integrity test. Model simulations also proved valuable for predicting the effect of partial deployment of the blowout preventer rams on flow rate. Taken together, the scientific analyses support flow rates in the range of ∼50,000-70,000 barrels/d, perhaps modestly decreasing over the duration of the oil spill, for a total release of ∼5.0 million barrels of oil, not accounting for BP's collection effort. By quantifying the amount of oil at different locations (wellhead, ocean surface, and atmosphere), we conclude that just over 2 million barrels of oil (after accounting for containment) and all of the released methane remained in the deep sea. By better understanding the fate of the hydrocarbons, the total discharge can be partitioned into separate components that pose threats to deep sea vs. coastal ecosystems, allowing responders in future events to scale their actions accordingly.

  16. The pipeline service obligation under changing LDC purchasing practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neff, S.J.

    1990-01-01

    Historically, interstate natural gas pipelines served as aggregators and transporters of gas supplies from the producing fields to the city-gate. In turn, local distribution companies (LDCs) bought gas from pipelines at the city-gate under long-term sales contracts and resold the gas to retail customers. Once a pipeline/LDC sales relationship was established through a regulated certificate process, the LDC was assured of gas supply up to the level of its contract demand (CD) at just and reasonable rates until abandonment of the pipeline's sales service obligation was granted by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC). During the years of regulated wellhead pricing and limited gas deliverability, pipelines signed long-term take-or-pay contracts with producers to induce them to develop and commit new gas supplies. Those supply cost obligations were reflected in tariff minimum bill provisions. For years, this pipeline/LDC arrangement was mutually beneficial and provided assured firm service. With the load diversity on large interstate pipeline systems and the make-up provisions under take-or-pay clauses, these gas purchase contracts provided supply reliability without negative economic consequence to the pipelines. Then, with the issuance of FERC Order Nos. 380, 436, and 500, LDCs' obligations to purchase gas from pipeline suppliers according to the terms of those long term sales agreements were irrevocably altered. The impacts of those long term sales agreements were irrevocably altered. The impacts of those orders the elimination of minimum bills and the advent of open access transportation caused a serious erosion of the mutual obligations between pipelines and their LDC customers. The result has been a significant loss of pipeline sales markets as LDC customers have chosen alternative supplied, often at the urging of state public utility commissions (PUCs) to lower short-term costs

  17. Preoperational Subsurface Conditions at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Service Wastewater Discharge Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansley, Shannon L.

    2002-01-01

    The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) Service Wastewater Discharge Facility replaces the existing percolation ponds as a disposal facility for the INTEC Service Waste Stream. A preferred alternative for helping decrease water content in the subsurface near INTEC, closure of the existing ponds is required by the INTEC Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Record of Decision (ROD) for Waste Area Group 3 Operable Unit 3-13 (DOE-ID 1999a). By August 2002, the replacement facility was constructed approximately 2 miles southwest of INTEC, near the Big Lost River channel. Because groundwater beneath the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is protected under Federal and State of Idaho regulations from degradation due to INEEL activities, preoperational data required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 were collected. These data include preexisting physical, chemical, and biological conditions that could be affected by the discharge; background levels of radioactive and chemical components; pertinent environmental and ecological parameters; and potential pathways for human exposure or environmental impact. This document presents specific data collected in support of DOE Order 5400.1, including: four quarters of groundwater sampling and analysis of chemical and radiological parameters; general facility description; site specific geology, stratigraphy, soils, and hydrology; perched water discussions; and general regulatory requirements. However, in order to avoid duplication of previous information, the reader is directed to other referenced publications for more detailed information. Documents that are not readily available are compiled in this publication as appendices. These documents include well and borehole completion reports, a perched water evaluation letter report, the draft INEEL Wellhead Protection Program Plan, and the Environmental Checklist

  18. Growth model for large branched three-dimensional hydraulic crack system in gas or oil shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Viet T.

    2016-01-01

    Recent analysis of gas outflow histories at wellheads shows that the hydraulic crack spacing must be of the order of 0.1 m (rather than 1 m or 10 m). Consequently, the existing models, limited to one or several cracks, are unrealistic. The reality is 105–106 almost vertical hydraulic cracks per fracking stage. Here, we study the growth of two intersecting near-orthogonal systems of parallel hydraulic cracks spaced at 0.1 m, preferably following pre-existing rock joints. One key idea is that, to model lateral cracks branching from a primary crack wall, crack pressurization, by viscous Poiseuille-type flow, of compressible (proppant-laden) frac water must be complemented with the pressurization of a sufficient volume of micropores and microcracks by Darcy-type water diffusion into the shale, to generate tension along existing crack walls, overcoming the strength limit of the cohesive-crack or crack-band model. A second key idea is that enforcing the equilibrium of stresses in cracks, pores and water, with the generation of tension in the solid phase, requires a new three-phase medium concept, which is transitional between Biot’s two-phase medium and Terzaghi’s effective stress and introduces the loading of the solid by pressure gradients of diffusing pore water. A computer program, combining finite elements for deformation and fracture with volume elements for water flow, is developed to validate the new model. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Energy and the subsurface’. PMID:27597791

  19. Technical and Economic Assessment of Solar Photovoltaic for Groundwater Extraction on the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackley, Rob D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Anderson, David M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Thomle, Jonathan N. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Strickland, Christopher E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The overall goal of environmental remediation is to protect human health and the environment. Implementing renewable energy sources such as solar photovoltaic (PV) in groundwater extraction and pump-and-treat (P&T) systems may help minimize the environmental footprint of remediation efforts. The first step in considering solar PV for powering Hanford groundwater extraction is assessing the technical and economic feasibility and identifying potential target locations where implementation would be most successful. Accordingly, a techno-economic assessment of solar PV for Hanford groundwater extraction was completed in FY15. Multiple solar PV alternatives ranging in size from 1.2 to 22.4 kWp DC were evaluated and compared against traditional grid-powered systems. Results indicate that the degree to which solar PV alternatives are feasible is primarily a function of the distance of avoided power cable costs and the inclusion of an energy storage component. Standalone solar PV systems provide an energy source at the well and avoid the costs and logistics associated with running long lengths of expensive power cable to the well-head. When solar PV systems include a battery storage component, groundwater can be pumped continuously day and night in a year-round schedule. However, due to the high cost premium of the energy storage component, a fully solar-powered solution could not provide an economic direct replacement for line-powered pumping systems. As a result, the most ideal target locations for successful implementation of solar PV on the Hanford Site are remote or distant extraction wells where the primary remedial objective is contaminant mass removal (as opposed to hydraulic containment) and three-season (March through October) intermittent pumping is acceptable (e.g. remediation of hexavalent chromium in 200-UP-1).

  20. Reservoir pressure evolution model during exploration drilling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korotaev B. A.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Based on the analysis of laboratory studies and literature data the method for estimating reservoir pressure in exploratory drilling has been proposed, it allows identify zones of abnormal reservoir pressure in the presence of seismic data on reservoir location depths. This method of assessment is based on developed at the end of the XX century methods using d- and σ-exponentials taking into account the mechanical drilling speed, rotor speed, bit load and its diameter, lithological constant and degree of rocks' compaction, mud density and "regional density". It is known that in exploratory drilling pulsation of pressure at the wellhead is observed. Such pulsation is a consequence of transferring reservoir pressure through clay. In the paper the mechanism for transferring pressure to the bottomhole as well as the behaviour of the clay layer during transmission of excess pressure has been described. A laboratory installation has been built, it has been used for modelling pressure propagation to the bottomhole of the well through a layer of clay. The bulge of the clay layer is established for 215.9 mm bottomhole diameter. Functional correlation of pressure propagation through the layer of clay has been determined and a reaction of the top clay layer has been shown to have bulge with a height of 25 mm. A pressure distribution scheme (balance has been developed, which takes into account the distance from layers with abnormal pressure to the bottomhole. A balance equation for reservoir pressure evaluation has been derived including well depth, distance from bottomhole to the top of the formation with abnormal pressure and density of clay.

  1. Appraisal of the tight sands potential of the Sand Wash and Great Divide Basins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-08-01

    The volume of future tight gas reserve additions is difficult to estimate because of uncertainties in the characterization and extent of the resource and the performance and cost-effectiveness of stimulation and production technologies. Ongoing R ampersand D by industry and government aims to reduce the risks and costs of producing these tight resources, increase the certainty of knowledge of their geologic characteristics and extent, and increase the efficiency of production technologies. Some basins expected to contain large volumes of tight gas are being evaluated as to their potential contribution to domestic gas supplies. This report describes the results of one such appraisal. This analysis addresses the tight portions of the Eastern Greater Green River Basin (Sand Wash and Great Divide Subbasins in Northwestern Colorado and Southwestern Wyoming, respectively), with respect to estimated gas-in-place, technical recovery, and potential reserves. Geological data were compiled from public and proprietary sources. The study estimated gas-in-place in significant (greater than 10 feet net sand thickness) tight sand intervals for six distinct vertical and 21 areal units of analysis. These units of analysis represent tight gas potential outside current areas of development. For each unit of analysis, a ''typical'' well was modeled to represent the costs, recovery and economics of near-term drilling prospects in that unit. Technically recoverable gas was calculated using reservoir properties and assumptions about current formation evaluation and extraction technology performance. Basin-specific capital and operating costs were incorporated along with taxes, royalties and current regulations to estimate the minimum required wellhead gas price required to make the typical well in each of unit of analysis economic

  2. Occurrence and potential human-health relevance of volatile organic compounds in drinking water from domestic wells in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, B.L.; Toccalino, P.L.; Moran, M.J.; Zogorski, J.S.; Price, C.V.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As the population and demand for safe drinking water from domestic wells increase, it is important to examine water quality and contaminant occurrence. A national assessment in 2006 by the U.S. Geological Survey reported findings for 55 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) based on 2,401 domestic wells sampled during 1985-2002. OBJECTIVES: We examined the occurrence of individual and multiple VOCs and assessed the potential human-health relevance of VOC concentrations. We also identified hydrogeologic and anthropogenic variables that influence the probability of VOC occurrence. METHODS: The domestic well samples were collected at the wellhead before treatment of water and analyzed for 55 VOCs. Results were used to examine VOC occurrence and identify associations of multiple explanatory variables using logistic regression analyses. We used a screening-level assessment to compare VOC concentrations to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) and health-based screening levels. RESULTS: We detected VOCs in 65% of the samples; about one-half of these samples contained VOC mixtures. Frequently detected VOCs included chloroform, toluene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, and perchloroethene. VOC concentrations generally were < 1 ??g/L. One or more VOC concentrations were greater than MCLs in 1.2% of samples, including dibromochloropropane, 1,2-dichloropropane, and ethylene dibromide (fumigants); perchloroethene and trichloroethene (solvents); and 1,1-dichloroethene (organic synthesis compound). CONCLUSIONS: Drinking water supplied by domestic wells is vulnerable to low-level VOC contamination. About 1% of samples had concentrations of potential human-health concern. Identifying factors associated with VOC occurrence may aid in understanding the sources, transport, and fate of VOCs in groundwater.

  3. Culture-dependent and culture-independent characterization of microbial assemblages associated with high-temperature petroleum reservoirs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orphan, V J; Taylor, L T; Hafenbradl, D; Delong, E F

    2000-02-01

    Recent investigations of oil reservoirs in a variety of locales have indicated that these habitats may harbor active thermophilic prokaryotic assemblages. In this study, we used both molecular and culture-based methods to characterize prokaryotic consortia associated with high-temperature, sulfur-rich oil reservoirs in California. Enrichment cultures designed for anaerobic thermophiles, both autotrophic and heterotrophic, were successful at temperatures ranging from 60 to 90 degrees C. Heterotrophic enrichments from all sites yielded sheathed rods (Thermotogales), pleomorphic rods resembling Thermoanaerobacter, and Thermococcus-like isolates. The predominant autotrophic microorganisms recovered from inorganic enrichments using H(2), acetate, and CO(2) as energy and carbon sources were methanogens, including isolates closely related to Methanobacterium, Methanococcus, and Methanoculleus species. Two 16S rRNA gene (rDNA) libraries were generated from total community DNA collected from production wellheads, using either archaeal or universal oligonucleotide primer sets. Sequence analysis of the universal library indicated that a large percentage of clones were highly similar to known bacterial and archaeal isolates recovered from similar habitats. Represented genera in rDNA clone libraries included Thermoanaerobacter, Thermococcus, Desulfothiovibrio, Aminobacterium, Acidaminococcus, Pseudomonas, Halomonas, Acinetobacter, Sphingomonas, Methylobacterium, and Desulfomicrobium. The archaeal library was dominated by methanogen-like rDNAs, with a lower percentage of clones belonging to the Thermococcales. Our results strongly support the hypothesis that sulfur-utilizing and methane-producing thermophilic microorganisms have a widespread distribution in oil reservoirs and the potential to actively participate in the biogeochemical transformation of carbon, hydrogen, and sulfur in situ.

  4. How bioavailable is highly weathered Deepwater Horizon oil?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostic, J.; Ziolkowski, L. A.; Reddy, C. M.; Aeppli, C.; Swarthout, B.

    2016-02-01

    Oiled sand patties continue to be deposited on northern Gulf of Mexico beaches five years after the Deepwater Horizon (DwH) oil spill. It is known that during the first 18 months post-spill, sand patties from DwH were chemically transformed, both biotically and abiotically, from wellhead release to beach deposition. However, the chemically transformed oil, which appears to become more polar over time, is not well understood in regards to its biodegradation potential. Biodegradation exerts a large control on the fate of spilled oil, representing a major conduit for its removal from the environment. To assess the bioavailability of this weathered oil, sand patties were collected from intertidal and supratidal zones of beaches in Florida, Alabama, and Mississippi in July 2015. Microbial biomarkers of the viable community, phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA), were detected on all samples collected. The PLFA distributions (mostly saturated and branched structures) and abundances (2 - 9 x 1013 cells/g sand patty) were similar across sampling locations. The positive correlation between PLFA abundance and surface area to volume ratios of sand patties indicates that microbes are preferentially inhabiting outside surfaces of the patties. We will present data on the radiocarbon (14C) content of PLFA to assess carbon (C) sources assimilated by microbes. 14C of PLFA is a powerful tool for assessing C sources assimilated in this setting. Oil has no 14C (Δ14C= -1000‰) while modern organic matter has relatively abundant 14C (Δ14C= 0‰). Fingerprinting analysis of biomarker ratios using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography will be presented to ascertain if oil originated from DwH. The extent of the chemical transformation of the oil into more polar compounds will also be measured using thin layer chromatography. Results of this investigation aim to determine the bioavailability and ultimate fate of oiled sand patties that continue to wash ashore on Gulf of Mexico

  5. Prospects for Strengthening the Security of Ukraine’s Energy Supply through Development of Unconventional Natural Gas Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyzym Mykola O.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The article presents an analysis of the American experience in development of natural shale gas in the US, identifies the causes that led to the shale revolution. Its current state is characterized by achieving the peak production simultaneously with shift in the emphasis from natural shale gas to shale oil. The potential technically extracted gas reserves as well as trends in terms of the growth of conventional natural gas reserves and the development of trade in liquefied natural gas are regarded as global preconditions for enlargement of the shale natural gas output. Natural shale gas can be considered as an alternative project only for liquefied natural gas while, compared to pipeline gas, its production is uncompetitive. The national preconditions for development of the industry of nonconventional natural gas production are determined on the basis of the current trends in Ukraine’s gas market. The main obstacles to the realization of this direction are reduction of the gas needs and liberalization of natural gas trade on the basis of European principles. Economic evaluation of the feasibility of natural shale gas production made it possible to forecast its production cost at the wellhead at different depths and estimate its investment attractiveness in different aggregate states. On the basis of the approbation of the presented methodological approach carried out for the Dnieper-Donets and Carpathian shale basins, it was concluded that the investment attractiveness of the first one is higher, given its reservoir properties and the presence of deposits of nonconventional hydrocarbons in different states of aggregation.

  6. Geomechanical Model Calibration Using Field Measurements for a Petroleum Reserve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Byoung Yoon; Sobolik, Steven R.; Herrick, Courtney G.

    2018-03-01

    A finite element numerical analysis model has been constructed that consists of a mesh that effectively captures the geometries of Bayou Choctaw (BC) Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) site and multimechanism deformation (M-D) salt constitutive model using the daily data of actual wellhead pressure and oil-brine interface location. The salt creep rate is not uniform in the salt dome, and the creep test data for BC salt are limited. Therefore, the model calibration is necessary to simulate the geomechanical behavior of the salt dome. The cavern volumetric closures of SPR caverns calculated from CAVEMAN are used as the field baseline measurement. The structure factor, A 2, and transient strain limit factor, K 0, in the M-D constitutive model are used for the calibration. The value of A 2, obtained experimentally from BC salt, and the value of K 0, obtained from Waste Isolation Pilot Plant salt, are used for the baseline values. To adjust the magnitude of A 2 and K 0, multiplication factors A 2 F and K 0 F are defined, respectively. The A 2 F and K 0 F values of the salt dome and salt drawdown skins surrounding each SPR cavern have been determined through a number of back analyses. The cavern volumetric closures calculated from this model correspond to the predictions from CAVEMAN for six SPR caverns. Therefore, this model is able to predict behaviors of the salt dome, caverns, caprock, and interbed layers. The geotechnical concerns associated with the BC site from this analysis will be explained in a follow-up paper.

  7. Natural gas market assessment. Canadian natural gas market mechanisms: Recent experiences and developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-11-01

    The increase in natural gas demand and the associated expansions of most of the pipeline systems serving western Canada have reduced the excess deliverability or excess productive capacity that existed at the time of deregulation of the natural gas industry in 1985. Based on an industry survey, the responses of natural gas buyers and sellers to recent supply difficulties are described. Specific production, transportation, and contractual difficulties were encountered in winter 1992/93 as production was stretched to meet record levels of demand during periods of very cold temperatures and as short-term spot prices reached very high levels. Problems at this time included wellhead freezeups, pipeline outages, and inadequate contract terms and conditions. Methods used to maintain gas flows to end users are reviewed, including a discussion of force majeure, spot gas purchases, storage, supply curtailment, and special loan arrangements. In 1992/93, in most instances where the responsibility fell on the end-user to solve the supply problem, the difficulty was shifted to local distribution companies who have traditionally had more experience with such situations. No cases were identified where either a firm or interruptible end-user was forced to curtail gas consumption because of inadequate supply. New market mechanisms are emerging that will enable buyers and sellers of western Canadian gas to avoid many of the problems encountered in 1992/93. These include prearranged backstopping arrangements, short-term spot markets, access to other gas basins, standardized gas contracts, electronic trading, and price risk management tools. 11 figs

  8. The effects of the Rulison event on buildings and other surface structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Lloyd A; Skjei, Roger E [John A. Blume and Associates Research Division, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1970-05-15

    Project RULISON is a joint experiment sponsored, by Austral Oil Company Incorporated, Houston, Texas, the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission and the Department of the Interior, with the Program Management provided by CER Geonuclear Corporation of Las Vegas, Nevada under contract to Austral. Its purpose is to study the economic and technical feasibility of using underground nuclear explosions to stimulate production of natural gas from the low productivity, gas bearing Mesaverde formation in the RULISON Field. The nuclear explosive for Project RULISON was detonated successfully at 3:00 p.m. plus 0.1 seconds Mountain Daylight Time, September 10, 1969, at a depth of 8425.5 feet below ground level and was completely contained. Preliminary results indicate that the RULISON device behaved about as expected; i.e., with a yield of about 40 kt. The wellhead of the emplacement well, Hayward 25-95A, is at an elevation of 8154 feet above mean sea level (MSL) and is located 1976.31 feet east of west line and 1813.19 feet north of south line of Section 25, Township 7 South, Range 95 west of 6th P.M., Garfield County, Colorado which corresponds to geodetic coordinates of longitude 107 deg. 56'53'' west and latitude 39 deg. 24'21'' north. John A. Blume and Associates Research Division, under contract with the Nevada Operations Office of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, has been assigned responsibility for structural inventories in the range of probable damage, structural response and damage predictions, surface earth structure hazard evaluations, and recommendations for safety measures in these particular aspects. The predictions were based on field data, office studies, ground motion predictions from the Environmental Research Corporation (ERC), and pertinent published information. This paper is essentially an interim report of currently available data. Studies are continuing to further develop the relationship of ground motion, structural properties, and damage. (author)

  9. Lightweight Approaches to Natural Gas Hydrate Exploration & Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Max, M. D.; Johnson, A. H.

    2017-12-01

    Lower-cost approaches to drilling and reservoir utilization are made possible by adapting both emerging and new technology to the unique, low risk NGH natural gas resource. We have focused on drilling, wellbore lining technology, and reservoir management with an emphasis on long-term sand control and adaptive mechanical stability during NGH conversion to its constituent gas and water. In addition, we suggest that there are opportunities for management of both the gas and water with respect to maintaining desired thermal conditions. Some of the unique aspects of NGH deposits allow for new, more efficient technology to be applied to development, particularly in drilling. While NGH-bearing sands are in deepwater, they are confined to depths beneath the seafloor of 1.2 kilometers or less. As a result, they will not be significantly above hydrostatic pressure, and temperatures will be less than 30 oC. Drilling will be through semi-consolidated sediment without liquid hydrocarbons. These characteristics mean that high capability drillships are not needed. What is needed is a new perspective about drilling and producing NGH. Drilling from the seafloor will resolve the high-pressure differential between a wellhead on the sea surface in a vessel and reservoir to about the hydrostatic pressure difference between the seafloor and, at most, the base of the GHSZ. Although NGH production will begin using "off-the-shelf" technology, innovation will lead to new technology that will bring down costs and increase efficiency in the same way that led to the shale breakthrough. Commercial success is possible if consideration is given to what is actually needed to produce NGH in a safe and environmentally manner. Max, M.D. 2017. Wellbore Lining for Natural Gas Hydrate. U.S. Patent Application US15644947 Max, M.D. & Johnson, A.H. 2017. E&P Cost Reduction Opportunities for Natural Gas Hydrate. OilPro. . Max, M.D. & Johnson, A.H. 2016. Exploration and Production of Oceanic Natural Gas

  10. The impact of energy production on the atmosphere: Laboratory and field studies of emissions from oil and gas production and their chemical transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui

    Over the past decades, the rapid development of energy production in the U.S. has led to significant changes in atmospheric emissions and transformation of trace gas and particles, which are still very uncertain and poorly understood. Through laboratory, modeling and field experiments we hope to better understand the trace gas emission and their contribution to secondary organic aerosols (SOA) formation in the oil and natural gas (O&NG) operations. A fast time-response Oxidation Flow Reactor (OFR) is used for the study of SOA formation from oil vapors. The radical chemistry and quantification of OH exposure (OHexp) in the reactor under various conditions were investigated using a photochemical kinetic model. An OHexp estimation equation derived from the model was shown to agree with measurements in several field campaigns. This work further establishes the usefulness of such reactors in atmospheric studies. Motivated from the SOA observations of Gulf of Mexico oil spill, the SOA formation from organic compounds of different volatility in the oil vapors was studied in the laboratory using OFR. We use the evaporation time dependence on volatility of the precursors to quantify their contribution to total SOA formation. This study shows (1) organic compounds of intermediate volatility contribute the large majority of SOA mass formed, (2) the mass spectral signature of SOA shows good agreement with that of ambient SOA formed during oil spill. These results in O&NG operations, the air toxic hydrogen sulfide (H 2S) can be released at wellheads, separation and storage tanks. Here, quantitative, fast time-response measurements of H2S using Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass-Spectrometry (PTR-MS) instruments in an O&NG field are presented. A laboratory calibration study was performed to measure the humidity dependent sensitivities of H2S. The close correlation between H2S and CH4 and significant H2S levels downwind of storage tanks suggest that H2S emissions associated with O

  11. Designing and implementing science-based methane policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, F.

    2017-12-01

    The phenomenal growth in shale gas production across the U.S. has significantly improved the energy security and economic prospects of the country. Natural gas is a "versatile" fuel that has application in every major end-use sector of the economy, both as a fuel and a feedstock. Natural gas has also played a significant role in reducing CO2 emissions from the power sector by displacing more carbon intensive fossil fuels. However, emissions of natural gas (predominantly methane) from the wellhead to the burner tip can erode this environmental benefit. Preserving the many benefits of America's natural gas resources requires smart, science-based policies to optimize the energy delivery efficiency of the natural gas supply chain and ensure that natural gas remains a key pillar in our transition to a low-carbon economy. Southwestern Energy (SWN) is the third largest natural gas producer in the United States. Over the last several years, SWN has participated in a number of scientific studies with regulatory agencies, academia and non-governmental entities that have led to over a dozen peer-reviewed papers on methane emissions from oil and gas operations. This presentation will review how our participation in these studies has informed our internal policies and procedures, as well as our external programs, including the ONE Future coalition (ONE Future). In particular, the presentation will highlight the impact of such studies on our Leak Detection and Repair (LDAR) program, designing new methane research and on the ONE Future initiatives - all with the focus of improving the delivery efficiency of oil and gas operations. Our experience supports continued research in the detection and mitigation of methane emissions, with emphasis on longer duration characterization of methane emissions from oil and gas facilities and further development of cost-effective methane detection and mitigation techniques. We conclude from our scientific and operational experiences that a

  12. Superhot Drilling in Iceland, the Experience of the Iceland Deep Drilling Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elders, W. A.; Friðleifsson, G. Ó.; Zierenberg, R. A.; Fowler, A. P.

    2017-12-01

    The Iceland Deep Drilling Project aims to improve geothermal economics by producing supercritical fluids (www.iddp.is). Supercritical wells could yield an order of magnitude more usable energy than that from conventional geothermal wells because of higher enthalpy and enhanced flow properties. In 2009, the IDDP-1 well failed to reach supercritical conditions in the Krafla caldera in NE Iceland, after encountering rhyolite magma at only 2.1 km depth. The completed geothermal well became the world's hottest and produced superheated steam with a wellhead temperature of 452°C and flow sufficient to generate 35 MWe. The IDDP next moved SW to the Reykjanes Peninsula, the landward extension of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, where it is possible to study an analog of the roots of a black smoker. Reykjanes is unique among Icelandic geothermal systems in being recharged by seawater, which has a critical point of 406°C at 298 bars. Drilling began by deepening an existing 2.5 km deep production well to 3 km depth, and then angling it towards the main upflow zone of the system, for a total slant depth of 4,659 m. Total circulation losses were encountered below 3 km that could not be cured by lost circulation materials or by multiple cement jobs. Accordingly, drilling continued to total depth without return of drill cuttings. We attempted 13 core runs below 3 km depth, only half of which recovered core. The cores are basalts and dolerites with alteration ranging from lower greenschist facies to lower amphibolite facies, suggesting formation temperatures >450°C. After the end of drilling in January 2017, following only six days of heating, supercritical conditions (426°C at 340 bars) were measured in the well at a depth of 4.5 km. The well has not yet been allowed to equilibrate to full in situ temperature. A perforated liner was inserted to 4,570 m, depth to facilitate temperature cycling to enhance permeability at depth through thermal cracking. In 2018 this will be followed by a

  13. Fault detection in the electrical equipment of the artificial system, used for the oil production in marine platforms; Deteccion de fallas en los equipos electricos del sistema artificial, utilizado para la produccion de petroleo en plataformas marinas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas H, Vicente; Rosales S, Inocente [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Pimentel M, Jorge [Petroleos Mexicanos (Mexico)

    2007-07-01

    At present, PEMEX is using new artificial pumping systems for the production of oil, specifically the Electro Centrifugal Pumping system (ECP). Nevertheless, during the operation of the (ECP) system problems by the failure of their electrical components have appeared, mainly of the equipment installed within the well. The faults have resulted in an increased cost for the diminution in the production and the maintenance cost of the remedial work. The maintenance personnel have procedures to perform verification tests of the conditions of the bottom electrical equipment. But, in the case of an electrical failure of the equipment, its location cannot be determined, since they are installed at 3,600 m from the production wellhead. In accordance with the former, the Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas proposed the application of the reflectometry technique in the time domain, to complement the maintenance procedures. This technique is a very useful diagnosis tool of the electrical equipment, which helps in the decision making of the maneuvers of preventive and corrective maintenance to be followed, with the consequent saving of resources. [Spanish] Actualmente, PEMEX esta utilizando nuevos sistemas artificiales de bombeo para la produccion de petroleo, en especifico el Sistema de Bombeo Electrocentrifugo (BEC). Sin embargo, durante la operacion del Sistema BEC se han presentado problemas por la falla de sus componentes electricos, sobre todo del equipo instalado dentro del pozo. Las fallas han resultado con un costo elevado por la disminucion en la produccion y por los trabajos de mantenimiento correctivo. El personal de mantenimiento cuenta con procedimientos para realizar pruebas de verificacion del estado de los equipos electricos de fondo. Pero, en el caso de una falla electrica de los equipos, no se puede determinar su ubicacion, dado que se instalan a 3,600 m del cabezal del pozo de produccion. De acuerdo con lo anterior, el Instituto de Investigaciones

  14. Development of a nuclear steam generator system for gas-cooled reactors for application in oil sands extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.; Hart, R.; Lazic, L.

    2009-01-01

    allow steam at the wellhead to be at 8.5 MPa, saturated, despite significant steam pipe lengths. The steam generator system consists of steam generators, pre-heaters and super-heaters, all designed for operation with high temperature helium as a heat transfer medium. This design utilizes worldwide nuclear steam generator as well as fossil-fuel steam generator experience for optimized, reliable performance. The paper describes the safety aspects of the steam generator system, overall layout of the gas-cooled reactor plant and system controls. With this system, the gas-cooled reactor becomes a viable alternative for energy supply in the Oil Sands. (author)

  15. Synthesis and gas permeation properties of a novel thermally-rearranged polybenzoxazole made from an intrinsically microporous hydroxyl-functionalized triptycene-based polyimide precursor

    KAUST Repository

    Alghunaimi, Fahd; Ghanem, Bader; Wang, Yingge; Salinas, Octavio; Alaslai, Nasser Y.; Pinnau, Ingo

    2017-01-01

    A hydroxyl-functionalized triptycene-based polyimide of intrinsic microporosity (TDA1-APAF) was converted to a polybenzoxazole (PBO) by heat treatment at 460 °C under nitrogen atmosphere. TDA1-APAF treated for 15 min (TR 460) resulted in a PBO conversion of 95% based on a theoretical weight loss of 11.7 wt% of the polyimide precursor. The BET surface area of the TR 460 (680 m2 g−1) was significantly higher than that of the TDA1-APAF polyimide (260 m2 g−1) as determined by nitrogen adsorption at −196 °C. Heating TDA1-APAF for 30 min (TRC 460) resulted in a weight loss of 13.5 wt%, indicating full conversion to PBO and partial main-chain degradation. The TR 460 membrane displayed excellent O2 permeability of 311 Barrer coupled with an O2/N2 selectivity of 5.4 and CO2 permeability of 1328 Barrer with a CO2/CH4 selectivity of 27. Interestingly, physical aging over 150 days resulted in enhanced O2/N2 selectivity of 6.3 with an O2 permeability of 185 Barrer. The novel triptycene-based TR 460 PBO outperformed all previously reported APAF-polyimide-based PBOs with gas permeation performance close to recently reported polymers located on the 2015 O2/N2 upper bound. Based on this study, thermally-rearranged membranes from hydroxyl-functionalized triptycene-based polyimides are promising candidate membrane materials for air separation, specifically in applications where space and weight of membrane systems are of utmost importance such as nitrogen production for inert atmospheres in fuel lines and tanks on aircrafts and off-shore oil- or natural gas platforms. Mixed-gas permeation experiments also demonstrated good performance of the TR 460 membrane for natural gas sweetening with a CO2 permeability of ∼1000 Barrer and CO2/CH4 selectivity of 22 at a typical CO2 wellhead partial pressure of 10 bar.

  16. A high-performance hydroxyl-functionalized polymer of intrinsic microporosity for an environmentally attractive membrane-based approach to decontamination of sour natural gas

    KAUST Repository

    Yi, Shouliang

    2015-09-24

    Acid gases carbon dioxide (CO2) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) are important and highly undesirable contaminants in natural gas, and membrane-based removal of these contaminants is environmentally attractive. Although removal of CO2 from natural gas using membranes is well established in industry, there is limited research on H2S removal, mainly due to its toxic nature. In actual field operations, wellhead pressures can exceed 50 bar with H2S concentrations up to 20%. Membrane plasticization and competitive mixed-gas sorption, which can both lead to a loss of separation efficiency, are likely to occur under these aggressive feed conditions, and this is almost always accompanied by a significant decrease in membrane selectivity. In this paper, permeation and separation properties of a hydroxyl-functionalized polymer with intrinsic microporosity (PIM-6FDA-OH) are reported for mixed-gas feeds containing CO2, H2S or the combined pair with CH4. The pure-gas permeation results show no H2S-induced plasticization of the PIM-6FDA-OH film in a pure H2S feed at 35 °C up to 4.5 bar, and revealed only a slight plasticization up to 8 bar of pure H2S. The hydroxyl-functionalized PIM membrane exhibited a significant pure-gas CO2 plasticization resistance up to 28 bar feed pressure. Mixed-gas (15% H2S/15% CO2/70% CH4) permeation results showed that the hydroxyl-functionalized PIM membrane maintained excellent separation performance even under exceedingly challenging feed conditions. The CO2 and H2S permeability isotherms indicated minimal CO2-induced plasticization; however, H2S-induced plasticization effects were evident at the highest mixed gas feed pressure of 48 bar. Under this extremely aggressive mixed gas feed, the binary CO2/CH4 and H2S/CH4 permselectivities, and the combined CO2 and H2S acid gas selectivity were 25, 30 and 55, respectively. Our results indicate that OH-functionalized PIM materials are very promising candidate membrane materials for simultaneous removal of CO2

  17. Sensitivity of CO2 storage performance to varying rates and dynamic injectivity in the Bunter Sandstone, UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolster, C.; Mac Dowell, N.; Krevor, S. C.; Agada, S.

    2016-12-01

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is needed for meeting legally binding greenhouse gas emissions targets in the UK (ECCC 2016). Energy systems models have been key to identifying the importance of CCS but they tend to impose few constraints on the availability and use of geologic CO2 storage reservoirs. Our aim is to develop simple models that use dynamic representations of limits on CO2 storage resources. This will allow for a first order representation of the storage reservoir for use in systems models with CCS. We use the ECLIPSE reservoir simulator and a model of the Southern North Sea Bunter Sandstone saline aquifer. We analyse reservoir performance sensitivities to scenarios of varying CO2 injection demand for a future UK low carbon energy market. With 12 injection sites, we compare the impact of injecting at a constant 2MtCO2/year per site and varying this rate by a factor of 1.8 and 0.2 cyclically every 5 and 2.5 years over 50 years of injection. The results show a maximum difference in average reservoir pressure of 3% amongst each case and a similar variation in plume migration extent. This suggests that simplified models can maintain accuracy by using average rates of injection over similar time periods. Meanwhile, by initiating injection at rates limited by pressurization at the wellhead we find that injectivity steadily increases. As a result, dynamic capacity increases. We find that instead of injecting into sites on a need basis, we can strategically inject the CO2 into 6 of the deepest sites increasing injectivity for the first 15 years by 13%. Our results show injectivity as highly dependent on reservoir heterogeneity near the injection site. Injecting 1MTCO2/year into a shallow, low permeability and porosity site instead of into a deep injection site with high permeability and porosity reduces injectivity in the first 5 years by 52%. ECCC. 2016. Future of Carbon Capture and Storage in the UK. UK Parliament House of Commons, Energy and Climate Change

  18. Monitoring underground migration of sequestered CO2 using self-potential methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishido, T.; Pritchett, J.; Tosha, T.; Nishi, Y.; Nakanishi, S.

    2013-12-01

    known as a 'geobattery' (e.g. Sato & Mooney, Geophysics 1960; Bigalke & Grabner, Electrochimica Acta 1997): the metallic well casing acts as a vertical electronic conductor connecting regions of differing redox potential. Electrons flow upward though the casing from a deeper reducing environment to a shallower oxidizing environment, and simultaneously a compensating vertical flow of ions is induced in the surrounding formation to maintain charge neutrality. If the redox potential in the deeper region is then increased by injecting an oxidizing substance, the difference in redox potential between the shallower and deeper regions will be reduced, resulting in an SP increase near the wellhead. We will report the results of SP measurements during gas (CO2 or air) injection tests at various sites and numerical simulations carried out using the extended SP postprocessor, which incorporates the above 'geobattery' mechanism in addition to electrokinetic coupling, and discuss the possibility mentioned above more quantitatively.

  19. Development of hydrate risk quantification in oil and gas production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Piyush N.

    Subsea flowlines that transport hydrocarbons from wellhead to the processing facility face issues from solid deposits such as hydrates, waxes, asphaltenes, etc. The solid deposits not only affect the production but also pose a safety concern; thus, flow assurance is significantly important in designing and operating subsea oil and gas production. In most subsea oil and gas operations, gas hydrates form at high pressure and low temperature conditions, causing the risk of plugging flowlines, with a undesirable impact on production. Over the years, the oil and gas industry has shifted their perspective from hydrate avoidance to hydrate management given several parameters such as production facility, production chemistry, economic and environmental concerns. Thus, understanding the level of hydrate risk associated with subsea flowlines is an important in developing efficient hydrate management techniques. In the past, hydrate formation models were developed for various flow-systems (e.g., oil dominated, water dominated, and gas dominated) present in the oil and gas production. The objective of this research is to extend the application of the present hydrate prediction models for assessing the hydrate risk associated with subsea flowlines that are prone to hydrate formation. It involves a novel approach for developing quantitative hydrate risk models based on the conceptual models built from the qualitative knowledge obtained from experimental studies. A comprehensive hydrate risk model, that ranks the hydrate risk associated with the subsea production system as a function of time, hydrates, and several other parameters, which account for inertial, viscous, interfacial forces acting on the flow-system, is developed for oil dominated and condensate systems. The hydrate plugging risk for water dominated systems is successfully modeled using The Colorado School of Mines Hydrate Flow Assurance Tool (CSMHyFAST). It is found that CSMHyFAST can be used as a screening tool in

  20. Evolution of Hydrocarbon-Degrading Microbial Communities in the Aftermath of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Well Blowout in the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, G.; Dubinsky, E. A.; Chakraborty, R.; Hollibaugh, J. T.; Hazen, T. C.

    2012-12-01

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill created large plumes of dispersed oil and gas that remained deep in the water column and stimulated growth of several deep-sea bacteria that can degrade hydrocarbons at cold temperatures. We tracked microbial community composition before, during and after the 83-day spill to determine relationships between microbial dynamics, and hydrocarbon and dissolved-oxygen concentrations. Dominant bacteria in plumes shifted drastically over time and were dependent on the concentration of hydrocarbons, and the relative quantities of insoluble and soluble oil fractions. Unmitigated flow from the wellhead early in the spill resulted in the highest concentrations of oil and relatively more n-alkanes suspended in the plume as small oil droplets. These conditions resulted in near complete dominance by alkane-degrading Oceanospirillales, Pseudomonas and Shewanella. Six-weeks into the spill overall hydrocarbon concentrations in the plume decreased and were almost entirely composed of BTEX after management actions reduced emissions into the water column. These conditions corresponded with the emergence of Colwellia, Pseudoalteromonas, Cycloclasticus and Halomonas that are capable of degrading aromatic compounds. After the well was contained dominant plume bacteria disappeared within two weeks after the spill and transitioned to an entirely different set of bacteria dominated by Flavobacteria, Methylophaga, Alteromonas and Rhodobacteraceae that were found in anomalous oxygen depressions throughout August and are prominent degraders of both high molecular weight organic matter as well as hydrocarbons. Bio-Sep beads amended with volatile hydrocarbons from MC-252 oil were used from August through September to create hydrocarbon-amended traps for attracting oil-degrading microbes in situ. Traps were placed at multiple depths on a drilling rig about 600-m from the original MC-252 oil spill site. Microbes were isolated on media using MC-252 oil as the sole

  1. The role of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) in the European gas market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahan, A.

    2003-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the role that Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) might play in the future EU gas market. LNG imports are not likely to have a place in the Netherlands soon, but they could make an important contribution to the volume and diversity of Europe's gas supplies. An important characteristic of LNG is its inherently high costs, throughout the whole chain, from the wellhead to the market. These costs are considerably higher than the costs of bringing oil to the market. Cost considerations, in combination with the rigidity of the gas market, have led to the use of long-term contracts as a basis for the business, as is the case for the long haul pipeline gas business. Costs have come down considerably and further cost reductions are 'in the pipeline'. While this does not alter the fundamentals of the business it has nonetheless helped to extend the reach of LNG. LNG from the Middle East to Europe has now become economically feasible. The high gas prices of recent years have further fuelled the expansion of the LNG business. Supported by a rapidly growing global economy at the turn of this century, many prospects are under development. The positive economic outlook has seen more speculative positioning in every segment of the LNG chain, while more vertical integration has been industry's response to market liberalisation. The more recent slowdown of the market economies has created a surplus of LNG, which is finding its way onto the markets through short-term and spot transactions. The short-term business will grow over the next few years as more LNG and shipping capacity comes on-stream. However, given underlying high costs and limited flexibility, it should be expected that new projects, currently under consideration, will only be developed on the basis of long-term contracts, thus returning to a balance between supply and demand. For these same reasons, LNG will not likely develop the same the liquidity as that of the oil market. The global

  2. The United Nations framework classification for fossil energy and mineral reserves and resources 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, D.; Lynch-Bell, M.; Ross, J.; Heiberg, S.; Griffiths, C.; Klett, T.

    2011-01-01

    Effective resource management in a globalizing economy requires accurate assessments of fossil energy and minerals resources. The recoverable quantities must be described and categorized in a manner that is consistent with scientific and social/economic information describing the economy as well as with the information describing the projects to recover them. A number of different standards have evolved over time in response to various professional needs Under a mandate given by the United Nations Economic and Social Council, the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE) has cooperated with Governments, regulatory agencies, industry, international organizations, and professional organizations (including Committee for Mineral Reserves International Reporting Standards (CRIRSCO), the Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE), the American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG), and the Society of Petroleum Evaluation Engineers (SPEE)), as well as with outstanding experts, to define a global classification for extractive activities (including oil, gas, heavy oil and bitumen extraction) that reflects the principal concerns of existing petroleum and mineral classifications. The United Nations Framework Classification for Fossil Energy and Mineral Reserves and Resources-2009 (UNFC-2009) aims to serve the following four principal needs: 1. The needs in international energy and mineral studies to formulate robust and long-sighted policies. 2. The needs of governments in managing their resources accordingly, allowing market prices to be transferred to the wellhead with as little loss as possible. 3. The industries' needs for information while deploying technology, management and finance to secure energy supplies and capture value efficiently within the established frameworks to serve its host countries, shareholders and stakeholders. 4. The financial community's need for information to allocate capital appropriately, providing reduced costs and improved long

  3. Effect of seasonal and long-term changes in stress on sources of water to wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Thomas E.; Pollock, David W.

    1995-01-01

    The source of water to wells is ultimately the location where the water flowing to a well enters the boundary surface of the ground-water system . In ground-water systems that receive most of their water from areal recharge, the location of the water entering the system is at the water table . The area contributing recharge to a discharging well is the surface area that defines the location of the water entering the groundwater system. Water entering the system at the water table flows to the well and is eventually discharged from the well. Many State agencies are currently (1994) developing wellhead-protection programs. The thrust of some of these programs is to protect water supplies by determining the areas contributing recharge to water-supply wells and by specifying regulations to minimize the opportunity for contamination of the recharge water by activities at the land surface. In the analyses of ground-water flow systems, steady-state average conditions are frequently used to simplify the problem and make a solution tractable. Recharge is usually cyclic in nature, however, having seasonal cycles and longer term climatic cycles. A hypothetical system is quantitatively analyzed to show that, in many cases, these cyclic changes in the recharge rates apparently do not significantly affect the location and size of the areas contributing recharge to wells. The ratio of the mean travel time to the length of the cyclic stress period appears to indicate whether the transient effects of the cyclic stress must be explicitly represented in the analysis of contributing areas to wells. For the cases examined, if the ratio of the mean travel time to the period of the cyclic stress was much greater than one, then the transient area contributing recharge to wells was similar to the area calculated using an average steady-state condition. Noncyclic long-term transient changes in water use, however, and cyclic stresses on systems with ratios less than 1 can and do affect the

  4. ECOLOGICALLY ACCEPTABLE WAY OF DEVELOPMENT OF THE NORTH CAUCASIAN FEDERAL DISTRICT AND PLANS FOR RESTORING TEREK RIVER BASIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Abdurakhmanov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. This paper analyzes the data on contamination of the Terek river basin in the period of 1978-2012. We give assessment to process of self-purification from oil pollution of coastal waters of the Dagestan coast of the Caspian Sea; tracked seasonal and long-term dynamics of the concentration of petroleum hydrocarbons in sea water, calculated an average concentration and load of petroleum hydrocarbons in the seaside area of Terek River. We also present information obtained in the course of fieldwork in Agrakhan Bay. As a result of field research we conducted full hydrochemical analysis of water samples taken at stations, evaluating the degree of water pollution of Agrakhan Bay.Materials and Methodology. We identified features of pollution of the seaside wellhead of Terek River by analyzing the information from the review journals of the state of environment and its pollution, and magazine-yearbooks of marine waters quality by hydrochemical indicators as well as our own data collections and analysis. Agrakhan Bay Research was conducted using modern physical and chemical methods of quantitative chemical analysis. The date was collected on an integrated basis at 16 stations.Results. It was found that anthropogenic load has reached its limits in the Terek basin. The main factor for the destruction of the ecology of Terek River constitutes extremely large number of oil extracting and refining industries in the region. Studies of Agrakhan Bay revealed a high concentration of zinc. We also found a slight excess of maximum permissible concentration of lead and copper in the southern part of the bay.Main conclusion. For the revival of the Terek River it is necessary to optimize the ecological and environmental impacts of activities of enterprises and industries, improve the efficiency of the entire economy of the North Caucasian region. It is crucial to combine environmental, economic, scientific, technical and organizational measures into a single set

  5. Pressure Build-up and Decay in Acid Gas Injection Operations in Reefs in the Zama Field, Canada, and Implications for CO2 Storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pooladi-Darvish, M.; Hong, H.; Pooladi-Darvish, M.; Bachu, S.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to examine reasons for pressure rise in the Zama X2X pool in northwestern Alberta, Canada, that was used for acid gas disposal, and whether subsequent pressure decay was a result of pressure dissipation into a larger aquifer. The Zama X2X pool, approximately 1 km 2 in size, is connected to four other nearby pools through a common underlying aquifer. Pressure analysis for all the pools indicates that they are in good hydraulic communication. Initial pressure in the Zama X2X pool was approximately 15 MPa. Pressure declined first during oil production, stabilizing at around 10 MPa in the early 1970's, after which started to increase such that it reached 26 MPa in 1986. Subsequently, pressure declined reaching 22 MPa by 1995 just prior to starting injection of acid gas (80% CO 2 and 20% H 2 S). The operator injected acid gas at lower rates and wellhead pressures than those licensed by the regulatory agency. Despite significant production of water and hydrocarbons, the pressure in the Zama X2X pool continued to be higher than the initial reservoir pressure by more than 5 MPa, such that disposal operations were suspended in late 1998. Oil production continued all this time until 2002. Numerical simulations using CMG-IMEM and corresponding sensitivity studies reported in this paper show that disposal of more than 1 million m 3 of water between 1970 and 1988 and again in 1992-1993 in the adjacent Zama YY pool, which is in good hydrodynamic communication with the Zama X2X pool through the aquifer below the oil column, is the main reason for the high pressures observed in the Zama X2X pool. Sensitivity studies indicate that pressure decay in the X2X pool was due to fluid production. The study indicates that while pressure rise has been caused by hydraulic communication between the X2X and YY pools through the common aquifer, the aquifer was not of large volume to allow dissipation of the pressure. In addition to the case study, the implications

  6. Linking Effective Project Management to Business Strategy in Oil and Gas Industry through Decision-making Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeleke, Adeyinka

    The construction project in the oil and gas industry covers the entire spectrum of hydrocarbon production from the wellhead (upstream) to downstream facilities. In each of these establishments, the activities in a construction project include: consulting, studies, front-end engineering, detail engineering, procurement, program management, construction, installation, commissioning and start-up. Efficient management of each of the activities involved in construction projects is one of the driving forces for the successful completion of the project. Optimizing the crucial factors in project management during each phase of a project in an oil and gas industry can assist managers to maximize the use of available resources and drive the project to successful conclusions. One of these factors is the decision-making process in the construction project. Current research effort investigated the relationship between decision-making processes and business strategy in oil and gas industry using employee surveys. I recruited employees of different races, age group, genders, and years of experience in order understand their influence on the implementation of the decision-making process in oil and gas industry through a quantitative survey. Decision-making was assessed using five decision measures: (a) rational, (b) intuitive, (c) dependent, (d) avoidant, and (e) spontaneous. The findings indicated gender, age, years of work experience and job titles as primary variables with a negative relationship with decision-making approach for employees working in a major oil and gas industry. The study results revealed that the two most likely decision-making methods in oil and gas industry include: making a decision in a logical and systematic way and seek assistance from others when making a decision. Additionally, the two leading management approaches to decision-making in the oil and gas industry include: decision analysis is part of organization culture and management is committed to

  7. Study of three-phase fluid dynamics in a surging production system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Rodolfo; Assuncao, Pablo Morelato; Ressel, Fabio de Assis [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo, Sao Mateus, ES (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    Among others factors, petroleum extraction is subordinate to the reservoir pressure and the required pressure to rise it to the surface production facilities. Reservoir deliverability equations tied production rate with reservoir driving force (Economides, 1994). The Inflow Performance Relationship (IPR) is obtained by measuring the production rates under various drawdown pressures, and is used to assess well performance by plotting the well production rate against the flowing bottonhole pressure. Others limiting rate of production factors are imposed by wellhead required pressure and the production tubing performance. The tubing performance is sensitive to several parameters among which we can highlight the production tubing geometry and the properties of the produced fluids (Guo, 2007). Therewith we can define the Tubing Performance Relationship (TPR) similarly to the IPR. Thus the present work aims the hydraulic performance analysis of a production system with a flowing well without artificial elevation methods. Furthermore the triphasic (water-oil-gas) flow studies, both in the production string and the production line, allowed the inspection of the main variables of the system, fluid properties, operation conditions and geometric parameters, on the head loss. In order obtain all these, several methods were developed, each one with specifics limitations to include all flow patterns. The most common biphasic horizontal flow patterns according to Brill and Beggs (1975) are: mist flow, bubble flow, plug flow, slug flow, stratified flow, wavy flow and annular flow. Yet according to Brill and Beggs (1975) the most common biphasic vertical flow patterns are: bubbly flow, slug flow, churn flow, and annular flow. Accordingly to these, another outbreak discussed is the pattern flow sensibility on the head loss. The methodology used in the present work is based on the discretization of the system in several discrete counterparts cells, in which was where it was applied

  8. Sulfide Generation by Dominant Halanaerobium Microorganisms in Hydraulically Fractured Shales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Booker, Anne E.; Borton, Mikayla A.; Daly, Rebecca A.; Welch, Susan A.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Hoyt, David W.; Wilson, Travis; Purvine, Samuel O.; Wolfe, Richard A.; Sharma, Shikha; Mouser, Paula J.; Cole, David R.; Lipton, Mary S.; Wrighton, Kelly C.; Wilkins, Michael J.; McMahon, Katherine

    2017-07-05

    research demonstrates that dominant microbial populations in these subsurface ecosystems contain the conserved capacity for the reduction of thiosulfate to sulfide and that this process is likely occurring in the environment. Sulfide generation (also known as “souring”) is considered deleterious in the oil and gas industry because of both toxicity issues and impacts on corrosion of the subsurface infrastructure. Critically, the capacity for sulfide generation via reduction of sulfate was not detected in our data sets. Given that current industry wellhead tests for sulfidogenesis target canonical sulfate-reducing microorganisms, these data suggest that new approaches to the detection of sulfide-producing microorganisms may be necessary.

  9. First geothermal pilot power plant in Hungary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tóth Anikó

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The Hungarian petroleum industry has always participated in the utilization of favourable geothermal conditions in the country. Most of the Hungarian geothermal wells were drilled by the MOL Ltd. as CH prospect holes. Accordingly, the field of geothermics belonged to the petroleum engineering, although marginally. It was therefore a surprise to hear of the decision of MOL Ltd. to build a geothermal power plant of about 2-5 MW. The tender was published in 2004.The site selected for the geothermal project is near the western border of an Hungarian oilfield, close to the Slovenian border. The location of the planned geothermal power plant was chosen after an analysis of suitable wells owned by the MOL Rt. The decision was made on the bases of different reservoir data. The existence of a reservoir of the necessary size, temperature, permeability, productivity and the water chemistry data was proved. The wells provide an enough information to understand the character of the reservoir and will be the production wells used by the planned power plant.The depth of the wells is about 2930 - 3200 m. The Triassic formation is reached at around 2851 m. The production and the reinjection wells are planned. The primary objective of the evaluation is to further learn the nature of the geothermal system. First a one-day discharge test is carried out. If this short-term test is successful, a six-months long-term discharge test will follow. The first period of the test is a transient phenomenon. Within the well test, the wellhead pressure, the flow rate, the outflowing water temperature, the dynamic fluid level, and the chemical components will be measured. The heat transfer around the bore-hole is influenced by the flow rate and the time. For the right appreciation of the measured data, it is very important to analyse the heat transfer processes around the bore-hole. The obtained data from the experiments must be also fitted into the framework of a mathematical

  10. The 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill: the trauma signature of an ecological disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, James M; Walsh, Lauren; Garfin, Dana Rose; Wilson, Fiona E; Neria, Yuval

    2015-01-01

    The 2010 Deepwater Horizon “British Petroleum (BP)” oil spill was a mega-disaster characterized as the petroleum industry’s largest-volume marine oil spill in history. Following a “wellhead blowout” that destroyed the drilling platform, 4.9 million barrels of petroleum flowed into the Gulf of Mexico over 87 days and the spill expanded to cover 68,000 square miles of sea surface. However, despite the expansive scope of the event, systematic surveys of affected coastal populations found only modest effects on mental health and substance abuse. An established trauma signature (TSIG) methodology was used to examine the psychological consequences in relation to exposure to the unique constellation of hazards associated with the spill. A hazard profile, a matrix of psychological stressors, and a “trauma signature” summary for the affected Gulf Coast population--in terms of exposure to hazard, loss, and change--were created specifically for this human-generated ecological disaster. Psychological risk characteristics of this event included: human causation featuring corporate culpability, large spill volume, protracted duration, coastal contamination from petroleum products, severe ecological damage, disruption of Gulf Coast industries and tourism, and extensive media coverage. The multiple impact effect was notable due to prior exposure of the region to Hurricane Katrina. These stressors were counterbalanced by the relative absence of other prominent risks for distress and psychopathology. Coastal residents did not experience significant onshore spill-related mortality or severe injury, shortages of survival needs, disruption of vital services (health care, schools, utilities, communications, and transportation), loss of homes, population displacement, destruction of the built environment, or loss of social supports. Initial acute economic losses were partially offset by large-sum BP payments for cleanup and recovery of the coastal economy. Not only did Gulf

  11. Investigations of Very High Enthalpy Geothermal Resources in Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elders, W. A.; Fridleifsson, G. O.

    2012-12-01

    The Iceland Deep Drilling Project (IDDP) is investigating the economic feasibility of producing electricity from supercritical geothermal reservoirs. Earlier modeling indicates that the power output of a geothermal well producing from a supercritical reservoir could potentially be an order of magnitude greater than that from a conventional hot geothermal reservoir, at the same volumetric flow rate. However, even in areas with an unusually high geothermal gradient, for normal hydrostatic pressure gradients reaching supercritical temperatures and pressures will require drilling to depths >4 km. In 2009 the IDDP attempted to drill the first deep supercritical well, IDDP-01, in the caldera of the Krafla volcano, in NE Iceland. However drilling had to be terminated at only 2.1 km depth when ~900°C rhyolite magma flowed into the well. Our studies indicate that this magma formed by partial melting of hydrothermally altered basalts within the Krafla caldera. Although this well was too shallow to reach supercritical pressures, it is highly productive, and is estimated to be capable of generating up to 36 MWe from the high-pressure, superheated steam produced from the upper contact zone of the intrusion. With a well-head temperature of ~440°C, it is at present apparently the hottest producing geothermal well in the world. A pilot plant is investigating the optimal utilization of this magmatically heated resource. A special issue of the journal Geothermics with 16 papers reporting on the IDDP-01 is in preparation. However, in order to continue the search for supercritical geothermal resources, planning is underway to drill a 4.5 km deep well at Reykjanes in SW Iceland in 2013-14. Although drilling deeper towards the heat source of this already developed high-temperature geothermal field will be more expensive, if a supercritical resource is found, this cost increase should be offset by the considerable increase in the power output and lifetime of the Reykjanes geothermal

  12. Snow on the Seafloor? Methods to Detect Carbohydrates in Deep-sea Sediments Impacted by the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, S. A.; Freeman, K. H.

    2015-12-01

    A significant portion of the oil released from the Macondo well after the 2010 Deepwater Horizon (DwH) explosion reached the seafloor (1,2). The transfer of buoyant hydrocarbons from the sea surface and subsurface plumes to depths >1500 m, however, is not well understood. A prominent role for sinking marine snow--small, composite particles composed largely of extracellular polymeric substances exuded by algae and bacteria--has been proposed. Snow particles, rich in carbohydrates, may have sorbed and physically entrained oil from the water column as they sank. Several lines of evidence support this scenario: abundant snow was observed 3-4 weeks after the oil spill (3); oil and dispersants can induce marine snow formation (4); and flocculent material covering deep-sea corals near the DwH site contained biomarkers consistent with Macondo oil (5). To investigate whether the chemically complex marine oil snow leaves a direct sedimentary record, we analyzed carbohydrates at high resolution (2 mm intervals) in sediment cores collected at 4 sites in the northern Gulf of Mexico in 2013 using a modified phenol-sulfuric acid spectrophotometric method. We detected a sharp subsurface peak in carbohydrate concentrations near the Macondo well; we interpret this peak as post-DwH marine snow. Coeval carbohydrate, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, and hopane profiles suggest a clear link between marine snow and Macondo oil components, as documented in a 3-year time-series at one site, and enable preliminary conclusions about the delivery and fate of marine snow components in sediments. We also characterized carbohydrates near the wellhead using fluorescent lectin-binding analyses developed for applications in cell biology. Particle morphologies include collapse structures suggestive of a water column origin. Finally, we explore the extent to which polysaccharide residues detected with selective lectins can be used to determine the provenance of marine snow (e.g., bacterial v. algal

  13. Dalia integrated production bundle (IPB): an innovative riser solution for deep water fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reals, Th Boscals de; Gloaguen, M.; Roche, F. [Total E and P (Angola); Marion, A.; Poincheval, A. [Technip, Paris (France)

    2008-07-01

    The Dalia field is located 210 km north west of Luanda (Angola), about 140 km from shore in 1400 meter water-depth. It was the second major discovery out of 15 made in the block 17 operated by Total. The Dalia Umbilical, Flow lines and Risers EPCI Contract was awarded in 2003. The sea-line network to connect and control the 71 wells and 9 manifolds consist of the following: 40 km of insulated pipe in pipe (12 inches into 17 inches) production flow lines; 45 km of 12 inches water and gas injection lines; 6 off 1.7 km flexible water and gas injection risers; 8 off 1.65 km flexible Integrated Production Bundle (IPB) risers; 75 km of control umbilicals. The flow assurance and associated insulation requirement of the production transport system was one of the main challenges of the project. With a crude temperature of 45 deg C at the wellhead and the required minimum temperature of 35 deg C on arrival at the FPSO, this problem was complex. Understanding that, due to the Joule Thompson effect of the riser gas lift, a 'built in' loss of about 5 deg C is induced and together with further losses through the sub sea pipelines, some up to 6 km long, the agreed solution was 'pipe in pipe' for the production flow lines. The innovative flexible IPB riser, incorporating gas lift and heating to keep the fluid temperature above hydrate formation zone, was the selected riser solution. The IPB is new technology for deep water, developed by Technip for Dalia, and consists of a 12 inches nominal central flexible, surrounded by layers of heat tracing cables, small bore gas lift lines, optical fibres and many insulation layers with an Overall Heat Transfer Coefficient of approximately 3,4 W/m{sup 2}K. After an earlier research and development programme, a further extensive qualification programme was conducted during the course of the project, culminating with the deep water testing phase offshore Brazil. The IPB was then approved for fabrication and installation

  14. Synthesis and gas permeation properties of a novel thermally-rearranged polybenzoxazole made from an intrinsically microporous hydroxyl-functionalized triptycene-based polyimide precursor

    KAUST Repository

    Alghunaimi, Fahd

    2017-06-06

    A hydroxyl-functionalized triptycene-based polyimide of intrinsic microporosity (TDA1-APAF) was converted to a polybenzoxazole (PBO) by heat treatment at 460 °C under nitrogen atmosphere. TDA1-APAF treated for 15 min (TR 460) resulted in a PBO conversion of 95% based on a theoretical weight loss of 11.7 wt% of the polyimide precursor. The BET surface area of the TR 460 (680 m2 g−1) was significantly higher than that of the TDA1-APAF polyimide (260 m2 g−1) as determined by nitrogen adsorption at −196 °C. Heating TDA1-APAF for 30 min (TRC 460) resulted in a weight loss of 13.5 wt%, indicating full conversion to PBO and partial main-chain degradation. The TR 460 membrane displayed excellent O2 permeability of 311 Barrer coupled with an O2/N2 selectivity of 5.4 and CO2 permeability of 1328 Barrer with a CO2/CH4 selectivity of 27. Interestingly, physical aging over 150 days resulted in enhanced O2/N2 selectivity of 6.3 with an O2 permeability of 185 Barrer. The novel triptycene-based TR 460 PBO outperformed all previously reported APAF-polyimide-based PBOs with gas permeation performance close to recently reported polymers located on the 2015 O2/N2 upper bound. Based on this study, thermally-rearranged membranes from hydroxyl-functionalized triptycene-based polyimides are promising candidate membrane materials for air separation, specifically in applications where space and weight of membrane systems are of utmost importance such as nitrogen production for inert atmospheres in fuel lines and tanks on aircrafts and off-shore oil- or natural gas platforms. Mixed-gas permeation experiments also demonstrated good performance of the TR 460 membrane for natural gas sweetening with a CO2 permeability of ∼1000 Barrer and CO2/CH4 selectivity of 22 at a typical CO2 wellhead partial pressure of 10 bar.

  15. Effect of Energy Efficiency Standards on Natural Gas Prices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carnall, Michael; Dale, Larry; Lekov, Alex

    2011-07-26

    in its price as seen at the wellhead (Wiser 2007). The magnitude of the effect on price relative to the demand reduction, and the mechanism through which it occurs, is less well established. This report attempts to quantify the potential effects of reduced demand for natural gas in the residential sector, in response to the implementation of an energy efficiency standard for water heaters.

  16. Analysis of cavern stability at the West Hackberry SPR site.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehgartner, Brian L.; Sobolik, Steven Ronald

    2009-05-01

    This report presents computational analyses that simulate the structural response of caverns at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) West Hackberry site. The cavern field comprises 22 caverns. Five caverns (6, 7, 8, 9, 11) were acquired from industry and have unusual shapes and a history dating back to 1946. The other 17 caverns (101-117) were leached according to SPR standards in the mid-1980s and have tall cylindrical shapes. The history of the caverns and their shapes are simulated in a three-dimensional geomechanics model of the site that predicts deformations, strains, and stresses. Future leaching scenarios corresponding to oil drawdowns using fresh water are also simulated by increasing the volume of the caverns. Cavern pressures are varied in the model to capture operational practices in the field. The results of the finite element model are interpreted to provide information on the current and future status of subsidence, well integrity, and cavern stability. The most significant results in this report are relevant to Cavern 6. The cavern is shaped like a bowl with a large ceiling span and is in close proximity to Cavern 9. The analyses predict tensile stresses at the edge of the ceiling during repressuization of Cavern 6 following workover conditions. During a workover the cavern is at low pressure to service a well. The wellhead pressures are atmospheric. When the workover is complete, the cavern is repressurized. The resulting elastic stresses are sufficient to cause tension around the edge of the large ceiling span. With time, these stresses relax to a compressive state because of salt creep. However, the potential for salt fracture and propagation exists, particularly towards Cavern 9. With only 200 ft of salt between the caverns, the operational consequences must be examined if the two caverns become connected. A critical time may be during a workover of Cavern 9 in part because of the operational vulnerabilities, but also because dilatant damage is

  17. Analysis of cavern stability at the Bryan Mound SPR site.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehgartner, Brian L.; Sobolik, Steven Ronald

    2009-04-01

    This report presents computational analyses that simulate the structural response of caverns at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Bryan Mound site. The cavern field comprises 20 caverns. Five caverns (1, 2, 4, and 5; 3 was later plugged and abandoned) were acquired from industry and have unusual shapes and a history dating back to 1946. The other 16 caverns (101-116) were leached according to SPR standards in the mid-1980s and have tall cylindrical shapes. The history of the caverns and their shapes are simulated in a 3-D geomechanics model of the site that predicts deformations, strains, and stresses. Future leaching scenarios due to oil drawdowns using fresh water are also simulated by increasing the volume of the caverns. Cavern pressures are varied in the model to capture operational practices in the field. The results of the finite element model are interpreted to provide information on the current and future status of subsidence, well integrity, and cavern stability. The most significant result in this report is relevant to caverns 1, 2, and 5. The caverns have non-cylindrical shapes and have potential regions where the surrounding salt may be damaged during workover procedures. During a workover the normal cavern operating pressure is lowered to service a well. At this point the wellhead pressures are atmospheric. When the workover is complete, the cavern is repressurized. The resulting elastic stresses are sufficient to cause tension and large deviatoric stresses at several locations. With time, these stresses relax to a compressive state due to salt creep. However, the potential for salt damage and fracturing exists. The analyses predict tensile stresses at locations with sharp-edges in the wall geometry, or in the case of cavern 5, in the neck region between the upper and lower lobes of the cavern. The effects do not appear to be large-scale, however, so the only major impact is the potential for stress-induced salt falls in cavern 5, potentially leading to

  18. One of a kind : from production accounting to trading and budgeting, Entero unifies data and business processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cope, G.

    2009-06-15

    Entero Corporation, a Calgary-based software developer, launched a software program in 2008 to keep track of petroleum when it comes out of the ground. It allows petroleum producers to keep track of who owns what, how much they own, what it's worth and where it's going. Founded in 1994, Entero's first energy industry software package was called EnteroVision, consisting of evTM and evFM. The evTM component focused on trading and marketing, and operations and logistics for use in inventory, risk management, terminal operations and reporting. The evFM component focused on financial management and accounting, allowing operators to view facility balance by owner, product or source. In 2003, Entero merged with software company MOSAIC Integration. The EnteroONE platform brings key Entero systems onto a shared platform that includes addition of production accounting and plant allocations. Once energy is produced, EnteroONE quickly tracks it from the wellhead through the gathering systems, doing production allocations, production and revenue accounting, managing trade deals, logistics and risk management. It also does financial accounting, such as invoicing for shipments made by any transportation mode, and a full general ledger. It eliminates multiple spreadsheets. Entero's 120 clients include exploration and production companies, trading and marketing companies, and midstream operators involved with product movement and processing. Entero is now focused on improving the functionality of its products. New workspace enhancements and reporting customization in EnteroONE financial management are expected to make troubleshooting, audit reporting more efficient. A new integrated field data capture system in EnteroONE production accounting will link field information to production accounting. A new order, scheduling and nominations workspace for EnteroONE trading and marketing will put decision-making information, including profitability, into one view

  19. Chemistry of fluids from a natural analogue for a geological CO{sub 2} storage site (Montmiral, France): Lessons for CO{sub 2}-water-rock interaction assessment and monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pauwels, Helene [BRGM - Water Division, 3, av Claude Guillemin, 45060 Orleans Cedex (France)], E-mail: h.pauwels@brgm.fr; Gaus, Irina; Le Nindre, Yves Michel [BRGM - Water Division, 3, av Claude Guillemin, 45060 Orleans Cedex (France); Pearce, Jonathan [British Geological Survey, Kingsley Dunham Centre, Keyworth, Nottingham NG125GG (United Kingdom); Czernichowski-Lauriol, Isabelle [BRGM - Water Division, 3, av Claude Guillemin, 45060 Orleans Cedex (France)

    2007-12-15

    Chemical and isotope studies of natural CO{sub 2} accumulations aid in assessing the chemical effects of CO{sub 2} on rock and thus provide a potential for understanding the long-term geochemical processes involved in CO{sub 2} geological storage. Several natural CO{sub 2} accumulations were discovered during gas and oil exploration in France's carbogaseous peri-Alpine province (south-eastern France) in the 1960s. One of these, the Montmiral accumulation at a depth of more than 2400 m, is currently being exploited. The chemical composition of the water collected at the wellhead has changed in time and the final salinity exceeds 75 g/L. These changes in time can be explained by assuming that the fraction of the reservoir brine in the recovered brine-CO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O mixture varies, resulting in variable proportions of H{sub 2}O and brine in the sampled water. The proportions can be estimated in selected samples due to the availability of gas and water flowrate data. These data enabled the reconstruction of the chemical and isotope composition of the brine. The proportions of H{sub 2}O and brine can also be estimated from isotope ({delta}{sup 2}H, {delta}{sup 18}O) composition of collected water and {delta}{sup 18}O of the sulfates or CO{sub 2}. The reconstituted brine has a salinity of more than 85 g/L and, according to its Br{sup -} content and isotope ({delta}{sup 2}H, {delta}{sup 18}O, {delta}{sup 34}S) composition, originates from an evaporated Triassic seawater that underwent dilution by meteoric water. The reconstitution of the brine's chemical composition enabled an evaluation of the CO{sub 2}-water-rock interactions based on: (1) mineral saturation indices; and (2) comparison with initial evaporated Triassic seawater. Dissolution of K- and SO{sub 4}-containing minerals such as K-feldspar and anhydrite, and precipitation of Ca and Mg containing minerals that are able to trap CO{sub 2} (carbonates) are highlighted. The changes in concentration of

  20. Field application. Selective stimulation of reservoirs or perforated intervals with use of coiled tubing equipped with real-time data communication system in combination with straddle packer assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberascher, R.; Breimer, G. [GDF SUEZ E and P Deutschland GmbH, Lingen (Germany); Jonge, R.M. de [Baker Hughes (Netherlands)

    2013-08-01

    In two German gas wells a decline in production and wellhead pressures had been observed. Production logging data obtained by PLT surveys were evaluated, which showed that certain intervals within the reservoir section did not contribute, or showed a restricted contribution to the overall gas production. The restricted contribution was suspected to be caused by near-wellbore damage. To restore or enhance the production of the perforated intervals an acid treatment was considered in these wells in order to remove skin damage. To restore or enhance the production of the wells, an acid treatment of the perforated intervals was designed. For obtaining the required selective placement of the acid across the zones of interest, the use of coiled tubing (CT) in combination with a resettable straddle packer assembly was selected. The accuracy of the setting depth of the straddle packer was a critical issue for the execution of the well intervention operations. In order to obtain the required depth accuracy, the CT string was equipped with an intelligent CT communication system, which transfers real-time downhole data to surface. For the first time, a reservoir stimulation project was executed by combining CT equipped with a real-time data communication system (TeleCoil) and the Inflatable Straddle Acidizing Packer (ISAP) assembly. Inside the CT an encapsulated monoconductor cable was installed to transmit real-time data from the CT Bottom Hole Assembly (BHA) to surface. The BHA consists of a Casing Collar Locator (CCL) and downhole pressure and temperature gauges. Due to the protective jacket of the monoconductor cable, there are no restrictions in the use of different fluids in combination with the system. Information provided by the CCL monitoring tool ensures accurate depth correlations, whereas differential pressure measurements from the down-hole pressure gauges provide positive information about the setting and sealing conditions of the straddle packer assembly. The

  1. Digital representation of oil and natural gas well pad scars in southwest Wyoming: 2012 update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garman, Steven L.; McBeth, Jamie L.

    2015-01-01

    The recent proliferation of oil and natural gas energy development in the Greater Green River Basin of southwest Wyoming has accentuated the need to understand wildlife responses to this development. The location and extent of surface disturbance that is created by oil and natural gas well pad scars are key pieces of information used to assess the effects of energy infrastructure on wildlife populations and habitat. A digital database of oil and natural gas pad scars had previously been generated from 1-meter (m) National Agriculture Imagery Program imagery (NAIP) acquired in 2009 for a 7.7-million hectare (ha) (19,026,700 acres) region of southwest Wyoming. Scars included the pad area where wellheads, pumps, and storage facilities reside and the surrounding area that was scraped and denuded of vegetation during the establishment of the pad. Scars containing tanks, compressors, the storage of oil and gas related equipment, and produced-water ponds were also collected on occasion. This report updates the digital database for the five counties of southwest Wyoming (Carbon, Lincoln, Sublette, Sweetwater, Uinta) within the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative (WLCI) study area and for a limited portion of Fremont, Natrona, and Albany Counties using 2012 1-m NAIP imagery and 2012 oil and natural gas well permit information. This report adds pad scars created since 2009, and updates attributes of all pad scars using the 2012 well permit information. These attributes include the origination year of the pad scar, the number of active and inactive wells on or near each pad scar in 2012, and the overall status of the pad scar (active or inactive). The new 2012 database contains 17,404 pad scars of which 15,532 are attributed as oil and natural gas well pads. Digital data are stored as shapefiles projected to the Universal Transverse Mercator (zones 12 and 13) coordinate system. These data are available from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) at http://dx.doi.org/10

  2. Analysis of cavern and well stability at the West Hackberry SPR site using a full-dome model.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobolik, Steven R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-08-01

    This report presents computational analyses that simulate the structural response of caverns at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) West Hackberry site. The cavern field comprises 22 caverns. Five caverns (6, 7, 8, 9, 11) were acquired from industry and have unusual shapes and a history dating back to 1946. The other 17 caverns (101-117) were leached according to SPR standards in the mid-1980s and have tall cylindrical shapes. The history of the caverns and their shapes are simulated in a three-dimensional geomechanics model of the site that predicts deformations, strains, and stresses. Future leaching scenarios corresponding to oil drawdowns using fresh water are also simulated by increasing the volume of the caverns. Cavern pressures are varied in the model to capture operational practices in the field. The results of the finite element model are interpreted to provide information on the current and future status of subsidence, well integrity, and cavern stability. The most significant results in this report are relevant to Cavern 6. The cavern is shaped like a bowl with a large ceiling span and is in close proximity to Cavern 9. The analyses predict tensile stresses at the edge of the ceiling during repressurization of Cavern 6 following workover conditions. During a workover the cavern is at low pressure to service a well. The wellhead pressures are atmospheric. When the workover is complete, the cavern is repressurized. The resulting elastic stresses are sufficient to cause tension around the edge of the large ceiling span. With time, these stresses relax to a compressive state because of salt creep. However, the potential for salt fracture and propagation exists, particularly towards Cavern 9. With only 200 feet of salt between the caverns, the operational consequences must be examined if the two caverns become connected. A critical time may be during a workover of Cavern 9 in part because of the operational vulnerabilities, but also because dilatant damage

  3. Incorporating Social Determinants into a Groundwater Risk Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, M.; Allen, D. M.; Journeay, M.; Korteling, B.

    2009-12-01

    The remediation of polluted groundwater is often very costly, therefore water managers utilize various proactive measures, such as wellhead protection planning, to prevent contamination events. With limited available resources, it is essential to prioritize where these measures are introduced; systematic and integrated methodologies of assessing risk to groundwater can be utilized for this prioritization. To quantify the resistance of the physical system to pollution, Aquifer Vulnerability is commonly mapped for the area of interest. This information is useful for focusing monitoring efforts and identifying data gaps, but is a relative measure of contaminant risk. To more accurately assess the probability of contamination, an inventory of hazards can be integrated with intrinsic vulnerability of the physical system. This Threat indicator links land-use with chemicals and quantifies the risk based on the toxicity and environmental fate of these substances. Local knowledge of the quantity stored and likelihood of release can be utilized to further assess these threats. Both of these steps form part of an existing frameworks for assessing risk to groundwater. In this study, a groundwater risk framework is developed and tested in two study areas; Pender Island and the Lower Fraser Valley in British Columbia, Canada. Enhancements of a basic groundwater risk framework include not only incorporating points sources such as septic systems, landfills and fuel storage, but also various social determinants of risk. These social determinants include the Resistance of a community, which represents the planning and protection initiatives designed to safeguard the resource. These include items such as land-use planning that consider groundwater vulnerability and best management practices enforced by local governments. The ability to recover following an event is the Capacity of a community; indicators include the presence or absence of spill response plans, treatment systems or an

  4. Natural Gas Sweetening by Ultra-Microporous Polyimides Membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Alghunaimi, Fahd

    2017-05-01

    -APAF polyimide is an excellent candidate membrane material for removal of CO2 and N2 from natural gas. Moreover, based on the collected data for CO2/CH4 mixed-gas experiments from this work and previously published reports, a new mixed-gas 2017 CO2/CH4 permeability/selectivity upper bound curve was initiated to reflect the actual performance including plasticization phenomena at high feed pressure and 10 bar CO2 partial pressure to simulate the real conditions of the wellhead pressure.

  5. Application of fine managed pressure drilling technique in complex wells with both blowout and lost circulation risks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Yan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Fractured carbonate reservoirs are susceptible to blowout and lost circulation during drilling, which not only restricts drilling speed, but also poses big threat to well control. Moreover, there are few technical means available to reconstruct pressure balance in the borehole. Accordingly, the fine managed pressure drilling was used in the drilling of Well GS19 in the Qixia Formation with super-high pressure and narrow density window, which is a success: ① back pressure in the annular spaces will be adjusted to maintain a slightly over-balanced bottom-hole hydraulic pressure, and fluid level in the circulation tank will be kept in a slight dropping state to ensure that natural gas in the formation would not invade into the borehole in a massive volume; ② inlet drilling fluid density will be controlled at around 2.35 g/cm3, back pressures in the annular be maintained at 2–5 MPa, and bottom-hole pressure equivalent circulation density be controlled at 2.46–2.52 g/cm3; ③ during managed pressure drilling operations, if wellhead pressure exceeds or expects to exceed 7 MPa, semi-blind rams will be closed. Fluids will pass through the choke manifold of the rig to the choke manifold specifically for pressure control before entering gas/liquid separators to discharge gas; ④ during tripping back pressure will be kept at less than 5 MPa, volume of injected drilling fluid will be higher than the theoretical volume during tripping out, whereas the volume of returned drilling fluid will be higher than the theoretical volume during the out-tripping. This technique has been applied successfully in the drilling of the Qixia Formation, Liangshan Formation and Longmaxi Formation with a total footage of 216.60 m, as a good attempt in complicated wells with both blowout and lost circulation risks, which can provide valuable experiences and guidance for handling similar complexities in the future.

  6. Approach for delineation of contributing areas and zones of transport to selected public-supply wells using a regional ground-water flow model, Palm Beach County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renken, R.A.; Patterson, R.D.; Orzol, L.L.; Dixon, Joann

    2001-01-01

    Rapid urban development and population growth in Palm Beach County, Florida, have been accompanied with the need for additional freshwater withdrawals from the surficial aquifer system. To maintain water quality, County officials protect capture areas and determine zones of transport of municipal supply wells. A multistep process was used to help automate the delineation of wellhead protection areas. A modular ground-water flow model (MODFLOW) Telescopic Mesh Refinement program (MODTMR) was used to construct an embedded flow model and combined with particle tracking to delineate zones of transport to supply wells; model output was coupled with a geographic information system. An embedded flow MODFLOW model was constructed using input and output file data from a preexisting three-dimensional, calibrated model of the surficial aquifer system. Three graphical user interfaces for use with the geographic information software, ArcView, were developed to enhance the telescopic mesh refinement process. These interfaces include AvMODTMR for use with MODTMR; AvHDRD to build MODFLOW river and drain input files from dynamically segmented linear (canals) data sets; and AvWELL Refiner, an interface designed to examine and convert well coverage spatial data layers to a MODFLOW Well package input file. MODPATH (the U.S. Geological Survey particle-tracking postprocessing program) and MODTOOLS (the set of U.S. Geological Survey computer programs to translate MODFLOW and MODPATH output to a geographic information system) were used to map zones of transport. A steady-state, five-layer model of the Boca Raton area was created using the telescopic mesh refinement process and calibrated to average conditions during January 1989 to June 1990. A sensitivity analysis of various model parameters indicates that the model is most sensitive to changes in recharge rates, hydraulic conductivity for layer 1, and leakance for layers 3 and 4 (Biscayne aquifer). Recharge (58 percent); river (canal

  7. Contingency interim measure for the public water supply at Barnes, Kansas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2009-07-09

    This document presents a conceptual design for a contingency interim measure (IM) for treatment of the public water supply system at Barnes, Kansas, should this become necessary. The aquifer that serves the public water supply system at Barnes has been affected by trace to low concentrations of carbon tetrachloride and its degradation product, chloroform. Investigations conducted on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne 2008a) have demonstrated that groundwater at the Barnes site is contaminated with carbon tetrachloride at concentrations exceeding the Kansas Tier 2 risk-based screening level (RBSL) and the EPA maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 5.0 {micro}g/L for this compound. The Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) formerly operated a grain storage facility in Barnes, approximately 800 ft east-southeast of the public water supply wells. Carbon tetrachloride was used in the treatment of grain. Another potential source identified in an investigation conducted for the KDHE (PRC 1996) is the site of a former agriculture building owned by the local school district (USD 223). This building is located immediately east of well PWS3. The potential contingency IM options evaluated in this report include the treatment of groundwater at the public water supply wellheads and the provision of an alternate water supply via Washington County Rural Water District No.2 (RWD 2). This document was developed in accordance with KDHE Bureau of Environmental Remediation (BER) Policy No.BER-RS-029 (Revised) (KDHE 2006a), supplemented by guidance from the KDHE project manager. Upon the approval of this contingency IM conceptual design by the KDHE, the CCC/USDA will prepare a treatment system design document that will contain the following elements: (1) Description of the approved contingency IM treatment method; (2) Drawings and/or schematics provided by the contractor and/or manufacturer of the approved technology; (3) A

  8. Disposal of liquid wastes by injection underground--Neither myth nor millennium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, Arthur M.

    1969-01-01

    Injecting liquid wastes deep underground is an attractive but not necessarily practical means for disposing of them. For decades, impressive volumes of unwanted oil-field brine have been injected, currently about 10,000 acre-feet yearly. Recently, liquid industrial wastes are being injected in ever-increasing quantity. Dimensions of industrial injection wells range widely but the approximate medians are: depth, 2,660 feet; thickness of injection zone, 185 feet; injection rate, 135 gallons per minute; wellhead injection pressure, 185 pounds per square inch. Effects of deep injection are complex and not all are understood clearly. In a responsible society, injection cannot be allowed to put wastes out of mind. Injection is no more than storage--for all time in the case of the most intractable wastes--in underground space of which little is attainable in some areas and which is exhaustible in most areas. Liquid wastes range widely in character and concentration-some are incompatible one with another or with materials of the prospective injection zone; some which are reactive or chemically unstable would require pretreatment or could not be injected. Standards by which to categorize the wastes are urgently desirable. To the end that injection may be planned effectively and administered in orderly fashion, there is proposed an immediate and comprehensive canvass of all the United States to outline injection provinces and zones according to their capacities to accept waste. Much of the information needed to this end is at hand. Such a canvass would consider (1) natural zone, of groundwater circulation, from rapid to stagnant, (2) regional hydrodynamics, (3) safe injection pressures, and (4) geochemical aspects. In regard to safe pressure, definitive criteria would be sought by which to avoid recurrence of earthquake swarms such as seem to have been triggered by injection at the Rocky Mountain Arsenal well near Denver, Colo. Three of the 50 States--Missouri, .Ohio, and

  9. A Groundwater project for K-12 schools: Bringing research into the classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodak, C. M.; Walsh, M.; Gensic, J.

    2011-12-01

    Simple water quality test kits were used in a series of K-12 classrooms to demonstrate scientific processes and to motivate learning in K-12 students. While focused on student learning, this project also allowed collection of regional data on groundwater quality (primarily nitrate) in the study area. The project consisted of development and administration of a weeklong groundwater quality unit introduced to K-12 schools in northern Indiana and taught by a graduate student in an engineering discipline. The structure of the week started with an introduction to basic groundwater concepts modified for the specific grade level; for this project the students ranged from grades 4-12. In addition to groundwater basics, the purpose of the collection of the water quality data, as well as relevance to the research of the graduate student, were outlined. The students were then: (i) introduced to two simple water quality testing methods for nitrates, (ii) required to hypothesize as to which method will likely be "better" in application, and (iii) asked to practice using these two methods under laboratory conditions. Following practice, the students were asked to discuss their hypotheses relative to what was observed during the practice focusing on which testing method was more accurate and/or precise. The students were then encouraged to bring water samples from their home water system (many of which are on private wells) to analyze within groups. At the end of the week, the students shared their experience in this educational effort, as well as the resulting nitrate data from numerous groundwater wells (as collected by the students). Following these discussions the data were added to an online database housed on a wiki sponsored by the Notre Dame Extended Research Community (http://wellhead.michianastem.org/home). These data were plotted using the free service MapAList to visually demonstrate to the students the spatial distribution of the data and how their results have

  10. Sustained in situ measurements of dissolved oxygen, methane and water transport processes in the benthic boundary layer at MC118, northern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Christopher S.; Mendlovitz, Howard P.; Seim, Harvey; Lapham, Laura; D'Emidio, Marco

    2016-07-01

    Within months of the BP Macondo Wellhead blowout, elevated methane concentrations within the water column revealed a significant retention of light hydrocarbons in deep waters plus corresponding dissolved oxygen (DO) deficits. However, chemical plume tracking efforts were hindered by a lack of in situ monitoring capabilities. Here, we describe results from in situ time-series, lander-based investigations of physical and biogeochemical processes controlling dissolved oxygen, and methane at Mississippi Canyon lease block 118 ( 18 km from the oil spill) conducted shortly after the blowout through April 2012. Multiple sensor arrays plus open-cylinder flux chambers (;chimneys;) deployed from a benthic lander collected oxygen, methane, pressure, and current speed and direction data within one meter of the seafloor. The ROVARD lander system was deployed for an initial 21-day test experiment (9/13/2010-10/04/2010) at 882 m depth before a longer 160-day deployment (10/24/2011-4/01/2012) at 884 m depth. Temporal variability in current directions and velocities and water temperatures revealed strong influences of bathymetrically steered currents and overlying along-shelf flows on local and regional water transport processes. DO concentrations and temperature were inversely correlated as a result of water mass mixing processes. Flux chamber measurements during the 160-day deployment revealed total oxygen utilization (TOU) averaging 11.6 mmol/m2 day. Chimney DO concentrations measured during the 21-day deployment exhibited quasi-daily variations apparently resulting from an interaction between near inertial waves and the steep topography of an elevated scarp immediately adjacent to the 21-day deployment site that modulated currents at the top of the chimney. Variability in dissolved methane concentrations suggested significant temporal variability in gas release from nearby hydrocarbon seeps and/or delivery by local water transport processes. Free-vehicle (lander) monitoring

  11. Flow rate and source reservoir identification from airborne chemical sampling of the uncontrolled Elgin platform gas release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, James D.; Mobbs, Stephen D.; Wellpott, Axel; Allen, Grant; Bauguitte, Stephane J.-B.; Burton, Ralph R.; Camilli, Richard; Coe, Hugh; Fisher, Rebecca E.; France, James L.; Gallagher, Martin; Hopkins, James R.; Lanoiselle, Mathias; Lewis, Alastair C.; Lowry, David; Nisbet, Euan G.; Purvis, Ruth M.; O'Shea, Sebastian; Pyle, John A.; Ryerson, Thomas B.

    2018-03-01

    An uncontrolled gas leak from 25 March to 16 May 2012 led to evacuation of the Total Elgin wellhead and neighbouring drilling and production platforms in the UK North Sea. Initially the atmospheric flow rate of leaking gas and condensate was very poorly known, hampering environmental assessment and well control efforts. Six flights by the UK FAAM chemically instrumented BAe-146 research aircraft were used to quantify the flow rate. The flow rate was calculated by assuming the plume may be modelled by a Gaussian distribution with two different solution methods: Gaussian fitting in the vertical and fitting with a fully mixed layer. When both solution methods were used they compared within 6 % of each other, which was within combined errors. Data from the first flight on 30 March 2012 showed the flow rate to be 1.3 ± 0.2 kg CH4 s-1, decreasing to less than half that by the second flight on 17 April 2012. δ13CCH4 in the gas was found to be -43 ‰, implying that the gas source was unlikely to be from the main high pressure, high temperature Elgin gas field at 5.5 km depth, but more probably from the overlying Hod Formation at 4.2 km depth. This was deemed to be smaller and more manageable than the high pressure Elgin field and hence the response strategy was considerably simpler. The first flight was conducted within 5 days of the blowout and allowed a flow rate estimate within 48 h of sampling, with δ13CCH4 characterization soon thereafter, demonstrating the potential for a rapid-response capability that is widely applicable to future atmospheric emissions of environmental concern. Knowledge of the Elgin flow rate helped inform subsequent decision making. This study shows that leak assessment using appropriately designed airborne plume sampling strategies is well suited for circumstances where direct access is difficult or potentially dangerous. Measurements such as this also permit unbiased regulatory assessment of potential impact, independent of the emitting

  12. One of a kind : from production accounting to trading and budgeting, Entero unifies data and business processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cope, G.

    2009-01-01

    Entero Corporation, a Calgary-based software developer, launched a software program in 2008 to keep track of petroleum when it comes out of the ground. It allows petroleum producers to keep track of who owns what, how much they own, what it's worth and where it's going. Founded in 1994, Entero's first energy industry software package was called EnteroVision, consisting of evTM and evFM. The evTM component focused on trading and marketing, and operations and logistics for use in inventory, risk management, terminal operations and reporting. The evFM component focused on financial management and accounting, allowing operators to view facility balance by owner, product or source. In 2003, Entero merged with software company MOSAIC Integration. The EnteroONE platform brings key Entero systems onto a shared platform that includes addition of production accounting and plant allocations. Once energy is produced, EnteroONE quickly tracks it from the wellhead through the gathering systems, doing production allocations, production and revenue accounting, managing trade deals, logistics and risk management. It also does financial accounting, such as invoicing for shipments made by any transportation mode, and a full general ledger. It eliminates multiple spreadsheets. Entero's 120 clients include exploration and production companies, trading and marketing companies, and midstream operators involved with product movement and processing. Entero is now focused on improving the functionality of its products. New workspace enhancements and reporting customization in EnteroONE financial management are expected to make troubleshooting, audit reporting more efficient. A new integrated field data capture system in EnteroONE production accounting will link field information to production accounting. A new order, scheduling and nominations workspace for EnteroONE trading and marketing will put decision-making information, including profitability, into one view. Within the next 5 years

  13. Environmental review of natural gas production in Lake Erie

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Shea, K.

    2002-01-01

    The water of Lake Erie is used as a source of drinking water for Ontario, New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio and Michigan. An environmental review has been conducted to determine the impact of drilling operations on the overall ecology of the lake. Since 1913, 2000 natural gas wells have been drilled in Lake Erie, of which 550 currently produce gas and account for 75 per cent of Ontario's total gas production. 180 wells are shut-in or suspended and the remaining wells have been abandoned. The gas wells are connected to onshore production facilities by approximately 1,600 km of small diameter pipelines that lie buried near shore or on top of the lake bed. Nearly 90 per cent of the in-lake infrastructure is in water depths of more than 20 metres. Talisman Energy is actively involved with the Canadian Coast Guard, the Department of Fisheries and Oceans, and the Ministry of Natural Resources to ensure cooperation between regulators and off-shore personnel. The environmental assessment of natural gas production in Lake Erie included a review of regulatory and best management practices, a biophysical overview of the lake, and a review of drilling practices, well completions, handling of waste streams, materials management, operations inspections, wastewater discharge, air emissions, and oil spills. It was revealed that for most drilling programs, cuttings are washed and discharged to the Lake. Ongoing testing will determine the impact that this practice has on benthic populations. The drill muds used for drilling operations are water based, environmentally friendly, and re-used between well locations. For completion programs, all well activities are closed circuit operations. Wells are abandoned through plugging with cement, removing wellheads and casing below the lake bottom. There has been a reported volume of about 23,000 litres of spilled product from 1990 to 2001, of which 68 per cent has come from 3 industrial companies that operate near Lake Erie. The offshore gas

  14. GeoSteamNet: A computer code to simulate geothermal steam flow in a pipeline network; GeoSteamNet: Programa de computo para simular el flujo de vapor geotermico de una red de vaporductos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma P., Mahendra; Aragon A., Alfonso [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)]. E-mail: mahendra@iie.org.mx; Ruiz L., Alejando; Mendoza C., Alfredo [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Campo Geotermico Los Azufres, Campamento Agua Fria, Michoacan (Mexico)

    2011-07-15

    A computer package, GeoSteamNet, was developed to simulate steam transport in a pipeline network of a geothermal field. The fluid motion is governed by the following basic principles: conservation of mass, linear momentum principle (Newton's second law or the Navier Stokes equations), and the first and second laws of thermodynamics. The second law of thermodynamics defines the direction of a spontaneous process, which is indirectly validated in the algorithm as vapor flows from high-to-low pressure, and heat flows from high-to-low temperatures. The nonlinear equations are solved with the Newton-Raphson method. Using the ActiveX component OrificeMeter, the steam-flow balance was calculated for power plants U-15 and U-16 in Los Azufres Geothermal Field, Mich., in February 2009. U-15 was fed by the production wells AZ-04, AZ-28, AZ-30, AZ-65D, and AZ-66, whereas wells AZ-28A, AZ-45, AZ-56, AZ-67, AZ-69D were connected to U-16. The analytical error is within {+-}4%, which is acceptable for practical purposes for steam-supply management, considering the uncertainties in parameters, such as pressure, temperature, pressure fluctuation at the wellhead, etc. The steam simulation results by GeoSteamNet for a hypothetical-pipeline network in a geothermal system with two production wells and a power plant illustrate its functionality. Several points need to be emphasized. For a specific geometry-pipeline network, there is only a certain amount of mass (vapor) that can be transported at a given pressure at the wellheads and the power plant. The construction and modification of a pipeline network is very expensive and the production of geothermal wells depends on many natural factors; therefore, there is need to conduct a tolerance study for each component of the network. A simulation study of the virtual-pipeline network for the design of a geothermal power plant can save money, effort, and time. [Spanish] Se desarrollo un paquete de computo, GeoSteamNet, para simular el

  15. The Value of Renewable Energy as a Hedge Against Fuel Price Risk: Analytic Contributions from Economic and Finance Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolinger, Mark A; Wiser, Ryan

    2008-09-15

    natural gas in the United States over a relatively brief period. Perhaps of most concern is that this dramatic price increase was largely unforeseen. Figure 2 compares the EIA's natural gas wellhead price forecast from each year's Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) going back to 1985 against the average US wellhead price that actually transpired. As shown, our forecasting abilities have proven rather dismal over time, as over-forecasts made in the late 1980's eventually yielded to under-forecasts that have persisted to this day. This historical experience demonstrates that little weight should be placed on any one forecast of future natural gas prices, and that a broad range of future price conditions ought to be considered in planning and investment decisions. Against this backdrop of high, volatile, and unpredictable natural gas prices, increasing the market penetration of renewable generation such as wind, solar, and geothermal power may provide economic benefits to ratepayers by displacing gas-fired generation. These benefits may manifest themselves in several ways. First, the displacement of natural gas-fired generation by increased renewable generation reduces ratepayer exposure to natural gas price risk--i.e., the risk that future gas prices (and by extension future electricity prices) may end up markedly different than expected. Second, this displacement reduces demand for natural gas among gas-fired generators, which, all else equal, will put downward pressure on natural gas prices. Lower natural gas prices in turn benefit both electric ratepayers and other end-users of natural gas. Using analytic approaches that build upon, yet differ from, the past work of others, including Awerbuch (1993, 1994, 2003), Kahn and Stoft (1993), and Humphreys and McClain (1998), this chapter explores each of these two potential 'hedging' benefits of renewable electricity. Though we do not seek to judge whether these two specific benefits outweigh any incremental

  16. Insulation system in an integrated motor compressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sihvo, V.

    2010-07-01

    A high-speed and high-voltage solid-rotor induction machine provides beneficial features for natural gas compressor technology. The mechanical robustness of the machine enables its use in an integrated motor-compressor. The technology uses a centrifugal compressor, which is mounted on the same shaft with the high-speed electrical machine driving it. No gearbox is needed as the speed is determined by the frequency converter. The cooling is provided by the process gas, which flows through the motor and is capable of transferring the heat away from the motor. The technology has been used in the compressors in the natural gas supply chain in the central Europe. New areas of application include natural gas compressors working at the wellheads of the subsea gas reservoir. A key challenge for the design of such a motor is the resistance of the stator insulation to the raw natural gas from the well. The gas contains water and heavy hydrocarbon compounds and it is far harsher than the sales gas in the natural gas supply network. The objective of this doctoral thesis is to discuss the resistance of the insulation to the raw natural gas and the phenomena degrading the insulation. The presence of partial discharges is analyzed in this doctoral dissertation. The breakdown voltage of the gas is measured as a function of pressure and gap distance. The partial discharge activity is measured on small samples representing the windings of the machine. The electrical field behavior is also modeled by finite element methods. Based on the measurements it has been concluded that the discharges are expected to disappear at gas pressures above 4 - 5 bar. The disappearance of discharges is caused by the breakdown strength of the gas, which increases as the pressure increases. Based on the finite element analysis, the physical length of a discharge seen in the PD measurements at atmospheric pressure was approximated to be 40 - 120 mum. The chemical aging of the insulation when exposed to raw

  17. The 2016 groundwater flow model for Dane County, Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsen, Michael J.; Bradbury, Kenneth R.; Hunt, Randall J.; Feinstein, Daniel T.

    2016-01-01

    -capacity wells, development of wellhead protection plans, evaluating the effects of changing land use and climate on groundwater, and quantifying the relationships between groundwater and surface water.

  18. Les ouvrages pétroliers en mer Offshore Petroleum Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susbielles G.

    2006-11-01

    the Cognac, Hondo, Ninian and Maureen fields are distinguished from the others by eithertheir architecture or their dimensions. Most of the concrete platforms are installed in the North Sea. The one on the Ninian field is largerthan all the others. An exceptionisBrazilwheretherearethreeplatforms in shallow water. For marginal fields or ta determine the exact characteristics of a discovered field, Mirr production is started up from subsea wellheads via a manifold and links ta a floating structure (semisubmersible platform, tanker. Few chang es have been made in semisubmersible platforms. Solely the Sedco709 platform is different from the others because it is dynamically positioned. The mort important offshore hoisting operations are done by very large capacity cranes. The designing of loading stations is done exclusively by a few companies. As for the laying of pipelines and pipes, it has evolved with the appearance of structures such as the Castoro VI barge of Saipem and the Apache barge of Santa Fe and the ship Flexservice I. Engineers still have the task of creating deep offshore development systems (water depth. greater than 500 m.

  19. Watershed Analysis of Nitrate Transport as a Result of Agricultural Inputs for Varying Land Use/Land Cover and Soil Type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, M. E.; Sykes, J. F.

    2006-12-01

    parameters that were obtained from literature or could be calculated from readily available soil information for the Grand River Watershed. Spatially and seasonally averaged results for the 14 year period indicate that nitrate leaching through the root zone does not exceed the maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 10 mg/l nitrate. However, in 1992, over 12 percent of the watershed area in crops exceeded the MCL during the winter season. The characteristically well drained soils of the central region of the watershed are more susceptible to groundwater contamination following autumn manure-N applications, as no crop-growth is present to remove excess nitrogen from the system. Therefore, farm best management practices do not ensure that groundwater contamination will not occur. This research is an important first step in developing agricultural contaminant loadings for a watershed scale surface water and groundwater model. Municipalities can utilize this model as a management tool to determine the extent of contamination and delineate site sensitive locations, such as well-head protection zones. Other applications of this model include risk assessments of contaminant migration due to climate change predictions, varying fertilizer application practices, modifications in crop management and changes in land use. The impact of climate change on recharge has been investigated.

  20. Initiation of long-term coupled microbiological, geochemical, and hydrological experimentation within the seafloor at North Pond, western flank of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, K.J.; Backert, N.; Bach, W.; Becker, K.; Klaus, A.; Griffin, Dale W.; Anderson, L.; Haddad, A.G.; Harigane, Y.; Campion, P.L.; Hirayama, H.; Mills, H.J.; Hulme, S.M.; Nakamura, K.; Jorgensen, S.L.; Orcutt, B.; Insua, T.L.; Park, Y.-S.; Rennie, V.; Salas, E.C.; Rouxel, O.; Wang, F.; Russel, J.A.; Wheat, C.G.; Sakata, K.; Brown, M.; Magnusson, J.L.; Ettlinger, Z.

    2012-01-01

    piston corer feature brown clay. Extended core barrel coring at the sediment/basement interface recovered drilled holes (U1382A and U1383C) and an instrument and sampling string were placed in an existing hole (395A). Although the CORK wellhead in Hole 395A broke off and Hole U1383B was abandoned after a bit failure, these holes and installations are intended for future observatory science targets. The CORK observatory in Hole U1382A has a packer seal in the bottom of the casing and monitors/samples a single zone in uppermost oceanic crust extending from 90 to 210 mbsf. Hole U1383C was equipped with a three-level CORK observatory that spans a zone of thin basalt flows with intercalated limestone (???70-146 mbsf), a zone of glassy, thin basaltic flows and hyaloclastites (146-200 mbsf), and a lowermost zone (???200-331.5 mbsf) of more massive pillow flows with occasional hyaloclastites in the upper part.

  1. GIS-based technology for marine geohazards in LW3-1 Gas Field of the South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Tianyun; Liu, Lejun; Li, Xishuang; Hu, Guanghai; Liu, Haixing; Zhou, Lin

    2013-04-01

    The exploration and exploitation of deep-water oil-gas are apt to be suffered from high-risk geo-hazards such as submarine landslide, soft clay creep, shallow gas, excess pore-water pressure, mud volcano or mud diaper, salt dome and so on. Therefore, it is necessary to survey the seafloor topography, identify the unfavourable geological risks and investigate their environment and mechanism before exploiting the deep-water oil-gas. Because of complex environment, the submarine phenomenon and features, like marine geohazards, can not be recognized directly. Multi-disciplinary data are acquired and analysed comprehensively in order to get more clear understanding about the submarine processes. The data include multi-beam bathymetry data, sidescan sonar images, seismic data, shallow-bottom profiling images, boring data, etc.. Such data sets nowadays increase rapidly to large amounts, but may be heterogeneous and have different resolutions. It is difficult to make good management and utilization of such submarine data with traditional means. GIS technology can provide efficient and powerful tools or services in such aspects as spatial data management, processing, analysis and visualization. They further promote the submarine scientific research and engineering development. The Liwan 3-1 Gas Field, the first deep-water gas field in China, is located in the Zhu II Depression in the Zhujiang Basin along the continental slope of the northern South China Sea. The exploitation of this field is designed to establish subsea wellhead and to use submarine pipeline for the transportation of oil. The deep-water section of the pipeline route in the gas field is to be selected to pass through the northern continental slope of the South China Sea. To avoid huge economic loss and ecological environmental damage, it is necessary to evaluate the geo-hazards for the establishment and safe operation of the pipeline. Based on previous scientific research results, several survey cruises have

  2. A proposal to investigate higher enthalpy geothermal systems in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elders, W. A.

    2013-12-01

    productive capable of generating >35 MWe from superheated steam at a well-head temperature of ~450°C. Plans for deep drilling to explore for deeper, much higher enthalpy, geothermal resources are already underway in the Taupo Volcanic Zone of New Zealand (Project HADES), and in northeast Japan the 'Beyond Brittle Project' (Project JBBP) is an ambitious program attempting to create an EGS reservoir in ~500oC rocks. However in the USA there is no comparable national program to develop such resources. There is a significant undeveloped potential for developing high-enthalpy geothermal systems in the western USA, Hawaii and Alaska. The purpose of this paper is to encourage the formation of a consortium to systematically explore, assess, and eventually develop such higher-enthalpy geothermal resources. Not only would this help develop large new sources of energy but it would permit scientific studies of pressure-temperature regimes not otherwise available for direct investigation, such as the coupling of magmatic and hydrothermal systems.

  3. Fugitive methane emissions from natural, urban, agricultural, and energy-production landscapes of eastern Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Bryce F. J.; Iverach, Charlotte P.; Lowry, Dave; Fisher, Rebecca E.; France, James L.; Nisbet, Euan G.

    2015-04-01

    Modern cavity ringdown spectroscopy systems (CRDS) enable the continuous measurement of methane concentration. This allows for improved quantification of greenhouse gas emissions associated with various natural and human landscapes. We present a subset of over 4000 km of continuous methane surveying along the east coast of Australia, made using a Picarro G2301 CRDS, deployed in a utility vehicle with an air inlet above the roof at 2.2 mAGL. Measurements were made every 5 seconds to a precision of cut coal mines, unconventional gas developments (coal seam gas; CSG), and leaks detected in cities and country towns. In areas of dryland crops the median methane concentration was 1.78 ppm, while in the irrigation districts located on vertisol soils the concentration was as low as 1.76 ppm, which may indicate that these soils are a sink for methane. In the Hunter Valley, New South Wales, open-cut coal mining district we mapped a continuous 50 km interval where the concentration of methane exceeded 1.80 ppm. The median concentration in this interval was 2.02 ppm. Peak readings were beyond the range of the reliable measurement (in excess of 3.00 ppm). This extended plume is an amalgamation of plumes from 17 major pits 1 to 10 km in length. Adjacent to CSG developments in the Surat Basin, southeast Queensland, only small anomalies were detected near the well-heads. Throughout the vast majority of the gas fields the concentration of methane was below 1.80 ppm. The largest source of fugitive methane associated with CSG was off-gassing methane from the co-produced water holding ponds. At one location the down wind plume had a cross section of approximately 1 km where the concentration of methane was above 1.80 ppm. The median concentration within this section was 1.82 ppm, with a peak reading of 2.11 ppm. The ambient air methane concentration was always higher in urban environments compared to the surrounding countryside. Along one major road in Sydney we mapped an interval

  4. Well construction: future vision; A visao de futuro da construcao de pocos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinto, Hardy Leonardo da Cunha Pereira; Magalhaes, Guilherme Ribeiro; Placido, Joao Carlos Ribeiro [Petroleo Brasileiro S.A. (PETROBRAS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    basically consists of a concentric drill string, a sub sea rotating control device located in the wellhead, whose function is to seal the annulus during drilling operations, preventing leakage of fluid into the sea, and a double blind shear ram in case becomes necessary to shut the well in an eventual emergency disconnection. Thus, with the availability of this new technology, lower day rate rigs can be used for drilling the salt section of the pre-salt wells. The uncertainties of the salt layer geomechanical properties and its interaction with the cement and the casing is of great concern in relation to the Pre-salt wells integrity. The wells in the Pre-salt are designed for a 30 year lifespan, with a minimum of interventions during their lives. Because of that it is not expected to have interventions in a period smaller than 10 years, even for recompletion, making cement or casing logging tools less useful. A project is being conducted to research and develop continuous monitoring tools to verify and ensure the integrity of the cement sheath and of the casing. The initial objective is to identify and quantify the parameters related to this integrity as well as their metrology. Specific sensors will be developed, or adapted, to monitor these parameters and lab and field tests will be performed to qualify them for the pre-salt wells. All the needed interfaces for outside-casing deployment of sensors will also be carefully addressed by this project. The monitoring of the integrity parameters shall allow the early identification of problems during the life of the production as well as help the engineers to optimize new well projects on the field. (author)

  5. Out of gas: Tenneco in the era of natural gas regulation, 1938--1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raley, David

    2011-12-01

    Federal regulation over the natural gas industry spanned 1938--1978, during which time both the industry and the nature of the regulation changed. The original intent of the law was to reform an industry stagnating because of the Depression, but regulation soon evolved into a public-private partnership to win World War II, then to a framework for the creation and management of a nationwide natural gas grid in the prosperous post-war years, and finally to a confused and chaotic system of wellhead price regulation which produced shortages and discouraged new production during the 1950s and 1960s. By the 1970s, regulation had become ineffective, leading to deregulation in 1978. The natural gas industry operated under the oversight of the Federal Power Commission (FPC) which set gas rates, regulated profits and competition, and established rules for entry and exit into markets. Over the course of four decades, the FPC oversaw the development of a truly national industry built around a system of large diameter pipelines. Tennessee Gas Transmission Company (later Tenneco) was an integral part of this industry. At first, Tenneco prospered under regulation. Regulation provided Tenneco with the means to build its first pipeline and a secure revenue stream for decades. A series of conflicts with the FPC and the difficulties imposed by the Phillips vs. Wisconsin case in 1954 soon interfered with the ambitious long-term goals of Tenneco CEO and president Gardiner Symonds. Tenneco first diversified into unregulated businesses in the 1940s, which accelerated as regulatory changes constrained the company's growth. By the 1960s the company was at the forefront of the conglomeration movement, when Tenneco included a variety of disparate businesses, including oil and gas production, chemicals, consumer packaging, manufacturing, shipbuilding, and food production, among others. Gas transmission became a minority interest in Tenneco's portfolio as newer and larger divisions

  6. Performance evaluation of an advanced air-fuel ratio controller on a stationary, rich-burn natural gas engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochuparampil, Roshan Joseph

    ) sensor feedback are unable to maintain engine AFR within the required range owing to drift in sensor output over time. In this thesis, the emissions compliance performance of an AFR controller is evaluated over a 6-month period on an engine driving a gas compressor in an active natural gas production field. This AFR controller differentiates itself from other commercially available products by employing a lambda sensor that has been engineered against sensor drift, making it better suited for natural gas engine applications. Also included in this study are the controller's responses to transient loads, diurnal performance, adaptability to seasonal variations in ambient temperature, fuel quality variations (in wellhead gas), engine health considerations for proper AFR control, and controller calibration sensitivity when replacing lambda sensors. During the first three months of operation and subsequent diurnal tests, the controller's performance as a multi-point AFR control system was consistent, demonstrating appropriate AFR adjustments to variation in engine operation, over a wide range of ambient conditions, despite high consumption rate of engine lubrication oil. For the remainder the test, the high levels of lubrication oil consumption, compromised the ability to verify controller performance.

  7. Determination of hydrologic properties needed to calculate average linear velocity and travel time of ground water in the principal aquifer underlying the southeastern part of Salt Lake Valley, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freethey, G.W.; Spangler, L.E.; Monheiser, W.J.

    1994-01-01

    A 48-square-mile area in the southeastern part of the Salt Lake Valley, Utah, was studied to determine if generalized information obtained from geologic maps, water-level maps, and drillers' logs could be used to estimate hydraulic conduc- tivity, porosity, and slope of the potentiometric surface: the three properties needed to calculate average linear velocity of ground water. Estimated values of these properties could be used by water- management and regulatory agencies to compute values of average linear velocity, which could be further used to estimate travel time of ground water along selected flow lines, and thus to determine wellhead protection areas around public- supply wells. The methods used to estimate the three properties are based on assumptions about the drillers' descriptions, the depositional history of the sediments, and the boundary con- ditions of the hydrologic system. These assump- tions were based on geologic and hydrologic infor- mation determined from previous investigations. The reliability of the estimated values for hydro- logic properties and average linear velocity depends on the accuracy of these assumptions. Hydraulic conductivity of the principal aquifer was estimated by calculating the thickness- weighted average of values assigned to different drillers' descriptions of material penetrated during the construction of 98 wells. Using these 98 control points, the study area was divided into zones representing approximate hydraulic- conductivity values of 20, 60, 100, 140, 180, 220, and 250 feet per day. This range of values is about the same range of values used in developing a ground-water flow model of the principal aquifer in the early 1980s. Porosity of the principal aquifer was estimated by compiling the range of porosity values determined or estimated during previous investigations of basin-fill sediments, and then using five different values ranging from 15 to 35 percent to delineate zones in the study area that were assumed to

  8. Assessing the Vulnerability of Public-Supply Wells to Contamination: Floridan Aquifer System Near Tampa, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagucki, Martha L.; Katz, Brian G.; Crandall, Christy A.; Eberts, Sandra M.

    2009-01-01

    This fact sheet highlights findings from the vulnerability study of a public-supply well in Temple Terrace, Florida, northeast of Tampa. The well selected for study typically produces water at the rate of 700 gallons per minute from the Upper Floridan aquifer. Water samples were collected at the public-supply well and at monitoring wells installed in or near the simulated zone of contribution to the supply well. Samples of untreated water from the public-supply wellhead contained the undesirable constituents nitrate, arsenic, uranium, radon-222, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and pesticides, although all were detected at concentrations less than established drinking-water standards, where such standards exist. Overall, study findings point to four primary factors that affect the movement and fate of contaminants and the vulnerability of the public-supply well in Temple Terrace: (1) groundwater age (how long ago water entered, or recharged, the aquifer); (2) short-circuiting of contaminated water through sinkholes; (3) natural geochemical processes within the aquifer; and (4) pumping stress. Although the public-supply well is completed in the Upper Floridan aquifer, it produces water with concentrations of nitrate, VOCs, and the natural contaminant radon that are intermediate between the typical composition of water from the Upper Floridan aquifer and that of the overlying surficial aquifer system. Mixing calculations show that the water produced by the public-supply well could consist of upwards of 50 percent water from the surficial aquifer system mixed with water from the Upper Floridan aquifer. Anthropogenically affected water from the surficial aquifer system travels rapidly to depth through sinkholes that must be directly connected to the cavernous zone intersected by the public-supply well (and several other production wells in the region). Such solution features serve as fast pathways to the well and circumvent the natural attenuation of nitrate and

  9. Sequestration and Enhanced Coal Bed Methane: Tanquary Farms Test Site, Wabash County, Illinois

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frailey, Scott; Parris, Thomas; Damico, James; Okwen, Roland; McKaskle, Ray; Monson, Charles; Goodwin, Jonathan; Beck, E; Berger, Peter; Butsch, Robert; Garner, Damon; Grube, John; Hackley, Keith; Hinton, Jessica; Iranmanesh, Abbas; Korose, Christopher; Mehnert, Edward; Monson, Charles; Roy, William; Sargent, Steven; Wimmer, Bracken

    2012-05-01

    wellheads, and changes in several shallow groundwater characteristics (e.g., alkalinity, pH, oxygen content, dissolved solids, mineral saturation indices, and isotopic distribution). Results showed that there was no CO{sub 2} leakage into groundwater or CO{sub 2} escape at the surface. Post-injection cased hole well log analyses supported this conclusion. Numerical and analytical modeling achieved a relatively good match with observed field data. Based on the model results the plume was estimated to extend 152 m (500 ft) in the face cleat direction and 54.9 m (180 ft) in the butt cleat direction. Using the calibrated model, additional injection scenarios-injection and production with an inverted five-spot pattern and a line drive pattern could yield CH{sub 4} recovery of up to 70%.

  10. Technology strategy for deepwater and subsea production systems 2008 update; Technology Target Areas; TTA7 - Deep water and subsea prodution technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2008-07-01

    main priority areas for TTA7 where both public and industry funding is needed are: Arctic Systems: The research and development priority areas include: ice and iceberg data, ice loading on offshore platforms, winterization of facilities, development of arctic floaters and subsea solutions for arctic regions; Deepwater Systems: (i) New floaters to enable developments in harsh environments (ii) Improved riser systems including dry wellheads (iii) New installation methods for ultra deep water to avoid expensive, heavy crane vessels (iv) New flexible and adaptive development solutions to deal with subsurface uncertainties; Subsea Systems: Develop systems compatible with slim and slender technology, large bore systems for gas developments, intervention in ultra-deep water, high speed communication and installation of umbilical for long offset and deep water. Other research and development areas with lower priority are listed in the report. Also an research and development Staircase, i.e. a road map for the coming 10-15 years, is presented and discussed. (Author)

  11. Assessing the Vulnerability of Public-Supply Wells to Contamination: Central Valley Aquifer System near Modesto, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagucki, Martha L.; Jurgens, Bryant C.; Burow, Karen R.; Eberts, Sandra M.

    2009-01-01

    This fact sheet highlights findings from the vulnerability study of a public-supply well in Modesto, California. The well selected for study pumps on average about 1,600 gallons per minute from the Central Valley aquifer system during peak summer demand. Water samples were collected at the public-supply well and at monitoring wells installed in the Modesto vicinity. Samples from the public-supply wellhead contained the undesirable constituents uranium, nitrate, arsenic, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and pesticides, although none were present at concentrations exceeding drinking-water standards. Of these contaminants, uranium and nitrate pose the most significant water-quality risk to the public-supply well because human activities have caused concentrations in groundwater to increase over time. Overall, study findings point to four primary factors that affect the movement and (or) fate of contaminants and the vulnerability of the public-supply well in Modesto: (1) groundwater age (how long ago water entered, or recharged, the aquifer); (2) irrigation and agricultural and municipal pumping that drives contaminants downward into the primary production zone of the aquifer; (3) short-circuiting of contaminated water down the public-supply well during the low-pumping season; and (4) natural geochemical conditions of the aquifer. A local-scale computer model of groundwater flow and transport to the public-supply well was constructed to simulate long-term nitrate and uranium concentrations reaching the well. With regard to nitrate, two conflicting processes influence concentrations in the area contributing recharge to the well: (1) Beneath land that is being farmed or has recently been farmed (within the last 10 to 20 years), downward-moving irrigation waters contain elevated nitrate concentrations; yet (2) the proportion of agricultural land has decreased and the proportion of urban land has increased since 1960. Urban land use is associated with low nitrate

  12. Methods for regional assessment of geothermal resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muffler, P.; Cataldi, R.

    1978-01-01

    A consistent, agreed-upon terminology is prerequisite for geothermal resource assessment. Accordingly, we propose a logical, sequential subdivision of the "geothermal resource base", accepting its definition as all the thermal energy in the earth's crust under a given area, measured from mean annual temperature. That part of the resource base which is shallow enough to be tapped by production drilling is termed the "accessible resource base", and it in turn is divided into "useful" and "residual" components. The useful component (i.e. the thermal energy that could reasonably be extracted at costs competitive with other forms of energy at some specified future time) is termed the "geothermal resource". This in turn is divided into "economic" and "subeconomic" components, based on conditions existing at the time of assessment. In the format of a McKelvey diagram, this logic defines the vertical axis (degree of economic feasibility). The horizontal axis (degree of geologic assurance) contains "identified" and "undiscovered" components. "Reserve" is then designated as the identified economic resource. All categories should be expressed in units of thermal energy, with resource and reserve figures calculated at wellhead, prior to the inevitable large losses inherent in any practical thermal use or in conversion to electricity. Methods for assessing geothermal resources can be grouped into 4 classes: (a) surface thermal flux, (b) volume, (c) planar fracture and (d) magmatic heat budget. The volume method appears to be most useful because (1) it is applicable to virtually any geologic environment, (2) the required parameters can in Sprinciple be measured or estimated, (3) the inevitable errors are in part compensated and (4) the major uncertainties (recoverability and resupply) are amenable to resolution in the foreseeable future. The major weakness in all the methods rests in the estimation of how much of the accessible resource base can be extracted at some time in the

  13. Biodegradation of dispersed Macondo crude oil by indigenous Gulf of Mexico microbial communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jian; Sandoval, Kathia; Ding, Yan [Southeaest Environmental Research Center, Florida International University, North Miami Beach, FL 33181 (United States); Stoeckel, Donald; Minard-Smith, Angela [Battelle 505 King Ave, Columbus, OH 43201 (United States); Andersen, Gary; Dubinsky, Eric A. [Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Atlas, Ronald [Department of Biology, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40292 (United States); Gardinali, Piero, E-mail: gardinal@fiu.edu [Southeaest Environmental Research Center, Florida International University, North Miami Beach, FL 33181 (United States); Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Florida International University, Miami, FL 33199 (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Because of the extreme conditions of the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) release (turbulent flow at 1500 m depth and 5 °C water temperature) and the sub-surface application of dispersant, small but neutrally buoyant oil droplets < 70 μm were formed, remained in the water column and were subjected to in-situ biodegradation processes. In order to investigate the biodegradation of Macondo oil components during the release, we designed and performed an experiment to evaluate the interactions of the indigenous microbial communities present in the deep waters of the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) with oil droplets of two representative sizes (10 μm and 30 μm median volume diameter) created with Macondo source oil in the presence of Corexit 9500 using natural seawater collected at the depth of 1100–1300 m in the vicinity of the DWH wellhead. The evolution of the oil was followed in the dark and at 5 °C for 64 days by collecting sacrificial water samples at fixed intervals and analyzing them for a wide range of chemical and biological parameters including volatile components, saturated and aromatic hydrocarbons, dispersant markers, dissolved oxygen, nutrients, microbial cell counts and microbial population dynamics. A one phase exponential decay from a plateau model was used to calculate degradation rates and lag times for more than 150 individual oil components. Calculations were normalized to a conserved petroleum biomarker (30αβ-hopane). Half-lives ranged from about 3 days for easily degradable compounds to about 60 days for higher molecular weight aromatics. Rapid degradation was observed for BTEX, 2–3 ring PAHs, and n-alkanes below n-C23. The results in this experimental study showed good agreement with the n-alkane (n-C13 to n-C26) half-lives (0.6–9.5 days) previously reported for the Deepwater Horizon plume samples and other laboratory studies with chemically dispersed Macondo oil conducted at low temperatures (< 8 °C). The responses of the microbial populations also

  14. Uranium-thorium series radionuclides in brines and reservoir rocks from two deep geothermal boreholes in the Salton Sea Geothermal Field, southeastern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zukin, Jeffrey G.; Hammond, Douglas E.; Teh-Lung, Ku; Elders, Wilfred A.

    1987-10-01

    Naturally occurring U and Th series radionuclides have been analyzed in high temperature brines (~300°C, 25 wt% dissolved solids) and associated rocks from two deep geothermal wells located on the northeastern margin of the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF). These data are part of a study of the SSGF as a natural analog of possible radionuclide behavior near a nuclear waste repository constructed in salt beds, and permit evaluation of some characteristics of water-rock interaction in the SSGF. Rock/Brine concentration ratios ( Rc = (dpm/ g) rock/(dpm/ g) brine) were found to vary from near unity for isotopes of Ra, Pb and Rn to about 5 × 10 5 for 232Th. The high sorptivity of 232Th is closely followed by that of 238U and 234U ( Rc ~ 5 × 10 4), suggesting that U is retained in the +4 oxidation state by the reducing conditions in the brines. The relatively high solubility of 210Pb and 212Pb is attributed to formation of chloride complexes, while the high Ra solubility is attributed to chloride complexing, a lack of suitable adsorption sites due to the high brine salinity and temperature, and the reducing conditions that prevent MnO 2 and RaSO 4 from forming. The 228Ra /226Ra ratios in the brines are approximately equal to those of their parents ( 232Th /230Th ) in associated rocks, indicating that Ra equilibration in the brine-rock system is achieved within the mean life of 228Ra (8.3 years). The 224Ra /228Ra ratios in these brines are about 0.7, indicating that either (1) brine composition is not homogeneous and 224Ra decays in fracture zones deficient in Ra and Th as the brine travels to the wellhead or (2) Ra equilibration in the brine-host rock system is not complete within the mean life of 224Ra (5.2 days) because the desorption of 224Ra from the solid phase is impeded. The 228Ac /228Ra activity ratio in the SSGF brines studied is <0.1, and from this ratio the residence time of 228Ac in the brine before sorption onto solid surfaces is estimated to be <70

  15. Modeling study of the Pauzhetsky geothermal field, Kamchatka, Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiryukhin, A.V. [Institute of Volcanology, Kamchatsky (Russian Federation); Yampolsky, V.A. [Kamchatskburgeotermia State Enterprise, Elizovo (Russian Federation)

    2004-08-01

    the central part of the field. The basic scenario assumes that the wellhead pressures of the eight exploitation wells and the injection rates of the three reinjection wells are maintained at the same conditions as of December 2000. In the base case, the model predicts a 12% decline in steam production rate (at 2.7 bar) during the next 30 years, even as the steam supply for the 5 MW{sub e} power plant is maintained. The modeling study confirmed that 30-60 kg/s is an optimal reinjection rate. An increase in the exploitation load has no significant effect on steam production from the central section of the Pauzhetsky field during the 30-year exploitation period; load doubling (eight additional exploitation wells) leads to a mere 16-27% increase in steam production. (author)

  16. State-of-the-art review of liquid loading in gas wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falcone, G. [Technische Univ. Clausthal, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany). ITE; Barbosa, J.R. Jr. [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2013-08-01

    Gas wells suffering from liquid loading are incapable of removing the liquid associated with produced gas from the wellbore. This phenomenon is initiated when the upward gas velocity in the well falls below a critical value at which point the liquid that was initially flowing upwards, begins to fall back. This liquid accumulates downhole, where it increases the hydrostatic back-pressure on the reservoir, destabilises the multiphase flow in the well (following flow regime changes), decreases production rate and, in severe cases, kills the well. The typical liquid loading sequence begins with a gas flow rate that is high enough to transport all liquids to surface and there is no liquid fall-back in the well. However, as the gas velocity slows or the liquid content in the well rises, there is insufficient energy in the well to carry all liquids to surface and some begins to flow backwards. As the hydrostatic head downhole increases, the liquid column that has accumulated in the well can re-enter the near-wellbore region of the reservoir. This results in the well becoming 'unloaded' so that it can flow once more, with the gas carrying all liquids to surface. However, the reinjection of liquids into the reservoir may cause formation damage, which will impair the well productivity. This cycle continues, providing the typical intermittent response of liquid-loaded gas wells, until the reservoir potential starts to fall or the liquid yield rises. Diagnosing liquid loading is often difficult as the affected well(s) may continue production without any substantial performance impairment for a long period of time. Typical symptoms of liquid loading include sharp drops in the cumulative production decline curve, the onset of liquid slugs in the surface facilities, abrupt changes in the flowing pressure gradient, low temperature spikes at the wellhead and declining water production or condensate-gas-ratio. Many remedial lifting options have been developed for use in

  17. Development of heavy oil fields onshore and offshore: resemblances and challenges; Desenvolvimento de campos de oleos pesados em terra e em mar: semelhancas e desafios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branco, Celso Cesar Moreira; Moczydlower, Priscila [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES)

    2008-07-01

    The so called offshore heavy oils (API gravity lower than 19) and extra heavy oils (API lower than 10) are receiving increasing importance due to the light oil production decline and also to exploration difficulties. In countries like Canada, Venezuela, China and the US (California) there are immense onshore heavy oil resources sometimes classified as non conventional. Differently in Brazil, onshore heavy oil volumes are modest being important those located in offshore fields (although non comparable to the Canadian and Venezuelan ones). The issue raised in this paper is: the field location, whether onshore or offshore, is always the main constraint in the development process? Well, the question has both a 'yes' and 'no' as an answer. There are important differences but some similarities in the technologies that can be applied. In this text the authors intend to explore this point while at the same time depicting some of the main related aspects under research for proper exploitation of heavy and extra heavy oil assets. The most relevant difference between onshore and offshore heavy oil fields is the application of thermal methods for improved recovery: while worldwide spread and commercially applied to onshore fields, steam injection is not yet viable for offshore operations. The only option for improving recovery in offshore fields is water injection, which has the drawback of producing large volumes of water during the field life. Another aspect is the cost of the production wells: much cheaper onshore they allow well spacing in the order of 100 m or even 50 m whereas in offshore well spacing are in the 1000 m range. From the flow assurance point of view, inland installations can take use of solvents for heavy oil dilution, such as diesel or naphtha. Offshore this option is complicated by the long distances from the wellheads to the producing facilities in the platform, in the case of wet completions. There are also differences regarding the

  18. How Well Does Fracture Set Characterization Reduce Uncertainty in Capture Zone Size for Wells Situated in Sedimentary Bedrock Aquifers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, A. C.; Novakowski, K. S.

    2005-12-01

    Regional groundwater flow models are rife with uncertainty. The three-dimensional flux vector fields must generally be inferred using inverse modelling from sparse measurements of hydraulic head, from measurements of hydraulic parameters at a scale that is miniscule in comparison to that of the domain, and from none to a very few measurements of recharge or discharge rate. Despite the inherent uncertainty in these models they are routinely used to delineate steady-state or time-of-travel capture zones for the purpose of wellhead protection. The latter are defined as the volume of the aquifer within which released particles will arrive at the well within the specified time and their delineation requires the additional step of dividing the magnitudes of the flux vectors by the assumed porosity to arrive at the ``average linear groundwater velocity'' vector field. Since the porosity is usually assumed constant over the domain one could be forgiven for thinking that the uncertainty introduced at this step is minor in comparison to the flow model calibration step. We consider this question when the porosity in question is fracture porosity in flat-lying sedimentary bedrock. We also consider whether or not the diffusive uptake of solute into the rock matrix which lies between the source and the production well reduces or enhances the uncertainty. To evaluate the uncertainty an aquifer cross section is conceptualized as an array of horizontal, randomly-spaced, parallel-plate fractures of random aperture, with adjacent horizontal fractures connected by vertical fractures again of random spacing and aperture. The source is assumed to be a continuous concentration (i.e. a dirichlet boundary condition) representing a leaking tank or a DNAPL pool, and the receptor is a fully pentrating well located in the down-gradient direction. In this context the time-of-travel capture zone is defined as the separation distance required such that the source does not contaminate the well

  19. Occurrence and status of volatile organic compounds in ground water from rural, untreated, self-supplied domestic wells in the United States, 1986-99

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Michael J.; Lapham, Wayne W.; Rowe, Barbara L.; Zogorski, John S.

    2002-01-01

    Samples of untreated ground water from 1,926 rural, self-supplied domestic wells were analyzed for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) during 1986-99. This information was used to characterize the occurrence and status of VOCs in domestic well water. The samples were either collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey?s National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program occurrence-assessment studies or were compiled by NAWQA from existing ambient ground-water or source-water-quality monitoring programs conducted by local, State, and other Federal agencies. Water samples were collected at the wellhead prior to treatment or storage. In most samples, 55 target VOCs were analyzed, and occurrence and status information generally was computed at an assessment level of 0.2 mg/L (microgram per liter). At least one VOC was detected in 12 percent of samples (232 samples) at an assessment level of 0.2 mg/L. This detection frequency is relatively low compared to the 26 percent detection frequency of at least one VOC in public sup-ply wells sampled by NAWQA, and the difference may be due, in part, to the higher pumping rates, pumping stress factors, and larger contributing areas of public supply wells. Samples with detections of at least one VOC were collected from wells located in 31 of 39 States. Solvents were the most frequently detected VOC group with detections in 4.6 percent of samples (89 samples) at an assessment level of 0.2 mg/L. The geographic distribution of detections of some VOC groups, such as fumigants and oxygenates, relates to the use pattern of com-pounds in that group. With the exception of com-pounds used in organic synthesis, detection frequencies of VOCs by group are proportional to the average half-life of compounds in the group. When the organic synthesis group is excluded from the analysis, a good correlation exists between the detection frequency of VOCs by group and average half-life of compounds in the group. Individually, VOCs were not commonly

  20. Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brugman, John; Hattar, Mai; Nichols, Kenneth; Esaki, Yuri

    1995-09-01

    cycle. Results of this study indicate that dual flash type plants are preferred at resources with temperatures above 400 F. Closed loop (binary type) plants are preferred at resources with temperatures below 400 F. A rotary separator turbine upstream of a dual flash plant can be beneficial at Salton Sea, the hottest resource, or at high temperature resources where there is a significant variance in wellhead pressures from well to well. Full scale demonstration is required to verify cost and performance. Hot water turbines that recover energy from the spent brine in a dual flash cycle improve that cycle's brine efficiency. Prototype field tests of this technology have established its technical feasibility. If natural gas prices remain low, a combustion turbine/binary hybrid is an economic option for the lowest temperature sites. The use of mixed fluids appear to be an attractive low risk option. The synchronous turbine option as prepared by Barber-Nichols is attractive but requires a pilot test to prove cost and performance. Dual flash binary bottoming cycles appear promising provided that scaling of the brine/working fluid exchangers is controllable. Metastable expansion, reheater, Subatmospheric flash, dual flash backpressure turbine, and hot dry rock concepts do not seem to offer any cost advantage over the baseline technologies. If implemented, the next generation geothermal power plant concept may improve brine utilization but is unlikely to reduce the cost of power generation by much more than 10%. Colder resources will benefit more from the development of a next generation geothermal power plant than will hotter resources. All values presented in this study for plant cost and for busbar cost of power are relative numbers intended to allow an objective and meaningful comparison of technologies. The goal of this study is to assess various technologies on an common basis and, secondarily, to give an approximate idea of the current costs of the technologies at

  1. Model Refinement and Simulation of Groundwater Flow in Clinton, Eaton, and Ingham Counties, Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luukkonen, Carol L.

    2010-01-01

    potential declines in water levels in both the upper glacial aquifer and the upper sandstone bedrock aquifer under steady-state and transient conditions when recharge was reduced by 20 and 50 percent in urban areas. Transient simulations were done to investigate reduced recharge due to low rainfall and increased pumping to meet anticipated future demand with 24 months (2 years) of modified recharge or modified recharge and pumping rates. During these two simulation years, monthly recharge rates were reduced by about 30 percent, and monthly withdrawal rates for Lansing area production wells were increased by 15 percent. The reduction in the amount of water available to recharge the groundwater system affects the upper model layers representing the glacial aquifers more than the deeper bedrock layers. However, with a reduction in recharge and an increase in withdrawals from the bedrock aquifer, water levels in the bedrock layers are affected more than those in the glacial layers. Differences in water levels between simulations with reduced recharge and reduced recharge with increased pumping are greatest in the Lansing area and least away from pumping centers, as expected. Additionally, the increases in pumping rates had minimal effect on most simulated streamflows. Additional simulations included updating the estimated 10-year wellhead-contributing areas for selected Lansing-area wells under 2006-7 pumping conditions. Optimization of groundwater withdrawals with a water-resource management model was done to determine withdrawal rates while minimizing operational costs and to determine withdrawal locations to achieve additional capacity while meeting specified head constraints. In these optimization scenarios, the desired groundwater withdrawals are achieved by simulating managed wells (where pumping rates can be optimized) and unmanaged wells (where pumping rates are not optimized) and by using various combinations of existing and proposed well locations.

  2. Leakage Risk Assessment of CO{sub 2} Transportation by Pipeline at the Illinois Basin Decatur Project, Decatur, Illinois

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazzoldi, A.; Oldenburg, C. M.

    2013-12-17

    the pipeline route within the ADM plant. Leakage scenarios at sites along the route of the pipeline, where plant operations (e.g., vehicular and train transportation) seem to present a higher likelihood of accidental failure, for example due to vehicles or equipment crashing into the pipeline and completely severing it, were modeled by allowing them to have a double source consistent with the pipeline releasing high-pressure CO{sub 2} from both ends of the broken pipe after a full-bore offset rupture. Simulation results show that the built environment of the plant plays a significant role in the dispersion of the gas as leaking CO{sub 2} can impinge upon buildings and other infrastructure. In all scenarios simulated, the region of very high-concentration of CO{sub 2} is limited to a small area around the pipeline failure, suggesting the likelihood of widespread harmful CO{sub 2} exposure to plant personnel from pipeline leakage is low. An additional risk is posed by the blast wave that emanates from a high-pressure pipeline when it is breached quickly. We estimate the blast wave risk as low because it occurs only for a short time in the immediate vicinity of the rupture, and requires an instantaneous large-scale rupture to occur. We recommend consideration of signage and guard rails and posts to mitigate the likelihood of vehicles crashing into the pipeline. A standardized emergency response plan applicable to capture plants within industrial sites could be developed based on the IBDP that would be useful for other capture plants. Finally, we recommend carrying out coupled wellbore-reservoir blowout scenario modeling to understand the potential for hazardous conditions arising from an unexpected blowout at the wellhead.

  3. Gas and Isotope Geochemistry of 81 Steam Samples from Wells in The Geysers Geothermal Field, Sonoma and Lake Counties, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Janik, Cathy J.; Fahlquist, Lynne; Johnson, Linda S.

    1999-01-01

    The Geysers geothermal field in northern California, with about 2000-MW electrical capacity, is the largest geothermal field in the world. Despite its importance as a resource and as an example of a vapor-dominated reservoir, very few complete geochemical analyses of the steam have been published (Allen and Day, 1927; Truesdell and others, 1987). This report presents data from 90 steam, gas, and condensate samples from wells in The Geysers geothermal field in northern California. Samples were collected between 1978 and 1991. Well attributes include sampling date, well name, location, total depth, and the wellhead temperature and pressure at which the sample was collected. Geochemical characteristics include the steam/gas ratio, composition of noncondensable gas (relative proportions of CO2, H2S, He, H2, O2, Ar, N2, CH4, and NH3), and isotopic values for deltaD and delta18O of H2O, delta13C of CO2, and delta34S of H2S. The compilation includes 81 analyses from 74 different production wells, 9 isotopic analyses of steam condensate pumped into injection wells, and 5 complete geochemical analyses on gases from surface fumaroles and bubbling pools. Most samples were collected as saturated steam and plot along the liquid-water/steam boiling curve. Steam-togas ratios are highest in the southeastern part of the geothermal field and lowest in the northwest, consistent with other studies. Wells in the Northwest Geysers are also enriched in N2/Ar, CO2 and CH4, deltaD, and delta18O. Well discharges from the Southeast Geysers are high in steam/gas and have isotopic compositions and N2/Ar ratios consistent with recharge by local meteoric waters. Samples from the Central Geysers show characteristics found in both the Southeast and Northwest Geysers. Gas and steam characteristics of well discharges from the Northwest Geysers are consistent with input of components from a high-temperature reservoir containing carbonrich gases derived from the host Franciscan rocks. Throughout the

  4. Hydrologic monitoring of a waste-injection well near Milton, Florida, June 1975 - June 1977

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascale, Charles A.; Martin, J.B.

    1978-01-01

    This report presents the hydraulic and chemical data collected from June 1, 1975, when injection began, to June 30, 1977 through a monitoring program at a deep-well waste-injection system at the American Cyanamid Company's plant near Milton, about 12 miles northwest of Pensacola. The injection system consists of a primary injection well, a standby injection well, and two deep monitor wells all completed open hole in the lower limestone of the Floridan aquifer and one shallow-monitor well completed in the upper limestone of the Floridan aquifer. Two of the monitor wells and the standby injection well are used to observe hydraulic and geochemical effects of waste injection in the injection zone at locations 8,180 feet northeast, 1,560 feet south, and 1,025 feet southwest of the primary injection well. The shallow-monitor well, used to observe any effects in the first permeable zone above the 200-foot-thick confining bed, is 28 feet north of the primary injection well. Since injection began in June 1975, 607 million gallons of treated industrial liquid waste with a pH of 4.6 to 6.3 and containing high concentrations of nitrate, organic nitrogen and carbon have been injected into a saline-water-filled limestone aquifer. Wellhead pressure at the injection well in June 1977 average 137 pounds per square inch and the hydraulic pressure gradient was 0.53 pound per square inch per foot of depth to the top of the injection zone. Water levels rose from 36 to 74 feet at the three wells used to monitor the injection zone during the 25-month period. The water level in the shallow-monitor well declined about 8 feet. No changes were detected in the chemical character of water from the shallow-monitor well and deep-monitor well-north. Increases in concentration of bicarbonate and dissolved organic carbon were detected in water from the deep-test monitor well in February 1976 and at the standby injection well in August 1976. In addition to increases in bicarbonate and dissolved

  5. New approach and methodology for radionuclide researches of oil industry wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humbatov, F.; Lisanova, E.; Suleymanov, B.; Ahmedov, M.

    2005-01-01

    Full text : Oil and gas production and processing operations sometimes accumulate Norm at elevated concentrations in by-product waste streams. The sources of most of the radioactivity are isotopes of uranium-238 (U-238) and thorium-232 (Th-232) naturally present in subsurface formations from which oil and gas are produced. The primary radionuclides of concern in NORM wastes are Ra-226 of the U-238 decay series, and Ra-228 of the Th-232 decay series. Other radionuclides of concern include radionuclides that form from the decay of Ra-226 and Ra-228. The production waste streams most likely to be contaminated by elevated radium concentrations include produced water, scale, and sludge. Spills or intentional releases of these waste streams to the ground can result in NORM-contaminated soils that must also be disposed of. Radium, which is slightly soluble, can be mobilized in the liquid phases of a formation and transported to the surface in the produced water stream. Dissolved radium either remains in solution in the produced water or precipitates out in scales or sludges. Conditions that appear to affect radium solubility and precipitation include water chemistry (primarily salinity), temperature, and pressure. NORM contamination of scale and sludge can occur when dissolved radium co precipitates with other alkaline earth elements such as barium, strontium, or calcium. In the case of scale, the radium co precipitates, primarily with barium, to form hard, insoluble sulfate deposits. Scale typically forms on the inside of piping, filters, injection wellhead equipment, and other water handling equipment, but also can form as a coating on produced sand grains. In the case of sludge, radium can be present in several forms. It can co precipitate with silicates and carbonates that form in the sludge, or it can be present in pieces of barium sulfate scale that become incorporated into the sludge. NORM-contaminated sludges can accumulate inside piping, separators, heater

  6. Three-dimensional numerical reservoir simulation of the EGS Demonstration Project at The Geysers geothermal field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgia, Andrea; Rutqvist, Jonny; Oldenburg, Curt M.; Hutchings, Lawrence; Garcia, Julio; Walters, Mark; Hartline, Craig; Jeanne, Pierre; Dobson, Patrick; Boyle, Katie

    2013-04-01

    The Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) Demonstration Project, currently underway at the Northwest Geysers, California, aims to demonstrate the feasibility of stimulating a deep high-temperature reservoir (up to 400 °C) through water injection over a 2-year period. On October 6, 2011, injection of 25 l/s started from the Prati 32 well at a depth interval of 1850-2699 m below sea level. After a period of almost 2 months, the injection rate was raised to 63 l/s. The flow rate was then decreased to 44 l/s after an additional 3.5 months and maintained at 25 l/s up to August 20, 2012. Significant well-head pressure changes were recorded at Prati State 31 well, which is separated from Prati 32 by about 500 m at reservoir level. More subdued pressure increases occur at greater distances. The water injection caused induced seismicity in the reservoir in the vicinity of the well. Microseismic monitoring and interpretation shows that the cloud of seismic events is mainly located in the granitic intrusion below the injection zone, forming a cluster elongated SSE-NNW (azimuth 170°) that dips steeply to the west. In general, the magnitude of the events increases with depth and the hypocenter depth increases with time. This seismic cloud is hypothesized to correlate with enhanced permeability in the high-temperature reservoir and its variation with time. Based on the existing borehole data, we use the GMS™ GUI to construct a realistic three-dimensional (3D) geologic model of the Northwest Geysers geothermal field. This model includes, from the top down, a low permeability graywacke layer that forms the caprock for the reservoir, an isothermal steam zone (known as the normal temperature reservoir) within metagraywacke, a hornfels zone (where the high-temperature reservoir is located), and a felsite layer that is assumed to extend downward to the magmatic heat source. We then map this model onto a rectangular grid for use with the TOUGH2 multiphase, multicomponent, non

  7. Status of Oil and Natural Gas in the World and Turkey, and Studies conducted at ITU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onur, Mustafa

    2006-01-01

    $65/barrel for oil and $230/1000 m 3 for natural gas), Turkey's expenditure for the imports of oil and natural gas in 2005 is about $20 billion. So, assuming that current oil and natural gas prices will be stationary at these levels or those projections given by EIA 2005 report of Energy Information Association of US DOE will hold true for the next 25 years (e.g., projections show that oil prices will not be less than $36/barrel, while the wellhead natural gas prices will not be less than $272/1000 m 3 in nominal dollars for the next 25 years), it is clear that Turkey's expenditure for oil and natural gas imports will not be less than a couple of ten billion American dollars by considering our increasing population and growing economy and industry for the years to come. This certainly necessitates and puts the picture clearly in front of us how much emphasis as a nation we should give to increase our domestic exploration and production activities as well as to invest to research and development in petroleum and natural gas engineering to mitigate our expenditure for the imports of oil and natural gas in the future. The roles of governments, national and international oil and gas companies as well as universities are critical in achieving such objectives. In this paper, first historical development on the use of oil and natural gas as energy resources are given. Then, their current status and future status in the world and Turkey are discussed in terms of their reserves, production, and consumption in comparison with other energy sources. Finally, the basic research and industrial projects conducted to date and planned to be studied in the near future by the department of petroleum and natural gas engineering in Istanbul Technical University are given.

  8. Séparation des ondes P et S à l'aide de la matrice spectrale avec informations à priori The Separation of P and S Waves Using the Spectral Matrix with a Priori Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari J. L.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Classiquement, la technique de filtrage utilisant la matrice spectrale proposée par Mermoz ne permet une séparation automatique des ondes au sens des indicatrices sismiques que dans certains cas particuliers, à savoir lorsque les ondes à séparer sont naturellement alignées sur les vecteurs propres de la matrice spectrale. Dans les autres cas, nous montrons que l'introduction d'information a priori sur la vitesse apparente de quelques ondes et une limitation de la durée temporelle de ces dernières permettent d'estimer leurs vecteurs d'ondes. L'utilisation de ces vecteurs et une technique de projection au sens des moindres carrés conduit à une extraction optimale de ces ondes, sans dégrader les autres ondes. La technique de filtrage proposée a été appliquée sur des données sismiques de type PSV (profil sismique vertical déporté. Le PSV a été enregistré dans un puits entre les cotes 1050 m et 1755 m; la source est déportée de 654 m par rapport à la tête de puits. L'outil utilisé est un géophone de puits à trois composantes. Le puits traverse une structure géologique complexe. Le traitement réalisé a mis en évidence des réflexions sismiques d'ondes de compression et de cisaillement, associées à des marqueurs fortement pentés (10 à 25°. Après estimation des champs de vitesse et des pendages à l'aide d'abaques, la migration en profondeur des horizons temps pointés a permis d'obtenir un modèle structural faillé. Detailed structural analysis can be achieved by using 3-component vertical seismic profiling method which gives structural information at several hundred meters from the wellhead. The use of an offset VSP on the Auzance structure has led to obtain a structural model composed by faulted dipping reflectors. This is due to the robust nature of the wave separation method which is based on the spectral matrix and uses an a priori information. This method preserves the true amplitude and the local apparent

  9. Assessing the vulnerability of public-supply wells to contamination--Glacial aquifer system in Woodbury, Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagucki, Martha L.; Brown, Craig J.; Starn, J. Jeffrey; Eberts, Sandra M.

    2010-01-01

    This fact sheet highlights findings from the vulnerability study of a public-supply well in Woodbury, Connecticut. The well typically produces water at the rate of 72 gallons per minute from the glacial aquifer system in the Pomperaug River Basin. Water samples were collected at the public-supply well and at monitoring wells installed in or near the simulated zone of contribution to the supply well. Samples of untreated water from the public-supply wellhead contained several types of undesirable constituents, including 11 volatile organic compounds (VOCs), nitrate, pesticides, uranium, and radon. Most of these constituents were detected at concentrations below drinking-water standards, where such standards exist. Only concentrations of the VOC trichlorethylene exceeded the Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) of 5 micrograms per liter (ug/L) established by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for drinking water. Radon concentrations exceeded a proposed-but not finalized-MCL of 300 picocuries per liter (pCi/L). Overall, the study findings point to four main factors that affect the movement and fate of contaminants and the vulnerability of the public-supply well in Woodbury: (1) groundwater age (how long ago water entered, or recharged, the aquifer); (2) the percentage of recharge received through urban areas; (3) the percentage of recharge received through dry wells and their proximity to the public-supply well; and (4) natural geochemical processes occurring within the aquifer system; that is, processes that affect the amounts and distribution of chemical substances in aquifer sediments and groundwater. A computer-model simulation of groundwater flow to the public-supply well was used to estimate the age of water particles entering the well along the length of the well screen. About 90 percent of the simulated flow to the well consists of water that entered the aquifer 9 or fewer years ago. Such young water is vulnerable to contaminants resulting from human activities

  10. A preliminary interpretation of gas composition in the CP IV sector wells, Cerro Prieto geothermal field, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barragan Reyes, Rosa Maria; Arellano Gomez, Victor M; Portugal Marin, Enrique [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Gerencia de Geotermia, Morelos (Mexico)]. E-mail: rmb@iie.org.mx; Perez Hernandez, Alfredo; Rodriguez Rodriguez, Marco Helio; Leon Vivar, Jesus de [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Residencia General Cerro Prieto, B.C. (Mexico)

    2007-07-15

    To increase the electrical generation capacity of the Cerro Prieto geothermal field from 620 MW to 720 MW, the Cerro Prieto IV (CP IV) sector of the field was developed in the NE portion of the exploited field. Fourteen new wells have been drilled there since 2000. The wells in CP IV zone produce two-phase fluids at wellhead with heterogeneous steam fraction characteristics: at the central zone and towards the NW, the wells are liquid-dominated while those towards the E and S produce a relatively high steam fraction. This work studies the gas compositions of produced fluids to obtain reservoir parameters such as temperature and steam fraction and identify different sources of fluids in the wells. A method was used based on the Fischer Tropsch reaction and H{sub 2}S equilibria with pyrite-pyrrhotite as a mineral buffer (FT-HSH3). The results for the natural state showed the presence of fluids with reservoir temperatures from 275 to 310 degrees Celsius and excess steam values from -1 to 50%. Data are aligned in a FT-HSH3 trend, suggesting that the well discharges consist of a mixture in different proportions of the two end members. One seems to be a liquid with a temperature of over 300 degrees Celsius with negative or negligible excess steam. The other seems to be a two-phase fluid with a temperature of about 275 degrees Celsius and an excess steam fraction of about 0.5. According to the data for single wells and depending on the production conditions of the wells, reservoir fluid mixtures could occur in different proportions of liquid and steam. Data for 2005 that included wells drilled after 2000 suggest the presence of a steam phase in the reservoir. The steam could be generated with the boiling of deep reservoir fluid from a pressure drop. The mixing trend obtained for the natural state was also seen for 2005 data but lower temperatures (from 265 to 295 degrees Celsius) were obtained compared with those for natural conditions. The entry of lower

  11. Gas Strategy of China: Developing competition between national production and imports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornot-Gandolphe, Sylvie

    2014-10-01

    price from upstream to downstream (from wellhead price to city gate price determine d by prices on markets of competing energies), the government tries to implement a system in which the market will determine the level of upstream investments in China and the volume of imports. In the end, this system will lead to an optimal allocation of supply sources, being extracted from its underground or imported, at a price determined by gas demand and offer dynamics. Given the current and future weight of China in international gas trade, this equilibrium on the Chinese market could determine the international gas price, as it occurred on the coal market in less than three years. China became a net coal importer in 2009 (although it is still the biggest producer worldwide), surpassed Japan as first world importer in 2011 and since then Chinese prices have become the international reference for steam coal prices sold on the world markets. Bringing forward the price reform, as announced by President Xi Jinping at the 18. Congress of the Communist Party in October 2013, will not be easy because it implies not only an increase in gas prices but also an increase in coal prices (through a tax on resources or a carbon tax or the introduction of a national emission trading scheme) and in electricity prices. These reforms would make gas more competitive in the power sector, but would lead to an overall increase of energy prices in China. It is a difficult and brave political decision. More broadly, China can count on the downward trend in international gas prices and on its unique position: China is the biggest importing gas market, it is expected to grow further and it is able to weigh significantly on the price of future imports at a time when the world LNG market is becoming less tight. In the long run, shale gas production in China could reshuffle the cards but, given the current status of knowledge, it is too soon to evaluate its future contribution and price

  12. Handbook: Collecting Groundwater Samples from Monitoring Wells in Frenchman Flat, CAU 98

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, Jenny [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Reno, NV (United States); Lyles, Brad [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Reno, NV (United States); Cooper, Clay [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Reno, NV (United States); Hershey, Ron [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Reno, NV (United States); Healey, John [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Reno, NV (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Available Data” section to an “MP diagram” with a photo annotated with the datum information. On the UGTA Field Operations well page, the same information is in the “Wellhead Diagram” link. Well RNM-2s does not have an annotated photo at this time. All of the CAU 98 monitoring wells are located within Area 5 of Frenchman Flat, with the exception of ER-11-2 in Area 11 (Figure 1). The wells are clustered in two areas: the northern area (Figure 2) and the central area (Figure 3). Each well is discussed below in geographic order from north to south as follows: ER-11-2, ER-5-3 shallow piezometer, ER-5-3-2, ER-5-5, RNM-1, RNM-2s, and UE-5n.

  13. Current knowledge on groundwater microbial pathogens and their control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macler, Bruce A.; Merkle, Jon C.

    Those who drink groundwater that has not been disinfected are at increased risk of infection and disease from pathogenic microorganisms. Recent studies have shown that up to half of all US drinking-water wells tested had evidence of fecal contamination. A significant fraction of all waterborne disease outbreaks is associated with groundwater. An estimated 750,000 to 5.9million illnesses per year result from contaminated groundwaters in the US. Mortality from these illnesses may be 1400-9400 deaths per year. Control of these pathogens starts with source-water protection activities to prevent fecal contamination of aquifers and wells. These include assessment of wellhead vulnerability to fecal contamination and correction of identified deficiencies. Correction may include control of sources or rehabilitation of the well itself. Disinfection can serve as a useful barrier and is recommended as a prudent public-health policy for all groundwater systems. Ceux qui boivent une eau souterraine non désinfectée présentent un risque accru d'infection et de maladie par des germes pathogènes. De récentes études ont montré que près de la moitié de tous les puits américains testés, captés pour l'eau potable, sont soumis à une contamination fécale. Une fraction significative de l'ensemble des premières manifestations de maladies liées à l'eau est associée aux eaux souterraines. On estime qu'entre 750 000 et 5,9millions de personnes sont malades chaque année aux États-Unis à cause d'eaux souterraines polluées. La mortalité parmi ces malades doit ètre de l'ordre de 1400 à 9400 décès par an. La protection contre ces germes pathogènes commence avec des mesures prises au niveau du captage pour empècher la pollution des aquifères et des puits. Celles-ci comprennent une évaluation de la vulnérabilité des tètes de puits à la pollution fécale et une correction des insuffisances mises en évidence. Cette correction peut comprendre une maîtrise des sources

  14. Origin of late pleistocene formation water in Mexican oil reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birkle, P. [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    . For wellhead samples, a 20 liter-sampling-reagent was previously filled with N{sub 2}-gas for the collection and phase separation of the pressurized gas-water-crude oil mixture. No differences in {sup 14}C-concentrations were detected applying, both, conventional and AMS-techniques. In contradiction to the expected 'fossil age' of reservoir water as part of a stagnant hydraulic system, measured {sup 14}C-concentrations between 0.89 pmC and 31.86 pmC indicate a late Pleistocene-early Holocene, regional event for the infiltration of surface water into the reservoir. The variety in water mineralization from meteoric (TDS{sub max} = 0.5 g/l) to hyper-saline composition (TDS{sub max} = 338 g/l) is not caused by halite dissolution from adjacent salt domes, as shown by elevated Br/Cl ratios. In contrary, the linear correlation between {sup 18}O and Cl values reflect varying mixing proportions of two components - meteoric water and evaporated seawater. Instead of water/rock-interaction, evaporation of seawater at the surface prior to infiltration represents the principal process for fluid enrichment in {sup 18}O and chlorine, with maximum values of 17.2 %o and 228 g/l, respectively. The young residence time of formation water in Mexican oil reservoirs implies following: - The common assumption of 'hydraulically-frozen' reservoirs is not correct, as main descending fluid migration occurred during glacial period. Probably, major infiltration processes are related to periods with climatic changes and increased humidity - as observed for the adjacent Yucatan region in SE-Mexico during early-mid Holocene (6,000 yr BP) (Metcalfe et al. 2000) - with the probable transgression of Mexican Gulf seawater into the recent Mexican coastal plain. - The common hypothesis of hydrocarbon maturation within Jurassic organic-rich layers, and its subsequent expulsion and migration into Cretaceous/Tertiary sedimentary units must be expanded by a last-step-process: As glacial

  15. Risk assessment in fractured porous media with particular reference to water catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enzenhoefer, R.; Helmig, R.; Nowak, W.; Binning, P. J.

    2009-04-01

    About 75% of the drinking water in Germany is drawn from groundwater. Karstic features can enhance the migration of contaminants to well fields, thus causing an elevated risk of contamination. In order to delineate well-head protection zones, the karstic flow and transport processes have to be understood and areas of high vulnerability have to be known from the perspective of a water constructor or manager. The trend in European legislation is to require probabilistic risk analysis in water supply management (see Water Safety Plan [WHO]). This will require to assess the 50 day line, and other indicators for well vulnerability, within stochastic frameworks. Also, the economic principles of risk (expected damage) minimization or cost/benefit optimization require probabilistic assessment of well vulnerability and well down time after contamination. The aim of this study is to provide a quantitative probabilistic approach to assess well vulnerability in a karstic system, meeting the future needs of water managers and expected legal requirements. To this end, we use a risk concept based on the four intrinsic well-vulnerability measures by Frind [2006], and transfer them to a probabilistic framework. The four vulnerability criteria are: (1)The time between a spill event and peak concentration arrival at the well, (2)The level of peak concentration relative to the spill concentration, (3)The time to breach a threshold concentration (e.g. drinking-water standard) and (4)The time of exposure (i.e., the time during which the threshold concentration is exceeded). This information helps the water manager to prioritize quantitatively the most sensitive areas with the highest risk to the well. To these areas the most efficient protection measures can be applied. Also, contamination sites can be ranked in the relevance of their remediation necessity. In order to model flow and transport processes in a karstic system, the aquifer has to be represented by a stochastic model concept

  16. Hydrogeology, chemical characteristics, and water sources and pathways in the zone of contribution of a public-supply well in San Antonio, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musgrove, MaryLynn; Fahlquist, Lynne; Stanton, Gregory P.; Houston, Natalie A.; Lindgren, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    depths and under three different pumping conditions. Additionally, selected monitoring wells and one of the well-field PSWs were sampled several times in response to a rainfall and recharge event to assess short-term (event-scale) temporal variations in water quality. For comparison purposes, groundwater samples were categorized as being from regional aquifer PSWs, from the well field (wellhead samples), from the monitoring wells (excluding the overburden well), from the overburden well, from the PSW depth-dependent sampling, and from temporal sampling. Groundwater samples were analyzed for inorganic, organic, isotopic, and age-dating tracers to characterize geochemical conditions in the aquifer and provide understanding of the mechanisms of mobilization and movement of selected constituents from source areas to a PSW. Sources, tracers, and conditions used to assess water quality and processes affecting the PSW and the aquifer system included (1) carbonate host rock composition; (2) physicochemical constituents; (3) major and trace element concentrations; (4) saturation indices with respect to minerals in aquifer rocks; (5) elemental ratios, such as magnesium to calcium ratios, that are indicative of water-rock interaction processes; (6) oxidation-reduction conditions; (7) nutrient concentrations, in particular nitrate concentrations; (8) the isotopic composition of nitrate, which can point to specific nitrate sources; (9) strontium isotopes; (10) stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen; (11) organic contaminant concentrations, including pesticides and volatile organic compounds; (12) age tracers, apparent-age distribution, and dissolved gas data used in age interpretations; (13) depth-dependent water chemistry collected from the PSW under different pumping conditions to assess zones of contribution; and (14) temporal variability in groundwater composition from the PSW and selected monitoring wells in response to an aquifer recharge event. Geochemical results indicate

  17. The Containment of Radioactive Wastes in Deep Geologic Formations; L'Elimination des Dechets Radioactifs dans les Formations Geologiques Profondes; 0423 0414 0414 ; Evacuacion de Desechos Radiactivos en Formaciones Geologicas Profundas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaufman, W. J. [University of California, Berkeley (United States)

    1960-07-01

    Generally the volumes of low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes produced at chemical processing sites are so great as to make permanent storage prohibitively costly. In many instances chemical treatment may provide sufficient decontamination to allow the discharge of these effluents to surface streams or estuaries. However, in some circumstances such methods are costly and either do not make possible adequate decontamination, or result in excessively large volumes of semi-solid wastes that must be permanently stored. It is believed that in such a situation the deep underlying formations of the earth may constitute a safe and economic waste-disposal resource. In sandstone formations large volumes of waste may be stored with a high degree of containment integrity. Both the interstitial voids and ion-exchange properties serve to make available a great storage capacity. The disposal system employing deep formations of the earth is conceived to consist of a pattern of injection wells for introducing the waste, and of relief wells which serve to reduce well-head pressures, permit monitoring, and direct the flow in such a manner as to make maximum use of the formation. Information needed for the design of such a system includes data on the dispersion or short-circuiting properties of the formations, ion-exchange characteristics of the media, and the chemical and radiochemical properties of the waste. A two-well prototype injection system has been in operation for two years at the Engineering Field Station of the University of California. (author) [French] En general, les dechets de faible ou moyenne activite produits dans les usines de traitement chimique atteignent un volume tel que le cout de leur entreposage permanent est prohibitif. Dans plusieurs cas, un traitement chimique peut produire une decontamination suffisante pour que ces effluents puissent etre jetes dans des cours d'eau et des estuaires. Dans certaines circonstances, cependant, ces methodes sont

  18. Anthropogenic organic compounds in source water of select community water systems in the United States, 2002-10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valder, Joshua F.; Delzer, Gregory C.; Kingsbury, James A.; Hopple, Jessica A.; Price, Curtis V.; Bender, David A.

    2014-01-01

    , watershed size, land use, population density, and recharge were characterized for each of the watersheds for river intakes and contributing areas for supply wells. A total of 313 samples were collected from 20 river intakes. Between the years of 2002 through 2010, samples were collected approximately 16 times over the course of a year. Seventy-one compounds from 12 of the 13 use groups commonly occurred (detected in greater than or equal to 1 percent of samples using an assessment level of 0.05 microgram per liter or when a compound was detected in greater than or equal to 10 percent of samples without an assessment level) indicating a wide variety of sources and pathways to these rivers and highlighting the importance of source-water protection strategies. A total of 448 supply wells were sampled once during 2002–10 as part of 30 independent groundwater studies. About 15 CWS supply wells were sampled for each independent groundwater study. Twenty-eight compounds from 7 of the 13 use groups commonly occurred indicating a wide variety of sources and pathways exist for these compounds to reach these wells and highlighting the importance of wellhead protection strategies. About one-half the 265 compounds monitored (122) were detected in both surface water and groundwater samples. A more diverse suite of compounds were detected in surface water in comparison to groundwater. However, herbicides and herbicide degradates were the most frequent group of compounds detected in both surface water and groundwater. Sixty-five of the most commonly occurring compounds were detected in one or more samples from both surface water and groundwater. Human-health benchmarks (MCLs for regulated compounds and HBSLs for unregulated compounds) were available for more than one-half the compounds (160 of the 265) monitored in this study. Fifty-eight percent (41 of 71) of the commonly occurring compounds in surface water have a human-health benchmark to which concentrations can be compared; 19 have

  19. Hydrologic assessment of the shallow groundwater flow system beneath the Shinnecock Nation tribal lands, Suffolk County, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noll, Michael L.; Rivera, Simonette L.; Busciolano, Ronald J.

    2016-12-02

    Defining the distribution and flow of shallow groundwater beneath the Shinnecock Nation tribal lands in Suffolk County, New York, is a crucial first step in identifying sources of potential contamination to the surficial aquifer and coastal ecosystems. The surficial or water table aquifer beneath the tribal lands is the primary source of potable water supply for at least 6 percent of the households on the tribal lands. Oyster fisheries and other marine ecosystems are critical to the livelihood of many residents living on the tribal lands, but are susceptible to contamination from groundwater entering the embayment from the surficial aquifer. Contamination of the surficial aquifer from flooding during intense coastal storms, nutrient loading from fertilizers, and septic effluent have been identified as potential sources of human and ecological health concerns on tribal lands.The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) facilitated the installation of 17 water table wells on and adjacent to the tribal lands during March 2014. These wells were combined with other existing wells to create a 32-well water table monitoring network that was used to assess local hydrologic conditions. Survey-grade, global-navigation-satellite systems provided centimeter-level accuracy for positioning wellhead surveys. Water levels were measured by the USGS during May (spring) and November (fall) 2014 to evaluate seasonal effects on the water table. Water level measurements were made at high and low tide during May 2014 to identify potential effects on the water table caused by changes in tidal stage (tidal flux) in Shinnecock Bay. Water level contour maps indicate that the surficial aquifer is recharged by precipitation and upgradient groundwater flow that moves from the recharge zone located generally beneath Sunrise Highway, to the discharge zone beneath the tribal lands, and eventually discharges into the embayment, tidal creeks, and estuaries that bound the tribal lands to the east, south, and