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Sample records for well-practiced visual categorization

  1. Network changes in the transition from initial learning to well-practiced visual categorization

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    Joseph M DeGutis

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Visual categorization is a remarkable ability that allows us to effortlessly identify objects and efficiently respond to our environment. The neural mechanisms of how visual categories become well-established are largely unknown. Studies of initial category learning implicate a network of regions that include inferior temporal cortex (ITC, medial temporal lobe (MTL, basal ganglia (BG, premotor cortex (PMC and prefrontal cortex (PFC. However, how these regions change with extended learning is poorly characterized. To understand the neural changes in the transition from initially learned to well-practiced categorization, we used functional MRI and compared brain activity and functional connectivity when subjects performed an initially learned categorization task (100 trials of training and a well-practiced task (4250 trials of training. We demonstrate that a similar network is implicated for initially learned and well-practiced categorization. Additionally, connectivity analyses reveal an increased coordination between ITC, MTL, and PMC when making category judgments during the well-practiced task. These results suggest that category learning involves an increased coordination between a distributed network of regions supporting retrieval and representation of categories.

  2. Network changes in the transition from initial learning to well-practiced visual categorization.

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    DeGutis, Joe; D'Esposito, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Visual categorization is a remarkable ability that allows us to effortlessly identify objects and efficiently respond to our environment. The neural mechanisms of how visual categories become well-established are largely unknown. Studies of initial category learning implicate a network of regions that include inferior temporal cortex (ITC), medial temporal lobe (MTL), basal ganglia (BG), premotor cortex (PMC) and prefrontal cortex (PFC). However, how these regions change with extended learning is poorly characterized. To understand the neural changes in the transition from initially learned to well-practiced categorization, we used functional MRI and compared brain activity and functional connectivity when subjects performed an initially learned categorization task (100 trials of training) and a well-practiced task (4250 trials of training). We demonstrate that a similar network is implicated for initially learned and well-practiced categorization. Additionally, connectivity analyses reveal an increased coordination between ITC, MTL, and PMC when making category judgments during the well-practiced task. These results suggest that category learning involves an increased coordination between a distributed network of regions supporting retrieval and representation of categories.

  3. Accelerating Visual Categorization with the GPU

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Sande, K.E.A.; Gevers, T.; Snoek, C.G.M.

    2012-01-01

    Visual categorization is important to manage large collections of digital images and video, where textual meta-data is often incomplete or simply unavailable. The bag-of-words model has become the most powerful method for visual categorization of images and video. Despite its high accuracy, a severe

  4. Empowering Visual Categorization with the GPU

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Sande, K.E.A.; Gevers, T.; Snoek, C.G.M.

    2011-01-01

    Visual categorization is important to manage large collections of digital images and video, where textual metadata is often incomplete or simply unavailable. The bag-of-words model has become the most powerful method for visual categorization of images and video. Despite its high accuracy, a severe

  5. The timing of visual object categorization.

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    Mack, Michael L; Palmeri, Thomas J

    2011-01-01

    AN OBJECT CAN BE CATEGORIZED AT DIFFERENT LEVELS OF ABSTRACTION: as natural or man-made, animal or plant, bird or dog, or as a Northern Cardinal or Pyrrhuloxia. There has been growing interest in understanding how quickly categorizations at different levels are made and how the timing of those perceptual decisions changes with experience. We specifically contrast two perspectives on the timing of object categorization at different levels of abstraction. By one account, the relative timing implies a relative timing of stages of visual processing that are tied to particular levels of object categorization: Fast categorizations are fast because they precede other categorizations within the visual processing hierarchy. By another account, the relative timing reflects when perceptual features are available over time and the quality of perceptual evidence used to drive a perceptual decision process: Fast simply means fast, it does not mean first. Understanding the short-term and long-term temporal dynamics of object categorizations is key to developing computational models of visual object recognition. We briefly review a number of models of object categorization and outline how they explain the timing of visual object categorization at different levels of abstraction.

  6. The timing of visual object categorization

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    Michael L. Mack

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available An object can be categorized at different levels of abstraction: as natural or man-made, animal or plant, bird or dog, or as a Northern Cardinal or Pyrrhuloxia. There has been growing interest in understanding how quickly categorizations at different levels are made and how the timing of those perceptual decisions changes with experience. We specifically contrast two perspectives on the timing of object categorization at different levels of abstraction. By one account, the relative timing implies a relative timing of stages of visual processing that are tied to particular levels of object categorization: Fast categorizations are fast because they precede other categorizations within the visual processing hierarchy. By another account, the relative timing reflects when perceptual features are available over time and the quality of perceptual evidence used to drive a perceptual decision process: Fast simply means fast, it does not mean first. Understanding the short-term and long-term temporal dynamics of object categorizations is key to developing computational models of visual object recognition. We briefly review a number of models of object categorization and outline how they explain the timing of visual object categorization at different levels of abstraction.

  7. Visual categorization with negative examples for free

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    Li, X.; Snoek, C.G.M.

    2009-01-01

    Automatic visual categorization is critically dependent on labeled examples for supervised learning. As an alternative to traditional expert labeling, social-tagged multimedia is becoming a novel yet subjective and inaccurate source of learning examples. Different from existing work focusing on coll

  8. Transfer learning for visual categorization: a survey.

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    Shao, Ling; Zhu, Fan; Li, Xuelong

    2015-05-01

    Regular machine learning and data mining techniques study the training data for future inferences under a major assumption that the future data are within the same feature space or have the same distribution as the training data. However, due to the limited availability of human labeled training data, training data that stay in the same feature space or have the same distribution as the future data cannot be guaranteed to be sufficient enough to avoid the over-fitting problem. In real-world applications, apart from data in the target domain, related data in a different domain can also be included to expand the availability of our prior knowledge about the target future data. Transfer learning addresses such cross-domain learning problems by extracting useful information from data in a related domain and transferring them for being used in target tasks. In recent years, with transfer learning being applied to visual categorization, some typical problems, e.g., view divergence in action recognition tasks and concept drifting in image classification tasks, can be efficiently solved. In this paper, we survey state-of-the-art transfer learning algorithms in visual categorization applications, such as object recognition, image classification, and human action recognition.

  9. The time course of visual categorization: Electrophysiological evidence from ERP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Antao; LI Hong; QIU Jiang; LUO Yuejia

    2006-01-01

    Visual categorization can be derived from interaction between inputting features set (IFS)from outside stimuli and anticipating features set (AFS) from concept, and such interaction can take two forms: match extraction and conflict control. Using ERP recording, we investigated the temporal course of visual categorization. The results indicated that the larger the AFS, the higher the amplitude of the N1 was generated, which demonstrated the effect of the AFS on the attention. When the size of the AFS was larger than or equal to 2, prominent N2 component was elicited, which demonstrated the effect of conflict when the feature of IFS mismatched with the feature of the AFS. The judgment of category was manifested on the LPC component, and this component was also sensitive to conflict control. Based on the results, we proposed that the temporal course of visual categorization was as follows: selective attention, feature perception, feature match/extraction and judgment of category/conflict control. Among those processes, the judgment of category is the core processing; however the former three sub-processes form the base of categorization. The results are in support of the idea that LPC is responsible for highlevel categorization process.

  10. Categorizing Fetal Heart Rate Variability with and without Visual Aids

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    Ashdown, Amanda J.; Scerbo, Mark W.; Belfore, Lee A.; Davis, Stephen S.; Abuhamad, Alfred Z.

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study examined the ability of clinicians to correctly categorize images of fetal heart rate (FHR) variability with and without the use of exemplars. Study Design A sample of 33 labor and delivery clinicians inspected static FHR images and categorized them into one of four categories defined by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) based on the amount of variability within absent, minimal, moderate, or marked ranges. Participants took part in three conditions: two in which they used exemplars representing FHR variability near the center or near the boundaries of each range, and a third control condition with no exemplars. The data gathered from clinicians were compared with those from a previous study using novices. Results Clinicians correctly categorized more images when the FHR variability fell near the center rather than the boundaries of each range, F (1,32) = 71.69, p < 0.001, partial η2 = 0.69. They also correctly categorized more images when exemplars were available, F (2,64) = 5.44, p = 0.007, partial η2 = 0.15. Compared with the novices, the clinicians were more accurate and quicker in their category judgments, but this difference was limited to the condition without exemplars. Conclusion The results suggest that categorizing FHR variability is more difficult when the examples fall near the boundaries of each NICHD-defined range. Thus, clinicians could benefit from training with visual aids to improve judgments about FHR variability and potentially enhance safety in labor and delivery. PMID:27722031

  11. ERP characterization of sustained attention effects in visual lexical categorization.

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    Martin, Clara D; Thierry, Guillaume; Démonet, Jean-François

    2010-03-25

    As our understanding of the basic processes underlying reading is growing, the key role played by attention in this process becomes evident. Two research topics are of particular interest in this domain: (1) it is still undetermined whether sustained attention affects lexical decision tasks; (2) the influence of attention on early visual processing (i.e., before orthographic or lexico-semantic processing stages) remains largely under-specified. Here we investigated early perceptual modulations by sustained attention using an ERP paradigm adapted from Thierry et al. [1]. Participants had to decide whether visual stimuli presented in pairs pertained to a pre-specified category (lexical categorization focus on word or pseudoword pairs). Depending on the lexical category of the first item of a pair, participants either needed to fully process the second item (hold condition) or could release their attention and make a decision without full processing of the second item (release condition). The P1 peak was unaffected by sustained attention. The N1 was delayed and reduced after the second item of a pair when participants released their attention. Release of sustained attention also reduced a P3 wave elicited by the first item of a pair and abolished the P3 wave elicited by the second. Our results are consistent with differential effects of sustained attention on early processing stages and working memory. Sustained attention modulated early processing stages during a lexical decision task without inhibiting the process of stimulus integration. On the contrary, working memory involvement/updating was highly dependent upon the allocation of sustained attention. Moreover, the influence of sustained attention on both early and late cognitive processes was independent of lexical categorization focus.

  12. ERP characterization of sustained attention effects in visual lexical categorization.

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    Clara D Martin

    Full Text Available As our understanding of the basic processes underlying reading is growing, the key role played by attention in this process becomes evident. Two research topics are of particular interest in this domain: (1 it is still undetermined whether sustained attention affects lexical decision tasks; (2 the influence of attention on early visual processing (i.e., before orthographic or lexico-semantic processing stages remains largely under-specified. Here we investigated early perceptual modulations by sustained attention using an ERP paradigm adapted from Thierry et al. [1]. Participants had to decide whether visual stimuli presented in pairs pertained to a pre-specified category (lexical categorization focus on word or pseudoword pairs. Depending on the lexical category of the first item of a pair, participants either needed to fully process the second item (hold condition or could release their attention and make a decision without full processing of the second item (release condition. The P1 peak was unaffected by sustained attention. The N1 was delayed and reduced after the second item of a pair when participants released their attention. Release of sustained attention also reduced a P3 wave elicited by the first item of a pair and abolished the P3 wave elicited by the second. Our results are consistent with differential effects of sustained attention on early processing stages and working memory. Sustained attention modulated early processing stages during a lexical decision task without inhibiting the process of stimulus integration. On the contrary, working memory involvement/updating was highly dependent upon the allocation of sustained attention. Moreover, the influence of sustained attention on both early and late cognitive processes was independent of lexical categorization focus.

  13. Semantic Categorization Precedes Affective Evaluation of Visual Scenes

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    Nummenmaa, Lauri; Hyona, Jukka; Calvo, Manuel G.

    2010-01-01

    We compared the primacy of affective versus semantic categorization by using forced-choice saccadic and manual response tasks. Participants viewed paired emotional and neutral scenes involving humans or animals flashed rapidly in extrafoveal vision. Participants were instructed to categorize the targets by saccading toward the location occupied by…

  14. Temporal properties of material categorization and material rating: visual vs non-visual material features.

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    Nagai, Takehiro; Matsushima, Toshiki; Koida, Kowa; Tani, Yusuke; Kitazaki, Michiteru; Nakauchi, Shigeki

    2015-10-01

    Humans can visually recognize material categories of objects, such as glass, stone, and plastic, easily. However, little is known about the kinds of surface quality features that contribute to such material class recognition. In this paper, we examine the relationship between perceptual surface features and material category discrimination performance for pictures of materials, focusing on temporal aspects, including reaction time and effects of stimulus duration. The stimuli were pictures of objects with an identical shape but made of different materials that could be categorized into seven classes (glass, plastic, metal, stone, wood, leather, and fabric). In a pre-experiment, observers rated the pictures on nine surface features, including visual (e.g., glossiness and transparency) and non-visual features (e.g., heaviness and warmness), on a 7-point scale. In the main experiments, observers judged whether two simultaneously presented pictures were classified as the same or different material category. Reaction times and effects of stimulus duration were measured. The results showed that visual feature ratings were correlated with material discrimination performance for short reaction times or short stimulus durations, while non-visual feature ratings were correlated only with performance for long reaction times or long stimulus durations. These results suggest that the mechanisms underlying visual and non-visual feature processing may differ in terms of processing time, although the cause is unclear. Visual surface features may mainly contribute to material recognition in daily life, while non-visual features may contribute only weakly, if at all.

  15. Categorically distinct types of receptive fields in early visual cortex.

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    Talebi, Vargha; Baker, Curtis L

    2016-05-01

    In the visual cortex, distinct types of neurons have been identified based on cellular morphology, response to injected current, or expression of specific markers, but neurophysiological studies have revealed visual receptive field (RF) properties that appear to be on a continuum, with only two generally recognized classes: simple and complex. Most previous studies have characterized visual responses of neurons using stereotyped stimuli such as bars, gratings, or white noise and simple system identification approaches (e.g., reverse correlation). Here we estimate visual RF models of cortical neurons using visually rich natural image stimuli and regularized regression system identification methods and characterize their spatial tuning, temporal dynamics, spatiotemporal behavior, and spiking properties. We quantitatively demonstrate the existence of three functionally distinct categories of simple cells, distinguished by their degree of orientation selectivity (isotropic or oriented) and the nature of their output nonlinearity (expansive or compressive). In addition, these three types have differing average values of several other properties. Cells with nonoriented RFs tend to have smaller RFs, shorter response durations, no direction selectivity, and high reliability. Orientation-selective neurons with an expansive output nonlinearity have Gabor-like RFs, lower spontaneous activity and responsivity, and spiking responses with higher sparseness. Oriented RFs with a compressive nonlinearity are spatially nondescript and tend to show longer response latency. Our findings indicate multiple physiologically defined types of RFs beyond the simple/complex dichotomy, suggesting that cortical neurons may have more specialized functional roles rather than lying on a multidimensional continuum.

  16. Image categorization based on spatial visual vocabulary model

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    Wang, Yuxin; He, Changqin; Guo, He; Feng, Zhen; Jia, Qi

    2010-08-01

    In this paper, we propose an approach to recognize scene categories by means of a novel method named spatial visual vocabulary. Firstly, we hierarchically divide images into sub regions and construct the spatial visual vocabulary by grouping the low-level features collected from every corresponding spatial sub region into a specified number of clusters using k-means algorithm. To recognize the category of a scene, the visual vocabulary distributions of all spatial sub regions are concatenated to form a global feature vector. The classification is obtained using LIBSVM, a support vector machine classifier. Our goal is to find a universal framework which is applicable to various types of features, so two kinds of features are used in the experiments: "V1-like" filters and PACT features. In almost all experimental cases, the proposed model achieves superior results. Source codes are available by email.

  17. Relationships between Categorical Perception of Phonemes, Phoneme Awareness, and Visual Attention Span in Developmental Dyslexia.

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    Zoubrinetzky, Rachel; Collet, Gregory; Serniclaes, Willy; Nguyen-Morel, Marie-Ange; Valdois, Sylviane

    2016-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the categorical perception deficit of speech sounds in developmental dyslexia is related to phoneme awareness skills, whereas a visual attention (VA) span deficit constitutes an independent deficit. Phoneme awareness tasks, VA span tasks and categorical perception tasks of phoneme identification and discrimination using a d/t voicing continuum were administered to 63 dyslexic children and 63 control children matched on chronological age. Results showed significant differences in categorical perception between the dyslexic and control children. Significant correlations were found between categorical perception skills, phoneme awareness and reading. Although VA span correlated with reading, no significant correlations were found between either categorical perception or phoneme awareness and VA span. Mediation analyses performed on the whole dyslexic sample suggested that the effect of categorical perception on reading might be mediated by phoneme awareness. This relationship was independent of the participants' VA span abilities. Two groups of dyslexic children with a single phoneme awareness or a single VA span deficit were then identified. The phonologically impaired group showed lower categorical perception skills than the control group but categorical perception was similar in the VA span impaired dyslexic and control children. The overall findings suggest that the link between categorical perception, phoneme awareness and reading is independent from VA span skills. These findings provide new insights on the heterogeneity of developmental dyslexia. They suggest that phonological processes and VA span independently affect reading acquisition.

  18. Video genre categorization and representation using audio-visual information

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    Ionescu, Bogdan; Seyerlehner, Klaus; Rasche, Christoph; Vertan, Constantin; Lambert, Patrick

    2012-04-01

    We propose an audio-visual approach to video genre classification using content descriptors that exploit audio, color, temporal, and contour information. Audio information is extracted at block-level, which has the advantage of capturing local temporal information. At the temporal structure level, we consider action content in relation to human perception. Color perception is quantified using statistics of color distribution, elementary hues, color properties, and relationships between colors. Further, we compute statistics of contour geometry and relationships. The main contribution of our work lies in harnessing the descriptive power of the combination of these descriptors in genre classification. Validation was carried out on over 91 h of video footage encompassing 7 common video genres, yielding average precision and recall ratios of 87% to 100% and 77% to 100%, respectively, and an overall average correct classification of up to 97%. Also, experimental comparison as part of the MediaEval 2011 benchmarking campaign demonstrated the efficiency of the proposed audio-visual descriptors over other existing approaches. Finally, we discuss a 3-D video browsing platform that displays movies using feature-based coordinates and thus regroups them according to genre.

  19. Emotion Modulation of Visual Attention: Categorical and Temporal Characteristics

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    Ciesielski, Bethany G.; Armstrong, Thomas; Zald, David H.; Olatunji, Bunmi O.

    2010-01-01

    Background Experimental research has shown that emotional stimuli can either enhance or impair attentional performance. However, the relative effects of specific emotional stimuli and the specific time course of these differential effects are unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings In the present study, participants (n = 50) searched for a single target within a rapid serial visual presentation of images. Irrelevant fear, disgust, erotic or neutral images preceded the target by two, four, six, or eight items. At lag 2, erotic images induced the greatest deficits in subsequent target processing compared to other images, consistent with a large emotional attentional blink. Fear and disgust images also produced a larger attentional blinks at lag 2 than neutral images. Erotic, fear, and disgust images continued to induce greater deficits than neutral images at lag 4 and 6. However, target processing deficits induced by erotic, fear, and disgust images at intermediate lags (lag 4 and 6) did not consistently differ from each other. In contrast to performance at lag 2, 4, and 6, enhancement in target processing for emotional stimuli was observed in comparison to neutral stimuli at lag 8. Conclusions/Significance These findings suggest that task-irrelevant emotion information, particularly erotica, impairs intentional allocation of attention at early temporal stages, but at later temporal stages, emotional stimuli can have an enhancing effect on directed attention. These data suggest that the effects of emotional stimuli on attention can be both positive and negative depending upon temporal factors. PMID:21079773

  20. Efficient Cross-Modal Transfer of Shape Information in Visual and Haptic Object Categorization

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    Nina Gaissert

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Categorization has traditionally been studied in the visual domain with only a few studies focusing on the abilities of the haptic system in object categorization. During the first years of development, however, touch and vision are closely coupled in the exploratory procedures used by the infant to gather information about objects. Here, we investigate how well shape information can be transferred between those two modalities in a categorization task. Our stimuli consisted of amoeba-like objects that were parametrically morphed in well-defined steps. Participants explored the objects in a categorization task either visually or haptically. Interestingly, both modalities led to similar categorization behavior suggesting that similar shape processing might occur in vision and haptics. Next, participants received training on specific categories in one of the two modalities. As would be expected, training increased performance in the trained modality; however, we also found significant transfer of training to the other, untrained modality after only relatively few training trials. Taken together, our results demonstrate that complex shape information can be transferred efficiently across the two modalities, which speaks in favor of multisensory, higher-level representations of shape.

  1. Cue integration in categorical tasks: insights from audio-visual speech perception.

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    Vikranth Rao Bejjanki

    Full Text Available Previous cue integration studies have examined continuous perceptual dimensions (e.g., size and have shown that human cue integration is well described by a normative model in which cues are weighted in proportion to their sensory reliability, as estimated from single-cue performance. However, this normative model may not be applicable to categorical perceptual dimensions (e.g., phonemes. In tasks defined over categorical perceptual dimensions, optimal cue weights should depend not only on the sensory variance affecting the perception of each cue but also on the environmental variance inherent in each task-relevant category. Here, we present a computational and experimental investigation of cue integration in a categorical audio-visual (articulatory speech perception task. Our results show that human performance during audio-visual phonemic labeling is qualitatively consistent with the behavior of a Bayes-optimal observer. Specifically, we show that the participants in our task are sensitive, on a trial-by-trial basis, to the sensory uncertainty associated with the auditory and visual cues, during phonemic categorization. In addition, we show that while sensory uncertainty is a significant factor in determining cue weights, it is not the only one and participants' performance is consistent with an optimal model in which environmental, within category variability also plays a role in determining cue weights. Furthermore, we show that in our task, the sensory variability affecting the visual modality during cue-combination is not well estimated from single-cue performance, but can be estimated from multi-cue performance. The findings and computational principles described here represent a principled first step towards characterizing the mechanisms underlying human cue integration in categorical tasks.

  2. Visual Cortical Entrainment to Motion and Categorical Speech Features during Silent Lipreading

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    O’Sullivan, Aisling E.; Crosse, Michael J.; Di Liberto, Giovanni M.; Lalor, Edmund C.

    2017-01-01

    Speech is a multisensory percept, comprising an auditory and visual component. While the content and processing pathways of audio speech have been well characterized, the visual component is less well understood. In this work, we expand current methodologies using system identification to introduce a framework that facilitates the study of visual speech in its natural, continuous form. Specifically, we use models based on the unheard acoustic envelope (E), the motion signal (M) and categorical visual speech features (V) to predict EEG activity during silent lipreading. Our results show that each of these models performs similarly at predicting EEG in visual regions and that respective combinations of the individual models (EV, MV, EM and EMV) provide an improved prediction of the neural activity over their constituent models. In comparing these different combinations, we find that the model incorporating all three types of features (EMV) outperforms the individual models, as well as both the EV and MV models, while it performs similarly to the EM model. Importantly, EM does not outperform EV and MV, which, considering the higher dimensionality of the V model, suggests that more data is needed to clarify this finding. Nevertheless, the performance of EMV, and comparisons of the subject performances for the three individual models, provides further evidence to suggest that visual regions are involved in both low-level processing of stimulus dynamics and categorical speech perception. This framework may prove useful for investigating modality-specific processing of visual speech under naturalistic conditions. PMID:28123363

  3. Does a yellow filter improve visual object categorization in normal aging?

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    Lenoble, Quentin; Boucart, Muriel; Rougier, Marie-Bénédicte; Bordaberry, Pierre; Delord, Sandrine

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that a yellow filter (CPF450) can increase contrast, motion sensitivity, vergence, and accommodation. We investigated whether a yellow filter can reduce age-related visual deficits. We tested two groups of 60 observers (mean age 24 vs. 72) in an object categorization task. Grayscale photographs of natural objects and artifacts were displayed either centrally or peripherally (21°) at low (8%) or medium (30%) contrast. There were three filter conditions (no filter, placebo filter, and yellow filter). Both groups of observers performed similarly on central and medium-contrast pictures. The deleterious effects of reduced contrast and eccentricity were stronger in elderly individuals. Moreover, the yellow filter globally improved the speed of categorization for the elderly participants. The decrease in response time in the yellow filter condition was larger when the stimuli were displayed peripherally in both groups. A yellow filter should be considered as a potential means for visual improvement in normal aging.

  4. Webly-supervised Fine-grained Visual Categorization via Deep Domain Adaptation.

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    Xu, Zhe; Huang, Shaoli; Zhang, Ya; Tao, Dacheng

    2016-12-08

    Learning visual representations from web data has recently attracted attention for object recognition. Previous studies have mainly focused on overcoming label noise and data bias and have shown promising results by learning directly from web data. However, we argue that it might be better to transfer knowledge from existing human labeling resources to improve performance at nearly no additional cost. In this paper, we propose a new semi-supervised method for learning via web data. Our method has the unique design of exploiting strong supervision, i.e., in addition to standard image-level labels, our method also utilizes detailed annotations including object bounding boxes and part landmarks. By transferring as much knowledge as possible from existing strongly supervised datasets to weakly supervised web images, our method can benefit from sophisticated object recognition algorithms and overcome several typical problems found in webly-supervised learning. We consider the problem of fine-grained visual categorization, in which existing training resources are scarce, as our main research objective. Comprehensive experimentation and extensive analysis demonstrate encouraging performance of the proposed approach, which, at the same time, delivers a new pipeline for fine-grained visual categorization that is likely to be highly effective for real-world applications.

  5. Categorical Perception of Colour in the Left and Right Visual Field Is Verbally Mediated: Evidence from Korean

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    Roberson, Debi; Pak, Hyensou; Hanley, J. Richard

    2008-01-01

    In this study we demonstrate that Korean (but not English) speakers show Categorical perception (CP) on a visual search task for a boundary between two Korean colour categories that is not marked in English. These effects were observed regardless of whether target items were presented to the left or right visual field. Because this boundary is…

  6. The emergence of semantic categorization in early visual processing: ERP indices of animal vs. artifact recognition

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    Del Zotto Marzia

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuroimaging and neuropsychological literature show functional dissociations in brain activity during processing of stimuli belonging to different semantic categories (e.g., animals, tools, faces, places, but little information is available about the time course of object perceptual categorization. The aim of the study was to provide information about the timing of processing stimuli from different semantic domains, without using verbal or naming paradigms, in order to observe the emergence of non-linguistic conceptual knowledge in the ventral stream visual pathway. Event related potentials (ERPs were recorded in 18 healthy right-handed individuals as they performed a perceptual categorization task on 672 pairs of images of animals and man-made objects (i.e., artifacts. Results Behavioral responses to animal stimuli were ~50 ms faster and more accurate than those to artifacts. At early processing stages (120–180 ms the right occipital-temporal cortex was more activated in response to animals than to artifacts as indexed by posterior N1 response, while frontal/central N1 (130–160 showed the opposite pattern. In the next processing stage (200–260 the response was stronger to artifacts and usable items at anterior temporal sites. The P300 component was smaller, and the central/parietal N400 component was larger to artifacts than to animals. Conclusion The effect of animal and artifact categorization emerged at ~150 ms over the right occipital-temporal area as a stronger response of the ventral stream to animate, homomorphic, entities with faces and legs. The larger frontal/central N1 and the subsequent temporal activation for inanimate objects might reflect the prevalence of a functional rather than perceptual representation of manipulable tools compared to animals. Late ERP effects might reflect semantic integration and cognitive updating processes. Overall, the data are compatible with a modality-specific semantic memory

  7. Visualized analysis of mixed numeric and categorical data via extended self-organizing map.

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    Hsu, Chung-Chian; Lin, Shu-Han

    2012-01-01

    Many real-world datasets are of mixed types, having numeric and categorical attributes. Even though difficult, analyzing mixed-type datasets is important. In this paper, we propose an extended self-organizing map (SOM), called MixSOM, which utilizes a data structure distance hierarchy to facilitate the handling of numeric and categorical values in a direct, unified manner. Moreover, the extended model regularizes the prototype distance between neighboring neurons in proportion to their map distance so that structures of the clusters can be portrayed better on the map. Extensive experiments on several synthetic and real-world datasets are conducted to demonstrate the capability of the model and to compare MixSOM with several existing models including Kohonen's SOM, the generalized SOM and visualization-induced SOM. The results show that MixSOM is superior to the other models in reflecting the structure of the mixed-type data and facilitates further analysis of the data such as exploration at various levels of granularity.

  8. High baseline activity in inferior temporal cortex improves neural and behavioral discriminability during visual categorization

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    Nazli eEmadi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous firing is a ubiquitous property of neural activity in the brain. Recent literature suggests that this baseline activity plays a key role in perception. However, it is not known how the baseline activity contributes to neural coding and behavior. Here, by recording from the single neurons in the inferior temporal cortex of monkeys performing a visual categorization task, we thoroughly explored the relationship between baseline activity, the evoked response, and behavior. Specifically we found that a low-frequency (< 8 Hz oscillation in the spike train, prior and phase-locked to the stimulus onset, was correlated with increased gamma power and neuronal baseline activity. This enhancement of the baseline activity was then followed by an increase in the neural selectivity and the response reliability and eventually a higher behavioral performance.

  9. Exploration of SWRL Rule Bases through Visualization, Paraphrasing, and Categorization of Rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanpour, Saeed; O'Connor, Martin J.; Das, Amar K.

    Rule bases are increasingly being used as repositories of knowledge content on the Semantic Web. As the size and complexity of these rule bases increases, developers and end users need methods of rule abstraction to facilitate rule management. In this paper, we describe a rule abstraction method for Semantic Web Rule Language (SWRL) rules that is based on lexical analysis and a set of heuristics. Our method results in a tree data structure that we exploit in creating techniques to visualize, paraphrase, and categorize SWRL rules. We evaluate our approach by applying it to several biomedical ontologies that contain SWRL rules, and show how the results reveal rule patterns within the rule base. We have implemented our method as a plug-in tool for Protégé-OWL, the most widely used ontology modeling software for the Semantic Web. Our tool can allow users to rapidly explore content and patterns in SWRL rule bases, enabling their acquisition and management.

  10. Basic-level categorization of intermediate complexity fragments reveals top-down effects of expertise in visual perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harel, Assaf; Ullman, Shimon; Harari, Danny; Bentin, Shlomo

    2011-07-28

    Visual expertise is usually defined as the superior ability to distinguish between exemplars of a homogeneous category. Here, we ask how real-world expertise manifests at basic-level categorization and assess the contribution of stimulus-driven and top-down knowledge-based factors to this manifestation. Car experts and novices categorized computer-selected image fragments of cars, airplanes, and faces. Within each category, the fragments varied in their mutual information (MI), an objective quantifiable measure of feature diagnosticity. Categorization of face and airplane fragments was similar within and between groups, showing better performance with increasing MI levels. Novices categorized car fragments more slowly than face and airplane fragments, while experts categorized car fragments as fast as face and airplane fragments. The experts' advantage with car fragments was similar across MI levels, with similar functions relating RT with MI level for both groups. Accuracy was equal between groups for cars as well as faces and airplanes, but experts' response criteria were biased toward cars. These findings suggest that expertise does not entail only specific perceptual strategies. Rather, at the basic level, expertise manifests as a general processing advantage arguably involving application of top-down mechanisms, such as knowledge and attention, which helps experts to distinguish between object categories.

  11. Visual exposure and categorization performance positively influence 3- to 6-year-old children's willingness to taste unfamiliar vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rioux, Camille; Lafraire, Jérémie; Picard, Delphine

    2017-08-28

    The present research focuses on the effectiveness of visual exposure to vegetables in reducing food neophobia and pickiness among young children. We tested the hypotheses that (1) simple visual exposure to vegetables leads to an increase in the consumption of this food category, (2) diverse visual exposure to vegetables (i.e., vegetables varying in color are shown to children) leads to a greater increase in the consumption of this food category than classical exposure paradigms (i.e. the same mode of presentation of a given food across exposure sessions) and (3) visual exposure to vegetables leads to an increase in the consumption of this food category through a mediating effect of an increase in ease of categorization. We recruited 70 children aged 3-6 years who performed a 4-week study consisting of three phases: a 2-week visual exposure phase where place mats with pictures of vegetables were set on tables in school cafeterias, and pre and post intervention phases where willingness to try vegetables as well as cognitive performances were assessed for each child. Results indicated that visual exposure led to an increased consumption of exposed and non-exposed vegetables after the intervention period. Nevertheless, the exposure intervention where vegetables varying in color were shown to children was no more effective. Finally, results showed that an ease of categorization led to a larger impact after the exposure manipulation. The findings suggest that vegetable pictures might help parents to deal with some of the difficulties associated with the introduction of novel vegetables and furthermore that focusing on conceptual development could be an efficient way to tackle food neophobia and pickiness. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Visual Object Detection, Categorization, and Identification Tasks Are Associated with Different Time Courses and Sensitivities

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Rosa, Stephan; Choudhery, Rabia N.; Chatziastros, Astros

    2011-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the recognition of an object's presence and its explicit recognition are temporally closely related. Here we re-examined the time course (using a fine and a coarse temporal resolution) and the sensitivity of three possible component processes of visual object recognition. In particular, participants saw briefly…

  13. Holistic face categorization in higher-level cortical visual areas of the normal and prosopagnosic brain: towards a non-hierarchical view of face perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Rossion

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available How a visual stimulus is initially categorized as a face in a network of human brain areas remains largely unclear. Hierarchical neuro-computational models of face perception assume that the visual stimulus is first decomposed in local parts in lower order visual areas. These parts would then be combined into a global representation in higher order face-sensitive areas of the occipito-temporal cortex. Here we tested this view in fMRI with visual stimuli that are categorized as faces based on their global configuration rather than their local parts (2-tones Mooney figures and Arcimboldo’s facelike paintings. Compared to the same inverted visual stimuli that are not categorized as faces, these stimuli activated the right middle fusiform gyrus (Fusiform face area, FFA and superior temporal sulcus (pSTS, with no significant activation in the posteriorly located inferior occipital gyrus (i.e., no occipital face area, OFA. This observation is strengthened by behavioral and neural evidence for normal face categorization of these stimuli in a brain-damaged prosopagnosic patient (PS whose intact right middle fusiform gyrus and superior temporal sulcus are devoid of any potential face-sensitive inputs from the lesioned right inferior occipital cortex. Together, these observations indicate that face-preferential activation may emerge in higher order visual areas of the right hemisphere without any face-preferential inputs from lower order visual areas, supporting a non-hierarchical view of face perception in the visual cortex.

  14. Creating a classification of image types in the medical literature for visual categorization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Henning; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Demner-Fushman, Dina; Antani, Sameer

    2012-02-01

    Content-based image retrieval (CBIR) from specialized collections has often been proposed for use in such areas as diagnostic aid, clinical decision support, and teaching. The visual retrieval from broad image collections such as teaching files, the medical literature or web images, by contrast, has not yet reached a high maturity level compared to textual information retrieval. Visual image classification into a relatively small number of classes (20-100) on the other hand, has shown to deliver good results in several benchmarks. It is, however, currently underused as a basic technology for retrieval tasks, for example, to limit the search space. Most classification schemes for medical images are focused on specific areas and consider mainly the medical image types (modalities), imaged anatomy, and view, and merge them into a single descriptor or classification hierarchy. Furthermore, they often ignore other important image types such as biological images, statistical figures, flowcharts, and diagrams that frequently occur in the biomedical literature. Most of the current classifications have also been created for radiology images, which are not the only types to be taken into account. With Open Access becoming increasingly widespread particularly in medicine, images from the biomedical literature are more easily available for use. Visual information from these images and knowledge that an image is of a specific type or medical modality could enrich retrieval. This enrichment is hampered by the lack of a commonly agreed image classification scheme. This paper presents a hierarchy for classification of biomedical illustrations with the goal of using it for visual classification and thus as a basis for retrieval. The proposed hierarchy is based on relevant parts of existing terminologies, such as the IRMA-code (Image Retrieval in Medical Applications), ad hoc classifications and hierarchies used in imageCLEF (Image retrieval task at the Cross-Language Evaluation

  15. Modifications of Visual Field Asymmetries for Face Categorization in Early Deaf Adults: A Study With Chimeric Faces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dole, Marjorie; Méary, David; Pascalis, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    Right hemisphere lateralization for face processing is well documented in typical populations. At the behavioral level, this right hemisphere bias is often related to a left visual field (LVF) bias. A conventional mean to study this phenomenon consists of using chimeric faces that are composed of the left and right parts of two faces. In this paradigm, participants generally use the left part of the chimeric face, mostly processed through the right optic tract, to determine its identity, gender or age. To assess the impact of early auditory deprivation on face processing abilities, we tested the LVF bias in a group of early deaf participants and hearing controls. In two experiments, deaf and hearing participants performed a gender categorization task with chimeric and normal average faces. Over the two experiments the results confirmed the presence of a LVF bias in participants, which was less frequent in deaf participants. This result suggested modifications of hemispheric lateralization for face processing in deaf participants. In Experiment 2 we also recorded eye movements to examine whether the LVF bias could be related to face scanning behavior. In this second study, participants performed a similar task while we recorded eye movements using an eye tracking system. Using areas of interest analysis we observed that the proportion of fixations on the mouth relatively to the other areas was increased in deaf participants in comparison with the hearing group. This was associated with a decrease of the proportion of fixations on the eyes. In addition these measures were correlated to the LVF bias suggesting a relationship between the LVF bias and the patterns of facial exploration. Taken together, these results suggest that early auditory deprivation results in plasticity phenomenon affecting the perception of static faces through modifications of hemispheric lateralization and of gaze behavior. PMID:28163692

  16. Automated quantification of 18F-flutemetamol PET activity for categorizing scans as negative or positive for brain amyloid: concordance with visual image reads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurfjell, Lennart; Lilja, Johan; Lundqvist, Roger; Buckley, Chris; Smith, Adrian; Vandenberghe, Rik; Sherwin, Paul

    2014-10-01

    Clinical trials of the PET amyloid imaging agent (18)F-flutemetamol have used visual assessment to classify PET scans as negative or positive for brain amyloid. However, quantification provides additional information about regional and global tracer uptake and may have utility for image assessment over time and across different centers. Using postmortem brain neuritic plaque density data as a truth standard to derive a standardized uptake value ratio (SUVR) threshold, we assessed a fully automated quantification method comparing visual and quantitative scan categorizations. We also compared the histopathology-derived SUVR threshold with one derived from healthy controls. Data from 345 consenting subjects enrolled in 8 prior clinical trials of (18)F-flutemetamol injection were used. We grouped subjects into 3 cohorts: an autopsy cohort (n = 68) comprising terminally ill patients with postmortem confirmation of brain amyloid status; a test cohort (n = 172) comprising 33 patients with clinically probable Alzheimer disease, 80 patients with mild cognitive impairment, and 59 healthy volunteers; and a healthy cohort of 105 volunteers, used to define a reference range for SUVR. Visual image categorizations for comparison were from a previous study. A fully automated PET-only quantification method was used to compute regional neocortical SUVRs that were combined into a single composite SUVR. An SUVR threshold for classifying scans as positive or negative was derived by ranking the PET scans from the autopsy cohort based on their composite SUVR and comparing data with the standard of truth based on postmortem brain amyloid status for subjects in the autopsy cohort. The derived threshold was used to categorize the 172 scans in the test cohort as negative or positive, and results were compared with categorization using visual assessment. Different reference and composite region definitions were assessed. Threshold levels were also compared with corresponding thresholds

  17. The Interplay between Perceptual Organization and Categorization in the Representation of Complex Visual Patterns by Young Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Paul C.; Schyns, Philippe G.; Goldstone, Robert L.

    2006-01-01

    The relation between perceptual organization and categorization processes in 3- and 4-month-olds was explored. The question was whether an invariant part abstracted during category learning could interfere with Gestalt organizational processes. A 2003 study by Quinn and Schyns had reported that an initial category familiarization experience in…

  18. Bayesian and Geostatistical Approaches to Combining Categorical Data Derived from Visual and Digital Processing of Remotely Sensed Images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jingxiong; LI Deren

    2005-01-01

    This paper seeks a synthesis of Bayesian and geostatistical approaches to combining categorical data in the context of remote sensing classification.By experiment with aerial photographs and Landsat TM data, accuracy of spectral, spatial, and combined classification results was evaluated.It was confirmed that the incorporation of spatial information in spectral classification increases accuracy significantly.Secondly, through test with a 5-class and a 3-class classification schemes, it was revealed that setting a proper semantic framework for classification is fundamental to any endeavors of categorical mapping and the most important factor affecting accuracy.Lastly, this paper promotes non-parametric methods for both definition of class membership profiling based on band-specific histograms of image intensities and derivation of spatial probability via indicator kriging, a non-parametric geostatistical technique.

  19. Haptic Identification of Raised-Line Drawings When Categorical Information Is Given: A Comparison between Visually Impaired and Sighted Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Delphine; Albaret, Jean-Michel; Mazella, Anaïs

    2014-01-01

    Research into haptic picture perception has mostly concerned adult participants, and little is known about haptic picture perception in visually impaired and sighted children. In the present study, we compared 13 visually impaired children (early blind and low vision) aged 9-10 years and 13 agematched blindfolded sighted children on their ability…

  20. Sticky Categorizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lagermann, Laila Colding

    2015-01-01

    What are the possibilities and/or limitations in becoming subjects who are differenciated from earlier processes of categorizations that certain students are subjected to? This is the question explored in the analysis of this paper, based on observations of, and narratives and perspectives of two...

  1. Child categorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelman, Susan A; Meyer, Meredith

    2011-01-01

    Categorization is a process that spans all of development, beginning in earliest infancy yet changing as children's knowledge and cognitive skills develop. In this review article, we address three core issues regarding childhood categorization. First, we discuss the extent to which early categories are rooted in perceptual similarity versus knowledge-enriched theories. We argue for a composite perspective in which categories are steeped in commonsense theories from a young age but also are informed by low-level similarity and associative learning cues. Second, we examine the role of language in early categorization. We review evidence to suggest that language is a powerful means of expressing, communicating, shaping, and supporting category knowledge. Finally, we consider categories in context. We discuss sources of variability and flexibility in children's categories, as well as the ways in which children's categories are used within larger knowledge systems (e.g., to form analogies, make inferences, or construct theories). Categorization is a process that is intrinsically tied to nearly all aspects of cognition, and its study provides insight into cognitive development, broadly construed.

  2. Categorical Pullbacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardi Marco

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this article is to introduce the categorical concept of pullback in Mizar. In the first part of this article we redefine homsets, monomorphisms, epimorpshisms and isomorphisms [7] within a free-object category [1] and it is shown there that ordinal numbers can be considered as categories. Then the pullback is introduced in terms of its universal property and the Pullback Lemma is formalized [15]. In the last part of the article we formalize the pullback of functors [14] and it is also shown that it is not possible to write an equivalent definition in the context of the previous Mizar formalization of category theory [8].

  3. Categorically Not!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, K. C.

    2011-04-01

    The artist Bob Miller liked to say that the worst disease afflicting humankind is ``hardening of the categories'' - the tendency to cram subjects into boxes labeled ``science,'' ``art,'' ``politics,'' ``economics,'' ``play'' - labels that are as outdated and meaningless as divisions between the colors on a continuous spectrum. Over the past 10 years, KC Cole has been organizing free form events that tear down these artificial barriers, and with intriguing results: actors gain insights into character from a topologist; a choreographer solves engineering problems through her knowledge of motion; neuroscientists learn about intuition from filmmakers and string theorists. Categorically Not! - as the series is called - is not (merely) an attempt to ``popularize'' science by looking at it through unlikely lenses, but a real exploration into the deep connections that both illuminate and energize all fields of study. It is a ``people's'' salon, free and open to the general public. Cole will talk about how she overcomes ``hardening of the categories'' not just through events, but also in her popular magazine and newspaper articles, books, radio commentaries, and teaching at USC's Annenberg School of Communication and Journalism.

  4. Biases in categorization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Das-Smaal, E.A.

    1990-01-01

    On what grounds can we conclude that an act of categorization is biased? In this chapter, it is contended that in the absence of objective norms of what categories actually are, biases in categorization can only be specified in relation to theoretical understandings of categorization. Therefore, the

  5. Análisis de categorías conceptuales asociadas al tipo de comercial y al efecto del material visual-verbal previo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marithza Sandoval Escobar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Este experimento pretendió identificar el tipo de calificativos asociados a cinco tipos de comerciales: afecto positivo, afecto negativo, humor, informativos - no emocionales y eróticos. Para este efecto se diseñó una tarea en la cual 48 sujetos aplicaron cinco adjetivos a cada uno de veinte (20 comerciales. Se controló el orden de presentación de los comerciales utilizando cuatro secuencias aleatorias distintas y se asignó a los sujetos también aleatoriamente a cada orden de presentación. Adicionalmente se investigó el efecto del tipo de material previo a la prueba. Los resultados mostraron que los comerciales de afecto positivo e informativo en la tarea de selección de calificativos conformaron categorías directas y claramente delimitadas, mientras que los comerciales de afecto negativo, humor y eróticos pertenecían en dicha tarea a categorías difusas con límites yuxtapuestos. No obstante, en las preguntas abiertas, los participantes describieron efectos emocionales fuertes de parte de los comerciales con afecto negativo y amenazantes, así como elaboración del mensaje, los cuales explican que la yuxtaposición se diera con los rótulos asociados con comerciales no emocionales e informativos. El tipo de materialprevio a la exposición del comercial no afectó la tarea posterior. Se concluye que el tipo de emoción manejada en cada comercial afecta la atención del mensaje y que esta comprensión es menor cuando se acude a emociones positivas, humor y erotismo.

  6. A Combination of Bag of Categorized Visual Words and Tag Voting Based Image Retrieval%基于按类视觉词袋模型与标签投票的图像检索

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张旺; 顾晓东; 陆灏源

    2015-01-01

    视觉词袋模型在基于内容的图像检索中已经得到了广泛应用,然而对于自然图像的检索,由于图像目标视角多样、背景复杂、光照多变等原因,传统的视觉词袋模型的检索准确率仍然比较低。提出一种按类视觉词袋模型,即采用按照图像中目标物体的类别进行分组训练视觉词,从而提高视觉词的表征能力,改善检索效果;并根据检索返回图像的标签,以投票方式对查询目标做出判别,辅以标签检索,从而较大地提高了检索结果的准确率。%Bag of visual words model has been wildly adopted for content based image retrieval. However, regarding natural scene image retrieval, traditional bag of visual words model still bears relatively low retrieval precision, in the presence of various and complicated viewing angle, background, and illumination conditions. In this paper, a bag of categorized visual words model is pro-posed. In this model, words are obtained from categorized objects to improve its description ability and therefore improve retrieval accuracy. Thereafter tag voting is also employed to judge the query object from retrieved image, and tag retrieval is auxiliary to im-prove the retrieval performance.

  7. Semantic home video categorization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Hyun-Seok; Lee, Young Bok; De Neve, Wesley; Ro, Yong Man

    2009-02-01

    Nowadays, a strong need exists for the efficient organization of an increasing amount of home video content. To create an efficient system for the management of home video content, it is required to categorize home video content in a semantic way. So far, a significant amount of research has already been dedicated to semantic video categorization. However, conventional categorization approaches often rely on unnecessary concepts and complicated algorithms that are not suited in the context of home video categorization. To overcome the aforementioned problem, this paper proposes a novel home video categorization method that adopts semantic home photo categorization. To use home photo categorization in the context of home video, we segment video content into shots and extract key frames that represent each shot. To extract the semantics from key frames, we divide each key frame into ten local regions and extract lowlevel features. Based on the low level features extracted for each local region, we can predict the semantics of a particular key frame. To verify the usefulness of the proposed home video categorization method, experiments were performed with home video sequences, labeled by concepts part of the MPEG-7 VCE2 dataset. To verify the usefulness of the proposed home video categorization method, experiments were performed with 70 home video sequences. For the home video sequences used, the proposed system produced a recall of 77% and an accuracy of 78%.

  8. Visualization

    OpenAIRE

    Balon, Andreja

    1990-01-01

    The present thesis entails the field of visualization which is divided into visualization along traditional lines and visualization in computer science. As the psychological aspect of image is of vital importance for visualization, it is shortly described in the beginning. Visualization in computer science is divided into three main fields: scientific visualization, program visualization and visual programming. An explanation and examples of approach to applications are given for each field....

  9. Categorizing Video Game Audio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westerberg, Andreas Rytter; Schoenau-Fog, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    This paper dives into the subject of video game audio and how it can be categorized in order to deliver a message to a player in the most precise way. A new categorization, with a new take on the diegetic spaces, can be used a tool of inspiration for sound- and game-designers to rethink how they ...

  10. Ignorability for categorical data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaeger, Manfred

    2005-01-01

    We study the problem of ignorability in likelihood-based inference from incomplete categorical data. Two versions of the coarsened at random assumption (car) are distinguished, their compatibility with the parameter distinctness assumption is investigated and several conditions for ignorability...

  11. Longitudinal categorical data analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Sutradhar, Brajendra C

    2014-01-01

    This is the first book in longitudinal categorical data analysis with parametric correlation models developed based on dynamic relationships among repeated categorical responses. This book is a natural generalization of the longitudinal binary data analysis to the multinomial data setup with more than two categories. Thus, unlike the existing books on cross-sectional categorical data analysis using log linear models, this book uses multinomial probability models both in cross-sectional and longitudinal setups. A theoretical foundation is provided for the analysis of univariate multinomial responses, by developing models systematically for the cases with no covariates as well as categorical covariates, both in cross-sectional and longitudinal setups. In the longitudinal setup, both stationary and non-stationary covariates are considered. These models have also been extended to the bivariate multinomial setup along with suitable covariates. For the inferences, the book uses the generalized quasi-likelihood as w...

  12. Neural Architecture of Auditory Object Categorization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yune-Sang Lee

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We can identify objects by sight or by sound, yet far less is known about auditory object recognition than about visual recognition. Any exemplar of a dog (eg, a picture can be recognized on multiple categorical levels (eg, animal, dog, poodle. Using fMRI combined with machine-learning techniques, we studied these levels of categorization with sounds rather than images. Subjects heard sounds of various animate and inanimate objects, and unrecognizable control sounds. We report four primary findings: (1 some distinct brain regions selectively coded for basic (“dog” versus superordinate (“animal” categorization; (2 classification at the basic level entailed more extended cortical networks than those for superordinate categorization; (3 human voices were recognized far better by multiple brain regions than were any other sound categories; (4 regions beyond temporal lobe auditory areas were able to distinguish and categorize auditory objects. We conclude that multiple representations of an object exist at different categorical levels. This neural instantiation of object categories is distributed across multiple brain regions, including so-called “visual association areas,” indicating that these regions support object knowledge even when the input is auditory. Moreover, our findings appear to conflict with prior well-established theories of category-specific modules in the brain.

  13. Population Code Dynamics in Categorical Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajima, Chihiro I; Tajima, Satohiro; Koida, Kowa; Komatsu, Hidehiko; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Suzuki, Hideyuki

    2016-03-03

    Categorical perception is a ubiquitous function in sensory information processing, and is reported to have important influences on the recognition of presented and/or memorized stimuli. However, such complex interactions among categorical perception and other aspects of sensory processing have not been explained well in a unified manner. Here, we propose a recurrent neural network model to process categorical information of stimuli, which approximately realizes a hierarchical Bayesian estimation on stimuli. The model accounts for a wide variety of neurophysiological and cognitive phenomena in a consistent framework. In particular, the reported complexity of categorical effects, including (i) task-dependent modulation of neural response, (ii) clustering of neural population representation, (iii) temporal evolution of perceptual color memory, and (iv) a non-uniform discrimination threshold, are explained as different aspects of a single model. Moreover, we directly examine key model behaviors in the monkey visual cortex by analyzing neural population dynamics during categorization and discrimination of color stimuli. We find that the categorical task causes temporally-evolving biases in the neuronal population representations toward the focal colors, which supports the proposed model. These results suggest that categorical perception can be achieved by recurrent neural dynamics that approximates optimal probabilistic inference in the changing environment.

  14. Supervised learning algorithms for visual object categorization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    bin Abdullah, A.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis presents novel techniques for image recognition systems for better understanding image content. More specifically, it looks at the algorithmic aspects and experimental verification to demonstrate the capability of the proposed algorithms. These techniques aim to improve the three major

  15. Modeling human color categorization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, Egon; Schouten, Th.E.; Kisters, P.M.F.

    2008-01-01

    A unique color space segmentation method is introduced. It is founded on features of human cognition, where 11 color categories are used in processing color. In two experiments, human subjects were asked to categorize color stimuli into these 11 color categories, which resulted in markers for a Colo

  16. Modeling human color categorization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, Egon; Schouten, Th.E.; Kisters, P.M.F.

    A unique color space segmentation method is introduced. It is founded on features of human cognition, where 11 color categories are used in processing color. In two experiments, human subjects were asked to categorize color stimuli into these 11 color categories, which resulted in markers for a

  17. Learning Context for Text Categorization

    CERN Document Server

    Haribhakta, Y V

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes our work which is based on discovering context for text document categorization. The document categorization approach is derived from a combination of a learning paradigm known as relation extraction and an technique known as context discovery. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our categorization approach using reuters 21578 dataset and synthetic real world data from sports domain. Our experimental results indicate that the learned context greatly improves the categorization performance as compared to traditional categorization approaches.

  18. Categorical database generalization in GIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Y.

    2002-01-01

    Key words: Categorical database, categorical database generalization, Formal data structure, constraints, transformation unit, classification hierarchy, aggregation hierarchy, semantic similarity, data model, Delaunay triangulation

  19. Research of Web Pages Categorization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhongda Lin; Kun Deng; Yanfen Hong

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss several issues related to automated classification of web pages, especially text classification of web pages. We analyze features selection and categorization algorithms of web pages and give some suggestions for web pages categorization.

  20. Categorization of birds, mammals, and chimeras by pigeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Robert G; Wright, Anthony A; Drachman, Eric E

    2013-02-01

    Identifying critical features that control categorization of complex polymorphous pictures by animals remains a challenging and important problem. Toward this goal, experiments were conducted to isolate the properties controlling the categorization of two pictorial categories by pigeons. Pigeons were trained in a go/no-go task to categorize black and white line drawings of birds and mammals. They were then tested with a variety of familiar and novel exemplars of these categories to examine the features controlling this categorization. These tests suggested the pigeons were segregating and using the principal axis of orientation of the animal figures as the primary means of discriminating each category, although other categorical and item-specific cues were likely involved. This perceptual/cognitive reduction of the categorical stimulus space to a few visual features or dimensions is likely a characteristic of this species' processing of complex pictorial discrimination problems and is a critical property for theoretical accounts of this behavior.

  1. Categorical Tensor Network States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob D. Biamonte

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We examine the use of string diagrams and the mathematics of category theory in the description of quantum states by tensor networks. This approach lead to a unification of several ideas, as well as several results and methods that have not previously appeared in either side of the literature. Our approach enabled the development of a tensor network framework allowing a solution to the quantum decomposition problem which has several appealing features. Specifically, given an n-body quantum state |ψ〉, we present a new and general method to factor |ψ〉 into a tensor network of clearly defined building blocks. We use the solution to expose a previously unknown and large class of quantum states which we prove can be sampled efficiently and exactly. This general framework of categorical tensor network states, where a combination of generic and algebraically defined tensors appear, enhances the theory of tensor network states.

  2. Categorization of Radioxenon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, Paul E.

    2012-04-26

    This report summarizes a study into some false positive issues in the use of radioxenon as a method to verify a clandestine nuclear weapons explosion. False positives arise due to similarities between the radioxenon signature generated in medical isotope production and that generated in a nuclear weapon explosion. This report also discusses how to categorize the radioxenon by levels of urgency for manual analysis and interpretation and recommends applying machine learning and time series analysis techniques in the automation of radioxenon characterization. The literature indicates that medical isotope production is a major contributor to atmospheric radioxenon and is the main source of confusion in determining the source of radioxenon. While radioxenon emissions from nuclear power plants can be distinguished from that from nuclear weapon explosions, emissions from medical isotope production generate signatures similar to certain nuclide ratios found in nuclear weapons explosions. Different techniques for analyzing nuclide concentrations and ratios as well as including other sensing modalities via sensor fusion are discussed.

  3. Probabilistic Event Categorization

    CERN Document Server

    Wiebe, J; Duan, L; Wiebe, Janyce; Bruce, Rebecca; Duan, Lei

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the automation of a new text categorization task. The categories assigned in this task are more syntactically, semantically, and contextually complex than those typically assigned by fully automatic systems that process unseen test data. Our system for assigning these categories is a probabilistic classifier, developed with a recent method for formulating a probabilistic model from a predefined set of potential features. This paper focuses on feature selection. It presents a number of fully automatic features. It identifies and evaluates various approaches to organizing collocational properties into features, and presents the results of experiments covarying type of organization and type of property. We find that one organization is not best for all kinds of properties, so this is an experimental parameter worth investigating in NLP systems. In addition, the results suggest a way to take advantage of properties that are low frequency but strongly indicative of a class. The problems of rec...

  4. Categorical organization in free recall across culture and age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutchess, Angela H; Yoon, Carolyn; Luo, Ting; Feinberg, Fred; Hedden, Trey; Jing, Qicheng; Nisbett, Richard E; Park, Denise C

    2006-01-01

    Cross-cultural differences in cognition suggest that Westerners use categories more than Easterners, but these differences have only been investigated in young adults. The contributions of cognitive resource and the extent of cultural exposure are explored for free recall by investigating cross-cultural differences in categorical organization in younger and older adults. Cultural differences in the use of categories should be larger for elderly than young because categorization is a well-practiced strategy for Westerners, but age-related cognitive resource limitations may make the strategy difficult for elderly Easterners to implement. Therefore, we expect that cultural differences in categorization will be magnified in elderly adults relative to younger adults, with Americans categorizing more than Chinese. Across two studies, 112 young and 112 elderly drawn from two cultures (American and Chinese) encoded words presented in their native language. One word list contained categorically-unrelated words and the other, categorically-related words; both lists were presented in the participants' native language. In experiment 1, the words were strong category associates, and in experiment 2, the words were weak category associates. Participants recalled all the words they could remember, and the number of words recalled and degree of clustering by category were analyzed. As predicted, cultural differences emerged for the elderly, with East-Asians using categories less than Americans during recall of highly-associated category exemplars (experiment 1). For recall of low-associate exemplars, East-Asians overall categorized less than Americans (experiment 2). Surprisingly, these differences in the use of categories did not lead to cultural differences in the number of words recalled. The expected effects of age were apparent with elderly recalling less than young, but in contrast to previous studies, elderly also categorized less than young. These studies provide support

  5. Analysis of Ordinal Categorical Data

    CERN Document Server

    Agresti, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Statistical science's first coordinated manual of methods for analyzing ordered categorical data, now fully revised and updated, continues to present applications and case studies in fields as diverse as sociology, public health, ecology, marketing, and pharmacy. Analysis of Ordinal Categorical Data, Second Edition provides an introduction to basic descriptive and inferential methods for categorical data, giving thorough coverage of new developments and recent methods. Special emphasis is placed on interpretation and application of methods including an integrated comparison of the available st

  6. Students' Categorizations of Organic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domin, Daniel S.; Al-Masum, Mohammad; Mensah, John

    2008-01-01

    Categorization is a fundamental psychological ability necessary for problem solving and many other higher-level cognitive tasks. In organic chemistry, students must establish groupings of different chemical compounds in order not only to solve problems, but also to understand course content. Classic models of categorization emphasize similarity as…

  7. Haptic categorical perception of shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaißert, Nina; Waterkamp, Steffen; Fleming, Roland W; Bülthoff, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    Categorization and categorical perception have been extensively studied, mainly in vision and audition. In the haptic domain, our ability to categorize objects has also been demonstrated in earlier studies. Here we show for the first time that categorical perception also occurs in haptic shape perception. We generated a continuum of complex shapes by morphing between two volumetric objects. Using similarity ratings and multidimensional scaling we ensured that participants could haptically discriminate all objects equally. Next, we performed classification and discrimination tasks. After a short training with the two shape categories, both tasks revealed categorical perception effects. Training leads to between-category expansion resulting in higher discriminability of physical differences between pairs of stimuli straddling the category boundary. Thus, even brief training can alter haptic representations of shape. This suggests that the weights attached to various haptic shape features can be changed dynamically in response to top-down information about class membership.

  8. The Psychophysics of Categorical Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macmillan, Neil A.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the relation between discrimination and identification performance, particularly with regard to experiments with speech and other signals used to draw a distinction between continuous and categorical perception. Offers three main arguments. (Author/RK)

  9. Humanizing Outgroups Through Multiple Categorization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prati, Francesca; Crisp, Richard J.; Meleady, Rose; Rubini, Monica

    2016-01-01

    In three studies, we examined the impact of multiple categorization on intergroup dehumanization. Study 1 showed that perceiving members of a rival university along multiple versus simple categorical dimensions enhanced the tendency to attribute human traits to this group. Study 2 showed that multiple versus simple categorization of immigrants increased the attribution of uniquely human emotions to them. This effect was explained by the sequential mediation of increased individuation of the outgroup and reduced outgroup threat. Study 3 replicated this sequential mediation model and introduced a novel way of measuring humanization in which participants generated attributes corresponding to the outgroup in a free response format. Participants generated more uniquely human traits in the multiple versus simple categorization conditions. We discuss the theoretical implications of these findings and consider their role in informing and improving efforts to ameliorate contemporary forms of intergroup discrimination. PMID:26984016

  10. Modeling learned categorical perception in human vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Matthew C; Sowden, Paul T

    2012-09-01

    A long standing debate in cognitive neuroscience has been the extent to which perceptual processing is influenced by prior knowledge and experience with a task. A converging body of evidence now supports the view that a task does influence perceptual processing, leaving us with the challenge of understanding the locus of, and mechanisms underpinning, these influences. An exemplar of this influence is learned categorical perception (CP), in which there is superior perceptual discrimination of stimuli that are placed in different categories. Psychophysical experiments on humans have attempted to determine whether early cortical stages of visual analysis change as a result of learning a categorization task. However, while some results indicate that changes in visual analysis occur, the extent to which earlier stages of processing are changed is still unclear. To explore this issue, we develop a biologically motivated neural model of hierarchical vision processes consisting of a number of interconnected modules representing key stages of visual analysis, with each module learning to exhibit desired local properties through competition. With this system level model, we evaluate whether a CP effect can be generated with task influence to only the later stages of visual analysis. Our model demonstrates that task learning in just the later stages is sufficient for the model to exhibit the CP effect, demonstrating the existence of a mechanism that requires only a high-level of task influence. However, the effect generalizes more widely than is found with human participants, suggesting that changes to earlier stages of analysis may also be involved in the human CP effect, even if these are not fundamental to the development of CP. The model prompts a hybrid account of task-based influences on perception that involves both modifications to the use of the outputs from early perceptual analysis along with the possibility of changes to the nature of that early analysis itself

  11. Unstructured Documents Categorization: A Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debnath Bhattacharyya

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of communication is to transfer information from onecorner to another of the world. The information is basically stored in forms of documents or files created on the basis of requirements. So, the randomness of creation and storage makes them unstructured in nature. As a consequence, data retrieval and modification become hard nut to crack. The data, that is required frequently, should maintain certain pattern. Otherwise, problems like retrievingerroneous data or anomalies in modification or time consumption in retrieving process may hike. As every problem has its own solution, these unstructured documents have also given the solution named unstructured document categorization. That means, the collected unstructured documents will be categorized based on some given constraints. This paper is a review which deals with different techniques like text and data mining, genetic algorithm, lexicalchaining, binarization method to reach the fulfillment of desired unstructured document categorization appeared in the literature.

  12. Categorization in the Affective Domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sauciuc, Gabriela-Alina

    2011-01-01

    Data collected in Romance and Scandinavian languages (N=474) in a superordinate category name production task indicate that a multiple-strategy approach would be more suitable for accounting of categorization in the affective domain instead of a prototype approach as suggested by previous studies...

  13. Latent Scope Bias in Categorization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Stangor, Lynch, Duan, & Glass, 1992; Tajfel , Billig, Bundy, & Claude, 1971), as well as broader aspects of judgment and decision making (for a review, see...Psychology, 207–218. Tajfel , H., Billig, M. G., Bundy, R. P., & Claude, F. (1971). Social categorization and inter- group behavior. European Journal of

  14. Colour displays for categorical images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glasbey, C.; Heijden, van der G.W.A.M.; Toh, V.F.K.; Gray, A.J.

    2007-01-01

    We propose a method for identifying a set of colours for displaying 2D and 3D categorical images when the categories are unordered labels. The principle is to find maximally distinct sets of colours. We either generate colours sequentially, to maximize the dissimilarity or distance between a new col

  15. Categorical perception of tactile distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Frances Le Cornu; Longo, Matthew R; Bremner, Andrew J

    2014-05-01

    The tactile surface forms a continuous sheet covering the body. And yet, the perceived distance between two touches varies across stimulation sites. Perceived tactile distance is larger when stimuli cross over the wrist, compared to when both fall on either the hand or the forearm. This effect could reflect a categorical distortion of tactile space across body-part boundaries (in which stimuli crossing the wrist boundary are perceptually elongated) or may simply reflect a localised increased in acuity surrounding anatomical landmarks (in which stimuli near the wrist are perceptually elongated). We tested these two interpretations across two experiments, by comparing a well-documented bias to perceive mediolateral tactile distances across the forearm/hand as larger than proximodistal ones along the forearm/hand at three different sites (hand, wrist, and forearm). According to the 'categorical' interpretation, tactile distances should be elongated selectively in the proximodistal axis thus reducing the anisotropy. According to the 'localised acuity' interpretation, distances will be perceptually elongated in the vicinity of the wrist regardless of orientation, leading to increased overall size without affecting anisotropy. Consistent with the categorical account, we found a reduction in the magnitude of anisotropy at the wrist, with no evidence of a corresponding localised increase in precision. These findings demonstrate that we reference touch to a representation of the body that is categorically segmented into discrete parts, which consequently influences the perception of tactile distance.

  16. Atomic toposes and countable categoricity

    OpenAIRE

    Caramello, Olivia

    2008-01-01

    We give a model-theoretic characterization of the class of geometric theories classified by an atomic topos having enough points; in particular, we show that every complete geometric theory classified by an atomic topos is countably categorical. Some applications are also discussed.

  17. Comparison of Text Categorization Algorithms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Yong-feng; ZHAO Yan-ping

    2004-01-01

    This paper summarizes several automatic text categorization algorithms in common use recently, analyzes and compares their advantages and disadvantages.It provides clues for making use of appropriate automatic classifying algorithms in different fields.Finally some evaluations and summaries of these algorithms are discussed, and directions to further research have been pointed out.

  18. 36 CFR 907.10 - Categorical exclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Categorical exclusion. 907.10... ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY § 907.10 Categorical exclusion. The CEQ Regulations provide for the categorical exclusion... administrative operations of the Corporation. (b) List of categorical exclusions. Categories of...

  19. Gaze categorization under uncertainty: psychophysics and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mareschal, Isabelle; Calder, Andrew J; Dadds, Mark R; Clifford, Colin W G

    2013-04-22

    The accurate perception of another person's gaze direction underlies most social interactions and provides important information about his or her future intentions. As a first step to measuring gaze perception, most experiments determine the range of gaze directions that observers judge as being direct: the cone of direct gaze. This measurement has revealed the flexibility of observers' perception of gaze and provides a useful benchmark against which to test clinical populations with abnormal gaze behavior. Here, we manipulated effective signal strength by adding noise to the eyes of synthetic face stimuli or removing face information. We sought to move beyond a descriptive account of gaze categorization by fitting a model to the data that relies on changing the uncertainty associated with an estimate of gaze direction as a function of the signal strength. This model accounts for all the data and provides useful insight into the visual processes underlying normal gaze perception.

  20. Beyond the Distributional Input? A Developmental Investigation of Asymmetry in Infants' Categorization of Cats and Dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furrer, Stephanie D.; Younger, Barbara A.

    2005-01-01

    Two experiments are reported using a visual familiarization categorization procedure. In both experiments, infants were familiarized with sets of stimuli previously shown to contain asymmetric feature distributions that support an asymmetry in young infants' categorization of cats and dogs (i.e. infants' cat category excludes dogs but their dog…

  1. Categorical Algebra and its Applications

    CERN Document Server

    1988-01-01

    Categorical algebra and its applications contain several fundamental papers on general category theory, by the top specialists in the field, and many interesting papers on the applications of category theory in functional analysis, algebraic topology, algebraic geometry, general topology, ring theory, cohomology, differential geometry, group theory, mathematical logic and computer sciences. The volume contains 28 carefully selected and refereed papers, out of 96 talks delivered, and illustrates the usefulness of category theory today as a powerful tool of investigation in many other areas.

  2. Categorical perception of tactile distance

    OpenAIRE

    Knight, F. L. C.; Longo, M. R.; Bremner, A.J.

    2014-01-01

    The tactile surface forms a continuous sheet covering the body. And yet, the perceived distance between two touches varies across stimulation sites. Perceived tactile distance is larger when stimuli cross over the wrist, compared to when both fall on either the hand or the forearm. This effect could reflect a categorical distortion of tactile space across body-part boundaries (in which stimuli crossing the wrist boundary are perceptually elongated) or may simply reflect a localised increased ...

  3. Categorization and category effects in normal object recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerlach, Christian; Law, I; Gade, A

    2000-01-01

    ). The object decision tasks were associated with activation of areas involved in structural processing (fusiform gyri, right inferior frontal gyrus). In contrast, the categorization tasks were associated with activation of the left inferior temporal gyrus, a structure believed to be involved in semantic......To investigate the neural correlates of the structural and semantic stages of visual object recognition and to see whether any effects of category could be found at these stages, we compared the rCBF associated with two categorization tasks (subjects decided whether pictures represented artefacts...... or natural objects), and two object decision tasks (subjects decided whether pictures represented real objects or nonobjects). The categorization tasks differed from each other in that the items presented in the critical scan window were drawn primarily from the category of artefacts in the one task and from...

  4. Categorization of natural dynamic audiovisual scenes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olli Rummukainen

    Full Text Available This work analyzed the perceptual attributes of natural dynamic audiovisual scenes. We presented thirty participants with 19 natural scenes in a similarity categorization task, followed by a semi-structured interview. The scenes were reproduced with an immersive audiovisual display. Natural scene perception has been studied mainly with unimodal settings, which have identified motion as one of the most salient attributes related to visual scenes, and sound intensity along with pitch trajectories related to auditory scenes. However, controlled laboratory experiments with natural multimodal stimuli are still scarce. Our results show that humans pay attention to similar perceptual attributes in natural scenes, and a two-dimensional perceptual map of the stimulus scenes and perceptual attributes was obtained in this work. The exploratory results show the amount of movement, perceived noisiness, and eventfulness of the scene to be the most important perceptual attributes in naturalistically reproduced real-world urban environments. We found the scene gist properties openness and expansion to remain as important factors in scenes with no salient auditory or visual events. We propose that the study of scene perception should move forward to understand better the processes behind multimodal scene processing in real-world environments. We publish our stimulus scenes as spherical video recordings and sound field recordings in a publicly available database.

  5. Learning shapes spatiotemporal brain patterns for flexible categorical decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sheng; Mayhew, Stephen D; Kourtzi, Zoe

    2012-10-01

    Learning is thought to facilitate our ability to perform complex perceptual tasks and optimize brain circuits involved in decision making. However, little is known about the experience-dependent mechanisms in the human brain that support our ability to make fine categorical judgments. Previous work has focused on identifying spatial brain patterns (i.e., areas) that change with learning. Here, we take advantage of the complementary high spatial and temporal resolution of simultaneous electroencephalography-functional magnetic resonance imaging (EEG-fMRI) to identify the spatiotemporal dynamics between cortical networks involved in flexible category learning. Observers were trained to use different decision criteria (i.e., category boundaries) when making fine categorical judgments on morphed stimuli (i.e., radial vs. concentric patterns). Our findings demonstrate that learning acts on a feedback-based circuit that supports fine categorical judgments. Experience-dependent changes in the behavioral decision criterion were associated with changes in later perceptual processes engaging higher occipitotemporal and frontoparietal circuits. In contrast, category learning did not modulate early processes in a medial frontotemporal network that are thought to support the coarse interpretation of visual scenes. These findings provide evidence that learning flexible criteria for fine categorical judgments acts on distinct spatiotemporal brain circuits and shapes the readout of sensory signals that provide evidence for categorical decisions.

  6. Detecting categorical perception in continuous discrimination data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boersma, P.; Chládková, K.

    2010-01-01

    We present a method for assessing categorical perception from continuous discrimination data. Until recently, categorical perception of speech has exclusively been measured by discrimination and identification experiments with a small number of repeatedly presented stimuli. Experiments by Rogers and

  7. Content-Based Video Description for Automatic Video Genre Categorization

    OpenAIRE

    Ionescu, Bogdan; Seyerlehner, Klaus; Rasche, Christoph; Vertan, Constantin; Lambert, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    International audience; In this paper, we propose an audio-visual approach to video genre categorization. Audio information is extracted at block-level, which has the advantage of capturing local temporal information. At temporal structural level, we asses action contents with respect to human perception. Further, color perception is quantified with statistics of color distribution, elementary hues, color properties and relationship of color. The last category of descriptors determines statis...

  8. Decision Making Under Uncertain Categorization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Ying-Fen Chen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Two experiments investigated how category information is used in decision making under uncertainty and whether the framing of category information influences how it is used. Subjects were presented with vignettes in which the categorization of a critical item was ambiguous and were asked to choose among a set of actions with the goal of attaining the desired outcome for the main character in the story. The normative decision making strategy was to base the decision on all possible categories; however, research on a related topic, category-based induction, has found that people often only consider a single category when making predictions when categorization is uncertain. These experiments found that subjects tend to consider multiple categories when making decisions, but do so both when it is and is not appropriate, suggesting that use of multiple categories is not driven by an understanding of what categories are and are not relevant to the decision. Similarly, although a framing manipulation increased the rate of multiple-category use, it did so in situations in which multiple-category use was and was not appropriate.

  9. 12 CFR 1815.110 - Categorical exclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Categorical exclusion. 1815.110 Section 1815... ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY § 1815.110 Categorical exclusion. The CEQ regulations provide for the categorical exclusion of actions that do not individually or cumulatively have a significant effect on the...

  10. 40 CFR 1508.4 - Categorical exclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Categorical exclusion. 1508.4 Section 1508.4 Protection of Environment COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY TERMINOLOGY AND INDEX § 1508.4 Categorical exclusion. Categorical exclusion means a category of actions which do not individually...

  11. ERPs to laterally presented pictures and words in a semantic categorization task.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Kok; A.J. Rooyakkers

    1986-01-01

    Recorded event-related potentials (ERPs) from 10 adult males reacting to visual stimuli (pictures or words) presented in the left and right visual fields. Ss were instructed to match these stimuli on the basis of physical or categorical identity with stimuli of a previously presented memory list. ER

  12. Emotion categorization using affective-pLSA model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuoyan; Xu, De; Feng, Songhe

    2010-12-01

    Emotion categorization of natural scene images represents a very useful task for automatic image analysis systems. Psychological experiments have shown that visual information at the emotion level is aggregated according to a set of rules. Hence, we attempt to discover the emotion descriptors based on the composition of visual word representation. First, the composition of visual word representation models each image as a matrix, where elements record the correlations of pairwise visual words. In this way, an image collection is modeled as a third-order tensor. Then we discover the emotion descriptors using a novel affective-probabilistic latent semantic analysis (affective-pLSA) model, which is an extension of the pLSA model, on this tensor representation. Considering that the natural scene image may evoke multiple emotional feelings, emotion categorization is carried out using the multilabel k-nearest-neighbor approach based on emotion descriptors. The proposed approach has been tested on the International Affective Picture System and a collection of social images from the Flickr website. The experimental results have demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed method for eliciting image emotions.

  13. Ensembles of Novel Visual Keywords Descriptors for Image Categorization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdullah, Azizi; Veltkamp, Remco C.; Wiering, Marco

    2010-01-01

    Object recognition systems need effective image descriptors to obtain good performance levels. Currently, the most widely used image descriptor is the SIFT descriptor that computes histograms of orientation gradients around points in an image. A possible problem of this approach is that the number

  14. Visuo-haptic multisensory object recognition, categorization, and representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacey, Simon; Sathian, K.

    2014-01-01

    Visual and haptic unisensory object processing show many similarities in terms of categorization, recognition, and representation. In this review, we discuss how these similarities contribute to multisensory object processing. In particular, we show that similar unisensory visual and haptic representations lead to a shared multisensory representation underlying both cross-modal object recognition and view-independence. This shared representation suggests a common neural substrate and we review several candidate brain regions, previously thought to be specialized for aspects of visual processing, that are now known also to be involved in analogous haptic tasks. Finally, we lay out the evidence for a model of multisensory object recognition in which top-down and bottom-up pathways to the object-selective lateral occipital complex are modulated by object familiarity and individual differences in object and spatial imagery. PMID:25101014

  15. Enhanced HMAX model with feedforward feature learning for multiclass categorization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinlin eLi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the interdisciplinary research between neuroscience and computer vision has promoted the development in both fields. Many biologically inspired visual models are proposed, and among them, the Hierarchical Max-pooling model (HMAX is a feedforward model mimicking the structures and functions of V1 to posterior inferotemporal (PIT layer of the primate visual cortex, which could generate a series of position- and scale- invariant features. However, it could be improved with attention modulation and memory processing, which are two important properties of the primate visual cortex. Thus, in this paper, based on recent biological research on the primate visual cortex, we still mimic the first 100-150 milliseconds of visual cognition to enhance the HMAX model, which mainly focuses on the unsupervised feedforward feature learning process. The main modifications are as follows: 1 To mimic the attention modulation mechanism of V1 layer, a bottom-up saliency map is computed in the S1 layer of the HMAX model, which can support the initial feature extraction for memory processing; 2 To mimic the learning, clustering and short-term memory to long-term memory conversion abilities of V2 and IT, an unsupervised iterative clustering method is used to learn clusters with multiscale middle level patches, which are taken as long-term memory; 3 Inspired by the multiple feature encoding mode of the primate visual cortex, information including color, orientation, and spatial position are encoded in different layers of the HMAX model progressively. By adding a softmax layer at the top of the model, multiclass categorization experiments can be conducted, and the results on Caltech101 show that the enhanced model with a smaller memory size exhibits higher accuracy than the original HMAX model, and could also achieve better accuracy than other unsupervised feature learning methods in multiclass categorization task.

  16. Hierarchical document categorization using associative networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloom, Niels; Theune, Mariet; de Jong, Franciska M.G.; Klement, E.P.; Borutzky, W.; Fahringer, T.; Hamza, M.H.; Uskov, V.

    Associative networks are a connectionist language model with the ability to handle dynamic data. We used two associative networks to categorize random sets of related Wikipedia articles with only their raw text as input. We then compared the resulting categorization to a gold standard: the manual

  17. 32 CFR 989.13 - Categorical exclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Categorical exclusion. 989.13 Section 989.13 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ANALYSIS PROCESS (EIAP) § 989.13 Categorical exclusion. (a) CATEXs define those...

  18. An Intelligent System For Arabic Text Categorization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Syiam, M.M.; Tolba, Mohamed F.; Fayed, Z.T.; Abdel-Wahab, Mohamed S.; Ghoniemy, Said A.; Habib, Mena Badieh

    Text Categorization (classification) is the process of classifying documents into a predefined set of categories based on their content. In this paper, an intelligent Arabic text categorization system is presented. Machine learning algorithms are used in this system. Many algorithms for stemming and

  19. Measuring Category Intuitiveness in Unconstrained Categorization Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothos, Emmanuel M.; Perlman, Amotz; Bailey, Todd M.; Kurtz, Ken; Edwards, Darren J.; Hines, Peter; McDonnell, John V.

    2011-01-01

    What makes a category seem natural or intuitive? In this paper, an unsupervised categorization task was employed to examine observer agreement concerning the categorization of nine different stimulus sets. The stimulus sets were designed to capture different intuitions about classification structure. The main empirical index of category…

  20. Dissociating Attention Effects from Categorical Perception with ERP Functional Microstates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dering, Benjamin; Donaldson, David I.

    2016-01-01

    When faces appear in our visual environment we naturally attend to them, possibly to the detriment of other visual information. Evidence from behavioural studies suggests that faces capture attention because they are more salient than other types of visual stimuli, reflecting a category-dependent modulation of attention. By contrast, neuroimaging data has led to a domain-specific account of face perception that rules out the direct contribution of attention, suggesting a dedicated neural network for face perception. Here we sought to dissociate effects of attention from categorical perception using Event Related Potentials. Participants viewed physically matched face and butterfly images, with each category acting as a target stimulus during different blocks in an oddball paradigm. Using a data-driven approach based on functional microstates, we show that the locus of endogenous attention effects with ERPs occurs in the N1 time range. Earlier categorical effects were also found around the level of the P1, reflecting either an exogenous increase in attention towards face stimuli, or a putative face-selective measure. Both category and attention effects were dissociable from one another hinting at the role that faces may play in early capturing of attention before top-down control of attention is observed. Our data support the conclusion that certain object categories, in this experiment, faces, may capture attention before top-down voluntary control of attention is initiated. PMID:27657921

  1. Study on Compatibility Laws of Siwu Decoction Categorized Formulae by 3-dimension Visualization Data Mining%基于三维图形化数据挖掘方法的四物汤类方配伍规律研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尚尔鑫; 范欣生; 段金廒; 唐于平

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To study on the compatibility characters of Siwu decoction categorized formulae for different Xueyu Zheng. The common elements of nature, flavor, channel tropism and effects from drugs in formulae were to be discovered. Method: Based on the 2-dimension (2D) visualization methods and formulae information database, the 3-dimension (3D) methods were developed and applied in this study. Result: Some common characters among categorized formulae were found by comparing different formulae information graphs for different Xuexu Xueyu Zheng. The drugs in formulae often had pungent, sweet and warm in flavor and nature. And these drugs most followed liver, heart and spleen channel tropism. Conclusion: The 3D visualization mining methods were verified suitable for the traditional Chinese medicine formulae data mining research.%目的:研究用于不同血瘀证证型的四物汤类方的配伍特点,从组方药物性味归经及功效等属性研究各类方之间的共同特征.方法:在本实验室开发的二维方剂图形化挖掘方法的基础上,进一步增加了药物的功效属性,分别以性味、归经、功效属性为坐标,将方剂信息表现在三维图形上.分别将用于各类血瘀证型的方剂转化为三维图形,并寻找各类血瘀证型方剂对图形中的共同节点,分析四物汤类方治疗血瘀证的用药特点.结果:通过适用于不同证型的各类方间的三维方剂图形比较,发现了部分四物汤类方治疗血虚血瘀证的部分共同特征.组方药味性味以辛、甘、温为多,大多归肝、心、脾经,功效以补血、活血、止痛为主.这类节点在各证型类方中均出现较多,平均每方出现0.5~1.5次.这些节点可代表四物汤类方治疗血瘀证的一般特点.与传统理论相符.结论:三维图形化数据挖掘方法具有直观、形象的特点,便于从复杂数据中发现规律,非常适用于类方数据挖掘研究.

  2. Text Categorization with Latent Dirichlet Allocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZLACKÝ Daniel

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the text categorization of Slovak text corpora using latent Dirichlet allocation. Our goal is to build text subcorpora that contain similar text documents. We want to use these better organized text subcorpora to build more robust language models that can be used in the area of speech recognition systems. Our previous research in the area of text categorization showed that we can achieve better results with categorized text corpora. In this paper we used latent Dirichlet allocation for text categorization. We divided initial text corpus into 2, 5, 10, 20 or 100 subcorpora with various iterations and save steps. Language models were built on these subcorpora and adapted with linear interpolation to judicial domain. The experiment results showed that text categorization using latent Dirichlet allocation can improve the system for automatic speech recognition by creating the language models from organized text corpora.

  3. NICE: A Computational Solution to Close the Gap from Colour Perception to Colour Categorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parraga, C Alejandro; Akbarinia, Arash

    2016-01-01

    The segmentation of visible electromagnetic radiation into chromatic categories by the human visual system has been extensively studied from a perceptual point of view, resulting in several colour appearance models. However, there is currently a void when it comes to relate these results to the physiological mechanisms that are known to shape the pre-cortical and cortical visual pathway. This work intends to begin to fill this void by proposing a new physiologically plausible model of colour categorization based on Neural Isoresponsive Colour Ellipsoids (NICE) in the cone-contrast space defined by the main directions of the visual signals entering the visual cortex. The model was adjusted to fit psychophysical measures that concentrate on the categorical boundaries and are consistent with the ellipsoidal isoresponse surfaces of visual cortical neurons. By revealing the shape of such categorical colour regions, our measures allow for a more precise and parsimonious description, connecting well-known early visual processing mechanisms to the less understood phenomenon of colour categorization. To test the feasibility of our method we applied it to exemplary images and a popular ground-truth chart obtaining labelling results that are better than those of current state-of-the-art algorithms.

  4. Graphics and statistics for cardiology: comparing categorical and continuous variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Kenneth; Lumley, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Graphs are a standard tool for succinctly describing data, and play a crucial role supporting statistical analyses of that data. However, all too often, graphical display of data in submitted manuscripts is either inappropriate for the task at hand or poorly executed, requiring revision prior to publication. To assist authors, in this paper, we present several forms of graph, for data typically seen in Heart, including dot charts, violin plots, histograms and boxplots for quantitative data, and mosaic plots and bar charts for categorical data. Justification for using these specific plots is drawn from the literature on visual perception; we also provide software instruction and examples, using various popular packages.

  5. Intercepting the first pass: rapid categorization is suppressed for unseen stimuli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisandro Nicolas Kaunitz

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The operations and processes that the human brain employs to achieve fast visual categorizationremain a matter of debate. A first issue concerns the timing and place of rapid visual categorizationand to what extent it can be performed with an early feed-forward pass of information throughthe visual system. A second issue involves the categorization of stimuli that do not reach visualawareness. There is disagreement over the degree to which these stimuli activate the same earlymechanisms as stimuli that are consciously perceived. We employed continuous flash suppression,EEG recordings and machine learning techniques to study visual categorization of seen and unseenstimuli. Our classifiers were able to predict from the EEG recordings the category of stimuli onseen trials but not on unseen trials. Rapid categorization of conscious images could be detectedaround 100 ms on the occipital electrodes, consistent with a fast, feed-forward mechanism of targetdetection. For the invisible stimuli, however, continuous flash suppression eliminated all traces ofearly processing. Our results support the idea of a fast mechanism of categorization and suggestthat this early categorization process plays an important role in later, more subtle categorizationsand perceptual processes.

  6. Space Structure and Clustering of Categorical Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yuhua; Li, Feijiang; Liang, Jiye; Liu, Bing; Dang, Chuangyin

    2016-10-01

    Learning from categorical data plays a fundamental role in such areas as pattern recognition, machine learning, data mining, and knowledge discovery. To effectively discover the group structure inherent in a set of categorical objects, many categorical clustering algorithms have been developed in the literature, among which k -modes-type algorithms are very representative because of their good performance. Nevertheless, there is still much room for improving their clustering performance in comparison with the clustering algorithms for the numeric data. This may arise from the fact that the categorical data lack a clear space structure as that of the numeric data. To address this issue, we propose, in this paper, a novel data-representation scheme for the categorical data, which maps a set of categorical objects into a Euclidean space. Based on the data-representation scheme, a general framework for space structure based categorical clustering algorithms (SBC) is designed. This framework together with the applications of two kinds of dissimilarities leads two versions of the SBC-type algorithms. To verify the performance of the SBC-type algorithms, we employ as references four representative algorithms of the k -modes-type algorithms. Experiments show that the proposed SBC-type algorithms significantly outperform the k -modes-type algorithms.

  7. Analysis of categorical data with R

    CERN Document Server

    Bilder, Christopher R

    2014-01-01

    Learn How to Properly Analyze Categorical DataAnalysis of Categorical Data with R presents a modern account of categorical data analysis using the popular R software. It covers recent techniques of model building and assessment for binary, multicategory, and count response variables and discusses fundamentals, such as odds ratio and probability estimation. The authors give detailed advice and guidelines on which procedures to use and why to use them.The Use of R as Both a Data Analysis Method and a Learning ToolRequiring no prior experience with R, the text offers an introduction to the essent

  8. Learning a Probabilistic Topology Discovering Model for Scene Categorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Luming; Ji, Rongrong; Xia, Yingjie; Zhang, Ying; Li, Xuelong

    2015-08-01

    A recent advance in scene categorization prefers a topological based modeling to capture the existence and relationships among different scene components. To that effect, local features are typically used to handle photographing variances such as occlusions and clutters. However, in many cases, the local features alone cannot well capture the scene semantics since they are extracted from tiny regions (e.g., 4×4 patches) within an image. In this paper, we mine a discriminative topology and a low-redundant topology from the local descriptors under a probabilistic perspective, which are further integrated into a boosting framework for scene categorization. In particular, by decomposing a scene image into basic components, a graphlet model is used to describe their spatial interactions. Accordingly, scene categorization is formulated as an intergraphlet matching problem. The above procedure is further accelerated by introducing a probabilistic based representative topology selection scheme that makes the pairwise graphlet comparison trackable despite their exponentially increasing volumes. The selected graphlets are highly discriminative and independent, characterizing the topological characteristics of scene images. A weak learner is subsequently trained for each topology, which are boosted together to jointly describe the scene image. In our experiment, the visualized graphlets demonstrate that the mined topological patterns are representative to scene categories, and our proposed method beats state-of-the-art models on five popular scene data sets.

  9. Press to grasp: how action dynamics shape object categorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triberti, Stefano; Repetto, Claudia; Costantini, Marcello; Riva, Giuseppe; Sinigaglia, Corrado

    2016-03-01

    Action and object are deeply linked to each other. Not only can viewing an object influence an ongoing action, but motor representations of action can also influence visual categorization of objects. It is tempting to assume that this influence is effector-specific. However, there is indirect evidence suggesting that this influence may be related to the action goal and not just to the effector involved in achieving it. This paper aimed, for the first time, to tackle this issue directly. Participants were asked to categorize different objects in terms of the effector (e.g. hand or foot) typically used to act upon them. The task was delivered before and after a training session in which participants were instructed either just to press a pedal with their foot or to perform the same foot action with the goal of guiding an avatar's hand to grasp a small ball. Results showed that pressing a pedal to grasp a ball influenced how participants correctly identified graspable objects as hand-related ones, making their responses more uncertain than before the training. Just pressing a pedal did not have any similar effect. This is evidence that the influence of action on object categorization can be goal-related rather than effector-specific.

  10. Web Page Categorization Using Artificial Neural Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Kamruzzaman, S M

    2010-01-01

    Web page categorization is one of the challenging tasks in the world of ever increasing web technologies. There are many ways of categorization of web pages based on different approach and features. This paper proposes a new dimension in the way of categorization of web pages using artificial neural network (ANN) through extracting the features automatically. Here eight major categories of web pages have been selected for categorization; these are business & economy, education, government, entertainment, sports, news & media, job search, and science. The whole process of the proposed system is done in three successive stages. In the first stage, the features are automatically extracted through analyzing the source of the web pages. The second stage includes fixing the input values of the neural network; all the values remain between 0 and 1. The variations in those values affect the output. Finally the third stage determines the class of a certain web page out of eight predefined classes. This stage i...

  11. Statistical methods for categorical data analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Powers, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive introduction to methods and models for categorical data analysis and their applications in social science research. Companion website also available, at https://webspace.utexas.edu/dpowers/www/

  12. Data Reduction Method for Categorical Data Clustering

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez Garreta, José Salvador; Rendón, Eréndira; García, Rene A.; Abundez, Itzel; Gutiérrez, Citlalih; Gasca, Eduardo

    2008-01-01

    Categorical data clustering constitutes an important part of data mining; its relevance has recently drawn attention from several researchers. As a step in data mining, however, clustering encounters the problem of large amount of data to be processed. This article offers a solution for categorical clustering algorithms when working with high volumes of data by means of a method that summarizes the database. This is done using a structure called CM-tree. In order to test our metho...

  13. Interference effects of categorization on decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheng; Busemeyer, Jerome R

    2016-05-01

    Many decision making tasks in life involve a categorization process, but the effects of categorization on subsequent decision making has rarely been studied. This issue was explored in three experiments (N=721), in which participants were shown a face stimulus on each trial and performed variations of categorization-decision tasks. On C-D trials, they categorized the stimulus and then made an action decision; on X-D trials, they were told the category and then made an action decision; on D-alone trials, they only made an action decision. An interference effect emerged in some of the conditions, such that the probability of an action on the D-alone trials (i.e., when there was no explicit categorization before the decision) differed from the total probability of the same action on the C-D or X-D trials (i.e., when there was explicit categorization before the decision). Interference effects are important because they indicate a violation of the classical law of total probability, which is assumed by many cognitive models. Across all three experiments, a complex pattern of interference effects systematically occurred for different types of stimuli and for different types of categorization-decision tasks. These interference effects present a challenge for traditional cognitive models, such as Markov and signal detection models, but a quantum cognition model, called the belief-action entanglement (BAE) model, predicted that these results could occur. The BAE model employs the quantum principles of superposition and entanglement to explain the psychological mechanisms underlying the puzzling interference effects. The model can be applied to many important and practical categorization-decision situations in life.

  14. Learning Category-Specific Dictionary and Shared Dictionary for Fine-Grained Image Categorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shenghua; Tsang, Ivor Wai-Hung; Ma, Yi

    2014-02-01

    This paper targets fine-grained image categorization by learning a category-specific dictionary for each category and a shared dictionary for all the categories. Such category-specific dictionaries encode subtle visual differences among different categories, while the shared dictionary encodes common visual patterns among all the categories. To this end, we impose incoherence constraints among the different dictionaries in the objective of feature coding. In addition, to make the learnt dictionary stable, we also impose the constraint that each dictionary should be self-incoherent. Our proposed dictionary learning formulation not only applies to fine-grained classification, but also improves conventional basic-level object categorization and other tasks such as event recognition. Experimental results on five data sets show that our method can outperform the state-of-the-art fine-grained image categorization frameworks as well as sparse coding based dictionary learning frameworks. All these results demonstrate the effectiveness of our method.

  15. CATEGORIZATION OF EVENT SEQUENCES FOR LICENSE APPLICATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G.E. Ragan; P. Mecheret; D. Dexheimer

    2005-04-14

    The purposes of this analysis are: (1) Categorize (as Category 1, Category 2, or Beyond Category 2) internal event sequences that may occur before permanent closure of the repository at Yucca Mountain. (2) Categorize external event sequences that may occur before permanent closure of the repository at Yucca Mountain. This includes examining DBGM-1 seismic classifications and upgrading to DBGM-2, if appropriate, to ensure Beyond Category 2 categorization. (3) State the design and operational requirements that are invoked to make the categorization assignments valid. (4) Indicate the amount of material put at risk by Category 1 and Category 2 event sequences. (5) Estimate frequencies of Category 1 event sequences at the maximum capacity and receipt rate of the repository. (6) Distinguish occurrences associated with normal operations from event sequences. It is beyond the scope of the analysis to propose design requirements that may be required to control radiological exposure associated with normal operations. (7) Provide a convenient compilation of the results of the analysis in tabular form. The results of this analysis are used as inputs to the consequence analyses in an iterative design process that is depicted in Figure 1. Categorization of event sequences for permanent retrieval of waste from the repository is beyond the scope of this analysis. Cleanup activities that take place after an event sequence and other responses to abnormal events are also beyond the scope of the analysis.

  16. Tough and tender: embodied categorization of gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slepian, Michael L; Weisbuch, Max; Rule, Nicholas O; Ambady, Nalini

    2011-01-01

    Emerging evidence has shown that human thought can be embodied within physical sensations and actions. Indeed, abstract concepts such as morality, time, and interpersonal warmth can be based on metaphors that are grounded in bodily experiences (e.g., physical temperature can signal interpersonal warmth). We hypothesized that social-category knowledge is similarly embodied, and we tested this hypothesis by examining a sensory metaphor related to categorical judgments of gender. We chose the dimension of "toughness" (ranging from tough to tender), which is often used to characterize differences between males and females. Across two studies, the proprioceptive experience of toughness (vs. tenderness) was manipulated as participants categorized sex-ambiguous faces as male or female. Two different manipulations of proprioceptive toughness predictably biased the categorization of faces toward "male." These findings suggest that social-category knowledge is at least partially embodied.

  17. Prosodic boundary information modulates phonetic categorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sahyang; Cho, Taehong

    2013-07-01

    Categorical perception experiments were performed on an English /b-p/ voice onset time (VOT) continuum with native (American English) and non-native (Korean) listeners to examine whether and how phonetic categorization is modulated by prosodic boundary and language experience. Results demonstrated perceptual shifting according to prosodic boundary strength: A longer VOT was required to identify a sound as /p/ after an intonational phrase than a word boundary, regardless of the listeners' language experience. This suggests that segmental perception is modulated by the listeners' computation of an abstract prosodic structure reflected in phonetic cues of phrase-final lengthening and domain-initial strengthening, which are common across languages.

  18. 24 CFR 58.35 - Categorical exclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... impact statement or environmental assessment and finding of no significant impact under NEPA is required... significant impact. Compliance with the other applicable Federal environmental laws and authorities listed in... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Categorical exclusions....

  19. Same-Different Categorization in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserman, Edward A.; Castro, Leyre; Freeman, John H.

    2012-01-01

    Same-different categorization is a fundamental feat of human cognition. Although birds and nonhuman primates readily learn same-different discriminations and successfully transfer them to novel stimuli, no such demonstration exists for rats. Using a spatial discrimination learning task, we show that rats can both learn to discriminate arrays of…

  20. Neighborhood conflicts: the role of social categorization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ufkes, E.G.; Otten, S.; Zee, van der K. I.; Giebels, E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose – In a multicultural context, this study aims to investigate the effect of ingroup versus outgroup categorization and stereotypes on residents' emotional and behavioral reactions in neighbor-to-neighbor conflicts. Based on the literature on the “black sheep effect”, the authors predicted tha

  1. Quantifier Scope in Categorical Compositional Distributional Semantics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrnoosh Sadrzadeh

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In previous work with J. Hedges, we formalised a generalised quantifiers theory of natural language in categorical compositional distributional semantics with the help of bialgebras. In this paper, we show how quantifier scope ambiguity can be represented in that setting and how this representation can be generalised to branching quantifiers.

  2. How Experimental Trial Context Affects Perceptual Categorization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J Palmeri

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available To understand object categorization, participants are tested in experiments often quite different from how people experience object categories in the real world. Learning and knowledge of categories is measured in discrete experimental trials, those trials may or may not provide feedback, trials appear one after another, after some fixed inter-trial interval, with hundreds of trials in a row, within experimental blocks with some structure dictated by the experimental design. In the real world, outside of certain educational and vocational contexts, opportunities to learn and use categories are intermixed over time with a whole multitude of intervening experiences. It is clear from any elementary understanding of human cognition that sequential effects matter, yet this understanding is often ignored, and categorization trials are often instead treated as independent events, immune to local trial context. In this perspective, we use some of our work to illustrate some of the consequences of the fact that categorization experiments have a particular trial structure. Experimental trial context can affect performance in category learning and categorization experiments in ways that can profoundly affect theoretical conclusions.

  3. Categorical properties of topological and differentiable stacks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carchedi, D.J.

    2011-01-01

    The focus of this PhD research is on the theory of topological and differentiable stacks. There are two main themes of this research. The first, is the creation of the theory of compactly generated stacks, which solve many categorical shortcomings of the theory of classical topological stacks. In pa

  4. The Education of the Categorical Imperative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, James Scott

    2006-01-01

    In this article, I examine anew the moral philosophy of Immanuel Kant and its contributions to educational theory. I make four claims. First, that Kant should be read as having the Categorical Imperative develop out of subjective maxims. Second, that moral self-perfection is the aim of moral education. Third, that moral self-perfection develops by…

  5. Emotional valence categorization using holistic image features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yanulevskaya, V.; van Gemert, J.C.; Roth, K.; Herbold, A.K.; Sebe, N.; Geusebroek, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Can a machine learn to perceive emotions as evoked by an artwork? Here we propose an emotion categorization system, trained by ground truth from psychology studies. The training data contains emotional valences scored by human subjects on the International Affective Picture System (IAPS), a standard

  6. Bayesian Estimation of Categorical Dynamic Factor Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiyong; Nesselroade, John R.

    2007-01-01

    Dynamic factor models have been used to analyze continuous time series behavioral data. We extend 2 main dynamic factor model variations--the direct autoregressive factor score (DAFS) model and the white noise factor score (WNFS) model--to categorical DAFS and WNFS models in the framework of the underlying variable method and illustrate them with…

  7. Image Categorization by Learning a Propagated Graphlet Path.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Luming; Hong, Richang; Gao, Yue; Ji, Rongrong; Dai, Qionghai; Li, Xuelong

    2016-03-01

    Spatial pyramid matching is a standard architecture for categorical image retrieval. However, its performance is largely limited by the prespecified rectangular spatial regions when pooling local descriptors. In this paper, we propose to learn object-shaped and directional receptive fields for image categorization. In particular, different objects in an image are seamlessly constructed by superpixels, while the direction captures human gaze shifting path. By generating a number of superpixels in each image, we construct graphlets to describe different objects. They function as the object-shaped receptive fields for image comparison. Due to the huge number of graphlets in an image, a saliency-guided graphlet selection algorithm is proposed. A manifold embedding algorithm encodes graphlets with the semantics of training image tags. Then, we derive a manifold propagation to calculate the postembedding graphlets by leveraging visual saliency maps. The sequentially propagated graphlets constitute a path that mimics human gaze shifting. Finally, we use the learned graphlet path as receptive fields for local image descriptor pooling. The local descriptors from similar receptive fields of pairwise images more significantly contribute to the final image kernel. Thorough experiments demonstrate the advantage of our approach.

  8. Indoor Place Categorization based on Adaptive Partitioning of Texture Histograms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Eberhardt

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available How can we localize ourselves within a building solely using visual information, i.e., when no data about prior location or movement are available? Here, we define place categorization as a set of three distinct image classification tasks for view matching, location matching, and room matching. We present a novel image descriptor built on texture statistics and dynamic image partitioning that can be used to solve all tested place classification tasks. We benchmark the descriptor by assessing performance of regularization on our own dataset as well as the established Indoor Environment under Changing conditionS dataset, which varies lighting condition, location, and viewing angle on photos taken within an office building. We show improvement on both the datasets against a number of baseline algorithms.

  9. Visual Intelligence and the Terminator

    OpenAIRE

    Culurciello, Eugenio; Canziani, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    What would it take to replicate the human visual system in synthetic hardware? What software models can we use to implement the mammalian visual system? The goal of our research is a neuromorphic vision system capable of categorizing, tracking and maintaining a visual memory of tens of targets. The application of such system is in smart phones, computers, robotics, autonomous cars, smart appliances, to name a few.

  10. Object knowledge during entry-level categorization is activated and modified by implicit memory after 200 ms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schendan, Haline E; Maher, Stephen M

    2009-02-15

    The timing of activating memory about visual objects is important for theories of human cognition but largely unknown, especially for tasks like entry level categorization that activate semantic memory. We tested an implicit memory-categorization "equivalence" hypothesis of multiple memory systems theory that a cortical system that stores structural knowledge to support entry level categorization also stores long-term, perceptual implicit memory, resulting in priming of this knowledge. Event-related brain potentials (ERPs) were recorded to impoverished pictures of new and repeated objects that were similar in perceptual properties but differed in categorization success. The cortical dynamics of object knowledge were defined using categorization ratings and naming. As predicted, rating, naming, and repetition effects on a frontocentral N350 show that implicit memory modifies the object knowledge network supporting categorization. This ERP is a complex of components between 200 and 500 ms indexing temporally overlapping substates from more perceptual to more conceptual knowledge. A frontopolar N350 subcomponent defines the first substate of a process of object model selection from occipitotemporal cortex based on shape similarity, and indicates that implicit memory in this system is greater with better categorization success. Afterwards, parietal positivity and a slow wave index secondary, post-model selection processes, like evaluating the success of a decision or memory match, and working memory for overt report, respectively. Altogether, ERP findings support the equivalence hypothesis and a two-state interactive account of visual object knowledge, and delineate the timing of multiple memory systems.

  11. Multilingual Sentence Categorization according to Language

    CERN Document Server

    Giguet, E

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, we describe an approach to sentence categorization which has the originality to be based on natural properties of languages with no training set dependency. The implementation is fast, small, robust and textual errors tolerant. Tested for french, english, spanish and german discrimination, the system gives very interesting results, achieving in one test 99.4% correct assignments on real sentences. The resolution power is based on grammatical words (not the most common words) and alphabet. Having the grammatical words and the alphabet of each language at its disposal, the system computes for each of them its likelihood to be selected. The name of the language having the optimum likelihood will tag the sentence --- but non resolved ambiguities will be maintained. We will discuss the reasons which lead us to use these linguistic facts and present several directions to improve the system's classification performance. Categorization sentences with linguistic properties shows that difficult problems ...

  12. Speech perception as complex auditory categorization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Lori L.

    2002-05-01

    Despite a long and rich history of categorization research in cognitive psychology, very little work has addressed the issue of complex auditory category formation. This is especially unfortunate because the general underlying cognitive and perceptual mechanisms that guide auditory category formation are of great importance to understanding speech perception. I will discuss a new methodological approach to examining complex auditory category formation that specifically addresses issues relevant to speech perception. This approach utilizes novel nonspeech sound stimuli to gain full experimental control over listeners' history of experience. As such, the course of learning is readily measurable. Results from this methodology indicate that the structure and formation of auditory categories are a function of the statistical input distributions of sound that listeners hear, aspects of the operating characteristics of the auditory system, and characteristics of the perceptual categorization system. These results have important implications for phonetic acquisition and speech perception.

  13. [Review and categorization of quinolone antibiotics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benes, Jirí

    2005-02-01

    No standard categorization of quinolone antibiotics into generations may be found in either Czech or world literature. The author recommends a categorization into four groups defined according to their spectrum of action and utilization: 1) preparations for the treatment of urinary tract infections; 2) systemically acting quinolones chiefly efficacious against Gram-negative bacteria; 3) so-called respiratory quinolones; and 4) quinolones with a very broad spectrum of action suitable for the treatment of very complicated infections. The author describes the chief characteristics of the most important quinolone antibiotics, including preparations either in their development stage or whose development has been prematurely interrupted because of adverse side-effects. The list includes all preparations that are or were temporarily registered in the Czech Republic.

  14. Other-Initiated Repair and Membership Categorization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egbert, Maria

    2004-01-01

    In continuation of recent discussions in JoP and elsewhere concerning the aptness of conversation analysis (‘‘CA’’) as a research methodology for ‘‘intercultural’’ interaction, this CA-study shows some procedures by which interactants overtly or covertly orient to regional or linguistic category...... membership where apparent trouble in hearing or understanding the talk are addressed (‘‘other- initiated repair’’ [Language 54 (2) (1977) 361]). These practices of membership categorizing are inferred from different kinds of structural elaborateness beyond the basic two-part repair sequence. CA is shown...... to provide analytic tools which are highly suitable to detecting and describing practices of membership categorizing along regional or linguistic lines both in so-called ‘‘native/native’’ and ‘‘native/nonnative’’ interaction....

  15. Categorical Pairs and the Indicative Shift

    CERN Document Server

    Kauffman, Louis H

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces the notion of a categorical pair, a pair of categories (C,C') such that every morphism in C is an object in C'. Categorical pairs are precursors to 2-categories. Arrows in C' can express relationships among the morphisms of C. In particular we show that by using a model of the linguistic process of naming, we can ensure that every morphism in C has an indirect self-reference of the form a -----> Fa where this arrow occurs in the category C'. This result is shown to generalize and clarify known fixed point theorems in logic and categories, and is applied to Goedel's Incompleteness Theorem, the Cantor Diagonal Process and the Lawvere Fixed Point Theorem. In particular we show that the indirect self-reference that is central to Goedel's Theorem is an instance of a general pattern here called the indicative shift.

  16. Phonetic categorization in auditory word perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganong, W F

    1980-02-01

    To investigate the interaction in speech perception of auditory information and lexical knowledge (in particular, knowledge of which phonetic sequences are words), acoustic continua varying in voice onset time were constructed so that for each acoustic continuum, one of the two possible phonetic categorizations made a word and the other did not. For example, one continuum ranged between the word dash and the nonword tash; another used the nonword dask and the word task. In two experiments, subjects showed a significant lexical effect--that is, a tendency to make phonetic categorizations that make words. This lexical effect was greater at the phoneme boundary (where auditory information is ambiguous) than at the ends of the condinua. Hence the lexical effect must arise at a stage of processing sensitive to both lexical knowledge and auditory information.

  17. The Representation and Matching of Categorical Shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-07-01

    with added flexibility for representing complex 3-D objects. Leibe and Schiele [23] propose a new database for comparing different methods for object cat...for object class recognition. In Workshop on Learning, Snowbird, Utah, 2004. [22] B. Leibe and B. Schiele . Analyzing appearance and contour based...and Bernt Schiele . Analyzing appearance and contour based methods for object categorization. In CVPR (2), pages 409–415, 2003. [24] T. Lindeberg. Edge

  18. Categorizing the Growth Strategies of Small Firms

    OpenAIRE

    Mika Westerlund; Seppo Leminen

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the link between a small firm’s investment in R&D and its growth strategy. A firm’s growth strategy refers to the means by which the organization plans to achieve its objective to grow in volume and turnover. We categorize firm growth strategies into eight distinctive clusters: opportunity explorers, radical innovators, business developers, business expanders, profit makers, business rebuilders, stagnators, and downsizers. We argue that understanding a firm’s growth or...

  19. Identification and Categorization of Climate Change Risks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yuehong; WU Shaohong; DAI Erfu; LIU Dengwei; YIN Yunhe

    2008-01-01

    The scientific evidence that climate is changing due to greenhouse gas emission is now incontestable,which may put many social,biological,and geophysical systems in the world at risk.In this paper,we first identified main risks induced from or aggravated by climate change.Then we categorized them applying a new risk categorization system brought forward by Renn in a framework of International Risk Governance Council.We proposed that "uncertainty" could be treated as the classification criteria.Based on this,we established a quantitative method with fuzzy set theory,in which "confidence" and "likelihood",the main quantitative terms for expressing uncertainties in IPCC,were used as the feature parameters to construct the fuzzy membership functions of four risk types.According to the maximum principle,most climate change risks identified were classified into the appropriate risk types.In the mean time,given that not all the quantitative terms are available,a qualitative approach was also adopted as a complementary classification method.Finally,we get the preliminary results of climate change risk categorization,which might lay the foundation for the future integrated risk management of climate change.

  20. Integrating image data into biomedical text categorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shatkay, Hagit; Chen, Nawei; Blostein, Dorothea

    2006-07-15

    Categorization of biomedical articles is a central task for supporting various curation efforts. It can also form the basis for effective biomedical text mining. Automatic text classification in the biomedical domain is thus an active research area. Contests organized by the KDD Cup (2002) and the TREC Genomics track (since 2003) defined several annotation tasks that involved document classification, and provided training and test data sets. So far, these efforts focused on analyzing only the text content of documents. However, as was noted in the KDD'02 text mining contest-where figure-captions proved to be an invaluable feature for identifying documents of interest-images often provide curators with critical information. We examine the possibility of using information derived directly from image data, and of integrating it with text-based classification, for biomedical document categorization. We present a method for obtaining features from images and for using them-both alone and in combination with text-to perform the triage task introduced in the TREC Genomics track 2004. The task was to determine which documents are relevant to a given annotation task performed by the Mouse Genome Database curators. We show preliminary results, demonstrating that the method has a strong potential to enhance and complement traditional text-based categorization methods.

  1. Dynamics of trimming the content of face representations for categorization in the brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola J van Rijsbergen

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available To understand visual cognition, it is imperative to determine when, how and with what information the human brain categorizes the visual input. Visual categorization consistently involves at least an early and a late stage: the occipito-temporal N170 event related potential related to stimulus encoding and the parietal P300 involved in perceptual decisions. Here we sought to understand how the brain globally transforms its representations of face categories from their early encoding to the later decision stage over the 400 ms time window encompassing the N170 and P300 brain events. We applied classification image techniques to the behavioral and electroencephalographic data of three observers who categorized seven facial expressions of emotion and report two main findings: (1 over the 400 ms time course, processing of facial features initially spreads bilaterally across the left and right occipito-temporal regions to dynamically converge onto the centro-parietal region; (2 concurrently, information processing gradually shifts from encoding common face features across all spatial scales (e.g., the eyes to representing only the finer scales of the diagnostic features that are richer in useful information for behavior (e.g., the wide opened eyes in 'fear'; the detailed mouth in 'happy'. Our findings suggest that the brain refines its diagnostic representations of visual categories over the first 400 ms of processing by trimming a thorough encoding of features over the N170, to leave only the detailed information important for perceptual decisions over the P300.

  2. Dynamics of Trimming the Content of Face Representations for Categorization in the Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rijsbergen, Nicola J.; Schyns, Philippe G.

    2009-01-01

    To understand visual cognition, it is imperative to determine when, how and with what information the human brain categorizes the visual input. Visual categorization consistently involves at least an early and a late stage: the occipito-temporal N170 event related potential related to stimulus encoding and the parietal P300 involved in perceptual decisions. Here we sought to understand how the brain globally transforms its representations of face categories from their early encoding to the later decision stage over the 400 ms time window encompassing the N170 and P300 brain events. We applied classification image techniques to the behavioral and electroencephalographic data of three observers who categorized seven facial expressions of emotion and report two main findings: (1) over the 400 ms time course, processing of facial features initially spreads bilaterally across the left and right occipito-temporal regions to dynamically converge onto the centro-parietal region; (2) concurrently, information processing gradually shifts from encoding common face features across all spatial scales (e.g., the eyes) to representing only the finer scales of the diagnostic features that are richer in useful information for behavior (e.g., the wide opened eyes in ‘fear’; the detailed mouth in ‘happy’). Our findings suggest that the brain refines its diagnostic representations of visual categories over the first 400 ms of processing by trimming a thorough encoding of features over the N170, to leave only the detailed information important for perceptual decisions over the P300. PMID:19911045

  3. Effects of Microstimulation in the Anterior Intraparietal Area during Three-Dimensional Shape Categorization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bram-Ernst Verhoef

    Full Text Available The anterior intraparietal area (AIP of rhesus monkeys is part of the dorsal visual stream and contains neurons whose visual response properties are commensurate with a role in three-dimensional (3D shape perception. Neuronal responses in AIP signal the depth structure of disparity-defined 3D shapes, reflect the choices of monkeys while they categorize 3D shapes, and mirror the behavioral variability across different stimulus conditions during 3D-shape categorization. However, direct evidence for a role of AIP in 3D-shape perception has been lacking. We trained rhesus monkeys to categorize disparity-defined 3D shapes and examined AIP's contribution to 3D-shape categorization by microstimulating in clusters of 3D-shape selective AIP neurons during task performance. We find that microstimulation effects on choices (monkey M1 and reaction times (monkey M1 and M2 depend on the 3D-shape preference of the stimulated site. Moreover, electrical stimulation of the same cells, during either the 3D-shape-categorization task or a saccade task, could affect behavior differently. Interestingly, in one monkey we observed a strong correlation between the strength of choice-related AIP activity (choice probabilities and the influence of microstimulation on 3D-shape-categorization behavior (choices and reaction time. These findings propose AIP as part of the network responsible for 3D-shape perception. The results also show that the anterior intraparietal cortex contains cells with different tuning properties, i.e. 3D-shape- or saccade-related, that can be dynamically read out depending on the requirements of the task at hand.

  4. Assessing Expertise in Quantum Mechanics using Categorization Task

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Shih-Yin

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the categorization of 20 quantum mechanics problems by 6 physics professors and 22 undergraduate students from two honors-level quantum mechanics courses. Professors and students were asked to categorize the problems based upon similarity of solution. We also had individual discussions with professors who categorized the problems. Faculty members' categorizations were overall rated better than those of students by three faculty members who evaluated all of the categorizations. But the categories created by faculty members were more diverse compared to the uniformity of the categories they created when asked to categorize introductory mechanics problems.

  5. Ambiguity, logic, simplicity, and dynamics: Wittgensteinian evaluative criteria in peer review of quantitative research on categorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimp, Charles P

    2004-06-30

    Research on categorization has changed over time, and some of these changes resemble how Wittgenstein's views changed from his Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus to his Philosophical Investigations. Wittgenstein initially focused on unambiguous, abstract, parsimonious, logical propositions and rules, and on independent, static, "atomic facts." This approach subsequently influenced the development of logical positivism and thereby may have indirectly influenced method and theory in research on categorization: much animal research on categorization has focused on learning simple, static, logical rules unambiguously interrelating small numbers of independent features. He later rejected logical simplicity and rigor and focused instead on Gestalt ideas about figure-ground reversals and context, the ambiguity of family resemblance, and the function of details of everyday language. Contemporary contextualism has been influenced by this latter position, some features of which appear in contemporary empirical research on categorization. These developmental changes are illustrated by research on avian local and global levels of visual perceptual analysis, categorization of rectangles and moving objects, and artificial grammar learning. Implications are described for peer review of quantitative theory in which ambiguity, logical rigor, simplicity, or dynamics are designed to play important roles.

  6. How active perception and attractor dynamics shape perceptual categorization: a computational model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catenacci Volpi, Nicola; Quinton, Jean Charles; Pezzulo, Giovanni

    2014-12-01

    We propose a computational model of perceptual categorization that fuses elements of grounded and sensorimotor theories of cognition with dynamic models of decision-making. We assume that category information consists in anticipated patterns of agent-environment interactions that can be elicited through overt or covert (simulated) eye movements, object manipulation, etc. This information is firstly encoded when category information is acquired, and then re-enacted during perceptual categorization. The perceptual categorization consists in a dynamic competition between attractors that encode the sensorimotor patterns typical of each category; action prediction success counts as "evidence" for a given category and contributes to falling into the corresponding attractor. The evidence accumulation process is guided by an active perception loop, and the active exploration of objects (e.g., visual exploration) aims at eliciting expected sensorimotor patterns that count as evidence for the object category. We present a computational model incorporating these elements and describing action prediction, active perception, and attractor dynamics as key elements of perceptual categorizations. We test the model in three simulated perceptual categorization tasks, and we discuss its relevance for grounded and sensorimotor theories of cognition.

  7. An evaluation of intraverbal training and listener training for teaching categorization skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petursdottir, Anna Ingeborg; Carr, James E; Lechago, Sarah A; Almason, Season M

    2008-01-01

    The effects of vocal intraverbal training and listener training on the emergence of untrained categorization skills were evaluated. Five typically developing preschool children initially learned to name a number of previously unfamiliar visual stimuli. Each child then received one of two types of training. Intraverbal training involved reinforcing vocally emitted category names by the child in the presence of a spoken exemplar name. Listener training involved reinforcing the selection of visual stimuli by the child in the presence of a spoken category name. A multiple baseline design was used to evaluate the effects of training on each child's intraverbal category naming and stimulus selection. Pre- and posttests were used to assess additional emergent relations. Four of 5 participants did not demonstrate the emergence of any untrained relations. The current findings suggest that additional research is needed to determine the optimal sequencing of conditions in programs designed to teach categorization skills.

  8. Applied categorical and count data analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Wan; Tu, Xin M

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Discrete Outcomes Data Source Outline of the BookReview of Key Statistical ResultsSoftwareContingency Tables Inference for One-Way Frequency TableInference for 2 x 2 TableInference for 2 x r TablesInference for s x r TableMeasures of AssociationSets of Contingency Tables Confounding Effects Sets of 2 x 2 TablesSets of s x r TablesRegression Models for Categorical Response Logistic Regression for Binary ResponseInference about Model ParametersGoodness of FitGeneralized Linear ModelsRegression Models for Polytomous ResponseRegression Models for Count Response Poisson Regression Mode

  9. Introduction to Categories and Categorical Logic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramsky, S.; Tzevelekos, N.

    The aim of these notes is to provide a succinct, accessible introduction to some of the basic ideas of category theory and categorical logic. The notes are based on a lecture course given at Oxford over the past few years. They contain numerous exercises, and hopefully will prove useful for self-study by those seeking a first introduction to the subject, with fairly minimal prerequisites. The coverage is by no means comprehensive, but should provide a good basis for further study; a guide to further reading is included.

  10. Categorizing the Growth Strategies of Small Firms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mika Westerlund

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the link between a small firm’s investment in R&D and its growth strategy. A firm’s growth strategy refers to the means by which the organization plans to achieve its objective to grow in volume and turnover. We categorize firm growth strategies into eight distinctive clusters: opportunity explorers, radical innovators, business developers, business expanders, profit makers, business rebuilders, stagnators, and downsizers. We argue that understanding a firm’s growth orientation provides a way to assess the returns of its R&D investments, because an organization’s intangible growth strategies and tangible inputs are connected.

  11. Categorization of aortic aneurysm thrombus morphology by magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de la Motte, Louise; Pedersen, Mads Møller; Thomsen, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been proposed for qualitative categorization of intraluminal thrombus morphology. We aimed to correlate the qualitative MRI categorization previously described to quantitative measurements of signal intensity and to compare morphological characteristics...

  12. Categorization:The major focus of cognitive linguistics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程丽群

    2009-01-01

    This paper is a part of literature review of categorization of cognitive linguistics.Based on the cognitive view,some comments on categorization theory are elaborated to provide theoretical evidence for our practical teaching.

  13. Categorization.The major focus of cogni tive linguistics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程丽群

    2009-01-01

    This paper is a part of literature review of categorization of cognitive linguistics:Based on the cognitive view,some comments on categorization theory are elaborated to provide theoretical evidence for our practical teaching.

  14. Behavioural evidence of a dissociation between voice gender categorization and phoneme categorization using auditory morphed stimuli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyril R Pernet

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Both voice gender and speech perception rely on neuronal populations located in the peri-sylvian areas. However, whilst functional imaging studies suggest a left versus right hemisphere and anterior versus posterior dissociation between voice and speech categorization, psycholinguistic studies on talker variability suggest that these two processes (voice and speech categorization share common mechanisms. In this study, we investigated the categorical perception of voice gender (male vs. female and phonemes (/pa/ vs. /ta/ using the same stimulus continua generated by morphing. This allowed the investigation of behavioural differences while controlling acoustic characteristics, since the same stimuli were used in both tasks. Despite a higher acoustic dissimilarity between items during the phoneme categorization task (a male and female voice producing the same phonemes than the gender task (the same person producing 2 phonemes, results showed that speech information is being processed much faster than voice information. In addition, f0 or timbre equalization did not affect RT, which disagrees with the classical psycholinguistic models in which voice information is stripped away or normalized to access phonetic content. Also, despite similar response (percentages and perceptual (d’ curves, a reverse correlation analysis on acoustic features revealed, as expected, that the formant frequencies of the consonant distinguished stimuli in the phoneme task, but that only the vowel formant frequencies distinguish stimuli in the gender task. The 2nd set of results thus also disagrees with models postulating that the same acoustic information is used for voice and speech. Altogether these results suggest that voice gender categorization and phoneme categorization are dissociated at an early stage on the basis of different enhanced acoustic features that are diagnostic to the task at hand.

  15. Clustering Categorical Data:A Cluster Ensemble Approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Zengyou(何增友); Xu Xiaofei; Deng Shengchun

    2003-01-01

    Clustering categorical data, an integral part of data mining,has attracted much attention recently. In this paper, the authors formally define the categorical data clustering problem as an optimization problem from the viewpoint of cluster ensemble, and apply cluster ensemble approach for clustering categorical data. Experimental results on real datasets show that better clustering accuracy can be obtained by comparing with existing categorical data clustering algorithms.

  16. What is automatized during perceptual categorization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeder, Jessica L; Ashby, F Gregory

    2016-09-01

    An experiment is described that tested whether stimulus-response associations or an abstract rule are automatized during extensive practice at perceptual categorization. Twenty-seven participants each completed 12,300 trials of perceptual categorization, either on rule-based (RB) categories that could be learned explicitly or information-integration (II) categories that required procedural learning. Each participant practiced predominantly on a primary category structure, but every third session they switched to a secondary structure that used the same stimuli and responses. Half the stimuli retained their same response on the primary and secondary categories (the congruent stimuli) and half switched responses (the incongruent stimuli). Several results stood out. First, performance on the primary categories met the standard criteria of automaticity by the end of training. Second, for the primary categories in the RB condition, accuracy and response time (RT) were identical on congruent and incongruent stimuli. In contrast, for the primary II categories, accuracy was higher and RT was lower for congruent than for incongruent stimuli. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that rules are automatized in RB tasks, whereas stimulus-response associations are automatized in II tasks. A cognitive neuroscience theory is proposed that accounts for these results.

  17. Automatic Induction of Rule Based Text Categorization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.Maghesh Kumar

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The automated categorization of texts into predefined categories has witnessed a booming interest in the last 10 years, due to the increased availability of documents in digital form and the ensuingneed to organize them. In the research community the dominant approach to this problem is based on machine learning techniques: a general inductive process automatically builds a classifier by learning, from a set of preclassified documents, the characteristics of the categories. This paper describes, a novel method for the automatic induction of rule-based text classifiers. This method supports a hypothesis language of the form "if T1, … or Tn occurs in document d, and none of T1+n,... Tn+m occurs in d, then classify d under category c," where each Ti is a conjunction of terms. This survey discusses the main approaches to text categorization that fall within the machine learning paradigm. Issues pertaining tothree different problems, namely, document representation, classifier construction, and classifier evaluation were discussed in detail.

  18. Using Corpus Statistics to Remove Redundant Words in Text Categorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yiming; Wilbur, John

    1996-01-01

    Studies aggressive automated word removal in text categorization in large databases based on corpus statistics to reduce the noise in free texts and to enhance the computational efficiency of categorization. Topics include stop word identification, categorization methods for comparison, tests on four document collections, and evaluation…

  19. The Curious Case of Orthographic Distinctiveness: Disruption of Categorical Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Mark A.; Cahill, Michael J.; Bugg, Julie M.

    2016-01-01

    How does orthographic distinctiveness affect recall of structured (categorized) word lists? On one theory, enhanced item-specific information (e.g., more distinct encoding) in concert with robust relational information (e.g., categorical information) optimally supports free recall. This predicts that for categorically structured lists,…

  20. Categorization of Quantum Mechanics Problems by Professors and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shih-Yin; Singh, Chandralekha

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the categorization of 20 quantum mechanics problems by physics professors and undergraduate students from two honours-level quantum mechanics courses. Professors and students were asked to categorize the problems based upon similarity of solution. We also had individual discussions with professors who categorized the problems. Faculty…

  1. Categorization of Quantum Mechanics Problems by Professors and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shih-Yin; Singh, Chandralekha

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the categorization of 20 quantum mechanics problems by physics professors and undergraduate students from two honours-level quantum mechanics courses. Professors and students were asked to categorize the problems based upon similarity of solution. We also had individual discussions with professors who categorized the problems. Faculty…

  2. Effects of prior knowledge on decisions made under perceptual vs. categorical uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen eHansen

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Humans use prior knowledge to bias decisions made under uncertainty. In this fMRI study we predicted that different brain dynamics play a role when prior knowledge is added to decisions made under perceptual vs. categorical uncertainty. Subjects decided whether shapes belonged to Category S – smoother – or Category B – bumpier – under both uncertainty conditions, with or without prior knowledge cues. When present, the prior knowledge cue, 80/20 or 50/50, indicated that 80% and 20% (or 50% and 50% were the chances that responding "S" and "B" (or vice versa would be correct. During perceptual uncertainty, shapes were degraded with noise. During categorical uncertainty, shapes were ambiguous. Adding the 80/20 cue increased activation during perceptual uncertainty in bilateral lateral occipital cortex and left middle frontal gyrus (MidFG, and decreased activity in bilateral lateral occipital cortex during categorical uncertainty. Right MidFG and other frontoparietal regions were active in all conditions. The results demonstrate that left MidFG shows activation changes, suggestive of an influence on visual cortex, that depend on the factor that makes the decisions difficult. When sensory evidence is difficult to perceive, prior knowledge increases visual cortical activity. When the sensory evidence is easy to perceive but difficult to interpret, prior knowledge decreases visual cortical activity.

  3. Edge co-occurrences can account for rapid categorization of natural versus animal images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrinet, Laurent U.; Bednar, James A.

    2015-06-01

    Making a judgment about the semantic category of a visual scene, such as whether it contains an animal, is typically assumed to involve high-level associative brain areas. Previous explanations require progressively analyzing the scene hierarchically at increasing levels of abstraction, from edge extraction to mid-level object recognition and then object categorization. Here we show that the statistics of edge co-occurrences alone are sufficient to perform a rough yet robust (translation, scale, and rotation invariant) scene categorization. We first extracted the edges from images using a scale-space analysis coupled with a sparse coding algorithm. We then computed the “association field” for different categories (natural, man-made, or containing an animal) by computing the statistics of edge co-occurrences. These differed strongly, with animal images having more curved configurations. We show that this geometry alone is sufficient for categorization, and that the pattern of errors made by humans is consistent with this procedure. Because these statistics could be measured as early as the primary visual cortex, the results challenge widely held assumptions about the flow of computations in the visual system. The results also suggest new algorithms for image classification and signal processing that exploit correlations between low-level structure and the underlying semantic category.

  4. Towards a Categorical Account of Conditional Probability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Furber

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a categorical account of conditional probability, covering both the classical and the quantum case. Classical conditional probabilities are expressed as a certain "triangle-fill-in" condition, connecting marginal and joint probabilities, in the Kleisli category of the distribution monad. The conditional probabilities are induced by a map together with a predicate (the condition. The latter is a predicate in the logic of effect modules on this Kleisli category. This same approach can be transferred to the category of C*-algebras (with positive unital maps, whose predicate logic is also expressed in terms of effect modules. Conditional probabilities can again be expressed via a triangle-fill-in property. In the literature, there are several proposals for what quantum conditional probability should be, and also there are extra difficulties not present in the classical case. At this stage, we only describe quantum systems with classical parametrization.

  5. Introduction to Categories and Categorical Logic

    CERN Document Server

    Abramsky, Samson

    2011-01-01

    The aim of these notes is to provide a succinct, accessible introduction to some of the basic ideas of category theory and categorical logic. The notes are based on a lecture course given at Oxford over the past few years. They contain numerous exercises, and hopefully will prove useful for self-study by those seeking a first introduction to the subject, with fairly minimal prerequisites. The coverage is by no means comprehensive, but should provide a good basis for further study; a guide to further reading is included. The main prerequisite is a basic familiarity with the elements of discrete mathematics: sets, relations and functions. An Appendix contains a summary of what we will need, and it may be useful to review this first. In addition, some prior exposure to abstract algebra - vector spaces and linear maps, or groups and group homomorphisms - would be helpful.

  6. Predictive Manufacturing: Classification of categorical data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Abdul Rauf; Schiøler, Henrik; Kulahci, Murat

    2017-01-01

    Today, advances in computing along with smart sensor technologies are redesigning the whole manufacturing paradigm. Advanced sensors have boosted the transition in manufacturing systems from semi-automated to fully automated manufacturing processes. The distinguishing feature of these automated...... processes is high volume of information about the process dynamics. In this paper we present a methodology to deal with the categorical data streams from manufacturing processes, with an objective of predicting failures on the last stage of the process. A thorough examination of the behaviour...... and classification capabilities of our methodology (on different experimental settings) is done through a specially designed simulation experiment. Secondly, in order to demonstrate the applicability in a real life problem a data set from electronics component manufacturing is being analysed through our proposed...

  7. Intuitionistic Fuzzy Graphs with Categorical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Rashmanlou

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this paper is to show the rationality of some operations, defined or to be defined, on intuitionistic fuzzy graphs. Firstly, three kinds of new product operations (called direct product, lexicographic product, and strong product are defined in intuitionistic fuzzy graphs, and some important notions on intuitionistic fuzzy graphs are demonstrated by characterizing these notions and their level counterparts graphs such as intuitionistic fuzzy complete graph, cartesian product of intuitionistic fuzzy graphs, composition of intuitionistic fuzzy graphs, union of intuitionistic fuzzy graphs, and join of intuitionistic fuzzy graphs. As a result, a kind of representations of intuitionistic fuzzy graphs and intuitionistic fuzzy complete graphs are given. Next, categorical goodness of intuitionistic fuzzy graphs is illustrated by proving that the category of intuitionistic fuzzy graphs and homomorphisms between them is isomorphic-closed, complete, and co-complete.

  8. Neural network models of categorical perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damper, R I; Harnad, S R

    2000-05-01

    Studies of the categorical perception (CP) of sensory continua have a long and rich history in psychophysics. In 1977, Macmillan, Kaplan, and Creelman introduced the use of signal detection theory to CP studies. Anderson and colleagues simultaneously proposed the first neural model for CP, yet this line of research has been less well explored. In this paper, we assess the ability of neural-network models of CP to predict the psychophysical performance of real observers with speech sounds and artificial/novel stimuli. We show that a variety of neural mechanisms are capable of generating the characteristics of CP. Hence, CP may not be a special model of perception but an emergent property of any sufficiently powerful general learning system.

  9. Effects of categorical representation on visuospatial working memory in autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmo, Joana C; Souza, Cristiane; Gonçalves, Filipe; Pinho, Sandra; Filipe, Carlos N; Lachmann, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    We tested whether individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are impaired in visuospatial working memory or in the use of the semantic system, in particular in categorization processes at the service of working memory. The performance of high-functioning individuals with ASD (N = 21) in a visual same-different task adapted from Lachmann and van Leeuwen [e.g., Lachmann, T., & van Leeuwen, C. (2010). Representational economy, not processing speed, determines preferred processing strategy of visual patterns. Acta Psychologica, 134(3), 290-298] was compared to those of typically developed controls (N = 25). In a categorical identity task, two successive patterns had to be judged as the same if they belonged to the same equivalence set (cf. Garner, W. R., & Clement, D. E. (1963). Goodness of pattern and pattern uncertainty. Journal of Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior, 2, 446-452), including all possible rotation and reflection transformations (R&R category), and as different otherwise. In a physical identity task, only patterns that matched in both shape and orientation had to be responded to as the same; all others, including category matches, had to be classified as different. Equivalence sets had different sizes (ESS). Earlier studies showed an increase in reaction time (RT) with increasing ESS and, for the physical identity task, a response conflict for category matching. Both of these effects were interpreted as evidence for a categorical code by which individual patterns are mentally represented. Assuming that categorization processes are deficient in individuals with ASD, we expected no ESS effects and, in the physical identity task, absence of a response conflict for these individuals. In contrast, we found individuals with ASD to be generally as sensitive to ESS as controls, and they showed a response conflict in the physical identity task. Thus, categorical processing seems to be intact in ASD. However, a strong overall group effect was found in RTs

  10. Research on Categorization of Animation Effect Based on Data Mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Na

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the production process of animation effect is increasingly developed, and its effect is also growing better. But in most cases, the categorization of special effect added to the animation is confusing due to excessive variations. Data mining will desirably solve the problem of animation effect categorization, so the application of data mining in the animation effect categorization becomes the hot spot in research and analysis at present. This article makes a detailed analysis on relevant algorithm of data mining technology, that is, the k application of averaging method, k central point method and relational degree algorithm in problem of animation effect categorization. It provides a clear method of categorization for animation effect. Thereafter, it also concludes the accuracy of animation effect categorization can be greatly improved through reasonable algorithm integration in the treatment of animation effect categorization by data mining.

  11. Categorization of Quantum Mechanics Problems by Professors and Students

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Shih-Yin

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the categorization of 20 quantum mechanics problems by physics professors and undergraduate students from two honors-level quantum mechanics courses. Professors and students were asked to categorize the problems based upon similarity of solution. We also had individual discussions with professors who categorized the problems. Faculty members' categorizations were overall rated higher than those of students by three faculty members who evaluated all of the categorizations. The categories created by faculty members were more diverse compared to the categories they created for a set of introductory mechanics problems. Some faculty members noted that the categorization of introductory physics problems often involves identifying fundamental principles relevant for the problem, whereas in upper-level undergraduate quantum mechanics problems, it mainly involves identifying concepts and procedures required to solve the problem. Moreover, physics faculty members who evaluated others' categorizations express...

  12. 28 CFR 91.55 - Categorical exclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... or other areas sensitive to the visual impacts resulting from height or lighting changes. (e... Environmental Impact Review Procedures for VOI/TIS Grant Program Application to Voi/tis Grant Program § 91.55... within or potentially affect any of the following: a 100-year flood plain, a wetland, important...

  13. Categorical model of structural operational semantics for imperative language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Steingartner

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Definition of programming languages consists of the formal definition of syntax and semantics. One of the most popular semantic methods used in various stages of software engineering is structural operational semantics. It describes program behavior in the form of state changes after execution of elementary steps of program. This feature makes structural operational semantics useful for implementation of programming languages and also for verification purposes. In our paper we present a new approach to structural operational semantics. We model behavior of programs in category of states, where objects are states, an abstraction of computer memory and morphisms model state changes, execution of a program in elementary steps. The advantage of using categorical model is its exact mathematical structure with many useful proved properties and its graphical illustration of program behavior as a path, i.e. a composition of morphisms. Our approach is able to accentuate dynamics of structural operational semantics. For simplicity, we assume that data are intuitively typed. Visualization and facility of our model is  not only  a  new model of structural operational semantics of imperative programming languages but it can also serve for education purposes.

  14. Large-Scale Aerial Image Categorization Using a Multitask Topological Codebook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Luming; Wang, Meng; Hong, Richang; Yin, Bao-Cai; Li, Xuelong

    2016-02-01

    Fast and accurately categorizing the millions of aerial images on Google Maps is a useful technique in pattern recognition. Existing methods cannot handle this task successfully due to two reasons: 1) the aerial images' topologies are the key feature to distinguish their categories, but they cannot be effectively encoded by a conventional visual codebook and 2) it is challenging to build a realtime image categorization system, as some geo-aware Apps update over 20 aerial images per second. To solve these problems, we propose an efficient aerial image categorization algorithm. It focuses on learning a discriminative topological codebook of aerial images under a multitask learning framework. The pipeline can be summarized as follows. We first construct a region adjacency graph (RAG) that describes the topology of each aerial image. Naturally, aerial image categorization can be formulated as RAG-to-RAG matching. According to graph theory, RAG-to-RAG matching is conducted by enumeratively comparing all their respective graphlets (i.e., small subgraphs). To alleviate the high time consumption, we propose to learn a codebook containing topologies jointly discriminative to multiple categories. The learned topological codebook guides the extraction of the discriminative graphlets. Finally, these graphlets are integrated into an AdaBoost model for predicting aerial image categories. Experimental results show that our approach is competitive to several existing recognition models. Furthermore, over 24 aerial images are processed per second, demonstrating that our approach is ready for real-world applications.

  15. Complex surveys analysis of categorical data

    CERN Document Server

    Mukhopadhyay, Parimal

    2016-01-01

    The primary objective of this book is to study some of the research topics in the area of analysis of complex surveys which have not been covered in any book yet. It discusses the analysis of categorical data using three models: a full model, a log-linear model and a logistic regression model. It is a valuable resource for survey statisticians and practitioners in the field of sociology, biology, economics, psychology and other areas who have to use these procedures in their day-to-day work. It is also useful for courses on sampling and complex surveys at the upper-undergraduate and graduate levels. The importance of sample surveys today cannot be overstated. From voters’ behaviour to fields such as industry, agriculture, economics, sociology, psychology, investigators generally resort to survey sampling to obtain an assessment of the behaviour of the population they are interested in. Many large-scale sample surveys collect data using complex survey designs like multistage stratified cluster designs. The o...

  16. Different options for noble gas categorization schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinowski, Martin

    2010-05-01

    For noble gas monitoring it is crucial to support the decision makers who need to decide whether a decection may indicate a potential nuclear test. Several parameters are available that may help to distinguish a legitimate civilian source from a nuclear explosion. The most promising parameters are: (a) Anomaly observations with respect to the history of concentrations found at that site. (b) Isotopic activity ratios can be used to separate a nuclear reactor domain from the parameter space that is specific for nuclear explosions. (c) Correlation with source-receptor-sensitivities related to known civilian sources as determined by atmospheric transport simulations. A combination of these can be used to categorize an observation. So far, several initial ideas have been presented but the issue of noble gas categorisation has been postponed with the argument that further scientific studies and additional experience have to be awaited. This paper presents the principles of different options for noble gas categorisation and considers how they would meet the interests of different classes of member states. It discusses under different points of view what might be the best approach for the noble gas categorisation scheme.

  17. Categorizing words through semantic memory navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borge-Holthoefer, J.; Arenas, A.

    2010-03-01

    Semantic memory is the cognitive system devoted to storage and retrieval of conceptual knowledge. Empirical data indicate that semantic memory is organized in a network structure. Everyday experience shows that word search and retrieval processes provide fluent and coherent speech, i.e. are efficient. This implies either that semantic memory encodes, besides thousands of words, different kind of links for different relationships (introducing greater complexity and storage costs), or that the structure evolves facilitating the differentiation between long-lasting semantic relations from incidental, phenomenological ones. Assuming the latter possibility, we explore a mechanism to disentangle the underlying semantic backbone which comprises conceptual structure (extraction of categorical relations between pairs of words), from the rest of information present in the structure. To this end, we first present and characterize an empirical data set modeled as a network, then we simulate a stochastic cognitive navigation on this topology. We schematize this latter process as uncorrelated random walks from node to node, which converge to a feature vectors network. By doing so we both introduce a novel mechanism for information retrieval, and point at the problem of category formation in close connection to linguistic and non-linguistic experience.

  18. A classification framework for lung tissue categorization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depeursinge, Adrien; Iavindrasana, Jimison; Hidki, Asmâa; Cohen, Gilles; Geissbuhler, Antoine; Platon, Alexandra; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Müller, Henning

    2008-03-01

    We compare five common classifier families in their ability to categorize six lung tissue patterns in high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) images of patients affected with interstitial lung diseases (ILD) but also normal tissue. The evaluated classifiers are Naive Bayes, k-Nearest Neighbor (k-NN), J48 decision trees, Multi-Layer Perceptron (MLP) and Support Vector Machines (SVM). The dataset used contains 843 regions of interest (ROI) of healthy and five pathologic lung tissue patterns identified by two radiologists at the University Hospitals of Geneva. Correlation of the feature space composed of 39 texture attributes is studied. A grid search for optimal parameters is carried out for each classifier family. Two complementary metrics are used to characterize the performances of classification. Those are based on McNemar's statistical tests and global accuracy. SVM reached best values for each metric and allowed a mean correct prediction rate of 87.9% with high class-specific precision on testing sets of 423 ROIs.

  19. Categorical representation of North American precipitation projections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Arthur M.; Seager, Richard

    2016-04-01

    We explore use of the familiar tercile framework of seasonal forecasting for the characterization of 21st-century precipitation projections over North America. Consistent with direct analyses of modeled precipitation change, in a superensemble of CMIP5 simulations an unambiguous pattern of shifted tercile population statistics develops as the globe warms. Expressed categorically, frequencies for the low (i.e., dry) tercile increase in the southwestern United States and southward into Mexico and decrease across the northern tier of North America, while counts for the high tercile shift in the opposite sense. We show that as the 21st-century proceeds, changes become statistically significant over wide regions in the pointwise sense, and also when considered as projections on model-specific climate change “fingerprints”. Background noise in the superensemble, against which significance is established, comprises both structural model uncertainty and natural climate variability. The robustness of these findings makes a compelling case for long-range planning for a dryer future in the American Southwest and southward, and wetter one to the north and especially northeast, while communication is facilitated by widespread user familiarity with the tercile format.

  20. Motivation to control prejudice predicts categorization of multiracials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jacqueline M; Moons, Wesley G; Gaither, Sarah E; Hamilton, David L; Sherman, Jeffrey W

    2014-05-01

    Multiracial individuals often do not easily fit into existing racial categories. Perceivers may adopt a novel racial category to categorize multiracial targets, but their willingness to do so may depend on their motivations. We investigated whether perceivers' levels of internal motivation to control prejudice (IMS) and external motivation to control prejudice (EMS) predicted their likelihood of categorizing Black-White multiracial faces as Multiracial. Across four studies, IMS positively predicted perceivers' categorizations of multiracial faces as Multiracial. The association between IMS and Multiracial categorizations was strongest when faces were most racially ambiguous. Explicit prejudice, implicit prejudice, and interracial contact were ruled out as explanations for the relationship between IMS and Multiracial categorizations. EMS may be negatively associated with the use of the Multiracial category. Therefore, perceivers' motivations to control prejudice have important implications for racial categorization processes.

  1. Person categorization and automatic racial stereotyping effects on weapon identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christopher R; Fazio, Russell H

    2010-08-01

    Prior stereotyping research provides conflicting evidence regarding the importance of person categorization along a particular dimension for the automatic activation of a stereotype corresponding to that dimension. Experiment 1 replicated a racial stereotyping effect on object identification and examined whether it could be attenuated by encouraging categorization by age. Experiment 2 employed socially complex person stimuli and manipulated whether participants categorized spontaneously or by race. In Experiment 3, the distinctiveness of the racial dimension was manipulated by having Black females appear in the context of either Black males or White females. The results indicated that conditions fostering categorization by race consistently produced automatic racial stereotyping and that conditions fostering nonracial categorization can eliminate automatic racial stereotyping. Implications for the relation between automatic stereotype activation and dimension of categorization are discussed.

  2. ARABIC TEXT CATEGORIZATION ALGORITHM USING VECTOR EVALUATION METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Odeh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Text categorization is the process of grouping documents into categories based on their contents. This process is important to make information retrieval easier, and it became more important due to the huge textual information available online. The main problem in text categorization is how to improve the classification accuracy. Although Arabic text categorization is a new promising field, there are a few researches in this field. This paper proposes a new method for Arabic text categorization using vector evaluation. The proposed method uses a categorized Arabic documents corpus, and then the weights of the tested document's words are calculated to determine the document keywords which will be compared with the keywords of the corpus categorizes to determine the tested document's best category.

  3. Assessing Expertise in Introductory Physics Using Categorization Task

    CERN Document Server

    Mason, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    The ability to categorize problems based upon underlying principles, rather than surface features or contexts, is considered one of several proxy predictors of expertise in problem solving. With inspiration from the classic study by Chi, Feltovich, and Glaser, we assess the distribution of expertise among introductory physics students by asking three introductory physics classes, each with more than a hundred students, to categorize mechanics problems based upon similarity of solution. We compare their categorization with those of physics graduate students and faculty members. To evaluate the effect of problem context on students' ability to categorize, two sets of problems were developed for categorization. Some problems in one set included those available from the prior study by Chi et al. We find a large overlap between calculus-based introductory students and graduate students with regard to their categorizations that were assessed as "good." Our findings, which contrast with those of Chi et al., suggest ...

  4. A Prototype-Based Resonance Model of Rhythm Categorization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasmus Bååth

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Categorization of rhythmic patterns is prevalent in musical practice, an example of this being the transcription of (possibly not strictly metrical music into musical notation. In this article we implement a dynamical systems' model of rhythm categorization based on the resonance theory of rhythm perception developed by Large (2010. This model is used to simulate the categorical choices of participants in two experiments of Desain and Honing (2003. The model accurately replicates the experimental data. Our results support resonance theory as a viable model of rhythm perception and show that by viewing rhythm perception as a dynamical system it is possible to model central properties of rhythm categorization.

  5. On $\\omega$-categorical groups and rings with NIP

    CERN Document Server

    Krupinski, Krzysztof

    2010-01-01

    We show that $\\omega$-categorical rings with NIP are nilpotent-by-finite. We prove that an $\\omega$-categorical group with NIP and fsg is nilpotent-by-finite. We also notice that an $\\omega$-categorical group with at least one strongly regular type is abelian. Moreover, we get that each $\\omega$-categorical, characteristically simple $p$-group with NIP has an infinite, definable abelian subgroup. Assuming additionally the existence of a non-algebraic, generically stable over $\\emptyset$ type, such a group is abelian.

  6. A prototype-based resonance model of rhythm categorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bååth, Rasmus; Lagerstedt, Erik; Gärdenfors, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Categorization of rhythmic patterns is prevalent in musical practice, an example of this being the transcription of (possibly not strictly metrical) music into musical notation. In this article we implement a dynamical systems' model of rhythm categorization based on the resonance theory of rhythm perception developed by Large (2010). This model is used to simulate the categorical choices of participants in two experiments of Desain and Honing (2003). The model accurately replicates the experimental data. Our results support resonance theory as a viable model of rhythm perception and show that by viewing rhythm perception as a dynamical system it is possible to model central properties of rhythm categorization.

  7. What makes a visualization memorable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkin, Michelle A; Vo, Azalea A; Bylinskii, Zoya; Isola, Phillip; Sunkavalli, Shashank; Oliva, Aude; Pfister, Hanspeter

    2013-12-01

    An ongoing debate in the Visualization community concerns the role that visualization types play in data understanding. In human cognition, understanding and memorability are intertwined. As a first step towards being able to ask questions about impact and effectiveness, here we ask: 'What makes a visualization memorable?' We ran the largest scale visualization study to date using 2,070 single-panel visualizations, categorized with visualization type (e.g., bar chart, line graph, etc.), collected from news media sites, government reports, scientific journals, and infographic sources. Each visualization was annotated with additional attributes, including ratings for data-ink ratios and visual densities. Using Amazon's Mechanical Turk, we collected memorability scores for hundreds of these visualizations, and discovered that observers are consistent in which visualizations they find memorable and forgettable. We find intuitive results (e.g., attributes like color and the inclusion of a human recognizable object enhance memorability) and less intuitive results (e.g., common graphs are less memorable than unique visualization types). Altogether our findings suggest that quantifying memorability is a general metric of the utility of information, an essential step towards determining how to design effective visualizations.

  8. Learning foreign sounds in an alien world: videogame training improves non-native speech categorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sung-joo; Holt, Lori L

    2011-01-01

    Although speech categories are defined by multiple acoustic dimensions, some are perceptually weighted more than others and there are residual effects of native-language weightings in non-native speech perception. Recent research on nonlinguistic sound category learning suggests that the distribution characteristics of experienced sounds influence perceptual cue weights: Increasing variability across a dimension leads listeners to rely upon it less in subsequent category learning (Holt & Lotto, 2006). The present experiment investigated the implications of this among native Japanese learning English /r/-/l/ categories. Training was accomplished using a videogame paradigm that emphasizes associations among sound categories, visual information, and players' responses to videogame characters rather than overt categorization or explicit feedback. Subjects who played the game for 2.5h across 5 days exhibited improvements in /r/-/l/ perception on par with 2-4 weeks of explicit categorization training in previous research and exhibited a shift toward more native-like perceptual cue weights.

  9. Visual Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Surgery? Choosing the Right Sport for You Shyness Visual Impairment KidsHealth > For Teens > Visual Impairment Print A A ... with the brain, making vision impossible. What Is Visual Impairment? Many people have some type of visual problem ...

  10. Visual field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perimetry; Tangent screen exam; Automated perimetry exam; Goldmann visual field exam; Humphrey visual field exam ... Confrontation visual field exam : This is a quick and basic check of the visual field. The health care provider ...

  11. An ERP analysis of recognition and categorization decisions in a prototype-distortion task.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J Tunney

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Theories of categorization make different predictions about the underlying processes used to represent categories. Episodic theories suggest that categories are represented in memory by storing previously encountered exemplars in memory. Prototype theories suggest that categories are represented in the form of a prototype independently of memory. A number of studies that show dissociations between categorization and recognition are often cited as evidence for the prototype account. These dissociations have compared recognition judgements made to one set of items to categorization judgements to a different set of items making a clear interpretation difficult. Instead of using different stimuli for different tests this experiment compares the processes by which participants make decisions about category membership in a prototype-distortion task and with recognition decisions about the same set of stimuli by examining the Event Related Potentials (ERPs associated with them. METHOD: Sixty-three participants were asked to make categorization or recognition decisions about stimuli that either formed an artificial category or that were category non-members. We examined the ERP components associated with both kinds of decision for pre-exposed and control participants. CONCLUSION: In contrast to studies using different items we observed no behavioural differences between the two kinds of decision; participants were equally able to distinguish category members from non-members, regardless of whether they were performing a recognition or categorisation judgement. Interestingly, this did not interact with prior-exposure. However, the ERP data demonstrated that the early visual evoked response that discriminated category members from non-members was modulated by which judgement participants performed and whether they had been pre-exposed to category members. We conclude from this that any differences between categorization and recognition reflect

  12. Categorical Representation of Facial Expressions in the Infant Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppanen, Jukka M.; Richmond, Jenny; Vogel-Farley, Vanessa K.; Moulson, Margaret C.; Nelson, Charles A.

    2009-01-01

    Categorical perception, demonstrated as reduced discrimination of within-category relative to between-category differences in stimuli, has been found in a variety of perceptual domains in adults. To examine the development of categorical perception in the domain of facial expression processing, we used behavioral and event-related potential (ERP)…

  13. Categorical Perception of Emotional Facial Expressions in Preschoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheal, Jenna L.; Rutherford, M. D.

    2011-01-01

    Adults perceive emotional facial expressions categorically. In this study, we explored categorical perception in 3.5-year-olds by creating a morphed continuum of emotional faces and tested preschoolers' discrimination and identification of them. In the discrimination task, participants indicated whether two examples from the continuum "felt the…

  14. Exploring Distance Learning Environments: A Proposal for Model Categorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgado, Eduardo Martins; Yonezawa, Wilson; Reinhard, Nicolau

    This article proposes a categorization model for online distance education environments, based on two different aspects: interaction and content. The proposed categorization, which was based on the experience acquired in developing, implementing, and operating different remote training courses, is aimed at providing evidence to help educational…

  15. Classification/Categorization Model of Instruction for Learning Disabled Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Lisa A.

    1987-01-01

    Learning-disabled students deficient in classification and categorization require specific instruction in these skills. Use of a classification/categorization instructional model improved the questioning strategies of 60 learning-disabled students, aged 10 to 12. The use of similar models is discussed as a basis for instruction in science, social…

  16. Working Memory Capacity and Categorization: Individual Differences and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowsky, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    Working memory is crucial for many higher-level cognitive functions, ranging from mental arithmetic to reasoning and problem solving. Likewise, the ability to learn and categorize novel concepts forms an indispensable part of human cognition. However, very little is known about the relationship between working memory and categorization, and…

  17. Assessing expertise in introductory physics using categorization task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Mason

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The ability to categorize problems based upon underlying principles, rather than surface features or contexts, is considered one of several proxy predictors of expertise in problem solving. With inspiration from the classic study by Chi, Feltovich, and Glaser, we assess the distribution of expertise among introductory physics students by asking three introductory physics classes, each with more than a hundred students, to categorize mechanics problems based upon similarity of solution. We compare their categorization with those of physics graduate students and faculty members. To evaluate the effect of problem context on students’ ability to categorize, two sets of problems were developed for categorization. Some problems in one set included those available from the prior study by Chi et al. We find a large overlap between calculus-based introductory students and graduate students with regard to their categorizations that were assessed as “good.” Our findings, which contrast with those of Chi et al., suggest that there is a wide distribution of expertise in mechanics among introductory and graduate students. Although the categorization task is conceptual, introductory students in the calculus-based course performed better than those in the algebra-based course. Qualitative trends in categorization of problems are similar between the non-Chi problems and problems available from the Chi study used in our study although the Chi problems used are more difficult on average.

  18. ONTOLOGY INTEGRATION APPROACHES AND ITS IMPACT ON TEXT CATEGORIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Machhour

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This article will introduce some approaches for improving text categorization models by integrating previously imported ontologies. From the Reuters Corpus Volume I (RCV1 dataset, some categories very similar in content and related to telecommunications, Internet and computer areas were selected for models experiments. Several domain ontologies, covering these areas were built and integrated to categorization models for their improvements.

  19. Categorization and Pathology of Persian Stylistic Researches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Dorpar

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In following article, surveys and researches about Persian style were categorized in two branches of historical and formalistic styles Mohammad Taghi Bahar founded stylistics as an autonomous knowledge by publishing his book, History of the evolution of Persian prose (1331, for teaching in University of Tehran. This book which has been influenced by verbal instructions of qajar dynasty’s scholars made the way generally has been followed by researchers in Persian stylistics up to now. However, researchers and critics have introduced various theories and approaches during last four decades.  Stagnation in Persian stylistic researches is the main problem which is considered in current article. The main questions are: What branch of stylistics should be the performed Persian stylistic researches? “what are the weak points of surveys” and “what should be done for getting rid of this stagnation?” The main objective of current article is taking steps for removing stagnation from Persian stylistics.  Malek osh-Shoara Bahar used periodization in studying prose styles and analyzed revolution of Persian prose in lexical aspect (obsolete words, Arabic words, synonyms, words repetition, morphological aspect (verbal prefixes, comparative adjective suffixes, syntactic aspect (precedence of verb over its belongings, omission of verbs and rhetorical aspect (simile and allegory, metonymy and metaphor, prolixity and periphrasis, riming prose and harmony. In fact he tried to show both health and strength and laxity and corruption period of prose. We call Bahar stylistics and all researches done in his way historical stylistics with traditional attitude. In this method, styles' consistency and evolution through history have been studied and preiodization of styles has been taken into account. Mentioned researches periodized styles, finding formal similarities and differences. Since, neglecting meaning and text functionality they have only paid

  20. Categorization and Pathology of Persian Stylistic Researches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Dorpar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available  Abstract In following article, surveys and researches about Persian style were categorized in two branches of historical and formalistic styles Mohammad Taghi Bahar founded stylistics as an autonomous knowledge by publishing his book, History of the evolution of Persian prose (1331, for teaching in University of Tehran. This book which has been influenced by verbal instructions of qajar dynasty’s scholars made the way generally has been followed by researchers in Persian stylistics up to now. However, researchers and critics have introduced various theories and approaches during last four decades.  Stagnation in Persian stylistic researches is the main problem which is considered in current article. The main questions are: What branch of stylistics should be the performed Persian stylistic researches? “what are the weak points of surveys” and “what should be done for getting rid of this stagnation?” The main objective of current article is taking steps for removing stagnation from Persian stylistics.  Malek osh-Shoara Bahar used periodization in studying prose styles and analyzed revolution of Persian prose in lexical aspect (obsolete words, Arabic words, synonyms, words repetition, morphological aspect (verbal prefixes, comparative adjective suffixes, syntactic aspect (precedence of verb over its belongings, omission of verbs and rhetorical aspect (simile and allegory, metonymy and metaphor, prolixity and periphrasis, riming prose and harmony. In fact he tried to show both health and strength and laxity and corruption period of prose. We call Bahar stylistics and all researches done in his way historical stylistics with traditional attitude. In this method, styles' consistency and evolution through history have been studied and preiodization of styles has been taken into account. Mentioned researches periodized styles, finding formal similarities and differences. Since, neglecting meaning and text

  1. Neural Correlates of Subjective Awareness for Natural Scene Categorization of Color Photographs and Line-Drawings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qiufang; Liu, Yong-Jin; Dienes, Zoltan; Wu, Jianhui; Chen, Wenfeng; Fu, Xiaolan

    2017-01-01

    It remains controversial whether visual awareness is correlated with early activation indicated by VAN (visual awareness negativity), as the recurrent process hypothesis theory proposes, or with later activation indicated by P3 or LP (late positive), as suggested by global workspace theories. To address this issue, a backward masking task was adopted, in which participants were first asked to categorize natural scenes of color photographs and line-drawings and then to rate the clarity of their visual experience on a Perceptual Awareness Scale (PAS). The interstimulus interval between the scene and the mask was manipulated. The behavioral results showed that categorization accuracy increased with PAS ratings for both color photographs and line-drawings, with no difference in accuracy between the two types of images for each rating, indicating that the experience rating reflected visibility. Importantly, the event-related potential (ERP) results revealed that for correct trials, the early posterior N1 and anterior P2 components changed with the PAS ratings for color photographs, but did not vary with the PAS ratings for line-drawings, indicating that the N1 and P2 do not always correlate with subjective visual awareness. Moreover, for both types of images, the anterior N2 and posterior VAN changed with the PAS ratings in a linear way, while the LP changed with the PAS ratings in a non-linear way, suggesting that these components relate to different types of subjective awareness. The results reconcile the apparently contradictory predictions of different theories and help to resolve the current debate on neural correlates of visual awareness. PMID:28261141

  2. Categorical membership modulates crowding: evidence from characters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuther, Josephine; Chakravarthi, Ramakrishna

    2014-10-16

    Visual crowding is generally thought to affect recognition mostly or only at the level of feature combination. Calling this assertion into question, recent studies have shown that if a target object and its flankers belong to different categories crowding is weaker than if they belong to the same category. Nevertheless, these results can be explained in terms of featural differences between categories. The current study tests if category-level (i.e., high-level) interference in crowding occurs when featural differences are controlled for. First, replicating previous results, we found lower critical spacing for targets and flankers belonging to different categories. Second, we observed the same, albeit weaker, category-specific effect when objects in both categories had the exact same feature set, suggesting that category-specific effects persist even when featural differences are fully controlled for. Third, we manipulated the semantic content of the flankers while keeping their feature set constant, by using upright or rotated objects, and found that meaning modulated crowding. An exclusively feature-based account of crowding would predict no differences due to such changes in meaning. We conclude that crowding results from not only the well-documented feature-level interactions but also additional interactions at a level where objects are grouped by meaning.

  3. Formalization of Human Categorization Process Using Interpolative Boolean Algebra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Dobrić

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the ancient times, it has been assumed that categorization has the basic form of classical sets. This implies that the categorization process rests on the Boolean laws. In the second half of the twentieth century, the classical theory has been challenged in cognitive science. According to the prototype theory, objects belong to categories with intensities, while humans categorize objects by comparing them to prototypes of relevant categories. Such categorization process is governed by the principles of perceived world structure and cognitive economy. Approaching the prototype theory by using truth-functional fuzzy logic has been harshly criticized due to not satisfying the complementation laws. In this paper, the prototype theory is approached by using structure-functional fuzzy logic, the interpolative Boolean algebra. The proposed formalism is within the Boolean frame. Categories are represented as fuzzy sets of objects, while comparisons between objects and prototypes are formalized by using Boolean consistent fuzzy relations. Such relations are directly constructed from a Boolean consistent fuzzy partial order relation, which is treated by Boolean implication. The introduced formalism secures the principles of categorization showing that Boolean laws are fundamental in the categorization process. For illustration purposes, the artificial cognitive system which mimics human categorization activity is proposed.

  4. The Categorical Distinction Between Targets and Distractors Facilitates Tracking in Multiple Identity Tracking Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Liuqing; Zhang, Xuemin; Lyu, Chuang; Li, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the tracking facilitation effect during categorical distinction between targets and distractors in the Multiple Identity Tracking task. We asked observers to track four targets in a total of eight moving objects, and manipulated categorical distinctions of targets and distractors across four experiments, with different combinations of inter-category and intra-category differences. Results show that tracking performance was significantly better when the targets and distractors were inter-category different, compared to when the targets and distractors were identical or intra-category distinctive. As the inter-category distinction between targets and distractors narrowed, tracking performance improved, but the inter-category facilitation effect decreased. These results may indicate a category-based grouping effect: the observers organized the targets within the same semantic category into one group and made the targets more easily and accurately rediscovered when lost during tracking. Furthermore, the tracking facilitation of categorical distinction diminished when all the objects were inverted. This proved that besides their visual distinctiveness, objects' semantic category information also played an important role during tracking.

  5. Emotional State Categorization from Speech: Machine vs. Human

    CERN Document Server

    Shaukat, Arslan

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents our investigations on emotional state categorization from speech signals with a psychologically inspired computational model against human performance under the same experimental setup. Based on psychological studies, we propose a multistage categorization strategy which allows establishing an automatic categorization model flexibly for a given emotional speech categorization task. We apply the strategy to the Serbian Emotional Speech Corpus (GEES) and the Danish Emotional Speech Corpus (DES), where human performance was reported in previous psychological studies. Our work is the first attempt to apply machine learning to the GEES corpus where the human recognition rates were only available prior to our study. Unlike the previous work on the DES corpus, our work focuses on a comparison to human performance under the same experimental settings. Our studies suggest that psychology-inspired systems yield behaviours that, to a great extent, resemble what humans perceived and their performance ...

  6. AutoCategorization for Customized Knowledge Portals Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An AutoCategorizing Knowledge Management Engine ("AKM") will automate key capabilities for both human-human and human-agent collaboration tools in aerospace...

  7. Atypical Categorization in Children with High Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Barbara A.; Krauss, Maria S.; Lopata, Christopher; Toomey, Jennifer A.; Thomeer, Marcus L.; Coutinho, Mariana V.; Volker, Martin A.; Mercado, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorder process many perceptual and social events differently from typically developing children, suggesting that they may also form and recognize categories differently. We used a dot pattern categorization task and prototype comparison modeling to compare categorical processing in children with high functioning autism spectrum disorder and matched typical controls. We were interested in whether there were differences in how children with autism use average similarity information about a category to make decisions. During testing, the group with autism spectrum disorder endorsed prototypes less and was seemingly less sensitive to differences between to-be-categorized items and the prototype. The findings suggest that individuals with high functioning autism spectrum disorder are less likely to use overall average similarity when forming categories or making categorical decisions. Such differences in category formation and use may negatively impact processing of socially relevant information, such as facial expressions. PMID:21169581

  8. Color Vision and Hue Categorization in Young Human Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornstein, Marc H.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    The main objective of the present investigations was to determine whether or not young human infants see the physical spectrum in a categorical fashion as human adults and animals who possess color vision regularly do. (Author)

  9. A Goal-Directed Bayesian Framework for Categorization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigoli, Francesco; Pezzulo, Giovanni; Dolan, Raymond; Friston, Karl

    2017-01-01

    Categorization is a fundamental ability for efficient behavioral control. It allows organisms to remember the correct responses to categorical cues and not for every stimulus encountered (hence eluding computational cost or complexity), and to generalize appropriate responses to novel stimuli dependant on category assignment. Assuming the brain performs Bayesian inference, based on a generative model of the external world and future goals, we propose a computational model of categorization in which important properties emerge. These properties comprise the ability to infer latent causes of sensory experience, a hierarchical organization of latent causes, and an explicit inclusion of context and action representations. Crucially, these aspects derive from considering the environmental statistics that are relevant to achieve goals, and from the fundamental Bayesian principle that any generative model should be preferred over alternative models based on an accuracy-complexity trade-off. Our account is a step toward elucidating computational principles of categorization and its role within the Bayesian brain hypothesis.

  10. SUPERVISED LEARNING METHODS FOR BANGLA WEB DOCUMENT CATEGORIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashis Kumar Mandal

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the use of machine learning approaches, or more specifically, four supervised learning Methods, namely Decision Tree(C 4.5, K-Nearest Neighbour (KNN, Naïve Bays (NB, and Support Vector Machine (SVM for categorization of Bangla web documents. This is a task of automatically sorting a set of documents into categories from a predefined set. Whereas a wide range of methods have been applied to English text categorization, relatively few studies have been conducted on Bangla language text categorization. Hence, we attempt to analyze the efficiency of those four methods for categorization of Bangla documents. In order to validate, Bangla corpus from various websites has been developed and used as examples for the experiment. For Bangla, empirical results support that all four methods produce satisfactory performance with SVM attaining good result in terms of high dimensional and relatively noisy document feature vectors.

  11. Categorization of Indoor Places Using the Kinect Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Kurazume

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The categorization of places in indoor environments is an important capability for service robots working and interacting with humans. In this paper we present a method to categorize different areas in indoor environments using a mobile robot equipped with a Kinect camera. Our approach transforms depth and grey scale images taken at each place into histograms of local binary patterns (LBPs whose dimensionality is further reduced following a uniform criterion. The histograms are then combined into a single feature vector which is categorized using a supervised method. In this work we compare the performance of support vector machines and random forests as supervised classifiers. Finally, we apply our technique to distinguish five different place categories: corridors, laboratories, offices, kitchens, and study rooms. Experimental results show that we can categorize these places with high accuracy using our approach.

  12. The Practical Interpretation of the Categorical Imperative: A Defense

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cristian Dimitriu

    2013-01-01

      The article compares two different interpretations of Kant's categorical imperative -the practical and the logical one- and defends the practical one, arguing that it is superior because it rejects...

  13. A CLUSTERING ALGORITHM FOR MIXED NUMERIC AND CATEGORICAL DATA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ohn Mar San; Van-Nam Huynh; Yoshiteru Nakamori

    2003-01-01

    Most of the earlier work on clustering mainly focused on numeric data whose inherent geometric properties can be exploited to naturally define distance functions between data points. However, data mining applications frequently involve many datasets that also consists of mixed numeric and categorical attributes. In this paper we present a clustering algorithm which is based on the k-means algorithm. The algorithm clusters objects with numeric and categorical attributes in a way similar to k-means. The object similarity measure is derived from both numeric and categorical attributes. When applied to numeric data, the algorithm is identical to the k-means. The main result of this paper is to provide a method to update the "cluster centers" of clustering objects described by mixed numeric and categorical attributes in the clustering process to minimize the clustering cost function. The clustering performance of the algorithm is demonstrated with the two well known data sets, namely credit approval and abalone databases.

  14. Random matrix approach to multivariate categorical data analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Patil, Aashay

    2015-01-01

    Correlation and similarity measures are widely used in all the areas of sciences and social sciences. Often the variables are not numbers but are instead qualitative descriptors called categorical data. We define and study similarity matrix, as a measure of similarity, for the case of categorical data. This is of interest due to a deluge of categorical data, such as movie ratings, top-10 rankings and data from social media, in the public domain that require analysis. We show that the statistical properties of the spectra of similarity matrices, constructed from categorical data, follow those from random matrix theory. We demonstrate this approach by applying it to the data of Indian general elections and sea level pressures in North Atlantic ocean.

  15. On 0-homology of categorical at zero semigroups

    OpenAIRE

    Novikov, B. V.; Polyakova, L. Yu.

    2008-01-01

    The isomorphism of 0-homology groups of a categorical at zero semigroup and homology groups of its 0-reflector is proved. Some applications of 0-homology to Eilenberg-MacLane homology of semigroups are given.

  16. A Text Categorization Algorithm Based on Sense Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Wan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Giving further consideration on linguistic feature, this study proposes an algorithm of Chinese text categorization based on sense group. The algorithm extracts sense group by analyzing syntactic and semantic properties of Chinese texts and builds the category sense group library. SVM is used for the experiment of text categorization. The experimental results show that the precision and recall of the new algorithm based on sense group is better than that of traditional algorithms.

  17. Prefrontal cortex neurons reflect categorical decisions about ambiguous stimuli

    OpenAIRE

    Roy, Jefferson E.; Buschman, Timothy J.; Miller, Earl K

    2014-01-01

    We examined whether prefrontal cortex (PFC) neuron activity reflects categorical decisions in monkeys categorizing ambiguous stimuli. A morphing system was used to systematically vary stimulus shape and precisely define category boundaries. Ambiguous stimuli were centered on a category boundary, i.e., they were a mix of 50% of two prototypes and therefore had no category information, so monkeys guessed at their category membership. We found that the monkey's trial-by-trial decision about the ...

  18. Some theoretical aspects of human categorization behavior: similarity and generalization

    OpenAIRE

    Jäkel, Frank

    2007-01-01

    Explanations of human categorization behavior often invoke similarity. Stimuli that are similar to each other are grouped together whereas stimuli that are very different are kept separate. Despite serious problems in defining similarity, both conceptually and experimentally, this is the prevailing view of categorization in prototype models (Posner & Keele, 1968; Reed, 1972) and exemplar models (Medin & Schaffer, 1978; Nosofsky, 1986). This is also the prevailing approach in machine learning ...

  19. Inference and coherence in causal-based artifact categorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puebla, Guillermo; Chaigneau, Sergio E

    2014-01-01

    In four experiments, we tested conditions under which artifact concepts support inference and coherence in causal categorization. In all four experiments, participants categorized scenarios in which we systematically varied information about artifacts' associated design history, physical structure, user intention, user action and functional outcome, and where each property could be specified as intact, compromised or not observed. Consistently across experiments, when participants received complete information (i.e., when all properties were observed), they categorized based on individual properties and did not show evidence of using coherence to categorize. In contrast, when the state of some property was not observed, participants gave evidence of using available information to infer the state of the unobserved property, which increased the value of the available information for categorization. Our data offers answers to longstanding questions regarding artifact categorization, such as whether there are underlying causal models for artifacts, which properties are part of them, whether design history is an artifact's causal essence, and whether physical appearance or functional outcome is the most central artifact property.

  20. The categorization of natural scenes: brain attention networks revealed by dense sensor ERPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codispoti, Maurizio; Ferrari, Vera; Junghöfer, Markus; Schupp, Harald T

    2006-08-15

    The present study examined cortical indicators of selective attention underlying categorization based on target features in natural scenes. The primary focus was to determine the neural sources associated with the processing of target stimuli containing animals compared to non-target control stimuli. Neural source estimation techniques [current source density (CSD) and L2-minimum norm estimate (L2-MNE)] were used to determine the sources of the potential fields measured from 58 sensor sites. Assuring an excellent signal-to-noise ratio, the categorization task consisted of 2400 trials. Replicating previous findings, target and non-target ERP activity diverged sharply around 150 ms after stimulus onset and the early differential ERP activity appeared as positive deflection over fronto-central sensor sites and as negative deflection over temporo-occipital regions. Both source estimation techniques (CSD and L2-MNE) suggested primary sources of the early differential ERP activity in posterior, visual-associative brain regions and, although less pronounced, revealed the contribution of additional anterior sources. These findings suggest that selective attention to category-relevant features reflects the interactions between prefrontal and inferior temporal cortex during visual processing of natural scenes.

  1. P1-15: Categorical Color Perception of LED Illuminant Color for Deuteranomals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeko Oishi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Color information has great value in our everyday lives, but it is not mindful of people with color vision deficiency (CVD. We can choose several color names to categorize a lot of colors around us. Eleven color names (white, black, red, green, yellow, blue, brown, orange, pink, and gray are known as basic color categories, but people with CVD cannot necessarily describe colors as people who are color vision normal (CVN do. Previous studies showed that it was hard for people with CVD to discriminate illuminant color from object color, and their color perception changed largely depending on experimental conditions. In this study we investigated categorical color perception of illuminant color for deuteranomals, using a mixture of light which consists of a red, a green, and a blue LED as a test stimulus. We tested those stimuli with three luminance levels (180 cd/m2, 18 cd/m2, 1.8 cd/m2 and two visual angles (10 deg, 0.5 deg. Subjects were three deuteranomals and three people who are CVN. Our result showed that the categorical color of mild deuteranomals was similar to that of those who were CVN, but that of severe deuteranomals was not. Severe deuteranomals judged more low chromatic colors as achromatic colors than those who were CVN. The smaller visual angle or lower luminance level the test stimulus had, the more deuteranomals confused color. The results suggest that the effect of the Bezold-Brucke phenomenon is greater to deuteranomals than to those who are CVN. Furthermore, deuteranomals use not only chromatic information but also luminance information when they describe color.

  2. 明视人听词分类任务时的视皮层激活——跨感觉通道的新证据%Visual Cortical Activation During Auditory Word Categorization:Evidence for Multiple Sensory Interaction From Normal Sighted Participants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董国珍; 杨志; 张兆琪; 于薇; 李静薇; 贺毅; 张学新; 翁旭初

    2009-01-01

    Sensory substitution has been reported in recent brain imaging studies with blind people and others with sensory deficits so that sensory cortical regions traditionally considered unimodal respond to stimulation from other sensory modalities.Similar effects are also found for normal sighted people with sensory deprivation (blindfolded),indicative of pre-existing neuronal pathways for multiple sensory interactions.Such pathways are considered latent in that they only become unmasked or potentiated in the event of sensory deafferentation,although whether sensory deprivation is necessary to expose these pathways is unclear due to inconclusive evidence.With a relatively strong power in experimental design,visual cortical activation was observed when normal sighted participants (not blindfolded) judged whether auditorily-presented nouns referred to artificial or natural objects.The results suggest the above mentioned pathways can be exposed without sensory deafferentation and therefore are not totally latent.This establishes a boundary condition constraining theoretical models for the neural basis of multiple sensory interactions.%近期的脑成像研究在盲人等感官缺陷被试者身上发现了感觉替换现象,即传统上认为仅对单一感觉通道刺激反应的皮层区域也参与其他感觉通道的信息加工.类似的效应在感觉剥夺(蒙住眼睛)的明视人被试中也被观察到,提示脑内可能预存着多感觉交瓦作用的神经通路.通常认为,上述神经通路在常态的人脑中是以潜伏形式存在的,只有当感觉剥夺时才显露出来或得到加强.但是,感觉剥夺是台是该类神经通路发挥作用的必要条件,已有的研究尚缺乏确切的证据.采用统计力度较强的实验设计,给未蒙眼明视人被试听觉旱现一组名词,要求其对听到的每一个词语做出是人工物体还是自然物体的语义判断.对同步采集的功能磁共振信号进行统计分析,观察到视皮

  3. Are all types of expertise created equal? Car experts use different spatial frequency scales for subordinate categorization of cars and faces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harel, Assaf; Bentin, Shlomo

    2013-01-01

    A much-debated question in object recognition is whether expertise for faces and expertise for non-face objects utilize common perceptual information. We investigated this issue by assessing the diagnostic information required for different types of expertise. Specifically, we asked whether face categorization and expert car categorization at the subordinate level relies on the same spatial frequency (SF) scales. Fifteen car experts and fifteen novices performed a category verification task with spatially filtered images of faces, cars, and airplanes. Images were categorized based on their basic (e.g. "car") and subordinate level (e.g. "Japanese car") identity. The effect of expertise was not evident when objects were categorized at the basic level. However, when the car experts categorized faces and cars at the subordinate level, the two types of expertise required different kinds of SF information. Subordinate categorization of faces relied on low SFs more than on high SFs, whereas subordinate expert car categorization relied on high SFs more than on low SFs. These findings suggest that expertise in the recognition of objects and faces do not utilize the same type of information. Rather, different types of expertise require different types of diagnostic visual information.

  4. Are all types of expertise created equal? Car experts use different spatial frequency scales for subordinate categorization of cars and faces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assaf Harel

    Full Text Available A much-debated question in object recognition is whether expertise for faces and expertise for non-face objects utilize common perceptual information. We investigated this issue by assessing the diagnostic information required for different types of expertise. Specifically, we asked whether face categorization and expert car categorization at the subordinate level relies on the same spatial frequency (SF scales. Fifteen car experts and fifteen novices performed a category verification task with spatially filtered images of faces, cars, and airplanes. Images were categorized based on their basic (e.g. "car" and subordinate level (e.g. "Japanese car" identity. The effect of expertise was not evident when objects were categorized at the basic level. However, when the car experts categorized faces and cars at the subordinate level, the two types of expertise required different kinds of SF information. Subordinate categorization of faces relied on low SFs more than on high SFs, whereas subordinate expert car categorization relied on high SFs more than on low SFs. These findings suggest that expertise in the recognition of objects and faces do not utilize the same type of information. Rather, different types of expertise require different types of diagnostic visual information.

  5. Visual agnosia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, R; Masjuan, J

    2016-03-01

    Visual agnosia is defined as an impairment of object recognition, in the absence of visual acuity or cognitive dysfunction that would explain this impairment. This condition is caused by lesions in the visual association cortex, sparing primary visual cortex. There are 2 main pathways that process visual information: the ventral stream, tasked with object recognition, and the dorsal stream, in charge of locating objects in space. Visual agnosia can therefore be divided into 2 major groups depending on which of the two streams is damaged. The aim of this article is to conduct a narrative review of the various visual agnosia syndromes, including recent developments in a number of these syndromes.

  6. Music Reading Expertise Selectively Improves Categorical Judgment with Musical Notation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yetta Kwailing Wong

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Different domains of perceptual expertise often lead to different hemispheric engagement (e.g. Kanwisher et al., 1997. Recent work suggests that the neural substrates engaged in musical reading are shifted from left hemisphere novice processing to bilateral processing in experts (Wong & Gauthier, 2010. To relate this shift to behavior, we tested whether music-reading training improves categorical and coordinate perceptual judgments, which are argued to rely on the left and right hemisphere respectively (Kosslyn et al., 1989. Music-reading experts and novices judged whether two sequentially presented music sequences were identical. The notes were either on a staff (categorical or without a staff (coordinate in either trained or untrained (90° rotated orientations. Experts performed better than novices for categorical judgments, and the advantage was larger for the trained than untrained orientation. The two groups performed similarly for coordinate judgments. Music-reading fluency predicted performance in categorical judgments in the trained orientation in experts, while it predicted performance in all conditions in novices. This suggests that music-reading training selectively improves categorical judgments in the trained orientation, while music-reading ability in novices reflects general perceptual ability with notes. Future studies will clarify how these findings are related to the hemispheric shift in music-reading expertise.

  7. Mentality or morality? Membership categorization, multiple meanings and mass murder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapley, Mark; McCarthy, David; McHoul, Alec

    2003-09-01

    A central topic for social psychology is how we identify, categorize or represent ourselves to ourselves and to each other. Previous work on this topic stemming from attribution theory, social identity theory, self-categorization theory and social representations theory has tended to accept the dominant cognitivist tenet of an interior self which is (with varying degrees of success) re-presented in ordinary discourse. Against this tradition, and drawing on membership categorization analysis, we argue here for an attention to ordinary members' methods of categorizing the self. Such devices are constitutive of a culture. Accounts of the self (whether lay or professional) cannot avoid reliance on such devices. Our particular case involves a corpus of materials from the press surrounding the Port Arthur massacre: the shooting of 35 people by a lone gunman, Martin Bryant, in Tasmania in 1996. In this case, where public accountings for what 'makes up' a particular person are tied to an otherwise inexplicable but ultra-newsworthy event, we find that lay and professional methods of accounting are remarkably congruent. One of the reasons for this congruence, we suggest, is that the categorization of persons is a fundamentally moral matter. Devices for producing everyday moral accounts, in actual practical circumstances, precede and ground, for example, 'technical', 'clinical' or 'scientific' judgments. We conclude that describing such routine (but ultimately grounding) cultural devices can be a central goal of social psychology, as opposed to explaining 'the self' by tacitly relying upon those same devices in an unacknowledged and unproblematized fashion.

  8. Methodology for categorization of nuclear material in pyroprocessing facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chanki; Choi, Sungyeol [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Woo Jin; Kim, Min Su; Jeong, Yon Hong [Korea Institute of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Control, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    For the pyroprocessing facility to be commercialized in future, current regulations should be evaluated and developed in advance, based on the new types of nuclear materials in the facility. Physical protection system, especially, requires reasonable and reliable categorization of nuclear materials, to prevent from the theft of nuclear materials. In this paper, therefore, current categorization methods of nuclear material are investigated and applied to the pyroprocessing facility. After inconsistencies and gaps are found among methods, they are compared and discussed based on eight considering points (i.e, degrees of attractiveness, levels of category, discount factor, physical barriers, chemical barriers, isotopic barriers, radiological barriers, and capabilities of adversaries), to roughly suggest a new method for categorization. Current categorization methods of nuclear material, including IAEA's INFCIRC/225, U.S. DOE's method, newly expected U.S. NRC's method, FOM, and Bunn's approach, are different and can bring inconsistencies of physical protection requirements. The gap among methods will be significant if advanced fuel cycles are applied to them for the future. For example, the categorization results of 5 target materials in pyroprocessing facility show clear inconsistencies, while TRU ingot is considered the most attractive material. To resolve inconsistencies, it is necessary to determine new method suitable to pyroproessing facility, by considering the effects of eight points (i.e, degrees of attractiveness, levels of category, discount factor, physical barriers, chemical barriers, isotopic barriers, radiological barriers, and capabilities of adversaries)

  9. DISTRIBUTED APPROACH to WEB PAGE CATEGORIZATION USING MAPREDUCE PROGRAMMING MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.Malarvizhi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The web is a large repository of information and to facilitate the search and retrieval of pages from it,categorization of web documents is essential. An effective means to handle the complexity of information retrieval from the internet is through automatic classification of web pages. Although lots of automatic classification algorithms and systems have been presented, most of the existing approaches are computationally challenging. In order to overcome this challenge, we have proposed a parallel algorithm, known as MapReduce programming model to automatically categorize the web pages. This approach incorporates three concepts. They are web crawler, MapReduce programming model and the proposed web page categorization approach. Initially, we have utilized web crawler to mine the World Wide Web and the crawled web pages are then directly given as input to the MapReduce programming model. Here the MapReduce programming model adapted to our proposed web page categorization approach finds the appropriate category of the web page according to its content. The experimental results show that our proposed parallel web page categorization approach achieves satisfactory results in finding the right category for any given web page.

  10. Visual art and visual perception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenderink, Jan J.

    2015-01-01

    Visual art and visual perception ‘Visual art’ has become a minor cul-de-sac orthogonal to THE ART of the museum directors and billionaire collectors. THE ART is conceptual, instead of visual. Among its cherished items are the tins of artist’s shit (Piero Manzoni, 1961, Merda d’Artista) “worth their

  11. Social Categorization on Perception Bias in the Practice of Microteaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jon-Chao; Hwang, Ming-Yueh; Lu, Chow-Chin; Tsai, Chi-Ruei

    2016-01-01

    Microteaching has gained considerable attention for its effectiveness in rapid and contextual training in professional development programs. However, the interpretive quality of the teaching demonstration and peer feedback may influence individuals' attribution and self-correction, leading to ineffective learning. In this study, a microteaching workshop in a professional development program for 78 elementary school science teachers was investigated. The results showed that the effectiveness of microteaching was negatively affected by participants' perception bias due to social categorization. Moreover, it was indicated that the participants' perception of the in-group and out-group, classified by the degree of the individuals' science knowledge, fostered social categorization. Participants tended to experience perception conflicts caused by their inability to see personal faults, and a typical perception bias of "seeing one's own strengths and seeing others' shortcomings" was more frequently recognized in the out-group. These results converge to highlight the importance of social categorization in perception bias relevant to microteaching.

  12. Development of Cloud Based Casting Defects Categorization System (CDCS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sata Amit V.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Defects affect the properties and behavior of the casting during its service life. Since the defects can occur due to different reasons, they must be correctly identified and categorized, to enable applying the appropriate remedial measures. several different approaches for categorizing casting defects have been proposed in technical literature. They mainly rely on physical description, location, and formation of defects. There is a need for a systematic approach for classifying investment casting defects, considering appropriate attributes such as their size, location, identification stage, inspection method, consistency, appearance of defects. A systematic approach for categorization of investment casting defects considering multiple attributes: detection stage, size, shape, appearance, location, consistency and severity of occurrence. Information about the relevant attributes of major defects encountered in investment casting process has been collected from an industrial foundry. This has been implemented in a cloud-based system to make the system freely and widely accessible.

  13. Social Categorization on Perception Bias in the Practice of Microteaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jon-Chao; Hwang, Ming-Yueh; Lu, Chow-Chin; Tsai, Chi-Ruei

    2017-02-01

    Microteaching has gained considerable attention for its effectiveness in rapid and contextual training in professional development programs. However, the interpretive quality of the teaching demonstration and peer feedback may influence individuals' attribution and self-correction, leading to ineffective learning. In this study, a microteaching workshop in a professional development program for 78 elementary school science teachers was investigated. The results showed that the effectiveness of microteaching was negatively affected by participants' perception bias due to social categorization. Moreover, it was indicated that the participants' perception of the in-group and out-group, classified by the degree of the individuals' science knowledge, fostered social categorization. Participants tended to experience perception conflicts caused by their inability to see personal faults, and a typical perception bias of "seeing one's own strengths and seeing others' shortcomings" was more frequently recognized in the out-group. These results converge to highlight the importance of social categorization in perception bias relevant to microteaching.

  14. Beliefs about poverty related to social categorization in childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Amar Amar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine whether the social categorization of poverty during childhood is based on essentialist beliefs. The study included 121 children, aged 5 to 7, from different socioeconomic backgrounds living in the city of Barranquilla, Colombia. The children stated that the nature of this social category is based on situations external to the individuals rather than essentialist reasons. No significant differences were found as regards age, gender or socioeconomic status (SES, except in the capacity of the respondents to self-categorize their social status. Children who find fewer differences between members and non-members of a given category tend to err in their self-categorization, which is important for the prevention of social exclusion.

  15. Measuring socioeconomic health inequalities in presence of multiple categorical information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makdissi, Paul; Yazbeck, Myra

    2014-03-01

    While many of the measurement approaches in health inequality measurement assume the existence of a ratio-scale variable, most of the health information available in population surveys is given in the form of categorical variables. Therefore, the well-known inequality indices may not always be readily applicable to measure health inequality as it may result in the arbitrariness of the health concentration index's value. In this paper, we address this problem by changing the dimension in which the categorical information is used. We therefore exploit the multi-dimensionality of this information, define a new ratio-scale health status variable and develop positional stochastic dominance conditions that can be implemented in a context of categorical variables. We also propose a parametric class of population health and socioeconomic health inequality indices. Finally we provide a twofold empirical illustration using the Joint Canada/United States Surveys of Health 2004 and the National Health Interview Survey 2010.

  16. Extracommunicative functions of language: verbal interference causes selective categorization impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupyan, Gary

    2009-08-01

    In addition to its communicative functions, language has been argued to have a variety of extracommunicative functions, as assessed by its causal involvement in putatively nonlinguistic tasks. In the present work, I argue that language may be critically involved in the ability of human adults to categorize objects on a specific dimension (e.g., color) while abstracting over other dimensions (e.g., size). This ability is frequently impaired in aphasic patients. The present work demonstrates that normal participants placed under conditions of verbal interference show a pattern of deficits strikingly similar to that of aphasic patients: impaired taxonomic categorization along perceptual dimensions, and preserved thematic categorization. A control experiment using a visuospatial-interference task failed to find this selective pattern of deficits. The present work has implications for understanding the online role of language in normal cognition and supports the claim that language is causally involved in nonverbal cognition.

  17. Study on categorization of the safety design evaluation event

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurisaka, Kenichi; Kani, Yoshio [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1997-05-01

    In order to make a FBR practicable, it is important to make rational categorization of a safety design evaluation event. In this study, for the purpose of providing useful information into the event categorization, we developed the occurrence frequency data of various abnormal events, presented a proposal of the event categorization primarily based on the occurrence frequency and examined efficiency of the proposal. We researched and analyzed abnormal event instances of foreign and domestic FBR plants and of domestic light water reactor power plants. On the basis of the analysis, the failure occurrence frequency of the protection system (PS) in the FBR model plants with electric power production of 600MW and 1,000MW was quantified. Making use of results of probabilistic safety assessment study, loss-of-function probability of the mitigation system (MS) was quantified. Some of combinations of PS failure and loss of MS function were selected and their occurrence frequencies were quantified. We examined problems in the current categorization of the safety design evaluation event and presented a new proposal of the event categorization. Merits of the new proposal are to have divided the current category of `accident` into `small accident` and `rare accident`, explicitly to treat a multiple failure event not as a collateral analysis condition of supposing `a single failure` but as an event to be evaluated, and to have added a category for the event which is beyond design base, but should be supposed to evaluate depth of the safety design in terms of defense-in-depth. Some candidates of the safety design evaluation event were identified and applied to the new proposal. In comparison with the current categorization, we obtained perspective that it was possible to evaluate the safety design more in detail and effectively, especially depth of the safety design such as backup reactor shutdown system, decay heat removal function in a natural circulation mode etc. (J.P.N.)

  18. Flow visualization

    CERN Document Server

    Merzkirch, Wolfgang

    1974-01-01

    Flow Visualization describes the most widely used methods for visualizing flows. Flow visualization evaluates certain properties of a flow field directly accessible to visual perception. Organized into five chapters, this book first presents the methods that create a visible flow pattern that could be investigated by visual inspection, such as simple dye and density-sensitive visualization methods. It then deals with the application of electron beams and streaming birefringence. Optical methods for compressible flows, hydraulic analogy, and high-speed photography are discussed in other cha

  19. Categorization framework to aid hazard identification of nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Steffen Foss; Larsen, Britt Hvolbæk; Olsen, Stig Irving

    2007-01-01

    The physical, chemical and biological properties of various nanomaterials differ substantially - as do the potential risks they pose. We argue that nanomaterials must be categorized based on the location of the nanoscale structure in the system/material before their hazards can be assessed...... and propose a categorization framework that enables scientists and regulators to identify the categories of nanomaterials systematically. The framework is applied to a suggested hazard identification approach aimed at identifying causality between inherent physical and chemical properties and observed adverse...

  20. Effects of vision and haptics on categorizing common objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haag, Susan

    2011-02-01

    Most research on object recognition and categorization centers on vision. However, these phenomena are likely influenced by the commonly used modality of touch. The present study tested this notion by having participants explore three-dimensional objects using vision and haptics in naming and sorting tasks. Results showed greater difficulty naming (recognizing) and sorting (categorizing) objects haptically. For both conditions, error increased from the concrete attribute of size to the more abstract quality of predation, providing behavioral evidence for shared object representation in vision and haptics.

  1. Categorical Data Analysis for the Behavioral and Social Sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Azen, Razia

    2010-01-01

    Featuring a practical approach with numerous examples, this book focuses on helping the reader develop a conceptual, rather than technical, understanding of categorical methods, making it a much more accessible text than others on the market. The authors cover common categorical analyses and emphasize specific research questions that can be addressed by each analytic procedure so that readers are able to address the research questions they wish to answer.  To achieve this goal, the authors:Review the theoretical implications and assumptions underlying each of the proceduresPresent each co

  2. Rapid Gist Perception of Meaningful Real-Life Scenes: Exploring Individual and Gender Differences in Multiple Categorization Tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Vanmarcke

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In everyday life, we are generally able to dynamically understand and adapt to socially (irelevant encounters, and to make appropriate decisions about these. All of this requires an impressive ability to directly filter and obtain the most informative aspects of a complex visual scene. Such rapid gist perception can be assessed in multiple ways. In the ultrafast categorization paradigm developed by Simon Thorpe et al. (1996, participants get a clear categorization task in advance and succeed at detecting the target object of interest (animal almost perfectly (even with 20 ms exposures. Since this pioneering work, follow-up studies consistently reported population-level reaction time differences on different categorization tasks, indicating a superordinate advantage (animal versus dog and effects of perceptual similarity (animals versus vehicles and object category size (natural versus animal versus dog. In this study, we replicated and extended these separate findings by using a systematic collection of different categorization tasks (varying in presentation time, task demands, and stimuli and focusing on individual differences in terms of e.g., gender and intelligence. In addition to replicating the main findings from the literature, we find subtle, yet consistent gender differences (women faster than men.

  3. Automaticity of basic-level categorization accounts for labeling effects in visual recognition memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richler, Jennifer J; Gauthier, Isabel; Palmeri, Thomas J

    2011-11-01

    Are there consequences of calling objects by their names? Lupyan (2008) suggested that overtly labeling objects impairs subsequent recognition memory because labeling shifts stored memory representations of objects toward the category prototype (representational shift hypothesis). In Experiment 1, we show that processing objects at the basic category level versus exemplar level in the absence of any overt labeling produces the same qualitative pattern of results. Experiment 2 demonstrates that labeling does not always disrupt memory as predicted by the representational shift hypothesis: Differences in memory following labeling versus preference are more likely an effect of judging preference, not an effect of overt labeling. Labeling does not influence memory by shifting memory representations toward the category prototype. Rather, labeling objects at the basic level produces memory representations that are simply less robust than those produced by other kinds of study tasks.

  4. Visual Servoing

    OpenAIRE

    Chaumette, Francois; Hutchinson, Seth; Corke, Peter

    2016-01-01

    International audience; This chapter introduces visual servo control, using computer vision data in the servo loop to control the motion of a robot. We first describe the basic techniques that are by now well established in the field. We give a general overview of the formulation of the visual servo control problem, and describe the two archetypal visual servo control schemes: image-based and pose-based visual servo control. We then discuss performance and stability issues that pertain to the...

  5. Visualization Cockpit: Orchestration of Multiple Visualizations for Knowledge-Exploration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawa Nazemi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Semantic-Web technologies and ontology-based information processing systems are established techniques, in more than only research areas and institutions. Different worldwide projects and enterprise companies identified already the added value of semantic technologies, so they work on different sub-topics for gathering and conveying knowledge. As the process of gathering and structuring semantic information plays a key role in the most developed applications, the process of transferring and adopting knowledge to and by humans is neglected, although the complex structure of knowledge-design opens many research-questions. The customization of the presentation itself and the interaction techniques with these presentation artifacts is a key question for gainful and effective work with semantic information. The following paper describes a new approach for visualizing semantic information as a composition of different adaptable ontology-visualization techniques. We start with a categorized description of existing ontology visualization techniques and show potential gaps.

  6. ProbCD: enrichment analysis accounting for categorization uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shmulevich Ilya

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As in many other areas of science, systems biology makes extensive use of statistical association and significance estimates in contingency tables, a type of categorical data analysis known in this field as enrichment (also over-representation or enhancement analysis. In spite of efforts to create probabilistic annotations, especially in the Gene Ontology context, or to deal with uncertainty in high throughput-based datasets, current enrichment methods largely ignore this probabilistic information since they are mainly based on variants of the Fisher Exact Test. Results We developed an open-source R-based software to deal with probabilistic categorical data analysis, ProbCD, that does not require a static contingency table. The contingency table for the enrichment problem is built using the expectation of a Bernoulli Scheme stochastic process given the categorization probabilities. An on-line interface was created to allow usage by non-programmers and is available at: http://xerad.systemsbiology.net/ProbCD/. Conclusion We present an analysis framework and software tools to address the issue of uncertainty in categorical data analysis. In particular, concerning the enrichment analysis, ProbCD can accommodate: (i the stochastic nature of the high-throughput experimental techniques and (ii probabilistic gene annotation.

  7. Document categorization using multilingual associative networks based on Wikipedia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloom, Niels; Theune, Mariet; de Jong, Franciska M.G.

    Associative networks are a connectionist language model with the ability to categorize large sets of documents. In this research we combine monolingual associative networks based on Wikipedia to create a larger, multilingual associative network, using the cross-lingual connections between Wikipedia

  8. Masked Translation Priming with Semantic Categorization: Testing the Sense Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Forster, Kenneth I.

    2010-01-01

    Four experiments are reported which were designed to test hypotheses concerning the asymmetry of masked translation priming. Experiment 1 confirmed the presence of L2-L1 priming with a semantic categorization task and demonstrated that this effect was restricted to exemplars. Experiment 2 showed that the translation priming effect was not due to…

  9. Semantic categorization: A comparison between deaf and hearing children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ormel, E.A.; Gijsel, M.A.R.; Hermans, D.; Bosman, A.M.T.; Knoors, H.E.T.; Verhoeven, L.T.W.

    2010-01-01

    Learning to read is a major obstacle for children who are deaf. The otherwise significant role of phonology is often limited as a result of hearing loss. However, semantic knowledge may facilitate reading comprehension. One important aspect of semantic knowledge concerns semantic categorization. In

  10. Overdistribution illusions: Categorical judgments produce them, confidence ratings reduce them.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brainerd, C J; Nakamura, K; Reyna, V F; Holliday, R E

    2017-01-01

    Overdistribution is a form of memory distortion in which an event is remembered as belonging to too many episodic states, states that are logically or empirically incompatible with each other. We investigated a response formatting method of suppressing 2 basic types of overdistribution, disjunction and conjunction illusions, which parallel some classic illusions in the judgment and decision making literature. In this method, subjects respond to memory probes by rating their confidence that test cues belong to specific episodic states (e.g., presented on List 1, presented on List 2), rather than by making the usual categorical judgments about those states. The central prediction, which was derived from the task calibration principle of fuzzy-trace theory, was that confidence ratings should reduce overdistribution by diminishing subjects' reliance on noncompensatory gist memories. The data of 3 experiments agreed with that prediction. In Experiment 1, there were reliable disjunction illusions with categorical judgments but not with confidence ratings. In Experiment 2, both response formats produced reliable disjunction illusions, but those for confidence ratings were much smaller than those for categorical judgments. In Experiment 3, there were reliable conjunction illusions with categorical judgments but not with confidence ratings. Apropos of recent controversies over confidence-accuracy correlations in memory, such correlations were positive for hits, negative for correct rejections, and the 2 types of correlations were of equal magnitude. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. Exploring a categorization of main competencies for digital librarians

    OpenAIRE

    Machin-Mastromatteo, Juan-Daniel

    2009-01-01

    This brief essay is concerned with the main topic “Job Analysis in a Digital Library Context” and its purpose is to explore some of the competencies that digital librarians must have to successfully work in a digital library context. The competencies explored are categorized under the headings of information management competencies, technological competencies, information literacy related competencies, and interpersonal competencies.

  12. Document categorization using multilingual associative networks based on Wikipedia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloom, Niels; Theune, Mariet; de Jong, Franciska M.G.

    2015-01-01

    Associative networks are a connectionist language model with the ability to categorize large sets of documents. In this research we combine monolingual associative networks based on Wikipedia to create a larger, multilingual associative network, using the cross-lingual connections between Wikipedia

  13. Masked Translation Priming with Semantic Categorization: Testing the Sense Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Forster, Kenneth I.

    2010-01-01

    Four experiments are reported which were designed to test hypotheses concerning the asymmetry of masked translation priming. Experiment 1 confirmed the presence of L2-L1 priming with a semantic categorization task and demonstrated that this effect was restricted to exemplars. Experiment 2 showed that the translation priming effect was not due to…

  14. Categorical Perception of Affective and Linguistic Facial Expressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Stephen; Emmorey, Karen

    2009-01-01

    Two experiments investigated categorical perception (CP) effects for affective facial expressions and linguistic facial expressions from American Sign Language (ASL) for Deaf native signers and hearing non-signers. Facial expressions were presented in isolation (Experiment 1) or in an ASL verb context (Experiment 2). Participants performed ABX…

  15. Perceptual, Categorical, and Affective Processing of Ambiguous Smiling Facial Expressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, Manuel G.; Fernandez-Martin, Andres; Nummenmaa, Lauri

    2012-01-01

    Why is a face with a smile but non-happy eyes likely to be interpreted as happy? We used blended expressions in which a smiling mouth was incongruent with the eyes (e.g., angry eyes), as well as genuine expressions with congruent eyes and mouth (e.g., both happy or angry). Tasks involved detection of a smiling mouth (perceptual), categorization of…

  16. The Categorical Perception Deficit in Dyslexia: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noordenbos, Mark W.; Serniclaes, Willy

    2015-01-01

    Speech perception in dyslexia is characterized by a categorical perception (CP) deficit, demonstrated by weaker discrimination of acoustic differences between phonemic categories in conjunction with better discrimination of acoustic differences within phonemic categories. We performed a meta-analysis of studies that examined the reliability of the…

  17. Multi-Label Object Categorization Using Histograms of Global Relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mustafa, Wail; Xiong, Hanchen; Kraft, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present an object categorization system capable of assigning multiple and related categories for novel objects using multi-label learning. In this system, objects are described using global geometric relations of 3D features. We propose using the Joint SVM method for learning...

  18. The role of piriform associative connections in odor categorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Xiaojun; Raguet, Louise Lg; Cole, Sydni M; Howard, James D; Gottfried, Jay

    2016-04-28

    Distributed neural activity patterns are widely proposed to underlie object identification and categorization in the brain. In the olfactory domain, pattern-based representations of odor objects are encoded in piriform cortex. This region receives both afferent and associative inputs, though their relative contributions to odor perception are poorly understood. Here, we combined a placebo-controlled pharmacological fMRI paradigm with multivariate pattern analyses to test the role of associative connections in sustaining olfactory categorical representations. Administration of baclofen, a GABA(B) agonist known to attenuate piriform associative inputs, interfered with within-category pattern separation in piriform cortex, and the magnitude of this drug-induced change predicted perceptual alterations in fine-odor discrimination performance. Comparatively, baclofen reduced pattern separation between odor categories in orbitofrontal cortex, and impeded within-category generalization in hippocampus. Our findings suggest that odor categorization is a dynamic process concurrently engaging stimulus discrimination and generalization at different stages of olfactory information processing, and highlight the importance of associative networks in maintaining categorical boundaries.

  19. A concept-based approach to text categorization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schijvenaars, B.J.A.; Schuemie, M.J.; Mulligen, E.M. van; Weeber, M.; Jelier, R.; Mons, B.; Kors, J.A.; Kraaij, W.

    2005-01-01

    The Biosemantics group (Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam) participated in the text categorization task of the Genomics Track. We followed a thesaurus-based approach, using the Collexis indexing system, in combination with a simple classification algorithm to assign a document to one of t

  20. How are nouns categorized as denoting "what" and "where"?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rybka, K.

    2014-01-01

    Categorization is an inherent feature of human cognitive processes and systems that identifies coherent patterns in our knowledge and behavior. In language it takes the form of formally definable categories. Spatial categories are particularly known to pervade linguistic structure, and even to organ

  1. On the categorization of the Japanese honorific system Keigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barešova Ivona

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The way the structure of the Japanese honorific system keigo is grasped and presented influences the understanding and appropriate use of the honorific forms this system includes. Functional categorization makes it easier to perceive principles that are not immediately evident.

  2. Document categorization using multilingual associative networks based on Wikipedia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloom, Niels; Theune, Mariët; Jong, de Franciska

    2015-01-01

    Associative networks are a connectionist language model with the ability to categorize large sets of documents. In this research we combine monolingual associative networks based on Wikipedia to create a larger, multilingual associative network, using the cross-lingual connections between Wikipedia

  3. The performance of robust test statistics with categorical data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savalei, V.; Rhemtulla, M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on a simulation study that evaluated the performance of five structural equation model test statistics appropriate for categorical data. Both Type I error rate and power were investigated. Different model sizes, sample sizes, numbers of categories, and threshold distributions were

  4. Semantic categorization: A comparison between deaf and hearing children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ormel, E.A.; Gijsel, M.A.R.; Hermans, D.; Bosman, A.M.T.; Knoors, H.E.T.; Verhoeven, L.T.W.

    2010-01-01

    Learning to read is a major obstacle for children who are deaf. The otherwise significant role of phonology is often limited as a result of hearing loss. However, semantic knowledge may facilitate reading comprehension. One important aspect of semantic knowledge concerns semantic categorization. In

  5. The performance of robust test statistics with categorical data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savalei, V.; Rhemtulla, M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on a simulation study that evaluated the performance of five structural equation model test statistics appropriate for categorical data. Both Type I error rate and power were investigated. Different model sizes, sample sizes, numbers of categories, and threshold distributions were

  6. A Self-Categorization Explanation for Opinion Consensus Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinguang; Reid, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    The public expression of opinions (and related communicative activities) hinges upon the perception of opinion consensus. Current explanations for opinion consensus perceptions typically focus on egocentric and other biases, rather than functional cognitions. Using self-categorization theory we showed that opinion consensus perceptions flow from…

  7. The Categorical Perception Deficit in Dyslexia: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noordenbos, Mark W.; Serniclaes, Willy

    2015-01-01

    Speech perception in dyslexia is characterized by a categorical perception (CP) deficit, demonstrated by weaker discrimination of acoustic differences between phonemic categories in conjunction with better discrimination of acoustic differences within phonemic categories. We performed a meta-analysis of studies that examined the reliability of the…

  8. Prevalence of Psychopathology in Childhood Epilepsy: Categorical and Dimensional Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, David W.; Austin, Joan K.; Perkins, Susan M.

    2009-01-01

    Few studies have utilized both categorical and dimensional measures of psychopathology in children with epilepsy. We evaluated 173 children (88 males, 85 females; mean age 11.7y [SD 1.8]; range 9-14y) who had epilepsy (generalized 36%, partial 61%) for at least 6 months. The primary caregiver completed a dimensional measure, the Child Behavior…

  9. Categorical Biases in Spatial Memory: The Role of Certainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Mark P.; Newcombe, Nora S.; Shipley, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    Memories for spatial locations often show systematic errors toward the central value of the surrounding region. The Category Adjustment (CA) model suggests that this bias is due to a Bayesian combination of categorical and metric information, which offers an optimal solution under conditions of uncertainty (Huttenlocher, Hedges, & Duncan,…

  10. Learning to Manipulate and Categorize in Human and Artificial Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morlino, Giuseppe; Gianelli, Claudia; Borghi, Anna M.; Nolfi, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the acquisition of integrated object manipulation and categorization abilities through a series of experiments in which human adults and artificial agents were asked to learn to manipulate two-dimensional objects that varied in shape, color, weight, and color intensity. The analysis of the obtained results and the…

  11. Ontology Integration Approaches and its Impact on Text Categorization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Machhour

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This article will introduce some approaches for improving text categorization models by integratingpreviously imported ontologies. From the Reuters Corpus Volume I (RCV1 dataset, some categories verysimilar in content and related to telecommunications, Internet and computer areas were selected for modelsexperiments. Several domain ontologies, covering these areas were built and integrated to categorizationmodels for their improvements.

  12. Biostatistics Series Module 4: Comparing Groups - Categorical Variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazra, Avijit; Gogtay, Nithya

    2016-01-01

    Categorical variables are commonly represented as counts or frequencies. For analysis, such data are conveniently arranged in contingency tables. Conventionally, such tables are designated as r × c tables, with r denoting number of rows and c denoting number of columns. The Chi-square (χ(2)) probability distribution is particularly useful in analyzing categorical variables. A number of tests yield test statistics that fit, at least approximately, a χ(2) distribution and hence are referred to as χ(2) tests. Examples include Pearson's χ(2) test (or simply the χ(2) test), McNemar's χ(2) test, Mantel-Haenszel χ(2) test and others. The Pearson's χ(2) test is the most commonly used test for assessing difference in distribution of a categorical variable between two or more independent groups. If the groups are ordered in some manner, the χ(2) test for trend should be used. The Fisher's exact probability test is a test of the independence between two dichotomous categorical variables. It provides a better alternative to the χ(2) statistic to assess the difference between two independent proportions when numbers are small, but cannot be applied to a contingency table larger than a two-dimensional one. The McNemar's χ(2) test assesses the difference between paired proportions. It is used when the frequencies in a 2 × 2 table represent paired samples or observations. The Cochran's Q test is a generalization of the McNemar's test that compares more than two related proportions. The P value from the χ(2) test or its counterparts does not indicate the strength of the difference or association between the categorical variables involved. This information can be obtained from the relative risk or the odds ratio statistic which is measures of dichotomous association obtained from 2 × 2 tables.

  13. Biostatistics series module 4: Comparing groups - categorical variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avijit Hazra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Categorical variables are commonly represented as counts or frequencies. For analysis, such data are conveniently arranged in contingency tables. Conventionally, such tables are designated as r × c tables, with r denoting number of rows and c denoting number of columns. The Chi-square (χ2 probability distribution is particularly useful in analyzing categorical variables. A number of tests yield test statistics that fit, at least approximately, a χ2 distribution and hence are referred to as χ2 tests. Examples include Pearson′s χ2 test (or simply the χ2 test, McNemar′s χ2 test, Mantel-Haenszel χ2 test and others. The Pearson′s χ2 test is the most commonly used test for assessing difference in distribution of a categorical variable between two or more independent groups. If the groups are ordered in some manner, the χ2 test for trend should be used. The Fisher′s exact probability test is a test of the independence between two dichotomous categorical variables. It provides a better alternative to the χ2 statistic to assess the difference between two independent proportions when numbers are small, but cannot be applied to a contingency table larger than a two-dimensional one. The McNemar′s χ2 test assesses the difference between paired proportions. It is used when the frequencies in a 2 × 2 table represent paired samples or observations. The Cochran′s Q test is a generalization of the McNemar′s test that compares more than two related proportions. The P value from the χ2 test or its counterparts does not indicate the strength of the difference or association between the categorical variables involved. This information can be obtained from the relative risk or the odds ratio statistic which is measures of dichotomous association obtained from 2 × 2 tables.

  14. Individual differences in nonlinguistic event categorization predict later motion verb comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konishi, Haruka; Stahl, Aimee E; Golinkoff, Roberta Michnick; Hirsh-Pasek, Kathy

    2016-11-01

    This study probes how individual differences in early event perception predict later verb knowledge. At Time 1, when infants were 13 to 15months of age, they saw videotaped silent scenes performed by a human actor. The goal was to see whether infants could form categories of path (a figure's trajectory with respect to a ground object) and manner (how an action is performed). Infants either saw the same manner (e.g., jogging) taking place across three different paths (around, through, and behind) or saw the same path (e.g., around a tent) taking place across three different manners (running, crawling, and walking). After familiarization, either the path or the manner was changed and visual fixation was monitored using preferential looking. At Time 2, the same children were tested on their comprehension of verbs in a two-choice pointing task showing two simultaneous actions (e.g., running vs. jumping). Success at categorization of path and manner at Time 1 predicted verb comprehension at Time 2, even when taking language knowledge at both time points into account. These preliminary results represent headway in identifying the factors that may contribute to children's language learning. They suggest that skill in categorizing semantic components present in nonlinguistic events is predictive of children's later verb vocabulary. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Data visualization

    CERN Document Server

    Azzam, Tarek

    2013-01-01

    Do you communicate data and information to stakeholders? In Part 1, we introduce recent developments in the quantitative and qualitative data visualization field and provide a historical perspective on data visualization, its potential role in evaluation practice, and future directions. Part 2 delivers concrete suggestions for optimally using data visualization in evaluation, as well as suggestions for best practices in data visualization design. It focuses on specific quantitative and qualitative data visualization approaches that include data dashboards, graphic recording, and geographic information systems (GIS). Readers will get a step-by-step process for designing an effective data dashboard system for programs and organizations, and various suggestions to improve their utility.

  16. Abstraction and use of categorical and physical information: a developmental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, J M; Schackman, M

    1977-12-01

    Children in nursery school and Grades 1, 3, and 5 (total N equal to 75) were asked to match one of two picture choices to a previously presented stimulus. Two types of matches were based upon the physical information in the stimuli and two types of matches were based upon categorical information. A comparison of mean reaction time for the two physical matches indicated a large change between nursery school and Grade 1 in the ability to use specific visual information in the matching of pictures of familiar objects. The efficiency of matches based upon category information showed a steady increase across the ages tested. Category matches based upon pictorial information were as efficient as category matches based upon verbal information for all groups.

  17. Inborn and experience-dependent models of categorical brain organization. A position paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gainotti, Guido

    2015-01-01

    The present review aims to summarize the debate in contemporary neuroscience between inborn and experience-dependent models of conceptual representations that goes back to the description of category-specific semantic disorders for biological and artifact categories. Experience-dependent models suggest that categorical disorders are the by-product of the differential weighting of different sources of knowledge in the representation of biological and artifact categories. These models maintain that semantic disorders are not really category-specific, because they do not respect the boundaries between different categories. They also argue that the brain structures which are disrupted in a given type of category-specific semantic disorder should correspond to the areas of convergence of the sensory-motor information which play a major role in the construction of that category. Furthermore, they provide a simple interpretation of gender-related categorical effects and are supported by studies assessing the importance of prior experience in the cortical representation of objects On the other hand, inborn models maintain that category-specific semantic disorders reflect the disruption of innate brain networks, which are shaped by natural selection to allow rapid identification of objects that are very relevant for survival. From the empirical point of view, these models are mainly supported by observations of blind subjects, which suggest that visual experience is not necessary for the emergence of category-specificity in the ventral stream of visual processing. The weight of the data supporting experience-dependent and inborn models is thoroughly discussed, stressing the fact observations made in blind subjects are still the subject of intense debate. It is concluded that at the present state of knowledge it is not possible to choose between experience-dependent and inborn models of conceptual representations.

  18. A generalized concordance correlation coefficient for continuous and categorical data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, T S; Chinchilli, V M

    2001-07-30

    This paper discusses a generalized version of the concordance correlation coefficient for agreement data. The concordance correlation coefficient evaluates the accuracy and precision between two measures, and is based on the expected value of the squared function of distance. We have generalized this coefficient by applying alternative functions of distance to produce more robust versions of the concordance correlation coefficient. In this paper we extend the application of this class of estimators to categorical data as well, and demonstrate similarities to the kappa and weighted kappa statistics. We also introduce a stratified concordance correlation coefficient which adjusts for explanatory factors, and an extended concordance correlation coefficient which measures agreement among more than two responses. With these extensions, the generalized concordance correlation coefficient provides a unifying approach to assessing agreement among two or more measures that are either continuous or categorical in scale.

  19. A Route Confidence Evaluation Method for Reliable Hierarchical Text Categorization

    CERN Document Server

    Hatami, Nima; Armano, Giuliano

    2012-01-01

    Hierarchical Text Categorization (HTC) is becoming increasingly important with the rapidly growing amount of text data available in the World Wide Web. Among the different strategies proposed to cope with HTC, the Local Classifier per Node (LCN) approach attains good performance by mirroring the underlying class hierarchy while enforcing a top-down strategy in the testing step. However, the problem of embedding hierarchical information (parent-child relationship) to improve the performance of HTC systems still remains open. A confidence evaluation method for a selected route in the hierarchy is proposed to evaluate the reliability of the final candidate labels in an HTC system. In order to take into account the information embedded in the hierarchy, weight factors are used to take into account the importance of each level. An acceptance/rejection strategy in the top-down decision making process is proposed, which improves the overall categorization accuracy by rejecting a few percentage of samples, i.e., thos...

  20. The Effect of Preprocessing on Arabic Document Categorization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Ayedh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Preprocessing is one of the main components in a conventional document categorization (DC framework. This paper aims to highlight the effect of preprocessing tasks on the efficiency of the Arabic DC system. In this study, three classification techniques are used, namely, naive Bayes (NB, k-nearest neighbor (KNN, and support vector machine (SVM. Experimental analysis on Arabic datasets reveals that preprocessing techniques have a significant impact on the classification accuracy, especially with complicated morphological structure of the Arabic language. Choosing appropriate combinations of preprocessing tasks provides significant improvement on the accuracy of document categorization depending on the feature size and classification techniques. Findings of this study show that the SVM technique has outperformed the KNN and NB techniques. The SVM technique achieved 96.74% micro-F1 value by using the combination of normalization and stemming as preprocessing tasks.

  1. The influence of landscape variation on landform categorization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maia Williams

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper compares the landform vocabularies of residents from two regions in Portugal. Participants described both their own and the other, less familiar landscapes in response to video footage of the regions. The results indicate that participants used more detailed vocabularies to describe the known landscape compared to the less familiar study site, with detail triggered by individual place recognition. A relationship between landform lexica content and landscape type was observed in the relative placement of detail within each vocabulary. The observed drivers of categorization were the salient features of the landscape (elevation and land cover and utilitarian motivations (land use, context, and familiarity. The results offer support to the notion of non-universality in geographic object categorization.

  2. Categorization of exchange fluxes explains the four relational models

    CERN Document Server

    Favre, Maroussia

    2013-01-01

    The theory of Relational Models (RMs) posits four elementary models of relationships governing all human interactions, singly or in combination: Communal Sharing, Authority Ranking, Equality Matching, and Market Pricing. By considering two agents that can act in one out of three ways towards one another: give resource A, give resource B, or give nothing, we find four discrete categories of exchange fluxes that map unequivocally to the four RMs. This categorization shows that the RMs form an exhaustive set of all possible elementary exchanges. Hence, the fluxes categorization answers why there are just four RMs and explains their discreteness. By considering the costs associated with extracting resources, storing them and implementing each flux category, we are able to propose conditions under which each RM should evolve. We also logically deduce the singular nature of the Authority Ranking model. Our propositions are compatible with anthropological, ethnological and historical observations and can be tested a...

  3. Towards A Categorical Approach of Transformational Music Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Popoff, Alexandre

    2012-01-01

    Transformational music theory mainly deals with group and group actions on sets, which are usually constituted by chords. For example, neo-Riemannian theory uses the dihedral group D24 to study transformations between major and minor triads, the building blocks of classical and romantic harmony. Since the developments of neo-Riemannian theory, many developments and generalizations have been proposed, based on other sets of chords, other groups, etc. However music theory also face problems for example when defining transformations between chords of different cardinalities, or for transformations that are not necessarily invertible. This paper introduces a categorical construction of musical transformations based on category extensions using groupoids. This can be seen as a generalization of a previous work which aimed at building generalized neo-Riemannian groups of transformations based on group extensions. The categorical extension construction allows the definition of partial transformations between differe...

  4. Efficiency of the categorization of the public procurement contracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin Tachlian

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The French public procurement contracts at large, including the public markets - public Works or services contracts – the delegation public service, public-private partnership contract or even the administrative emphyteutic lease are close as these contracts aims to procure a good or service to a public entity. But these contracts are classified and specialized, as France does not know a single and generic type of contract for its relation between the administration and the private sector. This categorization is rigid and complex. It is thus extremely difficult in France to create new forms of contract, due to the fact that each contract must enter into a predefined and pre-existing category. If the strict supervision of contracts of public seems dictated by a desire to secure the relationship between the administration and its contractors, it may nevertheless be asked whether this principle of categorization does not be an additional cost to the contractors and the same administration.

  5. Hierarchical Categorical Perception in Sensing and Cognitive Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruni, Luis Emilio

    2008-01-01

    This article considers categorical perception (CP) as a crucial process involved in all sort of communication throughout the biological hierarchy, i.e. in all of biosemiosis. Until now, there has been consideration of CP exclusively within the functional cycle of perception-cognition...... communication processes in living systems, including intracellular, intercellular, metabolic, physiological, cognitive and ecological levels. The main idea is to provide an account that considers the heterarchical embeddedness of many instances of CP and CS. This will take me to relate the hierarchical nature...... of categorical sensing and perception with the equally hierarchical issues of the "binding problem", "triadic causality", the "emergent interpretant" and the increasing semiotic freedom observed in biological and cognitive systems....

  6. Hierarchical Categorical Perception in Sensing and Cognitive Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruni, Luis Emilio

    2008-01-01

    This article considers categorical perception (CP) as a crucial process involved in all sort of communication throughout the biological hierarchy, i.e. in all of biosemiosis. Until now, there has been consideration of CP exclusively within the functional cycle of perception-cognition...... communication processes in living systems, including intracellular, intercellular, metabolic, physiological, cognitive and ecological levels. The main idea is to provide an account that considers the heterarchical embeddedness of many instances of CP and CS. This will take me to relate the hierarchical nature...... of categorical sensing and perception with the equally hierarchical issues of the "binding problem", "triadic causality", the "emergent interpretant" and the increasing semiotic freedom observed in biological and cognitive systems....

  7. Goguen categories a categorical approach to l-fuzzy relations

    CERN Document Server

    Winter, Michael; Mundici, Daniele

    2007-01-01

    Goguen categories extend the relational calculus and its categorical formalization to the fuzzy world. Starting from the fundamental concepts of sets, binary relations and lattices this book introduces several categorical formulations of an abstract theory of relations such as allegories, Dedekind categories and related structures. It is shown that neither theory is sufficiently rich to describe basic operations on fuzzy relations. The book then introduces Goguen categories and provides a comprehensive study of these structures including their representation theory, and the definability of norm-based operations. The power of the theory is demonstrated by a comprehensive example. A certain Goguen category is used to specify and to develop a fuzzy controller. Based on its abstract description as well as certain desirable properties and their formal proofs, a verified controller is derived without compromising the - sometimes - intuitive choice of norm-based operations by fuzzy engineers.

  8. A New Approach of Feature Selection for Text Categorization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Zifeng; XU Baowen; ZHANG Weifeng; XU Junling

    2006-01-01

    This paper proposes a new approach of feature selection based on the independent measure between features for text categorization.A fundamental hypothesis that occurrence of the terms in documents is independent of each other,widely used in the probabilistic models for text categorization (TC), is discussed.However, the basic hypothesis is incomplete for independence of feature set.From the view of feature selection, a new independent measure between features is designed, by which a feature selection algorithm is given to obtain a feature subset.The selected subset is high in relevance with category and strong in independence between features,satisfies the basic hypothesis at maximum degree.Compared with other traditional feature selection method in TC (which is only taken into the relevance account), the performance of feature subset selected by our method is prior to others with experiments on the benchmark dataset of 20 Newsgroups.

  9. Non-independent Term Selection for Chinese Text Categorization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jingyang; SUN Maosong

    2009-01-01

    Chinese text categorization differs from English text categorization due to its much larger term set (of words or character n-grams),which results in very slow training and working of modern high-performance classifiers.This study assumes that this high-dimensionality problem is related to the redundancy in the term set,which cannot be solved by traditional term selection methods.A greedy algorithm framework named "non-independent term selection" is presented,which reduces the redundancy according to string-level correlations.Several preliminary implementations of this idea are demonstrated.Experiment results show that a good tradeoff can be reached between the performance and the size of the term set.

  10. Professional Norms and Categorization Practices among Danish Social Workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Marie Østergaard

    2012-01-01

    compare correspondences between professional norms and categorization practice to the regulative setting (sickness benefits or social welfare) to see whether this matters to the found relationships. The analysis shows a relationship between administrative reasoning and stereotyped categorization of social......What drives professionals working within a strong public regulative setting? This question has been given a lot of attention from different disciplinary perspectives among them public administration and political science. Here different aspects of what can be coined as “policy fidelity” has paved...... the way for an understanding of professionals as street-level bureaucrats whose working conditions first and foremost are characterized as cross pressured between policy goals, personal preferences, citizen pressure and professional norms (Lipsky 2010; Hupe & Hill; Winter 2008). However, more sociological...

  11. Categorization of aortic aneurysm thrombus morphology by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motte, Louise de la, E-mail: louise.de.la.motte@rh.regionh.dk [Department of Vascular Surgery, Rigshospitalet and University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Pedersen, Mads Møller, E-mail: phd@medit.dk [Department of Radiology, Rigshospitalet and University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Thomsen, Carsten, E-mail: carsten.thomsen@rh.regionh.dk [Department of Radiology, Rigshospitalet and University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Vogt, Katja, E-mail: Vogt@dadlnet.dk [Department of Vascular Surgery, Rigshospitalet and University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Schroeder, Torben V., E-mail: Torben.Veith.schroeder@rh.regionh.dk [Department of Vascular Surgery, Rigshospitalet and University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Lonn, Lars, E-mail: lonn.lars@gmail.com [Department of Vascular Surgery and Department of Radiology, Rigshospitalet and University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2013-10-01

    Background: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been proposed for qualitative categorization of intraluminal thrombus morphology. We aimed to correlate the qualitative MRI categorization previously described to quantitative measurements of signal intensity and to compare morphological characteristics of intraluminal thrombus specimens to the appearance on magnetic resonance imaging. Methods: Thirty-four patients undergoing open surgery for abdominal aortic aneurysm had a preoperative MRI obtained with a 1.5 T magnet. Qualitative categorization was performed (blinded and in consensus) and correlated to intraluminal thrombus to muscle signal-intensity ratios. Morphology of intraluminal thrombus specimens collected during surgery were compared to the magnetic resonance imaging categories and specimen weight was correlated to thrombus volume measured on preoperative computer tomography angiography. Results: Blinded MRI categorization resulted in agreement in 22 out of 34 intraluminal thrombi (Kappa value 0.3, p = 0.006). Medians (p = 0.004) and distribution (p = 0.002) of signal-intensity ratios varied significantly across the three MRI categories obtained by consensus. Heterogeneous and homogenous specimen appearance corresponded to similar appearances on MRI in 78% and 55% respectively, resulting in an overall Kappa = 0.4 (p = 0.04). Intraluminal thrombus volume and weight correlated well (r{sub s} 0.831, p < 0.001) with a mean difference of 60 g (95% CI 38–80 g), without proportional bias. Conclusion: Qualitative evaluation of intraluminal thrombus morphology based on MRI can be quantified by measuring signal-intensity ratios. Concurrently a fair agreement to blinded qualitative evaluation of thrombus specimens can be obtained. However, the evaluation is impaired by loss of a large proportion of thrombus during sampling.

  12. Age-Dependent Face Detection and Face Categorization Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Claus-Christian Carbon; Martina Grüter; Thomas Grüter

    2013-01-01

    Empirical studies on the development of face processing skills with age show inconsistent patterns concerning qualitative vs. quantitative changes over time or the age range for peak cognitive performance. In the present study, we tested the proficiency in face detection and face categorization with a large sample of participants (N = 312; age range: 2-88 yrs). As test objects, we used so-called Mooney faces, two-tone (black and white) images of faces lacking critical information of a local, ...

  13. Online Categorical Subspace Learning for Sketching Big Data with Misses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yanning; Mardani, Morteza; Giannakis, Georgios B.

    2017-08-01

    With the scale of data growing every day, reducing the dimensionality (a.k.a. sketching) of high-dimensional data has emerged as a task of paramount importance. Relevant issues to address in this context include the sheer volume of data that may consist of categorical samples, the typically streaming format of acquisition, and the possibly missing entries. To cope with these challenges, the present paper develops a novel categorical subspace learning approach to unravel the latent structure for three prominent categorical (bilinear) models, namely, Probit, Tobit, and Logit. The deterministic Probit and Tobit models treat data as quantized values of an analog-valued process lying in a low-dimensional subspace, while the probabilistic Logit model relies on low dimensionality of the data log-likelihood ratios. Leveraging the low intrinsic dimensionality of the sought models, a rank regularized maximum-likelihood estimator is devised, which is then solved recursively via alternating majorization-minimization to sketch high-dimensional categorical data `on the fly.' The resultant procedure alternates between sketching the new incomplete datum and refining the latent subspace, leading to lightweight first-order algorithms with highly parallelizable tasks per iteration. As an extra degree of freedom, the quantization thresholds are also learned jointly along with the subspace to enhance the predictive power of the sought models. Performance of the subspace iterates is analyzed for both infinite and finite data streams, where for the former asymptotic convergence to the stationary point set of the batch estimator is established, while for the latter sublinear regret bounds are derived for the empirical cost. Simulated tests with both synthetic and real-world datasets corroborate the merits of the novel schemes for real-time movie recommendation and chess-game classification.

  14. Visualization Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Evaluates and improves the operational effectiveness of existing and emerging electronic warfare systems. By analyzing and visualizing simulation results...

  15. Room Categorization Based on a Hierarchical Representation of Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Uršič

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available For successful operation in real‐world environments, a mobile robot requires an effective spatial model. The model should be compact, should possess large expressive power and should scale well with respect to the number of modelled categories. In this paper we propose a new compositional hierarchical representation of space that is based on learning statistically significant observations, in terms of the frequency of occurrence of various shapes in the environment. We have focused on a two‐dimensional space, since many robots perceive their surroundings in two dimensions with the use of a laser range finder or sonar. We also propose a new low‐level image descriptor, by which we demonstrate the performance of our representation in the context of a room categorization problem. Using only the lower layers of the hierarchy, we obtain state‐of‐the‐art categorization results in two different experimental scenarios. We also present a large, freely available, dataset, which is intended for room categorization experiments based on data obtained with a laser range finder.

  16. Statistical Results of Activities Categorization in Czech Agricultural Companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svobodová J.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In today’s competitive environment, to identify and correctly adjust the individual components of the business model is an important strategic device for every entrepreneur. This paper (preliminary study deals with different types of business models applied to the sector of small and medium-size farms in the Czech Republic. The main objective was to identify and categorize activities undertaken by Czech farmers into homogeneous clusters and offer recommendations on possible business model modification. The research was based on data from the Farm Accountancy Data Network (hereafter FADN. The principal component analysis and cluster analysis were carried out as part of the assessment, under which farms are categorized into homogeneous groups. The results showed that the farms surveyed can be categorized according to similar economic characteristics, production plans, and implementation processes into three basic clusters. The first business model is elaborated for the classic field production and various kinds of vegetable or livestock production, the second model for the special crop and livestock production, and the third one for the animal production. The use of FADN data and the fact that most Czech agricultural companies are of small- and medium-size should be taken into account as limiting factors of the study.

  17. SURVEY ON CLUSTERING ALGORITHM AND SIMILARITY MEASURE FOR CATEGORICAL DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Anitha Elavarasi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Learning is the process of generating useful information from a huge volume of data. Learning can be either supervised learning (e.g. classification or unsupervised learning (e.g. Clustering Clustering is the process of grouping a set of physical objects into classes of similar object. Objects in real world consist of both numerical and categorical data. Categorical data are not analyzed as numerical data because of the absence of inherit ordering. This paper describes about ten different clustering algorithms, its methodology and the factors influencing its performance. Each algorithm is evaluated using real world datasets and its pro and cons are specified. The various similarity / dissimilarity measure applied to categorical data and its performance is also discussed. The time complexity defines the amount of time taken by an algorithm to perform the elementary operation. The time complexity of various algorithms are discussed and its performance on real world data such as mushroom, zoo, soya bean, cancer, vote, car and iris are measured. In this survey Cluster Accuracy and Error rate for four different clustering algorithm (K-modes, fuzzy K-modes, ROCK and Squeezer, two different similarity measure (DISC and Overlap and DILCA applied for hierarchy and partition algorithm are evaluated.

  18. Semi-automated categorization of open-ended questions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Schonlau

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Text data from open-ended questions in surveys are difficult to analyze and are frequently ignored. Yet open-ended questions are important because they do not constrain respondents’ answer choices. Where open-ended questions are necessary, sometimes multiple human coders hand-code answers into one of several categories. At the same time, computer scientists have made impressive advances in text mining that may allow automation of such coding. Automated algorithms do not achieve an overall accuracy high enough to entirely replace humans. We categorize open-ended questions soliciting narrative responses using text mining for easy-to-categorize answers and humans for the remainder using expected accuracies to guide the choice of the threshold delineating between “easy” and “hard”. Employing multinomial boosting avoids the common practice of converting machine learning “confidence scores” into pseudo-probabilities. This approach is illustrated with examples from open-ended questions related to respondents’ advice to a patient in a hypothetical dilemma, a follow-up probe related to respondents’ perception of disclosure/privacy risk, and from a question on reasons for quitting smoking from a follow-up survey from the Ontario Smoker’s Helpline. Targeting 80% combined accuracy, we found that 54%-80% of the data could be categorized automatically in research surveys.

  19. Analogies as categorization phenomena: Studies from scientific discourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Leslie Jill

    Studies on the role of analogies in science classrooms have tended to focus on analogies that come from the teacher or curriculum, and not the analogies that students generate. Such studies are derivative of an educational system that values content knowledge over scientific creativity, and derivative of a model of teaching in which the teacher's role is to convey content knowledge. This dissertation begins with the contention that science classrooms should encourage scientific thinking and one role of the teacher is to model that behavior and identify and encourage it in her students. One element of scientific thinking is analogy. This dissertation focuses on student-generated analogies in science, and offers a model for understanding these. I provide evidence that generated analogies are assertions of categorization, and the base of an analogy is the constructed prototype of an ad hoc category. Drawing from research on categorization, I argue that generated analogies are based in schemas and cognitive models. This model allows for a clear distinction between analogy and literal similarity; prior to this research analogy has been considered to exist on a spectrum of similarity, differing from literal similarity to the degree that structural relations hold but features do not. I argue for a definition in which generated analogies are an assertion of an unexpected categorization: that is, they are asserted as contradictions to an expected schema.

  20. Involution of categorical thinking processes in Alzheimer's disease: Preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Berlim de Mello

    Full Text Available Abstract Alzheimer's disease (AD is a degenerative brain disorder characterized by progressive losses in cognitive functions, including memory. The sequence of these losses may correspond to the inverse order of the normal sequence of ontogenetic cognitive acquisitions, a process named retrogenesis. One of the acquisitions that improve in normal development is the ability to retrieve previously acquired categorical knowledge from semantic memory in order to guide associative thinking and memory processes; consequently, children become able to associate verbal stimuli in more complex taxonomic ways and to use this knowledge to improve their recall. Objective: In this study, we investigated if AD-related deterioration of semantic memory involves a decrease in categorical thinking processes with progression of the disease, according to the retrogenesis hypothesis. Methods: We compared the performance of AD patients at mild and moderate stages, and of groups of 7, 10 and 14-year-old children in tasks of free association along with recall tasks of perceptually and semantically related stimuli. Results: ANOVAS showed a decrease in taxonomic associations and an increase in diffuse associations between mild and moderate stages, corresponding to the inverse order shown by the child groups. At the moderate AD stage, the pattern was similar to that of 7-year-old children. Both groups of patients performed worse than child groups in recall tasks. Conclusions: These results corroborate the hypothesis of an involution of the processes of categorical associative thinking in the course of the disease.

  1. Baboons, like humans, solve analogy by categorical abstraction of relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flemming, Timothy M; Thompson, Roger K R; Fagot, Joël

    2013-05-01

    Reasoning by analogy is one of the most complex and highly adaptive cognitive processes in abstract thinking. For humans, analogical reasoning entails the judgment and conceptual mapping of relations-between-relations and is facilitated by language (Gentner in Cogn Sci 7:155-170, 1983; Premack in Thought without language, Oxford University Press, New York, 1986). Recent evidence, however, shows that monkeys like "language-trained" apes exhibit similar capacity to match relations-between-relations (Fagot and Thompson in Psychol Sci 22:1304-1309, 2011; Flemming et al. in J Exp Psychol: Anim Behav Process 37:353-360, 2011; Truppa et al. in Plos One 6(8):e23809, 2011). Whether this behavior is driven by the abstraction of categorical relations or alternatively by direct perception of variability (entropy) is crucial to the debate as to whether nonhuman animals are capable of analogical reasoning. In the current study, we presented baboons (Papio papio) and humans (Homo sapiens) with a computerized same/different relational-matching task that in principle could be solved by either strategy. Both baboons and humans produced markedly similar patterns of responding. Both species responded different when the perceptual variability of a stimulus array fell exactly between or even closer to that of a same display. Overall, these results demonstrate that categorical abstraction trumped perceptual properties and, like humans, Old World monkeys can solve the analogical matching task by judging the categorical abstract equivalence of same/different relations-between-relations.

  2. Holistic gaze strategy to categorize facial expression of varying intensities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Guo

    Full Text Available Using faces representing exaggerated emotional expressions, recent behaviour and eye-tracking studies have suggested a dominant role of individual facial features in transmitting diagnostic cues for decoding facial expressions. Considering that in everyday life we frequently view low-intensity expressive faces in which local facial cues are more ambiguous, we probably need to combine expressive cues from more than one facial feature to reliably decode naturalistic facial affects. In this study we applied a morphing technique to systematically vary intensities of six basic facial expressions of emotion, and employed a self-paced expression categorization task to measure participants' categorization performance and associated gaze patterns. The analysis of pooled data from all expressions showed that increasing expression intensity would improve categorization accuracy, shorten reaction time and reduce number of fixations directed at faces. The proportion of fixations and viewing time directed at internal facial features (eyes, nose and mouth region, however, was not affected by varying levels of intensity. Further comparison between individual facial expressions revealed that although proportional gaze allocation at individual facial features was quantitatively modulated by the viewed expressions, the overall gaze distribution in face viewing was qualitatively similar across different facial expressions and different intensities. It seems that we adopt a holistic viewing strategy to extract expressive cues from all internal facial features in processing of naturalistic facial expressions.

  3. Contrast and assimilation in categorization and exemplar production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zotov, Vladimir; Jones, Michael N; Mewhort, D J K

    2011-02-01

    We studied contrast and assimilation in three tasks: an exemplar-production task, a categorization task, and a combined categorization-then-production task. On each trial of the first task, subjects produced a circle when prompted with a category label. In the second task, they classified lines that differed in length into one of four categories. On each trial of the combined task, they classified two lines and then produced a line when prompted by a category label. All three tasks converged on the same conclusion: subjects' representation of the categories (measured in pixels in the production tasks and by the direction of errors in classification) shifted systematically from trial to trial. When successive stimuli were from the same category, the representation of that category was pulled toward the exemplar from the previous trial. When successive stimuli were from different categories, the representations of the neighbouring categories were pushed from the category of the initial stimulus. We conclude that accounts of categorization and identification must accommodate both assimilation and contrast as a function of trial-to-trial shifts in representation.

  4. Memory, reasoning and categorization: Parallels and common mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BRETT eHAYES

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, memory, reasoning and categorization have been treated as separate components of human cognition. We challenge this distinction, arguing that there is broad scope for crossover between the methods and theories developed for each task. The links between memory and reasoning are illustrated in a review of two lines of research. The first takes theoretical ideas (two-process accounts and methodological tools (signal detection analysis, receiver operating characteristic curves from memory research and applies them to important issues in reasoning research: relations between induction and deduction, and the belief bias effect. The second line of research introduces a task in which subjects make either memory or reasoning judgments for the same set of stimuli. Other than broader generalization for reasoning than memory, the results were similar for the two tasks, across a variety of experimental stimuli and manipulations. It was possible to simultaneously explain performance on both tasks within a single cognitive architecture, based on exemplar-based comparisons of similarity. The final sections explore evidence for empirical and processing links between inductive reasoning and categorization and between categorization and recognition. An important implication is that progress in all three of these fields will be expedited by further investigation of the many commonalities between these tasks.

  5. Memory, reasoning, and categorization: parallels and common mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Brett K; Heit, Evan; Rotello, Caren M

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, memory, reasoning, and categorization have been treated as separate components of human cognition. We challenge this distinction, arguing that there is broad scope for crossover between the methods and theories developed for each task. The links between memory and reasoning are illustrated in a review of two lines of research. The first takes theoretical ideas (two-process accounts) and methodological tools (signal detection analysis, receiver operating characteristic curves) from memory research and applies them to important issues in reasoning research: relations between induction and deduction, and the belief bias effect. The second line of research introduces a task in which subjects make either memory or reasoning judgments for the same set of stimuli. Other than broader generalization for reasoning than memory, the results were similar for the two tasks, across a variety of experimental stimuli and manipulations. It was possible to simultaneously explain performance on both tasks within a single cognitive architecture, based on exemplar-based comparisons of similarity. The final sections explore evidence for empirical and processing links between inductive reasoning and categorization and between categorization and recognition. An important implication is that progress in all three of these fields will be expedited by further investigation of the many commonalities between these tasks.

  6. Electrophysiological evidence for early perceptual facilitation and efficient categorization of self-related stimuli during an Implicit Association Test measuring neuroticism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischhauer, Monika; Strobel, Alexander; Diers, Kersten; Enge, Sören

    2014-02-01

    The Implicit Association Test (IAT) is a widely used latency-based categorization task that indirectly measures the strength of automatic associations between target and attribute concepts. So far, little is known about the perceptual and cognitive processes underlying personality IATs. Thus, the present study examined event-related potential indices during the execution of an IAT measuring neuroticism (N  =  70). The IAT effect was strongly modulated by the P1 component indicating early facilitation of relevant visual input and by a P3b-like late positive component reflecting the efficacy of stimulus categorization. Both components covaried, and larger amplitudes led to faster responses. The results suggest a relationship between early perceptual and semantic processes operating at a more automatic, implicit level and later decision-related categorization of self-relevant stimuli contributing to the IAT effect.

  7. Visual Thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnheim, Rudolf

    Based on the more general principle that all thinking (including reasoning) is basically perceptual in nature, the author proposes that visual perception is not a passive recording of stimulus material but an active concern of the mind. He delineates the task of visually distinguishing changes in size, shape, and position and points out the…

  8. Visual search

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toet, A.; Bijl, P.

    2003-01-01

    Visual search, with or without the aid of optical or electro-optical instruments, plays a significant role in various types of military and civilian operations (e.g., reconnaissance, surveillance, and search and rescue). Advance knowledge of human visual search and target acquisition performance is

  9. Visual Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Mie; Flensborg, Ingelise

    2010-01-01

    The intrinsic breadth of various types of images creates new possibilities and challenges for visual education. The digital media have moved the boundaries between images and other kinds of modalities (e.g. writing, speech and sound) and have augmented the possibilities for integrating...... to emerge in the interlocutory space of a global visual repertoire and diverse local interpretations. The two perspectives represent challenges for future visual education which require visual competences, not only within the arts but also within the subjects of natural sciences, social sciences, languages...... the learning potential of images and visuality from two perspectives: 1) The perspective of digital media which are assumed to form an increasing part of experience and communication from the use of internet, tv and mobile devices. 2) The perspective of culture where images and visualisations are assumed...

  10. Visual Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Mie; Flensborg, Ingelise

    2010-01-01

    The intrinsic breadth of various types of images creates new possibilities and challenges for visual education. The digital media have moved the boundaries between images and other kinds of modalities (e.g. writing, speech and sound) and have augmented the possibilities for integrating the functi......The intrinsic breadth of various types of images creates new possibilities and challenges for visual education. The digital media have moved the boundaries between images and other kinds of modalities (e.g. writing, speech and sound) and have augmented the possibilities for integrating...... to emerge in the interlocutory space of a global visual repertoire and diverse local interpretations. The two perspectives represent challenges for future visual education which require visual competences, not only within the arts but also within the subjects of natural sciences, social sciences, languages...

  11. Puddles, parties, and professors: linking word categorization to neural patterns of visuospatial coding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quadflieg, Susanne; Etzel, Joset A; Gazzola, Valeria; Keysers, Christian; Schubert, Thomas W; Waiter, Gordon D; Macrae, C Neil

    2011-10-01

    Behavioral evidence suggests that during word processing people spontaneously map object, valence, and power information to locations in vertical space. Specifically, whereas "overhead" (e.g., attic), positive (e.g., party), and powerful nouns (e.g., professor) are associated with "up," "underfoot" (e.g., carpet), negative (e.g., accident), and powerless nouns (e.g., assistant) are associated with "down." What has yet to be elucidated, however, is the precise nature of these effects. To explore this issue, an fMRI experiment was undertaken, during which participants were required to categorize the position in which geometrical shapes appeared on a computer screen (i.e., upper or lower part of the display). In addition, they also judged a series of words with regard to location (i.e., up vs. down), valence (i.e., good vs. bad), and power (i.e., powerful vs. powerless). Using multivoxel pattern analysis, it was found that classifiers that successfully distinguished between the positions of shapes in subregions of the inferior parietal lobe also provided discriminatory information to separate location and valence, but not power word judgments. Correlational analyses further revealed that, for location words, pattern transfer was more successful the stronger was participants' propensity to use visual imagery. These findings indicate that visual coding and conceptual processing can elicit common representations of verticality but that divergent mechanisms may support the reported effects.

  12. Categorization of problems to assess and improve proficiency as teachers and learners

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Chandralekha

    2016-01-01

    We describe how graduate students categorize introductory mechanics problems based on the similarity of their solutions. Graduate students were asked at the end of a teaching assistant training class to categorize problems from their own perspective and from the perspective of typical introductory physics students whom they were teaching. We compare their categorizations with the categorizations by introductory physics students and physics faculty who categorized the same problems. The utility of categorization as a tool for teaching assistant training and faculty development workshops is discussed.

  13. Categorical perception of color: evidence from secondary category boundary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-rasheed AS

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Abdulrahman Saud Al-rasheed Department of Psychology, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Abstract: Despite a plethora of behavioral research exploring the phenomenon of color categorical perception (CP known as "better discrimination between pair of colors stimuli from different categories and pair of colors stimuli from the same category even when the stimulus differences between the pairs of stimuli are equal", most of the evidence for the CP of color was derived from Roman or top-to-down script readers and very rarely from right-to-left script readers in primary category. To date, no studies of color CP have been conducted on right-to-left script readers in secondary category boundary to support this theory. Three experiments have been conducted: Experiments 1 and 2 established the Arabic blue–purple secondary category boundary, and Experiment 3 tested the CP of color in the blue–purple category boundary. Sixty participants (30 men and 30 women took part in this study. All spoke Arabic as their first language, and all were undergraduate or postgraduate students at King Saud University. Their ages ranged from 18–35 years with a mean age of 21.9 years (SD =5.2. The result indicated that for Experiments 1 and 2, it appeared that the Arabic blue–purple category boundary was approximately 10PB and it is in the same location as for English. For Experiment 3, reaction times in the between-categories condition were significantly faster than those in the within-category condition; this suggested that CP of color was shown in the Arabic's blue–purple secondary category boundary. Keywords: categorical perception, CP of color, categorization, blue–purple category boundary, secondary category boundary

  14. An Empirical Analysis of Rough Set Categorical Clustering Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Clustering a set of objects into homogeneous groups is a fundamental operation in data mining. Recently, many attentions have been put on categorical data clustering, where data objects are made up of non-numerical attributes. For categorical data clustering the rough set based approaches such as Maximum Dependency Attribute (MDA) and Maximum Significance Attribute (MSA) has outperformed their predecessor approaches like Bi-Clustering (BC), Total Roughness (TR) and Min-Min Roughness(MMR). This paper presents the limitations and issues of MDA and MSA techniques on special type of data sets where both techniques fails to select or faces difficulty in selecting their best clustering attribute. Therefore, this analysis motivates the need to come up with better and more generalize rough set theory approach that can cope the issues with MDA and MSA. Hence, an alternative technique named Maximum Indiscernible Attribute (MIA) for clustering categorical data using rough set indiscernible relations is proposed. The novelty of the proposed approach is that, unlike other rough set theory techniques, it uses the domain knowledge of the data set. It is based on the concept of indiscernibility relation combined with a number of clusters. To show the significance of proposed approach, the effect of number of clusters on rough accuracy, purity and entropy are described in the form of propositions. Moreover, ten different data sets from previously utilized research cases and UCI repository are used for experiments. The results produced in tabular and graphical forms shows that the proposed MIA technique provides better performance in selecting the clustering attribute in terms of purity, entropy, iterations, time, accuracy and rough accuracy. PMID:28068344

  15. Attentional shifts in categorization learning: Perseveration but not learned irrelevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Leyre; Wasserman, Edward A

    2016-02-01

    Once a categorization task has been mastered, if features that once were relevant become irrelevant and features that once were irrelevant become relevant, a decrement in performance-a shift cost-is typically observed. This shift cost may reflect the involvement of two distinguishable factors: the inability to release attention from a previously relevant feature (i.e., attentional perseveration) and/or the inability to re-engage attention to a previously irrelevant feature (i.e., learned irrelevance). Here, we examined the nature of this shift cost in pigeons. We gave four groups of pigeons a categorization task in which we monitored their choice accuracy; at the same time, we tracked the location of their pecks to the relevant and irrelevant attributes of the stimuli to determine to which attributes the birds were attending during the course of learning. After identical training in Phase 1, the roles of the relevant/irrelevant features were changed in Phase 2, so that one group could show only learned irrelevance, a second group could show only attentional perseverance, a third group could show both, and a fourth control group could show neither of these effects. Results disclosed evidence of attentional perseverance, but no evidence of learned irrelevance, either in accuracy or in relevant feature tracking. In addition, we determined that pigeons' allocation of attention to the relevant features followed rather than preceded an increase in choice accuracy. Overall, our findings are best explained by theories which propose that attention is learned and deployed to those features that prove to be reliable predictors of the correct categorization response (e.g., George and Pearce, 2012; Kruschke, 2001; Mackintosh, 1975).

  16. An Empirical Analysis of Rough Set Categorical Clustering Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Jamal; Ghazali, Rozaida; Deris, Mustafa Mat

    2017-01-01

    Clustering a set of objects into homogeneous groups is a fundamental operation in data mining. Recently, many attentions have been put on categorical data clustering, where data objects are made up of non-numerical attributes. For categorical data clustering the rough set based approaches such as Maximum Dependency Attribute (MDA) and Maximum Significance Attribute (MSA) has outperformed their predecessor approaches like Bi-Clustering (BC), Total Roughness (TR) and Min-Min Roughness(MMR). This paper presents the limitations and issues of MDA and MSA techniques on special type of data sets where both techniques fails to select or faces difficulty in selecting their best clustering attribute. Therefore, this analysis motivates the need to come up with better and more generalize rough set theory approach that can cope the issues with MDA and MSA. Hence, an alternative technique named Maximum Indiscernible Attribute (MIA) for clustering categorical data using rough set indiscernible relations is proposed. The novelty of the proposed approach is that, unlike other rough set theory techniques, it uses the domain knowledge of the data set. It is based on the concept of indiscernibility relation combined with a number of clusters. To show the significance of proposed approach, the effect of number of clusters on rough accuracy, purity and entropy are described in the form of propositions. Moreover, ten different data sets from previously utilized research cases and UCI repository are used for experiments. The results produced in tabular and graphical forms shows that the proposed MIA technique provides better performance in selecting the clustering attribute in terms of purity, entropy, iterations, time, accuracy and rough accuracy.

  17. Categorical Data Analysis With Sas and Spss Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Lawal, H Bayo

    2003-01-01

    This book covers the fundamental aspects of categorical data analysis with an emphasis on how to implement the models used in the book using SAS and SPSS. This is accomplished through the frequent use of examples, with relevant codes and instructions, that are closely related to the problems in the text. Concepts are explained in detail so that students can reproduce similar results on their own. Beginning with chapter two, exercises at the end of each chapter further strengthen students' understanding of the concepts by requiring them to apply some of the ideas expressed in the text in a more

  18. Marketing image categorization using hybrid human-machine combinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnanasambandam, Nathan; Madhu, Himanshu

    2012-03-01

    Marketing instruments with nested, short-form, symbol loaded content need to be studied differently. Image classification in the Web2.0 world can dynamically use a configurable amount of internal and external data as well as varying levels of crowd-sourcing. Our work is one such examination of how to construct a hybrid technique involving learning and crowd-sourcing. Through a parameter called turkmix and a multitude of crowd-sourcing techniques available we show that we can control the trend of metrics such as precision and recall on the hybrid categorizer.

  19. Generalized linear models for categorical and continuous limited dependent variables

    CERN Document Server

    Smithson, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Introduction and OverviewThe Nature of Limited Dependent VariablesOverview of GLMsEstimation Methods and Model EvaluationOrganization of This BookDiscrete VariablesBinary VariablesLogistic RegressionThe Binomial GLMEstimation Methods and IssuesAnalyses in R and StataExercisesNominal Polytomous VariablesMultinomial Logit ModelConditional Logit and Choice ModelsMultinomial Processing Tree ModelsEstimation Methods and Model EvaluationAnalyses in R and StataExercisesOrdinal Categorical VariablesModeling Ordinal Variables: Common Practice versus Best PracticeOrdinal Model AlternativesCumulative Mod

  20. Experiences with automated categorization in e-government information retrieval

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonasen, Tanja Svarre; Lykke, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    High-precision search results are essential for supporting e-government employees’ information tasks. Prior studies have shown that existing features of e-government retrieval systems need improvement in terms of search facilities (e.g., Goh et al. 2008), navigation (e.g., de Jong and Lentz 2006...... documents were retrieved. The findings emphasise the importance of simultaneous search options for e-government IR systems, and reveal that automated categorization is valuable in improving search facilities in e-government....

  1. Categorical and nonparametric data analysis choosing the best statistical technique

    CERN Document Server

    Nussbaum, E Michael

    2014-01-01

    Featuring in-depth coverage of categorical and nonparametric statistics, this book provides a conceptual framework for choosing the most appropriate type of test in various research scenarios. Class tested at the University of Nevada, the book's clear explanations of the underlying assumptions, computer simulations, and Exploring the Concept boxes help reduce reader anxiety. Problems inspired by actual studies provide meaningful illustrations of the techniques. The underlying assumptions of each test and the factors that impact validity and statistical power are reviewed so readers can explain

  2. Categorization of fragrance contact allergens for prioritization of preventive measures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uter, Wolfgang; Johansen, Jeanne D; Börje, Anna;

    2013-01-01

    of substances as contact allergens. A total of 54 individual chemicals and 28 natural extracts (essential oils) can be categorized as established contact allergens in humans, including all 26 substances previously identified as contact allergens (SCCNFP/0017/98). Twelve of the 54 individual chemicals...... of 11 substances of special concern should be limited to 100 ppm. The substance hydroxyisohexyl 3-cyclohexene carboxaldehyde and the two ingredients chloroatranol and atranol in the natural extracts Evernia prunastri and Evernia furfuracea should not be present in cosmetic products....

  3. Iterative categorization (IC): a systematic technique for analysing qualitative data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neale, Joanne

    2016-06-01

    The processes of analysing qualitative data, particularly the stage between coding and publication, are often vague and/or poorly explained within addiction science and research more broadly. A simple but rigorous and transparent technique for analysing qualitative textual data, developed within the field of addiction, is described. The technique, iterative categorization (IC), is suitable for use with inductive and deductive codes and can support a range of common analytical approaches, e.g. thematic analysis, Framework, constant comparison, analytical induction, content analysis, conversational analysis, discourse analysis, interpretative phenomenological analysis and narrative analysis. Once the data have been coded, the only software required is a standard word processing package. Worked examples are provided.

  4. Privacy Preserving Categorical Data Analysis with Unknown Distortion Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Guo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Randomized Response techniques have been investigated in privacy preserving categorical data analysis. However, the released distortion parameters can be exploited by attackers to breach privacy. In this paper, we investigate whether data mining or statistical analysis tasks can still be conducted on randomized data when distortion parameters are not disclosed to data miners. We first examine how various objective association measures between two variables may be affected by randomization. We then extend to multiple variables by examining the feasibility of hierarchical loglinear modeling. Finally we show some classic data mining tasks that cannot be applied on the randomized data directly.

  5. La categoría del paisaje cultural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Álvarez Munárriz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available En este texto se pone de manifiesto el giro hacia el paisaje que se está produciendo en nuestra sociedad con la aparición de la conciencia medioambiental. Se considera un concepto clave para entender el territorio que habita la gente. Se postula una visión integral del paisaje. Y se defi ende la necesidad de recuperar pero también actualizar la categoría clásica en Antropología de paisaje cultural.

  6. Some applications of categorical data analysis to epidemiological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grizzle, J E; Koch, G G

    1979-10-01

    Several examples of categorized data from epidemiological studies are analyzed to illustrate that more informative analysis than tests of independence can be performed by fitting models. All of the analyses fit into a unified conceptual framework that can be performed by weighted least squares. The methods presented show how to calculate point estimate of parameters, asymptotic variances, and asymptotically valid chi 2 tests. The examples presented are analysis of relative risks estimated from several 2 x 2 tables, analysis of selected features of life tables, construction of synthetic life tables from cross-sectional studies, and analysis of dose-response curves.

  7. 77 FR 49057 - Categorical Exclusion From Further Environmental Review for Standard Terminal Arrival Route...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Categorical Exclusion From Further Environmental Review for Standard... Categorical Exclusion (Cat Ex) from environmental review does not require a formal public hearing or a...

  8. Visual Confidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamassian, Pascal

    2016-10-14

    Visual confidence refers to an observer's ability to judge the accuracy of her perceptual decisions. Even though confidence judgments have been recorded since the early days of psychophysics, only recently have they been recognized as essential for a deeper understanding of visual perception. The reluctance to study visual confidence may have come in part from obtaining convincing experimental evidence in favor of metacognitive abilities rather than just perceptual sensitivity. Some effort has thus been dedicated to offer different experimental paradigms to study visual confidence in humans and nonhuman animals. To understand the origins of confidence judgments, investigators have developed two competing frameworks. The approach based on signal decision theory is popular but fails to account for response times. In contrast, the approach based on accumulation of evidence models naturally includes the dynamics of perceptual decisions. These models can explain a range of results, including the apparently paradoxical dissociation between performance and confidence that is sometimes observed.

  9. Visual Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What Causes Visual Impairment? People rarely lose their eyesight during their teen years. When they do, it's ... inflammation in the eye. It's often found in poor rural countries that have overcrowded living conditions and ...

  10. Visual cognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinker, S.

    1985-01-01

    This book consists of essays covering issues in visual cognition presenting experimental techniques from cognitive psychology, methods of modeling cognitive processes on computers from artificial intelligence, and methods of studying brain organization from neuropsychology. Topics considered include: parts of recognition; visual routines; upward direction; mental rotation, and discrimination of left and right turns in maps; individual differences in mental imagery, computational analysis and the neurological basis of mental imagery: componental analysis.

  11. Psychophysical Criteria for Visual Simulation Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-05-01

    differences ( aniseikonia ) encompass a variety of visual display problems in which the images to the two eyes differ. These disparities are categorized...displacements is treated in the discussion of binocular image rotation. The topic of unequal magnification ( aniseikonia ), which has been the subject of much...The specific functional relationships needinq quantification were the following: 1. The effect of Horizontal Aniseikonia on Target Detection and

  12. Global Infrasound Association Based on Probabilistic Clutter Categorization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Nimar; Mialle, Pierrick

    2016-04-01

    The IDC advances its methods and continuously improves its automatic system for the infrasound technology. The IDC focuses on enhancing the automatic system for the identification of valid signals and the optimization of the network detection threshold by identifying ways to refine signal characterization methodology and association criteria. An objective of this study is to reduce the number of associated infrasound arrivals that are rejected from the automatic bulletins when generating the reviewed event bulletins. Indeed, a considerable number of signal detections are due to local clutter sources such as microbaroms, waterfalls, dams, gas flares, surf (ocean breaking waves) etc. These sources are either too diffuse or too local to form events. Worse still, the repetitive nature of this clutter leads to a large number of false event hypotheses due to the random matching of clutter at multiple stations. Previous studies, for example [1], have worked on categorization of clutter using long term trends on detection azimuth, frequency, and amplitude at each station. In this work we continue the same line of reasoning to build a probabilistic model of clutter that is used as part of NETVISA [2], a Bayesian approach to network processing. The resulting model is a fusion of seismic, hydroacoustic and infrasound processing built on a unified probabilistic framework. References: [1] Infrasound categorization Towards a statistics based approach. J. Vergoz, P. Gaillard, A. Le Pichon, N. Brachet, and L. Ceranna. ITW 2011 [2] NETVISA: Network Processing Vertically Integrated Seismic Analysis. N. S. Arora, S. Russell, and E. Sudderth. BSSA 2013

  13. Generalizing a categorization of students' interpretations of linear kinematics graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollen, Laurens; De Cock, Mieke; Zuza, Kristina; Guisasola, Jenaro; van Kampen, Paul

    2016-06-01

    We have investigated whether and how a categorization of responses to questions on linear distance-time graphs, based on a study of Irish students enrolled in an algebra-based course, could be adopted and adapted to responses from students enrolled in calculus-based physics courses at universities in Flanders, Belgium (KU Leuven) and the Basque Country, Spain (University of the Basque Country). We discuss how we adapted the categorization to accommodate a much more diverse student cohort and explain how the prior knowledge of students may account for many differences in the prevalence of approaches and success rates. Although calculus-based physics students make fewer mistakes than algebra-based physics students, they encounter similar difficulties that are often related to incorrectly dividing two coordinates. We verified that a qualitative understanding of kinematics is an important but not sufficient condition for students to determine a correct value for the speed. When comparing responses to questions on linear distance-time graphs with responses to isomorphic questions on linear water level versus time graphs, we observed that the context of a question influences the approach students use. Neither qualitative understanding nor an ability to find the slope of a context-free graph proved to be a reliable predictor for the approach students use when they determine the instantaneous speed.

  14. Web User Categorization and Behavior Study Based on Refreshing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratnesh Kumar Jain

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available As the information available on World Wide Web is growing the usage of the web sites is also growing. Since each access to the web pages are recorded in the web logs it is becoming a huge data repository which when mined properly can provide useful information for decision making. The designer of the web site, analyst and management executives are interested in extracting this hidden information from web logs for decision making. In this research paper we proposed a method to categorize the users into faithful, Partially Impatient and Completely Impatient user, page wise so that study of user behavior can be easier. To categorize the user we proposed one new information in the web log that represent each instance of refreshing. We used the markov chain model in which we treated the clicking of Refresh button as another state i.e. Refresh State. We derive some theorem to study each type of user behavior and show that how do users behavior differ.

  15. Formulation and categorizing Iran Behnoosh Co. strategies: An Fuzzy approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan. Mehrmanesh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available By attention to organization’s growth for competing to achieve more market share, strategic planning necessity has been more and more important for organization the has paid a lot of researchers attention. In this research, firt with refering to accomplished studies, strengths, weaknesses, oppurtunities, treatments and some strategies were distinguished in base of SWOT matrix. Then by defining critical success factors, the strategies were categorized by fuzzy topsis anf QSPM techniques. By the first technique, “producing new goods like water and juice to complete production basket” was chosen as the most important strategy and after that “apply Branding” and “using new production lines in Shirvan and Arak companies to increase productions” were placed in 2nd and 3rd places. Although “apply Branding”, “producing new goods like water and juice to complete production basket” and “allocating a little percentage for healthy drinks marketing” were selected as the top strategies by QSPM technique. Finally fuzzy topsis and QSPM techniques were comprised together by SAW technique. In this stage, 2 mentioned techniques and organization’s long term objectives were considered as althernatives and criterias in direct order that fuzzy topsis was selected as better one for categorizing Behnoosh company strategies.

  16. Non-abelian higher gauge theory and categorical bundle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viennot, David

    2016-12-01

    A gauge theory is associated with a principal bundle endowed with a connection permitting to define horizontal lifts of paths. The horizontal lifts of surfaces cannot be defined into a principal bundle structure. An higher gauge theory is an attempt to generalize the bundle structure in order to describe horizontal lifts of surfaces. A such attempt is particularly difficult for the non-abelian case. Some structures have been proposed to realize this goal (twisted bundle, gerbes with connection, bundle gerbe, 2-bundle). Each of them uses a category in place of the total space manifold of the usual principal bundle structure. Some of them replace also the structure group by a category (more precisely a Lie crossed module viewed as a category). But the base space remains still a simple manifold (possibly viewed as a trivial category with only identity arrows). We propose a new principal categorical bundle structure, with a Lie crossed module as structure groupoid, but with a base space belonging to a bigger class of categories (which includes non-trivial categories), that we called affine 2-spaces. We study the geometric structure of the categorical bundles built on these categories (which are a more complicated structure than the 2-bundles) and the connective structures on these bundles. Finally we treat an example interesting for quantum dynamics which is associated with the Bloch wave operator theory.

  17. Bayesian linkage analysis of categorical traits for arbitrary pedigree designs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abra Brisbin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pedigree studies of complex heritable diseases often feature nominal or ordinal phenotypic measurements and missing genetic marker or phenotype data. METHODOLOGY: We have developed a Bayesian method for Linkage analysis of Ordinal and Categorical traits (LOCate that can analyze complex genealogical structure for family groups and incorporate missing data. LOCate uses a Gibbs sampling approach to assess linkage, incorporating a simulated tempering algorithm for fast mixing. While our treatment is Bayesian, we develop a LOD (log of odds score estimator for assessing linkage from Gibbs sampling that is highly accurate for simulated data. LOCate is applicable to linkage analysis for ordinal or nominal traits, a versatility which we demonstrate by analyzing simulated data with a nominal trait, on which LOCate outperforms LOT, an existing method which is designed for ordinal traits. We additionally demonstrate our method's versatility by analyzing a candidate locus (D2S1788 for panic disorder in humans, in a dataset with a large amount of missing data, which LOT was unable to handle. CONCLUSION: LOCate's accuracy and applicability to both ordinal and nominal traits will prove useful to researchers interested in mapping loci for categorical traits.

  18. Near-Optimal Range Reporting Structures for Categorical

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kasper Green; Walderveen, Freek van

    2013-01-01

    Range reporting on categorical (or colored) data is a well-studied generalization of the classical range reporting problem in which each of the N input points has an associated color (category). A query then asks to report the set of colors of the points in a given rectangular query range, which...... may be far smaller than the set of all points in the query range. We study two-dimensional categorical range reporting in both the word-RAM and I/O-model. For the I/O-model, we present two alternative data structures for three-sided queries. The first answers queries in optimal O(lgB N + K/B) I....../Os using O(N lg*N) space, where K is the number of distinct colors in the output, B is the disk block size, and lg*N is the iterated logarithm of N. Our second data structure uses linear space and answers queries in O(lg B N + lg(h) N + K/B) I/Os for any constant integer h ≥ 1. Here lg(1) N = lg N and lg...

  19. Categorical Perception of emotional faces is not affected by aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandy Rossignol

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Effects of normal aging on categorical perception (CP of facial emotional expressions were investigated. One-hundred healthy participants (20 to 70 years old; five age groups had to identify morphed expressions ranging from neutrality to happiness, sadness and fear. We analysed percentages and latencies of correct recognition for nonmorphed emotional expressions, percentages and latencies of emotional recognition for morphed-faces, locus of the boundaries along the different continua and the number of intrusions. The results showed that unmorphed happy and fearful faces were better processed than unmorphed sad and neutral faces. For morphed faces, CP was confirmed, as latencies increased as a function of the distance between the displayed morph and the original unmorphed photograph. The locus of categorical boundaries was not affected by age. Aging did not alter the accuracy of recognition for original pictures, no more than the emotional recognition of morphed faces or the rate of intrusions. However, latencies of responses increased with age, for both unmorphed and morphed pictures. In conclusion, CP of facial expressions appears to be spared in aging.

  20. A computational feedforward model predicts categorization of masked emotional body language for longer, but not for shorter, latencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stienen, Bernard M C; Schindler, Konrad; de Gelder, Beatrice

    2012-07-01

    Given the presence of massive feedback loops in brain networks, it is difficult to disentangle the contribution of feedforward and feedback processing to the recognition of visual stimuli, in this case, of emotional body expressions. The aim of the work presented in this letter is to shed light on how well feedforward processing explains rapid categorization of this important class of stimuli. By means of parametric masking, it may be possible to control the contribution of feedback activity in human participants. A close comparison is presented between human recognition performance and the performance of a computational neural model that exclusively modeled feedforward processing and was engineered to fulfill the computational requirements of recognition. Results show that the longer the stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA), the closer the performance of the human participants was to the values predicted by the model, with an optimum at an SOA of 100 ms. At short SOA latencies, human performance deteriorated, but the categorization of the emotional expressions was still above baseline. The data suggest that, although theoretically, feedback arising from inferotemporal cortex is likely to be blocked when the SOA is 100 ms, human participants still seem to rely on more local visual feedback processing to equal the model's performance.

  1. A European approach to categorizing medicines for fitness to drive : outcomes of the DRUID project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ravera, Silvia; Monteiro, Susana P.; de Gier, Johan Jacob; van der Linden, Trudy; Gomez-Talegon, Trinidad; Javier Alvarez, F.

    2012-01-01

    AIMS To illustrate (i) the criteria and the development of the DRUID categorization system, (ii) the number of medicines that have currently been categorized, (iii) the added value of the DRUID categorization system and (iv) the next steps in the implementation of the DRUID system. METHODS The devel

  2. Fine-grained temporal coding of visually-similar categories in the ventral visual pathway and prefrontal cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang eXu

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Humans are remarkably proficient at categorizing visually-similar objects. To better understand the cortical basis of this categorization process, we used magnetoencephalography (MEG to record neural activity while participants learned--with feedback--to discriminate two highly-similar, novel visual categories. We hypothesized that although prefrontal regions would mediate early category learning, this role would diminish with increasing category familiarity and that regions within the ventral visual pathway would come to play a more prominent role in encoding category-relevant information as learning progressed. Early in learning we observed some degree of categorical discriminability and predictability in both the prefrontal cortex and the ventral visual pathway. Predictability improved significantly above chance in the ventral visual pathway over the course of learning with the left inferiortemporal and fusiform gyri showing the greatest improvement in predictability between 150-250msec (M200 during category learning. In contrast, there was no comparable increase in discriminability in prefrontal cortex with the only significant post-learning effect being a decrease in predictability in inferior frontal gyrus between 250-350msec (M300. Thus, the ventral visual pathway appears to encode learned visual categories over the long term. At the same time these results add to our understanding of the cortical origins of previously-reported signature temporal components associated with perceptual learning.

  3. Impact of feature saliency on visual category learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Rubi

    2015-01-01

    People have to sort numerous objects into a large number of meaningful categories while operating in varying contexts. This requires identifying the visual features that best predict the 'essence' of objects (e.g., edibility), rather than categorizing objects based on the most salient features in a given context. To gain this capacity, visual category learning (VCL) relies on multiple cognitive processes. These may include unsupervised statistical learning, that requires observing multiple objects for learning the statistics of their features. Other learning processes enable incorporating different sources of supervisory information, alongside the visual features of the categorized objects, from which the categorical relations between few objects can be deduced. These deductions enable inferring that objects from the same category may differ from one another in some high-saliency feature dimensions, whereas lower-saliency feature dimensions can best differentiate objects from distinct categories. Here I illustrate how feature saliency affects VCL, by also discussing kinds of supervisory information enabling reflective categorization. Arguably, principles debated here are often being ignored in categorization studies.

  4. Visualizing water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baart, F.; van Gils, A.; Hagenaars, G.; Donchyts, G.; Eisemann, E.; van Velzen, J. W.

    2016-12-01

    A compelling visualization is captivating, beautiful and narrative. Here we show how melding the skills of computer graphics, art, statistics, and environmental modeling can be used to generate innovative, attractive and very informative visualizations. We focus on the topic of visualizing forecasts and measurements of water (water level, waves, currents, density, and salinity). For the field of computer graphics and arts, water is an important topic because it occurs in many natural scenes. For environmental modeling and statistics, water is an important topic because the water is essential for transport, a healthy environment, fruitful agriculture, and a safe environment.The different disciplines take different approaches to visualizing water. In computer graphics, one focusses on creating water as realistic looking as possible. The focus on realistic perception (versus the focus on the physical balance pursued by environmental scientists) resulted in fascinating renderings, as seen in recent games and movies. Visualization techniques for statistical results have benefited from the advancement in design and journalism, resulting in enthralling infographics. The field of environmental modeling has absorbed advances in contemporary cartography as seen in the latest interactive data-driven maps. We systematically review the design emerging types of water visualizations. The examples that we analyze range from dynamically animated forecasts, interactive paintings, infographics, modern cartography to web-based photorealistic rendering. By characterizing the intended audience, the design choices, the scales (e.g. time, space), and the explorability we provide a set of guidelines and genres. The unique contributions of the different fields show how the innovations in the current state of the art of water visualization have benefited from inter-disciplinary collaborations.

  5. Deep Hierarchies in the Primate Visual Cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krüger, Norbert; Jannsen, Per; Kalkan, S.

    2013-01-01

    Computational modeling of the primate visual system yields insights of potential relevance to some of the challenges that computer vision is facing, such as object recognition and categorization, motion detection and activity recognition or vision-based navigation and manipulation. This article...... reviews some functional principles and structures that are generally thought to underlie the primate visual cortex, and attempts to extract biological principles that could further advance computer vision research. Organized for a computer vision audience, we present functional principles...... of the processing hierarchies present in the primate visual system considering recent discoveries in neurophysiology. The hierarchal processing in the primate visual system is characterized by a sequence of different levels of processing (in the order of ten) that constitute a deep hierarchy in contrast to the flat...

  6. Visual comparison for information visualization

    KAUST Repository

    Gleicher, M.

    2011-09-07

    Data analysis often involves the comparison of complex objects. With the ever increasing amounts and complexity of data, the demand for systems to help with these comparisons is also growing. Increasingly, information visualization tools support such comparisons explicitly, beyond simply allowing a viewer to examine each object individually. In this paper, we argue that the design of information visualizations of complex objects can, and should, be studied in general, that is independently of what those objects are. As a first step in developing this general understanding of comparison, we propose a general taxonomy of visual designs for comparison that groups designs into three basic categories, which can be combined. To clarify the taxonomy and validate its completeness, we provide a survey of work in information visualization related to comparison. Although we find a great diversity of systems and approaches, we see that all designs are assembled from the building blocks of juxtaposition, superposition and explicit encodings. This initial exploration shows the power of our model, and suggests future challenges in developing a general understanding of comparative visualization and facilitating the development of more comparative visualization tools. © The Author(s) 2011.

  7. Iterative categorization (IC): a systematic technique for analysing qualitative data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The processes of analysing qualitative data, particularly the stage between coding and publication, are often vague and/or poorly explained within addiction science and research more broadly. A simple but rigorous and transparent technique for analysing qualitative textual data, developed within the field of addiction, is described. The technique, iterative categorization (IC), is suitable for use with inductive and deductive codes and can support a range of common analytical approaches, e.g. thematic analysis, Framework, constant comparison, analytical induction, content analysis, conversational analysis, discourse analysis, interpretative phenomenological analysis and narrative analysis. Once the data have been coded, the only software required is a standard word processing package. Worked examples are provided. PMID:26806155

  8. Age-dependent face detection and face categorization performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbon, Claus-Christian; Grüter, Martina; Grüter, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Empirical studies on the development of face processing skills with age show inconsistent patterns concerning qualitative vs. quantitative changes over time or the age range for peak cognitive performance. In the present study, we tested the proficiency in face detection and face categorization with a large sample of participants (N = 312; age range: 2-88 yrs). As test objects, we used so-called Mooney faces, two-tone (black and white) images of faces lacking critical information of a local, featural and relational nature, reflecting difficult real world face processing conditions. We found that performance in the assessment of gender and age from Mooney faces increases up to about age 15, and decreases from 65 years on. The implications of these findings are discussed in the light of classic and recent findings from face development literature.

  9. AUTOMATION OF REMEDY TICKETS CATEGORIZATION USING BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE TOOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DR. M RAJASEKHARA BABU

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The work log of an issue is often the primary source of information for predicting the cause. Mining patterns from work log is an important issue management task. This paper aims at developing an application which categorizes the issues into problem areas using a clustering algorithm. This algorithm helps one to cluster the issues by mining patterns from the work log files. Standard reports can be generated for the root cause analysis. The whole process is automated using Business Intelligence Tools. This paper can be helpful in minimizing the recurrence of issues by informing the technical decision makers about the impact of the issues on the system andthus providing a permanent fix.

  10. Centennial glacier retreat as categorical evidence of regional climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, Gerard H.; Baker, Marcia B.; Herla, Florian

    2016-12-01

    The near-global retreat of glaciers over the last century provides some of the most iconic imagery for communicating the reality of anthropogenic climate change to the public. Surprisingly, however, there has not been a quantitative foundation for attributing the retreats to climate change, except in the global aggregate. This gap, between public perception and scientific basis, is due to uncertainties in numerical modelling and the short length of glacier mass-balance records. Here we present a method for assessing individual glacier change based on the signal-to-noise ratio, a robust metric that is insensitive to uncertainties in glacier dynamics. Using only meteorological and glacier observations, and the characteristic decadal response time of glaciers, we demonstrate that observed retreats of individual glaciers represent some of the highest signal-to-noise ratios of climate change yet documented. Therefore, in many places, the centennial-scale retreat of the local glaciers does indeed constitute categorical evidence of climate change.

  11. Neural network models of learning and categorization in multigame experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide eMarchiori

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has shown that regret-driven neural networks predict behavior in repeated completely mixed games remarkably well, substantially equating the performance of the most accurate established models of learning. This result prompts the question of what is the added value of modeling learning through neural networks. We submit that this modeling approach allows for models that are able to distinguish among and respond differently to different payoff structures. Moreover, the process of categorization of a game is implicitly carried out by these models, thus without the need of any external explicit theory of similarity between games. To validate our claims, we designed and ran two multigame experiments in which subjects faced, in random sequence, different instances of two completely mixed 2x2 games. Then, we tested on our experimental data two regret-driven neural network models, and compared their performance with that of other established models of learning and Nash equilibrium.

  12. Decoding stimulus features in primate somatosensory cortex during perceptual categorization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Manuel; Zainos, Antonio; Romo, Ranulfo

    2015-01-01

    Neurons of the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) respond as functions of frequency or amplitude of a vibrotactile stimulus. However, whether S1 neurons encode both frequency and amplitude of the vibrotactile stimulus or whether each sensory feature is encoded by separate populations of S1 neurons is not known, To further address these questions, we recorded S1 neurons while trained monkeys categorized only one sensory feature of the vibrotactile stimulus: frequency, amplitude, or duration. The results suggest a hierarchical encoding scheme in S1: from neurons that encode all sensory features of the vibrotactile stimulus to neurons that encode only one sensory feature. We hypothesize that the dynamic representation of each sensory feature in S1 might serve for further downstream processing that leads to the monkey’s psychophysical behavior observed in these tasks. PMID:25825711

  13. formales o categorías tipo interfase?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Alfonso Piña López

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Se analiza la relación entre los fenómenos básicos y los fenómenos del desarrollo y la personalidad, en términos de si los primeros deberían concebirse como condición de existencia necesaria y suficiente de los segundos, y, a su vez, si los unos y los otros lo son de los últimos. Se concluye que dependiendo de cómo se plantee dicha relación, es que eventualmente tendrá sentido la construcción de teorías formales sobre el desarrollo y la personalidad, o bien caracterizar ambos fenómenos como categorías tipo interfase con fines de predicción.

  14. Lazy learner text categorization algorithm based on embedded feature selection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Peng; Zheng Xuefeng; Zhu Jianyong; Xiao Yunhong

    2009-01-01

    To avoid the curse of dimensionality, text categorization (TC) algorithms based on machine learning (ML) have to use an feature selection (FS) method to reduce the dimensionality of feature space. Although having been widely used, FS process will generally cause information losing and then have much side-effect on the whole performance of TC algorithms. On the basis of the sparsity characteristic of text vectors, a new TC algorithm based on lazy feature selection (LFS) is presented. As a new type of embedded feature selection approach, the LFS method can greatly reduce the dimension of features without any information losing, which can improve both efficiency and performance of algorithms greatly. The experiments show the new algorithm can simultaneously achieve much higher both performance and efficiency than some of other classical TC algorithms.

  15. Developing a Grid-based search and categorization tool

    CERN Document Server

    Haya, Glenn; Vigen, Jens

    2003-01-01

    Grid technology has the potential to improve the accessibility of digital libraries. The participants in Project GRACE (Grid Search And Categorization Engine) are in the process of developing a search engine that will allow users to search through heterogeneous resources stored in geographically distributed digital collections. What differentiates this project from current search tools is that GRACE will be run on the European Data Grid, a large distributed network, and will not have a single centralized index as current web search engines do. In some cases, the distributed approach offers advantages over the centralized approach since it is more scalable, can be used on otherwise inaccessible material, and can provide advanced search options customized for each data source.

  16. A Text Categorization System with Soft Real-Time Guarantee

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In order to provide predictable runtime performance for text categorization (TC) systems, an innovative system design method is proposed for soft real-time TC systems. An analyzable mathematical model is established to approximately describe the nonlinear and time-varying TC systems. According to this mathematical model, the feedback control theory is adopted to prove the system's stableness and zero steady state error. The experiments result shows that the error of deadline satisfied ratio in the system is kept within 4% of the desired value. And the number of classifiers can be dynamically adjusted by the system itself to save the computation resources. The proposed methodology enables the theoretical analysis and evaluation to the TC systems, leading to a high-quality and low-cost implementation approach.

  17. Experimental Support for a Categorical Compositional Distributional Model of Meaning

    CERN Document Server

    Grefenstette, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Modelling compositional meaning for sentences using empirical distributional methods has been a challenge for computational linguists. We implement the abstract categorical model of Coecke et al. (arXiv:1003.4394v1 [cs.CL]) using data from the BNC and evaluate it. The implementation is based on unsupervised learning of matrices for relational words and applying them to the vectors of their arguments. The evaluation is based on the word disambiguation task developed by Mitchell and Lapata (2008) for intransitive sentences, and on a similar new experiment designed for transitive sentences. Our model matches the results of its competitors in the first experiment, and betters them in the second. The general improvement in results with increase in syntactic complexity showcases the compositional power of our model.

  18. Polarity Categorization with Fine Tuned Pipeline Process of Online Reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabha Natarajan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The development of Web 2.0 concept increased the web storage by offering information sharing from anywhere in the world. But how to use this content effectively and efficiently is the challenging taskwhich is the important research in the field of Sentiment Analysis and Opinion Mining. This paper focus on these online data to process the web content using a pipeline processing which is applied to onlinereviews about products and generating a polarity checking tool for the user to provide them decision support information. Most of the research focuses on classification of polarities instead of pre-processing of data. But our idea is fine tuned pipeline processing will help us give better categorization. Classificationhas been achieved with many techniques, mainly depends on Machine Learning. This study also focuses on ranking using different classification techniques.

  19. Squeezer: An Efficient Algorithm for Clustering Categorical Data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何增有; 徐晓飞; 邓胜春

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a new efficient algorithm for clustering categorical data,Squeezer, which can produce high quality clustering results and at the same time deservegood scalability. The Squeezer algorithm reads each tuple t in sequence, either assigning tto an existing cluster (initially none), or creating t as a new cluster, which is determined bythe similarities between t and clusters. Due to its characteristics, the proposed algorithm isextremely suitable for clustering data streams, where given a sequence of points, the objective isto maintain consistently good clustering of the sequence so far, using a small amount of memoryand time. Outliers can also be handled efficiently and directly in Squeezer. Experimental resultson real-life and synthetic datasets verify the superiority of Squeezer.

  20. Visualizing Transformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Pia

    2012-01-01

    Transformation, defined as the step of extracting, arranging and simplifying data into visual form (M. Neurath, 1974), was developed in connection with ISOTYPE (International System Of TYpographic Picture Education) and might well be the most important legacy of Isotype to the field of graphic...... design. Recently transformation has attracted renewed interest because of the book ‘The Transformer’ written by Robin Kinross and Marie Neurath. My on-going research project, summarized in this paper, identifies and depicts the essential principles of data visualization underlying the process...... of transformation with reference to Marie Neurath’s sketches on the Bilston Project. The material has been collected at the Otto and Marie Neurath Collection housed at the University of Reading, UK. By using data visualization as a research method to look directly into the process of transformation the project...

  1. Visual cognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinker, S.

    1985-01-01

    This collection of research papers on visual cognition first appeared as a special issue of Cognition: International Journal of Cognitive Science. The study of visual cognition has seen enormous progress in the past decade, bringing important advances in our understanding of shape perception, visual imagery, and mental maps. Many of these discoveries are the result of converging investigations in different areas, such as cognitive and perceptual psychology, artificial intelligence, and neuropsychology. This volume is intended to highlight a sample of work at the cutting edge of this research area for the benefit of students and researchers in a variety of disciplines. The tutorial introduction that begins the volume is designed to help the nonspecialist reader bridge the gap between the contemporary research reported here and earlier textbook introductions or literature reviews.

  2. Dynamic species distribution models from categorical survey data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieszkowska, Nova; Milligan, Gregg; Burrows, Michael T; Freckleton, Rob; Spencer, Matthew

    2013-11-01

    1. Species distribution models are static models for the distribution of a species, based on Hutchinson's niche concept. They make probabilistic predictions about the distribution of a species, but do not have a temporal interpretation. In contrast, density-structured models based on categorical abundance data make it possible to incorporate population dynamics into species distribution modelling. 2. Using dynamic species distribution models, temporal aspects of a species' distribution can be investigated, including the predictability of future abundance categories and the expected persistence times of local populations, and how these may respond to environmental or anthropogenic drivers. 3. We built density-structured models for two intertidal marine invertebrates, the Lusitanian trochid gastropods Phorcus lineatus and Gibbula umbilicalis, based on 9 years of field data from around the United Kingdom. Abundances were recorded on a categorical scale, and stochastic models for year-to-year changes in abundance category were constructed with winter mean sea surface temperature (SST) and wave fetch (a measure of the exposure of a shore) as explanatory variables. 4. Both species were more likely to be present at sites with high SST, but differed in their responses to wave fetch. Phorcus lineatus had more predictable future abundance and longer expected persistence times than G. umbilicalis. This is consistent with the longer lifespan of P. lineatus. 5. Where data from multiple time points are available, dynamic species distribution models of the kind described here have many applications in population and conservation biology. These include allowing for changes over time when combining historical and contemporary data, and predicting how climate change might alter future abundance conditional on current distributions.

  3. Evaluation of Feature Selection Approaches for Urdu Text Categorization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tehseen Zia

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Efficient feature selection is an important phase of designing an effective text categorization system. Various feature selection methods have been proposed for selecting dissimilar feature sets. It is often essential to evaluate that which method is more effective for a given task and what size of feature set is an effective model selection choice. Aim of this paper is to answer these questions for designing Urdu text categorization system. Five widely used feature selection methods were examined using six well-known classification algorithms: naive Bays (NB, k-nearest neighbor (KNN, support vector machines (SVM with linear, polynomial and radial basis kernels and decision tree (i.e. J48. The study was conducted over two test collections: EMILLE collection and a naive collection. We have observed that three feature selection methods i.e. information gain, Chi statistics, and symmetrical uncertain, have performed uniformly in most of the cases if not all. Moreover, we have found that no single feature selection method is best for all classifiers. While gain ratio out-performed others for naive Bays and J48, information gain has shown top performance for KNN and SVM with polynomial and radial basis kernels. Overall, linear SVM with any of feature selection methods including information gain, Chi statistics or symmetric uncertain methods is turned-out to be first choice across other combinations of classifiers and feature selection methods on moderate size naive collection. On the other hand, naive Bays with any of feature selection method have shown its advantage for a small sized EMILLE corpus.

  4. Assessing Measurement Equivalence in Ordered-Categorical Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Elosua

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available La invarianza factorial estudia de la equivalencia métrica en el marco del modelo lineal del factor común por medio de la comparación de los parámetros del modelo de medida en los grupos de interés. Sin embargo cuando se utilizan ítems dicotómicos, Likert o categorías de respuestas ordenadas se viola la asunción referida al carácter continuo de las variables. Aunque existen modelos explícitos para este tipo de atos son muy escasos los trabajos que analizan su potencia y error Tipo I en el estudio de la invarianza factorial. Por medio de simulación Montecarlo este trabajo analiza la potencia y error tipo I asociados a la detección de la invarianza factorial en un diseño que manipula cuatro factores; tamaño de la muestra (300, 500 y 1000, tipo de DIF (umbrales, pesos, cantidad de DIF (0,25, 0,40, y presencia de impacto. Los parámetros de generación de datos provienen de una escala unifactorial compuesta por 9 indicadores con 3 categorías de respuesta ordenada. La presencia/ausencia de invarianza se evaluó utilizando trescriterios : a significación de la diferencia entre valores chi-cuadrado e modelos anidados, b la significación de la diferencia entre valores chicuadrado de modelos anidados aplicando la corrección Bonferroni, y c la diferencia entre los valores del Índice Comparativo de Ajuste (CFI entre modelos anidados. Los resultados mostraron un buena potencia y control de falsos positivos asociados a la diferencia entre CFIs y a la corrección Bonferroni.

  5. Uncertainty Categorization, Modeling, and Management for Regional Water Supply Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, S.; Strzepek, K. M.; AlSaati, A.; Alhassan, A.

    2016-12-01

    Many water planners face increased pressure on water supply systems from growing demands, variability in supply and a changing climate. Short-term variation in water availability and demand; long-term uncertainty in climate, groundwater storage, and sectoral competition for water; and varying stakeholder perspectives on the impacts of water shortages make it difficult to assess the necessity of expensive infrastructure investments. We categorize these uncertainties on two dimensions: whether they are the result of stochastic variation or epistemic uncertainty, and whether the uncertainties can be described probabilistically or are deep uncertainties whose likelihood is unknown. We develop a decision framework that combines simulation for probabilistic uncertainty, sensitivity analysis for deep uncertainty and Bayesian decision analysis for uncertainties that are reduced over time with additional information. We apply this framework to two contrasting case studies - drought preparedness in Melbourne, Australia and fossil groundwater depletion in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia - to assess the impacts of different types of uncertainty on infrastructure decisions. Melbourne's water supply system relies on surface water, which is impacted by natural variation in rainfall, and a market-based system for managing water rights. Our results show that small, flexible investment increases can mitigate shortage risk considerably at reduced cost. Riyadh, by contrast, relies primarily on desalination for municipal use and fossil groundwater for agriculture, and a centralized planner makes allocation decisions. Poor regional groundwater measurement makes it difficult to know when groundwater pumping will become uneconomical, resulting in epistemic uncertainty. However, collecting more data can reduce the uncertainty, suggesting the need for different uncertainty modeling and management strategies in Riyadh than in Melbourne. We will categorize the two systems and propose appropriate

  6. Categorizing Ideas about Trees: A Tree of Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisler, Marie; Lecointre, Guillaume

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explore whether matrices and MP trees used to produce systematic categories of organisms could be useful to produce categories of ideas in history of science. We study the history of the use of trees in systematics to represent the diversity of life from 1766 to 1991. We apply to those ideas a method inspired from coding homologous parts of organisms. We discretize conceptual parts of ideas, writings and drawings about trees contained in 41 main writings; we detect shared parts among authors and code them into a 91-characters matrix and use a tree representation to show who shares what with whom. In other words, we propose a hierarchical representation of the shared ideas about trees among authors: this produces a “tree of trees.” Then, we categorize schools of tree-representations. Classical schools like “cladists” and “pheneticists” are recovered but others are not: “gradists” are separated into two blocks, one of them being called here “grade theoreticians.” We propose new interesting categories like the “buffonian school,” the “metaphoricians,” and those using “strictly genealogical classifications.” We consider that networks are not useful to represent shared ideas at the present step of the study. A cladogram is made for showing who is sharing what with whom, but also heterobathmy and homoplasy of characters. The present cladogram is not modelling processes of transmission of ideas about trees, and here it is mostly used to test for proximity of ideas of the same age and for categorization. PMID:23950877

  7. No Role for Motor Affordances in Visual Working Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecher, Diane

    2013-01-01

    Motor affordances have been shown to play a role in visual object identification and categorization. The present study explored whether working memory is likewise supported by motor affordances. Use of motor affordances should be disrupted by motor interference, and this effect should be larger for objects that have motor affordances than for…

  8. Representing and Inferring Visual Perceptual Skills in Dermatological Image Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui

    2013-01-01

    Experts have a remarkable capability of locating, perceptually organizing, identifying, and categorizing objects in images specific to their domains of expertise. Eliciting and representing their visual strategies and some aspects of domain knowledge will benefit a wide range of studies and applications. For example, image understanding may be…

  9. Miniature Brain Decision Making in Complex Visual Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-18

    release; distribution unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The grantee investigated, using the honeybee (Apis mellifera ) as a model...successful for understanding face processing in both human adults and infants. Individual honeybees (Apis mellifera ) were trained with...for 30 bees (group 3) of the target stimuli. Bernard J, Stach S, Giurfa M (2007) Categorization of visual stimuli in the honeybee Apis mellifera

  10. Hearing feelings: affective categorization of music and speech in alexithymia, an ERP study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Sophia Goerlich

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Alexithymia, a condition characterized by deficits in interpreting and regulating feelings, is a risk factor for a variety of psychiatric conditions. Little is known about how alexithymia influences the processing of emotions in music and speech. Appreciation of such emotional qualities in auditory material is fundamental to human experience and has profound consequences for functioning in daily life. We investigated the neural signature of such emotional processing in alexithymia by means of event-related potentials. METHODOLOGY: Affective music and speech prosody were presented as targets following affectively congruent or incongruent visual word primes in two conditions. In two further conditions, affective music and speech prosody served as primes and visually presented words with affective connotations were presented as targets. Thirty-two participants (16 male judged the affective valence of the targets. We tested the influence of alexithymia on cross-modal affective priming and on N400 amplitudes, indicative of individual sensitivity to an affective mismatch between words, prosody, and music. Our results indicate that the affective priming effect for prosody targets tended to be reduced with increasing scores on alexithymia, while no behavioral differences were observed for music and word targets. At the electrophysiological level, alexithymia was associated with significantly smaller N400 amplitudes in response to affectively incongruent music and speech targets, but not to incongruent word targets. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest a reduced sensitivity for the emotional qualities of speech and music in alexithymia during affective categorization. This deficit becomes evident primarily in situations in which a verbalization of emotional information is required.

  11. Traffic Visualization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Picozzi, Matteo; Verdezoto, Nervo; Pouke, Matti

    2013-01-01

    techniques to give a rapid overview of traffic data. We illustrate our approach as a case study for traffic visualization systems, using datasets from the city of Oulu that can be extended to other city planning activities. We also report the feedback of real users (traffic management employees, traffic police...

  12. Visualizing inequality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliazar, Iddo

    2016-07-01

    The study of socioeconomic inequality is of substantial importance, scientific and general alike. The graphic visualization of inequality is commonly conveyed by Lorenz curves. While Lorenz curves are a highly effective statistical tool for quantifying the distribution of wealth in human societies, they are less effective a tool for the visual depiction of socioeconomic inequality. This paper introduces an alternative to Lorenz curves-the hill curves. On the one hand, the hill curves are a potent scientific tool: they provide detailed scans of the rich-poor gaps in human societies under consideration, and are capable of accommodating infinitely many degrees of freedom. On the other hand, the hill curves are a powerful infographic tool: they visualize inequality in a most vivid and tangible way, with no quantitative skills that are required in order to grasp the visualization. The application of hill curves extends far beyond socioeconomic inequality. Indeed, the hill curves are highly effective 'hyperspectral' measures of statistical variability that are applicable in the context of size distributions at large. This paper establishes the notion of hill curves, analyzes them, and describes their application in the context of general size distributions.

  13. Latent variable indirect response modeling of categorical endpoints representing change from baseline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chuanpu; Xu, Zhenhua; Mendelsohn, Alan M; Zhou, Honghui

    2013-02-01

    Accurate exposure-response modeling is important in drug development. Methods are still evolving in the use of mechanistic, e.g., indirect response (IDR) models to relate discrete endpoints, mostly of the ordered categorical form, to placebo/co-medication effect and drug exposure. When the discrete endpoint is derived using change-from-baseline measurements, a mechanistic exposure-response modeling approach requires adjustment to maintain appropriate interpretation. This manuscript describes a new modeling method that integrates a latent-variable representation of IDR models with standard logistic regression. The new method also extends to general link functions that cover probit regression or continuous clinical endpoint modeling. Compared to an earlier latent variable approach that constrained the baseline probability of response to be 0, placebo effect parameters in the new model formulation are more readily interpretable and can be separately estimated from placebo data, thus allowing convenient and robust model estimation. A general inherent connection of some latent variable representations with baseline-normalized standard IDR models is derived. For describing clinical response endpoints, Type I and Type III IDR models are shown to be equivalent, therefore there are only three identifiable IDR models. This approach was applied to data from two phase III clinical trials of intravenously administered golimumab for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, where 20, 50, and 70% improvement in the American College of Rheumatology disease severity criteria were used as efficacy endpoints. Likelihood profiling and visual predictive checks showed reasonable parameter estimation precision and model performance.

  14. Application of image categorization methods for buried threat detection in GPR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, Rayn T.; Morton, Kenneth D.; Collins, Leslie M.; Torrione, Peter A.

    2013-06-01

    Utilizing methods from the image processing and computer vision fields has led to advances in high resolution Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) based threat detection. By analyzing 2-D slices of GPR data and applying various image processing algorithms, it is possible to discriminate between threat and non-threat objects. In initial attempts to utilize such approaches, object instance-matching algorithms were applied to GPR images, but only limited success was obtained when utilizing feature point methods to identify patches of data that displayed landmine-like characteristics. While the approach worked well under some conditions, the instance-matching method of classification was not designed to identify a type of class, only reproductions of a specific instance. In contrast, our current approach is focused on identifying methods that can account for within-class variations that result from changing target types and varying operating conditions that a GPR system regularly encounters. Image category recognition is an area of research that attempts to account for within class variation of objects within visual images. Instead of finding a reproduction of a particular known object within an image, algorithms for image categorization are designed to learn the qualities of images that contain an instance belonging to a known class. The results illustrate how image category recognition algorithms can be successfully applied to threat identification in GPR data.

  15. Semantic Richness Effects in Spoken Word Recognition: A Lexical Decision and Semantic Categorization Megastudy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Winston D; Yap, Melvin J; Lau, Mabel C; Ng, Melvin M R; Tan, Luuan-Chin

    2016-01-01

    A large number of studies have demonstrated that semantic richness dimensions [e.g., number of features, semantic neighborhood density, semantic diversity , concreteness, emotional valence] influence word recognition processes. Some of these richness effects appear to be task-general, while others have been found to vary across tasks. Importantly, almost all of these findings have been found in the visual word recognition literature. To address this gap, we examined the extent to which these semantic richness effects are also found in spoken word recognition, using a megastudy approach that allows for an examination of the relative contribution of the various semantic properties to performance in two tasks: lexical decision, and semantic categorization. The results show that concreteness, valence, and number of features accounted for unique variance in latencies across both tasks in a similar direction-faster responses for spoken words that were concrete, emotionally valenced, and with a high number of features-while arousal, semantic neighborhood density, and semantic diversity did not influence latencies. Implications for spoken word recognition processes are discussed.

  16. Robust and Blind 3D Mesh Watermarking in Spatial Domain Based on Faces Categorization and Sorting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molaei, Amir Masoud; Ebrahimnezhad, Hossein; Sedaaghi, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a 3D watermarking algorithm in spatial domain is presented with blind detection. In the proposed method, a negligible visual distortion is observed in host model. Initially, a preprocessing is applied on the 3D model to make it robust against geometric transformation attacks. Then, a number of triangle faces are determined as mark triangles using a novel systematic approach in which faces are categorized and sorted robustly. In order to enhance the capability of information retrieval by attacks, block watermarks are encoded using Reed-Solomon block error-correcting code before embedding into the mark triangles. Next, the encoded watermarks are embedded in spherical coordinates. The proposed method is robust against additive noise, mesh smoothing and quantization attacks. Also, it is stout next to geometric transformation, vertices and faces reordering attacks. Moreover, the proposed algorithm is designed so that it is robust against the cropping attack. Simulation results confirm that the watermarked models confront very low distortion if the control parameters are selected properly. Comparison with other methods demonstrates that the proposed method has good performance against the mesh smoothing attacks.

  17. Data Properties Categorization to Improve Scientific Sensor Data Error Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, I.; Gates, A.; Tweedie, C. E.

    2009-12-01

    to perform the error detection at near-real time as data is recorded. Because the effectiveness of an error-detection mechanism depends on the quality of the specified error detection properties, there is a need to identify and categorize the types of properties of interest for scientists working with sensor data. A categorization of error-detection properties will allow the development of a software tool to facilitate the specification of effective error-detection properties.

  18. Categorical Imperative Immanuel Kant sebagai Landasan Filosofis Pelaksanaan Putusan Arbitrase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djunyanto Thriyana

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Penyelesaian sengketa dalam bidang bisnis sering kali menuntut kecepatan, kepastian, dan biaya yang murah. Arbitrase sebagai salah satu metode alternatif penyelesaian sengketa sebaiknya ideal agar dapat dimanfaatkan oleh para pihak yang bersengketa. Beberapa prinsip dalam arbitrase mendukung harapan para pebisnis dalam menyelesaikan sengketanya. Namun demikian, putusan arbitrase juga sering menjadi lambat karena perilaku para pihak terutama yang kalah. Sebagai pebisnis seharusnya para pihak mempunyai integritas yang dapat mempertahankan bonafiditas dan iktikad baik mengingat dunia bisnis berdasarkan pada kepercayaan. Untuk itu, para pebisnis diharapkan memiliki norma-norma yang menyatu dalam cara pandang atau tindakan termasuk dalam penyelesaian sengketa yang terjadi. Norma moral merupakan norma yang dapat menjadi panduan. Salah satu konsep filosofi yang berlandaskan pada moral adalah konsep yang berasal dari Immanuel Kant. Kant memperkenalkan konsep ‘Categorical Imperative’ atau kewajiban tanpa syarat yang semestinya dimiliki oleh manusia sebagai makhluk berakal dalam mencapai keharmonian dalam kehidupan bersama manusia lain, di bawah hukum kebebasan berdasarkan prinsip-prinsip universal. Konsep ini dapat menjadi landasan filosofi dalam penyelesaian sengketa melalui arbitrase. Abstract Dispute resolution in business requires immediacy and certainty at a reasonable cost. Arbitration as an alternative method for dispute resolution should be ideal to be used by the parties in dispute. Principles in arbitration support expectations of businesses in handling dispute. However, arbitration is inevitably slow due to the behavior of the parties, especially by the party at loss. Business stakeholders acting as the parties should be compelled to maintain the integrity and reliability of their businesses, in accordance with the principle of good faith based on trust. Businesses are expected to follow norms coherent between the worldview and its

  19. Temporal summaries: supporting temporal categorical searching, aggregation and comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Taowei David; Plaisant, Catherine; Shneiderman, Ben; Spring, Neil; Roseman, David; Marchand, Greg; Mukherjee, Vikramjit; Smith, Mark

    2009-01-01

    When analyzing thousands of event histories, analysts often want to see the events as an aggregate to detect insights and generate new hypotheses about the data. An analysis tool must emphasize both the prevalence and the temporal ordering of these events. Additionally, the analysis tool must also support flexible comparisons to allow analysts to gather visual evidence. In a previous work, we introduced align, rank, and filter (ARF) to accentuate temporal ordering. In this paper, we present temporal summaries, an interactive visualization technique that highlights the prevalence of event occurrences. Temporal summaries dynamically aggregate events in multiple granularities (year, month, week, day, hour, etc.) for the purpose of spotting trends over time and comparing several groups of records. They provide affordances for analysts to perform temporal range filters. We demonstrate the applicability of this approach in two extensive case studies with analysts who applied temporal summaries to search, filter, and look for patterns in electronic health records and academic records.

  20. Non-abelian higher gauge theory and categorical bundle

    CERN Document Server

    Viennot, David

    2012-01-01

    A gauge theory is associated with a principal bundle endowed with a connection permitting to define horizontal lifts of paths. The horizontal lifts of surfaces cannot be defined into a principal bundle structure. An higher gauge theory is an attempt to generalize the bundle structure in order to describe horizontal lifts of surfaces. A such attempt is particularly difficult for the non-abelian case. Some structures have been proposed to realize this goal (twisted bundle, gerbes with connection, bundle gerbe, 2-bundle). Each of them uses a category in place of the total space manifold of the usual principal bundle structure. Some of them replace also the structure group by a category (more precisely a Lie crossed module viewed as a category). But the base space remains still a simple manifold (possibly viewed as a trivial category with only identity arrows). We propose a new principal categorical bundle structure, with a Lie crossed module as structure groupoid, but with a base space belonging to a bigger clas...

  1. Categorization of speech sounds by Norwegian/English bilinguals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dypvik, Audny T.; Slawinski, Elzbieta B.

    2005-04-01

    Bilinguals who learned English late in life (late bilinguals) as opposed to those who learned English early in life (early bilinguals) differ in their perception of phonemic distinctions. Age of acquisition of a second language as well as depth of immersion into English is influenced by perceptual differences of phonemic contrasts between monolinguals and bilinguals, with consequences for speech production. The phonemes /v/ and /w/ are from the same category in Norwegian, rendering them perceptually indistinguishable to the native Norwegian listener. In English, /v/ and /w/ occupy two categories. Psychoacoustic testing on this phonemic distinction in the current study will compare perceptual abilities of monolingual English and bilingual Norwegian/English listeners. Preliminary data indicates that Norwegian/English bilinguals demonstrate varying perceptual abilities for this phonemic distinction. A series of speech sounds have been generated by an articulatory synthesizer, the Tube Resonance Model, along a continuum between the postures of /v/ and /w/. They will be presented binaurally over headphones in an anechoic chamber at a sound pressure level of 75 dB. Differences in the perception of the categorical boundary between /v/ and /w/ among English monolinguals and Norwegian/English bilinguals will be further delineated.

  2. Historical literature review on waste classification and categorization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croff, A.G.; Richmond, A.A.; Williams, J.P.

    1995-03-01

    The Staff of the Waste Management Document Library (WMDL), in cooperation with Allen Croff have been requested to provide information support for a historical search concerning waste categorization/classification. This bibliography has been compiled under the sponsorship of Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Chemical Technology Division to help in Allen`s ongoing committee work with the NRC/NRCP. After examining the search, Allen Croff saw the value of the search being published. Permission was sought from the database providers to allow limited publication (i.e. 20--50 copies) of the search for internal distribution at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and for Allen Croff`s associated committee. Citations from the database providers who did not grant legal permission for their material to be published have been omitted from the literature review. Some of the longer citations have been included in an abbreviated form in the search to allow the format of the published document to be shortened from approximately 1,400 pages. The bibliography contains 372 citations.

  3. Categorization and Searching of Color Images Using Mean Shift Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash PANDEY

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Now a day’s Image Searching is still a challenging problem in content based image retrieval (CBIR system. Most CBIR system operates on all images without pre-sorting the images. The image search result contains many unrelated image. The aim of this research is to propose a new object based indexing system Based on extracting salient region representative from the image, categorizing the image into different types and search images that are similar to given query images.In our approach, the color features are extracted using the mean shift algorithm, a robust clustering technique, Dominant objects are obtained by performing region grouping of segmented thumbnails. The category for an image is generated automatically by analyzing the image for the presence of a dominant object. The images in the database are clustered based on region feature similarity using Euclidian distance. Placing an image into a category can help the user to navigate retrieval results more effectively. Extensive experimental results illustrate excellent performance.

  4. Children with medically unexplained pain symptoms: Categorization and effective management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharmishtha S Deshpande

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Medically unexplained pain symptoms are common in children, and their incidence is on the rise. There is often a lack of clearly articulated pathophysiology in these patients. There is need to improve understanding about varied causes and presentations of these patients which would generate further insight in management of these patients. Documentation and detailed assessment of such children in Indian setting is not seen in literature. Materials and Methods: A series of 17 cases, 10 boys and 7 girls referred from pediatrics department is discussed, so as to categorize them in three different subgroups for management. Result and Discussion: Although there were often no overt anxiety or depressive features, some psychosocial stress which was mostly unnoticed by the child, the parents and the doctor, preceded such a pain. It was often an academic stress, familial separation or parental psychiatric illness. They were at times not able to verbalize their distress, which was revealed with the help of Children′s Apperception Test (C.A.T.. They mainly had anxieties about loss of love or disapproval by parents and also fear of harm or injury. They used defence mechanisms like denial, reaction formation and repression, which were ineffective in handling the overwhelming anxiety. Most of these children had either above average or borderline intelligence. Somatic expression of emotional needs and fears in these children was managed effectively by supportive therapy and antidepressant drugs.

  5. Ambiguity and Incomplete Information in Categorical Models of Language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Marsden

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate notions of ambiguity and partial information in categorical distributional models of natural language. Probabilistic ambiguity has previously been studied using Selinger's CPM construction. This construction works well for models built upon vector spaces, as has been shown in quantum computational applications. Unfortunately, it doesn't seem to provide a satisfactory method for introducing mixing in other compact closed categories such as the category of sets and binary relations. We therefore lack a uniform strategy for extending a category to model imprecise linguistic information. In this work we adopt a different approach. We analyze different forms of ambiguous and incomplete information, both with and without quantitative probabilistic data. Each scheme then corresponds to a suitable enrichment of the category in which we model language. We view different monads as encapsulating the informational behaviour of interest, by analogy with their use in modelling side effects in computation. Previous results of Jacobs then allow us to systematically construct suitable bases for enrichment. We show that we can freely enrich arbitrary dagger compact closed categories in order to capture all the phenomena of interest, whilst retaining the important dagger compact closed structure. This allows us to construct a model with real convex combination of binary relations that makes non-trivial use of the scalars. Finally we relate our various different enrichments, showing that finite subconvex algebra enrichment covers all the effects under consideration.

  6. On the categorical nature of Korean /pk/ place assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Minjung; Kochetov, Alexei

    2001-05-01

    Korean exhibits regressive place assimilation in /pk/ clusters, which has been described as gradient and rate dependent. However, this assumption has empirically only been tested on the basis of air pressure data [Jun, 1996] which does not provide a direct record of articulator movement. The present study examines articulator movement using EMMA. For three Seoul-dialect speakers, stimuli containing /pk/ clusters were elicited word-medially (for words and nonwords) and in a phrase-boundary condition; two rates were employed. Results show that the labial can indeed reduce word medially, rendering [kk]. However, contrary to previous claims, the data demonstrate that reduction in /pk/ is always categorical, although it is optional or stochastic in its occurrence. Substantial interspeaker variation is observed, with the frequency of reduction being higher at fast rate and ranging overall from 6 at both rates and is never gradient. The lack of reduction in nonsense words and in the phrase boundary condition shows that the process is sensitive to lexical properties. The observed tendency for more gestural overlap word medially compared to the phrase-boundary condition supports the hypothesis that gestural overlap plays a role in the origins of place assimilation. [Work supported by NIH.

  7. Is Adolescent Suicidal Ideation Continuous or Categorical? A Taxometric Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Richard T; Jones, Richard N; Spirito, Anthony

    2015-11-01

    Despite the strong association between suicidal ideation and suicidal behavior, a relative minority of ideators transition to attempting suicide. Clarifying the latent structure of suicidal ideation has direct implications for theory, as well as suicidal risk assessment and prevention efforts. Taxometric analysis is a statistical technique specifically designed to assess whether a latent construct is taxonic (i.e., categorical) or continuous (i.e., dimensional) in nature. Although this statistical approach has been increasingly used over the past decade to elucidate the latent structure of various forms of psychopathology and related risk factors, there are no taxometric studies to date of suicidal ideation. The aim of the current project is to apply taxometric methods to a sample of clinically depressed, treatment-seeking adolescents (n = 334). Current suicidal ideation was measured using the Suicidal Ideation Questionnaire-Jr., (SIQ-Jr.). The results of two mathematically non-redundant taxometric approaches (i.e., MAXEIG and L-Mode) are consistent with a continuous latent structure for suicidal ideation. The current findings suggest that suicidal ideation in depressed adolescents is dimensional. The implication of these findings for research, theory, and suicidal risk assessment strategies are discussed.

  8. A Categorical Model for the Virtual Braid Group

    CERN Document Server

    Kauffman, Louis H

    2011-01-01

    This paper gives a new interpretation of the virtual braid group in terms of a tensor category with generating diagrams that are abstract strings or connections between pairs of strands in an identity braid, and elements corresponding to virtual crossings that generate the symmetric group. The point of this categorical formulation of the virtual braid groups is that we see how these groups form a natural extension of the symmetric groups by formal elements that satisfy the algebraic Yang-Baxter equation. The category we desribe is a natural structure for an algebraist interested in exploring formal properties of the algebraic Yang-Baxter equation, and it is directly related to more topological points of view about virtual links and virtual braids. We discuss a generalization of the virtual braiding formalism to braided tensor categories that can be used for obtaining invariants of knots and links via Hopf algebras. The invariants we obtain are invariants of rotational virtual knots and links, where the term r...

  9. Listening for the norm: adaptive coding in speech categorization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingyuan eHuang

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Perceptual aftereffects have been referred to as the psychologist’s microelectrode because they can expose dimensions of representation through the residual effect of a context stimulus upon perception of a subsequent target. The present study uses such context dependence to examine the dimensions of representation involved in a classic demonstration of talker normalization in speech perception. Whereas most accounts of talker normalization have emphasized talker-, speech- or articulatory-specific dimensions’ significance, the present work tests an alternative hypothesis: that the long-term average spectrum of speech context is responsible for patterns of context-dependent perception considered to be evidence for talker normalization. In support of this hypothesis, listeners’ vowel categorization was equivalently influenced by speech contexts manipulated to sound as though they were spoken by different talkers and nonspeech analogs matched in LTAS to the speech contexts. Since the nonspeech contexts did not possess talker, speech or articulatory information, general perceptual mechanisms are implicated. Results are described in terms of adaptive perceptual coding.

  10. Uniform categorization of biocommunication in bacteria, fungi and plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witzany, Günther

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a coherent biocommunication categorization for the kingdoms of bacteria, fungi and plants. The investigation further shows that, besides biotic sign use in trans-, inter- and intraorganismic communication processes, a common trait is interpretation of abiotic influences as indicators to generate an appropriate adaptive behaviour. Far from being mechanistic interactions, communication processes within organisms and between organisms are sign-mediated interactions. Sign-mediated interactions are the precondition for every cooperation and coordination between at least two biological agents such as cells, tissues, organs and organisms. Signs of biocommunicative processes are chemical molecules in most cases. The signs that are used in a great variety of signaling processes follow syntactic (combinatorial), pragmatic (context-dependent) and semantic (content-specific) rules. These three levels of semiotic rules are helpful tools to investigate communication processes throughout all organismic kingdoms. It is not the aim to present the latest empirical data concerning communication in these three kingdoms but to present a unifying perspective that is able to interconnect transdisciplinary research on bacteria, fungi and plants. PMID:21541001

  11. Uniform categorization of biocommunication in bacteria,fungi and plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Günther; Witzany

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a coherent biocommunication categorization for the kingdoms of bacteria,fungi and plants. The investigation further shows that,besides biotic sign use in trans-,inter-and intraorganismic communication processes,a common trait is interpretation of abiotic influences as indicators to generate an appropriate adaptive behaviour.Far from being mechanistic interactions,communication processes within organisms and between organisms are sign-mediated interactions.Sign-mediated interactions are the precondition for every cooperation and coordination between at least two biological agents such as cells,tissues,organs and organisms.Signs of biocommunicative processes are chemical molecules in most cases.The signs that are used in a great variety of signaling processes follow syntactic(combinatorial) ,pragmatic(context-dependent) and semantic(contentspecific) rules.These three levels of semiotic rules are helpful tools to investigate communication processes throughout all organismic kingdoms.It is not the aim to present the latest empirical data concerning communication in these three kingdoms but to present a unifying perspective that is able to interconnect transdisciplinary research on bacteria,fungi and plants.

  12. Cheese Classification, Characterization, and Categorization: A Global Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almena-Aliste, Montserrat; Mietton, Bernard

    2014-02-01

    Cheese is one of the most fascinating, complex, and diverse foods enjoyed today. Three elements constitute the cheese ecosystem: ripening agents, consisting of enzymes and microorganisms; the composition of the fresh cheese; and the environmental conditions during aging. These factors determine and define not only the sensory quality of the final cheese product but also the vast diversity of cheeses produced worldwide. How we define and categorize cheese is a complicated matter. There are various approaches to cheese classification, and a global approach for classification and characterization is needed. We review current cheese classification schemes and the limitations inherent in each of the schemes described. While some classification schemes are based on microbiological criteria, others rely on descriptions of the technologies used for cheese production. The goal of this review is to present an overview of comprehensive and practical integrative classification models in order to better describe cheese diversity and the fundamental differences within cheeses, as well as to connect fundamental technological, microbiological, chemical, and sensory characteristics to contribute to an overall characterization of the main families of cheese, including the expanding world of American artisanal cheeses.

  13. Feasibility of an Ultrasonographic Categorical Reporting System for Thyroid Incidentaloma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Won Ho; Lee, Hui Joong; Yi, Jae Hyuck; Kim, Yong Sun; Kang, Duk Sik; Park, Ji Young [Kyungpook National University Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seung Hun [Daegu Veterans Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-12-15

    To evaluate the feasibility of an ultrasonographic category system for the proper management of incidentally found thyroid nodules. We retrospectively evaluated 2,688 patients who had thyroid nodules and underwent ultrasonography- guided fine needle aspiration biopsy. We made an ultrasonographic categorical reporting system by logistic regression analysis for comparison with the pathologic results of cytology and biopsy. The distribution of malignancy probability for benign nodules was 0.07 to 0.23 and for malignant nodules was 0.37 to 0.91 (95% confidence intervals). We stratified the distribution of the probability of malignancy of each nodule into 6 categories (category 0, no nodule: 1, highly suggestive of benignancy: 2, probably benign: 3, indeterminate: 4, probably malignant: and 5, highly suggestive of malignancy) and summarized the representative US findings. We compared the category of each nodule with the pathological results. In nodules with surgically proven pathologic diagnoses, benign lesions were 96.1% (348/361) in category 1 and malignant lesions were 98.6% (139/141) in category 5. We suggest that the ultrasonographic category system for thyroid incidentaloma may provide optimal strategies to manage incidentally found thyroid nodules

  14. Visualizing Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Reality Capture Technologies, Inc. is a spinoff company from Ames Research Center. Offering e-business solutions for optimizing management, design and production processes, RCT uses visual collaboration environments (VCEs) such as those used to prepare the Mars Pathfinder mission.The product, 4-D Reality Framework, allows multiple users from different locations to manage and share data. The insurance industry is one targeted commercial application for this technology.

  15. Adaptive categorization of ART networks in robot behavior learning using game-theoretic formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Wai-keung; Liu, Yun-hui

    2003-12-01

    Adaptive Resonance Theory (ART) networks are employed in robot behavior learning. Two of the difficulties in online robot behavior learning, namely, (1) exponential memory increases with time, (2) difficulty for operators to specify learning tasks accuracy and control learning attention before learning. In order to remedy the aforementioned difficulties, an adaptive categorization mechanism is introduced in ART networks for perceptual and action patterns categorization in this paper. A game-theoretic formulation of adaptive categorization for ART networks is proposed for vigilance parameter adaptation for category size control on the categories formed. The proposed vigilance parameter update rule can help improving categorization performance in the aspect of category number stability and solve the problem of selecting initial vigilance parameter prior to pattern categorization in traditional ART networks. Behavior learning using physical robot is conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed adaptive categorization mechanism in ART networks.

  16. Categorizing document by fuzzy C-Means and K-nearest neighbors approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priandini, Novita; Zaman, Badrus; Purwanti, Endah

    2017-08-01

    Increasing of technology had made categorizing documents become important. It caused by increasing of number of documents itself. Managing some documents by categorizing is one of Information Retrieval application, because it involve text mining on its process. Whereas, categorization technique could be done both Fuzzy C-Means (FCM) and K-Nearest Neighbors (KNN) method. This experiment would consolidate both methods. The aim of the experiment is increasing performance of document categorize. First, FCM is in order to clustering training documents. Second, KNN is in order to categorize testing document until the output of categorization is shown. Result of the experiment is 14 testing documents retrieve relevantly to its category. Meanwhile 6 of 20 testing documents retrieve irrelevant to its category. Result of system evaluation shows that both precision and recall are 0,7.

  17. Representations of general linear groups and categorical actions of Kac-Moody algebras

    OpenAIRE

    Losev, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    This is an expanded version of the lectures given by the author on the 3rd school "Lie algebras, algebraic groups and invariant theory" in Togliatti, Russia. In these notes we explain the concept of a categorical Kac-Moody action by studying an example of the category of rational representations of a general linear group in positive characteristic. We also deal with some more advanced topics: a categorical action on the polynomial representations and crystals of categorical actions.

  18. A quantum dynamic belief model to explain the interference effects of categorization on decision making

    OpenAIRE

    He, Zichang; Jiang, Wen

    2017-01-01

    Categorization is necessary for many decision making tasks. However, the categorization process may interfere the decision making result and the law of total probability can be violated in some situations. To predict the interference effect of categorization, some model based on quantum probability has been proposed. In this paper, a new quantum dynamic belief (QDB) model is proposed. Considering the precise decision may not be made during the process, the concept of uncertainty is introduced...

  19. The Categorical Imperative Analyzing Immanuel Kant’s Grounding for A Metaphysics of Morals

    OpenAIRE

    Bordum, Anders

    2002-01-01

    In this article I first argue that Immanuel Kant’s conception of the categorical imperative is important to his philosophy. I systematically, though indirectly, interconnect the cognitive and moral aspects of his thinking. Second, I present an interpretation of the Kantian ethics, taking as my point of departure, the concept of the categorical imperative. Finally, I show how the categorical imperative is given a dialogical interpretation by Jürgen Habermas in his approach, usually referred to...

  20. Infototal, inforrelato e infopincel. Nuevas categorías que caracterizan la infografía como estructura informativa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lic. Leticia Borrás

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available La infografía es una explicación visual y sintética que integra sobre la base de la imagen y el complemento de otros recursos gráficos la esencia de la información.Si bien el concepto ha evolucionado en el ámbito de los medios impresos, no se han manifestado en el mismo sentido los estudios académicos que permitan definir intrínseca e integralmente este fenómeno.Un análisis sistemático de la infografía en términos de estructura informativa permitió construir nuevas categorías: infototal, inforrelato e infopincel.

  1. Bayesian network classifiers for categorizing cortical GABAergic interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihaljević, Bojan; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Bielza, Concha; DeFelipe, Javier; Larrañaga, Pedro

    2015-04-01

    An accepted classification of GABAergic interneurons of the cerebral cortex is a major goal in neuroscience. A recently proposed taxonomy based on patterns of axonal arborization promises to be a pragmatic method for achieving this goal. It involves characterizing interneurons according to five axonal arborization features, called F1-F5, and classifying them into a set of predefined types, most of which are established in the literature. Unfortunately, there is little consensus among expert neuroscientists regarding the morphological definitions of some of the proposed types. While supervised classifiers were able to categorize the interneurons in accordance with experts' assignments, their accuracy was limited because they were trained with disputed labels. Thus, here we automatically classify interneuron subsets with different label reliability thresholds (i.e., such that every cell's label is backed by at least a certain (threshold) number of experts). We quantify the cells with parameters of axonal and dendritic morphologies and, in order to predict the type, also with axonal features F1-F4 provided by the experts. Using Bayesian network classifiers, we accurately characterize and classify the interneurons and identify useful predictor variables. In particular, we discriminate among reliable examples of common basket, horse-tail, large basket, and Martinotti cells with up to 89.52% accuracy, and single out the number of branches at 180 μm from the soma, the convex hull 2D area, and the axonal features F1-F4 as especially useful predictors for distinguishing among these types. These results open up new possibilities for an objective and pragmatic classification of interneurons.

  2. PRIMING OF OBJECT CATEGORIZATION WITHIN AND ACROSS LEVELS OF SPECIFICITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias M. Müller

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Identification of objects can occur at different levels of specificity. Dependingon task and context, an object can be classified at the superordinate level (as ananimal, at the basic level (a bird or at the subordinate level (a sparrow. Whatare the interactions between these representational levels and do they rely onthe same sequential processes that lead to successful object identification? Inthis electroencephalogram study, a task-switching paradigm (covert naming orliving/non-living judgment was used. Images of objects were repeated eitherwithin the same task, or with a switch from a covert naming task to a livingor non-living judgment and vice versa. While covert naming accesses entrylevel(basic or subordinate, living/non-living judgments rely on superordinateclassification. Our beha-vioural results demonstrated clear priming effectswithin both tasks. However, asymmetries were found when task-switching hadoccurred, with facilitation for covert naming but not for categorization. Wealso found lower accuracy and early-starting and persistent enhancements ofevent-related potentials (ERPs for covert naming, indicating that this task wasmore difficult and involved more intense perceptual and semantic processing.Perceptual priming was marked by consistent reductions of the ERP componentL1 for repeated presentations, both with and without task switching. Additionalrepetition effects were found in early event-related activity between 150-190 ms(N1 when a repeated image had been named at initial presentation. We conclude that differences in N1 indicate task-related changes in the identification processitself. Such enhancements for covert naming again emerge in a later timewindow associated with depth of semantic processing. Meanwhile, L1 reflectsmodulations due to implicit memory of objects. In conclusion, evidence wasfound for representational overlap; changes in ERP markers started early andrevealed cross-task priming at the level of object

  3. Beyond categorical diagnostics in psychiatry: Scientific and medicolegal implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anckarsäter, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    Conforming to a medical disease model rooted in phenomenology and natural science, psychiatry classifies mental disorders according to signs and symptoms considered to be stable and homogeneous across individuals. Scientific studies addressing the validity of this classification are scarce. Following a seminal paper by Robins and Guze in 1970, validity of categories has been sought in specific criteria referring to symptoms and prognosis, aggregation in families, and "markers", preferentially laboratory tests. There is, however, a growing misfit between the model and empirical findings from studies putting it to the test. Diagnostic categories have not been shown to represent natural groups delineated from the normal variation or from each other. Aetiological factors (genetic and/or environmental), laboratory aberrations, and treatment effects do not respect categorical boundaries. A more adequate description of mental problems may be achieved by: 1) a clear definition of the epistemological frame in which psychiatry operates, 2) a basic rating of the severity of intra- and interpersonal dysfunctions, and 3) empirical comparisons to complementary rather than exclusive dimensions of inter-individual differences in context-specific mental functions, treatment effects, and laboratory findings. Such a pluralistic understanding of mental health problems would fit empirical models in the neurosciences and postmodern notions of subjectivity alike. It would also clarify the assessment of dysfunction and background factors in relation to the requisites for penal law exemptions or insurance policies and make them empirically testable rather than dependent on expert opinion on issues such as whether a specific dysfunction is "psychiatric", "medical", or ascribable to "personality".

  4. Cortical Visual Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Cortical Visual Impairment En Español Read in Chinese What is cortical visual impairment? Cortical visual impairment (CVI) is a decreased visual ...

  5. Visual aesthetics and human preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Stephen E; Schloss, Karen B; Sammartino, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Human aesthetic preference in the visual domain is reviewed from definitional, methodological, empirical, and theoretical perspectives. Aesthetic science is distinguished from the perception of art and from philosophical treatments of aesthetics. The strengths and weaknesses of important behavioral techniques are presented and discussed, including two-alternative forced-choice, rank order, subjective rating, production/adjustment, indirect, and other tasks. Major findings are reviewed about preferences for colors (single colors, color combinations, and color harmony), spatial structure (low-level spatial properties, shape properties, and spatial composition within a frame), and individual differences in both color and spatial structure. Major theoretical accounts of aesthetic response are outlined and evaluated, including explanations in terms of mere exposure effects, arousal dynamics, categorical prototypes, ecological factors, perceptual and conceptual fluency, and the interaction of multiple components. The results of the review support the conclusion that aesthetic response can be studied rigorously and meaningfully within the framework of scientific psychology.

  6. The Visual What For Area

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Starrfelt, Randi; Gerlach, Christian

    2007-01-01

    An area in the left fusiform gyrus labelled the Visual Word Form Area (VWFA) is claimed to be especially, or even selectively, responsive to words. We explored how stimulus type and task demands affect activity in this area by conducting a PET experiment where words and pictures were presented...... in two conditions that differed in demands on shape processing: colour decision and categorization. The subjects also performed an object decision task with pictures only. The imaging data revealed a main effect of stimulus type: rCBF was higher during word compared with picture processing. When compared...... indicate that the putative VWFA is activated more by written words than pictures, but only under certain circumstances. As demands on shape processing increase, the difference in activation between words and pictures decreases and can even be abolished. We suggest that activation in the VWFA could reflect...

  7. Jointly Learning Visually Correlated Dictionaries for Large-Scale Visual Recognition Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning Zhou; Jianping Fan

    2014-04-01

    Learning discriminative dictionaries for image content representation plays a critical role in visual recognition. In this paper, we present a joint dictionary learning (JDL) algorithm which exploits the inter-category visual correlations to learn more discriminative dictionaries. Given a group of visually correlated categories, JDL simultaneously learns one common dictionary and multiple category-specific dictionaries to explicitly separate the shared visual atoms from the category-specific ones. The problem of JDL is formulated as a joint optimization with a discrimination promotion term according to the Fisher discrimination criterion. A visual tree method is developed to cluster a large number of categories into a set of disjoint groups, so that each of them contains a reasonable number of visually correlated categories. The process of image category clustering helps JDL to learn better dictionaries for classification by ensuring that the categories in the same group are of strong visual correlations. Also, it makes JDL to be computationally affordable in large-scale applications. Three classification schemes are adopted to make full use of the dictionaries learned by JDL for visual content representation in the task of image categorization. The effectiveness of the proposed algorithms has been evaluated using two image databases containing 17 and 1,000 categories, respectively.

  8. A hierarchical probabilistic model for rapid object categorization in natural scenes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofu He

    Full Text Available Humans can categorize objects in complex natural scenes within 100-150 ms. This amazing ability of rapid categorization has motivated many computational models. Most of these models require extensive training to obtain a decision boundary in a very high dimensional (e.g., ∼6,000 in a leading model feature space and often categorize objects in natural scenes by categorizing the context that co-occurs with objects when objects do not occupy large portions of the scenes. It is thus unclear how humans achieve rapid scene categorization.To address this issue, we developed a hierarchical probabilistic model for rapid object categorization in natural scenes. In this model, a natural object category is represented by a coarse hierarchical probability distribution (PD, which includes PDs of object geometry and spatial configuration of object parts. Object parts are encoded by PDs of a set of natural object structures, each of which is a concatenation of local object features. Rapid categorization is performed as statistical inference. Since the model uses a very small number (∼100 of structures for even complex object categories such as animals and cars, it requires little training and is robust in the presence of large variations within object categories and in their occurrences in natural scenes. Remarkably, we found that the model categorized animals in natural scenes and cars in street scenes with a near human-level performance. We also found that the model located animals and cars in natural scenes, thus overcoming a flaw in many other models which is to categorize objects in natural context by categorizing contextual features. These results suggest that coarse PDs of object categories based on natural object structures and statistical operations on these PDs may underlie the human ability to rapidly categorize scenes.

  9. Natural Scene Classification Inspired by Visual Perception and Cognition Mechanisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Rui

    2011-01-01

    The process of human natural scene categorization consists of two correlated stages: visual perception and visual cognition of natural scenes. Inspired by this fact, we propose a biologically plausible approach for natural scene image classification. This approach consists of one visual perception model and two visual cognition models. The visual perception model, composed of two steps, is used to extract discriminative features from natural scene images. In the first step, we mimic the oriented and bandpass properties of human primary visual cortex by a special complex wavelets transform, which can decompose a natural scene image into a series of 2D spatial structure signals. In the second step, a hybrid statistical feature extraction method is used to generate gist features from those 2D spatial structure signals. Then we design a cognitive feedback model to realize adaptive optimization for the visual perception model. At last, we build a multiple semantics based cognition model to imitate human cognitive mode in rapid natural scene categorization. Experiments on natural scene datasets show that the proposed method achieves high efficiency and accuracy for natural scene classification.

  10. Evaluation of alternate categorical tumor metrics and cut points for response categorization using the RECIST 1.1 data warehouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandrekar, Sumithra J; An, Ming-Wen; Meyers, Jeffrey; Grothey, Axel; Bogaerts, Jan; Sargent, Daniel J

    2014-03-10

    We sought to test and validate the predictive utility of trichotomous tumor response (TriTR; complete response [CR] or partial response [PR] v stable disease [SD] v progressive disease [PD]), disease control rate (DCR; CR/PR/SD v PD), and dichotomous tumor response (DiTR; CR/PR v others) metrics using alternate cut points for PR and PD. The data warehouse assembled to guide the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) version 1.1 was used. Data from 13 trials (5,480 patients with metastatic breast cancer, non-small-cell lung cancer, or colorectal cancer) were randomly split (60:40) into training and validation data sets. In all, 27 pairs of cut points for PR and PD were considered: PR (10% to 50% decrease by 5% increments) and PD (10% to 20% increase by 5% increments), for which 30% and 20% correspond to the RECIST categorization. Cox proportional hazards models with landmark analyses at 12 and 24 weeks stratified by study and number of lesions (fewer than three v three or more) and adjusted for average baseline tumor size were used to assess the impact of each metric on overall survival (OS). Model discrimination was assessed by using the concordance index (c-index). Standard RECIST cut points demonstrated predictive ability similar to the alternate PR and PD cut points. Regardless of tumor type, the TriTR, DiTR, and DCR metrics had similar predictive performance. The 24-week metrics (albeit with higher c-index point estimate) were not meaningfully better than the 12-week metrics. None of the metrics did particularly well for breast cancer. Alternative cut points to RECIST standards provided no meaningful improvement in OS prediction. Metrics assessed at 12 weeks have good predictive performance.

  11. Universality of Categorical Perception Deficit in Developmental Dyslexia: An Investigation of Mandarin Chinese Tones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yajing; Zhang, Linjun; Shu, Hua; Xi, Jie; Wu, Han; Zhang, Yang; Li, Ping

    2012-01-01

    Background: While previous studies have shown that children affected by dyslexia exhibit a deficit in categorical perception of segmental features in alphabetic languages, it remains unclear whether the categorical perception deficit generalizes to nonalphabetic languages at the suprasegmental level. In this study, we investigated the occurrence…

  12. CATEGORICAL IMAGE COMPONENTS IN THE FORMING SYSTEM OF A MARKETING TECHNIQUES MANAGER’S IMAGE CULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Borisovna Cherednyakova

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Based on the understanding of the image culture formation of managers of marketing techniques, as a representative of the social and communication interaction of public structures, categorical apparatus of image culture with an emphasis on the etymology of the image, as an integral component of image culture was analyzed. Categorical components of the image are presented from the standpoint of image culture, as personal new formation, an integral part of the professional activity of the marketing techniques manager: object-communicative categorical component, subject-activity categorical component of image, personality-oriented categorical component, value-acmeological categorical component of image.The aim is to identify and justify the image categorical components as a component of image culture of the marketing techniques manager.Method and methodology of work – a general scientific research approach reflecting scientific apparatus of research.Results. Categorical components of the image, as an image culture component of manager of marketing techniques were defined.Practical implication of the results. The theoretical part of «Imageology» course, special course «Image culture of manager of marketing techniques», the theoretical and methodological study and the formation of image culture.

  13. Perceiving Age and Gender in Unfamiliar Faces: An fMRI Study on Face Categorization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiese, Holger; Kloth, Nadine; Gullmar, Daniel; Reichenbach, Jurgen R.; Schweinberger, Stefan R.

    2012-01-01

    Efficient processing of unfamiliar faces typically involves their categorization (e.g., into old vs. young or male vs. female). However, age and gender categorization may pose different perceptual demands. In the present study, we employed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to compare the activity evoked during age vs. gender…

  14. An Exemplar-Model Account of Feature Inference from Uncertain Categorizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosofsky, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    In a highly systematic literature, researchers have investigated the manner in which people make feature inferences in paradigms involving uncertain categorizations (e.g., Griffiths, Hayes, & Newell, 2012; Murphy & Ross, 1994, 2007, 2010a). Although researchers have discussed the implications of the results for models of categorization and…

  15. Automatic categorization of web pages and user clustering with mixtures of hidden Markov models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ypma, A.; Heskes, T.M.

    2003-01-01

    We propose mixtures of hidden Markov models for modelling clickstreams of web surfers. Hence, the page categorization is learned from the data without the need for a (possibly cumbersome) manual categorization. We provide an EM algorithm for training a mixture of HMMs and show that additional static

  16. Fast computation of categorical richness on raster data sets and related problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Berg, Mark; Tsirogiannis, Constantinos; Wilkinson, Bryan T.

    2015-01-01

    In many scientific fields, it is common to encounter raster data sets consisting of categorical data, such as soil type or land usage of a terrain. A problem that arises in the presence of such data is the following: given a raster G of n cells storing categorical data, compute for every cell c...

  17. Using Categorization of Problems as an Instructional Tool to Help Introductory Students Learn Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Andrew; Singh, Chandralekha

    2016-01-01

    The ability to categorize problems based upon underlying principles, rather than contexts, is considered a hallmark of expertise in physics problem solving. With inspiration from a classic study by Chi, Feltovich, and Glaser, we compared the categorization of 25 introductory mechanics problems based upon similarity of solution by students in large…

  18. Extending consumer categorization based on innovativeness: Intentions and technology clusters in consumer electronics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijnsoever, F.J. van; Castaldi, C.

    2011-01-01

    Consumer categorizations based on innovativeness were originally proposed by E.M. Rogers (2003) and remain of relevance for predicting purchasing behavior in high-tech domains such as consumer electronics. We extend such innovativeness-based categorizations in two directions: We first take into acco

  19. Categorical Flexibility in Preschoolers: Contributions of Conceptual Knowledge and Executive Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaye, Agnes; Jacques, Sophie

    2009-01-01

    The current study evaluated the relative roles of conceptual knowledge and executive control on the development of "categorical flexibility," the ability to switch between simultaneously available but conflicting categorical representations of an object. Experiment 1 assessed conceptual knowledge and executive control together; Experiment 2…

  20. The Development of White-Asian Categorization : Contributions from Skin Color and Other Physiognomic Cues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dunham, Yarrow; Dotsch, Ron; Clark, Amelia R; Stepanova, Elena V

    2016-01-01

    We examined the development of racial categorizations of faces spanning the European-East Asian ("White-Asian") categorical continuum in children between the ages of four and nine as well as adults. We employed a stimulus set that independently varied skin color and other aspects of facial

  1. The development of White-Asian categorization: Contributions from skin color and other physiognomic cues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dunham, Y.; Dotsch, R.; Clark, A.R.; Stepanova, E.V.

    2016-01-01

    We examined the development of racial categorizations of faces spanning the European-East Asian ("White-Asian") categorical continuum in children between the ages of four and nine as well as adults. We employed a stimulus set that independently varied skin color and other aspects of facial

  2. Children's Categorization and Evaluation of Different Types of Lies and Truths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussey, Kay

    1999-01-01

    Investigated 4-, 8-, and 11-year-olds' ability to categorize intentionally false and true statements as lies and truths. Found that older children were more likely to categorize false statements as lies and true statements as truths than were 4-year-olds. Antisocial lies were rated as most serious, and "white lies" as least serious. Anticipated…

  3. Establishing Derived Categorical Responding in Children with Disabilities Using the Peak-E Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Mark R.; Belisle, Jordan; Stanley, Caleb R.; Speelman, Ryan C.; Rowsey, Kyle E.; Kime, Dena; Daar, Jacob H.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate a procedure to generate derived categorical responding by three children with disabilities and to promote the emergence of untrained intraverbal categorical responses. In the study, three 4-member equivalence classes including three stimuli (A, B, and C) and a category name (D) for each class were trained…

  4. 42 CFR 435.1007 - Categorically needy, medically needy, and qualified Medicare beneficiaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Limitations on Ffp § 435.1007 Categorically needy, medically needy, and qualified Medicare beneficiaries. (a) FFP is available in expenditures for covered services provided to categorically needy recipients.... (b) Except as provided in paragraphs (c) and (d) of this section, FFP is not available in...

  5. Automatic categorization of web pages and user clustering with mixtures of hidden Markov models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ypma, A.; Heskes, T.M.

    2003-01-01

    We propose mixtures of hidden Markov models for modelling clickstreams of web surfers. Hence, the page categorization is learned from the data without the need for a (possibly cumbersome) manual categorization. We provide an EM algorithm for training a mixture of HMMs and show that additional static

  6. Decision-Tree Models of Categorization Response Times, Choice Proportions, and Typicality Judgments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafond, Daniel; Lacouture, Yves; Cohen, Andrew L.

    2009-01-01

    The authors present 3 decision-tree models of categorization adapted from T. Trabasso, H. Rollins, and E. Shaughnessy (1971) and use them to provide a quantitative account of categorization response times, choice proportions, and typicality judgments at the individual-participant level. In Experiment 1, the decision-tree models were fit to…

  7. The Roles of Encoding and Retrieval Processes in Associative and Categorical Memory Illusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewhurst, Stephen A.; Bould, Emma; Knott, Lauren M.; Thorley, Craig

    2009-01-01

    Four experiments investigated the origin of associative and categorical memory illusions by comparing the effects of study and test associations on Deese/Roediger-McDermott (DRM) and categorized lists. Experiments 1 and 2 found that levels of false recognition with both list types were increased by manipulations that facilitated the generation of…

  8. Decision-Tree Models of Categorization Response Times, Choice Proportions, and Typicality Judgments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafond, Daniel; Lacouture, Yves; Cohen, Andrew L.

    2009-01-01

    The authors present 3 decision-tree models of categorization adapted from T. Trabasso, H. Rollins, and E. Shaughnessy (1971) and use them to provide a quantitative account of categorization response times, choice proportions, and typicality judgments at the individual-participant level. In Experiment 1, the decision-tree models were fit to…

  9. Categorical information for assessments of land use change. Opportunities and challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levin, Gregor

    2014-01-01

    Access to detailed categorical information on land use and land cover (LULC) has increased significantly during recent years. In Denmark, free access to most categorical information (i.e. pre-classified spatially explicit information) gives opportunities for assessments and analyses of LULC-chang...... and not reality, stressing the necessity to document the applied methodology and the scientific decisions taken....

  10. Cognitive Processes in Associative and Categorical Priming: A Diffusion Model Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Andreas; Rothermund, Klaus; Gast, Anne; Wentura, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive processes and mechanisms underlying different forms of priming were investigated using a diffusion model approach. In a series of 6 experiments, effects of prime-target associations and of a semantic and affective categorical match of prime and target were analyzed for different tasks. Significant associative and categorical priming…

  11. Automatic categorization of diverse experimental information in the bioscience literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Ruihua

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Curation of information from bioscience literature into biological knowledge databases is a crucial way of capturing experimental information in a computable form. During the biocuration process, a critical first step is to identify from all published literature the papers that contain results for a specific data type the curator is interested in annotating. This step normally requires curators to manually examine many papers to ascertain which few contain information of interest and thus, is usually time consuming. We developed an automatic method for identifying papers containing these curation data types among a large pool of published scientific papers based on the machine learning method Support Vector Machine (SVM. This classification system is completely automatic and can be readily applied to diverse experimental data types. It has been in use in production for automatic categorization of 10 different experimental datatypes in the biocuration process at WormBase for the past two years and it is in the process of being adopted in the biocuration process at FlyBase and the Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD. We anticipate that this method can be readily adopted by various databases in the biocuration community and thereby greatly reducing time spent on an otherwise laborious and demanding task. We also developed a simple, readily automated procedure to utilize training papers of similar data types from different bodies of literature such as C. elegans and D. melanogaster to identify papers with any of these data types for a single database. This approach has great significance because for some data types, especially those of low occurrence, a single corpus often does not have enough training papers to achieve satisfactory performance. Results We successfully tested the method on ten data types from WormBase, fifteen data types from FlyBase and three data types from Mouse Genomics Informatics (MGI. It is being used in

  12. A Categorical Framework for Model Classification in the Geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauhs, Michael; Trancón y Widemann, Baltasar; Lange, Holger

    2016-04-01

    which a transport problem is combined with the strategic behaviour of living agents. The living and the non-living aspects of the model belong to two different model types. If a model is built to combine strategic behaviour with the constraint of mass conservation, some critical assumptions appear as inevitable, or models may become logically inconsistent. The categorical assessment and the examples demonstrate that many models at ecosystem level, where both living and non-living aspects inevitably meet, pose so far unsolved, fundamental problems. Today, these are often pragmatically resolved at the level of software engineering. Some suggestions will be given how model documentation and benchmarking may help clarifying and resolving some of these issues.

  13. Categorical discrimination of human body parts by magnetoencephalography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Misaki; Yanagisawa, Takufumi; Okamura, Yumiko; Fukuma, Ryohei; Hirata, Masayuki; Araki, Toshihiko; Kamitani, Yukiyasu; Yorifuji, Shiro

    2015-01-01

    Humans recognize body parts in categories. Previous studies have shown that responses in the fusiform body area (FBA) and extrastriate body area (EBA) are evoked by the perception of the human body, when presented either as whole or as isolated parts. These responses occur approximately 190 ms after body images are visualized. The extent to which body-sensitive responses show specificity for different body part categories remains to be largely clarified. We used a decoding method to quantify neural responses associated with the perception of different categories of body parts. Nine subjects underwent measurements of their brain activities by magnetoencephalography (MEG) while viewing 14 images of feet, hands, mouths, and objects. We decoded categories of the presented images from the MEG signals using a support vector machine (SVM) and calculated their accuracy by 10-fold cross-validation. For each subject, a response that appeared to be a body-sensitive response was observed and the MEG signals corresponding to the three types of body categories were classified based on the signals in the occipitotemporal cortex. The accuracy in decoding body-part categories (with a peak at approximately 48%) was above chance (33.3%) and significantly higher than that for random categories. According to the time course and location, the responses are suggested to be body-sensitive and to include information regarding the body-part category. Finally, this non-invasive method can decode category information of a visual object with high temporal and spatial resolution and this result may have a significant impact in the field of brain-machine interface research.

  14. Categorical perception of face actions: their role in sign language and in communicative facial displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, R; Woll, B; Benson, P J; Wallace, S B

    1999-02-01

    Can face actions that carry significance within language be perceived categorically? We used continua produced by computational morphing of face-action images to explore this question in a controlled fashion. In Experiment 1 we showed that question--type--a syntactic distinction in British Sign Language (BSL)--can be perceived categorically, but only when it is also identified as a question marker. A few hearing non-signers were sensitive to this distinction; among those who used sign, late sign learners were no less sensitive than early sign users. A very similar facial-display continuum between "surprise" and "puzzlement" was perceived categorically by deaf and hearing participants, irrespective of their sign experience (Experiment 2). The categorical processing of facial displays can be demonstrated for sign, but may be grounded in universally perceived distinctions between communicative face actions. Moreover, the categorical perception of facial actions is not confined to the six universal facial expressions.

  15. Generalization of category knowledge and dimensional categorization in humans (Homo sapiens) and nonhuman primates (Macaca mulatta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J David; Zakrzewski, Alexandria C; Johnston, Jennifer J R; Roeder, Jessica L; Boomer, Joseph; Ashby, F Gregory; Church, Barbara A

    2015-10-01

    A theoretical framework within neuroscience distinguishes humans' implicit and explicit systems for category learning. We used a perceptual-categorization paradigm to ask whether nonhumans share elements of these systems. Participants learned categories that foster implicit or explicit categorization in humans, because they had a multidimensional, information-integration (II) solution or a unidimensional, rule-based (RB) solution. Then humans and macaques generalized their category knowledge to new, untested regions of the stimulus space. II generalization was impaired, suggesting that II category learning is conditioned and constrained by stimulus generalization to its original, trained stimulus contexts. RB generalization was nearly seamless, suggesting that RB category knowledge in humans and monkeys has properties that grant it some independence from the original, trained stimulus contexts. These findings raise the questions of (a) how closely macaques' dimensional categorization verges on humans' explicit/declarative categorization, and (b) how far macaques' dimensional categorization has advanced beyond that in other vertebrate species.

  16. Essentialism and Racial Bias Jointly Contribute to the Categorization of Multiracial Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Arnold K; Roberts, Steven O; Gelman, Susan A

    2015-10-01

    Categorizations of multiracial individuals provide insight into the psychological mechanisms driving social stratification, but few studies have explored the interplay of cognitive and motivational underpinnings of these categorizations. In the present study, we integrated research on racial essentialism (i.e., the belief that race demarcates unobservable and immutable properties) and negativity bias (i.e., the tendency to weigh negative entities more heavily than positive entities) to explain why people might exhibit biases in the categorization of multiracial individuals. As theorized, racial essentialism, both dispositional (Study 1) and experimentally induced (Study 2), led to the categorization of Black-White multiracial individuals as Black, but only among individuals evaluating Black people more negatively than White people. These findings demonstrate how fundamental cognitive and motivational biases interact to influence the categorization of multiracial individuals.

  17. Comparison of visual 24-hour and spectrophotometric 48-hour MICs to CLSI reference microdilution MICs of fluconazole, itraconazole, posaconazole, and voriconazole for Candida spp.: a collaborative study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Espinel-Ingroff, A.; Barchiesi, F.; Cuenca-Estrella, M.; Fothergill, A.; Pfaller, M.A.; Rinaldi, M.; Rodriguez-Tudela, J.L.; Verweij, P.E.

    2005-01-01

    A multicenter (six-center) study evaluated the performance (interlaboratory reproducibility, compatibility with reference methods, and categorical agreement) of 24-h visual and 48-h spectrophotometric MICs. MICs of fluconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole, and posaconazole were compared to reference

  18. Comparison of visual 24-hour and spectrophotometric 48-hour MICs to CLSI reference microdilution MICs of fluconazole, itraconazole, posaconazole, and voriconazole for Candida spp.: a collaborative study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Espinel-Ingroff, A.; Barchiesi, F.; Cuenca-Estrella, M.; Fothergill, A.; Pfaller, M.A.; Rinaldi, M.; Rodriguez-Tudela, J.L.; Verweij, P.E.

    2005-01-01

    A multicenter (six-center) study evaluated the performance (interlaboratory reproducibility, compatibility with reference methods, and categorical agreement) of 24-h visual and 48-h spectrophotometric MICs. MICs of fluconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole, and posaconazole were compared to reference

  19. Visualization rhetoric: framing effects in narrative visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hullman, Jessica; Diakopoulos, Nicholas

    2011-12-01

    Narrative visualizations combine conventions of communicative and exploratory information visualization to convey an intended story. We demonstrate visualization rhetoric as an analytical framework for understanding how design techniques that prioritize particular interpretations in visualizations that "tell a story" can significantly affect end-user interpretation. We draw a parallel between narrative visualization interpretation and evidence from framing studies in political messaging, decision-making, and literary studies. Devices for understanding the rhetorical nature of narrative information visualizations are presented, informed by the rigorous application of concepts from critical theory, semiotics, journalism, and political theory. We draw attention to how design tactics represent additions or omissions of information at various levels-the data, visual representation, textual annotations, and interactivity-and how visualizations denote and connote phenomena with reference to unstated viewing conventions and codes. Classes of rhetorical techniques identified via a systematic analysis of recent narrative visualizations are presented, and characterized according to their rhetorical contribution to the visualization. We describe how designers and researchers can benefit from the potentially positive aspects of visualization rhetoric in designing engaging, layered narrative visualizations and how our framework can shed light on how a visualization design prioritizes specific interpretations. We identify areas where future inquiry into visualization rhetoric can improve understanding of visualization interpretation.

  20. The role of visual spatial attention in audiovisual speech perception

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Tobias; Tiippana, K.; Laarni, J.

    2009-01-01

    integration did not change. Visual spatial attention was also able to select between the faces when lip reading. This suggests that visual spatial attention acts at the level of visual speech perception prior to audiovisual integration and that the effect propagates through audiovisual integration......Auditory and visual information is integrated when perceiving speech, as evidenced by the McGurk effect in which viewing an incongruent talking face categorically alters auditory speech perception. Audiovisual integration in speech perception has long been considered automatic and pre-attentive...... but recent reports have challenged this view. Here we study the effect of visual spatial attention on the McGurk effect. By presenting a movie of two faces symmetrically displaced to each side of a central fixation point and dubbed with a single auditory speech track, we were able to discern the influences...

  1. Constructing Emotion Categorization: Insights From Developmental Psychology Applied to a Young Adult Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruba, Ashley L; Wilbourn, Makeba Parramore; Ulrich, Devin M; Harris, Lasana T

    2017-09-07

    Previous research has found that the categorization of emotional facial expressions is influenced by a variety of factors, such as processing time, facial mimicry, emotion labels, and perceptual cues. However, past research has frequently confounded these factors, making it impossible to ascertain how adults use this varied information to categorize emotions. The current study is the first to explore the magnitude of impact for each of these factors on emotion categorization in the same paradigm. Participants (N = 102) categorized anger and disgust emotional facial expressions in a novel computerized task, modeled on similar tasks in the developmental literature with preverbal infants. Experimental conditions manipulated (a) whether the task was time-restricted, and (b) whether the labels "anger" and "disgust" were used in the instructions. Participants were significantly more accurate when provided with unlimited response time and emotion labels. Participants who were given restricted sorting time (2s) and no emotion labels tended to focus on perceptual features of the faces when categorizing the emotions, which led to low sorting accuracy. In addition, facial mimicry related to greater sorting accuracy. These results suggest that when high-level (labeling) categorization strategies are unavailable, adults use low-level (perceptual) strategies to categorize facial expressions. Methodological implications for the study of emotion are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Why Teach Visual Culture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passmore, Kaye

    2007-01-01

    Visual culture is a hot topic in art education right now as some teachers are dedicated to teaching it and others are adamant that it has no place in a traditional art class. Visual culture, the author asserts, can include just about anything that is visually represented. Although people often think of visual culture as contemporary visuals such…

  3. Recent developments in maximum likelihood estimation of MTMM models for categorical data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minjeong eJeon

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Maximum likelihood (ML estimation of categorical multitrait-multimethod (MTMM data is challenging because the likelihood involves high-dimensional integrals over the crossed method and trait factors, with no known closed-form solution.The purpose of the study is to introduce three newly developed ML methods that are eligible for estimating MTMM models with categorical responses: Variational maximization-maximization, Alternating imputation posterior, and Monte Carlo local likelihood. Each method is briefly described and its applicability for MTMM models with categorical data are discussed.An illustration is provided using an empirical example.

  4. The role of edge-based and surface-based information in natural scene categorization: Evidence from behavior and event-related potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qiufang; Liu, Yong-Jin; Dienes, Zoltan; Wu, Jianhui; Chen, Wenfeng; Fu, Xiaolan

    2016-07-01

    A fundamental question in vision research is whether visual recognition is determined by edge-based information (e.g., edge, line, and conjunction) or surface-based information (e.g., color, brightness, and texture). To investigate this question, we manipulated the stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) between the scene and the mask in a backward masking task of natural scene categorization. The behavioral results showed that correct classification was higher for line-drawings than for color photographs when the SOA was 13ms, but lower when the SOA was longer. The ERP results revealed that most latencies of early components were shorter for the line-drawings than for the color photographs, and the latencies gradually increased with the SOA for the color photographs but not for the line-drawings. The results provide new evidence that edge-based information is the primary determinant of natural scene categorization, receiving priority processing; by contrast, surface information takes longer to facilitate natural scene categorization.

  5. Fear of heights and visual height intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Thomas; Huppert, Doreen

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this review is, first, to cover the different aspects of visual height intolerance such as historical descriptions, definition of terms, phenomenology of the condition, neurophysiological control of gaze, stance and locomotion, and therapy, and, second, to identify warranted epidemiological and experimental studies. Vivid descriptions of fear of heights can be found in ancient texts from the Greek, Roman, and Chinese classics. The life-time prevalence of visual height intolerance is as high as 28% in the general population, and about 50% of those who are susceptible report an impact on quality of life. When exposed to heights, visual exploration by eye and head movements is restricted, and the velocity of locomotion is reduced. Therapy for fear of heights is dominated by the behavioral techniques applied during real or virtual reality exposure. Their efficacy might be facilitated by the administration of D-cycloserine or glucocorticoids. Visual height intolerance has a considerable impact on daily life and interpersonal interactions. It is much more frequent than fear of heights, which is defined as an environmental subtype of a specific phobia. There is certainly a continuum stretching from acrophobia to a less-pronounced visual height intolerance, to which the categorical distinction of a specific phobia does not apply.

  6. Investigating visual analogies for visual insight problems

    OpenAIRE

    Corina Sas; Eric Luchian; Linden Ball

    2010-01-01

    Much research has focused on the impact of analogies in insight problem solving, but less work has investigated how the visual analogies for insight are actually constructed. Thus, it appears that in the search for their facilitative impact on the incubation effect, the understanding of what makes good visual analogies has somehow been lost. This paper presents preliminary work of constructing a set of 6 visual analogies and evaluating their impact on solving the visual problem of eight coins...

  7. Data Visualization and Infographics

    OpenAIRE

    Prepared by Mathematica Policy Research

    2014-01-01

    Data visualization translates complex ideas and concepts into a simple visual context. Patterns, trends, and relationships that might go undetected in text are conveyed at a glance in effective data visualization.

  8. The target effect: visual memory for unnamed search targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Mark D; Williams, Carrick C

    2014-01-01

    Search targets are typically remembered much better than other objects even when they are viewed for less time. However, targets have two advantages that other objects in search displays do not have: They are identified categorically before the search, and finding them represents the goal of the search task. The current research investigated the contributions of both of these types of information to the long-term visual memory representations of search targets. Participants completed either a predefined search or a unique-object search in which targets were not defined with specific categorical labels before searching. Subsequent memory results indicated that search target memory was better than distractor memory even following ambiguously defined searches and when the distractors were viewed significantly longer. Superior target memory appears to result from a qualitatively different representation from those of distractor objects, indicating that decision processes influence visual memory.

  9. Visual framing of nanotechnology in newspapers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kristian Hvidtfelt

    discourse, very little research into to the visual communication of science in public has been carried out. Nanotechnology is an emerging scientific discipline that just recently has entered the public sphere. Surveys show that most Europeans and most Americans have very little knowledge about...... nanotechnology. Even so, there is a marked difference between Europeans who generally are cautious, it not skeptical about nanotechnology, and American who seem to have a much more positive attitude towards nanotechnology. Objective This paper surveys visual images used to communicate nanotechnology (and...... nanotechnology-related issues) in the printed press in Denmark from 1993 to 2006. Based on a representative sample of newspaper articles referring to nanotechnology, the survey categorizes and analyzes the images used. Studies have shown that to a high degree newspaper readers use images to navigate...

  10. Categorizing at the group-level in response to intragroup social comparisons : A self-categorization theory integration of self-evaluation and social identity motives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitt, MT; Branscombe, NR; Silvia, PJ; Garcia, DM; Spears, R

    2006-01-01

    Two experiments examined how people respond to upward social comparisons in terms of the extent to which they categorize the self and the source of comparison within the same social group. Self-evaluation maintenance theory (SEM) suggests that upward ingroup comparisons can lead to the rejection of

  11. A Text Classifier Model for Categorizing Feed Contents Consumed by a Web Aggregator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.O.D. Longe

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method of using a Text Classifier to automatically categorize the content of web feeds consumed by a web aggregator. The pre-defined category of the feed to be consumed by the aggregator does not always match the content being consumed and categorizing the content using the pre-defined category of the feed curtails user experience as users would not see all the contents belonging to their category of interest. A web aggregator was developed and this was integrated with the SVM classifier to automatically categorize feed content being consumed. The experimental results showed that the text classifier performs well in categorizing the content of feed being consumed and it also affirmed the disparity in the pre-defined category of the source feed and appropriate category of the consumed content.

  12. 77 FR 49056 - Categorical Exclusion From Further Environmental Review for Standard Terminal Arrival Route...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Categorical Exclusion From Further Environmental Review for Standard... Exclusion (Cat Ex) from environmental review does not require a formal public hearing or a formal...

  13. Analysis of Extension Categorical Data Mining Process for the Extension Interior Designing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Ma; Guangtian Zou

    2016-01-01

    On the basis of extension architectonics, this paper researches the process of extension categorical data mining for extension interior design. In accordance with the theory of extension data mining, the extension categorical data mining for the extension interior design can be divided into data preparation, the operation of mining and knowledge application. The paper expatiates the main content and cohesive relations of each link, and emphatically discusses extension acquisition, analysis extension, categorical mining extension, knowledge application extension and other several core nodes that are related with data. Through the knowledge fusion of extension architectonics and data mining, the paper discusses the process of knowledge requirements with multiple classification under different mining targets. The purpose of this paper is to explore a whole categorical data mining process of interior design from extension design data to the design of knowledge discovery and extension application.

  14. Categorization of extremely brief auditory stimuli: domain-specific or domain-general processes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Bigand

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the minimum amount of auditory stimulation that allows differentiation of spoken voices, instrumental music, and environmental sounds. Three new findings were reported. 1 All stimuli were categorized above chance level with 50 ms-segments. 2 When a peak-level normalization was applied, music and voices started to be accurately categorized with 20 ms-segments. When the root-mean-square (RMS energy of the stimuli was equalized, voice stimuli were better recognized than music and environmental sounds. 3 Further psychoacoustical analyses suggest that the categorization of extremely brief auditory stimuli depends on the variability of their spectral envelope in the used set. These last two findings challenge the interpretation of the voice superiority effect reported in previously published studies and propose a more parsimonious interpretation in terms of an emerging property of auditory categorization processes.

  15. The role of automated categorization in e-government information retrieval

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonasen, Tanja Svarre; Lykke, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    High-precision search results are essential for helping e-government employees complete work-based tasks. Prior studies have shown that existing features of e-government systems need improvement in terms of search facilities, navigation, and metadata adoption. This paper investigates how automated...... categorization can enhance information organization and retrieval and presents the results of a controlled evaluation that compared automated categorization and free text indexing of the government intranet used by Danish tax authorities. Thirty-two individuals participated in the evaluation, conducting...... knowledge was present, categorization was used to support the assumptions of a correct search. On the other hand, however, test participants avoided using automated categorization if high-precision documents were among the top results or if few documents were retrieved. The findings emphasize the importance...

  16. 77 FR 47862 - National Environmental Policy Act: Implementing Procedures; Addition to Categorical Exclusions...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-10

    ... Office of the Secretary National Environmental Policy Act: Implementing Procedures; Addition to... Final National Environmental Policy Act Implementing Procedures. SUMMARY: This notice announces the addition of a new categorical exclusion under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) to be...

  17. Humanizing Outgroups Through Multiple Categorization: The Roles of Individuation and Threat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prati, Francesca; Crisp, Richard J; Meleady, Rose; Rubini, Monica

    2016-04-01

    In three studies, we examined the impact of multiple categorization on intergroup dehumanization. Study 1 showed that perceiving members of a rival university along multiple versus simple categorical dimensions enhanced the tendency to attribute human traits to this group. Study 2 showed that multiple versus simple categorization of immigrants increased the attribution of uniquely human emotions to them. This effect was explained by the sequential mediation of increased individuation of the outgroup and reduced outgroup threat. Study 3 replicated this sequential mediation model and introduced a novel way of measuring humanization in which participants generated attributes corresponding to the outgroup in a free response format. Participants generated more uniquely human traits in the multiple versus simple categorization conditions. We discuss the theoretical implications of these findings and consider their role in informing and improving efforts to ameliorate contemporary forms of intergroup discrimination.

  18. Categorical phonotactic knowledge filters second language input, but probabilistic phonotactic knowledge can still be acquired

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lentz, T.O.; Kager, R.W.J.

    2015-01-01

    Probabilistic phonotactic knowledge facilitates perception, but categorical phonotactic illegality can cause misperceptions, especially of non-native phoneme combinations. If misperceptions induced by first language (L1) knowledge filter second language input, access to second language (L2) probabil

  19. [Environmental Action Statement : Categorical Exclusion : Bison Round Up 2013 : Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This record establishes that the action of the 2013 bison roundup and removal and transportation of up to 20 animals from the herd is a categorical exclusion as...

  20. [Environmental Action Statement : Categorical Exclusion : Bison Round Up 2014 : Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This record establishes that the action of the 2014 bison roundup and removal and transportation of up to 10 animals from the herd is a categorical exclusion as...

  1. [Environmental Action Statement : Categorical Exclusion : Bison Round Up 2015 : Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This record establishes that the action of the 2015 bison roundup and removal and transportation of up to 15 animals from the herd is a categorical exclusion as...

  2. Experimental design and model choice the planning and analysis of experiments with continuous or categorical response

    CERN Document Server

    Toutenburg, Helge

    1995-01-01

    This textbook gives a representation of the design and analysis of experiments, that comprises the aspects of classical theory for continuous response and of modern procedures for categorical response, and especially for correlated categorical response. Complex designs, as for example, cross-over and repeated measures, are included. Thus, it is an important book for statisticians in the pharmaceutical industry as well as for clinical research in medicine and dentistry.

  3. Are Kant's categorical imperative and instrumental rationality incompatible? The case for the prisoner's dilemma

    OpenAIRE

    Brinca, Pedro

    2005-01-01

    Why is good good and bad bad? Kant's categorical imperative (KCI) and instrumental rationality are analyzed under the game-theoretical framework of the folk theorem. Prescribing different courses of action under the one-shot game, Kant's categorical imperative emerges as instrumentally rational provided that the conditions of the folk theorem are observed and the norms and values underlying KCI are presented as selective advantages of the group of reference in which the individual belongs. No...

  4. A Comparative Study on Different Types of Approaches to Bengali document Categorization

    OpenAIRE

    Islam, Md. Saiful; Jubayer, Fazla Elahi Md; Ahmed, Syed Ikhtiar

    2017-01-01

    Document categorization is a technique where the category of a document is determined. In this paper three well-known supervised learning techniques which are Support Vector Machine(SVM), Na\\"ive Bayes(NB) and Stochastic Gradient Descent(SGD) compared for Bengali document categorization. Besides classifier, classification also depends on how feature is selected from dataset. For analyzing those classifier performances on predicting a document against twelve categories several feature selectio...

  5. CATEGORICAL IMAGE COMPONENTS IN THE FORMING SYSTEM OF A MARKETING TECHNIQUES MANAGER’S IMAGE CULTURE

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Borisovna Cherednyakova

    2015-01-01

    Based on the understanding of the image culture formation of managers of marketing techniques, as a representative of the social and communication interaction of public structures, categorical apparatus of image culture with an emphasis on the etymology of the image, as an integral component of image culture was analyzed. Categorical components of the image are presented from the standpoint of image culture, as personal new formation, an integral part of the professional activity of the marke...

  6. Thermal facial reactivity patterns predict social categorization bias triggered by unconscious and conscious emotional stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponsi, Giorgia; Panasiti, Maria Serena; Rizza, Giulia; Aglioti, Salvatore Maria

    2017-08-30

    Members of highly social species decode, interpret, and react to the emotion of a conspecific depending on whether the other belongs to the same (ingroup) or different (outgroup) social group. While studies indicate that consciously perceived emotional stimuli drive social categorization, information about how implicit emotional stimuli and specific physiological signatures affect social categorization is lacking. We addressed this issue by exploring whether subliminal and supraliminal affective priming can influence the categorization of neutral faces as ingroup versus outgroup. Functional infrared thermal imaging was used to investigate whether the effect of affective priming on the categorization decision was moderated by the activation of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS). During the subliminal condition, we found that stronger SNS activation after positive or negative affective primes induced ingroup and outgroup face categorization, respectively. The exact opposite pattern (i.e. outgroup after positive and ingroup after negative primes) was observed in the supraliminal condition. We also found that misattribution effects were stronger in people with low emotional awareness, suggesting that this trait moderates how one recognizes SNS signals and employs them for unrelated decisions. Our results allow the remarkable implication that low-level affective reactions coupled with sympathetic activation may bias social categorization. © 2017 The Author(s).

  7. Neuronal categorization and discrimination of social behaviors in primate prefrontal cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joji Tsunada

    Full Text Available It has been implied that primates have an ability to categorize social behaviors between other individuals for the execution of adequate social-interactions. Since the lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC is involved in both the categorization and the processing of social information, the primate LPFC may be involved in the categorization of social behaviors. To test this hypothesis, we examined neuronal activity in the LPFC of monkeys during presentations of two types of movies of social behaviors (grooming, mounting and movies of plural monkeys without any eye- or body-contacts between them (no-contacts movies. Although the monkeys were not required to categorize and discriminate the movies in this task, a subset of neurons sampled from the LPFC showed a significantly different activity during the presentation of a specific type of social behaviors in comparison with the others. These neurons categorized social behaviors at the population level and, at the individual neuron level, the majority of the neurons discriminated each movie within the same category of social behaviors. Our findings suggest that a fraction of LPFC neurons process categorical and discriminative information of social behaviors, thereby contributing to the adaptation to social environments.

  8. Visualization as Seen through its Research Paper Keywords.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isenberg, Petra; Isenberg, Tobias; Sedlmair, Michael; Chen, Jian; Moller, Torsten

    2017-01-01

    We present the results of a comprehensive multi-pass analysis of visualization paper keywords supplied by authors for their papers published in the IEEE Visualization conference series (now called IEEE VIS) between 1990-2015. From this analysis we derived a set of visualization topics that we discuss in the context of the current taxonomy that is used to categorize papers and assign reviewers in the IEEE VIS reviewing process. We point out missing and overemphasized topics in the current taxonomy and start a discussion on the importance of establishing common visualization terminology. Our analysis of research topics in visualization can, thus, serve as a starting point to (a) help create a common vocabulary to improve communication among different visualization sub-groups, (b) facilitate the process of understanding differences and commonalities of the various research sub-fields in visualization, (c) provide an understanding of emerging new research trends, (d) facilitate the crucial step of finding the right reviewers for research submissions, and (e) it can eventually lead to a comprehensive taxonomy of visualization research. One additional tangible outcome of our work is an online query tool (http://keyvis.org/) that allows visualization researchers to easily browse the 3952 keywords used for IEEE VIS papers since 1990 to find related work or make informed keyword choices.

  9. Probing the Feature Map for Faces in Visual Search

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Yang

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Controversy surrounds the mechanisms underlying the pop-out effect for faces in visual search. Is there a feature map for faces? If so, does it rely on the categorical distinction between faces and nonfaces, or on image-level face semblance? To probe the feature map, we compared search efficiency for faces, and nonface stimuli with high, low, and no face semblance. First, subjects performed a visual search task with objects as distractors. Only faces popped-out. Moreover, search efficiency for nonfaces correlated with image-level face semblance of the target. In a second experiment, faces were used as distractors but nonfaces did not pop-out. Interestingly, search efficiency for nonfaces was not modulated by face semblance, although searching for a face among faces was particularly difficult, reflecting a categorical boundary between nonfaces and faces. Finally, inversion and contrast negation significantly interacted with the effect of face semblance, ruling out the possibility that search efficiency solely depends on low-level features. Our study supports a parallel search for faces that is perhaps preattentive. Like other features (color, orientation etc., there appears to be a continuous face feature map for visual search. Our results also suggest that this map may include both image-level face semblance and face categoricity.

  10. Snowflake Visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliven, L. F.; Kucera, P. A.; Rodriguez, P.

    2010-12-01

    NASA Snowflake Video Imagers (SVIs) enable snowflake visualization at diverse field sites. The natural variability of frozen precipitation is a complicating factor for remote sensing retrievals in high latitude regions. Particle classification is important for understanding snow/ice physics, remote sensing polarimetry, bulk radiative properties, surface emissivity, and ultimately, precipitation rates and accumulations. Yet intermittent storms, low temperatures, high winds, remote locations and complex terrain can impede us from observing falling snow in situ. SVI hardware and software have some special features. The standard camera and optics yield 8-bit gray-scale images with resolution of 0.05 x 0.1 mm, at 60 frames per second. Gray-scale images are highly desirable because they display contrast that aids particle classification. Black and white (1-bit) systems display no contrast, so there is less information to recognize particle types, which is particularly burdensome for aggregates. Data are analyzed at one-minute intervals using NASA's Precipitation Link Software that produces (a) Particle Catalogs and (b) Particle Size Distributions (PSDs). SVIs can operate nearly continuously for long periods (e.g., an entire winter season), so natural variability can be documented. Let’s summarize results from field studies this past winter and review some recent SVI enhancements. During the winter of 2009-2010, SVIs were deployed at two sites. One SVI supported weather observations during the 2010 Winter Olympics and Paralympics. It was located close to the summit (Roundhouse) of Whistler Mountain, near the town of Whistler, British Columbia, Canada. In addition, two SVIs were located at the King City Weather Radar Station (WKR) near Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Access was prohibited to the SVI on Whistler Mountain during the Olympics due to security concerns. So to meet the schedule for daily data products, we operated the SVI by remote control. We also upgraded the

  11. Evaluation of two treatment outcome prediction models for restoration of visual fields in patients with postchiasmatic visual pathway lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gall, Carolin; Steger, Benedikt; Koehler, Juergen; Sabel, Bernhard A

    2013-09-01

    Visual functions of patients with visual field defects after acquired brain injury affecting the primary visual pathway can be improved by means of vision restoration training. Since the extent of the restored visual field varies between patients, the prediction of treatment outcome and its visualization may help patients to decide for or against participating in therapies aimed at vision restoration. For this purpose, two treatment outcome prediction models were established based on either self-organizing maps (SOMs) or categorical regression (CR) to predict visual field change after intervention by several features that were hypothesized to be associated with vision restoration. Prediction was calculated for visual field changes recorded with High Resolution Perimetry (HRP). Both models revealed a similar predictive quality with the CR model being slightly more beneficial. Predictive quality of the SOM model improved when using only a small number of features that exhibited a higher association with treatment outcome than the remaining features, i.e. neighborhood activity and homogeneity within the surrounding 5° visual field of a given position, together with its residual function and distance to the scotoma border. Although both models serve their purpose, these were not able to outperform a primitive prediction rule that attests the importance of areas of residual vision, i.e. regions with partial visual field function, for vision restoration.

  12. Visuals for Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersson, Rune

    This report focuses on the visual component of verbo-visual literacy, a communications concept involving the production, transmission, and perception of verbal and visual images. Five current problem areas in verbal-visual research are introduced and discussed: (1) communication (communication models, media consumption, new media, the information…

  13. Postencoding cognitive processes in the cross-race effect: Categorization and individuation during face recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Michael R; Pezdek, Kathy

    2016-06-01

    The cross-race effect (CRE) describes the finding that same-race faces are recognized more accurately than cross-race faces. According to social-cognitive theories of the CRE, processes of categorization and individuation at encoding account for differential recognition of same- and cross-race faces. Recent face memory research has suggested that similar but distinct categorization and individuation processes also occur postencoding, at recognition. Using a divided-attention paradigm, in Experiments 1A and 1B we tested and confirmed the hypothesis that distinct postencoding categorization and individuation processes occur during the recognition of same- and cross-race faces. Specifically, postencoding configural divided-attention tasks impaired recognition accuracy more for same-race than for cross-race faces; on the other hand, for White (but not Black) participants, postencoding featural divided-attention tasks impaired recognition accuracy more for cross-race than for same-race faces. A social categorization paradigm used in Experiments 2A and 2B tested the hypothesis that the postencoding in-group or out-group social orientation to faces affects categorization and individuation processes during the recognition of same-race and cross-race faces. Postencoding out-group orientation to faces resulted in categorization for White but not for Black participants. This was evidenced by White participants' impaired recognition accuracy for same-race but not for cross-race out-group faces. Postencoding in-group orientation to faces had no effect on recognition accuracy for either same-race or cross-race faces. The results of Experiments 2A and 2B suggest that this social orientation facilitates White but not Black participants' individuation and categorization processes at recognition. Models of recognition memory for same-race and cross-race faces need to account for processing differences that occur at both encoding and recognition.

  14. Categorical Perception of Lexical Tones in Mandarin-speaking Congenital Amusics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Ting Huang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous research suggests that within Mandarin-speaking congenital amusics, only a subgroup has behavioral lexical tone perception impairments (tone agnosia, whereas the rest of amusics do not. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the categorical nature of lexical tone perception in Mandarin-speaking amusics with and without behavioral lexical tone deficits. Three groups of listeners (controls, pure amusics and amusics with tone agnosia participated in tone identification and discrimination tasks. Indexes of the categorical perception of a physical continuum of fundamental frequencies ranging from a rising to level tone were measured. Specifically, the stimulus durations were manipulated at 100 and 200 ms. For both stimulus durations, all groups exhibited similar categorical boundaries. The pure amusics showed sharp identification slopes and significantly peaked discrimination functions similar to those of normal controls. However, such essential characteristics for the categorical perception of lexical tones were not observed in amusics with tone agnosia. An enlarged step-size from 20 Hz to 35 Hz was not able to produce any discrimination peaks in tone agnosics either. The current study revealed that only amusics with tone agnosia showed a lack of categorical tone perception, while the pure amusics demonstrated typical categorical perception of lexical tones, indicating that the deficit of pitch processing in music does not necessarily result in the deficit in the categorical perception of lexical tones. The different performance between congenital amusics with and without tone agnosia provides a new perspective on the proposition of the relationship between music and speech perception.

  15. Visual thinking & digital imagery

    OpenAIRE

    Blevis, Eli; Churchill, Elizabeth; Odom, William; Pierre, James; Roedl, David; Wakkary, Ron

    2012-01-01

    This workshop focuses on exploring the centrality of visual literacy and visual thinking to HCI. Drawing on emerging critical perspectives, the workshop will address visual literacy and visual thinking from an interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary design-orientation [2, 8], foregrounding the notion that imagery is a primary form of visual thinking. Imagery—which subsumes digital imagery—goes well beyond sketching and beyond storyboards, screenshots and wireframes. We will address how a broa...

  16. Using transparency in visualization

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Over the last two decades, there have been a growing number of applications for transparency in visualization. Transparency is a visual feature that provides solutions to certain fundamental visualization problems. Currently, there is insufficient research regarding the benefits and the limitations of using transparency in visualization. The lack of research on this topic becomes more apparent when we compare the amount of research done towards applying colour in visualization. This thesis at...

  17. Custom Visualization without Real Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pantazos, Kostas

    Information Visualization tools have simplified visualization development. Some tools help simple users construct standard visualizations; others help programmers develop custom visualizations. This thesis contributes to the field of Information Visualization and End-User Development. The first...

  18. Impact of cataract surgery in reducing visual impairment: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandekar, Rajiv; Sudhan, Anand; Jain, B K; Deshpande, Madan; Dole, Kuldeep; Shah, Mahul; Shah, Shreya

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to assess the impact of cataract surgeries in reducing visual disabilities and factors influencing it at three institutes of India. A retrospective chart review was performed in 2013. Data of 4 years were collected on gender, age, residence, presenting a vision in each eye, eye that underwent surgery, type of surgery and the amount the patient paid out of pocket for surgery. Visual impairment was categorized as; absolute blindness (no perception of light); blind (visual impairment (SVI) (visual impairment (6/18-6/60) and; normal vision (≥6/12). Statistically analysis was performed to evaluate the association between visual disabilities and demographics or other possible barriers. The trend of visual impairment over time was also evaluated. We compared the data of 2011 to data available about cataract cases from institutions between 2002 and 2009. There were 108,238 cataract cases (50.6% were female) that underwent cataract surgery at the three institutions. In 2011, 71,615 (66.2%) cases underwent surgery. There were 45,336 (41.9%) with presenting vision visual disability. The goal of improving vision related quality of life for cataract patients during the early stages of visual impairment that is common in industrialized countries seems to be non-attainable in the rural India.

  19. Individual and developmental differences in preschoolers' categorization biases and vocabulary across tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, Elizabeth A

    2017-01-01

    This study bridges prior research on young children's use of taxonomic versus thematic relations to categorize objects with prior research on their use of shared shape versus shared function to categorize artifacts. Specifically, this research examined associations in children's categorization tendencies across these two dichotomies, including assessments of individual differences, developmental trends, and vocabulary level. Preschoolers (3- to 5-year-olds) completed a receptive vocabulary assessment and two match-to-sample tasks: one pitting (superordinate) taxonomic and thematic relations against each other and one pitting shape and function similarity against each other. The results revealed individual and developmental variation in children's cross-task categorization biases, with a predominant tendency to focus on both thematic and function relations that became increasingly stronger with age. In 3- and 5-year-olds, function-based categorization was also positively associated with verb vocabulary. These findings demonstrate an emerging tendency to focus on relational information during the preschool years that, among other learning effects, may benefit verb acquisition. The results are discussed in terms of the real-time processing and developmental factors that might contribute to the development of strategies for learning about objects and categories during early childhood. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Can you eat it? A link between categorization difficulty and food likability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yuki; Kawabe, Takahiro; Ihaya, Keiko

    2012-01-01

    In the present study we examined whether categorization difficulty regarding a food is related to its likability. For this purpose, we produced stimulus images by morphing photographs of a tomato and a strawberry. Subjects categorized these images as either a tomato or a strawberry and in separate sessions evaluated the food's eatability or the subject's willingness to eat (Experiments 1 and 2) and the likeliness of existence of each food (Experiment 2). The lowest score for ca- tegorization confidence coincided with the lowest scores for eatability, willingness to eat, and likeliness of existence. In Experiment 3, we found that food neophobia, a trait of ingestion avoidance of novel foods, modulated food likability but not categorization confidence. These findings suggest that a high categorization difficulty generally co-occurs with a decrease in food likability and that food neophobia modulates likability. This avoidance of difficult-to-categorize foods seems ecologically valid because before eating we have little information regarding whether a food is potentially harmful.

  1. Duality Theory and Categorical Universal Logic: With Emphasis on Quantum Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro Maruyama

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Categorical Universal Logic is a theory of monad-relativised hyperdoctrines (or fibred universal algebras, which in particular encompasses categorical forms of both first-order and higher-order quantum logics as well as classical, intuitionistic, and diverse substructural logics. Here we show there are those dual adjunctions that have inherent hyperdoctrine structures in their predicate functor parts. We systematically investigate into the categorical logics of dual adjunctions by utilising Johnstone-Dimov-Tholen's duality-theoretic framework. Our set-theoretical duality-based hyperdoctrines for quantum logic have both universal and existential quantifiers (and higher-order structures, giving rise to a universe of Takeuti-Ozawa's quantum sets via the tripos-to-topos construction by Hyland-Johnstone-Pitts. The set-theoretical hyperdoctrinal models of quantum logic, as well as all quantum hyperdoctrines with cartesian base categories, turn out to give sound and complete semantics for Faggian-Sambin's first-order quantum sequent calculus over cartesian type theory; in addition, quantum hyperdoctrines with monoidal base categories are sound and complete for the calculus over linear type theory. We finally consider how to reconcile Birkhoff-von Neumann's quantum logic and Abramsky-Coecke's categorical quantum mechanics (which is modernised quantum logic as an antithesis to the traditional one via categorical universal logic.

  2. Temporal and spatial categorization in human and non-human primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Juan Carlos; Prado, Luis; Mendoza, German; Merchant, Hugo

    2011-01-01

    It has been proposed that a functional overlap exists in the brain for temporal and spatial information processing. To test this, we designed two relative categorization tasks in which human subjects and a Rhesus monkey had to assign time intervals or distances to a "short" or "long" category according to varying prototypes. The performance of both species was analyzed using psychometric techniques that showed that they may have similar perceptual, memory, and/or decision mechanisms, specially for the estimation of time intervals. We also did a correlation analysis with human subjects' psychometric thresholds and the results imply that indeed, temporal and spatial information categorization share neural substrates. However, not all of the tested distances and intervals correlated with each other, suggesting the existence of sub-circuits that process restricted ranges of distances and intervals. A different analysis was done on the monkey data, in which the influence of the previous categorical prototypes was measured on the task currently being performed. Again, we found a significant interaction between previous and current interval and distance categorization. Overall, the present paper points toward common or at least partially overlapped neural circuits for temporal and spatial categorization in primates.

  3. Temporal and Spatial Categorization in Human and Non-Human Primates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos eMendez

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available It has been proposed that a functional overlap exists in the brain for temporal and spatial information processing. To test this, we designed two relative categorization tasks in which human subjects and a Rhesus monkey had to assign time intervals or distances to a ‘short’ or ‘long’ category according to varying prototypes. The performance of both species was analyzed using psychometric techniques that showed that they may have similar perceptual, memory and/or decision mechanisms, specially for the estimation of time intervals. We also did a correlation analysis with human subjects’ psychometric thresholds and the results imply that indeed, temporal and spatial information categorization share neural substrates. However, not all of the tested distances and intervals correlated with each other, suggesting the existence of sub-circuits that process restricted ranges of distances and intervals. A different analysis was done on the monkey data, in which the influence of the previous categorical prototypes was measured on the task currently being performed. Again, we found a significant interaction between previous and current interval and distance categorization. Overall, the present paper points towards common or at least partially overlapped neural circuits for temporal and spatial categorization in primates.

  4. Bayesian data fusion for spatial prediction of categorical variables in environmental sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gengler, Sarah, E-mail: sarahgengler@gmail.com; Bogaert, Patrick, E-mail: sarahgengler@gmail.com [Earth and Life Institute, Environmental Sciences. Université catholique de Louvain, Croix du Sud 2/L7.05.16, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

    2014-12-05

    First developed to predict continuous variables, Bayesian Maximum Entropy (BME) has become a complete framework in the context of space-time prediction since it has been extended to predict categorical variables and mixed random fields. This method proposes solutions to combine several sources of data whatever the nature of the information. However, the various attempts that were made for adapting the BME methodology to categorical variables and mixed random fields faced some limitations, as a high computational burden. The main objective of this paper is to overcome this limitation by generalizing the Bayesian Data Fusion (BDF) theoretical framework to categorical variables, which is somehow a simplification of the BME method through the convenient conditional independence hypothesis. The BDF methodology for categorical variables is first described and then applied to a practical case study: the estimation of soil drainage classes using a soil map and point observations in the sandy area of Flanders around the city of Mechelen (Belgium). The BDF approach is compared to BME along with more classical approaches, as Indicator CoKringing (ICK) and logistic regression. Estimators are compared using various indicators, namely the Percentage of Correctly Classified locations (PCC) and the Average Highest Probability (AHP). Although BDF methodology for categorical variables is somehow a simplification of BME approach, both methods lead to similar results and have strong advantages compared to ICK and logistic regression.

  5. Combining wavelets transform and Hu moments with self-organizing maps for medical image categorization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Leandro A.; Del-Moral-Hernandez, Emilio; Moreno, Ramon A.; Furuie, Sérgio S.

    2011-10-01

    Images are fundamental sources of information in modern medicine. The images stored in a database and divided in categories are an important step for image retrieval. For an automatic categorization process, detailed analysis is done regarding image representation and generalization method. The baseline method for this process, in the medical image context, is using thumbnails and K-nearest neighbor (KNN), which is easily implemented and has had satisfactory results in literature. This work addresses an alternative method for automatic categorization, which jointly uses discrete wavelet transform with Hu's moments for image representation and self-organizing maps (SOM) neural networks combined with the KNN classifier (SOM-KNN), for medical image categorization. Furthermore, extensive experiments are conducted, to define the best wavelet family and to select the best coefficients set, to consider the remaining wavelet coefficients set (not selected as the best ones) through their Hu's moments, and to carry out a contrastive study with other successful approaches for categorization. The categorization result from a database with 10,000 images in 116 categories yielded 81.8% of correct rate, which is much better than the 67.9% obtained by the baseline method; and the time consumed in classification processing with SOM-KNN is 100 times shorter than KNN.

  6. La categoría bienestar psicológico: Su relación con otras categorías sociales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen R Victoria García-Viniegras

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Desde los tiempos más remotos los pensadores, poetas y científicos han intentado reflexionar y postular principios de diversa índole acerca del bienestar o felicidad del ser humano, constituyendo en la actualidad un tema de estudio importante para la psicología y en general para las ciencias sociales. Numerosos esfuerzos se han dirigido hacia el establecimiento de los componentes del bienestar, creándose para ellos distintos modelos para su estudio desde las perspectivas de muy variadas disciplinas. El bienestar colinda con una serie de otras categorías psico-sociológicas y sociológicas, siendo su delimitación conceptual y metodológica uno de los retos más grandes que tienen ante sí estas ciencias. El presente trabajo pretende realizar un análisis de la categoría bienestar desde un ángulo psicológico, estableciendo puntos de contacto con otras categorías sociales, tales como: desarrollo económico, nivel de vida, condiciones materiales de vida, modo de vida y estilo de vida

  7. Is a Fan Always Fun? Phonological and Orthographic Effects in Bilingual Visual Word Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Mitsuhiko; Hartsuiker, Robert J.; Haywood, Sarah L.

    2010-01-01

    A visual semantic categorization task in English was performed by native English speakers (Experiment 1) and late bilinguals whose first language was Japanese (Experiment 2) or Spanish (Experiment 3). In the critical conditions, the target word was a homophone of a correct category exemplar (e.g., A BODY OF WATER-SEE; cf. SEA) or a word that…

  8. Universal visualization platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, Alexander G.; Li, Hongli; Yu, Min; Smrtic, Mary Beth; Cvek, Urska; Goodell, Howie; Gupta, Vivek; Lawrence, Christine; Zhou, Jainping; Chiang, Chih-Hung; Grinstein, Georges G.

    2005-03-01

    Although there are a number of visualization systems to choose from when analyzing data, only a few of these allow for the integration of other visualization and analysis techniques. There are even fewer visualization toolkits and frameworks from which one can develop ones own visualization applications. Even within the research community, scientists either use what they can from the available tools or start from scratch to define a program in which they are able to develop new or modified visualization techniques and analysis algorithms. Presented here is a new general-purpose platform for constructing numerous visualization and analysis applications. The focus of this system is the design and experimentation of new techniques, and where the sharing of and integration with other tools becomes second nature. Moreover, this platform supports multiple large data sets, and the recording and visualizing of user sessions. Here we introduce the Universal Visualization Platform (UVP) as a modern data visualization and analysis system.

  9. Declarative Visualization Queries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro da Silva, P.; Del Rio, N.; Leptoukh, G. G.

    2011-12-01

    In an ideal interaction with machines, scientists may prefer to write declarative queries saying "what" they want from a machine than to write code stating "how" the machine is going to address the user request. For example, in relational database, users have long relied on specifying queries using Structured Query Language (SQL), a declarative language to request data results from a database management system. In the context of visualizations, we see that users are still writing code based on complex visualization toolkit APIs. With the goal of improving the scientists' experience of using visualization technology, we have applied this query-answering pattern to a visualization setting, where scientists specify what visualizations they want generated using a declarative SQL-like notation. A knowledge enhanced management system ingests the query and knows the following: (1) know how to translate the query into visualization pipelines; and (2) how to execute the visualization pipelines to generate the requested visualization. We define visualization queries as declarative requests for visualizations specified in an SQL like language. Visualization queries specify what category of visualization to generate (e.g., volumes, contours, surfaces) as well as associated display attributes (e.g., color and opacity), without any regards for implementation, thus allowing scientists to remain partially unaware of a wide range of visualization toolkit (e.g., Generic Mapping Tools and Visualization Toolkit) specific implementation details. Implementation details are only a concern for our knowledge-based visualization management system, which uses both the information specified in the query and knowledge about visualization toolkit functions to construct visualization pipelines. Knowledge about the use of visualization toolkits includes what data formats the toolkit operates on, what formats they output, and what views they can generate. Visualization knowledge, which is not

  10. Musical experience modulates categorical perception of lexical tones by native Chinese speakers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han eWu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Although musical training has been shown to facilitate both native and nonnative phonetic perception, it remains unclear whether and how musical experience affects native speakers’ categorical perception (CP of speech at the suprasegmental level. Using both identification and discrimination tasks, this study compared Chinese-speaking musicians and non-musicians in their categorical perception of a lexical tone continuum (from the high level tone, Tone1 to the high falling tone, Tone4. While the identification functions showed similar steepness and boundary location between the two subject groups, the discrimination results revealed superior performance in the musicians for discriminating within-category stimuli pairs but not for between-category stimuli. These findings suggest that musical training can enhance sensitivity to subtle pitch differences between within-category sounds in the presence of robust mental representations in service of categorical perception of lexical tonal contrasts.

  11. A COMPARISON OF ALTERNATIVE CRITERIA FOR DEFINING FUZZY BOUNDARIES ON FUZZY CATEGORICAL MAPS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This paper provides a brief introduction to the methods for generating fuzzy categorical maps from remotely sensed images (in graphical and digital forms). This is followed by a description of the slicing process for deriving fuzzy boundaries from fuzzy categorical maps, which can be based on the maximum fuzzy membership values, confusion index, or measure of entropy. Results from an empirical test preformed in an Edinburgh suburb show that fuzzy boundaries of land cover can be derived from aerial photographs and satellite images by using the three criteria with small differences, and that slicing based on the maximum fuzzy membership values is the easiest and most straightforward solution. This, in turn, implies the suitability of maintaining both a crisp classification and its underlying certainty map for deriving fuzzy boundaries at different thresholds, which is a flexible and compact management of categorical map data and their uncertainty.

  12. Dos categorías para analizar el razonamiento sobre reglas sociomorales

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Este artículo reporta los resultados de una investigación diseñada para conocer el razonamiento moral de niños y niñas de entre 10 y 11 años de edad, acerca de reglas sociomorales y transgresiones narradas en historias hipotéticas. Para el análisis de la información utilicé un método inductivo, construyendo categorías a partir de los datos y sin contar con categorías a priori. Los resultados muestran dos categorías de pensamiento en relación con las reglas. La primera la denominé Regularidad ...

  13. Using Categorization of Problems as an Instructional Tool to Help Introductory Students Learn Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Mason, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    The ability to categorize problems based upon underlying principles, rather than contexts, is considered a hallmark of expertise in physics problem solving. With inspiration from a classic study by Chi, Feltovich, and Glaser, we compared the categorization of 25 introductory mechanics problems based upon similarity of solution by students in large calculus-based introductory courses with physics faculty and Ph.D. students. Here, we summarize the study and suggest that a categorization task, especially when conducted with students working with peers in small groups, can be an effective pedagogical tool to help students in introductory physics courses learn to discern the underlying similarity between problems with diverse contexts but the same underlying physics principles.

  14. Dual-mode nested search method for categorical uncertain multi-objective optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Long; Wang, Hu

    2016-10-01

    Categorical multi-objective optimization is an important issue involved in many matching design problems. Non-numerical variables and their uncertainty are the major challenges of such optimizations. Therefore, this article proposes a dual-mode nested search (DMNS) method. In the outer layer, kriging metamodels are established using standard regular simplex mapping (SRSM) from categorical candidates to numerical values. Assisted by the metamodels, a k-cluster-based intelligent sampling strategy is developed to search Pareto frontier points. The inner layer uses an interval number method to model the uncertainty of categorical candidates. To improve the efficiency, a multi-feature convergent optimization via most-promising-area stochastic search (MFCOMPASS) is proposed to determine the bounds of objectives. Finally, typical numerical examples are employed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed DMNS method.

  15. A Novel Approach for Text Categorization of Unorganized data based with Information Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suneetha Manne,

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Internet has made a profound change in the lives of many enthusiastic innovators and researchers. The information available on the web has knocked the doors of Knowledge Discovery leading to a new Information era. Unfortunately, most Search Engines provide web content which is irrelevant to the information intended to the browser. Many Text Categorization techniques for web content have been developed, to recognize the given document’s category but failed to make trust worthy results. This paper primarily focuses on web content categorization based on classic summarization technique by enabling the classification at word level. The web document is preprocessed first which involves filtering the content with classical techniques and then is converted into organized data. The organized data is then treated with predefined hierarchical categorical set to identify theexact category.

  16. [Group Lasso Penalized Classifier for Diagnosis of Diseases with Categorical Data].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinjia; Xue, Fang

    2015-10-01

    Six kinds of erythemato-squamous diseases have been common skin diseases, but the diagnosis of them has always been a problem. The quantitative data processing method is not suitable for erythemato-squamous data because they are categorical qualitative data. This paper proposed a new method based on group lasso penalized classification for the feature selection and classification for erythemato-squamous data with categorical qualitative data. The first categorical data of 33 dimensions were changed by the virtual code, and then 34th dimension age data were discretized and changed by the virtual code. Then the encoded data were grouped according to class group and variable group. Lastly Group Lasso penalized classification was executed. The classified accuracy of 10-fold cross validation was 98.88% ± 0.002 3%. Compared with those of other method in the literature, this new method is simpler, and better for effect and efficiency, and has stronger interpretability and stronger stability.

  17. Race and Color: Two Sides of One Story? Development of Biases in Categorical Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timeo, Susanna; Farroni, Teresa; Maass, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Categorical perception is a phenomenon that leads people to group stimuli into categories instead of perceiving their natural continua. This article reviews the literature of two biases connected with categorical perception: categorical color perception and the other-race effect. Although these two phenomena concern distant targets (colors and faces) and imply different biases (one attentional, one mnemonic), they share at least three commonalities. First, they both involve the chunking of continuous dimensions into categories. Second, adult categories are shaped by cultural processes. Third, infants' discrimination performance seems universal and guided by perception. In this article, it is proposed to look for a common developmental mechanism that clarifies the shift from a perceptual to a sociocognitive knowledge of the environment. New perspectives are discussed. © 2016 The Authors. Child Development © 2016 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  18. An Affinity Propagation Clustering Algorithm for Mixed Numeric and Categorical Datasets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Clustering has been widely used in different fields of science, technology, social science, and so forth. In real world, numeric as well as categorical features are usually used to describe the data objects. Accordingly, many clustering methods can process datasets that are either numeric or categorical. Recently, algorithms that can handle the mixed data clustering problems have been developed. Affinity propagation (AP algorithm is an exemplar-based clustering method which has demonstrated good performance on a wide variety of datasets. However, it has limitations on processing mixed datasets. In this paper, we propose a novel similarity measure for mixed type datasets and an adaptive AP clustering algorithm is proposed to cluster the mixed datasets. Several real world datasets are studied to evaluate the performance of the proposed algorithm. Comparisons with other clustering algorithms demonstrate that the proposed method works well not only on mixed datasets but also on pure numeric and categorical datasets.

  19. Rethinking the link between categorization and prejudice within the social cognition perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Bernadette; Judd, Charles M

    2005-01-01

    For the past 40 years, social psychological research on stereotyping and prejudice in the United States has been dominated by the social cognition perspective, which has emphasized the important role of basic categorization processes in intergroup dynamics. An inadvertent consequence of this approach has been a disproportionate focus on social categorization as a causal factor in intergroup animosity and, accordingly, an emphasis on approaches that minimize category distinctions as the solution to intergroup conflict. Though recognizing the crucial function of categorization, we question existing support for the hypothesis that the perception of strong group differences necessarily results in greater intergroup bias. Given that it is neither feasible nor ultimately desirable to imagine that social categories can be eliminated, we suggest that a more useful approach is one that promotes intergroup harmony even while recognizing and valuing the distinctions that define our social world.

  20. Categorical Analysis of Human T Cell Heterogeneity with One-Dimensional Soli-Expression by Nonlinear Stochastic Embedding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yang; Wong, Michael T; van der Maaten, Laurens; Newell, Evan W

    2016-01-15

    Rapid progress in single-cell analysis methods allow for exploration of cellular diversity at unprecedented depth and throughput. Visualizing and understanding these large, high-dimensional datasets poses a major analytical challenge. Mass cytometry allows for simultaneous measurement of >40 different proteins, permitting in-depth analysis of multiple aspects of cellular diversity. In this article, we present one-dimensional soli-expression by nonlinear stochastic embedding (One-SENSE), a dimensionality reduction method based on the t-distributed stochastic neighbor embedding (t-SNE) algorithm, for categorical analysis of mass cytometry data. With One-SENSE, measured parameters are grouped into predefined categories, and cells are projected onto a space composed of one dimension for each category. In contrast with higher-dimensional t-SNE, each dimension (plot axis) in One-SENSE has biological meaning that can be easily annotated with binned heat plots. We applied One-SENSE to probe relationships between categories of human T cell phenotypes and observed previously unappreciated cellular populations within an orchestrated view of immune cell diversity. The presentation of high-dimensional cytometric data using One-SENSE showed a significant improvement in distinguished T cell diversity compared with the original t-SNE algorithm and could be useful for any high-dimensional dataset.