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Sample records for weldments

  1. Weldments for liquid helium service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHenry, H.I.; Whipple, T.A.

    1980-01-01

    Research started this year on the evaluation of promising filler metals for improved-toughness stainless steel weldments (but not improved strength), on the evaluation of aluminum alloy weldments, and in the development of improved procedures for measuring fracture toughness at 4 0 K. Work continued on metallurgical investigations and toughness tests on stainless steel weldments supplied by various contributers to the DOE/OFE superconducting magnet programs. This report summarizes the results obtained in FY79 and briefly outlines the plans for FY80

  2. An intelligent software approach to ultrasonic flaw classification in weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Sung Jin; Kim, Hak Joon; Lee, Hyun

    1997-01-01

    Ultrasonic pattern recognition is the most effective approach to the problem of discriminating types of flaws in weldments based on ultrasonic flaw signals. In spite of significant progress on this methodology, it has not been widely used in practical ultrasonic inspection of weldments in industry. Hence, for the convenient application of this approach in many practical situations, we develop an intelligent ultrasonic signature classification software which can discriminate types of flaws in weldments using various tools in artificial intelligence such as neural networks. This software shows excellent performances in an experimental problem where flaws in weldments are classified into two categories of cracks and non-cracks.

  3. Measured residual stresses in overlay pipe weldments removed from service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shack, W.J.

    1985-02-01

    Surface and throughwall residual stresses were measured on an elbow-to-pipe weldment that had been removed from the Hatch-2 reactor about a year after the application of a weld overlay. The results were compared with experimental measurements on three mock-up weldments and with finite-element calculations. The comparison shows that there are significant differences in the form and magnitude of the residual stress distributions. However, even after more than a year of service, the residual stresses over most of the inner surface of the actual plant weldment with an overlay were strongly compressive. 3 refs., 7 figs

  4. Fatigue-crack growth behavior in dissimilar metal weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, L.A.

    1977-03-01

    The techniques of linear-elastic fracture mechanics were used to characterize fatigue-crack propagation behavior in three dissimilar metal weldments at test temperatures of 800 0 F (427 0 C) and 1000 0 F (538 0 C). The weldments studied included Inconel 718/Type 316, all using Inconel 82 as the filler metal. In general, fatigue-crack growth rates in the weldments were equal to, or less than, those observed in the base metals. Crack deviation from the expected path perpendicular to the loading axis was noted in some cases, and is discussed

  5. Elevated temperature weldment behavior as related to nuclear design criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, R.T.; Canonico, D.A.; Brinkman, C.R.

    1975-01-01

    Factors affecting the physical and mechanical properties of weldments are reviewed. Data are presented that show wide variability in the properties of weld metal and heat-affected zones both within a given weldment and from weldment to weldment. The weld metal or heat-affected zone may be stronger or weaker, and more or less ductile than the base metal joined. This implies that current design rules, which are presumed to have well-known safety factors based on the properties of base metals, may have other actual safety factors in welded construction, due to the differences between weld metal and base metal properties. Suggestions for obtaining further data that can subsequently be used to improve confidence in design rules or to change design rules for nuclear application are presented

  6. Simulation of a stainless steel multipass weldment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lejeail, Y.; Cabrillat, M.T. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    1995-12-31

    Several problems in nuclear power plants are due to shrinkage and distortion of welded structures and the associated residual stresses. In this context, a stainless steel multipass weldment realized in a H type constrained specimen has been calculated by means of finite element method. The temperatures obtained from a 3 D modified Rosenthal equation are compared with the experimental ones, and are then used for the 2 D simulation in which a linear Kinematic hardening is assumed in relation to a Von Mises plasticity criteria. Materials data are well known up to very high temperatures (1200{sup 0} C) and are introduced in the model. Experimental and calculated displacements after the first pass are compared and a discussion points out what improvements should be made for a better agreement. (author). 3 refs., 8 figs, 1 tab.

  7. Voronoi diagram and microstructure of weldment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jung Ho [Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    Voronoi diagram, one of the well-known space decomposition algorithms has been applied to express the microstructure of a weldment for the first time due to the superficial analogy between a Voronoi cell and a metal's grain. The area of the Voronoi cells can be controlled by location and the number of the seed points. This can be correlated to the grain size in the microstructure and the number of nuclei formed. The feasibility of representing coarse and fine grain structures were tested through Voronoi diagrams and it is applied to expression of cross-sectional bead shape of a typical laser welding. As result, it successfully described coarsened grain size of heat affected zone and columnar crystals in fusion zone. Although Voronoi diagram showed potential as a microstructure prediction tool through this feasible trial but direct correlation control variable of Voronoi diagram to solidification process parameter is still remained as further works.

  8. Evaluation of sensitization and corrosive damages of the weldment for SUS 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na, Eui Gyun

    2013-01-01

    The anodic polarization method was verified to be suitable for evaluating the degree of sensitization for the weldment of stainless steel at the passive region. Heat treated weldment and parent are more sensitized than untreated weldments and parents. Specifically, weldments treated at 730 .deg. C with a 4 h holding time and then cooled in a furnace are the most sensitized. An unstable passive film formed on the surface of the heated-treated weldment because of the Cr-depletion zone at the passive region. The time to failure (TTF) for the parent in synthetic seawater requires a longer amount of time than that in air. However, the TTF for the weldment is shorter than that in air. The heat treated-weldment in a corrosive environment was the most severely damaged among the specimens. For the heat-treated weldment, most acoustic emission (AE) counts were emitted until 4 x 10 5 s, whereas those for the untreated weldment were produced over the elastic-plastic deformation range. Moreover, the number of AE counts per hour for the heat- treated weldments and parents decreased considerably compared with the untreated weldments and parents

  9. Effects of titanium and zirconium on iron aluminide weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulac, B.L.; Edwards, G.R. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Center for Welding, Joining, and Coatings Research; Burt, R.P. [Alumax Technical Center, Golden, CO (United States); David, S.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.

    1997-12-01

    When gas-tungsten arc welded, iron aluminides form a coarse fusion zone microstructure which is susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement. Titanium inoculation effectively refined the fusion zone microstructure in iron aluminide weldments, but the inoculated weldments had a reduced fracture strength despite the presence of a finer microstructure. The weldments fractured by transgranular cleavage which nucleated at cracked second phase particles. With titanium inoculation, second phase particles in the fusion zone changed shape and also became more concentrated at the grain boundaries, which increased the particle spacing in the fusion zone. The observed decrease in fracture strength with titanium inoculation was attributed to increased spacing of second phase particles in the fusion zone. Current research has focused on the weldability of zirconium- and carbon-alloyed iron aluminides. Preliminary work performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has shown that zirconium and carbon additions affect the weldability of the alloy as well as the mechanical properties and fracture behavior of the weldments. A sigmajig hot cracking test apparatus has been constructed and tested at Colorado School of Mines. Preliminary characterization of hot cracking of three zirconium- and carbon-alloyed iron aluminides, each containing a different total concentration of zirconium at a constant zirconium/carbon ratio of ten, is in progress. Future testing will include low zirconium alloys at zirconium/carbon ratios of five and one, as well as high zirconium alloys (1.5 to 2.0 atomic percent) at zirconium/carbon ratios of ten to forty.

  10. Residual-stress distributions near stainless steel butt weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elligson, W.A.; Shack, W.J.

    1978-01-01

    Concern for the integrity of stainless steel butt-weldments in boiling-water-reactor (BWR) piping systems has stimulated study of the conditions that cause stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in the heat-affected zones (HAZ) of the weldments. It is generally agreed that a high stress exceeding the initial yield strength is one of the essential elements for crack initiation. Since design procedures usually ensure that load stresses are below initial yield, the source of the high stresses necessary to produce SCC is thought to be the residual stresses due to welding. To examine the level of residual stresses in the weldments of interest, bulk residual stresses were measured on 100 mm (4-in.) and 254 mm (10-in.) diameter Schedule 80 piping weldments using strain relief techniques. Both laboratory welded specimens and field welded specimens from reactors in service were studied. Axial bulk residual stress distributions were obtained at 45 0 intervals around the circumference. At each azimuthal position, the residual stresses were measured at seven axial positions: on the weld centerline and 13, 20, and 25 mm on either side of the weld centerline on both the inside and outside surfaces

  11. A study of fatigue life prediction for automotive spot weldment using local strain approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Song In; Yu, Hyo Sun; Na, Sung Hun; Na, Eui Gyun

    2000-01-01

    The fatigue crack initiation life is studied on automotive spot weldment made from cold rolled carbon steel(SPC) sheet by using DCPDM and local strain approach. It can be found that the fatigue crack initiation behavior in spot weldment can be definitely detected by DCPDM system. The local stresses and strains are estimated by elastic-plastic FEM analysis and the alternative approximate method based on Neuber's rule were applied to predict the fatigue life of spot weldment. A satisfactory correlation between the predicted life and experimental life can be found in spot weldment within a factor of 4

  12. Effect of preemptive weld overlay on residual stress of repaired weldment in surge nozzle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Chang Young; Song, Tae Kwang; Bae, Hong Yeol; Chun, Yun Bae; Kim, Yun Jae [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoung Soo; Park, Chi Yong [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-01

    In the welding process, weldments usually include repair weld during the manufacturing process. Repair welds is supposed to cause strong tensile residual stress. Moreover weldments, usually made by Alloy 82/182, is susceptible to PWSCC. Therefore, mitigation of welding residual stress in weldments is important for reliable operating. PWOL is one of the methods for mitigation and verified for over twenty years. In this paper, residual stress distribution of repaired weldments and the effect of PWOL on mitigation is examined for surge nozzle.

  13. Application of fracture mechanics to weldments; Bruchmechanische Bewertung von Schweissverbindungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zerbst, U.; Kocak, M. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstofforschung; Huebner, P. [Technische Univ. Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    Weldments have been a major topic of engineering fracture mechanics research for many years as it shows up in the immense number of scientific papers published recently. Part of this generated knowledge has already been implemented in some industrial codes and standards. The focussing on weldments has its own reason in the utmost importance of this class of components in many industrial fields, but also in its susceptibility to the formation of defects during manufacturing and cracks in service, which promotes the danger of component failure. The present report is addressed to designers and material testers to provide updated information on the present state-of-the-art of fracture mechanics application to weldments. (orig.) [German] Schweissverbindungen bilden seit vielen Jahren einen Schwerpunkt der anwendungsnahen bruchmechanischen Forschung, was seinen Niederschlag in einer nahezu unuebersehbaren Fuelle an wissenschaftlichen Publikationen findet. Ein Teil der Ergebnisse hat bereits Eingang in industrienahe bruchmechanische Bewertungsvorschriften gefunden. Die Konzentration auf Schweissverbindungen hat ihre Ursache in der immensen Bedeutung dieser Bauteilklasse fuer viele Gebiete der Volkswirtschaft, aber auch in ihrer besonderen Anfaelligkeit zur Rissbildung in der Fertigung und im Betrieb und damit hinsichtlich der Gefahr von Bauteilversagen. Der vorliegende Beitrag wendet sich an Konstrukteure und Werkstoffpruefer, die einen Einblick in den gegenwaertigen Stand der Ingenieurbruchmechanik an Schweissverbindungen gewinnen wollen. (orig.)

  14. Numerical Fracture Analysis of Cryogenically Treated Alloy Steel Weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasool Mohideen, S; Thamizhmanii, S; Muhammed Abdul Fatah, M.M; Saidin, W. Najmuddin W.

    2016-01-01

    Cryogenic treatment is being used commercially in the industries in the last two decades for improving the life of many engineering component such as bearings and cutting tools. Though their influence in improving the wear resistance of tool materials is well established, the effect of treatment on weldments is not much investigated. In the present work, a two dimensional finite element analysis was carried out on the compact tension specimen model for simulating the treatment process and to study the fracture behaviour. The weldments were modelled by thermo- mechanical coupled field analysis for simulating he temperature distribution in the model during weld pool cooling and introducing thermal stresses due to uneven contraction and cooling. The model was subjected to cryogenic treatment by adopting radiation effect. The fracture analysis was carried out using Rice's J- Integral approach. The analysis produced a similar outcome of experimental results i.e. Increase in the fracture toughness of the specimen after cryogenic treatment in the heat affected zone of weldment. (paper)

  15. Development of an Intelligent Ultrasonic Signature Classification Software for Discrimination of Flaws in Weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H. J.; Song, S. J.; Jeong, H. D.

    1997-01-01

    Ultrasonic pattern recognition is the most effective approach to the problem of discriminating types of flaws in weldments based on ultrasonic flaw signals. In spite of significant progress in the research on this methodology, it has not been widely used in many practical ultrasonic inspections of weldments in industry. Hence, for the convenient application of this approach in many practical situations, we develop an intelligent ultrasonic signature classification software which can discriminate types of flaws in weldments based on their ultrasonic signals using various tools in artificial intelligence such as neural networks. This software shows the excellent performance in an experimental problem where flaws in weldments are classified into two categories of cracks and non-cracks. This performance demonstrates the high possibility of this software as a practical tool for ultrasonic flaw classification in weldments

  16. Studies on the weldability, microstructure and mechanical properties of activated flux TIG weldments of Inconel 718

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramkumar, K. Devendranath; Kumar, B. Monoj; Krishnan, M. Gokul; Dev, Sidarth; Bhalodi, Aman Jayesh; Arivazhagan, N.; Narayanan, S.

    2015-01-01

    This research article addresses the joining of 5 mm thick plates of Inconel 718 by activated flux tungsten inert gas (A-TIG) welding process using SiO 2 and TiO 2 fluxes. Microstructure studies inferred the presence of Nb rich eutectics and/or laves phase in the fusion zone of the A-TIG weldments. Tensile studies corroborated that the ultimate tensile strength of TiO 2 flux assisted weldments (885 MPa) was better compared to SiO 2 flux assisted weldments (815 MPa) and the failure was observed in the parent metal for both the cases. Impact test results portrayed that both the weldments were inferior in toughness as compared to the parent metal, which was due to the presence of oxide inclusions. Also, the study investigated the structure–property relationships of the A-TIG weldments of Inconel 718

  17. Benefits of the S/F cask impact limiter weldment imperfection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ku, Jeong Hoe; Lee, Ju Chan; Kim, Jong Hun; Park, Seong Won; Park, Hyun Soo

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the beneficial effect of weldment imperfection of the cask impact limiter, by applying intermittent-weld, for impact energy absorbing behavior. From the point of view of energy absorbing efficiency of an energy absorber, it is desirable to reduce the crush load resistance and increase the deformation of the energy absorber within certain limit. This paper presents the test results of intermittent-weldment and the analysis results of cask impacts and the discussions of the improvement of impact mitigating effect by the imperfect-weldment. The rupture of imperfect weldment of an impact limiter improves the energy-absorbing efficiency by reducing the crush load amplitude without loss of total energy absorption. The beneficial effect of weldment imperfection should be considered to the cask impact limiter design. (author)

  18. Studies on the weldability, microstructure and mechanical properties of activated flux TIG weldments of Inconel 718

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramkumar, K. Devendranath, E-mail: ramdevendranath@gmail.com; Kumar, B. Monoj; Krishnan, M. Gokul; Dev, Sidarth; Bhalodi, Aman Jayesh; Arivazhagan, N.; Narayanan, S.

    2015-07-15

    This research article addresses the joining of 5 mm thick plates of Inconel 718 by activated flux tungsten inert gas (A-TIG) welding process using SiO{sub 2} and TiO{sub 2} fluxes. Microstructure studies inferred the presence of Nb rich eutectics and/or laves phase in the fusion zone of the A-TIG weldments. Tensile studies corroborated that the ultimate tensile strength of TiO{sub 2} flux assisted weldments (885 MPa) was better compared to SiO{sub 2} flux assisted weldments (815 MPa) and the failure was observed in the parent metal for both the cases. Impact test results portrayed that both the weldments were inferior in toughness as compared to the parent metal, which was due to the presence of oxide inclusions. Also, the study investigated the structure–property relationships of the A-TIG weldments of Inconel 718.

  19. Finite element modeling of ultrasonic inspection of weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewey, B.R.; Adler, L.; Oliver, B.F.; Pickard, C.A.

    1983-01-01

    High performance weldments for critical service applications require 100% inspection. Balanced against the adaptability of the ultrasonic method for automated inspection are the difficulties encountered with nonhomogeneous and anisotropic materials. This research utilizes crystals and bicrystals of nickel to model austenitic weld metal, where the anisotropy produces scattering and mode conversion, making detection and measurement of actual defects difficult. Well characterized samples of Ni are produced in a levitation zone melting facility. Crystals in excess of 25 mm diameter and length are large enough to permit ultrasonic measurements of attenuation, wave speed, and spectral content. At the same time, the experiments are duplicated as finite element models for comparison purposes

  20. Intergranular corrosion susceptibility in supermartensitic stainless steel weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aquino, J.M. [Sao Carlos Federal University (UFSCar), Materials Engineering Department, Rodovia Washington Luis, km 235, CEP 13565-905, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil)], E-mail: dsek@power.ufscar.br; Della Rovere, C.A.; Kuri, S.E. [Sao Carlos Federal University (UFSCar), Materials Engineering Department, Rodovia Washington Luis, km 235, CEP 13565-905, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2009-10-15

    The intergranular corrosion susceptibility in supermartensitic stainless steel (SMSS) weldments was investigated by the double loop - electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (DL-EPR) technique through the degree of sensitization (DOS). The results showed that the DOS decreased from the base metal (BM) to the weld metal (WM). The heat affected zone (HAZ) presented lower levels of DOS, despite of its complex precipitation mechanism along the HAZ length. Chromium carbide precipitate redissolution is likely to occur due to the attained temperature at certain regions of the HAZ during the electron beam welding (EBW). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images showed preferential oxidation sites in the BM microstructure.

  1. TEM observations of HT-9 as-welded weldment microstructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foulds, J.R.; Lechtenberg, T.A.

    1984-01-01

    TEM studies of different locations in an HT-9 weldment indicated delta-ferrite (delta) occurrence, M 23 C 6 precipitation at delta-martensite interfaces, fine carbide precipitation at prior austenite grain boundaries, and martensite lath and lath packet size to be the distinguishable microstructure features observed. Furthermore, retained austenite films were observed in the weld metal and the HAZ adjacent to the weld metal that reached the highest temperature during joining. The microstructures correlate well with the observed room temperature microhardness except for the fusion boundary in weld metal which exhibited a hardness drop and an unexpected minimum amount of delta-ferrite

  2. Temperature and distortion transients in gas tungsten-arc weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glickstein, S.S.; Friedman, E.

    1979-10-01

    An analysis and test program to develop a fundamental understanding of the gas tungsten-arc welding process has been undertaken at the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory to develop techniques to determine and control the various welding parameters and weldment conditions so as to result in optimum weld response characteristics. These response characteristics include depth of penetration, weld bead configuration, weld bead sink and roll, distortion, and cracking sensitivity. The results are documented of that part of the program devoted to analytical and experimental investigations of temperatures, weld bead dimensions, and distortions for moving gas tungsten-arc welds applied to Alloy 600 plates

  3. Galvanic corrosion of laser weldments of AA6061 aluminium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, A.B.M. Mujibur; Kumar, S.; Gerson, A.R.

    2007-01-01

    Galvanic corrosion of laser welded AA6061 aluminium alloy, arising from the varying rest potentials of the various weldment regions, was examined. The weld fusion zone is found to be the most cathodic region of the weldment while the base material is the most anodic region. The rate of galvanic corrosion, controlled by the cathodic process at the weld fusion zone, increases with time until a steady state maximum is reached. On galvanic corrosion the corrosion potential of the weld fusion zone shifts in the positive direction and the free corrosion current increases. It is proposed that the cathodic process at the weld fusion zone causes a local increase in pH that in turn causes dissolution of the surface film resulting in the loss of Al to solution and the increase of intermetallic phases. The increase in galvanic corrosion may result from either the build up of the intermetallic phases in the surface layer and/or significant increase in surface area of the weld fusion zone due to the porous nature of the surface layer

  4. FINAL DESIGN REVIEW REPORT Subcritical Experiments Gen 2, 3-ft Confinement Vessel Weldment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, Christopher [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-09-28

    A Final Design Review (FDR) of the Subcritical Experiments (SCE) Gen 2, 3-ft. Confinement Vessel Weldment was held at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) on September 14, 2017. The review was a focused review on changes only to the confinement vessel weldment (versus a system design review). The changes resulted from lessons-learned in fabricating and inspecting the current set of confinement vessels used for the SCE Program. The baseline 3-ft. confinement vessel weldment design has successfully been used (to date) for three (3) high explosive (HE) over-tests, two (2) fragment tests, and five (5) integral HE experiments. The design team applied lessons learned from fabrication and inspection of these vessel weldments to enhance fit-up, weldability, inspection, and fitness for service evaluations. The review team consisted of five (5) independent subject matter experts with engineering design, analysis, testing, fabrication, and inspection experience. The

  5. Mechanical Behavior of Commercially Pure Titanium Weldments at Lower Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, R. K.; Anil Kumar, V.; Xavier, X. Roshan

    2018-05-01

    Commercially pure titanium is used for low-temperature applications due to good toughness attributed to single-phase microstructure (α). Electron beam welding (EBW) and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) processes have been used for welding two grades of commercially pure titanium (Grade 2 and Grade 4). Martensitic microstructure is found to be finer in the case of EBW joint as compared to GTAW joint due to faster rate of cooling in the former process. Weldments have been characterized to study the mechanical behavior at ambient (298 K) and cryogenic temperatures (20 and 77 K). Strength of weldments increases with the decrease in temperature, which is found to be more prominent in case of Grade 4 titanium as compared to Grade 2. Weld efficiency of Grade 4 is found to be higher at all the temperatures (ambient, 77 and 20 K). However, ultimate tensile strength/yield strength ratio is higher for Grade 2 as compared to Grade 4. % Elongation is found to increase/retained at cryogenic temperatures for Grade 2, and it is found to decrease for Grade 4. Electron backscattered diffraction analysis and transmission electron microscopy of deformed samples confirmed the presence of extensive twinning in Grade 2 and the presence of finer martensitic structure in Grade 4. Fractography analysis of tested specimens revealed the presence of cleavage facets in Grade 4 and dimples in specimens of Grade 2. Higher strength in Grade 4 is attributed to higher oxygen restricting the twin-assisted slip, which is otherwise prominent in Grade 2 titanium.

  6. An Investigation of the Mechanical Properties of a Weldment of 7% Nickel Alloy Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong Yeol Park

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade, the demand for natural gas has steadily increased for the prevention of environmental pollution. For this reason, many liquefied natural gas (LNG carriers have been manufactured. Since one of the most important issues in the design of LNG carriers is to guarantee structural safety, the use of low-temperature materials is increasing. Among commonly employed low-temperature materials, nickel steel has many benefits such as good strength and outstanding corrosion resistance. Accordingly, nickel steels are one of the most commonly used low-temperature steels for LNG storage tanks. However, the study of fracture toughness with various welding consumables of 7% nickel alloy steel is insufficient for ensuring the structural safety of LNG storage tanks. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate fracture toughness of several different weldments for 7% nickel alloy steels. The weldment of 7% nickel alloy steel was fabricated by tungsten inert gas (TIG, flux cored arc welding (FCAW, and gas metal arc welding (GMAW. In order to assess the material performance of the weldments at low temperature, fracture toughness such as crack tip opening displacement (CTOD and the absorbed impact energy of weldments were compared with those of 9% nickel steel weldments.

  7. Investigations on Microstructure and Corrosion behavior of Superalloy 686 weldments by Electrochemical Corrosion Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arulmurugan, B.; Manikandan, M.

    2018-02-01

    In the present study, microstructure and the corrosion behavior of Nickel based superalloy 686 and its weld joints has been investigated by synthetic sea water environment. The weldments were fabricated by Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) and Pulsed Current Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (PCGTAW) techniques with autogenous mode and three different filler wires (ERNiCrMo-4, ERNiCrMo-10 and ERNiCrMo-14). Microstructure and Scanning electron microscope examination was carried out to evaluate the structural changes in the fusion zones of different weldments. Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) analysis was carried out to evaluate the microsegregation of alloying elements in the different weld joints. Potentiodynamic polarization study was experimented on the base metal and weld joints in the synthetic sea water environment to evaluate the corrosion rate. Tafel’s interpolation technique was used to obtain the corrosion rate. The microstructure examination revealed that the fine equiaxed dendrites were observed in the pulsed current mode. EDS analysis shows the absence of microsegregation in the current pulsing technique. The corrosion rates of weldments are compared with the base metal. The results show that the fine microstructure with the absence of microsegregation in the PCGTA weldments shows improved corrosion resistance compared to the GTAW. Autogenous PCGTAW shows higher corrosion resistance irrespective of all weldments employed in the present study.

  8. Finite element modelling of the creep deformation of T91 steel weldments at 600 C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhadrui, A.K. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Gaudig, W. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Staatliche Materialpruefungsanstalt; Theofel, H. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Staatliche Materialpruefungsanstalt; Maile, K. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Staatliche Materialpruefungsanstalt

    1996-05-01

    Finite element modelling of the creep deformation of T91 steel weldments, welded using the manual metal arc (MMA) and submerged arc (SA) welding processes, was carried out to predict creep curves for both of the weldments under different stresses and compared with the experimental data. The stress and strain redistribution across the length of the transverse-weld specimens has also been predicted. Data of creep tests at 600 C at stresses between 90-130 MPa for the base metal, the MMA and SA weld metals, and the simulated heat-affected zone were used to determine Garofalo`s equation for creep strain. Finite element meshes for both of the weldments were constructed after calculating the HAZ locations using Rosenthal`s heat flow equation. (orig.)

  9. Effect of heat treatment upon the fatigue-crack growth behavior of Alloy 718 weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, L.A.; Mills, W.J.

    1981-05-01

    Gas-tungsten-arc weldments in Alloy 718 were studied in fatigue-crack growth test conducted at five temperatures over the range 24--649 degree C. In general, crack growth rates increased with increasing temperature, and weldments given the ''conventional'' post-weld heat-treatment generally exhibited crack growth rates that were higher than for weldments given the ''modified'' (INEL) heat-treatment. Limited testing in the as-welded condition revealed crack growth rates significantly lower than observed for the heat-treated cases, and this was attributed to residual stresses. Three different heats of filler wire were utilized, and no heat-to-heat variations were noted. 23 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs

  10. Critical stresses in pintle, weldment and top head of nuclear waste container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladkany, S.G.; Kniss, B.R.

    1992-01-01

    Critical stresses in the pintle, the weldment, and the top heads (flat and curved), of a high level nuclear waste container are evaluated under an annular loading. This loading is three times larger than the expected normal operating load. Results show that the shape and the thickness of the pintle and the top head, along with the thickness of the weldment, substantially affect the magnitude of the critical stresses and distortions in the various components (i.e. pintle, shell, and heads) when they are supporting a load. Stiffer top heads and pintles and larger weldment sizes reduce the critical stresses in all welded joints. Various shapes of curved top heads were investigated. In this paper an ASME flanged and dished top head, which has the same thickness as the canister, is analyzed

  11. Low Cycle Fatigue Behavior of Alloy617 Weldment at 850°C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Jeong Jun; Kim, Seon Jin [Pukyong Nat’l Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Woo Gon; Kim, Eung-Seon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    Alloy 617 is one of the primary candidate materials to be used in a very high temperature reactor (VHTR) system as an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX). To investigate the low cycle fatigue behavior of Alloy 617 weldments at a high temperature of 850℃, fully reversed strain-controlled fatigue tests were conducted with the total strain values ranging from 0.6~1.5%. The weldment specimens were machined using the weld pads fabricated with a single V-grove configuration by gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process. The fatigue life is reduced as the total strain range increases. For all testing conditions, the cyclic stress response behavior of the Alloy 617 weldments exhibited the initial cyclic strain hardening phenomenon during the initial small number of cycles. Furthermore, the overall fatigue cracking and the propagation or cracks showed a transgranular failure mode.

  12. Corrosion of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel Weldment in Chloride Medium Containing Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antony, P. J.; Singh Raman, R. K.; Kumar, Pradeep; Raman, R.

    2008-11-01

    Influence of changes in microstructure caused due to welding on microbiologically influenced corrosion of a duplex stainless steel was studied by exposing the weldment and parent metal to chloride medium containing sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Identically prepared coupons (same area and surface finish) exposed to sterile medium were used as the control. Etching-type attack was observed in the presence of SRB, which was predominant in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of the weldment. The anodic polarization studies indicated an increase in current density for coupon exposed to SRB-containing medium as compared to that obtained for coupon exposed to sterile medium. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations after anodic polarization revealed that the attack was preferentially in the ferrite phase of HAZ of the weldment, whereas it was restricted to the austenite phase of the parent metal.

  13. Hot deformation behavior and hot working characteristic of Nickel-base electron beam weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ning, Yongquan, E-mail: ningke521@163.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Yao, Zekun; Guo, Hongzhen [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Fu, M.W. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

    2014-01-25

    Highlights: • The Hot deformation behavior of electron beam (EB) Nickel-base weldments was investigated. • The constitutive equation represented by temperature, strain rate and true strain was developed. • Processing map approach was adopted to optimize the hot forging process of EB weldments. • True strain has a great effect on the efficiency of power dissipation (η). -- Abstract: The electron beam welding (EBW) of Nickel-base superalloys was conducted, and the cylindrical compression specimens were machined from the central part of the electron beam (EB) weldments. The hot deformation behavior of EB weldments was investigated at the temperature of 960–1140 °C and the strain rate of 0.001–1.0 s{sup −1}. The apparent activation energy of deformation was calculated to be 400 kJ/mol, and the constitutive equation that describes the flow stress as a function of strain rate and deformation temperature was proposed for modeling of the hot deformation process of EB weldments. The processing map approach was adopted to investigate the deformation mechanisms during the hot plastic deformation and to optimize the processing parameters of EB weldments. It is found that the true strain has a significant effect on the efficiency of power dissipation (η). The η value in the safe processing domain (1140 °C, 1.0 s{sup −1}) increases from 0.32 to 0.55. In the unsafe processing domain (1080 °C, 0.001 s{sup −1}), however, the η value greatly decreases with the increase of strain. When the strain is 0.40, the efficiency of power dissipation becomes negative. The flow instability is predicted to occur since the instability parameter ξ(ε) becomes negative. The hot deformation of EB weldments can be carried out safely in the domain with the strain rate range of 0.1–1.0 s{sup −1} and the temperature range of 960–1140 °C. When the height reduction is about 50%, the optimum processing condition is (T{sub opi}: 1140 °C, ε{sub opi}: 1.0 s{sup −1}) with

  14. Hot deformation behavior and hot working characteristic of Nickel-base electron beam weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ning, Yongquan; Yao, Zekun; Guo, Hongzhen; Fu, M.W.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The Hot deformation behavior of electron beam (EB) Nickel-base weldments was investigated. • The constitutive equation represented by temperature, strain rate and true strain was developed. • Processing map approach was adopted to optimize the hot forging process of EB weldments. • True strain has a great effect on the efficiency of power dissipation (η). -- Abstract: The electron beam welding (EBW) of Nickel-base superalloys was conducted, and the cylindrical compression specimens were machined from the central part of the electron beam (EB) weldments. The hot deformation behavior of EB weldments was investigated at the temperature of 960–1140 °C and the strain rate of 0.001–1.0 s −1 . The apparent activation energy of deformation was calculated to be 400 kJ/mol, and the constitutive equation that describes the flow stress as a function of strain rate and deformation temperature was proposed for modeling of the hot deformation process of EB weldments. The processing map approach was adopted to investigate the deformation mechanisms during the hot plastic deformation and to optimize the processing parameters of EB weldments. It is found that the true strain has a significant effect on the efficiency of power dissipation (η). The η value in the safe processing domain (1140 °C, 1.0 s −1 ) increases from 0.32 to 0.55. In the unsafe processing domain (1080 °C, 0.001 s −1 ), however, the η value greatly decreases with the increase of strain. When the strain is 0.40, the efficiency of power dissipation becomes negative. The flow instability is predicted to occur since the instability parameter ξ(ε) becomes negative. The hot deformation of EB weldments can be carried out safely in the domain with the strain rate range of 0.1–1.0 s −1 and the temperature range of 960–1140 °C. When the height reduction is about 50%, the optimum processing condition is (T opi : 1140 °C, ε opi : 1.0 s −1 ) with the peak efficiency of 0

  15. Examination of overlay pipe weldments removed from the Hatch-2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J.Y.; Kupperman, D.S.; Shack, W.J.

    1985-02-01

    Laboratory ultrasonic examination (UT), dye penetrant examination (PT), metallography, and sensitization measurements were performed on Type 304 stainless steel overlay pipe weldments from the Hatch-2 BWR to determine the effectiveness of UT through overlays and the effects of the overlays on crack propagation in the weldments. Little correlation was observed between the results of earlier in-service ultrasonic inspection and the results of PT and destructive examination. Considerable difficulty was encountered in correctly detecting the presence of cracks by UT in the laboratory. Blunting of the crack tip by the weld overlay was observed, but there was no evidence of tearing or throughwall extension of the crack beyond the blunted region

  16. A review of hot cracking in austenitic stainless steel weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shankar, V.; Gill, T.P.S.; Mannan, S.L.; Rodriguez, P.

    1991-01-01

    The occurrence of hot cracking in austenitic stainless steel weldments is discussed with respect to its origin and metallurgical contributory factors. Of the three types of hot cracking, namely solidification cracking, liquation and ductility dip cracking, solidification cracking occurs in the interdendritic regions in weld metal while liquation and ductility dip cracking occur intergranularly in the heat-affected zone (HAZ). Segregation of impurity and minor elements such as sulphur, phosphorous, silicon, niobium, boron etc to form low melting eutectic phases has been found to be the major cause of hot cracking. Control of HAZ cracking requires minimisation of impurity elements in the base metal. In stabilized stainless steels containing niobium, higher amounts of delta-ferrite have been found necessary to prevent cracking than in unstabilized compositions. Titanium compounds have been found to cause liquation cracking in maraging steels and titanium containing stainless steels and superalloys. In nitrogen added stainless steels, cracking resistance decreases when the solidification mode changes to primary austenitic due to nitrogen addition. A review of the test methods to evaluate hot cracking behaviour showed that several external restraint and semi-self-restraint tests are available. The finger Test, WRC Fissure Bend Test, the PVR test and the Varestraint Test are described along with typical test results. Hot ductility testing to reveal HAZ cracking tendency during welding is described, which is of particular importance to stabilized stainless steels. Based on the literature, recommendations are made for welding stabilized and nitrogen added steels, indicating areas of further work. (author). 81 refs., 30 figs., 1 tab

  17. Three-dimensional temperature history of a multipass, filled weldment. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleinschmidt, D.E.; Trinh, T.; Troiano, R.A.

    1976-01-01

    A conceptual model is developed for the three-dimensional temperature history of a multipass, filled weldment. Property variations with temperature and phase change are included. A mathematical model and finite difference equations are derived from the conceptual model and a solution procedure for the equations is presented

  18. Mechanical behaviour of AISI 304/307 weldments creep tested at 7000C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pope, A.M.; Monteiro, S.N.; Silveira, T.L.

    Preliminary observations on the mechanical behavior of AISI 304/347 weldments creep tested at 700 0 C are presented. The results are compared with those of similar welded joints isothermally treated at the same temperature for different times. The peculiar aspects in the mechanical behavior are discussed based on precipitation reactions which occur in the joint materials [pt

  19. Process Management Development for Quality Monitoring on Resistance Weldment of Nuclear Fuel Rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Tae Hyung; Yang, Kyung Hwan; Kim, In Kyu [KEPCO, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The current, welding force, and displacement are displayed on the indicator during welding. However, real-time quality control is not performed. Due to the importance of fuel rod weldment, many studies on welding procedures have been conducted. However, there are not enough studies regarding weldment quality evaluation. On the other hand, there are continuous studies on the monitoring and control of welding phenomena. In resistance welding, which is performed in a very short time, it is important to find the process parameters that well represent the weld zone formation and the welding process. In his study, Gould attempted to analyze melt zone formation using the finite difference method. Using the artificial neural network, Javed and Sanders, Messler Jr et al., Cho and Rhee, Li and Gong et al. estimated the size of the melt zone by mapping a nonlinear functional relation between the weldment and the electrode head movement, which is a typical welding process parameter. Applications of the artificial intelligence method include fuzzy control using electrode displacement, fuzzy control using the optimal power curve, neural network control using the dynamic resistance curve, fuzzy adaptive control using the optimal electrode curve, etc. Therefore, this study induced quality factors for the real-time quality control of nuclear fuel rod end plug weldment using instantaneous dynamic resistance (IDR), which incorporates the instantaneous value of secondary current and voltage of the transformer, and using instantaneous dynamic force (IDF), obtained real-time during welding.

  20. 2017 Accomplishments – Tritium Aging Studies on Stainless Steel Weldments and Heat-Affected Zones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, Michael J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hitchcock, Dale [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Krentz, Tim [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); McNamara, Joy [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Duncan, Andrew [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2018-01-31

    In this study, the combined effects tritium and decay helium in forged and welded Types 304L and 21-6-9 stainless steels were studied. To measure these effects, fracture mechanic specimens were thermally precharged with tritium and aged for approximately 17 years to build in decay helium from tritium decay prior to testing. The results are compared to earlier measurements on the same alloys and weldments (4-5, 8-9). In support of Enhanced Surveillance, “Tritium Effects on Materials”, the fracture toughness properties of long-aged tritium-charged stainless-steel base metals and weldments were measured and compared to earlier measurements. The fracture-toughness data were measured by thermally precharging as-forged and as-welded specimens with tritium gas at 34.5 MPa and 350°C and aging for approximately 17 years to build-in decay helium prior to testing. These data result from the longest aged specimens ever tested in the history of the tritium effects programs at Savannah River and the fracture toughness values measured were the lowest ever recorded for tritium-exposed stainless steel. For Type 21-6-9 stainless steel, fracture toughness values were reduced to less than 2-4% of the as-forged values to 41 lbs / in specimens that contained more than 1300 appm helium from tritium decay. The fracture toughness properties of long-aged weldments were also measured. The fracture toughness reductions were not as severe because the specimens did not retain as much tritium from the charging and aging as did the base metals. For Type 304L weldments, the specimens in this study contained approximately 600 appm helium and their fracture toughness values averaged 750 lbs / in. The results for other steels and weldments are reported and additional tests will be conducted during FY18.

  1. Effects of laser shock processing on electrochemical corrosion resistance of ANSI 304 stainless steel weldments after cavitation erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.K.; Lu, J.Z.; Dai, F.Z.; Feng, A.X.; Luo, K.Y.; Zhong, J.S.; Wang, Q.W.; Luo, M.; Qi, H.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Weldments were done with laser shock processing impacts after cavitation erosion. ► Laser shock processing enhanced the erosion and corrosion resistance of weldments. ► Tensile residual stress and surface roughness decreased by laser shock processing. ► Microstructure was observed to explain the improvement by laser shock processing. ► Obvious passivation areas occurred with laser shock processing impacts. - Abstract: Effects of laser shock processing (LSP) on electrochemical corrosion resistance of weldments after cavitation erosion were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) technology, scanning electron microscope (SEM), roughness tester and optical microscope (OM). Some main factors to influence erosion and corrosion of weldments, residual stresses, surface roughness, grain refinements and slip, were discussed in detail. Results show that LSP impacts can induce compressive residual stresses, decrease surface roughness, refine grains and generate the slip. Thus, the erosion and corrosion resistance with LSP impacts is improved.

  2. Influence of magnetic arc oscillation and current pulsing on microstructure and high temperature tensile strength of alloy 718 TIG weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivaprasad, K.; Ganesh Sundara Raman, S.; Mastanaiah, P.; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to study the effect of magnetic arc oscillation and current pulsing on the microstructure and high temperature tensile strength of alloy 718 tungsten inert gas weldments. The magnetic arc oscillation technique resulted in refined Laves phase with lesser interconnectivity. The full benefits of current pulsing in breaking the dendrites could not be realized in the present study due to relatively higher heat input used in the welding process. In the direct aged condition weldments prepared using magnetic arc oscillation technique exhibited higher tensile strength due to the presence of refined and lesser-interconnected Laves particles. In the solution treated and aged condition, magnetic arc oscillated weldments exhibited lower tensile strength compared with the weldments made without arc oscillation due to the presence of large amounts of finer δ needles

  3. Macro and Microscopic Investigation on Fracture Specimen of Alloy 617 Base Metal and Weldment in Low Cycle Fatigue Regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seon Jin; Dewa, Rando Tungga [Pukyung National Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Won Gon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    This paper investigates macro- and microscopic fractography performed on fracture specimens from low cycle fatigue (LCF) testings through an Alloy 617 base metal and weldments. The weldment specimens were taken from gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) pad of Alloy 617. The aim of the present study is to investigate the macro- and microscopic aspects of the low cycle fatigue fracture mode and mechanism of Alloy 617 base metal and GTAWed weldment specimens. Fully axial total strain controlled fatigue tests were conducted at room temperature with total strain ranges of 0.6, 0.9, 1.2 and 1.5%. Macroscopic fracture surfaces of Alloy 617 base metal specimens showed a flat type normal to the fatigue loading direction, whereas the GTAWed weldment specimens were of a shear/star type. The fracture surfaces of both the base metal and weldment specimens revealed obvious fatigue striations at the crack propagation regime. In addition, the fatigue crack mechanism of the base metal showed a transgranular normal to fatigue loading direction; however, the GTAWed weldment specimens showed a transgranular at approximately 45° to the fatigue loading direction.

  4. Macro and Microscopic Investigation on Fracture Specimen of Alloy 617 Base Metal and Weldment in Low Cycle Fatigue Regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seon Jin; Dewa, Rando Tungga; Kim, Won Gon

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates macro- and microscopic fractography performed on fracture specimens from low cycle fatigue (LCF) testings through an Alloy 617 base metal and weldments. The weldment specimens were taken from gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) pad of Alloy 617. The aim of the present study is to investigate the macro- and microscopic aspects of the low cycle fatigue fracture mode and mechanism of Alloy 617 base metal and GTAWed weldment specimens. Fully axial total strain controlled fatigue tests were conducted at room temperature with total strain ranges of 0.6, 0.9, 1.2 and 1.5%. Macroscopic fracture surfaces of Alloy 617 base metal specimens showed a flat type normal to the fatigue loading direction, whereas the GTAWed weldment specimens were of a shear/star type. The fracture surfaces of both the base metal and weldment specimens revealed obvious fatigue striations at the crack propagation regime. In addition, the fatigue crack mechanism of the base metal showed a transgranular normal to fatigue loading direction; however, the GTAWed weldment specimens showed a transgranular at approximately 45° to the fatigue loading direction

  5. Mechanical Properties of Laser Weldment of V-4Cr-4Ti Alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heo, Nam-Jin; Nagasaka, Takuya; Muroga, Takeo; Nishimura, Arata; Shinozaki, Kenji; Watanabe, Hideo

    2003-01-01

    The effect of the laser welding condition on properties of the weldment, such as bending, tensile and charpy impact properties were investigated in a V-4Cr-4Ti alloy (NIFS-HEAT- 2). The microstructural and microchemical development in the weldment was also investigated for mechanistic study of the impurity behavior during the welding. Increase in hardness occurred in the weld zone. The hardening was due to the dissolution of the large and small precipitates existed in the base metal before welding. The degree of hardening varied with a distance from the bead center. The absorption energy by the impact test increased with the decrease in the input power density during the laser welding. The impact absorption energy of the weld, which is similar to that of the base metal, was obtained by optimizing the welding condition

  6. Evaluation of weldment creep and fatigue strength-reduction factors for elevated-temperature design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corum, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    New explicit weldment strength criteria in the form of creep and fatigue strength-reduction factors were recently introduced into the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Code Case N-47, which governs the design of elevated-temperature nuclear plants components in the United States. This paper provides some of the background and logic for these factors and their use, and it describes the results of a series of long-term, confirmatory, creep-rupture and fatigue tests of simple welded structures. The structures (welded plates and tubes) were made of 316 stainless steel base metal and 16-8-2 weld filler metal. Overall, the results provide further substantiation of the validity of the strength-reduction factor approach for ensuring adequate life in elevated-temperature nuclear component weldments. 16 refs., 7 figs

  7. Mechanical Characteristics of Submerged Arc Weldment in API Gas Pipeline Steel of Grade X65

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashemi, S. H.; Mohammadyani, D.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanical properties of submerged arc weldment (SAW) in gas transportation pipeline steel of grade API X65 (65 ksi yield strength) were investigated. This steel is produced by thermo mechanical control rolled (TMC), and is largely used in Iran gas piping systems and networks. The results from laboratory study on three different regions; i.e. base metal (BM), fusion zone (FZ) and heat affected zone (HAZ) were used to compare weldment mechanical characteristics with those specified by API 5L (revision 2004) standard code. Different laboratory experiments were conducted on test specimens taken from 48 inch outside diameter and 14.3 mm wall thickness gas pipeline. The test results showed a gradient of microstructure and Vickers hardness data from the centerline of FZ towards the unaffected MB. Similarly, lower Charpy absorbed energy (compared to BM) was observed in the FZ impact specimens. Despite this, the API specifications were fulfilled in three tested zones, ensuring pipeline structural integrity under working conditions.

  8. Creep deformation and rupture behavior of type 304/308 stainless steel structural weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McAfee, W.J.; Richardson, M.; Sartory, W.K.

    1977-01-01

    The creep deformation and rupture of type 304/308 stainless steel structural weldments at 593 0 C (1100 0 F) was experimentally investigated to study the comparative behavior of the base metal and weld metal constituents. The tests were conducted in support of ORNL's program to develop high-temperature structural design methods applicable to liquid-metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) system components that operate in the creep range. The specimens used were thin-walled, right circular cylinders capped with either flat or hemispherical heads and tested under internal gas pressure. Circumferential welds were located in different regions of the cylinder or head and, with one exception, were geometrically duplicated by all base metal regions in companion specimens. Results are presented on the comparative deformation and rupture behavior of selected points in the base metal and weldment regions of the different specimens and on the overall surface strains for selected specimens

  9. Corrosion behavior of CLAM steel weldment in flowing liquid Pb-17Li at 480 °C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xizhang; Shen Zheng; Chen Xing; Lei Yucheng; Huang Qunying

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► The research shows that the CLAM steel weldment have its own corrosion mechanism in liquid Pb-17Li alloy. The basic rule of the corrosion behaviour of weldments is that the coorosion rate decreases obviously with the increasing of exposed time. ► The weight loss of CLAM steel weldment is far higer than the base metal after exposed to Pb-17Li alloy. Corrosion has little effects on elements of weldment sample surfaces. And an easier corrosion area in the weld joint are found. ► A simple presumably corrosion behavior model is established. The model demonstrate that the easier corroded area will be formed when the direction of martensite laths form small-angle with the specimen surface, The easy corrosion area is the martensite lath area lack of Cr and distributes like laths, the cross-section area is 1 μm 2 to 4 μm 2, the existence of the easier corrosion area is one of the reasons that lead to the difference of the corrosion rate. - Abstract: CLAM (China Low Activation Martensitic) steel is considered as one of the candidate structural materials in liquid LiPb blanket concepts. Welding is one of the essential technologies for its practical application, CLAM steel weldment shows a great difference with base metal due to the effect of welding thermal cycle. In order to investigate the corrosion behavior and mechanism of CLAM weldments in liquid Pb-17Li, the experiments were performed by exposing the TIG weldment samples in flowing LiPb at 480 °C. The weight loss test of exposed specimens show that in 500 h, 1000 h dynamic conditions, corrosion resistance of CLAM steel weldment is poor, SEM analysis shows that the thicker martensite lath in weld area lead to higher corrosion amount, EDS results show that the influence of corrosion on surface elements is small, and surface corrosion is even, EDX analysis shows that the penetration of Pb-17Li does not exist in the joint. With the increasing of exposure time, the corrosion rate decreases

  10. Technique for ultrasonic testing of austenitic steel weldments of NPP components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lantukh, V.M.; Grebennik, V.S.; Kordinov, E.V.; Kesler, N.A.; Shchedrin, I.F.

    1987-01-01

    Special literature on ultrasonic testing of weldments of austenitic steel is analysed. Technique for ultrasonic testing of the ring and longitudinal butt welded joints of NPP components without reinforcing bead removal is described. Special converter design and fabrication practice are described. Results of experimental check of the developed testing technology and its application during NNPs' mounting and operation are presented. Results of ultrasonic and X-ray testing are compared

  11. Development of the Automated Ultrasonic Testing System for Inspection of the flaw in the Socket Weldment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Ki; Park, Moon Ho; Park, Ki Sung; Lee, Jae Ho; Lim, Sung Jin

    2004-01-01

    Socket weldment used to change the flow direction of fluid nay have flaws such as lack of fusion and cracks. Liquid penetrant testing or Radiography testing have been applied as NDT methods for flaw detection of the socket weldment. But it is difficult to detect the flaw inside of the socket weldment with these methods. In order to inspect the flaws inside the socket weldment, a ultrasonic testing method is established and a ultrasonic transducer and automated ultrasonic testing system are developed for the inspection. The automated ultrasonic testing system is based on the portable personal computer and operated by the program based Windows 98 or 2000. The system has a pulser/receiver, 100MHz high speed A/D board, and basic functions of ultrasonic flaw detector using the program. For the automated testing, motion controller board of ISA interface type is developed to control the 4-axis scanner and a real time iC-scan image of the automated testing is displayed on the monitor. A flaws with the size of less than 1mm in depth are evaluated smaller than its actual site in the testing, but the flaws larger than 1mm appear larger than its actual size on the contrary. This tendency is shown to be increasing as the flaw size increases. h reliable and objective testing results are obtained with the developed system, so that it is expected that it can contribute to safety management and detection of repair position of pipe lines of nuclear power plants and chemical plants

  12. Three-dimensional temperature history of a multipass filled weldment. Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinkowish, J.A.; Whitman, P.K.

    1976-01-01

    Computer simulation of the three-dimensional temperature history in a multipass filled weldment was attempted by modifying a transient heat transfer code, HEATING5. The model includes temperature-dependent physical parameters, radiation and convection heat losses, turbulent and laminar convection in the molten pool, and variable arc velocity, intensity, and weld geometry. The model requires approximately 28 CPU min to simulate one second of welding. 15 figures, 8 tables

  13. TIG Dressing Effects on Weld Pores and Pore Cracking of Titanium Weldments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Jun Yi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Weld pores redistribution, the effectiveness of using tungsten inert gas (TIG dressing to remove weld pores, and changes in the mechanical properties due to the TIG dressing of Ti-3Al-2.5V weldments were studied. Moreover, weld cracks due to pores were investigated. The results show that weld pores less than 300 μm in size are redistributed or removed via remelting due to TIG dressing. Regardless of the temperature condition, TIG dressing welding showed ductility, and there was a loss of 7% tensile strength of the weldments. Additionally, it was considered that porosity redistribution by TIG dressing was due to fluid flow during the remelting of the weld pool. Weld cracks in titanium weldment create branch cracks around pores that propagate via the intragranular fracture, and oxygen is dispersed around the pores. It is suggested that the pore locations around the LBZ (local brittle zone and stress concentration due to the pores have significant effects on crack initiation and propagation.

  14. Effect of welding parameters on pitting behavior of GTAW of DSS and super DSS weldments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhu Paulraj

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This work focuses on the effect of welding parameters on corrosion behavior of welded duplex stainless steel (DSS and super duplex stainless steel (SDSS. The effect of welding parameters, such as heat input, inter-pass temperature, cooling rate, shielding/back purging gas, on corrosion behavior was studied. DSS and SDSS pipes were welded with Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW process. After welding, the test samples were non-destructively tested to ensure no defects and test samples were prepared for microstructural examinations and ferrite content measurements. The root region had complex microstructure because of the repetitive heating of the zone during different weld layers. It was observed that at low heat input desirable microstructure was formed. The test samples were subjected to corrosion tests, i.e. ASTM G48 test for the determination of pitting corrosion rate, potentiodynamic polarization tests, and potentiostatic tests to verify susceptibility of the alloys to corrosion attack. DSS weldments had CPT in between 23 °C to 27 °C and SDSS weldments had CPT between 37 °C to 41 °C in potentiostatic measurements. The corrosion test results were correlated to the microstructures of the weldments. The pitting resistance of individual phases was studied and the effect of secondary austenite on corrosion attack was also observed.

  15. Evaluation of mechanical properties of weldments for reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakata, T. [Muroran Institute of Technology, Dept. of Materials Science and Engineeering, Muroran, Hokkaido (Japan); Tanigawa, H.; Ando, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naga-gun, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Komazaki, S.; Kohno, Y. [Muroran Institute of Technology, Muroran (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels are the first candidate material for fusion reactor, and will be used as the structural materials of ITER test blanket modules (TBM). TBM will be assembled by welding various parts, it is important to be clearly mechanical properties of weldments to qualify TBM structure. In this paper, unirradiated mechanical properties of weldments, which is consisted of weld metal, heat affected zone (HAZ) and base metal region, obtained from TIG and EB welded F82H IEA-heat were evaluated by tensile, Charpy impact and creep test. Charpy impact test revealed that impact properties of weld metal does not deteriorate compared with that of base metal. The creep tests were carried out at temperatures of 773-873 K and at stress levels of 130-280 MPa, with the specimens which include weld metal and HAZ region in the gage section. In these conditions, rupture time of weldments yield to about 100-1000 hours. In the high-stress range, creep lives of welded joint decreased about 40% of base metal. However, in the low-stress range, creep lives of welded joint decrease about 60 to 70% of base metal. The failure at fine grain HAZ region (Type IV failure) does not occur in these conditions. The mechanism of these properties deterioration will be discussed based on the detailed analyses on microstructure changes. (authors)

  16. Microstructure and mechanical properties of aluminum 5083 weldments by gas tungsten arc and gas metal arc welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Yao [State Key Laboratory of Nonlinear Mechanics, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Wang Wenjing [School of Mechanical, Electronic and Control Engineering, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Xie Jijia [State Key Laboratory of Nonlinear Mechanics, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Sun Shouguang [School of Mechanical, Electronic and Control Engineering, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Wang Liang [College of Metallurgy and Material Engineering, Chongqing University of Science and Technology, Chongqing 401331 (China); Qian Ye; Meng Yuan [State Key Laboratory of Nonlinear Mechanics, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Wei Yujie, E-mail: yujie_wei@lnm.imech.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Nonlinear Mechanics, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2012-07-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Welding zones by GTAW and GMAW are softer than the parent material Al5083. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GTAW for Al5083 are mechanically more reliable than that welded by GMAW. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GTAW welds fail by shear, but GMAW welds show mixed shear and normal failure. - Abstract: The mechanical properties and microstructural features of aluminum 5083 (Al5083) weldments processed by gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and gas metal arc welding (GMAW) are investigated. Weldments processed by both methods are mechanically softer than the parent material Al5083, and could be potential sites for plastic localization. It is revealed that Al5083 weldments processed by GTAW are mechanical more reliable than those by GMAW. The former bears higher strength, more ductility, and no apparent microstructure defects. Perceivable porosity in weldments by GMAW is found, which could account for the distinct mechanical properties between weldments processed by GTAW and GMAW. It is suggested that caution should be exercised when using GMAW for Al5083 in the high-speed-train industry where such light weight metal is broadly used.

  17. Microstructure and mechanical properties of aluminum 5083 weldments by gas tungsten arc and gas metal arc welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yao; Wang Wenjing; Xie Jijia; Sun Shouguang; Wang Liang; Qian Ye; Meng Yuan; Wei Yujie

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Welding zones by GTAW and GMAW are softer than the parent material Al5083. ► GTAW for Al5083 are mechanically more reliable than that welded by GMAW. ► GTAW welds fail by shear, but GMAW welds show mixed shear and normal failure. - Abstract: The mechanical properties and microstructural features of aluminum 5083 (Al5083) weldments processed by gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and gas metal arc welding (GMAW) are investigated. Weldments processed by both methods are mechanically softer than the parent material Al5083, and could be potential sites for plastic localization. It is revealed that Al5083 weldments processed by GTAW are mechanical more reliable than those by GMAW. The former bears higher strength, more ductility, and no apparent microstructure defects. Perceivable porosity in weldments by GMAW is found, which could account for the distinct mechanical properties between weldments processed by GTAW and GMAW. It is suggested that caution should be exercised when using GMAW for Al5083 in the high-speed-train industry where such light weight metal is broadly used.

  18. Mechanical properties of 9Cr–1W reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel weldment prepared by electron beam welding process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, C.R., E-mail: chitta@igcar.gov.in [Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Albert, S.K. [Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Sam, Shiju [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar (India); Mastanaiah, P. [Defense Research and Development Laboratory, Hyderabad (India); Chaitanya, G.M.S.K.; Bhaduri, A.K.; Jayakumar, T. [Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Murthy, C.V.S. [Defense Research and Development Laboratory, Hyderabad (India); Kumar, E. Rajendra [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar (India)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Width of HAZ is smaller in the 9Cr–1W RAFM weldment prepared by EB process compared to that reported for TIG weldments in literature. • Weld joint is stronger than that of the base metal. • Toughness of weld metal prepared by EB welding process is comparable to that (in PWHT condition) prepared by TIG process. • DBTT of as-welded 9Cr–1W RAFM weldment prepared by EB process is comparable to that reported for TIG weld metal in PWHT condition. - Abstract: Microstructure and mechanical properties of the weldments prepared from 9Cr–1W reduced activation ferritic martensitic (RAFM) steel using electron beam welding (EBW) process were studied. Microstructure consists of tempered lath martensite where precipitates decorating the boundaries in post weld heat treated (PWHT) condition. Lath and precipitate sizes were found to be finer in the weld metal than in base metal. Accordingly, hardness of the weld metal was found to be higher than the base metal. Tensile strength of the cross weldment specimen was 684 MPa, which was comparable with the base metal tensile strength of 670 MPa. On the other hand, DBTT of 9Cr–1W weld metal in as-welded condition is similar to that reported for TIG weld metal in PWHT condition.

  19. Mechanical properties of 9Cr–1W reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel weldment prepared by electron beam welding process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, C.R.; Albert, S.K.; Sam, Shiju; Mastanaiah, P.; Chaitanya, G.M.S.K.; Bhaduri, A.K.; Jayakumar, T.; Murthy, C.V.S.; Kumar, E. Rajendra

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Width of HAZ is smaller in the 9Cr–1W RAFM weldment prepared by EB process compared to that reported for TIG weldments in literature. • Weld joint is stronger than that of the base metal. • Toughness of weld metal prepared by EB welding process is comparable to that (in PWHT condition) prepared by TIG process. • DBTT of as-welded 9Cr–1W RAFM weldment prepared by EB process is comparable to that reported for TIG weld metal in PWHT condition. - Abstract: Microstructure and mechanical properties of the weldments prepared from 9Cr–1W reduced activation ferritic martensitic (RAFM) steel using electron beam welding (EBW) process were studied. Microstructure consists of tempered lath martensite where precipitates decorating the boundaries in post weld heat treated (PWHT) condition. Lath and precipitate sizes were found to be finer in the weld metal than in base metal. Accordingly, hardness of the weld metal was found to be higher than the base metal. Tensile strength of the cross weldment specimen was 684 MPa, which was comparable with the base metal tensile strength of 670 MPa. On the other hand, DBTT of 9Cr–1W weld metal in as-welded condition is similar to that reported for TIG weld metal in PWHT condition

  20. Effect of heat treatment on the elevated temperature tensile and fracture toughness behavior of Alloy 718 weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, W.J.

    1980-05-01

    The effect of heat treatment on the tensile and fracture toughness properties of Alloy 718 weldments was characterized at room temperature and elevated temperatures. The two heat treatments employed during this investigation were the convectional (ASTM A637) precipitation treatment and a modified treatment designed to improve the toughness of Alloy 718 welds. Weldments were also examined in the as-welded condition. The fracture toughness behavior of the Alloy 718 weldments was determined at 24, 427 and 538 degree C using both linear-elastic (K Ic ) and elastic-plastic (J Ic ) fracture mechanics concepts. Metallographic and electron fractographic examination of Alloy 718 weld fracture surfaces revealed that differences in fracture toughness behavior for the as-welded, conventional and modified conditions were associated with variations in the weld microstructure. 28 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs

  1. Corrosion characterisation of laser beam and tungsten inert gas weldment of nickel base alloys: Micro-cell technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abraham, Geogy J.; Kain, V.; Dey, G.K.; Raja, V.S.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Grain matrix showed better corrosion resistance than grain boundary. • Microcell studies showed distinct corrosion behaviour of individual regions of weldment. • TIG welding resulted in increased stable anodic current density on weld fusion zone. • LB welding resulted in high stable anodic current density for heat affected zone. - Abstract: The electrochemical studies using micro-cell technique gave new understanding of electrochemical behaviour of nickel base alloys in solution annealed and welded conditions. The welding simulated regions depicted varied micro structural features. In case of tungsten inert gas (TIG) weldments, the weld fusion zone (WFZ) showed least corrosion resistance among all other regions. For laser beam (LB) weldments it was the heat-affected zone (HAZ) that showed comparatively high stable anodic current density. The high heat input of TIG welding resulted in slower heat dissipation hence increased carbide precipitation and segregation in WFZ resulting in high stable anodic current density

  2. Corrosion of carbon and low-alloy steel weldments in brines: A literature review: Salt Repository Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reimus, P.W.

    1988-07-01

    The literature indicates that corrosion of carbon and low-alloy steel weldments in brines should not be a major concern if the weld is properly designed and fabricated. Seven characteristics of a weld can affect the corrosion performance of the weldment including composition of the weld metal (with respect to that of the parent metal); microstructure of the weld metal, heat-affected zone (HAZ), and parent metal; size and number of defects (cracks and pores) in the weld metal and HAZ (both internal and external); size, shape composition, location, and number of nonmetallic inclusions in the weld metal and HAZ; residual stress distribution in the weld; hydrogen content of the weld; and geometry of the weld at the outer surface. The effects of these characteristics on weldment corrosion are discussed in the report. 104 refs., 14 figs

  3. Influence of heat treatment on the microstructure and mechanical properties of Alloy 718 base metal and weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, W.J.

    1979-06-01

    Effect of heat treatment on the metallurgical structure and tensile properties of three heats of Alloy 718 base metal and an Alloy 718 GTA weldment were characterized. Heat treatments employed were the conventional (ASTM A637) precipitation treatment and a modified precipitation treatment designed to improve the toughness of the weldments. The GTA weldments were characterized in the as-welded condition. Light microscopy, thin foil, and surface replica electron microscopy revealed that the microstructure of this superalloy was sensitive to heat treatment and heat-to-heat variations. The modified aging treatment resulted in a larger grain size and a more homogeneous microstructure than the conventional treatments. The morphology of the primary strengthening γ phase was found to be finer and more closely spaced in the conventionally treated condition. Room and elevated temperature tensile testing revealed that the strength of the conventionally treated alloy was generally superior to that of the modified material. The conventional aging treatment resulted in greater heat-to-heat variations in tensile properties. This behavior was correlated with variations in the microstructure resulting from the precipitation heat treatments. The precipitate morphology of the GTA weldments was sensitive to heat treatment. The Laves phase was present in the interdendritic regions of both heat-treated welds. The modified aging treatment reduced the amount of Laves phase present in the weld zone. Room and elevated temperature tensile properties of the precipitation hardened weldments were relatively insensitive to heat treatment, suggesting that reduction in Laves phase from the weld zone had essentially no effect on tensile properties. As-welded GTA weldments exhibited lower strength levels and higher ductility values than heat-treated welds

  4. The measurement of internal stress fields in weldments and around cracks using high resolution neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, A.J.; Hutchings, M.T.; Windsor, C.G.

    1987-01-01

    The paper describes and illustrates the capability of neutron diffraction to measure the complete internal lattice macrostrain field, and hence the stress field, within steel components and weldments arising from their fabrication. A brief outline is given of the theory of the neutron method. The experimental considerations are discussed. The method is illustrated by its application to the measurement of the stress distribution in a:- uniaxially stressed mild steel rod, a double - V test weld, a tube-plate weld, and a cracked fatigue test specimen. (U.K.)

  5. The role of silicon in the corrosion of AA6061 aluminium alloy laser weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, A.B.M. Mujibur; Kumar, Sunil [Ian Wark Research Institute, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes Campus, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095 (Australia); Gerson, Andrea R. [Applied Centre for Structural and Synchrotron Studies, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes Campus, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095 (Australia)], E-mail: Andrea.Gerson@unisa.edu.au

    2010-06-15

    The galvanic corrosion temporal increase observed on examination of the weld fusion zone (WFZ) of AA6061 laser weldments in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution cannot be attributed to electron tunnelling as the surface oxide layer is too thick, or the presence of Cl{sup -} within the surface layer as this element was not found to be present. Aluminium alloy and WFZ galvanic and surface analyses indicate that the cathodic WFZ corrosion characteristics are due to increases in silicate concentrations in the surface oxide layer, leading to increased ionic and/or p-type semi-conductor conductivity, intermetallic concentrations and surface area.

  6. The role of silicon in the corrosion of AA6061 aluminium alloy laser weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, A.B.M. Mujibur; Kumar, Sunil; Gerson, Andrea R.

    2010-01-01

    The galvanic corrosion temporal increase observed on examination of the weld fusion zone (WFZ) of AA6061 laser weldments in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution cannot be attributed to electron tunnelling as the surface oxide layer is too thick, or the presence of Cl - within the surface layer as this element was not found to be present. Aluminium alloy and WFZ galvanic and surface analyses indicate that the cathodic WFZ corrosion characteristics are due to increases in silicate concentrations in the surface oxide layer, leading to increased ionic and/or p-type semi-conductor conductivity, intermetallic concentrations and surface area.

  7. Investigation of surface residual stress profile on martensitic stainless steel weldment with X-ray diffraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.I. Ahmed

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The development of residual stresses during fabrication is inevitable and often neglected with dire consequences during the service life of the fabricated components. In this work, the surface residual stress profile following the martensitic stainless steel (MSS pipe welding was investigated with X-ray diffraction technique. The results revealed the presence of residual stresses equilibrated across the weldment zones. Tensile residual stress observed in weld metal was balanced by compressive residual stresses in the parent material on the opposing sides of weld metal. Keywords: Residual stress, Weld, Stainless steel, X-ray, HAZ

  8. Modeling of residual stress mitigation in austenitic stainless steel pipe girth weldment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, M.; Atteridge, D.G.; Anderson, W.E.; West, S.L.

    1994-01-01

    This study provides numerical procedures to model 40-cm-diameter, schedule 40, Type 304L stainless steel pipe girth welding and a newly proposed post-weld treatment. The treatment can be used to accomplish the goal of imparting compressive residual stresses at the inner surface of a pipe girth weldment to prevent/retard the intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of the piping system in nuclear reactors. This new post-weld treatment for mitigating residual stresses is cooling stress improvement (CSI). The concept of CSI is to establish and maintain a certain temperature gradient across the pipe wall thickness to change the final stress state. Thus, this process involves sub-zero low temperature cooling of the inner pipe surface of a completed girth weldment, while simultaneously keeping the outer pipe surface at a slightly elevated temperature with the help of a certain heating method. Analyses to obtain quantitative results on pipe girth welding and CSI by using a thermo-elastic-plastic finite element model are described in this paper. Results demonstrate the potential effectiveness of CSI for introducing compressive residual stresses to prevent/retard IGSCC. Because of the symmetric nature of CSI, it shows great potential for industrial application

  9. Reduction factors for creep strength and fatigue life of modified 9 Cr-1 Mo steel weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blass, J.J.; Battiste, R.L.; O'Connor, D.G.

    1991-01-01

    The provisions of ASME B ampersand PV Code Case N-47 currently include reduction factors for creep strength and fatigue life of weldments. To provide experimental confirmation of such factors for modified 9 Cr-1 Mo steel, tests of tubular specimens were conducted at 538 degree C (1000 degree F). Three creep-rupture specimens with longitudinal welds were tested in tension; and, of three with circumferential welds, two were tested in tension and one in torsion. In each specimen with a circumferential weld, a nonuniform axial distribution of strain was easily visible. The test results were compared to an existing empirical model of creep-rupture life. For the torsion test, the comparison was based on a definition of equivalent normal stress recently adopted in Code Case N-47. Some 27 fatigue specimens, with longitudinal, circumferential, or no welds, were tested under axial or torsional strain control. In specimens with welds, fatigue cracking initiated at fusion lines. In axial tests cracks grew in the circumferential direction, and in torsional tests cracks grew along fusion lines. The test results were compared to empirical models of fatigue life based on two definition of equivalent normal strain range. The results have provided some needed confirmation of the reduction factors for creep strength and fatigue life of modified 9 Cr-1 Mo steel weldments currently under consideration by ASME Code committees. 8 refs., 5 figs

  10. Development of an intelligent system for ultrasonic flaw classification in weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Sung-Jin; Kim, Hak-Joon; Cho, Hyeon

    2002-01-01

    Even though ultrasonic pattern recognition is considered as the most effective and promising approach to flaw classification in weldments, its application to the realistic field inspection is still very limited due to the crucial barriers in cost, time and reliability. To reduce such barriers, previously we have proposed an intelligent system approach that consisted of the following four ingredients: (1) a PC-based ultrasonic testing (PC-UT) system; (2) an effective invariant ultrasonic flaw classification algorithm; (3) an intelligent flaw classification software; and (4) a database with abundant experimental flaw signals. In the present work, for performing the ultrasonic flaw classification in weldments in a real-time fashion in many real word situations, we develop an intelligent system, which is called the 'Intelligent Ultrasonic Evaluation System (IUES)' by the integration of the above four ingredients into a single, unified system. In addition, for the improvement of classification accuracy of flaws, especially slag inclusions, we expand the feature set by adding new informative features, and demonstrate the enhanced performance of the IUES with flaw signals in the database constructed previously. And then, to take care of the increased redundancy in the feature set due to the addition of features, we also propose two efficient schemes for feature selection: the forward selection with trial and error, and the forward selection with criteria of the error probability and the linear correlation coefficients of individual features

  11. The relationship between microstructure and mechanical properties of ferritic chromium steel weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayr, Peter; Cerjak, Horst [Graz Univ. of Technology (Austria); Toda, Yoshiaki; Hara, Toru; Abe, Fujio [National Institute for Materials Science (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    Welding as the major joining and repair technology for steels in thermal power plants has a significant influence on the steels microstructure and, therefore, on its properties. Heat-resistant martensitic 9-12% chromium steels show an affinity to the retention of delta ferrite in the heat-affected zone of their weldments. This is related to their high level of ferrite stabilizing alloying elements such as Cr, W or Mo. Retained delta ferrite in martensitic steel grades has a significant negative influence on creep strength, fatigue strength, toughness and oxidation resistance. In the long-term range of creep exposure, many weldments of martensitic heatresistant steels fail by Type IV cracking in the fine-grained region of the heat-affected zone. In this work, the formation of the heat-affected zone microstructures in martensitic chromium steels is studied by in-situ X-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation, optical microscopy as well as most advanced electron microscopical methods. The observed microstructure is directly linked to the mechanical properties, i.e. ductility, toughness and creep strength. Characteristic failure modes are discussed in detail. (orig.)

  12. Hydrogen assisted stress-cracking behaviour of electron beam welded supermartensitic stainless steel weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bala Srinivasan, P.; Sharkawy, S.W.; Dietzel, W.

    2004-01-01

    Supermartensitic stainless steel (SMSS) grades are gaining popularity as an alternate material to duplex and super duplex stainless steels for applications in oil and gas industries. The weldability of these steels, though reported to be better when compared to conventional martensitic stainless steels, so far has been addressed with duplex stainless steel electrodes/fillers. This work addresses the stress-cracking behaviour of weldments of a high-grade supermartensitic stainless steel (11% Cr, 6.5% Ni and 2% Mo) in the presence of hydrogen. Welds were produced with matching consumables, using electron beam welding (EBW) process. Weldments were subjected to slow strain rate tests in 0.1 M NaOH solution, with introduction of hydrogen into the specimens by means of potentiostatic cathodic polarisation at a potential of -1200 mV versus Ag/AgCl electrode. Reference tests were performed in air for comparison, and the results suggest that both the SMSS base material and the EB weld metal are susceptible to embrittlement under the conditions of hydrogen charging

  13. Cyclic Deformation and Fatigue Behaviors of Alloy 617 Base Metal and Weldments at 900℃ for VHTR Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seon Jin; Kim, Byung Tak; Dewa, Rando T.; Hwang, Jeong Jun; Kim, Tae Su [Pukyong National Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Woo Gon; Kim, Eung Seon [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    An analysis of cyclic deformation can contribute to a deeper understanding of the fatigue fracture mechanisms as well as to improvements in the design and application of VHTR system. However, the studies associated with cyclic deformation and low cycle fatigue (LCF) properties of Alloy 617 have focused mainly on the base metal, with little attention given to the weldments. Totemeier studied on high-temperature creep-fatigue of Alloy 617 base metal and weldments. Current research activities at PKNU and KAERI focus on the study of cyclic deformation and LCF behaviors of Alloy 617 base metal (BM) and weldments (WM) specimens were machined from GTAW buttwelded plates at very high-temperature of 900℃. In this work, the cyclic deformation characteristics and fatigue behaviors of Alloy 617 BM and WM are studied and discussed with respect to LCF. In this paper, cyclic deformation and low cycle fatigue behaviors of Alloy 617 base metal and weldments was evaluated using strain-controlled LCF tests at 900℃for 0.6% total strain range. Results of the current experiments can be concluded; The WM specimen has shown a higher cyclic stress response than the BM specimen. The fatigue life of WM specimen was reduced relative to that of BM specimen.

  14. Method for evaluationo of the 3D residual stress field from X-ray diffraction measurements on heavy weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, L.E.; Sandstroem, R.

    1982-03-01

    A method for evaluation of the three dimensional residual 30 stress distribution in heavy weldmwents has been developed. The evaluation is based on measured stress data at a number of depth levels below the plate surface. The method has been applied to two measurements on heavy weldments of A 553 B steel. Comparison to a previous evaluation shows good agreement. (Authors)

  15. Characterizing and improving the toughness of thick-sectioned 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo electroslag weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, G.R.; Frost, R.H.

    1980-09-01

    Efforts to improve the toughness of electroslag weldments consisted of four endeavors: process control, changes caused in 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel by electroslag welding and post-weld heat treatment, electrochemical reactions during the electroslag welding, and toughness testing.

  16. Formation of microcracks during stress-relief annealing of a weldment in pressure vessel steel of type A508 C1 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liljestrand, L.-G.; Oestberg, G.; Lindhagen, P.

    1978-01-01

    Crack formation in the heat-affected zones of heavy section weldments of type A 508 C1 2 pressure vessel steel during stress-relief annealing has been studied on an actual weldment and on simulated structures. Mechanical testing of the latter showed that stress relaxation of the order of magnitude occuring during stress-relief annealing can produce cracks of the same kind as occasionally found in weldments of pressure vessel steel. The primary cause is believed to be grain boundary sliding, possibly but not necessarily enhanced by impurities. (Auth.)

  17. A strategy for accommodating residual stresses in the assessment of repair weldments based upon measurement of near surface stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mcdonald, E.J.; Hallam, K.R.; Flewitt, P.E.J.

    2005-01-01

    On many occasions repairs are undertaken to ferritic steel weldments on plant either during construction or to remove service induced defects. These repaired weldments are subsequently put into service with or without a post-weld heat treatment. In either case, but particularly for the latter, there is a need to accommodate the associated residual stresses in structural integrity assessments such as those based upon the R6 failure avoidance procedure. Although in some circumstances the residual macro-stresses developed within weldments of components and structures can be calculated this is not so readily achieved in the case of residual stresses introduced by repair welds. There is a range of physical and mechanical techniques available to undertake the measurement of macro-residual stresses. Of these X-ray diffraction has the advantage that it is essentially non-destructive and offers the potential for evaluating stresses, which exist in the near surface layer. Although for many structural integrity assessments both the magnitude and distribution of residual stresses have to be accommodated it is not practical to make destructive measurements on weld repaired components and structures to establish the through section distribution of stresses. An approach is to derive a description of the appropriate macro-stresses by a combination of measurement and calculation on trial ferritic steel repair weldments. Surface measurements on the plant can then be made to establish the relationship between the repaired component or structure and the trial weld and thereby improve confidence in predicted stresses and their distribution from the near-surface measured values. Hence X-ray diffraction measurements at the near-surface of the plant weldment can be used to underwrite the quality of the repair by confirming the magnitude and distribution of residual stresses used for the integrity assessment to demonstrate continued safe operation

  18. Comparison of neutron and synchrotron diffraction measurements of residual stress in bead-on-plate weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paradowska, A.M.; Price, J.W.; Finlayson, T.R.; Lienert, U.; Ibrahim, R.

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the use of neutron and synchrotron diffractions for the evaluation of residual stresses in welded components. It has been shown that it is possible to achieve very good agreement between the two independent diffraction techniques. This study shows the significance of the weld start and end sites on the residual strain/stress distribution. Quantitative evaluation of the residual stress development process for multibead weldments has been presented. Some measurements were also taken before and after postweld stress relieving to establish the reduction and redistribution of the residual stress. The detailed measurements of residual stress around the weld achieved in this work significantly improve the knowledge and understanding of residual stress in welded components.

  19. Predicting the creep life and failure mode of low-alloy steel weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brear, J.M.; Middleton, C.J.; Aplin, P.F. [ERA Technology Ltd., Leatherhead (United Kingdom)

    1998-12-31

    This presentation reviews and consolidates experience gained through a number of research projects and practical plant assessments in predicting both the life and the likely failure mode and location in low alloy steel weldments. The approach adopted begins with the recognition that the relative strength difference between the microstructural regions is a key factor controlling both life and failure location. Practical methods based on hardness measurement and adaptable to differing weld geometries are presented and evidence for correlations between hardness ratio, damage accumulation and strain development is discussed. Predictor diagrams relating weld life and failure location to the service conditions and the hardness of the individual microstructural constituents are suggested and comments are given on the implications for identifying the circumstances in which Type IV cracking is to be expected. (orig.) 6 refs.

  20. Optimization and Prediction of Angular Distortion and Weldment Characteristics of TIG Square Butt Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, H. K.; Mahapatra, M. M.; Jha, P. K.; Biswas, P.

    2014-05-01

    Autogenous arc welds with minimum upper weld bead depression and lower weld bead bulging are desired as such welds do not require a second welding pass for filling up the upper bead depressions (UBDs) and characterized with minimum angular distortion. The present paper describes optimization and prediction of angular distortion and weldment characteristics such as upper weld bead depression and lower weld bead bulging of TIG-welded structural steel square butt joints. Full factorial design of experiment was utilized for selecting the combinations of welding process parameter to produce the square butts. A mathematical model was developed to establish the relationship between TIG welding process parameters and responses such as upper bead width, lower bead width, UBD, lower bead height (bulging), weld cross-sectional area, and angular distortions. The optimal welding condition to minimize UBD and lower bead bulging of the TIG butt joints was identified.

  1. Effects of thermal aging on the mechanical behavior of F82H weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alamo, A.; Castaing, A.; Fontes, A.; Wident, P.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this work is to characterize the mechanical behavior of F82H weldments, which were produced by tungsten inert gas (TIG) and electron beam (EB) processes. Tensile and impact properties were determined for both types of welds in the as-received condition and after thermal aging for 10 000 h at 400 deg. C and 550 deg. C. The mechanical properties of TIG welds and their evolution during aging is quite similar in the base metal (BM). The main difference was given by the impact energy level (upper shelf energy (USE)) of TIG joints, which is about 60% of the BM. EB welds were delivered without post-weld heat treatment. Very scattered results were obtained, particularly for impact properties

  2. Predicting the creep life and failure mode of low-alloy steel weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brear, J M; Middleton, C J; Aplin, P F [ERA Technology Ltd., Leatherhead (United Kingdom)

    1999-12-31

    This presentation reviews and consolidates experience gained through a number of research projects and practical plant assessments in predicting both the life and the likely failure mode and location in low alloy steel weldments. The approach adopted begins with the recognition that the relative strength difference between the microstructural regions is a key factor controlling both life and failure location. Practical methods based on hardness measurement and adaptable to differing weld geometries are presented and evidence for correlations between hardness ratio, damage accumulation and strain development is discussed. Predictor diagrams relating weld life and failure location to the service conditions and the hardness of the individual microstructural constituents are suggested and comments are given on the implications for identifying the circumstances in which Type IV cracking is to be expected. (orig.) 6 refs.

  3. Elevated temperature creep and fatigue damage of a 2.25 Cr--1 Mo steel weldment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Den Avyle, J.A.

    1978-01-01

    In weldments between dissimilar metals wide variations occur in metallurgical structure and mechanical properties, so that for good structural design it is necessary to understand the mechanical response of individual microstructural segments of the weld. This study investigates elevated temperature properties of a 2.25 Cr--1 Mo ferritic steel base metal welded with Chromenar 382V (Inconel 82) filler metal. Creep and low-cycle fatigue tests at 866 0 K (1100 0 F) show the filler metal and heat affected zone to be much stronger than the base metal. Optical microscopy does not show significant aging effects in the short-term fatigue tests or creep tests of 1180 hour duration

  4. Case histories of microbiologically influenced corrosion of austenitic stainless steel weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borenstein, S.W.; Buchanan, R.A.; Dowling, N.J.E.

    1990-01-01

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) is initiated or accelerated by microorganisms and is currently recognized as a serious problem affecting the construction and operation of many industrial facilities, including nuclear power plants. The purpose of this paper is to review how biofouling and MIC can occur and discuss current mechanistic theories. A case history of MIC attack in power plants is examined with emphasis on the role of welding and heat treatment variables using laboratory electrochemical analyses. Although MIC can occur on a variety of alloys, pitting corrosion failures of austenitic stainless steels are often associated with weldments. MIC occurs as the result of a consortium of microorganisms colonizing on the metal surface and their variety (fungi, bacteria, algae, mold, and slimes) enables them to form support systems for cross feeding to enhance survival. The metabolic processes influence corrosion behaviour of materials by destroying protective coatings, producing a localized acid environment, creating corrosive deposits, or altering anodic and cathodic reactions. On stainless steels, biofilms destroy the passive oxide film on the surface of the steels and subject them to localized forms of corrosion. Many of the MIC failures in industry result in pitting to austenitic stainless steel weldments. Pitting primarily occurs in the weld metal, heat affected zones, and adjacent to the weld in the base metal. Depending on the conditions of the concentration cell created by the biofilm, either phase of the two-phase duplex stainless steel, austenite or delta ferrite, may be selectively attacked. Theories have been proposed about the mechanism of MIC on austenitic stainless steel and and a general understanding is that some function associated with the biofilm formation directly affects the electrochemical process

  5. A comparative study of creep rupture behaviour of modified 316L(N) base metal and 316L(N)/16-8-2 weldment in air and liquid sodium environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, M.P.; Mathew, M.D.; Mannan, S.L.; Rodriguez, P.; Borgstedt, H.U.

    1997-01-01

    Creep rupture behaviour of modified type 316L(N) stainless steel base metal and weldments prepared with 16-8-2 filler wire has been investigated in air and flowing sodium environments at 823 K. No adverse environmental effects have been noticed due to sodium on the creep rupture behaviour of these weldments for tests up to 10 000 h. Rupture lives of the weldment were higher in the sodium environment than those in air. Rupture lives of the weldments were found to be lower than those of the base metal by a factor of two to five in both air and sodium environments. Minimum creep rates were essentially the same for the weldment as well as for the base metal in both the environments, whereas rupture strain was usually lower for the weldment than that of the base metal. The reduction in area of the weldment specimens increased with increase in stress. Failures in the specimens of weldments were in the weld metal region. Microstructural studies carried out on failed weldment specimens after the creep rupture tests revealed extensive cavitation in the weld metal region in air tested specimens predominantly at the austerite/δ-ferrite interphase. However, no cavitation was observed in specimens tested in sodium. (author)

  6. Evaluation of weldments in Type 21-6-9 stainless steel for Compact Ignition Tokamak structural applications: Phase 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, D.J.; Goodwin, G.M.; Bloom, E.E.

    1991-06-01

    Primary design considerations for the Compact Ignition Tokamak toroidal field-coil cases are yield strength and toughness in the temperature range from 77 to 300 K. Type 21-6-9 stainless steel, also still known by its original Armco Steel Company trade name Nitronic 40, is the proposed alloy for this application. It has high yield strength and usually adequate base metal toughness, but weldments in thick sections have not been adequately characterized in terms of mechanical properties or hot-cracking propensity. In this study, weldability of the alloy in heavy sections and the mechanical properties of the resultant welds were investigated including tensile yield strength and Charpy V-notch toughness at 77 K and room temperature. Weldments were made in four different base metals using seven different filler metals. None of the weldments showed any indication of hot-cracking problems. All base metals, including weldment heat-affected zones, were found to have adequate strength and impact toughness at both test temperatures. Weld metals, on the other hand, except ERNiCr-3 and ENiCrFe-3 had impact toughnesses of less than 67 J at 77 K. Inconel 82 had an average weld metal impact toughness of over 135 J at 77 K, and although its strength at 77 K is less than that of type 21-6-9 base metal, at this point it is considered to be the first-choice filler metal. Phase 2 of this program will concentrate on composition refinement and process/procedure optimization for the generic ERNiCr-3 composition and will generate a design data base for base and weld metal, including tensile, fracture toughness, and crack growth rate data

  7. Experimental assessments of notch ductility and tensile strength of stainless steel weldments after 1200C neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawthorne, J.R.; Menke, B.H.; Awadalla, N.G.; O'Kula, K.R.

    1986-01-01

    The Charpy-V (C/sub v/) properties of AISI 300 series stainless steel plate, weld, and weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) materials from commercial production weldments in 406-mm-diameter pipe (12.7-mm wall) were investigated in unirradiated and irradiated conditions. Weld and HAZ tensile properties were also assessed in the two conditions. The plates and weld filler wires represent different steel melts; the welds were produced using the multipass MIG process. Weldment properties in two test orientations were evaluated. Specimens were irradiated in the UBR reactor to 1 x 10 20 n/cm 2 , E >0.1 MeV in a controlled temperature assembly. Specimen tests were performed at 25 0 C and 125 0 C. The radiation-induced reductions in C/sub v/ energy absorption at 25 0 C were about 42 percent for the weld and HAZ materials evaluated. A trend of energy increase with temperature was observed. The concomitant elevation in yield strength was about 53%. In contrast, the increase in tensile strength was only 16%. The postirradiation yield strength of the axial test orientation in the pipe was less than that of the circumferential test orientation. Results for the HAZ indicate that this component may be the weakest link in the weldment from a fracture resistant viewpoint

  8. Effects of the Crack Tip Constraint on the Fracture Assessment of an Al 5083-O Weldment for Low Temperature Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Hyun Moon

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The constraint effect is the key issue in structural integrity assessments based on two parameter fracture mechanics (TPFM to make a precise prediction of the load-bearing capacity of cracked structural components. In this study, a constraint-based failure assessment diagram (FAD was used to assess the fracture behavior of an Al 5083-O weldment with various flaws at cryogenic temperature. The results were compared with those of BS 7910 Option 1 FAD, in terms of the maximum allowable stress. A series of fracture toughness tests were conducted with compact tension (CT specimens at room and cryogenic temperatures. The Q parameter for the Al 5083-O weldment was evaluated to quantify the constraint level, which is the difference between the actual stress, and the Hutchinson-Rice-Rosengren (HRR stress field near the crack tip. Nonlinear 3D finite element analysis was carried out to calculate the Q parameter at cryogenic temperature. Based on the experimental and numerical results, the influence of the constraint level correction on the allowable applied stress was investigated using a FAD methodology. The results showed that the constraint-based FAD procedure is essential to avoid an overly conservative allowable stress prediction in an Al 5083-O weldment with flaws.

  9. Fatigue crack growth behavior of pressure vessel steels and submerged arc weldments in a high-temperature pressurized water environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liaw, P.K.; Logsdon, W.A.; Begley, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    The fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR) properties of SA508 Cl 2a and SA533 Gr A Cl 2 pressure vessel steels and the corresponding automatic submerged arc weldments were developed in a high-temperature pressurized water (HPW) environment at 288 degrees C (550 degrees F) and 7.2 MPa (1044 psi) at load ratios of 0.20 and 0.50. The properties were generally conservative compared to American Society of Mechanical Engineers Section XI water environment reference curve. The growth rate of fatigue cracks in the base materials, however, was faster in the HPW environment than in a 288 degrees C (550 degrees F) base line air environment. The growth rate of fatigue cracks in the two submerged arc weldments was also accelerated in the HPW environment but to a lesser degree than that demonstrated by the base materials. In the air environment, fatigue striations were observed, independent of material and load ratio, while in the HPW environment, some intergranular facets were present. The greater environmental effect on crack growth rates displayed by the base materials compared the weldments attributed to a different sulfide composition and morphology

  10. Experimental assessments of notch ductility and tensile strength of stainless steel weldments after 1200C neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawthorne, J.R.; Menke, B.H.; Awadalla, N.G.; O'Kula, K.R.

    1987-01-01

    The Charpy-V (C/sub V/) properties of American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI) 300 series stainless steel plate, weld, and weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) materials from commercial production weldments in 406-mm-diameter pipe (12.7-mm wall) were investigated in unirradiated and irradiated conditions. Weld and HAZ tensile properties were also assessed in the two conditions. The plates and weld filler wires represent different steel melts; the welds were produced using the multipass metal inert gas (MIG) process. Weldment properties in two test orientations were evaluated. Specimens were irradiated in a light water cooled and moderated reactor to 1 x 10/sup 20/ n/cm/sup 2/, E > 0.1 MeV, using a controlled temperature assembly. Specimen tests were performed at 25 and 125 0 C. The radiation-induced reductions in C/sub V/ energy absorption at 25 0 C were about 42% for the weld and the HAZ materials evaluated. A trend of energy increase with temperature was observed. The concomitant elevation in yield strength was about 53%. The increase in tensile strength in contrast was only 16%. The postirradiation yield strength of the axial test orientation in the pipe was less than that of the circumferential test orientation. Results for the HAZ indicate that this component may be the weakest link in the weldment from a fracture resistance viewpoint

  11. Formation of nanostructured weldments in the Al-Si system using electrospark welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milligan, J.; Heard, D.W.; Brochu, M.

    2010-01-01

    Electrospark welding (ESW) electrodes were manufactured from three binary aluminum-silicon alloys consisting of 12 and 17 wt% silicon, produced using chill and sand casting. The electrodes were used to assess the feasibility of producing aluminum-silicon weldments consisting of nano-sized silicon particles embedded in nanostructured aluminum matrix, using the ESW process. Line tests were performed to determine the optimal processing parameters resulting in a high quality deposit. X-ray diffraction (XRD) as well as optical and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was performed to determine the composition and microstructure of the depositions. It was determined that a capacitance of 110 μF and a voltage of 100 V resulted in the highest quality deposition. Furthermore it was determined that the ESW process was capable of producing a microstructure consisting of an extremely fine-grained silicon phase ranging from ∼6 to 50 nm for the eutectic composition, and 10-200 nm for the hypereutectic compositions. Finally it was determined that the functional thickness limit of the aluminum-silicon deposit produced under these process parameters was 120 μm.

  12. Improvement of Weldment Properties by Hot Forming Quenching of Friction Stir Welded TWB Sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae-Hoon Ko

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to improve the mechanical properties and formability of friction stir welded tailor-welded blanks (TWBs of Al6061 alloy with a new forming method called hot forming quenching (HFQ in which solid-solution heat-treated aluminum sheets are formed at elevated temperature. Forming and quenching during HFQ are simultaneously performed with the forming die for the solid-solution heat-treated sheet. In this study, specimens of aluminum TWBs were prepared by friction stir welding (FSW with a butt joint. The effectiveness of FSW joining was evaluated by observation of the macrostructure for different sheet thicknesses. In order to evaluate the formability of TWBs by HFQ, a hemisphere dome stretching test of the limit dome height achieved without specimen failure was performed with various tool temperatures. A Vickers test was also performed to measure weldment hardness as a function of position. The formability and mechanical properties of products formed by HFQ are compared with those formed by conventional forming methods, demonstrating the suitability of HFQ for sheet metal forming of friction stir welded TWBs.

  13. Microstructure, Composition, and Impact Toughness Across the Fusion Line of High-Strength Bainitic Steel Weldments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Liangyun; Kong, Xiangwei; Chang, Zhiyuan; Qiu, Chunlin; Zhao, Dewen

    2017-09-01

    This paper analyzed the evolution of microstructure, composition, and impact toughness across the fusion line of high-strength bainitic steel weldments with different heat inputs. The main purpose was to develop a convenient method to evaluate the HAZ toughness quickly. The compositions of HAZ were insensitive to higher contents of alloy elements ( e.g., Ni, Mo) in the weld metal because their diffusion distance is very short into the HAZ. The weld metal contained predominantly acicular ferrite at any a heat input, whereas the main microstructures in the HAZ changed from lath martensite/bainite to upper bainite with the increasing heat input. The evolution of HAZ toughness in relation to microstructural changes can be revealed clearly combined with the impact load curve and fracture morphology, although the results of impact tests do not show an obvious change with heat input because the position of Charpy V notch contains the weld metal, HAZ as well as a part of base metal. As a result, based on the bead-on-plate welding tests, the welding parameter affecting the HAZ toughness can be evaluated rapidly.

  14. Effect of controlled atmosphere on the mig-mag arc weldment properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kacar, Ramazan; Koekemli, Koray

    2005-01-01

    Due to their higher welding speed, automation and weld pool protection against to the atmosphere gases, gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process is widely used in industry. Due to the less stable arc associated with the use of consumable electrodes, GMAW process is not clean as good as gas tungsten arc welding process. Furthermore, the greater arc length in GMAW process also reduces the protective effect of the shielding gas. Due to electrochemical and thermochemical reactions between weld pool and arc atmosphere, it is quite important, especially weld metal toughness and joining of reactive materials to entirely create inert atmosphere for GMAW process. Therefore, a controlled atmosphere cabinet was developed for GMAW process. Low carbon steel combinations were welded with classical GMAW process in argon atmosphere as well as controlled atmosphere cabinet by using similar welding parameters. The mechanical and metallurgical properties of both weldments were evaluated. Result shows that toughness of the weld metal that was obtained in the controlled atmosphere cabinet much higher than that of classical GMAW process. The metallographic examination also clarified that there was not any gas porosity and inclusion in the weld metal compared with classical process

  15. Reduction factors for creep strength and fatigue life of modified 9Cr-1 Mo steel weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blass, J.J.; Battiste, R.L.; O'Connor, D.G.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on the provisions of ASME B and PV code Case N-47 currently include reduction factors for creep strength and fatigue life of weldments. To provide experimental confirmation of such factors for modified 9 Cr-1 Mo steel, tests of tubular specimens were conducted at 538 degrees C (1000 degrees F). Three creep-rupture specimens with longitudinal welds were tested in tension; and, of three with circumferential welds, two were tested in tension and one in torsion. In each specimen with a circumferential weld, a nonuniform axial distribution of strain was easily visible. The test results were compared to an existing empirical model of creep-rupture life. For the torsion test, the comparison was based on a definition of equivalent normal stress recently adopted in code Case N-47. some 27 fatigue specimens, with longitudinal, circumferential, or no welds, were tested under axial or torsional strain control. In specimens with welds, fatigue cracking initiated at fusion lines. In axial tests cracks grew in the circumferential direction, and in torsional tests cracks grew along fusion lines

  16. Effect of intermetallic precipitation on the properties of multi passed duplex stainless steel weldment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Seong Han [Technology research institute, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hae Woo [Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-15

    This study investigated the effect of the aging time of weldment of 24Cr-3.5Mo duplex stainless steel on the microstructure and corrosion behavior. After performing FCAW, we carried out heat treatments at varying times at 850 ℃ and performed observation of microstructure, potentio dynamic test, SEM-EDS analysis, and X-ray diffraction analysis. As the aging time increased, the fraction of δ-ferrite decreased sharply, but the fraction of γ slightly increased. The σ phase was generated at a non-metallic inclusion along the grain boundaries of δ-ferrite and γ, while the χ phase was generated in the structure of δ-ferrite. As the intermetallic compounds increased, the critical pitting potential fell sharply, and PREN of the surrounding structure decreased by 5 due to precipitation of the σ phase in 3.5% NaCl at 60 ℃. Pitting occurred intensively under a multi-pass line which relatively had more intermetallic compounds, and the precipitation of the σ phase caused the formation of Cr carbide.

  17. Recommended practice for fracture toughness testing of weldments with strength mismatch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hornet, P.; Eripret, C.; Wang, Y.Y.; Kirk, M.T.; Gordon, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    Fracture toughness testing requires relationships between experimentally measured quantities, such as load and displacement, and J and crack tip opening displacement (CTOD).The relationships provided in the presently codified procedures (ASTM E813, E1152, E1290 et BSI 7848:Part 1) were derived under the assumption that the specimens have homogeneous mechanical properties. However, these codified procedures are frequently used for testing of weldments despite their strong mechanical properties variations. As a result, the accuracy of the toughness values (J or CCTOD) is sometimes in question. Systematic finite element studies of mismatched single-edge-notched-bend specimens (SENB) having a crack on the centerline have been conducted to resolve this question. The effect of various parameters on these relationships, such as weld size, degree of mismatch, and crack depth, is investigated. The accuracy of the codified J and CTOD testing procedures when applied to the mismatched SE(B) specimens is examined. This systematic examination is extended to several newly proposed procedures, such as those from Joch et al. and Hornet and Eripret. New J and CTOD estimations procedures are proposed. The expected error in applying the codified and the new procedures are shown are proposed. The expected error in applying the codified and the new procedures are shown in terms of mismatch level and level width. Recommendations are made on the use of those procedures for a variety of weld mismatch and crack depth conditions. (authors)

  18. Effect of intermetallic precipitation on the properties of multi passed duplex stainless steel weldment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Seong Han; Lee, Hae Woo

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of the aging time of weldment of 24Cr-3.5Mo duplex stainless steel on the microstructure and corrosion behavior. After performing FCAW, we carried out heat treatments at varying times at 850 ℃ and performed observation of microstructure, potentio dynamic test, SEM-EDS analysis, and X-ray diffraction analysis. As the aging time increased, the fraction of δ-ferrite decreased sharply, but the fraction of γ slightly increased. The σ phase was generated at a non-metallic inclusion along the grain boundaries of δ-ferrite and γ, while the χ phase was generated in the structure of δ-ferrite. As the intermetallic compounds increased, the critical pitting potential fell sharply, and PREN of the surrounding structure decreased by 5 due to precipitation of the σ phase in 3.5% NaCl at 60 ℃. Pitting occurred intensively under a multi-pass line which relatively had more intermetallic compounds, and the precipitation of the σ phase caused the formation of Cr carbide.

  19. Effect of heat treatment upon the fatigue-crack growth behavior of Alloy 718 weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, W.J.; James, L.A.

    1981-05-01

    The microstructural features that influenced the room and elevated temperature fatigue-crack growth behavior of as-welded, conventional heat-treated, and modified heat-treated Alloy 718 GTA weldments were studied. Electron fractographic examination of fatigue fracture surfaces revealed that operative fatigue mechanisms were dependent on microstructure, temperatures and stress intensity factor. All specimens exhibited three basic fracture surface appearances at temperatures up to 538 degrees C: crystallographic faceting at low stress intensity range (ΔK) levels, striation, formation at intermediate values, and dimples coupled with striations in the highest (ΔK) regime. At 649 degrees C, the heat-treated welds exhibited extensive intergranular cracking. Laves and δ particles in the conventional heat-treated material nucleated microvoids ahead of the advancing crack front and caused on overall acceleration in crack growth rates at intermediate and high ΔK levels. The modified heat treatment removed many of these particles from the weld zone, thereby improving its fatigue resistance. The dramatically improved fatigue properties exhibited by the as-welded material was attributed to compressive residual stresses introduced by the welding process. 19 refs., 16 figs

  20. Low temperature tensile properties and stress corrosion cracking resistance in the super duplex stainless steels weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeung Woo; Sung, Jang Hyun; Lee, Sung Keun

    1998-01-01

    Low temperature tensile properties and SCC resistances of super duplex stainless steels and their weldments are investigated. Tensile strengths increase remarkably with decreasing test temperature, while elongations decrease steeply at -196 .deg. C after showing peak or constant value down to -100 .deg. C. Owing to the low tensile deformation of weld region, elongations of welded specimen decrease in comparison to those of unwelded specimen. The welded tensile specimen is fractured through weld region at -196 .deg. C due to the fact that the finely dispersed ferrite phase in the austenite matrix increases an opportunity to supply the crack propagation path through the brittle ferrite phase at low temperature. The stress corrosion cracking initiates preferentially at the surface ferrite phase of base metal region and propagates through ferrite phase. When the corrosion crack meets with the fibrously aligned austenite phase to the tensile direction, the ferrite phase around austenite continues to corrode. Eventually, fracture of the austenite phase begins without enduring the tensile load. The addition of Cu+W to the super duplex stainless steel deteriorates the SCC resistance in boiling MgCl 2 solution, possibly due to the increment of pits in the ferrite phase and reduction of N content in the austenite phase

  1. Correlation between corrosion resistance properties and thermal cycles experienced by gas tungsten arc welding and laser beam welding Alloy 690 butt weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H T; Wu, J L

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the correlation between the thermal cycles experienced by Alloy 690 weldments fabricated using gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and laser beam welding (LBW) processes, and their corresponding corrosion resistance properties. The corrosion resistance of the weldments is evaluated using a U-bend stress corrosion test in which the specimens are immersed in a boiling, acid solution for 240 h. The experimental results reveal that the LBW inputs significantly less heat to the weldment than the GTAW, and therefore yields a far faster cooling rate. Moreover, the corrosion tests show that in the GTAW specimen, intergranular corrosion (IGC) occurs in both the fusion zone (FZ) and the heat affected zone (HAZ). By contrast, the LBW specimen shows no obvious signs of IGC.

  2. High temperature oxidation in the context of life assessment and microstructural degradation of weldments of 2.25Cr-1Mo steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh Raman, R.K.; Muddle, B.C.

    2002-01-01

    The prevalence of in-service failures in the welds of chromium-molybdenum ferritic steels causes great concern in steam generating/handling systems of power plants, and components of petroleum/petrochemical industries. This paper is a review of the non-uniform scaling behaviour across microstructural gradients in weldments of pressure vessel steels in order to develop a global model for life-assessment by relating oxide scale thickness with time-temperature history of in-service components. The paper also investigates gaseous corrosion-assisted deterioration of the weldment microstructure

  3. Mis-Match Limit Load Analyses and Fracture Mechanics Assessment for Welded Pipe with Circumferential Crack at the Center of Weldment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Tae Kwang; Jeon, Jun Young; Shim, Kwang Bo; Kim, Yun Jae [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Sung [Sunchon University, Suncheon (Korea, Republic of); Jin, Tae Eun [Korea Power Engineering Company, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-01-15

    In this paper, limit load analyses and fracture mechanics analyses were conducted via finite element analyses for the welded pipe with circumferential crack at the center of the weldment. Systematic changes for strength mismatch ratio, width of weldment, crack shape and thickness ratio of the pipe were considered to provide strength mismatch limit load. And J-integral calculations based on reference stress method were conducted for two materials, stainless steel and ferritic steel. Reference stress defined by provided strength mis-match limit load gives much more accurate J-integral.

  4. Assessment of high-strength stainless steel weldments for fusion energy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, D.J.; Goodwin, G.M.

    1991-01-01

    Primary design considerations for the Compact Ignition Tokomak fusion reactor magnet cases are yield strength and toughness in the temperature range from liquid nitrogen to room temperature (77 to 300K). Type 21-6-9 stainless steel, also known as Nitronic 40, is the proposed alloy for this application. This study documented the mechanical properties, including tensile yield strength and Charpy V-notch impact toughness, at 77K and room temperature, of weldments made using seven different filler metals. Six welds were made with filler metal added as cold filler wire using the argon-shielded gas tungsten arc welding process. Filler metals included Nitronic 35W and 40W, 21-6-9, ERNiCr-3 (Inconel 82), ERNiCrMo-3 (Inconel 625), and Inconel 625 PLUS. All welds were prepared with a double-groove butt-weld geometry. At room temperature, all of the filler metals had yield strengths which exceeded the base metal. However, at 77K only the Nitronics and the 21-6-9 filler metals exceeded the base metals, and the Inconel filler metals were significantly weaker. The impact properties of the weld metals were very good at room temperature, with the exception of Inconel 625. At 77K, impact toughness was greatly reduced for all of the filler metals with the exception of Inconel 82. This alloy had excellent toughness at both temperatures. The severe drop in the impact toughness of the Nitronic and 21-6-9 filler metals was attributed to the amount of ferrite present in these welds. At 77K, fracture occurred by a cleavage mechanism in the ferrite regions which allowed the crack to grow readily. The fully austenitic Inconel 82 material fractured by a microvoid coalescence mode at either test temperature. These results indicate that the Inconel 82 filler metal is the preferred material for welding 21-6-o stainless steel for this application

  5. Mechanical properties of 1950's vintage 304 stainless steel weldment components after low temperature neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sindelar, R.L.; Caskey, G.R. Jr.; Thomas, J.K.; Hawthorne, J.R.; Hiser, A.L.; Lott, R.A.; Begley, J.A.; Shogan, R.P.

    1991-01-01

    The reactor vessels of the nuclear production reactors at the Savannah River Site (SRS) were constructed in the 1950's from Type 304 stainless steel plates welded with Type 308 stainless steel filler using the multipass metal inert gas process. An irradiated mechanical properties database has been developed for the vessel with materials from archival primary coolant system piping irradiated at low temperatures (75 to 150 degrees C) in the State University of New York at Buffalo reactor (UBR) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) to doses of 0.065 to 2.1 dpa. Fracture toughness, tensile, and Charpy-V impact properties of the weldment components (base, weld, and weld heat-affected-zone (HAZ)) have been measured at temperatures of 25 degrees C and 125 degrees C in the L-C and C-L orientations for materials in both the irradiated and unirradiated conditions for companion specimens. Fracture toughness and tensile properties of specimens cut from an SRS reactor vessel sidewall with doses of 0.1 and 0.5 dpa were also measured at temperatures of 25 and 125 degrees C. The irradiated materials exhibit hardening with loss of work hardenability and a reduction in toughness relative to the unirradiated materials. The HFIR-irradiated materials show an increase in yield strength between about 20% and 190% with a concomitant tensile strength increase between about 15% to 30%. The elastic-plastic fracture toughness parameters and Charpy-V energy absorption both decrease and show only a slight sensitivity to dose. The irradiation-induced decrease in the elastic-plastic fracture toughness (J def at 1 mm crack extension) is between 20% to 65%; the range of J 1C values are 72.8 to 366 kJ/m 2 for the irradiated materials. Similarly, Charpy V-notch results show a 40% to 60% decrease in impact energies

  6. Impact of neutron irradiation on mechanical performance of FeCrAl alloy laser-beam weldments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gussev, M. N.; Cakmak, E.; Field, K. G.

    2018-06-01

    Oxidation-resistant iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) alloys demonstrate better performance in Loss-of-Coolant Accidents, compared with austenitic- and zirconium-based alloys. However, further deployment of FeCrAl-based materials requires detailed characterization of their performance under irradiation; moreover, since welding is one of the key operations in fabrication of light water reactor fuel cladding, FeCrAl alloy weldment performance and properties also should be determined prior to and after irradiation. Here, advanced C35M alloy (Fe-13%Cr-5%Al) and variants with aluminum (+2%) or titanium carbide (+1%) additions were characterized after neutron irradiation in Oak Ridge National Laboratory's High Flux Isotope Reactor at 1.8-1.9 dpa in a temperature range of 195-559 °C. Specimen sets included as-received (AR) materials and specimens after controlled laser-beam welding. Tensile tests with digital image correlation (DIC), scanning electron microscopy-electron back scatter diffraction analysis, fractography, and x-ray tomography analysis were performed. DIC allowed for investigating local yield stress in the weldments, deformation hardening behavior, and plastic anisotropy. Both AR and welded material revealed a high degree of radiation-induced hardening for low-temperature irradiation; however, irradiation at high-temperatures (i.e., 559 °C) had little overall effect on the mechanical performance.

  7. Effect of artificial aging on the microstructure of weldment on API 5L X-52 steel pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas-Arista, B.; Hallen, J.M.; Albiter, A.

    2007-01-01

    The effects of artificial aging on the microstructure in the weldment of an API 5L X-52 steel pipe were studied. Aging was performed at 250 deg. C over a period of 1000 h and values were recorded at every 100 h intervals. Transmission electron microscopy observations showed precipitation strengthening from nearly circular Nb-C containing nanoparticles for the base metal and heat affected zone, and cementite for the weld metal. The largest amount of precipitation in the weldment zone was obtained at 500 h, due to peak-aging, which showed the highest particle density. The weld metal was more susceptible to aging, exhibiting the highest increase in precipitation at 500 h, followed by the heat affected zone. After 500 h, the deterioration in the microstructure was caused by the coarsening of particles due to over-aging. The base metal showed the larger increment in particle size after 900 h of aging accompanied by a bigger decrease in fine particles than in the weld metal

  8. Investigations on structure–property relationships of activated flux TIG weldments of super-duplex/austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devendranath Ramkumar, K., E-mail: ramdevendranath@gmail.com; Bajpai, Ankur; Raghuvanshi, Shubham; Singh, Anshuman; Chandrasekhar, Aditya; Arivarasu, M.; Arivazhagan, N.

    2015-06-25

    This research work articulated the effect of SiO{sub 2} flux assisted tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding on the microstructure and mechanical properties of marine grade stainless steel weldments, such as super-duplex stainless steel (UNS S32750) and austenitic stainless steel (AISI 316L). The studies showed that the use of flux decreased the heat input required to obtain complete penetration. Microstructure studies revealed the presence of ferrite at the heat affected zone of AISI 316L and the fusion zone which obviated the hot cracking tendency. Tensile studies corroborated that the joint strength was sufficiently greater than that of the parent metals. Impact toughness slightly impoverished owing to the presence of large platelets of Widmanstätten austenite in the fusion zone. The study also explored the structure–property relationships of the flux assisted weldments using the combined techniques of optical and scanning electron microscopy analysis. Owing to the better metallurgical and mechanical properties, this study recommends the use of SiO{sub 2} flux for joining the dissimilar metals involving austenitic and super-duplex stainless steels.

  9. Investigations on structure–property relationships of activated flux TIG weldments of super-duplex/austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devendranath Ramkumar, K.; Bajpai, Ankur; Raghuvanshi, Shubham; Singh, Anshuman; Chandrasekhar, Aditya; Arivarasu, M.; Arivazhagan, N.

    2015-01-01

    This research work articulated the effect of SiO 2 flux assisted tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding on the microstructure and mechanical properties of marine grade stainless steel weldments, such as super-duplex stainless steel (UNS S32750) and austenitic stainless steel (AISI 316L). The studies showed that the use of flux decreased the heat input required to obtain complete penetration. Microstructure studies revealed the presence of ferrite at the heat affected zone of AISI 316L and the fusion zone which obviated the hot cracking tendency. Tensile studies corroborated that the joint strength was sufficiently greater than that of the parent metals. Impact toughness slightly impoverished owing to the presence of large platelets of Widmanstätten austenite in the fusion zone. The study also explored the structure–property relationships of the flux assisted weldments using the combined techniques of optical and scanning electron microscopy analysis. Owing to the better metallurgical and mechanical properties, this study recommends the use of SiO 2 flux for joining the dissimilar metals involving austenitic and super-duplex stainless steels

  10. Effect of welding parameters on mechanical properties of GTAW of UNS S31803 and UNS S32750 weldments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulraj Prabhu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Duplex Stainless Steel (DSS and Super Duplex Stainless Steel (SDSS pipes were welded by Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW process. The effect of welding parameters such as heat input, cooling rate, shielding/purging gas composition and interpass temperature on tensile strength, hardness and impact toughness were studied. The microstructure analysis revealed presence of intermetallic phases at root region of the weldments. All mechanical properties were improved at lower heat input and high cooling rate due to grain refinement and balanced microstructure [ferrite and austenite]. All weldments exhibited higher strength than base materials. Weld root region was harder than centre and cap region. SDSS is more susceptible to sigma phase formation due to higher alloying elements and weld thermal cycles, which lead to considerable loss of toughness. Higher nitrogen contents in shielding and purging gas resulted strengthening of austenite phase and restriction of dislocations, which ultimately improved mechanical properties. Higher interpass temperature caused reduction in strength and toughness because of grain coarsening and secondary phase precipitation.

  11. Systematic study of formation of soft and hard zones in the dissimilar weldments of Cr-Mo steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudha, C.; Terrance, A.L.E.; Albert, S.K.; Vijayalakshmi, M.

    2002-01-01

    The microstructural stability and elemental redistribution in dissimilar weldments between 9Cr-1Mo and 2.25Cr-1Mo ferritic steels during various postweld heat treatments (PWHTs) have been studied using microscopy techniques ranging from optical to transmission electron microscopy and electron probe microanalyser. Application of PWHT at 1023 K for various times resulted in the formation of a soft zone in the low Cr side and a carbide rich hard zone adjoining the soft zone in the high Cr side of the weldment. The width of these zones and their hardness are influenced by the time of exposure at elevated temperature. A measurable increase in the width and a decrease in the hardness of the soft and hard zones with aging times are observed. Correlation between these observed effects and the elemental redistribution responsible for the formation of these zones is being attempted. Micromechanisms responsible for the formation of these zones are proposed. Migration of carbon from low Cr side to high Cr side driven by the gradient in the carbon activity has been found to be responsible for the formation of these zones

  12. Investigation on un-peened and laser shock peened weldment of Inconel 600 fabricated by ATIG welding process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandrasekar, G., E-mail: gopalsamychandrasekar@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, PSNA College of Engineering and Technology, Dindigul 624622, Tamilnadu (India); Kailasanathan, C., E-mail: uthrakailash@yahoo.co.in [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Sethu Institute of Technology, Virudhunagar District, Kariapatti 626115, Tamilnadu (India); Verma, Dhanesh Kant, E-mail: dkverma@bheltry.co.in [Welding Research Institute, Bharat Heavy Electricals Limited, Thiruchirappalli 620014, Tamilnadu (India)

    2017-04-06

    The present investigation articulates the joining of Inconel 600 plates using activated tungsten inert gas (ATIG) welding process. Before joining of Inconel 600 plates, welding parameters have been optimized and suitable flux has been selected to produce complete weld penetration in a single pass welding. The various mechanical and metallurgical characterizations were performed on the un-peened ATIG (UP-ATIG) weldment. The experimental results attested that the tensile failure occurred in the weld zone and also the tensile strength is lower than the base metal (BM) because of coarser grain structures and tensile residual stresses in the weld zone. Laser shock peening (LSP) was carried out on the welded joint to enhance its properties. After LSP treatment, the significant improvement was observed in the laser peened ATIG (LP-ATIG) weldment and the fracture occurred at the parent metal side owing to the compressive residual stresses developed by LSP. Residual stress measurements indicated that the compressive residual stresses were higher at the surface and they decrease with increasing depth.

  13. Tensile Property of ANSI 304 Stainless Steel Weldments Subjected to Cavitation Erosion Based on Treatment of Laser Shock Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Liu, Yue-Hua; Luo, Kai-Yu; Zhang, Yong-Kang; Zhao, Yong; Huang, Jian-Yun; Wu, Xu-Dong; Zhou, Chuang

    2018-05-16

    Tensile property was one important index of mechanical properties of ANSI 304 stainless steel laser weldments subjected to cavitation erosion (CE). Laser shock processing (LSP) was utilized to strengthen the CE resistance, and the tensile property and fracture morphology were analyzed through three replicated experiment times. Results showed tensile process of treated weldments was composed of elastic deformation, plastic deformation, and fracture. The elastic limit, elastic modulus, elongation, area reduction, and ultimate tensile strength of tensile sample after CE were higher in view of LSP. In the fracture surface, the fiber zone, radiation zone and shear lip zone were generated, and those were more obvious through LSP. The number and size of pores in the fracture surface were smaller, and the fracture surface was smoother and more uniform. The dimples were elongated along the unified direction due to effects of LSP, and the elongated direction was in agreement with the crack propagation direction. Their distribution and shape were uniform with deeper depth. It could be reflected that the tensile property was improved by LSP and the CE resistance was also enhanced.

  14. Investigation on un-peened and laser shock peened weldment of Inconel 600 fabricated by ATIG welding process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandrasekar, G.; Kailasanathan, C.; Verma, Dhanesh Kant

    2017-01-01

    The present investigation articulates the joining of Inconel 600 plates using activated tungsten inert gas (ATIG) welding process. Before joining of Inconel 600 plates, welding parameters have been optimized and suitable flux has been selected to produce complete weld penetration in a single pass welding. The various mechanical and metallurgical characterizations were performed on the un-peened ATIG (UP-ATIG) weldment. The experimental results attested that the tensile failure occurred in the weld zone and also the tensile strength is lower than the base metal (BM) because of coarser grain structures and tensile residual stresses in the weld zone. Laser shock peening (LSP) was carried out on the welded joint to enhance its properties. After LSP treatment, the significant improvement was observed in the laser peened ATIG (LP-ATIG) weldment and the fracture occurred at the parent metal side owing to the compressive residual stresses developed by LSP. Residual stress measurements indicated that the compressive residual stresses were higher at the surface and they decrease with increasing depth.

  15. Concurrent phase separation and clustering in the ferrite phase during low temperature stress aging of duplex stainless steel weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, J.; Odqvist, J.; Thuvander, M.; Hertzman, S.; Hedström, P.

    2012-01-01

    The concurrent phase separation and clustering of alloying elements in the ferrite phase of duplex stainless steel weldments after stress aging at 325 °C have been investigated by atom probe tomography analysis. Both phase separation, into Fe-rich and Cr-rich ferrite, and solute clustering were observed. Phase separation in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) is most pronounced in the high alloyed SAF 2507, followed by SAF 2205 and SAF 2304. Moreover Cu clustering was observed in the HAZ of SAF 2507. However, decomposition in the weld bead (25.10.4L) was more pronounced than in the HAZs, with both phase separation and clustering of Ni–Mn–Si–Cu. The observed differences in the decomposition behaviors in the HAZ and weld bead can be attributed to the high Ni content and the characteristic microstructure of the weld bead with high internal strains. In addition, an applied tensile stress during aging of weldments has been found to further promote the kinetics of phase separation and clustering.

  16. Effect of normalization and tempering on microstructure and mechanical properties of V-groove and narrow-groove P91 pipe weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, Chandan [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Uttarakhand 247667 (India); Mahapatra, M.M. [School of Mechanical Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology Bhubaneswar, Odisha 751013 (India); Kumar, Pradeep; Saini, N. [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Uttarakhand 247667 (India)

    2017-02-08

    In Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), The Nb-V modified 9Cr-1Mo (P91) creep strength enhanced ferritic (CSEF) steel is currently considered as a candidate material for reactor internals and reactor pressure vessels (RPVs). After the welding of P91 steel, the inhomogeneous microstructure of weldment is a serious issue because it promotes the well-known Type IV cracking in P91 weldments. The present research work is focused on how the microstructure evolve in various zone of P91 pipe weldment during the sub-critical post weld heat treatment (PWHT) and normalized and tempered (N&T) heat treatment. The effect of PWHT and N&T heat treatment are also considered on tensile properties and hardness variation of P91 weldments. To characterize the sample scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and optical micrograph was used. It was observed that the N&T heat treatment provides the homogeneous microstructure compared to PWHT. The superior mechanical properties was also measured in N&T condition compared to PWHT. Study of fracture surface morphology of tensile tested specimen in different heat treatment condition is also presented.

  17. Effect of normalization and tempering on microstructure and mechanical properties of V-groove and narrow-groove P91 pipe weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandey, Chandan; Mahapatra, M.M.; Kumar, Pradeep; Saini, N.

    2017-01-01

    In Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), The Nb-V modified 9Cr-1Mo (P91) creep strength enhanced ferritic (CSEF) steel is currently considered as a candidate material for reactor internals and reactor pressure vessels (RPVs). After the welding of P91 steel, the inhomogeneous microstructure of weldment is a serious issue because it promotes the well-known Type IV cracking in P91 weldments. The present research work is focused on how the microstructure evolve in various zone of P91 pipe weldment during the sub-critical post weld heat treatment (PWHT) and normalized and tempered (N&T) heat treatment. The effect of PWHT and N&T heat treatment are also considered on tensile properties and hardness variation of P91 weldments. To characterize the sample scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and optical micrograph was used. It was observed that the N&T heat treatment provides the homogeneous microstructure compared to PWHT. The superior mechanical properties was also measured in N&T condition compared to PWHT. Study of fracture surface morphology of tensile tested specimen in different heat treatment condition is also presented.

  18. Creep-fatigue life assessment of cruciform weldments using the linear matching method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorash, Yevgen; Chen, Haofeng

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a creep-fatigue life assessment of a cruciform weldment made of the steel AISI type 316N(L) and subjected to reversed bending and cyclic dwells at 550 °C using the Linear Matching Method (LMM) and considering different weld zones. The design limits are estimated by the shakedown analysis using the LMM and elastic-perfectly-plastic material model. The creep-fatigue analysis is implemented using the following material models: 1) Ramberg–Osgood model for plastic strains under saturated cyclic conditions; 2) power-law model in “time hardening” form for creep strains during primary creep stage. The number of cycles to failure N ⋆ under creep-fatigue interaction is defined by: a) relation for cycles to fatigue failure N ∗ dependent on numerical total strain range Δε tot for the fatigue damage ω f ; b) long-term strength relation for the time to creep rupture t ∗ dependent on numerical average stress σ ¯ during dwell Δt for the creep damage ω cr ; c) non-linear creep-fatigue interaction diagram for the total damage. Numerically estimated N ⋆ for different Δt and Δε tot shows good quantitative agreement with experiments. A parametric study of different dwell times Δt is used to formulate the functions for N ⋆ and residual life L ⋆ dependent on Δt and normalised bending moment M -tilde , and the corresponding contour plot intended for design applications is created. -- Highlights: ► Ramberg–Osgood model is used for plastic strains under saturated cyclic conditions. ► Power-law model in time-hardening form is used for creep strains during dwells. ► Life assessment procedure is based on time fraction rule to evaluate creep damage. ► Function for cycles to failure is dependent on dwell period and normalised moment. ► Function for FSRF dependent on dwell period takes into account the effect of creep

  19. Characteristics of SCC crack propagation in 22Cr-5. 5Ni-3Mo duplex stainless steel weldment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Choong Un; Kang, Choon Sik

    1988-02-01

    The characteristics of SCC crack propagation in duplex stainless steel weldment made by SMAW, GTAW and GMAW processes were investigated in 42% MgCl/sub 2/ 142 deg C boiling solution. From these experiments, it could be concluded that the structure anisotropy of ..gamma.. phase as well as the phase ratio played an important role in SCC resistance. GTA and GMA weld metal showed higher SCC resistance than base metal because of randomly distributed ..gamma.. phase. The crack in weld metal had same opportunity of receiving keying effect as that in base metal, but it had less possibility of intersecting ..gamma.. phase. The SCC resistance of the SMA weld metal and the HAZ was lower than that of the base metal because their phase ratio deviated from the proper phase ratio.

  20. Thick-section weldments in 21-6-9 and 316LN stainless steel for fusion energy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, D.J.; Goodwin, G.M.

    1991-01-01

    The Burning Plasma Experiment (BPX), formerly known as the Compact Ignition Tokomak, will be a major advance in the design of a fusion reactor. The successful construction of fusion reactors will require extensive welding of thick-section stainless steel plates. Severe service conditions will be experienced by the structure. Operating temperatures will range from room temperature (300 K) to liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K), and perhaps even lower. The structure will be highly stressed, and subject to sudden impact loads if plasma disruptions occur. This demands a combination of high strength and high toughness from the weldments. Significant portions of the welding will be done in the field, so preweld and postweld heat treatments will be difficult. The thick sections to be welded will require a high deposition rate process, and will result in significant residual stresses in the materials. Inspection of these thick sections in complex geometries will be very difficult. All of these constraints make it essential that the welding procedures and alloys be well understood, and the mechanical properties of the welds and their heat-affected zones must be adequately characterized. The candidate alloy for structural applications in the BPX such as the magnet cases was initially selected as 21-6-9 austenitic stainless steel, and later changed to 316LN stainless steel. This study examined several possible filler materials for thick-section (25 to 50 mm) weldments in these two materials. The tensile and Charpy V-notch properties were measured at room temperature and 77 K. The fracture toughness was measured for promising materials

  1. Long-term creep rupture strength of weldment of Fe-Ni based alloy as candidate tube and pipe for advanced USC boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, Gang; Sato, Takashi [Babcok-Hitachi K.K., Hiroshima (Japan). Kure Research Laboratory; Marumoto, Yoshihide [Babcok-Hitachi K.K., Hiroshima (Japan). Kure Div.

    2010-07-01

    A lot of works have been going to develop 700C USC power plant in Europe and Japan. High strength Ni based alloys such as Alloy 617, Alloy 740 and Alloy 263 were the candidates for boiler tube and pipe in Europe, and Fe-Ni based alloy HR6W (45Ni-24Fe-23Cr-7W-Ti) is also a candidate for tube and pipe in Japan. One of the Key issues to achieve 700 C boilers is the welding process of these alloys. Authors investigated the weldability and the long-term creep rupture strength of HR6W tube. The weldments were investigated metallurgically to find proper welding procedure and creep rupture tests are ongoing exceed 38,000 hours. The long-term creep rupture strengths of the HST weld joints are similar to those of parent metals and integrity of the weldments was confirmed based on with other mechanical testing results. (orig.)

  2. Localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking behavior of austenitic stainless steel weldments containing retained ferrite. Annual progress report, June 1, 1978--March 31, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savage, W.F.; Duquette, D.J.

    1979-03-01

    Localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking experiments have been performed on single phase 304 stainless steel alloys and autogeneous weldments containing retained delta ferrite as a second phase. The results of the pitting experiments show that the pressure of delta ferrite decreases localized corrosion resistance with pits initiating preferentially at delta ferrite--gamma austenite interphase boundaries. This increased susceptibility is reversible with elevated temperature heat treatments which revert the metastable ferrite phase to the equilibrium austenite phase

  3. The Effect of Heat Input and Composition on Weld Metal Microstructures in Thin Section HY-130 GMAW(Gas Metal Are Welding) Weldments

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-12-01

    weldments, Glover et al. [Ref. Ej show, via a schematic CCT diagram , that austenite should transform to coarse polygonal ferrite with regions of pearlite...are essentially subjected to continuous cooling during solidification, so the resultant microstructures should be predictable from CCT diagrams . Unfortunately...cooling rate variaticn just within a single weld pass. Although individual CCT diagrams for weld metals are generally not available, the influence of

  4. On the corrosion testing of weldments of high alloyed CrNiMo-stainless steels and NiCrMo-alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riedel, G.; Voigt, C.; Werner, H.

    1997-01-01

    Weldments of high-alloyed CrNiMo stainless steels and NiCrMo alloys can be more susceptible to localized corrosion than the solution annealed basic material owing to segregations and precipitations in the heat affected zone, the high temperature zone and/or in the weld. To investigate these differences the FeCl 3 -test (10% FeCl 3 . 6aq), the test ''green death'' (11.5% H 2 SO 4 , 1.2% HCl, 1% CuCl 2 , 1% FeCl 3 ) as well as chronopotentiostatic tests in artificial sea water or in 3% NaCl-solution are used. In particular for testing the highest alloyed materials a CaCl 2 -test was developed (4.5 M CaCl 2 , chronopotentiostatic test in duration of 8 to 10 hours at + 200 mV (SCE)), which can be carried out to a temperature of 115 C at atmospheric pressure. The aggressivity increases in the range FeCl 3 -test, ''green death''-test, CaCl 2 -test. Matching and graduated over-alloyed weldments (TIG, heat input of 7 and 15.5 kJ/cm) of materials 1.4529, 1.4562, 2.4856, 2.4819 (german materials No.) are comparingly examined in various tests, of materials 1.4406, 1.4539, 1.4439 and 1.4563 (german materials No.) only matching weldments in the FeCl 3 -test. In strongly oxidizing media only a highly over-alloyed performed weldment (filler material 2.4607, german material No.) produces the best corrosion behaviour, measured as the critical temperatures of localized corrosion. Measurements of critical current densities of passivation can be used for investigations of corrosion behaviour of weldments, too. Critical current densities of passivation are showing a tendency to inverse proportion to the critical temperatures of localized corrosion. Suitable electrolytes are among others 0.2 M H 2 SO 4 + 1 M NaCl + 10 -3 % KSCN, N 2 -bubbled, 25 to 60 C and xM H 2 SO 4 + 4 M NaCl + 10 -3 % KSCN (x = 0.05 to 1), 25 C, in contact with air. An influence of heat input at the welding is indicated in the test of localized corrosion, but it is only small. It is sometimes more clearly shown at

  5. Preliminary Analysis of the General Performance and Mechanical Behavior of Irradiated FeCrAl Base Alloys and Weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gussev, Maxim N. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Field, Kevin G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Briggs, Samuel A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Yamamoto, Yukinori [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-30

    The iron-based, iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) alloys are promising, robust materials for deployment in current and future nuclear power plants. This class of alloys demonstrates excellent performance in a range of environments and conditions, including high-temperature steam (>1000°C). Furthermore, these alloys have the potential to have prolonged survival under loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditions compared to the more traditional cladding materials that are either Zr-based alloys or austenitic steels. However, one of the issues associated with FeCrAl alloys is cracking during welding. The present project investigates the possibility of mitigating welding-induced cracking via alloying and precise structure control of the weldments; in the frame work of the project, several advanced alloys were developed and are being investigated prior to and after neutron irradiation to provide insight into the radiation tolerance and mechanical performance of the weldments. The present report provides preliminary results on the post-irradiation characterization and mechanical tests performed during United States Fiscal Year (FY) 2016. Chapter 1 provides a general introduction, and Chapter 2 describes the alloy compositions, welding procedure, specimen geometry and manufacturing parameters. Also, a brief discussion of the irradiation at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) is provided. Chapter 3 is devoted to the analysis of mechanical tests performed at the hot cell facility; tensile curves and mechanical properties are discussed in detail focusing on the irradiation temperature. Limited fractography results are also presented and analyzed. The discussion highlights the limitations of the testing within a hot cell. Chapter 4 underlines the advantages of in-situ testing and discusses the preliminary results obtained with newly developed miniature specimens. Specimens were moved to the Low Activation Materials Development and Analysis (LAMDA) laboratory and prepared for

  6. Effects of Grain Boundary Microconstituents on Heat-Affected Zone Cracks in a Mar-M004 Weldment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai-Cheng Chen

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Repair-welding of a cast Mar-M004 superalloy by gas tungsten arc welding was performed. Liquation cracks of the heat-affected zone (HAZ in a Mar-M004 weldment were closely related to the presence of low-melting constituents along the solidified boundaries in the weld. The metal carbides (MC, M3B2 and M5B3 borides, Ni7(Hf,Zr2 intermetallic compounds, and γ-γ′colonies were found at the interdendritic boundaries. Fine boride precipitates mixed with intermetallic compounds in lamellar form were more likely to liquate during repair-welding. The melting of borides and intermetallic compounds in 1180 °C/4 h treated samples confirmed the poor weldability of the Mar-M004 superalloy due to enhanced liquation cracking. In addition to boride formation, fractographs of liquation cracks revealed strong segregation of B element in carbides and intermetallics, which might further lower the solidus temperature of the repair weld.

  7. Thick-section weldments in 21-6-9 and 316LN stainless steel for fusion energy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, D.J.; Goodwin, G.M.

    1991-01-01

    The mechanical properties of several weldments in 21-6-9 and 316LN stainless steel metals have been measured at 77 K and room temperature. Filler metals for the 211-6-9 included Nitronic 35W and 40W, 21-6-9, Inconel 82, 182, 625, and 625 PLUS. For the 316LN base metal, 316L, 316L-T3, 316L-4K-O, and Inconel 82 filler metals were used. At room temperature all of the filler metals had yield strengths that exceeded those of the base metals. At 77K only the Nitronics and the 21-6-9 filler metals exceeded those of the base metals, and the Inconel filler metals were significantly weaker. The impact properties of the weld metals were very good at room temperature, with the exception of Inconel 625. At 77 K the impact toughness was greatly reduced for all of the filler metals, with the dramatic exception of Inconel 82. The 316L-4K-O filler metal showed higher impact energies than the other ferrite-containing filler metals, although the levels were still much lower than for the Inconel filler metals. The Inconel 82 filler had excellent fracture toughness at both temperatures

  8. The effect of cathodic protection on the behaviour of API-5LX 65 line-pipe weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saenz de Santamaria, M.; Procter, R.P.

    1987-01-01

    The results of studies of the loss of ductility shown by X65 linepipe steel weldments during slow strain rate testing in 3.5% NaCl solution, under conditions of cathodic protection/overprotection are reported. Two types of specimens have been used; the first type was extracted longitudinally from along the weld seam while the second type was taken perpendicular to the weld and contained in its gauge length, weld metal, heat affected zone and parent metal. The weld metal shows hardness values higher than those of the parent plate and the heat affected zone. Therefore, it could be expected to be more susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement under cathodic protection and overprotection conditions. However, in the second type of specimens, fracture actually takes place through the parent plate, or at lack of fusion flaws. This behaviour is related to the fact that the net sections stresses in the specimen are plastic in the parent plate but elastic in the weld metal and heat affected zone. (author)

  9. A three-dimensional thermal finite element analysis of AISI 304 stainless steel and copper dissimilar weldment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gurdeep; Saxena, Ravindra K.; Pandey, Sunil

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this study to developed a 3-D thermal finite element model for dissimilar material welding of AISI-304 stainless steel and copper. Welding of similar material is widely studied using experimental and numerical methods but the problem becomes trivial for the welding of dissimilar materials especially in ferrous and nonferrous materials. Finite element analysis of dissimilar material welding is a cost-effective method for the understanding and analysis of the process. The finite element analysis has been performed to predict the heat affected zone and temperature distribution in AISI-304 stainless steel and copper dissimilar weldment using MSC Marc 2017®. Due to the difference in physical properties of these materials the behavior of heat affected zone and temperature distribution are perceived to be different. To verify the accuracy of the thermal finite element model, the welding process was simulated with butt-welded joints having same dimensions and parameters from Attarha and Far [1]. It is found from the study that the heat affected zone is larger in copper weld pads than in AISI 304 stainless steel due to large difference in thermal conductivity of these two weld pads.

  10. Irradiation testing of stainless steel plate material and weldments. Report on ITER Task T14, Part B. Tensile properties after 0.5 and 5 dpa at 350 and 500 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rensman, J.W.; Boskeljon, J.; Horsten, M.G.; De Vries, M.I.

    1997-10-01

    The tensile properties of unirradiated and neutron irradiated type 316L(N)-SPH stainless steel plate, EB weldments, 16-8 TIG-weldments, and full 16-8 TIG-deposits have been measured. Miniature 4 mm diameter test specimens of the European Reference Heat 1 and 2 (ERH), and 4 mm and some 8 mm diameter specimens of the weldments mentioned above, were irradiated in the High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten, The Netherlands, simulating the first wall conditions by a combination of high displacement damage with high amounts of helium. The irradiation conditions were 0.5 and 5 displacements per atom (dpa) at 350K and 0.5 and 5 dpa at 500K. Testing temperatures ranged from 300K to 850K. This work was performed as part of the European Fusion Technology Programme for ITER as 'Irradiation testing of stainless steel' The report contains the experimental conditions and summarises the results. The tensile properties of the unirradiated ERH's 1 and 2 plate materials were found to differ slightly but significantly: ERH2 has a lower UTS, but higher yield strength and ductility than ERH1. The plate materials have lower yield strength in the unirradiated condition than all of the weldments (EB, TIG-weld and TIG-deposit), accompanied by a higher ductility of the plate materials. When irradiated at 350K the differences in strength between the plate and weld materials decrease, but the ductility of the plate remains higher than that of the weldments. A saturation of irradiation damage has taken place already at about 0.5 dpa. When irradiated at 500K the plate material continuously hardens up to 5 dpa, where it has lost all uniform plastic ductility. The weldments show similar but less dramatic hardening and loss of ductility as the plate material for both irradiation conditions. 54 figs., 17 tabs., 21 refs

  11. Test-system for the control and selection of tests applicable to a weldment and its documentation for assembling the Angra - 2 pipelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho Nunez, J.I. de; Spiegelberg, N.; Souza Rosa, M. de; Soares Filho, J.C.T.

    1988-01-01

    Due to quality assurance characteristics applicable to the construction of a Nuclear Power Plant, the welding inspection for the piping erection becomes a very well controlled and documented activity. By means of informatic support, a system was developed for the control and selection of testes applicable to a weldment according to the suitable specification. As a result, it is obtained: cost reduction during the project phase, expedition of modifications due to isometric revision, better control and follow-up of inspections activities and piping erection, and the guarantee of the correct interpretation for the applicable specification. (author) [pt

  12. The influence of isothermal ageing and subsequent hydrogen charging at room temperature on local mechanical properties and fracture characteristics of martensitic-bainitic weldments for power engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falat L.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study deals with the effects of high temperature expositions and subsequent cathodic hydrogen charging of dissimilar martensitic/bainitic weldment on its local mechanical properties and fracture behaviour at room temperature. Circumferential welded joint under investigation was produced by tungsten inert gas welding of X10CrWMoVNb9-2 martensitic and 7CrMoVTiB10-10 bainitic steels tubes with Ni-based filler metal and the application of subcritical postweld heat treatment. Hardness profile measurements revealed pronounced hardness peaks in over-heated regions of the individual steels heat-affected zones which remained preserved also during subsequent expositions at 600°C for up to 5000 hours. Gradual microstructural degradation of these regions included precipitate coarsening and the formation of new secondary phases during thermal exposure. The combined effects of thermal and hydrogen embrittlement of the studied weldment resulted in deleterious effects on its tensile and fracture behaviour.

  13. Residual stress measurements in a ferritic steel/In625 superalloy dissimilar metal weldment using neutron diffraction and deep-hole drilling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skouras, A.; Paradowska, A.; Peel, M.J.; Flewitt, P.E.J.; Pavier, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the use of non-invasive and semi-invasive techniques to measure the residual stresses in a large dissimilar weldment. This took the form of a butt weld between two sections of a P92 steel pipe, joined using an In625 welding consumable. Residual stress measurements have been carried out on the 30 mm thick welded pipe using the deep-hole drilling technique to characterise the through wall section residual stress distribution for the weld metal, HAZ and parent material. In addition, neutron diffraction measurements have been carried out within the weld zone. Diffraction patterns presented a high intensity and sharp peaks for the base P92 steel material. However measurements in the weld superalloy material were proven problematic as very weak diffraction patterns were observed. A thorough examination of the weld material suggested that the likely cause of this phenomenon was texture in the weld material created during the solidification phase of the welding procedure. This paper discusses the challenges in the execution and interpretation of the neutron diffraction results and demonstrates that realistic measurements of residual stresses can be achieved, in complex dissimilar metal weldments. Highlights: ► One of the few papers to measure residual stresses on dissimilar metal welds. ► Paper managed to provide realistic measurements of residual stresses using the DHD and ND technique. ► Results of this study have demonstrated the effect of texture during the ND measurements.

  14. Effect of filler metals on the mechanical properties of Inconel 625 and AISI 904L dissimilar weldments using gas tungsten arc welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthur Prabu, S.; Devendranath Ramkumar, K.; Arivazhagan, N.

    2017-11-01

    In the present research work, dissimilar welding between Inconel 625 super alloy and AISI 904L super austenitic stainless steel using manual multi-pass continuous current gas tungsten arc (CCGTA) welding process employed with ERNiCrMo-4 and ERNiCrCoMo-1 fillers were performed to determine the mechanical properties and weldability. Tensile test results corroborated that the fracture had occurred at the parent metal of AISI 904L irrespective of filler used for all the trials. The presence of the macro and micro void coalescence in the fibrous matrix characterised for ductile mode of fracture. The hardness values at the weld interface of Inconel 625 side were observed to be higher for ERNiCrMo-4 filler due to the presence of strengthening elements such as W, Mo, Ni and Cr. The impact test accentuated that the weldments using ERNiCrMo-4 filler offered better impact toughness (41J) at room temperature. Bend test results showed that the weldments using these fillers exhibited good ductility without cracks.

  15. Effects of the use of a flat wire electrode in gas metal arc welding and fuzzy logic model for the prediction of weldment shape profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karuthapandi, Sripriyan; Thyla, P. R. [PSG College of Technology, Coimbatore (India); Ramu, Murugan [Amrita University, Ettimadai (India)

    2017-05-15

    This paper describes the relationships between the macrostructural characteristics of weld beads and the welding parameters in Gas metal arc welding (GMAW) using a flat wire electrode. Bead-on-plate welds were produced with a flat wire electrode and different combinations of input parameters (i.e., welding current, welding speed, and flat wire electrode orientation). The macrostructural characteristics of the weld beads, namely, deposition, bead width, total bead width, reinforcement height, penetration depth, and depth of HAZ were investigated. A mapping technique was employed to measure these characteristics in various segments of the weldment zones. Results show that the use of a flat wire electrode improves the depth-to-width (D/W) ratio by 16.5 % on average compared with the D/W ratio when a regular electrode is used in GMAW. Furthermore, a fuzzy logic model was established to predict the effects of the use of a flat electrode on the weldment shape profile with varying input parameters. The predictions of the model were compared with the experimental results.

  16. Experimental study and modelling of high temperature creep flow and damage behaviour of 9Cr1Mo-NbV steel weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaffard, V.

    2004-12-01

    Chromium martensitic stainless steels are under development since the 70's with the prospect of using them as structural components in thermal and nuclear power plants. The modified 9Cr1Mo-NbV steel is already used, especially in England and Japan, as a material for structural components in thermal power plants where welding is a commonly used joining technique. New generations of chromium martensitic stainless steels with improved mechanical properties for high pressure and temperature use are currently under development. However, observations of several in-service premature failures of welded components in 9Cr1Mo-NbV steel, outline a strong need for understanding the high temperature creep flow and damage behaviour of 9Cr1Mo-NbV steels and weldments. The present study aimed at experimentally determining and then modelling the high temperature creep flow and damage behaviour of both 9Cr1Mo-NbV steels and weldments (typically in the temperature range from 450 C to 650 C). The base metal was first studied as the reference material. It was especially evidenced that tempered chromium martensitic steels exhibit a change in both creep flow and damage behaviour for long term creep exposure. As a consequence, the classically performed extrapolation of 1,000 hours creep data to 100,000 hours creep lifetime predictions might be very hazardous. Based on experimental observations, a new model, integrating and coupling multiple creep flow and damage mechanisms, was developed in the framework of the mechanics of porous media. It was then successfully used to represent creep flow and damage behaviour of the base metal from high to low stress levels even for complex multiaxial loading conditions. Although the high temperature creep properties of the base metal are quite good, the occurrence of premature failure in weldments in high temperature creep conditions largely focused the attention of the scientific community. The lower creep strength of the weld component was also

  17. Compatibility of CLAM steel weldments with static LiPb alloy at 550 Degree-Sign C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Xizhang, E-mail: kernel.chen@gmail.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, ZhenJiang, Jiangsu 212013 (China); Shen Zheng; Li Peng [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, ZhenJiang, Jiangsu 212013 (China); Madigan, Bruce [Montana Tech. of University of Montana, Butte, MT 59701 (United States); Huang Yuming; Lei Yucheng [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, ZhenJiang, Jiangsu 212013 (China); Huang Qunying [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 031 (China); Zhou Jianzhong [School of Mechanical Engineering, Jiangsu University, ZhenJiang, Jiangsu 212013 (China)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Corrosion extent of weld zone is higher than that of HAZ. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thick martensite lath and large residual stress lead to higher corrosion rate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cr on the surface of weld zone decreases by about 50%, W increases slightly. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer After 500 h and 1000 h of corrosion, weight losses are 0.272 mg/cm{sup 2} and 0.403 mg/cm{sup 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer With the increasing of corrosion time, the corrosion rate decreases significantly. - Abstract: CLAM steel is considered as a structural material to be used in the Test Blanket Module as a barrier or blanket adjacent to liquid LiPb in fusion reactors. In this paper, CLAM steel is welded by tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding, and the compatibility of the weldment with liquid LiPb is tested. Specimens were corroded in static liquid LiPb, with corrosion times of 500 h and 1000 h, at 550 Degree-Sign C, and the corresponding weight losses are 0.272 mg/cm{sup 2} and 0.403 mg/cm{sup 2} respectively. Also the corrosion rate decreases with increased corrosion time. In the as-welded condition, corrosion resistance of the weld zone is higher than that of the HAZ (Heat Affected Zone). Likely, thick martensite lath and large residual stresses at the welding zone result in higher corrosion rates. The compatibility of CLAM steel weld joints with high temperature liquid LiPb can be improved to some extent through a post-weld tempering process. The surface of the as-welded CLAM steel is uniformly corroded and the concentration of Cr on the surface decreases by about 50% after corrosion. Penetration of LiPb into the matrix is observed for neither the as-welded nor the as-tempered conditions. Influenced by thick martensite lath and large residual stresses, the welded area, especially the weld zone, is easily corroded, therefore it is of primary importance to protect the welded area in the solid blanket of the fusion reactor.

  18. Unaxial stress relaxation and creep behaviour in weldments of the pressure vessel steel A533B between 600 and 640 degree C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otterberg, R.

    1979-10-01

    In order to predict the stress reduction during stress relief heat treatment in welded joints of the pressure vessel steel A533B, uniaxial stress relaxation as well as creep tests have been performed. The specimens were isothermally stress relaxed between 600 and 640 degree C from initial stresses corresponding to specimen elongations of 0.25, 0.5 and 0.2 percent. The stress relaxation results are excellently described by a Norton relationship. The magnitude of the initial stress has been found to affect the stress relaxation in the beginning of the tests, but at times longer than one hour the effect is very small. Creep strain data from creep tests in the actual temperature interval was converted to describe stress relaxation behaviour as well. The results will be used in a forthcoming study to predict the multiaxial stress reduction in thick weldments of A533B. (author)

  19. Evaluation on materials performance of Hastelloy Alloy XR for HTTR uses-5 (Creep properties of base metal and weldment in air)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Katsutoshi; Nakajima, Hajime; Koikegami, Hajime; Higuchi, Makoto; Nakanishi, Tsuneo; Saitoh, Teiichiro; Takatsu, Tamao.

    1994-01-01

    Creep properties of weldment made from Hastelloy Alloy XR base metals and filler metals for the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) components were examined by means of creep and creep rupture tests at 900 and 950degC in air. The results obtained are as follows: creep rupture strength was nearly equal or higher than that of Hastelloy Alloy XR master curve and was much higher than design creep rupture strength [S R ]. Furthermore, creep rupture strength and ductility of the present filler metal was in the data band in comparison with those of the previous filler metals. It is concluded from these reasons that this filler metal has fully favorable properties for HTTR uses. (author)

  20. Irradiated dynamic fracture toughness of ASTM A533, Grade B, Class 1 steel plate and submerged arc weldment. Heavy section steel technology program technical report No. 41

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, J.A.; Ceschini, L.J.; Shogan, R.P.; Rao, G.V.

    1976-10-01

    As a result of the Heavy Section Steel Technology Program (HSST), sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Westinghouse Electric Corporation conducted dynamic fracture toughness tests on irradiated HSST Plate 02 and submerged arc weldment material. Testing performed at the Westinghouse Research and Development Laboratory in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, included 0.394T compact tension, 1.9T compact tension, and 4T compact tension specimens. This data showed that, in the transition region, dynamic test procedures resulted in lower (compared to static) fracture toughness results, and that weak direction (WR) oriented specimen data were lower than the strong direction (RW) oriented specimen results. Irradiated lower-bound fracture toughness results of the HSST Program material were well above the adjusted ASME Section III K/sub IR/ curve. An irradiated and nonirradiated 4T-CT specimen was tested during a fracture toughness test as a preliminary study to determine the effect of irradiation on the acoustic emission-stress intensity factor relation in pressure vessel grade steel. The results indicated higher levels of acoustic emission activity from the irradiated sample as compared to the unirradiated one at a given stress intensity factor (K) level

  1. The fracture mechanical significance of cracks formed during stress-relief annealing of a submerged arc weldment in pressure vessel steel of type A508 class 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liljestrand, L.-G.; Oestberg, G.

    1978-01-01

    In large weldments of type A508 C12 cracks can form in the heat-affected zone during stress-relief annealing. The significance of such cracks with respect to catastrophic fracture is of interest from the point of view of safety, in particular for nuclear pressure vessels. In this investigation the size of reheat cracks, as formed and after fatigue growth, has been compared with the critical size for fast fracture. The latter was assessed by determination of the toughness of the heat-affected zones. The fracture toughness of the heat-affected zones did not differ much from that of the parent material. The presence of microcracks reduced the fracture toughness (of a special type of simulated specimen) at 20 0 C by about 20%. The fracture mechanical evaluation indicates that the cracks formed during stress-relief annealing should not impair the safety of the vessel under normal conditions, except for particular geometries and when the cracks may rapidly link together during fatigue. (author)

  2. Effects of filler metal composition on the microstructure and mechanical properties for ER NiCrFe-7 multi-pass weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mo, Wenlin; Lu, Shanping, E-mail: shplu@imr.ac.cn; Li, Dianzhong; Li, Yiyi

    2013-10-10

    The effects of the minor elements Ti and Nb on the microstructure and mechanical properties for multi-pass weldments from the alloy ER NiCrFe-7 were studied using an optical microscope (OM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), electron probe micro analysis (EPMA), as well as tensile and bend tests. The results show that grain size does not change significantly by increasing the Ti content from 0.28 wt% to 0.87 wt% in the weld metal (WM), whereas the grain boundaries become tortuous. The intragranular precipitate in the WM with Ti are AlO and Ti(C, N), whereas the intragranular precipitate in the WM with Nb are AlO and MX (M=Nb, Ti, X=C, N). As the Ti and Nb content increased in the WM, more MX was produced. Furthermore, the majority of C was fixed in the grain, not segregated to the grain boundaries; and less M{sub 23}C{sub 6} (M=Cr, Fe) formed at the grain boundaries. Fewer ductility-dip-cracking (DDC) was observed for WM with higher levels of Ti and Nb. The tensile strength and elongation simultaneously increased with an increase in Ti and Nb in WM. The number and length of the cracks in the bend specimens decreased upon adding Ti and Nb.

  3. Experimental study and modelling of high temperature creep flow and damage behaviour of 9Cr1Mo-NbV steel weldments; Etude experimentale et modelisation, du comportement, de l'endommagement et de la rupture en fluage a haute temperature de joint soudes en acier 9Cr1Mo-NbV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaffard, V

    2004-12-15

    Chromium martensitic stainless steels are under development since the 70's with the prospect of using them as structural components in thermal and nuclear power plants. The modified 9Cr1Mo-NbV steel is already used, especially in England and Japan, as a material for structural components in thermal power plants where welding is a commonly used joining technique. New generations of chromium martensitic stainless steels with improved mechanical properties for high pressure and temperature use are currently under development. However, observations of several in-service premature failures of welded components in 9Cr1Mo-NbV steel, outline a strong need for understanding the high temperature creep flow and damage behaviour of 9Cr1Mo-NbV steels and weldments. The present study aimed at experimentally determining and then modelling the high temperature creep flow and damage behaviour of both 9Cr1Mo-NbV steels and weldments (typically in the temperature range from 450 C to 650 C). The base metal was first studied as the reference material. It was especially evidenced that tempered chromium martensitic steels exhibit a change in both creep flow and damage behaviour for long term creep exposure. As a consequence, the classically performed extrapolation of 1,000 hours creep data to 100,000 hours creep lifetime predictions might be very hazardous. Based on experimental observations, a new model, integrating and coupling multiple creep flow and damage mechanisms, was developed in the framework of the mechanics of porous media. It was then successfully used to represent creep flow and damage behaviour of the base metal from high to low stress levels even for complex multiaxial loading conditions. Although the high temperature creep properties of the base metal are quite good, the occurrence of premature failure in weldments in high temperature creep conditions largely focused the attention of the scientific community. The lower creep strength of the weld component was also

  4. Longitudinal wave ultrasonic inspection of austenitic weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, B.S.; Hudgell, R.J.; Seed, H.

    1980-01-01

    Successful volumetric inspection of LMFBR primary circuits, and also much of the secondary circuit, is dependent on the availability of satisfactory examination procedures for austenitic welds. Application of conventional ultrasonic techniques is hampered by the anisotropic, textured structure of the weld metal and this paper describes development work on the use of longitudinal wave techniques. In addition to confirming the dominant effects of the weld structure on ultrasound propagation some results are given of studies utilising deliberately induced defects in Manual Metal Arc Welds in 50 mm plate together with preliminary work on the inspection of narrow austenitic welds fabricated by automatic processes. (author)

  5. Fracture Characteristics of Structural Steels and Weldments

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-11-01

    CARACTERISTICS 0F.$ýTRUCTURAL TEL/ - "AD E NTSA .INAL 1 A7 sk S. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(&) Y.2G. im 9. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS -017...36, T- 1,and HY-Y130 Steel and AX. Il 30 15 I Tensile F~racture Surface of A-36 Steel, 12x 31 16 Dimple Rupture in A-6Sel 0X 31 17 Plastic ...sites and the relative plasticity of thle The objective of this study was to use a scanning metal. If many fracture icleation sites initiate mticro

  6. Ultrasonic examination of stainless steel weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullan, J.V.

    1976-01-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. have specified a combination of liquid penetrant, radiography and ultrasonic examination of welds in austenitic stainless steel. In the past, angle wedges attached to ultrasonic transducers have been designed so that only shear waves are propagated in the medium. Shear waves, however, do not penetrate one half inch of weld metal without high transmission losses, so that the signal-to-noise ratio is poor. Canadian Vickers have therefore developed a method using longitudinal waves at 45 deg in the material. The presence also of a shear wave at an angle of 19 deg does not cause confusion, because the shear wave travels slower, and has farther to travel. Some considerations for the design of transducers and wedges are outlined. (N.D.H.)

  7. Quality assurance in thick-walled weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straub, H.

    1978-01-01

    Some guidelines are given here for judging the magnitude of flaws in welded thick-walled components (such as nuclear reactor vessels). The actually critical defect sizes are analysed, taking into account the residual stresses after welding and after annealing also. Various procedures for repairing such work are then indicated. (Auth.)

  8. Corrosion of weldments in orthodontic appliances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez, S.M.; Riesgo, O.; Duffo, G.S.

    1997-01-01

    The study of corrosion-related problems of dental materials has undergone a considerable development in recent years in order to avoid the use of materials with insufficient corrosion resistance in patients mouth. The subject of the present work was to study a particular type of corrosion: galvanic corrosion. One of the most common case of galvanic couples in patients mouth are the orthodontic appliances. The materials studied in the present work were stainless steel strips and silver-copper wires, isolated and welded between them. The electrochemical tests were performed in a NaCl 0.1M and Lactic Acid 0.1 M solution (pH2.3), and after test, the specimens were observed using the optical and scanning electron microscope. The results show that when stainless steel is coupled with a silver solder, the last is the anode of the galvanic couple. As a consequence of this, the silver solder undergone a severe attack. Stainless steel orthodontic appliances with silver solder are feasibly destroyed due to a severe attack on the filler metal disjoining the welded parts. (author) 9 refs

  9. Reduction of residual strains in weldments in explosion welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsemakhovich, B.D.

    1985-01-01

    Peculiarities of large-size item strains in explosion cladding have been investigated. Causes of explosion-welded item destruction under the action of reflected waves have been established by means of the acoustic analysis of the item-support system. It is suggested to use grit as a support which permits to decrease 3-4 times and stabilize residual strains and reduce to minimum the probability of crack appearance

  10. Characterisation of metallic glass incorporated Zircaloy-2 weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, S.; Savalia, R.T.; Bhanumurthy, K.; Dey, G.K.; Banerjee, S.

    1995-01-01

    In this study the effect of incorporation of Zr based Fe and Ni bearing metallic glass in spot welds in Zircaloy components has been examined. A comparison of strength and microstructure of the welded joint with and without glass has been carried out. The welded joint with metallic glass has been found to be stronger than the one without metallic glass. The microstructure of the welded region with metallic glass has been found to comprise a large region having martensite. This large martensitic region has also been found to have considerable amount of excess solute (Fe, Ni). The higher strength of the weld with metallic glass seems to originate due to solid solution strengthening, small grain size and the presence of martensitic structure over a large region. (orig.)

  11. Microstructural Characterization of HSLA-100 GMA-Weldments

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-01

    Intermeiate Oxygen Regime ----------- 66 D.) Schematic CCT Diagram - --------------- 66 9 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS I wish to express my appreciation to my thesis...have been observed in this research [review Figures 31 (a), (b) and 35 (a)]. Figure 38 (d) shows a schematic CCT diagram reported by Glover (Ref. 5) and...Regime B.) High Ox. gen Regime C. )Interme late Oxygen Regime D.1 Schematic CCT Diagram 66 LIST OF REFERENCES 1. Anderson, T.L., Hyatt J A West, J.C

  12. Strengthening of stainless steel weldment by high temperature precipitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Neves Monteiro

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical behavior and the strengthening mechanism of stainless steel welded joints at 600 °C have been investigated. The welds were composed of AISI 304 stainless steel, as base metal, and niobium containing AISI 347 stainless steel, as weld metal. The investigation was conducted by means of creep tests. The welded specimens were subjected to both high temperature (600 °C and long periods (up to 2000 h under constant load, and both mechanical properties and microstructural changes in the material were monitored. It was found that the exposure of the material at 600 °C under load contributes to a strengthening effect on the weld. The phenomenon might be correlated with an accelerated process of second phase precipitation hardening. Keywords: Stainless steel, Weld, AISI 304, Precipitation hardening

  13. Strengthening of stainless steel weldment by high temperature precipitation

    OpenAIRE

    Sergio Neves Monteiro; Lucio Fabio Cassiano Nascimento; Édio Pereira Lima, Jr.; Fernanda Santos da Luz; Eduardo Sousa Lima; Fábio de Oliveira Braga

    2017-01-01

    The mechanical behavior and the strengthening mechanism of stainless steel welded joints at 600 °C have been investigated. The welds were composed of AISI 304 stainless steel, as base metal, and niobium containing AISI 347 stainless steel, as weld metal. The investigation was conducted by means of creep tests. The welded specimens were subjected to both high temperature (600 °C) and long periods (up to 2000 h) under constant load, and both mechanical properties and microstructural changes in ...

  14. Exploratory Study of Bend Ductility of Selected Refractory Metal Weldments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sinclair, John

    1965-01-01

    .... Bead-on-plate welds were made on the materials by using the electron-beam process or by using the gas tungsten process in argon atmosphere containing either 2 to 4 ppm oxygen with the moisture level...

  15. Creep damage of 12% CrMoV weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kussmaul, K.; Maile, K.; Theofel, H.

    1989-01-01

    Creep tests were performed to determine the creep behaviour of similar welded joints of 12% CrMoV-steels which had been made using various heat inputs. The specimens were taken transverse to the seam. The transition from the coarse-grained to the fine-grained area of the heat affected zone (HAZ) proved to be the location of failure after longer rupture times. All tested specimens lie in the +-20% scatterband of the material standard DIN 17175. Creep rupture was initiated by the nucleation and growth of cavities. The appearance of the damage zone near the fracture face depends on testing conditions and heat input. The nucleation of cavities can be detected at an early stage of lifetime

  16. Residual stresses in a weldment of pressure vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gott, K.E.

    1978-01-01

    A study was made of the distribution of residual stresses around a typical weld from a light water reactor pressure vessel by an X-ray double-exposure camera technique. So that the magnitude, sign, and distribution of the residual stresses were as similar as possible to those found in practice, a wide, full-thickness specimen of A533B Cl 1 steel containing a submerged-arc weld was stress-relief annealed. To obtain a three-dimensional distribution of the stresses the specimen was examined at different levels through the thickness. Following the removal of material by milling, the specimen surface was electropolished to free it from cold work. Corrections have been made to take into account specimen relaxation. To completely define the original stress system it is desirable also to measure the change in curvature on removing a layer of material. Unless this is done assumptions must be made which complicate the calculations unnecessarily. This became apparent after the experimental work was completed. In the centre of the plate the methods of correction which can be used are sensitive to errors in the measurements. The corrected results show that the dominant residual stress is perpendicular to the weld. It is positive at the surfaces and negative in the centre of the plate. The maximum value can reach the yield stress. The residual stresses in the weld metal can locally vary considerably: from 100 to 350N/mm 2 over a distance of 5mm. Such large variations have been found to coincide with the heat-affected zones of the individual weld runs. (author)

  17. Corrosion behavior of stainless steel weldments in physiological solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, A.; Azam, M.; Deen, K. M.

    2018-01-01

    In this study corrosion behavior of TIG welded 316L stainless steel plates in simulated biological solutions is investigated. The mechanical testing results showed slight decrease in ductility after welding and the fracture surface represented mixed cleavage and inclusions containing dimple structure. The heat affected and weld zone (WZ) demonstrated higher corrosion potential and relatively large pitting tendency than base metal (BM) in both Hank’s and Ringer’s solution. The formation of delta (δ) ferrite in the heat affected and WZ decreased the corrosion resistance as confirmed from potentiodynamic Tafel scans. The decrease in pitting resistance and lower protection tendency of the WZ compared to BM and heat affected zone was also quantified from the cyclic polarization trends.

  18. Effects of titanium and zirconium on iron aluminide weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burt, R.P.; Edwards, G.R. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); David, S.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Iron aluminides form a coarse fusion zone microstructure when gas-tungsten arc welded. This microstructure is susceptible to hydrogen cracking when water vapor is present in the welding environment. Because fusion zone microstructural refinement can reduce the hydrogen cracking susceptibility, titanium was used to inoculate the weld pool in iron aluminide alloy FA-129. Although the fusion zone microstructure was significantly refined by this method, the fracture stress was found to decrease with titanium additions. This decrease is attributed to an increase in inclusions at the grain boundaries.

  19. Neutron irradiation effects in pressure vessel steels and weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ianko, L [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria). Div. of Nuclear Power; Davies, L M

    1994-12-31

    This paper deals with the effects of neutron irradiation on the steel and welds used for the pressure vessels which house the reactor cores in light water reactors: irradiation effects on mechanical properties and the shift in ductile-brittle transition temperature, importance of the knowledge of the neutron fluence and of the monitoring and surveillance programmes; empirical and mechanistic modelling of irradiation effects and the necessity of data extension to new operational limits; consequences on the manufacturing and structural design of materials and structures; mitigation of irradiation effects by annealing; international activities and programmes in the field of neutron irradiation effects on PV steels and welds. 37 refs., 22 figs.

  20. Stress relief of austenitic weldments: microstructural and mechanical property effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, R.G.

    1982-01-01

    Two consumables suitable for welding AISI 316 have been studied. Both contained 3-8% delta-ferrite in the as-welded state but were of different nominal compositions, namely 19Cr-12Ni-3Mo and 17Cr-8Ni-2Mo. The results of a series of uniaxial stress relaxation tests carried out over a range of temperatures from 650 to 850 0 C indicate that it was practicable to achieve acceptable residual stress levels even at the lower end of this temperature range; the inference was, therefore, that the final choice of stress relief treatment will be determined by the metallurgical changes that simultaneously occur. The isothermal transformation kinetics of the delta-ferrite were determined over the temperature range 600-800 0 C for both weld metals and the nature and morphology of the phases formed was studied. Transformation proceeded more rapidly in the 19Cr-12Ni-3Mo deposit than in the 17Cr-8Ni-2Mo deposit. Electron microscopy revealed that in both weld metals the delta-ferrite acted as a focus for a series of complex precipitation reactions involving initially the simultaneous formation of M 23 C 6 and reversion of delta to #betta# followed by precipitation of intermetallic phases chi and σ. Tensile impact and creep properties of aged material have been determined and are discussed in terms of the structural features observed. (author)

  1. High-Mn steel weldment mechanical properties at 4 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, J.W.; Sunwoo, A.J.; Morris, J.W. Jr.

    1988-06-01

    Advanced high-field superconducting magnets of the next generation of magnetic confinement fusion devices will require structural alloys with high yield strength and high toughness at cryogenic temperatures. Commercially available alloys used in the current generation of magnets, such as 300 series stainless steels, do not have the required properties. N-strengthened, high-Mn alloys meet base plate requirements in the as-rolled condition. However, the property changes associated with weld microstructural and chemical changes in these alloys have not been well characterized. In this work welding induced cryogenic mechanical property changes of an 18Mn-16Cr-5Ni-0.2N alloy are correlated with as-solidified weld microstructures and chemistries. 30 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs

  2. Effects of Preheat on Weldments of NICOP Steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-09-01

    percent Nital solution (nitric acid (HNO3) ,* and ethanol (C2HsOH) which revealed the weld area, heat affected zone and base metal. A section 25.2mm (1 inch...electrolyte, consisting of 10% per- cloric acid (HC104 ) and 90% methanal (CH30H) was maintained at a temperature of -450C (-49 0 F). The Polipower was set...Preheated Weidment. N on Non-Preheated Weidment. Figre3. Loaton o McrhadnssTrvese I17 ~.4. .9 G° s s E 43 C 0 CL 44’ 00 Hda *SBUPJQH Figure 4. Comparison

  3. Fatigue strength depending on position of cracks for weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hae Woo; Park, Won Jo

    2006-01-01

    This is a study of fatigue strength of weld deposits with transverse cracks in plate up to 50 mm thick. It is concerned with the fatigue properties of welds already with transverse cracks. A previous study of transverse crack occurrence, location and microstructure in accordance with welding conditions was published in the Welding Journal (Lee et al., 1998). A fatigue crack develops as a result of stress concentration and extends with each load cycle until fatigue occurs, or until the cyclic loads are transferred to redundant members. The fatigue performance of a member is more dependent on the localized state of stress than the static strength of the base metal or the weld metal. Fatigue specimens were machined to have transverse cracks located on the surface and inside the specimen. Evaluation of fatigue strength depending on location of transverse cracks was then performed. When transverse cracks were propagated in a quarter-or half-circle shape, the specimen broke at low cycle in the presence of a surface crack. However, when the crack was inside the specimen, it propagated in a circular or elliptical shape and the specimen showed high fatigue strength, enough to reach the fatigue limit within tolerance of design stresses

  4. Development of residual stress prediction model in pipe weldment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eom, Yun Yong; Lim, Se Young; Choi, Kang Hyeuk; Cho, Young Sam; Lim, Jae Hyuk [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-03-15

    When Leak Before Break(LBB) concepts is applied to high energy piping of nuclear power plants, residual weld stresses is a important variable. The main purpose of his research is to develop the numerical model which can predict residual weld stresses. Firstly, basic theories were described which need to numerical analysis of welding parts. Before the analysis of pipe, welding of a flat plate was analyzed and compared. Appling the data of used pipes, thermal/mechanical analysis were accomplished and computed temperature gradient and residual stress distribution. For thermal analysis, proper heat flux was regarded as the heat source and convection/radiation heat transfer were considered at surfaces. The residual stresses were counted from the computed temperature gradient and they were compared and verified with a result of another research.

  5. Creep and Creep Crack Growth Behaviors for SMAW Weldments of Gr. 91 Steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Woo Gon; Yin, Song Nan; Park, Ji Yeon; Hong, Sung Deok; Kim, Yong Wan; Park, Jae Young

    2010-01-01

    High Cr ferritic resistance steels with tempered martensite microstructures posses enhanced creep strength at the elevated temperatures. Those steels as represented by a modified 9Cr-1Mo steel (ASME Grade 91, hereafter Gr.91) are regarded as main structural materials of sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFR) and reactor pressure vessel materials of very high temperature reactors (VHTR). The SFR and VHTR systems are designed during long-term duration reaching 60 years at elevated temperatures and often subjected to non-uniform stress and temperature distribution during service. These conditions may generate localized creep damage and propagate the cracks and ultimately may cause a fracture. A significant portion of its life is spent in crack propagation. Therefore, a creep crack growth rate (CCGR) due to creep damage should be assessed for both the base metal (BM) and welded metal (WM). Enough CCGR data for them should be provided for assessing their structural integrities. However, their CCGR data for the Gr. 91 steels is still insufficient. In this study, the CCGR for the BM and the WM of the Gr. 91 steel was comparatively investigated. A series of the CCG tests were conducted under different applied loads for the BM and the WM at 600 .deg. C. The CCGR was characterized in terms of the C parameter, and their CCG behavior were compared, respectively

  6. Effect of stress relief parameters on the mechanical properties of pressure vessel steels and weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canonico, D.A.; Stelzman, W.J.

    1976-01-01

    Post weld heat treatments of thick-section A533B steel for nuclear pressure vessels are discussed with reference to the ASME code. The discussion is in the form of a lecture and summarized by noting that the ASME code, in particular Section III, Division 1, imposes a post weld heat treatment requirement on pressure vessels fabricated from low alloy high strength steels. The Code permits a holding temperature range, the high side of which could result in poorer toughness properties. Long times in excess of 100 hours and/or high temperatures, 649 0 C can result in an increase in the NDT and a decrease in the upper shelf energy

  7. Corrosion behavior of Al6061 alloy weldment produced by friction stir welding process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Gharavi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the corrosion behavior of welded lap joints of AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy produced by friction stir welding process has been investigated. Corrosion properties of welded lap joints were studied by cyclic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy tests. All tests were performed in an aerated 0.6 mol L−1 NaCl aqueous solution with pH = 6.5 at a temperature of 30 °C to characterize corrosion morphology and realize corrosion features of weld regions as opposed to the parent alloy. The microstructure of weld nugget (WN, heated affected zone (HAZ, and parent alloy were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The experimental results indicated that the welding process has a major effect on the corrosion resistance, which possibly associated to the break-down and dissolution of intermetallic particles. It is supposed that an increasing in intermetallic distributed throughout the matrix of weld regions increases the galvanic corrosion couples. Furthermore, by decreasing the grain size in the weld regions, the susceptibility to corrosion is enhanced. The pitting corrosion and intergranular attack are the dominant corrosion types in the weld regions and the parent alloy.

  8. Quantification of the toughness distribution in a heavy section submerged arc multilayer reactor pressure vessel weldment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerjak, H.; Prader, R.

    1999-01-01

    In a working procedure qualification test weld representing a heavy section circumferential reactor pressure vessel (RPV) weld tested in 1968, lower toughness values were observed in the top layer region compared to those found in the filler region. Gleeble simulation, extensive microscopic evaluation, diligent Charpy V-notch testing and modelling of the bead sequence and distribution of alloying elements was applied to explain this effect. It could be revealed that the microstructure of the weld metal is the most important factor influencing the toughness. When an 'as welded' microstructure is partly or fully reaustenitised by the adjacent multilayer beads, the microstructure transforms and the toughness increases. In the filler region, 85% of the cross-section consists from transformed microstructure, whereas in the top layer only 20% are transformed. It is quite evident that, accidentally, the notch tip of Charpy samples in 1968 were placed in untransformed microstructures. When the top layer on the inner surface of the RPV is weld cladded by austenitic stainless steel, full transformation occurs and the toughness representing the filler region can be taken into account for safety evaluations. (orig.)

  9. Residual stress measurements in thick structural weldments by means of neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohms, C.; Youtsos, A.G.; Idsert, P. v.d.; Timke, T.

    2000-01-01

    Welding residual stresses in large structural components are a major concern with respect to their performance and lifetime. In large structures reasonable thermal stress relief treatment is usually impossible due to the component size. On the other hand, prediction of welding stresses by numerical modelling has not yet proven to be generally reliable, while the experimental determination of such stresses remains a demanding task. At the high flux reactor (HFR), Petten, a new residual stress diffractometer has been installed recently capable of handling of components up to 1000 kg - the large component neutron diffraction facility (LCNDF). It has facilitated residual stress measurements in two large welded components, of which results are presented here. The first component represents a bi-metallic weld in form of a pipe of 25 mm wall thickness. Three dimensional measurements of residual stress are discussed in detail. The second specimen is a 66 mm wall thickness austenitic steel nuclear piping weld. Results on relief of strain within the weld through post weld heat treatment (PWHT) are presented. Additionally results obtained earlier at former CRNL (CAN) on a section of a thick nuclear piping weld are presented in order to illustrate the variation in the reference lattice parameter trough the weld and the heat affected zone (HAZ). These results clearly show the necessity to determine the reference parameters for each location in all measurement directions by means of measurements in small coupons free of macro-stresses. (orig.)

  10. Study of Residual Stresses and Distortion in Structural Weldments in High-Strength Steels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-11-30

    diagram of the material under consideration which is either known experimentally or can be derived from the TTT diagram. Using the CCT diagram and the...strains are incorporated into the finite element program ADINA replacing the conventional thermal strains, T TH e i" I Computed CCT Diagram . Experimentally...derived CCT diagrams exist today for several steel alloys, enabling one to predict the microstructure [history during the cooling stage of the

  11. The Effect of Welding Process on the Microstructure of HY-130 Steel Weldments

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-12-01

    rates. Cooling is continuous, therefore continuous cooling transformation ( CCT ) diagrams may be used to predict the microstructure of the particular...weld metal composition. A schematic CCT diagram for low-carbon steel [Ref. 12] is included at Figure 3. This summarizes the weld metal microstructure...the driving force for the reaction. From the CCT diagram it is seen that increasing the cooling rate would increase the formation of acic- ular

  12. Super Phenix 1: In-service inspection of main and safety tanks weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asty, M.; Vertut, J.; Argous, J.P.

    1980-01-01

    In Service Inspection of the main tank of the Super Phenix 1 reactor is a new demand compared to Phenix: the authorities have asked that surface and internal defects be detected and their evolution monitored in the future. The presence of thermal baffles inside the main tank precludes the access on that side: the distance between the main and safety tanks takes into account the room needed for an In Service Inspection module. An inspection vehicle is presently under development, which includes ultrasonic examination (focussed probes) and visual examination (TV cameras) capabilities. We briefly describe the techniques that have been selected for ultrasonic testing and also for the vehicle and its guidance between the tanks. (author)

  13. Super Phenix 1: In-service inspection of main and safety tanks weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asty, M [DTech/STA, Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay (France); Vertut, J [DPR/STEP, Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay (France); Argous, J P [DRNR/STRS, Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Cadarache (France)

    1980-11-01

    In Service Inspection of the main tank of the Super Phenix 1 reactor is a new demand compared to Phenix: the authorities have asked that surface and internal defects be detected and their evolution monitored in the future. The presence of thermal baffles inside the main tank precludes the access on that side: the distance between the main and safety tanks takes into account the room needed for an In Service Inspection module. An inspection vehicle is presently under development, which includes ultrasonic examination (focussed probes) and visual examination (TV cameras) capabilities. We briefly describe the techniques that have been selected for ultrasonic testing and also for the vehicle and its guidance between the tanks. (author)

  14. Neutron irradiation effects in reactor pressure vessel steels and weldments. Working document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-10-01

    As a result of the popularity of the Agencies report 'Neutron Irradiation Embrittlement of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels' of 1975, it was decided that another report on this broad subject would be of use. In this report, background and contemporary views on specially identified areas of the subject are considered as self-contained chapters, written by experts. A separate abstract was prepared for the introduction and for each of the eleven chapters, which are: 1. Reactor Pressure Vessel Design, 2. Reactor Pressure Materials, 3. WWER Pressure Vessels, 4. Determination of Mechanical Properties, 5. Neutron Exposure, 6. Methodology of Irradiation Experiments, 7. Effect of Irradiation on Mechanical Properties, 8. Mechanisms of Irradiation Embrittlement, 9. Modelling of Irradiation Damage, 10. Annealing of Irradiation Damage, 11. Safety Assessment using Surveillance Programmes and Data Bases

  15. Effects of Cluster Porosity on the Tensile Properties of Butt-Weldments in T-1 Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-11-01

    measured both in terms ol the actual total area ol pores and the area ol ihe clustei (including metal ligaments, or webs , that connect pores...8217hat a nearly linear con elation exists between the J integral value at maximum load. JM=J<^max,> aml tne Product °im max < Wix - Hcrt’ <W\\ is the

  16. A determination of the benefits of annealing irradiated pressure vessel weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lott, R.G.; Mager, T.R.

    1988-01-01

    The long-term benefit of annealing an irradiated reactor pressure vessel steel may be described in terms of a benefit factor, B. The benefit factor compares the mechanical properties of an annealed and reirradiated specimen with an equivalent specimen having no intermediate anneal. The benefit factor was determined using a series of microhardness specimens prepared from nuclear pressure vessel surveillance program materials. These specimens were annealed and then reirradiated in a test reactor. There was an obvious long-term benefit in the specimens annealed at 450 0 C. The long-term benefit was less obvious at 400 0 C and no significant benefit was noted at 350 0 C. The benefit factor may also be used as the basis of a surveillance program for an annealed pressure vessel. A strategy for such a surveillance program is described. (author)

  17. Time-temperature characteristics of the various heat-affected zones in HT-9 weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foulds, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    Temperatures at different distances from the fusion boundary were measured during GTA weld depositing MTS-4 filler wire on 9.52-mm (3/8 in.) thick HT-9 plate. Peak temperature measurements indicate each of the heat-affected regions to be austenitized. An exponential expression has been used to describe the cooling curves as a function of peak temperature (or distance) from the fusion boundary

  18. Hydrogen induced cold cracking studies on armour grade high strength, quenched and tempered steel weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magudeeswaran, G.; Balasubramanian, V. [Centre for Materials Joining Research (CEMAJOR), Department of Manufacturing Engineering, Annamalai University, Annamalai Nagar 608 002, Tamil Nadu (India); Madhusudhan Reddy, G. [Metal Joining Section, Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory (DMRL), Kanchanbagh (P.O.) Hyderabad 560 058 Andhra Pradesh (India)

    2008-04-15

    Quenched and tempered (Q and T) steels are prone to hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) in the heat affected zone after welding. The use of austenitic stainless steel (ASS) consumables to weld the above steel was the only available remedy because of higher solubility for hydrogen in austenitic phase. The use of stainless steel consumables for a non-stainless steel base metal is not economical. Hence, alternate consumables for welding Q and T steels and their vulnerability to HIC need to be explored. Recent studies proved that low hydrogen ferritic (LHF) steel consumables can be used to weld Q and T steels, which can give very low hydrogen levels in the weld deposits. In this investigation an attempt has been made to study the influence of welding consumables and welding processes on hydrogen induced cold cracking of armour grade Q and T steel welds by implant testing. Shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) and flux cored arc welding (FCAW) processes were used for making welds using ASS and LHF welding consumables. ASS welds made using FCAW process offered a higher resistance to HIC than all other welds considered in this investigation. (author)

  19. Super Phenix 1: in Service inspection of main and safety tanks weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asty, Michel; Vertut, Jean; Argous, J.P.

    1980-05-01

    In service inspection of the main tank of the Super Phenix 1 reactor is a new demand as compared to Phenix: the authorities have asked that surface and internal defects could be detected and their evolution monitored in the future. The presence of thermal baffles inside the main tank precludes the access on that side: the distance between the main and safety tanks takes into account the room needed for an In Service Inspection module. An inspection vehicle is presently under development, which includes ultrasonic examination (focussed probes) and visual examination (TV cameras) capabilities. We briefly describe the techniques that have been selected for ultrasonic testing and also for the vehicle and its guidance between the tanks

  20. Estimation of the defect detection probability for ultrasonic tests on thick sections steel weldments. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, D.P.; Toomay, T.L.; Davis, C.S.

    1979-02-01

    An inspection uncertainty analysis of published PVRC Specimen 201 data is reported to obtain an estimate of the probability of recording an indication as a function of imperfection height for ASME Section XI Code ultrasonic inspections of the nuclear reactor vessel plate seams and to demonstrate the advantages of inspection uncertainty analysis over conventional detection/nondetection counting analysis. This analysis found the probability of recording a significant defect with an ASME Section XI Code ultrasonic inspection to be very high, if such a defect should exist in the plate seams of a nuclear reactor vessel. For a one-inch high crack, for example, this analysis gives a best estimate recording probability of .985 and a 90% lower confidence bound recording probabilty of .937. It is also shown that inspection uncertainty analysis gives more accurate estimates and gives estimates over a much greater flaw size range than is possible with conventional analysis. There is reason to believe that the estimation procedure used is conservative, the estimation is based on data generated several years ago, on very small defects, in an environment that is different from the actual in-service inspection environment

  1. Optimization of pulsed TIG welding process parameters on mechanical properties of AA 5456 Aluminum alloy weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Warangal 506 004 (India)], E-mail: adepu_kumar7@yahoo.co.in; Sundarrajan, S. [Scientist ' G' , Defence Research and Development Laboratory, Hyderabad 500 028 (India)

    2009-04-15

    The present work pertains to the improvement of mechanical properties of AA 5456 Aluminum alloy welds through pulsed tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding process. Taguchi method was employed to optimize the pulsed TIG welding process parameters of AA 5456 Aluminum alloy welds for increasing the mechanical properties. Regression models were developed. Analysis of variance was employed to check the adequacy of the developed models. The effect of planishing on mechanical properties was also studied and observed that there was improvement in mechanical properties. Microstructures of all the welds were studied and correlated with the mechanical properties.

  2. Optimization of pulsed TIG welding process parameters on mechanical properties of AA 5456 Aluminum alloy weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, A.; Sundarrajan, S.

    2009-01-01

    The present work pertains to the improvement of mechanical properties of AA 5456 Aluminum alloy welds through pulsed tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding process. Taguchi method was employed to optimize the pulsed TIG welding process parameters of AA 5456 Aluminum alloy welds for increasing the mechanical properties. Regression models were developed. Analysis of variance was employed to check the adequacy of the developed models. The effect of planishing on mechanical properties was also studied and observed that there was improvement in mechanical properties. Microstructures of all the welds were studied and correlated with the mechanical properties

  3. Microstructure and Hardness Variation in a TIG Weldment of Irradiated F82H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanigawa, H.; Ando, M.; Sawai, T.; Shiba, K.; Hashimoto, N.; Klueh, R.L.

    2003-01-01

    Previous work reported that a TIG weld joint of F82H exhibited low irradiation hardening in a tensile test, compared to the base metal. Microhardness tests and microstructure observation on the neutron-irradiated TIG weld joint of F82H revealed that the over-tempered zone in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) exhibited this good performance. The region in the HAZ where the prior austenite grain size became very fine during welding also exhibited lower irradiation hardening. Hypotheses for these low-hardening mechanisms were proposed based on the phase diagram and grain size

  4. Properties of cast CF-8 stainless-steel weldments at cryogenic temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chow, J.G.Y.; Klamut, C.J.

    1981-01-01

    ISABELLE is a 400 x 400 GeV proton-proton colliding beam accelerator now under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The beams will be guided and focused by superconducting magnets. A total of 722 dipole beam bending magnets and 280 quadrupole beam focusing magnets are required. Centrifugally cast CF-8 stainless steel tubes were selected to provide a rigid support and to house the superconducting magnet assembly. The selection of this material for the support tubes is discussed by Dew-Hughes and Lee. Their study indicates that the presence of delta ferrite strengthens the material but causes a decrease in ductility if the ferrite content is greater than 10%. Brown and Tobler found that the fracture toughness is also decreased as the delta ferrite content is increased

  5. Characterisation of weldment hardness, impact energy and microstructure in API X65 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashemi, S.H.; Mohammadyani, D.

    2012-01-01

    The variation of microstructure and mechanical properties in various sub-zones of double submerged arc welded line pipe steel of grade API X65 was investigated. Instrumented Charpy V-notch tests and Vickers hardness experiments were conducted on the fusion zone, base metal and heat affected zone of the weld joint in 14.3 mm thick, 1219 mm outside diameter spiral pipeline. The lowest impact energy and the highest hardness level (160J and 218 HV, respectively) were recorded in the fusion zone. The low energy and high hardness characteristics of the seam weld can be attributed to its cast microstructure and the presence of grain boundary phases (such as proeutectoid ferrite), confirmed by standard metallographic observation. Despite this, service requirements set by the API 5L industry code (minimum impact energy of 73J, maximum hard spots of 350 HV) were fulfilled by the tested steel. Highlights: ► Experimental study of API X65 steel microstructure. ► Analysis of the relationship between X65 steel microstructure and hardness. ► Analysis of the relationship between X65 steel microstructure and impact energy. ► Presentation of detailed technical information on DSA welding in spiral pipes.

  6. Corrosion Damage in Penetration Nozzle and Its Weldment of Reactor Pressure Vessel Head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Yun Soo; Kim, Joung Soo; Kim, Hong Pyo; Hwang, Seong Sik; Yi, Young Sun; Kim, Dong Jin; Jung, Man Kyo

    2003-07-01

    The recent status on corrosion damage of reactor vessel head (RVH) penetration nozzles at primary water reactors (PWRs), including control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) and thermocouple nozzles, was investigated. The studies for primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) characteristics of Alloy 600 and Alloy 182/82 were reviewed and summarized in terms of the crack initiation and crack growth rate. The studies on the boric acid corrosion (BAC) of low alloy steels were also included in this report. PWSCC was found to be the main failure mechanism of RVH CRDM nozzles, which are constituted with Alloy 600 base metal and Alloy 182 weld filler materials. Alloy 600 and Alloy 182/82 are very susceptible to intergranular SCC in the PWR environments. The PWSCC crack initiation and growth features in the fusion zone of Alloy 182/82 were strongly dependant on solidification anisotropy during welding, test temperature, weld heat, mechanical loading, stress relief heat treatment, cold work and so on. BAC of low alloy steels is a wastage phenomenon due to general corrosion occurring on the over-all surface area of material. Systematic studies, concerned with structural integrity of RVH penetration nozzles as well as improvement of PWSCC resistance of nickel-based weld metals in the simulated PWR environment, are needed

  7. Effect of Cr Contents and Heat Treating on Reverted Austenite in Maraging Steel Weldments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S. W.; Lee, H. W.

    2018-05-01

    By conducting flux cored arc welding (FCAW) on maraging steels with Cr contents of 1.4 and 5.2 wt%, this study observed the effects of Cr content and heat treating on reverted austenite formation in welded maraging steel. Aging treatment was carried out at the temperatures of 450, 480 and 530 °C for 3 h in each condition. As the aging temperature increased, reverted austenite was formed along the interdendritic and intercellular grain boundaries, and the proportion of reverted austenite increased with increasing Cr addition. The aging process led to the segregation of Ti and Mo along the interdendritic and intercellular grain boundaries. Some of the welded specimens were subjected to solution heat treatment at 820 and 1250 °C for 1 h after welding, resulting in a decrease in reverted austenite fraction.

  8. Improving the ballistic immunity of armour steel weldments by plasma transferred arc (PTA) hardfacing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babu, S.; Balasubramanian, V.; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.; Balasubramanian, T.S.

    2010-01-01

    This investigation describes about improving the ballistic immunity of armour steel joints which are fabricated by sandwiching of plasma transferred arc (PTA) hardfaced interlayers in between soft austenitic stainless steel (ASS) welds. From the results, the welds with sandwiched interlayer stopped all the projectiles successfully, irrespective of processes used, whereas welds without sandwiched interlayer were failed. In order to know the cause of failure, a detailed metallographic examination was carried out. The variation in microstructure and hardness at various zones of the weld are discussed. For the first time, it was found that the armour steel could be hardfaced by the PTA process with tungsten carbide powder.

  9. Evaluation of flow properties in the weldments of vanadium alloys using a novel indentation technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubbi, A.N.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Lee, E.H.; King, J.F.; Goodwin, G.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Automated Ball Indentation (ABI) testing, was successfully employed to determine the flow properties of the fusion zone, heat affected zone (HAZ), and base metal of the gas tungsten arc (GTA) and electron beam (EB) welds of the V-4Cr-4Ti (large heat no. 832665) and the V-5Cr-5Ti (heat 832394) alloys. ABI test results showed a clear distinction among the properties of the fusion zone, HAZ, and base metal in both GTA and EB welds of the two alloys. GTA and EB welds of both V-4Cr-4Ti and V-5Cr-5Ti alloys show strengthening of both the fusion zone and the HAZ (compared to base metal) with the fusion zone having higher strength than the HAZ. These data correlate well with the Brinell hardness. On the other hand, GTA welds of both alloys, after a post-weld heat treatment of 950{degrees}C for 2 h, show a recovery of the properties to base metal values with V-5Cr-5Ti showing a higher degree of recovery compared to V-4Cr-4Ti. These measurements correlate with the reported recovery of the Charpy impact properties.

  10. Fatigue life extension techniques for weldments via mechanical surface post treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Seung Ho; Han, Jeong Woo; Cho, In Ho

    2008-01-01

    In many welded structures, fatigue failures are often occurred at welded joints in which stress concentrations due to the joint geometry are relatively high. Although employing good detail design practices by upgrading the welded detail class enables to improve the fatigue performance, in many cases, the modification of the detail may not be practicable. As an alternative, fatigue life extension techniques, that reduce the severity of the stress concentration at the weld toe region, remove imperfections, and introduce local compressive welding residual stress, can be applied. These techniques are also used as remedial measures to extend the fatigue life of critical welds that have failed prematurely and have been repaired. This paper introduces peening techniques via a pneumatic hammer peening and ultrasonic impact which make it possible to give the weld not only a favorable shape reducing the local stress concentration, but also a beneficial compressive residual stress into material surface

  11. Fracture toughness shifts in high-copper weldments (series 5 and 6)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskander, S.K.

    1995-01-01

    The specific activities to be performed in this task are the: (1) continuation of Phase 2 of the Fifth Irradiation Series, and (2) completion of the Sixth Irradiation Series, including testing nine irradiated Italian crack-arrest specimens. The test results of the Italian crack-arrest specimens are being analyzed, and full details will be published in a NUREG report currently in preparation. The crack-mouth opening displacement (CMOD) was measured at a distance greater than that prescribed in the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) open-quotes Test for Determining Plane-Strain Crack-Arrest Fracture Toughness, K la , of Ferritic Steelsclose quotes (E 1221-88). A method for adjusting the CMOD to account for this has been developed and is presented. The correction was ∼4% for small specimens and ∼2% for the larger ones. As part of this task, irradiation of HSSI weld 73W to a high fluence [5 x 10 19 neutrons/cm 2 ( > 1 MeV)] will be performed to determine whether the K Jc curve shape change observed in the Fifth HSSI Series is exacerbated. The design and fabrication of the temperature and dosimetry verification capsules are performed under this task, but for purposes of continuity, their progress will be reported under Task 6, where the design of the new irradiation facilities and capsules is performed

  12. Evaluation of long-term creep-fatigue life of stainless steel weldment based on a microstructure degradation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asayama, Tai; Hasebe, Shinichi

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes a newly developed analytical method of evaluation of creep-fatigue strength of stainless weld metals. Based on the observation that creep-fatigue crack initiates adjacent to the interface of sigma-phase/delta-ferrite and matrix, a mechanistic model which allows the evaluation of micro stress/strain concentration adjacent to the interface was developed. Fatigue and creep damage were evaluated using the model which describes the microstructure after exposed to high temperatures for a long time. Thus it was made possible to predict analytically the long-term creep-fatigue life of stainless steel metals whose microstructure is degraded as a result of high temperature service. (author)

  13. Effect of heat input on the microstructure, residual stresses and corrosion resistance of 304L austenitic stainless steel weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unnikrishnan, Rahul, E-mail: rahulunnikrishnannair@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Visvesvaraya National Institute of Technology (VNIT), South Ambazari Road, Nagpur 440010, Maharashtra (India); Idury, K.S.N. Satish, E-mail: satishidury@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Visvesvaraya National Institute of Technology (VNIT), South Ambazari Road, Nagpur 440010, Maharashtra (India); Ismail, T.P., E-mail: tpisma@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Visvesvaraya National Institute of Technology (VNIT), South Ambazari Road, Nagpur 440010, Maharashtra (India); Bhadauria, Alok, E-mail: alokbhadauria1@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Visvesvaraya National Institute of Technology (VNIT), South Ambazari Road, Nagpur 440010, Maharashtra (India); Shekhawat, S.K., E-mail: satishshekhawat@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay (IITB), Powai, Mumbai 400076, Maharashtra (India); Khatirkar, Rajesh K., E-mail: rajesh.khatirkar@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Visvesvaraya National Institute of Technology (VNIT), South Ambazari Road, Nagpur 440010, Maharashtra (India); Sapate, Sanjay G., E-mail: sgsapate@yahoo.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Visvesvaraya National Institute of Technology (VNIT), South Ambazari Road, Nagpur 440010, Maharashtra (India)

    2014-07-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are widely used in high performance pressure vessels, nuclear, chemical, process and medical industry due to their very good corrosion resistance and superior mechanical properties. However, austenitic stainless steels are prone to sensitization when subjected to higher temperatures (673 K to 1173 K) during the manufacturing process (e.g. welding) and/or certain applications (e.g. pressure vessels). During sensitization, chromium in the matrix precipitates out as carbides and intermetallic compounds (sigma, chi and Laves phases) decreasing the corrosion resistance and mechanical properties. In the present investigation, 304L austenitic stainless steel was subjected to different heat inputs by shielded metal arc welding process using a standard 308L electrode. The microstructural developments were characterized by using optical microscopy and electron backscattered diffraction, while the residual stresses were measured by X-ray diffraction using the sin{sup 2}ψ method. It was observed that even at the highest heat input, shielded metal arc welding process does not result in significant precipitation of carbides or intermetallic phases. The ferrite content and grain size increased with increase in heat input. The grain size variation in the fusion zone/heat affected zone was not effectively captured by optical microscopy. This study shows that electron backscattered diffraction is necessary to bring out changes in the grain size quantitatively in the fusion zone/heat affected zone as it can consider twin boundaries as a part of grain in the calculation of grain size. The residual stresses were compressive in nature for the lowest heat input, while they were tensile at the highest heat input near the weld bead. The significant feature of the welded region and the base metal was the presence of a very strong texture. The texture in the heat affected zone was almost random. - Highlights: • Effect of heat input on microstructure, residual stresses and corrosion is studied. • HAZ and width of dendrite in the welded region increase with heat input. • Residual stresses are tensile near the welded region after the highest heat input. • Welded region has the highest pit density after highest heat input. • Dendrites and δ-ferrite were highly oriented in the welded region.

  14. Characterization of microstructure and texture across dissimilar super duplex/austenitic stainless steel weldment joint by super duplex filler metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eghlimi, Abbas, E-mail: a.eghlimi@ma.iut.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shamanian, Morteza [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Eskandarian, Masoomeh [Department of Materials Engineering, Shiraz University, Shiraz 71348-51154 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zabolian, Azam [Department of Natural Resources, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Szpunar, Jerzy A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon SK S7N 5A9 (Canada)

    2015-08-15

    In the present paper, microstructural changes across an as-welded dissimilar austenitic/duplex stainless steel couple welded by a super duplex stainless steel filler metal using gas tungsten arc welding process is characterized with optical microscopy and electron back-scattered diffraction techniques. Accordingly, variations of microstructure, texture, and grain boundary character distribution of base metals, heat affected zones, and weld metal were investigated. The results showed that the weld metal, which was composed of Widmanstätten austenite side-plates and allotriomorphic grain boundary austenite morphologies, had the weakest texture and was dominated by low angle boundaries. The welding process increased the ferrite content but decreased the texture intensity at the heat affected zone of the super duplex stainless steel base metal. In addition, through partial ferritization, it changed the morphology of elongated grains of the rolled microstructure to twinned partially transformed austenite plateaus scattered between ferrite textured colonies. However, the texture of the austenitic stainless steel heat affected zone was strengthened via encouraging recrystallization and formation of annealing twins. At both interfaces, an increase in the special character coincident site lattice boundaries of the primary phase as well as a strong texture with <100> orientation, mainly of Goss component, was observed. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Weld metal showed local orientation at microscale but random texture at macroscale. • Intensification of <100> orientated grains was observed adjacent to the fusion lines. • The austenite texture was weaker than that of the ferrite in all duplex regions. • Welding caused twinned partially transformed austenites to form at SDSS HAZ. • At both interfaces, the ratio of special CSL boundaries of the primary phase increased.

  15. A microstructural study of F82H-MOD. Plate, powder HIP and EB and TIG weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuring, E.W.

    1998-06-01

    F82H is the heat identification number of a ferritic/martensitic steel. The steel has a chemical composition resulting in low activation after neutron irradiation. At ECN a microstructural study was conducted on plates of F82H (73, 15 and 25mm thick), a bar of HIPped F82H and EB and TIG welds in F82H plates. The investigation was aimed to characterise the microstructures for reference in irradiation experiments. The F82H mod. plates have a martensitic matrix with carbide precipitation on the prior austenite grain boundaries and the martensite laths. The carbide precipitation is most pronounced on the prior austenite grain boundaries. The PAG is comparable for the three plate thicknesses investigated. In two plates faint segregation bands were found with a denser carbide precipitation and 8-ferrite. Further Ta, Ti and Zr containing oxides are present. Hardness measurements show a higher overall hardness in the 25mm plate investigated compared to the 7.5 and 15mm plates. The F82H HIP bar shows a homogeneous PAG throughout the diameter. The microstructure shows a zone starting at about 1 mm below the surface with a width of 14mm, with a relatively high concentration of low precipitation density ferritic like fields, which corresponds to a zone with a 15HV5 lower hardness with respect to the rest of the bar. This zone is expected to be related to the HIP process. Further in the microstructure a circular pattern of W and Ta enriched inclusions is found, which mark the original HIP-powder grain boundaries. The EB-welds were manufactured by two manufactures and differ mostly in the heat input, resulting in differences in HAZ-width and the width of the weld cap. The F82H EB welds show comparable microstructures in the weld pool, with a martensitic microstructure free of carbides. All EB-welds contain 8-ferrite in concentrations of 0.1-1%. In the heat affected zone (HAZ), the coarse grained HAZ (CGHAZ) is free of carbide precipitation, whereas the fine grained HAZ (FGHAZ) shows a dense carbide precipitation. At the transition from FGHAZ to unaffected base material, non-transformed ferritic phases enriched in W are present. The TIG weld was post weld heat treated which resulted in a lower hardness than the EB welds and a dense carbide precipitation. The hardness measurements of the EB and the TIG welds show a hardness dip on the transitions FGHAZ to the 'unaffected' base material. 3 refs

  16. Corrosion behaviour of austenitic stainless steel, nickel-base alloy and its weldments in aqueous LiBr solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blasco-Tamarit, E.; Igual-Munoz, A.; Garcia Anton, J.; Garcia-Garcia, D. [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear. E.T.S.I.Industriales, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, P.O. Box 22012 E-46071 Valencia (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    With the advances in materials production new alloys have been developed, such as High- Alloy Austenitic Stainless Steels and Nickel-base alloys, with high corrosion resistance. These new alloys are finding applications in Lithium Bromide absorption refrigeration systems, because LiBr is a corrosive medium which can cause serious corrosion problems, in spite of its favourable properties as absorbent. The objective of the present work was to study the corrosion resistance of a highly alloyed austenitic stainless steel (UNS N08031) used as base metal, a Nickel-base alloy (UNS N06059) used as its corresponding filler metal, and the weld metal obtained by the Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) procedure. The materials have been tested in different LiBr solutions (400 g/l, 700 g/l, 850 g/l and a commercial 850 g/l LiBr heavy brine containing Lithium Chromate as corrosion inhibitor), at 25 deg. C. Open Circuit Potential tests and potentiodynamic anodic polarization curves have been carried out to obtain information about the general electrochemical behaviour of the materials. The polarization curves of all the alloys tested were typical of passivable materials. Pitting corrosion susceptibility has been evaluated by means of cyclic potentiodynamic curves, which provide parameters to analyse re-passivation properties. The galvanic corrosion generated by the electrical contact between the welded and the base material has been estimated from the polarization diagrams according to the Mixed Potential Method. Samples have been etched to study the microstructure by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The results demonstrate that the pitting resistance of all these materials increases as the LiBr concentration decreases. In general, the presence of chromate tended to shift the pitting potential to more positive values than those obtained in the 850 g/l LiBr solution. (authors)

  17. A Study on Microstructure Change and Pitting Corrosion Resistance of Ferritic Stainless Steel Weldment According to Nb Contents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong-Min; Shin, Yong-Taek; Lee, Sang-Hwa; Lee, Jun-Hee; Lee, Hae-Woo [Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sung-Riong [Kangwon National University, ChunCheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Soon-Ho [Silla University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-15

    This paper identified the effects of Nb on microstructure. Also, it has studied on uniform and pitting corrosion resistance in a ferritic stainless steel weld metal of the automobile exhaust system. We fabricated 3 flux cored wires designed with 0-1.0 wt% Nb and performed Flux Cored Arc Welding. We observed the microstructure with the SEM/EDS and EBSD. To evaluate the uniform and pitting corrosion resistance, we performed a potentiodynamic polarization test in 0.2 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and 0.1, 0.3, 0.5 M NaCl. As a result of the tests, we found that as the amount of addition of Nb rose, the amount of Cr-carbide fell. The microstructure became more refined. The specimen with 1.0%Nb added had the highest uniform and pitting corrosion resistance. After the pitting corrosion test, a pit was formed at the grain boundary that has no addition of Nb. In addition, in the specimen with added Nb, pits were formed at the inclusions.

  18. Parent material and weldments degradation on SASOL reduction reactors due to combined effect of thermal fatigue, vibration and hydrogen attack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borla, Jan Z.

    2002-01-01

    All six installed reduction reactors showed the same failure pattern, which can be attributed to inadequate original design, material degradation due to service conditions and improper maintenance activities. Service is typically low frequency fatigue load conditions with changes of pressure, temperature and batch load. All revealed defects severely affected the integrity of the pressure envelope and vessels were classified for major repair work with subsequent in situ monitoring program. The justification for such extensive and costly repair required a positive evaluation of the current condition of equipment. After complete study, a report was prepared which included the fitness for purpose evaluation, remaining life assessment and recommendation for future field inspections. All reactors were found to be suitable for repair. Within the scope of repair a number of critical elements were redesigned and replaced. The repair was successful and all reactors were put back into operation. Unique expertise was obtained regarding setting the parameters of dehydrogenation in reference to the heavy wall items. Taking replicas and surface sampling appeared to be very reliable and simple tools in monitoring the condition of pressure envelope. For the purpose of future inspection shutdowns specific inspection requirements were put in place to ensure continuous monitoring of the vessel integrity

  19. A process model for the heat-affected zone microstructure evolution in duplex stainless steel weldments: Part I. the model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmer, H.; Grong, Ø.

    1999-11-01

    The present investigation is concerned with modeling of the microstructure evolution in duplex stainless steels under thermal conditions applicable to welding. The important reactions that have been modeled are the dissolution of austenite during heating, subsequent grain growth in the delta ferrite regime, and finally, the decomposition of the delta ferrite to austenite during cooling. As a starting point, a differential formulation of the underlying diffusion problem is presented, based on the internal-state variable approach. These solutions are later manipulated and expressed in terms of the Scheil integral in the cases where the evolution equation is separable or can be made separable by a simple change of variables. The models have then been applied to describe the heat-affected zone microstructure evolution during both thick-plate and thin-plate welding of three commercial duplex stainless steel grades: 2205, 2304, and 2507. The results may conveniently be presented in the form of novel process diagrams, which display contours of constant delta ferrite grain size along with information about dissolution and reprecipitation of austenite for different combinations of weld input energy and peak temperature. These diagrams are well suited for quantitative readings and illustrate, in a condensed manner, the competition between the different variables that lead to structural changes during welding of duplex stainless steels.

  20. Characterization of microstructure and texture across dissimilar super duplex/austenitic stainless steel weldment joint by austenitic filler metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eghlimi, Abbas; Shamanian, Morteza; Eskandarian, Masoomeh; Zabolian, Azam; Szpunar, Jerzy A.

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of microstructure and texture across an as-welded dissimilar UNS S32750 super duplex/UNS S30403 austenitic stainless steel joint welded by UNS S30986 (AWS A5.9 ER309LMo) austenitic stainless steel filler metal using gas tungsten arc welding process was evaluated by optical micrography and EBSD techniques. Due to their fabrication through rolling process, both parent metals had texture components resulted from deformation and recrystallization. The weld metal showed the highest amount of residual strain and had large austenite grain colonies of similar orientations with little amounts of skeletal ferrite, both oriented preferentially in the < 001 > direction with cub-on-cube orientation relationship. While the super duplex stainless steel's heat affected zone contained higher ferrite than its parent metal, an excessive grain growth was observed at the austenitic stainless steel's counterpart. At both heat affected zones, austenite underwent some recrystallization and formed twin boundaries which led to an increase in the fraction of high angle boundaries as compared with the respective base metals. These regions showed the least amount of residual strain and highest amount of recrystallized austenite grains. Due to the static recrystallization, the fraction of low degree of fit (Σ) coincident site lattice boundaries, especially Σ3 boundaries, was increased in the austenitic stainless steel heat affected zone, while the formation of subgrains in the ferrite phase increased the content of < 5° low angle boundaries at that of the super duplex stainless steel. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Extensive grain growth in the HAZ of austenitic stainless steel was observed. • Intensification of < 100 > orientated grains was observed adjacent to both fusion lines. • Annealing twins with Σ3 CSL boundaries were formed in the austenite of both HAZ. • Cub-on-cube OR was observed between austenite and ferrite in the weld metal. • Weld metal had the lowest texture intensity and ratio of low angle and CSL boundaries

  1. Characterization of microstructure and texture across dissimilar super duplex/austenitic stainless steel weldment joint by austenitic filler metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eghlimi, Abbas, E-mail: a.eghlimi@ma.iut.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shamanian, Morteza [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Eskandarian, Masoomeh [Department of Materials Engineering, Shiraz University, Shiraz 71348-51154 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zabolian, Azam [Department of Natural Resources, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Szpunar, Jerzy A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A9 (Canada)

    2015-08-15

    The evolution of microstructure and texture across an as-welded dissimilar UNS S32750 super duplex/UNS S30403 austenitic stainless steel joint welded by UNS S30986 (AWS A5.9 ER309LMo) austenitic stainless steel filler metal using gas tungsten arc welding process was evaluated by optical micrography and EBSD techniques. Due to their fabrication through rolling process, both parent metals had texture components resulted from deformation and recrystallization. The weld metal showed the highest amount of residual strain and had large austenite grain colonies of similar orientations with little amounts of skeletal ferrite, both oriented preferentially in the < 001 > direction with cub-on-cube orientation relationship. While the super duplex stainless steel's heat affected zone contained higher ferrite than its parent metal, an excessive grain growth was observed at the austenitic stainless steel's counterpart. At both heat affected zones, austenite underwent some recrystallization and formed twin boundaries which led to an increase in the fraction of high angle boundaries as compared with the respective base metals. These regions showed the least amount of residual strain and highest amount of recrystallized austenite grains. Due to the static recrystallization, the fraction of low degree of fit (Σ) coincident site lattice boundaries, especially Σ3 boundaries, was increased in the austenitic stainless steel heat affected zone, while the formation of subgrains in the ferrite phase increased the content of < 5° low angle boundaries at that of the super duplex stainless steel. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Extensive grain growth in the HAZ of austenitic stainless steel was observed. • Intensification of < 100 > orientated grains was observed adjacent to both fusion lines. • Annealing twins with Σ3 CSL boundaries were formed in the austenite of both HAZ. • Cub-on-cube OR was observed between austenite and ferrite in the weld metal. • Weld metal had the lowest texture intensity and ratio of low angle and CSL boundaries.

  2. Continuous monitoring of back wall stress corrosion cracking growth in sensitized type 304 stainless steel weldment by means of potential drop techniques

    OpenAIRE

    SATO, Y; ATSUMI, T; SHOJI, T

    2007-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests on welded specimens of sensitized type 304SS with a thickness of 20 mm were performed in sodium thiosulphate solution at room temperature, with continuous monitoring of the SCC growth, using the techniques of modified induced current potential drop (MICPD), alternating current potential drop (ACPD) and direct current potential drop (DCPD). The MICPD and DCPD techniques permit continuous monitoring of the back wall SCC, which initiates from a fatigue pre-c...

  3. The effect of inhibitor sodium nitrate on pitting corrosion of dissimilar material weldment joint of stainless steel AISI 304 and mild steel SS 400

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilca, B. R., E-mail: bangkithilca@yahoo.com; Triyono, E-mail: triyonomesin@uns.ac.id [Mechanical Engineering Department, Sebelas Maret University, Surakarta 57126 (Indonesia)

    2016-03-29

    This study experimentally evaluated the effect of Sodium Nitrate inhibitor (NaNO{sub 3}) of 0.1%, 0.3%, and 0.5% on NaCl 3.5% toward pitting corrosion of dissimilar metal welding joint between stainless steel AISI 304 and mild steel SS 400. Electrochemical corrosion was tested using potentiodynamic polarization. Further the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) conducted to analyze the specimen. Chemical composition analysis used Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectrometry (EDS). The highest efficiency of sodium nitrate for ER 308 attained 63.8% and 64.89%for ER 309L. The specimen surface which observed through SEM showed decrease of pitting corrosion respectively with the addition of sodium nitrate content as inhibitor.

  4. Sensitivity analyses of finite element method for estimating residual stress of dissimilar metal multi-pass weldment in nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Tae Kwang; Bae, Hong Yeol; Kim, Yun Jae [Korea Unviersity, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoung Soo; Park, Chi Yong [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-09-15

    In nuclear power plants, ferritic low alloy steel components were connected with austenitic stainless steel piping system through alloy 82/182 butt weld. There have been incidents recently where cracking has been observed in the dissimilar metal weld. Alloy 82/182 is susceptible to primary water stress corrosion cracking. Weld-induced residual stress is main factor for crack growth. Therefore exact estimation of residual stress is important for reliable operating. This paper presents residual stress computation performed by 6'' safety and relief nozzle. Based on 2 dimensional and 3 dimensional finite element analyses, effect of welding variables on residual stress variation is estimated for sensitivity analysis.

  5. Mechanical properties of similar and dissimilar weldments of RAFMS and AISI 316L (N) SS prepared by electron beam welding process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, S.K., E-mail: shaju@igcar.gov.in [Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Das, C.R. [Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Sam, Shiju [Institute of Plasma Research, Gandhi Nagar (India); Mastanaiah, P.; Patel, M. [Defence Research and Development Laboratory, Hyderabad (India); Bhaduri, A.K.; Jayakumar, T. [Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Murthy, C.V.S. [Defence Research and Development Laboratory, Hyderabad (India); Kumar, Rajendra [Institute of Plasma Research, Gandhi Nagar (India)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Increase of W content in RAFM steel can result in retention of delta ferrite in the EB weld of the steel. • Presence of delta ferrite seems to affect the ductile brittle transition temperature of the weld metal. • There is improper mixing of the two base metals in the fusion zone dissimilar welds of RAFM steel and austenitic stainless steel made by EB welding. - Abstract: Effect of weld metal composition on microstructure and toughness of weld metal is studied in this paper. Weld joints of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel containing 1.0 and 1.4 wt.% W were prepared using electron beam welding (EBW) process. Dissimilar weld joints between 1.0 wt.% W RAFM steel and AISI 316L (N) SS were also prepared using EBW process. The effect of post weld heat treatment (PWHT) temperatures on microstructure and mechanical properties was also studied. Microstructural observation reveals delta–ferrite in 1.4 wt.% W containing weld metal, which is absent in 1.0 wt.% W weld metal. In the case of the dissimilar weld metal, microstructure shows presence of lath martensite and retained austenite. Austenite was stable even after PWHT and its presence is attributed to high nickel (5–6 wt.%) content in the dissimilar weld metal. Hardness of RAFM steel weld metal was found to be 270–290 VHN after PWHT at 750 °C for 2 h. Impact toughness of both 1.0 and 1.4 wt.% W RAFM steel is high (>250 J) at ambient temperature. However, after PWHT, variation of toughness with temperature is more drastic for 1.4 wt.% W RAFM steel weld metal than the other. As a result, ductile brittle transition temperature (DBTT) for the 1.4 wt.% steel weld metal is close to 0 °C while that of the 1.0 wt.% W steel is close to that of the base metal (∼−80 °C)

  6. The influence of isothermal ageing and subsequent hydrogen charging at room temperature on local mechanical properties and fracture characteristics of martensitic-bainitic weldments for power engineering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Falat, L.; Čiripová, L.; Homolová, V.; Kroupa, Aleš

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 3 (2017), s. 373-382 ISSN 1450-5339 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : power -plant steels * dissimilar weld * thermal exposure Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics OBOR OECD: Thermodynamics Impact factor: 0.804, year: 2016

  7. A process model for the heat-affected zone microstructure evolution in duplex stainless steel weldments: Part II. Application to electron beam welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmer, H.; Grong, Ø.; Klokkehaug, S.

    2000-03-01

    In the present investigation, a process model for electron beam (EB) welding of different grades of duplex stainless steels (i.e. SAF 2205 and 2507) has been developed. A number of attractive features are built into the original finite element code, including (1) a separate module for prediction of the penetration depth and distribution of the heat source into the plate, (2) adaptive refinement of the three-dimensional (3-D) element mesh for quick and reliable solution of the differential heat flow equation, and (3) special subroutines for calculation of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) microstructure evolution. The process model has been validated by comparison with experimental data obtained from in situ thermocouple measurements and optical microscope examinations. Subsequently, its aptness to alloy design and optimization of welding conditions for duplex stainless steels is illustrated in different numerical examples and case studies pertaining to EB welding of tubular joints.

  8. Interplay of microbiological corrosion and alloy microstructure in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. Senthilkumar (Newgen Imaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    cracking (SCC) of duplex stainless steels and their weldments in marine ... of austenitic stainless steel weldment, caused by the variation in Cr content .... boundaries as a result of chromium carbide precipitation (Fontana & Greene 1984).

  9. Low temperature sensitization behavior in the weld metal of austenitic stainless steel. Study on low temperature sensitization in weldments of austenitic stainless steels and its improvement by laser surface melting treatment. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Hiroaki; Nishimoto, Kazutoshi; Nakao, Yoshikuni

    1996-01-01

    Low temperature sensitization (LTS) behavior in the weld metal of Type308 stainless steel was investigated in this study. Three kinds of Type308 stainless steels, of which carbon contents were 0.04%, 0.06% and 0.08%, were used for this study. TIG welding method was adopted to make the weld metals. Weld metals were subjected to the sensitizing heat treatment in the temperature range between 773 K and 1073 K. The degree of sensitization were examined by the EPR method and the Strauss test. Chromium carbide was absorbed to precipitate at δ/γ grain boundaries in the as-welded weld metals Corrosion test results have shown that the higher carbon content in the weld metal is, the earlier sensitization yields in it. Sensitization in weld metals is found to occur faster than in those solution heat-treated at 1273 K prior to sensitizing heat-treatment. This fact suggests that preexisted chromium carbides have an effect to accelerate sensitization. That is, it is apparent that LTS phenomenon occur even in the weld metal. Moreover, sensitization in the weld metal has occurred in much shorter time than in HAZ, which is attributed to the preferential precipitation of chromium carbide at δ/γ grain boundaries in the weld metals. (author)

  10. Investigating the Crevice Corrosion Behavior of Coated Stainless Steel in Seawater

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kain, Robert

    2000-01-01

    .... austenitic stainless steel. Testing in natural seawater has demonstrated that coatings can protect susceptible stainless steel from barnacle related crevice corrosion and localized corrosion at weldments...

  11. Joining technology development summary, 189a OH024

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edmonds, D.P.

    1978-01-01

    Joining technology is discussed for Breeder Reactor technology including welding development and mechanical properties of weldments for austenitic stainless steels, high-temperature structural design data for austenitic stainless steel weldments and advanced transition joints is discussed. Technology developed in this program is briefly reviewed

  12. Evaluation of fracture behavior of SA-516 steel welds using acoustic emission analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na, Eui Gyun; Ono, Kanji; Lee, Dong Whan

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the AE characteristics for the basemetal, PWHT (Post-Weld Heat Treatment) and weldment specimens of SA-516 steel during fracture testing. Four-point bending and AE tests were conducted simultaneously. AE signals were emitted in the process of plastic deformation. AE signal strength and amplitude of the weldment was the strongest, followed by PWHT specimen and basemetal. More AE signals were emitted from the weldment samples because of the oxides, and discontinuous mechanical properties. AE signal strength and amplitude for the basemetal or PWHT specimen decreased remarkably compared to the weldment because of lower strength. Pre-cracked specimens emitted even lower event counts than the corresponding blunt notched specimens. Dimple fracture from void coalescence mechanism is associated with low-level AE signal strength for the basemetal or PWHT. Tearing mode and dimple formation were shown on the fracture surfaces of the weldment, but only a small fraction produced detectable AE

  13. Characterization of metallurgical and mechanical properties on the multi-pass welding of Inconel 625 and AISI 316L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, K. Gokul; Ramkumar, K. Devendranath; Arivazhagan, N. [VIT University, Vellore (India)

    2015-03-15

    This article investigated the weldability, metallurgical and mechanical properties of Inconel 625 and AISI 316L stainless steel weldments obtained by continuous current (CC) and pulsed current (PC) gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) processes employing ERNiCr-3 and ER2209 fillers. Microstructure studies showed the migrated grain boundaries at the weld zone of ERNiCr-3 weldments and multidirectional grain growth for ER2209 weldments. It was inferred from the tension tests that the fracture occurred at the parent metal of AISI 316L in all the cases. Charpy V-notch impact tests accentuated that the CCGTA weldments employing ERNiCr-3 filler offered better impact toughness of 77 J at room temperature. Further a detailed study has been carried out to analyze the structure - property relationships of these weldments using the combined techniques of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) analysis.

  14. Application of the tack weld to cask impact limiter case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ku, J. H.; Choung, W. M.; You, G. S.; Park, S. W.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to evaluate the benefit of the application of intermittent tack weld to the cask impact limiter case in the cask impact accident. This paper describes the test results of weldment rupture of foam filled tube type energy absorber and analytical evaluation of the effect of intermittent tack weld to the cask impact limiter case on the cask impact behavior. Prior to the cask impact analysis, the evaluation of weldment joint was carried out for intermittent tack weldment considering the weldment rupture. The intermittent tack welded part is weaker than ordinary weldment so ruptured if the stress exceeds certain limit. The rupture of the impact limiter case causes to lose its constraining effect for the wood blocks, which are filled into the metal incasement between the case and the gussets. The application of intermittent tack weld to the impact limiter case showed great advantage in vertical and horizontal drop impacts

  15. Improved TIG weld joint strength in aluminum alloy 2219-T87 by filler metal substitution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorman, R. M.; Lovoy, C. V.

    1972-01-01

    The results of an investigation on weld joint characteristics of aluminum alloy 2219-T87 are given. Five different alloys were utilized as filler material. The mechanical properties of the joints were determined at ambient and cryogenic temperatures for weldments in the as-welded condition and also, for weldments after elevated temperature exposures. Other evaluations included hardness surveys, stress corrosion susceptibility, and to a limited extent, the internal metallurgical weld structures. The overall results indicate that M-943 filler weldments are superior in strength to weldments containing either the standard 2319 filler or fillers 2014, 2020, and a dual wire feed consisting of three parts 2319 and one part 5652. In addition, no deficiencies were evident in M-934 filler weldments with regard to ductility, joint strength after elevated temperature exposure, weld hardness, metallographic structures, or stress corrosion susceptibility.

  16. Study of microstructure and mechanical property relationships of A-TIG welded P91–316L dissimilar steel joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidyarthy, R.S., E-mail: vidyashanker01@gmail.com; Kulkarni, A.; Dwivedi, D.K.

    2017-05-17

    The current work enunciated the effect of activating flux tungsten inert gas (A-TIG) welding on the microstructural, mechanical and corrosion behaviour of the 316L stainless steel (SS) and P91 steel weldment. The current study also demonstrated the comprehensive structure–property relationships of dissimilar joint weldment using the collective techniques of optical macro and microscopy, electron microscopy, and Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) techniques. Microstructure study reveals the presence of delta ferrite, austenite and martensite in different zones of the weldment. The dissimilar steel weldment failed from the 316L side fusion boundary during the tensile testing. Maximum impact energy was absorbed by the 316L SS side heat affected zone (HAZ) while minimum by P91 steel side HAZ during the Charpy toughness test. The potentiodynamic test result suggested that the P91 side fusion boundary had minimum corrosion and pitting potential in all the weldment.

  17. Development of an intelligent ultrasonic welding defect classification software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Sung Jin; Kim, Hak Joon; Jeong, Hee Don

    1997-01-01

    Ultrasonic pattern recognition is the most effective approach to the problem of discriminating types of flaws in weldments based on ultrasonic flaw signals. In spite of significant progress in the research on this methodology, it has not been widely used in many practical ultrasonic inspections of weldments in industry. Hence, for the convenient application of this approach in many practical situations, we develop an intelligent ultrasonic signature classification software which can discriminate types of flaws in weldments based on their ultrasonic signals using various tools in artificial intelligence such as neural networks. This software shows the excellent performance in an experimental problem where flaws in weldments are classified into two categories of cracks and non-cracks. This performance demonstrates the high possibility of this software as a practical tool for ultrasonic flaw classification in weldments.

  18. A comparative evaluation of microstructural and mechanical behavior of fiber laser beam and tungsten inert gas dissimilar ultra high strength steel welds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaiteerth R. Joshi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The influence of different welding processes on the mechanical properties and the corresponding variation in the microstructural features have been investigated for the dissimilar weldments of 18% Ni maraging steel 250 and AISI 4130 steel. The weld joints are realized through two different fusion welding processes, tungsten inert arc welding (TIG and laser beam welding (LBW, in this study. The dissimilar steel welds were characterized through optical microstructures, microhardness survey across the weldment and evaluation of tensile properties. The fiber laser beam welds have demonstrated superior mechanical properties and reduced heat affected zone as compared to the TIG weldments.

  19. A study of the mechanisms for the irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solt, G.; Zimmermann, U.; Waeber, W.B.; Mercier, O.; Frisius, F.; Ghazi-Wakili, K.

    1987-03-01

    Irradiation damage particles were detected by small angle neutron scattering and positron annihilation techniques in two RPV steels. The particle radii were 8A and 14A prior to heat treatments for the plate and weldment, respectively; annealing leads to coarsening in the weldment, the volume fraction remains essentially constant at about 0.14%. The model of copper-rich precipitates 'diluted' by Mn atoms or, alternatively, by vacancy agglomerates is consistent with the neutron scattering data, the presence of simple voids in the weldment would contradict the positron results. Preliminary results on these steels and also on related alloys by methods 'new' in this field are reported. (author)

  20. Design rule for fatigue of welded joints in elevated-temperature nuclear components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connor, D.G.; Corum, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    Elevated-temperature weldment fatigue failures have occurred in several operating liquid-metal reactor plants. Yet, ASME Code Case N-47, which governs the design of such plants in the United States, does not currently address the Code Subgroup on Elevated Temperature Design recently proposed a fatigue strength reduction factor for austenitic and ferritic steel weldments. The factor is based on a variety of weld metal and weldment fatigue data generated in the United States, Europe, and Japan. This paper describes the factor and its bases, and it presents the results of confirmatory fatigue tests conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory on 316 stainless steel tubes with axial and circumferential welds of 16-8-2 filler metal. These test results confirm the suitability of the design factor, and they support the premise that the metallurgical notch effect produced by yield strength variations across a weldment is largely responsible for the observed elevated-temperature fatigue strength reduction

  1. 75 FR 8923 - Notice of Petitions by Firms for Determination of Eligibility To Apply for Trade Adjustment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-26

    ... weldments. Apple Archery Products LLC 60 Leigh Drive, York, PA 2/17/2010 Apple Archery manufactures 17406.... Services include all marketing activities related to selling seafood products. Larkin Industries, Inc 2020...

  2. Model for Estimation of Thermal History Produced by a Single Pass Underwater Wet Weld

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dill, Jay

    1997-01-01

    Thermal history calculations for single pass underwater wet weldments were made by solving the appropriate beat transfer equations using the three-dimensional Crank-Nicholson finite difference method...

  3. Notch effects in uniaxial tension specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delph, T.J.

    1979-03-01

    Results of a literature survey on the effect of notches on the time-dependent failure of uniaxial tension specimens at elevated temperatures are presented. Particular attention is paid to the failure of notched specimens containing weldments

  4. Torque strength of an endplate welding due to process parameters using a fuel assembling welder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Dae-Seo; Kim, Soo-Sung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-05-15

    As fuel bundles in a PHWR core irradiated, inner pressure in the claddings of the fuel rods increases owing to the outer pressure and fission products of the nuclear fissions. Because of a leak possibility from a welding between a cladding and end plug, this welding part is connected with the safety of nuclear fuel rods. Endplug-cladding welding of nuclear fuel rods in a PHWR takes advantage of a resistance upset butt welding. The weldment between a cladding and endplug is to be sound to prevent a leakage of fission products from a cladding as a UO{sub 2} pellet is irradiated. Weld flash was made from a deformation due to a welding heat and increasing the pressure of the resistivity and resistance from a cladding and endplug. Weld line of a welding interface, microstructure of a weldment and a crystallographic structure change were sources of an iodine induced SCC in a reactor. The soundness of a weldment is important because a weld line connects the leakage of fission products from an operational reactor. In this study, welding specimens were fabricated by a resistance welding method using a bundle fuel welder to measure and analyze the torque of an endplug-endplate welding. The torque of a weldment between an endplug and endplate was measured and analyzed with the welding time. The weldability of a weldment between an endplug and endplate was investigated by a metallographic examination.

  5. Progress report on the influence of higher interpass temperatures on the integrity of austenitic stainless steel welded joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarmuch, M.; Choi, L. [Alberta Research Council, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Armstrong, K.; Radu, I. [PCL Industrial Constructors Inc., Nisku, AB (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    This report discussed the progress of the Welding Productivity Group (TWPG) interpass temperature assessment project (ITAP). The project was initiated to evaluate the influence of interpass temperatures on the metallurgical, corrosive, and mechanical properties of austenitic stainless steel, carbon steel, and low-alloy pressure weldments. To date, the project has conducted experiments to determine if interpass temperatures in austenitic stainless steel weldments are higher than temperatures recommended by API requirements. Elevated interpass temperatures for various base materials have been evaluated. Preliminary metallurgical, mechanical, and laboratory corrosion data from 3 experiments with 304/304L and 316/316L stainless steel weldment test specimens has shown that no significant changes occur as a result of elevated interpass temperatures. Results from side bend specimens have demonstrated that elevated interpass temperatures produce acceptable weldment ductility. No intergranular cracking was observed during oxalic acid etch tests conducted for the 316/316L samples. Huey tests performed on the 304/304L specimens indicated that elevated interpass temperatures did not adversely affect the intergranular corrosion resistance of weldments with less than 3 weld passes. Huey tests performed on the 316 specimens showed a marked increase in corrosion rates and normalized weight losses. It was concluded that rates of attack correlate with the maximum interpass temperature and not the average weld metal ferrite number. 22 refs., 11 tabs., 12 figs.

  6. Molecular Dynamics Simulation Connections and Mechanical Properties of Cu/Al Explosion Shock Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Yan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Based on the molecular dynamics (MD method, transient explosive welding process of Cu/Al junction point was revealed from the microscopic aspect, and mechanical properties and machinability of the Cu/Al nano-weldment were studied. The results show that kinetic energy is converted into internal energy in the system after the collision. The heterogeneous atoms penetrate into each other and the diffusion effect of copper atoms is better than aluminium atoms. The elastic modulus of the nano-weldment is 64.56 GPa, which is between copper's and aluminium's; however, its yield strength is less than those of the two monocrystals. Interactions between dislocations and disordered lattices cause the stress strengthening in the plastic deformation stage, which causes that the stress values of the weldment is larger than those of the two monocrystals. This strengthening mechanism is also reflected in the cutting process, and the weldment has the highest average cutting force 117.80 nN. A mass of dislocations nucleate in the disordered lattice areas of the weldment, and they spread at 45¯ to the cutting direction. However, dislocations pile up when their propagation is hindered by the disordered lattices and interface, which leads to the work hardening effect.

  7. Structural analysis interpretation task for the magnet system for Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldi, R.W.

    1979-11-01

    The primary objective of this study was to develop recommendations to improve and substantiate the structural integrity of the highly stresses small radius region of the MFTF magnet. The specific approach is outlined: (1) Extract detail stress/strain data from General Dynamics Convair Finite-Element Refinement Analysis. (2) Diagram local plate stress distribution and its relationship to the adjacent weldment. (3) Update the parametric fracture mechanics analysis using most recent MFTF related data developed by National Bureau of Standards. (4) Review sequence and assembly as modified by Chicago Bridge and Iron for adaptability to refinements. (5) Investigate the need for fillet radii weldments to reduce stress concentrations at critical corners. (6) Review quality assurance plan for adequacy to insure structural quality in the small radius region. (7) Review instrumentation plan for adequacy of structural diagnostics in small radius region. (8) Participate in planning a small-scale fatigue test program of a typical MFTF weldment

  8. Improvement of sensitizatiuon in weld metals of austenitic stainless steels by laser surface melting treatment. Report 3. Study on low temperature sensitization in weldments of austenitic stainless steels ans its improvement by laser surface melting treatment; Reza hyomen yoyu shori ni yoru sutenresu ko yosetsu kinzoku no enbinka kaizen. 3. Osutenaito kei sutenresu ko yosetsubu no teion enbinka to reza hyomen yoyu shori ni yoru sono kaizen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimoto, K. [Osaka Univ., Osaka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Mori, H. [Osaka Univ., Osaka (Japan). Graduate School; Yamamura, T. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-05-05

    Laser surface melting treatment used for the improvement of intergranular corrosion resistance of sensitized austenitic stainless steel weld metal was studied. As a result, it was revealed that as compared to untreated material, sensitization was improved widely and intergranular corrosion resistance was improved to a level of base metal when laser surface melting treatment of sensitized weld metal was carried out. Further, sensitization effect at a condition of laser traveling velocity of 0.00167m/s was slightly insufficient compared to that of laser traveling velocity above 0.00833m/s. This phenomena was caused due to the existence of {delta} ferrite that accelerates the precipitation of Cr carbides inside the laser treatment portion and together with this, the Cr carbides are precipitated in {delta}/{gamma} grain boundary due to the effect of laser heat cycle with insufficient cooling velocity and this has caused desensitization. 16 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Optimization of process parameters in welding of dissimilar steels using robot TIG welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navaneeswar Reddy, G.; VenkataRamana, M.

    2018-03-01

    Robot TIG welding is a modern technique used for joining two work pieces with high precision. Design of Experiments is used to conduct experiments by varying weld parameters like current, wire feed and travelling speed. The welding parameters play important role in joining of dissimilar stainless steel SS 304L and SS430. In this work, influences of welding parameter on Robot TIG Welded specimens are investigated using Response Surface Methodology. The Micro Vickers hardness tests of the weldments are measured. The process parameters are optimized to maximize the hardness of the weldments.

  10. A Destructive Validation of NDE Responses of Service-Induced PWSCC Found in North Anna 2 Control Rod Drive Nozzle 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.; Schuster, George J.; Harris, Robert V.; Crawford, Susan L.; Seffens, Rob J.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.; Moyer, C.

    2009-01-01

    Studies conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington focused on assessing the effectiveness of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques for inspecting control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) nozzles and J-groove weldments. The primary objective of this work is to provide information to the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on the effectiveness of NDE methods as related to the in-service inspection of CRDM nozzles and J-groove weldments, and to enhance the knowledge base of primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) through destructive characterization of the CRDM assemblies.

  11. Influence of neutron irradiation at 550C on the properties of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiffen, F.W.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1981-01-01

    Types 316 and 316 + 0.23 wt % Ti stainless steels and 16-8-2 weldment were irradiated in HFIR at 55 0 C to fluences up to 1.35 x 10 26 neutrons/m 2 ( 0 C strength properties, with the weldments the weakest of the materials. The ductility of all materials was reduced by the irradiation, the uniform elongation to only 0.4% in the cold-worked material. Tests at temperatures above the irradiation temperature showed an approach to unirradiated properties as the temperature was increased from 200 to 600 0 C. Helium embrittlement at 700 0 C severely reduced elongation

  12. Study of problems associated with the ultrasonic examination of repeatedly repaired austenitic stainless steel welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subbaratnam, R.; Palaniappan, M.; Baskaran, A.; Chandramohan, R.

    1994-01-01

    In recent years the ultrasonic examination of austenitic stainless steel weldments has gained increased importance as an NDE technique for the volumetric examination in the nuclear power plant construction and other industries. A study has been undertaken to evaluate the effects of multiple repairs on austenitic stainless steel weldments, for the successful ultrasonic examination. The test welds have been subjected to repeated welding cycles and the ultrasonic parameters including the defect characterization have been evaluated for analysis. The paper discusses the approach followed, analysis, results obtained and the recommendations based on the above. 1 fig., 2 tabs

  13. Diffusion and autoradiographic investigations of the tritium--304 stainless steel system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downs, G.L.; Braun, J.D.; Chaney, K.F.; Powell, G.W.

    1975-01-01

    The diffusion coefficient of tritium in 304-stainless steel at low temperatures (100 to 300 0 C) was determined. Autoradiography was used to establish the concentration as well as the distribution of tritium in the alloy. The autoradiographic study shows that tritium is distributed heterogeneously at room temperature in the cold-worked alloy and also in the fusion zone of weldments. Tritium partitions preferentially to the delta ferrite in weldments and to martensite produced by the cold working of 304-stainless steel. (auth)

  14. Thermophysical properties of a Type 308 stainless steel weld

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lore, J.D.; Richards, H.L.; King, R.T.; Greene, L.M.; Darby, D.M.

    1975-01-01

    Thermal expansion, thermal diffusivity, specific heat, and thermal conductivity measurements were obtained in vacuo for a Type 304-308 stainless steel weldment for use in the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor. Property measurements were somewhat variant, depending upon the direction of measurement, but the observed differences were small. (U.S.)

  15. Heavy wall pressure vessels for energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canonico, D.A.

    Modifications of steels currently accepted in the Code appear to provide improved mechanical properties. These steels may permit the fabrication of larger diameter vessels with thinner section sizes and improved reliability and integrity. Adapting current specifications should expedite Code approval. Finally the challenge of improving welding procedures and adapting processes for field applications will result in higher quality weldments

  16. Nondestructive evaluation of LWR spent fuel shipping casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballard, D.W.

    1978-02-01

    An analysis of nondestructive testing (NDT) methods currently being used to evaluate the integrity of Light Water Reactor (LWR) spent fuel shipping casks is presented. An assessment of anticipated NDT needs related to breeder reactor cask requirements is included. Specific R and D approaches to probable NDT problem areas such as the evaluation of austenitic stainless steel weldments are outlined

  17. 75 FR 43930 - Notice of Petitions by Firms for Determination of Eligibility To Apply for Trade Adjustment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-27

    ... company is a manufacturer Addison, IL 60101. of metal parts for the locomotive and industrial manufacturing industries. The firm manufactures brackets, pads and custom weldments. Express Scale Parts, Inc 6873 Martindale Rd., 6/29/2010 Weighing, bagging and Shawnee, KS. conveying equipment systems Strive...

  18. Laser processing of materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. Senthilkumar (Newgen Imaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    The initial foundation of laser theory was laid by Einstein [11]. ..... general definition and scope of the processes as understood in conventional practice, but is ..... [54]. Laser welding of Ti-alloys. Welding. 2001 TiNi shape memory alloys. CW–CO2. Study corrosion, mechanical and shape memory properties of weldments.

  19. Influence of alloying on hydrogen-assisted cracking and diffusible ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. Senthilkumar (Newgen Imaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    moisture in the welding consumables which dissociate in the welding arc to form hydrogen and oxygen. The susceptibility of the weldment to HAC is assessed from the hydrogen diffused out from the weld after the welding is over. Hydrogen thus diffused out is referred to as diffusible hydrogen (HD) and is estimated from the ...

  20. Soft zone formation in dissimilar welds between two Cr-Mo steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albert, S.K.; Gill, T.P.S.; Tyagi, A.K.; Mannan, S.L.; Rodriguez, P.; Kulkarni, S.D.

    1997-01-01

    Two dissimilar weldments between 9Cr-1Mo and 2.25Cr-1Mo ferritic steels have been characterized for their microstructural stability during various postweld heat treatments (PWHTs). The samples for the investigation were extracted from bead-on-plate weldments made by depositing 2.25Cr-1Mo weld metal on 9Cr-1Mo base plate and vice versa. Subsequent application of PWHT resulted in the formation of a soft zone in the low Cr ferritic steel weld or base plate. A carbide-rich hard zone, adjoining the soft zone, was also detected in the high Cr side of the weldment. Unmixed zones in the weld metal provided additional soft and hard zones in the weld metals. The migration of carbon from low-Cr steel to high-Cr steel, driven by the carbon activity gradient, has been shown to be responsible for the formation of soft and hard zones. A carbon activity diagram for 2.25Cr-1Mo/9Cr-1Mo weldments has been proposed to aid in the selection of welding consumables for reducing or preventing the soft zone formation

  1. Charpy impact test results of ferritic alloys at a fluence of 6 x 1022n/cm2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, W.L.

    1985-01-01

    Charpy impact tests on specimens in the AD-2 reconstitution experiment were completed. One hundred ten specimens made of HT-9 base metal, 9Cr-1Mo base metal and 9Cr-1Mo weldment at various heat treatment conditions were tested in temperature range from -73 0 C to 260 0 C. The specimens were irradiated from 390 0 C to 550 0 C and the fluence of the specimens reached 6 x 10 22 n/cm 2 . This is the first time that the transition behavior of ferritic alloys at high fluence was obtained. This is also the first time that comprehensive results on the irradiated 9Cr-1Mo weldment are available. The test results show a small additional shift in transition temperature for HT-9 base metal irradiated at 390 0 C and 450 0 C as the fluence was raised to 6 x 10 22 n/cm 2 . At higher irradiation temperatures, however, the shift in transition temperature is less conclusive. Further reduction in USE was observed at higher fluence for all the irradiation temperatures. There is no apparent fluence effect for 9Cr-1Mo base metal at all the irradiation temperatures studied. Contrary to the previous finding on HT-9 base metal and weldment, the 9Cr-1Mo weldment shows a higher transition temperature ( + 60 0 C) and a higher USE ( + 100%) as compared to the 9Cr-1MO base metal for the same irradiation conditions. 6 references, 7 figures, 7 tables

  2. Effect of post weld heat treatment on the microstructure and tensile properties of activated flux TIG welds of Inconel X750

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramkumar, K. Devendranath, E-mail: ramdevendranath@gmail.com; Ramanand, R.; Ameer, Ajmal; Simon, K. Aghil; Arivazhagan, N.

    2016-03-21

    This study addresses the effect of post weld heat treatment on the fusion zone microstructure and the mechanical properties of activated flux tungsten inert gas (A-TIG) weldments of Inconel X750. In this study, a compound flux of 50% SiO{sub 2}+50% MoO{sub 3} was used for A-TIG welding of the samples. Comparative studies on the microstructure and mechanical properties have been made on the weldments both in the as-welded and post weld heat treated conditions. Direct ageing post weld heat treatment (PWHT) was carried out at 705 °C for 22 h on the A-TIG weldment to assess the structure–property relationships. It was inferred that direct ageing post weld heat treatment resulted in better tensile strength (1142 MPa) compared to the as-welded coupons (736 MPa). The joint efficiencies of the as-welded and post weld heat treated conditions were found to be 60.7% and 94.07% respectively. The impact toughness of the as-welded coupons were found to be greater than the post weld heat treated samples; however the impact toughness of the welds are greater than the parent metal employed in both the cases. This study also attested the detailed structure–property relationships of A-TIG weldments using the combined techniques of optical and scanning electron microscopy, Electron Dispersive X-ray Analysis (EDAX) techniques.

  3. Effect of post weld heat treatment on the microstructure and tensile properties of activated flux TIG welds of Inconel X750

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramkumar, K. Devendranath; Ramanand, R.; Ameer, Ajmal; Simon, K. Aghil; Arivazhagan, N.

    2016-01-01

    This study addresses the effect of post weld heat treatment on the fusion zone microstructure and the mechanical properties of activated flux tungsten inert gas (A-TIG) weldments of Inconel X750. In this study, a compound flux of 50% SiO_2+50% MoO_3 was used for A-TIG welding of the samples. Comparative studies on the microstructure and mechanical properties have been made on the weldments both in the as-welded and post weld heat treated conditions. Direct ageing post weld heat treatment (PWHT) was carried out at 705 °C for 22 h on the A-TIG weldment to assess the structure–property relationships. It was inferred that direct ageing post weld heat treatment resulted in better tensile strength (1142 MPa) compared to the as-welded coupons (736 MPa). The joint efficiencies of the as-welded and post weld heat treated conditions were found to be 60.7% and 94.07% respectively. The impact toughness of the as-welded coupons were found to be greater than the post weld heat treated samples; however the impact toughness of the welds are greater than the parent metal employed in both the cases. This study also attested the detailed structure–property relationships of A-TIG weldments using the combined techniques of optical and scanning electron microscopy, Electron Dispersive X-ray Analysis (EDAX) techniques.

  4. Mechanical properties and microstructure of laser welded Ti–6Al–2Sn–4Zr–2Mo (Ti6242) titanium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chamanfar, A., E-mail: ahc215@lehigh.edu [Institute for Metal Forming, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Lehigh University, 5 East Packer Avenue, Bethlehem, PA 18015 (United States); Pasang, T. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Auckland University of Technology, Auckland (New Zealand); Ventura, A.; Misiolek, W.Z. [Institute for Metal Forming, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Lehigh University, 5 East Packer Avenue, Bethlehem, PA 18015 (United States)

    2016-04-29

    Room temperature tensile properties and microhardness of a laser welded Ti–6Al–2Sn–4Zr–2Mo (Ti6242) titanium alloy sheet were examined and correlated to the microstructure evolution across the weld. Tensile testing integrated with the optical image correlation Instron® system indicated that the average yield strength (YS), ultimate tensile strength (UTS), and total elongation of the weldment were respectively 88%, 87%, and 69% of the corresponding base material (BM) values. Electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) demonstrated a uniform distribution of the main alloying elements across the weld. The hardness raised increasingly from the BM toward the heat affected zone (HAZ) and the fusion zone (FZ) due to mainly a higher α volume fraction in HAZ and acicular α′ martensite formation in the FZ. Because of the higher hardness of the HAZ and FZ, a higher YS for the weldment relative to the BM would be expected. However, the lower YS as well as the lower UTS of the weldment can be explained by presence of some porosity and underfill in the FZ. The lower total elongation of the weldment compared to the BM can be related to the higher hardness of the HAZ and FZ.

  5. Optimization of digital radiography techniques for specific application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harara, W.

    2010-12-01

    A low cost digital radiography system (DRS) for testing weld joints and castings in laboratory was assembled. The DRS is composed from X-ray source, scintillator, first surface mirror with Aluminum coating, charged coupled device (CCD) camera and lens. The DRS was used to test flawed carbon steel welded plates with thicknesses up to 12 mm. The comparison between the digital radiographs of the plates weldments and the radiographs of the same plates weldments using medium speed film type had shown that, the detection capability of the weld flaws are nearly identical for the two radiography techniques, while the sensitivity achieved in digital radiography of the plates weldments was one IQI wire less than the sensitivity achieved by conventional radiography of the same plates weldments according to EN 462-1. Further, the DRS was also successfully used to test (100 x 100 x 100) mm Aluminum casting with artificial flaws of varied dimensions and orientations. The resulted digital radiographs of the casting show that, all the flaws had been detected and their dimensions can be measured accurately, this confirm that, The proposed DRS can be used to detect and measure the flaws in the Aluminum and others light metals castings accurately. (author)

  6. Significance of reheat cracks to the integrity of pressure vessels for light-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canonico, D.A.

    1977-01-01

    Reheat cracks usually manifest themselves as macroscopic defects, which are centimeters long and deep, and are detectable by the usual nondestructive examination (NDE) procedures or as microscopic grain boundary decohesions (GBD) that are beyond the limit of detection by commercial NDE procedures. This report has concentrated on the significance of the microscopic cracks that may go undetected. The probability that GBD exist in the heat-affected zones (HAZ) of weldments of pressure vessel steels is high; particularly in SA 508 Class 2 weldments. A sample of the HAZ from the prolongation-weldment from the Heavy Section Steel Technology program Intermediate Test Vessel (ITV) No. 4 was examined by the Staatliche Materialprufungsanstalt (MPA). They reported GBD 5 mm (0.2 in.) long. This prompted an examination of the HAZ from the ITV vessel that had been tested to failure at 24 0 C (75 0 F). During testing, the region of the weld which contained the flaw that initiated the failure was strained up to 0.5%. A metallographic examination of this region of the weldment revealed GBD, but none of the size reported by the MPA. Further, there was no evidence that the GBD had extended as a consequence of the tests. Fracture toughness tests were made of the HAZ of welds from ITV-4. The electron-beam welding procedure, which permits more accurate siting of the crack, was used. Fracture toughness values in excess of 220 MPa root m (200 ksi root in.) were obtained at -18 0 C

  7. System for ultrasonic testing of welded seams. Einrichtung zur Ultraschallpruefung von Schweissnaehten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bondarenko, J K; Troizkij, V A; Agronskaja, E V; Vasiliev, L N; Orel, V G; Naida, V L; Baldakov, V F; Ustjusanin, J V; Litvinenko, V A; Petrovskij, S N

    1984-07-12

    The invention concerns a device for the ultrasonic testing of welded joints which can be used in particular for quality control of multi-layer weldments. The testing equipment consists of probe, material testing device, amplitude discriminator, recording device, up and down counters and threshold value stages. (GSCH).

  8. Quantification of Residual Stresses in External Attachment Welding Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alhajri, R.; Liu, S.; Yu, Z.

    2017-01-01

    welding (GMAW) process to deposit single beadonplate welds with ER70S6 wire on ASTM516 grade 70 pressure vessel steel plates of 6.3, 12.7, and 19 mm thicknesses. Microstructural analysis, temperature, and distortion measurements of weldments were performed to qualify the FEA modeling results. In addition...

  9. Mechanical properties and microstructure of laser welded Ti–6Al–2Sn–4Zr–2Mo (Ti6242) titanium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamanfar, A.; Pasang, T.; Ventura, A.; Misiolek, W.Z.

    2016-01-01

    Room temperature tensile properties and microhardness of a laser welded Ti–6Al–2Sn–4Zr–2Mo (Ti6242) titanium alloy sheet were examined and correlated to the microstructure evolution across the weld. Tensile testing integrated with the optical image correlation Instron® system indicated that the average yield strength (YS), ultimate tensile strength (UTS), and total elongation of the weldment were respectively 88%, 87%, and 69% of the corresponding base material (BM) values. Electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) demonstrated a uniform distribution of the main alloying elements across the weld. The hardness raised increasingly from the BM toward the heat affected zone (HAZ) and the fusion zone (FZ) due to mainly a higher α volume fraction in HAZ and acicular α′ martensite formation in the FZ. Because of the higher hardness of the HAZ and FZ, a higher YS for the weldment relative to the BM would be expected. However, the lower YS as well as the lower UTS of the weldment can be explained by presence of some porosity and underfill in the FZ. The lower total elongation of the weldment compared to the BM can be related to the higher hardness of the HAZ and FZ.

  10. A Plan to Optimize the Management of Weld ID SSN Numbering System for Nuclear Power Plants in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Hyun Ju; Cho, Chan Hee; Kim, Jin Hoi; Park, Dong Min

    2016-01-01

    Summary Sheet Number(SSN) in the current LTP is an ID which means a weldment in a nuclear power plant. However, the SSN ID, which is unique on in a nuclear power plant, is not unique one if the weldments of entire nuclear power plant in Korea are treated in one system. Therefore, it is hard to manage the data during life time using the existing SSN ID system. It is also hard to configure the characteristics of weldment in mind because IDs implying Alloy600 and overlay weld do not exist in the existing SSN ID System. An optimized SSN numbering system managing weldments for the life time is introduced in this paper. Moreover, it is explained how to manage the SSN numbering system in the computer program system, too. The problem, which the weld is not harmoniously managed, would be solved provided adapting the new SSN ID introduced in this paper. A weld is managed during its life time from creation to extinction. The inquiry of inspection history of a concerned weld and the reference of statistics would be performed easily and rightly because the concerned weld can be accessed from anywhere connected to KHNP network such as KHNP headquater, plants and CRI

  11. Investigation on AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel to AISI 4140 low alloy steel dissimilar joints by gas tungsten arc, electron beam and friction welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arivazhagan, N.; Singh, Surendra; Prakash, Satya; Reddy, G.M.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Beneficial effects of FRW, GTAW and EBW joints of dissimilar AISI 304 and AISI 4140 materials. → Comparative study of FRW, GTAW and EBW joints on mechanical properties. → SEM/EDAX, XRD analysis on dissimilar AISI 304 and AISI 4140 materials. -- Abstract: This paper presents the investigations carried out to study the microstructure and mechanical properties of AISI 304 stainless steel and AISI 4140 low alloy steel joints by Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW), Electron Beam Welding (EBW) and Friction Welding (FRW). For each of the weldments, detailed analysis was conducted on the phase composition, microstructure characteristics and mechanical properties. The results of the analysis shows that the joint made by EBW has the highest tensile strength (681 MPa) than the joint made by GTAW (635 Mpa) and FRW (494 Mpa). From the fractographs, it could be observed that the ductility of the EBW and GTA weldment were higher with an elongation of 32% and 25% respectively when compared with friction weldment (19%). Moreover, the impact strength of weldment made by GTAW is higher compared to EBW and FRW.

  12. Fatigue-crack propagation behavior of Inconel 718

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, L.A.

    1975-09-01

    The techniques of linear-elastic fracture mechanics were used to characterize the effect of several variables (temperature, environment, cyclic frequency, stress ratio, and heat-treatment variations) upon the fatigue-crack growth behavior of Inconel 718 base metal and weldments. Relevant crack growth data on this alloy from other laboratories is also presented. (33 fig, 39 references)

  13. Sadhana | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Sadhana. R K Singh Raman. Articles written in Sadhana. Volume 28 Issue 3-4 June-August 2003 pp 467-473. Interplay of microbiological corrosion and alloy microstructure in stress corrosion cracking of weldments of advanced stainless steels · R K Singh Raman · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  14. The Physics of Weldpool Formation: Phase Transition Process In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... phase transition took place but did not significantly alter the microstructure of the weldment. This study also supports the claims made by different investigators about the different heat treatments given to metals to determine a particular hardenability level. This heat treatment process is an indicator of phase change.

  15. Interplay of microbiological corrosion and alloy microstructure in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper presents an overview of the phenomenon of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of duplex stainless steels and their weldments in marine environments and the potential role of microbial activity in inducing SCC susceptibility. As a precursor to the topic the paper also reviews the performance of the traditional ...

  16. Suitability of Tophet C-Alloy 52/Kovar components to hydrogen environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebhart, J.M.; Kelly, M.D.

    1976-01-01

    The suitability of Tophet C-Alloy 52/Kovar weldments to hydrogen embrittlement were investigated because of their potential as candidate materials in fabrication of minaturized initiators for pyrotechnics. Cathodic charged samples were statically loaded for extended periods of time resulting in no load failures and in ductile fracture surfaces indicating resistance to hydrogen embrittlement. 20 figures

  17. Radiation Tolerance of Controlled Fusion Welds in High Temperature Oxidation Resistant FeCrAl Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gussev, Maxim N. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Field, Kevin G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-08-01

    High temperature oxidation resistant iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) alloys are candidate alloys for nuclear applications due to their exceptional performance during off-normal conditions such as a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) compared to currently deployed zirconium-based claddings [1]. A series of studies have been completed to determine the weldability of the FeCrAl alloy class and investigate the weldment performance in the as-received (non-irradiated) state [2,3]. These initial studies have shown the general effects of composition and microstructure on the weldability of FeCrAl alloys. Given this, limited details on the radiation tolerance of FeCrAl alloys and their weldments exist. Here, the highest priority candidate FeCrAl alloys and their weldments have been investigated after irradiation to enable a better understanding of FeCrAl alloy weldment performance within a high-intensity neutron field. The alloys examined include C35M (Fe-13%Cr-5% Al) and variants with aluminum (+2%) or titanium carbide (+1%) additions. Two different sub-sized tensile geometries, SS-J type and SS-2E (or SS-mini), were neutron irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor to 1.8-1.9 displacements per atom (dpa) in the temperature range of 195°C to 559°C. Post irradiation examination of the candidate alloys was completed and included uniaxial tensile tests coupled with digital image correlation (DIC), scanning electron microscopy-electron back scattered diffraction analysis (SEM-EBSD), and SEM-based fractography. In addition to weldment testing, non-welded parent material was examined as a direct comparison between welded and non-welded specimen performance. Both welded and non-welded specimens showed a high degree of radiation-induced hardening near irradiation temperatures of 200°C, moderate radiation-induced hardening near temperatures of 360°C, and almost no radiation-induced hardening at elevated temperatures near 550°C. Additionally, low-temperature irradiations showed

  18. Stress Corrosion Cracking Behaviour of Dissimilar Welding of AISI 310S Austenitic Stainless Steel to 2304 Duplex Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago AmaroVicente

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the weld metal chemistry on the stress corrosion cracking (SCC susceptibility of dissimilar weldments between 310S austenitic stainless steel and 2304 duplex steels was investigated by constant load tests and microstructural examination. Two filler metals (E309L and E2209 were used to produce fusion zones of different chemical compositions. The SCC results showed that the heat affected zone (HAZ on the 2304 base metal side of the weldments was the most susceptible region to SCC for both filler metals tested. The SCC results also showed that the weldments with 2209 duplex steel filler metal presented the best SCC resistance when compared to the weldments with E309L filler metal. The lower SCC resistance of the dissimilar joint with 309L austenitic steel filler metal may be attributed to (1 the presence of brittle chi/sigma phase in the HAZ on the 2304 base metal, which produced SC cracks in this region and (2 the presence of a semi-continuous delta-ferrite network in the fusion zone which favored the nucleation and propagation of SC cracks from the fusion zone to HAZ of the 2304 stainless steel. Thus, the SC cracks from the fusion zone associated with the SC cracks of 2304 HAZ decreased considerably the time-of-fracture on this region, where the fracture occurred. Although the dissimilar weldment with E2209 filler metal also presented SC cracks in the HAZ on the 2304 side, it did not present the delta ferrite network in the fusion zone due to its chemical composition. Fractography analyses showed that the mixed fracture mode was predominant for both filler metals used.

  19. Application of secondary and residual stresses to the assessment of the structural integrity of nuclear power-generating plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banahan, B.D.

    2008-01-01

    Magnox nuclear power stations were built in the 1960s to design codes that, in general, required weldments to be subject to a post-weld heat treatment to remove residual stresses. Implicit in this was the assumption that the heat treatment reduced the stresses significantly such that as stated in the codes 'stresses caused by fabrication and welding are practically annulled'. However, it has since been realised that the stresses remaining, although small, could still be significant when incorporated into the subsequently developed failure avoidance methodologies such as R6. Moreover, either at the time of construction or during the operating life, repairs are undertaken to remove manufacturing or service-induced defects. These repairs can be put into service with or without a post-weld heat treatment. As a consequence of a paucity of data for the two- and three-dimensional distribution of the magnitude of these stresses, extremely conservative values of stresses have been adopted to ensure that the plant is secure against the design intent throughout the service life. In this paper, the requirements of the failure-avoidance methodology R6 Revision 4 are briefly reviewed with respect to the categorisation of secondary and residual stresses and the application of the three approaches for determining the as-welded residual stress distribution at room temperature. These three levels comprise, Level 1, simple estimates, Level 2, bounding profiles, and Level 3, detailed evaluation. Examples are presented where knowledge of the residual stresses has been an important component of the overall integrity assessment. The first relates to multi-pass weldments in superheater headers fabricated from a ferritic steel and the second to the weldments in the standpipes, both at Magnox power stations with concrete pressure vessels. Although in these cases the weldments had been subject to a post-weld heat treatment, the remaining residual stresses presented a significant challenge to

  20. Microstructural development in multi-pass TIG welded F82H steels under dual-ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogiwara, H.; Tanigawa, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naga-gun, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Kishimoto, H.; Tomohiro, M.; Kohyama, A. [Kyoto Univ., Institute of Advanced Energy (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels are the first candidate materials for blanket structural component. On fabricating blanket components, various joining technologies will be required, and it could be anticipated that some parts of the weldments will suffer from high-dose 14 MeV neutron irradiation. For example, the current Japanese water cooled test blanket module design has the weldment of the first wall and side wall at 25 mm from the surface. This will not be the case for TIER-TBM, but could be the critical issue if the same design is applied for DEMO blanket system. In this study, the effects of displacement damage and helium production on mechanical properties and microstructures of the multi-pass tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding were investigated. The welded joint used in this study is a multi-pass TIG weldment on 15-mm thick plates of F82H-IEA. The post weld heat treatment was carried out at 720 deg. C for 1 h. To obtain systematic and accurate information of the microstructural response under fusion environment, dual-ion irradiation was performed. 15 mm x 20 mm pieces which cover the whole TIG weldment were irradiated at 470 deg. C up to 20 dpa using 6.4 MeV Fe{sup +3} and/or energy-degraded 1.0 MeV He{sup +}. The damage rate was 1.0 x 10{sup -3} dpa/s, and the helium injection rate was 15 x 10{sup -3} appm He/s. After the irradiations, thin film samples were made from various regions of the weldment by focused ion beam (FIB) processor, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation and hardness tests were performed. Microstructure and Vickers hardness profiles across base metal, heat affected zone (HAZ) and fusion zone (FZ) were examined before irradiation experiments. The hardness measurements revealed that the maximum hardness was observed at the last pass region of FZ, and the softest region was in the middle of the FZ and HAZ region near the transformation line. In the microstructure study

  1. Measurement and Analysis of the Diffusible Hydrogen in Underwater Wet Welding Joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kong Xiangfeng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The diffusible hydrogen in steel weldments is one of the main reasons that led to hydrogen assisted cracking. In this paper, the results of literatures survey and preliminary tests of the diffusible hydrogen in underwater wet welding joint were presented. A fluid-discharge method of for measuring the diffusible hydrogen in weldment was introduced in detail. Two kinds of underwater welding electrode diffusible hydrogen are 26.5 mL/100g and 35.5 mL/100g by fluid-discharge method, which are high levels. The diffusible hydrogen of underwater welding is higher than atmospheric welding, and the result is closely related to welding material. The best way to control the diffusible hydrogen is adjusting welding material and improving fluidity of slag.

  2. An Ultrasonic Pattern Recognition Approach to Welding Defect Classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Sung Jin

    1995-01-01

    Classification of flaws in weldments from their ultrasonic scattering signals is very important in quantitative nondestructive evaluation. This problem is ideally suited to a modern ultrasonic pattern recognition technique. Here brief discussion on systematic approach to this methodology is presented including ultrasonic feature extraction, feature selection and classification. A stronger emphasis is placed on probabilistic neural networks as efficient classifiers for many practical classification problems. In an example probabilistic neural networks are applied to classify flaws in weldments into 3 classes such as cracks, porosity and slag inclusions. Probabilistic nets are shown to be able to exhibit high performance of other classifiers without any training time overhead. In addition, forward selection scheme for sensitive features is addressed to enhance network performance

  3. Analytical considerations for stress related remedies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rybicki, E.F.; McGuire, P.A.

    1984-01-01

    The study described here focuses on reducing the impact of one of the factors, contributing to integranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in BWR reactor piping, e.g., tensile residual stresses in the areas of observed cracking. There are several techniques for controlling residual stresses on the inside surface of girth welded pipes. The work described here is part of a larger study where various remedies and pipe geometries were considered. The stress remedy technique utilizes an induction heating method to alter residual stresses due to welding. The method is referred to as Induction Heating for Stress Improvement (IHSI). While IHSI was first applied to pipe-to-pipe weldments with successful results, many field applications of IHSI will be to pipe-to-tee or pipe-to-component geometries. Therefore, this study is directed toward obtaining a better understanding of the weld induced residual stress and the effect of IHSI on weldments with this type of geometry

  4. Irradiation effects in low-alloy reactor pressure vessel steels (Heavy-Section Steel Technology program series 4 and 5)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGowan, J.J.; Nanstad, R.K.; Thoms, K.R.; Menke, B.H.

    1985-01-01

    This report presents studies on the irradiation effects in low-alloy reactor pressure vessel steels. The Fourth Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Irradiation Series, almost completed, was aimed at elastic-plastic and fully plastic fracture toughness of low-copper weldments (''current practice welds''). A typical nuclear pressure vessel plate steel was included for statistical purposes. The Fifth HSST Irradiation Series, now in progress, is aimed at determining the shape of the K/sub IR/ curve after significant radiation-induced shift of the transition temperatures. This series includes irradiated test specimens of thicknesses up to 100 mm and weldment compositions typical of early nuclear power reactor pressure vessel welds. 27 refs., 22 figs

  5. Development of a new bundle welding technology for CANDU fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Soo Sung; Lee, D. Y.; Goo, D. S.

    2010-01-01

    The new technology of welding process for fuel bundle of CANDU nuclear fuels is considered important in respect to the soundness of weldments and the improvement of the performance of nuclear fuels during the operation in reactor. The probability of leakage of the fission products is mostly apt to occur at the weldments of fuel bundles, and it is connected directly with the safety and life prediction of the nuclear reactor in operation. The fuel bundles of CANDU nuclear fuels are welded by the electrical resistance method, connecting the endplates and endcaps with fuel rods. Therefore, the purpose of this study of the 2nd year is to select the proper welding parameters and to investigate the characteristics of the full-sized samples using the projection endplates and make some prototype samples for the endplate welding of CANDU nuclear fuels. This study will be also provide the fundamental data for the new design and fabrications of CANDU nuclear fuel bundles

  6. X-ray diffraction based residual stress analysis of repair welds of CrMo steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rai, Sanjay; Sujith, S.; Jayakumar, T.

    1996-01-01

    Premature failure of weldments is often reported in the industry. Once failure occurs, the common practice now a days is either to replace the whole component or repair the failed region by welding. Since repairing rather than replacing is more economical, the process of repair welding assumes technological significance. However, it is necessary to realise the problems associated with repair-welding. During most of the repair welding cases, after repair weldments are hard and brittle. In many cases it is not possible to give post weld heat treatment (PWHT). This demands better welding techniques for repair without affecting the microstructure. Repair welding requires adoption of special procedure and parameters to obtain acceptable properties of the repair welded regions. In this paper different repair welding methods have been compared from residual stress and hardness point of view. (author)

  7. Relationship between ultrasonic Rayleigh waves and surface residual stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, L.; Cook, K.V.; Dewey, B.R.; King, R.T.

    1977-01-01

    Local variations of Rayleigh (surface) circumferential ultrasonic wave velocity near a pipe-girth weld in large-diameter thin-wall type 316H stainless steel pipe were measured. The weldment was similar to those anticipated for the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) piping systems. The residual stress distribution was estimated independently from shell theory for an elastic, infinite, thin shell with circumferential line loading. An upper bound on the magnitude of the residual stresses was estimated assuming the deformation of the shell was entirely elastic. The pattern of surface wave velocity variations matches the theoretical residual stress pattern closely. It is suggested that the monitoring of surface wave velocity variations might be used for characterizing residual stress patterns near critical welds in piping, aiding in design calculations, and for in-service monitoring of the state of stress of weldments

  8. Studies on the Influence of Various factors in Ultrasonic Flaw Detection in Ferrite Steel Butt Weld Joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baby, Sony; Balasubramanian, T.; Pardikar, R. J.

    2003-01-01

    Parametric studies have been conducted into the variability of the factors affecting the ultrasonic testing applied to weldments. The influence of ultrasonic equipment, transducer parameters, test technique, job parameters, defect type and characteristics on reliability far defect detection and sizing was investigated by experimentation. The investigation was able to build up substantial bank of information on the reliability of manual ultrasonic method for testing weldments. The major findings of the study separate into two parts, one dealing with correlation between ultrasonic techniques, equipment and defect parameters and inspection performance effectiveness and other with human factors. Defect detection abilities are dependent on the training, experience and proficiency of the UT operators, the equipment used, the effectiveness of procedures and techniques

  9. Aqueous stress corrosion of candidate austenitic steels for ITER structural applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soppet, W.K.; French, D.M.; Kassner, T.F.

    1993-01-01

    Susceptibility of crevice-weldment specimens of Types 316L and 316NG stainless steel (SS) to SCC was investigated in slow-strain-rate-tensile (SSRT) tests in water that simulates important parameters anticipated in first-wall/blanket systems. The SSRT tests were performed in oxygenated water containing 0.06-10 ppm chloride at temperatures of 95 to 225 degrees C to establish the effects of water purity and temperature on SC resistance. These steels, including weldments, exhibit good resistance to SCC under crevice conditions at temperatures of 150 degrees C in oxygenated water containing 0.1-10 ppm chloride. Most specimens fractured in the base metal, and several others fractured in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of the weld, but none failed in the weld metal

  10. The effects of alloying elements on microstructures and mechanical properties of tungsten inert gas welded AZ80 magnesium alloys joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Zhang, Jiansheng; Ding, Rongrong

    2017-11-01

    The effects of alloying elements on the macrostructures, microstructures and tensile strength of AZ80 Mg alloy weldments were studied in the present study. The results indicate that with the decrease of Al element content of filler wire, the welding defects of seam are gradually eliminated and the β-Mg17Al12 phases at α-Mg boundaries are refined and become discontinuous, which are beneficial to the improvement of tensile strength. With AZ31 Mg alloy filler wire, the maximum tensile strength of AZ80 weldment is 220 MPa and fracture occurs at the welding seam of joint. It is experimentally proved that robust AZ80 Mg alloy joints can be obtained by tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding process with AZ31 Mg alloy filler wire. However, further study is required to improve the microstructures and reduce welding defects of joint in order to further improve the joining strength of AZ80 Mg alloy joint.

  11. Acoustical holographic Siamese image technique for imaging radial cracks in reactor piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, H.D.; Gribble, R.P.

    1985-04-01

    This paper describes a unique technique (i.e., ''Siamese imaging'') for imaging quasi-vertical defects in reactor pipe weldments. The Siamese image is a bi-symmetrical view of the inner surface defect. Image construction geometry consists of two probes (i.e., source/receiver) operating either from opposite sides or the same side of the defect to be imaged. As the probes are scanned across a lower surface connected defect, they encounter two images - first the normal upright image and then the inverted image. The final integrated image consists of two images connected along their baselines, thus we call it a ''Siamese image.'' The experimental imaging results on simulated and natural cracks in reactor piping weldments graphically illustrate this unique technique. Excellent images of mechanical fatique and thermal cracks were obtained on ferritic and austenitic piping

  12. High temperature corrosion studies on friction-welded dissimilar metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arivazhagan, N.; Singh, Surendra; Prakash, Satya; Reddy, G.M.

    2006-01-01

    Understanding the behaviour of weldment at elevated temperatures and especially their corrosion behaviour has become an object of scientific investigation recently. Investigation has been carried out on friction-welded AISI 4140 and AISI 304 under molten salt of Na 2 SO 4 + V 2 O 5 (60%) environment at 500 and 550 deg. C under cyclic condition. The influences of welding parameters on the hot corrosion have been discussed. The resulting oxide scales in the weldment have been characterized systematically using surface analytical techniques. Scale thickness on low alloy steel side was found to be more and was prone to spalling. Weld region has been found to be more prone to degradation than base metals due to inter diffusion of element across the interface and the formation of intermetallic compound

  13. High temperature corrosion studies on friction-welded dissimilar metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arivazhagan, N. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee (India)]. E-mail: arivadmt@iitr.ernet.in; Singh, Surendra [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee (India); Prakash, Satya [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee (India); Reddy, G.M. [Defense Metallurgical and Research Laboratory, Hyderabad (India)

    2006-07-25

    Understanding the behaviour of weldment at elevated temperatures and especially their corrosion behaviour has become an object of scientific investigation recently. Investigation has been carried out on friction-welded AISI 4140 and AISI 304 under molten salt of Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + V{sub 2}O{sub 5} (60%) environment at 500 and 550 deg. C under cyclic condition. The influences of welding parameters on the hot corrosion have been discussed. The resulting oxide scales in the weldment have been characterized systematically using surface analytical techniques. Scale thickness on low alloy steel side was found to be more and was prone to spalling. Weld region has been found to be more prone to degradation than base metals due to inter diffusion of element across the interface and the formation of intermetallic compound.

  14. Pitting Corrosion of the Resistance Welding Joints of Stainless Steel Ventilation Grille Operated in Swimming Pool Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirosław Szala

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This work focuses on the pitting corrosion of ventilation grilles operated in swimming pool environments. The ventilation grille was made by resistance welding of stainless steel rods. Based on the macroscopic and microscopic examinations, the mechanism of the pitting corrosion was confirmed. Chemical composition microanalysis of sediments as well as base metal using scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS method was carried out. The weldments did not meet the operating conditions of the swimming pool environment. The wear due to the pitting corrosion was identified in heat affected zones of stainless steel weldment and was more severe than the corrosion of base metal. The low quality finish of the joints and influence of the welding process on the weld metal microstructure lead to accelerated deposition of corrosion effecting elements such as chlorine.

  15. Mechanical considerations in cw linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    An 80-MHz radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linac has been designed, fabricated and operated at 100% duty factor (cw) for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) project at Los Alamos. This paper describes the design features, fabrication techniques, and operational problems of the device. The RFQ is an assembly of heavy steel, copper-plated weldments. It measures about 15 ft (4.5 m) long by 5 ft (1.5 m) in diameter and weighs over 12 t. Major components are two pair of diametrically orthogonal vanes mounted in a core cylinder. The core is assembled into a manifold cylinder that couples rf power into the vane quadrants. The design features discussed include assembly of hollow wall, flood-cooled components; high-conductivity rf seals; removable and adjustable vanes; and tuning devices. Fabrication challenges such as close-tolerance weldments, vane-tip-contour machining and large-component plating requirements are covered

  16. Probing liquation cracking and solidification through modeling of momentum, heat, and solute transport during welding of aluminum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, S.; Chakraborty, S.; DebRoy, T.

    2005-01-01

    A transport phenomena-based mathematical model is developed to understand liquation cracking in weldments during fusion welding. Equations of conservation of mass, momentum, heat, and solute transport are numerically solved considering nonequilibrium solidification and filler metal addition to determine the solid and liquid phase fractions in the solidifying region and the solute distribution in the weld pool. An effective partition coefficient that considers the local interface velocity and the undercooling is used to simulate solidification during welding. The calculations show that convection plays a dominant role in the solute transport inside the weld pool. The predicted weld-metal solute content agreed well with the independent experimental observations. The liquation cracking susceptibility in Al-Cu alloy weldments could be reliably predicted by the model based on the computed solidifying weld-metal composition and solid fraction considering nonequilibrium solidification

  17. Irradiation embrittlement and optimisation of annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This conference is composed of 30 papers grouped in 6 sessions related to the following themes: neutron irradiation effects in pressure vessel steels and weldments used in PWR, WWER and BWR nuclear plants; results from surveillance programmes (irradiation induced damage and annealing processes); studies on the influence of variations in irradiation conditions and mechanisms, and modelling; mitigation of irradiation effects, especially through thermal annealing; mechanical test procedures and specimen size effects

  18. Computer automation of ultrasonic testing. [inspection of ultrasonic welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, B. G. W.; Kerlin, E. E.; Gardner, A. H.; Dunmyer, D.; Wells, T. G.; Robinson, A. R.; Kunselman, J. S.; Walker, T. C.

    1974-01-01

    Report describes a prototype computer-automated ultrasonic system developed for the inspection of weldments. This system can be operated in three modes: manual, automatic, and computer-controlled. In the computer-controlled mode, the system will automatically acquire, process, analyze, store, and display ultrasonic inspection data in real-time. Flaw size (in cross-section), location (depth), and type (porosity-like or crack-like) can be automatically discerned and displayed. The results and pertinent parameters are recorded.

  19. 電位差法を用いた裏面応力腐食割れ進展の連続モニタリング

    OpenAIRE

    佐藤, 康元; 渥美, 健夫; 庄子, 哲雄

    2006-01-01

    In order to investigate the applicability of the potential drop techniques to the continuous monitoring of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) propagation, SCC tests were performed in a sodium thiosulfate solution at room temperature using plate specimens with weldments. The SCC propagation was monitored using the techniques of direct current potential drop (DCPD), alternating current potential drop (ACPD) and modified induced current potential drop (MICPD) on the reverse side that on which the S...

  20. Reactive Fusion Welding for Ultra-High Temperature Ceramic Composite Joining

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-16

    istribution un lim it ed 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Plasm a and pulsed plasma arc w eld ing (PAW and PPAW) processes w ere used to fusion...were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. 3.4 Microscopy Weldment specimens were cut perpendicular to the welding direction using a manual...Nikon; Epiphot 200; Tokyo, Japan) and scanning electron microscopy (Hitachi; S- 570; Tokyo, Japan). ZrB2 grain sizes in the parent material and heat

  1. Shaping the Strength of Cast Rocker Arm for Special Purpose Vehicle

    OpenAIRE

    Żuczek R.; Pysz S.; Maj M.; Piekło J.

    2015-01-01

    The article discusses the weldment to casting conversion process of rocker arm designed for operation in a special purpose vehicle to obtain a consistency of objective functions, which assume the reduced weight of component, the reduced maximum effort of material under the impact of service loads achieved through topology modification for optimum strength distribution in the sensitive areas, and the development of rocker arm manufacturing technology. As a result of conducted studies, the unit...

  2. Ship Structure Committee Publications: A Special Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    structural surfaces, even more so when the surfaces were machined after straining. damage; heavy weather damage to the forefoot and forward weather deck...One of the striking ORDER FROM: NTIS inadequacies of the impact test was the failure to show a difference between AD-72963 steels A and C, a...weldment in the range of 40 deg to 0 deg F. The effects of various types of defects, including arc strikes , Contract NObs-50238 porosity, and partial

  3. Residual Stress Analysis for Engineering Applications by Means of Neutron Diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gndupel-Herold, Thomas; Brand, Paul C.; Prask, Henry J.

    1999-01-01

    The economic and scientific importance of neutron diffraction residual stress analysis has led to an increasing number of suitable instruments worldwide. Recently, a dedicated state-of-the-art diffractometer has been installed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology reactor. It has been used for a variety of measurements on basic and engineering stress problems. Among the most prominent examples that have been investigated are residual stresses in rails, weldments, and plasma-sprayed coatings

  4. Lamb wave scattering by a surface-breaking crack in a plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, S. K.; Al-Nassar, Y.; Shah, A. H.

    1991-01-01

    An NDE method based on finite-element representation and modal expansion has been developed for solving the scattering of Lamb waves in an elastic plate waveguide. This method is very powerful for handling discontinuities of arbitrary shape, weldments of different orientations, canted cracks, etc. The advantage of the method is that it can be used to study the scattering of Lamb waves in anisotropic elastic plates and in multilayered plates as well.

  5. Mechanical properties and long-range behaviour of TZM-welding joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakobeit, W.; Eck, R.; Ullrich, G.

    1987-01-01

    In order to utilize the known excellent high temperature properties of TZM (Mo-0,5Ti-0,08Zr) for construction of components with thick sections (sheets of 8 mm wall thickness, bars of 25 mm diameter) the testing of suitable joining techniques was necessary. Based on the present state of the art the EB- and TIG-welding as well as the friction welding seemed to be the qualified methods. The investigations of the welded specimens covered non-destructive tests and metallographic evaluations as well as tensile tests, long term creep rupture tests at 850 0 C and fatigue tests unter tension-compression stresses at room temperature and 850 0 C. EB- and TIG-weldments showed coarse grained weld and heat affected zones. Due to higher gas contents, the EB-welded specimens produced by P/M process were interspersed with pores while the joints of the ARC-cast TZM material were uniform. However, TIG-welds of both variants were affected with porosity and cracks. The friction welds were almost perfect. In the tensile tests, all the joints containing recrystallized microstructure zones ruptured in the welds at strength values equivalent to recrystallized TZM. The strength of friction welds exhibited significant higher values. At room temperature the tensile ductility of all weldments was inadequate, the friction welded specimens showed the lowest values. At 850 0 C the tensile ductility was adequate in all variants. The creep rupture tests at 850 0 C exhibit up to 10 000 h that the strength of the friction weldments exceed those of the EB-weldments. (orig./IHOE) [de

  6. Fatigue Characterization of Fabricated Ship Details for Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-08-01

    than the ques- tion of brittle fracture. Such cracking has been found in the forepeak region, bottom amidships, at the bulwark at both ends of the...results of the laboratory studies are presented in the Appendices. 1.3 References 1.1 Vedeler, G. "To What Extent Do Brittle Fracture and Fatigue...Civil Engineering. Appre- ciation is extended to Mr. John R. Williams who prepared the weldments, to Mr. Glen Lafenhagen who assisted in the fatigue

  7. Real time computer controlled weld skate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, W. A., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A real time, adaptive control, automatic welding system was developed. This system utilizes the general case geometrical relationships between a weldment and a weld skate to precisely maintain constant weld speed and torch angle along a contoured workplace. The system is compatible with the gas tungsten arc weld process or can be adapted to other weld processes. Heli-arc cutting and machine tool routing operations are possible applications.

  8. Linear accelerator use in the nuclear field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecomte, J.-C.

    Radiography of internal conformity is performed on weldments and thick castings using linear accelerators. The basic principles relating to linear accelerators are outlined and their advantages over Co 60 sources described. Linear accelerator operation related requirements are presented as well as the use of this apparatus as a method for volumetric inspection, during fabrication of French Nuclear Steam Supply Systems (NSSS). Finally the resources needed to use this technique as an inspection method is dealt with [fr

  9. Irradiation embrittlement and optimisation of annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    This conference is composed of 30 papers grouped in 6 sessions related to the following themes: neutron irradiation effects in pressure vessel steels and weldments used in PWR, WWER and BWR nuclear plants; results from surveillance programmes (irradiation induced damage and annealing processes); studies on the influence of variations in irradiation conditions and mechanisms, and modelling; mitigation of irradiation effects, especially through thermal annealing; mechanical test procedures and specimen size effects.

  10. A Review on Solidification and Change in Mechanical Properties Under Vibratory Welding Condition

    OpenAIRE

    Jyoti Prakash; Dr. S.P. Tewari; Bipin Kumar Srivastava

    2010-01-01

    Welding has been applied to various industries in particular, automotive, aerospace and microelectronics. Thermal cycle produced near weld line generates residual stress and inhomogeneous plastic deformation in weldments. However there are many methods for welding the workpieces and one of the method among these is vibratory welding. It has the advantages of less investment, more convenient operation, less pollution and shorter manufacturing period. In vibratory welding, workpiece vibrates in...

  11. Effects of tempering temperature on microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of high-strength low-alloy D6AC plasma arc welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chun-Ming, E-mail: chunming@ntut.edu.tw [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Taipei University of Technology, Taipei 10608, Taiwan (China); Lu, Chi-Hao [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10673, Taiwan (China)

    2016-10-31

    This study prepared high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) D6AC weldments using a plasma arc welding (PAW) process. The PAW weldments were then tempered at temperatures of 300 °C, 450 °C, and 600 °C for 1000 min. Microstructural characteristics of the weld in as-welded HSLA-D6AC, tempered D6AC, and tensile-tested D6AC were observed via optical microscopy (OM). We also investigated the hardness, tensile strength, and V-notched tensile strength (NTS) of the tempered specimens using a Vickers hardness tester and a universal testing machine. The fracture surfaces of the specimens were observed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Our results show that the mechanical properties and microstructural features of the HSLA weldments are strongly dependent on tempering temperature. An increase in tempering temperature led to a decrease in the hardness and tensile strength of the weldments but led to an increase in ductility. These effects can be attributed to the transformation of the microstructure and its effect on fracture characteristics. The specimens tempered at 300 °C and 450 °C failed in a ductile-brittle manner due to the presence of inter-lath austenite in the microstructure. After tempering at a higher temperature of 600 °C, martensite embrittlement did not occur, such that specimens failure was predominantly in a ductile manner. In the NTS specimens, an increase in tempering temperature led to a reduction in tensile strength due to notch embrittlement and the effects of grain boundary thickening and sliding. Our findings provide a valuable reference for the application of HSLA-D6AC steel in engineering and other fields.

  12. Effect of step-aging on the fracture toughness of Ti-15V-3Cr-3Sn-3Al alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niwa, Naotake

    1993-01-01

    Development and an application of a new high-low step-aging to improve the fracture toughness-strength balance of a Ti-15V-3Cr-3Sn-3Al alloy are studied. The high-low step-aging of aging at higher temperatures followed by aging at lower temperatures produces bi-modal microstructure composed of coarse and fine alpha precipitates in beta matrix. It greatly improves fracture toughness-strength balance compared with aging at a single temperature. Homogeneous distribution of coarse alpha precipitates produced by adding pre-aging at 573K before the high-low step-aging tends to reduce the superiority of the bi-modal microstructure in fracture toughness. The improvement is provided by the formation of microcracks and voids in the coarse alpha precipitates and rugged crack propagation due to the uneven microstructure. The high-low step-aging is applied to a TIG weldment of the alloy to improve the mechanical properties of the weldment. In the TIG weldment, strength of a fusion zone becomes much higher than that of a base metal after aging at a single temperature because of different aging response. In the first high temperature aging of the high low step-aging, coarse alpha particles that strengthen little and suppress strengthening by fine alpha precipitation in low temperature re-aging, precipitate more in fusion zone than in base metal because of the enhancement of aging in fusion zone. Therefore, strengthening of fusion zone in re-aging is less than in the base metal, resulting in comparable strength between the fusion zone and the base metal after re-aging. The bi-modal microstructure produced by the step-aging also improves, the, fracture toughness of the fusion zone of the weldment

  13. Towards risk-based structural integrity methods for PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, O.J.V.; Lloyd, R.B.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the development of risk-based structural integrity assurance methods and their application to Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) plant. In-service inspection is introduced as a way of reducing the failure probability of high risk sites and the latter are identified using reliability analysis; the extent and interval of inspection can also be optimized. The methodology is illustrated by reference to the aspect of reliability of weldments in PWR systems. (author)

  14. Investigation of the Weld Properties of Dissimilar S32205 Duplex Stainless Steel with AISI 304 Steel Joints Produced by Arc Stud Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz Barış Başyiğit

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available UNS S32205 duplex stainless steel plates with a thickness of 3 mm are arc stud welded by M8 × 40 mm AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel studs with constant stud lifts in order to investigate the effects of welding arc voltages on mechanical and microstructural behaviors of the joints. As the welding arc voltage increases starting from 140 V, the tensile strength of the weldment also increases but the higher arc values results in more spatters around the weld seam up to 180 V. Conversely, the lower arc voltages causes poor tensile strength values to weldments. Tensile tests proved that all of the samples are split from each other in the welding zone but deformation occurs in duplex plates during the tensile testing of weldments so that the elongation values are not practically notable. The satisfactory tensile strength and bending values are determined by applying 180 volts of welding arc voltage according to ISO 14555 standard. Peak values of micro hardness occurred in weld metal most probably as a consequence of increasing heat input decreasing the delta ferrite ratios. As the arc voltage increases, the width of the heat affected zone increases. Coarsening of delta-ferrite and austenite grains was observed in the weld metal peak temperature zone but it especially becomes visible closer to the duplex side in all samples. The large voids and unwelded zones up to approximately 1 mm by length are observed by macro-structure inspections. Besides visual tests and micro-structural surveys; bending and microhardness tests with radiographic inspection were applied to samples for maintaining the correct welding parameters in obtaining well-qualified weldments of these two distinct groups of stainless steel materials.

  15. Effect of pressurized water reactor environment on fatigue crack propagation, including hole times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bamford, W.H.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented from an experimental program being conducted to investigate the effects of pressurized water reactor environment on the fatigue crack growth rate of pressure vessel steels. Tests were conducted on precracked WOL type specimens under load controlled conditions. The effects of R ratio, loading rates, and loading wave form are evaluated, and the results are compared for both forging and plate material, as well as weldments

  16. Assessment of the reliability of ultrasonic inspection methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haines, N.F.; Langston, D.B.; Green, A.J.; Wilson, R.

    1982-01-01

    The reliability of NDT techniques has remained an open question for many years. A reliable technique may be defined as one that, when rigorously applied by a number of inspection teams, consistently finds then correctly sizes all defects of concern. In this paper we report an assessment of the reliability of defect detection by manual ultrasonic methods applied to the inspection of thick section pressure vessel weldments. Initially we consider the available data relating to the inherent physical capabilities of ultrasonic techniques to detect cracks in weldment and then, independently, we assess the likely variability in team to team performance when several teams are asked to follow the same specified test procedure. The two aspects of 'capability' and 'variability' are brought together to provide quantitative estimates of the overall reliability of ultrasonic inspection of thick section pressure vessel weldments based on currently existing data. The final section of the paper considers current research programmes on reliability and presents a view on how these will help to further improve NDT reliability. (author)

  17. High-Temperature Creep-Fatigue Behavior of Alloy 617

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rando Tungga Dewa

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the high-temperature creep-fatigue testing of a Ni-based superalloy of Alloy 617 base metal and weldments at 900 °C. Creep-fatigue tests were conducted with fully reversed axial strain control at a total strain range of 0.6%, 1.2%, and 1.5%, and peak tensile hold time of 60, 180, and 300 s. The effects of different constituents on the combined creep-fatigue endurance such as hold time, strain range, and stress relaxation behavior are discussed. Under all creep-fatigue tests, weldments’ creep-fatigue life was less than base metal. In comparison with the low-cycle fatigue condition, the introduction of hold time decreased the cycle number of both base metal and weldments. Creep-fatigue lifetime in the base metal was continually decreased by increasing the tension hold time, except for weldments under longer hold time (>180 s. In all creep-fatigue tests, intergranular brittle cracks near the crack tip and thick oxide scales at the surface were formed, which were linked to the mixed-mode creep and fatigue cracks. Creep-fatigue interaction in the damage-diagram (D-Diagram (i.e., linear damage summation was evaluated from the experimental results. The linear damage summation was found to be suitable for the current limited test conditions, and one can enclose all the data points within the proposed scatter band.

  18. Multiaxial Cycle Deformation and Low-Cycle Fatigue Behavior of Mild Carbon Steel and Related Welded-Metal Specimen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weilian Qu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The low-cycle fatigue experiments of mild carbon Q235B steel and its related welded-metal specimens are performed under uniaxial, in-phase, and 90° out-of-phase loading conditions. Significant additional cyclic hardening for 90° out-of-phase loading conditions is observed for both base metal and its related weldment. Besides, welding process produces extra additional hardening under the same loading conditions compared with the base metal. Multiaxial low-cycle fatigue strength under 90° out-of-phase loading conditions is significantly reduced for both base-metal and welded-metal specimens. The weldment has lower fatigue life than the base metal under the given loading conditions, and the fatigue life reduction of weldment increases with the increasing strain amplitude. The KBM, FS, and MKBM critical plane parameters are evaluated for the fatigue data obtained. The FS and MKBM parameters are found to show better correlation with fatigue lives for both base-metal and welded-metal specimens.

  19. Microstructural characterization of dissimilar welds between Incoloy 800H and 321 Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sayiram, G., E-mail: sayiram.g@vit.ac.in; Arivazhagan, N.

    2015-04-15

    In this work, the microstructural character of dissimilar welds between Incoloy 800H and 321 Stainless Steel has been discussed. The microscopic examination of the base metals, fusion zones and interfaces was characterized using an optical microscope and scanning electron microscopy. The results revealed precipitates of Ti (C, N) in the austenitic matrix along the grain boundaries of the base metals. Migration of grain boundaries in the Inconel 82 weld metal was very extensive when compared to Inconel 617 weldment. Epitaxial growth was observed in the 617 weldment which increases the strength and ductility of the weld metal. Unmixed zone near the fusion line between 321 Stainless Steel and Inconel 82 weld metal was identified. From the results, it has been concluded that Inconel 617 filler metal is a preferable choice for the joint between Incoloy 800H and 321 Stainless Steel. - Highlights: • Failure mechanisms produced by dissimilar welding of Incoloy 800H to AISI 321SS • Influence of filler wire on microstructure properties • Contemplative comparisons of metallurgical aspects of these weldments • Microstructure and chemical studies including metallography, SEM–EDS • EDS-line scan study at interface.

  20. Deformation behavior of a 16-8-2 GTA weld as influenced by its solidification substructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foulds, J.R.; Moteff, J.; Sikka, V.K.; McEnerney, J.W.

    1983-01-01

    Weldment sections from formed and welded type 316 stainless steel pipe are characterized with respect to some time-independent (tensile) and time-dependent (creep) mechanical properties at temperatures between 25 0 C and 649 0 C. The GTA weldment, welded with 16-8-2 filler metal, is sectioned from pipe in the formed + welded + solution annealed + straightened condition, as well as in the same condition with an additional re-solution treatment. Detailed room temperature microhardness measurements on these sections before and after reannealing enable a determination of the different recovery characteristics of weld and base metal. The observed stable weld metal solidification dislocation substructure in comparison with the base metal random dislocation structure, in fact, adequately explains weld/base metal elevated temperature mechanical behavior differences from this recovery characteristic standpoint. The weld metal substructure is the only parameter common to the variety of austenitic stainless steel welds exhibiting the consistent parent/weld metal deformation behavior differences described. As such, it must be considered the key to understanding weldment mechanical behavior

  1. A high molybdenum stainless steel and its resistance to chloride environments in the welded condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coppolecchia, V.D.; Jasner, M.; Rockel, M.B.

    1988-01-01

    Highly alloyed stainless steels, such as 1925 hMo UNS N08925 with 6 percent molybdenum, are finding widespread use in high chloride cooling water and process environments. This alloy has good general corrosion resistance to a variety of chloride environments but it's main attraction is excellent resistance to all forms of localized corrosion. In aggressive chloride environments weldments are generally the area of concern with regard to localized corrosion. Temperature-time-sensitization diagrams are presented that demonstrate the resistance of 1925 hMo weldments to intergranular attack. Immersion tests in 10% ferric chloride substantiate that autogenous tube welds, also have excellent pitting resistance. Various filler metals are compared both electrochemically and in immersion tests. These comparisons reveal that an overalloyed filler metal is required to achieve pitting and crevice corrosion resistance equal or better than that of the base metal. Alloy 625 (UNS NO6625) has been selected. Constant extension rate tests in boiling 62% calcium chloride reveal that 1925 hMo weldments are immune to stress corrosion cracking in this environment which virtually guarantees absence of SCC in seawater regardless of temperature as well as in most commercial chemical environments

  2. Effects of LSP on micro-structures and residual stresses in a 4 mm CLAM steel weld joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xizhang, E-mail: chenxizhang@wzu.edu.cn [School of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Wenzhou University., Wenzhou 325035 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013, Jiangsu (China); Fang, Yuanyuan [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013, Jiangsu (China); Zhang, Shuyan; Kelleher, Joe F. [ISIS, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Zhou, Jianzhong [School of Mechanical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013, Jiangsu (China)

    2015-05-15

    The effects of laser shock processing (LSP) on the distribution of residual stress and micro-structure of China Low Activation Martensitic (CLAM) steel weldment were investigated via neutron diffraction and optical microscope (OM). A pair of 4 mm CLAM steel plates joined by GTA welding. Special attention is paid to the generation of high level compressive residual stresses introduced by LSP. Residual stress in longitudinal, normal and transversal direction at weldment surface and longitudinal stress through thickness are evaluated via neutron diffraction. Compressive residual stress after LSP occurred at more than 90% areas within the weld joint, it is almost double the areas of compressive stress compare to weldment surface before LSP. The maximum compressive normal residual stress becomes to −183 MPa after LSP from −63 MPa before LSP. The Modification of surface micro-structures including weld zone (WZ), heat affected zone (HAZ) and base metal (BM) are also discussed. Results to date demonstrate that laser shock processing has been a great potential method for the improvement of mechanical performance of components.

  3. A comparative study of the SSC resistance of a novel welding process IEA with SAW and MIG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natividad, C.; Salazar, M.; Espinosa-Medina, M.A.; Perez, R.

    2007-01-01

    The Stress Sulphide Cracking resistance of X65 weldments produced by Indirect Electric Arc, Submerged Arc Welding (SAW) and Metal Inert Gas (MIG) processes were evaluated in a NACE solution saturated with H 2 S at 25 deg. C, 37 deg. C and 50 deg. C using Slow Strain Rate Tests (SSRT) and electrochemical measurements. Weldments produced by the Indirect Electric Arc presented the best Stress Sulphide Cracking resistance at 25 deg. C. This behavior is attributed to the microstructural modification of the weld bead from ferrite in a needlelike form to a fine grain microstructure, which was not observed at 37 deg. C and 50 deg. C. In addition, the hydrogen permeation flux increased with the temperature, this result is associated with the ferrite phase. The electrochemical results show a decrease of the trapping sites for the atomic hydrogen on this weldment. This behavior has not been observed for the other welding processes due to their microstructure (a typical columnar growth of coarse grain)

  4. Ferrous alloy metallurgy, liquid lithium corrosion and welding. Final report, April 1, 1973-March 31, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, D.L.; Matlock, D.K.

    1984-01-01

    This research program consists of two parts: an evaluation of the corrosion behavior of ferrous alloys in liquid lithium, and a study of microstructure development and properties of dissimilar metal weldments. A ten-year overview of the research accomplishments made is presented. The effects of liquid lithium on both uniform corrosion and grain boundary penetration in ferrous alloys has been investigated as a function of time, temperature, base metal alloy content, and liquid lithium nitrogen content. Kinetic equations for the various corrosion processes have been developed and analyzed with respect to models for corrosion and corrosion product development. The effects of liquid lithium on mechanical properties, particularly fatigue, have been studied. Results have shown that in both austenitic stainless steels and ferritic steels, liquid lithium significantly reduces the mechanical integrity of all materials by inducing liquid metal embrittlement. A model for liquid metal embrittlement induced damage during fatigue was developed and shown to correlate with the experimental results. Microstructural development in austenitic weld metal, with particular emphasis on new grades with reduced chromium contents, has been investigated. The microstructures have been correlated with alloy content and the basics of a thermodynamic model for predicting weld metal microstructure has been developed. The high temperature mechanical behavior of dissimilar metal weldments (austenitic stainless steel to ferritic steel) has been investigated with the impression-creep test technique. Observed microstructural changes with position across the weldment are shown to correlate directly with creep behavior. A model based on deformation of composite materials was developed

  5. Metallurgy and deformation of electron beam welded similar titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasang, T.; Sabol, J. C.; Misiolek, W. Z.; Mitchell, R.; Short, A. B.; Littlefair, G.

    2012-04-01

    Butt welded joins were produced between commercially pure titanium and various titanium alloys using an electron beam welding technique. The materials used represent commercially pure grade, α-β alloy and β alloy. They were CP Ti, Ti-6Al-4V (Ti64) and Ti-5Al-5V-5Mo-3Cr (Ti5553), respectively. Grains were largest in the FZs of the different weldments, decreasing in size towards the heat affected zones (HAZs) and base metals. Hardness measurements taken across the traverse cross-sections of the weldments were constant from base metal-to-weld-to-base metal for CP Ti/CP Ti and Ti64/Ti64 welds, while the FZ of Ti5553/Ti5553 had a lower hardness compared with the base metal. During tensile testing the CP Ti/CP Ti weldments fractured at the base metal, whereas both the Ti64/Ti64 and Ti5553/Ti5553 broke at the weld zones. Fracture surface analysis suggested microvoid coalescence as the failure mechanism. The compositional analysis showed a relatively uniform distribution of solute elements from base metal-to-weld-to-base metal. CP Ti has always been known for its excellent weldability, Ti64 has good weldability and, preliminary results indicated that Ti5553 alloy is also weldable.

  6. A study on the development of a real-time intelligent system for ultrasonic flaw classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Sung Jin; Kim, Hak Joon; Lee, Hyun; Lee, Seung Seok

    1998-01-01

    In spite of significant progress in research on ultrasonic pattern recognition it is not widely used in many practical field inspection in weldments. For the convenience of field application of this methodology, following four key issues have to be suitably addressed; 1) a software where the ultrasonic pattern recognition algorithm is efficiently implemented, 2) a real-time ultrasonic testing system which can capture the digitized ultrasonic flaw signal so the pattern recognition software can be applied in a real-time fashion, 3) database of ultrasonic flaw signals in weldments, which is served as a foundation of the ultrasonic pattern recognition algorithm, and finally, 4) ultrasonic features which should be invariant to operational variables of the ultrasonic test system. Presented here is the recent progress in the development of a real-time ultrasonic flaw classification by the novel combination of followings; an intelligent software for ultrasonic flaw classification in weldments, a computer-base real-time ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation system, database of ultrasonic flaw signals, and invariant ultrasonic features called 'normalized features.'

  7. Characterization of weld strength and impact toughness in the multi-pass welding of super-duplex stainless steel UNS 32750

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devendranath Ramkumar, K.; Thiruvengatam, G.; Sudharsan, S.P.; Mishra, Debidutta; Arivazhagan, N.; Sridhar, R.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Effect of filler metals on the weldability of super-duplex stainless steel plates. • Contemplative explanations on the metallurgical and mechanical properties of the weldments. • Enhanced mechanical properties of the welds at ambient room temperature. - Abstract: This paper investigates the weldability, metallurgical and mechanical properties of the UNS 32750 super-duplex stainless steels joints by Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) employing ER2553 and ERNiCrMo-4 filler metals. Impact and tensile studies envisaged that the weldments employing ER2553 exhibited superior mechanical properties compared to ERNiCrMo-4 weldments. Microstructure studies performed using optical and SEM analysis clearly exhibited the different forms of austenite including widmanstatten austenite on the weld zone employing ER2553 filler. Also the presented results clearly reported the effect of filler metals on strength and toughness during the multi-pass welding. This research article addressed the improvement of tensile and impact strength using appropriate filler wire without obtaining any deleterious phases

  8. A Relationship of the Torque Strength between Endplates and Endcaps due to the Welding Parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Dae Seo; Kim, Soo Sung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-10-15

    As fuel bundles in a PHWR core irradiated, inner pressure in the claddings of the fuel rods increases owing to the outer pressure and fission products of the nuclear fissions. Because of a leak possibility from a welding between a cladding and an endcap, this welding part is connected with the safety of nuclear fuel rods. Endcap-cladding welding of nuclear fuel rods in a PHWR takes advantage of a resistance upset butt welding. The weldment between a cladding and an endcap is to be sound to prevent a leakage of fission products from a cladding as a UO{sub 2} pellet is irradiated. Weld flash was made from a deformation due to a welding heat and increasing the pressure of the resistivity and resistance from a cladding and an endcap. Weld line of a welding interface, microstructure of a weldment and a crystallographic structure change were sources of an iodine induced SCC in a reactor. The soundness of a weldment is important because a weld line connects the leakage of fission products from an operational reactor. In this study, welding specimens were fabricated by a resistance welding method using a fuel bundle welder to measure and analyze the torque strength of an endplate-endcap welding. The torque strength between endplates and endcaps was measured and analyzed with the welding current and the welding time. The torque strength between endplates and endcaps was, on the whole, within 6.9-12.7 N{center_dot}m in the range of fabrication specification of the fuel bundles. The weldability of between an endplate and an endcap was investigated by a metallographic examination.

  9. Metallurgical and mechanical examinations of steel–copper joints arc welded using bronze and nickel-base superalloy filler materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velu, M.; Bhat, Sunil

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Optical and scanning electron microscopy show defect free weld interfaces. ► Energy dispersive spectroscopy shows low dilution level of the weld by Fe. ► XRD studies show no brittle intermetallic phases in the weld interfaces. ► Weld interfaces did not fail during tensile, transverse bending and impact tests. ► The joint exhibits superior strength properties than that of bronze filler. - Abstract: The paper presents metallurgical and mechanical examinations of joints between dissimilar metals viz. copper (UNSC11000) and alloy steel (En31) obtained by Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) using two different filler materials, bronze and nickel-base super alloy. The weld bead of the joint with bronze-filler displayed porosity, while that with nickel-filler did not. In tension tests, the weldments with bronze-filler fractured in the centre of the weld, while those with nickel-filler fractured in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of copper. Since the latter exhibited higher strength than the former, all the major tests were undertaken over the joints with nickel-filler alone. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) coupled with Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) indicated corrugated weld interfaces and favorable elemental diffusions across them. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies around the weld interfaces did not reveal any detrimental intermetallic compounds. Transverse bending tests showed that flexural strengths of the weldments were higher than the tensile strengths. Transverse side bend tests confirmed good ductility of the joints. Shear strength of the weld-interface (Cu–Ni or Ni–steel) was higher than the yield strength of weaker metal. Microhardness and Charpy impact values were measured at all the important zones across the weldment

  10. Development of Environment and Irradiation Effects of High Temperature Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Woo Seog; Kim, D. W.; Kim, S. H.

    2009-11-01

    Proposed materials, Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel (32 mm thickness) and 9Cr-1Mo-1W (100 mm thickness), for the reactor vessel were procured, and welded by the qualified welding technologies. Welding soundness was conformed by NDT, and mechanical testings were done along to weld depth. Two new irradiation capsules for use in the OR test hole of HANARO were designed and fabricated. specimens was irradiated in the OR5 test hole of HANARO with a 30MW thermal power at 390±10 .deg. C up to a fast neutron fluence of 4.4x10 19 (n/cm 2 ) (E>1.0 MeV). The dpa was evaluated to be 0.034∼0.07. Base metals and weldments of both Mod.9Cr-1Mo and 9Cr-1Mo-1W steels were tested tensile and impact properties in order to evaluate the irradiation hardening effects due to neutron irradiation. DBTT of base metal and weldment of Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel were -16 .deg. C and 1 .deg. C, respectively. After neutron irradiation, DBTT of weldment of Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel increased to 25 . deg. C. Alloy 617 and several nickel-base superalloys were studied to evaluate high temperature degradation mechanisms. Helium loop was developed to evaluate the oxidation behaviors of materials in the VHTR environments. In addition, creep behaviors in air and He environments were compared, and oxidation layers formed outer surfaces were measured as a function of applied stress and these results were investigated to the creep life

  11. Integrity of Safety-Related Fast Reactor Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, R.T.; Tomkins, B.

    1981-01-01

    The LMFBR contains several structural items whose integrity must be safeguarded during the life of the plant. These items include the main core support structures (strongback, diagrid) and the primary tank to which these structures are attached. In order to demonstrate an acceptable level of structural integrity, the chosen design philosophy must be supported by both analytical and experimental evidence. This paper describes the current approaches in the UK to these requirements. Section 2 describes the materials mechanical properties tests performed to date on both fracture toughness and fatigue crack growth in Type 316 austenitic stainless steel plate and weldments. This data illustrates the problems in identifying the relevant materials fracture parameters for use in assessments. Section 3 shows the test programmes in hand to extend the materials programmes to tests on structural features (mainly welded wide plate tests) which incorporate the complexity of weldments in a structural context. This includes experimental evidence on the effects of local weld residual stresses on structural failure. Various routes are open for the integrity assessment of FR structures. These are discussed in Section 4 but in effect they reduce to a fracture mechanics approach using some technique to cope with elastic-plastic fracture. The main problems at present relate to our ability in analysis to cope with residual stresses and the post-initiation region of the fracture resistance curve. Also, there is the problem of initial defect sizing by current NDE techniques. Current conservative analytical assessments give acceptable defect sizes of order a few millimetres in irradiated weldments. Finally, Section 5 discusses the options open in design to cope with safety related structures under normal and abnormal loading conditions. It is clear that several options exist in design to satisfy the demand for high integrity

  12. Global and local characteristics of an autogenous single pass electron beam weld in thick gage UNS S41500 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarafan, S., E-mail: Sheida.Sarafan.1@ens.etsmtl.ca [École de Technologie Supérieure, Montréal, Québec, Canada H3C 1K3 (Canada); National Research Council Canada, Aerospace, Montréal, Québec, Canada H3T 2B2 (Canada); Wanjara, P., E-mail: priti.wanjara@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca [National Research Council Canada, Aerospace, Montréal, Québec, Canada H3T 2B2 (Canada); Gholipour, J., E-mail: Javad.gholipour@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca [National Research Council Canada, Aerospace, Montréal, Québec, Canada H3T 2B2 (Canada); Champliaud, H., E-mail: henri.champliaud@etsmtl.ca [École de Technologie Supérieure, Montréal, Québec, Canada H3C 1K3 (Canada)

    2016-06-01

    Electron beam welding of UNS S41500, a low carbon martensitic stainless steel utilized in hydroelectric turbine manufacturing, was investigated by applying a single pass autogenous process to penetrate a section thickness of 72 mm without preheating. In the as-welded and post-weld heat treated conditions, the evolution in microhardness and microstructure across the weldments, as well as the global and local tensile properties, were evaluated. In the as-welded condition, assessment of the microhardness and the associated microstructure across the welds led to the identification of six regions, including the fusion zone, four heat affected zones and the base metal; each of these regions consisted of different phase constituents, such as tempered martensite, untempered martensite, delta ferrite and retained austenite. Post-weld heat treatment, undertaken to temper the untempered martensite in the as-welded microstructure, was effective in homogenizing the hardness across the weldment. The mechanical response of the welds, determined through tensile testing at room temperature with an automated non-contact three-dimensional deformation measurement system, indicated that the global tensile properties in the as-welded and post-weld heat treated conditions met the acceptance criteria in the ASME Section IX standard. Also, evaluation of the local tensile properties in the fusion and heat affected zones of the as-welded samples allowed a more comprehensive understanding of the strength and ductility associated with the different microstructures in the “composite” nature of the weldment. Fractographic analysis demonstrated dimpled features on the tensile fracture surfaces and failure was associated with debonding between the martensitic matrix and the secondary phases (such as delta ferrite and retained austenite) that resulted in the formation, growth and coalescence of voids into a macroscale crack.

  13. High temperature corrosion studies on friction welded low alloy steel and stainless steel in air and molten salt environment at 650 oC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arivazhagan, N.; Narayanan, S.; Singh, Surendra; Prakash, Satya; Reddy, G.M.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: → Thermogravimetric analysis on friction welded AISI 304 with AISI 4140 exposed in air and molten salt environment. → Comparative study on friction welded AISI 4140 with AISI 304 exposed in air, Na 2 SO 4 -60%V 2 O 5 and NaCl-50%Na 2 SO 4 at 650 o C. → SEM/EDAX, XRD analysis on corroded dissimilar AISI 304 and AISI 4140 materials. -- Abstract: The investigation on high-temperature corrosion resistance of the weldments is necessary for prolonged service lifetime of the components used in corrosive environments. This paper reports on the performance of friction welded low alloy steel AISI 4140 and stainless steel AISI 304 in air as well as molten salt environment of Na 2 SO 4 -60%V 2 O 5 and NaCl-50%Na 2 SO 4 at 650 o C. This paper reports several studies carried out for characterizing the weldments corrosion behavior. Initially thermogravimetric technique was used to establish the kinetics of corrosion. For analyzing the corrosion products, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive analysis and electron probe micro analysis techniques were used. From the results of the experiments, it is observed that the weldments suffered accelerated corrosion in NaCl-Na 2 SO 4 environment and showed spalling/sputtering of the oxide scale. Furthermore, corrosion resistance of weld interface was found to be lower than that of parent metals in molten salt environment. Weight gain kinetics in air oxidation studies reveals a steady-state parabolic rate law while the kinetics with salt deposits displays multi-stage growth rates. Moreover NaCl is the main corrosive species in high temperature corrosion, involving mixtures of NaCl and Na 2 SO 4 which is responsible for formation of internal attack.

  14. A Review of Alloy 800H for Applications in the Gen IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, Weiju; Swindeman, Robert W.

    2010-01-01

    Alloy 800H is currently under consideration for applications in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant at operational temperatures above 750 C. To provide supporting information in this paper at the attempt to facilitate the consideration, service requirements of the nuclear system for structural materials is first described; and then an extensive review of Alloy 800H is given on its codification with respect to development and research history, mechanical behavior and design allowables, metallurgical aging resistance, environmental effect considerations, data requirements and availability, weldments, as well as many other aspects relevant to the intended nuclear application; an finally further research and development activities to support the materials qualification are suggested.

  15. Method and apparatus for determining weldability of thin sheet metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Gene M.; Hudson, Joseph D.

    1988-01-01

    A fixture is provided for testing thin sheet metal specimens to evaluate hot-cracking sensitivity for determining metal weldability on a heat-to-heat basis or through varying welding parameters. A test specimen is stressed in a first direction with a load selectively adjustable over a wide range and then a weldment is passed along over the specimen in a direction transverse to the direction of strain to evaluate the hot-cracking characteristics of the sheet metal which are indicative of the weldability of the metal. The fixture provides evaluations of hot-cracking sensitivity for determining metal weldability in a highly reproducible manner with minimum human error.

  16. Weldability of thermally grain-refined Fe-12Ni-0.25Ti for cryogenic structural applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, D.E.

    1980-02-01

    The weldability of a research alloy designed for structural use in liquid helium temperature, cryogenic environments was investigated. Plates of iron-12 weight percent nickel-0.25 weight percent titanium were grain refined by the four-step, grain refining thermal treatment developed for this alloy and welded with Inconel Number 92 weld wire using the Gas Metal Arc (GMA) welding process with argon-15% helium gas shielding. Both a single pass and a double-sided, 2 pass electron beam (EB) weld were also made without filler metal addition. Weldments were radiographed and sectioned and the charpy V-notch specimens removed were tested at liquid nitrogen and helium temperatures

  17. Pulsed Nd:YAG laser welding of Cu54Ni6Zr22Ti18 bulk metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Hyun; Lee, Changhee; Lee, D.M.; Sun, J.H.; Shin, S.Y.; Bae, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    Pulsed Nd:YAG laser was used to weld Cu 54 Ni 6 Zr 22 Ti 18 (numbers indicate at.%) metallic glass with glass forming ability of 6 mm. Through a single pulse irradiation on the glassy plate, the pulse condition for welding without crystallization was investigated. Under the selected pulse condition, the Cu 54 Ni 6 Zr 22 Ti 18 plate was periodically welded with different welding speeds. For the welding speed of 60 mm/min, no crystallization was observed in both weldment and heat-affected zone. For the 20 mm/min, the crystallized areas with a band shape were observed along the welding direction

  18. Quantitative analysis of tritium distribution in austenitic stainless steels welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roustila, A.; Kuromoto, N.; Brass, A.M.; Chene, J.

    1994-01-01

    Tritium autoradiography was used to study the tritium distribution in laser and arc (TIG) weldments performed on tritiated AISI 316 samples. Quantitative values of the local tritium concentration were obtained from the microdensitometric analysis of the autoradiographs. This procedure was used to map the tritium concentration in the samples before and after laser and TIG treatments. The effect of the detritiation conditions and of welding on the tritium distribution in the material is extensively characterized. The results illustrate the interest of the technique for predicting a possible embrittlement of the material associated with a local enhancement of the tritium concentration and the presence of helium 3 generated by tritium decay. ((orig.))

  19. Post test evaluation of a fire tested rail spent fuel cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rack, H.J.; Yoshimura, H.R.

    1980-01-01

    Postmortem examination of a large rail-transported spent fuel shipping cask which had been exposed to a JP-4 fuel fire revealed the presence of two macrofissures in the outer cask shell. One, a part-through crack located within the seam weld fusion zone of the outer cask shell, is typical of hot cracks found in stainless steel weldments. The other, a through-crack, was apparently initiated during the formation of a copper-stainless steel dissimilar metal joint, with crack propagation through the cask outer shell having occurred during the fire-test. 8 figures

  20. Postmortem metallurgical examination of a fire-exposed spent fuel shipping cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rack, H.J.; Yoshimura, H.R.

    1980-04-01

    A potmortem examination of a large fire-exposed rail-transported spent fuel shipping container has revealed the presence of two macrofissures in the outer cask shell. The first, a part-thru crack located within the seam weld fusion zone of the outer cask shell, was typical of hot cracks that may be found in stainless steel weldments. The second, located within the stainless steel base metal, apparently originated at microcracks formed during the welding of a copper-stainless steel dissimilar metal joint. The latter microcrack then propagated during the fire-test, ultimately penetrating the outer shall of the cask. 18 figures, 2 tables

  1. Assessment of weld heat-affected zones in a reactor vessel material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marston, T.U.; Server, W.

    1978-01-01

    The mechanical properties of weld heat-affected zones (HAZ's) associated with the heavy section, nuclear quality weldments are evaluated and found to be superior to those of the parent base material. The nil ductility transition temperature (NDTT), Charpy impact and static and dynamic fracture toughness properties of a HAZ associated with a submerged arc weld and one associated with a manual metal arc weld are directly compared with those of the parent base material. It is concluded that the stigma normally associated with HAZ is not justified for this grade and quality of material and weld procedure

  2. Service experience with AISI type 316 steel components in CEGB Midlands Region power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plastow, B.; Bagnall, B.I.; Yeldham, D.E.

    1979-01-01

    The service performance of AISI Type 316 steel components in sections up to 100 mm thick in Power Plant of the Midlands Region of the C.E.G.B. is reviewed. A comparison is drawn between the satisfactory performance of components whose dimensional stability is not critical and the difficulties experienced when rapid rates of change of temperature cause distortion in thick section components. Weldment manufacture and performance are reviewed and both are considered to be satisfactory. In general the material has performed well and the difficulties due to distortion have been overcome by imposing operating regimes which limit rates of temperature change. (author)

  3. Assesment of influncing factors on mechanical and electrical properties of Al/Cu joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaraj, R. Meby; Hynes, N. Rajesh Jesudoss

    2018-05-01

    Joining of dissimilar materials opens up challenging opportunities in todays technology. Al/Cu weldments are used in applications that demands corrosion resistance, thermal and electrical conducting properties. In dissimilar joining mechanical and thermal properties result in large stress gradients during heating. The Al-Cu joints are lighter, cheaper and have conductivity equal to copper alloy. The main scope of this study is to assess the influencing factors of Al/Cu joints in mechanical and electrical properties. It includes the influence of the dilution between the base metals, influence of physical properties, influence of welding parameters, influence of filler metal, influence of heat treatment, and influence of electrical properties

  4. Experience with simplified inelastic analysis of piping designed for elevated temperature service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severud, L.K.

    1980-03-01

    Screening rules and preliminary design of FFTF piping were developed in 1974 based on expected behavior and engineering judgment, approximate calculations, and a few detailed inelastic analyses of pipelines. This paper provides findings from six additional detailed inelastic analyses with correlations to the simplified analysis screening rules. In addition, simplified analysis methods for treating weldment local stresses and strains as well as fabrication induced flaws are described. Based on the FFTF experience, recommendations for future Code and technology work to reduce design analysis costs are identified

  5. Review of progress in quantitative nondestructive evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, D.O.; Chimenti, D.E.

    1983-01-01

    A comprehensive review of the current state of quantitative nondestructive evaluation (NDE), this volume brings together papers by researchers working in government, private industry, and university laboratories. Their papers cover a wide range of interests and concerns for researchers involved in theoretical and applied aspects of quantitative NDE. Specific topics examined include reliability probability of detection--ultrasonics and eddy currents weldments closure effects in fatigue cracks technology transfer ultrasonic scattering theory acoustic emission ultrasonic scattering, reliability and penetrating radiation metal matrix composites ultrasonic scattering from near-surface flaws ultrasonic multiple scattering

  6. Technical Support of Performance Improvement for Resistance Welding Using Zr-4 Endcap and Endplate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Soo Sung

    2008-10-15

    The proper welding process for Zircaloy-4 endplate of PHWR and DUPIC fuel bundle assembly is considered important in respect to the soundness of weldment and the improvement of the performance of nuclear fuel bundle during the operation in reactor. The Zircaloy-4 endplate of PHWR and DUPIC fuel bundles are welded by the projection joint type, connecting the endcaps of fuel elements. Therefore, the purpose of this projection joint is to improve the welding quality of torque strength and welding deformation and to apply the commercial productions for the endplate welding of PHWR and DUPIC nuclear fuel bundle assembly.

  7. Selection of engineering materials and fabrication of liquid metal fast breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patriarca, P.

    1975-01-01

    Information is presented graphically and pictorially concerning the need for nuclear power; basic nuclear concepts including BWR, PWR, HTGR, and LMFBR; the fissioning process; nuclear reactor fuel; fabrication of reactor vessels for LMFBR's; fabrication of intermediate heat exchangers for LMFBR's; piping fabrication for LMFBR's; transition welds; steam generators for LMFBR demonstration plants worldwide; stress corrosion cracking of steam generator materials and weldments; post--test examination of the Alco/BLH sodium-heated steam generator; alternate steam generator designs; and alternate structural materials. (DCC)

  8. Nondestructive evaluation of LWR spent fuel shipping casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballard, D.W.

    1978-02-01

    An analysis of nondestructve testing (NDT) methods currently being used to evaluate the integrity of Light Water Reactor (LWR) spent fuel shipping casks is presented. An assessment of anticipated NDT needs related to breeder reactor cask requirements is included. Specific R and D approaches to probable NDT problem areas such as the evaluation of austenitic stainless steel weldments are outlined. A comprehensive bibliography of current NDT methods for cask evaluation in the USA, Great Britain, Japan and West Germany was compiled for this study

  9. Fatigue crack propagation in neutron-irradiated ferritic pressure-vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, L.A.

    1977-01-01

    The results of a number of experiments dealing with fatigue crack propagation in irradiated reactor pressure-vessel steels are reviewed. The steels included ASTM alloys A302B, A533B, A508-2, and A543, as well as weldments in A543 steel. Fluences and irradiation conditions were generally typical of those experienced by most power reactors. In general, the effect of neutron irradiation on the fatigue crack propagation behavior of these steels was neither significantly beneficial nor significantly detrimental

  10. Evaluation and prediction of neutron embrittlement in reactor pressure vessel materials. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawthorne, J.R.; Menke, B.H.; Loss, F.J.; Watson, H.E.; Hiser, A.L.; Gray, R.A.

    1982-12-01

    This study evaluates the effects of fast neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties of eight nuclear reactor vessel materials. The materials include submerged arc weldments, three plates, and one forging. The materials are in the unirradiated and irradiated conditions with regard to tensile, Charpy impact, and static and dynamic fracture toughness properties. Correlations between impact and fracture toughness parameters are developed from the experimental results. The observed shifts in transition temperature and the drop in upper-shelf energy are compared with predictions developed from the Regulatory Guide 1.99.1 trend curves

  11. EFAM GTP 02 - the GKSS test procedure for determining the fracture behaviour of materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwalbe, K.H.; Heerens, J.; Zerbst, U.; Kocak, M.

    2002-01-01

    This document describes a unified fracture mechanics test method in procedural form for quasi-static testing of materials. It is based on the ESIS Procedures P1 and P2 and introduces additional features, such as middle cracked tension specimens, shallow cracks, the δ 5 crack tip opening displacement, the crack tip opening angle, the rate of dissipated energy, testing of weldments, and guidance for statistical treatment of scatter. Special validity criteria are given for tests on specimens with low constraint. This document represents an updated version of EFAM GTP 94. (orig.) [de

  12. Shaping the Strength of Cast Rocker Arm for Special Purpose Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Żuczek R.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the weldment to casting conversion process of rocker arm designed for operation in a special purpose vehicle to obtain a consistency of objective functions, which assume the reduced weight of component, the reduced maximum effort of material under the impact of service loads achieved through topology modification for optimum strength distribution in the sensitive areas, and the development of rocker arm manufacturing technology. As a result of conducted studies, the unit weight of the item was reduced by 25%, and the stress limit values were reduced to a level guaranteeing safe application.

  13. Příklad predikce rozložení uhlíku ve svarových spojích ocelí

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řeháčková, L.; Dobrovská, J.; Dobrovská, V.; Pilous, V.; Million, Bořivoj; Stránský, K.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 86, č. 308 (2005), s. 181-186 ISSN 1429-6055. [20. mezinárodní sympozium Metody hodnocení stuktury a vlastností materiálů. 051207-051209, Ustroň-Jaszowiec] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA106/04/1006; GA ČR(CZ) GA106/04/0949; GA ČR(CZ) GA106/03/0264 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : prediction * carbon redistribution * steel weldments Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy

  14. Redistribuce hliníku a uhlíku ve svarech ocelí v intervalu teplot 500-1100 stupňů C (0,34 hm.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stránský, K.; Million, Bořivoj; Foret, R.; Michalička, Petr; Rek, A.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 76, č. 290 (2003), s. 213-221 ISSN 1429-6055. [Mezinárodní sympózium Struktura a vlastnosti konstrukčních materiálů /18./. Svratka, 25.11.2003-27.11.2003] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/01/0379; GA ČR GA106/01/0382 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2041904 Keywords : aluminium and carbon diffusion * steel weldments Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy

  15. Příspěvek k modelování teplotní závislosti difuzních koeficientů ve svarovém spoji ocelí

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řeháčková, L.; Million, Bořivoj; Dobrovská, J.; Stránský, K.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 78, č. 298 (2004), s. 119-124 ISSN 1429-6055. [Metody hodnocení struktury a vlastností materiálů /19./. Rožnov pod Radhoštěm, 30.11.2004-02.12.2004] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA106/04/0949; GA ČR(CZ) GA106/04/1006 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2041904 Keywords : carbon diffusion coefficient * steel weldments Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy

  16. Predikce rozložení uhlíku ve svarových spojích ocelí

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řeháčková, L.; Dobrovská, J.; Dobrovská, V.; Pilous, V.; Million, Bořivoj; Stránský, K.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 86, č. 308 (2005), s. 175-180 ISSN 1429-6055. [20. mezinárodní sympozium Metody hodnocení stuktury a vlastností materiálů. 051207-051209, Ustroň-Jaszowiec] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA106/04/1006; GA ČR(CZ) GA106/04/0949; GA ČR(CZ) GA106/03/0271 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : carbon diffusion * steel weldments

  17. Redistribuce hliníku a uhlíku ve svarech ocelí v intervalu teplot 500-1100 stupňů C (0,34 hm.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stránský, K.; Million, Bořivoj; Foret, R.; Michalička, Petr; Rek, A.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 76, č. 290 (2003), s. 213-216 ISSN 1429-6055. [Mezinárodní sympózium Struktura a vlastnosti konstrukčních materiálů /18./. Svratka, 25.11.2003-27.11.2003] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/01/0379; GA ČR GA106/01/0382 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2041904 Keywords : aluminium and carbon diffusion * steel weldments Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy

  18. Recent advances in condition assessment of components based on strain monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, J.D. [University of Wales, Swansea (United Kingdom)

    1998-12-31

    Service experience indicates that creep cavitation and cracking can develop in components operating at high temperature and pressure. Life optimisation programmes for power generating plant require periodic evaluation of plant condition. Instrumentation to measure component deformation provides information regarding operating practices which lead to excessive loading and data which can be related to damage state. Indeed, even near weldments, where creep cavitation and cracking can develop with low overall strain, significant levels of deformation have been recorded in local regions. Thus, knowledge of strain accumulation allows identification of the factors affecting damage accumulation and provides a basis for predicting remaining life. (orig.) 8 refs.

  19. High-Temperature Tensile Behaviors of Base Metal and Electron Beam-Welded Joints of Ni-20Cr-9Mo-4Nb Superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, R. K.; Anil Kumar, V.; Sukumaran, Arjun; Kumar, Vinod

    2018-05-01

    Electron beam welding of Ni-20Cr-9Mo-4Nb alloy sheets was carried out, and high-temperature tensile behaviors of base metal and weldments were studied. Tensile properties were evaluated at ambient temperature, at elevated temperatures of 625 °C to 1025 °C, and at strain rates of 0.1 to 0.001 s-1. Microstructure of the weld consisted of columnar dendritic structure and revealed epitaxial mode of solidification. Weld efficiency of 90 pct in terms of strength (UTS) was observed at ambient temperature and up to an elevated temperature of 850 °C. Reduction in strength continued with further increase of test temperature (up to 1025 °C); however, a significant improvement in pct elongation is found up to 775 °C, which was sustained even at higher test temperatures. The tensile behaviors of base metal and weldments were similar at the elevated temperatures at the respective strain rates. Strain hardening exponent `n' of the base metal and weldment was 0.519. Activation energy `Q' of base metal and EB weldments were 420 to 535 kJ mol-1 determined through isothermal tensile tests and 625 to 662 kJ mol-1 through jump-temperature tensile tests. Strain rate sensitivity `m' was low ( 775 °C) is attributed to the presence of recrystallized grains. Up to 700 °C, the deformation is through slip, where strain hardening is predominant and effect of strain rate is minimal. Between 775 °C to 850 °C, strain hardening is counterbalanced by flow softening, where cavitation limits the deformation (predominantly at lower strain rate). Above 925 °C, flow softening is predominant resulting in a significant reduction in strength. Presence of precipitates/accumulated strain at high strain rate results in high strength, but when the precipitates were coarsened at lower strain rates or precipitates were dissolved at a higher temperature, the result was a reduction in strength. Further, the accumulated strain assisted in recrystallization, which also resulted in a reduction in strength.

  20. 3-D characteristics of the residual stress in the plate weld between SA508 and stainless steel 316L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyoung Soo; Kim, Tae Ryong [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jai Hak [Chungbuk National Univ., Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Man Won [Global New-clear Engineering and Consulting, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Seon Yeong [Korea Laboratory Engineering System Company, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-01

    This study is performed to check the three dimensional characteristics of residual stress in the dissimilar metal weld. Although two dimensional analysis has been widely used for the assessment of weld residual stress, it has limitations to understand the stress distribution of the third direction. 3-D analysis was done to understand residual stress distribution of the welded plate. A simple butt-welded plate was considered to show the stress variation on all direction. A mock-up plate weldment was fabricated with SA-508 and F316L, which are widely used in nuclear power plants. The analysis results were validated with the measured values in the mock-up.

  1. 3-D Characteristics of the Residual Stress in the Plate Butt Weld Between SA508 and F316L SS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyoung Soo; Kim, Tae Ryong [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jai Hak [Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Man Won [GNEC, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Seon Yeong [KLES, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-04-15

    This study is performed to check the three dimensional characteristics of residual stress in the dissimilar metal weld. Although two dimensional analysis has been widely used for the assessment of weld residual stress, it has limitations to understand the stress distribution of the third direction. 3-D analysis was done to understand residual stress distribution of the welded plate. A simple butt-welded plate was considered to show the stress variation on all direction. A mock-up plate weldment was fabricated with SA-508 and F316L, which are widely used in nuclear power plants. The analysis results were validated with the measured values in the mock-up.

  2. Non typical results of the first and second irradiation set of the surveillance programme of a boiling water reactor in Switzerland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullrich, G; Krompholz, K [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1994-12-31

    In the surveillance programme for the pressure vessel of the Muhleberg NPP in Switzerland, tensile and impact tests on the base material (ASTM A 508 Cl 2) and two weldments (main and automatic) as well as the heat affected zone, were performed with two sets of irradiation (neutron fluence of 5.5.10{sup 17} and 1.1.10{sup 18}) leading to different shifts of the transition temperature (except for the automatic welded joints which keep the same large shift). Results and causes of the discrepancy are discussed. (authors). 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Applicability of JIS SPV 50 steel to primary containment vessels of nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, K.; Ishikawa, K.; Satoh, M.; Soya, I.

    1980-01-01

    The fracture toughness of JIS SPV 50 steel and its weldment has been examined in order to verify the applicability of these materials to primary containment vessels of nuclear power stations. Test results were evaluated using elastic plastic fracture mechanics through the COD and the J integral concepts for non ductile fracture initiation characteristics. Linear fracture mechanics was employed for propagation arrest characteristics. Results showed that the materials tested here have a sufficient fracture toughness to prevent nonductile fracture and that this steel is a suitable material for use in construction of primary containment vessels of nuclear power stations. (author)

  4. Recent advances in condition assessment of components based on strain monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, J D [University of Wales, Swansea (United Kingdom)

    1999-12-31

    Service experience indicates that creep cavitation and cracking can develop in components operating at high temperature and pressure. Life optimisation programmes for power generating plant require periodic evaluation of plant condition. Instrumentation to measure component deformation provides information regarding operating practices which lead to excessive loading and data which can be related to damage state. Indeed, even near weldments, where creep cavitation and cracking can develop with low overall strain, significant levels of deformation have been recorded in local regions. Thus, knowledge of strain accumulation allows identification of the factors affecting damage accumulation and provides a basis for predicting remaining life. (orig.) 8 refs.

  5. Study on the Image Quality Comparison between in Digital RT and Film RT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sang Ki; Ahn, Yean Shik; Gil, Doo Song

    2011-01-01

    Conventional film radiographic test has been generally and widely used in the inspection on the weldment for quality assurance. On the other hand, since the analog RT is well known for typical time and cost consuming method with complex process of inspection, the industry has researched various ways how to improve radiographic test technology. In this study, we verified the fact that digital RT provides a lot more benefit in effectively detecting defects, ever film details, through digital processing of image enhancement, compared to film RT. As a result, we reached conclusion that digital RT is positively able to replace the film RT in industry in part or in whole

  6. Change of Charpy impact fracture behavior of precracked ferritic specimens due to thermal aging in sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, W.L.

    1985-12-01

    A series of tests were conducted to evaluate the effect of sodium on the impact fracture behavior of precracked Charpy specimens made of HT-9 weldment. One set of samples was precracked prior to sodium aging and the other set was precracked after aging in sodium. Both set of specimens exhibited the same DBTT. Samples precracked prior to sodium exposure, however, showed a 40% reduction in the upper shelf energy (USE) as compared to the set precracked after aging. The results suggest that the fracture toughness of the material may be reduced if an existing crack was soaked in sodium at elevated temperature for a period of time

  7. Electron Beam Welding of Gear Wheels by Splitted Beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dřímal Daniel

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This contribution deals with the issue of electron beam welding of high-accurate gear wheels composed of a spur gearing and fluted shaft joined with a face weld for automotive industry. Both parts made of the high-strength low-alloy steel are welded in the condition after final machining and heat treatment, performed by case hardening, whereas it is required that the run-out in the critical point of weldment after welding, i. e. after the final operation, would be 0.04 mm max..

  8. Mechanical and structural characteristics in high temperature of stainless steel welded joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro, S.N.; Carvalho Mota, A.F. de

    1980-01-01

    The mechanical behavior at 600 0 C of weldments made of type 304 stainless as base metal and niobium containing type 347 stainless as weld metal has been investigated. This was done through tensile and creep tests. Heat treatments at 600 0 C and up to 6000 hours permited a simultaneous follow up of the mechanical and microstructural changes. It was observed that the exposure at 600 0 C under load contributes, from the begining, to the strengthening of the weld. This is due to the acceleration of the second phase precipitation hardening. (Author) [pt

  9. Effects of Heat Input on Microstructure, Corrosion and Mechanical Characteristics of Welded Austenitic and Duplex Stainless Steels: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghusoon Ridha Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of input heat of different welding processes on the microstructure, corrosion, and mechanical characteristics of welded duplex stainless steel (DSS are reviewed. Austenitic stainless steel (ASS is welded using low-heat inputs. However, owing to differences in the physical metallurgy between ASS and DSS, low-heat inputs should be avoided for DSS. This review highlights the differences in solidification mode and transformation characteristics between ASS and DSS with regard to the heat input in welding processes. Specifically, many studies about the effects of heat energy input in welding process on the pitting corrosion, intergranular stress, stresscorrosion cracking, and mechanical properties of weldments of DSS are reviewed.

  10. Improvement of methods to evaluate brittle failure resistance of the WWER reactor pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popov, A A; Parshutin, E V [Engineering Center of Nuclear Equipment Strength, Research and Development Inst. of Power Engineering, Moscow (Russian Federation); Rogov, M F; Dragunov, U G [Experimenter` s and Designer` s Office ` ` Hydropress` ` (Russian Federation)

    1997-09-01

    At the next 10 years a number of Russian WWER nuclear power plants will complete its design lifetime. Normative methods to evaluate brittle failure resistance of the reactor pressure vessels used in Russia have been intended for design stage. The evaluation of reactor pressure vessel lifetime in operation stage demands to create new methods of calculation and new methods for experimental evaluation of brittle failure resistance degradation. The main objective of the study in this type of reactor is weldment number 4. In this report an analysis is made of methods to determine critical temperature of reactor materials including the results of instrumented Charpy testing. 12 figs.

  11. Friction stir welding (FSW of aluminium foam sandwich panels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bušić

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on the influence of welding speed and tool tilt angle upon the mechanical properties at the friction stir welding of aluminium foam sandwich panels. Double side welding was used for producing butt welds of aluminium sandwich panels applying insertion of extruded aluminium profile. Such insertion provided lower pressure of the tool upon the aluminium panels, providing also sufficient volume of the material required for the weldment formation. Ultimate tensile strength and flexural strength for three-point bending test have been determined for samples taken from the welded joints. Results have confirmed anticipated effects of independent variables.

  12. Ti-3Al-2.5V for seawater piping applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caplan, I.L.

    1984-01-01

    Copper-nickel alloys and steel are the materials most commonly used for piping applications in a seawater environment. For situations where reduced weight, incraesed flexibility, and excellent corrosion-erosion resistance are desired, titanium is an extremely attractive alternate material. Commercially pure grades of titanium can be used for seawater piping, but are rather low in strength. However, by taking advantage of the high specific strength possible with alloys of titanium, substantial weight savings can be achieved. Based upon screening studies, Ti-3Al-2.5V was selected for investigation as a candidate alloy for this application. Plate 25.4-mm (1-in.) thick, extruded from Ti-3Al-2.5V billet at a 10:1 reduction ratio, was used for heat treatment and property studies. In addition, double-vee butt weldments of this plate were prepared by the automatic cold-wire gas tungsten arc welding process. The results of mechanical property tests are presented for both Ti-3Al-2.5V plate and weldments. Results to date indicate that the Ti-3Al-2.5V alloy possesses a highly desirable suite of properties that make it a very attractive candidate for piping and machinery applications in the seawater environment

  13. Low-Cycle Fatigue Behavior of 10CrNi3MoV High Strength Steel and Its Undermatched Welds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wei; Liu, Xuesong; Berto, Filippo; Razavi, S M J

    2018-04-24

    The use of high strength steel allows the design of lighter, more slender and simpler structures due to high strength and favorable ductility. Nevertheless, the increase of yield strength does not guarantee the corresponding improvement of fatigue resistance, which becomes a major concern for engineering structure design, especially for the welded joints. The paper presents a comparison of the low cycle fatigue behaviors between 10CrNi3MoV high strength steel and its undermatched weldments. Uniaxial tension tests, Push-pull, strain-controlled fatigue tests were conducted on base metal and weldments in the strain range of 0.2⁻1.2%. The monotonic and cyclic stress-strain curves, stress-life, strain-life and energy-life in terms of these materials were analyzed for fatigue assessment of materials discrepancy. The stress-life results of base metal and undermatched weld metal exhibit cyclic softening behaviors. Furthermore, the shapes of 10CrNi3MoV steel hysteresis loops show a satisfactory Masing-type behavior, while the weld metal shows a non-Masing type behavior. Strain, plastic and total strain energy density amplitudes against the number of reversals to failure results demonstrate that the undermatched weld metal presents a higher resistance to fatigue crack initiation than 10CrNi3MoV high strength steel. Finally, fatigue fracture surfaces of specimens were compared by scanning electron microscopy to identify the differences of crack initiation and the propagation between them.

  14. Welding stainless steels for structures operating at liquid helium temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witherell, C.E.

    1980-04-18

    Superconducting magnets for fusion energy reactors require massive monolithic stainless steel weldments which must operate at extremely low temperatures under stresses approaching 100 ksi (700 MPa). A three-year study was conducted to determine the feasibility of producing heavy-section welds having usable levels of strength and toughness at 4.2/sup 0/K for fabrication of these structures in Type 304LN plate. Seven welding processes were evaluated. Test weldments in full-thickness plate were made under severe restraint to simulate that of actual structures. Type 316L filler metal was used for most welds. Welds deposited under some conditions and which solidify as primary austenite have exhibited intergranular embrittlement at 4.2/sup 0/K. This is believed to be associated with grain boundary metal carbides or carbonitrides precipitated during reheating of already deposited beads by subsequent passes. Weld deposits which solidify as primary delta ferrite appear immune. Through use of fully austenitic filler metals of low nitrogen content under controlled shielded metal arc welding conditions, and through use of filler metals solidifying as primary delta ferrite where only minimum residuals remain to room temperature, welds of Type 316L composition have been made with 4.2K yield strength matching that of Type 304LN plate and acceptable levels of soundness, ductility and toughness.

  15. Weld metal resistant to neutron-bombardment embrittlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biemiller, E.C.

    1980-01-01

    The object of the invention is the provision of a broad range of weldments for reactor pressure vessels that exhibit resistance to neutron-induced changes sufficient to prevent the weldments from being limiting factors in reactor operation. The weld materials of the present invention are defined by as deposited weight percentages in the following ranges: carbon 0.00-0.l5, manganese 1.00 - 2.20, phosphorus 0.000 - 0.015, sulfur 0.00 - 0.02, silicon 0.00 - 0.40, nickel 0.00 - 1.20, chromium 0.00 - 2.50, molybdenum 0.30 - 1.20, copper 0.00 - 0.10, vanadium 0.00 - 0.15, balance essentially iron. A further constraint is that, in its deposited state, A/B <0.4, where A is the sum of the weight percents of nickel and silicon in the metal and B is the sum of the weight percents of manganese, chromium, and molybdenum. (LL)

  16. Sensitization development in austenitic stainless steel piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruemmer, S.M.; Page, R.E.; Atteridge, D.G.

    1984-10-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory and the Division of Engineering Technology of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission are conducting a program to determine a method for evaluating welded and rapair-welded stainless steel piping for light-water reactor service. Validated models, based on experimental data, are being developed to predict the degree of sensitization (DOS) and the intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) susceptibility in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of the SS weldments. The cumulative effects of material composition, past fabrication procedures, past service exposure, weldment thermomechanical (TM) history, and projected post-repair component life are being considered. This program will measure and model the development of HAZ TM history and resultant sensitized microstructure in welded and repair-welded piping. An empirical correlation between a material's DOS and its susceptibility to SCC will be determined using slow strain rate tensile tests. Mill heat chemistries and processing/fabrication records already required in the nuclear industry will be used as input for initial DOS predictions

  17. Evaluation of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel for liquid lithium containment. II. Effects of post-weld heat treatment and niobium content. Annual report, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, T.L.; Edwards, G.R.

    1979-01-01

    The lithium corrosion resistance of the regular grade of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel can be vastly improved with a proper postweld heat treatment, but even greater improvements are needed. Results indicate that if weldments were tempered sufficiently long at 760C to remove all Mo/sub 2/C from the microstructure, even greater resistance to attack by low nitrogen lithium could be achieved. Corrosion tests should eventually be performed on regular grade 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel weldments which have been given a long-term (> 25 h) post-weld temper at 760C. Lithium corrosion resistance of regular grade 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel may also be improved by employing a quench and temper heat treatment. Quenched microstructures have more homogenous distribution of carbides than isothermally annealed microstructures, and if properly tempered, should provide excellent lithium corrosion resistance. Furthermore, the toughness of such a lower bainite microstructure should be better than that of the ferrite-bainitic microstructure created by an isothermal anneal. Numerous parameters, all potentially deleterious to the lithium corrosion resistance of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel, remain to be investigated; two such variables are velocity effects and lead content in the lithium.

  18. Study on Characteristics of Corrosion Fatigue Crack Propagation for Austenitic Stainless Steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Uh Joh; Kim, Bu Ahn

    1988-01-01

    The characteristics of the corrosion fatigue cracking of both TIG weld heat affected zone and base metal for austenitic stainless steel were investigated under the environments of various specific resistance and the air. The corrosion fatigue crack initiation sensitivity was quantitatively investigated for SUS 304 weldments in the various specific resistances. Also, the characteristics of corrosion fatigue cracking for the weldments were investigated from mechanical, electrochemical, and microstructural point of view. Main results obtained are as follows: (1) The corrosion fatigue crack initiation sensitivity on the base metal and weld hea affected zone increases as the specific resistance of corrosion environment decreases, and the sensitivity of the weld heat affected zone appears increasing more than that of the base metal. (2) The corrosion potentials of various specific resistances are almost constant in initial corrosion fatigue cracking, but the corrosion potential becomes less noble promptly with the corrosion fatigue crack growth as the specific resistances decrease. (3) The corrosion fatigue crack growth of the weld heat affected zone rapid than that of the base metal, because of the softening and the less noble potential caused by welding heat cycle

  19. Formed electroslag welded joint from austenitic steel 18/10 CrNi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jilek, L.; Kusak, L.; Martinak, A.

    1987-01-01

    The electroslag welded joint from titanium stabilized steel 18/10 CrNi of 150 mm in thickness showed positive results for both nondestructive and destructive testing. Czechoslovak flux VUZ-4F and the optimized welding mode were completely proven. The weldment was subject to deformation by forging with a removal of 20 to 50% and to bending deformation. A 40% to 50% deformation was necessary for breaking the coarse-grain casting structure. The bending deformation resulted in breaking the coarse-grain casting structure in the entire cross-section, it was, however, only acting in a narrow band corresponding to the largest curvature. At the same time, the heat affected zone decayed. Following heat treatment, especially forming, the delta ferrite content in the weld metal decreased, the mechanical properties of the weld metal and the welded joint following welding and heat treatment showed a relatively large scatter. Forming reduced the scatter and improved plastic properties. Machining within 40 and 50% resulted in good echogenicity of the welded joint in ultrasound testing. The welded joint showed equal properties as the base material of the weldment. (author). 15 figs., 2 tabs., 16 refs

  20. Modified 9Cr-1Mo steel for advanced steam generator applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brinkman, C.R.; Alexander, D.J.; Maziasa, P.J.

    1990-01-01

    Results are reported from several types of mechanical property tests conducted on a number of commercial heats of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel. Data from long term creep-rupture tests conducted on base and weldment material were compared with an analytical model which has been shown to give good agreement between measured and predicted values. Weldment material had somewhat inferior creep-rupture strength in comparison to base material due to a soft zone at the edge of the HAZ. Data are presented from elevated temperature tensile and creep-rupture tests conducted on material thermally aged for periods of up to 75,000 h (8.6 years). Some reduction in strength was shown to occur in comparison to unaged material. Models were developed for predicting the reduction in short term elevated temperature tensile and yield strength for material thermally aged in the temperature range of 482 to 704 degrees C. Results from Charpy impact tests conducted on material thermally aged at 538 degrees C for periods of up to 75,000 h show an increase in the ductile-brittle transition temperature

  1. Weldability of newly developed austenitic alloy for cryogenic service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, T.; Koseki, T.

    1986-01-01

    The testing reported in this paper involved typical steels of the new grades such as STEEL-A (0.025C-14Ni-25Cr-0.35N), STEEL-B (0.04C-23Mn-13Cr-0.22N) and STEEL-C (0.20C-25Mn-5Cr), and commercial steels of Type 300 series. Weldments were made mainly using the GTAW, SMAW and SAW processes with experimental and commercial filler metals. Strength and toughness of weldments were examined at 77 K (-321 0 F) and 4 K. The strengthening of material through the addition of nitrogen was far greater in the weld metal that in the base metal at cryogenic temperature. In fact, 0.2% proof stress of weld metals bearging 0.20% to 0.40% nitrogen at 77 K exhibited a higher value by 60 to 150 MPa (8,740 to 21,760 psi) than that of the base metal. Impact absorbed energy of weld metals at 77 K decreased rapidly with nitrogen content, 60-90 J at 0.20%N to 20-50J at 0.35% N. Rather high impact absorbed energy was obtained when the weld metal solidified as primary austenitic phase, resulting in fully austenitic microstructure or austenite-eutectic ferrite mixture at ambient temperature. In addition, oxide inclusions, the number of which strongly depends on welding processes, were detrimental to toughness of weld metals at cryogenic temperature

  2. Overview of fast reactor structural materials programme in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, P.; Paranjpe, S.R.; Chetal, S.C.; Mannan, S.L.; Ray, S.K.; Seetharaman, V.; Srinivasan, G.

    The fast reactor structural materials activities in India comprise of the programme on the materials for the Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR), the construction of which is nearing completion, and the programme on the candidate materials for the Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) which is now in the design stage. For the materials in use in FBTR, the main thrust has been towards detailed evaluation and documentation of long term (creep) properties of type 316 stainless steel base material in air. For the PFBR the philosophy has been to identify the candidate materials and to evolve a wider scope for the testing and evaluation programmes. The major structural component is identified as variants of type 304 stainless steel and the programmes undertaken include study of low cycle fatigue properties and environmental effects on creep and stress rupture properties. Evaluations of aging embrittlement of type 316 stainless steel base material and weldments are also in progress. The paper lists the testing programmes identified for adoption in the near future. These include creep-fatigue damage studies and fracture mechanics studies on weldments for type 304 stainless steel and testing programme on 2.25 Cr-1 Mo and 9 Cr-1 Mo steels, the identified candidate materials for steam generators. The development efforts also include a comprehensive programme on inelastic analysis procedure. (author)

  3. First Annual Progress Report on Radiation Tolerance of Controlled Fusion Welds in High Temperature Oxidation Resistant FeCrAl Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, Kevin G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gussev, Maxim N. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hu, Xunxiang [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Yamamoto, Yukinori [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Howard, Richard H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-12-01

    The present report summarizes and discusses the first year efforts towards developing a modern, nuclear grade FeCrAl alloy designed to have enhanced radiation tolerance and weldability under the Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) program. Significant efforts have been made within the first year of this project including the fabrication of seven candidate FeCrAl alloys with well controlled chemistry and microstructure, the microstructural characterization of these alloys using standardized and advanced techniques, mechanical properties testing and evaluation of base alloys, the completion of welding trials and production of weldments for subsequent testing, the design of novel tensile specimen geometry to increase the number of samples that can be irradiated in a single capsule and also shorten the time of their assessment after irradiation, the development of testing procedures for controlled hydrogen ingress studies, and a detailed mechanical and microstructural assessment of weldments prior to irradiation or hydrogen charging. These efforts and research results have shown promise for the FeCrAl alloy class as a new nuclear grade alloy class.

  4. Creep failure analysis of butt welded tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Browne, R.J.; Parker, J.D.; Walters, D.J.

    1981-01-01

    As part of a major research programme to investigate the influence of butt welds on the life expectancy of tubular components, a series of internal-pressure, stress-rupture tests have been carried out. Thick walled 1/2Cr 1/2Mo 1/4V tube specimens were welded with mild steel, 1Cr 1/2Mo steel, 2 1/4Cr 1Mo steel or nominally matching 1/2Cr 1/2Mo 1/4V steel to give a wide range of weld metal creep strengths relative to the parent tube. The weldments were tested at 565 0 C at two values of internal pressure, and gave failure lives of up to 44,000 hrs. Finite element techniques have been used to determine the stationary state stress distribution in the weldment which was represented by a three material model. Significant stress redistribution was indicated and these results enabled the position and orientation of cracking and the rupture life to be predicted. The theoretical and experimental results have been used to highlight the limitations of current design methods which are based on the application of the mean diameter hoop stress to the parent material stress rupture data. (author)

  5. Assessment of repair welding technologies of irradiated materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-08-15

    Damages of reactor internals of stainless steels caused by SCC and fatigue were identified in aged BWR plants. Repair-welding is one of the practical countermeasure candidates to restore the soundness of components and structures. The project of 'Assessment of Repair welding Technologies of Irradiated Materials' is being carried out to develop the technical guideline regarding the repair-welding of reactor internals. In fiscal 2011, we investigated the weldability of stainless steel 316L irradiated by welding (TIG) tungsten inert gas. Furthermore, the tensile properties and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of the welds were investigated. Cross-sectional observation of heat affected zone (HAZ) of the bead on plate TIG weldments (heat input 4 kJ/cm) of irradiated SUS316L stainless steel containing 0.026 ~ 0.12appm helium showed degradation of grain boundaries due to helium accumulation. Degree of the degradation depended on the amount of helium. No deterioration of grain boundaries was observed by bead on plate welding with one pass one layer when helium content was 0.039appm. The tensile strengths of welds in non-irradiated and irradiated material were similar. However, the elongation of a weldment by irradiated SUS316L containing 0.124appm Helium was lower than non-irradiated. It was estimated to cause the effects of helium bubbles. The SCC susceptibility of the HAZ was no significant difference compared with other locations. (author)

  6. Effects of welding on toughness of Mod. 9Cr-1Mo steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, W. S.; Kim, S. H.; Yoon, J. H.

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear energy is being seriously considered to meet the increasing demand for a world-wide energy supply without environmental effects. Generation IV reactors are being developed to produce a reliable energy safely and with an economic benefit. Since these new reactors require an elevated temperature, ferritic/martensitic steels are attracting attention as candidate materials for the reactor vessel of a very high temperature reactor (VHTR) and the cladding of a sodium fast reactor (SFR,) due to their high strength and thermal conductivity, low thermal expansion, and good resistance to corrosion. in recent years, new ferritic/martensitic steels have been developed for ultra supercritical fossil power plants. Advanced technologies for a steel fabrication have improved the elevated temperature properties of ferritic/martensitic steels to make them comparable with austenitic stainless steels. The microstructural stability of the pressure vessel, cladding and core structural materials of the VHTR and SCWR is very important. Welding process affects the microstructure and residual stress, so the toughness of ferritic/martensitic steels decreases in general. In this paper; Mod. 9Cr-1Mo steel is welded by SMAW with V-groove, and the effects of welding on tensile and impact properties are evaluated. The upper self energy of the weldment was only 57% of that of the base metal, and the DBTT T 41J and T 68J index temperatures of the weldment were higher than those of the base metal by 17 deg. C, 38 deg. C and 37 deg. C, respectively. (authors)

  7. Evolution of microstructure in laser welding of SS304L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Santosh; Kushwaha, R.P.; Viswanadham, C.S.; Dey, G.K.

    2009-01-01

    Laser welding is an important joining process and its application in industries is growing rapidly. One can produce laser welds over a wide range of process parameters and this offers very good opportunity for producing microstructure of different morphology and scales in the weldment. Weld beads have been produced on 5 mm thick plates of SS304L using CW Nd-YAG laser. Laser power was varied in 200 W to 1000 W range and welding speed was varied in 100 mm/mm to 1000 mm/mm. This resulted in weld beads of different morphology. Microstructure of the weld beads was examined on the cross-section as well as in the axial direction using optical microscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) to study evolution of the microstructure in the weldment. Microstructure was cellular and cellular-dendritic with grains growing from the fusion line towards the centerline. In the central region, cellular growth along the welding direction was observed. The cell size was found to increase with increasing laser power and decreasing welding speed. The findings are presented in this paper. (author)

  8. Slow strain rate stress corrosion tests on A508-III and A533B steel in de-ionized and PWR water at 563K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurst, P.; Appleton, D.A.; Banks, P.; Raffel, A.S.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental programme is being undertaken to assess the extent to which PWR pressure vessel steels, including weldments, may be susceptible to stress corrosion cracking under relevant water chemistry and flow rate conditions. Initial results from slow strain rate tests on parent A533B and A508-III steels together with a weldment are described. No susceptibility to stress corrosion was observed for either steel, when tested in the rolling (L) direction, at a potential characteristic of normal quality PWR water. For cracking to occur on such specimens the potential must be displaced by 400 to 500 mV in the positive direction, requiring (in the case of high flow de-ionized water) the presence of ca 200 ppb oxygen. Some cracking was observed on transverse (S) direction specimens in water containing 2 , indicating that there may be micro-structural features which can cause cracking even in low oxygen water. This orientation is not directly relevant to pressure vessels and the cracking may only arise as a consequence of the deformation encountered in the slow strain rate test. (author)

  9. Microstructural characterization of weld joints of 9Cr reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel fabricated by different joining methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas Paul, V.; Saroja, S.; Albert, S.K.; Jayakumar, T.; Rajendra Kumar, E., E-mail: vtp@igcar.gov.in

    2014-10-15

    This paper presents a detailed electron microscopy study on the microstructure of various regions of weldment fabricated by three welding methods namely tungsten inert gas welding, electron beam welding and laser beam welding in an indigenously developed 9Cr reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel. Electron back scatter diffraction studies showed a random micro-texture in all the three welds. Microstructural changes during thermal exposures were studied and corroborated with hardness and optimized conditions for the post weld heat treatment have been identified for this steel. Hollomon–Jaffe parameter has been used to estimate the extent of tempering. The activation energy for the tempering process has been evaluated and found to be corresponding to interstitial diffusion of carbon in ferrite matrix. The type and microchemistry of secondary phases in different regions of the weldment have been identified by analytical transmission electron microscopy. - Highlights: • Comparison of microstructural parameters in TIG, electron beam and laser welds of RAFM steel • EBSD studies to illustrate the absence of preferred orientation and identification of prior austenite grain size using phase identification map • Optimization of PWHT conditions for indigenous RAFM steel • Study of kinetics of tempering and estimation of apparent activation energy of the process.

  10. Factors affecting the grain growth of austenite in low alloy steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, J.D.; Storer, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    The performance of steels is linked to the metallurgical transformations which occur during manufacture. Clearly then the optimization of a fabrication procedure must be based on fundamental relationships linking specific thermal treatments with transformation behaviour. Optimized manufacture of thick-section, multipass welds is therefore particularly complex since the thermal cycles associated with fusion welding result in the formation of heterogeneous microstructures. Moreover, these transformations will take place under rapid heating and cooling conditions so that standard data based on equilibrium behaviour may not be directly relevant. The present study is part of an integrated research programme aimed at establishing the basic microstructural relationships required to optimize the manufacture and performance of weldments. Work to date demonstrates that utilization of a computer controlled Gleeble simulation system allows a wider range of heating and cooling rates to be applied than is possible with traditional heat treatment techniques. Additional advantages of this system include precise control of time at peak temperature and uniform temperatures within a defined work zone. Results presented for a CrMoV creep resistant low alloy steel indicate that grain growth behaviour in the range 955-1390 C can be related to the time at peak temperature. The effect of this transformation behaviour on weldment behaviour is discussed. (orig.)

  11. Repair welding of cracked steam turbine blades using austenitic and martensitic stainless-steel consumables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhaduri, A.K.; Gill, T.P.S.; Albert, S.K.; Shanmugam, K.; Iyer, D.R.

    2001-01-01

    The procedure for repair welding of cracked steam turbine blades made of martensitic stainless steels has been developed using the gas tungsten arc welding process. Weld repair procedures were developed using both ER 316L austenitic and ER 410 martensitic stainless-steel filler wire. The overall development of the repair welding procedure included selection of welding consumables (for austenitic filler metal), optimisation of post-weld heat treatment parameters, selection of suitable method for local pre-heating and post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) of the blades, determination of mechanical properties of weldments in as-welded and PWHT conditions, and microsturctural examination. After various trials using different procedures, the procedure of local PWHT (and preheating when using martensitic stainless-steel filler wire) using electrical resistance heating on the top surface of the weldment and monitoring the temperature by placing a thermocouple at the bottom of the weld was found to give the most satisfactory results. These procedures have been developed and/or applied for repair welding of cracked blades in steam turbines

  12. Modified 9Cr-1Mo steel for advanced steam generator applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brinkman, C.R.; Alexander, D.J.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1990-01-01

    Results are reported from several types of mechanical property tests conducted on a number of commercial heats of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel. Data from long term creep-rupture tests conducted on base and weldment material were compared with an analytical model which has been shown to give good agreement between measured and predicted values. Weldment material had somewhat inferior creep-rupture strength in comparison to base material due to a soft zone at the edge of the HAZ. Data are presented from elevated temperature tensile and creep-rupture tests conducted n material thermally aged for periods of up to 75,000 h (8.6 years). Some reduction in strength was shown to occur in comparison to unaged material. Models were developed for predicting the reduction in short term elevated temperature tensile and yield strength for material thermally aged in the temperature range of 482 to 704 degree C. Results from Charpy impact tests conducted on material thermally aged at 538 degree C for periods of up to 75,000 h showed an increase in the ductile-brittle transition temperature. Finally, results from transmission electron microscopy studies were presented to explain changes in mechanical properties due to thermal aging. These observations showed that Laves phase precipitation and recovery occurs on prolonged exposure of this alloy in this temperature range. 9 refs

  13. Evaluation of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel for liquid lithium containment. II. Effects of post-weld heat treatment and niobium content. Annual report, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, T.L.; Edwards, G.R.

    1979-01-01

    The lithium corrosion resistance of the regular grade of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel can be vastly improved with a proper postweld heat treatment, but even greater improvements are needed. Results indicate that if weldments were tempered sufficiently long at 760C to remove all Mo 2 C from the microstructure, even greater resistance to attack by low nitrogen lithium could be achieved. Corrosion tests should eventually be performed on regular grade 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel weldments which have been given a long-term (> 25 h) post-weld temper at 760C. Lithium corrosion resistance of regular grade 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel may also be improved by employing a quench and temper heat treatment. Quenched microstructures have more homogenous distribution of carbides than isothermally annealed microstructures, and if properly tempered, should provide excellent lithium corrosion resistance. Furthermore, the toughness of such a lower bainite microstructure should be better than that of the ferrite-bainitic microstructure created by an isothermal anneal. Numerous parameters, all potentially deleterious to the lithium corrosion resistance of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel, remain to be investigated; two such variables are velocity effects and lead content in the lithium

  14. Modeling Long-term Creep Performance for Welded Nickel-base Superalloy Structures for Power Generation Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Chen [GE Global Research, NIskayuna, NY (United States); Gupta, Vipul [GE Global Research, NIskayuna, NY (United States); Huang, Shenyan [GE Global Research, NIskayuna, NY (United States); Soare, Monica [GE Global Research, NIskayuna, NY (United States); Zhao, Pengyang [GE Global Research, NIskayuna, NY (United States); Wang, Yunzhi [GE Global Research, NIskayuna, NY (United States)

    2017-02-28

    The goal of this project is to model long-term creep performance for nickel-base superalloy weldments in high temperature power generation systems. The project uses physics-based modeling methodologies and algorithms for predicting alloy properties in heterogeneous material structures. The modeling methodology will be demonstrated on a gas turbine combustor liner weldment of Haynes 282 precipitate-strengthened nickel-base superalloy. The major developments are: (1) microstructure-property relationships under creep conditions and microstructure characterization (2) modeling inhomogeneous microstructure in superalloy weld (3) modeling mesoscale plastic deformation in superalloy weld and (4) a constitutive creep model that accounts for weld and base metal microstructure and their long term evolution. The developed modeling technology is aimed to provide a more efficient and accurate assessment of a material’s long-term performance compared with current testing and extrapolation methods. This modeling technology will also accelerate development and qualification of new materials in advanced power generation systems. This document is a final technical report for the project, covering efforts conducted from October 2014 to December 2016.

  15. Braze welding of cobalt with a silver–copper filler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everett M. Criss

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method of joining cobalt by braze-welding it with a silver–copper filler was developed in order to better understand the residual stresses in beryllium–aluminum/silicon weldments which are problematic to investigate because of the high toxicity of Be. The base and filler metals of this new welding system were selected to replicate the physical properties, crystal structures, and chemical behavior of the Be–AlSi welds. Welding parameters of this surrogate Co–AgCu system were determined by experimentation combining 4-point bending tests and microscopy. Final welds are 5 pass manual TIG (tungsten inert gas, with He top gas and Ar back gas. Control of the welding process produces welds with full penetration melting of the cobalt base. Microscopy indicates that cracking is minimal, and not through thickness, whereas 4-point bending shows failure is not by base-filler delamination. These welds improve upon the original Be–AlSi welds, which do not possess full penetration, and have considerable porosity. We propose that utilization of our welding methods will increase the strength of the Be–AlSi weldments. The specialized welding techniques developed for this study may be applicable not only for the parent Be–AlSi welds, but to braze welds and welds utilizing brittle materials in general. This concept of surrogacy may prove useful in the study of many different types of exotic welds.

  16. Feasibility of and methodology for thermal annealing an embrittled reactor vessel. Volume 1. Program overview. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mager, T.R.

    1983-01-01

    An EPRI sponsored program was carried out by Westinghouse to determine the extent of fracture toughness recovery as a function of annealing time and temperature for neutron embrittlement sensitive reactor vessel material and to develop an optimal thermal anneal procedure for field applications. Program materials were three weldments fabricated by Combustion Engineering, Inc., from the same heat of A533 Grade B Class 1 plate material and the same heat of MnMoNi weld wire. The only variables were the target copper level and the welding flux which was Linde Grade 80 and Linde 0091. Weldments of 0.22, 0.36, and 0.41 wt % copper were produced. It was concluded from this study that excellent recovery of all properties could be achieved by annealing at 850 0 F (454 0 C) and above for 168 hours. Such an annealing resulted in ductile-brittle transition temperature shift recovery of 80 to 100%, and reirradiation after this annealing indicated that the ductile-brittle transition temperature shift appears to continue at the rate which would have been expected had no anneal been performed. System limitations were identified for both wet and dry annealing methods

  17. Feasibility of and methodology for thermal annealing an embrittled reactor vessel. Volume 2. Detailed technical description of the work. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mager, T.R.

    1982-11-01

    Program materials were three weldments fabricated from A533 Grade B class 1 plate material and Mn Mo Ni weld wire. Specimens fabricated from the three submerged arc weldments included Type A Charpy V-notch impact, small size tensile, and 1/2T compact tension specimens. After encapsulation, the specimens were irradiated at the UVAR to two fluence levels, 8 x 10 18 n/cm 2 and 1.5 x 10 19 n/cm 2 (E > 1 MeV). Specimens were subjected to sequences of irradiation and anneals and then tested. Metallurgial/mechanistic analyses were also performed. It was concluded that excellent recovery of all properties could be achieved by annealing at greater than or equal to 850 0 F (454 0 C) for 168 hours. Such an annealing resulted in ductile-brittle transition temperature shift recovery of 80 to 100%, and reirradiation after this annealing indicated that the ductile-brittle transition temperature shift appears to continue at the expected rate. Several drawbacks were identified for wet thermal annealing. A conceptual dry in-situ thermal annealing procedure was developed for thermal annealing embrittled reactor vessels

  18. Stress analysis of the HFIR HB-2 and HB-3 beam tube nozzles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, P.T.

    1998-08-01

    The results of three-dimensional linear elastic stress analyses of the HFIR HB-2 and HB-3 nozzles are presented in this report. Finite element models were developed using the PATRAN pre-processing code and translated into ABAQUS input file format. A scoping analysis using simple geometries with internal pressure loading was carried out to assess the capabilities of the ABAQUS/Standard code to calculate maximum principal stress distributions within cylinders with and without holes. These scoping calculations were also used to provide estimates for the variation in tangential stress around the rim of a nozzle using the superposition of published closed-form solutions for the stress around a hole in an infinite flat plate under uniaxial tension. From the results of the detailed finite element models, peak stress concentration factors (based on the maximum principal stresses in tension) were calculated to be 3.0 for the HB-2 nozzle and 2.8 for the HB-3 nozzle. Submodels for each nozzle were built to calculate the maximum principal stress distribution in the weldment region around the nozzle, where displacement boundary conditions for the submodels were automatically calculated by ABAQUS using the results of the global nozzle models. Maximum principal stresses are plotted and tabulated for eight positions around each nozzle and nozzle weldment

  19. Analysis of cracks in stainless steel TIG [tungsten inert gas] welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagaki, M.; Marschall, C.; Brust, F.

    1986-12-01

    This report contains the results of a combined experimental and analytical study of ductile crack growth in tungsten inert gas (TIG) weldments of austenitic stainless steel specimens. The substantially greater yield strength of the weld metal relative to the base metal causes more plastic deformation in the base metal adjacent to the weld than in the weld metal. Accordingly, the analytical studies focused on the stress-strain interaction between the crack tip and the weld/base-metal interface. Experimental work involved tests using compact (tension) specimens of three different sizes and pipe bend experiments. The compact specimens were machined from a TIG weldment in Type 304 stainless steel plate. The pipe specimens were also TIG welded using the same welding procedures. Elastic-plastic finite element methods were used to model the experiments. In addition to the J-integral, different crack-tip integral parameters such as ΔT/sub p/* and J were evaluated. Also, engineering J-estimation methods were employed to predict the load-carrying capacity of the welded pipe with a circumferential through-wall crack under bending

  20. Effect of zirconium addition on welding of aluminum grain refined by titanium plus boron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaid, A. I. O.

    2014-06-01

    Aluminum oxidizes freely in ordinary atmosphere which makes its welding difficult and weak, particularly it solidifies in columnar structure with large grains. Therefore, it is anticipated that the effect of addition of some grain refiners to its melt before solidification is worth while investigating as it may enhance its weldabilty and improve its mechanical strength. In this paper, the effect of addition of zirconium at a weight of 0.1% (which corresponds to the peretictic limit on the aluminum-zirconium base phase diagram) to commercially pure aluminum, grain refined by Ti+B on its weldability, using gas tungsten arc welding, GTAW, method which was formerly known as TIG. A constant current level of 30 AC Ampere was used because it removes the oxides during the welding process. Metallographic examination of the weldments of the different combinations of Al with Al and Al with its microalloys: in the heat affected zone, HAZ, and away from it was carried out and examined for HAZ width, porosity, cracks and microhardness. It was found that grain refining by Ti+B or Zr resulted in enhancement of the weldment.

  1. Effect of zirconium addition on welding of aluminum grain refined by titanium plus boron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaid, A. I. O.

    2013-01-01

    Aluminum oxidizes freely in ordinary atmosphere which makes its welding difficult and weak, particularly it solidifies in columnar structure with large grains. Therefore, it is anticipated that the effect of addition of some grain refiners to its melt before solidification is worth while investigating as it may enhance its weldabilty and improve its mechanical strength. In this paper, the effect of addition of zirconium at a weight of 0.1 percentage (which corresponds to the peretictic limit on the aluminum-zirconium base phase diagram) to commercially pure aluminum, grain refined by Tau i+Beta on its weldability, using gas tungsten arc welding, GTAW, method which was formerly known as TIG. A constant current level of 30 AC Ampere was used because it removes the oxides during the welding process. Metallographic examination of the weldments of the different combinations of Al with Al and Al with its microalloys: in the heat affected zone, HAZ, and away from it was carried out and examined for HAZ width, porosity, cracks and microhardness. It was found that grain refining by Tau i+Beta or Zr resulted in enhancement of the weldment. (author)

  2. Effect of zirconium addition on welding of aluminum grain refined by titanium plus boron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaid, A I O

    2014-01-01

    Aluminum oxidizes freely in ordinary atmosphere which makes its welding difficult and weak, particularly it solidifies in columnar structure with large grains. Therefore, it is anticipated that the effect of addition of some grain refiners to its melt before solidification is worth while investigating as it may enhance its weldabilty and improve its mechanical strength. In this paper, the effect of addition of zirconium at a weight of 0.1% (which corresponds to the peretictic limit on the aluminum-zirconium base phase diagram) to commercially pure aluminum, grain refined by Ti+B on its weldability, using gas tungsten arc welding, GTAW, method which was formerly known as TIG. A constant current level of 30 AC Ampere was used because it removes the oxides during the welding process. Metallographic examination of the weldments of the different combinations of Al with Al and Al with its microalloys: in the heat affected zone, HAZ, and away from it was carried out and examined for HAZ width, porosity, cracks and microhardness. It was found that grain refining by Ti+B or Zr resulted in enhancement of the weldment

  3. Influence of laser peening on the tensile strength and impact toughness of dissimilar welds of Inconel 625 and UNS S32205

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramkumar, K. Devendranath, E-mail: ramdevendranath@gmail.com [School of Mechanical Engineering, VIT University, Vellore 632014 (India); Kumar, P. Siva Goutham; Krishna, V. Radha; Chandrasekhar, Aditya; Dev, Sidharth; Abraham, Winston Sunny [School of Mechanical Engineering, VIT University, Vellore 632014 (India); Prabhakaran, S.; Kalainathan, S. [Centre for Crystal Growth, VIT University, Vellore 632014 (India); Sridhar, R. [Saraswathi Velu Engineering College, Sholinghur, Vellore 632501 (India)

    2016-10-31

    The present study addresses the effect of fillers on the microstructure and tensile strength of dissimilar joints of Inconel 625 and UNS S32205 by pulsed current gas tungsten arc welding (PCGTAW) employing ERNiCrMo-10 and ERNiCrMo-14 fillers. This study attested that tensile failure occurred in the fusion zone of the dissimilar joints for both the cases in the as-welded un-peened condition. Double shot laser shock peening (DLSP) was performed on the fusion zone of these PCGTA welds on the cap and root regions of the weldments. It was assimilated that after DLSP on the cap and root regions of the weldments, the yield and tensile strength of the welded joints employing these fillers were improved considerably. Residual stress analysis were carried out on the dissimilar coupons using X-ray Diffraction analysis. The results demonstrated that after subjecting to double sided DLSP, the fusion zones were subjected to compressive residual stresses. The present study articulated that shot peening using low energy laser beam resulted in better tensile strength.

  4. Welding stainless steels for structures operating at liquid helium temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witherell, C.E.

    1980-01-01

    Superconducting magnets for fusion energy reactors require massive monolithic stainless steel weldments which must operate at extremely low temperatures under stresses approaching 100 ksi (700 MPa). A three-year study was conducted to determine the feasibility of producing heavy-section welds having usable levels of strength and toughness at 4.2 0 K for fabrication of these structures in Type 304LN plate. Seven welding processes were evaluated. Test weldments in full-thickness plate were made under severe restraint to simulate that of actual structures. Type 316L filler metal was used for most welds. Welds deposited under some conditions and which solidify as primary austenite have exhibited intergranular embrittlement at 4.2 0 K. This is believed to be associated with grain boundary metal carbides or carbonitrides precipitated during reheating of already deposited beads by subsequent passes. Weld deposits which solidify as primary delta ferrite appear immune. Through use of fully austenitic filler metals of low nitrogen content under controlled shielded metal arc welding conditions, and through use of filler metals solidifying as primary delta ferrite where only minimum residuals remain to room temperature, welds of Type 316L composition have been made with 4.2K yield strength matching that of Type 304LN plate and acceptable levels of soundness, ductility and toughness

  5. Weldability prequalification of steels for deep water service

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, Michael D. [Acute Technological Services, Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Ibarra, S. Jim [BP America (United States); Fazackerley, W.J. [EWI Microalloying, Houston, TX (United States)

    2004-07-01

    The weldability of steels for deep water applications must be determined long before welding procedures are qualified. The weldments of deep water equipment such as steel Catenary risers (SCRs) are subjected to currents which result in high cyclic stresses. It is imperative that steels selected for such service have high CTOD fracture toughness values after welding to ensure good defect tolerance. Through fracture mechanics analyses, these CTOD values are used to determine the defect acceptance criteria that is used for inspection of such weldments. The base metal and weld metal are more easily obtained, but because the weld joint design changes the position of the HAZs, the CTOD value for the HAZ is usually a combination of the base, weld consumable, and HAZ. The value obtained from such a test is suspect, and may give an optimistic value if the weld metal or base metal have high CTOD values. This paper discusses the various strategies for determining the true weldability long before construction commences, using API RP 2Z (1) Type tests for prequalification of base materials. (author)

  6. Manufacturing and Construction of Spent Fuel Storage Rack for Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sangjin; Jung, Kwangsub; Oh, Jinho; Lee, Jongmin [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The spent fuel storage rack consists of spent fuel storage racks and support frame. The spent fuel storage racks are installed in the support frame. A spent fuel storage rack consists of frame weldment and storage cell pipe assembly. Storage cell pipe assembly is mounted on the base plate of the frame weldment. The spent fuel storage rack is designed to withstand seismic load and other loads during earthquake. The structural integrity of the spent fuel storage rack is evaluated in accordance with ASME Section III, Subsection NF. Computer Code used for this analysis is ANSYS version 14.0.0. Dead load and seismic load is considered in load condition and hydrodynamic mass is included in the analysis. Design, manufacturing, and construction of the spent fuel storage rack are introduced. The spent fuel storage rack is for storage of spent fuel assemblies. The spent fuel storage rack should be designed, manufactured, and installed with consideration of predicted number of spent fuel assemblies, structural integrity, resistivity to corrosion and radiation, cleaning, and workability.

  7. Electrochemical investigations for understanding and controlling corrosion in nuclear reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gnanamoorthy, J.B.

    1998-01-01

    Electrochemical techniques such as potentiodynamic polarization have been used at the Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research at Kalpakkam for understanding and controlling the corrosion of nuclear reactor materials such as austenitic stainless steels and chrome-moly steels. Results on the measurements of critical potentials for pitting and crevice corrosion of stainless steels and their weldments and of laser surface modified stainless steels in aqueous chloride solutions are discussed. Investigations carried out to correlate the degree of sensitization in types 304 and 316 stainless steels, measured by the electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation technique, with the susceptibility to intergranular corrosion and intergranular stress corrosion cracking have been discussed. The stress corrosion cracking behaviour of weldments of type 316 stainless steel was studied in a boiling solution of a mixture of 5 M NaCl and 0.15 M Na 2 SO 4 acidified to give a pH of 1.3 by monitoring of the open circuit potential with time as well as by anodic polarization. Interesting information could also been obtained on the microbiologically influenced corrosion of type 304 stainless steels in a fresh water system by carrying out cyclic potentiodynamic polarization measurements as well as by monitoring the open circuit potential measurements with exposure time. Since secondary phases present (or developed during thermal ageing) in stainless steels have a significant influence on their corrosion behaviour, the estimation of these secondary phases by electrochemical methods has also been discussed. (author)

  8. Multi Objective Optimization of Weld Parameters of Boiler Steel Using Fuzzy Based Desirability Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Satheesh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The high pressure differential across the wall of pressure vessels is potentially dangerous and has caused many fatal accidents in the history of their development and operation. For this reason the structural integrity of weldments is critical to the performance of pressure vessels. In recent years much research has been conducted to the study of variations in welding parameters and consumables on the mechanical properties of pressure vessel steel weldments to optimize weld integrity and ensure pressure vessels are safe. The quality of weld is a very important working aspect for the manufacturing and construction industries. Because of high quality and reliability, Submerged Arc Welding (SAW is one of the chief metal joining processes employed in industry. This paper addresses the application of desirability function approach combined with fuzzy logic analysis to optimize the multiple quality characteristics (bead reinforcement, bead width, bead penetration and dilution of submerged arc welding process parameters of SA 516 Grade 70 steels(boiler steel. Experiments were conducted using Taguchi’s L27 orthogonal array with varying the weld parameters of welding current, arc voltage, welding speed and electrode stickout. By analyzing the response table and response graph of the fuzzy reasoning grade, optimal parameters were obtained. Solutions from this method can be useful for pressure vessel manufacturers and operators to search an optimal solution of welding condition.

  9. Replacement of Co-base alloy for radiation exposure reduction in the primary system of PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Jeong Ho; Nyo, Kye Ho; Lee, Deok Hyun; Lim, Deok Jae; Ahn, Jin Keun; Kim, Sun Jin

    1996-01-01

    Of numerous Co-free alloys developed to replace Co-base stellite used in valve hardfacing material, two iron-base alloys of Armacor M and Tristelle 5183 and one nickel-base alloy of Nucalloy 488 were selected as candidate Co-free alloys, and Stellite 6 was also selected as a standard hardfacing material. These four alloys were welded on 316SS substrate using TIG welding method. The first corrosion test loop of KAERI simulating the water chemistry and operation condition of the primary system of PWR was designed and fabricated. Corrosion behaviors of the above four kinds of alloys were evaluated using this test loop under the condition of 300 deg C, 1500 psi. Microstructures of weldment of these alloys were observed to identify both matrix and secondary phase in each weldment. Hardnesses of weld deposit layer including HAZ and substrate were measured using micro-Vickers hardness tester. The status on the technology of Co-base alloy replacement in valve components was reviewed with respect to the classification of valves to be replaced, the development of Co-free alloys, the application of Co-free alloys and its experiences in foreign NPPs, and the Co reduction program in domestic NPPs and industries. 18 tabs., 20 figs., 22 refs. (Author)

  10. Microstructural characterization and formation of α′ martensite phase in Ti–6Al–4V alloy butt joints produced by friction stir and gas tungsten arc welding processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esmaily, M.; Nooshin Mortazavi, S.; Todehfalah, P.; Rashidi, M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► A fusion (GTAW) and a solid state method (FSW) are used to weld Ti–6Al–4V alloy. ► Optimal parameters yielding defects-free weldments are identified. ► A very careful microstructural quantification of the FSW and GTAW weldments are performed. ► α′ Martensite formed only in FSWed samples and avoided in GTAWed samples. ► FSW process produced joints with considerably smaller HAZ and higher hardness values. - Abstract: The obtained microstructures of a Ti–6Al–4V alloy welded by Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) and Friction Stir Welding (FSW) were investigated and evaluated quantitatively. In the GTAW method, the effect of current was examined so that the samples were subjected to various currents between 90 and 120 A. In the FSW process, samples were welded by different rotational speeds (450–850 rpm). Non-destructive tests including Visual and Radiography Tests (VT and RT) were used to identify defect-free samples. The microstructural studies by electron microscopes revealed formation of different phases in the weld area of the samples welded via mentioned methods. The recorded peak temperatures in the weld regions compared favorably with the expectations about the evolved microstructures. A bi-modal microstructure was just obtained in the FSWed sample with a peak temperature below β transus temperature (T < 995 °C). α′ martensite phase, which is an acicular and strengthening phase in this alloy, was only observed in FSWed specimens

  11. Recent Developments and Research Progress on Friction Stir Welding of Titanium Alloys: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karna, Sivaji; Cheepu, Muralimohan; Venkateswarulu, D.; Srikanth, V.

    2018-03-01

    Titanium and its alloys are joined by various welding processes. However, Fusion welding of titanium alloys resulted solidification problems like porosity, segregation and columnar grains. The problems occurred in conventional welding processes can be resolved using a solid state welding i.e. friction stir welding. Aluminium and Magnesium alloys were welded by friction stir welding. However alloys used for high temperature applications such as titanium alloys and steels are arduous to weld using friction stir welding process because of tool limitations. Present paper summarises the studies on joining of Titanium alloys using friction stir welding with different tool materials. Selection of tool material and effect of welding conditions on mechanical and microstructure properties of weldments were also reported. Major advantage with friction stir welding is, we can control the welding temperature above or below β-transus temperature by optimizing the process parameters. Stir zone in below beta transus condition consists of bi-modal microstructure and microstructure in above β-transus condition has large prior β- grains and α/β laths present in the grain. Welding experiments conducted below β- transus condition has better mechanical properties than welding at above β-transus condition. Hardness and tensile properties of weldments are correlated with the stir zone microstructure.

  12. Spanish RPV head penetrations. Regulatory status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueras, J.M.; Colino, J.R.

    1995-01-01

    The paper presents the actual status of inspection results on the Spanish PWR RPV CRD head penetrations (CRDH's), after two years of a whole program of inspections in all affected plants. Actual situation of penetrations pertaining to ALMARAZ 1 and 2, ASCO 1 and 2 and VANDELLOS 2 NPP's show any damage in those CRDH's inspected in 1993 and 1994 (roughly 20 out of 65 CRDH's at each unit). The paper presents a summary of CRDH characteristics, inspection methods and results obtained in each plant. TRILLO NPP has a different CRDH design (KWU-SIEMENS type) and for that reason is not considered an affected plant nor has conducted any inspection up to now. JOSE CABRERA (ZORITA) NPP has shown extensive damage, both in the lower side (weldment to the vessel) and in the upper free span area, near bimetallic weldment to SS 304, in active and nonactive penetrations and also in the vent nozzle. The paper comments extensively on the CRDH materials general data, root-cause analysis and structural analysis of degraded zones, inspection results, repair actions and other additional actions applied up to now. Finally, the paper deals with the regulatory actions taken by CSN on this topic, both for those NPP's actually non affected by the IGSCC phenomenon in the RPV CRDH's and for the specific safety case of ZORITA NPP. (author)

  13. Life prediction of repaired welds in a pressurised CrMoV pipe with incorporation of initial damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyde, T.H.; Sun, W.; Becker, A.A.; Williams, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    Creep damage FE modelling was performed for fully and partially repaired, thick-walled, circumferential pipe weldments, in which initial damage was incorporated into the calculations to take account of the material degradation of the aged materials. The pipe welds were subjected to a realistic internal pressure and axial loading, the latter of which is allowed to vary within the range allowed by design codes. The material properties used are related to a CrMoV weldment at 640 deg. C. The initial damage distribution was numerically determined using an established procedure. A full post weld heat treatment is assumed to be carried out and the effects of welding induced residual stresses were neglected. The results obtained cover a number of initial damage levels, magnitudes of axial load, and repair excavation depth. On this basis, the sensitivities of the failure life of the repaired welds to these important factors can be evaluated. It was found that both the peak initial damage and the total life are very sensitive to the repair time, particularly when system load is high. The effect of the repair depth for depth: thickness ratios ≥0.5 is generally small for these loadings. There could be a significant benefit if the initial damage in the HAZ of the repair weld, which could be relatively high when the repair time is relatively large, could be reduced by repair welding or by post weld heat treatment

  14. Advanced Pressure Boundary Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santella, Michael L [ORNL; Shingledecker, John P [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    Increasing the operating temperatures of fossil power plants is fundamental to improving thermal efficiencies and reducing undesirable emissions such as CO{sub 2}. One group of alloys with the potential to satisfy the conditions required of higher operating temperatures is the advanced ferritic steels such as ASTM Grade 91, 9Cr-2W, and 12Cr-2W. These are Cr-Mo steels containing 9-12 wt% Cr that have martensitic microstructures. Research aimed at increasing the operating temperature limits of the 9-12 wt% Cr steels and optimizing them for specific power plant applications has been actively pursued since the 1970's. As with all of the high strength martensitic steels, specifying upper temperature limits for tempering the alloys and heat treating weldments is a critical issue. To support this aspect of development, thermodynamic analysis was used to estimate how this critical temperature, the A{sub 1} in steel terminology, varies with alloy composition. The results from the thermodynamic analysis were presented to the Strength of Weldments subgroup of the ASME Boiler & Pressure Vessel Code and are being considered in establishing maximum postweld heat treatment temperatures. Experiments are also being planned to verify predictions. This is part of a CRADA project being done with Alstom Power, Inc.

  15. The Effect of Shielding N{sub 2} gas on The Pitting Corrosion of Seal-welded Super Austenitic Stainless Steel by Autogenous Welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ki Tae; Kim, Young Sik [Andong National University, Andong (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Hyun Young [KEPCO Engineering and Construction Company, Gimcheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Many research efforts on the effect of nitrogen on the corrosion resistance of stainless steels have been reported, but little research has been conducted on the effect of nitrogen for the weldment of stainless steels by the seal-weld method. Therefore, this work focused on the determining the corrosion resistance of tube/tube sheet mock-up specimen for sea water condensers, and elucidating the effect of shielding nitrogen gas on its resistance. The pitting corrosion of autogenously welded specimen propagated preferentially along the dendritic structure. Regardless of the percent of shielding nitrogen gas, the analyzed nitrogen contents were very much lower than that of the bulk specimen. This can be arisen because the nitrogen in shielding gas may partly dissolve into the weldment, but simultaneously during the welding process, nitrogen in the alloy may escape into the atmosphere. However, the pitting resistance equivalent number (PREN) of the interdendrite area was higher than that of the dendrite arm, regardless of the shielding gas percent; and the PREN of the interdendrite area was higher than that of the base metal; the PREN of the dendrite arm was lower than that of the base metal because of the formation of (Cr, Mo) rich phases by welding.

  16. The significance of residual stresses in relation to the integrity of LWR pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lidbury, D.P.G.

    1984-01-01

    The level and distribution of residual stresses in heavy section weldments and the factors affecting their relaxation with post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) are discussed; residual stresses are also considered in relation to the deposition of austenitic strip cladding and repair welding. A brief survey is made of currently available methods of measuring surface and sub-surface residual stresses in heavy section weldments; the effects of compressive residual stresses on the detection and sizing of planar defects are similarly considered. Available fracture mechanics methodologies with the capability of evaluation defect significance in the presence of residual and other secondary stresses are reviewed in some detail. On-going experimental investigations of the effects of residual stresses on structural integrity are also described. Following a general discussion, the desirability of internationally agreed Codes and Methods for assessing defects in the presence of residual and other self-limiting stresses is pointed out. It is argued that before such agreement could be achieved, however, further work is necessary, and a number of recommendations are given. (author)

  17. Correlation Between Intercritical Heat-Affected Zone and Type IV Creep Damage Zone in Grade 91 Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiyu; Kannan, Rangasayee; Li, Leijun

    2018-04-01

    A soft zone in Cr-Mo steel weldments has been reported to accompany the infamous Type IV cracking, the highly localized creep damage in the heat-affected zone of creep-resistant steels. However, the microstructural features and formation mechanism of this soft zone are not well understood. In this study, using microhardness profiling and microstructural verification, the initial soft zone in the as-welded condition was identified to be located in the intercritical heat-affected zone of P91 steel weldments. It has a mixed structure, consisting of Cr-rich re-austenitized prior austenite grains and fine Cr-depleted, tempered martensite grains retained from the base metal. The presence of these further-tempered retained grains, originating from the base metal, is directly responsible for the hardness reduction of the identified soft zone in the as-welded condition. The identified soft zone exhibits a high location consistency at three thermal stages. Local chemistry analysis and thermodynamic calculation show that the lower chromium concentrations inside these retained grains thermodynamically decrease their potentials for austenitic transformation during welding. Heterogeneous grain growth is observed in the soft zone during postweld heat treatment. The mismatch of strengths between the weak Cr-depleted grains and strong Cr-rich grains enhances the creep damage. Local deformation of the weaker Cr-depleted grains accelerates the formation of creep cavities.

  18. The flow behavior and constitutive equation in isothermal compression of FGH4096-GH4133B dual alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yanhui; Yao, Zekun; Ning, Yongquan; Nan, Yang; Guo, Hongzhen; Qin, Chun; Shi, Zhifeng

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Hot compression behaviors of the FGH4096-GH4133B dual alloy were investigated. • Constitutive equation also represented deformation behavior of a dual alloy. • The effects of deformation activation energy on the microstructures were discussed. • Constitutive equation represented an accurate and precise estimate of flow stress. - Abstract: The electron beam welding of superalloy FGH4096 and GH4133B was conducted, and the cylindrical compression specimens were machined from the central part of the electron beam weldments. Isothermal compression tests were carried out on electron beam weldments FGH4096-GH4133B alloy at the temperatures of 1020–11140 °C (the nominal γ′-transus temperature is about 1080 °C) and the strain rates of 0.001–1.0 s −1 with the height reduction of 50%. True stress–true strain curves are sensitive to the deformation temperature and strain rate, and the flow stress decreases with the increasing deformation temperature and the decreasing strain rate. The true stress–true strain curves can indicate the intrinsic relationship between the flow stress and the thermal-dynamic behavior. The apparent activation energy of deformation at the strain of 0.6 was calculated to be 550 kJ/mol, and the apparent activation energy has a great effect on the microstructure. The constitutive equation that describes the flow stress as a function of strain rate and deformation temperature was proposed for modeling the hot deformation process of FGH4096-GH4133B electron beam weldments. The constitutive equation at the strain of 0.6 was established using the hyperbolic law. The relationship between the strain and the values of parameters was studied, and the cubic functions were built. The constitutive equation during the whole process can be obtained based on the parameters under different strains. Comparing the experimental flow stress and the calculated flow stress, the constitutive equation obtained in this paper can be very good

  19. Repair welding of cracked steam turbine blades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhaduri, A.K.; Gill, T.P.S.; Albert, S.K.; Shanmugam, K.; Iyer, D.R.

    1999-01-01

    The procedure for repair welding of cracked steam turbine blades made of martensitic stainless steels has been developed using the gas tungsten arc welding process. Weld repair procedures were developed using both ER316L austenitic stainless steel filler wire and ER410 martensitic stainless steel filler wire. The repair welding procedure with austenitic filler wire was developed to avoid preheating of the blade as also hydrogen induced cold cracking, and involved evaluation of three different austenitic filler wires, viz. ER309L, ER316L and ERNiCr-3. The overall development of the repair welding procedure included selection of welding consumables (for austenitic filler metal), optimisation of post weld heat treatment parameters, selection of suitable method for local pre-heating and post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) of the blades, determination of mechanical properties of weldments in as-welded and PWHT conditions, and microstructural examination. After various trials using different procedures, the procedure of local PWHT using electrical resistance heating on the top surface of the weldment and monitoring the temperature by placing a thermocouple at the bottom of the weld, was found to give the most satisfactory results. A similar procedure was used for preheating while using ER410 filler metal. Mechanical testing of weldments before and after PWHT involved tensile tests at room temperature, face and root bend tests, and microhardness measurements across the fusion line and heat affected zone. During procedure qualification, mock-ups and actual repair welding, dye penetrant testing was used at different stages and where ever possible radiography was carried out. These procedures were developed for repair welding of cracked blades in the low-pressure (LP) steam turbines of Indian nuclear power plants. The procedure with ER316 L filler wire has so far been applied for repair welding of 2 cracked blades (made of AISI 410 SS) of LP steam turbines, while the procedure

  20. Formación de fase sigma en uniones soldadas de acero inoxidable súper dúplex fundido

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garin, J. L.

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper decribes the microstructural characteristics of weldments of cast super duplex stainless steel (J93404, being subjected to annealing processes to induce formation of sigma-phase at high temperatures. The influence of heating time at 1073 K, 1123 K and 1173 K upon precipitation of sigma in the heat affected zone, base metal and fusion zone of the weldments was analyzed. The experimental results revealed the formation of this intermetallic compound throughout decomposition of the ferritic phase into austenite and sigma. At earlier stages of the transformation the phase rapidly nucleates and growth along the ferrite-austenite grain boundaries, and then massively advances towards the bulk of the ferritic zone with greater effectiveness as temperature increases. The formation of sigma-phase in all weldments resembles the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami’s mechanism stated for nucleation and growth.

    El presente trabajo describe las características microestructurales de uniones soldadas de acero súper dúplex fundido (J93404, al ser sometidas a procesos de recocido para inducir la formación de fase sigma a altas temperaturas. Se analizó la influencia del tiempo de calentamiento a 1.073 K, 1.123 K y 1.173 K sobre la precipitación de fase sigma en la zona afectada térmicamente, metal base y zona de fusión de los conjuntos soldados. Los resultados experimentales evidenciaron la formación de este compuesto intermetálico por descomposición de la fase ferrítica en austenita y sigma. Al comienzo de la transformación la fase nuclea y crece rápidamente en los bordes de grano austenita-ferrita, extendiéndose luego masivamente hacia el seno de la zona ferrítica, con mayor efectividad en términos del aumento de la temperatura de proceso. La formación de sigma en todas las uniones soldadas obedece a un mecanismo de nucleación y crecimiento del tipo Jonson-Mehl-Avrami.

  1. Microstructural and mechanical properties on friction welding of dissimilar metals used in motor vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesudoss Hynes, N. Rajesh; Shenbaga Velu, P.

    2018-02-01

    In the last two decades, major car manufacturing companies are exploring the possibilities of joining magnesium with aluminium, via friction welding technique for many crucial automotive applications. Our primary objective, is to carry out an experimental investigation in order to study the behaviour of dissimilar joints. The microscopic structure at the welded joint interface was analysed using an optical microscopy and scanning electron microscope. It was found that, by increasing the value of friction time, the value of the tensile strength increases and the result of tensile strength is found to be 120 MPa at a friction time of 10 s. Micro hardness was found to be higher at the interface of the weldment due to the development of a brittle intermetallic compound. Micro structural studies using SEM reveals, distinct zones such as an unaffected parent metal zone, the heat affected zone, a thermo-mechanically affected zone and a fully deformed plasticised zone.

  2. Review of ASME-NH Design Materials for Creep-Fatigue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Gyeong Hoi; Kim, Jong Bum

    2010-01-01

    To review and recommend the candidate design materials for the Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor, the material sensitivity evaluations by the comparison of design data between the ASME-NH materials were performed by using the SIE ASME-NH computer program implementing the material database of the ASME-NH. The design material data provided by the ASME-NH code are the elastic modulus and yield Strength, Time-Independent Allowable Stress Intensity value, time-dependent allowable stress intensity value, expected minimum stress-to rupture value, stress rupture Factors for weldment, isochronous stress-strain curves, and design fatigue curves. Among these, the data related with the creep-fatigue evaluation are investigated in this study

  3. External attachment of titanium sheathed thermocouples to zirconium nuclear fuel rods for the loss-of-fluid-test (LOFT) Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welty, R.K.

    1980-01-01

    A welding process to attach titanium sheathed thermocouples to the outside of the zircaloy clad fuel rods has been developed. A laser beam was selected as the optimum welding process because of the extremely high energy input per unit volume that can be achieved allowing local fusion of a small area irrespective of the difference in material thickness to be joined. Irradiation tests showed no degradation of thermocouples or weld structure. Fast thermal cycle and heater rod blowdown reflood tests were made to subject the weldments to high temperatures, high pressure steam, and fast water quench cycles. From the behavior of these tests, it was concluded that the attachment welds would survive a series of reactor safety tests. 2 refs

  4. Progress in welding studies for Canadian nuclear fuel waste disposal containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maak, P.Y.Y.

    1985-11-01

    This report describes the progress in the development of closure-welding technology for Canadian nuclear fuel waste disposal containers. Titanium, copper and Inconel 625 are being investigated as candidate materials for fabrication of these containers. Gas-tungsten-arc welding, gas metal-arc-welding, resistance-heated diffusion bonding and electron beam welding have been evaluated as candidate closure welding processes. Characteristic weldment properties, relative merits of welding techniques, suitable weld joint configurations and fit-up tolerances, and welding parameter control ranges have been identified for various container designs. Furthermore, the automation requirements for candidate welding processes have been assessed. Progress in the development of a computer-controlled remote gas-shielded arc welding system is described

  5. Effect of gaussian beam on microstructural and mechanical properties of dissimilarlaser welding ofAA5083 and AA6061 alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, B.; Cheepu, Muralimohan; Sivaprasad, K.; Muthupandi, V.

    2018-03-01

    The present study focuses on a sheet thickness of 4 mm using different laser power and welding rate by the laser beam welding (LBW) at a beam size180 μm. The observations on the weldments are showing that thermal conductivity of the materials plays a major role on microstructural changes. The as-welded mechanical properties were studied by correlation with its microstructures. Due to the steeper temperature gradient during the laser beam welding AA6061 was showing the greater variation compares with AA5083 side in the micro hardness studies.Also, the tensile strength of 241 MPa has been reported as highest with the welds made of laser powerat 3.5 kW and welding rate at 3.5 mmin-1.

  6. Analysis of the Charpy V-notch test for welds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo; Needleman, A.

    2000-01-01

    The ductile-brittle transition for a weld is investigated by numerical analyses of Charpy impact specimens. The material response is characterized by an elastic-viscoplastic constitutive relation for a porous plastic solid, with adiabatic heating due to plastic dissipation and the resulting thermal...... softening accounted for. The onset of cleavage is taken to occur when a critical value of the maximum principal stress is attained. The effect of weld strength undermatch or overmatch is investigated for a comparison material, and analyses are also carried out based on experimentally determined flow...... strength variations in a weldment in a HY100 steel. The predicted work to fracture shows a strong sensitivity to the location of the notch relative to the weld, with the most brittle behavior for a notch close to the narrow heat affected zone. The analyses illustrate the strong dependence of the transition...

  7. Effects of off-specification procedures on the mechanical properties of half-bead weld repairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobson, D.O.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1983-07-01

    We examined the effects of off-specification procedures on the mechanical properties of half-bead weld repairs. The name half-bead is derived from the specification that half the thickness of the initial weld layer be ground off before the second layer is deposited. In this study the heat-affected zones of a weldment made with both all and none of the first layer removed were tested for toughness, hardness, and microstructural differences, and the results were compared with the properties of a protypical half-bead repair made under ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Sect. XI, guidelines. The results of this limited study showed no apparent justification for the requirement to grind off half the first layer in this type of weld repair. The graded electrode sizes used to make the welds probably had more to do with the weld properties than did the range of first-layer thicknesses used in this study

  8. Microstructural examination of Zr-2.5%Nb alloy welds made by pulsed Nd:YAG laser and TIG welding technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatt, R.B.; Varma, P.V.S.; Panakkal, J.P.; Srivastava, D.; Dey, G.K.

    2009-01-01

    The paper describes the weld microstructure of Zr-2.5%Nb alloy material. Bead on plate welds were made using pulsed Nd:YAG laser and TIG welding technique at different parameters. These welds were characterized at macro and microstructural level. Weld pools of Pulsed Laser and TIG welds were not resolved by optical microscopy. SEM too did not reveal much. Orientation imaging microscopy could reveal the presence of fine martensite. It was observed that microstructure is very sensitive to welding parameters. Microhardness studies suggested formation of martensite in the weld pool. It was also observed that laser welds had very sharp weld pool boundary as compared to TIG welds. Variation in microhardness of the weldment is seen and is influenced by overlapping of weld spots causing thermal treatment of previously deposited spots. (author)

  9. Stress Distribution in the Dissimilar Metal Butt Weld of Nuclear Reactor Piping due to the Simulation Technique for the Repair Welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hweeseung; Huh, Namsu; Kim, Jinsu; Lee, Jinho

    2013-01-01

    During welding, the dissimilar metal butt welds of nuclear piping are typically subjected to repair welding in order to eliminate defects that are found during post-weld inspection. It has been found that the repair weld can significantly increase the tensile residual stress in the weldment, and therefore, accurate estimation of the weld residual stress due to repair weld, especially for dissimilar metal welds using Ni-based alloy 82/182 in nuclear components, is of great importance in order to assess susceptibility to primary water stress corrosion cracking. In the present study, the stress distributions of dissimilar metal butt welds in nuclear reactor piping subjected to repair weld were investigated based on detailed nonlinear finite element analyses. Particular emphasis was placed on the variation of the stress distribution in the dissimilar metal butt weld according to the finite element welding analysis sequence for the repair welding process

  10. Irradiation hardening of Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Woo-Seog; Kim, Sung-Ho; Choo, Kee-Nam; Kim, Do-Sik

    2009-01-01

    An irradiation test of Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel was carried out in the OR5 test hole of HANARO of a 30 MW thermal power at 390±10degC up to a fast neutron fluence of 4.4x10 19 (n/cm 2 ) (E > 1.0 MeV). The dpa of the irradiated specimens was evaluated to be 0.034 - 0.07. Tensile and impact tests of the irradiated Mod.9Cr-1Mo were done in the hot cell of the IMEF. The change of the tensile strength by irradiation was similar to the change of the yield strength. The increase of the yield and tensile strengths was up to 18% and 10% respectively. The elongation reduction of the weldment was up to 65%. (author)

  11. Study of austenitic stainless steel welded with low alloy steel filler metal. [tensile and impact strength tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, F. A.; Dyke, R. A., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The tensile and impact strength properties of 316L stainless steel plate welded with low alloy steel filler metal were determined. Tests were conducted at room temperature and -100 F on standard test specimens machined from as-welded panels of various chemical compositions. No significant differences were found as the result of variations in percentage chemical composition on the impact and tensile test results. The weldments containing lower chromium and nickel as the result of dilution of parent metal from the use of the low alloy steel filler metal corroded more severely in a marine environment. The use of a protective finish, i.e., a nitrile-based paint containing aluminum powder, prevented the corrosive attack.

  12. Advanced Gas Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program. Progress report, July 1, 1981-September 30, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Work covered in this report includes the activities associated with the status of the simulated reactor helium supply systems and testing equipment. The progress in the screening test program is described; this includes: screening creep results and metallographic analysis for materials thermally exposed or tested at 750 0 , 850 0 , 950 0 , and 1050 0 C (1382 0 , 1562 0 , 1742 0 , and 1922 0 F). The status of controlled purity helium and air creep-rupture testing in the intensive screening test program is discussed. The results of metallographic studies of screening alloys exposed in controlled purity helium for 3000 hours at 750 0 C and 6000 hours at 850 0 C and for weldments exposed in controlled purity helium for 6000 hours at 850 0 and 950 0 C are presented and discussed

  13. Development of advanced high strength tantalum base alloys. Phase 3: Influence of metallurgical condition on the mechanical properties of ASTAR-811C sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammon, R. L.; Buckman, R. W., Jr.; Harrod, D. L.

    1972-01-01

    Metallurgical condition was shown to have a significant effect on the creep properties of ASTAR-811C (Ta-8W-1Re-0.7Hf-0.025C) sheet. Cold worked material exhibited creep rates 30 times higher than solution annealed material and 10 times greater than for recrystallized material. Both grain size and the carbide morphology changes as the final annealing temperature was raised from 3000 F to 3600 F. However, the lowest creep rates were achieved for material which retained the high temperature form of the Ta2C precipitate. Samples with GTA weldments had essentially identical properties as recrystallized base metal. Cooling rates from 3600 F of 5, 50, and 800 F deg/min. had little effect on the 2000 and 2400 F creep behavior of ASTAR-811C.

  14. A method for visual inspection of welding by means of image processing of x-ray photograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshimizu, Hiroyasu; Yoshida, Tohru.

    1983-01-01

    Computer image processing is becoming a helpful tool even in industrial inspections. A computerized method for welding visual inspection is proposed in this paper. This method is based on computer image processing of X-ray photograph of welding, in which the appearance information of weldments such as shape of weld bead really exists. Structural patterns are extracted at first and seven computer measures for inspection are calculated using those patterns. Software system for visual inspection is constructed based on these seven measures. It was experimentally made clear that this system can provide a performance of more than 0.85 correlation to human visual inspection. As a result, the visual inspection by computer using X-ray photograph became a promising tool to realize objectivity and quantitativity of welding inspection. Additionally, the consistency of the system, the possibility to reduce computing costs, and so on are discussed to improve the proposed method. (author)

  15. Revised analysis of the Transition Joint Life Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sartory, W K

    1984-07-01

    The Transition Joint Life Test was performed by General Electric and the Energy Technology Engineering Center and was analyzed earlier by General Electric. Because of later developments in analysis techniques and in our understanding of the stress behavior near a dissimilar metal weldment, agreement was reached between General Electric and Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s High-Temperature Structural Design program that a more up-to-date analysis was needed. This report presents results of a new analysis incorporating modified mechanical properties, revised constitutive equations, and a more refined finite element grid. The structural life prediction of the present report is quite conservative (approximately 3 cycles of predicted life compared to 12 to 25 cycles of measured life), whereas the earlier General Electric analysis was underconservative by a similar factor.

  16. Properties of Alloy 617 for Heat Exchanger Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, R.N.; Carroll, L.J.; Benz, J.K.; Wright, J.K.; Lillo, T.M.; Lybeck, N.J.

    2014-01-01

    Alloy 617 is among the primary candidates for very high temperature reactor heat exchangers anticipated for use up to 950ºC. Elevated temperature properties of this alloy and the mechanisms responsible for the observed tensile, creep and creep-fatigue behavior have been characterized over a wide range of test temperatures up to 1000ºC. Properties from the current experimental program have been combined with archival information from previous VHTR research to provide large data sets for many heats of material, product forms, and weldments. The combined data have been analyzed to determine conservative values of yield and tensile strength, strain rate sensitivity, creep-rupture behavior, fatigue and creep- fatigue properties that can be used for engineering design of reactor components. Phenomenological models have been developed to bound the regions over which the engineering properties are well known or can be confidently extrapolated for use in design. (author)

  17. Electron beam welding of heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chergov, I.V.; Jarinov, V.I.; Minine, V.A.

    1983-01-01

    For a long time neither qualitative, nor quantitative criteria have been available that would have allowed choosing the most suitable welding techniques from the three stated below: 1) electron gun rotates relative to stationary tube; 2) electron beam is magnetically deviated relative to stationary tube; 3) permanent deviation magnet is rotated mechanically relative to stationary tube and gun. To our experience, the 2nd technique is most promising when welding 16x1.5 diameter stainless tubes. The e-b welds are vulnerable to root defects. With welding done in a movable manner, the root defect area will be found to locate in the tube plate body and, hence, the weldment, as a whole, will not be impaired [fr

  18. Stainless steel corrosion in conditions simulating WWER-1000 primary coolant. Corrosion behaviour in mixed core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasnorutskij, V.S.; Petel'guzov, I.A.; Gritsina, V.M.; Zuek, V.A.; Tret'yakov, M.V.; Rud', R.A.; Svichkar', N.V.; Slabospitskaya, E.A.; Ishchenko, N.I.

    2011-01-01

    Research into corrosion kinetics of austenitic stainless steels (06Cr18Ni10Ti, 08Cr18Ni10Ti, 12Cr18Ni10Ti) in medium which corresponds to composition and parameters of WWER-1000 primary coolant with different pH values in autoclave out-pile conditions during 14000 hours is given. Surface of oxide films on stainless steels is investigated. Visual inspection of Westinghouse and TVEL fuel was carried out after 4 cycles in WWER-1000 primary water chemistry conditions at South Ukraine NPP. Westinghouse and TVEL fuel cladding materials possess high corrosion resistance. Blushing of weldments was observed. No visual corrosion defects or deposits were observed on fuel rods.

  19. Automatic weld torch guidance control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaith, H. E.; Wall, W. A.; Burns, M. R., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A highly reliable, fully digital, closed circuit television optical, type automatic weld seam tracking control system was developed. This automatic tracking equipment is used to reduce weld tooling costs and increase overall automatic welding reliability. The system utilizes a charge injection device digital camera which as 60,512 inidividual pixels as the light sensing elements. Through conventional scanning means, each pixel in the focal plane is sequentially scanned, the light level signal digitized, and an 8-bit word transmitted to scratch pad memory. From memory, the microprocessor performs an analysis of the digital signal and computes the tracking error. Lastly, the corrective signal is transmitted to a cross seam actuator digital drive motor controller to complete the closed loop, feedback, tracking system. This weld seam tracking control system is capable of a tracking accuracy of + or - 0.2 mm, or better. As configured, the system is applicable to square butt, V-groove, and lap joint weldments.

  20. Progress report 1994 on fusion technology tasks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klippel, H.T.

    1995-09-01

    This annual progress report describes research activities which have been performed at ECN within the framework of the European Fusion Technology Programme during the period 1 January to 31 December 1994. The work is organized in R and D contracts for the next step NET/ITER Technology, the Solid Breeder Blanket Programme, the Long Term Programme and in JET and NET contracts. The topics concern: irradiation damage in austenitic and martensitic stainless steel, weldments, low-activation vanadium alloys, first wall coatings, simulation off-normal heat loads, nuclear data and neutronics for fusion, safety studies, development of ceramic breeding material and stress analysis on magnet coils. A list of publications and staff members is also given. (orig.)

  1. Inspection reliability comparison of digital radiography, film radiography and radioscopy for inspection of Inconel welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meade, W.; Kidwell, C.; Warren, G.

    2004-01-01

    Digital Radiography offers the promise of economic and environmental advantages over traditional film based inspection. Boeing Commercial Aircraft Group has an on-going effort to evaluate this emerging radiographic method for production of aerospace hardware. Included in this effort was a program to evaluate the potential for utilizing amorphous silicon based digital radiography for the inspection of inconel weldments in engine ducting. For this particular program, probability of detection (POD) studies were conducted to compare the reliability of digital radiography with the existing production processes that utilize film radiography and image-intensifier based radioscopy. Cycle time studies were also conducted to determine the potential economic benefit for switching to the new process. The methodology and findings of this comparison are presented. (author)

  2. Inspection reliability comparison of digital radiography, film radiography and radioscopy for inspection of Inconel welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meade, W.; Kidwell, C.; Warren, G. [Boeing Commercial Aircraft Group, Renton, Washington (United States)

    2004-07-01

    Digital Radiography offers the promise of economic and environmental advantages over traditional film based inspection. Boeing Commercial Aircraft Group has an on-going effort to evaluate this emerging radiographic method for production of aerospace hardware. Included in this effort was a program to evaluate the potential for utilizing amorphous silicon based digital radiography for the inspection of inconel weldments in engine ducting. For this particular program, probability of detection (POD) studies were conducted to compare the reliability of digital radiography with the existing production processes that utilize film radiography and image-intensifier based radioscopy. Cycle time studies were also conducted to determine the potential economic benefit for switching to the new process. The methodology and findings of this comparison are presented. (author)

  3. Structural performance of a multipurpose canister shell for HLNW under normal handling conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladkany, S.G.; Rajagopalan, R.

    1994-01-01

    A Multipurpose Canister (MPC) is analyzed for critical stresses that occur during normal handling conditions and accidental scenarios. Linear and Non-linear Finite Element Analysis is performed and the stresses at various critical locations in the MPC and its weldments are studied extensively. Progressive failure analysis of the MPC's groove and fillet welds, is presented. The structural response of the MPC to dynamic lifting loads, to loads resulting from an accidental slippage of a crane cable carrying the MPC, and from the impact between two canisters, is evaluated. Nonlinear structural analysis is used in the evaluation of the local buckling and the ultimate failure phenomena in the shell when the steel is in the strain hardening state during impact. Results make a case for increasing the thickness of the shell and all the welds

  4. Investigations on the structure – Property relationships of electron beam welded Inconel 625 and UNS 32205

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devendranath Ramkumar, K.; Sridhar, R.; Periwal, Saurabh; Oza, Smitkumar; Saxena, Vimal; Hidad, Preyas; Arivazhagan, N.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Joining of dissimilar metals of Inconel 625 and UNS S32205 using electron beam welding. • Detailed structure – property relationship of dissimilar welds. • Improved metallurgical and tensile properties from the EB welding. - Abstract: The metallurgical and mechanical properties of electron beam welded Ni based superalloy Inconel 625 and UNS S32205 duplex stainless steel plates have been investigated in the present study. Interface microstructure studies divulged the absence of any grain coarsening effects or the formation of any secondary phases at the heat affected zone (HAZ) of the electron beam (EB) weldments. Tensile studies showed that the fracture occurred at the weld zone in all the trials and the average weld strength was reported to be 850 MPa. Segregation of Mo rich phases was witnessed at the inter-dendritic arms of the fusion zone. The study recommended the use of EB welding for joining these dissimilar metals by providing detailed structure – property relationships

  5. A weldability study of the structural steel of the Angra II reactor containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos Pinto, M. dos.

    1980-01-01

    A weldability study of the german steel WSTE-51 based on mechanical, metallographic, hardness as well as special tests such as the CTS, the Tekken, for cold cracking, and the Vinckier test for reheat cracking is presented. The welding process used was the manual metal arc with low hydrogen eletrodes. In order to broaden the scope of this study the properties of weldments fabricated by submerged arc welding with high and low heat input were analized by means of mechanical and metallographic tests. The results showed that the joints had good quality and emphasize the necessity of special care in order to avoid cold cracking as well as the use of a temperbead in order to avoid reheat cracking. The submerged arc welding study concludes that higher impact resistance in the HAZ is obtained with low heat imput. (Author) [pt

  6. Experiments and calculations to leak openings and leak rates on typical piping components and systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoefler, A.; Grebner, H.

    1992-01-01

    Calculations of leak opening and leak rate for through cracks in piping components have been performed. The analyses are pre- or mostly post-calculations to experiments performed at the HDR facility under PWR operating conditions. Piping components under consideration are small diameter straight pipes with circumferential cracks, pipe bends with longitudinal or circumferential cracks and pipe branches with weldment cracks. The component are loaded by internal pressure and opening as well as closing bending moment. The finite element method and two-phase flow leak rate programs are used for the calculations. Results of the analyses are presented as J-integral values, crack opening displacements and areas and leak rates as well as comparisons to the experimental results. 6 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Comparison of leak opening and leak rate calculations to HDR experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grebner, H.; Hoefler, A.; Hunger, H.

    1993-01-01

    During the last years a number of calculations of leak opening and leak rate for through cracks in piping components have been performed. Analyses are pre- or mostly post-calculations to experiments performed at the HDR facility under PWR operating conditions. Piping components under consideration were small diameter straight pipes with circumferential cracks, pipe bends with longitudinal or circumferential cracks and pipe branches with weldment cracks. The components were loaded by internal pressure and opening as well as closing bending moment. The finite element method and two-phase flow leak rate programs were used for the calculations. Results of the analyses are presented as J-integral values, crack opening displacements and areas and leak rates as well as comparisons to the experimental results

  8. Defect sizing using automated ultrasonic inspection techniques at RNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogerson, A.; Highmore, P.J.; Poulter, L.N.J.

    1983-10-01

    RNL has developed and applied automated wide-beam pulse-echo and time-of-flight techniques with synthetic aperture processing for sizing defects in clad thick-section weldments and nozzle corner regions. These techniques were amongst those used in the four test plate inspections making up the UKAEA Defect Detection Trials. In this report a critical appraisal is given of the sizing procedures adopted by RNL in these inspections. Several factors influencing sizing accuracy are discussed and results from particular defects highlighted. The time-of-flight technique with colour graphics data display is shown to be highly effective in imaging near-vertical buried defects and underclad defects of height greater than 5 mm. Early characterisation of any identified defect from its ultrasonic response under pulse-echo inspection is seen as a desirable aid to the selection of an appropriate advanced sizing technique for buried defects. (author)

  9. Environmentally assisted cracking in LWR materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.; Kassner, T.F.; Park, J.H.; Shack, W.J.; Zhang, J.; Brust, F.W.; Dong, P.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of dissolved oxygen level on fatigue life of austenitic stainless steels is discussed and the results of a detailed study of the effect of the environment on the growth of cracks during fatigue initiation are presented. Initial test results are given for specimens irradiated in the Halden reactor. Impurities introduced by shielded metal arc welding that may affect susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking are described. Results of calculations of residual stresses in core shroud weldments are summarized. Crack growth rates of high-nickel alloys under cyclic loading with R ratios from 0.2--0.95 in water that contains a wide range of dissolved oxygen and hydrogen concentrations at 289 and 320 C are summarized

  10. Microstructural evolution and precipitation behavior in heat affected zone of Inconel 625 and AISI 904L dissimilar welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthur Prabu, S.; Devendranath Ramkumar, K.; Arivazhagan, N.

    2017-11-01

    In the present investigation an attempt has been made to join the dissimilar combination of Inconel 625 super alloy and super austenitic stainless steel (AISI 904L) using manual multi-pass continuous current gas tungsten arc (CCGTA) welding processes. Two different filler wires such as ERNiCrMo-4 and ERNiCrCoMo-1 have been used to compare the metallurgical properties of these welded joints. Both optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy techniques were adopted to disseminate the microstructure traits of these weldments. Formation of secondary phases at the HAZ and weld interface of AISI 904L was witnessed while using the ERNiCrCoMo-1 filler, along with Solidification Grain Boundary (SGB) and Migrated Grain Boundary (MGB) were also observed at the weld zone.

  11. An improved method to identify grain boundary creep cavitation in 316H austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, B., E-mail: b.chen@bristol.ac.uk [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TR (United Kingdom); Flewitt, P.E.J. [Interface Analysis Centre, University of Bristol, 121 St. Michael' s Hill, Bristol BS2 8BS (United Kingdom); H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Smith, D.J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TR (United Kingdom); Jones, C.P. [Interface Analysis Centre, University of Bristol, 121 St. Michael' s Hill, Bristol BS2 8BS (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-15

    Inter-granular creep cavitation damage has been observed in an ex-service 316H austenitic stainless steel thick section weldment. Focused ion beam cross-section milling combined with ion channelling contrast imaging is used to identify the cavitation damage, which is usually associated with the grain boundary carbide precipitates in this material. The results demonstrate that this technique can identify, in particular, the early stage of grain boundary creep cavitation unambiguously in materials with complex phase constituents. -- Research highlights: {yields} FIB milling plus ion channelling contrast optimise the observation of cavity. {yields} Identification of the creep cavities unambiguously, using an FIB technique. {yields} The FIB technique can retain the polyhedral shape of cavity. {yields} Various stages of creep cavitation can be observed, using the FIB technique.

  12. Progress report 1992 on fusion technology tasks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klippel, H.T.

    1993-08-01

    This annual progress report describes research activities which have been performed at ECN within the framework of the European Fusion Technology Programme during the period 1 January to 31 December 1992. The work is organized in RandD contracts for the next step NET/ITER Technology, the Solid Breeder Blanket Programme, the Long Term Programme and in JET and NET contracts. The topics concern: irradiation damage in austenitic and martensitic stainless steel, weldments, low-activation vanadium alloys, first wall coatings, simulation off-normal heat loads, nuclear data and neutronics for fusion, safety studies, development of ceramic breeding material and stress analysis on magnet coils. List of publications and staff members are also given. (orig.)

  13. Effect of preemptive weld overlay on residual stress mitigation for dissimilar metal weld of nuclear power plant pressurizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Tae Kwang; Bae, Hong Yeol; Chun, Yun Bae; Oh, Chang Young; Kim, Yun Jae; Lee, Kyoung Soo; Park, Chi Yong

    2008-01-01

    Weld overlay is one of the residual stress mitigation methods which arrest crack initiation and crack growth. Therefore weld overlay can be applied to the region where cracking is likely to be. An overlay weld used in this manner is termed a Preemptive Weld OverLay(PWOL). In Pressurized Water Reactor(PWR) dissimilar metal weld is susceptible region for Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking(PWSCC). In order to examine the effect of PWOL on residual stress mitigation, PWOL was applied to a specific dissimilar metal weld of Kori nuclear power plant by finite element analysis method. As a result, strong compressive residual stress was made in PWSCC susceptible region and PWOL was proved effective preemptive repair method for weldment

  14. Thermo-mechanical process for treatment of welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, R.K.

    1980-03-01

    Benefits from thermo-mechanical processing (TMP) of austenitic stainless steel weldments, analogous to hot isostatic pressing (HIP) of castings, most likely result from compressive plastic deformation, enhanced diffusion, and/or increased dislocation density. TMP improves ultrasonic inspectability of austenitic stainless steel welds owing to: conversion of cast dendrites into equiaxed austenitic grains, reduction in size and number of stringers and inclusions, and reduction of delta ferrite content. TMP induces structural homogenization and healing of void-type defects and thus contributes to an increase in elongation, impact strength, and fracture toughness as well as a significant reduction in data scatter for these properties. An optimum temperature for TMP or HIP of welds is one which causes negligible grain growth and an acceptable reduction in yield strength, and permits healing of porosity

  15. Key technological issues in LMFBR high-temperature structural design - the US perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corum, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is: (1) to review the key technological issues in LMFBR high-temperature structural design, particularly as they relate to cost reduction; and (2) to provide an overview of activities sponsored by the US Department of Energy to resolve the issues and to establish stable, standardized, and defensible structural design methods and criteria. Specific areas of discussion include: weldments, structural validation tests, simplified design analysis procedures, design procedures for piping, validation of the methodology for notch-like geometries, improved life assessment procedures, thermal striping, extension of the methodology to new materials, and ASME high-temperature Code reform needs. The perceived problems and needs in each area are discussed, and the current status of related US activities is given

  16. Progress report 1994 on fusion technology tasks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klippel, H T [ed.

    1995-09-01

    This annual progress report describes research activities which have been performed at ECN within the framework of the European Fusion Technology Programme during the period 1 January to 31 December 1994. The work is organized in R and D contracts for the next step NET/ITER Technology, the Solid Breeder Blanket Programme, the Long Term Programme and in JET and NET contracts. The topics concern: irradiation damage in austenitic and martensitic stainless steel, weldments, low-activation vanadium alloys, first wall coatings, simulation off-normal heat loads, nuclear data and neutronics for fusion, safety studies, development of ceramic breeding material and stress analysis on magnet coils. A list of publications and staff members is also given. (orig.).

  17. Progress report 1993 on fusion technology tasks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klippel, H T [ed.

    1994-09-01

    This annual progress report describes research activities which have been performed at ECN within the framework of the European Fusion Technology Programme during the period 1 January to 31 December 1993. The work is organized in RandD contracts for the next step NET/ITER Technology, the Solid Breeder Blanket Programme, the Long Term Programme and in JET and NET contracts. The topics concern: irradiation damage in austenitic and martensitic stainless steel, weldments, low-activation vanadium alloys, first wall coatings, simulation off-normal heat loads, nuclear data and neutronics for fusion, safety studies, development of ceramic breeding material and stress analysis on magnet coils. List of publications and staff members are also given. (orig.).

  18. Proceedings of the joint CEC OECD IAEA specialists meeting on non-destructive examination - Practice and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borloo, E [Institute of Advanceds Materials, Ispra (Italy); Lemaitre, P M.V. [Institute of Advanced Materials, PO Box 2, NL-1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)

    1994-07-01

    This meeting was organized to be an international forum for discussion of recent application results and of utility experience with non-destructive methods used for the inspection of steel components and weldments; it was also the closing meeting of the Round Robin Tests phase of PISC III (Programme for the Inspection of Steel Components). Lessons learned, data base available and first results were presented and discussed in view of further detailed analysis of all the information generated by that programme. The meeting addressed, in terms of the state of art, the capability and reliability of NDT procedures applied to the major nuclear reactor components. Special emphasis was placed on NDE techniques to detect and size flaws in order to assure structural integrity during plant design life or beyond. Related topics included qualification with emphasis on performance demonstration and application of NDT in plant life management

  19. Progress report 1993 on fusion technology tasks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klippel, H.T.

    1994-09-01

    This annual progress report describes research activities which have been performed at ECN within the framework of the European Fusion Technology Programme during the period 1 January to 31 December 1993. The work is organized in RandD contracts for the next step NET/ITER Technology, the Solid Breeder Blanket Programme, the Long Term Programme and in JET and NET contracts. The topics concern: irradiation damage in austenitic and martensitic stainless steel, weldments, low-activation vanadium alloys, first wall coatings, simulation off-normal heat loads, nuclear data and neutronics for fusion, safety studies, development of ceramic breeding material and stress analysis on magnet coils. List of publications and staff members are also given. (orig.)

  20. Synthesis of low cycle fatigue test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrews, R.M.

    1990-01-01

    Axial strain controlled cycle fatigue tests were carried out on type 316 stainless steel parent metal, vacuum and non-vacuum electron beams welds, submerged arc welds and gas shielded metal arc welds. Testing covered total strains in the range 0.6% to 2%, and was at room temperature and 550 0 C. Parent metal and the electron beam welds showed rapid cyclic hardening, while arc welds showed little hardening. The weld metal cyclic stress-strain response was above that obtained for the parent metal, although below data obtained by other workers for similar parent materials. Weld metal endurances were above the ASME N47 continuous cycling design line at both temperatures, and comparable with parent metal data. However, the weld metal data approached the design line at low strain ranges (around 0.5%). Endurances were predicted from crack growth rates estimated from striation spacings, giving acceptable results except for the gas shielded metal arc weldments. (author)

  1. Effect of heat-treatment on elevated temperature fatigue-crack growth behavior of two heats of Alloy 718

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, W.J.; James, L.A.

    1978-05-01

    The room temperature and elevated temperature fatigue-crack growth behavior of two heats of Alloy 718 was characterized within a linear-elastic fracture mechanics framework. Two different heat-treatments were used: the ''conventional'' (ASTM A637) treatment, and a ''modified'' heat-treatment designed to improve the toughness of Alloy 718 base metal and weldments. Heat-to-heat variations in the fatigue-crack propagation behavior were observed in the conventionally-treated material. On the other hand, no heat-to-heat variations were observed in the modified condition. Furthermore, both heats of Alloy 718 exhibited superior fatigue-crack growth resistance when given the modified heat-treatment. Electron fractographic examination of Alloy 718 fatigue fracture surfaces revealed that the operative crack growth mechanisms were dependent on heat-treatment, temperature, and ΔK level

  2. Improvement of the reliability on nondestructive inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Sung Jin; Kim, Young H.; Lee, Hyang Beom; Shin, Young Kil; Jung, Hyun Jo; Park, Ik Keun; Park, Eun Soo

    2002-03-01

    Retaining reliabilities of nondestructive testing is essential for the life-time maintenance of Nuclear Power Plant. The nondestructive testing methods which are frequently used in the Nuclear Power Plant are eddy current testing for the inspection of steam generator tubes and ultrasonic testing for the inspection of weldments. In order to improve reliabilities of ultrasonic testing and eddy current testing, the subjects carried out in this study are as follows : development of BEM analysis technique for ECT of SG tube, development of neural network technique for the intelligent analysis of ECT flaw signals of SG tubes, development of RFECT technology for the inspection of SG tube, FEM analysis of ultrasonic scattering field, evaluation of statistical reliability of PD-RR test of ultrasonic testing and development of multi-Gaussian beam modeling technique to predict accurate signal of signal beam ultrasonic testing with the efficiency in calculation time

  3. Arc-weld pool interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glickstein, S.S.

    1978-08-01

    The mechanisms involved in arc-weld pool interactions are extremely complex and no complete theory is presently available to describe much of the phenomena observed during welding. For the past several years, experimental and analytical studies have been undertaken at the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory to increase basic understanding of the gas tungsten arc welding process. These studies have included experimental spectral analysis of the arc in order to determine arc temperature and analytical modeling of the arc and weld puddle. The investigations have been directed toward determining the cause and effects of variations in the energy distribution incident upon the weldment. In addition, the effect of weld puddle distortion on weld penetration was investigated, and experimental and analytical studies of weld process variables have been undertaken to determine the effects of the variables upon weld penetration and configuration. A review of the results and analysis of these studies are presented

  4. Creep lifetime assessements of ferritic pipeline welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ainsworth, R.A.; Goodall, I.W.; Miller, D.A.

    1995-01-01

    The low alloy ferritic steam pipework in Advanced Gas Cooled reactor (AGR) power stations operates at temperatures in the creep range. An inspection strategy for continued operation of the pipework has been developed based on estimation of the creep rupture life of pipework weldments and fracture mechanics for demonstrating acceptance of defects. This strategy is described in outline. The estimation of creep rupture life is described in more detail. Validation for the approach is illustrated by comparison with pressure vessel tests and with metallographic examination of components removed from service. The fracture mechanics methods are also described. It is shown that the amount of creep crack growth is dependent on the life fraction at which the assessment is made; crack growth being rapid as the creep rupture life is approached. (author). 3 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  5. Progress report 1995 on fusion technology tasks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laan, J.G. van der [ed.

    1996-07-01

    This annual progress report describes research activities which have been performed at ECN within the framework of the European Fusion Technology Programme during the period 1 January to 31 December 1995. The work is organized in R and D contracts for the next step NET/ITER Technology, the Blanket Development Programme, the Long Term Programme and in NET contracts. The topics concern: Irradiation damage in austenitic and martensitic stainless steel, weldments, low-activation vanadium alloys, first wall coatings, simulation off-normal heat loads, nuclear data and neutronics for fusion, safety studies, development of ceramic breeding material and structural analysis on magnet coils. In addition the supporting and supplementary tasks and investigations in the category underlying technology are reported. A list of publications and staff members is also given. (orig.).

  6. Nondestructive testing for microstructural characterization in 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel towards assessment of fabrication quality and in-service degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayakumar, T.; Rao, K.B.S.; Raj, Baldev [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    1999-07-01

    The paper discusses the usefulness of non destructive testing for microstructural characterization in 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel. Ultrasonic velocity and attenuation measurements and spectral analysis have been used in a complementary way for characterizing Ac{sub 1} and Ac{sub 3} temperatures, amount of martensite and ferrite, dissolution of V{sub 4}C{sub 3} and NbC and formation of {delta}-ferrite. The microstructural degradation occurring due to thermal ageing and creep has also been studied by ultrasonic velocity measurements. Magnetic Barkhausen noise technique has been used for estimating the extent of various regions in heat affected zone (HAZ) of 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel weldment. The same technique has been used for the assessment of low cycle fatigue damage in 9Cr-1Mo steel. The study establishes that non destructive methods can be used for the assessment of fabrication quality and in service degradation of the components. (author)

  7. Corrosion studies on materials of construction for spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plant equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamachi Mudali, U.; Dayal, R.K.; Gnanamoorthy, J.B.

    1993-01-01

    Corrosion studies on specimens of commercial Type 304L stainless steel (SS), nuclear grade type 304L SS, extra low-carbon nitric acid grade (NAG) Uranus-16 SS, NAG Uranus-65 SS, Ti, Ti-5% Ta, Ti-0.25% Pd, Zircaloy-2, weldments of Ti and of Ti-5% Ta, and surface-modified (thermally oxidised and anodised) Ti were carried out to assess their corrosion resistance in nitric acid medium. The results indicated that Zircaloy-2, Ti-5% Ta, Uranus-16 SS and Uranus-65 SS have excellent corrosion resistance in boiling nitric acid solution. Specimens of Zircaloy-2, Ti-5% Ta and thermally-oxidised Ti showed excellent corrosion resistance also in a simulated uranium-containing reprocessing medium in a concentrated nitric acid solution. SEM and XRD analyses were carried out on the tested specimens to examine the scale morphology and phases present on the surface. (orig.)

  8. Influence of Temperature and Chloride Concentration on Passivation Mechanism and Corrosion of a DSS2209 Welded Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachemi, Hania; Azzaz, Mohamed; Djeghlal, Mohamed Elamine

    2016-10-01

    The passivity behavior of a 2209 duplex stainless steel welded joint was investigated using potentiodynamic polarization, Mott-Schottky analysis and EIS measurements. In order to evaluate the contribution of temperature, chloride concentration and microstructure, a sequence of polarization tests were carried out in aerated NaCl solutions selected according to robust design of a three level-three factors Taguchi L9 orthogonal array. Analysis of signal-to-noise ratio and ANOVA were achieved on all measured data, and the contribution of every control factor was estimated. The results showed that the corrosion resistance of 2209 duplex stainless steel welded joint is related to the evolution of the passive film formed on the surface. It was found that the passive film on the welded zone possessed n- and p-type semiconductor characteristics. With the increase of solution temperature and chlorides concentration, the corrosion resistance of the passive film is more affected in the weldment than in the base metal.

  9. NDE of stainless steel and on-line leak monitoring of LWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupperman, D.S.; Claytor, T.N.; Mathieson, T.; Prine, D.W.

    1985-10-01

    The GARD/ANL acoustic leak detection system is under evaluation in the laboratory. Results of laboratory tests with simulated acoustic leak signals and acoustic signals from field-induced intergranular stress corrosion cracks (IGSCCs) indicate that cross-correlation techniques can be used to locate the position of a leak. Leaks from a 2-in. ball valve and a flange were studied and compared with leaks from IGSCCs and fatigue cracks. The dependence of acoustic signal on flow rate and frequency for the valve and the flange was comparable to that of fatigue cracks (thermal and mechanical) and different from that of IGSCCs. Two pipe-to-endcap weldments with overlays were examined. Because the amount of cracking in the specimens was limited, the emphasis was on trying understand the nature of crack overcalling. Four 60-mm-thick cast stainless steel plates with microstructures ranging from equiaxed to primarily columnar grains have been examined with ultrasonic waves. 13 refs., 23 figs

  10. Improving the corrosion properties of magnesium AZ31 alloy GTA weld metal using microarc oxidation process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.Siva Prasad; M.Ashfaq; N.Kishore Babu; A.Sreekanth; K.Sivaprasad; V.Muthupandi

    2017-01-01

    In this work,the morphology,phase composition,and corrosion properties of microarc oxidized (MAO) gas tungsten arc (GTA) weldments of AZ31 alloy were investigated.Autogenous gas tungsten arc welds were made as full penetration bead-on-plate welding under the alternating-current mode.A uniform oxide layer was developed on the surface of the specimens with MAO treatment in silicate-based alkaline electrolytes for different oxidation times.The corrosion behavior of the samples was evaluated by potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.The oxide film improved the corrosion resistance substantially compared to the uncoated specimens.The sample coated for 10 min exhibited better corrosion properties.The corrosion resistance of the coatings was concluded to strongly depend on the morphology,whereas the phase composition and thickness were concluded to only slightly affect the corrosion resistance.

  11. Estimation of residual stress distribution for pressurizer nozzle of Kori nuclear power plant considering safe end

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Tae Kwang; Bae, Hong Yeol; Chun, Yun Bae; Oh, Chang Young; Kim, Yun Jae [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoung Soo; Park, Chi Yong [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-08-15

    In nuclear power plants, ferritic low alloy steel nozzle was connected with austenitic stainless steel piping system through alloy 82/182 butt weld. Accurate estimation of residual stress for weldment is important in the sense that alloy 82/182 is susceptible to stress corrosion cracking. There are many results which predict residual stress distribution for alloy 82/182 weld between nozzle and pipe. However, nozzle and piping system usually connected through safe end which has short length. In this paper, residual stress distribution for pressurizer nozzle of Kori nuclear power plant was predicted using FE analysis, which considered safe end. As a result, existing residual stress profile was redistributed and residual stress of inner surface was decreased specially. It means that safe end should be considered to reduce conservatism when estimating the piping system.

  12. Effect of preemptive weld overlay on residual stress mitigation for dissimilar metal weld of nuclear power plant pressurizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Tae Kwang; Bae, Hong Yeol; Chun, Yun Bae; Oh, Chang Young; Kim, Yun Jae [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoung Soo; Park, Chi Yong [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-10-15

    Weld overlay is one of the residual stress mitigation methods which arrest crack initiation and crack growth. Therefore weld overlay can be applied to the region where cracking is likely to be. An overlay weld used in this manner is termed a Preemptive Weld OverLay(PWOL). In Pressurized Water Reactor(PWR) dissimilar metal weld is susceptible region for Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking(PWSCC). In order to examine the effect of PWOL on residual stress mitigation, PWOL was applied to a specific dissimilar metal weld of Kori nuclear power plant by finite element analysis method. As a result, strong compressive residual stress was made in PWSCC susceptible region and PWOL was proved effective preemptive repair method for weldment.

  13. Heatup of the TMI-2 lower head during core relocation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.K.; Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W.

    1989-01-01

    An analysis has been carried out to assess the potential of a melting attack upon the reactor vessel lower head and incore instrument nozzle penetration weldments during the TMI core relocation event at 224 minutes. Calculations were performed to determine the potential for molten corium to undergo breakup into droplets which freeze and form a debris bed versus impinging upon the lower head as one or more coherent streams. The effects of thermal-hydraulic interactions between corium streams and water inside the lower plenum, the effects of the core support assembly structure upon the corium, and the consequences of corium relocation by way of the core former region were examined. 19 refs., 24 figs

  14. Heavy-section steel irradiation program. Progress report, October 1994--March 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corwin, W.R.

    1995-10-01

    This document is the October 1994-March 1995 Progress Report for the Heavy Section Steel Irradiation Program. The report contains a summary of activities in each of the 14 tasks of the HSSI Program, including: (1) Program management, (2) Fracture toughness shifts in high-copper weldments, (3) Fracture toughness shifts in low upper-shelf welds, (4) Irradiation effects in a commercial low upper-shelf weld, (5) Irradiation effects on weld heat-affected zone and plate materials, (6) Annealing effects in low upper-shelf welds, (7) Microstructural analysis of radiation effects, (8) In-service irradiated and aged material evaluations, (9) Japanese power development reactor vessel steel examination, (10) fracture toughness curve shift method, (11) Special technical assistance, (12) Technical assistance for JCCCNRS, (13) Correlation monitor materials, and (14) Test reactor irradiation coordination. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database

  15. Improvement of the reliability on nondestructive inspection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Sung Jin; Kim, Young H. [Sungkyunkwan Univ., Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyang Beom [Soongsil Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Young Kil [Kunsan National Univ., Gunsan (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Hyun Jo [Wonkwang Univ., Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Ik Keun; Park, Eun Soo [Seoul Nationl Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-03-15

    Retaining reliabilities of nondestructive testing is essential for the life-time maintenance of Nuclear Power Plant. The nondestructive testing methods which are frequently used in the Nuclear Power Plant are eddy current testing for the inspection of steam generator tubes and ultrasonic testing for the inspection of weldments. In order to improve reliabilities of ultrasonic testing and eddy current testing, the subjects carried out in this study are as follows : development of BEM analysis technique for ECT of SG tube, development of neural network technique for the intelligent analysis of ECT flaw signals of SG tubes, development of RFECT technology for the inspection of SG tube, FEM analysis of ultrasonic scattering field, evaluation of statistical reliability of PD-RR test of ultrasonic testing and development of multi-Gaussian beam modeling technique to predict accurate signal of signal beam ultrasonic testing with the efficiency in calculation time.

  16. Nondestructive/in-situ evaluation of the tensile properties in industrial facilities using indentation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Jae Il; Choi, Yeol; Son, Dong Il; Kwon, Dong Il

    2001-01-01

    Exact reliability evaluation and lifetime prediction through the in-field diagnosis of materials properties is needed for safe usage of degraded industrial structures. But, conventional standard testing methods having destructive procedures are not applicable to in-field assessment of mechanical property. Therefore, an advanced indentation technique was proposed for simple and non-destructive testing of in-field structures and for selected testing of local range such as heat affected zone and weldment. This test measures indentation load-depth curve during indentation and analyzes the mechanical properties related to deformation and fracture. First of all, flow properties such as yield strength, tensile strength and work hardening index can be evaluated through the analysis of the deformation behavior beneath the spherical indenter. Additionally, case studies of advanced indentation techniques are introduced.

  17. Recent advances on Charpy specimen reconstitution techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Arnaldo H.P.; Lobo, Raquel M.; Miranda, Carlos Alexandre J., E-mail: aandrade@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Charpy specimen reconstitution is widely used around the world as a tool to enhance or supplement surveillance programs of nuclear reactor pressure vessels. The reconstitution technique consists in the incorporation of a small piece from a previously tested specimen into a compound specimen, allowing to increase the number of tests. This is especially important if the available materials is restricted and fracture mechanics parameter have to be determined. The reconstitution technique must fulfill some demands, among them tests results like the original standard specimens and the loaded material of the insert must not be influenced by the welding and machining procedure. It is known that reconstitution of Charpy specimens may affect the impact energy in a consequence of the constraint of plastic deformation by the hardened weldment and HAZ. This paper reviews some recent advances of the reconstitution technique and its applications. (author)

  18. Effect of inclusion content on the creep rupture properties of type 17Cr-8Ni-2Mo weld metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senior, B.A.

    1988-01-01

    It has been known for some time that austenitic weldments exhibit low and variable creep rupture properties, but many of the factors controlling these properties are not well understood. In this investigation, two welds (Type 316) with similar compositions and fabricated using the same welding parameters, but with different electrode coatings, have been examined after creep testing. The results indicate that the inclusion and silicon content of type 316 welds can strongly influence their creep rupture properties, a high inclusion density being associated with poor creep rupture properties, and a low silicon content with a higher creep rate. This has been explained with reference to the micromechanism of creep failure operating in these welds. (author)

  19. NDE methodologies for characterisation of defects, stresses and microstructures in pressure vessels and pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raj, Baldev; Jayakumar, T.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, the experience of the authors on high sensitive detection of defects by ultrasonic testing using advanced signal analysis and pattern recognition methodologies in the case of austenitic stainless steel and thin walled Zircaloy-2 weldments; residual stresses measurements and evaluation and adequacy of post-weld heat treatment of simulated tube to tube sheet weld joints of the steam generators of the prototype fast breeder reactor and evaluation of ASME repair welding procedures from the residual stress point of view in the case of 9Cr-1Mo steel; and assessment of microstructural degradation in 9Cr-1Mo steel, creep damage in 0.5Cr-0.5Mo-0.25V steel and detection of marteniste in AISI 304 type stainless steel is discussed. The development of expert systems for giving advice on optimum procedures for non-destructive testing and evaluation is also discussed. (author)

  20. Features of residual stresses in duplex stainless steel butt welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Um, Tae-Hwan; Lee, Chin-Hyung; Chang, Kyong-Ho; Nguyen Van Do, Vuong

    2018-04-01

    Duplex stainless steel finds increasing use as an alternative to austenitic stainless steel, particularly where chloride or sulphide stress corrosion cracking is of primary concern, due to the excellent combination of strength and corrosion resistance. During welding, duplex stainless steel does not create the same magnitude or distribution of weld-induced residual stresses as those in welded austenitic stainless steel due to the different physical and mechanical properties between them. In this work, an experimental study on the residual stresses in butt-welded duplex stainless steel is performed utilizing the layering technique to investigate the characteristics of residual stresses in the weldment. Three-dimensional thermos-mechanical-metallurgical finite element analysis is also performed to confirm the residual stress measurements.

  1. Non-destructive testing of a NPP's metallic equipment during operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodskij, B.R.; Monina, Eh.F.

    1977-01-01

    Some nondestructive testing methods and facilities currently used in the USSR and overseas to remotely control the quality of a NPPs metallic equipment during operation are reviewed. The ultrasonic and γ scanning devices designed to verify the integrity of nuclear reactor pressure vessels and piping weldments are considered. The acoustic emission techniques, ultrasonic holography and routine ultrasonic fault detection are acknowledged the most promising and safe when applied to reactor vessels. On the other hand, the radiographic methods are pointed out not to quarantee the identification of a flaw. There is also a description of a container designed to maintain and repair a nuclear reactor in the highly radioactive environment. The increased interest of foreign firms towards acoustic emission techniques is stressed

  2. Evaluation of laser welding techniques for hydrogen transmission. Final report, September 1977-November 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mucci, J

    1980-05-01

    This program was established to determine the feasibility of laser beam welding as a fabrication method for hydrogen transmission and is a precursor in the effort to systematically provide the technological base necessary for large-scale, economic pipeline transmission of fuel for a hydrogen energy system. The study contributes to the technology base by establishing the effect of conventional weld processes and laser beam welding on the mechanical properties of two classes of steels in an air and high pressure gaseous hydrogen environment. Screening evaluation of the tensile, low-cycle fatigue and fracture toughness properties and metallurgical analyses provide the basis for concluding that laser beam welding of AISI 304L stainless steel and ASTM A106B carbon steel can produce weldments of comparable quality to those produced by gas-tungsten arc and electron beam welding and is at least equally compatible with 13.8 MPa (2000 psig) gaseous hydrogen environment.

  3. Investigation of the susceptibility to solidification cracking in copper alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Richard [Avesta Sheffield R and D, Avesta (Sweden)

    2000-04-01

    A test procedure has been developed at LuTH for investigating the susceptibility to cracking at high temperatures in weldments. It has been proposed to adapt this testing procedure to investigate the cracking susceptibility at high temperatures during strip casting of certain copper alloys. Six different materials were selected for investigation - OFHC copper, tellurium containing copper, 4% tin bronze, 6% tin bronze, 30% zinc brass and 35% zinc brass. The aim of the investigation was to characterize the cracking susceptibility of the candidate materials so as to be able to rank and compare them in a quantitative manner. A further aim of the work was to study the suitability of using the data on the cracking indices generated in the present work in thermomechanical models of the casting process to optimize the casting parameters for each of the materials.

  4. HAZARDS OF THERMAL EXPANSION FOR RADIOLOGICAL CONTAINER ENGULFED IN FIRE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donna Post Guillen

    2013-05-01

    Fire accidents pose a serious threat to nuclear facilities. It is imperative that transport casks or shielded containers designed to transport/contain radiological materials have the ability to withstand a hypothetical fire. A numerical simulation was performed for a shielded container constructed of stainless steel and lead engulfed in a hypothetical fire as outlined by 10 CFR §71.73. The purpose of this analysis was to determine the thermal response of the container during and after the fire. The thermal model shows that after 30 minutes of fire, the stainless steel will maintain its integrity and not melt. However, the lead shielding will melt since its temperature exceeds the melting point. Due to the method of construction of the container under consideration, ample void space must be provided to allow for thermal expansion of the lead upon heating and melting, so as to not overstress the weldment.

  5. Microbially influenced corrosion of stainless steels in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, U.P.; Wolfram, J.H.; Rogers, R.D.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews the components, causative agents, corrosion sites, and potential failure modes of stainless steel components susceptible to microbially influenced corrosion (MIC). The stainless steel components susceptible to MIC are located in the reactor coolant, emergency, and reactor auxiliary systems, and in many plants, in the feedwater train and condenser. The authors assessed the areas of most high occurrence of corrosion and found the sites most susceptible to MIC to the heat-affected zones in the weldments of sensitized stainless steel. Pitting is the predominant MIC corrosion mechanisms, caused by sulfur reducing bacteria (SRB). Also discussed is the current status of the diagnostic, preventive, and mitigation techniques, including use of improved water chemistry, alternate materials, and improved thermomechanical treatments. 37 refs., 3 figs

  6. Biaxial Creep Specimen Fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JL Bump; RF Luther

    2006-01-01

    This report documents the results of the weld development and abbreviated weld qualification efforts performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for refractory metal and superalloy biaxial creep specimens. Biaxial creep specimens were to be assembled, electron beam welded, laser-seal welded, and pressurized at PNNL for both in-pile (JOYO reactor, O-arai, Japan) and out-of-pile creep testing. The objective of this test campaign was to evaluate the creep behavior of primary cladding and structural alloys under consideration for the Prometheus space reactor. PNNL successfully developed electron beam weld parameters for six of these materials prior to the termination of the Naval Reactors program effort to deliver a space reactor for Project Prometheus. These materials were FS-85, ASTAR-811C, T-111, Alloy 617, Haynes 230, and Nirnonic PE16. Early termination of the NR space program precluded the development of laser welding parameters for post-pressurization seal weldments

  7. Modifications of Hinge Mechanisms for the Mobile Launcher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganzak, Jacob D.

    2018-01-01

    The further development and modifications made towards the integration of the upper and lower hinge assemblies for the Exploration Upper Stage umbilical are presented. Investigative work is included to show the process of applying updated NASA Standards within component and assembly drawings for selected manufacturers. Component modifications with the addition of drawings are created to precisely display part geometries and geometric tolerances, along with proper methods of fabrication. Comparison of newly updated components with original Apollo era components is essential to correctly model the part characteristics and parameters, i.e. mass properties, material selection, weldments, and tolerances. 3-Dimensional modeling software is used to demonstrate the necessary improvements. In order to share and corroborate these changes, a document management system is used to store the various components and associated drawings. These efforts will contribute towards the Mobile Launcher for Exploration Mission 2 to provide proper rotation of the Exploration Upper Stage umbilical, necessary for providing cryogenic fill and drain capabilities.

  8. Nuclear welding, application for an LMFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patriarca, P.; Goodwin, G.M.

    1975-01-01

    Fabrication of an LMFBR system is discussed, with emphasis on areas where joint welding innovations have been introduced. Each major component of the system, including reactor vessel, intermediate heat exchanger, steam generator, and sodium-containment piping, is treated separately. Developmet of special filler metals to avoid the low elevated-temperature creep ductility obtained with conventional austenitic stainless steel weldments is reported. Bore-side welding of steam generator tube-to-tubesheet joints with and without filler metal is desirable to improve inspectability and eliminate the crevice inherent with face-side weld design, thus minimizing corrosion problems. Automated welding methods for sodium-containment piping are summarized which iminimize and control distortion and ensure welds of high integrity. Selection of materials for the various components is discussed for plants presently under construction, and materials predictions are made for future concepts. (U.S.)

  9. Proceedings of the joint CEC OECD IAEA specialists meeting on non-destructive examination - Practice and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borloo, E.; Lemaitre, P.M.V.

    1994-01-01

    This meeting was organized to be an international forum for discussion of recent application results and of utility experience with non-destructive methods used for the inspection of steel components and weldments; it was also the closing meeting of the Round Robin Tests phase of PISC III (Programme for the Inspection of Steel Components). Lessons learned, data base available and first results were presented and discussed in view of further detailed analysis of all the information generated by that programme. The meeting addressed, in terms of the state of art, the capability and reliability of NDT procedures applied to the major nuclear reactor components. Special emphasis was placed on NDE techniques to detect and size flaws in order to assure structural integrity during plant design life or beyond. Related topics included qualification with emphasis on performance demonstration and application of NDT in plant life management

  10. Guidelines for destructive examination of potential MIC [microbiologically influenced corrosion]-related failures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borenstein, S.S.

    1989-01-01

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) is recognized as a major cause of pitting corrosion failures in natural waters. In order to alleviate the problem, it is important to establish the exact cause of corrosion. If there is a possibility that the failure is due to MIC, a particularly careful failure analysis must be conducted. MIC can be misdiagnosed as attack due to conventional chloride crevice/pitting corrosion unless specialized techniques are used. Certain techniques generally must be employed, including a careful visual examination, is situ bacterial sampling of residual water, bacterial analysis for corrosion products, radiographic examinations, and metallographic examinations. Other techniques may be necessary, or may be very helpful in the analysis, including culture growth, scanning electron microscopy, and ultrasonic examinations. Metallographic examinations can reveal MIC characteristics such as selective pitting of one phase in duplex stainless steel weldments. The methods of failure analysis and their importance are addressed, including each of the steps in the nondestructive examinations and destructive analyses

  11. Combination thermal and radiation shield for well logging apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, B.F.

    1984-01-01

    A device for providing both thermal protection and radiation shielding for components such as radiation detectors within a well logging instrument comprises a thermally insulative flask containing a weldment filled with a mass of eutectic material which undergoes a change of state e.g. melting at a temperature which will provide an acceptable thermal environment for such components for extended time periods. The eutectic material which is preferably a bismuth (58%)/tin (42%) alloy has a specific gravity (> 8.5) facilitating its use as a radiation shield and is distributed around the radiation detectors so as to selectively impede the impinging of the detectors by radiation. The device is incorporated in a skid of a well logging instrument for measuring γ backscatter. A γ source is located either above or within the protective shielding. (author)

  12. Implant test and acoustic emission technique used to investigate hydrogen assisted cracking in the melted zone of a welded HSLA-80 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fals, H. C.; Trevisan, R. E.

    1999-01-01

    Weld metal hydrogen assisted cracking was studied using two flux cored wire (AWS E 70T-5 and AWS E 120 T5-K4) and a mixture gas of CO 2 +5% H 2 to induce values of diffusible hydrogen in high strength low alloy steel (HSLA-80) weldments. An acoustical Emission Measurement System (AEMS) RMS voltmeter was coupled to the implant test (NF 89-100) apparatus to determine energy, amplitude and event numbers of signal. All cracks were initiated in the partially melted zone and propagated into the coarse-grained region of the heat affected zone when E 70 T5 consumable was used, and the quasi-cleavage fracture mode was predominant. When E 120 T5 K4 consumable was used the cracks propagated vertically across the fusion zone, and a mixed fracture mode was the most important. A significant relationship between acoustic emission parameters and fracture modes was found. (Author) 12 refs

  13. Biaxial Creep Specimen Fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JL Bump; RF Luther

    2006-02-09

    This report documents the results of the weld development and abbreviated weld qualification efforts performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for refractory metal and superalloy biaxial creep specimens. Biaxial creep specimens were to be assembled, electron beam welded, laser-seal welded, and pressurized at PNNL for both in-pile (JOYO reactor, O-arai, Japan) and out-of-pile creep testing. The objective of this test campaign was to evaluate the creep behavior of primary cladding and structural alloys under consideration for the Prometheus space reactor. PNNL successfully developed electron beam weld parameters for six of these materials prior to the termination of the Naval Reactors program effort to deliver a space reactor for Project Prometheus. These materials were FS-85, ASTAR-811C, T-111, Alloy 617, Haynes 230, and Nirnonic PE16. Early termination of the NR space program precluded the development of laser welding parameters for post-pressurization seal weldments.

  14. Fatigue test results of straight pipe with flaws in inner surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Katsuyuki; Oba, Toshihiro; Kawamura, Takaichi; Yokoyama, Norio; Miyazono, Shohachiro

    1981-01-01

    Fatigue and fracture tests of piping models with flaws in the inner surface were carried out to investigate the fatigue crack growth, coalescence of multiple cracks and fracture behavior. Two straight test pipes with and without weldment in the test section of SUS304L stainless steel were tested under almost the same test conditions. Three artificial defects were machined in the inner surface of the test section of the test pipes. The fatigue test were performed untill the cracks coalesced and grew through the thickness. Subsequently, a static load was imposed on test pipe which contained a large crack in the test section. The test results show that the fatigue crack growth is slower than that predicted by the method specified in the Section XI of ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, and that the test pipes can endure more than the static load of 3Sm without an unstable fracture. (author)

  15. The variable polarity plasma arc welding process: Characteristics and performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, R. J.; Zhu, G. J.

    1991-01-01

    Significant advantages of the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) Welding Process include faster welding, fewer repairs, less joint preparation, reduced weldment distortion, and absence of porosity. The power distribution was analyzed for an argon plasma gas flow constituting the fluid in the VPPA Welding Process. The major heat loss at the torch nozzle is convective heat transfer; in the space between the outlet of the nozzle and the workpiece; radiative heat transfer; and in the keyhole in the workpiece, convective heat transfer. The power absorbed at the workpiece produces the molten puddle that solidifies into the weld bead. Crown and root widths, and crown and root heights of the weld bead are predicted. The basis is provided for an algorithm for automatic control of VPPA welding machine parameters to obtain desired weld bead dimensions.

  16. Development of a statistically-based lower bound fracture toughness curve (Ksub(IR) curve)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wullaert, R.A.; Server, W.L.; Oldfield, W.; Stahlkopf, K.E.

    1977-01-01

    A program of initiation fracture toughness measurements on fifty heats of nuclear pressure vessel production materials (including weldments) was used to develop a methodology for establishing a revised reference toughness curve. The new methodology was statistically developed and provides a predefined confidence limit (or tolerance limit) for fracture toughness based upon many heats of a particular type of material. Overall reference curves were developed for seven specific materials using large specimen static and dynamic fracture toughness results. The heat-to-heat variation was removed by normalizing both the fracture toughness and temperature data with the precracked Charpy tanh curve coefficients for each particular heat. The variance and distribution about the curve were determined, and lower bounds of predetermined statistical significance were drawn based upon a Pearson distribution in the lower shelf region (since the data were skewed to high values) and a t-distribution in the transition temperature region (since the data were normally distributed)

  17. Creep fatigue design of FBR components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhoje, S.B.; Chellapandi, P.

    1997-01-01

    This paper deals with the characteristic features of Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) with reference to creep fatigue, current creep fatigue design approach in compliance with RCCMR (1987) design code, material data, effects of weldments and neutron irradiation, material constitutive models employed, structural analysis and further R and D required for achieving maturity in creep fatigue design of FBR components. For the analysis reported in this paper, material constitutive models developed based on ORNIb (Oak Ridge National Laboratory) and Chaboche viscoplastic theories are employed to demonstrate the potential of FBR components for higher plant temperatures and/or longer life. The results are presented for the studies carried out towards life prediction of Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) components. (author). 24 refs, 8 figs, 5 tabs

  18. Fatigue crack growth in ferritic steels as influence by elevated temperature and environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, H.; Minakawa, K.; Murali, K.; Mc Evily, A.J.

    1987-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth studies have been carried out at room temperature and at 538 deg C in air as well as in vacuum in order to assess the influence of both temperature and environment on the growth process. The materials investigated were 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel, a modified 9Cr-1Mo steel and a 9Cr-2Mo steel, as well as weldments of the 9Cr-2Mo steel. Crack opening levels were determined for all test conditions. The R-dependency of the crack growth rate could be accounted for by crack closure, both at room and elevated temperature. Closure in air at 538 deg C was due to oxidation, whereas at room temperature closure was due to microstructurally related roughness and the influence of oxygen. (Author)

  19. Investigations on the lifetime behaviour of a P23 pipe under fatigue loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedmann, V.; Hartrott, P. von [Fraunhofer IWM, Freiburg (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The performance of girth welds on new P23 low chromium steel pipes under cyclic loading at 450 C was investigated. The loading conditions were chosen to be representative for bore crack initiation and growth observed in main steam lines fabricated of 0.5Cr0.5Mo0.25V (CrMoV) steel. The microstructure of the base material and weldments was analysed. A lifetime model, initially set up for the prediction of thermo-cyclic loading, is used to predict the isothermal component behaviour. It is based on a Chaboche-type deformation model and the DTMF crack growth model. The failure mechanism of two component tests was compared to the model assumptions and the component lifetimes and failure locations are compared to the model predictions. (orig.)

  20. Development of the ultrasonic technique for examination of centrifugally-cast stainless steel in pressure piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurenka, H.J.

    1983-01-01

    Centrifugally - cast stainless steel (CCSS) are used to manufacture a large variety of components in the nuclear industry. Weldments are also made to join these parts to carbon steel items. These welds are usually made of stainless steel or inconel alloys. CCSS is sophisticated material and justification for its use in critical components is safety and reliability. These steels, as any other materials, need to be inspected to assess their structural integrity. Ultrasonic testing is one of the possible techniques. In some cases it is the only one of the feasible methods for this examination. This mainly concerns components in the primary and auxiliary circuits of nuclear plants. For a long time it has been recognized that CCSS items can be extremely difficult to inspect using ultrasonics. Many attempts in various research laboratories were conducted to improve the testing technique

  1. Progress report 1995 on fusion technology tasks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laan, J.G. van der

    1996-07-01

    This annual progress report describes research activities which have been performed at ECN within the framework of the European Fusion Technology Programme during the period 1 January to 31 December 1995. The work is organized in R and D contracts for the next step NET/ITER Technology, the Blanket Development Programme, the Long Term Programme and in NET contracts. The topics concern: Irradiation damage in austenitic and martensitic stainless steel, weldments, low-activation vanadium alloys, first wall coatings, simulation off-normal heat loads, nuclear data and neutronics for fusion, safety studies, development of ceramic breeding material and structural analysis on magnet coils. In addition the supporting and supplementary tasks and investigations in the category underlying technology are reported. A list of publications and staff members is also given. (orig.)

  2. EFFECT OF INTERMETALLIC PHASES ON CORROSION BEHAVIOR AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF DUPLEX STAINLESS STEEL AND SUPER-DUPLEX STAINLESS STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhu Paulraj

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Duplex Stainless Steels (DSS and Super Duplex Stainless Steel (SDSS have excellent integration of mechanical and corrosion properties. However, the formation of intermetallic phases is a major problem in their usage. The mechanical and corrosion properties are deteriorated due to the presence of intermetallic phases. These phases are induced during welding, prolonged exposure to high temperatures, and improper heat treatments. The main emphasis of this review article is on intermetallic phases and their effects on corrosion and mechanical properties. First the effect of various alloying elements on DSS and SDSS has been discussed followed by formation of various intermetallic phases. The intermetallic phases affect impact toughness and corrosion resistance significantly. Their deleterious effect on weldments has also been reviewed.

  3. Effects of laser shock peening on stress corrosion behavior of 7075 aluminum alloy laser welded joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J.T., E-mail: jiasqq1225@126.com [School of Mechanical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); School of Materials Engineering, Jiangsu University of Technology, Changzhou 213001 (China); Zhang, Y.K. [School of Mechanical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); School of Mechanical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China); Chen, J.F.; Zhou, J.Y.; Ge, M.Z.; Lu, Y.L.; Li, X.L. [School of Materials Engineering, Jiangsu University of Technology, Changzhou 213001 (China)

    2015-10-28

    7075 aluminum alloy weldments were processed by an intensive process known as laser shock peening (LSP), meanwhile its stress corrosion behaviors were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) tests. Results showed that the effect of LSP on corrosion behavior of the joint was fairly useful and obvious. With LSP, the elongation, time of fracture and static toughness after the SSRT test were improved by 11.13%, 20% and 100%, respectively. At the same time, the location of the fracture also changed. LSP led to a transition of the fracture type from transgranular to intergranular The reasons for these enhancements of the joint on corrosion behavior were caused by microstructure, residual stress, micro-hardness, and fracture appearance.

  4. Improvement of ultrasonic examination using the Spartacus system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benoist, P.; Chapuis, N.; Cartier, F.; Pincemaille, G.

    1992-01-01

    Improved computer technology and technical advances in data analysis have significantly modified the methods employed to perform ultrasonic inspections. The SPARTACUS system developed by the CEA (French Atomic Agency) in an example of this progress. The nerve center of the system is a graphic workstation. The system permits full digitization of waveform while retaining high data acquisition rates of conventional system. In addition, it enables ultra fast analysis with comprehensive interactive imaging including signal processing (filtering, correlation, deconvolution...), image processing, spectrum analysis, automatic edition of report, 3D presentation. This system is now use during In-Service Inspection with MIS (In-Service Inspection Machine). Some examples of applications are shown: improvement in sizing capabilities, examination of austenitic weldments; thickness measurement (tube applications...), automatic detection

  5. Effects of the Substitution of the Mo Element W of Super Duplex Stainless Steel Weld on the Secondary Phase Formation and Corrosion Resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hae-Ji; Lee, Hae-Woo [Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    To investigate the effect of tungsten substitution of molybdenum on the formation of the second phase in Super Duplex Stainless Steel Weldments, welding wires with a composition of 3 wt% Mo, 2.2 wt% Mo-2.2 wt% W were designed for the flux cored arc welding process. As a result, the precipitation of the χ phase and σ phase increased in proportion to the decrease in the amount of δ ferrite content because the reaction, δ ferrite → σ + γ2, proceeded as the temperature rose. Under the same experimental conditions, the precipitation of the second phase, which degrades the properties of the material, was significantly reduced in the W substitution specimens compared to the Mo-only specimens. A polarization test conducted in a salt solution revealed that the pitting potential of the W substitution specimens was higher than that of the Mo-only specimens.

  6. Properties of Alloy 617 for Heat Exchanger Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Richard Neil [Idaho National Laboratory; Carroll, Laura Jill [Idaho National Laboratory; Benz, Julian Karl [Idaho National Laboratory; Wright, Julie Knibloe [Idaho National Laboratory; Lillo, Thomas Martin [Idaho National Laboratory; Lybeck, Nancy Jean [Idaho National Laboratory

    2014-10-01

    Abstract – Alloy 617 is among the primary candidates for very high temperature reactor heat exchangers anticipated for use up to 950ºC. Elevated temperature properties of this alloy and the mechanisms responsible for the observed tensile, creep and creep-fatigue behavior have been characterized over a wide range of test temperatures up to 1000ºC. Properties from the current experimental program have been combined with archival information from previous VHTR research to provide large data sets for many heats of material, product forms, and weldments. The combined data have been analyzed to determine conservative values of yield and tensile strength, strain rate sensitivity, creep-rupture behavior, fatigue and creep- fatigue properties that can be used for engineering design of reactor components. Phenomenological models have been developed to bound the regions over which the engineering properties are well known or can be confidently extrapolated for use in design.

  7. Analysis of Defective Pipings in Nuclear Power Plants and Applications of Guided Ultrasonic Wave Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Dae Seo; Cheong, Yong Moo; Jung, Hyun Kyu; Park, Chi Seung; Park, Jae Suck; Choi, H. R.; Jung, S. S.

    2006-07-01

    In order to apply the guided ultrasonic techniques to the pipes in nuclear power plants, the cases of defective pipes of nuclear power plants, were investigated. It was confirmed that geometric factors of pipes, such as location, shape, and allowable space were impertinent for the application of guided ultrasonic techniques to pipes of nuclear power plants. The quality of pipes, supports, signals analysis of weldment/defects, acquisition of accurate defects signals also make difficult to apply the guided ultrasonic techniques to pipes of nuclear power plants. Thus, a piping mock-up representing the pipes in the nuclear power plants were designed and fabricated. The artificial flaws will be fabricated on the piping mock-up. The signals of guided ultrasonic waves from the artificial flaws will be analyzed. The guided ultrasonic techniques will be applied to the inspection of pipes of nuclear power plants according to the basis of signals analysis of artificial flaws in the piping mock-up

  8. Tensile and Creep-Rupture Evaluation of a New Heat of Haynes Alloy 25

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shingledecker, J.P.; Glanton, D.B.; Martin, R.L.; Sparks, B.L.; Swindeman, R.W.

    2007-01-01

    From 1999 to 2006, a program was undertaken within the Materials Science and Technology Division, formerly the Metals and Ceramics Division, of Oak Ridge National Laboratory to characterize the tensile and creep-rupture properties of a newly produced heat of Haynes alloy 25 (L-605). Tensile properties from room temperature to 1100 C were evaluated for base material and welded joints aged up to 12,000 hours at 675 C. Creep and creep-rupture tests were conducted on base metal and cross-weldments from 650 to 950 C. Pressurized tubular creep tests were conducted to evaluate multiaxial creep-rupture response of the material. Over 800,000 hours of creep test data were generated during the test program with the longest rupture tests extending beyond 38,000 hours, and the longest creep-rate experiments exceeding 40,000 hours

  9. Recent advances on Charpy specimen reconstitution techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, Arnaldo H.P.; Lobo, Raquel M.; Miranda, Carlos Alexandre J.

    2017-01-01

    Charpy specimen reconstitution is widely used around the world as a tool to enhance or supplement surveillance programs of nuclear reactor pressure vessels. The reconstitution technique consists in the incorporation of a small piece from a previously tested specimen into a compound specimen, allowing to increase the number of tests. This is especially important if the available materials is restricted and fracture mechanics parameter have to be determined. The reconstitution technique must fulfill some demands, among them tests results like the original standard specimens and the loaded material of the insert must not be influenced by the welding and machining procedure. It is known that reconstitution of Charpy specimens may affect the impact energy in a consequence of the constraint of plastic deformation by the hardened weldment and HAZ. This paper reviews some recent advances of the reconstitution technique and its applications. (author)

  10. Influence of The Arrangement of Materials and Microstructural Analysis During FSW of AZ80A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevvel P.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this paper is to produce defect free weldments with improved properties during friction stir welding of dissimilar Mg alloys. The influence of the anisotropic arrangement of materials when AZ80A Mg alloy is taken as advancing side and AZ91C Mg alloy as retreating side and vice versa with respect to their mechanical properties and microstructural characteristics were investigated. The effects of various FSW parameters on the quality of these joints were also analyzed and best optimized FSW parameters were suggested. Defect free sound joints with excellent mechanical properties were produced when AZ80A Mg alloy was positioned at retreating side. At the same time, it seems a little bit difficult to obtain good quality joints with the contrary arrangement of materials. These investigations revealed that materials having inferior plastic deformability must be kept at the advancing side to obtain sound joints during FSW of dissimilar alloys of Magnesium.

  11. Radiographic detection of IGSCC using MINAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapides, M.L.

    1984-01-01

    In response to utility interest MINAC, a portable linear accelerator (RP 822) was modified to yield an extremely small accelerator, e.g., radiation source, volume appropriate for BWR riser piping inspection. The modified unit dubbed Shrinkac was shown to be capable of detecting IGSCC of approximately 30% throughwall depth in laboratory tests using water-filled riser pipes. Since the test cracks were tighter than service expectations, it was projected that IGSCC or approximately 15% throughwall depth could be detected in the field. The Shrinkac unit was successfully utilized at Peachbottom Unit 3 to detect both axial and circumferential flaws in riser piping considered to be uninspectable by ultrasonics because of weldment rework conditions. Pipes ranging from 12-20'' nominal size, water-filled and with and without weld overlay remedies were successfully examined

  12. Structural design of shield-integrated thin-wall vacuum vessel and manufacturing qualification tests for International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Katsusuke; Shibui, Masanao; Koizumi, Koichi; Kanamori, Naokazu; Nishio, Satoshi; Sasaki, Takashi; Tada, Eisuke

    1992-09-01

    Conceptual design of shield-integrated thin-wall vacuum vessel has been done for ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor). The vacuum vessel concept is based on a thin-double-wall structure, which consists of inner and outer plates and rib stiffeners. Internal shielding structures, which provide neutron irradiation shielding to protect TF coils, are set up between the inner plate and the outer plate of the vessel to avoid complexity of machine systems such as supporting systems of blanket modules. The vacuum vessel is assembled/disassembled by remote handling, so that welding joints are chosen as on-site joint method from reliability of mechanical strength. From a view point of assembling TF coils, the vacuum vessel is separated at the side of port, and is divided into 32 segments similar to the ITER-CDA reference design. Separatrix sweeping coils are located in the vacuum vessel to reduce heat fluxes onto divertor plates. Here, the coil structure and attachment to the vacuum vessel have been investigated. A sectorized saddle-loop coil is available for assembling and disassembling the coil. To support electromagnetic loads on the coils, they are attached to the groove in the vacuum vessel by welding. Flexible multi-plate supporting structure (compression-type gravity support), which was designed during CDA, is optimized by investigating buckling and frequency response properties, and concept on manufacturing and fabrication of the gravity support are proposed. Partial model of the vacuum vessel is manufactured for trial, so that fundamental data on welding and fabrication are obtained. From mechanical property tests of weldment and partial models, mechanical intensity and behaviors of the weldment are obtained. Informations on FEM-modeling are obtained by comparing analysis results with experimental results. (author)

  13. Electron beam welding of heavy section 3Cr-1.5Mo alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, J.F.; David, S.A.; Nasreldin, A.

    1986-01-01

    Welding of thick section steels is a common practice in the fabrication of pressure vessels for energy systems. The fabrication cost is strongly influenced by the speed at which these large components can be welded. Conventional welding processes such as shielded metal arc (SMA) and submerged arc (SA) are time-consuming and expensive. Hence there is a great need to reduce welding time and the tonnage of weld metal deposited. Electron beam welding (EBW) is a process that potentially could be used to achieve dramatic reduction in the welding time and costs. The penetrating ability of the beam produces welds with high depth-to-width ratios at relatively high travel speeds, making it possible to weld thick sections with one or two passes without filler metals and other consumables. The paper describes a study that was undertaken to investigate the feasibility of using a high power electron beam welding machine to weld heavy section steel. The main emphasis of this work was concentrated on determining the mechanical properties of the resulting weldment, characterizing the microstructure of the various weldment regions, and comparing these results with those from other processes. One of the steels selected for the heavy section electron beam welding study was a new 3 Cr-1.5 Mo-0.1 V alloy. The steel was developed at the AMAX Materials Research Center by Wada and co-workers for high temperature, high pressure hydrogen service as a possible improved replacement for 2-1/4 Cr-1 Mo steels. The excellent strength and toughness of this steel make it a promising candidate for future pressure vessels such as those for coal gasifiers. The work was conducted on 102 mm (4 in.) thick plates of this material in the normalized-and-tempered condition

  14. Low-Cycle Fatigue Behavior of 10CrNi3MoV High Strength Steel and Its Undermatched Welds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Song

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of high strength steel allows the design of lighter, more slender and simpler structures due to high strength and favorable ductility. Nevertheless, the increase of yield strength does not guarantee the corresponding improvement of fatigue resistance, which becomes a major concern for engineering structure design, especially for the welded joints. The paper presents a comparison of the low cycle fatigue behaviors between 10CrNi3MoV high strength steel and its undermatched weldments. Uniaxial tension tests, Push-pull, strain-controlled fatigue tests were conducted on base metal and weldments in the strain range of 0.2–1.2%. The monotonic and cyclic stress-strain curves, stress-life, strain-life and energy-life in terms of these materials were analyzed for fatigue assessment of materials discrepancy. The stress-life results of base metal and undermatched weld metal exhibit cyclic softening behaviors. Furthermore, the shapes of 10CrNi3MoV steel hysteresis loops show a satisfactory Masing-type behavior, while the weld metal shows a non-Masing type behavior. Strain, plastic and total strain energy density amplitudes against the number of reversals to failure results demonstrate that the undermatched weld metal presents a higher resistance to fatigue crack initiation than 10CrNi3MoV high strength steel. Finally, fatigue fracture surfaces of specimens were compared by scanning electron microscopy to identify the differences of crack initiation and the propagation between them.

  15. Control of the development of residual stresses and heat affected zone (HAZ) microstructure during welding of low alloy steels and influence on stress relieve cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storesund, J.; Rui Wu; Sandstroem, R.; von Walden, E. [Swedish Inst. for Metals Research, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1990-12-31

    Creep resistant 1 Cr 0.5 Mo steels are frequently used as steam pipes at operating temperature of 450 degree C to 500 degrees C. Welded joints have been post weld heat treated (PWHT). The results show: - In fully refined microstructures close to the fusion boundary of the weldments a reduction of the grain size by a factor of 3-4 was measured. The impact transition temperature was up to 27 degree C lower for test series notched in the refined HAZ (Heat Affected Zone) than in the coarse grained HAZ of the as welded condition. The overlay heat treatments were not observed to significantly influence the hardness and the room temperature tensile properties of the weldments. - The influence of refinement on impact transition temperature (ITT) and upper shelf energy was beneficial. In the coarse grained HAZ, for which the ITT was significantly higher than for weld metal and base metal, the refinement resulted in a 30 degrees C lower value of the ITT. The influence of PWHT on impact properties was also studied. The PWHT raised the upper shelf energy greatly. The effect on the ITT was smaller than that of refinement. - For cross welds in the as-welded (AW) condition refinement improved the creep properties. After PWHT the creep ductility was significantly increased at the same as a considerable reduction of life was observed. At lower stresses the effects of refinement and especially PWHT were less pronounced. Beneficial influence of refinement in inhibiting the formation of creep cavitation was apparent regardless stress level in both AW and PWHT conditions. (K.A.E).

  16. Limit load solution for electron beam welded joints with single edge weld center crack in tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wei; Shi, Yaowu; Li, Xiaoyan; Lei, Yongping

    2012-05-01

    Limit loads are widely studied and several limit load solutions are proposed to some typical geometry of weldments. However, there are no limit load solutions exist for the single edge crack weldments in tension (SEC(T)), which is also a typical geometry in fracture analysis. The mis-matching limit load for thick plate with SEC(T) are investigated and the special limit load solutions are proposed based on the available mis-matching limit load solutions and systematic finite element analyses. The real weld configurations are simplified as a strip, and different weld strength mis-matching ratio M, crack depth/width ratio a/ W and weld width 2H are in consideration. As a result, it is found that there exists excellent agreement between the limit load solutions and the FE results for almost all the mis-matching ration M, a/ W and ligament-to-weld width ratio ( W-a)/ H. Moreover, useful recommendations are given for evaluating the limit loads of the EBW structure with SEC(T). For the EBW joints with SEC(T), the mis-matching limit loads can be obtained assuming that the components are wholly made of base metal, when M changing from 1.6 to 0.6. When M decreasing to 0.4, the mis-matching limit loads can be obtained assuming that the components are wholly made of base metal only for large value of ( W-a)/ H. The recommendations may be useful for evaluating the limit loads of the EBW structures with SEC(T). The engineering simplifications are given for assessing the limit loads of electron beam welded structure with SEC(T).

  17. NDE Studies on CRDMs Removed From Service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doctor, Steven R.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Schuster, George J.; Hockey, Ronald L.; Abrefah, John

    2005-01-01

    Studies being conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington are focused on assessing the effectiveness of NDE inspections of control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) nozzles and J-groove weldments. The primary objective of this work is to provide information to the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC) on the effectiveness of ultrasonic testing (UT) and eddy current testing (ET) as related to the in-service inspection of CRDM nozzles and J-groove weldments, and to enhance the knowledge base of primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) through destructive characterization of the CRDM assemblies. In describing two CRDM assemblies removed from service, decontaminated, and then used in a series of NDE measurements, this paper will address the following questions: (1) What did each technique detect?, (2) What did each technique miss?, (3) How accurately did each technique characterize the detected flaws? Two CRDM assemblies including the CRDM nozzle, the J-groove weld, buttering, and a portion of the ferritic head material were selected for this study. One contained suspected PWSCC, based on in-service inspection data; the other contained evidence suggesting through-wall leakage, but this was unconfirmed. The selected NDE measurements follow standard industry techniques for conducting in-service inspections of CRDM nozzles and the crown of the J-groove welds and buttering. In addition, laboratory based NDE methods will be employed to conduct inspections of the CRDM assemblies, with particular emphasis on inspecting the J-groove weld and buttering. This paper will also describe the NDE methods used and discuss the NDE results. Future work will involve using the results from these NDE studies to guide the development of a destructive characterization plan to reveal the crack morphology, to be compared with NDE responses

  18. Creep Strength of Nb-1Zr for SP-100 Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horak, James A.; Egner, Larry K.

    1994-07-01

    Power systems that are used to provide electrical power in space are designed to optimize conversion of thermal energy to electrical energy and to minimize the mass and volume that must be launched. Only refractory metals and their alloys have sufficient long-term strength for several years of uninterrupted operation at the required temperatures of 1200 K and above. The high power densities and temperatures at which these reactors must operate require the use of liquid-metal coolants. The alloy Nb-1 wt % Zr (Nb-lZr), which exhibits excellent corrosion resistance to alkali liquid-metals at high temperatures, is being considered for the fuel cladding, reactor structural, and heat-transport systems for the SP-100 reactor system. Useful lifetime of this system is limited by creep deformation in the reactor core. Nb-lZr sheet procured to American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) specifications for reactor grade and commercial grade has been processed by several different cold work and annealing treatments to attempt to produce the grain structure (size, shape, and distribution of sizes) that provides the maximum creep strength of this alloy at temperatures from 1250 to 1450 K. The effects of grain size, differences in oxygen concentrations, tungsten concentrations, and electron beam and gas tungsten arc weldments on creep strength were studied. Grain size has a large effect on creep strength at 1450 K but only material with a very large grain size (150 μm) exhibits significantly higher creep strength at 1350 K. Differences in oxygen or tungsten concentrations did not affect creep strength, and the creep strengths of weldments were equal to, or greater than, those for base metal.

  19. Detection and characterization of flaws in segments of light water reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, K.V.; Cunningham, R.A. Jr.; McClung, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    Studies have been conducted to determine flaw density in segments cut from light water reactor )LWR) pressure vessels as part of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Heavy-Section Steel Technology (H SST) Program. Segments from the Hope Creek Unit 2 vessel and the Pilgrim Unit 2 Vessel were purchased from salvage dealers. Hope Creek was a boiling water reactor (BWR) design and Pilgrim was a pressurized water reactor (PWR) design. Neither were ever placed in service. Objectives were to evaluate these LWR segments for flaws with ultrasonic and liquid penetrant techniques. Both objectives were successfully completed. One significant indication was detected in a Hope Creek seam weld by ultrasonic techniques and characterized by further analyses terminating with destructive correlation. This indication [with a through-wall dimension of ∼6 mm (∼0.24 in.)] was detected in only 3 m (10 ft) of weldment and offers extremely limited data when compared to the extent of welding even in a single pressure vessel. However, the detection and confirmation of the flaw in the arbitrarily selected sections implies the Marshall report estimates (and others) are nonconservative for such small flaws. No significant indications were detected in the Pilgrim material by ultrasonic techniques. Unfortunately, the Pilgrim segments contained relatively little weldment; thus, we limited our ultrasonic examinations to the cladding and subcladding regions. Fluorescent liquid penetrant inspection of the cladding surfaces for both LWR segments detected no significant indications [i.e., for a total of approximately 6.8 m 2 (72 ft 2 ) of cladding surface]. (author)

  20. Effect of zirconium addition on welding of aluminum grain refined by titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaid, A.I.O.

    2011-01-01

    Aluminum and its alloys solidify in large grains columnar structure which tends to reduce their mechanical behaviour and surface quality. Therefore, they are industrially grain refined by titanium or titanium + boron. Furthermore, aluminum oxidizes in ordinary atmosphere which makes its weldability difficult and weak. Therefore, it is anticipated that the effect of addition of zirconium at a weight percentages of 0.1% (which proved to be an effective grain refiner on the weldability of aluminum grain refined by Ti) is worthwhile investigating. This formed the objective of this research work. In this paper, the effect of zirconium addition at a weight percentage of 0.1%, which corresponds to the peritctic limit on the aluminum-zirconium phase diagram, on the weldability of aluminum grain refined by Ti is investigated. Rolled sheets of commercially pure aluminum, Al grain refined Ti of 3 mm thickness were welded together using Gas Tungsten Arc Welding method (GTAW), formerly known as TIG. A constant air gap was maintained at a constant current level, 30 ampere AC, was used because it removes the oxides of the welding process under the same process parameters. Metallographic examination of weldments of the different combinations of aluminum and its microalloys at the heat affected zone, HAZ, and base metal was carried out and examined for width, porosity, cracks and microhardness. It was found that grain refining of commercially pure aluminum by Ti resulted in enhancement of its weldability. Similarly, addition of zirconium to Al grain refined by Ti resulted in further enhancement of the weldment. Photomicrographs of the HAZ regions are presented and discussed. (author)