WorldWideScience

Sample records for welding irradiated stainless

  1. Tensile properties of a titanium modified austenitic stainless steel and the weld joints after neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiba, K.; Ioka, I.; Jitsukawa, S.; Hamada, A.; Hishinuma, A. [and others

    1996-10-01

    Tensile specimens of a titanium modified austenitic stainless steel and its weldments fabricated with Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) and Electron Beam (EB) welding techniques were irradiated to a peak dose of 19 dpa and a peak helium level of 250 appm in the temperature range between 200 and 400{degrees}C in spectrally tailored capsules in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The He/dpa ratio of about 13 appm/dpa is similar to the typical helium/dpa ratio of a fusion reactor environment. The tensile tests were carried out at the irradiation temperature in vacuum. The irradiation caused an increase in yield stress to levels between 670 and 800 MPa depending on the irradiation temperature. Total elongation was reduced to less than 10%, however the specimens failed in a ductile manner. The results were compared with those of the specimens irradiated using irradiation capsules producing larger amount of He. Although the He/dpa ratio affected the microstructural change, the impact on the post irradiation tensile behavior was rather small for not only base metal specimens but also for the weld joint and the weld metal specimens.

  2. Ion-irradiation effects on dissimilar friction stir welded joints between ODS alloy and ferritic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, C.-L., E-mail: chunliang@mail.ndhu.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Dong-Hwa University, Hualien 97401, Taiwan (China); Richter, A. [Department of Engineering, Technical University of Applied Sciences Wildau, Bahnhofstrasse 1, 15745 Wildau (Germany); Kögler, R. [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz Center Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Griepentrog, M.; Reinstädt, P. [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Unter den Eichen 87, 12205 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • FSSW has successfully been used in the welding of dissimilar materials. • The irradiation causes different degrees of hardening in the welding zones. • The formation of He bubbles at precipitates was found in the dissimilar joints. • The hardening effect is due to formation of He-filled vacancies. - Abstract: Friction stir spot welding (FSSW) is an advanced technique for the joining of materials to prevent agglomeration of fine oxide particles, grain coarsening, and stress corrosion cracking etc. In this study, the dissimilar FSSW joint of stainless steel 430/ODS was irradiated with a Fe{sup +}/He{sup +} dual ion beam. Irradiation damage can cause deterioration in the mechanical properties especially in the welding zones. The joint quality therefore plays a decisive role in the life expectancy of nuclear reactors. The effect of irradiation on different zones in the joint (the thermo-mechanically affected zone, the heat affected zone and the base material) was investigated by TEM and nanoindentation. Irradiation causes a hardness increase in all welding zones with a characteristic hardness maximum. The relative hardness increase and the related microstructure are discussed. The formation of He bubbles at chromium carbide precipitates and the homogeneous distribution of He filled vacancies in the mixture region of the 430/ODS FSSW joints was observed.

  3. Comparison of laser welding conditions of Zircaloy-4 and stainless steel for nuclear fuel irradiation rig

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kahye; Hong, Jintae; Joung, Changyoung; Heo, Sungho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Various materials for Zircaloy-4, SUS 316L, such as Inconel, are used as a survey rig that has been produced for fuel irradiation testing. Precision sensors, thermocouples, LVDT, and SPND should also be assembled. Therefore, a welding device for connecting them is necessary. With a high density of energy, laser welding can be properly used in a deep permeation, and in precisely welding narrow and deep joints. In particular, it has been applied to other fields such as metal welding. Since the technology bears no pores or cavities, resulting in a clean surface after the welding process, it does not require an 'after-process' such as grinding or polishing, which is useful where high water-tightness is required. Therefore, we developed and researched a special fiber laser welding system for the production of a nuclear research rig. Through the above test, the different conditions of laser welding were found for Zircaloy-4 and AISI 316L used for producing a nuclear fuel research rig, performing the most optimal welding conditions according to the properties of the materials in the future.

  4. Weld bonding of stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santos, I. O.; Zhang, Wenqi; Goncalves, V.M.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive theoretical and experimental investigation of the weld bonding process with the purpose of evaluating its relative performance in case of joining stainless steel parts, against alternative solutions based on structural adhesives or conventional spot...

  5. Effect of post-weld heat treatment and neutron irradiation on a dissimilar-metal joint between F82H steel and 316L stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Haiying, E-mail: haigirl1983@gmail.com [SOKENDAI - The Graduated University for Advanced Studies, Toki (Japan); Nagasaka, Takuya [SOKENDAI - The Graduated University for Advanced Studies, Toki (Japan); National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki (Japan); Kometani, Nobuyuki [Nagoya University, Nagoya (Japan); Muroga, Takeo [SOKENDAI - The Graduated University for Advanced Studies, Toki (Japan); National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki (Japan); Guan, Wenhai; Nogami, Shuhei; Yabuuchi, Kiyohiro; Iwata, Takuya; Hasegawa, Akira [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Yamazaki, Masanori [International Research Center for Nuclear Materials Science, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University (Japan); Kano, Sho; Satoh, Yuhki; Abe, Hiroaki [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Tanigawa, Hiroyasu [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Rokkasho (Japan)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Significant hardening after neutron irradiation at 300 °C for 0.1 dpa was found in the fine-grain HAZ of F82H for the dissimilar-metal joint between F82H and 316L. • The possible hardening mechanism was explained from the viewpoint of carbon behavior. • However, the significant hardening did not degrade the impact property significantly. - Abstract: A dissimilar-metal joint between F82H steel and 316L stainless steel was fabricated by using electron beam welding (EBW). By microstructural analysis and hardness test, the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of F82H was classified into interlayer area, fine-grain area, and coarse-carbide area. Post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) was applied to control the hardness of HAZ. After PWHT at 680 °C for 1 h, neutron irradiation at 300 °C with a dose of 0.1 dpa was carried out for the joint in Belgian Reactor II (BR-II). Compared to the base metals (BMs) and weld metal (WM), significant irradiation hardening up to 450HV was found in the fine-grain HAZ of F82H. However, the impact property of F82H-HAZ specimens, which was machined with the root of the V-notch at HAZ of F82H, was not deteriorated obviously in spite of the significant irradiation hardening.

  6. Corrosion Properties of Laser Welded Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weldingh, Jakob; Olsen, Flemmming Ove

    1997-01-01

    In this paper the corrosion properties of laser welded AISI 316L stainless steel are examined. A number of different welds has been performed to test the influence of the weld parameters of the resulting corrosion properties. It has been chosen to use the potential independent critical pitting...... temperature (CPT) test as corrosion test. The following welding parameters are varied: Welding speed, lsser power, focus point position and laser operation mode (CW or pulsed)....

  7. Embrittlement of austenitic stainless steel welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.

    1997-12-31

    The microstructure of type-308 austenitic stainless steel weld metal containing {gamma} and {delta} and ferrite is shown. Typical composition of the weld metal is Cr-20.2, Ni-9.4, Mn-1.7, Si-0.5, C-0.05, N-0.06 and balance Fe (in wt %). Exposure of austenitic stainless steel welds to elevated temperatures can lead to extensive changes in the microstructural features of the weld metal. On exposure to elevated temperatures over a long period of time, a continuous network of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbide forms at the austenite/ferrite interface. Upon aging at temperatures between 550--850 C, ferrite in the weld has been found to be unstable and transforms to sigma phase. These changes have been found to influence mechanical behavior of the weld metal, in particular the creep-rupture properties. For aging temperatures below 550 C the ferrite decomposes spinodally into {alpha} and {alpha}{prime} phases. In addition, precipitation of G-phase occurs within the decomposed ferrite. These transformations at temperatures below 550 C lead to embrittlement of the weld metal as revealed by the Charpy impact properties.

  8. Plasma spot welding of ferritic stainless steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lešnjak, A.

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasma spot welding of ferritic stainless steels is studied. The study was focused on welding parameters, plasma and shielding gases and the optimum welding equipment. Plasma-spot welded overlap joints on a 0.8 mm thick ferritic stainless steel sheet were subjected to a visual examination and mechanical testing in terms of tension-shear strength. Several macro specimens were prepared. Plasma spot welding is suitable to use the same gas as shielding gas and as plasma gas, i.e., a 98 % Ar/2 % H 2 gas mixture. Tension-shear strength of plasma-spot welded joints was compared to that of resistance-spot welded joints. It was found that the resistance welded joints withstand a somewhat stronger load than the plasma welded joints due to a larger weld spot diameter of the former. Strength of both types of welded joints is approximately the same.

    El artículo describe el proceso de soldeo de aceros inoxidables ferríticos por puntos con plasma. La investigación se centró en el establecimiento de los parámetros óptimos de la soldadura, la definición del gas de plasma y de protección más adecuado, así como del equipo óptimo para la realización de la soldadura. Las uniones de láminas de aceros inoxidables ferríticos de 0,8 mm de espesor, soldadas a solape por puntos con plasma, se inspeccionaron visualmente y se ensayaron mecánicamente mediante el ensayo de cizalladura por tracción. Se realizaron macro pulidos. Los resultados de la investigación demostraron que la solución más adecuada para el soldeo por puntos con plasma es elegir el mismo gas de plasma que de protección. Es decir, una mezcla de 98 % de argón y 2 % de hidrógeno. La resistencia a la cizalladura por tracción de las uniones soldadas por puntos con plasma fue comparada con la resistencia de las uniones soldadas por resistencia por puntos. Se llegó a la conclusión de que las uniones soldadas por resistencia soportan una carga algo mayor que la uniones

  9. Welding Behavior of Free Machining Stainless Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BROOKS,JOHN A.; ROBINO,CHARLES V.; HEADLEY,THOMAS J.; MICHAEL,JOSEPH R.

    2000-07-24

    The weld solidification and cracking behavior of sulfur bearing free machining austenitic stainless steel was investigated for both gas-tungsten arc (GTA) and pulsed laser beam weld processes. The GTA weld solidification was consistent with those predicted with existing solidification diagrams and the cracking response was controlled primarily by solidification mode. The solidification behavior of the pulsed laser welds was complex, and often contained regions of primary ferrite and primary austenite solidification, although in all cases the welds were found to be completely austenite at room temperature. Electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) pattern analysis indicated that the nature of the base metal at the time of solidification plays a primary role in initial solidification. The solid state transformation of austenite to ferrite at the fusion zone boundary, and ferrite to austenite on cooling may both be massive in nature. A range of alloy compositions that exhibited good resistance to solidification cracking and was compatible with both welding processes was identified. The compositional range is bounded by laser weldability at lower Cr{sub eq}/Ni{sub eq} ratios and by the GTA weldability at higher ratios. It was found with both processes that the limiting ratios were somewhat dependent upon sulfur content.

  10. Simulation of the welding of irradiated materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Hua Tay

    1989-07-01

    Helium was uniformly implanted using the ''tritium trick'' technique to levels of 0.18, 2.5, 27, 105 and 256 atomic part per million (appm) for type 316 stainless steel, and 0.3 and 1 appm for Sandvik HT-9 (12 Cr-1MoVW). Both full penetration as well as partial penetration welds were then produced on control and helium-containing materials using the autogenous gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding process under full constraint conditions. For full penetration welds, both materials were successfully welded when they contained less than 0.3 appm helium. However, welds of both materials, when containing greater than 1 appm helium, were found to develop cracks during cooling of the weld. Transmission and scanning electron microscopy indicated that the HAZ cracking was caused by the growth and coalescence of grain boundary (GB) helium bubbles. This cracking occurred as a result of the combination of high temperatures and high shrinkage tensile stresses. The cracking in the fusion zone was found to result from the precipitation of helium along dendrite interfaces. A model based on the kinetics of diffusive cavity growth is presented to explain the observed results. The model proposes a helium bubble growth mechanism which leads to final intergranular rupture in the heat-affected zone. Results of the present study demonstrate that the use of conventional fusion welding techniques to repair materials degraded by exposure to irradiation environments may be difficult if the irradiation results in the generation of helium equal to or greater than 1 appm.

  11. Laser Welding of Large Scale Stainless Steel Aircraft Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitemeyer, D.; Schultz, V.; Syassen, F.; Seefeld, T.; Vollertsen, F.

    In this paper a welding process for large scale stainless steel structures is presented. The process was developed according to the requirements of an aircraft application. Therefore, stringers are welded on a skin sheet in a t-joint configuration. The 0.6 mm thickness parts are welded with a thin disc laser, seam length up to 1920 mm are demonstrated. The welding process causes angular distortions of the skin sheet which are compensated by a subsequent laser straightening process. Based on a model straightening process parameters matching the induced welding distortion are predicted. The process combination is successfully applied to stringer stiffened specimens.

  12. Microstructural observations of HFIR-irratiated austenitic stainless steels including welds from JP9-16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawai, T.; Shiba, K.; Hishinuma, A.

    1996-04-01

    Austenitic stainless steels, including specimens taken from various electron beam (EB) welds, have been irradiated in HFIR Phase II capsules, JP9-16. Fifteen specimens irradiated at 300, 400, and 500{degrees}C up to 17 dpa are so far examined by a transmission electron microscope (TEM). In 300{degrees}C irradiation, cavities were smaller than 2nm and different specimens showed little difference in cavity microstructure. At 400{degrees}C, cavity size was larger, but still very small (<8 nm). At 500{degrees}C, cavity size reached 30 nm in weld metal specimens of JPCA, while cold worked JPCA contained a small (<5 nm) cavities. Inhomogeneous microstructural evolution was clearly observed in weld-metal specimens irradiated at 500{degrees}C.

  13. Assessment of Hot Crack Properties of Laser Welded Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Thomas Winther; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    2003-01-01

    Crack testing concerning small and fast solidifying laser welds in austenitic stainless steel has been studied. A set of methods has been applied to investigate alloy properties, including (1) Application of known information to predict solidification phases, (2) Weld metal solidification rate...

  14. Laser Welding Of Thin Sheet Of AISI 301 Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilar, R.; Miranda, R. M.

    1989-01-01

    Preliminary results of an investigation on laser welding of AISI 301 stainless steel thin sheet are presented. Welds were made with a CO2 continuous wave laser, varying power density and welding speed. The welds were studied by optical and electron scanning microscopy, X-ray diffraction and hardness tests. Experimental results show that under appropriate conditions, sound welds are obtained, with a negligeable heat affected zoneanda fine microstructure in the fusion zone. The fusion zone shows a cellular - dendritic microstructure, with austenite and ferrite as the major constituents. Ferrite, whose content is 5 to 7%, is predominantly intradendritic with both vermicular and acicular morphologies. However some interdendritic ferrite may also be present. The characteristics of the structure suggest that the solidification mode of AISI 301 stainless steel is essentially ferritic.

  15. 77 FR 60478 - Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-03

    ... COMMISSION Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal.'' This guide describes a method that the NRC staff considers acceptable for controlling ferrite content in stainless steel weld metal. Revision 4 updates...

  16. 78 FR 63517 - Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-24

    ... COMMISSION Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... revision to Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.31, ``Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal.'' This... content in stainless steel weld metal. It updates the guide to remove references to outdated standards...

  17. Characterization of duplex stainless steel weld metals obtained by hybrid plasma-gas metal arc welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koray Yurtisik

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite its high efficiency, autogenous keyhole welding is not well-accepted for duplex stainless steels because it causes excessive ferrite in as-welded duplex microstructure, which leads to a degradation in toughness and corrosion properties of the material. Combining the deep penetration characteristics of plasma arc welding in keyhole mode and metal deposition capability of gas metal arc welding, hybrid plasma - gas metal arc welding process has considered for providing a proper duplex microstructure without compromising the welding efficiency. 11.1 mm-thick standard duplex stainless steel plates were joined in a single-pass using this novel technique. Same plates were also subjected to conventional gas metal arc and plasma arc welding processes, providing benchmarks for the investigation of the weldability of the material. In the first place, the hybrid welding process enabled us to achieve less heat input compared to gas metal arc welding. Consequently, the precipitation of secondary phases, which are known to be detrimental to the toughness and corrosion resistance of duplex stainless steels, was significantly suppressed in both fusion and heat affected zones. Secondly, contrary to other keyhole techniques, proper cooling time and weld metal chemistry were achieved during the process, facilitating sufficient reconstructive transformation of austenite in the ferrite phase.

  18. Assessment of Hot Crack Properties of Laser Welded Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Thomas Winther; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    2003-01-01

    Crack testing concerning small and fast solidifying laser welds in austenitic stainless steel has been studied. A set of methods has been applied to investigate alloy properties, including (1) Application of known information to predict solidification phases, (2) Weld metal solidification rate...... are given. Results from the solidification rate measurements had high variations. They do not show an expected correlation between the crack resistance and the solidification rate. The employment of pulsed seam welds is assessed not to be usable in the present measurement method. From evaluation of several...... crack tests, the Weeter spot weld test has been chosen to form a basis for the development of a practicable method to select specific alloys for welding applications. A new test, the Groove weld test was developed, which has reduced the time consumption and lightened the analysis effort considerably...

  19. Reactor Materials Program: Mechanical properties of irradiated Types 304 and 304L stainless steel weldment components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sindelar, R.L.; Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1991-12-01

    The vessels (reactor tanks) of the Savannah River Site nuclear production reactors constructed in the 1950`s are comprised of Type 304 stainless steel with Type 308 stainless steel weld filler. Irradiation exposure to the reactor tank sidewalls through reactor operation has caused a change in the mechanical properties of these materials. A database of as-irradiated mechanical properties for site-specific materials and irradiation conditions has been produced for reactor tank structural analyses and to quantify the effects of radiation-induced materials degradation for evaluating reactor service life. The data has been collected from the SRL Reactor Materials Program (RMP) irradiations and testing of archival stainless steel weldment components and from previous SRL programs to measure properties of irradiated reactor Thermal Shield weldments and reactor tank (R-tank) sidewall material. Irradiation programs of the RMP are designed to quantify mechanical properties at tank operating temperatures following irradiation to present and future tank wall maximum exposure conditions. The exposure conditions are characterized in terms of fast neutron fluence (E{sub n} > 0.1 MeV) and displacements per atom (dpa){sup 3}. Tensile properties, Charpy-V notch toughness, and elastic-plastic fracture toughness were measured for base, weld, and weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) weldment components from archival piping specimens following a Screening Irradiation in the University of Buffalo Reactor (UBR) and following a Full-Term Irradiation in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR).

  20. Reactor Materials Program: Mechanical properties of irradiated Types 304 and 304L stainless steel weldment components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sindelar, R.L.; Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1991-12-01

    The vessels (reactor tanks) of the Savannah River Site nuclear production reactors constructed in the 1950's are comprised of Type 304 stainless steel with Type 308 stainless steel weld filler. Irradiation exposure to the reactor tank sidewalls through reactor operation has caused a change in the mechanical properties of these materials. A database of as-irradiated mechanical properties for site-specific materials and irradiation conditions has been produced for reactor tank structural analyses and to quantify the effects of radiation-induced materials degradation for evaluating reactor service life. The data has been collected from the SRL Reactor Materials Program (RMP) irradiations and testing of archival stainless steel weldment components and from previous SRL programs to measure properties of irradiated reactor Thermal Shield weldments and reactor tank (R-tank) sidewall material. Irradiation programs of the RMP are designed to quantify mechanical properties at tank operating temperatures following irradiation to present and future tank wall maximum exposure conditions. The exposure conditions are characterized in terms of fast neutron fluence (E{sub n} > 0.1 MeV) and displacements per atom (dpa){sup 3}. Tensile properties, Charpy-V notch toughness, and elastic-plastic fracture toughness were measured for base, weld, and weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) weldment components from archival piping specimens following a Screening Irradiation in the University of Buffalo Reactor (UBR) and following a Full-Term Irradiation in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR).

  1. Studies of Hot Crack Properties of Laser Welded Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Thomas Winther

    During the present work crack testing concerning small and fast solidifying laser welds in austenitic stainless steel has been studied. A set of methods has been applied to investigate alloy properties, including ·Application of known information to predict solidification phases from the alloy...... investigated and recommendations are given. From studies of literature it is found that the austenitic stainless steels have lowest crack susceptibility by a solidification course leaving approximately 15% rest ferrite in the weld metal. The alloys properties and the solidification rate determines the amount...

  2. Solidification cracking in austenitic stainless steel welds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Shankar; T P S Gill; S L Mannan; S Sundaresan

    2003-06-01

    Solidification cracking is a significant problem during the welding of austenitic stainless steels, particularly in fully austenitic and stabilized compositions. Hot cracking in stainless steel welds is caused by low-melting eutectics containing impurities such as S, P and alloy elements such as Ti, Nb. The WRC-92 diagram can be used as a general guide to maintain a desirable solidification mode during welding. Nitrogen has complex effects on weld-metal microstructure and cracking. In stabilized stainless steels, Ti and Nb react with S, N and C to form low-melting eutectics. Nitrogen picked up during welding significantly enhances cracking, which is reduced by minimizing the ratio of Ti or Nb to that of C and N present. The metallurgical propensity to solidification cracking is determined by elemental segregation, which manifests itself as a brittleness temperature range or BTR, that can be determined using the varestraint test. Total crack length (TCL), used extensively in hot cracking assessment, exhibits greater variability due to extraneous factors as compared to BTR. In austenitic stainless steels, segregation plays an overwhelming role in determining cracking susceptibility.

  3. Measurement of local creep properties in stainless steel welds

    OpenAIRE

    Sakanashi, Y.; Gungor, S; Bouchard, J.

    2012-01-01

    A high temperature measurement system for creep deformation based on the digital image correlation (DIC) technique is described. The new system is applied to study the behaviour of a multi-pass welded joint in a high temperature tensile test and a load controlled creep test at 545°C. Spatially resolved tensile properties and time dependent creep deformation properties across a thick section type 316 stainless steel multi-pass welded joint are presented and discussed. Significantly lower creep...

  4. Weld Decay Recovery by Laser Beam Surfacing of Austenitic Stainless Steel Welded Joints

    OpenAIRE

    Isao, MASUMOTO; Takeshi, SHINODA; Toshimasa, HIRATE; Nagoya University, currently at Gifu Vocational Training College; Faculty of Engineering, Nagoya University; Nagoya University, currently at Toshiba Co. Ltd.

    1990-01-01

    This study is an attempt to improve corrosion resistance by laser beam surface treatment. AISI 304 type stainless steel welds were surface treated by laser and the effectivenesses of various treatment conditions were evaluated by acidic corrosion tests and metallurgical observation. It was found that laser treatment changed the morphology of carbide precipitates in the heat affected zone of AISI 304 austenitic steel MIG welded joints, and that it is possible to effect revovery from weld decay...

  5. Effect of A-TIG Welding Process on the Weld Attributes of Type 304LN and 316LN Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, M.

    2017-03-01

    The specific activated flux has been developed for enhancing the penetration performance of TIG welding process for autogenous welding of type 304LN and 316LN stainless steels through systematic study. Initially single-component fluxes were used to study their effect on depth of penetration and tensile properties. Then multi-component activated flux was developed which was found to produce a significant increase in penetration of 10-12 mm in single-pass TIG welding of type 304LN and 316LN stainless steels. The significant improvement in penetration achieved using the activated flux developed in the present work has been attributed to the constriction of the arc and as well as reversal of Marangoni flow in the molten weld pool. The use of activated flux has been found to overcome the variable weld penetration observed in 316LN stainless steel with welds compared to that of the welds produced by conventional TIG welding on the contrary the transverse strength properties of the 304LN and 316LN stainless steel welds produced by A-TIG welding exceeded the minimum specified strength values of the base metals. Improvement in toughness values were observed in 316LN stainless steel produced by A-TIG welding due to refinement in the weld microstructure in the region close to the weld center. Thus, activated flux developed in the present work has greater potential for use during the TIG welding of structural components made of type 304LN and 316LN stainless steels.

  6. Effect of A-TIG Welding Process on the Weld Attributes of Type 304LN and 316LN Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, M.

    2017-02-01

    The specific activated flux has been developed for enhancing the penetration performance of TIG welding process for autogenous welding of type 304LN and 316LN stainless steels through systematic study. Initially single-component fluxes were used to study their effect on depth of penetration and tensile properties. Then multi-component activated flux was developed which was found to produce a significant increase in penetration of 10-12 mm in single-pass TIG welding of type 304LN and 316LN stainless steels. The significant improvement in penetration achieved using the activated flux developed in the present work has been attributed to the constriction of the arc and as well as reversal of Marangoni flow in the molten weld pool. The use of activated flux has been found to overcome the variable weld penetration observed in 316LN stainless steel with welds compared to that of the welds produced by conventional TIG welding on the contrary the transverse strength properties of the 304LN and 316LN stainless steel welds produced by A-TIG welding exceeded the minimum specified strength values of the base metals. Improvement in toughness values were observed in 316LN stainless steel produced by A-TIG welding due to refinement in the weld microstructure in the region close to the weld center. Thus, activated flux developed in the present work has greater potential for use during the TIG welding of structural components made of type 304LN and 316LN stainless steels.

  7. Dissimilar material welding of rapidly solidified foil and stainless steel plate using underwater explosive welding technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hokamoto, Kazuyuki [Shock Wave and Condensed Matter Research Center, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan)], E-mail: hokamoto@mech.kumamoto-u.ac.jp; Nakata, Kazuhiro [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Mori, Akihisa [Shock Wave and Condensed Matter Research Center, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Tsuda, Shota [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University (Japan); Tsumura, Takuya [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Inoue, Akihisa [Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2009-03-20

    Rapidly solidified amorphous and metallic glass thin foils clad on a stainless steel base plate is attempted by employing underwater shock wave assembly. The conditions of the explosive welding are numerically analyzed and discussed based on the earlier welding limits. The thin foils successfully welded along the length of 50 mm show clear waves typically found in explosively welded interface. The interfacial microstructure characterized through optical and scanning electron microscopes shows evidence of excessive melting generated due to the trapping of metal jet in limited area.

  8. Studies of Hot Crack Properties of Laser Welded Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Thomas Winther

    During the present work crack testing concerning small and fast solidifying laser welds in austenitic stainless steel has been studied. A set of methods has been applied to investigate alloy properties, including ·Application of known information to predict solidification phases from the alloy...... composition. ·Weld metal solidification rate measurements for prediction of phases. ·Various crack tests to assess the crack susceptibility of alloys. ·A combination of the above for selection of suitable, weldable alloys. The possibility of using such specific methods for alloys and applications has been...... investigated and recommendations are given. From studies of literature it is found that the austenitic stainless steels have lowest crack susceptibility by a solidification course leaving approximately 15% rest ferrite in the weld metal. The alloys properties and the solidification rate determines the amount...

  9. New explosive welding technique to weld aluminum alloy and stainless steel plates using a stainless steel intermediate plate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hokamoto, K.; Fujita, M. (Kumamoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Izuma, T. (Asahi Chemical Industry Co., Ltd., Siga (Japan))

    1993-10-01

    Various aluminum alloys and stainless steel were explosively welded using a thin stainless steel intermediate plate inserted between the aluminum alloy driver and stainless steel base plates. At first. the velocity change of the driver plate with flying distance is calculated using finite-difference analysis. Since the kinetic energy lost by collision affects the amount of the fused layer generated at the interface between the aluminum alloy and stainless steel, the use of a thin stainless steel intermediate plate is effective for decreasing the energy dissipated by the collision. The interfacial zone at the welded interface is composed of a fine eutectic structure of aluminum and Fe[sub 4]Al[sub 13], and the explosive welding, process of this metal combination proceeds mainly by intensive deformation of the aluminum alloy. The weldable region for various aluminum alloys is decided by the change in collision velocity and kinetic energy lost by collision, and the weldable region is decreased with the increase in the strength of the aluminum alloy.

  10. Activated flux tungsten inert gas welding of 8 mm-thick AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘观辉; 刘美华; 易耀勇; 张宇鹏; 罗子艺; 许磊

    2015-01-01

    AISI 304 stainless steel plates were welded with activated flux tungsten inert gas (A-TIG) method by utilizing self-developed activated flux. It is indicated from the experimental results that for 8 mm-thick AISI 304 stainless steel plate, weld joint of full penetration and one-side welding with good weld appearance can be obtained in a single pass without groove preparation by utilizing A-TIG welding. Moreover, activated flux powders do not cause significant effect on the microstructure of TIG weld and the mechanical properties of A-TIG weld joints are also superior to those of C-TIG (conventional TIG) welding.

  11. Corrosion behavior of a welded stainless-steel orthopedic implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reclaru, L; Lerf, R; Eschler, P Y; Meyer, J M

    2001-02-01

    The corrosion behavior of combinations of materials used in an orthopedic implant: the spherical part (forged or forged and annealed) constituting the head, the weld (tungsten inert gas (TIG) or electron beam (EB) techniques), and the cylindrical part (annealed) constituting the shaft of a femoral prosthesis - has been investigated. Open-circuit potentials, potentiodynamic curves, Tafel slope, mixed potential theory and susceptibility to intergranular attack are electrochemical and chemical procedures selected for this work. Electrochemical measurements using a microelectrode have been made in the following zones: spherical part, cylindrical part, weld, and weld/sphere, and weld/shaft interfaces. To detect intergranular attack, the Strauss test has been used. At the interfaces, corrosion currents, measured (Icorr) and predicted (Icouple) are low, in the order of the pico- to nanoampere. The electrochemical behavior of the electron beam (EB) weld is better than that of the tungsten inert gas (TIG). Welds at interfaces can behave either anodically or cathodically. It is better if welds, which are sensitive parts of the femoral prosthesis, behave cathodically. In this way, the risk of starting localized corrosion (pitting, crevice or intergranular corrosion) from a galvanic couple, remains low. From this point of view, the sample with the EB weld offers the best behavior. All the other samples containing a TIG type of weld exhibit a less favorable behavior. The mechanical treatments (forged, and forged and annealed) of the steel sphere did not show any difference in the corrosion behavior. No intergranular corrosion has been observed at the weld/steel interface for unsensitized samples. With sensitized samples, however, a TIG sample has exhibited some localized intergranular corrosion at a distance of 500 microm along the weld/stainless steel (sphere) interface.

  12. Welding of titanium and stainless steel using the composite insert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherepanov, A. N.; Mali, V. I.; Orishich, A. M.; Malikov, A. G.; Drozdov, V. O.; Malyutina, Y. N.

    2016-11-01

    The paper concerns the possibility of obtaining a lasting permanent joint of dissimilar metals: technically pure titanium and stainless steel using laser welding and an intermediate composite insert. The insert was a four-layer composition of plates of steel, copper, niobium, and titanium welded by explosion. The material layers used in the insert prevented the molten steel and titanium from mixing, which excluded the formation of brittle intermetallic compounds, such as FeTi and Fe2Ti. The optimization of explosion welding parameters provided a high quality of the four-layer composition and the absence of defects in the area of the joint of insert plates. The results of strength tests showed that values of the ultimate strength and yield of the permanent joint with the composite insert welded by explosion are comparable to the strength characteristics of titanium.

  13. Weld Properties of a Free Machining Stainless Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. A. Brooks; S. H. Goods; C. V. Robino

    2000-08-01

    The all weld metal tensile properties from gas tungsten arc and electron beam welds in free machining austenitic stainless steels have been determined. Ten heats with sulfur contents from 0.04 to 0.4 wt.% and a wide range in Creq/Nieq ratios were studied. Tensile properties of welds with both processes were related to alloy composition and solidification microstructure. The yield and ultimate tensile strengths increased with increasing Creq/Nieq ratios and ferrite content, whereas the ductility measured by RA at fracture decreased with sulfur content. Nevertheless, a range in alloy compositions was identified that provided a good combination of both strength and ductility. The solidification cracking response for the same large range of compositions are discussed, and compositions identified that would be expected to provide good performance in welded applications.

  14. Laser welding of stainless steel weld filler metals at high cooling rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitek, J.M.; David, S.A.

    1988-01-01

    Several stainless steels were laser welded under conditions resulting in high cooling rates of the welds. Significant changes in the microstructures, compared to those produced by conventional welding techniques, were found. For alloys 304, 308, 309, 316 and 347, a general decrease in ferrite content with increasing cooling rate was found. For three alloys (304, 308, 347), a fully austenitic structure was obtained at the highest cooling rates. For alloys 312 and 446, the high cooling rates retarded the formation of austenite, resulting in higher ferrite contents and fully ferritic structures at the highest cooling rates. Only for alloy 310 was the microstructure after laser welding comparable to that found after conventional welding. The results are discussed in terms of their impact on the Schaeffler diagram and its applicability to laser welding. 11 refs., 7 figs.

  15. Mechanical characteristics of welded joints between different stainless steels grades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topolska, S.; Łabanowski, J.

    2017-08-01

    Investigation of mechanical characteristics of welded joints is one of the most important tasks that allow determining their functional properties. Due to the very high, still rising, cost of some stainless steels it is justified, on economic grounds, welding austenitic stainless steel with steels that are corrosion-resistant like duplex ones. According to forecasts the price of corrosion resistant steels stil can increase by 26 ÷ 30%. For technical reasons welded joints require appropriate mechanical properties such as: tensile strength, bending, ductility, toughness, and resistance to aggressive media. Such joints are applied in the construction of chemical tankers, apparatus and chemical plants and power steam stations. Using the proper binder makes possible the welds directly between the elements of austenitic stainless steels and duplex ones. It causes that such joits behave satisfactorily in service in such areas like maritime constructions and steam and chemical plants. These steels have high mechanical properties such as: the yield strength, the tensile strength and the ductility as well as the resistance to general corrosion media. They are resistant to both pitting and stress corrosions. The relatively low cost of production of duplex steels, in comparison with standard austenitic steels, is inter alia, the result of a reduced amount of scarce and expensive Nickel, which is seen as a further advantage of these steels.

  16. Welding of AA1050 aluminum with AISI 304 stainless steel by rotary friction welding process

    OpenAIRE

    Chen Ying An; Francisco Piorino Neto; Eder Paduan Alves

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to assess the development of solid state joints of dissimilar material AA1050 aluminum and AISI 304 stainless steel, which can be used in pipes of tanks of liquid propellants and other components of the Satellite Launch Vehicle. The joints were obtained by rotary friction welding process (RFW), which combines the heat generated from friction between two surfaces and plastic deformation. Tests were conducted with different welding process parameters. The results we...

  17. Corrosion of an austenite and ferrite stainless steel weld

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BRANIMIR N. GRGUR

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Dissimilar metal connections are prone to frequent failures. These failures are attributed to the difference in the mechanical properties across the weld, the coefficients of thermal expansion of the two types of steels and the resulting creep at the interface. For the weld analyzed in this research, it was shown that corrosion measurements can be used for a proper evaluation of the quality of weld material and for the prediction of whether or not the material, after the applied welding process, can be in service without failures. It was found that the corrosion of the weld analyzed in this research resulted from the simultaneous activity of different types of corrosion. In this study, electrochemical techniques including polarization and metallographic analysis were used to analyze the corrosion of a weld material of ferrite and austenitic stainless steels. Based on surface, chemical and electrochemical analyses, it was concluded that corrosion occurrence was the result of the simultaneous activity of contact corrosion (ferrite and austenitic material conjuction, stress corrosion (originating from deformed ferrite structure and inter-granular corrosion (due to chromium carbide precipitation. The value of corrosion potential of –0.53 V shows that this weld, after the thermal treatment, is not able to repassivate a protective oxide film.

  18. Development of Weld Metal Microstructures in Pulsed Laser Welding of Duplex Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirakhorli, F.; Malek Ghaini, F.; Torkamany, M. J.

    2012-10-01

    The microstructure of the weld metal of a duplex stainless steel made with Nd:YAG pulsed laser is investigated at different travel speeds and pulse frequencies. In terms of the solidification pattern, the weld microstructure is shown to be composed of two distinct zones. The presence of two competing heat transfer channels to the relatively cooler base metal and the relatively hotter previous weld spot is proposed to develop two zones. At high overlapping factors, an array of continuous axial grains at the weld centerline is formed. At low overlapping factors, in the zone of higher cooling rate, a higher percentage of ferrite is transformed to austenite. This is shown to be because with extreme cooling rates involved in pulsed laser welding with low overlapping, the ferrite-to-austenite transformation can be limited only to the grain boundaries.

  19. Accurate modelling of anisotropic effects in austenitic stainless steel welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowers, O. D.; Duxbury, D. J.; Drinkwater, B. W.

    2014-02-01

    The ultrasonic inspection of austenitic steel welds is challenging due to the formation of highly anisotropic and heterogeneous structures post-welding. This is due to the intrinsic crystallographic structure of austenitic steel, driving the formation of dendritic grain structures on cooling. The anisotropy is manifested as both a `steering' of the ultrasonic beam and the back-scatter of energy due to the macroscopic granular structure of the weld. However, the quantitative effects and relative impacts of these phenomena are not well-understood. A semi-analytical simulation framework has been developed to allow the study of anisotropic effects in austenitic stainless steel welds. Frequency-dependent scatterers are allocated to a weld-region to approximate the coarse grain-structures observed within austenitic welds and imaged using a simulated array. The simulated A-scans are compared against an equivalent experimental setup demonstrating excellent agreement of the Signal to Noise (S/N) ratio. Comparison of images of the simulated and experimental data generated using the Total Focusing Method (TFM) indicate a prominent layered effect in the simulated data. A superior grain allocation routine is required to improve upon this.

  20. Activating Flux Design for Laser Welding of Ferritic Stainless Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马立; 胡绳荪; 胡宝; 申俊琦; 王勇慧

    2014-01-01

    The behaviors of YAG laser welding process of ferritic stainless steel with activating fluxes were investi-gated in this study. Some conventional oxides, halides and carbonates were applied in laser welding. The results showed that the effect of oxides on the penetration depth was more remarkable. Most activating fluxes improved the penetration more effectively at low power than that at high power. The uniform design was adopted to arrange the formula of multicomponent activating fluxes, showing that the optimal formula can make the penetration depth up to 2.23 times as large as that without flux, including 50%ZrO2, 12.09%CaCO3, 10.43%CaO and 27.48%MgO. Through the high-speed photographs of welding process, CaF2 can minimize the plasma volume but slightly improve the pene-tration capability.

  1. Elemental distribution inside a heat treated stainless steel weld.

    CERN Multimedia

    2017-01-01

    The video shows the elemental distribution of Molybdenum (red), Manganese (green) and Chromium (blue) within a 20 μm × 20 μm × 20 μm region of a heat treated stainless steel weld. This data has been collected using 3D Focused Ion Beam Milling and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy, an elemental characterisation analysis technique. High resolution (75 nm voxel size) mapping is necessary to gain insight into the distribution of regions with distinct elemental composition (phases), which are shown in purple (sigma) and yellow (delta ferrite) in the video. These features have important implications for the toughness and the magnetic properties of the weld, especially at cryogenic temperatures. The video shows the individual slices which were collected in a direction perpendicular to the weld bead direction, followed by a 3D representation of the gauge volume.

  2. Research on CMT welding of nickel-based alloy with stainless steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Cold Metal Transfer (CMT) welding technique is a new welding technique introduced by Fronius company. CMT welding of nickel-based alloy with stainless steel was carried out using CuSi3 filler wire in this paper. Effects of welding parameters, including welding current, welding speed, etc, on weld surface appearance were tested. Microstructure and mechanical properties of CMT weld were studied. The results show that the thickness of interface reaction layer of the nickel-based alloy is 14.3μm, which is only 4.33% of base material. The weld is made up of two phases,α-copper and iron-based solid solution. Rupture occurs initially at the welded seam near the edge of stainless steel in shear test. The maximum shear strength of the CuSi3 welded joint is 184.9MPa.

  3. Weld solidification cracking in 304 to 204L stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hochanadel, Patrick W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lienert, Thomas J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Jesse N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Matthew Q [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-09-15

    A series of annulus welds were made between 304 and 304L stainless steel coaxial tubes using both pulsed laser beam welding (LBW) and pulsed gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). In this application, a change in process from pulsed LBW to pulsed gas tungsten arc welding was proposed to limit the possibility of weld solidification cracking since weldability diagrams developed for GTAW display a greater range of compositions that are not crack susceptible relative to those developed for pulsed LBW. Contrary to the predictions of the GTAW weldability diagram, cracking was found.This result was rationalized in terms of the more rapid solidification rate of the pulsed gas tungsten arc welds. In addition, for the pulsed LBW conditions, the material compositions were predicted to be, by themselves, 'weldable' according to the pulsed LBW weldability diagram. However, the composition range along the tie line connecting the two compositions passed through the crack susceptible range. Microstructurally, the primary solidification mode (PSM) of the material processed with higher power LBW was determined to be austenite (A), while solidification mode of the materials processed with lower power LBW apparently exhibited a dual PSM of both austenite (A) and ferrite-austenite (FA) within the same weld. The materials processed by pulsed GTAW showed mostly primary austenite solidification, with some regions of either primary austenite-second phase ferrite (AF) solidification or primary ferrite-second phase austenite (FA) solidification. This work demonstrates that variations in crack susceptibility may be realized when welding different heats of 'weldable' materials together, and that slight variations in processing can also contribute to crack susceptibility.

  4. Weld solidification cracking in 304 to 304L stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hochanadel, Patrick W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lienert, Thomas J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Jesse N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Raymond J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Matthew Q [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    A series of annulus welds were made between 304 and 304L stainless steel coaxial tubes using both pulsed laser beam welding (LBW) and pulsed gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). In this application, a change in process from pulsed LBW to pulsed gas tungsten arc welding was proposed to limit the possibility of weld solidification cracking since weldability diagrams developed for GTAW display a greater range of compositions that are not crack susceptible relative to those developed for pulsed LBW. Contrary to the predictions of the GTAW weldability diagram, cracking was found. This result was rationalized in terms of the more rapid solidification rate of the pulsed gas tungsten arc welds. In addition, for the pulsed LBW conditions, the material compositions were predicted to be, by themselves, 'weldable' according to the pulsed LBW weldability diagram. However, the composition range along the tie line connecting the two compositions passed through the crack susceptible range. Microstructurally, the primary solidification mode (PSM) of the material processed with higher power LBW was determined to be austenite (A), while solidification mode of the materials processed with lower power LBW apparently exhibited a dual PSM of both austenite (A) and ferrite-austenite (FA) within the same weld. The materials processed by pulsed GT A W showed mostly primary austenite solidification, with some regions of either primary austenite-second phase ferrite (AF) solidification or primary ferrite-second phase austenite (FA) solidification. This work demonstrates that variations in crack susceptibility may be realized when welding different heats of 'weldable' materials together, and that slight variations in processing can also contribute to crack susceptibility.

  5. Prediction of solidification and phase transformation in weld metals for welding of high performance stainless steels; Kotaishoku kotainetsu stainless koyo yosetsu kinzoku no gyoko hentai no yosoku gijutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koseki, T.; Inoue, H.; Morimoto, H.; Okita, S. [Nippon Steel Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1995-02-28

    Prediction technology is introduced on the solidification and transformation of weld metals used for high performance stainless steel. A model has been developed which uses Thermo Calc, a multiple balanced calculation program, as a means to analyze the solidification of multi-component alloys including the polyphase solidification such as eutectic and peritectic. Verification has been in progress concerning the adequacy of this model and the adaptability as a practical steel. The following are the prediction technologies for solidification and transformation which have been derived from experiments and applied to welding techniques: the effects of nitrogen on the solidification mode and residual {gamma}quantity of a welding metal that is required for controlling the welding/solidification of high nitrogen content {gamma}system stainless steel; the structural control of weld metal for high corrosion resistance high Mo stainless steel, in which high Ni and high Mo contents are indispensable for attaining the optimum structure; the structural control of weld metal for two-phase stainless steel containing Mo and N, in which it is essential to secure a high nitrogen content and a {delta}/{gamma}phase balance in a weld metal; and the precipitation prediction of intermetallic compound in a high alloy weld metal for a high alloy stainless steel, for which an explanation is there by Cieslak et al. based on the phase stability theory. 22 refs., 16 figs.

  6. 76 FR 67673 - Welded ASTM A-312 Stainless Steel Pipe From South Korea and Taiwan: Final Results of Expedited...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-02

    ... International Trade Administration Welded ASTM A-312 Stainless Steel Pipe From South Korea and Taiwan: Final... (the Department) initiated sunset reviews of the antidumping duty orders on welded ASTM A-312 stainless... the antidumping duty orders on welded ASTM A-312 stainless steel pipe from South Korea and...

  7. 76 FR 78614 - Welded ASTM A-312 Stainless Steel Pipe From South Korea and Taiwan: Continuation of Antidumping...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-19

    ... International Trade Administration Welded ASTM A-312 Stainless Steel Pipe From South Korea and Taiwan... welded ASTM A-312 stainless steel pipe from South Korea (Korea) and Taiwan would likely lead to... published the antidumping duty orders on welded ASTM A-312 stainless steel pipe from Korea and Taiwan.\\1\\...

  8. 78 FR 31574 - Welded Stainless Steel Pressure Pipe From Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam; Institution of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-24

    ... the Commission's Handbook on Filing Procedures, 76 FR 62092 (Oct. 6, 2011), available on the... COMMISSION Welded Stainless Steel Pressure Pipe From Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam; Institution of... materially retarded, by reason of imports from Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam of welded stainless...

  9. 75 FR 76025 - Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Japan, Korea, and Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-07

    ... party responded to the sunset review notice of initiation by the applicable deadline * * *'' (75 FR... COMMISSION Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Japan, Korea, and Taiwan AGENCY: United States... stainless steel butt-weld pipe fittings from Japan, Korea, and Taiwan would be likely to lead...

  10. 75 FR 53714 - Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Japan, Korea, and Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    ... imports of stainless steel butt-weld pipe fittings from Japan (53 FR 9787). On February 23, 1993, Commerce... on imports of stainless steel butt-weld pipe fittings from Japan, Korea, and Taiwan (65 FR 11766... Japan, Korea, and Taiwan (70 FR 61119). The Commission is now conducting third reviews to...

  11. 78 FR 45271 - Welded Stainless Steel Pressure Pipe From Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-26

    ... COMMISSION Welded Stainless Steel Pressure Pipe From Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam Determination On the... injured by reason of imports from Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam of welded stainless steel pressure pipe... pipe from Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam. Accordingly, effective May 16, 2013, the...

  12. The Effect of Welding Current and Composition of Stainless steel on the Panetration in GTAW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramazan Yılmaz

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, welding was performed on the plates of two different types of AISI 316 and AISI 316Ti austenitic stainless steels by GTAW (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding without using welding consumable in flat position. Automatic GTAW welding machine was used to control and obtain the exact values. The effects of welding currents used in welding process and the compositions of the stainless steels materials on the penetration were investigated. Weld bead size and shape such as bead width and dept were important considerations for penetration. Welding process was performed using various welding current values. The study showed that both welding parameters and composition of the stainless steels has influence on the penetration and It is increased with increasing of welding current. Besides, P/W rate of the weldments were influenced by the current and hardness values of the weld metal decrease with increasing welding current. The microstructure of the weld metal was also changed by variation of welding current.

  13. Effects of X-rays Radiation on AISI 304 Stainless Steel Weldings with AISI 316L Filler Material: A Study of Resistance and Pitting Corrosion Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Javier Cárcel-Carrasco

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates the effect of low-level ionizing radiation, namely X-rays, on the micro structural characteristics, resistance, and corrosion resistance of TIG-welded joints of AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel made using AISI 316L filler rods. The welds were made in two different environments: natural atmospheric conditions and a closed chamber filled with inert argon gas. The influence of different doses of radiation on the resistance and corrosion characteristics of the welds is analyzed. Welded material from inert Ar gas chamber TIG showed better characteristics and lesser irradiation damage effects.

  14. Tensile and Impact Properties of Shielded Metal Arc Welded AISI 409M Ferritic Stainless Steel Joints

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K.Shanmugam; A.K.Lakshminarayanan; V.Balasubramanian

    2009-01-01

    The present study is concerned with the effect of filler metals such as austenitic stainless steel, ferritic stainless steel and duplex stainless steel on tensile and impact properties of the ferritic stainless steel conforming to AISI 409M grade. Rolled plates of 4 mm thickness were used as the base material for preparing single pass butt welded joints. Tensile and impact properties, microhardness, microstructure and fracture surface morphology of the joints fabricated by austenitic stainless steel, ferritic stainless steel and duplex stainless steel filler metals were evaluated and the results were reported. From this investigation, it is found that the joints fabricated by duplex stainless steel filler metal showed higher tensile strength and hardness compared to the joints fabricated by austenitic and ferritic stainless steel filler metals. Joints fabricated by austenitic stainless steel filler metal exhibited higher ductility and impact toughness compared with the joints fabricated by ferritic stainless steel and duplex stainless steel filler metals.

  15. Hybrid/Tandem Laser-Arc Welding of Thick Low Carbon Martensitic Stainless Steel Plates =

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirakhorli, Fatemeh

    High efficiency and long-term life of hydraulic turbines and their assemblies are of utmost importance for the hydropower industry. Usually, hydroelectric turbine components are made of thick-walled low carbon martensitic stainless steels. The assembly of large hydroelectric turbine components has been a great challenge. The use of conventional welding processes involves typical large groove design and multi-pass welding to fill the groove which exposes the weld to a high heat input creating relatively large fusion zone and heat affected zone. The newly-developed hybrid/tandem laser-arc welding technique is believed to offer a highly competitive solution to improve the overall hydro-turbine performance by combining the high energy density and fast welding speed of the laser welding technology with the good gap bridging and feeding ability of the gas metal arc welding process to increase the productivity and reduce the consumable material. The main objective of this research work is to understand different challenges appearing during hybrid laser-arc welding (HLAW) of thick gauge assemblies of low carbon 13%Cr- 4%Ni martensitic stainless steel and find a practical solution by adapting and optimizing this relatively new welding process in order to reduce the number of welding passes necessary to fill the groove gap. The joint integrity was evaluated in terms of microstructure, defects and mechanical properties in both as-welded and post-welded conditions. A special focus was given to the hybrid and tandem laser-arc welding technique for the root pass. Based on the thickness of the low carbon martensitic stainless steel plates, this work is mainly focused on the following two tasks: • Single pass hybrid laser-arc welding of 10-mm thick low carbon martensitic stainless steel. • Multi-pass hybrid/tandem laser-arc welding of 25-mm thick martensitic stainless steel.

  16. Application of lap laser welding technology on stainless steel railway vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongxiao; Wang, Chunsheng; He, Guangzhong; Li, Wei; Liu, Liguo

    2016-10-01

    Stainless steel railway vehicles with so many advantages, such as lightweight, antirust, low cost of maintenance and simple manufacturing process, so the production of high level stainless steel railway vehicles has become the development strategy of European, American and other developed nations. The current stainless steel railway vehicles body and structure are usually assembled by resistance spot welding process. The weak points of this process are the poor surface quality and bad airtight due to the pressure of electrodes. In this study, the partial penetration lap laser welding process was investigated to resolve the problems, by controlling the laser to stop at the second plate in the appropriate penetration. The lap laser welding joint of stainless steel railway vehicle car body with partial penetration has higher strength and surface quality than those of resistance spot welding joint. The biggest problem of lap laser welding technology is to find the balance of the strength and surface quality with different penetrations. The mechanism of overlap laser welding of stainless steel, mechanical tests, microstructure analysis, the optimization of welding parameters, analysis of fatigue performance, the design of laser welding stainless steel railway vehicles structure and the development of non-destructive testing technology were systematically studied before lap laser welding process to be applied in manufacture of railway vehicles. The results of the experiments and study show that high-quality surface state and higher fatigue strength can be achieved by the partial penetration overlap laser welding of the side panel structure, and the structure strength of the car body can be higher than the requirements of En12663, the standard of structural requirements of railway vehicles bodies. Our company has produced the stainless steel subway and high way railway vehicles by using overlap laser welding technology. The application of lap laser welding will be a big

  17. Precipitation in CF-8M duplex stainless steel welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Ann M.; Cieslak, Michael J.; Savage, Warren F.

    1983-01-01

    Welds of CF-8M, a cast 316-type stainless steel which normally solidifies as primary delta-ferrite, were induced to solidify as primary austenite by the addition of nitrogen to the shielding gas used during gas tungsten arc welding. Those welds which experienced a shift in solidification mode formed eutectic ferrite during the terminal transient stage of solidification. Primary delta-ferrite and eutectic ferrite are differentiated by their location in the dendritic microstructure. The shape of the ferrite/austenite interface tends to be rounded for primary delta-ferrite and more angular for eutectic ferrite. Elemental profiles were plotted from STEM/EDS measurements across the two types of ferrite, and showed differences between the composition of the austenite immediately adjacent to the primary delta-ferrite, as opposed to the eutectic ferrite. In addition, while the primary delta-ferrite/austenite interfaces are largely devoid of precipitation, the eutectic ferrite/austenite interfaces are densely covered with small precipitates of x-phase. The mean stoichiometry of this phase has been calculated from STEM/EDS data on extraction replicas, and approximates Fe50Cr32Mo13Ni5. Intragranular inclusions were also examined and found to be complex, with most of them containing varying quantities of Mn, Si, and S.

  18. Introduction and Validation of Chromium-Free Consumables for Welding Stainless Steels. Version 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-14

    and ER308LSi consumables . The corresponding welding procedures are provided in Appendix E. Figure 5.8 shows the welding process involved in the...based welding consumable with high alloying content of Cu. Similar behavior would be expected in GMAW with other Ni-based consumables . The source of Ni... CONSUMABLES FOR WELDING STAINLESS STEELS Project Engineer: Kathleen Paulson, NAVFAC Engineering and Expeditionary Warfare Center Contractor: Dr. Boian

  19. Mechanism of laser welding on dissimilar metals between stainless steel and W-Cu alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kai Chen; Zhiyong Wang; Rongshi Xiao; Tiechuan Zuo

    2006-01-01

    @@ CO2 laser is employed to join a piece of powder metallurgical material (PMM) to a stainless steel in butt joint welding mode. The powder Ni35, as a filler powder, is used. The weld metal comes from three parts of stainless steel, powder Ni35, and Cu in W-Cu PMM. It is indicated that some parts of the W-Cu base metal are heated by laser and the metal Cu at the width of 0.06-0.12 mm from the edge is melted into the melting pool in the laser welding process. The formation of firm weld joint is just because that the melting liquid metal could fill the position occupied by metal Cu and surround the metal W granules fully. The analysis results indicate that the mechanism of the laser welding for stainless steel and W-Cu alloy is a special mode of fusion-brazing welding.

  20. Laser power coupling efficiency in conduction and keyhole welding of austenitic stainless steel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A K Nath; R Sridhar; P Ganesh; R Kaul

    2002-06-01

    Laser welding of thin sheets of AISI 304 stainless steel was carried out with high power CW CO2 laser. The laser power utilized in the welding process was estimated using the experimental results and the dimensionless parameter model for laser welding; and also the energy balance equation model. Variation of laser welding efficiency with welding speed and mode of welding was studied. Welding efficiency was high for high-speed conduction welding of thin sheets and also in keyhole welding process at high laser powers. Effect of pre-oxidization of the surface and powder as filler material on laser power coupling is also reported. The paper also discusses effect of microstructure on the cracking susceptibility of laser welds.

  1. Parametric optimization of seam welding of stainless steel (SS 304) sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnan, Muthuraman Pandi; Sait, Abdullah Naveen; Ravichandran, Manickam [Chendhuran College of Engineering and Technology, Pudukkottai, Tamilnadu (India)

    2015-06-01

    In the present study, seam welding process parameters were optimized for joining 306 stainless steel plates. Welding pressure, welding speed and welding temperature combinations were carefully selected with the objective of producing a weld joint with maximum impact strength and hardness. Taguchi technique was applied for optimizing the selected welding parameters. The factors used in this study consisted of pressure, welding speed and welding temperature, each of which had three levels in the study. L{sub 27} orthogonal array and corresponding levels were selected according to the aforementioned factors and experimental tests were performed. Signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio was used to evaluate the experimental results. The results indicate that the welding speed has the greatest influence on impact strength, followed by welding pressure and temperature. Experiments have also been conducted to validate the optimized parameters.

  2. Metallographic Characteristics of Stainless Steel Overlay Weld with Resistance to Hydrogen-Induced Disbonding : Study on a Stainless Steel Overlay Welding Process for Superior Resistance to Disbonding (Report 3)

    OpenAIRE

    Akiyoshi, FUJI; Etsuo, KUDO; Tomoyuki, TAKAHASHI; The Japan Steel Works, Ltd., Muroran Plant

    1986-01-01

    The metallographic characteristics of the disbanding resistant stainless steel overlay weld were studied and compared with those of the conventional overlay weld. It was found that the first layer overlay weld metal of the disbanding resistant overlay weld consisted of austenite and martensite after regular post-weld heat treatment. A coarse planar grain, which strongly affects the disbanding resistance of over-lay welds, scarcely existed in the disbanding resistant overlay weld. A higher wel...

  3. Optimization of Friction Welding Process Parameters for Joining Carbon Steel and Stainless Steel%Optimization of Friction Welding Process Parameters for Joining Carbon Steel and Stainless Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R Paventhan; P R Lakshminarayanan; V Balasubramanian

    2012-01-01

    Friction weIding is a solid state joining process used extensively currently owing to its advantages such as low heat input, high production efficiency, ease of manufacture, and environment friendliness. Materials difficult to be welded by fusion welding processes can be successfully welded by friction welding. An attempt was made to develop an empirical relationship to predict the tensile strength of friction welded AISI 1040 grade medium carbon steel and AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel, incorporating the process parameters such as friction pressure, forging pressure, friction time and forging time, which have great influence on strength of the joints. Response surface methodology was applied to optimize the friction welding process parameters to attain maximum tensile strength of the joint. The maximum tensile strength of 543 MPa could be obtained for the joints fabricated under the welding conditions of friction pressure of 90 MPa, forging pressure of 90 MPa, friction time of 6 s and forging time of 6 s.

  4. Hybrid Laser-arc Welding of 17-4 PH Martensitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Ma, Junjie; Atabaki, Mehdi Mazar; Pillai, Raju; Kumar, Biju; Vasudevan, Unnikrishnan; Sreshta, Harold; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2015-06-01

    17-4 PH stainless steel has wide applications in severe working conditions due to its combination of good corrosion resistance and high strength. The weldability of 17-4 PH stainless steel is challenging. In this work, hybrid laser-arc welding was developed to weld 17-4 PH stainless steel. This method was chosen based on its advantages, such as deep weld penetration, less filler materials, and high welding speed. The 17-4 PH stainless steel plates with a thickness of 19 mm were successfully welded in a single pass. During the hybrid welding, the 17-4 PH stainless steel was immensely susceptible to porosity and solidification cracking. The porosity was avoided by using nitrogen as the shielding gas. The nitrogen stabilized the keyhole and inhibited the formation of bubbles during welding. Solidification cracking easily occurred along the weld centerline at the root of the hybrid laser-arc welds. The microstructural evolution and the cracking susceptibility of 17-4 PH stainless steel were investigated to remove these centerline cracks. The results showed that the solidification mode of the material changed due to high cooling rate at the root of the weld. The rapid cooling rate caused the transformation from ferrite to austenite during the solidification stage. The solidification cracking was likely formed as a result of this cracking-susceptible microstructure and a high depth/width ratio that led to a high tensile stress concentration. Furthermore, the solidification cracking was prevented by preheating the base metal. It was found that the preheating slowed the cooling rate at the root of the weld, and the ferrite-to-austenite transformation during the solidification stage was suppressed. Delta ferrite formation was observed in the weld bead as well no solidification cracking occurred by optimizing the preheating temperature.

  5. Influence of PWHT on Toughness of High Chromium and Nickel Containing Martensitic Stainless Steel Weld Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divya, M.; Das, Chitta Ranjan; Mahadevan, S.; Albert, S. K.; Pandian, R.; Kar, Sujoy Kumar; Bhaduri, A. K.; Jayakumar, T.

    2015-06-01

    Commonly used 12.5Cr-5Ni consumable specified for welding of martensitic stainless steels is compared with newly designed 14.5Cr-5Ni consumable in terms of their suitability for repair welding of 410 and 414 stainless steels by gas tungsten arc welding process. Changes in microstructure and austenite evolution were investigated using optical, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction techniques and Thermo-Calc studies. Microstructure of as-welded 12.5Cr-5Ni weld metal revealed only lath martensite, whereas as-welded 14.5Cr-5Ni weld metal revealed delta-ferrite, retained austenite, and lath martensite. Toughness value of as-welded 12.5Cr-5Ni weld metal is found to be significantly higher (216 J) than that of the 14.5Cr-5Ni weld metal (15 J). The welds were subjected to different PWHTs: one at 923 K (650 °C) for 1, 2, 4 hours (single-stage PWHT) and another one at 923 K (650 °C)/4 h followed by 873 K (600 °C)/2 h or 873 K (600 °C)/4 h (two-stage heat treatment). Hardness and impact toughness of the weld metals were measured for these weld metals and correlated with the microstructure. The study demonstrates the importance of avoiding formation of delta-ferrite in the weld metal.

  6. Welding Stainless Steels and Refractory Metals Using Diode-Pumped Continuous Wave Nd:YAG Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, T A; Elmer, J W; Pong, R; Gauthier, M D

    2004-09-27

    This report provides an overview of a series of developmental welding studies performed on a 2.2 kW Rofin Sinar DY-022 Diode Pumped Continuous Wave (CW) Nd:YAG welder at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Several materials systems, ranging from refractory metals, such as commercially pure tantalum and vanadium, to austenitic stainless steels, including both 304L and 21-6-9 grades, are examined. Power input and travel speed are systematically varied during the welding of each materials system, and the width, depth, and cross sectional area of the resulting weld fusion zones are measured. These individual studies are undertaken in order to characterize the response of the welder to changes in these welding parameters for a range of materials and to determine the maximum depth of penetration of which this welder is capable in each materials system. The maximum weld depths, which are on the order of 5.4 mm, are observed in the 21-6-9 austenitic stainless steel at the maximum laser power setting (2200 W) and a slow travel speed (6.4 mm/sec). The next highest weld depth is observed in the 304L stainless steel, followed by that observed in the vanadium and, finally, in the tantalum. Porosity, which is attributed to the collapse of the keyhole during welding, is also observed in the welds produced in tantalum, vanadium, and 304L stainless steel. Only the 21-6-9 austenitic stainless steel welds displayed little or no porosity over the range of welding parameters. Comparisons with similar laser welding systems are also made for several of these same materials systems. When compared with the welds produced by these other systems, the LLNL system typically produces welds of an equivalent or slightly higher depth.

  7. Study on laser welding of stainless steel/copper dissimilar materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besnea, D.; Dontu, O.; Avram, M.; Spânu, A.; Rizescu, C.; Pascu, T.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper stainless steel/copper laser welding was investigated by controlling the processing parameters like welding speed and laser power. Welding the dissimilar materials of stainless steel and copper presents a series of problems. Differences in the physical properties of the two metals, including the melting point, thermal conductivity and thermal dilatation are the main reasons for obtaining an inappropriate laser welding bead. Particularly, the laser welding process of copper is complex because of the very high reflectivity of cooper and in almost situations it requires a specific surface pre-treatment. The main objective of the study conducted in this work was to laser weld a structure used in pressure measuring and control equipments. In order to satisfy the conditions imposed by the sensor manufacturer, the difficulty of obtaining flawless joints was represented by the very small dimensions of the parts to be welded especially of the elastic spiral thickness made of steel.

  8. Microbial corrosion in weld zone of stainless steel. Stainless ko yosetsubu no biseibutsu fushoku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, E. (National Chemical Laboratory for Industry, Tsukuba (Japan)); Nishimura, M. (Mitsubishi Kakoki Kaisha, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1992-10-15

    Microbial corrosion may happen wherever water is treated in many kinds of practical metal except titan, such as common steel, copper alloy, stainless steel, and high-nickel alloy. Although microbes causing microbial corrosion are not limited to specified microbes, specially affecting microbes are iron bacteria, iron-oxidizing bacteria, and sulfate-reducing bacteria. mechanism in these microbial corrosion, which is fundamentally caused through formation of oxygen concentration cells and production of metabolites, is complex and different by each microbe. In the case of stainless steel, the corrosion is located mainly in weld zones or heat affected zones, the shape of corrosion is like a pot, and the pattern is a type of pitting corrosion. Microbes are apt to adhere to the surface near weld zones, then oxygen becomes consequently insufficient beneath the surface, where the self-mending capacity of passive films is deprived, resulting in occurrence of pitting corrosion. For protection of microbial corrosion, it is essential to control water so that habitation of microbes is not formed. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Shielding gas effect on weld characteristics in arc-augmented laser welding process of super austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathiya, P.; Kumar Mishra, Mahendra; Soundararajan, R.; Shanmugarajan, B.

    2013-02-01

    A series of hybrid welding (gas metal arc welding-CO2 laser beam welding) experiments were conducted on AISI 904L super austenitic stainless steel sheet of 5 mm thickness. A detailed study of CO2 Laser-GMAW hybrid welding experiments with different shielding gas mixtures (100% He, 50% He+50% Ar, 50%He+45% Ar+5% O2, and 45% He+45% Ar+10% N2) were carried out and the results are presented. The resultant welds were subjected to detailed mechanical and microstructural characterization. Hardness testing revealed that the hardness values in the fusion zone were higher than the base material irrespective of the parameters. Transverse tensile testing showed that the joint efficiency is 100% with all the shielding gas experimented. Impact energy values of the welds were also found to be higher than the base material and the fractrograph taken in scanning electron microscope (SEM) has shown that the welds exhibited dimple fracture similar to the base material.

  10. Active flux tungsten inert gas welding of austenitic stainless steel AISI 304

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Klobčar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the effects of flux assisted tungsten inert gas (A-TIG welding of 4 (10 mm thick austenitic stainless steel EN X5CrNi1810 (AISI 304 in the butt joint. The sample dimensions were 300 ´ 50 mm, and commercially available active flux QuickTIG was used for testing. In the planned study the influence of welding position and weld groove shape was analysed based on the penetration depth. A comparison of microstructure formation, grain size and ferrit number between TIG welding and A-TIG welding was done. The A-TIG welds were subjected to bending test. A comparative study of TIG and A-TIG welding shows that A-TIG welding increases the weld penetration depth.

  11. High Power Laser Welding. [of stainless steel and titanium alloy structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banas, C. M.

    1972-01-01

    A review of recent developments in high power, carbon dixoide laser welding is presented. Deep penetration welding in stainless steel to 0.5-in. thick, high speed welding in thin gage rimmed steel and gas shielded welding in Ti-6Al-4V alloy are described. The effects of laser power, power density, focusing optics, gas-shielding techniques, material properties and weld speed on weld quality and penetration are discussed. It is shown that laser welding performance in thin materials is comparable to that of electron beams. It is further shown that high quality welds, as evidenced by NDT, mechanical and metal-lographic tests, can be achieved. The potential of the laser for industrial welding applications is indicated.

  12. Adhesion of Salmonella Enteritidis and Listeria monocytogenes on stainless steel welds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casarin, Letícia Sopeña; Brandelli, Adriano; de Oliveira Casarin, Fabrício; Soave, Paulo Azevedo; Wanke, Cesar Henrique; Tondo, Eduardo Cesar

    2014-11-17

    Pathogenic microorganisms are able to adhere on equipment surfaces, being possible to contaminate food during processing. Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes are important pathogens that can be transmitted by food, causing severe foodborne diseases. Most surfaces of food processing industry are made of stainless steel joined by welds. However currently, there are few studies evaluating the influence of welds in the microorganism's adhesion. Therefore the purpose of the present study was to investigate the adhesion of Salmonella Enteritidis and L. monocytogenes on surface of metal inert gas (MIG), and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding, as well as to evaluate the cell and surface hydrophobicities. Results demonstrated that both bacteria adhered to the surface of welds and stainless steel at same levels. Despite this, bacteria and surfaces demonstrated different levels of hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity, results indicated that there was no correlation between adhesion to welds and stainless steel and the hydrophobicity.

  13. Failure of Stainless Steel Welds Due to Microstructural Damage Prevented by In Situ Metallography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Manuel Salgado Lopez

    Full Text Available Abstract In stainless steels, microstructural damage is caused by precipitation of chromium carbides or sigma phase. These microconstituents are detrimental in stainless steel welds because they lead to weld decay. Nevertheless, they are prone to appear in the heat affected zone (HAZ microstructure of stainless steel welds. This is particularly important for repairs of industrial components made of austenitic stainless steel. Non-destructive metallography can be applied in welding repairs of AISI 304 stainless steel components where it is difficult to ensure that no detrimental phase is present in the HAZ microstructure. The need of microstructural inspection in repairs of AISI 304 is caused because it is not possible to manufacture coupons for destructive metallography, with which the microstructure can be analyzed. In this work, it is proposed to apply in situ metallography as non-destructive testing in order to identify microstructural damage in the microstructure of AISI 304 stainless steel welds. The results of this study showed that the external surface micrographs of the weldment are representative of HAZ microstructure of the stainless steel component; because they show the presence of precipitated metallic carbides in the grain boundaries or sigma phase in the microstructure of the HAZ.

  14. Evaluation of weld defects in stainless steel 316L pipe using guided wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Joon Hyun [School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jin Kyung [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Dongeui University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Stainless steel is a popular structural materials for liquid-hydrogen storage containers and piping components for transporting high-temperature fluids because of its superior material properties such as high strength and high corrosion resistance at elevated temperatures. In general, tungsten inert gas (TIG) arc welding is used for bonding stainless steel. However, it is often reported that the thermal fatigue cracks or initial defects in stainless steel after welding decreases the reliability of the material. The objective of this paper is to clarify the characteristics of ultrasonic guided wave propagation in relation to a change in the initial crack length in the welding zone of stainless steel. For this purpose, three specimens with different artificial defects of 5 mm, 10 mm, and 20 mm in stainless steel welds were prepared. By considering the thickness of s stainless steel pipe, special attention was given to both the L(0,1) mode and L(0,2) mode in this study. It was clearly found that the L(0,2) mode was more sensitive to defects than the L(0,1) mode. Based on the results of the L(0,1) and L(0,2) mode analyses, the magnitude ratio of the two modes was more effective than studying each mode when evaluating defects near the welded zone of stainless steel because of its linear relationship with the length of the artificial defect.

  15. Mechanical Properties of Stainless Steel Overlay Weld with Resistance to Hydrogen-Induced Disbonding : Study on a Stainless Steel Overlay Welding Process for Superior Resistance to Disbonding (Report 2)

    OpenAIRE

    Akiyoshi, FUJI; Etsuo, KUDO; Tomoyuki, TAKAHASHI; Kazuaki, MANO; The Japan Steel Works, Ltd., Muroran Plant

    1986-01-01

    The mechanical properties of the disbanding resistant stainless steel overlay weld were studied and compared with those of the conventional overlay weld. It was found that the mechanical properties of the disbanding resistant overlay weld were almost equal to those of the conventional overlay weld, whereas the residual sites in through-thickness direction at the bond between the first layer weld metal and the base metal was smaller than t/.al of the conventional overlay weld. This low residua...

  16. Nickel-based alloy/austenitic stainless steel dissimilar weld properties prediction on asymmetric distribution of laser energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Siyu; Ma, Guangyi; Chai, Dongsheng; Niu, Fangyong; Dong, Jinfei; Wu, Dongjiang; Zou, Helin

    2016-07-01

    A properties prediction method of Nickel-based alloy (C-276)/austenitic stainless steel (304) dissimilar weld was proposed and validated based on the asymmetric distribution of laser energy. Via the dilution level DC-276 (the ratio of the melted C-276 alloy), the relations between the weld properties and the energy offset ratio EC-276 (the ratio of the irradiated energy on the C-276 alloy) were built, and the effects of EC-276 on the microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of dissimilar welds were analyzed. The element distribution Cweld and EC-276 accorded with the lever rule due to the strong convention of the molten pool. Based on the lever rule, it could be predicted that the microstructure mostly consists of γ phase in each weld, the δ-ferrite phase formation was inhibited and the intermetallic phase (P, μ) formation was promoted with the increase of EC-276. The ultimate tensile strength σb of the weld joint could be predicted by the monotonically increasing cubic polynomial model stemming from the strengthening of elements Mo and W. The corrosion potential U, corrosion current density I in the active region and EC-276 also met the cubic polynomial equations, and the corrosion resistance of the dissimilar weld was enhanced with the increasing EC-276, mainly because the element Mo could help form a steady passive film which will resist the Cl- ingress.

  17. Effects of the Process Parameters on Austenitic Stainless Steel by TIG-Flux Welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Heryueh HUANG; Shengwen SHYU; Kuanghung TSENG; Changpin CHOU

    2006-01-01

    The effects of the process parameters of TIG (tungsten inset gas)-flux welding on the welds morphology,angular distortion, ferrite content and hot cracking in austenitic stainless steel were investigated. Autogenous TIG welding process was applied to the type 304 stainless steel through a thin layer of activating flux to produce a bead on plate welded joint. TiO2, SiO2, Fe2O3, Cr2O3, ZnO and MnO2 were used as the activating fluxes. The experimental results indicated that the TIG-flux welding can increase the weld depth/width ratio and reduce the HAZ (heat affected zone) range, and therefore the angular distortion of the weldment can be reduced. It was also found that the retained ferrite content within the TIG-flux welds is increased, and has a beneficial effect in reducing hot cracking tendency for stainless steels of the austenitic type weld metals. A plasma column constriction increases the current density at the anode spot and then a substantial increase in penetration of the TIG-flux welds can be obtained.

  18. Elucidation of high-power fibre laser welding phenomena of stainless steel and effect of factors on weld geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawahito, Yousuke; Mizutani, Masami; Katayama, Seiji [Joining and Welding Research Institute (JWRI), Osaka University, 11-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan)

    2007-10-07

    The fibre laser has been receiving great attention due to its advantages of high efficiency, high power and high beam quality, and is expected to be one of the most desirable heat sources for high-speed and deep-penetration welding. In this study, therefore, in bead-on-plate welding of Type 304 stainless steel plates with 6 kW fibre laser, the effects of laser power, power density and welding speed on the formation of sound welds were investigated with four laser beams of 130, 200, 360 and 560 {mu}m in spot diameter, and their welding phenomena were clarified with high-speed video cameras and an x-ray transmission real-time imaging system. The weld beads showed a keyhole type of penetration at any diameter, and the maximum penetration of 11 mm in depth was obtained at 130 {mu}m spot diameter and 0.6 m min{sup -1} welding speed. It was found that the laser power density exerted a remarkable effect on the increase in weld penetration at higher welding speeds, and sound partially penetrated welds without welding defects such as porosity, underfilling or humping could be produced at wide process windows of welding speeds between 4.5 and 10 m min{sup -1} with fibre laser beams of 360 {mu}m or 560 {mu}m in spot diameter. The high-speed video observation pictures and the x-ray images of the welding phenomena at 6 m min{sup -1} welding speed and 360 {mu}m spot diameter show that a sound weld bead was formed owing to a long molten pool suppressing and accommodating spattering and a stable keyhole generating no bubbles from the tip, respectively.

  19. Elucidation of high-power fibre laser welding phenomena of stainless steel and effect of factors on weld geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahito, Yousuke; Mizutani, Masami; Katayama, Seiji

    2007-10-01

    The fibre laser has been receiving great attention due to its advantages of high efficiency, high power and high beam quality, and is expected to be one of the most desirable heat sources for high-speed and deep-penetration welding. In this study, therefore, in bead-on-plate welding of Type 304 stainless steel plates with 6 kW fibre laser, the effects of laser power, power density and welding speed on the formation of sound welds were investigated with four laser beams of 130, 200, 360 and 560 µm in spot diameter, and their welding phenomena were clarified with high-speed video cameras and an x-ray transmission real-time imaging system. The weld beads showed a keyhole type of penetration at any diameter, and the maximum penetration of 11 mm in depth was obtained at 130 µm spot diameter and 0.6 m min-1 welding speed. It was found that the laser power density exerted a remarkable effect on the increase in weld penetration at higher welding speeds, and sound partially penetrated welds without welding defects such as porosity, underfilling or humping could be produced at wide process windows of welding speeds between 4.5 and 10 m min-1 with fibre laser beams of 360 µm or 560 µm in spot diameter. The high-speed video observation pictures and the x-ray images of the welding phenomena at 6 m min-1 welding speed and 360 µm spot diameter show that a sound weld bead was formed owing to a long molten pool suppressing and accommodating spattering and a stable keyhole generating no bubbles from the tip, respectively.

  20. Welding of AA1050 aluminum with AISI 304 stainless steel by rotary friction welding process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Ying An

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work was to assess the development of solid state joints of dissimilar material AA1050 aluminum and AISI 304 stainless steel, which can be used in pipes of tanks of liquid propellants and other components of the Satellite Launch Vehicle. The joints were obtained by rotary friction welding process (RFW, which combines the heat generated from friction between two surfaces and plastic deformation. Tests were conducted with different welding process parameters. The results were analyzed by means of tensile tests, Vickers microhardness, metallographic tests and SEM-EDX. The strength of the joints varied with increasing friction time and the use of different pressure values. Joints were obtained with superior mechanical properties of the AA1050 aluminum, with fracture occurring in the aluminum away from the bonding interface. The analysis by EDX at the interface of the junction showed that interdiffusion occurs between the main chemical components of the materials involved. The RFW proves to be a great method for obtaining joints between dissimilar materials, which is not possible by fusion welding processes.

  1. Heat sink welding of austenitic stainless steel pipes to control distortion and residual stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, H.; Albert, S.K.; Bhaduri, A.K. [Materials Technology Div., Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    2007-07-01

    Construction of India's Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) involves extensive welding of austenitic stainless steels pipes of different dimensions. Due to high thermal expansion coefficient and poor thermal conductivity of this class of steels, welding can result in significant distortion of these pipes. Attempts to arrest this distortion can lead to high levels of residual stresses in the welded parts. Heat sink welding is one of the techniques often employed to minimize distortion and residual stress in austenitic stainless steel pipe welding. This technique has also been employed to repair welding of the piping of the Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) subjected to radiation induced intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). In the present study, a comparison of the distortion in two pipe welds, one made with heat sink welding and another a normal welds. Pipes of dimensions 350{phi} x 250(L) x 8(t) mm was fabricated from 316LN plates of dimensions 1100 x 250 x 8 mm by bending and long seam (L-seam) welding by SMAW process. Two fit ups with a root gap of 2 mm, land height of 1mm and a groove angle of 70 were prepared using these pipes for circumferential seam (C-seam) welding. Dimensions at predetermined points in the fit up were made before and after welding to check the variation in radius, circumference and and ovality of the pipes. Root pass for both the pipe fit up were carried out using conventional GTAW process with 1.6 mm AWS ER 16-8-2 as consumables. Welding of one of the pipe fit ups were completed using conventions GTAW process while the other was completed using heat sink welding. For second and subsequent layers of welding using this process, water was sprayed at the root side of the joint while welding was in progress. Flow rate of the water was {proportional_to}6 1/minute. Welding parameters employed were same as those used for the other pipe weld. Results of the dimensional measurements showed that there is no circumferential shrinkage in

  2. Risk of lung cancer according to mild steel and stainless steel welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Anita Rath; Thulstrup, Ane Marie; Hansen, Johnni

    2007-01-01

    to welding fume particulates. METHODS: Male metal workers employed at least 1 year at one or more Danish stainless or mild steel industrial companies from 1964 through 1984 were enrolled in a cohort. Data on occupational and smoking history were obtained by questionnaire in 1986. Welders in the cohort who.......06-1.70)]. Among the stainless steel welders, the risk increased significantly with increasing accumulative welding particulate exposure, while no exposure-response relation was found for mild steel welders, even after adjustment for tobacco smoking and asbestos exposure. CONCLUSIONS: The study corroborates...... earlier findings that welders have an increased risk of lung cancer. While exposure-response relations indicate carcinogenic effects related to stainless steel welding, it is still unresolved whether the mild steel welding process carries a carcinogenic risk....

  3. UNS S31603 Stainless Steel Tungsten Inert Gas Welds Made with Microparticle and Nanoparticle Oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuang-Hung Tseng

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the difference between tungsten inert gas (TIG welding of austenitic stainless steel assisted by microparticle oxides and that assisted by nanoparticle oxides. SiO2 and Al2O3 were used to investigate the effects of the thermal stability and the particle size of the activated compounds on the surface appearance, geometric shape, angular distortion, delta ferrite content and Vickers hardness of the UNS S31603 stainless steel TIG weld. The results show that the use of SiO2 leads to a satisfactory surface appearance compared to that of the TIG weld made with Al2O3. The surface appearance of the TIG weld made with nanoparticle oxide has less flux slag compared with the one made with microparticle oxide of the same type. Compared with microparticle SiO2, the TIG welding with nanoparticle SiO2 has the potential benefits of high joint penetration and less angular distortion in the resulting weldment. The TIG welding with nanoparticle Al2O3 does not result in a significant increase in the penetration or reduction of distortion. The TIG welding with microparticle or nanoparticle SiO2 uses a heat source with higher power density, resulting in a higher ferrite content and hardness of the stainless steel weld metal. In contrast, microparticle or nanoparticle Al2O3 results in no significant difference in metallurgical properties compared to that of the C-TIG weld metal. Compared with oxide particle size, the thermal stability of the oxide plays a significant role in enhancing the joint penetration capability of the weld, for the UNS S31603 stainless steel TIG welds made with activated oxides.

  4. Welding of nickel free high nitrogen stainless steel: Microstructure and mechanical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffi Mohammed

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available High nitrogen stainless steel (HNS is a nickel free austenitic stainless steel that is used as a structural component in defence applications for manufacturing battle tanks as a replacement of the existing armour grade steel owing to its low cost, excellent mechanical properties and better corrosion resistance. Conventional fusion welding causes problems like nitrogen desorption, solidification cracking in weld zone, liquation cracking in heat affected zone, nitrogen induced porosity and poor mechanical properties. The above problems can be overcome by proper selection and procedure of joining process. In the present work, an attempt has been made to correlate the microstructural changes with mechanical properties of fusion and solid state welds of high nitrogen steel. Shielded metal arc welding (SMAW, gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW, electron beam welding (EBW and friction stir welding (FSW processes were used in the present work. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction were used to characterize microstructural changes. Hardness, tensile and bend tests were performed to evaluate the mechanical properties of welds. The results of the present investigation established that fully austenitic dendritic structure was found in welds of SMAW. Reverted austenite pools in the martensite matrix in weld zone and unmixed zones near the fusion boundary were observed in GTA welds. Discontinuous ferrite network in austenite matrix was observed in electron beam welds. Fine recrystallized austenite grain structure was observed in the nugget zone of friction stir welds. Improved mechanical properties are obtained in friction stir welds when compared to fusion welds. This is attributed to the refined microstructure consisting of equiaxed and homogenous austenite grains.

  5. Irradiation-Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking of Austenitic Stainless Steels in BWR Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Chopra, O. K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gruber, Eugene E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Shack, William J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2010-06-01

    The internal components of light water reactors are exposed to high-energy neutron irradiation and high-temperature reactor coolant. The exposure to neutron irradiation increases the susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels (SSs) to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) because of the elevated corrosion potential of the reactor coolant and the introduction of new embrittlement mechanisms through radiation damage. Various nonsensitized SSs and nickel alloys have been found to be prone to intergranular cracking after extended neutron exposure. Such cracks have been seen in a number of internal components in boiling water reactors (BWRs). The elevated susceptibility to SCC in irradiated materials, commonly referred to as irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC), is a complex phenomenon that involves simultaneous actions of irradiation, stress, and corrosion. In recent years, as nuclear power plants have aged and irradiation dose increased, IASCC has become an increasingly important issue. Post-irradiation crack growth rate and fracture toughness tests have been performed to provide data and technical support for the NRC to address various issues related to aging degradation of reactor-core internal structures and components. This report summarizes the results of the last group of tests on compact tension specimens from the Halden-II irradiation. The IASCC susceptibility of austenitic SSs and heat-affected-zone (HAZ) materials sectioned from submerged arc and shielded metal arc welds was evaluated by conducting crack growth rate and fracture toughness tests in a simulated BWR environment. The fracture and cracking behavior of HAZ materials, thermally sensitized SSs and grain-boundary engineered SSs was investigated at several doses (≤3 dpa). These latest results were combined with previous results from Halden-I and II irradiations to analyze the effects of neutron dose, water chemistry, alloy compositions, and welding and processing conditions on IASCC

  6. INVESTIGATING SPOT WELD GROWTH ON 304 AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL (2 mm SHEETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NACHIMANI CHARDE

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Resistance spot welding (RSW has revolutionized automotive industries since early 1970s for its mechanical assemblies. To date one mechanical assembly out five is welded using spot welding technology in various industries and stainless steel became very popular among common materials. As such this research paper analyses the spot weld growth on 304 austenitic stainless steels with 2mm sample sheets. The growth of a spot weld is primarily determined by its parameters such as current, weld time, electrode tip and force. However other factors such as electrode deformations, corrosions, dissimilar materials and material properties are also affect the weld growth. This paper is intended to analyze only the effects of nuggets growth due to the current and weld time increment with constant force and unchanged electrode tips. A JPC 75kVA spot welder was used to accomplish it and the welded samples were undergone tensile test, hardness test and metallurgical test to characterize the formation of weld nuggets.

  7. Acoustic emission detection of 316L stainless steel welded joints during intergranular corrosion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meng-yu Chai; Quan Duan; Wen-jie Bai; Zao-xiao Zhang; Xu-meng Xie

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzes acoustic emission (AE) signals during the intergranular corrosion (IGC) process of 316L stainless steel welded joints under different welding currents in boiling nitric acid. IGC generates several AE signals with high AE activity. The AE tech-nique could hardly distinguish IGC in stainless steel welded joints with different welding heat inputs. However, AE signals can effectively distinguish IGC characteristics in different corrosion stages. The IGC resistance of a heat-affected zone is lower than that of a weld zone. The initiation and rapid corrosion stages can be distinguished using AE results and microstructural analysis. Moreover, energy count rate and am-plitude are considered to be ideal parameters for characterizing different IGC processes. Two types of signals are detected in the rapid corro-sion stage. It can be concluded that grain boundary corrosion and grain separation are the AE sources of type 1 and type 2, respectively.

  8. Microstructural and electrochemical characterization of a thin-section dissimilar stainless steel weld joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bala Srinivasan, P. [Institute of Materials Research, GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH, D 21502, Geesthacht (Germany)], E-mail: bala.srinivasan@gkss.de; Satish Kumar, M.P. [Mabani Steel, Ras Al Khaimah (United Arab Emirates)

    2009-05-15

    A dissimilar weld joint consisting of an austenitic stainless steel (ASS) and a martensitic stainless steel (MSS) was obtained under optimized welding conditions by autogenous gas tungsten arc welding technique. The weld metal was found to be dual-phased, and was constituted with an austenite matrix containing interdendritic ferrite of about 3-8 EFN, with over-matching mechanical properties. Electrochemical behaviour assessment of the composite zone comprising the weld metal, HAZ of both ASS and MSS showed different general corrosion behaviour in neutral and acidic chloride solutions. However, in both the electrolytes, the pitting susceptibility of this region was the highest, and the MSSHAZ of this composite zone was the observed to be more vulnerable to localized damage.

  9. Effect of Autogenous Arc Welding Processes on Tensile and Impact Properties of Ferritic Stainless Steel Joints

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A K Lakshminarayanan; K Shanmugam; V Balasubramanian

    2009-01-01

    The effect of autogeneous arc welding processes on tensile and impact properties of ferritic stainless steel conformed to AISI 409M grade is studied.Rolled plates of 4 mm thickness have been used as the base material for preparing single pass butt welded jointa.Tensile and impact properties,microhardness,microstructure,and fracture surface morphology of continuous current gas tungsten arc welding (CCGTAW),pulsed current gas tungsten arc welding (PCGTAW),and plasma arc welding (PAW) joints are evaluated and the results are compared.It is found that the PAW joints of ferritic stainless steel show superior tensile and impact properties when compared with CCGTAW and PCGTAW joints,and this is mainly due to lower heat input,finer fusion zone grain diameter,and higher fusion zone hardness.

  10. Role of ferrite and phosphorus plus sulphur in the crack sensitivity of autogenously welded type 309 stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, Jr., F. J.

    1976-07-01

    A study on autogenous welding of Type 309 thin stainless steel sheet was made after experiencing cracking difficulties on several commercial heats. A relationship exists between the sum of the phosphorus plus sulfur, the ferrite control of the weld metal, and the crack sensitivity of autogenously made welds. A new simple weld test for thin-gage sheet is utilized for studying the susceptibility to cracking. A chemistry modification is suggested to alleviate possible weld cracking when autogenously welding this grade. The principles of crack sensitivity prediction could apply to other austenitic stainless steel types where chemistry limits are such that ferrite is possible.

  11. Mechanical Test on Irradiated Welding X80/X02 Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; Xin-peng; ZHANG; Chang-yi; NING; Guang-sheng; TONG; Zhen-feng; YANG; Wen

    2015-01-01

    The dedicated X80base metal,welding metal and X80/X02HAZ metal are irradiated in experimental reactor in order to evaluate the mechanical properties on the special condition.The cumulative irradiate dose(E>1 MeV)is 4×1016 cm-2,and irradiating temperature is below

  12. A Plasma Control and Gas Protection System for Laser Welding of Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Thomas Winther; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    1997-01-01

    A prototype shield gas box with different plasma control nozzles have been investigated for laser welding of stainless steel (AISI 316). Different gases for plasma control and gas protection of the weld seam have been used. The gas types, welding speed and gas flows show the impact on process...... stability and protection against oxidation. Also oxidation related to special conditions at the starting edge has been investigated. The interaction between coaxial and plasma gas flow show that the coaxial flow widens the band in which the plasma gas flow suppresses the metal plasma. In this band the welds...

  13. Active flux tungsten inert gas welding of austenitic stainless steel AISI 304

    OpenAIRE

    Klobčar, D.; J. Tušek; Bizjak, M.; S. Simončič; V. Lešer

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the effects of flux assisted tungsten inert gas (A-TIG) welding of 4 (10) mm thick austenitic stainless steel EN X5CrNi1810 (AISI 304) in the butt joint. The sample dimensions were 300 ´ 50 mm, and commercially available active flux QuickTIG was used for testing. In the planned study the influence of welding position and weld groove shape was analysed based on the penetration depth. A comparison of microstructure formation, grain size and ferrit number between TIG welding a...

  14. NDE of explosion welded copper stainless steel first wall mock-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taehtinen, S.; Kauppinen, P.; Jeskanen, H.; Lahdenperae, K.; Ehrnsten, U. [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland). Materials and Structural Integrity

    1997-04-01

    The study showed that reflection type C-mode scanning acoustic microscope (C-SAM) and internal ultrasonic inspection (IRIS) equipment can be applied for ultrasonic examination of copper stainless steel compound structures of ITER first wall mock-ups. Explosive welding can be applied to manufacture fully bonded copper stainless steel compound plates. However, explosives can be applied only for mechanical tightening of stainless steel cooling tubes within copper plate. If metallurgical bonding between stainless steel tubes and copper plate is required Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) method can be applied. (orig.)

  15. Acoustic emisson and ultrasonic wave characteristics in TIG-welded 316 stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin Kyung; Lee, Joon Hyun; Lee, Sang Pill; Son, In Su; Bae, Dong Su

    2014-05-01

    A TIG welded 316 stainless steel materials will have a large impact on the design and the maintenance of invessel components including pipes used in a nuclear power plant, and it is important to clear the dynamic behavior in the weld part of stainless steel. Therefore, nondestructive techniques of acoustic emission (AE) and ultrasonic wave were applied to investigate the damage behavior of welded stainless steel. The velocity and attenuation ratio of the ultrasonic wave at each zone were measured, and a 10 MHz sensor was used. We investigated the relationship between dynamic behavior and AE parameters analysis and derived the optimum parameters to evaluate the damage degree of the specimen. By measuring the velocity and the attenuation of an ultrasonic wave propagating each zone of the welded stainless steel, the relation of the ultrasonic wave and metal structure at the base metal, heat affected zone (HAZ) metal and weld metal is also discussed. The generating tendency of cumulated counts is similar to that of the load curve. The attenuation ratios from the ultrasonic test results were 0.2 dB/mm at the base zone, and 0.52 dB/mm and 0.61 dB/mm at the HAZ zone and weld zone, respectively.

  16. Effect of Welding Processes on Tensile and Impact Properties, Hardness and Microstructure of AISI 409M Ferritic Stainless Joints Fabricated by Duplex Stainless Steel Filler Metal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A K Lakshminarayanan; K Shanmugam; V Balasubramanian

    2009-01-01

    The effect of welding processes such as shielded metal arc welding, gas metal arc welding and gas tungsten arc welding on tensile and impact properties of the ferritic stainless steel conforming to AISI 409M grade is studied. Rolled plates of 4 mm thickness were used as the base material for preparing single pass butt welded joints. Tensile and impact properties, microhardness, microstructure and fracture surface morphology of the welded joints have been evaluated and the results are compared. From this investigatio.n, it is found that gas tungsten arc welded joints of ferritic stainless steel have superior tensile and impact properties compared with shielded metal are and gas metal arc welded joints and this is mainly due to the presence of finer grains in fusion zone and heat affected zone.

  17. A temperature dependent slip factor based thermal model for friction stir welding of stainless steel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Selvaraj

    2013-12-01

    This paper proposes a new slip factor based three-dimensional thermal model to predict the temperature distribution during friction stir welding of 304L stainless steel plates. The proposed model employs temperature and radius dependent heat source to study the thermal cycle, temperature distribution, power required, the effect of process parameters on heat generation per mm length of the weld and peak temperature during the friction stir welding process. Simulations of friction stir welding process were carried out on 304L stainless steel workpieces for various rotational and welding speeds. The predicted thermal cycle, power required and temperature distributions were found to be in good agreement with the experimental results. The heat generation per mm length of weld and peak temperature were found to be directly proportional to rotational speed and inversely proportional to welding speed. The rate of increase in heat generation per mm length of the weld and peak temperature are found to be higher at lower rotational speeds and lower at higher rotational speed. The heat generation during friction stir welding was found to be 80.8 % at shoulder, 16.1 % at pin side and 3.1 % at the bottom of the pin.

  18. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of 21-6-9 Stainless Steel Electron Beam Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmer, John W.; Ellsworth, G. Fred; Florando, Jeffrey N.; Golosker, Ilya V.; Mulay, Rupalee P.

    2017-04-01

    Welds can either be stronger or weaker than the base metals that they join depending on the microstructures that form in the fusion and heat-affected zones of the weld. In this paper, weld strengthening in the fusion zone of annealed 21-6-9 stainless steel is investigated using cross-weld tensile samples, hardness testing, and microstructural characterization. Due to the stronger nature of the weld, the cross-weld tensile tests failed in the base metal and were not able to generate true fusion zone mechanical properties. Nanoindentation with a spherical indenter was instead used to predict the tensile behavior for the weld metal. Extrapolation of the nanoindentation results to higher strains was performed using the Steinberg-Guinan and Johnson-Cook strength models, and the results can be used for weld strength modeling purposes. The results illustrate how microstructural refinement and residual ferrite formation in the weld fusion zone can be an effective strengthener for 21-6-9 stainless steel.

  19. Thermocapillary and arc phenomena in stainless steel welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, S.W.

    1993-10-01

    Goal was to study effect of power level and distribution on thermocapiilary-induced weld shape and of arc factors on weld shape. Thermocapillarity was apparent in both conduction mode EB welds and GTA welds, particularly in the former. A non-Gaussian arc distribution is suggested for accounting for the differences between the twoss processes. At higher current levels (200--300 A), plasma shear force also contributes to weld shape development. Evidence suggests that thermocapillary flow reversal is not a factor in normal GTA welds; EDB flow reversal occurs only at high power density levels where the keyhole mode is present.

  20. Linear friction welding of AISI 316L stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhamji, Imran, E-mail: imran.bhamji@postgrad.manchester.ac.uk [Manchester Materials Science Centre, University of Manchester, Grosvenor Street, M1 7HS (United Kingdom); Preuss, Michael [Manchester Materials Science Centre, University of Manchester, Grosvenor Street, M1 7HS (United Kingdom); Threadgill, Philip L. [Formerly with TWI Ltd., Cambridge, UK (now retired) (United Kingdom); Moat, Richard J. [Manchester Materials Science Centre, University of Manchester, Grosvenor Street, M1 7HS (United Kingdom); Addison, Adrian C. [TWI Ltd., Cambridge (United Kingdom); Peel, Matthew J. [University of Bristol, Queens Building, University Walk, Bristol BS8 1TR (United Kingdom)

    2010-12-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Linear friction welding is a feasible process for joining AISI316L. {yields} Most welds had tensile strengths superior to the parent material. {yields} Welding parameters had a significant impact on weld microstructure. {yields} Control of microstructure by controlling welding parameters is a process benefit. - Abstract: Linear friction welding is a solid state joining process established as a niche technology for the joining of aeroengine bladed disks. However, the process is not limited to this application, and therefore the feasibility of joining a common engineering austenitic steel, AISI 316L, has been explored. It was found that mechanically sound linear friction welds could be produced in 316L, with tensile properties in most welds exceeding those of the parent material. The mechanical properties of the welds were also found to be insensitive to relatively large changes in welding parameters. Texture was investigated in one weld using high energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction. Results showed a strong {l_brace}1 1 1{r_brace}< 1 1 2 > type texture at the centre of the weld, which is a typical shear texture in face centre cubic materials. Variations in welding parameters were seen to have a significant impact on the microstructures of welds. This was particularly evident in the variation of the fraction of delta ferrite, in the thermo-mechanically affected zone of the welds, with different process parameters. Analysis of the variation in delta ferrite, with different welding parameters, has produced some interesting insights into heat generation and dissipation during the process. It is hoped that a greater understanding of the process could help to make the parameter optimisation process, when welding 316L as well as other materials, more efficient.

  1. Analysis of Sensitization Profile in Medium Chromium Ferritic Stainless Steel (FSS Welds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammed Olawale Hakeem Amuda

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The sensitization features in FSS welds are discussed in the present work. The welds were produced on a 1.5mm thick plate of 16wt%Cr ferritic stainless steel conforming to AISI 430 commercial steel grade, using TIG torch in argon environment at a heat flux between 1008W and 1584W and speed between 2.5mm/s and 3.5mm/s. The sensitization was evaluated by electrolytic etching of the weld cross sections in 10% oxalic acid. The characterization of the weld section for sensitization indicates that the size of the sensitized zone increases in direct proportion to the quantum of the heat input (combination of heat flux and welding speed. Microstructural analysis suggests that sensitization is promoted in the welds when the processing conditions (heat flux and welding speed restricts the transformation occurring during cooling through the dual phase region, i.e. the welding conditions that promote transformation of delta ferrite (δ to austenite (γ during cooling cycle can prevent sensitization in the FSS welds and such conditions found in this investigation correspond to welding with a heat flux in the range 1008W to 1296W  and speed 3mm/s to 3.5mm/s. These conditions of heat fluxes and welding speeds correspond to heat inputs in the range 288-432J/mm.

  2. Heat transfer and fluid flow during laser spot welding of 304 stainless steel

    CERN Document Server

    He, X; Debroy, T

    2003-01-01

    The evolution of temperature and velocity fields during laser spot welding of 304 stainless steel was studied using a transient, heat transfer and fluid flow model based on the solution of the equations of conservation of mass, momentum and energy in the weld pool. The weld pool geometry, weld thermal cycles and various solidification parameters were calculated. The fusion zone geometry, calculated from the transient heat transfer and fluid flow model, was in good agreement with the corresponding experimentally measured values for various welding conditions. Dimensional analysis was used to understand the importance of heat transfer by conduction and convection and the roles of various driving forces for convection in the weld pool. During solidification, the mushy zone grew at a rapid rate and the maximum size of the mushy zone was reached when the pure liquid region vanished. The solidification rate of the mushy zone/liquid interface was shown to increase while the temperature gradient in the liquid zone at...

  3. An Overview of Irradiation Creep of Stainless Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Woo Seog [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    This paper reviewed systematically a state-of-art of irradiation creep for stainless steels to provide a background information for performing irradiation creep tests and establishing the creep model for advanced domestic steels effectively. An irradiation creep model of SFR core materials is necessary to apply to the fuel cladding and assembly materials of domestic SFR reactor system. The document of in-reactor irradiation creep has been obtained by investing a long time and large-scale cost using limited experimental research reactors. This paper will provide the knowledge to understand the irradiation creep and to obtain the background information of advanced domestic steels, so that it hopes to practically apply for timely producing the documents of irradiation creep of advanced domestic steels necessary for the national SFR program.

  4. Microstructure and high temperature properties of the dissimilar weld between ferritic stainless steel and carbon steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong Kil; Hong, Seung Gab; Kang, Ki Bong; Kang, Chung Yun

    2009-10-01

    Dissimilar joints between STS441, a ferritic stainless steel, and SS400, a carbon steel, were welded by GMAW (Gas Metal Arc Welding) using STS430LNb as a welding wire. The fracture behavior of the dissimilar weld was analyzed by a microstructural observation and thermo-mechanical tests. Martensite was formed at the region between SS400 and the weld metal because the Cr and Nb content in this region decreased due to the dilution of SS400 carbon steel during welding. According to results from a high temperature tensile test with a specimen aged at 900 °C, it was found that the tensile strength of the dissimilar weld at high temperature was equal to that of STS441 base metal and the formation of martensite had little influence on tensile strength of the dissimilar weld at high temperature. However, in the case of thermal fatigue resistance, the dissimilar weld had an inferior thermal fatigue life to STS441 because of the presence of martensite and the softened region around the interface between the dissimilar weld metal and SS400.

  5. Mechanical property variation within Inconel 82/182 dissimilar metal weld between low alloy steel and 316 stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Changheui [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1, Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: chjang@kaist.ac.kr; Lee, Jounghoon [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1, Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Sung Kim, Jong; Eun Jin, Tae [Korea Power Engineering Company, 360-9 Mabuk-ri, Guseong-eup, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 449-713 (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-09-15

    In several locations of pressurized water reactors, dissimilar metal welds using Inconel welding wires are used to join the low alloy steel components to stainless-steel pipes. Because of the existence of different materials and chemistry variation within welds, mechanical properties, such as tensile and fracture properties, are expected to show spatial variation. For design and integrity assessment of the dissimilar welds, these variations should be evaluated. In this study, dissimilar metal welds composed of low alloy steel, Inconel 82/182 weld, and stainless steel were prepared by gas tungsten arc welding and shielded metal arc welding techniques. Microstructures were observed using optical and electron microscopes. Typical dendrite structures were observed in Inconel 82/182 welds. Tensile tests using standard and mini-sized specimens and micro-hardness tests were conducted to measure the variation in strength along the thickness of the weld as well as across the weld. In addition, fracture toughness specimens were taken at the bottom, middle, and top of the welds and tested to evaluate the spatial variation along the thickness. It was found that while the strength is about 50-70 MPa greater at the bottom of the weld than at the top of the weld, fracture toughness values at the top of the weld are about 70% greater than those at the bottom of the weld.

  6. Microstructural characterization in dissimilar friction stir welding between 304 stainless steel and st37 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jafarzadegan, M. [Department of Materials Eng., Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box: 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding Production Technology, School of Materials Science and Eng., Harbin Institute of Technology, P.O. Box: 150001, Harbin (China); Feng, A.H. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding Production Technology, School of Materials Science and Eng., Harbin Institute of Technology, P.O. Box: 150001, Harbin (China); Abdollah-zadeh, A., E-mail: zadeh@modares.ac.ir [Department of Materials Eng., Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box: 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Saeid, T. [Advanced Materials Research Center, Sahand University of Technology, P.O. Box: 51335-1996, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shen, J. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding Production Technology, School of Materials Science and Eng., Harbin Institute of Technology, P.O. Box: 150001, Harbin (China); Assadi, H. [Department of Materials Eng., Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box: 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    In the present study, 3 mm-thick plates of 304 stainless steel and st37 steel were welded together by friction stir welding at a welding speed of 50 mm/min and tool rotational speed of 400 and 800 rpm. X-ray diffraction test was carried out to study the phases which might be formed in the welds. Metallographic examinations, and tensile and microhardness tests were used to analyze the microstructure and mechanical properties of the joint. Four different zones were found in the weld area except the base metals. In the stir zone of the 304 stainless steel, a refined grain structure with some features of dynamic recrystallization was evidenced. A thermomechanically-affected zone was characterized on the 304 steel side with features of dynamic recovery. In the other side of the stir zone, the hot deformation of the st37 steel in the austenite region produced small austenite grains and these grains transformed to fine ferrite and pearlite and some products of displacive transformations such as Widmanstatten ferrite and martensite by cooling the material after friction stir welding. The heat-affected zone in the st37 steel side showed partially and fully refined microstructures like fusion welding processes. The recrystallization in the 304 steel and the transformations in the st37 steel enhanced the hardness of the weld area and therefore, improved the tensile properties of the joint. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FSW produced sound welds between st37 low carbon steel and 304 stainless steel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The SZ of the st37 steel contained some products of allotropic transformation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The material in the SZ of the 304 steel showed features of dynamic recrystallization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The finer microstructure in the SZ increased the hardness and tensile strength.

  7. Effect of welding process on the microstructure and properties of dissimilar weld joints between low alloy steel and duplex stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Lu, Min-xu; Zhang, Lei; Chang, Wei; Xu, Li-ning; Hu, Li-hua

    2012-06-01

    To obtain high-quality dissimilar weld joints, the processes of metal inert gas (MIG) welding and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding for duplex stainless steel (DSS) and low alloy steel were compared in this paper. The microstructure and corrosion morphology of dissimilar weld joints were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM); the chemical compositions in different zones were detected by energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS); the mechanical properties were measured by microhardness test, tensile test, and impact test; the corrosion behavior was evaluated by polarization curves. Obvious concentration gradients of Ni and Cr exist between the fusion boundary and the type II boundary, where the hardness is much higher. The impact toughness of weld metal by MIG welding is higher than that by TIG welding. The corrosion current density of TIG weld metal is higher than that of MIG weld metal in a 3.5wt% NaCl solution. Galvanic corrosion happens between low alloy steel and weld metal, revealing the weakness of low alloy steel in industrial service. The quality of joints produced by MIG welding is better than that by TIG welding in mechanical performance and corrosion resistance. MIG welding with the filler metal ER2009 is the suitable welding process for dissimilar metals jointing between UNS S31803 duplex stainless steel and low alloy steel in practical application.

  8. Numerical simulation on temperature field for resistance spot welding of non-equal thickness stainless steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王春生; 陈勇; 韩凤武; 陆培德; 姜中辉

    2003-01-01

    An axisymmetric finite element model is developed to simulate the temperature field of resistant spot welding according to the process characters of nugget formation of non-equal stainless steel sheets. A simulation method of the interaction of electrical and thermal factors is presented. The spot welding process of nugget formation is simulated using hard and soft welding technique norms. The heating characters of soft and hard norms determine the differences in the process of nugget formation and determine the finally shape and offset of nugget. Experimental verification shows that the model prediction agrees well with the practical.

  9. Hydrogen Embrittlement of Welded Joint Made of Supermartensitic Stainless Steel in Environment Containing Sulfane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonšta P.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The work is focused on evaluation of resistance of the welded joint made of supermartensitic 13Cr6Ni2.5Mo stainless steel to sulfide stress cracking. Testing method A and solution B in accordance with NACE TM 0177 were used. All the testing samples were ruptured in a very short time interval but welded joint samples were fractured primarily in the weld metal or in heat affected zone and not in the basic material. Material analysis of samples were made with use of a ZEISS NEOPHOT 32 light microscope and a JEOL 6490LV scanning electron microscope.

  10. Porosity in millimeter-scale welds of stainless steel : three-dimensional characterization.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aagesen, Larry K. (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI); Madison, Jonathan D.

    2012-05-01

    A variety of edge joints utilizing a continuous wave Nd:YAG laser have been produced and examined in a 304-L stainless steel to advance fundamental understanding of the linkage between processing and resultant microstructure in high-rate solidification events. Acquisition of three-dimensional reconstructions via micro-computed tomography combined with traditional metallography has allowed for qualitative and quantitative characterization of weld joints in a material system of wide use and broad applicability. The presence, variability and distribution of porosity, has been examined for average values, spatial distributions and morphology and then related back to fundamental processing parameters such as weld speed, weld power and laser focal length.

  11. Effect of Welding Current and Time on the Microstructure, Mechanical Characterizations, and Fracture Studies of Resistance Spot Welding Joints of AISI 316L Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kianersi, Danial; Mostafaei, Amir; Mohammadi, Javad

    2014-09-01

    This article aims at investigating the effect of welding parameters, namely, welding current and welding time, on resistance spot welding (RSW) of the AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel sheets. The influence of welding current and welding time on the weld properties including the weld nugget diameter or fusion zone, tensile-shear load-bearing capacity of welded materials, failure modes, energy absorption, and microstructure of welded nuggets was precisely considered. Microstructural studies and mechanical properties showed that the region between interfacial to pullout mode transition and expulsion limit is defined as the optimum welding condition. Electron microscopic studies indicated different types of delta ferrite in welded nuggets including skeletal, acicular, and lathy delta ferrite morphologies as a result of nonequilibrium phases, which can be attributed to a fast cooling rate in the RSW process. These morphologies were explained based on Shaeffler, WRC-1992, and pseudo-binary phase diagrams. The optimum microstructure and mechanical properties were achieved with 8-kA welding current and 4-cycle welding time in which maximum tensile-shear load-bearing capacity or peak load of the welded materials was obtained at 8070 N, and the failure mode took place as button pullout with tearing from the base metal. Finally, fracture surface studies indicated that elongated dimples appeared on the surface as a result of ductile fracture in the sample welded in the optimum welding condition.

  12. Effect of irradiation temperature on microstructural changes in self-ion irradiated austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hyung-Ha; Ko, Eunsol; Lim, Sangyeob; Kwon, Junhyun; Shin, Chansun

    2017-09-01

    We investigated the microstructural and hardness changes in austenitic stainless steel after Fe ion irradiation at 400, 300, and 200 °C using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and nanoindentation. The size of the Frank loops increased and the density decreased with increasing irradiation temperature. Radiation-induced segregation (RIS) was detected across high-angle grain boundaries, and the degree of RIS increases with increasing irradiation temperature. Ni-Si clusters were observed using high-resolution TEM in the sample irradiated at 400 °C. The results of this work are compared with the literature data of self-ion and proton irradiation at comparable temperatures and damage levels on stainless steels with a similar material composition with this study. Despite the differences in dose rate, alloy composition and incident ion energy, the irradiation temperature dependence of RIS and the size and density of radiation defects followed the same trends, and were very comparable in magnitude.

  13. Effects of post weld heat treatments on the microstructure and mechanical properties of dissimilar weld of supermartensític stainless steel

    OpenAIRE

    Tavares,Sérgio Souto Maior; Rodrigues,Clóvis Ribeiro; Pardal,Juan Manuel; Barbosa,Edvan da Silva; Abreu,Hamilton Ferreira Gomes de

    2014-01-01

    A supermartensitic stainless steel with composition 12.2%Cr-5.8%Ni-1.90%Mo-0.028%C (%wt.) was welded by gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) with superduplex stainless steel filler metal. Post weld heat treatments (PWHT) at 650 ºC for different periods of time were performed in order to decrease the hardness in the heat affected zone (HAZ). This paper deals with the effect of these heat treatments on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the joint. Mechanical strength of the weld jo...

  14. Plasma Control and Gas Protection System for Laser Welding of Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Thomas Winther; Olsen, Flemming Ove; Petersen, Kaj

    1997-01-01

    An integrated plasma nozzle and a shield gas box have been investigated for laser welding of 2 mm stainless steel sheets. Different gases for plasma control and gas protection of the weld seam have been used. The gas types, welding speed and coaxial and plasma flow show the impact on process...... stability and protection against oxidation. Also oxidation related to special conditions at the starting edge has been investigated. The interaction between coaxial and plasma gas flow show that the coaxial flow widens the band in which the plasma gas flow suppresses the metal plasma. In this band the welds...... are oxide free. With 2.7 kW power welds have been performed at 3000 mm/min with Ar / He (70%/30%) as coaxial, plasma and shield gas....

  15. A Plasma Control and Gas Protection System for Laser Welding of Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Thomas Winther; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    1997-01-01

    A prototype shield gas box with different plasma control nozzles have been investigated for laser welding of stainless steel (AISI 316). Different gases for plasma control and gas protection of the weld seam have been used. The gas types, welding speed and gas flows show the impact on process...... stability and protection against oxidation. Also oxidation related to special conditions at the starting edge has been investigated. The interaction between coaxial and plasma gas flow show that the coaxial flow widens the band in which the plasma gas flow suppresses the metal plasma. In this band the welds...... are oxide free. With 2.7 kW power welds have been performed at 4000 mm/min with Ar / He (70%/30%) as coaxial, plasma and shield gas....

  16. Effect of Electrode Types on the Solidification Cracking Susceptibility of Austenitic Stainless Steel Weld Metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. U. Anaele

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of electrode types on the solidification cracking susceptibility of austenitic stainless steel weld metal was studied. Manual metal arc welding method was used to produce the joints with the tungsten inert gas welding serving as the control. Metallographic and chemical analyses of the fusion zones of the joints were conducted. Results indicate that weldments produced from E 308-16 (rutile coated, E 308-16(lime-titania coated electrodes, and TIG welded joints fall within the range of 1.5≤Creq./Nieq.≤1.9 and solidified with a duplex mode and were found to be resistant to solidification cracking. The E 308-16 weld metal had the greatest resistance to solidification cracking. Joints produced from E 310-16 had Creq./Nieq. ratio 1.9 and solidified with ferrite mode. It had a low resistance to solidification cracking.

  17. Mechanical and physical properties of irradiated type 348 stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beeston, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    A type 348 stainless steel in-pile tube irradiated to a fluence of 3 x 10/sup 22/ n/cm/sup 2/, E > 1 MeV (57 dpa), was destructively examined. The service had resulted in a maximum total creep of 1.8% at the high fluence. The metal temperature ranged between 623 and 652/sup 0/K, hence the thermal creep portion of the total was negligible. Total creep was greater than had been anticipated from creep data for austenitic stainless steels irradiated in other reactors. The objectives of the destructive examination were to determine the service-induced changes of mechanical and physical properties, and to assess the possibility of adverse effects of both these changes and the greater total creep on the prospective service life of other tubes.

  18. Effect of the purging gas on properties of Ti stabilized AISI 321 stainless steel TIG welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taban, Emel; Kaluc, Erdinc; Aykan, T. Serkan [Kocaeli Univ. (Turkey). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2014-07-01

    Gas purging is necessary to provide a high quality of stainless steel pipe welding in order to prevent oxidation of the weld zone inside the pipe. AISI 321 stabilized austenitic stainless steel pipes commonly preferred in refinery applications have been welded by the TIG welding process both with and without the use of purging gas. As purging gases, Ar, N{sub 2}, Ar + N{sub 2} and N{sub 2} + 10% H{sub 2} were used, respectively. The aim of this investigation is to detect the effect of purging gas on the weld joint properties such as microstructure, corrosion, strength and impact toughness. Macro sections and microstructures of the welds were investigated. Chemical composition analysis to obtain the nitrogen, oxygen and hydrogen content of the weld root was done by Leco analysis. Ferrite content of the beads including root and cap passes were measured by a ferritscope. Vickers hardness (HV10) values were obtained. Intergranular and pitting corrosion tests were applied to determine the corrosion resistance of all welds. Type of the purging gas affected pitting corrosion properties as well as the ferrite content and nitrogen, oxygen and hydrogen contents at the roots of the welds. Any hot cracking problems are not predicted as the weld still solidifies with ferrite in the primary phase as confirmed by microstructural and ferrite content analysis. Mechanical testing showed no significant change according to the purge gas. AISI 321 steel and 347 consumable compositions would permit use of nitrogen rich gases for root shielding without a risk of hot cracking.

  19. Modelling grain-scattered ultrasound in austenitic stainless-steel welds: A hybrid model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowers, O.; Duxbury, D. J.; Velichko, A.; Drinkwater, B. W.

    2015-03-01

    The ultrasonic inspection of austenitic stainless steel welds can be challenging due to their coarse grain structure, charaterised by preferentially oriented, elongated grains. The anisotropy of the weld is manifested as both a `steering' of the beam and the back-scatter of energy due to the macroscopic granular structure of the weld. However, the influence of weld properties, such as mean grain size and orientation distribution, on the magnitude of scattered ultrasound is not well understood. A hybrid model has been developed to allow the study of grain-scatter effects in austenitic welds. An efficient 2D Finite Element (FE) method is used to calculate the complete scattering response from a single elliptical austenitic grain of arbitrary length and width as a function of the specific inspection frequency. A grain allocation model of the weld is presented to approximate the characteristic structures observed in austenitic welds and the complete scattering behaviour of each grain calculated. This model is incorporated into a semi-analytical framework for a single-element inspection of a typical weld in immersion. Experimental validation evidence is demonstrated indicating excellent qualitative agreement of SNR as a function of frequency and a minimum SNR difference of 2 dB at a centre frequency of 2.25 MHz. Additionally, an example Monte-Carlo study is presented detailing the variation of SNR as a function of the anisotropy distribution of the weld, and the application of confidence analysis to inform inspection development.

  20. Effects of stop-start features on residual stresses in a multipass austenitic stainless steel weld

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turski, M., E-mail: Mark.Turski@magnesium-elektron.com [School of Materials, University of Manchester, Grosvenor Street, Manchester M1 7HS (United Kingdom); Francis, J.A. [School of Materials, University of Manchester, Grosvenor Street, Manchester M1 7HS (United Kingdom)] [Materials Engineering, Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Hurrell, P.R. [Rolls-Royce Plc., Raynesway, Derby DE21 7XX (United Kingdom); Bate, S.K. [Serco Technical Services, Birchwood Park, Warrington, Cheshire WA3 6GA (United Kingdom); Hiller, S. [Materials Engineering, Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Withers, P.J. [School of Materials, University of Manchester, Grosvenor Street, Manchester M1 7HS (United Kingdom)

    2012-01-15

    In this article we describe experiments that characterise and quantify the localised perturbations in residual stress associated with both ramped and abrupt stop-start features in a multipass weld. Residual stress distributions in AISI Grade 304L/308L stainless steel groove-welded specimens, containing weld interruptions that were introduced in a controlled manner, have been characterised using both neutron diffraction and the incremental deep hole drilling method. The extent to which the localised stresses associated with the interruptions were annealed by overlayed passes was also assessed. The results suggest that, regardless of the type of interruption, there can be significant localised increases in residual stress if the stop-start feature is left exposed. If further weld passes are deposited, then the localised increases in stress are likely to persist if the interruption was abrupt, whereas for a ramped interruption they may be dissipated. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In this study the residual stress-field surrounding weld interruptions was measured. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Localised stresses were found to increase at weld interruptions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both ramped and abrupt weld interruptions were investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer After subsequent weld passes, localised stresses persisted for abrupt interruptions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer After subsequent weld passes, localised stresses dissipated for ramped interruptions.

  1. 78 FR 62583 - Welded Stainless Pressure Pipe From Malaysia, Thailand, and the Socialist Republic of Vietnam...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-22

    ... of Antidumping Duty Investigations, 78 FR 35253 (June 12, 2013). On September 19, 2013, more than 25... International Trade Administration Welded Stainless Pressure Pipe From Malaysia, Thailand, and the Socialist..., 2013. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Charles Riggle (Malaysia), Brandon ] Farlander (Thailand),...

  2. 77 FR 39735 - Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Italy, Malaysia, and the Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-05

    ...)] Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Italy, Malaysia, and the Philippines Determination On the basis..., Malaysia, and the Philippines would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material injury to... Pipe Fittings from Italy, Malaysia, and the Philippines: Inv. Nos. 731-TA-865-867 (Second...

  3. Prediction of microsegregation and pitting corrosion resistance of austenitic stainless steel welds by modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilpas, M. [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland). Materials and Structural Integrity

    1999-07-01

    The present study focuses on the ability of several computer models to accurately predict the solidification, microsegregation and pitting corrosion resistance of austenitic stainless steel weld metals. Emphasis was given to modelling the effect of welding speed on solute redistribution and ultimately to the prediction of weld pitting corrosion resistance. Calculations were experimentally verified by applying autogenous GTA- and laser processes over the welding speed range of 0.1 to 5 m/min for several austenitic stainless steel grades. Analytical and computer aided models were applied and linked together for modelling the solidification behaviour of welds. The combined use of macroscopic and microscopic modelling is a unique feature of this work. This procedure made it possible to demonstrate the effect of weld pool shape and the resulting solidification parameters on microsegregation and pitting corrosion resistance. Microscopic models were also used separately to study the role of welding speed and solidification mode in the development of microsegregation and pitting corrosion resistance. These investigations demonstrate that the macroscopic model can be implemented to predict solidification parameters that agree well with experimentally measured values. The linked macro-micro modelling was also able to accurately predict segregation profiles and CPT-temperatures obtained from experiments. The macro-micro simulations clearly showed the major roles of weld composition and welding speed in determining segregation and pitting corrosion resistance while the effect of weld shape variations remained negligible. The microscopic dendrite tip and interdendritic models were applied to welds with good agreement with measured segregation profiles. Simulations predicted that weld inhomogeneity can be substantially decreased with increasing welding speed resulting in a corresponding improvement in the weld pitting corrosion resistance. In the case of primary austenitic

  4. The Effect of Constant and Pulsed Current Gas Tungsten Arc Welding on Joint Properties of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel to 316L Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neissi, R.; Shamanian, M.; Hajihashemi, M.

    2016-05-01

    In this study, dissimilar 316L austenitic stainless steel/2205 duplex stainless steel (DSS) joints were fabricated by constant and pulsed current gas tungsten arc welding process using ER2209 DSS as a filler metal. Microstructures and joint properties were characterized using optical and electron scanning microscopy, tensile, Charpy V-notch impact and micro-hardness tests, and cyclic polarization measurements. Microstructural observations confirmed the presence of chromium nitride and delta ferrite in the heat-affected zone of DSS and 316L, respectively. In addition, there was some deviation in the austenite/ferrite ratio of the surface welding pass in comparison to the root welding pass. Besides having lower pitting potential, welded joints produced by constant current gas tungsten arc welding process, consisted of some brittle sigma phase precipitates, which resulted in some impact energy reduction. The tensile tests showed high tensile strength for the weld joints in which all the specimens were broken in 316L base metal.

  5. Crack growth rates and fracture toughness of irradiated austenitic stainless steels in BWR environments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, O. K.; Shack, W. J.

    2008-01-21

    In light water reactors, austenitic stainless steels (SSs) are used extensively as structural alloys in reactor core internal components because of their high strength, ductility, and fracture toughness. However, exposure to high levels of neutron irradiation for extended periods degrades the fracture properties of these steels by changing the material microstructure (e.g., radiation hardening) and microchemistry (e.g., radiation-induced segregation). Experimental data are presented on the fracture toughness and crack growth rates (CGRs) of wrought and cast austenitic SSs, including weld heat-affected-zone materials, that were irradiated to fluence levels as high as {approx} 2x 10{sup 21} n/cm{sup 2} (E > 1 MeV) ({approx} 3 dpa) in a light water reactor at 288-300 C. The results are compared with the data available in the literature. The effects of material composition, irradiation dose, and water chemistry on CGRs under cyclic and stress corrosion cracking conditions were determined. A superposition model was used to represent the cyclic CGRs of austenitic SSs. The effects of neutron irradiation on the fracture toughness of these steels, as well as the effects of material and irradiation conditions and test temperature, have been evaluated. A fracture toughness trend curve that bounds the existing data has been defined. The synergistic effects of thermal and radiation embrittlement of cast austenitic SS internal components have also been evaluated.

  6. Friction Welding For Cladding Applications: Processing, Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Inertia Friction Welds of Stainless Steel to Low Carbon Steel and Evaluation of Wrought and Welded Austenitic Stainless Steels for Cladding Applications in Acidchloride Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Switzner, Nathan

    Friction welding, a solid-state joining method, is presented as a novel alternative process step for lining mild steel pipe and forged components internally with a corrosion resistant (CR) metal alloy for petrochemical applications. Currently, fusion welding is commonly used for stainless steel overlay cladding, but this method is costly, time-consuming, and can lead to disbonding in service due to a hard martensite layer that forms at the interface due to partial mixing at the interface between the stainless steel CR metal and the mild steel base. Firstly, the process parameter space was explored for inertia friction butt welding using AISI type 304L stainless steel and AISI 1018 steel to determine the microstructure and mechanical properties effects. A conceptual model for heat flux density versus radial location at the faying surface was developed with consideration for non-uniform pressure distribution due to frictional forces. An existing 1 D analytical model for longitudinal transient temperature distribution was modified for the dissimilar metals case and to account for material lost to the flash. Microstructural results from the experimental dissimilar friction welds of 304L stainless steel to 1018 steel were used to discuss model validity. Secondly, the microstructure and mechanical property implications were considered for replacing the current fusion weld cladding processes with friction welding. The nominal friction weld exhibited a smaller heat softened zone in the 1018 steel than the fusion cladding. As determined by longitudinal tensile tests across the bond line, the nominal friction weld had higher strength, but lower apparent ductility, than the fusion welds due to the geometric requirements for neck formation adjacent to a rigid interface. Martensite was identified at the dissimilar friction weld interface, but the thickness was smaller than that of the fusion welds, and the morphology was discontinuous due to formation by a mechanism of solid

  7. Friction Stir Welding of Stainless Steel to Al Alloy: Effect of Thermal Condition on Weld Nugget Microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, M.; Gupta, R. K.; Husain, M. M.

    2014-02-01

    Joining of dissimilar materials is always a global challenge. Sometimes it is unavoidable to execute multifarious activities by a single component. In the present investigation, 6061 aluminum alloy and 304 stainless steel were joined by friction stir welding (FSW) at different tool rotational rates. Welded joints were characterized in optical and scanning electron microscopes. Reaction products in the stirring zone (SZ) were confirmed through X-ray diffraction. Joint strength was evaluated by tensile testing. It was found that the increment in average heat input and temperature at the weld nugget (WN) facilitated iron enrichment near the interface. Enhancement in the concentration of iron shifted the nature of intermetallics from the Fe2Al5 to Fe-rich end of the Fe-Al binary phase diagram. The peak microhardness and ultimate tensile strength were found to be maxima at the intermediate tool rotational rate, where Fe3Al and FeAl2 appeared along with Fe2Al5.

  8. Evaluation of irradiation hardening of proton irradiated stainless steels by nanoindentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yabuuchi, Kiyohiro, E-mail: kiyohiro.yabuuchi@qse.tohoku.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-01-2 Aramaki-Aza-Aoba, Aobaku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8579 (Japan); Kuribayashi, Yutaka [Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-01-2 Aramaki-Aza-Aoba, Aobaku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8579 (Japan); Nogami, Shuhei, E-mail: shuhei.nogami@qse.tohoku.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-01-2 Aramaki-Aza-Aoba, Aobaku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8579 (Japan); Kasada, Ryuta, E-mail: r-kasada@iae.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Hasegawa, Akira, E-mail: akira.hasegawa@qse.tohoku.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-01-2 Aramaki-Aza-Aoba, Aobaku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8579 (Japan)

    2014-03-15

    Ion irradiation experiments are useful for investigating irradiation damage. However, estimating the irradiation hardening of ion-irradiated materials is challenging because of the shallow damage induced region. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to prove usefulness of nanoindentation technique for estimation of irradiation hardening for ion-irradiated materials. SUS316L austenitic stainless steel was used and it was irradiated by 1 MeV H{sup +} ions to a nominal displacement damage of 0.1, 0.3, 1, and 8 dpa at 573 K. The irradiation hardness of the irradiated specimens were measured and analyzed by Nix–Gao model. The indentation size effect was observed in both unirradiated and irradiated specimens. The hardness of the irradiated specimens changed significantly at certain indentation depths. The depth at which the hardness varied indicated that the region deformed by the indenter had reached the boundary between the irradiated and unirradiated regions. The hardness of the irradiated region was proportional to the inverse of the indentation depth in the Nix–Gao plot. The bulk hardness of the irradiated region, H{sub 0}, estimated by the Nix–Gao plot and Vickers hardness were found to be related to each other, and the relationship could be described by the equation, HV = 0.76H{sub 0}. Thus, the nanoindentation technique demonstrated in this study is valuable for measuring irradiation hardening in ion-irradiated materials.

  9. EFFECTS OF ELECTRODE DEFORMATION OF RESISTANCE SPOT WELDING ON 304 AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL WELD GEOMETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nachimani Charde

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The resistance spot welding process is accomplished by forcing huge amounts of current flow from the upper electrode tip through the base metals to the lower electrode tip, or vice versa or in both directions. A weld joint is established between the metal sheets through fusion, resulting in a strong bond between the sheets without occupying additional space. The growth of the weld nugget (bond between sheets is therefore determined from the welding current density; sufficient time for current delivery; reasonable electrode pressing force; and the area provided for current delivery (electrode tip. The welding current and weld time control the root penetration, while the electrode pressing force and electrode tips successfully accomplish the connection during the welding process. Although the welding current and weld time cause the heat generation at the areas concerned (electrode tip area, the electrode tips’ diameter and electrode pressing forces also directly influence the welding process. In this research truncated-electrode deformation and mushrooming effects are observed, which result in the welded areas being inconsistent due to the expulsion. The copper to chromium ratio is varied from the tip to the end of the electrode whilst the welding process is repeated. The welding heat affects the electrode and the electrode itself influences the shape of the weld geometry.

  10. The studies of irradiation hardening of stainless steel reactor internals under proton and xenon irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Chaoliang; Zhang, Lu; Qian, Wangjie; Mei, Jinna; Liu, Xiang Bing [Suzhou Nuclear Power Research Institute, Suzuhou (China)

    2016-06-15

    Specimens of stainless steel reactor internals were irradiated with 240 keV protons and 6 MeV Xe ions at room temperature. Nanoindentation constant stiffness measurement tests were carried out to study the hardness variations. An irradiation hardening effect was observed in proton- and Xe-irradiated specimens and more irradiation damage causes a larger hardness increment. The Nix-Gao model was used to extract the bulk-equivalent hardness of irradiation-damaged region and critical indentation depth. A different hardening level under H and Xe irradiation was obtained and the discrepancies of displacement damage rate and ion species may be the probable reasons. It was observed that the hardness of Xe-irradiated specimens saturate at about 2 displacement/atom (dpa), whereas in the case of proton irradiation, the saturation hardness may be more than 7 dpa. This discrepancy may be due to the different damage distributions.

  11. Low Cycle Fatigue behavior of SMAW welded Alloy28 superaustenitic stainless steel at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kchaou, Y., E-mail: yacinekchaou@yahoo.fr [Institut Pprime, Département Physique et Mécanique des Matériaux, UPR 3346 CNRS ISAE-ENSMA Université de Poitiers, Téléport 2, 1, avenue Clément Ader, BP 40109, F – 86961 Futuroscope Chasseneuil Cedex (France); Laboratoire de Génie des Matériaux et Environnement (LGME), ENIS, BPW 1173, Sfax (Tunisia); Pelosin, V.; Hénaff, G. [Institut Pprime, Département Physique et Mécanique des Matériaux, UPR 3346 CNRS ISAE-ENSMA Université de Poitiers, Téléport 2, 1, avenue Clément Ader, BP 40109, F – 86961 Futuroscope Chasseneuil Cedex (France); Haddar, N.; Elleuch, K. [Laboratoire de Génie des Matériaux et Environnement (LGME), ENIS, BPW 1173, Sfax (Tunisia)

    2016-01-10

    This paper focused on the study of Low Cycle Fatigue of welded joints of superaustenitic (Alloy28) stainless steels. Chemical composition and microstructure investigation of Base Metal (BM) and Weld Metal (WM) were identified. The results showed that both of composition is fully austenitic with a dendritic microstructure in the WM. Low cycle fatigue tests at different strain levels were performed on Base Metal (BM) and Welded Joint (WJ) specimens with a strain ratio R{sub ε}=−1. The results indicated that the fatigue life of welded joints is lower than the base metal. This is mainly due to the low ductility of the Welded Metal (WM) and the presence of welding defects. Simultaneously, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) observations of fractured specimens show that WJ have brittle behavior compared to BM with the presence of several welding defects especially in the crack initiation site. An estimation of the crack growth rate during LCF tests of BM and WJ was performed using distance between striations. The results showed that the crack initiation stage is shorter in the case of WJ compared to BM because of the presence of welding defects in WJ specimens.

  12. Hydrogen Cracking in Gas Tungsten Arc Welding of an AISI Type 321 Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenak, P.; Unigovski, Ya.; Shneck, R.

    The effects of in situ cathodic charging on the tensile properties and susceptibility to cracking of an AISI type 321 stainless steel, welded by the gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process, was studied by various treatments. Appearance of delta-ferrite phase in the as-welded steels in our tested conditions was observed with discontinuous grain boundaries (M23C6) and a dense distribution of metal carbides MC ((Ti, Nb)C), which precipitated in the matrix. Shielding gas rates changes the mechanical properties of the welds. Ultimate tensile strength and ductility are increases with the resistance to the environments related the increase of the supplied shielding inert gas rates. Charged specimens, caused mainly in decreases in the ductility of welded specimens. However, more severe decrease in ductility was obtained after post weld heat treatment (PWHT). The fracture of sensitized specimens was predominantly intergranular, whereas the as-welded specimens exhibited massive transgranular regions. Both types of specimen demonstrated narrow brittle zones at the sides of the fracture surface and ductile micro-void coalescences in the middle. Ferrite δ was form after welding with high density of dislocation structures and stacking faults formation and the thin stacking fault plates with e-martensite phase were typically found in the austenitic matrix after the cathodical charging process.

  13. Defocusing Techniques for Multi-pass Laser Welding of Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karhu, Miikka; Kujanpää, Veli

    This study introduces an experimental work carried out in multi-pass laser welding with cold filler wire and laser-arc hybrid welding of thick section austenitic stainless steel. As it has been demonstrated earlier, hybrid and cold wire welding with a keyhole-mode can offer very efficient way to produce multi-pass welds in narrow gap thick section joints. However, when multi-pass welding is applied to one pass per layer method without e.g. scanning or defocusing, the used groove width needs to be very narrow in order to ensure the proper melting of groove side walls and thus to avoid lack of fusion/cold-run defects. As a consequence of the narrow groove, particularly in thick section joints, the accessibility of an arc torch or a wire nozzle into the very bottom of a groove in root pass welding can be considerably restricted. In an alternative approach described in this paper, a power density of a laser beam spot was purposely dispersed by using a defocusing technique. In groove filling experiments, a power density of defocused laser beam was kept in the range, which led the welding process towards to conduction limited regime and thus enabled to achieve broader weld cross-sections. The object was to study the feasibility of defocusing as a way to fill and bridge wider groove geometries than what can be welded with focused keyhole-mode welding with filler addition. The paper covers the results of multi-pass welding of up to 60 mm thick joints with single side preparations.

  14. Study on laser welding of austenitic stainless steel by varying incident angle of pulsed laser beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Nikhil; Mukherjee, Manidipto; Bandyopadhyay, Asish

    2017-09-01

    In the present work, AISI 304 stainless steel sheets are laser welded in butt joint configuration using a robotic control 600 W pulsed Nd:YAG laser system. The objective of the work is of twofold. Firstly, the study aims to find out the effect of incident angle on the weld pool geometry, microstructure and tensile property of the welded joints. Secondly, a set of experiments are conducted, according to response surface design, to investigate the effects of process parameters, namely, incident angle of laser beam, laser power and welding speed, on ultimate tensile strength by developing a second order polynomial equation. Study with three different incident angle of laser beam 89.7 deg, 85.5 deg and 83 deg has been presented in this work. It is observed that the weld pool geometry has been significantly altered with the deviation in incident angle. The weld pool shape at the top surface has been altered from semispherical or nearly spherical shape to tear drop shape with decrease in incident angle. Simultaneously, planer, fine columnar dendritic and coarse columnar dendritic structures have been observed at 89.7 deg, 85.5 deg and 83 deg incident angle respectively. Weld metals with 85.5 deg incident angle has higher fraction of carbide and δ-ferrite precipitation in the austenitic matrix compared to other weld conditions. Hence, weld metal of 85.5 deg incident angle achieved higher micro-hardness of ∼280 HV and tensile strength of 579.26 MPa followed by 89.7 deg and 83 deg incident angle welds. Furthermore, the predicted maximum value of ultimate tensile strength of 580.50 MPa has been achieved for 85.95 deg incident angle using the developed equation where other two optimum parameter settings have been obtained as laser power of 455.52 W and welding speed of 4.95 mm/s. This observation has been satisfactorily validated by three confirmatory tests.

  15. Effect of Post Weld Heat Treatment on Mechanical and Corrosion Behaviors of NiTi and Stainless Steel Laser-Welded Wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirshekari, G. R.; Saatchi, A.; Kermanpur, A.; Sadrnezhaad, S. K.

    2016-06-01

    Effects of post weld heat treatment (PWHT) on mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of NiTi shape memory wire, laser welded to the 304 stainless steel wire were investigated. The results showed that PWHT at 200 °C increased corrosion resistance and tensile strength of the joint up to ~1.8 times that of the as-weld joint, with no heat treatment. On the contrary, precipitation of neoteric intermetallic compounds like Fe2Ti, Cr2Ti, FeNi, Ni3Ti, and Ti2Ni in the welded region deteriorated these properties, when PWHT was conducted at 400 °C. Due to the vital effects of the PWHT performed after the laser welding, careful control of the PWHT temperature was found to be a prerequisite for achievement of desirable properties in the dissimilar NiTi-304 stainless steel laser-welded wires.

  16. Finite element modelling and characterization of friction welding on UNS S31803 duplex stainless steel joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Asif. M

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Solid state joining techniques are increasingly employed in joining duplex stainless steel materials due to their high integrity. Continuous drive friction welding is a solid state welding technique which is used to join similar and dissimilar materials. This joining technique is characterized by short cycle time, low heat input and narrow heat affected zones. The simulation becomes an important tool in friction welding because of short welding cycle. In the present work, a three dimensional non-linear finite element model was developed. The thermal history and axial shortening profiles were predicted using ANSYS, a software tool. This numerical model was validated using experimental results. The results show that the frictional heating stage of the process has more influence on temperature and upsetting stage has more impact on axial shortening. The knowledge of these parameters would lead to optimization of input parameters and improvement of design and machine tools.

  17. Numerical simulation and experimental investigation of laser dissimilar welding of carbon steel and austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekouie Esfahani, M. R.; Coupland, J.; Marimuthu, S.

    2015-07-01

    This study reports an experimental and numerical investigation on controlling the microstructure and brittle phase formation during laser dissimilar welding of carbon steel to austenitic stainless steel. The significance of alloying composition and cooling rate were experimentally investigated. The investigation revealed that above a certain specific point energy the material within the melt pool is well mixed and the laser beam position can be used to control the mechanical properties of the joint. The heat-affected zone within the high-carbon steel has significantly higher hardness than the weld area, which severely undermines the weld quality. A sequentially coupled thermo-metallurgical model was developed to investigate various heat-treatment methodology and subsequently control the microstructure of the HAZ. Strategies to control the composition leading to dramatic changes in hardness, microstructure and service performance of the dissimilar laser welded fusion zone are discussed.

  18. Tensile behavior of irradiated manganese-stabilized stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Tensile tests were conducted on seven experimental, high-manganese austenitic stainless steels after irradiation up to 44 dpa in the FFTF. An Fe-20Mn-12Cr-0.25C base composition was used, to which various combinations of Ti, W, V, B, and P were added to improve strength. Nominal amounts added were 0.1% Ti, 1% W, 0.1% V, 0.005% B, and 0.03% P. Irradiation was carried out at 420, 520, and 600{degrees}C on the steels in the solution-annealed and 20% cold-worked conditions. Tensile tests were conducted at the irradiation temperature. Results were compared with type 316 SS. Neutron irradiation hardened all of the solution-annealed steels at 420, 520, and 600{degrees}C, as measured by the increase in yield stress and ultimate tensile strength. The steel to which all five elements were added to the base composition showed the least amount of hardening. It also showed a smaller loss of ductility (uniform and total elongation) than the other steels. The total and uniform elongations of this steel after irradiation at 420{degrees}C was over four times that of the other manganese-stabilized steels and 316 SS. There was much less difference in strength and ductility at the two higher irradiation temperatures, where there was considerably less hardening, and thus, less loss of ductility. In the cold-worked condition, hardening occured only after irradiation at 420{degrees}C, and there was much less difference in the properties of the steels after irradiation. At the 420{degrees}C irradiation temperature, most of the manganese-stabilized steels maintained more ductility than the 316 SS. After irradiation at 420{degrees}C, the temperature of maximum hardening, the steel to which all five of the elements were added had the best uniform elongation.

  19. Effect of Post-weld Heat Treatment on the Mechanical Properties of Supermartensitic Stainless Steel Deposit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappa, Sebastián; Svoboda, Hernán; Surian, Estela

    2017-02-01

    Supermartensitic stainless steels have good weldability and adequate tensile property, toughness and corrosion resistance. They have been developed as an alternative technology, mainly for oil and gas industries. The final properties of a supermartensitic stainless steel deposit depend on its chemical composition and microstructure: martensite, tempered martensite, ferrite, retained austenite and carbides and/or nitrides. In these steels, the post-weld heat treatments (PWHTs) are usually double tempering ones, to ensure both complete tempering of martensite and high austenite content, to increase toughness and decrease hardness. The aim of this work was to study the effect of post-weld heat treatments (solution treatment with single and double tempering) on the mechanical properties of a supermartensitic stainless steel deposit. An all-weld metal test coupon was welded according to standard ANSI/AWS A5.22-95 using a GMAW supermartensitic stainless steel metal cored wire, under gas shielding. PWHTs were carried out varying the temperature of the first tempering treatment with and without a second tempering one, after solution treatment. All-weld metal chemical composition analysis, metallurgical characterization, hardness and tensile property measurements and Charpy-V tests were carried out. There are several factors which can be affected by the PWHTs, among them austenite content is a significant one. Different austenite contents (0-42%) were found. Microhardness, tensile property and toughness were affected with up to 15% of austenite content, by martensite tempering and carbide precipitation. The second tempering treatment seemed not to have had an important effect on the mechanical properties measured in this work.

  20. Dissimilar Friction Stir Welding Between UNS S31603 Austenitic Stainless Steel and UNS S32750 Superduplex Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodoro, Maria Claudia; Pereira, Victor Ferrinho; Mei, Paulo Roberto; Ramirez, Antonio Jose

    2015-02-01

    In order to verify the viability of dissimilar UNS S31603 austenitic and UNS S32750 superduplex stainless steels joined by friction stir welding, 6-mm-thick plates were welded using a PCBN-WRe tool. The welded joints were performed in position control mode at rotational speeds of 100 to 300 rpm and a feed rate of 100 mm/min. The joints performed with 150 and 200 rpm showed good appearance and no defects. The metallographic analysis of both joints showed no internal defects and that the material flow pattern is visible only in the stirred zone (SZ) of the superduplex steel. On the SZ top, these patterns are made of regions of different phases (ferrite and austenite), and on the bottom and central part of the SZ, these patterns are formed by alternated regions of different grain sizes. The ferrite grains in the superduplex steel are larger than those in the austenitic ones along the SZ and thermo-mechanically affected zone, explained by the difference between austenite and ferrite recrystallization kinetics. The amount of ferrite islands present on the austenitic steel base metal decreased near the SZ interface, caused by the dissolving of the ferrite in austenitic matrix. No other phases were found in both joints. The best weld parameters were found to be 200 rpm rotation speed, 100 mm/min feed rate, and tool position control.

  1. Aging Degradation of Austenitic Stainless Steel Weld Probed by Electrochemical Method and Impact Toughness Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Raghuvir; Das, Goutam; Mahato, B.; Singh, P. K.

    2017-01-01

    The present study discriminates the spinodal decomposition and G-phase precipitation in stainless steel welds by double loop electrochemical potentio-kinetic reactivation method and correlates it with the degradation in toughness property. The welds produced with different heat inputs were aged up to 10,000 hours at 673 K to 723 K (400 to 450 °C) and evaluated subsequently for the degree of sensitization (DOS) and impact toughness. The DOS values obtained were attributed to the spinodal decomposition and precipitation of G-phase. Study shows that the DOS correlates well with the impact toughness of the 304LN weld. Prolonged aging at 673 K and 723 K (400 °C and 450 °C) increased the DOS values while the impact toughness was decreased. The weld fabricated at 1 kJ/mm of heat input, produced higher DOS, compared to that at 3 kJ/mm. The geometrical location along the weld is shown to influence the DOS; higher values were obtained at the root than at the topside of the weld. Vermicular and columnar microstructure, in addition to the spinodal decomposition and G-phase precipitation, observed in the root side of the weld appear risky for the impact toughness.

  2. Aging Degradation of Austenitic Stainless Steel Weld Probed by Electrochemical Method and Impact Toughness Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Raghuvir; Das, Goutam; Mahato, B.; Singh, P. K.

    2017-03-01

    The present study discriminates the spinodal decomposition and G-phase precipitation in stainless steel welds by double loop electrochemical potentio-kinetic reactivation method and correlates it with the degradation in toughness property. The welds produced with different heat inputs were aged up to 10,000 hours at 673 K to 723 K (400 to 450 °C) and evaluated subsequently for the degree of sensitization (DOS) and impact toughness. The DOS values obtained were attributed to the spinodal decomposition and precipitation of G-phase. Study shows that the DOS correlates well with the impact toughness of the 304LN weld. Prolonged aging at 673 K and 723 K (400 °C and 450 °C) increased the DOS values while the impact toughness was decreased. The weld fabricated at 1 kJ/mm of heat input, produced higher DOS, compared to that at 3 kJ/mm. The geometrical location along the weld is shown to influence the DOS; higher values were obtained at the root than at the topside of the weld. Vermicular and columnar microstructure, in addition to the spinodal decomposition and G-phase precipitation, observed in the root side of the weld appear risky for the impact toughness.

  3. Fatigue cracking of hybrid plasma gas metal arc welded 2205 duplex stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yurtisik, Koray; Tirkes, Suha [Middle East Technical Univ., Ankara (Turkey). Welding Technology and Nondestructive Testing Research/Application Center

    2014-10-01

    Contrary to other keyhole welding applications on duplex stainless steels, a proper cooling time and a dilution were achieved during hybrid plasma gas metal arc welding that provided sufficient reconstructive transformation of austenite without sacrificing its high efficiency and productivity. Simultaneous utilization of keyhole and metal deposition in the hybrid welding procedure enabled us to get an as-welded 11 mm-thick standard duplex stainless steel plate in a single pass. Metallographic examination on hybrid plasma-gas metal arc weldments revealed only primary austenite in ferrite matrix, whereas in addition to reconstructive transformation of primary austenite during solidification, secondary austenite was also transformed in a displacive manner due to successive thermal cycles during multi-pass gas metal arc welding. On the one hand, secondary austenite provided barriers and retarded the crack propagation during the tests in laboratory air. On the other hand, chromium and molybdenum depletion in the neighborhood of secondary austenite precipitates yielded relatively high crack propagation rates in multi-pass weldments under chloride attack.

  4. Evaluation on defect in the weld of stainless steel materials using nondestructive technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jin Kyung, E-mail: leejink@deu.ac.kr [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Dongeui University, Eomgwangno 176, Busanjingu, Busan 614-714 (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Dong Su [Department of Advanced Materials Engineering, Dongeui University, Eomgwangno 176, Busanjingu, Busan 614-714 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Pill [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Dongeui University, Eomgwangno 176, Busanjingu, Busan 614-714 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Joon Hyun [School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, Busandaehakro 63beongil, Geumjeonggu, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the elastic wave's characteristic on the crack in the weld of stainless steel materials using guided wave and acoustic emission, nondestructive tests. The stainless steel is expected as candidate of structural piping material under high temperature condition in nuclear fusion instrument, and a tungsten inert gas (TIG) weld technique was applied for making its jointing. The defect size of 20 mm was induced in the weld material. The guided wave, one of elastic waves, can propagate through very long pipe, and easily change to lots of modes by the defects in the structure. By analyzing the relationship between the mode conversion and the defects we can evaluate existing of the defects in weld material. In present study Nd-YAG laser was used to excite the guided wave by non-contact method, and AE technique was also used to clarify the mode conversion of guided wave by defect because lots of AE parameters of energy, count and amplitude can give more chances for analysis of mode conversion. The optimal AE parameters for the evaluation of the defects in weld zone using laser guided wave were derived.

  5. Electrochemical Corrosion Behavior ofthe Laser Continuous Heat Treatment Welded Joints of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Heping; JIN Xuejun

    2011-01-01

    The electrochemical corrosion behaviors of the welded joints of 2205 duplex stainless steel with the laser continuous heat treatment were investigated.The secondary austenite formation is the outcome of thermodynamic equilibrium breach of the alloy during heat treatment and the result of the continuous heat treatment which has the most important effect on the weld material.The partitioning behaviors of chromium and molybdenum as well as the volume fraction of ferrite and austenite have a remarkable influence on the composition of the individual phase.Mechanical examination of the laser trated weld demonstrates that the tensile strength and yield strength increase with increasing the amount of the secondary austenite.It is shown that the ultimate tensile strength of the 6 kW laser-treated weld is higher about 20 MPa than no heat treatment weld and the ductility can be further improved without compromising strength.The results indicate that the welding alters the corrosion behavior because of different post heat treatment power and the broad active peak is not identified which is attributed to the dissolution of the secondary austenitic in the ferrite phase.It is indicated that pitting resistance equivalent (PRE) values of base metal and 6 kW weld are higher than that of other welds; base metal is 33.7,6 kW weld 33.3,no treatment 32.4,4 kW weld 32.8,8 kW weld 32.5.The extent of corrosion resistance improvement after reheating treatment is mainly caused by the removal of nitrogen from ferritic regions,which occurred as a consequence of secondary austenite growth.

  6. Plasma Plume Oscillations Monitoring during Laser Welding of Stainless Steel by Discrete Wavelet Transform Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Sibillano

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The plasma optical radiation emitted during CO2 laser welding of stainless steel samples has been detected with a Si-PIN photodiode and analyzed under different process conditions. The discrete wavelet transform (DWT has been used to decompose the optical signal into various discrete series of sequences over different frequency bands. The results show that changes of the process settings may yield different signal features in the range of frequencies between 200 Hz and 30 kHz. Potential applications of this method to monitor in real time the laser welding processes are also discussed.

  7. Plasma Plume Oscillations Monitoring during Laser Welding of Stainless Steel by Discrete Wavelet Transform Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibillano, Teresa; Ancona, Antonio; Rizzi, Domenico; Lupo, Valentina; Tricarico, Luigi; Lugarà, Pietro Mario

    2010-01-01

    The plasma optical radiation emitted during CO2 laser welding of stainless steel samples has been detected with a Si-PIN photodiode and analyzed under different process conditions. The discrete wavelet transform (DWT) has been used to decompose the optical signal into various discrete series of sequences over different frequency bands. The results show that changes of the process settings may yield different signal features in the range of frequencies between 200 Hz and 30 kHz. Potential applications of this method to monitor in real time the laser welding processes are also discussed. PMID:22319311

  8. Joining silicon carbide to austenitic stainless steel through diffusion welding; Stellingen behorende bij het proefschrift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krugers, Jan-Paul

    1993-01-19

    In this thesis, the results are presented of a study dealing with joining silicon carbide to austenitic stainless steel AIS316 by means of diffusion welding. Welding experiments were carried out without and with the use of a metallic intermediate, like copper, nickel and copper-nickel alloys at various conditions of process temperature, process time, mechanical pressure and interlayer thickness. Most experiments were carried out in high vacuum. For reasons of comparison, however, some experiments were also carried out in a gas shielded environment of 95 vol.% Ar and 5 vol.% H2.

  9. Waste Water Treatment after Removal of Thermic Oxides from Stainless Steel Welding Joints

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    This work describes chemical methods of removal of thermic oxides from stainless steel welding joints, as well as waste water treatment. Thermal oxides were removed from the stainless steel surface using chemical and electrochemical procedures. A pickling paste that contains HNO3 and HF in different ratios was used for chemical cleansing of thermal oxides (A, B, and C). Electrochemical removal was done using an apparatus Magic Cleaner, and as electrolyte a solution H2SO4+H3PO4 was used. Conce...

  10. Dependence of Radiation Damage in Stainless Steel on Irradiation Dose

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The accelerator driven radioactive clean nuclear power system (ADS) is a novel innovative idea forthe sustainable development of nuclear power system. The spallation neutron source system is one of thethree key parts of ADS, which provides source neutrons of about 1018 s-1 for the burning-up of fuels.Stainless steel (SS) is used for the beam window and target materials of the spallation neutron sourcesystem. It is irradiated by high-energy and intense protons and/or neutrons during operation. Theaccumulated displacement damage dose could reach a couple of hundred dpa (displacement per atom) per

  11. MICROBIOLOGICALLY INFLUENCED CORROSION ON WELD OF STAINLESS STEEL 304L

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    The influence of welding defects on MIC (microbiologically influenced corrosion) was studied.The open circuit potential (OCP) was measured during MIC test. It was found that OCP shifted to a higher level when the system was inoculated with bacteria and it decreased dramatically when MIC started. Among a series of welding defects golden heat tint was found the most susceptible to MIC. The tubercles over pitting were observed with SEM. Some elements inside of the tubercles were analysed with EDXA. Microbiological analysis of a corroded and a non-corroded sample revealed no significant difference between them with the exception of the number of the manganeseoxidising bacteria.

  12. 77 FR 42697 - Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Italy, Malaysia, and the Philippines: Continuation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-20

    ... Orders: Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Italy, Malaysia, and the Philippines, 66 FR 11257 (February 23, 2001). \\2\\ See Initiation of Five-Year (``Sunset'') Review, 76 FR 67412 (November 1, 2011... Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Italy, Malaysia, and the Philippines, 77 FR 39735 (July 5, 2012),...

  13. Influence of Simulated Outside-Reactor Irradiation on Anticorrosion Property of Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The influence of γ-ray irradiation on the properties of inside-reactor stainless steel structures was studied by simulating the working condition of pressurized water reactor (PWR) first circuit and the outside-reactor γ-ray irradiation. The result shows that the simulated outside-reactor irradiation (irradiation dose 4.4 × 104 Gy) has no influence on anticorrosion properties of solutionized SUS304 austenitic stainless steel, including intergranular corrosion (IC) and stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Anticorrosion properties (IC, SCC) of sensitized SUS304 austenitic stainless steel are reduced by simulated outside-reactor irradiation. The longer the sensitizedtime is, the more obvious the influence is.

  14. X-Ray diffraction technique applied to study of residual stresses after welding of duplex stainless steel plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monin, Vladimir Ivanovitch; Assis, Joaquim Teixeira de [Instituto Politecnico do Rio e Janeiro (IPRJ), Nova Friburgo, RJ (Brazil); Lopes, Ricardo Tadeu; Turibus, Sergio Noleto; Payao Filho, Joao C., E-mail: sturibus@nuclear.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    Duplex stainless steel is an example of composite material with approximately equal amounts of austenite and ferrite phases. Difference of physical and mechanical properties of component is additional factor that contributes appearance of residual stresses after welding of duplex steel plates. Measurements of stress distributions in weld region were made by X-ray diffraction method both in ferrite and austenite phases. Duplex Steel plates were joined by GTAW (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding) technology. There were studied longitudinal and transverse stress components in welded butt joint, in heat affected zone (HAZ) and in points of base metal 10 mm from the weld. Residual stresses measured in duplex steel plates jointed by welding are caused by temperature gradients between weld zone and base metal and by difference of thermal expansion coefficients of ferrite and austenite phases. Proposed analytical model allows evaluating of residual stress distribution over the cross section in the weld region. (author)

  15. Influence of heat input on weld bead geometry using duplex stainless steel wire electrode on low alloy steel specimens

    OpenAIRE

    Ajit Mondal; Manas Kumar Saha; Ritesh Hazra; Santanu Das

    2016-01-01

    Gas metal arc welding cladding becomes a popular surfacing technique in many modern industries as it enhances effectively corrosion resistance property and wear resistance property of structural members. Quality of weld cladding may be enhanced by controlling process parameters. If bead formation is found acceptable, cladding is also expected to be good. Weld bead characteristics are often assessed by bead geometry, and it is mainly influenced by heat input. In this paper, duplex stainless st...

  16. Heat input effect on the microstructural transformation and mechanical properties in GTAW welds of a 409L ferritic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgado, J. A.; Ambriz, R. R.; Cuenca-Alvarez, R.; Alatorre, N.; Curiel, F. F.

    2016-10-01

    Welds without filler metal and welds using a conventional austenitic stainless steel filler metal (ER308L) were performed to join a ferritic stainless steel with Gas Tungsten Arc Welding process (GTAW). Welding parameters were adjusted to obtain three different heat input values. Microstructure reveals the presence of coarse ferritic matrix and martensite laths in the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ). Dilution between filler and base metal was correlated with the presence of austenite, martensite and ferrite in the weld metal. Weld thermal cycles were measured to correlate the microstructural transformation in the HAZ. Microhardness measurements (maps and profiles) allow to identify the different zones of the welded joints (weld metal, HAZ, and base metal). Comparing the base metal with the weld metal and the HAZ, a hardness increment (∼172 HV{sub 0}.5 to ∼350 HV{sub 0}.5 and ∼310 HV{sub 0}.5, respectively) was observed, which has been attributed to the martensite formation. Tensile strength of the welded joints without filler metal increased moderately with respect to base metal. In contrast, ductility was approximately 25% higher than base metal, which provided a toughness improvement of the welded joints. (Author)

  17. Mechanical properties of type 316L stainless steel welded joint for ITER vacuum vessel (1). Experiment of unirradiated welded joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Shigeru; Fukaya, Kiyoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Ishiyama, Shintaro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Koizumi, Kouichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    2001-01-01

    In design activity of ITER, the vacuum vessel (VV) is ranked as one of the most important components in core reactor from the view point of first barrier to tritium release from the reactor. The VV of ITER is designed as double walled structure so that some parts of them are not qualified in the conventional design standards. So it is necessary to prepare the new design standards to be applied them. JAERI has executed the preparation activity of the new design standards and the technical data to support them. In this study, the results of metallographic observation and mechanical properties of unirradiated type 316L stainless steel welded joint were reported. (author)

  18. Phenomena Elucidation of High Brightness Fiber Laser Welding of Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahito, Yousuke; Mizutani, Masami; Katayama, Seiji

    A high-brigthness fiber laser can produce an ultra-high peak power density of MW/mm2 level corresponding to a focused electron beam, and is promising as one of the desirable heat sources for deep-penetration welding. The objectives of this research are to elucidate the factors affecting weld penetration and defects formation mechanisms, to obtain a fundamental knowledge of interaction between a fiber laser beam and the laser-induced plume, and to assess laser absorption with water-calorimetric method in bead-on-plate welding of Type 304 austenitic stainless steel plates with a 10 kW fiber laser beam. Concerning the weldablity and defects, the penetration depth reached 18 mm at the maximum. At 50 mm/s or lower welding speeds, porosity was generated under the conventionally-focused and tightly-focused conditions. X-ray transmission in-site observation images demonstrated that pores were formed not only at the tip of the keyhole but also near the upper part. The keyhole behavior was stabilized by using nitrogen shielding gas, which led to the porosity prevention. As for the interaction under the normal Ar shielding gas conditions, the temperature and ionization degree of the laser-induced plumes were calculated to be 6,000 K and 0.02, respectively, by the Bolzman plots and Saha's equation. It was also found that the attenuation and the refraction between the 10-kW fiber laser beam and the short weakly-ionized plume were too small to exert the reduction in weld penetration. The laser absorption of the stainless steel plate was approximately 85 % high at 10 kW laser power and 50 mm/s welding speed. Compared X-ray transmission observation images of the keyhole with the focusing feature of the fiber laser beam, most of the incident laser passed through the keyhole inlet, and the center part of the beam was delivered directly to the tip of the deep keyhole. Consequently, as far as the adquate welding procedures were utilized on the basis of eclucidation of the welding

  19. Alloying element losses in pulsed Nd : YAG laser welding of stainless steel 316

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandaghi, M.; Parvin, P.; Torkamany, M. J.; Sabbaghzadeh, J.

    2008-12-01

    Experimental studies of pulsed laser welding of stainless steel 316 in keyhole mode were done to examine a vaporization model based on the kinetic theory of gases and the thermodynamic laws. Undesirable loss of volatile elements affects the weld metal composition and properties. The profile of the keyhole was simulated as a function of time from a 'hydrodynamic' physical model. The power density and pulse duration were the main investigated variables. The model predicts that loss of alloying elements increases at higher peak powers and longer pulse durations. Accordingly, the concentrations of iron, chromium, nickel and manganese were determined in the weld pool by means of the proton-induced x-ray emission and energy dispersive x-ray/wavelength dispersive x-ray analysis. It was shown that the composition alteration, predicted by the model due to varying laser parameters, accords well with the corresponding experimental data.

  20. Influence of Material Model on Prediction Accuracy of Welding Residual Stress in an Austenitic Stainless Steel Multi-pass Butt-Welded Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Dean; Zhang, Chaohua; Pu, Xiaowei; Liang, Wei

    2017-03-01

    Both experimental method and numerical simulation technology were employed to investigate welding residual stress distribution in a SUS304 steel multi-pass butt-welded joint in the current study. The main objective is to clarify the influence of strain hardening model and the yield strength of weld metal on prediction accuracy of welding residual stress. In the experiment, a SUS304 steel butt-welded joint with 17 passes was fabricated, and the welding residual stresses on both the upper and bottom surfaces of the middle cross section were measured. Meanwhile, based on ABAQUS Code, an advanced computational approach considering different plastic models as well as annealing effect was developed to simulate welding residual stress. In the simulations, the perfect plastic model, the isotropic strain hardening model, the kinematic strain hardening model and the mixed isotropic-kinematic strain hardening model were employed to calculate the welding residual stress distributions in the multi-pass butt-welded joint. In all plastic models with the consideration of strain hardening, the annealing effect was also taken into account. In addition, the influence of the yield strength of weld metal on the simulation result of residual stress was also investigated numerically. The conclusions drawn by this work will be helpful in predicting welding residual stresses of austenitic stainless steel welded structures used in nuclear power plants.

  1. Welding Characteristics of Nitrogen Added Stainless Steels for Nuclear Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y. D. [Pohang Iron and Steel Co., Ltd, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    Characteristics of properties and manufacturing process was evaluated in development of high strength and corrosion resistant stainless steel. The continuous cast structure of STS 316L was similar to that of STS 304. The most of residual {delta}-ferrite of STS 316L was vermicular type. The residual {delta}-ferrite content increased from the surface towards the center of the slab and after reaching a maximum value at about 50mm distance from surface and steeply decreased towards the center itself. Hot ductility of STS 304L and STS 316L stainless steels containing below 1000 ppm N was appeared to be reasonably good in the range of hot rolling temperature. In case of the steels containing over 1000 ppm N, the hot ductility was decreased rapidly when sulfur content of the steel was above 20 ppm. Therefore, to achieve good hot ductility of the high nitrogen containing steel, reduction of sulfur contents is required as low as possible. The inter granular corrosion resistance and impact toughness of STS 316L were increased with increasing the nitrogen contents. Yield strength and tensile strength of 304 and 316 stainless steels are increased linearly with increasing the nitrogen contents but their elongations are decreased with increasing the nitrogen contents. Therefore, the mechanical properties of these stainless steels could be controlled with variation of nitrogen. The effects of nitrogen on the resistance of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) can be explained by improvement of the load bearing capacity with increasing tensile strength rather than inhibition of trans granular SCC crack generation and propagation. 101 refs., 17 tabs., 105 figs. (author)

  2. Effect of Stress Relief Annealing on Microstructure & Mechanical Properties of Welded Joints Between Low Alloy Carbon Steel and Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nivas, R.; Das, G.; Das, S. K.; Mahato, B.; Kumar, S.; Sivaprasad, K.; Singh, P. K.; Ghosh, M.

    2017-01-01

    Two types of welded joints were prepared using low alloy carbon steel and austenitic stainless steel as base materials. In one variety, buttering material and weld metal were Inconel 82. In another type, buttering material and weld metal were Inconel 182. In case of Inconel 82, method of welding was GTAW. For Inconel 182, welding was done by SMAW technique. For one set of each joints after buttering, stress relief annealing was done at 923 K (650 °C) for 90 minutes before further joining with weld metal. Microstructural investigation and sub-size in situ tensile testing in scanning electron microscope were carried out for buttered-welded and buttered-stress relieved-welded specimens. Adjacent to fusion boundary, heat-affected zone of low alloy steel consisted of ferrite-pearlite phase combination. Immediately after fusion boundary in low alloy steel side, there was increase in matrix grain size. Same trend was observed in the region of austenitic stainless steel that was close to fusion boundary between weld metal-stainless steel. Close to interface between low alloy steel-buttering material, the region contained martensite, Type-I boundary and Type-II boundary. Peak hardness was obtained close to fusion boundary between low alloy steel and buttering material. In this respect, a minimum hardness was observed within buttering material. The peak hardness was shifted toward buttering material after stress relief annealing. During tensile testing no deformation occurred within low alloy steel and failure was completely through buttering material. Crack initiated near fusion boundary between low alloy steel-buttering material for welded specimens and the same shifted away from fusion boundary for stress relieved annealed specimens. This observation was at par with the characteristics of microhardness profile. In as welded condition, joints fabricated with Inconel 82 exhibited superior bond strength than the weld produced with Inconel 182. Stress relief annealing

  3. Experimental Analysis of Residual Stresses in Samples of Austenitic Stainless Steel Welded on Martensitic Stainless Steel Used for Kaplan Blades Repairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasile Cojocaru

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Residual stresses occur in materials as a result of mechanical processes: welding, machining, grinding etc. If residual stresses reach high values they can accelerate the occurrence of cracks and erosion of material. An experimental research was made in order to study the occurrence of residual stresses in the repaired areas of hydraulic turbine components damaged by cavitation erosion. An austenitic stainless steel was welded in various layer thicknesses on a martensitic stainless steel base. The residual stresses were determined using the hole drilling strain gage method.

  4. Three-dimensional transient thermoelectric currents in deep penetration laser welding of austenite stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin; Pang, Shengyong; Shao, Xinyu; Wang, Chunming; Xiao, Jianzhong; Jiang, Ping

    2017-04-01

    The existence of thermoelectric currents (TECs) in workpieces during the laser welding of metals has been common knowledge for more than 15 years. However, the time-dependent evolutions of TECs in laser welding remain unclear. The present study developed a novel three-dimensional theoretical model of thermoelectric phenomena in the fiber laser welding of austenite stainless steel and used it to observe the time-dependent evolutions of TECs for the first time. Our model includes the complex physical effects of thermal, electromagnetic, fluid and phase transformation dynamics occurring at the millimeter laser ablated zone, which allowed us to simulate the TEC, self-induced magnetic field, Lorentz force, keyhole and weld pool behaviors varying with the welding time for different parameters. We found that TECs are truly three-dimensional, time-dependent, and uneven with a maximum current density of around 107 A/m2 located at the liquid-solid (L/S) interface near the front or bottom part of the keyhole at a laser power of 1.5 kW and a welding speed of 3 m/min. The TEC formed three-dimensional circulations moving from the melting front to solidification front in the solid part of workpiece, after which the contrary direction was followed in the liquid part. High frequency oscillation characteristics (2.2-8.5 kHz) were demonstrated in the TEC, which coincides with that of the keyhole instability (2.0-5.0 kHz). The magnitude of the self-induced magnetic field and Lorentz force can reach 0.1 mT and 1 kN/m3, respectively, which are both consistent with literature data. The predicted results of the weld dimensions by the proposed model agree well with the experimental results. Our findings could enhance the fundamental understanding of thermoelectric phenomena in laser welding.

  5. First samples of Ti and Nb tubes explosion welding joint with stainless steel for ILC 1.8 K cryomodule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabirov, B. M.; Budagov, J. A.; Shirkov, G. D.

    2013-07-01

    The world first samples of Ti and Nb tubes joint with stainless steel ones by an explosion welding by the JINR-VNIIEF-FNAL-INFN cooperation were manufactured in the frame of ILC R&D programe. An applying methods of relaxation of residual tensions (after explosion and electron beam welding), macro- and microanalyses of welding seam and cryogenic tests of the samples produced manifest the achievement of high mechanic strength (≈250 MPa/share) of welding seam, solidity and leak absence on 10-10 l atm/s level at 1.8 K. The explosion welding technology and methods introducing to industrial manufacturing of the 4-th generation of cryomodule of TESLA TYPE DESIGN can exclude the Ti—communications, connect the Nb—cavity with stainless steel vessel and reduce significantly the accelerator cost.

  6. Narrow gap TIG and electron beam weld inspection in austenitic stainless steel using pulse echo, TOFD and phased array ultrasonics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quirk, K.P.; Turner, J.L. [Phoenix Inspection Systems Limited, Warrington (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    'Full-text:' Narrow gap Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) and Electron Beam (EB) welding techniques are being considered for the splice joint welds on the austenitic stainless steel Vacuum Vessel in the next generation of experimental Fusion Power stations under the ITER programme. Under the programme there is a requirement to develop automated ultrasonic NDT techniques to inspect material up to 60 mm thick in both weld types. These narrow welds are difficult to inspect because of the steep fusion faces made more difficult in this project by the beam scattering effects of austenitic stainless steel welds and the very limited access from only one side of the vessel. The paper details the development of the combined Pulse Echo, TOFD and Phased Array techniques on behalf of ITER. The authors describe the philosophy behind the inspections, results and possible transfer of the technology to other sectors of industry. (author)

  7. a Study of Stress Relaxation Rate in Un-Irradiated and Neutron-Irradiated Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghauri, I. M.; Afzal, Naveed; Zyrek, N. A.

    Stress relaxation rate in un-irradiated and neutron-irradiated 303 stainless steel was investigated at room temperature. The specimens were exposed to 100 mC, Ra-Be neutron source of continuous energy 2-12 MeV for a period ranging from 4 to 16 days. The tensile deformation of the specimens was carried out using a Universal Testing Machine at 300 K. During the deformation, straining was frequently interrupted by arresting the cross head to observe stress relaxation at fixed load. Stress relaxation rate, s, was found to be stress dependent i.e. it increased with increasing stress levels σ0 both in un-irradiated and irradiated specimens, however the rate was lower in irradiated specimens than those of un-irradiated ones. A further decrease in s was observed with increase in exposure time. The experiential decrease in the relaxation rate in irradiated specimens is ascribed to strong interaction of glide dislocations with radiation induced defects. The activation energy for the movement of dislocations was found to be higher in irradiated specimens as compared with the un-irradiated ones.

  8. Effect of thermal aging on SCC and mechanical properties of stainless steel weld metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hixon, J.R. [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (United States); Kim, J.H.; Ballinger, R.G. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (United States)

    2007-07-01

    The thermal aging and consequent embrittlement of materials are ongoing issues in cast stainless steels and duplex stainless steel. Spinodal decomposition is largely responsible for the well known '475{sup o}C embrittlement that results in drastic reductions in ductility and toughness in these materials, and this process is operative in welds in either cast or wrought stainless steels where delta ferrite is present. While the embrittlement can occur after several hundred hours of aging at 475{sup o}C, the process is also operative at lower temperatures, including the 300{sup o}C operating temperature of a boiling water reactor (BWR), where ductility reductions have been observed after several tens of thousands of hours. An experimental program is under way in to understand how the spinodal decomposition may affect material properties changes in BWR pipe weld metals. Testing includes nano and micro-structural analysis as well as fatigue and SCC crack growth. In this study we report on the initial results of this program, including tensile, Charpy impact, fracture toughness and SCC crack growth rates of SS weld metals under simulated BWR conditions. The measurement of tensile, microhardness and Charpy-impact energy show an increase in strength, a decrease in ductility, and a decrease in impact energy after aging for 1000 hours at 430 and 400 {sup o}C. Crack growth rates for material in the as welded and aged for 5000 hours at 400{sup o}C have been measured and are generally within the scatter band for wrought material although the aged material data fall at the high end. Unusual insitu unstable fracture behavior has been experienced at toughness values significantly below (<50%) the room temperature fracture toughness. This behavior, termed 'environmental fracture' requires further investigation. (author)

  9. Stainless steel submerged arc weld fusion line toughness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenfield, A.R.; Held, P.R.; Wilkowski, G.M. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

    1995-04-01

    This effort evaluated the fracture toughness of austenitic steel submerged-arc weld (SAW) fusion lines. The incentive was to explain why cracks grow into the fusion line in many pipe tests conducted with cracks initially centered in SAWS. The concern was that the fusion line may have a lower toughness than the SAW. It was found that the fusion line, Ji. was greater than the SAW toughness but much less than the base metal. Of greater importance may be that the crack growth resistance (JD-R) of the fusion line appeared to reach a steady-state value, while the SAW had a continually increasing JD-R curve. This explains why the cracks eventually turn to the fusion line in the pipe experiments. A method of incorporating these results would be to use the weld metal J-R curve up to the fusion-line steady-state J value. These results may be more important to LBB analyses than the ASME flaw evaluation procedures, since there is more crack growth with through-wall cracks in LBB analyses than for surface cracks in pipe flaw evaluations.

  10. Post-weld Tempered Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Hybrid Laser-Arc Welded Cast Martensitic Stainless Steel CA6NM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirakhorli, Fatemeh; Cao, Xinjin; Pham, Xuan-Tan; Wanjara, Priti; Fihey, Jean-Luc

    2016-12-01

    Manufacturing of hydroelectric turbine components involves the assembly of thick-walled stainless steels using conventional multi-pass arc welding processes. By contrast, hybrid laser-arc welding may be an attractive process for assembly of such materials to realize deeper penetration depths, higher production rates, narrower fusion, and heat-affected zones, and lower distortion. In the present work, single-pass hybrid laser-arc welding of 10-mm thick CA6NM, a low carbon martensitic stainless steel, was carried out in the butt joint configuration using a continuous wave fiber laser at its maximum power of 5.2 kW over welding speeds ranging from 0.75 to 1.2 m/minute. The microstructures across the weldment were characterized after post-weld tempering at 873 K (600 °C) for 1 hour. From microscopic examinations, the fusion zone was observed to mainly consist of tempered lath martensite and some residual delta-ferrite. The mechanical properties were evaluated in the post-weld tempered condition and correlated to the microstructures and defects. The ultimate tensile strength and Charpy impact energy values of the fully penetrated welds in the tempered condition were acceptable according to ASTM, ASME, and industrial specifications, which bodes well for the introduction of hybrid laser-arc welding technology for the manufacturing of next generation hydroelectric turbine components.

  11. Persistence of deposited metals in the lungs after stainless steel and mild steel welding fume inhalation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonini, James M; Roberts, Jenny R; Stone, Samuel; Chen, Bean T; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Chapman, Rebecca; Zeidler-Erdely, Patti C; Andrews, Ronnee N; Frazer, David G

    2011-05-01

    Welding generates complex metal fumes that vary in composition. The objectives of this study were to compare the persistence of deposited metals and the inflammatory potential of stainless and mild steel welding fumes, the two most common fumes used in US industry. Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 40 mg/m(3) of stainless or mild steel welding fumes for 3 h/day for 3 days. Controls were exposed to filtered air. Generated fume was collected, and particle size and elemental composition were determined. Bronchoalveolar lavage was done on days 0, 8, 21, and 42 after the last exposure to assess lung injury/inflammation and to recover lung phagocytes. Non-lavaged lung samples were analyzed for total and specific metal content as a measure of metal persistence. Both welding fumes were similar in particle morphology and size. Following was the chemical composition of the fumes-stainless steel: 57% Fe, 20% Cr, 14% Mn, and 9% Ni; mild steel: 83% Fe and 15% Mn. There was no effect of the mild steel fume on lung injury/inflammation at any time point compared to air control. Lung injury and inflammation were significantly elevated at 8 and 21 days after exposure to the stainless steel fume compared to control. Stainless steel fume exposure was associated with greater recovery of welding fume-laden macrophages from the lungs at all time points compared with the mild steel fume. A higher concentration of total metal was observed in the lungs of the stainless steel welding fume at all time points compared with the mild steel fume. The specific metals present in the two fumes were cleared from the lungs at different rates. The potentially more toxic metals (e.g., Mn, Cr) present in the stainless steel fume were cleared from the lungs more quickly than Fe, likely increasing their translocation from the respiratory system to other organs.

  12. Partially degradable friction-welded pure iron-stainless steel 316L bone pin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasution, A K; Murni, N S; Sing, N B; Idris, M H; Hermawan, H

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the development of a partially degradable metal bone pin, proposed to minimize the occurrence of bone refracture by avoiding the creation of holes in the bone after pin removal procedure. The pin was made by friction welding and composed of two parts: the degradable part that remains in the bone and the nondegradable part that will be removed as usual. Rods of stainless steel 316L (nondegradable) and pure iron (degradable) were friction welded at the optimum parameters: forging pressure = 33.2 kPa, friction time = 25 s, burn-off length = 15 mm, and heat input = 4.58 J/s. The optimum tensile strength and elongation was registered at 666 MPa and 13%, respectively. A spiral defect formation was identified as the cause for the ductile fracture of the weld joint. A 40-µm wide intermetallic zone was identified along the fusion line having a distinct composition of Cr, Ni, and Mo. The corrosion rate of the pin gradually decreased from the undeformed zone of pure iron to the undeformed zone of stainless steel 316L. All metallurgical zones of the pin showed no toxic effect toward normal human osteoblast cells, confirming the ppb level of released Cr and Ni detected in the cell media were tolerable.

  13. Microstructure characterization and corrosion testing of MAG pulsed duplex stainless steel welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitelea, Ion; Utu, Ion Dragos; Urlan, Sorin Dumitru; Karancsi, Olimpiu [Politehnica Univ. Timisoara (Romania). Faculty of Mechanical Engineering

    2017-08-01

    Duplex stainless steels are extremely attractive construction materials for their usage in intense aggressive environments. They offer numerous advantages compared to the austenitic stainless steels having an excellent behavior to pitting and cavernous corrosion, and a high resistance to stress cracking corrosion in chlorides media. However, their corrosion properties are largely dependent on the microstructural factors such as: the quantitative ratio of the two phases ferrite/austenite (F/A), the presence of intermetallic compounds and the distribution of the alloying elements between the ferrite and austenite. As a result of the thermal cycles experienced by the base metal without a post-weld heat treatment, the mechanical properties are significantly different in the heat affected zone and the deposited metal compared with the properties of the base metal. The present paper highlights the effect of the post-weld solution treatment in order to restore the balance between austenite and ferrite in the welded joint areas and also to limit undesirable precipitation of secondary phases with implications for increasing the corrosion resistance.

  14. Microstructures and properties of welded joint of TiNi shape memory alloy and stainless steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱小明; 孙大谦; 李明高; 刘卫红

    2004-01-01

    The fracture characteristics of the joint were analyzed by means of scanning electron microscope(SEM).Microstructures of the joint were examined by means of optical microscope, SEM and an image analyzer. The results show that the tensile strength of the inhomogeneous joint of TiNi shape memory alloy and stainless steel is lower than that of the homogeneous joint and a plastic field appears in the heat affected zone on the side of TiNi shape memory alloy. Because TiNi shape memory alloy and stainless steel melted, a brittle as-cast structure was formed in the weld. The tensile strength and the shape memory effect of the inhomogeneous joint are strongly influenced by the changes of composition and structure of the joint. Measures should be taken to reduce the base metal melting and prevent the weld metal from the invasion by O for improving the properties of the TiNi shape memory alloy and stainless steel inhomogeneous joint.

  15. Hybrid Laser-Arc Welding of 10-mm-Thick Cast Martensitic Stainless Steel CA6NM: As-Welded Microstructure and Mechanical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirakhorli, Fatemeh; Cao, Xinjin; Pham, Xuan-Tan; Wanjara, Priti; Fihey, Jean-Luc

    2016-07-01

    Cast CA6NM martensitic stainless steel plates, 10 mm in thickness, were welded using hybrid laser-arc welding. The effect of different welding speeds on the as-welded joint integrity was characterized in terms of the weld bead geometry, defects, microstructure, hardness, ultimate tensile strength, and impact energy. Significant defects such as porosity, root humping, underfill, and excessive penetration were observed at a low welding speed (0.5 m/min). However, the underfill depth and excessive penetration in the joints manufactured at welding speeds above 0.75 m/min met the specifications of ISO 12932. Characterization of the as-welded microstructure revealed untempered martensite and residual delta ferrite dispersed at prior-austenite grain boundaries in the fusion zone. In addition, four different heat-affected zones in the weldments were differentiated through hardness mapping and inference from the Fe-Cr-Ni ternary phase diagram. The tensile fracture occurred in the base metal for all the samples and fractographic analysis showed that the crack path is within the martensite matrix, along primary delta ferrite-martensite interfaces and within the primary delta ferrite. Additionally, Charpy impact testing demonstrated slightly higher fracture energy values and deeper dimples on the fracture surface of the welds manufactured at higher welding speeds due to grain refinement and/or lower porosity.

  16. Effect of oxygen on weld shape and crystallographic orientation of duplex stainless steel weld using advanced A-TIG (AA-TIG) welding method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Ying, E-mail: yingzou@jwri.osaka-u.ac.jp; Ueji, Rintaro; Fujii, Hidetoshi

    2014-05-01

    The double-shielded advanced A-TIG (AA-TIG) welding method was adopted in this study for the welding of the SUS329J4L duplex stainless steel with the shielding gases of different oxygen content levels. The oxygen content in the shielding gas was controlled by altering the oxygen content in the outer layer gas, while the inner layer remained pure argon to suppress oxidation on the tungsten electrode. As a result, a deep weld penetration was obtained due to the dissolution of oxygen into the weld metals. Additionally, the microstructure of the weld metal was changed by the dissolution of oxygen. The austenite phase at the ferrite grain boundary followed a Kurdjumov–Sachs (K–S) orientation relationship with the ferrite matrix phase at any oxide content. On the other hand, the orientation relationship between the intragranular austenite phase and the ferrite matrix phase exhibited different patterns under different oxygen content levels. When there was little oxide in the fusion zone, only a limited part of the intragranular austenite phase and the ferrite matrix phase followed the K–S orientation relationship. With the increase of the oxide, the correspondence of the K–S relationship increased and fit very well in the 2.5% O{sub 2} shielded sample. The investigation of this phenomenon was carried out along with the nucleation mechanisms of the intragranular austenite phases. - Highlights: • Weld penetration increased with the increase of the oxygen content. • Average diameter and number density of oxide were changed by the oxygen content. • K-S relationship of Widmanstätten austenite/ferrite wasn’t varied by oxide. • Orientation relationship of intragranular austenite/ferrite was varied by oxide.

  17. Investigation of the Weld Properties of Dissimilar S32205 Duplex Stainless Steel with AISI 304 Steel Joints Produced by Arc Stud Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz Barış Başyiğit

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available UNS S32205 duplex stainless steel plates with a thickness of 3 mm are arc stud welded by M8 × 40 mm AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel studs with constant stud lifts in order to investigate the effects of welding arc voltages on mechanical and microstructural behaviors of the joints. As the welding arc voltage increases starting from 140 V, the tensile strength of the weldment also increases but the higher arc values results in more spatters around the weld seam up to 180 V. Conversely, the lower arc voltages causes poor tensile strength values to weldments. Tensile tests proved that all of the samples are split from each other in the welding zone but deformation occurs in duplex plates during the tensile testing of weldments so that the elongation values are not practically notable. The satisfactory tensile strength and bending values are determined by applying 180 volts of welding arc voltage according to ISO 14555 standard. Peak values of micro hardness occurred in weld metal most probably as a consequence of increasing heat input decreasing the delta ferrite ratios. As the arc voltage increases, the width of the heat affected zone increases. Coarsening of delta-ferrite and austenite grains was observed in the weld metal peak temperature zone but it especially becomes visible closer to the duplex side in all samples. The large voids and unwelded zones up to approximately 1 mm by length are observed by macro-structure inspections. Besides visual tests and micro-structural surveys; bending and microhardness tests with radiographic inspection were applied to samples for maintaining the correct welding parameters in obtaining well-qualified weldments of these two distinct groups of stainless steel materials.

  18. Electrical-thermal interaction simulation for resistance spot welding nugget process of mild steel and stainless steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王春生; 韩凤武; 陆培德; 赵熹华; 陈勇; 邱冬生

    2002-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite difference electrical-thermal model for resistance spot welding nugget process of mild steel and stainless steel is introduced. A simulation method of the interaction of electrical and thermal factors is presented. Meanwhile, calculation method of contact resistance and treatment method of heater structure is provided. The influence of the temperature dependent material properties and various cooling boundary conditions on welding process was also taken into account in the model. A method for improving the mild steel and stainless steel joint was analyzed in numerical simulation process. Experimental verification shows that the model prediction agrees well with the practice. The model provides a useful theoretic tool for the analysis of the process of resistance spot welding of mild steel and stainless steel.

  19. On the effects of gravity and sulfur content on the weld shape in horizontal narrow gap GTAW of stainless steels

    KAUST Repository

    Traidia, Abderrazak

    2013-07-01

    A simplified 2D axisymmetric model and a comprehensive 3D weld pool model, accounting for the free surface deformation and the filler metal addition, have been developed to investigate the factors that lead to asymmetric bead shapes in horizontal GTA welding of stainless steels. Buoyancy-induced flow and the sagging of the pool free surface, under the action of gravity, are found to be responsible for the weld asymmetry and the decrease in the weld penetration at the bottom sidewall. The numerical results clearly emphasized the beneficial role of the Marangoni shear stress in limiting the asymmetry of horizontal GTA welds. An additional experimental investigation showed that the asymmetry in the weld shape can be reduced when placing the lowest sulfur content component at the bottom side. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Modelling the grain orientation of austenitic stainless steel multipass welds to improve ultrasonic assessment of structural integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moysan, J.; Apfel, A.; Corneloup, G.; Chassignole, B

    2003-02-01

    Knowledge of the grain orientation quantifies the material anisotropy which helps to ensure the good ultrasonic testing of welded assemblies and the assessment of their mechanical integrity. The model described here concerns the weld solidification of 316L stainless steel. The solidification of multipass welds made with a shielded electrode raises many unsolved modelling questions as it involves heat and fluid flow modelling in addition to solute redistribution models. To overcome these difficulties we have developed the MINA model to predict the resulting grain orientations without using a complete solidification model. This model relies upon a phenomenological description of grain orientations from macrograph analysis. One important advance of this model is to include data reporting in the welding notebook that ensures the generality of the model. This model allows us to accurately simulate the ultrasonic testing of welded components and to propose a new tool to associate welding design with the ultrasonic assessment of structural integrity.

  1. Evaluation of welding by MIG in martensitic stainless steel; Avaliacao da soldagem pelo processo MIG em aco inoxidavel martensitico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, M.A. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil); Mariano, N.A.; Marinho, D.H.C. Marinho, E-mail: neideaparecidamariano@gmail.co [Universidade Federal de Alfenas (UNIFAL), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    This work evaluated structure's characterization and mechanical properties after the welding process of the stainless steel CA6NM. The employed welding process was the metal active gas with tubular wire. The control of the thermal cycle in the welding process has fundamental importance regarding the properties of the welded joint, particularly in the thermally affected zone. The mechanical properties were appraised through impact resistance tests and the hardness and microstructure through metallographic characterization and Ray-X diffraction. The parameters and the process of welding used promoted the hardness and toughness appropriate to the applications of the steel. Welding energy's control becomes an essential factor that can affect the temperature of carbide precipitation and the nucleation of the retained austenite in the in the region of the in the thermally affected zone. (author)

  2. Influence of microstructure and elemental partitioning on pitting corrosion resistance of duplex stainless steel welding joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiqiang; Jing, Hongyang; Xu, Lianyong; Han, Yongdian; Zhao, Lei; Zhang, Jianli

    2017-02-01

    The influences of microstructure and elemental partitioning on pitting corrosion resistance of duplex stainless steel joints welded by gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and flux-cored arc welding (FCAW) with different shielding gas compositions were studied by optical microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, electron probe microanalysis, and potentiostatic and potentiodynamic polarization methods The adding 2% N2 in shielding gas facilitated primary austenite formation in GTAW weld metal (WM) and suppressed Cr2N precipitation in GTAW weld root. In the HAZ, the banded microstructure disappeared while the coarse ferrite grains maintained same orientation as the banded ferrite in the BM. In the WM, the ferrite had one single orientation throughout a grain, whereas several families of austenite appeared. The austenite both in BM and WM enriched in Ni and nitro`gen, while Cr and Mo were concentrated in the ferrite and thus no element showed clear dendritic distribution in the WM (ER2209 and E2209T1). In addition, the secondary austenite had higher Ni content but lower Cr and Mo content than the primary austenite. The N2-supplemented shielding gas promoted nitrogen solid-solution in the primary and secondary austenite. Furthermore, the secondary austenite had relatively lower pitting resistance equivalent number (PREN) than the ferrite and primary austenite, thereby resulting in its preferential corrosion. The Cr2N precipitation led to relatively poor resistance to pitting corrosion in three HAZs and pure Ar shielding GTAW weld root. The N2-supplemented shielding gas improved pitting corrosion resistance of GTAW joint by increasing PREN of secondary austenite and suppressing Cr2N precipitation. In addition, the FCAW WM had much poorer resistance to pitting corrosion than the GTAW WM due to many O-Ti-Si-Mn inclusions. In the BM, since the austenite with lower PREN compared

  3. Metallic glass formation at the interface of explosively welded Nb and stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bataev, I. A.; Hokamoto, K.; Keno, H.; Bataev, A. A.; Balagansky, I. A.; Vinogradov, A. V.

    2015-07-01

    The interface between explosively welded niobium and stainless steel SUS 304 was studied using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-Ray spectroscopy. The wavy interface along which vortex zones were located was observed. The vortex zones formed due to the mixing of materials typically had amorphous structure. Inoue's criteria of glass formation were used to explain this result. The effect of the composition, cooling rate and pressure on the glass formation are discussed. The conditions of deformation, heating, and cooling as well as shockwaves propagation were numerically simulated. We show that the conditions of vortex zone formation resemble the conditions of rapid solidification processes. In contrast to the "classical" methods of rapid solidification of melt, the conditions of metastable phase formation during explosive welding are significantly complicated by the fluctuations of composition and pressure. Possible metastable structures formation at the interface of some common explosively joined materials is predicted.

  4. Ultrasonic C-scan Detection for Stainless Steel Spot Welding Based on Wavelet Package Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jing; XU Guocheng; XU Desheng; ZHOU Guanghao; FAN Qiuyue

    2015-01-01

    An ultrasonic test of spot welding for stainless steel is conducted. Based on wavelet packet decomposition, the ultrasonic echo signal has been analyzed deeply in time - frequency domain, which can easily distinguish the nugget from the corona bond. The 2D C-scan images produced by ultrasonic C scan which contribute to quantitatively calculate the nugget diameter for the computer are further analyzed. The spot welding nugget diameter can be automatically obtained by image enhancement, edge detection and equivalent diameter algorithm procedure. The ultrasonic detection values in this paper show good agreement with the metallographic measured values. The mean value of normal distribution curve is 0.006 67, and the standard deviation is 0.087 11. Ultrasonic C-scan test based on wavelet packet signal analysis is of high accuracy and stability.

  5. Evolution of microstructure and residual stress under various vibration modes in 304 stainless steel welds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Chih-Chun; Wang, Peng-Shuen; Wang, Jia-Siang; Wu, Weite

    2014-01-01

    Simultaneous vibration welding of 304 stainless steel was carried out with an eccentric circulating vibrator and a magnetic telescopic vibrator at subresonant (362 Hz and 59.3 Hz) and resonant (376 Hz and 60.9 Hz) frequencies. The experimental results indicate that the temperature gradient can be increased, accelerating nucleation and causing grain refinement during this process. During simultaneous vibration welding primary δ -ferrite can be refined and the morphologies of retained δ-ferrite become discontinuous so that δ-ferrite contents decrease. The smallest content of δ-ferrite (5.5%) occurred using the eccentric circulating vibrator. The diffraction intensities decreased and the FWHM widened with both vibration and no vibration. A residual stress can obviously be increased, producing an excellent effect on stress relief at a resonant frequency. The stress relief effect with an eccentric circulating vibrator was better than that obtained using a magnetic telescopic vibrator.

  6. Cracking behavior in a dissimilar weld between high silicon nodular cast iron and ferritic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sanghoon; Lee, Sangchul; Han, Kyutae; Hong, Seunggab; Lee, Changhee

    2010-06-01

    In this work, the microstructural evolution and cracking behavior of a dissimilar weld between high silicon nodular cast iron and ferritic stainless steel was investigated. An austenitic filler metal (Y309) was employed to produce the dissimilar weld. Microstructural analysis revealed that cracking formed at the unmixed zone (UMZ) and propagated into the partially melted zone (PMZ) in the bond line between the cast iron and the Y309, with hard layers formed around the bond line. The cracking behavior was strongly related to the difference in the melting points of cast iron and the Y309 filler metal, the local liquation of the laves phase, and the constitutional liquation between the graphite and austenite phases in the PMZ.

  7. Analysis of Acoustic Emission Signals During Laser Spot Welding of SS304 Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seounghwan; Ahn, Suneung; Park, Changsoon

    2014-03-01

    In this article, an in-process monitoring scheme for a pulsed Nd:YAG laser spot welding (LSW) is presented. Acoustic emission (AE) was selected for the feedback signal, and the AE data during LSW were sampled and analyzed for varying process conditions such as laser power and pulse duration. In the analysis, possible AE generation sources such as melting and solidification mechanism during welding were investigated using both the time- and frequency-domain signal processings. The results, which show close relationships between LSW and AE signals, were adopted in the feature (input) selection of a back-propagation artificial neural network, to predict the weldability of stainless steel sheets. Processed outputs agree well with LSW experimental data, which confirms the usefulness of the proposed scheme.

  8. On qualification of TOFD technique for austenitic stainless steel welds inspection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Ona, R. [Tecnatom, San Sebastian de los Reyes (Spain); Viggianiello, S.; Bleuze, A. [Metalscan, Saint-Remy (France)

    2006-07-01

    Time of Flight Diffraction (TOFD) technique is gaining ground as a solid method for detection and sizing of defects. It has been reported that TOFD technique provides good results on the inspection of fine grain steels. However, there are few results regarding the application and performance of this technique on austenitic stainless steels. A big challenge of these inspections is the coarse grain structure that produces low signal to noise ratio and may mask the diffraction signals. Appropriate transducer design, selection of technique parameters and analysis tools could overcome the actual difficulties. In this paper, the main design aspects and parameters of the TOFD technique for austenitic steels are presented. It follows the description of qualification tests carried out to validate the technique for inspecting stainless steels welds. To conclude, discussion of results from actual inspections is shown. (orig.)

  9. Multiobjective optimization of friction welding of UNS S32205 duplex stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.M. Ajith

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study is to optimize the process parameters for friction welding of duplex stainless steel (DSS UNS S32205. Experiments were conducted according to central composite design. Process variables, as inputs of the neural network, included friction pressure, upsetting pressure, speed and burn-off length. Tensile strength and microhardness were selected as the outputs of the neural networks. The weld metals had higher hardness and tensile strength than the base material due to grain refinement which caused failures away from the joint interface during tensile testing. Due to shorter heating time, no secondary phase intermetallic precipitation was observed in the weld joint. A multi-layer perceptron neural network was established for modeling purpose. Five various training algorithms, belonging to three classes, namely gradient descent, genetic algorithm and Levenberg–Marquardt, were used to train artificial neural network. The optimization was carried out by using particle swarm optimization method. Confirmation test was carried out by setting the optimized parameters. In conformation test, maximum tensile strength and maximum hardness obtained are 822 MPa and 322 Hv, respectively. The metallurgical investigations revealed that base metal, partially deformed zone and weld zone maintain austenite/ferrite proportion of 50:50.

  10. Finite Element Simulation of Residual Stresses in Butt Welding of Two AISI 304 Stainless Steel Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurinder Singh Brar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Welding is one of the most reliable and efficient permanent metal joining processes in the industry. When two plates are joined by welding, a very complex thermal cycle is applied to the weldment. Thermal energy applied results in irreversible elastic-plastic deformation and consequently gives rise to the residual stresses in and around fusion zone and heat affected zone (HAZ. It is well established fact that structural integrity of components is substantially affected by the residual stresses when subjected to thermal and structural loads. Presence of residual stresses may be beneficial or harmful for the structural components depending on the nature and magnitude of residual stresses. Using finite element based commercially available software, coupled thermal-mechanical three dimensional finite element model was developed by making an approximate geometry of the butt welded joint. Finite element analysis was performed to understand the complete nature of residual stresses in manual metal arc welded joint of AISI 304 stainless steel plate. Variation of residual stress in the plates in the heat affected zone was also being studied. The results obtained by finite element method agree well with those from X-ray diffraction method as published in literature for the prediction of residual stresses.

  11. Pitting and galvanic corrosion behavior of stainless steel with weld in wet-dry environment containing Cl-

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Accelerated corrosion test of stainless steel with weld was carried out to investigate the corrosion behavior under the wetdry cyclic condition in the atmosphere containing Cl-. In the surface morphology, corrosion products were analyzed by metallographic observation, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results show that the damage to stainless steel with weld in the atmosphere containing Cl- is due to localized corrosion, especially pitting and galvanic corrosion.Weld acts as the anode, whereas matrix acts as the cathode in the corrosion process. The pitting corrosion, including the nucleation and growth of a stable pit, is promoted by the presence of wet-dry cycles, especially during the drying stage. Pits centralizing in weld are found to be grouped together like colonies, with a number of smaller pits surrounding a larger pit. The composition of the corrosion products is Fe2O3, Cr2O3, Fe3O4, NiCrO4, etc.

  12. Electrochemical Study of Welded AISI 304 and 904L Stainless Steel in Seawater in View of Corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richárd Székely

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This is a comparative study of the corrosion behaviour of welds in AISI 304 and AISI 904L stainless steels carried out in seawater model solution in the temperature range 5-35°C and the standard of corrosion testing of welds was followed. The corrosion rate and corrosion attack characteristics were determined for welds of the examined steels with several type of treatment. The aim of this work was to compare the steels based on their resistance against the corrosion in terms of pitting potential (Epit and repassivation potential (Erepass. Seawater is an electrochemically aggressive medium, which can initiate localised corrosion in welded stainless steels. Different electrochemical and testing methods were used, including cyclic voltammetry, chronopotentiometry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS, pH measuring and penetration tests.

  13. CHOSEN PROPERTIES OF SANDWICH MATERIAL Ti-304 STAINLESS STEEL AFTER EXPLOSIVE WELDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmytro Ostroushko

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The work deals with evaluation of joint of stainless steel 304 SS (sheet and commercially pure Ti both after welding explosion and followed-up annealing at 600°C/1.5h/air. The bonding line shows sinusoidal character with curls in crest unlike the trough of the sine curve. The heat treatment does not change the character of the interface. In work amplitude, wave length and the interface thickness were measured. Thickness of compressed cladded matrix of Ti was measured in area of crests and troughs. In crest of joint melted zones were studied, where complex oxides and intermetallic phases were revealed.

  14. Intergranular stress corrosion cracking of welded ferritic stainless steels in high temperature aqueous environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuzuka, Toshio; Shimogori, Kazutoshi; Fujiwara, Kazuo; Tomari, Haruo (Kobe Steel Ltd. (Japan). Central Research and Development Lab.); Kanda, Masao

    1982-07-01

    In considering the application of ferritic stainless steels to heat exchanger tubing materials for moisture separator-reheaters in LWRs, the effects of environmental conditions (temperature, chloride, dissolved oxygen, pH), thermal history, and steel composition (content of C, N, Cr and Ti) on the Inter-Granular Stress Corrosion Cracking (IGSCC) in high temperature aqueous environments, were studied. The IGSCC was proved to depend on steel composition and thermal history rather than environment. From these results, a steel was designed to prevent IGSCC of the welding HAZ for 18Cr and 13Cr steels.

  15. Effects of post-weld heat treatment on dissimilar metal joint between aluminum alloy and stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong Honggang, E-mail: donghg@dlut.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116085 (China); Liao Chuanqing; Yang Liqun [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116085 (China); Dong Chuang [Key Lab of Materials Modification, Dalian University of Technology, Ministry of Education, Dalian 116085 (China)

    2012-07-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Al alloy was joined to stainless steel with Zn-15Al flux-cored filler wire. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effects of post-weld heat treatment on joint performance were investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The distribution of Zn-rich phases in the weld changed with PWHT conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fine Zn-rich phases uniformly distributed in the weld enhanced the joint strength. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fractured surfaces of the specimens after tensile testing were examined. - Abstract: Lap joining of 5A02 aluminum alloy to 304 stainless steel sheets was conducted by gas tungsten arc welding with Zn-15%Al flux-cored filler wire, and the effects of the temperature and duration time during post-weld heat treatment on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the resultant joints were investigated. The experimental results show that the concentration and size of the Zn-rich phases in the weld, especially along the weld/steel interface, changed with different temperature and duration time, and consequently affected the joint strength. The fine Zn-rich phases uniformly distributed in the weld could enhance the joint strength; however, the coarse Zn-rich phases along the interfacial layer would degrade the bonding strength of the interfacial layer. The fractured surfaces of the specimens after tensile testing were also examined.

  16. Feasibility of surface-coated friction stir welding tools to join AISI 304 grade austenitic stainless steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.K. LAKSHMINARAYANAN; C.S.RAMACHANDRAN; V.BALASUBRAMANIAN

    2014-01-01

    An attempt is made to develop the tools that are capable enough to withstand the shear, impact and thermal forces that occur during friction stir welding of stainless steels. The atmospheric plasma spray and plasma transferred arc hardfacing processes are employed to deposit refractory ceramic based composite coatings on the Inconel 738 alloy. Five different combinations of self-fluxing alloy powder and 60% ceramic rein-forcement particulate mixtures are used for coating. The best friction stir welding tool selected based on tool wear analysis is used to fabricate the austenitic stainless steel joints.

  17. 不锈钢球阀自动堆焊机的设计%Design of an Automatic Welding Machine for Stainless Steel Ball Valve

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张辉; 冯晓宁

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an automatic surface welding machine of welded stainless steel ball valve, mainly composed of the welding robot, welding machine and positioner. It automatically complete the surface welding of stainless steel layer of a complex space surface of the steel ball. After testing, the valve welding quality of stainless steel ball by the automatic surface welding machine meet the technical requirements.%设计了一种焊接不锈钢球阀的自动堆焊机,主要由焊接机器人、焊机及变位机组成, 能够直接在具有复杂空间表面的碳钢球体上自动地完成不锈钢层的堆焊.经过试验,自动堆焊机焊接的不锈钢球阀质量满足技术要求.

  18. Influence of the post-weld surface treatment on the corrosion resistance of the duplex stainless steel 1.4062

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosemann, P.; Müller, C.; Baumann, O.; Modersohn, W.; Halle, T.

    2017-03-01

    The duplex stainless steel 1.4062 (X2CrNiN22-2) is used as alternative material to austenitic stainless steels in the construction industry. The corrosion resistance of welded seams is influenced by the base material, the weld filler material, the welding process and also by the final surface treatment. The scale layer next to the weld seam can be removed by grinding, pickling, electro-polished or blasting depending on the application and the requested corrosion resistance. Blasted surfaces are often used in industrial practice due to the easier and cheaper manufacturing process compared to pickled or electro-polished surfaces. Furthermore blasting with corundum-grain is more effective than blasting with glass-beads which also lower the process costs. In recent years, stainless steel surfaces showed an unusually high susceptibility to pitting corrosion after grinding with corundum. For this reason, it is now also questioned critically whether the corrosion resistance is influenced by the applied blasting agent. This question was specifically investigated by comparing grinded, pickled, corundum-grain- and glass-bead-blasted welding seams. Results of the SEM analyses of the blasting agents and the blasted surfaces will be presented and correlated with the different performed corrosion tests (potential measurement, KorroPad-test and pitting potential) on welding seams with different surface treatments.

  19. Microstructural evolution in fast-neutron-irradiated austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoller, R.E.

    1987-12-01

    The present work has focused on the specific problem of fast-neutron-induced radiation damage to austenitic stainless steels. These steels are used as structural materials in current fast fission reactors and are proposed for use in future fusion reactors. Two primary components of the radiation damage are atomic displacements (in units of displacements per atom, or dpa) and the generation of helium by nuclear transmutation reactions. The radiation environment can be characterized by the ratio of helium to displacement production, the so-called He/dpa ratio. Radiation damage is evidenced microscopically by a complex microstructural evolution and macroscopically by density changes and altered mechanical properties. The purpose of this work was to provide additional understanding about mechanisms that determine microstructural evolution in current fast reactor environments and to identify the sensitivity of this evolution to changes in the He/dpa ratio. This latter sensitivity is of interest because the He/dpa ratio in a fusion reactor first wall will be about 30 times that in fast reactor fuel cladding. The approach followed in the present work was to use a combination of theoretical and experimental analysis. The experimental component of the work primarily involved the examination by transmission electron microscopy of specimens of a model austenitic alloy that had been irradiated in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. A major aspect of the theoretical work was the development of a comprehensive model of microstructural evolution. This included explicit models for the evolution of the major extended defects observed in neutron irradiated steels: cavities, Frank faulted loops and the dislocation network. 340 refs., 95 figs., 18 tabs.

  20. Evaluation of irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of type 316 stainless steel irradiated in FBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukada, T. (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)); Jitsukawa, S. (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)); Shiba, K. (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)); Sato, Y. (Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan)); Shibahara, I. (Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan)); Nakajima, H. (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan))

    1993-12-01

    Type 316 stainless steel from the core of the experimental fast breeder reactor (FBR) JOYO was examined by the slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) test in pure, oxygenated-water and air and by the electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (EPR) test to evaluate a susceptibility to the irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) and the radiation-induced segregation (RIS). The solution annealed and 20% cold-worked materials had been irradiated at 425 C to a neutron fluence of 8.3x10[sup 26] n/m[sup 2] (> 0.1 MeV) which is equivalent to 40 displacement per atom (dpa). Intergranular cracking was induced by the SSRT in water at 200 and 300 C, but was not observed on specimen tested in water at 60 C and in air at 300 C. This indicates that irradiation increased a susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in water. After the EPR test, grain boundary etching was observed in addition to grain face etching. This suggests Cr depletion may have occurred both at grain boundary and at defect clusters during the irradiation. The results are compared with the behavior of similar materials irradiated with different neutron spectrum. (orig.)

  1. Parametric Optimization Of Gas Metal Arc Welding Process By Using Grey Based Taguchi Method On Aisi 409 Ferritic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Nabendu; Kumar, Pradip; Nandi, Goutam

    2016-10-01

    Welding input process parameters play a very significant role in determining the quality of the welded joint. Only by properly controlling every element of the process can product quality be controlled. For better quality of MIG welding of Ferritic stainless steel AISI 409, precise control of process parameters, parametric optimization of the process parameters, prediction and control of the desired responses (quality indices) etc., continued and elaborate experiments, analysis and modeling are needed. A data of knowledge - base may thus be generated which may be utilized by the practicing engineers and technicians to produce good quality weld more precisely, reliably and predictively. In the present work, X-ray radiographic test has been conducted in order to detect surface and sub-surface defects of weld specimens made of Ferritic stainless steel. The quality of the weld has been evaluated in terms of yield strength, ultimate tensile strength and percentage of elongation of the welded specimens. The observed data have been interpreted, discussed and analyzed by considering ultimate tensile strength ,yield strength and percentage elongation combined with use of Grey-Taguchi methodology.

  2. Mechanical Properties and Microstructure of Dissimilar Friction Stir Welds of 11Cr-Ferritic/Martensitic Steel to 316 Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yutaka S.; Kokawa, Hiroyuki; Fujii, Hiromichi T.; Yano, Yasuhide; Sekio, Yoshihiro

    2015-12-01

    Dissimilar joints between ferritic and austenitic steels are of interest for selected applications in next generation fast reactors. In this study, dissimilar friction-stir welding of an 11 pct Cr ferritic/martensitic steel to a 316 austenitic stainless steel was attempted and the mechanical properties and microstructure of the resulting welds were examined. Friction-stir welding produces a stir zone without macroscopic weld-defects, but the two dissimilar steels are not intermixed. The two dissimilar steels are interleaved along a sharp zigzagging interface in the stir zone. During small-sized tensile testing of the stir zone, this sharp interface did not act as a fracture site. Furthermore, the microstructure of the stir zone was refined in both the ferritic/martensitic steel and the 316 stainless steel resulting in improved mechanical properties over the adjacent base material regions. This study demonstrates that friction-stir welding can produce welds between dissimilar steels that contain no macroscopic weld-defects and display suitable mechanical properties.

  3. Microstructural, Micro-hardness and Sensitization Evaluation in HAZ of Type 316L Stainless Steel Joint with Narrow Gap Welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Islam, Faisal Shafiqul; Jang, Changheui [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Shi Chull [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    From Micro-hardness measurement HAZ zone was found approximately 1-1.5 mm in NGW and DL-EPR test confirmed that 316L NGW HAZ was not susceptible to sensitization as DOS <1% according to sensitization criteria based on reference. In nuclear power plants 316L stainless steels are commonly used material for their metallurgical stability, high corrosion resistance, and good creep and ductility properties at elevated temperatures. Welding zone considered as the weakest and failure initiation source of the components. For safety and economy of nuclear power plants accurate and dependable structural integrity assessment of main components like pressure vessels and piping are need as it joined by different welding process. In similar and dissimilar metal weld it has been observed that weld microstructure cause the variation of mechanical properties through the thickness direction. In the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) relative to the fusion line face a unique thermal experience during welding.

  4. Assessment of The Cracking Properties of Stainless Steel Alloys and their Usability for Laser Welding in Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Thomas Winther

    2001-01-01

    Methods to assess stainless steel alloys’ cracking properties and usability for laser welding has been studied. Also tests to assess alloys’ susceptibility to hot cracking has been conducted. Among these is the so-called Weeter test which assesses the alloy by executing a number of spot welds...... to provoke cracking in the alloy. In this work the Weeter test has been modified and changed in order to develop a faster and easier test also applicable to small specimens. The new test, called a Groove test differs from the Weeter test by its procedure in which linear seam welds are conducted instead...... of spot welds. The Groove test has the advantage of an easier microscopy and analysis in the welds. Results from crack tests was partly confirmed by predictions made on the basis of the alloy’s constituents and solidification growth rate....

  5. Effects of laser power density on static and dynamic mechanical properties of dissimilar stainless steel welded joints

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-Peng Wei; Mao-Hui Li; Gang Yu; Xian-Qian Wu; Chen-Guang Huang; Zhu-Ping Duan

    2012-01-01

    The mechanical properties of laser welded joints under impact loadings such as explosion and car crash etc.are critical for the engineering designs. The hardness,static and dynamic mechanical properties of AISI304 and AISI316L dissimilar stainless steel welded joints by CO2 laser were experimentally studied. The dynamic strain-stress curves at the strain rate around 103 s-1 were obtained by the split Hopkinson tensile bar (SHTB).The static mechanical properties of the welded joints have little changes with the laser power density and all fracture occurs at 316 L side.However,the strain rate sensitivity has a strong dependence on laser power density.The value of strain rate factor decreases with the increase of laser power density.The welded joint which may be applied for the impact loading can be obtained by reducing the laser power density in the case of welding quality assurance.

  6. Finite element modeling of the effect of welding parameters on solidification cracking of Austenitic Stainless Steel 310

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eslam Ranjbarnodeh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A transient thermo-mechanical model is employed to study the effects of welding parameters on the occurrence of solidification cracking. A finite element program, ANSYS, is employed to solve the thermal and mechanical equations while the different variables such as welding current, speed and sequence are considered in the simulation. The studied geometry was butt joint of two stainless steel plates with the thickness of 2 mm. Then, the samples were welded by TIG method without filler. To verify the numerical results, the model outputs were checked with the experimental observations and good agreement was observed. It was found that the increasing of welding current from 70 A to 100 A resulted in the increase in transverse tensile strain from 1.2 to 2.1 which can facilitate the occurrence of solidification cracking. Furthermore, the application of symmetric welding layout is an effective method to prevent solidification cracking.

  7. Microstructure characterization in the weld joint of a high nickel austenitic alloy and Cr18-Ni8 stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Na; Li, Yajiang; Wang, Juan [Shandong Univ., Jinan (CN). Key Lab. for Liquid - Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials (Ministry of Education)

    2012-06-15

    High nickel austenitic alloy, 6 mm thick, and Cr18-Ni8 stainless steel with a thickness of 0.6 mm were joined by pulsed current tungsten inert gas arc welding without filler metal in this work. Metallographic examination, microhardness measurement and electron microprobe analysis were used to reveal microstructural characteristics in the joint. The results indicated that the weld metal consisted of {gamma}-austenite, {delta}-ferrite and carbides without the appearance of martensite. There were dendrite crystals at the edge of the weld metal near the high nickel austenitic alloy and isometric crystals in the center of the weld metal. The microhardness of the weld metal was the highest due to the existence of carbides and its finer structure. Graphite flakes were still embedded in the austenite matrix of the heat-affected zone without the formation of martensite. (orig.)

  8. Hardness analysis of welded joints of austenitic and duplex stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topolska, S.

    2016-08-01

    Stainless steels are widely used in the modern world. The continuous increase in the use of stainless steels is caused by getting greater requirements relating the corrosion resistance of all types of devices. The main property of these steels is the ability to overlap a passive layer of an oxide on their surface. This layer causes that they become resistant to oxidation. One of types of corrosion-resistant steels is ferritic-austenitic steel of the duplex type, which has good strength properties. It is easily formable and weldable as well as resistant to erosion and abrasive wear. It has a low susceptibility to stress-corrosion cracking, to stress corrosion, to intercrystalline one, to pitting one and to crevice one. For these reasons they are used, among others, in the construction of devices and facilities designed for chemicals transportation and for petroleum and natural gas extraction. The paper presents the results which shows that the particular specimens of the ][joint representing both heat affected zones (from the side of the 2205 steel and the 316L one) and the weld are characterized by higher hardness values than in the case of the same specimens for the 2Y joint. Probably this is caused by machining of edges of the sections of metal sheets before the welding process, which came to better mixing of native materials and the filler metal. After submerged arc welding the 2205 steel still retains the diphase, austenitic-ferritic structure and the 316L steel retains the austenitic structure with sparse bands of ferrite σ.

  9. Effect of Austenitic and Austeno-Ferritic Electrodes on 2205 Duplex and 316L Austenitic Stainless Steel Dissimilar Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Jagesvar; Taiwade, Ravindra V.

    2016-09-01

    This study addresses the effect of different types of austenitic and austeno-ferritic electrodes (E309L, E309LMo and E2209) on the relationship between weldability, microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of shielded metal arc welded duplex/austenitic (2205/316L) stainless steel dissimilar joints using the combined techniques of optical, scanning electron microscope, energy-dispersive spectrometer and electrochemical. The results indicated that the change in electrode composition led to microstructural variations in the welds with the development of different complex phases such as vermicular ferrite, lathy ferrite, widmanstatten and intragranular austenite. Mechanical properties of welded joints were diverged based on compositions and solidification modes; it was observed that ferritic mode solidified weld dominated property wise. However, the pitting corrosion resistance of all welds showed different behavior in chloride solution; moreover, weld with E2209 was superior, whereas E309L exhibited lower resistance. Higher degree of sensitization was observed in E2209 weld, while lesser in E309L weld. Optimum ferrite content was achieved in all welds.

  10. Effect of Austenitic and Austeno-Ferritic Electrodes on 2205 Duplex and 316L Austenitic Stainless Steel Dissimilar Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Jagesvar; Taiwade, Ravindra V.

    2016-11-01

    This study addresses the effect of different types of austenitic and austeno-ferritic electrodes (E309L, E309LMo and E2209) on the relationship between weldability, microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of shielded metal arc welded duplex/austenitic (2205/316L) stainless steel dissimilar joints using the combined techniques of optical, scanning electron microscope, energy-dispersive spectrometer and electrochemical. The results indicated that the change in electrode composition led to microstructural variations in the welds with the development of different complex phases such as vermicular ferrite, lathy ferrite, widmanstatten and intragranular austenite. Mechanical properties of welded joints were diverged based on compositions and solidification modes; it was observed that ferritic mode solidified weld dominated property wise. However, the pitting corrosion resistance of all welds showed different behavior in chloride solution; moreover, weld with E2209 was superior, whereas E309L exhibited lower resistance. Higher degree of sensitization was observed in E2209 weld, while lesser in E309L weld. Optimum ferrite content was achieved in all welds.

  11. Effect of Gas Tungsten Arc Welding Parameters on Hydrogen-Assisted Cracking of Type 321 Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenak, Paul; Unigovski, Yaakov; Shneck, Roni

    2016-05-01

    The susceptibility of AISI type 321 stainless steel welded by the gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process to hydrogen-assisted cracking (HAC) was studied in a tensile test combined with in situ cathodic charging. Specimen charging causes a decrease in ductility of both the as-received and welded specimens. The mechanical properties of welds depend on welding parameters. For example, the ultimate tensile strength and ductility increase with growing shielding gas (argon) rate. More severe decrease in the ductility was obtained after post-weld heat treatment (PWHT). In welded steels, in addition to discontinuous grain boundary carbides (M23C6) and dense distribution of metal carbides MC ((Ti, Nb)C) precipitated in the matrix, the appearance of delta-ferrite phase was observed. The fracture of sensitized specimens was predominantly intergranular, whereas the as-welded specimens exhibited mainly transgranular regions. High-dislocation density regions and stacking faults were found in delta-ferrite formed after welding. Besides, thin stacking fault plates and epsilon-martensite were found in the austenitic matrix after the cathodic charging.

  12. Linear Friction Welding Process Model for Carpenter Custom 465 Precipitation-Hardened Martensitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grujicic, M.; Yavari, R.; Snipes, J. S.; Ramaswami, S.; Yen, C.-F.; Cheeseman, B. A.

    2014-06-01

    An Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian finite-element analysis is combined with thermo-mechanical material constitutive models for Carpenter Custom 465 precipitation-hardened martensitic stainless steel to develop a linear friction welding (LFW) process model for this material. The main effort was directed toward developing reliable material constitutive models for Carpenter Custom 465 and toward improving functional relations and parameterization of the workpiece/workpiece contact-interaction models. The LFW process model is then used to predict thermo-mechanical response of Carpenter Custom 465 during LFW. Specifically, temporal evolutions and spatial distribution of temperature within, and expulsion of the workpiece material from, the weld region are examined as a function of the basic LFW process parameters, i.e., (a) contact-pressure history, (b) reciprocation frequency, and (c) reciprocation amplitude. Examination of the results obtained clearly revealed the presence of three zones within the weld, i.e., (a) Contact-interface region, (b) Thermo-mechanically affected zone, and (c) heat-affected zone. While there are no publicly available reports related to Carpenter Custom 465 LFW behavior, to allow an experiment/computation comparison, these findings are consistent with the results of our ongoing companion experimental investigation.

  13. 77 FR 10773 - Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Italy, Malaysia, and the Philippines; Scheduling of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-23

    ... to its notice of institution (76 FR 67473, November 1, 2011) of the subject five-year reviews was.... See 76 FR 61937 (Oct. 6, 2011) and the newly revised Commission's Handbook on E-Filing, available on... COMMISSION Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Italy, Malaysia, and the Philippines; Scheduling...

  14. 77 FR 18266 - Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Italy, Malaysia, and the Philippines; Revised...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-27

    ... the conduct of the expedited subject five- year reviews (77 FR 10773, February 23, 2012). The... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Italy, Malaysia, and the Philippines;...

  15. 75 FR 27987 - Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipes From the Republic of Korea: Final Results of Antidumping...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-19

    ... USA, Inc., and Outokumpu Stainless Pipe, Inc. Scope of the Order The merchandise subject to the... set forth by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) for the welded form of chromium... consumption on or after the publication date of the final results of this ] administrative review, as provided...

  16. Laser-Beam Welding Impact on the Deformation Properties of Stainless Steels When Used for Automotive Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evin Emil

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Materials other than standard and advanced high strength steels are remarkable for the thin-walled structures of the car-body in recent years in order to safety enhancement, weight and emission reduction, corrosion resistance improvement. Thus, there are presented in the paper the deformation properties of laser welded austenitic AISI 304 and ferritic AISI 430 stainless steels compared to these one measured for the high strength low alloyed steel H220PD. The properties were researched by tensile test and 3-point bending test with fixed ends on specimens made of basic material and laser welded one. The specimens were welded by solid state fiber laser YLS-5000 in longitudinal direction (the load direction. The deformation properties such as strength, stiffness and deformation work were evaluated and compared. The strength and stiffness were calculated from tensile test results and the deformation work was calculated from both, tensile test and 3-point bending test results. There has been found only minor effect of laser welding to the deformation properties for high strength low alloyed steel H220PD and austenitic stainless steel AISI 304. Otherwise, the laser welding strongly influenced the deformation work of the ferritic stainless steel AISI 430 as well as the elongation at tensile test.

  17. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of a Dissimilar Friction Stir Weld between Austenitic Stainless Steel and Low Carbon Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.Jafarzadegan; A.Abdollah-zadeh; A.H.Feng; T.Saeid; J.Shen; H.Assadi

    2013-01-01

    Dissimilar fusion welding of austenitic stainless steels to carbon steels has some metallurgical and technical problems.It was suggested that the solid-state nature of friction stir welding (FSW) can overcome these problems and produce a sound weld with reliable mechanical properties.In this study,plates of 304 stainless steel and st37 steel were welded together by FSW at tool rotational speed of 600 r/min and welding speed of 50 mm/min.In the stir zone (SZ) of 304 stainless steel,the results showed a refined grain structure with some features of metadynamic recrystallization.In the SZ of st37 steel,the hot deformation of material in the austenite region produced small austenite grains.These grains transformed to fine ferrite and pearlite by cooling the material after FSW.The production of fine grains increased the hardness and tensile strength in the SZ of both sides with respect to their base metals (BMs).

  18. Hydrogen embrittlement of super austenitic stainless steel welded joints; Fragilizacao por hidrogenio em juntas soldadas de acos inoxidaveis superausteniticos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paredes, Ramon S. Cortes [Parana Univ., Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Centro Politecnico. Inst. de Tecnologia para o Desenvolvimento (LACTEC); Berthier, Thiana; Kuromoto, Neide K. [Parana Univ., Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Lab. de Materiais e Tratamento de Superficies. Lab. de Nanopropriedades Mecanicas

    2004-09-15

    The austenitic stainless steel embrittlement is usually present on sulphurous medium due to the hydrogen presence, resulting on cracks and corrosion on acid medium. Several researches carried out on the behaviour of hydrogenated stainless steel structures, had shown that the hydrogen induces superficial phase transformation during hydrogenation period and cracks formation after this period. These are due to the permeation of the hydrogen into the material, which is apprehended on preferential site, resulting on high pressure zones of molecular hydrogen. These zones may lead the crack formation, compromising the mechanical properties. There are few results on austenitic and super austenitic stainless steel, considering the transformations induced on welded unions. This work evaluates the cracks nucleation on welded unions of super austenitic stainless steel AISI 904L exposed to hydrogen rich environments and its relation to the reduction of material ductility. The samples were welded by the Mig/Mag process, followed by hydrogenation which were cathodic on sulfuric acid solution at room temperature. The results showed that the tested super austenitic stainless steel has a significant amount of cracks and no phase transformation has occurred after hydronization. (author)

  19. Effects of water and irradiation temperatures on IASCC susceptibility of type 316 stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukada, Takashi E-mail: ttsukada@popsvr.tokai.jaeri.go.jp; Miwa, Yukio; Jitsukawa, Shiro; Shiba, Kiyoyuki; Ouchi, Asao

    2004-08-01

    Effects of water and irradiation temperatures on irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of type 316 stainless steel were investigated. Type 316 stainless steel was irradiated at 333-673 K to a dose level of 16 dpa. Susceptibility to IASCC was evaluated by slow strain rate testing in oxygenated water in the temperature range of 513-573 K. Irradiation at 603 and 673 K caused IASCC in 513 K water, but irradiation below 473 K did not induce IASCC at 513 K. Specimens irradiated at 333 K did not show IASCC susceptibility in 513 K water, but high susceptibility was observed in 573 K water. Effect of irradiation temperature is discussed from the view points of microstructural and microcompositional changes.

  20. Automated Flaw Detection Scheme For Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel Weld Specimens Using Hilbert Huang Transform Of Ultrasonic Phased Array Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, T.; Majumdar, Shantanu; Udpa, L.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Crawford, Susan L.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work is to develop processing algorithms to detect and localize the flaws using NDE ultrasonic data. Data was collected using cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) weld specimens on-loan from the U.S. nuclear power industry’s Pressurized Water Reactor Owners Group (PWROG) specimen set. Each specimen consists of a centrifugally cast stainless steel (CCSS) pipe section welded to a statically cast (SCSS) or wrought (WRSS) section. The paper presents a novel automated flaw detection and localization scheme using low frequency ultrasonic phased array inspection signals in the weld and heat affected zone of the base materials. The major steps of the overall scheme are preprocessing and region of interest (ROI) detection followed by the Hilbert Huang transform (HHT) of A-scans in the detected ROIs. HHT offers time-frequency-energy distribution for each ROI. The accumulation of energy in a particular frequency band is used as a classification feature for the particular ROI.

  1. The possibility of tribopair lifetime extending by welding of quenched and tempered stainless steel with quenched and tempered carbon steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Marušić

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In the conditions of tribocorrosion wear, extending of parts lifetime could be achieved by using stainless steel,which is hardened to sufficiently high hardness. In the tribosystem bolt/ bushing shell/link plate of the bucket elevator transporter conveyor machine, the previously quenched and tempered martensitic stainless steel for bolts is hardened at ≈47 HRC and welded with the quenched and tempered high yield carbon steel for bolts. Additional material, based on Cr-Ni-Mo (18/8/6 is used. The microstructure and hardness of welded samples are tested. On the tensile tester, resistance of the welded joint is tested with a simulated experiment. Dimensional control of worn tribosystem elements was performed after six months of service.

  2. Gas tungsten arc welding and friction stir welding of ultrafine grained AISI 304L stainless steel: Microstructural and mechanical behavior characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabooni, S., E-mail: s.sabooni@ma.iut.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, 84156-83111 Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Karimzadeh, F.; Enayati, M.H. [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, 84156-83111 Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ngan, A.H.W. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong (China); Jabbari, H. [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, 84156-83111 Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    In the present study, an ultrafine grained (UFG) AISI 304L stainless steel with the average grain size of 650 nm was successfully welded by both gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and friction stir welding (FSW). GTAW was applied without any filler metal. FSW was also performed at a constant rotational speed of 630 rpm and different welding speeds from 20 to 80 mm/min. Microstructural characterization was carried out by High Resolution Scanning Electron Microscopy (HRSEM) with Electron Backscattered Diffraction (EBSD) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Nanoindentation, microhardness measurements and tensile tests were also performed to study the mechanical properties of the base metal and weldments. The results showed that the solidification mode in the GTAW welded sample is FA (ferrite–austenite) type with the microstructure consisting of an austenite matrix embedded with lath type and skeletal type ferrite. The nugget zone microstructure in the FSW welded samples consisted of equiaxed dynamically recrystallized austenite grains with some amount of elongated delta ferrite. Sigma phase precipitates were formed in the region ahead the rotating tool during the heating cycle of FSW, which were finally fragmented into nanometric particles and distributed in the weld nugget. Also there is a high possibility that the existing delta ferrite in the microstructure rapidly transforms into sigma phase particles during the short thermal cycle of FSW. These suggest that high strain and deformation during FSW can promote sigma phase formation. The final austenite grain size in the nugget zone was found to decrease with increasing Zener–Hollomon parameter, which was obtained quantitatively by measuring the peak temperature, calculating the strain rate during FSW and exact examination of hot deformation activation energy by considering the actual grain size before the occurrence of dynamic recrystallization. Mechanical properties observations showed that the welding

  3. Laser Welding Characterization of Kovar and Stainless Steel Alloys as Suitable Materials for Components of Photonic Devices Packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadhali, M. M. A.; Zainal, Saktioto J.; Munajat, Y.; Jalil, A.; Rahman, R.

    2010-03-01

    The weldability of Kovar and stainless steel alloys by Nd:YAG laser beam is studied through changing of some laser beam parameters. It has been found that there is a suitable interaction of the pulsed laser beam of low power laser pulse with both the two alloys. The change of thermophysical properties with absorbed energy from the laser pulse is discussed in this paper which reports the suitability of both Kovar and stainless steel 304 as the base materials for photonic devices packaging. We used laser weld system (LW4000S from Newport) which employs Nd:YAG laser system with two simultaneous beams output for packaging 980 nm high power laser module. Results of changing both laser spot weld width and penetration depth with changing both the pulse peak power density, pulse energy and pulse duration show that there are good linear relationships between laser pulse energy or peak power density and pulse duration with laser spot weld dimensions( both laser spot weld width and penetration depth). Therefore we concluded that there should be an optimization for both the pulse peak power and pulse duration to give a suitable aspect ratio (laser spot width to penetration depth) for achieving the desired welds with suitable penetration depth and small spot width. This is to reduce the heat affected zone (HAZ) which affects the sensitive optical components. An optimum value of the power density in the order of 105 w/cm2 found to be suitable to induce melting in the welded joints without vaporization. The desired ratio can also be optimized by changing the focus position on the target material as illustrated from our measurements. A theoretical model is developed to simulate the temperature distribution during the laser pulse heating and predict the penetration depth inside the material. Samples have been investigated using SEM with EDS. The metallographic measurements on the weld spot show a suitable weld yield with reasonable weld width to depth ratio.

  4. Effect of electromagnetic interaction during fusion welding of AISI 2205 duplex stainless steel on the corrosion resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Rentería, M. A.; López-Morelos, V. H.; González-Sánchez, J.; García-Hernández, R.; Dzib-Pérez, L.; Curiel-López, F. F.

    2017-02-01

    The effect of electromagnetic interaction of low intensity (EMILI) applied during fusion welding of AISI 2205 duplex stainless steel on the resistance to localised corrosion in natural seawater was investigated. The heat affected zone (HAZ) of samples welded under EMILI showed a higher temperature for pitting initiation and lower dissolution under anodic polarisation in chloride containing solutions than samples welded without EMILI. The EMILI assisted welding process developed in the present work enhanced the resistance to localised corrosion due to a modification on the microstructural evolution in the HAZ and the fusion zone during the thermal cycle involved in fusion welding. The application of EMILI reduced the size of the HAZ, limited coarsening of the ferrite grains and promoted regeneration of austenite in this zone, inducing a homogeneous passive condition of the surface. EMILI can be applied during fusion welding of structural or functional components of diverse size manufactured with duplex stainless steel designed to withstand aggressive environments such as natural seawater or marine atmospheres.

  5. The influence of the corrosion product layer generated on the high strength low-alloy steels welded by underwater wet welding with stainless steel electrodes in seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Qiang; Zou, Yan; Kong, Xiangfeng; Gao, Yang; Dong, Sheng; Zhang, Wei

    2017-02-01

    The high strength low-alloy steels are welded by underwater wet welding with stainless steel electrodes. The micro-structural and electrochemical corrosion study of base metal (BM), weld zone (WZ) and heat affected zone (HAZ) are carried out to understand the influence of the corrosion product layer generated on the high strength low-alloy steels welded by underwater wet welding with stainless steel electrodes, methods used including, potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results indicate that the WZ acts as a cathode and there is no corrosion product on it throughout the immersion period in seawater. The HAZ and BM acts as anodes. The corrosion rates of the HAZ and BM change with the immersion time increasing. In the initial immersion period, the HAZ has the highest corrosion rate because it has a coarse tempered martensite structure and the BM exhibites a microstructure with very fine grains of ferrite and pearlite. After a period of immersion, the BM has the highest corrosion rate. The reason is that the corrosion product layer on the HAZ is dense and has a better protective property while that on the BM is loose and can not inhibit the diffusion of oxygen.

  6. The Influence of Post Weld Heat Treatment in Alloy 82/182 Dissimilar Metal Weld between Low Alloy Steel and 316L Stainless Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Sunghoon; Hong, Jong-Dae; Jang, Changheui [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoung Soo [KHNP-CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Dissimilar metal welds (DMWs) using an Alloy 82/182 are widely used to join low alloy steel components and stainless steel pipes in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). It has been reported that tensile residual stress would be generated within DMWs during the welding processes. It is thought as main reason for primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) resulting in deterioration of long-term integrity. The application of post weld heat treatment (PWHT) has been considered to reduce the tensile residual stress after welding process. Meanwhile, the PWHT could affect the changes in microstructure, mechanical properties, and corrosion resistance. Therefore, in this study, the effects of PWHT on the microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion behaviors of base metals of low alloy steel and stainless steel and welding materials of Alloy 82/182 are evaluated. The influence of PWHT in DMW has been investigated. SA 508 and 316L SS exhibited tempered bainite and austenitic grains with a few residual stringer type ferrite. Grain boundary carbides are not precipitated owing to low carbon and insufficient exposure time in 316L SS. The change of mechanicals properties in base metals is not observed. In case of Alloy 182, after PWHT, grain boundaries are covered with film-like continuous Cr-rich carbides.

  7. Corrosion Resistance and Mechanical Properties of TIG and A-TIG Welded Joints of Lean Duplex Stainless Steel S82441 / 1.4662

    OpenAIRE

    Brytan Z.; Niagaj J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents results of pitting corrosion resistance of TIG (autogenous and with filler metal) and A-TIG welded lean duplex stainless steel S82441/1.4662 evaluated according to ASTM G48 method, where autogenous TIG welding process was applied using different amounts of heat input and shielding gases like pure Ar and Ar+N2 and Ar+He mixtures. The results of pitting corrosion resistance of the welded joints of lean duplex stainless steel S82441 were studied in as weld conditions and afte...

  8. Laser-induced fluorescence applied to laser welding of austenitic stainless steel for dilute alloying element detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonds, Brian J.; Sowards, Jeffrey W.; Williams, Paul A.

    2017-08-01

    Optical spectral analysis of the laser weld plume is a common technique for non-contact, in situ weld plume analysis. However, the low sensitivity of optical emission spectroscopy limits the available information during 1070 nm wavelength laser welding, which is becoming the standard in many industrial operations. Here we demonstrate an improved sensitivity of optical spectroscopy by applying laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) for probing the hot gas plume induced during fiber laser welding of 304L austenitic stainless steel. As a proof-of-principle, we show that LIF is capable of resolving a spectral signal from silicon being emitted during welding. Optical detection of such a low concentration alloying element has not previously been reported and shows the capability of LIF for increased sensitivity. Silicon atoms in the weld plume were excited in the ultraviolet at 221.09 nm and detected at 221.64 nm. We demonstrate the detection of silicon LIF down to laser welding powers of 600 W (210 kW cm-2) making this technique applicable even in low-power laser welding or additive manufacturing scenarios.

  9. Finite Element Analysis of Modeling Residual Stress Distribution in All-position Duplex Stainless Steel Welded Pipe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaojun JIN; Lixing HUO; Yufeng ZHANG; Bingren BAI; Xiaowei LI; Jun CAO

    2004-01-01

    On the basis of the thermal-elastic-plastic theory, a three-dimensional finite element numerical simulation is performed on the girth welded residual stresses of the duplex stainless steel pipe with ANSYS nonlinear finite element program for the first time. Three-dimensional FEM using mobile heat source for analysis transient temperature field and welding stress field in circumferential joint of pipes is founded. Distributions of axial and hoop residual stresses of the joint are investigated. The axial and the hoop residual stresses at the weld and weld vicinity on inner surface of pipes are tensile, and they are gradually transferred into compressive with the increase of the departure from the weld. The axial residual stresses at the weld and weld vicinity on outer surface of pipes is compressive while the hoop one is tensile. The distributions of residual stresses compared positive-circle with negative-circle show distinct symmetry. These results provide theoretical knowledge for the optimization of process and the control of welding residual stresses.

  10. Stress/strain distributions for weld metal solidification crack in stainless steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This paper has simulated the driving force of solidification crack of stainless steels, that is, stress/strain field in the trail of molten pool. Firstly, the effect of the deformation in the molten pool was eliminated after the element rebirth method was adopted. Secondly, the influence of solidification shrinkage was taken into account by increasing thermal expansion coefficients of the steels at elevated temperatures. Finally, the stress/strain distributions of different conditions have been computed and analyzed. Furthermore, the driving force curves of the solidification crack of the steels have been obtained by converting strain-time curves into strain-temperature curves, which founds a basis for predicting welding solidification crack.

  11. Investigations on the microstructure and mechanical properties of multi-pass PCGTA welding of super-duplex stainless steel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Devendranath Ramkumar; Debidutta Mishra; G Thiruvengatam; S P Sudharsan; Tadikonda Harsha Mohan; Vimal Saxena; Rachit Pandey; N Arivazhagan

    2015-08-01

    This paper addresses the weldability, microstructure and mechanical properties of the multi-pass welding of super-duplex stainless steel (SDSS). Pulsed current gas tungsten arc welding (PCGTAW) was carried out employing ER2553 and ERNiCrMo-4 fillers. Microstructure examination showed the presence of austenite in different forms at the weld zone of ER2553 whereas multi-directional grain growth was observed for ERNiCrMo-4 welds. Tensile and impact studies corroborated that the weldments employing ER2553 exhibited better results compared with ERNiCrMo-4 weldments. Detailed structure–property relationships of the weldments have been reported in the present study. The results corroborated that the enhanced properties could be achieved with the matching filler wire compared with the over-alloyed filler.

  12. Microstructure and Low-Temperature Mechanical Properties of 304 Stainless Steel Joints by PAW + GTAW Combined Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kun; Li, Yajiang; Wang, Juan

    2016-10-01

    The combined double-pass process of plasma arc welding (PAW) + gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) was performed on 304 austenitic stainless steel with the thickness of 12 mm. Results indicated that two different morphologies of ferrite (e.g., lathy δ-ferrite and skeletal δ-ferrite) were formed within the austenite matrix in PAW weld metal (PAW-WM). GTAW weld metal (GTAW-WM) was mainly composed of fine austenite and skeletal δ-ferrite. In transition zone between PAW-WM and GTAW-WM, epitaxial growth contributed to cellular dendritic crystals transforming into columnar crystals. The tensile strength of joint is about 700 MPa. The impact toughness of WM varied from 281 J (20 °C) to 122 (-196 °C), while the impact toughness of heat-affected zone (HAZ) varied from 205 J (20 °C) to 112 J (-196 °C).

  13. ROLE OF FCA WELDING PROCESS PARAMETERS ON BEAD PROFILE, ANGULAR AND BOWING DISTORTION OF FERRITIC STAINLESS STEEL SHEETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VENKATESAN M. V.

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the influence of flux cored arc welding (FCAW process parameters such as welding current, travel speed, voltage and CO2 shielding gas flow rate on bead profile, bowing distortion and angular distortion of 409 M ferritic stainless steel sheets of 2 mm thickness. The bowing and angular distortions of the welded plates were measured using a simple device called profile tracer and Vernier bevel protractor respectively. The study revealed that the FCAW process parameters have significant effect on bead profile, and distortion. The relationship between bead profile and distortions were analyzed. Most favorable process parameters that give uniform bead profile and minimum distortion for the weld are recommended for fabrication.

  14. Effects of Thermocapillary Forces during Welding of 316L-Type Wrought, Cast and Powder Metallurgy Austenitic Stainless Steels

    CERN Document Server

    Sgobba, Stefano

    2003-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is now under construction at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). This 27 km long accelerator requires 1248 superconducting dipole magnets operating at 1.9 K. The cold mass of the dipole magnets is closed by a shrinking cylinder with two longitudinal welds and two end covers at both extremities of the cylinder. The end covers, for which fabrication by welding, casting or Powder Metallurgy (PM) was considered, are dished-heads equipped with a number of protruding nozzles for the passage of the different cryogenic lines. Structural materials and welds must retain high strength and toughness at cryogenic temperature. AISI 316L-type austenitic stainless steel grades have been selected because of their mechanical properties, ductility, weldability and stability of the austenitic phase against low-temperature spontaneous martensitic transformation. 316LN is chosen for the fabrication of the end covers, while the interconnection components to be welded on the protrud...

  15. Ultrasonic inspectability of austenitic stainless steel and dissimilar metal weld joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pudovikov, S.; Bulavinov, A.; Kroening, M. [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Zerstoerungsfreie Pruefverfahren IZFP, Saarbruecken (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Since their invention in 1912, austenitic stainless steel materials are widely used in a variety of industry sectors. In particular, austenitic stainless steel material is qualified to meet the design criteria of high quality, safety related applications, for example, the primary loop of the most of the nuclear power plants in the world, due to high durability and corrosion resistance. Certain operating conditions may cause a range of changes in the integrity of the component, and therefore require nondestructive testing at reasonable intervals. These in-service inspections are often performed using ultrasonic techniques, in particular when cracking is of specific concern. However, the coarse, dendritic grain structure of the weld material, formed during the welding process, is extreme and unpredictably anisotropic. Such structure is no longer direction-independent to the ultrasonic wave propagation; therefore, the ultrasonic beam deflects and redirects and the wave front becomes distorted. Thus, the use of conventional ultrasonic testing techniques using fixed beam angles is very limited and the application of ultrasonic Phased Array techniques becomes desirable. The ''Sampling Phased Array'' technique, invented and developed by Fraunhofer IZFP, allows the acquisition of time signals (A-scans) for each individual transducer element of the array along with image reconstruction techniques using ''SynFoc'' algorithms. The reconstruction considers the sound propagation from each image pixel to the individual sensor element. For anisotropic media, where the sound beam is deflected and the sound path is not known a-priory, we implement a new phase adjustment called ''Reverse Phase Matching'' technique. This algorithm permits the acquisition of phase-corrected A-scans that represent the actual sound propagation in the anisotropic structure; this technique can be utilized for image reconstruction. (orig.)

  16. Investigation of the Welding Performance of 1Cr18Mn8Ni5N Stainless Steel with A-TIG Welding%奥氏体不锈钢A-TIG焊焊接性能研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏钰; 许静远; 刘爱阳; 王海燕

    2012-01-01

    研究了1Cr18Mn8Ni5N不锈钢薄板A-TIG焊与常规TIG焊和填丝TIG焊的焊接规范和焊接接头性能.结果表明:与常规TIG焊相比,A-TIG焊焊缝宽度减小,焊缝组织中晶粒细化,焊接接头的抗拉强度显著提高,且高于母材的抗拉强度;与填丝TIG焊相比,A-TIG只需小电流且不需要填丝即可达到相同的焊接性能,同时可以降低成本,提高生产效率.%The welding specification and welding joint property of the activating flux TIG welding (A-TIG welding) , conventional TIG welding and filler metal TIG welding in the welding experiments of thin plates of lCrl8Mn8Ni5N stainless steel are investigated. The results show that compared with conventional TIG welding, A-TIG welding can decrease the weld width, refine the grains of the welding bead microstructure and improve the tensile strength of the welding joint; A-TIG welding only needs small welding current and no filler metal for achieving the same welding performance as filler metal TIG welding, which reduces cost and improves the production efficiency.

  17. Weldability and Welding Technique of 2101 Duplex Stainless Steel%2101双相不锈钢的焊接性能和焊接技术

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘长文; 邓钢; 曾广庭

    2012-01-01

    对2101双相不锈钢的焊接性能进行了分析,并提出了几个关键的焊接技术,最后以12.7mm厚2101双相不锈钢板为例,进行了该材料的焊接工艺评定。结果表明:在合理的焊接方法和焊接参数下,2101双相不锈钢具有良好的焊接性能。%Weldability of 2101 duplex stainless steel was analyzed, several key welding techniques were put forward, and finally welding procedure qualification was done taken 12. 7 mm 2101 duplex stainless steel plate as an example. The results show that 2101 duplex stainless steel has good welding performance under the condition of reasonable welding method and welding parameters.

  18. Round robin analysis on stress intensity factor of inner surface cracks in welded stainless steel pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Chang Gi; Chang, Yoon Suk [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, College of Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Sung [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Sunchon National University, Sunchon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Maan Won [Central Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Company, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Austenitic stainless steels (ASSs) are widely used for nuclear pipes as they exhibit a good combination of mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. However, high tensile residual stresses may occur in ASS welds because postweld heat treatment is not generally conducted in order to avoid sensitization, which causes a stress corrosion crack. In this study, round robin analyses on stress intensity factors (SIFs) were carried out to examine the appropriateness of structural integrity assessment methods for ASS pipe welds with two types of circumferential cracks. Typical stress profiles were generated from finite element analyses by considering residual stresses and normal operating conditions. Then, SIFs of cracked ASS pipes were determined by analytical equations represented in fitness-for-service assessment codes as well as reference finite element analyses. The discrepancies of estimated SIFs among round robin participants were confirmed due to different assessment procedures and relevant considerations, as well as the mistakes of participants. The effects of uncertainty factors on SIFs were deducted from sensitivity analyses and, based on the similarity and conservatism compared with detailed finite element analysis results, the R6 code, taking into account the applied internal pressure and combination of stress components, was recommended as the optimum procedure for SIF estimation.

  19. Round Robin Analyses on Stress Intensity Factors of Inner Surface Cracks in Welded Stainless Steel Pipes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Gi Han

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Austenitic stainless steels (ASSs are widely used for nuclear pipes as they exhibit a good combination of mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. However, high tensile residual stresses may occur in ASS welds because postweld heat treatment is not generally conducted in order to avoid sensitization, which causes a stress corrosion crack. In this study, round robin analyses on stress intensity factors (SIFs were carried out to examine the appropriateness of structural integrity assessment methods for ASS pipe welds with two types of circumferential cracks. Typical stress profiles were generated from finite element analyses by considering residual stresses and normal operating conditions. Then, SIFs of cracked ASS pipes were determined by analytical equations represented in fitness-for-service assessment codes as well as reference finite element analyses. The discrepancies of estimated SIFs among round robin participants were confirmed due to different assessment procedures and relevant considerations, as well as the mistakes of participants. The effects of uncertainty factors on SIFs were deducted from sensitivity analyses and, based on the similarity and conservatism compared with detailed finite element analysis results, the R6 code, taking into account the applied internal pressure and combination of stress components, was recommended as the optimum procedure for SIF estimation.

  20. Numerical study on forming complex fitting body on end of integrated stainless steel pipe without welds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张大伟; 赵升吨

    2016-01-01

    It is necessary to use the integrated stainless steel pipe having two fitting bodies without welds while train travelling at high speed. In order to form this type of integrated stainless steel pipe, the method of preforming combined finish forming process is developed. The preforming process is characterized by flaring combined upsetting for left fitting body which is like a flange, and is characterized by tube axial compressive process under die constraint for right fitting body which is like a double-wall pipe. The finite element simulations of the processes are carried out by software package DEFORM, and the results indicate that: 1) left or right fitting body can be formed by a two-step forming process without folding and under-filling defects; 2) by using two-step forming, strain and stress in left fitting body are larger than those in right fitting body, and deformation in right fitting body is more homogenous than the deformation in left fitting body; 3) two or more preforming steps may be needed for left fitting body considering the distributions of strain and stress.

  1. Investigation of corrosion of welded joints of austenitic and duplex stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topolska, S.

    2016-08-01

    Investigation of corrosion resistance of materials is one of the most important tests that allow determining their functional properties. Among these tests the special group consist electrochemical investigations, which let to accelerate the course of the process. These investigations allow rapidly estimating corrosion processes occurring in metal elements under the influence of the analysed environment. In the paper are presented results of investigations of the resistance to pitting corrosion of the steel of next grades: austenitic 316L and duplex 2205. It was also analysed the corrosion resistance of welded joints of these grades of steel. The investigations were conducted in two different corrosion environments: in the neutral one (3.5 % sodium chloride) and in the aggressive one (0.1 M sulphuric acid VI). The obtained results indicate different resistance of analysed grades of steel and their welded joints in relation to the corrosion environment. The austenitic 316L steel characterizes by the higher resistance to the pitting corrosion in the aggressive environment then the duplex 2205 steel. In the paper are presented results of potentiodynamic tests. They showed that all the specimens are less resistant to pitting corrosion in the environment of sulphuric acid (VI) than in the sodium chloride one. The 2205 steel has higher corrosion resistance than the 316L stainless steel in 3.5% NaCl. On the other hand, in 0.1 M H2SO4, the 316L steel has a higher corrosion resistance than the 2205 one. The weld has a similar, very good resistance to pitting corrosion like both steels.

  2. Reactor Materials Program electrochemical potential measurements by ORNL with unirradiated and irradiated stainless steel specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann, E.W.; Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1993-07-01

    Effect of irradiation of stainless steel on electrochemical potential (ECP) was investigated by measurements in dilute HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} solutions, conditions simulating reactor moderator. The electrodes were made from unirradiated/irradiated, unsensitized/sensitized specimens from R-reactor piping. Results were inconclusive because of budgetary restrictions. The dose rate may have been too small to produce a significant radiolytic effect. Neither the earlier CERT corrosion susceptibility tests nor the present ECP measurements showed a pronounced effect of irradiation on susceptibility of the stainless steel to IGSCC; this is confirmed by the absence in the stainless steel of the SRS reactor tanks (except for the C Reactor tank knuckle area).

  3. Corrosion studies using potentiodynamic and EIS electrochemical techniques of welded lean duplex stainless steel UNS S82441

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brytan, Z.; Niagaj, J.; Reiman, Ł.

    2016-12-01

    The corrosion characterisation of lean duplex stainless steel (1.4662) UNS S82441 welded joints using the potentiodynamic test and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in 1 M NaCl solution are discussed. The influence of autogenous TIG welding parameters (amount of heat input and composition of shielding gases like Ar and Ar-N2 and an Ar-He mixture), as well as A-TIG welding was studied. The influence of welding parameters on phase balance, microstructural changes and the protective properties of passive oxide films formed at the open circuit potential or during the anodic polarisation were studied. From the results of the potentiodynamic test and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of TIG and A-TiG, welded joints show a lower corrosion resistance compared to non-welded parent metal, but introducing heat input properly during welding and applying shielding gases rich in nitrogen or helium can increase austenitic phase content, which is beneficial for corrosion resistance, and improves surface oxide layer resistance in 1 M NaCl solution.

  4. Influence of heat input on weld bead geometry using duplex stainless steel wire electrode on low alloy steel specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajit Mondal

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Gas metal arc welding cladding becomes a popular surfacing technique in many modern industries as it enhances effectively corrosion resistance property and wear resistance property of structural members. Quality of weld cladding may be enhanced by controlling process parameters. If bead formation is found acceptable, cladding is also expected to be good. Weld bead characteristics are often assessed by bead geometry, and it is mainly influenced by heat input. In this paper, duplex stainless steel E2209 T01 is deposited on E250 low alloy steel specimens with 100% CO2 gas as shielding medium with different heats. Weld bead width, height of reinforcement and depth of penetration are measured. Regression analysis is done on the basis of experimental data. Results reveal that within the range of bead-on-plate welding experiments done, parameters of welding geometry are on the whole linearly related with heat input. A condition corresponding to 0.744 kJ/mm heat input is recommended to be used for weld cladding in practice.

  5. Microstructure characteristics and mechanical property of aluminum alloy/stainless steel lap joints fabricated by MIG welding-brazing process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Hongtao, E-mail: hitzht@yahoo.com.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology at Weihai, Weihai 264209 (China); Liu Jiakun [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology at Weihai, Weihai 264209 (China)

    2011-07-25

    Highlights: {yields} Wrought aluminum and stainless steel was joined with welding-brazing process. {yields} Effect of different layers on spreadability of molten filler metal was examined. {yields} Mechanical property of the joints with different heat inputs was investigated. {yields} Microstructure of the joints were also studied by OM, SEM and TEM. {yields} Phase composition was ascertained by diffraction spot and XRD analysis. - Abstract: Lap joints of aluminum alloy 2B50 and stainless steel 1Cr18Ni9Ti were welded by MIG welding-brazing method with 4043 Al-Si filler metal. The effect of aluminizing coating and galvanized zinc coating on fusion metal spreadability were studied. The aluminized coating had limited effect to promote weld surface appearance and obvious micro-cracks were found between the compound layer and the steel side. The fracture in tensile tests occurred at the interfacial layer of the weld with a low tensile strength about 60 MPa. Joints between aluminum alloy and galvanized steel had good surface appearances and the intermetallic compound in fusion zone region close to joint interface was Al{sub 4.5}FeSi. The thickness of the intermetallic compound layer varied from about 5 {mu}m to 15 {mu}m depending on the heat input and the highest tensile strength of lap joint could reached 193.6 MPa when the heat input is 0.846 KJ/cm.

  6. Isothermal Calorimetric Observations of the Effect of Welding on Compatibility of Stainless Steels with High-Test Hydrogen Peroxide Propellant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gostowski, Rudy

    2003-01-01

    High-Test Hydrogen Peroxide (HTP) is receiving renewed interest as a monopropellant and as the oxidizer for bipropellant systems. HTP is hydrogen peroxide having concentrations ranging from 70 to 98%. In these applications the energy and oxygen released during decomposition of HTP is used for propulsion. In propulsion systems components must be fabricated and connected using available joining processes. Welding is a common joining method for metallic components. The goal of this study was to compare the HTP compatibility of welded vs. unwelded stainless steel.

  7. Contribution to the Study of Effects of Surface State of Welded Joints in Stainless Steel Upon Resistance Towards Pitting Corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juraga, I.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Successful corrosion resistance of stainless steels is based on their natural ability of passivation, i.e. formation of film of chromium oxides that prevents corrosion in many environments. Any nonuniformity of surface layers may be initial spot for corrosion processes and damages. In this contribution, beside real corrosion damages occurred in practice, results of testing of pitting corrosion resistance of weld beads made applying TIG process on AISI 316L steel grade are presented. SEM and EDX testing, as well as electrochemical corrosion testing confirmed adverse effects of heat tints zones upon corrosion resistance of stainless steels.

  8. Tensile Characteristics of Bond of Stainless Steel Overlay Weld after Absorption of Hydrogen : Study on a Stainless Steel Overlay Welding Process for Superior Resistance to Disbonding (Report 4)

    OpenAIRE

    Akiyoshi, FUJI; Etsuo, KUDO; Tomoyuki, TAKAHASHI; The Japan Steel Works, Ltd., Muroran Plant

    1987-01-01

    The tensile characteristics of the bond of the disbanding-resistant overlay weld after absorption of hydrogen were studied and compared with those of the conventional overlay weld. It was found that the tensile strength of the bond of the conventional overlay weld was lower than that of the disbanding-resistant overlay weld. This is due to existence of the coarse planar grains in first layer overlay weld metal adjacent to the bond. The coarse planar grains strongly reduce the resistance to hy...

  9. Corrosion Resistance and Mechanical Properties of TIG and A-TIG Welded Joints of Lean Duplex Stainless Steel S82441 / 1.4662

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brytan Z.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results of pitting corrosion resistance of TIG (autogenous and with filler metal and A-TIG welded lean duplex stainless steel S82441/1.4662 evaluated according to ASTM G48 method, where autogenous TIG welding process was applied using different amounts of heat input and shielding gases like pure Ar and Ar+N2 and Ar+He mixtures. The results of pitting corrosion resistance of the welded joints of lean duplex stainless steel S82441 were studied in as weld conditions and after different mechanical surface finish treatments. The results of the critical pitting temperature (CPT determined according to ASTM G48 at temperatures of 15, 25 and 35°C were presented. Three different surface treatment after welding were applied: etching, milling, brushing + etching. The influence of post weld surface treatment was studied in respect to the pitting corrosion resistance, basing on CPT temperature.

  10. Heat input effect on the microstructural transformation and mechanical properties in GTAW welds of a 409L ferritic stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delgado, Jorge A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Welds without filler metal and welds using a conventional austenitic stainless steel filler metal (ER308L were performed to join a ferritic stainless steel with Gas Tungsten Arc Welding process (GTAW. Welding parameters were adjusted to obtain three different heat input values. Microstructure reveals the presence of coarse ferritic matrix and martensite laths in the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ. Dilution between filler and base metal was correlated with the presence of austenite, martensite and ferrite in the weld metal. Weld thermal cycles were measured to correlate the microstructural transformation in the HAZ. Microhardness measurements (maps and profiles allow to identify the different zones of the welded joints (weld metal, HAZ, and base metal. Comparing the base metal with the weld metal and the HAZ, a hardness increment (~172 HV0.5 to ~350 HV0.5 and ~310 HV0.5, respectively was observed, which has been attributed to the martensite formation. Tensile strength of the welded joints without filler metal increased moderately with respect to base metal. In contrast, ductility was approximately 25% higher than base metal, which provided a toughness improvement of the welded joints.Se llevaron a cabo soldaduras sin material de aporte y empleando un electrodo convencional (ER308L para unir un acero inoxidable ferrítico, empleando el proceso de soldadura de arco con electrodo de tungsteno (GTAW. Los parámetros de soldadura fueron ajustados para obtener tres valores diferentes de calor de aporte. La microestructura revela la presencia de una matriz ferrítica gruesa y placas de martensita en la Zona Afectada por el Calor (ZAC. La dilución entre el metal base y de aporte fue correlacionada con la presencia de austenita, martensita y ferrita en el metal de soldadura. Los ciclos térmicos de la soldadura fueron medidos para correlacionar la transformación microestrutural en la ZAC. Mediciones de microdureza (mapas y perfiles, permitieron identificar las

  11. Swelling analysis of austenitic stainless steels by means of ion irradiation and kinetic modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohyama, Akira [Kyoto Univ., Institute of Advanced Energy, Uji, Kyoto (Japan); Donomae, Takako [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1999-03-01

    The influences of irradiation environment on the swelling behavior of austenitic stainless steel has been studied, to aid understanding the origin of the difference in swelling response of PNC316 stainless steel in fuel-pin environment and in materials irradiation capsules, in terms of irradiation conditions, damage mechanism and material conditions. This work focused on the theoretical investigation of the influence of temperature variation on microstructural development of austenitic stainless steels during irradiation, using a kinetic rate theory model. A modeling and calculation on non-steady irradiation effects were first carried out. A fully dynamic model of point defect evolution and extended defect development, which accounts for cascade damage, was developed and successfully applied to simulate the interstitial loop evolution in low temperature regimes. The influence of cascade interstitial clustering on dislocation loop formation has also been assessed. The establishment of a basis for general assessment of non-steady irradiation effects in austenitic stainless steels was advanced. The developed model was applied to evaluate the influences of temperature variation in formerly carried out CMIR and FFTF/MFA-1 FBR irradiation experiments. The results suggested the gradual approach of microstructural features to equilibrium states in all the temperature variation conditions and no sign of anomalous behavior was noted. On the other hand, there is the influence of temperature variation on microstructural development under the neutron irradiation, like CMIR. So there are some possibilities of the work of mechanism which is not taken care on this model, for example the effect of the precipitate behavior which is sensitive to irradiation temperature. (author)

  12. Effect of Heat Input on Fume Generation and Joint Properties of Gas Metal Arc Welded Austenitic Stainless Steel%Effect of Heat Input on Fume Generation and Joint Properties of Gas Metal Arc Welded Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K Srinivasan; V Balasubramanian

    2011-01-01

    The effect of heat input on fume and their compositions during gas metal arc welding (GMAW) of AISI 316 stainless steel plates are investigated. Fume generation rate (FGR) and fume percentage were determined by ANSI/AWS F1.2 methods. Particle characterization was performed with SEM-XEDS and XRF analysis to reveal the particle morphology and chemical composition of the fume particles. The SEM analysis reveals the morphology of particles having three distinct shapes namely spherical, irregular, and agglomerated. Spherical particles were the most abundant type of individual particle. All the fume particle size falls in the range of less than 100 nm. Mechanical properties (strength, hardness and toughness) and microstructural analysis of the weld deposits were evaluated. It is found that heat input of 1.15 kJ/mm is beneficial to weld stainless steel by GMAW process due to lower level of welding fume emissions and superior mechanical properties of the joints.

  13. Effect of explosive characteristics on the explosive welding of stainless steel to carbon steel in cylindrical configuration

    OpenAIRE

    Mendes, R; Ribeiro, J. B.; Loureiro, A.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this research is to study the influence of explosive characteristics on the weld interfaces of stainless steel AISI 304L to low alloy steel 51CrV4 in a cylindrical configuration. The effect of ammonium nitrate-based emulsion, sensitized with different quantities and types of sensitizing agents (hollow glass microballoons or expanded polystyrene spheres) and Ammonium Nitrate Fuel Oil (ANFO) explosives on the interface characteristics is analyzed. Research showed that the type of exp...

  14. Influence of M-TIG and A-TIG Welding Process on Microstructure and Mechanical Behavior of 409 Ferritic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidyarthy, R. S.; Dwivedi, D. K.; Vasudevan, M.

    2017-03-01

    The current study investigates the effects of activating flux tungsten inert gas welding (A-TIG) and multipass tungsten inert gas welding (M-TIG) on the weld morphology, angular distortion, microstructures and mechanical properties when welding 8-mm-thick 409 ferritic stainless steel (FSS). SiO2 was used as activating flux for A-TIG welding, while SUPERTIG ER309L was used as filler for M-TIG welding. Bead-on-plate weld trials were carried out to obtain the full penetration by using different combinations of flux coating density, welding speed and welding current. An optical microscope, field emission scanning microscope (FESEM), and x-ray diffractometer were used for the metallurgical characterizations. Vickers hardness, tensile test, Charpy toughness test, and creep behavior test were carried out to evaluate the mechanical properties of the base and weld metals. Experimental results indicate that the A-TIG process can increase the joint penetration and tends to reduce the angular distortion of the 409 FSS weldment. The A-TIG welded joint also exhibited greater mechanical strength. However, a critically low Charpy toughness was measured for the A-TIG weld fusion zone, which was later sufficiently improved after post weld heat treatment (PWHT). It was concluded that PWHT is mandatory for A-TIG welded 409 FSS.

  15. Influence of M-TIG and A-TIG Welding Process on Microstructure and Mechanical Behavior of 409 Ferritic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidyarthy, R. S.; Dwivedi, D. K.; Vasudevan, M.

    2017-02-01

    The current study investigates the effects of activating flux tungsten inert gas welding (A-TIG) and multipass tungsten inert gas welding (M-TIG) on the weld morphology, angular distortion, microstructures and mechanical properties when welding 8-mm-thick 409 ferritic stainless steel (FSS). SiO2 was used as activating flux for A-TIG welding, while SUPERTIG ER309L was used as filler for M-TIG welding. Bead-on-plate weld trials were carried out to obtain the full penetration by using different combinations of flux coating density, welding speed and welding current. An optical microscope, field emission scanning microscope (FESEM), and x-ray diffractometer were used for the metallurgical characterizations. Vickers hardness, tensile test, Charpy toughness test, and creep behavior test were carried out to evaluate the mechanical properties of the base and weld metals. Experimental results indicate that the A-TIG process can increase the joint penetration and tends to reduce the angular distortion of the 409 FSS weldment. The A-TIG welded joint also exhibited greater mechanical strength. However, a critically low Charpy toughness was measured for the A-TIG weld fusion zone, which was later sufficiently improved after post weld heat treatment (PWHT). It was concluded that PWHT is mandatory for A-TIG welded 409 FSS.

  16. Examination of the 1970 National Bureau of Standards Underground Corrosion Test Welded Stainless STeel Coupons from Site D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. R. Zirker; M. K. Adler Flitton; T. S. Yoder; T. L. Trowbridge

    2008-01-01

    A 1970 study initiated by the National Bureau of Standards (NBS), now known as the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), buried over 6000 corrosion coupons or specimens of stainless steel Types 201, 202, 301, 304, 316, 409, 410, 430, and 434. The coupons were configured as sheet metal plates, coated plates, cross-welded plates, U-bend samples, sandwiched materials, and welded tubes. All coupons were of various heat-treatments and cold worked conditions and were buried at six distinctive soil-type sites throughout the United States. The NBS scientists dug five sets of two trenches at each of the six sites. In each pair of trenches, they buried duplicate sets of stainless steel coupons. The NBS study was designed to retrieve coupons after one year, two years, four years, eight years, and x years in the soil. During the first eight years of the study, four of five planned removals were completed. After the fourth retrieval, the NBS study was abandoned, and the fifth and final set of specimens remained undisturbed for over 33 years. In 2003, an interdisciplinary research team of industrial, university, and national laboratory investigators were funded under the United States Department of Energy’s Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP; Project Number 86803) to extract part of the remaining set of coupons at one of the test sites, characterize the stainless steel underground corrosion rates, and examine the fate and transport of metal ions into the soil. Extraction of one trench at one of the test sites occurred in April 2004. This report details only the characterization of corrosion found on the 14 welded coupons–two cross welded plates, six U-bends, and six welded tubes–that were retrieved from Site D, located near Wildwood, NJ. The welded coupons included Type 301, 304, 316, and 409 stainless steels. After 33 years in the soil, corrosion on the coupons varied according to alloy. This report discusses the stress corrosion cracking and

  17. Detailed Microstructural Characterization and Restoration Mechanisms of Duplex and Superduplex Stainless Steel Friction-Stir-Welded Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, T. F. A.; Torres, E. A.; Lippold, J. C.; Ramirez, A. J.

    2016-12-01

    Duplex stainless steels are successfully used in a wide variety of applications in areas such as the food industry, petrochemical installations, and sea water desalination plants, where high corrosion resistance and high mechanical strength are required. However, during fusion welding operations, there can be changes to the favorable microstructure of these materials that compromise their performance. Friction stir welding with a non-consumable pin enables welded joints to be obtained in the solid state, which avoids typical problems associated with solidification of the molten pool, such as segregation of alloying elements and the formation of solidification and liquefaction cracks. In the case of superduplex stainless steels, use of the technique can avoid unbalanced proportions of ferrite and austenite, formation of deleterious second phases, or growth of ferritic grains in the heat-affected zone. Consolidated joints with full penetration were obtained for 6-mm-thick plates of UNS S32101 and S32205 duplex stainless steels, and S32750 and S32760 superduplex steels. The welding heat cycles employed avoided the conditions required for formation of deleterious phases, except in the case of the welded joint of the S32760 steel, where SEM images indicated the formation of secondary phases, as corroborated by decreased mechanical performance. Analysis using EBSD and transmission electron microscopy revealed continuous dynamic recrystallization by the formation of cellular arrays of dislocations in the ferrite and discontinuous dynamic recrystallization in the austenite. Microtexture evaluation indicated the presence of fibers typical of shear in the thermomechanically affected zone. These fibers were not obviously present in the stir zone, probably due to the intensity of microstructural reformulation to which this region was subjected.

  18. Microstructure, Mechanical Property and Corrosion Resistance Property of Cr26Mo3.5 Super Ferritic Stainless Joints by P-TIG and Laser Welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡绳荪; 庞杰; 申俊琦; 伍文勇; 刘腊腊

    2016-01-01

    The characteristics of microstructure, mechanical property and corrosion behavior of Cr26Mo3.5 super stainless steel joints by pulse tungsten inert gas(P-TIG)welding and laser welding were investigated. The results indicate that the widths of the center equiaxed grain zone(EGZ)and the columnar grain zone(CGZ)increase with the increase of heat input in both welding processes. The precipitates of Nb and Ti carbides and nitrides are formed in the weld metal(WM)and the heat affected zone(HAZ). The joints by laser welding show better tensile and cor-rosion resistance properties than those by P-TIG welding due to the heat concentration and lower heat input. The tensile strength and elongation increase with the decrease of heat input, and the fracture mode of the joints turns into ductile-brittle mixed fracture from ductile fracture when the welding method turns into P-TIG welding from laser welding. Moreover, the corrosion resistance of all joints declines slightly with the increase of heat input. Hence, laser welding is more suitable for welding Cr26Mo3.5 super stainless steel in engineering applications.

  19. Influence of austenitizing temperature on microstructure and mechanical properties of AISI 431 martensitic stainless steel electron beam welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajasekhar, A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, SVITS, Mahaboob Nagar 509 001 (India)], E-mail: adula.rajasekhar@rediffmail.com; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.; Mohandas, T. [Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory, Hyderabad 500 058 (India); Murti, V.S.R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, SVITS, Mahaboob Nagar 509 001 (India)

    2009-05-15

    The relative effects of various austenitizing temperatures on microstructure and mechanical properties of electron beam welds of AISI 431martensitic stainless steel were studied. The post-weld heat treatments consist of austenitizing the weld samples for 1 h at various temperatures, i.e., at 950 deg. C, 1000 deg. C, 1050 deg. C, 1100 deg. C and at 1150 deg. C and air cooling followed by double tempering, i.e., tempering at 670 + 600 deg. C. In the as-welded condition the microstructure contains dendritic structure with ferrite network and retained austenite in a matrix of un-tempered martensite. The prior austenite grain size increased with increase in austenitizing temperature. Parent metal grain size was coarser as compared to grain size in the weld zone in respective conditions. Retained austenite content increased with increase in the austenitizing temperature. Presence of undissolved carbides was observed in welds and parent metal austenitized up to 1000 deg. C and they dissolved at austenitizing temperature {>=} 1050 deg. C. Coarsening of martensite laths was observed after tempering. The martensite laths were coarser in the samples subjected to higher austenitizing temperatures. Optimum mechanical properties, i.e., strength, hardness and toughness were observed when austenitized between 1050 deg. C and 1100 deg. C followed by tempering. Austenitizing at 1150 deg. C and tempering resulted in inferior mechanical properties. The mechanism for the observed trends is discussed in relation to the microstructure, fracture features and mechanical properties.

  20. SANS response of VVER440-type weld material after neutron irradiation, post-irradiation annealing and reirradiation

    OpenAIRE

    Ulbricht, Andreas; Bergner, Frank; Boehmert, Juergen; Valo, Matti; Mathon, Marie-Helene; Heinemann, Andre

    2007-01-01

    Abstract It is well accepted that the reirradiation behaviour of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel after annealing can be different from the original irradiation behaviour. We present the first small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) study of neutron irradiated, annealed and reirradiated VVER440-type RPV weld material. The SANS results are analysed both in terms of the size distribution of irradiation-induced defect/solute atom clusters and in terms of the ratio of total and nuclea...

  1. Experimental Determination of Temperature During Rotary Friction Welding of AA1050 Aluminum with AISI 304 Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eder Paduan Alves

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was the temperature monitoring at bonding interface during the rotary friction welding process of dissimilar materials: AA1050 aluminum with AISI 304 stainless steel. As it is directly related to the mechanical strenght of the junction, its experimental determination in real time is of fundamental importance for understanding and characterizing the main process steps, and the definition and optimization of parameters. The temperature gradients were obtained using a system called Thermocouple Data-Logger, which allowed monitoring and recording data in real-time operation. In the graph temperature versus time obtained, the heating rates, cooling were analyzed, and the maximum temperature was determined that occurred during welding, and characterized every phases of the process. The efficiency of this system demonstrated by experimental tests and the knowledge of the temperature at the bonding interface open new lines of research to understand the process of friction welding.

  2. Fatigue Crack Growth Rate and Fracture Resistance of Heat Affected Zone of Stainless Steel Narrow Gap Welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ho Jung; Kim, Min U; Jang, Chang Heui [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Sun Young [Korea Laboratory Engineering System, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Jun Seog [KEPCO, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    In nuclear power plants, the automated narrow gap welding (NGW) technique has been widely used in joining stainless steel pipes in primary coolant system. As the primary system pipes are subjected to various transients during plant operation, cracks could initiate and propagate that would cause accidents. To prevent the cracking from developing into sudden failure in the primary system, leak-before-break (LBB) design concept has been developed and applied to many nuclear power plants. Meanwhile, to apply the LBB design, mechanical properties of the structural materials of piping systems should be evaluated, especially at weld zone and heat affected zone (HAZ), because mechanical properties within those regions show considerable scatter and spatial differences. In this study, fatigue crack grow rate (FCGR) and fracture resistance of base metal, weld zone, and HAZ of type 316L stainless steel narrow gap welds were performed at plant operating temperature (315 .deg. C) and room temperature. In particular, FCGR and fracture resistance of HAZ were evaluated in detail and compared to those of base metal

  3. Irradiation-induced precipitates in a neutron irradiated 304 stainless steel studied by three-dimensional atom probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toyama, T., E-mail: ttoyama@imr.tohoku.ac.jp [International Research Center for Nuclear Materials Science, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Narita-cho 2145-2, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Nozawa, Y. [International Research Center for Nuclear Materials Science, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Narita-cho 2145-2, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Van Renterghem, W. [SCK-CEN, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Matsukawa, Y.; Hatakeyama, M.; Nagai, Y. [International Research Center for Nuclear Materials Science, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Narita-cho 2145-2, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Al Mazouzi, A. [EDF R and D, Avenue des Renardieres Ecuelles, 77818 Moret sur Loing Cedex (France); Van Dyck, S. [SCK-CEN, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: > Irradiation-induced precipitates in a 304 stainless steel were investigated by three-dimensional atom probe. > The precipitates were found to be {gamma}' precipitates (Ni{sub 3}Si). > Post-irradiation annealing was performed to discuss the contribution of the precipitates to irradiation-hardening. - Abstract: Irradiation-induced precipitates in a 304 stainless steel, neutron-irradiated to a dose of 24 dpa at 300 deg. C in the fuel wrapper plates of a commercial pressurized water reactor, were investigated by laser-assisted three-dimensional atom probe. A high number density of 4 x 10{sup 23} m{sup -3} of Ni-Si rich precipitates was observed, which is one order of magnitude higher than that of Frank loops. The average diameter was {approx}10 nm and the average chemical composition was 40% Ni, 14% Si, 11% Cr and 32% Fe in atomic percent. Over a range of Si concentrations, the ratio of Ni to Si was {approx}3, close to that of {gamma}' precipitate (Ni{sub 3}Si). In some precipitates, Mn enrichment inside the precipitate and P segregation at the interface were observed. Post-irradiation annealing was performed to discuss the contribution of the precipitates to irradiation-hardening.

  4. Irradiation response of delta ferrite in as-cast and thermally aged cast stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhangbo; Lo, Wei-Yang [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nuclear Engineering Program, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Chen, Yiren [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Pakarinen, Janne [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Wu, Yaqiao [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Boise State University, Boise, ID 83715 (United States); Center for Advanced Energy Studies, Idaho Falls, ID 83401 (United States); Allen, Todd [Engineering Physics Department, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Yang, Yong, E-mail: yongyang@ufl.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nuclear Engineering Program, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    To enable the life extension of Light Water Reactors (LWRs) beyond 60 years, it is critical to gain adequate knowledge for making conclusive predictions to assure the integrity of duplex stainless steel reactor components, e.g. primary pressure boundary and reactor vessel internal. Microstructural changes in the ferrite of thermally aged, neutron irradiated only, and neutron irradiated after being thermally aged cast austenitic stainless steels (CASS) were investigated using atom probe tomography. The thermal aging was performed at 400 °C for 10,000 h and the irradiation was conducted in the Halden reactor at ∼315 °C to 0.08 dpa (5.6 × 10{sup 19} n/cm{sup 2}, E > 1 MeV). Low dose neutron irradiation at a dose rate of 5 × 10{sup −9} dpa/s was found to induce spinodal decomposition in the ferrite of as-cast microstructure, and further to enhance the spinodal decomposition in the thermally aged cast alloys. Regarding the G-phase precipitates, the neutron irradiation dramatically increases the precipitate size, and alters the composition of the precipitates with increased, Mn, Ni, Si and Mo and reduced Fe and Cr contents. The results have shown that low dose neutron irradiation can further accelerate the degradation of ferrite in a duplex stainless steel at the LWR relevant condition.

  5. Irradiation response of delta ferrite in as-cast and thermally aged cast stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhangbo; Lo, Wei-Yang; Chen, Yiren; Pakarinen, Janne; Wu, Yaqiao; Allen, Todd; Yang, Yong

    2015-11-01

    To enable the life extension of Light Water Reactors (LWRs) beyond 60 years, it is critical to gain adequate knowledge for making conclusive predictions to assure the integrity of duplex stainless steel reactor components, e.g. primary pressure boundary and reactor vessel internal. Microstructural changes in the ferrite of thermally aged, neutron irradiated only, and neutron irradiated after being thermally aged cast austenitic stainless steels (CASS) were investigated using atom probe tomography. The thermal aging was performed at 400 °C for 10,000 h and the irradiation was conducted in the Halden reactor at ∼315 °C to 0.08 dpa (5.6 × 1019 n/cm2, E > 1 MeV). Low dose neutron irradiation at a dose rate of 5 × 10-9 dpa/s was found to induce spinodal decomposition in the ferrite of as-cast microstructure, and further to enhance the spinodal decomposition in the thermally aged cast alloys. Regarding the G-phase precipitates, the neutron irradiation dramatically increases the precipitate size, and alters the composition of the precipitates with increased, Mn, Ni, Si and Mo and reduced Fe and Cr contents. The results have shown that low dose neutron irradiation can further accelerate the degradation of ferrite in a duplex stainless steel at the LWR relevant condition.

  6. Initial tensile test results from J316 stainless steel irradiated in the HFIR spectrally tailored experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawel, J.E.; Grossbeck, M.L.; Rowcliffe, A.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this work is to determine the effects of neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties of austenitic stainless steel alloys. In this experiment, the spectrum has been tailored to reduce the thermal neutron flux and achieve a He/dpa level near that expected in a fusion reactor.

  7. Signal quality enhancement using higher order wavelets for ultrasonic TOFD signals from austenitic stainless steel welds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praveen, Angam; Vijayarekha, K; Abraham, Saju T; Venkatraman, B

    2013-09-01

    Time of flight diffraction (TOFD) technique is a well-developed ultrasonic non-destructive testing (NDT) method and has been applied successfully for accurate sizing of defects in metallic materials. This technique was developed in early 1970s as a means for accurate sizing and positioning of cracks in nuclear components became very popular in the late 1990s and is today being widely used in various industries for weld inspection. One of the main advantages of TOFD is that, apart from fast technique, it provides higher probability of detection for linear defects. Since TOFD is based on diffraction of sound waves from the extremities of the defect compared to reflection from planar faces as in pulse echo and phased array, the resultant signal would be quite weak and signal to noise ratio (SNR) low. In many cases the defect signal is submerged in this noise making it difficult for detection, positioning and sizing. Several signal processing methods such as digital filtering, Split Spectrum Processing (SSP), Hilbert Transform and Correlation techniques have been developed in order to suppress unwanted noise and enhance the quality of the defect signal which can thus be used for characterization of defects and the material. Wavelet Transform based thresholding techniques have been applied largely for de-noising of ultrasonic signals. However in this paper, higher order wavelets are used for analyzing the de-noising performance for TOFD signals obtained from Austenitic Stainless Steel welds. It is observed that higher order wavelets give greater SNR improvement compared to the lower order wavelets.

  8. Assessment of Crack Detection in Heavy-Walled Cast Stainless Steel Piping Welds Using Advanced Low-Frequency Ultrasonic Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Michael T.; Crawford, Susan L.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Denslow, Kayte M.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2007-03-01

    Studies conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Washington, have focused on assessing the effectiveness and reliability of novel approaches to nondestructive examination (NDE) for inspecting coarse-grained, cast stainless steel reactor components. The primary objective of this work is to provide information to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission on the effectiveness and reliability of advanced NDE methods as related to the inservice inspection of safety-related components in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). This report provides progress, recent developments, and results from an assessment of low frequency ultrasonic testing (UT) for detection of inside surface-breaking cracks in cast stainless steel reactor piping weldments as applied from the outside surface of the components. Vintage centrifugally cast stainless steel piping segments were examined to assess the capability of low-frequency UT to adequately penetrate challenging microstructures and determine acoustic propagation limitations or conditions that may interfere with reliable flaw detection. In addition, welded specimens containing mechanical and thermal fatigue cracks were examined. The specimens were fabricated using vintage centrifugally cast and statically cast stainless steel materials, which are typical of configurations installed in PWR primary coolant circuits. Ultrasonic studies on the vintage centrifugally cast stainless steel piping segments were conducted with a 400-kHz synthetic aperture focusing technique and phased array technology applied at 500 kHz, 750 kHz, and 1.0 MHz. Flaw detection and characterization on the welded specimens was performed with the phased array method operating at the frequencies stated above. This report documents the methodologies used and provides results from laboratory studies to assess baseline material noise, crack detection, and length-sizing capability for low-frequency UT in cast stainless steel piping.

  9. Material property evaluations of bimetallic welds, stainless steel saw fusion lines, and materials affected by dynamic strain aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudland, D.; Scott, P.; Marschall, C.; Wilkowski, G. [Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, OH (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Pipe fracture analyses can often reasonably predict the behavior of flawed piping. However, there are material applications with uncertainties in fracture behavior. This paper summarizes work on three such cases. First, the fracture behavior of bimetallic welds are discussed. The purpose of the study was to determine if current fracture analyses can predict the response of pipe with flaws in bimetallic welds. The weld joined sections of A516 Grade 70 carbon steel to F316 stainless steel. The crack was along the carbon steel base metal to Inconel 182 weld metal fusion line. Material properties from tensile and C(T) specimens were used to predict large pipe response. The major conclusion from the work is that fracture behavior of the weld could be evaluated with reasonable accuracy using properties of the carbon steel pipe and conventional J-estimation analyses. However, results may not be generally true for all bimetallic welds. Second, the toughness of austenitic steel submerged-arc weld (SAW) fusion lines is discussed. During large-scale pipe tests with flaws in the center of the SAW, the crack tended to grow into the fusion line. The fracture toughness of the base metal, the SAW, and the fusion line were determined and compared. The major conclusion reached is that although the fusion line had a higher initiation toughness than the weld metal, the fusion-line J-R curve reached a steady-state value while the SAW J-R curve increased. Last, carbon steel fracture experiments containing circumferential flaws with periods of unstable crack jumps during steady ductile tearing are discussed. These instabilities are believed to be due to dynamic strain aging (DSA). The paper discusses DSA, a screening criteria developed to predict DSA, and the ability of the current J-based methodologies to assess the effect of these crack instabilities. The effect of loading rate on the strength and toughness of several different carbon steel pipes at LWR temperatures is also discussed.

  10. Effect of welding process, type of electrode and electrode core diameter on the tensile property of 304L austenitic stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinlabi OYETUNJI

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The effect of welding process, type of electrode and electrode core diameter on the tensile property of AISI 304L Austenitic Stainless Steel (ASS was studied. The tensile strength property of ASS welded samples was evaluated. Prepared samples of the ASS were welded under these three various variables. Tensile test was then carried out on the welded samples. It was found that the reduction in ultimate tensile strength (UTS of the butt joint samples increases with increase in core diameter of the electrode. Also, the best electrode for welding 304L ASS is 308L stainless steel-core electrode of 3.2 mm core diameter. It is recommended that the findings of this work can be applied in the chemical, food and oil industries where 304L ASS are predominantly used.

  11. The microstructure of neutron irradiated type-348 stainless steel and its relation to creep and hardening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, L. E.; Beeston, J. M.

    1982-06-01

    Annealed type-348 stainless steel specimens irradiated to 33 to 39 dpa at 350°C were examined by transmission electron microscopy to determine the cause of pronounced irradiation creep and hardening. The irradiation produced very high densities of 1-2 nm diameter helium bubbles, 2-20 nm diameter faulted (Frank) dislocation loops and 10 nm diameter precipitate particles. These defects account for the observed irradiation hardening but do not explain the creep strains. Too few point defects survive as faulted dislocation loops for significant creep by the stress-induced preferential absorption (SIPA) mechanism and there are not enough unfaulted dislocations for creep by climb-induced glide. Also, the irradiation-induced precipitates are face-centred cubic G-phase (a niobium nickel suicide), and cannot cause creep. It is suggested that the irradiation creep occurs by a grain-boundary movement mechanism such as diffusion accomodated grain-boundary sliding.

  12. Temperature dependence of the deformation behavior of 316 stainless steel after low temperature neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawel-Robertson, J.E.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Grossbeck, M.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    The effects of low temperature neutron irradiation on the tensile behavior of 316 stainless steel have been investigated. A single heat of solution annealed 316 was irradiated to 7 and 18 dpa at 60, 200, 330, and 400{degrees}C. The tensile properties as a function of dose and as a function of temperature were examined. Large changes in yield strength, deformation mode, strain to necking, and strain hardening capacity were seen in this irradiation experiment. The magnitudes of the changes are dependent on both irradiation temperature and neutron dose. Irradiation can more than triple the yield strength over the unirradiated value and decrease the strain to necking (STN) to less than 0.5% under certain conditions. A maximum increase in yield strength and a minimum in the STN occur after irradiation at 330{degrees}C but the failure mode remains ductile.

  13. On the formation of stacking fault tetrahedra in irradiated austenitic stainless steels – A literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schibli, Raluca, E-mail: raluca.stoenescu@gmail.com; Schäublin, Robin

    2013-11-15

    Irradiated austenitic stainless steels, because of their low stacking fault energy and high shear modulus, should exhibit a high ratio of stacking fault tetrahedra relative to the overall population of radiation induced nanometric defects. Experimental observations of stacking fault tetrahedra by transmission electron microscopy in commercial-purity stainless steels are however scarce, while they abundantly occur in high-purity or model austenitic alloys irradiated at both low and high temperatures, but not at around 673 K. In commercial alloys, the little evidence of stacking fault tetrahedra does not follow such a trend. These contradictions are reviewed and discussed. Reviewing the three possible formation mechanisms identified in the literature, namely the Silcox and Hirsch Frank loop dissociation, the void collapse and the stacking fault tetrahedra growth, it seems that the later dominates under irradiation.

  14. Investigation of the precipitation mechanism in HAZ of super-martensitic stainless steels. Two-pass weld simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladanova, Elena; Solberg, Jan K. [The Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7491 Trondheim (Norway); Rogne, Trond [SINTEF Materials and Chemistry, N-7465 Trondheim (Norway)

    2004-07-01

    Weld simulation is widely used for studying weldability of steels. Mostly, HAZ of one pass welding is simulated, and the produced specimens are mainly used for mechanical testing. Another way of applying weld simulation is to find the temperature history giving a certain microstructure observed in the HAZ of a real multipass weld. In the present work, a two-pass weld simulation was used to investigate the precipitation mechanism of carbides in the HAZ of two super-martensitic stainless steels. Previously, a model for carbide precipitation was suggested. According to this model, a reheating of the HAZ in the martensitic stage is needed to provoke strong carbide formation. In the present work, the peak temperatures of the first and second heating pass and also the temperature of the inter-pass holding were varied together with holding time during the reheat (the second pass). The most favourable heating regime for grain boundary carbide precipitation was found for both investigated steels. In addition, measurements of the chromium content across prior austenite grain boundaries were done for one of the investigated steels. The thin foils were prepared from the specimens where the strongest carbide precipitation was observed. (authors)

  15. Optimisation of GTAW parameters for the tensile strength of AISI 304 stainless steel welds using the Taguchi method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ertan, Rukiye

    2012-07-01

    The influence of welding parameters, i. e. the welding current, root gap and the shielding gas flow rate, on the tensile strength of AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel welded with gas tungsten arc welding was investigated. To determine the optimum levels of the parameters, the Taguchi approach was used to increase the tensile strength. The results were analysed by investigating the variance by which welding parameters significantly affect the response. Mathematical models were developed to describe the influence of the selected parameters on the tensile strength. The results were confirmed by experiments. [German] Der Einfluss der Schweissparameter, d. h. der Schweissstromstaerke, des Wurzelspaltes und des Schutzgasdurchflusses, auf die Zugfestigkeit des WIG-geschweissten hochlegierten Stahles AISI 304 ist in der diesem Beitrag zugrunde liegenden Studie untersucht worden. Um die optimale Groesse der Parameter in Bezug auf eine Erhoehung der Zugfestigkeit zu bestimmen, wurde der Ansatz nach Taguchi gewaehlt. Die Ergebnisse wurden analysiert, indem die Varianz ermittelt wurde, mit der die Schweissparameter signifikant die Ergebnisse veraendern. Es wurden mathematische Modelle entwickelt, um den Einfluss der gewaehlten Parameter auf die Zugfestigkeit zu beschreiben. Die Ergebnisse wurden durch Experimente bestaetigt.

  16. Heterogeneities in local plastic flow behavior in a dissimilar weld between low-alloy steel and stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mas, Fanny [Université Grenoble Alpes, SIMAP, 38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, SIMAP, 38000 Grenoble (France); Martin, Guilhem, E-mail: guilhem.martin@simap.grenoble-inp.fr [Université Grenoble Alpes, SIMAP, 38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, SIMAP, 38000 Grenoble (France); Lhuissier, Pierre; Bréchet, Yves; Tassin, Catherine [Université Grenoble Alpes, SIMAP, 38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, SIMAP, 38000 Grenoble (France); Roch, François [Areva NP, Tour Areva, 92084 Paris La Défense (France); Todeschini, Patrick [EDF R& D, Avenue des Renardières, 77250 Moret-sur-Loing (France); Simar, Aude [Institute of Mechanics, Materials and Civil Engineering (iMMC), Université catholique de Louvain, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

    2016-06-14

    In dissimilar welds between low-alloy steel and stainless steel, the post-weld heat-treatment results in a high variety of microstructures coexisting around the fusion line, due to carbon diffusion and carbides dissolution/precipitation. The local constitutive laws in the vicinity of the fusion zone were identified by micro tensile specimens for the sub-millimeter sized zones, equivalent bulk materials representing the decarburized layer using both wet H{sub 2} atmosphere and diffusion couple, and nano-indentation for the carburized regions (i.e. the martensitic band and the austenitic region). The decarburized zone presents only 50% of the yield strength of the low-alloy steel heat affected zone and a ductility doubled. The carburized zones have a yield strength 3–5 times higher than that of the low-alloy steel heat affected zone and have almost no strain hardening capacity. These properties result in heterogeneous plastic deformation happening over only millimeters when the weld is loaded perpendicularly to the weld line, affecting its overall behavior. The constitutive laws experimentally identified were introduced as inputs into a finite elements model of the transverse tensile test performed on the whole dissimilar weld. A good agreement between experiments and simulations was achieved on the global stress-strain curve. The model also well predicts the local strain field measured by microscale DIC. A large out-of-plane deformation due to the hard carburized regions has also been identified.

  17. The Early Characterization of Irradiation Effects in Stainless Steels at the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. L. Porter

    2008-01-01

    The new Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) program is revitalizing interest in materials development for fast spectrum reactors. With this comes the need for new, high-performance materials that are resistant to property changes caused by radiation damage. In the 1970s there was an effort to monitor the irradiation effects on stainless steels used in fast reactor cores, largely because there were a number of ‘surprises’ where materials subjected to a high flux of fast neutrons incurred dimensional and property changes that had not been expected. In the U.S., this applied to the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II. Void swelling and irradiation-induced creep caused dimensional changes in the reactor components that shortened their useful lifetime and impacted reactor operations by creating fuel handling difficulties and reactivity anomalies. The surveillance programs and early experiments studied the simplest of austenitic stainless steels, such as Types 304 and 304L stainless steel, and led to some basic understanding of the links between these irradiation effects and microchemical changes within the steel caused by operational variables such as temperature, neutron flux and neutron fluence. Some of the observations helped to define later alloy development programs designed to produce alloys that were much more resistant to the effects of neutron irradiation.

  18. Profiling stainless steel welding processes to reduce fume emissions, hexavalent chromium emissions and operating costs in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Michael; Siert, Arlen; Stone, Samuel; Chen, Bean T

    2016-01-01

    Nine gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes for stainless steel were assessed for fume generation rates, fume generation rates per g of electrode consumed, and emission rates for hexavalent chromium (Cr(6+)). Elemental manganese, nickel, chromium, iron emissions per unit length of weld, and labor plus consumables costs were similarly measured. Flux-cored arc welding and shielded metal arc (SMAW) processes were also studied. The objective was to identify the best welding processes for reducing workplace exposures, and estimate costs for all processes. Using a conical chamber, fumes were collected, weighed, recovered, and analyzed by inductively coupled atomic emission spectroscopy for metals, and by ion chromatography for Cr(6+). GMAW processes used were Surface Tension Transfer, Regulated Metal Deposition, Cold Metal Transfer, short-circuit, axial spray, and pulsed spray modes. Flux-cored welding used gas shielding; SMAW used E308 rods. Costs were estimated as dollars per m length of a ¼ in (6.3 mm) thick horizontal butt weld; equipment costs were estimated as ratios of new equipment costs to a 250 ampere capacity SMAW welding machine. Results indicate a broad range of fume emission factors for the processes studied. Fume emission rates per g of electrode were lowest for GMAW processes such as pulsed-spray mode (0.2 mg/g), and highest for SMAW (8 mg fume/g electrode). Emission rates of Cr(6+) ranged from 50-7800 µg/min, and Cr(6+) generation rates per g electrode ranged from 1-270 µg/g. Elemental Cr generation rates spanned 13-330 µg/g. Manganese emission rates ranged from 50-300 µg/g. Nickel emission rates ranged from 4-140 µg/g. Labor and consumables costs ranged from $3.15 (GMAW pulsed spray) to $7.40 (SMAW) per meter of finished weld, and were measured or estimated for all 11 processes tested. Equipment costs for some processes may be as much as five times the cost of a typical SMAW welding machine. The results show that all of the GMAW processes in this

  19. Impact property of low-activation vanadium alloy after laser welding and heavy neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagasaka, Takuya, E-mail: nagasaka@nifs.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Muroga, Takeo [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Watanabe, Hideo [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Kasuga (Japan); Miyazawa, Takeshi [The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Yamazaki, Masanori [International Research Center for Nuclear Materials Science, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan); Shinozaki, Kenji [Department of Mechanical System Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Hiroshima University, Higashi Hiroshima (Japan)

    2013-11-15

    Weld specimens of the reference low activation vanadium alloy, NIFS-HEAT-2, were irradiated up to a neutron fluence of 1.5 × 10{sup 25} n m{sup −2} (E > 0.1 MeV) (1.2 dpa) at 670 K and 1.3 × 10{sup 26} n m{sup −2} (5.3 dpa) at 720 K in the JOYO reactor in Japan. The base metal exhibited superior irradiation resistance with the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) much lower than room temperature (RT) for both irradiation conditions. The weld metal kept the DBTT below RT after the 1.2 dpa irradiation; however, it showed enhanced irradiation embrittlement with much higher DBTT than RT after the 5.3 dpa irradiation. The high DBTT for the weld metal was effectively recovered by a post-irradiation annealing at 873 K for 1 h. Mechanisms of the irradiation embrittlement and its recovery are discussed, based on characterization of the radiation defects and irradiation-induced precipitation.

  20. Improvement of localised corrosion resistance of AISI 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel joints made by gas metal arc welding under electromagnetic interaction of low intensity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Rentería, M.A., E-mail: crazyfim@gmail.com [Instituto de Investigación en Metalurgia y Materiales, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, A.P. 888, CP 58000, Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico); López-Morelos, V.H., E-mail: vhlopez@umich.mx [Instituto de Investigación en Metalurgia y Materiales, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, A.P. 888, CP 58000, Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico); García-Hernández, R., E-mail: rgarcia@umich.mx [Instituto de Investigación en Metalurgia y Materiales, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, A.P. 888, CP 58000, Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico); Dzib-Pérez, L., E-mail: luirdzib@uacam.mx [Centre for Corrosion Research, Autonomous University of Campeche, Av. Agustín Melgar s/n, Col. Buenavista, CP 24039, Campeche, Cam (Mexico); García-Ochoa, E.M., E-mail: emgarcia@uacam.mx [Centre for Corrosion Research, Autonomous University of Campeche, Av. Agustín Melgar s/n, Col. Buenavista, CP 24039, Campeche, Cam (Mexico); González-Sánchez, J., E-mail: jagonzal@uacam.mx [Centre for Corrosion Research, Autonomous University of Campeche, Av. Agustín Melgar s/n, Col. Buenavista, CP 24039, Campeche, Cam (Mexico)

    2014-12-01

    Highlights: • Electromagnetic interaction in welding improved localised corrosion resistance. • Electromagnetic interaction in welding enhanced γ/δ phase balance of DuplexSS. • Welding under Electromagnetic interaction repress formation and growth of detrimental phases. • Welds made with gas protection (2% O{sub 2} + 98% Ar) have better microstructural evolution during welding. - Abstract: The resistance to localised corrosion of AISI 2205 duplex stainless steel plates joined by Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) under the effect of electromagnetic interaction of low intensity (EMILI) was evaluated with sensitive electrochemical methods. Welds were made using two shielding gas mixtures: 98% Ar + 2% O{sub 2} (M1) and 97% Ar + 3% N{sub 2} (M2). Plates were welded under EMILI using the M1 gas with constant welding parameters. The modified microstructural evolution in the high temperature heat affected zone and at the fusion zone induced by application of EMILI during welding is associated with the increase of resistance to localised corrosion of the welded joints. Joints made by GMAW using the shielding gas M2 without the application of magnetic field presented high resistance to general corrosion but high susceptibility to undergo localised attack.

  1. Laser-based welding of 17-4 PH martensitic stainless steel in a tubular butt joint configuration with a built-in backing bar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Junjie; Atabaki, Mehdi Mazar; Liu, Wei; Pillai, Raju; Kumar, Biju; Vasudevan, Unnikrishnan; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2016-08-01

    Laser-based welding of thick 17-4 precipitation hardening (PH) martensitic stainless steel (SS) plates in a tubular butt joint configuration with a built-in backing bar is very challenging because the porosity and cracks are easily generated in the welds. The backing bar blocked the keyhole opening at the bottom surface through which the entrapped gas could escape, and the keyhole was unstable and collapsed overtime in a deep partially penetrated welding conditions resulting in the formation of pores easily. Moreover, the fast cooling rate prompted the ferrite transform to austenite which induced cracking. Two-pass welding procedure was developed to join 17-4 PH martensitic SS. The laser welding assisted by a filler wire, as the first pass, was used to weld the groove shoulder. The added filler wire could absorb a part of the laser beam energy; resulting in the decreased weld depth-to-width ratio and relieved intensive restraint at the weld root. A hybrid laser-arc welding or a gas metal arc welding (GMAW) was used to fill the groove as the second pass. Nitrogen was introduced to stabilize the keyhole and mitigate the porosity. Preheating was used to decrease the cooling rate and mitigate the cracking during laser-based welding of 17-4 PH martensitic SS plates.

  2. Improvement of localised corrosion resistance of AISI 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel joints made by gas metal arc welding under electromagnetic interaction of low intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Rentería, M. A.; López-Morelos, V. H.; García-Hernández, R.; Dzib-Pérez, L.; García-Ochoa, E. M.; González-Sánchez, J.

    2014-12-01

    The resistance to localised corrosion of AISI 2205 duplex stainless steel plates joined by Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) under the effect of electromagnetic interaction of low intensity (EMILI) was evaluated with sensitive electrochemical methods. Welds were made using two shielding gas mixtures: 98% Ar + 2% O2 (M1) and 97% Ar + 3% N2 (M2). Plates were welded under EMILI using the M1 gas with constant welding parameters. The modified microstructural evolution in the high temperature heat affected zone and at the fusion zone induced by application of EMILI during welding is associated with the increase of resistance to localised corrosion of the welded joints. Joints made by GMAW using the shielding gas M2 without the application of magnetic field presented high resistance to general corrosion but high susceptibility to undergo localised attack.

  3. OPTIMIZATION OF PROCESS PARAMETERS TO MINIMIZE ANGULAR DISTORTION IN GAS TUNGSTEN ARC WELDED STAINLESS STEEL 202 GRADE PLATES USING PARTICLE SWARM OPTIMIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. SUDHAKARAN

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study on optimization of process parameters using particle swarm optimization to minimize angular distortion in 202 grade stainless steel gas tungsten arc welded plates. Angular distortion is a major problem and most pronounced among different types of distortion in butt welded plates. The process control parameters chosen for the study are welding gun angle, welding speed, plate length, welding current and gas flow rate. The experiments were conducted using design of experiments technique with five factor five level central composite rotatable design with full replication technique. A mathematical model was developed correlating the process parameters with angular distortion. A source code was developed in MATLAB 7.6 to do the optimization. The optimal process parameters gave a value of 0.0305° for angular distortion which demonstrates the accuracy of the model developed. The results indicate that the optimized values for the process parameters are capable of producing weld with minimum distortion.

  4. Grafting of HEMA onto dopamine coated stainless steel by 60Co-γ irradiation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Wanqin; Yang, Liming; Yang, Wei; Chen, Bin; Chen, Jie

    2014-12-01

    A novel method for grafting of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) onto the surface of stainless steel (SS) was explored by using 60Co-γ irradiation. The surface of SS was modified by coating of dopamine before radiation grafting. The grafting reaction was performed in a simultaneous irradiation condition. The chemical structures change of the surface before and after grafting was demonstrated by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer. The hydrophilicity of the samples was determined by water contact angle measurement in the comparison of the stainless steel in the conditions of pristine, dopamine coated and HEMA grafted. Surface morphology of the samples was characterized by atomic force microscope (AFM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The corrosion resistance properties of the samples were evaluated by Tafel polarization curve. The hemocompatibility of the samples were tested by platelet adhesion assay.

  5. Study of austenitic stainless steel welded with low alloy steel filler metal. [tensile and impact strength tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, F. A.; Dyke, R. A., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The tensile and impact strength properties of 316L stainless steel plate welded with low alloy steel filler metal were determined. Tests were conducted at room temperature and -100 F on standard test specimens machined from as-welded panels of various chemical compositions. No significant differences were found as the result of variations in percentage chemical composition on the impact and tensile test results. The weldments containing lower chromium and nickel as the result of dilution of parent metal from the use of the low alloy steel filler metal corroded more severely in a marine environment. The use of a protective finish, i.e., a nitrile-based paint containing aluminum powder, prevented the corrosive attack.

  6. Analysis of features of stainless steels in dissimilar welded joints in chloride inducted corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topolska, S.; Łabanowski, J.

    2017-08-01

    Stainless steels of femtic-austenitic microstructure that means the duplex Cr-Ni-Mo steels, in comparison with austenitic steel includes less expensive nickel and has much better mechanical properties with good formability and corrosion resistance, even in environments containing chloride ions. Similar share of high chromium ferrite and austenite, which is characterized by high ductility, determines that the duplex steels have good crack resistance at temperatures up to approximately -40°C. The steels containing approximately 22% Cr, 5% Ni, 3% Mo and 0.2% N crystallizes as a solid solution δ, partially transforming from the temperature of about 1200°C to 850°C into the phase α. The stable structure of considered steels, at temperatures above 850°C, is ferrite, and at lower temperatures the mixture of phase γ+α +σ. The two-phase structure α+γ the duplex steel obtains after hyperquenching at the temperature of stability of the mixture of α+γ phases, and the share of the phases depends on the hyper quenching attributes. Hyperquenching in water, with a temperature close to 1200°C, ensures the instance in the microstructure of the steel a large share of ferrite and a small share of the high chromium austenite. This causes the increase of strength properties and reducing the plasticity of the steel and its resistance ability to cracking and corrosion. Slower cooling from the mentioned temperature, for example in the air, enables the partial transformation of the a phase into the γ one (α → γ) and increasing the share of austenite in the steel structure. It leads to improvement of plasticity properties. In the paper are presented the results of investigations of heteronymous welded joints of duplex steel and austenitic one. The results include the relation between the chemical composition of steels and their weldability.

  7. Preliminary stress corrosion cracking modeling study of a dissimilar material weld of alloy (INCONEL) 182 with Stainless Steel 316

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aly, Omar F.; Mattar Neto, Miguel, E-mail: ofaly@ipen.br, E-mail: mmattar@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Schvartzman, Monica M.A.M., E-mail: monicas@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Dissimilar welds (DW) are normally used in many components junctions in structural project of PWR (Pressurized Water Reactors) in Nuclear Plants. One had been departed of a DW of a nozzle located at a Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) of a PWR reactor, that joins the structural vessel material with an A316 stainless steel safe end. This weld is basically done with Alloy 182 with a weld buttering of Alloy 82. It had been prepared some axial cylindrical specimens retired from the Alloy 182/A316 weld end to be tested in the slow strain rate test machine located at CDTN laboratory. Based in these stress corrosion susceptibility results, it was done a preliminary semi-empirical modeling application to study the failure initiation time evolution of these specimens. The used model is composed by a deterministic part, and a probabilistic part according to the Weibull distribution. It had been constructed a specific Microsoft Excel worksheet to do the model application of input data. The obtained results had been discussed according with literature and also the model application limits. (author)

  8. Microstructural changes of a thermally aged stainless steel submerged arc weld overlay cladding of nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, T., E-mail: takeuchi.tomoaki@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Kameda, J. [National Institute for Materials Science, Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Nagai, Y.; Toyama, T.; Matsukawa, Y. [Oarai Center, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Nishiyama, Y.; Onizawa, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2012-06-15

    The effect of thermal aging on microstructural changes in stainless steel submerged arc weld-overlay cladding of reactor pressure vessels was investigated using atom probe tomography (APT). In as-received materials subjected to post-welding heat treatments (PWHTs), with a subsequent furnace cooling, a slight fluctuation of the Cr concentration was observed due to spinodal decomposition in the {delta}-ferrite phase but not in the austenitic phase. Thermal aging at 400 Degree-Sign C for 10,000 h caused not only an increase in the amplitude of spinodal decomposition but also the precipitation of G phases with composition ratios of Ni:Si:Mn = 16:7:6 in the {delta}-ferrite phase. The degree of the spinodal decomposition in the submerged arc weld sample was similar to that in the electroslag weld one reported previously. We also observed a carbide on the {gamma}-austenite and {delta}-ferrite interface. There were no Cr depleted zones around the carbide.

  9. High resolution grain boundary analysis of neutron irradiated stainless steel using FEG-TEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kodama, Mitsuhiro; Ishiyama, Yoshihide; Yokota, Norikatsu [Nippon Nuclear Fuel Development Co. Ltd., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1999-09-01

    High-resolution grain boundary analyses of irradiated SUS304 stainless steel using a field emission gun equipped transmission electron microscope were carried out in order to detect radiation-induced grain boundary segregation. The effect of probe size on the measured compositional profiles was studied. The depletion of chromium and enrichment of nickel, phosphorus and silicon were detected at a grain boundary. The measured compositional profiles were affected by the probe size which impeded their interpretation. (author)

  10. Stress corrosion cracking of welded joints of super-martensitic stainless steel in H{sub 2}S free environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoerner, Bertrand; Bayle, Bernard; Delafosse, David [Centre Science des Materiaux et des Structures - URA CNRS 5146, ENS Mines de Saint-Etienne, 158 Cours Fauriel, 42023 Saint-Etienne cedex 02 (France); Ligier, Vincent [CRMC, INDUSTEEL Creusot, 56, rue Clemenceau, BP 56 - 71 202 Le Creusot Cedex (France)

    2004-07-01

    Due to their combination of good weldability and good mechanical properties, low carbon super-martensitic stainless steels are good candidates for oil and gas flow line applications. These alloys have already been used in slightly sour environments containing chlorides, CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S. The properties of a welded joint whose composition is matching or superduplex that of the base metal are investigated. The base material is the super-martensitic stainless steels medium alloy: 13Cr-4.5Ni-1.5Mo. The Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) of girth welds may be sensitive to stress corrosion cracking and presents distinct features intergranular cracking when tested in four-point bending in a sour deaerated environment at temperatures around 100 deg. C. The electrochemical properties of the medium alloy and the matching welded joint + HAZ were determined in a chloride-containing environment without H{sub 2}S. A passive film is formed on polished samples. This film is less protective for the welded joint + HAZ samples than in the base metal. Moreover, the pitting corrosion resistance is strongly decreased in the HAZ. Slow strain rate tensile tests were conducted in a de-aerated solution without H{sub 2}S. They reproduce the same type of cracking as was observed in four point bending tests in a sour environment: initiation in the HAZ and an intergranular crack with a very brittle aspect and no significant trace of corrosion. The presence H{sub 2}S is not the prevailing factor for the occurrence of cracking. Furthermore, it is not necessary to have a specific surface condition for crack initiation to occur in slow strain rate tension, as it is the case four point bend tests where initiation appears to be controlled by the surface condition (chemical and / or geometrical). Finally, a simulated PWHT strongly increase the resistance to SSC. (authors)

  11. Infrared nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation of stainless steel: micro iron-oxide zones generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Morales, M; Frausto-Reyes, C; Soto-Bernal, J J; Acosta-Ortiz, S E; Gonzalez-Mota, R; Rosales-Candelas, I

    2014-07-15

    Nanosecond-pulsed, infrared (1064 nm) laser irradiation was used to create periodic metal oxide coatings on the surface of two samples of commercial stainless steel at ambient conditions. A pattern of four different metal oxide zones was created using a galvanometer scanning head and a focused laser beam over each sample. This pattern is related to traverse direction of the laser beam scanning. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) was used to find the elemental composition and Raman spectroscopy to characterize each oxide zone. Pulsed laser irradiation modified the composition of the stainless steel samples, affecting the concentration of the main components within each heat affected zone. The Raman spectra of the generated oxides have different intensity profiles, which suggest different oxide phases such as magnetite and maghemite. In addition, these oxides are not sensible to the laser power of the Raman system, as are the iron oxide powders reported in the literature. These experiments show that it is possible to generate periodic patterns of various iron oxide zones by laser irradiation, of stainless steel at ambient conditions, and that Raman spectroscopy is a useful punctual technique for the analysis and inspection of small oxide areas.

  12. Effect of Active Gas on Weld Shape and Microstructure of Advanced A-TIG-Welded Stainless Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Reza Nakhaei; Alireza Khodabandeh; Hamidreza Najafi

    2016-01-01

    Advanced A-TIG method was conducted to increase the weld penetration and compared with the conventional TIG welding process.A two-pipeline setup was designed to apply Ar + CO2 mixed gas as the outer layer,while pure argon was applied as the inner layer to prevent any consumption of the tungsten electrode.The results indicate that the presence of active gas in the molten pool led to the change in the temperature coefficient of surface tension so that the Marangoni convection turns inward and forms a deep weld zone.The increase in gas flow rate causes a decrease in the weld efficiency which is attributed to the increase in oxygen content in the weld pool and the formation of a thicker oxide layer on the weld surface.Moreover,the stir and the temperature fluctuation,led by double shielding gas,create more homogeneous nucleation sites in the molten pool so that a fine grain microstructure was obtained.

  13. Fluence dependence of defect evolution in austenitic stainless steels during fission neutron irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, H.; Muroga, T.; Yoshida, N.

    To understand microstructural evolution during fission neutron irradiation, a pure Fe-Cr-Ni ternary alloy, phosphorus-containing model austenitic stainless steels and SUS316 were irradiated in a Japanese Material Testing Reactor (JMTR) at 493 and 613 K. At 493 K, the density of defect cluster increased with the irradiation dose, but there was no significant change in loop density and loop size among all the materials. At 613 K, on the other hand, interstitial type dislocation loops and phosphides were formed in pure ternary and phosphorus-containing alloys, respectively, by an early stage of irradiation. These results suggest that the defect cluster formation at 493 and 613 K is mainly controlled by the cascade damage and long-range migration of free point defects, respectively.

  14. Cracking behavior of thermally aged and irradiated CF-8 cast austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y., E-mail: Yiren_Chen@anl.gov [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Alexandreanu, B.; Chen, W.-Y.; Natesan, K. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Li, Z.; Yang, Y. [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Rao, A.S. [US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, 11545 Rockville Pike, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    To assess the combined effect of thermal aging and neutron irradiation on the cracking behavior of CF-8 cast austenitic stainless steel, crack growth rate (CGR) and fracture toughness J-R curve tests were carried out on compact-tension specimens in high-purity water with low dissolved oxygen. Both unaged and thermally aged specimens were irradiated at ∼320 °C to 0.08 dpa. Thermal aging at 400 °C for 10,000 h apparently had no effect on the corrosion fatigue and stress corrosion cracking behavior in the test environment. The cracking susceptibility of CF-8 was not elevated significantly by neutron irradiation at 0.08 dpa. Transgranular cleavage-like cracking was the main fracture mode during the CGR tests, and a brittle morphology of delta ferrite was often seen on the fracture surfaces at the end of CGR tests. The fracture toughness J-R curve tests showed that both thermal aging and neutron irradiation can induce significant embrittlement. The loss of fracture toughness due to neutron irradiation was more pronounced in the unaged than aged specimens. After neutron irradiation, the fracture toughness values of the unaged and aged specimens were reduced to a similar level. G-phase precipitates were observed in the aged and irradiated specimens with or without prior aging. The similar microstructural changes resulting from thermal aging and irradiation suggest a common microstructural mechanism of inducing embrittlement in CF-8.

  15. [Cytotoxicitic detection of laser welding between NiTi shape memory alloy and stainless steel in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wenwen; Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Bing; Liu, Jiming; Sun, Xinhua

    2014-04-01

    To investigate the cytotoxicity of laser-welded nickel titanium (NiTi) and stainless steel composite archwire. The NiTi and stainless steel composite archwire (CoAW) laser-welded with pure copper inrerplayer was studied with methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) test in vitro. The cytotoxicity of CoAW was compared with stainless steel archwire and NiTi archwire. Two tests were carried out. Test 1: the immersed solution of CoAW was diluted to five grades (50%, 40%, 30%, 20%, 10%). The cytotoxicity in vitro of these agents was assayed on murine fibroblast cell L929 line with MTT test at 24 and 48 hours. Test 2: the immeresed solution of CoAW, NiTi archwires and stainless steel archwires was diluted to four grads (100%, 75%, 50%, 25%). The cytotoxity of three kinds of material was compared at 48 hours. The results of all samples revealed level 0-1 cytotoxicity. In test 1, the same grade solution optical density (except 20%) at 24 hours was statistically lower than at 48 hours. In test 2, the optical density of CoAW solution (1.964 ± 0.122, 2.084 ± 0.056, 2.056 ± 0.071, 2.096 ± 0.050) was statistically lower than the same grade solution of stainless steel archwire (2.168 ± 0.091, 2.227 ± 0.160, 2.302 ± 0.052, 2.301 ± 0.060) and NiTi archwire (2.138 ± 0.105, 2.262 ± 0.050, 2.271 ± 0.082, 2.294 ± 0.056) (P < 0.05). The MTT test of CoAW in vitro showed that cytotoxicity was related to concentration and time. The cytotoxicity of the CoAW was more serious than that of stainless steel and NiTi archwires. However, CoAW belonged to secure rang of material toxicity reaction.

  16. The time-dependent health and biochemical effects in rats exposed to stainless steel welding dust and its soluble form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halatek, Tadeusz; Stanislawska, Magdalena; Kaminska, Irena; Cieslak, Malgorzata; Swiercz, Radoslaw; Wasowicz, Wojciech

    2017-02-23

    Welding processes that generate fumes containing toxic metals, such as hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)), manganese (Mn), and nickel (Ni), have been implicated in lung injury, inflammation, and lung tumor promotion in animal models. The principal objective of this study was to determine the dynamics of toxic effects of inhalation exposure to morphologically rated welding dust from stainless steel welding and its soluble form in TSE System with a dynamic airflow. We assessed the pulmonary toxicity of welding dust in Wistar rats exposed to 60.0 mg/m(3) of respirable-size welding dust (mean diameter 1.17 µm) for 2 weeks (6 h/day, 5 days/week); the aerosols were generated in the nose-only exposure chambers (NOEC). An additional aim included the study of the effect of betaine supplementation on oxidative deterioration in rat lung during 2 weeks of exposure to welding dust or water-soluble dust form. The animals were divided into eight groups (n = 8 per group): control, dust, betaine, betaine + dust, soluble-form dust, soluble-form dust + betaine, saline and saline + betaine groups. Rats were euthanized 1 or 2 weeks after the last exposure for assessment of pulmonary toxicity. Differential cell counts, total protein concentrations and cellular enzyme (lactate dehydrogenase-LDH) activities were determined in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, and corticosterone and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) concentrations were assessed in serum. The increase in polymorphonuclear (PMN) leukocytes in BAL fluid (a cytological index of inflammatory responses of the lung) is believed to reflect pulmonary toxicity of heavy metals. Biomarkers of toxicity assessed in bronchoalveolar fluids indicate that the level of the toxic effect depends mainly on the solubility of studied metal compounds; biomarkers that showed treatment effects included: total cell, neutrophil and lymphocyte counts, total protein concentrations, and cellular enzyme (lactate dehydrogenase) activity

  17. Tissue distribution of manganese in iron-sufficient or iron-deficient rats after stainless steel welding-fume exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung-Duck; Kim, Ki-Young; Kim, Dong-Won; Choi, Seong-Jin; Choi, Byung-Sun; Chung, Yong Hyun; Han, Jeong Hee; Sung, Jae Hyuck; Kwon, Il Hoon; Mun, Je-Hyeok; Yu, Il Je

    2007-05-01

    Welders can be exposed to high levels of manganese through welding fumes. Although it has already been suggested that excessive manganese exposure causes neurotoxicity, called manganism, the pathway of manganese transport to the brain with welding-fume exposure remains unclear. Iron is an essential metal that maintains a homeostasis in the body. The divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) transports iron and other divalent metals, such as manganese, and the depletion of iron is known to upregulate DMT1 expression. Accordingly, this study investigated the tissue distribution of manganese in iron-sufficient and iron-deficient rats after welding-fume exposure. The feeding of an iron-deficient diet for 4 wk produced a depletion of body iron, such as decreased iron levels in the serum and tissues, and upregulated the DMT1 expression in the rat duodenum. The iron-sufficient and iron-deficient rats were then exposed to welding fumes generated from manual metal arc stainless steel at a concentration of 63.5 +/- 2.3 mg/m3 for 2 h per day over a 30-day period. Animals were sacrificed on days 1, 15, and 30. The level of body iron in the iron-deficient rats was restored to the control level after the welding-fume exposure. However, the tissue distributions of manganese after the welding-fume exposure showed similar patterns in both the iron-sufficient and iron-deficient groups. The concentration of manganese increased in the lungs and liver on days 15 and 30, and increased in the olfactory bulb on day 30. Slight and heterogeneous increases of manganese were observed in different brain regions. Consequently, these findings suggest that the presence of Fe in the inhaled welding fumes may not have a significant effect on the uptake of Mn into the brain. Thus, the condition of iron deficiency did not seem to have any apparent effect on the transport of Mn into the brain after the inhalation of welding fumes.

  18. The results and analysis of irradiation experiments conducted on reactor vessel plate and weld materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biemiller, E.C. [Yankee Atomic Electric Co., Bolton, MA (United States); Carter, R.G.; Rosinski, S.T. [Electric Power Research Inst., Charlotte, NC (United States)

    1996-09-01

    This paper documents the extensive amount of experimental work on radiation damage to reactor vessel materials carried out by Yankee Atomic Electric Company (YAEC) and others in support of a licensing effort to restart the Yankee Rowe nuclear power plant. The effect of plate nickel content and microstructure on irradiation damage sensitivity was assessed. Typical reactor pressure vessel plate materials each containing 0.24% (by weight) copper, but different nickel contents at 0.19% and 0.63% were heat treated to produce different microstructures. A Linde 80 weld containing 0.30% copper and 1.00% nickel was produced and heat treated to test microstructure effects on the irradiation response of weld metal. Materials taken from plate surface locations (vs 1/4%) were included to test whether or not the improved toughness properties of the plate surface layer, resulting from a rapid quench, is maintained after irradiation. Irradiations were conducted at two irradiation temperatures, 500 F (260 C) and 550 F (288 C), to determine the effect of irradiation temperature on embrittlement. The results of this irradiation testing and additional data from a DOE/Sandia National Laboratories irradiation study show an irradiation temperature effect that is not consistent, but varies with the materials tested. The test results demonstrate that for nickel bearing steels, the superior toughness of plate surface material is maintained even after irradiation to high fluences, and for the copper content tested, nickel has little effect on irradiation response. A mixed effect of microstructure/heat treatment on the materials` irradiation response was noted. Phosphorus potentially played a role in the irradiation response of the low nickel material irradiated at 500 F (288 C) but did not show prominence in the irradiations for the same material conducted at 500 F (260 C).

  19. Recent advances in Ti and Nb explosion welding with stainless steel for 2K operating (ILC Program)- To the proceedings of LCWS11

    CERN Document Server

    Sabirov, B; Sissakian, A; Shirkov, G; Taran, Yu; Trubnikov, G; Dhanarai, N; Foley, M; Harms, E; Mitchell, D; Nagaitsev, S; Soyars, W; Rybakov, V; Samarokov, Yu; Zhigalov, V; Basti, A; Bedeschi, F

    2012-01-01

    The world first samples 0f Ti+SS and Nb+SS joints were manufactured by an explosion welding technology demonstrating a high mechanic properties and leak absence at 4.6 x 10^{-9} atm-cc/sec. Residual stresses in bimetallic joints resulting from explosion welding measured by neutron diffraction method are quite high (~1000 MPa). Thermal tempering of explosion welded Ti+SS and Nb+SS specimens leads to complete relaxation of internal stresses in Ti,Nb and Stainless steel and makes the transition elements quite serviceable.

  20. The evolution of mechanical property change in irradiated austenitic stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, G. E.

    1993-11-01

    The evolution of mechanical properties in austenitic stainless steels during irradiation is reviewed. Changes in strength, ductility and fracture toughness are strongly related to the evolution of the damage microstructure and microstructurally-based models for strengthening reasonably correlate the data. Irradiation-induced defects promote work softening and flow localization which in turn leads to significant reductions in ductility and fracture toughness beyond about 10 dpa. The effects of irradiation on fatigue appear to be modest except at high temperature where helium embrittlement becomes important. The swelling-independent component of irradiation creep strain increases linearly with dose and is relatively insensitive to material variables and irradiation temperature, except at low temperatures where accelerated creep may occur as a result of low vacancy mobility. Creep rupture life is a strong function of helium content, but is less sensitive to metallurgical conditions. Irradiation-induced stress corrosion cracking appears to be related to the evolution of radiation-induced segregation/depletion at grain boundaries, and hence may not be significant at low irradiation temperatures.

  1. SANS examination of irradiated RPV steel welds during in-situ annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boothby, R.M. [National Nuclear Laboratory, B168 Harwell Campus, Didcot, Oxon. OX11 0QT (United Kingdom); Hyde, J.M., E-mail: jonathan.m.hyde@nnl.co.uk [National Nuclear Laboratory, B168 Harwell Campus, Didcot, Oxon. OX11 0QT (United Kingdom); Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Swan, H. [National Nuclear Laboratory, B168 Harwell Campus, Didcot, Oxon. OX11 0QT (United Kingdom); Parfitt, D.; Wilford, K. [Rolls-Royce plc, P.O. Box 2000, Derby DE21 7XX (United Kingdom); Lindner, P. [Institut Laue-Langevin, 71 avenue des Martyrs, CS20156, 38042 Grenoble CEDEX 9 (France)

    2015-06-15

    An in-situ annealing experiment was performed using SANS measurements to examine the distribution and thermal stability of irradiation-induced solute clusters in RPV steel welds. Samples were sequentially annealed for 30 min at ∼50 °C intervals in the temperature range 295–497 °C. A methodology was developed to correct the observed data to allow for increased thermal diffuse scattering during annealing which enabled analysis of the changes in coherent scattering in isolation. Results for a low-Ni weld irradiated at low temperature showed apparent decreases in the volume fraction of solute clusters during annealing. However the cluster size was unaffected and these results could have arisen from reduced scattering contrast due to compositional changes, rather than cluster dissolution. A similarly irradiated high-Ni weld exhibited cluster coarsening at high annealing temperatures. Samples of both welds irradiated at a higher temperature were relatively unaffected by annealing except at high temperatures where some shrinkage, indicative of cluster dissolution, occurred.

  2. Effect of neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties of weld overlay cladding for reactor pressure vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobita, Tohru; Udagawa, Makoto; Chimi, Yasuhiro; Nishiyama, Yutaka; Onizawa, Kunio

    2014-09-01

    This study investigates the effects of high fluence neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties of two types of cladding materials fabricated using the submerged-arc welding and electroslag welding methods. The tensile tests, Charpy impact tests, and fracture toughness tests were conducted before and after the neutron irradiation with a fluence of 1 × 1024 n/m2 at 290 °C. With neutron irradiation, we could observe an increase in the yield strength and ultimate strength, and a decrease in the total elongation. All cladding materials exhibited ductile-to-brittle transition behavior during the Charpy impact tests. A reduction in the Charpy upper-shelf energy and an increase in the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature was observed with neutron irradiation. There was no obvious decrease in the elastic-plastic fracture toughness (JIc) of the cladding materials upon irradiation with high neutron fluence. The tearing modulus was found to decrease with neutron irradiation; the submerged-arc-welded cladding materials exhibited low JIc values at high temperatures.

  3. Effect of neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties of weld overlay cladding for reactor pressure vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobita, Tohru, E-mail: tobita.tohru@jaea.go.jp; Udagawa, Makoto; Chimi, Yasuhiro; Nishiyama, Yutaka; Onizawa, Kunio

    2014-09-15

    This study investigates the effects of high fluence neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties of two types of cladding materials fabricated using the submerged-arc welding and electroslag welding methods. The tensile tests, Charpy impact tests, and fracture toughness tests were conducted before and after the neutron irradiation with a fluence of 1 × 10{sup 24} n/m{sup 2} at 290 °C. With neutron irradiation, we could observe an increase in the yield strength and ultimate strength, and a decrease in the total elongation. All cladding materials exhibited ductile-to-brittle transition behavior during the Charpy impact tests. A reduction in the Charpy upper-shelf energy and an increase in the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature was observed with neutron irradiation. There was no obvious decrease in the elastic–plastic fracture toughness (J{sub Ic}) of the cladding materials upon irradiation with high neutron fluence. The tearing modulus was found to decrease with neutron irradiation; the submerged-arc-welded cladding materials exhibited low J{sub Ic} values at high temperatures.

  4. Correlation between locally deformed structure and oxide film properties in austenitic stainless steel irradiated with neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimi, Yasuhiro; Kitsunai, Yuji; Kasahara, Shigeki; Chatani, Kazuhiro; Koshiishi, Masato; Nishiyama, Yutaka

    2016-07-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) in high-temperature water for neutron-irradiated austenitic stainless steels (SSs), the locally deformed structures, the oxide films formed on the deformed areas, and their correlation were investigated. Tensile specimens made of irradiated 316L SSs were strained 0.1%-2% at room temperature or at 563 K, and the surface structures and crystal misorientation among grains were evaluated. The strained specimens were immersed in high-temperature water, and the microstructures of the oxide films on the locally deformed areas were observed. The appearance of visible step structures on the specimens' surface depended on the neutron dose and the applied strain. The surface oxides were observed to be prone to increase in thickness around grain boundaries (GBs) with increasing neutron dose and increasing local strain at the GBs. No penetrative oxidation was observed along GBs or along surface steps.

  5. Deformation control technique for welding stainless steel sheet expansion tank%不锈钢薄板溢流箱焊接变形控制工艺

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石秋红; 张勤

    2013-01-01

    某公司建设工程中的304材质不锈钢薄板溢流箱有较大的焊接变形倾向,而产品对变形后的尺寸偏差要求非常严格.通过分析304材质的焊接性,对比不同焊接方法,选用了焊接变形较小的药芯焊丝CO2气体保护焊,并合理选用焊接材料与焊接工艺参数,根据溢流箱结构特点安排合适的焊缝焊接顺序.焊接效果证明此焊接工艺有效解决了不锈钢薄板溢流箱的焊接变形难题,降低了生产成本,提高了生产效率,满足了工程质量要求.%The production of X company's construction project has a quite strict dimensional deviation criterion after deformation. However, type 304 stainless sheet steel overflow tank has significant tendency of weld deformation. Therefore, in this paper, it performed analysis on the weld ability of type 304, and comparison among different welding methods. It chose flux-cored wire co2 shield welding which of little welding deformation, and chose reasonable welding parameters and materials. In addition, it also arranged suitable weld sequence in accordance with the structural features of overflow tank. The welding effect proved that this welding method can effectively resolve the welding deformation problems of stainless sheet steel overflow tank, reduced cost of production, improved production efficiency and met project quality requirements.

  6. Microstructure, Mechanical and Corrosion Properties of Friction Stir Welding High Nitrogen Martensitic Stainless Steel 30Cr15Mo1N

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Geng

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available High nitrogen martensitic stainless steel 30Cr15Mo1N plates were successfully welded by friction stir welding (FSW at a tool rotation speed of 300 rpm with a welding speed of 100 mm/min, using W-Re tool. The sound joint with no significant nitrogen loss was successfully produced. Microstructure, mechanical and corrosion properties of an FSW joint were investigated. The results suggest that the grain size of the stir zone (SZ is larger than the base metal (BM and is much larger the case in SZ-top. Some carbides and nitrides rich in chromium were found in BM while not observed in SZ. The martensitic phase in SZ could transform to austenite phase during the FSW process and the higher peak temperature, the greater degree of transformation. The hardness of SZ is significantly lower than that of the BM. An abrupt change of hardness defined as hard zone (HZ was found in the thermo-mechanically affected zone (TMAZ on the advancing side (AS, and the HZ is attributed to a combination result of temperature, deformation, and material flow behavior. The corrosion resistance of SZ is superior to that of BM, which can be attributed to less precipitation and lower angle boundaries (LABs. The corrosion resistance of SZ-bottom is slight higher than that of SZ-top because of the finer grained structure.

  7. Modelling the attenuation in the ATHENA finite elements code for the ultrasonic testing of austenitic stainless steel welds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassignole, B; Duwig, V; Ploix, M-A; Guy, P; El Guerjouma, R

    2009-12-01

    Multipass welds made in austenitic stainless steel, in the primary circuit of nuclear power plants with pressurized water reactors, are characterized by an anisotropic and heterogeneous structure that disturbs the ultrasonic propagation and makes ultrasonic non-destructive testing difficult. The ATHENA 2D finite element simulation code was developed to help understand the various physical phenomena at play. In this paper, we shall describe the attenuation model implemented in this code to give an account of wave scattering phenomenon through polycrystalline materials. This model is in particular based on the optimization of two tensors that characterize this material on the basis of experimental values of ultrasonic velocities attenuation coefficients. Three experimental configurations, two of which are representative of the industrial welds assessment case, are studied in view of validating the model through comparison with the simulation results. We shall thus provide a quantitative proof that taking into account the attenuation in the ATHENA code dramatically improves the results in terms of the amplitude of the echoes. The association of the code and detailed characterization of a weld's structure constitutes a remarkable breakthrough in the interpretation of the ultrasonic testing on this type of component.

  8. Tensile Strength of Welded Joint of 1Cr18Ni9 Stainless Steel and Nb-1Zr Alloy Jointed by Electron Beam Self-material Brazing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Compared with Nb-1Zr alloy stainless steels have a quite difference in melting point, thermalphysical and electromagnetism properties etc.. Therefore, it is very difficulty to joint by melting weldingmethod. Electron beam self-brazing method is an accepted method to use for this kind of welding. Make

  9. Irradiation accelerated corrosion of 316L stainless steel in simulated primary water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raiman, Stephen S.

    The objective of this work is to understand the effects of irradiation on the corrosion of 316L stainless steel in simulated primary water. 316L stainless steel samples were irradiated with a proton beam while simultaneously exposed to simulated PWR primary water to study the effects of radiation on corrosion. A 3.2 MeV proton beam was transmitted through a 37 microm thick sample that served as a "window" into a corrosion cell containing flowing 320° C water with 3 wppm H2. This design permitted radiolysis and displacement damage to occur on the sample surface in contact with the simulated primary water environment. Samples were irradiated for 4, 12, 24, and 72 hrs at dose rates between 400 and 4000 kGy/s, corresponding to damage rates of 7x10-7 to 7x10-6 dpa/s respectively. The structure and composition of the oxide films were characterized using Raman spectroscopy, STEM, and SEM. Sample areas exposed to direct proton irradiation had inner oxide films that were thinner, more porous, and were deficient in chromium when compared to unirradiated oxides. Outer oxides on irradiated samples exhibited a smaller particle size, and had a significant amount of hematite, which was not found on unirradiated samples. The presence of hematite on irradiated samples indicates an increase in electrochemical potential due to irradiation. Dissolution of chromium-rich spinels due to the elevated potential is identified as a likely mechanism behind the loss of inner oxide chromium. It is suggested that the loss of inner-oxide chromium leads to a less protective inner oxide, and a higher rate of oxide dissolution. Sample areas that were not irradiated, but were exposed to the flow of radiolyzed water, exhibited most of the same phenomena found on irradiated areas including loss of Cr and thinner more porous oxides, indicating that water radiolysis is the primary mechanism. When a sample with a pre-formed oxide was irradiated in the same conditions, the region exposed to radiolyzed

  10. Impact of the nanostructuration on the corrosion resistance and hardness of irradiated 316 austenitic stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hug, E.; Prasath Babu, R.; Monnet, I.; Etienne, A.; Moisy, F.; Pralong, V.; Enikeev, N.; Abramova, M.; Sauvage, X.; Radiguet, B.

    2017-01-01

    The influence of grain size and irradiation defects on the mechanical behavior and the corrosion resistance of a 316 stainless steel have been investigated. Nanostructured samples were obtained by severe plastic deformation using high pressure torsion. Both coarse grain and nanostructured samples were irradiated with 10 MeV 56Fe5+ ions. Microstructures were characterized using transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. Surface mechanical properties were evaluated thanks to hardness measurements and the corrosion resistance was studied in chloride environment. Nanostructuration by high pressure torsion followed by annealing leads to enrichment in chromium at grain boundaries. However, irradiation of nanostructured samples implies a chromium depletion of the same order than depicted in coarse grain specimens but without metallurgical damage like segregated dislocation loops or clusters. Potentiodynamic polarization tests highlight a definitive deterioration of the corrosion resistance of coarse grain steel with irradiation. Downsizing the grain to a few hundred of nanometers enhances the corrosion resistance of irradiated samples, despite the fact that the hardness of nanocrystalline austenitic steel is only weakly affected by irradiation. These new experimental results are discussed in the basis of couplings between mechanical and electrical properties of the passivated layer thanks to impedance spectroscopy measurements, hardness properties of the surfaces and local microstructure evolutions.

  11. Damage structure of austenitic stainless steel 316LN irradiated at low temperature in HFIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, N.; Robertson, J.P.; Grossbeck, M.L.; Rowcliffe, A.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Wakai, E. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst. (Japan)

    1998-03-01

    TEM disk specimens of austenitic stainless steel 316LN irradiated to damage levels of about 3 dpa at irradiation temperatures of either about 90 C or 250 C have been investigated by using transmission electron microscopy. The irradiation at 90 C and 250 C induced a dislocation loop density of 3.5 {times} 10{sup 22} m{sup {minus}3} and 6.5 {times} 10{sup 22} m{sup {minus}3}, a black dot density of 2.2 {times} 10{sup 23} m{sup {minus}3} and 1.6 {times} 10{sup 23} m{sup {minus}3}, respectively, in the steels, and a high density (<1 {times} 10{sup 22} m{sup {minus}3}) of precipitates in matrix. Cavities could be observed in the specimens after the irradiation. It is suggested that the dislocation loops, the black dots, and the precipitates cause irradiation hardening, an increase in the yield strength and a decrease in the uniform elongation, in the 316LN steel irradiated at low temperature.

  12. Experimental investigation of explosive welding of cp-titanium/AISI 304 stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbari Mousavi, S.A.A. [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, University College of Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 11365-4563, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: akbarimusavi@ut.ac.ir; Farhadi Sartangi, P. [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, University College of Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 11365-4563, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: farhadi_pezhman@engmail.ut.ac.ir

    2009-03-15

    In explosive welding process, the controlled energy of explosives is used to create a metallurgical bond between two similar or dissimilar materials. This paper presents the analytical calculation for determination of weldability domain or welding window. The analytical calculations are in good agreement with experimental results. The welding conditions are tailored through parallel geometry route with different explosive loads. The study was also conducted to consider the effects of explosive loading on the bonding interface and the characterization of explosive welding experiments carried out under different conditions. Optical microscopy studies show that a transition from a smooth interface to a wavy one occurs with increase in explosive load. Scanning electron microscopy studies show that the interface was outlined by characteristic sharp transition between two materials, but local melted zones were also encountered in the front slope of waves in the interface at high explosive loads. XRD studies detected no intermetallic phases for specimen welded at low explosive load.

  13. Atom probe tomography characterizations of high nickel, low copper surveillance RPV welds irradiated to high fluences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M. K.; Powers, K. A.; Nanstad, R. K.; Efsing, P.

    2013-06-01

    The Ringhals Units 3 and 4 reactors in Sweden are pressurized water reactors (PWRs) designed and supplied by Westinghouse Electric Company, with commercial operation in 1981 and 1983, respectively. The reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) for both reactors were fabricated with ring forgings of SA 508 class 2 steel. Surveillance blocks for both units were fabricated using the same weld wire heat, welding procedures, and base metals used for the RPVs. The primary interest in these weld metals is because they have very high nickel contents, with 1.58 and 1.66 wt.% for Unit 3 and Unit 4, respectively. The nickel content in Unit 4 is the highest reported nickel content for any Westinghouse PWR. Although both welds contain less than 0.10 wt.% copper, the weld metals have exhibited high irradiation-induced Charpy 41-J transition temperature shifts in surveillance testing. The Charpy impact 41-J shifts and corresponding fluences are 192 °C at 5.0 × 1023 n/m2 (>1 MeV) for Unit 3 and 162 °C at 6.0 × 1023 n/m2 (>1 MeV) for Unit 4. These relatively low-copper, high-nickel, radiation-sensitive welds relate to the issue of so-called late-blooming nickel-manganese-silicon phases. Atom probe tomography measurements have revealed ˜2 nm-diameter irradiation-induced precipitates containing manganese, nickel, and silicon, with phosphorus evident in some of the precipitates. However, only a relatively few number of copper atoms are contained within the precipitates. The larger increase in the transition temperature shift in the higher copper weld metal from the Ringhals R3 Unit is associated with copper-enriched regions within the manganese-nickel-silicon-enriched precipitates rather than changes in their size or number density.

  14. Study on the Effect of Laser Welding Parameters on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Ultrafine Grained 304L Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reihane Nafar Dehsorkhi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, an ultrafine grained (UFG 304L stainless steel with the average grain size of 300 nm was produced by a combination of cold rolling and annealing. Weldability of the UFG sample was studied by Nd: YAG laser welding under different welding conditions. Taguchi experimental design was used to optimize the effect of frequency, welding time, laser current and laser pulse duration on the resultant microstructure and mechanical properties. X-ray Diffraction (XRD, Optical Microscope (OM, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM, Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM, microhardness measurements and tension tests were conducted to characterize the sample after thermomechanical processing and laser welding. The results showed that the ultrafine grained steel had the yield strength of 1000 Mpa and the total elongation of 48%, which were almost three times higher than those of the as-received sample. The microstructure of the weld zone was shown to be a mixture of austenite and delta ferrite. The microhardness of the optimized welded sample (315 HV0.5 was found to be close to the UFG base metal (350 HV. It was also observed that the hardness of the heat affected zone (HAZ was  lower than that of the weld zone, which was related to the HAZ grain growth during laser welding. The results of optimization also showed that the welding time was the most important parameter affecting the weld strength. Overall, the study showed that laser welding could be an appropriate and alternative welding technique for the joining of UFG steels.

  15. Influence of irradiation conditions on the deformation of pure titanium frames in laser welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimakura, Michio; Yamada, Satoshi; Takeuchi, Misao; Miura, Koki; Ikeyama, Joji

    2009-03-01

    Due to its ease of use in connecting metal frames, laser welding is now applied in dentistry. However, to achieve precise laser welding, several problems remain to be resolved. One such problem is the influence of irradiation conditions on the deformation of titanium frameworks during laser welding, which this study sought to investigate. Board-shaped pure titanium specimens were prepared with two different joint types. Two specimens were abutted against each other to form a welding block with gypsum. For welding, three different laser waveforms were used. Deformation of the specimen caused by laser welding was measured as a rise from the gypsum surface at the opposite, free end of the specimen. It was observed that specimens with a beveled edge registered a smaller deformation than specimens with a square edge. In addition, a double laser pulse waveform--whereby a supplementary laser pulse was delivered immediately after the main pulse--resulted in a smaller deformation than with a single laser pulse waveform.

  16. Transformation and Precipitation Reactions by Metal Active Gas Pulsed Welded Joints from X2CrNiMoN22-5-3 Duplex Stainless Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion-Dragos Utu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The high alloying degree of Duplex stainless steels makes them susceptible to the formation of intermetallic phases during their exposure to high temperatures. Precipitation of these phases can lead to a decreasing of the corrosion resistance and sometimes of the toughness. Starting from the advantages of the synergic Metal Active Gas (MAG pulsed welding process, this paper analyses the structure formation particularities of homogeneous welded joints from Duplex stainless steel. The effect of linear welding energy on the structure morphology of the welded joints was revealed by macro- and micrographic examinations, X-ray energy dispersion analyses, measurements of ferrite proportion and X-ray diffraction analysis. The results obtained showed that the transformation of ferrite into austenite is associated with the chromium, nickel, molybdenum and nitrogen distribution between these two phases and their redistribution degree is closely linked to the overall heat cycle of the welding process. The adequate control of the energy inserted in the welded components provides an optimal balance between the two microstructural constituents (Austenite and Ferrite and avoids the formation of undesirable intermetallic phases.

  17. 316L 超低碳不锈钢的焊接性分析%Analysis of the Welding Character of Extra Low Carbon Stainless Steel 316L

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王敏华; 顾天杰

    2015-01-01

    用不同焊接方式和同一焊接方式不同焊口坡度焊接多种316L超低碳不锈钢焊接试板。通过外观观察、 X射线检验、机械性能检验等方法对成品进行分析,掌握了316L材料的焊接性能。结果表明通过采取适当的工艺措施,316L奥氏体不锈钢焊接接头可以避免热裂纹、晶间腐蚀、刀状腐蚀等缺陷。同时验证了316L焊接接头良好的耐蚀性和机械性能。%A variety of extra low carbon stainless steel 316 L welding test plates were made by different welding ways and different weld slope in the same way.Through visual observation, X-ray inspection, mechanical properties test to analyze the products, the welding properties of 316L materials were mastered.The results showed that by adopting the appropriate process measures, welding joint of 316L austenitic stainless steel can prevent hot crack, intergranular corrosion, knife shaped corrosion.At the same time, it was verified that 316L welded joints had good corrosion resistance and mechanical properties.

  18. Embrittlement of molybdenum-rhenium welds under low and high temperature neutron irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajnikov, A. V.; Morito, F.; Danylenko, M. I.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of low- and high-temperature neutron irradiation on the tensile strength, microhardness, and fracture mode has been studied for a series of Mo-Re welds with various Re concentrations. Radiation-induced hardening and concurrent ductility reduction are the key after-effects of neutron exposure. Low-temperature irradiation usually leads to a very hard embrittlement. The hardening effect is rather limited and unstable because of the lack of ductility. Irradiated specimens fail by brittle intergranular or transgranular fracture. The damaging effect of neutrons is less pronounced after high-temperature irradiation. The hardening of the matrix is rather high, but irradiated specimens still keep residual plasticity. High-temperature irradiation intensifies homogeneous nucleation of Re-rich phases, and this effect equalises the difference in mechanical properties between the different weld zones. A characteristic ductility loss exposure temperature was found to separate the temperature fields of absolutely brittle and relatively ductile behaviour. It usually varies between 850 K and 1000 K depending on the alloy composition and irradiation conditions.

  19. Automatic TIG welding of austenitic stainless steels in nitrogen and nitrogen-based gas mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zorc, B.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper treats studies of TIG gas-shielded arc welding using pure nitrogen, N2+ 5-20 % Ar gas mixtures and N2 + 2-10 % H2 gas mixtures. A weld root shielding was provided by nitrogen gas. Welding in N2 requires by 40 % lower welding current than welding in argon. The study showed that porosity was an issue due to overalloying of N2 in the weld pool; it can, however, be avoided with adequate welding parameters, particularly sufficiently high welding speed and controlled low heat input. The microstructure of all-weld metal is fully austenitic (γ. Hydrogen reduces nitrogen solubility in the weld pool and produces an austenitic-ferritic (γ+δ microstructure. Titanium increases nitrogen solubility in the weld pool and strongly reacts with nitrogen. Consequently, there is a high fraction of TiN inclusions in the weld metal.

    Hemos efectuado las investigaciones de la soldadura TIG en nitrógeno puro, las mezclas de gas N2 + 5 hasta un 20 % Ar, así como también N2 + 2 hasta un 10 % H2. Para la protección se utilizó nitrógeno. Para la soldadura se necesitan aproximadamente un 40 % menos de corriente de soldadura, comparado con la soldadura de argón. La investigación ha mostrado que la porosidad es un problema de absorción excesiva de la fundición con nitrógeno y que es posible suprimir la porosidad mediante parámetros adecuados de soldadura, sobre todo con una suficiente velocidad de soldadura y, con ella, una pequeña emisión controlada de calor. El hidrógeno reduce la solubilidad del nitrógeno en la fundición y acciona la segregación de ferrita. El titanio aumenta la solubilidad del nitrógeno en la fundición y reacciona fuertemente con el nitrógeno, de tal modo que en la soldadura hay una gran parte de inclusiones TiN.

  20. Influence of Welding Technology on Strain Strengthening Properties of Austenitic Stainless Steel Welded Joints%焊接工艺对奥氏体不锈钢焊接接头应变强化性能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王步美; 陈挺; 徐涛; 何华

    2013-01-01

    用等离子焊、埋弧焊和气体保护焊对不同厚度的国产304不锈钢板进行焊接,通过三种工艺焊接接头应变强化前后的力学性能和组织变化来研究焊接工艺对奥氏体不锈钢焊接接头应变强化性能的影响.结果表明:板材和三种焊接接头应变强化后,屈服强度均增大,板材和等离子焊焊接接头的其他性能基本不受影响,埋弧焊和气体保护焊的焊接接头的塑性有不同程度的降低,低温冲击韧性有一定幅度变化,组织都没有发生马氏体相变;焊缝余高和焊缝一次返修对气体保护焊焊接接头的应变强化性能基本没有影响.%Plasma welding, submerged arc welding and gas shielded arc welding were used to weld domestic 304 stainless steel plates with different thicknesses. The influences of welding technology on strain strengthening properties of austenitic stainless steel joints were investigated through changes of mechanical properties and microstructures of welding joints by three welding methods before and after strain strengthening. Results show that after being strain strengthened the yield strength of the plates and three welded joints increased, other properties of plates and plasma welded joints were not affected, while the ductility of submerged arc welded joint and gas shielded arc welded joint deteriorated. And the low temperature impact toughness of the welded joints varied in some amplitude. Martensite was not be found. Weld reinforcement and repair had no effect on strain strengthening properties of gas shielded arc welded joints.

  1. Microstructural evolution in austenitic stainless steel irradiated with triple-beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamada, Shozo; Miwa, Yukio; Yamaki, Daiju [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Zhang Yichuan

    1997-03-01

    An austenitic stainless steel was simultaneously irradiated with nickel, helium and hydrogen ions at the temperature range of 573-673 K. The damage level and injected concentration of He and H ions in the triple-beam irradiated region are 57 dpa, 19000 and 18000 at.ppm, respectively. Following to irradiation, the cross sectional observation normal to the incident surface of the specimen was carried out with a transmission electron microscope. Two bands parallel to the incident surface were observed in the irradiated specimen, which consist of dislocation loops and lines of high number density. These locate in the range of the depth of 0.4 to 1.3 {mu}m and 1.8 to 2.4 {mu}m from the incident surface, respectively. The region between two bands, which corresponds to the triple beam irradiated region, shows very low number density of dislocations than that in each band. Observation with higher magnification of this region shows that fine cavities with high number density uniformly distribute in the matrix. (author)

  2. Atomistic Analysis Of Radiation-Induced Segregation In Ion-Irradiated Stainless Steel 316

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee G.-G.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Stainless steel (SS is a well-known material for the internal parts of nuclear power plants. It is known that these alloys exhibit radiation-induced segregation (RIS at point defect sinks at moderate temperature, while in service. The RIS behavior of SS can be a potential problem by increasing the susceptibility to irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking. In this work, the RIS behavior of solute atoms at sinks in SS 316 irradiated with Fe4+ ions were characterized by atom probe tomography (APT. There were torus-shaped defects along with a depletion of Cr and enrichment of Ni and Si. These clusters are believed to be dislocation loops resulting from irradiation. The segregation of solutes was also observed for various defect shapes. These observations are consistent with other APT results from the literature. The composition of the clusters was analyzed quantitatively almost at the atomic scale. Despite the limitations of the experiments, the APT analysis was well suited for discovering the structure of irradiation defects and performing a quantitative analysis of RIS in irradiated specimens.

  3. Technical Letter Report on the Cracking of Irradiated Cast Stainless Steels with Low Ferrite Content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Alexandreanu, B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Natesan, K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Crack growth rate and fracture toughness J-R curve tests were performed on CF-3 and CF-8 cast austenite stainless steels (CASS) with 13-14% of ferrite. The tests were conducted at ~320°C in either high-purity water with low dissolved oxygen or in simulated PWR water. The cyclic crack growth rates of CF-8 were higher than that of CF-3, and the differences between the aged and unaged specimens were small. No elevated SCC susceptibility was observed among these samples, and the SCC CGRs of these materials were comparable to those of CASS alloys with >23% ferrite. The fracture toughness values of unirradiated CF-3 were similar between unaged and aged specimens, and neutron irradiation decreased the fracture toughness significantly. The fracture toughness of CF-8 was reduced after thermal aging, and declined further after irradiation. It appears that while lowering ferrite content may help reduce the tendency of thermal aging embrittlement, it is not very effective to mitigate irradiation-induced embrittlement. Under a combined condition of thermal aging and irradiation, neutron irradiation plays a dominant role in causing embrittlement in CASS alloys.

  4. Accelerated corrosion and oxide dissolution in 316L stainless steel irradiated in situ in high temperature water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raiman, Stephen S.; Was, Gary S.

    2017-09-01

    316L stainless steel samples were irradiated with a proton beam while simultaneously exposed to high temperature water with added hydrogen (320 °C, 3 wppm H2, neutral pH) to study the effect of radiation on stainless steel corrosion. Irradiated samples had thinner and more porous inner oxides with a lower chromium content when compared to unirradiated samples. Observations suggest that depletion of chromium from the inner oxide can be attributed to the dissolution of chromium-rich spinel oxides in irradiated water, leading to an accelerated rate of inner oxide dissolution. Sample areas which were not irradiated, but were exposed to the flow of irradiated water were also found to be porous and deficient in chromium, indicating that these phenomena can be attributed primarily to water radiolysis. A new empirical equation for oxide growth and dissolution is used to describe the observed changes in oxide thickness under irradiation. An experiment in which a stainless steel sample was exposed to high temperature water (320 °C, 3 wppm H2, neutral pH) without irradiation, and then exposed for a second time with irradiation was conducted to observe the effect of irradiation on a pre-formed protective film. After the irradiated exposure, the sample exhibited chromium loss in regions which were directly irradiated, but not on regions exposed only to irradiated water, suggesting that a pre-formed protective oxide may be effective in preventing chromium loss due to irradiated water. Additionally, this observation suggests that enhanced kinetics under irradiation may have accelerated dissolution of chromium from the inner oxide.

  5. Grain boundary segregation in neutron-irradiated 304 stainless steel studied by atom probe tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toyama, T., E-mail: ttoyama@imr.tohoku.ac.jp [International Research Center for Nuclear Materials Science, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Nozawa, Y. [International Research Center for Nuclear Materials Science, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Van Renterghem, W. [SCK Bullet CEN, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Matsukawa, Y.; Hatakeyama, M.; Nagai, Y. [International Research Center for Nuclear Materials Science, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Al Mazouzi, A. [EDF R and D, Avenue des Renardieres Ecuelles, 77818 Moret sur Loing Cedex (France); Van Dyck, S. [SCK Bullet CEN, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2012-06-15

    Radiation-induced segregation (RIS) of solute atoms at a grain boundary (GB) in 304 stainless steel (SS), neutron-irradiated to a dose of 24 dpa at 300 Degree-Sign C in the fuel wrapper plates of a commercial pressurized water reactor, was investigated using laser-assisted atom probe tomography (APT). Ni, Si, and P enrichment and Cr and Fe depletion at the GB were evident. The full-width at half-maximum of the RIS region was {approx}3 nm for the concentration profile peaks of Ni and Si. The atomic percentages of Ni, Si, and Cr at the GB were {approx}19%, {approx}7%, and {approx}14%, respectively, in agreement with previously-reported values for neutron-irradiated SS. A high number density of intra-granular Ni-Si rich precipitates formed in the matrix. A precipitate-denuded zone with a width of {approx}10 nm appeared on both sides of the GB.

  6. Influence of the austenitic stainless steel microstructure on the void swelling under ion irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rouxel Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To understand the role of different metallurgical parameters on the void formation mechanisms, various austenitic stainless steels were elaborated and irradiated with heavy ions. Two alloys, in several metallurgical conditions (15Cr/15Ni–Ti and 15Cr/25Ni–Ti, were irradiated in the JANNUS-Saclay facility at 600 °C with 2 MeV Fe2+ ions up to 150 dpa. Resulting microstructures were observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM. Different effects on void swelling are highlighted. Only the pre-aged samples, which were consequently solute and especially titanium depleted, show cavities. The nickel-enriched matrix shows more voids with a smaller size. Finally, the presence of nano-precipitates combined with a dense dislocation network decreases strongly the number of cavities.

  7. Microstructure and pitting corrosion of shielded metal arc welded high nitrogen stainless steel

    OpenAIRE

    Raffi Mohammed; G. Madhusudhan Reddy; K. Srinivasa Rao

    2015-01-01

    The present work is aimed at studying the microstructure and pitting corrosion behaviour of shielded metal arc welded high nitrogen steel made of Cromang-N electrode. Basis for selecting this electrode is to increase the solubility of nitrogen in weld metal due to high chromium and manganese content. Microscopic studies were carried out using optical microscopy (OM) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). Energy back scattered diffraction (EBSD) method was used to determine t...

  8. The influence of the heat treatment on delta ferrite transformation in austenitic stainless steel welds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Mateša

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Shielded metal arc (SMAW welded specimens using austenitic consumable materials with different amount of delta-ferrite are annealed in range 650-750 °C through 2-10 hours. Factorial plan 33 with influenced factors regression analyze of measured delta-ferrite values is used. The transformation i.e. decomposition of delta ferrite during annealing was analyzed regarding on weld cracking resistance using metallographic examination and WRC-1992 diagram.

  9. Influence of filler wire composition on weld microstructures of a 444 ferritic stainless steel grade

    OpenAIRE

    Villaret, Vincent; Deschaux-Beaume, Frédéric; Bordreuil, Cyril; Rouquette, Sébastien; Chovet, Corinne

    2013-01-01

    International audience; Seven compositions of metal cored filler wires for Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW), containing the same weight percent of chromium (Cr) and molybdenum (Mo) as 444 steel, but with different titanium (Ti) and niobium (Nb) contents were investigated. Experimental results pointed out that the filler wire Ti content required to be twice time more than the amount expected in the deposited metal. This was due to the low Ti transfer ratio during arc welding. Moreover, Ti increase...

  10. Experimental analysis of dissimilar metal weld joint: Ferritic to austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rathod, Dinesh W., E-mail: dineshvrathod@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India); Pandey, Sunil [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India); Singh, P.K. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Prasad, Rajesh [Department of Applied Mechanics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2015-07-15

    The dissimilar metal weld (DMW) joint between SA508Gr.3Cl.1 ferritic steel and SS304LN using Inconel 82/182 consumables was required in the nuclear power plants. The joint integrity assessment of these welds requires mechanical and metallurgical properties evaluation in weldment regions. The joint was subjected to 100% radiography test and bend test and transverse tensile test. Welding and testing were carried out as per the requirements of ASME Sec-IX and acceptance criteria as per ASME Sec-III. The transverse tensile test results indicated the failure from the weld metal although it satisfies the minimum strength requirement of the ASME requirements; therefore, the DMW joint was analyzed in detail. Straight bead deposition technique, fine slag inclusion, less reliable radiograph technique, plastic instability stress, yield strength ratio and metallurgical deteriorations have been contributed to failure of the DMW joint from the weld region. In the present work, the factors contributing to the fracture from weld metal have been discussed and analyzed.

  11. Functional properties of bimetal composite of “stainless steel-TiNi alloy” produced by explosion welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaev, S.; Rubanik, V.; Resnina, N.; Rubanik (jr), V.; Rubanik, O.; Borisov, V.; Lomakin, I.

    The functional properties of "TiNi-stainless steel" bimetal composite produced by explosion welding were studied. The influence of the ratio of the TiNi layer thickness to the total thickness of the sample as well as the influence of preliminary deformation on the recoverable strain and a temperature of shape memory effect were studied. It was found that the best combination of strain variation observed in repeated thermal cycles was demonstrated by the bimetal sample in which the thickness of the TiNi layer was 64% of the thickness of the sample. The preliminary deformation resulted in an increase in stress stored in the sample and led to an increase in recoverable strain.

  12. Corneal tissue welding with infrared laser irradiation after clear corneal incision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasier, Rfat; Ozeren, Mediha; Artunay, Ozgür; Bahçecioğlu, Halil; Seçkin, Ismail; Kalaycoğlu, Hamit; Kurt, Adnan; Sennaroğlu, Alphan; Gülsoy, Murat

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of infrared lasers for corneal welding to seal corneal cuts done in an experimental animal model. Full-thickness corneal cuts on freshly enucleated bovine eyes were irradiated with infrared (809-nm diode, 980-nm diode, 1070-nm YLF, and 1980-nm Tm:YAP) lasers to get immediate laser welding. An 809-nm laser was used with the topical application of indocyanine green to enhance the photothermal interaction at the weld site. In total, 60 bovine eyes were used in this study; 40 eyes were used in the first part of the study for the determination of optimal welding parameters (15 eyes were excluded because of macroscopic carbonization, opacification, or corneal shrinkage; 2 eyes were used for control), and 20 eyes were used for further investigation of more promising lasers (YLF and Tm:YAP). Laser wavelength, irradiating power, exposure time, and spot size were the dose parameters, and optimal dose for immediate closure with minimal thermal damage was estimated through histological examination of welded samples. In the first part of the study, results showed that none of the applications was satisfactory. Full-thickness success rates were 28% (2 of 7) for 809-nm and for 980-nm diode lasers and 67% (2 of 3) for 1070-nm YLF and (4 of 6) for 1980-nm Tm:YAP lasers. In the second part of the study, YLF and Tm:YAP lasers were investigated with bigger sample size. Results were not conclusive but promising again. Five corneal incisions were full-thickness welded out of 10 corneas with 1070-nm laser, and 4 corneal incisions were partially welded out of 10 corneas with 1980-nm laser in the second part of the study. Results showed that noteworthy corneal welding could be obtained with 1070-nm YLF laser and 1980-nm Tm:YAP laser wavelengths. Furthermore, in vitro and in vivo studies will shed light on the potential usage of corneal laser welding technique.

  13. Effect of continuous and pulsed currents on microstructural evolution of stainless steel joined by TIG welding; Einfluss des Einsatzes von Dauerstrom und Impulsstrom auf die Mikrostrukturentwicklung bei durch das WIG-Schweissverfahren gefuegtem rostfreiem Stahl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durgutlu, Ahmet; Findik, Tayfun; Guelenc, Behcet [Gazi Univ., Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering; Cevik, Bekir [Duezce Univ. (Turkey). Dept. of Welding Technology; Kaya, Yakup; Kahraman, Nizamettin [Karabuek Univ. (Turkey). Dept. of Manufacturing Engineering

    2015-07-01

    In this study, AISI 316L series austenitic stainless steel sheets were joined by tungsten inert gas welding method in continuous and pulsed currents. Regarding microstructural investigation and hardness values of weld metal, samples were welded to investigate the effect of current type on grain structures of weld metal. Results showed that samples welded by using pulsed current had considerable different properties compared to the samples welded by using continuous current. While the weld metals of joinings obtained by using continuous current displayed a coarse-grained and columnar structure, weld metals obtained by using pulsed current had a finer-grained structure. It was also found that hardness values of samples, which were welded with continuous and pulsed current, were quite different.

  14. Comparison of the microstructure, deformation and crack initiation behavior of austenitic stainless steel irradiated in-reactor or with protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephenson, Kale J., E-mail: kalejs@umich.edu; Was, Gary S.

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Dislocation loops were the prominent defect, but neutron irradiation caused higher loop density. • Grain boundaries had similar amounts of radiation-induced segregation. • The increment in hardness and yield stress due to irradiation were very similar. • Relative IASCC susceptibility was nearly identical. • The effect of dislocation channel step height on IASCC was similar. - Abstract: The objective of this study was to compare the microstructures, microchemistry, hardening, susceptibility to IASCC initiation, and deformation behavior resulting from proton or reactor irradiation. Two commercial purity and six high purity austenitic stainless steels with various solute element additions were compared. Samples of each alloy were irradiated in the BOR-60 fast reactor at 320 °C to doses between approximately 4 and 12 dpa or by a 3.2 MeV proton beam at 360 °C to a dose of 5.5 dpa. Irradiated microstructures consisted mainly of dislocation loops, which were similar in size but lower in density after proton irradiation. Both irradiation types resulted in the formation of Ni–Si rich precipitates in a high purity alloy with added Si, but several other high purity neutron irradiated alloys showed precipitation that was not observed after proton irradiation, likely due to their higher irradiation dose. Low densities of small voids were observed in several high purity proton irradiated alloys, and even lower densities in neutron irradiated alloys, implying void nucleation was in process. Elemental segregation at grain boundaries was very similar after each irradiation type. Constant extension rate tensile experiments on the alloys in simulated light water reactor environments showed excellent agreement in terms of the relative amounts of intergranular cracking, and an analysis of localized deformation after straining showed a similar response of cracking to surface step height after both irradiation types. Overall, excellent agreement was observed

  15. True stress–strain curve acquisition for irradiated stainless steel including the range exceeding necking strain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamaya, Masayuki, E-mail: kamaya@inss.co.jp [Institute of Nuclear Safety System, Inc., 64 Sata Mihama-cho, Fukui 919-1205 (Japan); Kitsunai, Yuji; Koshiishi, Masato [Nippon Nuclear Fuel Dvelopment Co., Ltd., 2163 Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan)

    2015-10-15

    True stress–strain curves were obtained for irradiated 316L stainless steel by a tensile test and by a curve estimation procedure. In the tensile test, the digital image correlation technique together with iterative finite element analysis was applied in order to identify curves for strain larger than the necking strain. The true stress–strain curves were successfully obtained for the strain of more than 0.4 whereas the necking strain was about 0.2 in the minimum case. The obtained true stress–strain curves were approximated well with the Swift-type equation including the post-necking strain even if the exponential constant n was fixed to 0.5. Then, the true stress–strain curves were estimated by a curve estimation procedure, which was referred to as the K-fit method. Material properties required for the K-fit method were the yield and ultimate strengths or only the yield strength. Some modifications were made for the K-fit method in order to improve estimation accuracy for irradiated stainless steels.

  16. Spherical nanoindentation of proton irradiated 304 stainless steel: A comparison of small scale mechanical test techniques for measuring irradiation hardening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Jordan S.; Pathak, Siddhartha; Reichardt, Ashley; Vo, Hi T.; Maloy, Stuart A.; Hosemann, Peter; Mara, Nathan A.

    2017-09-01

    Experimentally quantifying the mechanical effects of radiation damage in reactor materials is necessary for the development and qualification of new materials for improved performance and safety. This can be achieved in a high-throughput fashion through a combination of ion beam irradiation and small scale mechanical testing in contrast to the high cost and laborious nature of bulk testing of reactor irradiated samples. The current work focuses on using spherical nanoindentation stress-strain curves on unirradiated and proton irradiated (10 dpa at 360 °C) 304 stainless steel to quantify the mechanical effects of radiation damage. Spherical nanoindentation stress-strain measurements show a radiation-induced increase in indentation yield strength from 1.36 GPa to 2.72 GPa and a radiation-induced increase in indentation work hardening rate of 10 GPa-30 GPa. These measurements are critically compared against Berkovich nanohardness, micropillar compression, and micro-tension measurements on the same material and similar grain orientations. The ratio of irradiated to unirradiated yield strength increases by a similar factor of 2 when measured via spherical nanoindentation or Berkovich nanohardness testing. A comparison of spherical indentation stress-strain curves to uniaxial (micropillar and micro-tension) stress-strain curves was achieved using a simple scaling relationship which shows good agreement for the unirradiated condition and poor agreement in post-yield behavior for the irradiated condition. The disagreement between spherical nanoindentation and uniaxial stress-strain curves is likely due to the plastic instability that occurs during uniaxial tests but is absent during spherical nanoindentation tests.

  17. Solidification and transformation behavior of Cr-Ni stainless steel weld metals with ferritic single phase solidification mode. Report 4. Study on solidification and subsequent transformation of Cr-Ni stainless steel weld metals; Feraito tanso de gyokosuru Cr-Ni kei sutenresu ko yosetsu kinzoku no gyoko/hendo kyodo. 4. Cr-Ni kei sutenresu ko yosetsu kinzoku no gyoko/hentai ni kansuru kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, H.; Koseki, T.; Okita, S.; Fuji, M. [Nippon Steel Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-05-05

    The solidification modes of {gamma} stainless steel that solidifies at initial crystal {delta} are classified into FA mode where solidification at two phase of {delta}+{gamma} takes place after crystallization at {gamma} phase during solidification and F mode where solidification is completed at {delta} single phase, and solidification transformation behaviors of weld metal of FA mode are reported in the previous paper. Hereupon, in this report, solidification and transformation behaviors of stainless steel weld metal of F mode are studied. Cr-Ni stainless steel of F mode consists of two phase stainless steel with two phase base metal structure of {delta}+{gamma} besides {gamma} stainless steel. Further, two phase stainless steel with higher alloy compared to conventional one has been developed. In this report, not only the {gamma} stainless steel but also two phase stainless weld metals with varied amount of alloying metal are studied. The welding method and welding conditions are same as that of previous paper. Observation of structure was carried out by optical microscope, and crystal orientation and element distribution were measured by EBSP and CMA respectively. 11 refs., 18 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Effect of 16Cr Austenite Stainless Steel High Frequency Welding Parameters on Weld Microstructure and Properties%16Cr奥氏体不锈钢高频焊接参数对焊缝组织性能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毕宗岳; 严培林; 余晗; 汪海涛

    2016-01-01

    In order to analyze the effect of 16Cr stainless steel high frequency welding parameter on weld microstructure and properties, under the different high frequency welding(HFW) parameters,the change of weld microstructure and properties of 16Cr stainless steel were studied by optical microscope(OM), scanning electron microscope(SEM) tensile test and bending test. The results showed that the weld formability of 16Cr austenitic stainless steel becomes better with the increase of welding speed. The content of δ-ferrite in weld show a trend of decrease after an initial increase with the increasing of welding heat input,accompanied by brittle σ-phase precipitation. The weld of 3.4 mm thickness 16Cr austenitic stainless steel has good formability,when welding speed about 10 m/min,welding heat input 2.9 kJ/cm, and with appropriate pressing force and the opening angle. The welded joints have good matching hardness and the weld tensile strength is close to the base material tensile strength. The microstructure of weld is mainly composed of austenite and δ-ferrite. But the welded joints have poor toughness, because of the oxide inclusions in weld.%为了分析16Cr不锈钢高频焊接参数对焊缝组织性能的影响,通过光学显微镜(OM)、扫描电镜(SEM)和拉伸、弯曲试验,分析了不同高频焊接参数下1Cr17Mn6Ni5N 不锈钢(以下简称16Cr不锈钢)焊缝组织与性能的变化情况。结果表明:16Cr奥氏体不锈钢高频焊随着焊接速度的增加,焊缝成形性能变好;焊缝中δ铁素体的含量随焊接热输入的增加先增后减,同时伴随σ脆性相析出;对于壁厚3.4 mm的16Cr奥氏体不锈钢,当焊接速度为10 m/min、焊接热输入为2.9 kJ/cm、并配以适当的挤压力和开口角时,焊缝成形及焊接接头硬度匹配良好,且焊缝抗拉强度接近母材抗拉强度,焊缝显微组织以奥氏体+δ铁素体为主,但由于焊缝存在大量

  19. Technical Letter Report Assessment of Ultrasonic Phased Array Testing for Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel Pressurizer Surge Line Piping Welds and Thick Section Primary System Cast Piping Welds JCN N6398, Task 2A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, Aaron A.; Denslow, Kayte M.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Morra, Marino; Crawford, Susan L.; Prowant, Matthew S.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2008-07-21

    Research is being conducted for the NRC at PNNL to assess the effectiveness and reliability of advanced NDE methods for the inspection of LWR components. The scope of this research encompasses primary system pressure boundary materials including cast austenitic stainless steels (CASS), dissimilar metal welds (DMWs), piping with corrosion-resistant cladding, weld overlays, and far-side examinations of austenitic piping welds. A primary objective of this work is to evaluate various NDE methods to assess their ability to detect, localize, and size cracks in coarse-grained steel components. This interim technical letter report (TLR) provides a synopsis of recent investigations at PNNL aimed at evaluating the capabilities of phased-array (PA) ultrasonic testing (UT) methods as applied to the inspection of CASS welds in nuclear reactor piping. A description of progress, recent developments and interim results are provided.

  20. Void Swelling and Microstructure of Austenitic Stainless Steels Irradiated in the BOR - 60 Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Yang, Yong [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Huang, Yina [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Allen, T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Alexandreanu, B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Natesan, K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2012-11-01

    As nuclear power plants age and neutron fluence increases, detrimental effects resulting from radiation damage have become an increasingly important issue for the operational safety and structural integrity of core internal components. In this study, irradiated specimens of reactor core internal components were characterized by transmission electron microscopy. The specimens had been irradiated to 5.5-45 dpa in the BOR-60 reactor at a dose rate close to 10-6 dpa/s and temperature of about 320°C. No voids were observed in the austenitic stainless steels and nickel alloys at all doses. Despite the possibility that fine voids below the TEM resolution limit may be present, it was clear that void swelling was insignificant in all examined alloys up to 45 dpa. Irradiated microstructures of the studied alloys were dominated by a high density of Frank loops. The mean size and density of the Frank loops varied from one material to another, but saturated with increasing dose above ~10 dpa. While no irradiation-induced precipitations were present below 24.5 dpa, fine precipitates were evident in several alloys at 45 dpa.

  1. Direct Observation of Phase Transformations in Austenitic Stainless Steel Welds Using In-situ Spatially Resolved and Time-resolved X-ray Diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elmer, J.; Wong, J.; Ressler, T.

    1999-09-23

    Spatially resolved x-ray diffraction (SRXRD) and time resolved x-ray diffraction (TRXRD) were used to investigate real time solid state phase transformations and solidification in AISI type 304 stainless steel gas tungsten arc (GTA) welds. These experiments were conducted at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) using a high flux beam line. Spatially resolved observations of {gamma} {leftrightarrow} {delta} solid state phase transformations were performed in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of moving welds and time-resolved observations of the solidification sequence were performed in the fusion zone (FZ) of stationary welds after the arc had been terminated. Results of the moving weld experiments showed that the kinetics of the {gamma}{yields}{delta} phase transformation on heating in the HAZ were sufficiently rapid to transform a narrow region surrounding the liquid weld pool to the {delta} ferrite phase. Results of the stationary weld experiments showed, for the first time, that solidification can occur directly to the {delta} ferrite phase, which persisted as a single phase for 0.5s. Upon solidification to {delta}, the {delta} {yields} {gamma} phase transformation followed and completed in 0.2s as the weld cooled further to room temperature.

  2. Investigation of the Mechanical Properties of AISI 316 Austenitic Stainless Steel and St 37 Low Carbon Steel Dissimilar Joint by Friction Stir Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.H. Khosrovaninezhad

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the mechanical properties of the dissimilar joints between AISI 316 austenitic stainless steel and St 37 low carbon steel achieved using friction stir welding technique. The welding was carried out by means of rotational speed of 800 rpm and linear speeds of 50,100,150 mm/min. EDS and XRD techniques were employed in order to determine possible phase transformations. Tensile test, shear punch test and microhardness measurements were conducted to evaluate the mechanical properties of the joints. The results of phase investigations showed that no carbide and brittle phase were detected at the joint boundary. Also, tensile test results demonstrated that failure occurred in the St 37 base metal. According to the shear punch test, the highest ultimate shear strength and yield shear strength was achieved for the sample welded at rotational speed of 800 rpm and linear speed of 150 mm/min, while this sample showed the least elongation. In addition, the highest microhardness was measured in the stir zone of austenitic stainless steel sample welded in the above mentioned welding condition, which can be attributed to the decrease in grain size caused by recrystallization process.

  3. Intermediate layer, microstructure and mechanical properties of aluminum alloy/stainless steel butt joint using laser-MIG hybrid welding-brazing method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zongtao; Wan, Zhandong; Li, Yuanxing; Xue, Junyu; Hui, Chen

    2017-07-01

    Butt joining of AA6061 aluminum (Al) alloy and 304 stainless steel of 2-mm thickness was conducted using laser-MIG hybrid welding-brazing method with ER4043 filler metal. To promote the mechanical properties of the welding-brazing joints, two kinds of intermediate layers (Al-Si-Mg alloy and Ag-based alloy) are used to adjust the microstructures of the joints. The brazing interface and the tensile strength of the joints were characterized. The results showed that the brazing interface between Al alloy and stainless steel consisted of double layers of Fe2Al5 (near stainless steel) and Fe4Al13 intermetallic compounds (IMCs) with a total thickness of 3.7 μm, when using Al-Si-Mg alloy as the intermediate layer. The brazing interface of the joints using Ag-based alloy as intermediate layer also consists of double IMC layers, but the first layer near stainless steel was FeAl2 and the total thickness of these two IMC layers decreased to 3.1 μm. The tensile strength of the joints using Al-Si-Mg alloy as the intermediate layer was promoted to 149 MPa, which was 63 MPa higher than that of the joints using Al-Si-Mg alloy as the intermediate layer. The fractures occurred in the brazing interface between Al alloy and stainless steel.

  4. Tensile stress corrosion cracking of type 304 stainless steel irradiated to very high dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, H. M.; Ruther, W. E.; Strain, R. V.; Shack, W. J.

    2001-09-01

    Certain safety-related core internal structural components of light water reactors, usually fabricated from Type 304 or 316 austenitic stainless steels (SSs), accumulate very high levels of irradiation damage (20--100 displacement per atom or dpa) by the end of life. The data bases and mechanistic understanding of, the degradation of such highly irradiated components, however, are not well established. A key question is the nature of irradiation-assisted intergranular cracking at very high dose, i.e., is it purely mechanical failure or is it stress-commotion cracking? In this work, hot-cell tests and microstructural characterization were performed on Type 304 SS from the hexagonal fuel can of the decommissioned EBR-11 reactor after irradiation to {approximately}50 dpa at {approximately}370 C. Slow-strain-rate tensile tests were conducted at 289 C in air and in water at several levels of electrochemical potential (ECP), and microstructural characteristics were analyzed by scanning and transmission electron microcopies. The material deformed significantly by twinning and exhibited surprisingly high ductility in air, but was susceptible to severe intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) at high ECP. Low levels of dissolved O and ECP were effective in suppressing the susceptibility of the heavily irradiated material to IGSCC, indicating that the stress corrosion process associated with irradiation-induced grain-boundary Cr depletion, rather than purely mechanical separation of grain boundaries, plays the dominant role. However, although IGSCC was suppressed, the material was susceptible to dislocation channeling at low ECP, and this susceptibility led to poor work-hardening capability and low ductility.

  5. Construction and final assembly of an automatic arc welding machine; Construccion y puesta a punto de una maquina automatica para soldadura remota por arco bajo atmosfera inerte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrero Alvarez, J.; Diaz Diaz, J.; Diaz Diaz, J. L.

    1972-07-01

    It has been constructed a remote are welding machine, wholly transistorized, to be used in a Hot Cell of 1.000 Cu. In this work are presented the different parts of the equipment and its electronic description. Finally, some works of final preparation are shown such as ending of irradiation capsules, thermocouples welding, stainless steel cover welding. For these types of welding are quoted its relative programs. (Author)

  6. Towards a Map of Solidification Cracking Risk in Laser Welding of Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermejo, María-Asunción Valiente; DebRoy, Tarasankar; Hurtig, Kjell; Karlsson, Leif; Svensson, Lars-Erik

    In this work, two series of specimens with Hammar and Svensson's Cr- and Ni-equivalents (Creq+Nieq) = 35 and 45 wt% were used to cover a wide range of austenitic grades. These were laser welded with different energy inputs achieving cooling rates in the range of 103 °C/s to 104 °C/s. As high cooling rates and rapid solidification conditions could favour fully austenitic solidification and therefore raise susceptibility to solidification cracking, the solidification modes of the laser welded specimens were compared to the ones experienced by the same alloys under arc welding conditions. It was found that high cooling rates experienced in laser welding promoted fully austenitic solidification for a wider range of compositions, for example specimens with (Creq+Nieq) = 35% under arc welding cooling conditions at 10 °C/s showed fully austenitic solidification up to Creq/Nieq = 1.30, whilst the same specimens laser cooled at 103 °C/s showed fully austenitic solidification up to Creq/Nieq = 1.50 and those cooled at 104 °C/s showed it up to Creq/Nieq = 1.68. Therefore, high cooling rates extended the solidification cracking risk to a wider range of Creq/Nieq values. This work also compares the cooling rates experimentally determined by thermocouples to the computed cooling rates calculated by a highly-advanced computational model. The distance between the thermocouple's wires and the thermal resistance of thermocouples together with the small size of the weld pools proved to be practical limitations in the experimental determination of cooling rates. However, an excellent agreement was found between computed and experimental solidus isotherms at high energy input settings. For low energy input settings cooling rate was in the order of magnitude of 104 °C/s, whilst for high energy input settings cooling rate was found to be in the order of magnitude of 103 °C/s.

  7. Three dimensional numerical simulation of welding temperature fields in stainless steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董志波; 魏艳红; 刘仁培; 董祖珏

    2004-01-01

    Three kinds of mathematical models representing welding heat sources are presented. Among them, Gaussian model and double ellipsoidal model are used to analyze the thermal distributions with finite element method. At the same time, this paper analyzed the influences of the heat source models, the latent heat and the welding parameters on the temperature distributions. The comparisons between the simulated results and the experiments show double ellipsoidal model is good for three-dimensional numerical simulations. Furthermore, the adaptive mesh technique is applied in the three-dimensional model which greatly reduces the number of nodes and elements in the simulation.

  8. Nano-Welding of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes on Silicon and Silica Surface by Laser Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanping Yuan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a continuous fiber laser (1064 nm wavelength, 30 W/cm2 is used to irradiate multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs on different substrate surfaces. Effects of substrates on nano-welding of MWCNTs are investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM. For MWCNTs on silica, after 3 s irradiation, nanoscale welding with good quality can be achieved due to breaking C–C bonds and formation of new graphene layers. While welding junctions can be formed until 10 s for the MWCNTs on silicon, the difference of irradiation time to achieve welding is attributed to the difference of thermal conductivity for silica and silicon. As the irradiation time is prolonged up to 12.5 s, most of the MWCNTs are welded to a silicon substrate, which leads to their frameworks of tube walls on the silicon surface. This is because the accumulation of absorbed energy makes the temperature rise. Then chemical reactions among silicon, carbon and nitrogen occur. New chemical bonds of Si–N and Si–C achieve the welding between the MWCNTs and silicon. Vibration modes of Si3N4 appear at peaks of 363 cm−1 and 663 cm−1. There are vibration modes of SiC at peaks of 618 cm−1, 779 cm−1 and 973 cm−1. The experimental observation proves chemical reactions and the formation of Si3N4 and SiC by laser irradiation.

  9. Cracking behavior and microstructure of austenitic stainless steels and alloy 690 irradiated in BOR-60 reactor, phase I.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y.; Chopra, O. K.; Soppet, W. K.; Shack, W. J.; Yang, Y.; Allen, T. R.; Univ. of Wisconsin at Madison

    2010-02-16

    Cracking behavior of stainless steels specimens irradiated in the BOR-60 at about 320 C is studied. The primary objective of this research is to improve the mechanistic understanding of irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of core internal components under conditions relevant to pressurized water reactors. The current report covers several baseline tests in air, a comparison study in high-dissolved-oxygen environment, and TEM characterization of irradiation defect structure. Slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) tests were conducted in air and in high-dissolved-oxygen (DO) water with selected 5- and 10-dpa specimens. The results in high-DO water were compared with those from earlier tests with identical materials irradiated in the Halden reactor to a similar dose. The SSRT tests produced similar results among different materials irradiated in the Halden and BOR-60 reactors. However, the post-irradiation strength for the BOR-60 specimens was consistently lower than that of the corresponding Halden specimens. The elongation of the BOR-60 specimens was also greater than that of their Halden specimens. Intergranular cracking in high-DO water was consistent for most of the tested materials in the Halden and BOR-60 irradiations. Nonetheless, the BOR-60 irradiation was somewhat less effective in stimulating IG fracture among the tested materials. Microstructural characterization was also carried out using transmission electron microscopy on selected BOR-60 specimens irradiated to {approx}25 dpa. No voids were observed in irradiated austenitic stainless steels and cast stainless steels, while a few voids were found in base and grain-boundary-engineered Alloy 690. All the irradiated microstructures were dominated by a high density of Frank loops, which varied in mean size and density for different alloys.

  10. 铁素体不锈钢CMT焊接接头HAZ组织性能研究%Microstructure and Properties of Ferritic Stainless Steel CMT Welding HAZ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贺舒榕; 王文先; 张婷婷; 张昭晗

    2014-01-01

    针对铁素体不锈钢焊接HAZ晶粒易长大的问题,提出采用小热输入的CM T 焊接工艺。通过分析接头HAZ的显微组织、显微硬度和冲击性能,探讨了4003铁素体不锈钢焊接接头 HAZ组织和性能,并与常规MIG焊焊接接头试样的组织、性能进行对比。试验结果表明:采用CMT焊接工艺获得的接头 HAZ粗晶区宽度为460μm ,明显窄于M IG焊接接头的粗晶区宽度545μm ;CM T接头强度与M IG焊接接头显微硬度值相近,但CMT接头HAZ冲击韧性较MIG焊接接头试样提高了16.28%。%In this paper ,CM T welding process as a kind of low heat input process was adopted ,aiming at the problem that the ferritic stainless steel HAZ grain is easy to grow up .Contrast to the traditional MIG welding joints ,the CMT welding joints'appearance ,microstructure ,microhardness and impact property in HAZ were analyzed of the 4003 ferritic stainless steel . The results show that the width of joint coarse grain zone of the CMT welding is 460μm ,which is narrower than the width value 545 μm of MIG welding joint .The microhardness of the CMT welding joint is near to the MIG welding joint ,but the toughness is increased by 16 .28% .

  11. Effect of Grain Size on Void Formation during High-Energy Electron Irradiation of Austenitic Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Bachu Narain

    1974-01-01

    Thin foils of an ‘ experimental ’ austenitic stainless steel, with and without dispersions of aluminium oxide particles, are irradiated with 1 MeV electrons in a High Voltage Electron Microscope at 600°C. Evidence of grain size dependent void nucleation, void concentration, and void volume swelling...

  12. Effects of nitrogen and pulsed mean welding current in AISI 316 austenitic stainless steel solidification cracks; Efecto del nitrogeno y la corriente media pulsada de soldadura en la formacion de grietas de solidificacion en aceros inoxidables AISI 316L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trevisan, R. E.; Braga, E.; Fals, H. C.

    2002-07-01

    An analysis of the influence of nitrogen concentration in the weld zone and the pulsed mean welding current in the solidification crack formation is presented in this paper. The AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel was employed as the metal base. The welding was done using CC+ pulsed flux cored are welding process and AWS E316L wire type. The tests were conducted using CO{sub 2} shielding gas with four different nitrogen levels (0,5; 10 and 15%) in order to induce different nitrogen weld metal concentrations. The pulsed mean welding current was varied in three levels and the. Transvarestraint tangential strain test was fixed of 5%. The results showed that the solidification cracking decreased as the pulsed mean welding current increase. It was also verified that an increase of the weld zone nitrogen level was associated with a decrease in both the total length of solidification crack and the amount of {delta} ferrite. (AUthor) 20 refs.

  13. Welding hot cracking in an austenitic stainless steel; Fissuration a chaud en soudage d'un acier inoxydable austenitique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerrouault, N

    2001-07-01

    The occurrence of hot cracking is linked to several conditions, in particular, the composition of the material and the local strains due to clambering. The aim of this study is to better analyse the implied mechanisms and to lead to a local thermomechanical criterion for hot cracking. The example studied is an AISI 321-type stainless steel (X10CrNiTi18-12) strongly prone to cracking. Two weldability tests are studied: - the first one consists in carrying out a fusion line by the TIG process on a thin sheet. In the case of the defect occurrence, the crack is longitudinal and follows the back of the molten bath. The influence of the operating conditions welding (speed, welding heat input, width test sample) is studied. - the second one is the Varestraint test. It is widely used to evaluate the sensitivity of a material to hot cracking. It consists in loading the material by bending during a fusion line by the TIG process and in characterising the defects quantity (length, number). Various thermal and mechanical instrumentation methods were used. The possibilities of a local instrumentation instrumentation being limited because of the melting, the experimental results were complemented by a numerical modelling whose aim is to simulate the thermomechanical evolution of the loading thanks to the finite element analysis code ABAQUS. First, the heat input for thermal simulation is set by the use of an inverse method in order to optimise the energy deposit mode during welding in the calculation. Then, the mechanical simulation needs the input of a constitutive law that fits the mechanical behaviour over a wide temperature range from ambient to melting temperature. Thus, a mechanical characterization is performed by selecting strain values and strain rates representative of what the material undergoes during the tests. The results come from tensile and compressive tests and allow to settle an elasto-visco-plastic constitutive law over temperatures up to liquidus. Once

  14. Correlation between locally deformed structure and oxide film properties in austenitic stainless steel irradiated with neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chimi, Yasuhiro, E-mail: chimi.yasuhiro@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 2-4 Shirakata, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Kitsunai, Yuji [Nippon Nuclear Fuel Development, 2163 Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Higashi-ibaraki-gun, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Kasahara, Shigeki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 2-4 Shirakata, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Chatani, Kazuhiro; Koshiishi, Masato [Nippon Nuclear Fuel Development, 2163 Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Higashi-ibaraki-gun, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Nishiyama, Yutaka [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 2-4 Shirakata, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2016-07-15

    To elucidate the mechanism of irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) in high-temperature water for neutron-irradiated austenitic stainless steels (SSs), the locally deformed structures, the oxide films formed on the deformed areas, and their correlation were investigated. Tensile specimens made of irradiated 316L SSs were strained 0.1%–2% at room temperature or at 563 K, and the surface structures and crystal misorientation among grains were evaluated. The strained specimens were immersed in high-temperature water, and the microstructures of the oxide films on the locally deformed areas were observed. The appearance of visible step structures on the specimens' surface depended on the neutron dose and the applied strain. The surface oxides were observed to be prone to increase in thickness around grain boundaries (GBs) with increasing neutron dose and increasing local strain at the GBs. No penetrative oxidation was observed along GBs or along surface steps. - Highlights: • Visible step structures depend on the neutron dose and the applied strain. • Local strain at grain boundaries was accumulated with the neutron dose. • Oxide thickness increases with neutron dose and local strain at grain boundaries. • No penetrative oxidation was observed along grain boundaries or surface steps.

  15. Effects of low temperature neutron irradiation on deformation behavior of austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawel, J.E.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Alexander, D.J.; Grossbeck, M.L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States); Shiba, K.

    1996-04-01

    An austenitic stainless steel, designated 316LN-IG, has been chosen for the first wall/shield (FW/S) structure for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The proposed operational temperature range for the structure (100 to 250{degree}C) is below the temperature regimes for void swelling (400-600{degree}C) and for helium embrittlement (500-700{degree}C). However, the proposed neutron dose is such that large changes in yield strength, deformation mode, and strain hardening capacity could be encountered which could significantly affect fracture properties. Definition of the irradiation regimes in which this phenomenon occurs is essential to the establishment of design rules to protect against various modes of failure.

  16. In situ micro-tensile testing on proton beam-irradiated stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, H. T.; Reichardt, A.; Frazer, D.; Bailey, N.; Chou, P.; Hosemann, P.

    2017-09-01

    Small-scale mechanical testing techniques are currently being explored and developed for engineering applications. In particular, micro-tensile testing can add tremendous value, since the entire stress-strain curve, including the strain to failure, can be measured directly. In this work, 304 stainless steel specimens irradiated with 2 MeV protons to 10 dpa (full-cascade setting in the Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter, SRIM, software) at 360 °C was evaluated using micro-tensile testing. It was found that even on the micron scale, the measured strain corresponds well with macroscopic expectations. In addition, a new approach to analyzing sudden slip events is presented.

  17. Composite model of microstructural evolution in austenitic stainless steel under fast neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoller, R.E.; Odette, G.R.

    1986-01-01

    A rate-theory-based model has been developed which includes the simultaneous evolution of the dislocation and cavity components of the microstructure of irradiated austenitic stainless steels. Previous work has generally focused on developing models for void swelling while neglecting the time dependence of the dislocation structure. These models have broadened our understanding of the physical processes that give rise to swelling, e.g., the role of helium and void formation from critically-sized bubbles. That work has also demonstrated some predictive capability by successful calibration to fit the results of fast reactor swelling data. However, considerable uncertainty about the values of key parameters in these models limits their usefulness as predictive tools. Hence the use of such models to extrapolate fission reactor swelling data to fusion reactor conditions is compromised.

  18. Influence of the nitrogen gas addition in the Ar shielding gas on the erosion-corrosion of tube-to-tube sheet welds of hyper duplex stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hye-Jin; Jeon, Soon-Hyeok; Kim, Soon-Tae; Lee, In-Sung; Park, Yong-Soo [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    Duplex stainless steels with nearly equal fraction of the ferrite(α) phase and austenite(γ) phase have been increasingly used for various applications such as power plants, desalination facilities due to their high resistance to corrosion, good weldability, and excellent mechanical properties. Hyper duplex stainless steel (HDSS) is defined as the future duplex stainless steel with a pitting resistance equivalent (PRE= wt.%Cr+3.3(wt.%Mo+0.5wt.%W)+30wt.%N) of above 50. However, when HDSS is welded with gas tungsten arc (GTA), incorporation of nitrogen in the Ar shielding gas are very important because the volume fraction of α-phase and γ-phase is changed and harmful secondary phases can be formed in the welded zone. In other words, the balance of corrosion resistance between two phases and reduction of Cr{sub 2}N are the key points of this study. The primary results of this study are as follows. The addition of N{sub 2} to the Ar shielding gas provides phase balance under weld-cooling conditions and increases the transformation temperature of the α-phase to γ-phase, increasing the fraction of γ-phase as well as decreasing the precipitation of Cr2N. In the anodic polarization test, the addition of nitrogen gas in the Ar shielding gas improved values of the electrochemical parameters, compared to the Pure Ar. Also, in the erosion-corrosion test, the HDSS welded with shielding gas containing N{sub 2} decreased the weight loss, compared to HDSS welded with the Ar pure gas. This result showed the resistance of erosion-corrosion was increased due to increasing the fraction of γ-phase and the stability of passive film according to the addition N{sub 2} gas to the Ar shielding gas. As a result, the addition of nitrogen gas to the shielding gas improved the resistance of erosion-corrosion.

  19. Results of crack-arrest tests on two irradiated high-copper welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iskander, S.K.; Corwin, W.R.; Nanstead, R.K. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1990-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of neutron irradiation on the shift and shape of the lower-bound curve to crack-arrest data. Two submerged-arc welds with copper contents of 0.23 and 0.31 wt % were commercially fabricated in 220-mm-thick plate. Crack-arrest specimens fabricated from these welds were irradiated at a nominal temperature of 288{degree}C to an average fluence of 1.9 {times} 10{sup 19} neutrons/cm{sup 2} (>1 MeV). Evaluation of the results shows that the neutron-irradiation-induced crack-arrest toughness temperature shift is about the same as the Charpy V-notch impact temperature shift at the 41-J energy level. The shape of the lower-bound curves (for the range of test temperatures covered) did not seem to have been altered by irradiation compared to those of the ASME K{sub Ia} curve. 9 refs., 21 figs., 10 tabs.

  20. Influence of Mode of Metal Transfer on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Gas Metal Arc-Welded Modified Ferritic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Manidipto; Pal, Tapan Kumar

    2012-06-01

    This article describes in detail the effect of the modes of metal transfer on the microstructure and mechanical properties of gas metal arc-welded modified ferritic stainless steel (SSP 409M) sheets (as received) of 4 mm thickness. The welded joints were prepared under three modes of metal transfer, i.e., short-circuit (SC), spray (S), transfer, and mix (M) mode transfer using two different austenitic filler wires (308L and 316L) and shielding gas composition of Ar + 5 pct CO2. The welded joints were evaluated by means of microstructural, hardness, notched tensile strength, Charpy impact toughness, and high cycle fatigue. The dependence of weld metal microstructure on modes of metal transfer and filler wires has been determined by dilution calculation, WRC-1992 diagram, Creq/Nieq ratio, stacking fault energy (SFE), optical microscopy (OM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It was observed that the microstructure as well as the tensile, Charpy impact, and high cycle fatigue of weld metal is significantly affected by the mode of metal transfer and filler wire used. However, the heat-affected zone (HAZ) is affected only by the modes of metal transfer. The results have been correlated with the microstructures of weld and HAZ developed under different modes of metal transfer.

  1. Optimization of Process Parameters to Minimize Angular Distortion in Gas Tungsten Arc Welded Stainless Steel 202 Grade Plates Using Genetic Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhakaran .R,

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study on optimization of process parameters using genetic algorithm to minimize angular distortion in 202 grade stainless steel gas tungsten arc welded plates. Angular distortion is a major problem and most pronounced among different types of distortion in butt welded plates. The extent of distortion depends onthe welding process control parameters. The important process control parameters chosen for study are gun angle (θ, welding speed (V, plate length (L, welding current (I and gas flow rate (Q. The experiments are conducted based on five factor five level central composite rotatable designs with full replication technique. A mathematical model was developed correlating the process parameters and the angular distortion. The developed model is checked for the adequacy based on ANOVA analysis and accuracy of prediction by confirmatory test. The optimization of process parameters was done using genetic algorithms (GA. A source code was developed using C language to do the optimization. The optimal process parameters gave a value of 0.000379° for angular distortion which demonstrates the accuracy and effectiveness of the model presented and program developed. The obtained results indicate that the optimized parameters are capable of producing weld with minimum distortion.

  2. Effect of Continuous and Pulsed Current Gas Tungsten Arc Welding on Dissimilar Weldments Between Hastelloy C-276/AISI 321 Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sumitra; Taiwade, Ravindra V.; Vashishtha, Himanshu

    2017-03-01

    In the present investigation, an attempt has been made to join Hastelloy C-276 nickel-based superalloy and AISI 321 austenitic stainless steel using ERNiCrMo-4 filler. The joints were fabricated by continuous and pulsed current gas tungsten arc welding processes. Experimental studies to ascertain the structure-property co-relationship with or without pulsed current mode were carried out using an optical microscope and scanning electron microscope. Further, the energy-dispersive spectroscope was used to evaluate the extent of microsegregation. The microstructure of fusion zone was obtained as finer cellular dendritic structure for pulsed current mode, whereas columnar structure was formed with small amount of cellular structure for continuous current mode. The scanning electron microscope examination witnessed the existence of migrated grain boundaries at the weld interfaces. Moreover, the presence of secondary phases such as P and μ was observed in continuous current weld joints, whereas they were absent in pulsed current weld joints, which needs to be further characterized. Moreover, pulsed current joints resulted in narrower weld bead, refined morphology, reduced elemental segregation and improved strength of the welded joints. The outcomes of the present investigation would help in obtaining good quality dissimilar joints for industrial applications and AISI 321 ASS being cheaper consequently led to cost-effective design also.

  3. Effect of Continuous and Pulsed Current Gas Tungsten Arc Welding on Dissimilar Weldments Between Hastelloy C-276/AISI 321 Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sumitra; Taiwade, Ravindra V.; Vashishtha, Himanshu

    2017-02-01

    In the present investigation, an attempt has been made to join Hastelloy C-276 nickel-based superalloy and AISI 321 austenitic stainless steel using ERNiCrMo-4 filler. The joints were fabricated by continuous and pulsed current gas tungsten arc welding processes. Experimental studies to ascertain the structure-property co-relationship with or without pulsed current mode were carried out using an optical microscope and scanning electron microscope. Further, the energy-dispersive spectroscope was used to evaluate the extent of microsegregation. The microstructure of fusion zone was obtained as finer cellular dendritic structure for pulsed current mode, whereas columnar structure was formed with small amount of cellular structure for continuous current mode. The scanning electron microscope examination witnessed the existence of migrated grain boundaries at the weld interfaces. Moreover, the presence of secondary phases such as P and μ was observed in continuous current weld joints, whereas they were absent in pulsed current weld joints, which needs to be further characterized. Moreover, pulsed current joints resulted in narrower weld bead, refined morphology, reduced elemental segregation and improved strength of the welded joints. The outcomes of the present investigation would help in obtaining good quality dissimilar joints for industrial applications and AISI 321 ASS being cheaper consequently led to cost-effective design also.

  4. Evolution of weld metals nanostructure and properties under irradiation and recovery annealing of VVER-type reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurovich, B.; Kuleshova, E.; Shtrombakh, Ya.; Fedotova, S.; Zabusov, O.; Prikhodko, K.; Zhurko, D.

    2013-03-01

    The results of VVER-440 steel Sv-10KhMFT and VVER-1000 steel SV-10KhGNMAA investigations by transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Auger-electron spectroscopy and mechanical tests are presented in this paper. The both types of weld metals with different content of impurities and alloying elements were studied after irradiations to fast neutron (E > 0.5 MeV) fluences in the wide range below and beyond the design values, after recovery annealing procedures and after re-irradiation following the annealing. The distinctive features of embrittlement kinetics of VVER-440 and VVER-1000 RPV weld metals conditioned by their chemical composition differences were investigated. It is shown that the main contribution into radiation strengthening within the design fluence can be attributed to radiation-induced precipitates, on reaching the design or beyond design values of fast neutron fluencies the main contribution into VVER-440 welds strengthening is made by radiation-induced dislocation loops, and in case of VVER-1000 welds - radiation-induced precipitates and grain-boundary phosphorous segregations. Recovery annealing of VVER-440 welds at 475 °C during 100 h causes irradiation-induced defects disappearance, transformation of copper enriched precipitates into bigger copper-rich precipitates with lower number density and leads to almost full recovery of mechanical properties followed by comparatively slow re-embrittlement rate. The recovery annealing temperature of VVER-1000 welds was higher - 565 °C during 100 h - to avoid temper brittleness. The annealing of VVER-1000 welds leads to almost full recovery of mechanical properties due to irradiation-induced defects disappearance and decrease in precipitates number density and grain-boundary segregation of phosphorus. The re-embrittlement rate of VVER-1000 weld during subsequent re-irradiation is at least not higher than the initial rate.

  5. Wear resistance of laser cladding and plasma spray welding layer on stainless steel surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinlin Wang(王新林); Shihong Shi(石世宏); Qiguang Zheng(郑启光)

    2004-01-01

    The effect of coatings, which are formed with laser cladding and plasma spray welding on 1Cr18Ni9Ti base metal, on wear resistance is studied, A 5-kW transverse flowing CO2 laser is used for cladding Co base alloy powder pre-placed on the substrate. Comparing with the plasma spray coatings, the spoiled rate of products with laser clad layers was lower and the rate of finished products was higher. Their microstructure is extremely fine. They have close texture and small size grain. Their dilution resulting from the compositions of the base metal and thermal effect on base metal are less. The hardness, toughness,and strength of the laser cladding layers are higher. Wear tests show that the laser layers have higher properties of anti-friction, anti-scour and high-temperature sliding strike. The wear resistance of laser clad layers are about one time higher than that of plasma spray welding layer.

  6. Effect of Welding Process on Intergranular Corrosion Resistance of 304 Stainless Steel Welded Joints%焊接工艺对304不锈钢焊接接头耐晶间腐蚀性能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜爱华; 陈亮; 丁毅; 马立群

    2012-01-01

    采用草酸电解侵蚀法和HNO3-HF法研究了焊接电流对304不锈钢焊接接头耐晶间腐蚀性能的影响.研究结果表明:对于填充焊丝308L的焊接接头,耐晶间腐蚀性能随着焊接电流的增大而增强;对于自熔合的焊接接头,耐晶间腐蚀性能随着焊接电流的增大而减弱.%The effects of welding current on intergranular corrosion (IGC) resistance of 304 stainless steel welded joints were investigated by electrolytic oxalic acid etching method and HNO3-HF method. The experimental results show that the IGC resistance of filled welded joints improves with the increase of welding current. But the IGC resistance of self-fusion welded joints weakens with the increase of welding current.

  7. Microstructure and pitting corrosion of shielded metal arc welded high nitrogen stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffi Mohammed

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The present work is aimed at studying the microstructure and pitting corrosion behaviour of shielded metal arc welded high nitrogen steel made of Cromang-N electrode. Basis for selecting this electrode is to increase the solubility of nitrogen in weld metal due to high chromium and manganese content. Microscopic studies were carried out using optical microscopy (OM and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM. Energy back scattered diffraction (EBSD method was used to determine the phase analysis, grain size and orientation image mapping. Potentio-dynamic polarization testing was carried out to study the pitting corrosion resistance in aerated 3.5% NaCl environment using a GillAC electrochemical system. The investigation results showed that the selected Cr–Mn–N type electrode resulted in a maximum reduction in delta-ferrite and improvement in pitting corrosion resistance of the weld zone was attributed to the coarse austenite grains owing to the reduction in active sites of the austenite/delta ferrite interface and the decrease in galvanic interaction between austenite and delta-ferrite.

  8. Analysis of WWER-440 and PWR RPV welds surveillance data to compare irradiation damage evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debarberis, L. [Joint Research Centre of the European Commission, Institute for Energy, P.O. Box 2, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)]. E-mail: luigi.debarberis@cec.eu.int; Acosta, B. [Joint Research Centre of the European Commission, Institute for Energy, P.O. Box 2, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)]. E-mail: beatriz.acosta-iborra@jrc.nl; Zeman, A. [Joint Research Centre of the European Commission, Institute for Energy, P.O. Box 2, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Sevini, F. [Joint Research Centre of the European Commission, Institute for Energy, P.O. Box 2, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Ballesteros, A. [Tecnatom, Avd. Montes de Oca 1, San Sebasitan de los Reyes, E-28709 Madrid (Spain); Kryukov, A. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute, Kurchatov Square 1, 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); Gillemot, F. [AEKI Atomic Research Institute, Konkoly Thege M. ut 29-33, 1121 Budapest (Hungary); Brumovsky, M. [NRI, Nuclear Research Institute, Husinec-Rez 130, 25068 Rez (Czech Republic)

    2006-04-15

    It is known that for Russian-type and Western water reactor pressure vessel steels there is a similar degradation in mechanical properties during equivalent neutron irradiation. Available surveillance results from WWER and PWR vessels are used in this article to compare irradiation damage evolution for the different reactor pressure vessel welds. The analysis is done through the semi-mechanistic model for radiation embrittlement developed by JRC-IE. Consistency analysis with BWR vessel materials and model alloys has also been performed within this study. Globally the two families of studied materials follow similar trends regarding the evolution of irradiation damage. Moreover in the high fluence range typical of operation of WWER the radiation stability of these vessels is greater than the foreseen one for PWR.

  9. A Field Study on the Respiratory Deposition of the Nano-Sized Fraction of Mild and Stainless Steel Welding Fume Metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cena, L G; Chisholm, W P; Keane, M J; Chen, B T

    2015-01-01

    A field study was conducted to estimate the amount of Cr, Mn, and Ni deposited in the respiratory system of 44 welders in two facilities. Each worker wore a nanoparticle respiratory deposition (NRD) sampler during gas metal arc welding (GMAW) of mild and stainless steel and flux-cored arc welding (FCAW) of mild steel. Several welders also wore side-by-side NRD samplers and closed-face filter cassettes for total particulate samples. The NRD sampler estimates the aerosol's nano-fraction deposited in the respiratory system. Mn concentrations for both welding processes ranged 2.8-199 μg/m3; Ni concentrations ranged 10-51 μg/m3; and Cr concentrations ranged 40-105 μg/m3. Cr(VI) concentrations ranged between 0.5-1.3 μg/m3. For the FCAW process the largest concentrations were reported for welders working in pairs. As a consequence this often resulted in workers being exposed to their own welding fumes and to those generated from the welding partner. Overall no correlation was found between air velocity and exposure (R2 = 0.002). The estimated percentage of the nano-fraction of Mn deposited in a mild-steel-welder's respiratory system ranged between 10 and 56%. For stainless steel welding, the NRD samplers collected 59% of the total Mn, 90% of the total Cr, and 64% of the total Ni. These results indicate that most of the Cr and more than half of the Ni and Mn in the fumes were in the fraction smaller than 300 nm.

  10. Effect of Composition on the Formation of Sigma during Single-Pass Welding of Mo-Bearing Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perricone, M. J.; Anderson, T. D.; Robino, C. V.; Dupont, J. N.; Michael, J. R.

    2007-09-01

    A series of 64 Mo-bearing stainless steel compositions ranging from 0 to 10 wt pct Mo and over a broad range of Ni and Cr contents were analyzed over a variety of cooling rates. Alloys were created using the arc button melting process, and laser welds were prepared on each alloy at constant power and travel speeds ranging from 4.2 to 42 mm/s. The presence of the σ-sigma intermetallic was observed in several primary γ-austenite alloys with Mo contents ≥2.5 wt pct Mo and in several primary δ-ferrite alloys with Mo contents ≥6 wt pct Mo. However, its formation cannot be explained by the eutectic solidification reaction previously explored in this class of materials by the present authors. Instead, σ-sigma was determined to form by the eutectoid decomposition of δ-ferrite ( δ → γ + σ) in the as-solidified arc melt buttons in both primary γ-austenite and primary δ-ferrite alloys. The high cooling rates in the laser welds (estimated to range from 104 °C/s to 105 °C/s) largely prevented this transformation from occurring, resulting in the retention of metastable δ-ferrite to room temperature. A correlation was observed between the composition of the δ-ferrite in the microstructure and the calculated onset temperature of sigma stability. By combining multicomponent liquidus projections and isothermal sections, a good correlation of δ-ferrite compositions that decompose to γ-austenite + σ-sigma upon cooling is presented. It is suggested that the absence of the chi ( χ) phase, often observed in a similar composition range at high Mo contents, could be attributed to the extremely low carbon content in these alloys.

  11. Effect of laser irradiation conditions on the laser welding strength of cobalt-chromium and gold alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Hisaji; Kurotani, Tomoko; Kaketani, Masahiro; Hiraguchi, Hisako; Hirose, Hideharu; Yoneyama, Takayuki

    2011-09-01

    Using tensile tests, this study investigated differences in the welding strength of casts of cobalt-chromium and gold alloys resulting from changes in the voltage and pulse duration in order to clarify the optimum conditions of laser irradiation for achieving favorable welding strength. Laser irradiation was performed at voltages of 150 V and 170 V with pulse durations of 4, 8, and 12 ms. For cobalt-chromium and gold alloys, it was found that a good welding strength could be achieved using a voltage of 170 V, a pulse duration of 8 ms, and a spot diameter of 0.5 mm. However, when the power density was set higher than this, defects tended to occur, suggesting the need for care when establishing welding conditions.

  12. Heat transfer and fluid flow during keyhole mode laser welding of tantalum, Ti 6Al 4V, 304L stainless steel and vanadium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, R.; Elmer, J. W.; Palmer, T. A.; Roy, T. Deb

    2007-09-01

    Because of the complexity of several simultaneous physical processes, most heat transfer models of keyhole mode laser welding require some simplifications to make the calculations tractable. The simplifications often limit the applicability of each model to the specific materials systems for which the model is developed. In this work, a rigorous, yet computationally efficient, keyhole model is developed and tested on tantalum, Ti-6Al-4V, 304L stainless steel and vanadium. Unlike previous models, this one combines an existing model to calculate keyhole shape and size with numerical fluid flow and heat transfer calculations in the weld pool. The calculations of the keyhole profile involved a point-by-point heat balance at the keyhole walls considering multiple reflections of the laser beam in the vapour cavity. The equations of conservation of mass, momentum and energy are then solved in three dimensions assuming that the temperatures at the keyhole wall reach the boiling point of the different metals or alloys. A turbulence model based on Prandtl's mixing length hypothesis was used to estimate the effective viscosity and thermal conductivity in the liquid region. The calculated weld cross-sections agreed well with the experimental results for each metal and alloy system examined here. In each case, the weld pool geometry was affected by the thermal diffusivity, absorption coefficient, and the melting and boiling points, among the various physical properties of the alloy. The model was also used to better understand solidification phenomena and calculate the solidification parameters at the trailing edge of the weld pool. These calculations indicate that the solidification structure became less dendritic and coarser with decreasing weld velocities over the range of speeds investigated in this study. Overall, the keyhole weld model provides satisfactory simulations of the weld geometries and solidification sub-structures for diverse engineering metals and alloys.

  13. A comparison of cytotoxicity and oxidative stress from welding fumes generated with a new nickel-, copper-based consumable versus mild and stainless steel-based welding in RAW 264.7 mouse macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa A Badding

    Full Text Available Welding processes that generate fumes containing toxic metals, such as hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI, manganese (Mn, and nickel (Ni, have been implicated in lung injury, inflammation, and lung tumor promotion in animal models. While federal regulations have reduced permissible worker exposure limits to Cr(VI, this is not always practical considering that welders may work in confined spaces and exhaust ventilation may be ineffective. Thus, there has been a recent initiative to minimize the potentially hazardous components in welding materials by developing new consumables containing much less Cr(VI and Mn. A new nickel (Ni and copper (Cu-based material (Ni-Cu WF is being suggested as a safer alternative to stainless steel consumables; however, its adverse cellular effects have not been studied. This study compared the cytotoxic effects of the newly developed Ni-Cu WF with two well-characterized welding fumes, collected from gas metal arc welding using mild steel (GMA-MS or stainless steel (GMA-SS electrodes. RAW 264.7 mouse macrophages were exposed to the three welding fumes at two doses (50 µg/ml and 250 µg/ml for up to 24 hours. Cell viability, reactive oxygen species (ROS production, phagocytic function, and cytokine production were examined. The GMA-MS and GMA-SS samples were found to be more reactive in terms of ROS production compared to the Ni-Cu WF. However, the fumes from this new material were more cytotoxic, inducing cell death and mitochondrial dysfunction at a lower dose. Additionally, pre-treatment with Ni-Cu WF particles impaired the ability of cells to phagocytize E. coli, suggesting macrophage dysfunction. Thus, the toxic cellular responses to welding fumes are largely due to the metal composition. The results also suggest that reducing Cr(VI and Mn in the generated fume by increasing the concentration of other metals (e.g., Ni, Cu may not necessarily improve welder safety.

  14. Flux dependence of cluster formation in neutron-irradiated weld material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergner, F.; Ulbricht, A.; Hein, H.; Kammel, M.

    2008-03-01

    The effect of neutron flux on the formation of irradiation-induced clusters in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels is an unresolved issue. Small-angle neutron scattering was measured for a neutron-irradiated RPV weld material containing 0.22 wt% impurity Cu. The experiment was focused on the influence of neutron flux on the formation of irradiation-induced clusters at fixed fluence. The aim was to separate and tentatively interpret the effect of flux on the characteristics of the cluster size distribution. We have observed a pronounced effect of neutron flux on cluster size, whereas the total volume fraction of irradiation-induced clusters is insensitive to the level of flux. The result is compatible with a rate theory model according to which the range of applied fluxes covers the transition from a flux-independent regime at lower fluxes to a regime of decelerating cluster growth. The results are confronted with measured irradiation-induced changes of mechanical properties. Despite the observed flux effect on cluster size, both yield stress increase and transition temperature shift turned out to be independent of flux. This is in agreement with the volume fraction of irradiation-induced clusters being insensitive to the level of flux.

  15. The effect of CO{sub 2} laser beam welded AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel on the viability of fibroblast cells, in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Köse, Ceyhun, E-mail: ceyhun.kose@gop.edu.tr [Faculty of Natural Sciences and Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Gaziosmanpaşa University, Tokat (Turkey); Kaçar, Ramazan, E-mail: rkacar@karabuk.edu.tr [Faculty of Technology Department of Manufacturing Engineering, Karabuk University, Karabuk 78050 (Turkey); Zorba, Aslı Pınar, E-mail: aslipinarzorba@gmail.com [Graduate School of Natural and Applied Sciences, Department of Bioengineering Cell Culture and Tissue Engineering, Yıldız Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey); Bağırova, Melahat, E-mail: mbagir@yildiz.edu.tr [Department of Bioengineering Cell Culture and Tissue Engineering, Yıldız Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey); Allahverdiyev, Adil M., E-mail: adil@yildiz.edu.tr [Department of Bioengineering Cell Culture and Tissue Engineering, Yıldız Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2016-03-01

    It has been determined by the literature research that there is no clinical study on the in vivo and in vitro interaction of the cells with the laser beam welded joints of AISI 316L biomaterial. It is used as a prosthesis and implant material and that has adequate mechanical properties and corrosion resistance characteristics. Therefore, the interaction of the CO{sub 2} laser beam welded samples and samples of the base metal of AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel with L929 fibroblast cells as an element of connective tissue under in vitro conditions has been studied. To study the effect of the base metal and the laser welded test specimens on the viability of the fibroblast cells that act as an element of connective tissues in the body, they were kept in DMEMF-12 medium for 7, 14, 28 days and 18 months. The viability study was experimentally studied using the MTT method for 7, 14, 28 days. In addition, the direct interaction of the fibroblast cells seeded on 6 different plates with the samples was examined with an inverted microscope. The MTT cell viability experiment was repeated on the cells that were in contact with the samples. The statistical relationship was analyzed using a Tukey test for the variance with the GraphPad statistics software. The data regarding metallic ion release were identified with the ICP-MS method after the laser welded and main material samples were kept in cell culture medium for 18 months. The cell viability of the laser welded sample has been detected to be higher than that of the base metal and the control based on 7th day data. However, the laser welded sample's viability of the fibroblast cells has diminished by time during the test period of 14 and 28 days and base metal shows better viability when compared to the laser welded samples. On the other hand, the base metal and the laser welded sample show better cell viability effect when compared to the control group. According to the ICP-MS results of the main material and

  16. Estimation of embrittlement during aging of AISI 316 stainless steel TIG welds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J Nayak; K R Udupa; K R Hebbar; H V S Nayak

    2004-12-01

    Weldments of AISI grade 316 stainless steel, having a ferrite content of 4–6% and a variety of nitrogen concentrations were prepared using a modified element implant technique. Charpy impact specimens prepared from these weldments were subjected to a variety of aging treatments. Impact toughness decreases with aging time at all aging temperatures. Nitrogen is found to be beneficial to toughness. An empirical relation connecting the aging temperature, aging time and nitrogen content with toughness has been developed which can be used to estimate the time for embrittlement.

  17. Characterization of Low Temperature Ferrite/Austenite Transformations in the Heat Affected Zone of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel Arc Welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, T A; Elmer, J W; Babu, S S; Vitek, J M

    2003-08-20

    Spatially Resolved X-Ray Diffraction (SRXRD) has been used to identify a previously unobserved low temperature ferrite ({delta})/austenite({gamma}) phase transformation in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel (DSS) welds. In this ''ferrite dip'' transformation, the ferrite transforms to austenite during heating to peak temperatures on the order of 750 C, and re-transforms to ferrite during cooling, resulting in a ferrite volume fraction equivalent to that in the base metal. Time Resolved X-Ray Diffraction (TRXRD) and laser dilatometry measurements during Gleeble{reg_sign} thermal simulations are performed in order to verify the existence of this low temperature phase transformation. Thermodynamic and kinetic models for phase transformations, including both local-equilibrium and para-equilibrium diffusion controlled growth, show that diffusion of substitutional alloying elements does not provide a reasonable explanation for the experimental observations. On the other hand, the diffusion of interstitial alloying elements may be rapid enough to explain this behavior. Based on both the experimental and modeling results, two mechanisms for the ''ferrite dip'' transformation, including the formation and decomposition of secondary austenite and an athermal martensitic-type transformation of ferrite to austenite, are considered.

  18. Physical Simulation of a Duplex Stainless Steel Friction Stir Welding by the Numerical and Experimental Analysis of Hot Torsion Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Fonseca, Eduardo Bertoni; Santos, Tiago Felipe Abreu; Button, Sergio Tonini; Ramirez, Antonio Jose

    2016-09-01

    Physical simulation of friction stir welding (FSW) by means of hot torsion tests was performed on UNS S32205 duplex stainless steel. A thermomechanical simulator Gleeble 3800® with a custom-built liquid nitrogen cooling system was employed to reproduce the thermal cycle measured during FSW and carry out the torsion tests. Microstructures were compared by means of light optical microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction. True strain and strain rate were calculated by numerical simulation of the torsion tests. Thermomechanically affected zone (TMAZ) was reproduced at peak temperature of 1303 K (1030 °C), rotational speeds of 52.4 rad s-1 (500 rpm) and 74.5 rad s-1 (750 rpm), and 0.5 to 0.75 revolutions, which represent strain rate between 10 and 16 s-1 and true strain between 0.5 and 0.8. Strong grain refinement, similar to the one observed in the stir zone (SZ), was attained at peak temperature of 1403 K (1130 °C), rotational speed of 74.5 rad s-1 (750 rpm), and 1.2 revolution, which represent strain rate of 19 s-1 and true strain of 1.3. Continuous dynamic recrystallization in ferrite and dynamic recrystallization in austenite were observed in the TMAZ simulation. At higher temperature, dynamic recovery of austenite was also observed.

  19. A review of irradiation effects on LWR core internal materials - IASCC susceptibility and crack growth rates of austenitic stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, O. K.; Rao, A. S.

    2011-02-01

    Austenitic stainless steels (SSs) are used extensively as structural alloys in the internal components of light water reactor (LWR) pressure vessels because of their relatively high strength, ductility, and fracture toughness. However, exposure to neutron irradiation for extended periods changes the microstructure (radiation hardening) and microchemistry (radiation-induced segregation) of these steels, and degrades their fracture properties. Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) is another degradation process that affects LWR internal components exposed to neutron radiation. The existing data on irradiated austenitic SSs were reviewed to evaluate the effects of key parameters such as material composition, irradiation dose, and water chemistry on IASCC susceptibility and crack growth rates of these materials in LWR environments. The significance of microstructural and microchemistry changes in the material on IASCC susceptibility is also discussed. The results are used to determine (a) the threshold fluence for IASCC and (b) the disposition curves for cyclic and IASCC growth rates for irradiated SSs in LWR environments.

  20. Cost and Performance Report: Introduction and Validation of Chromium-Free Consumables for Welding Stainless Steels. Version 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    generation rate γ gamma GECRM gamma exposure and count rate meter GMAW gas metal arc welding vii GTAW gas tungsten arc welding HAP Hazardous Air...confined spaces Navy ships and DoD facilities where effective welding fume ventilation is impossible or impractical GTAW – gas tungsten arc...and ductility Joints – bend, tensile strength, fillet weld, fracture toughness Equivalent to existing welding performance tests for the

  1. T.I.G. Welding of stainless steel. Numerical modelling for temperatures calculation in the Haz; Soldadura T.I.G. de acero inoxidable. Modelo numerico para el calculo de temperaturas en la ZAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Conesa, E. J.; Estrems-Amestoy, M.; Miguel-Eguia, V.; Garrido-Hernandez, A.; Guillen-Martinez, J. A.

    2010-07-01

    In this work, a numerical method for calculating the temperature field into the heat affected zone for butt welded joints is presented. The method has been developed for sheet welding and takes into account a bidimensional heat flow. It has built a computer program by MS-Excel books and Visual Basic for Applications (VBA). The model has been applied to the TIG process of AISI 304 stainless steel 2mm thickness sheet. The welding process has been considered without input materials. The numerical method may be used to help the designers to predict the temperature distribution in welded joints. (Author) 12 refs.

  2. Review of the concept and of the equations of the weldability window for explosive welding. Application to the explosive welding of stainless steel to carbon steel in cylindrical configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Jose; Mendes, Ricardo; Loureiro, Altino

    2013-06-01

    Explosive cladding/welding is usually considered a solid state process in which the detonation of a certain amount of an explosive composition is used to accelerate one of the materials to be weld against the other. By this way a high velocity oblique collision is promoted and that will be responsible for the materials bonding. The conditions that should be met to achieve good welds define what is called as a weldability window or criteria. A weldability criteria based on the collision point velocity (Vc) and on the collision angle (β) is the most used today. In the β-Vc space the weldability window is defined by four lines or limits. Despite of its widely used in explosive welding works, neither the concepts behind those limits neither the equations used to define them in the β-Vc space are particularly clear. Contradictory concepts, and equations with undefined variables or parameters, are commonly found in the literature. This paper aims to clarify those concepts and equations through an integrated description of the weldability limits and a presentation of the reviewed associated equations with the variables and parameters, including their units, clearly defined. The reviewed concepts and equations are then used for the description of the explosive welds of stainless steel to carbon steel in cylindrical configuration.

  3. Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking behavior of austenitic stainless steels applicable to LWR core internals.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, H. M.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

    2006-01-31

    This report summarizes work performed at Argonne National Laboratory on irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of austenitic stainless steels that were irradiated in the Halden reactor in simulation of irradiation-induced degradation of boiling water reactor (BWR) core internal components. Slow-strain-rate tensile tests in BWR-like oxidizing water were conducted on 27 austenitic stainless steel alloys that were irradiated at 288 C in helium to 0.4, 1.3, and 3.0 dpa. Fractographic analysis was conducted to determine the fracture surface morphology. Microchemical analysis by Auger electron spectroscopy was performed on BWR neutron absorber tubes to characterize grain-boundary segregation of important elements under BWR conditions. At 0.4 and 1.4 dpa, transgranular fracture was mixed with intergranular fracture. At 3 dpa, transgranular cracking was negligible, and fracture surface was either dominantly intergranular, as in field-cracked core internals, or dominantly ductile or mixed. This behavior indicates that percent intergranular stress corrosion cracking determined at {approx}3 dpa is a good measure of IASCC susceptibility. At {approx}1.4 dpa, a beneficial effect of a high concentration of Si (0.8-1.5 wt.%) was observed. At {approx}3 dpa, however, such effect was obscured by a deleterious effect of S. Excellent resistance to IASCC was observed up to {approx}3 dpa for eight heats of Types 304, 316, and 348 steel that contain very low concentrations of S. Susceptibility of Types 304 and 316 steels that contain >0.003 wt.% S increased drastically. This indicates that a sulfur related critical phenomenon plays an important role in IASCC. A sulfur content of <0.002 wt.% is the primary material factor necessary to ensure good resistance to IASCC. However, for Types 304L and 316L steel and their high-purity counterparts, a sulfur content of <0.002 wt.% alone is not a sufficient condition to ensure good resistance to IASCC. This is in distinct contrast to

  4. Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking behavior of austenitic stainless steels applicable to LWR core internals.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, H. M.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

    2006-01-31

    This report summarizes work performed at Argonne National Laboratory on irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of austenitic stainless steels that were irradiated in the Halden reactor in simulation of irradiation-induced degradation of boiling water reactor (BWR) core internal components. Slow-strain-rate tensile tests in BWR-like oxidizing water were conducted on 27 austenitic stainless steel alloys that were irradiated at 288 C in helium to 0.4, 1.3, and 3.0 dpa. Fractographic analysis was conducted to determine the fracture surface morphology. Microchemical analysis by Auger electron spectroscopy was performed on BWR neutron absorber tubes to characterize grain-boundary segregation of important elements under BWR conditions. At 0.4 and 1.4 dpa, transgranular fracture was mixed with intergranular fracture. At 3 dpa, transgranular cracking was negligible, and fracture surface was either dominantly intergranular, as in field-cracked core internals, or dominantly ductile or mixed. This behavior indicates that percent intergranular stress corrosion cracking determined at {approx}3 dpa is a good measure of IASCC susceptibility. At {approx}1.4 dpa, a beneficial effect of a high concentration of Si (0.8-1.5 wt.%) was observed. At {approx}3 dpa, however, such effect was obscured by a deleterious effect of S. Excellent resistance to IASCC was observed up to {approx}3 dpa for eight heats of Types 304, 316, and 348 steel that contain very low concentrations of S. Susceptibility of Types 304 and 316 steels that contain >0.003 wt.% S increased drastically. This indicates that a sulfur related critical phenomenon plays an important role in IASCC. A sulfur content of <0.002 wt.% is the primary material factor necessary to ensure good resistance to IASCC. However, for Types 304L and 316L steel and their high-purity counterparts, a sulfur content of <0.002 wt.% alone is not a sufficient condition to ensure good resistance to IASCC. This is in distinct contrast to

  5. Irradiation-induced structural changes in surveillance material of VVER 440-type weld metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, M.; Denner, V.; Böhmert, J.; Mathon, M.-H.

    2000-01-01

    The irradiation-induced microstructural changes in surveillance materials of the VVER 440-type weld metal Sv-10KhMFT were investigated by small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and anomalous small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Due to the high fluence, a strong effect was found in the SANS experiment. No significant effect of the irradiation is detected by SAXS. The reason for this discrepancy is the different scattering contrast of irradiation-induced defects for neutrons and X-rays. An analysis of the SAXS shows that the scattering intensity is mainly caused by vanadium-containing (VC) precipitates and grain boundaries. Both types of scattering defects are hardly changed by irradiation. Neutron irradiation rather produces additional scattering defects of a few nanometers in size. Assuming these defects are clusters containing copper and other foreign atoms with a composition according to results of atom probe field ion microscopy (APFIM) investigations, both the high SANS and the low SAXS effect can be explained.

  6. Depth distribution of Frank loop defects formed in ion-irradiated stainless steel and its dependence on Si addition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Dongyue, E-mail: dychen@safety.n.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [The University of Tokyo, Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, 7-3-1 Hongo Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Murakami, Kenta [The University of Tokyo, Nuclear Professional School, School of Engineering, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Dohi, Kenji; Nishida, Kenji; Soneda, Naoki [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, 2-11-1 Iwado-kita, Komae, Tokyo 201-8511 (Japan); Li, Zhengcao, E-mail: zcli@tsinghua.edu.cn [Tsinghua University, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing 100084 (China); Liu, Li; Sekimura, Naoto [The University of Tokyo, Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, 7-3-1 Hongo Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    Although heavy ion irradiation is a good tool to simulate neutron irradiation-induced damages in light water reactor, it produces inhomogeneous defect distribution. Such difference in defect distribution brings difficulty in comparing the microstructure evolution and mechanical degradation between neutron and heavy ion irradiation, and thus needs to be understood. Stainless steel is the typical structural material used in reactor core, and could be taken as an example to study the inhomogeneous defect depth distribution in heavy ion irradiation and its influence on the tested irradiation hardening by nano-indentation. In this work, solution annealed stainless steel model alloys are irradiated by 3 MeV Fe{sup 2+} ions at 400 °C to 3 dpa to produce Frank loops that are mainly interstitial in nature. The silicon content of the model alloys is also tuned to change point defect diffusion, so that the loop depth distribution influenced by diffusion along the irradiation beam direction could be discussed. Results show that in low Si (0% Si) and base Si (0.42% Si) samples the depth distribution of Frank loop density quite well matches the dpa profile calculated by the SRIM code, but in high Si sample (0.95% Si), the loop number density in the near-surface region is very low. One possible explanation could be Si’s role in enhancing the effective vacancy diffusivity, promoting recombination and thus suppressing interstitial Frank loops, especially in the near-surface region, where vacancies concentrate. By considering the loop depth distribution, the tested irradiation hardening is successfully explained by the Orowan model. A hardening coefficient of around 0.30 is obtained for all the three samples. This attempt in interpreting hardening results may make it easier to compare the mechanical degradation between different irradiation experiments.

  7. Investigation on the explosive welding mechanism of corrosion-resisting aluminum and stainless steel tubes through finite element simulation and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Guo-Fa; Li, Jin-Shan; Li, Hong-Wei; Sun, Feng; Zhang, Tie-Bang; Fu, Heng-Zhi

    2012-02-01

    To solve the difficulty in the explosive welding of corrosion-resistant aluminum and stainless steel tubes, three technologies were proposed after investigating the forming mechanism through experiments. Then, a 3D finite element model was established for systematic simulations in the parameter determination. The results show that the transition-layer approach, the coaxial initial assembly of tubes with the top-center-point the detonation, and the systematic study by numerical modeling are the key technologies to make the explosive welding of LF6 aluminum alloy and 1Cr18Ni9Ti stainless steel tubes feasible. Numerical simulation shows that radial contraction and slope collision through continuous local plastic deformation are necessary for the good bonding of tubes. Stand-off distances between tubes ( D 1 and D 2) and explosives amount ( R) have effect on the plastic deformation, moving velocity, and bonding of tubes. D 1 of 1 mm, D 2 of 2 mm, and R of 2/3 are suitable for the explosive welding of LF6-L2-1Cr18Ni9Ti three-layer tubes. The plastic strain and moving velocity of the flyer tubes increase with the increase of stand-off distance. More explosives ( R>2/3) result in the asymmetrical distribution of plastic strain and non-bonding at the end of detonation on the tubes.

  8. Study on microstructural changes in thermally-aged stainless steel weld-overlay cladding of nuclear reactor pressure vessels by atom probe tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, T., E-mail: takeuchi.tomoaki@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Kameda, J. [National Institute for Materials Science, Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Nagai, Y.; Toyama, T. [Oarai Center, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Nishiyama, Y.; Onizawa, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > Microstructural changes in stainless steel electroslag weld-overlay cladding. > Thermal aging caused progress of spinodal decomposition and precipitation of G phases in the {delta}-ferrite phase. > The degree of the spinodal decomposition had a linear relationship to the hardness. - Abstract: The effect of thermal aging on microstructural changes was investigated in stainless steel weld-overlay cladding composed of 90% austenite and 10% {delta}-ferrite phases using atom probe tomography (APT). In as-received materials subjected to cooling process after post-welding heat treatments (PWHT), a slight fluctuation of the Cr concentration was already observed due to spinodal decomposition in the ferrite phase but not in the austenitic phase. Thermal aging at 400 deg. C for 10,000 h caused not only an increase in the amplitude of spinodal decomposition but also the precipitation of G phases with composition ratios of Ni:Si:Mn = 16:7:6 in the ferrite phase. The chemical compositions of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} type carbides seemed to be formed at the austenite/ferrite interface were analyzed. The analyses of the magnitude of the spinodal decomposition and the hardness implied that the spinodal decomposition was the main cause of the hardening.

  9. Hydrogen embrittlement in superaustenitic stainless steels welded unions in sulfuric acid; Fragilizacao por hidrogenio em juntas soldadas de acos inoxidaveis superausteniticos em acido sulfurico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berthier, T. [Parana Univ., Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Lab. de Materiais e Tratamento de Superficies (LaMaTS)]. E-mail: thiana@demec.ufpr.br; Kuromoto, N.K. [Parana Univ., Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Lab. de Nanopropriedades Mecanicas; Paredes, R.S.C. [Instituto de Tecnologia para o Desenvolvimento (LACTEC), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2003-07-01

    The embrittlement of the austenitic stainless steel by hydrogen has been known for more than four decades. Researches done into the behavior of the hydrogenated homogeneous structures, under cathodic charging at room temperature, have shown that the hydrogen induces phase transformations and nucleation of retarded superficial cracks during the outgassing which is followed by the end of the hydrogenation. The results obtained upon austenitic and superaustenitic stainless steels are few considering the changes produced in welded unions. The aim of this work is to evaluate mechanical properties of material and its relation to the nucleation of the cracks in the austenitic steels welds type AISI 904L submitted to hydrogenated solutions. The samples have been welded through the process MIG/MAG; the hydrogenation has been made catholically in a sulfuric acid solution of 1N, with variable time of 1 to 4 hours at the room temperature. An anode of platinum in and density of current 1000 A/m{sup 2} has been used. The outgassing has occurred at the room temperature. Many retarded superficial cracks with different morphologies have been observed. Regarding the hardness measure, major alterations in all the regions of the sample have not been noticed. (author)

  10. The effect of CO2 laser beam welded AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel on the viability of fibroblast cells, in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köse, Ceyhun; Kaçar, Ramazan; Zorba, Aslı Pınar; Bağırova, Melahat; Allahverdiyev, Adil M

    2016-03-01

    It has been determined by the literature research that there is no clinical study on the in vivo and in vitro interaction of the cells with the laser beam welded joints of AISI 316L biomaterial. It is used as a prosthesis and implant material and that has adequate mechanical properties and corrosion resistance characteristics. Therefore, the interaction of the CO2 laser beam welded samples and samples of the base metal of AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel with L929 fibroblast cells as an element of connective tissue under in vitro conditions has been studied. To study the effect of the base metal and the laser welded test specimens on the viability of the fibroblast cells that act as an element of connective tissues in the body, they were kept in DMEMF-12 medium for 7, 14, 28 days and 18 months. The viability study was experimentally studied using the MTT method for 7, 14, 28 days. In addition, the direct interaction of the fibroblast cells seeded on 6 different plates with the samples was examined with an inverted microscope. The MTT cell viability experiment was repeated on the cells that were in contact with the samples. The statistical relationship was analyzed using a Tukey test for the variance with the GraphPad statistics software. The data regarding metallic ion release were identified with the ICP-MS method after the laser welded and main material samples were kept in cell culture medium for 18 months. The cell viability of the laser welded sample has been detected to be higher than that of the base metal and the control based on 7th day data. However, the laser welded sample's viability of the fibroblast cells has diminished by time during the test period of 14 and 28 days and base metal shows better viability when compared to the laser welded samples. On the other hand, the base metal and the laser welded sample show better cell viability effect when compared to the control group. According to the ICP-MS results of the main material and laser welded

  11. Atom Probe Tomography Characterization of the Solute Distributions in a Neutron-Irradiated and Annealed Pressure Vessel Steel Weld

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, M.K.

    2001-01-30

    A combined atom probe tomography and atom probe field ion microscopy study has been performed on a submerged arc weld irradiated to high fluence in the Heavy-Section Steel irradiation (HSSI) fifth irradiation series (Weld 73W). The composition of this weld is Fe - 0.27 at. % Cu, 1.58% Mn, 0.57% Ni, 0.34% MO, 0.27% Cr, 0.58% Si, 0.003% V, 0.45% C, 0.009% P, and 0.009% S. The material was examined after five conditions: after a typical stress relief treatment of 40 h at 607 C, after neutron irradiation to a fluence of 2 x 10{sup 23} n m{sup {minus}2} (E > 1 MeV), and after irradiation and isothermal anneals of 0.5, 1, and 168 h at 454 C. This report describes the matrix composition and the size, composition, and number density of the ultrafine copper-enriched precipitates that formed under neutron irradiation and the change in these parameters with post-irradiation annealing treatments.

  12. Raman spectroscopic analysis of iron chromium oxide microspheres generated by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation on stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Morales, M; Soto-Bernal, J J; Frausto-Reyes, C; Acosta-Ortiz, S E; Gonzalez-Mota, R; Rosales-Candelas, I

    2015-06-15

    Iron chromium oxide microspheres were generated by pulsed laser irradiation on the surface of two commercial samples of stainless steel at room temperature. An Ytterbium pulsed fiber laser was used for this purpose. Raman spectroscopy was used for the characterization of the microspheres, whose size was found to be about 0.2-1.7 μm, as revealed by SEM analysis. The laser irradiation on the surface of the stainless steel modified the composition of the microspheres generated, affecting the concentration of the main elemental components when laser power was increased. Furthermore, the peak ratio of the main bands in the Raman spectra has been associated to the concentration percentage of the main components of the samples, as revealed by Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) analysis. These experiments showed that it is possible to generate iron chromium oxide microspheres on stainless steel by laser irradiation and that the concentration percentage of their main components is associated with the laser power applied.

  13. The effect of low dose rate irradiation on the swelling of 12% cold-worked 316 stainless steel.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, T. R.

    1999-03-02

    In pressurized water reactors (PWRs), stainless steel components are irradiated at temperatures that may reach 400 C due to gamma heating. If large amounts of swelling (>10%) occur in these reactor internals, significant swelling related embrittlement may occur. Although fast reactor studies indicate that swelling should be insignificant at PWR temperatures, the low dose rate conditions experienced by PWR components may possibly lead to significant swelling. To address these issues, JNC and ANL have collaborated to analyze swelling in 316 stainless steel, irradiated in the EBR-II reactor at temperatures from 376-444 C, at dose rates between 4.9 x 10{sup {minus}8} and 5.8 x 10{sup {minus}7} dpa/s, and to doses of 56 dpa. For these irradiation conditions, the swelling decreases markedly at temperatures less than approximately 386 C, with the extrapolated swelling at 100 dpa being around 3%. For temperatures greater than 386 C, the swelling extrapolated to 100 dpa is around 9%. For a factor of two difference in dose rate, no statistically significant effect of dose rate on swelling was seen. For the range of dose rates analyzed, the swelling measurements do not support significant (>10%) swelling of 316 stainless steel in PWRs.

  14. Radiolysis driven changes to oxide stability during irradiation-corrosion of 316L stainless steel in high temperature water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raiman, Stephen S.; Bartels, David M.; Was, Gary S.

    2017-09-01

    316L stainless steel samples were irradiated with a proton beam while simultaneously exposed to high temperature water with hydrogen (320 °C, 3 wppm H2, neutral pH) to study the effect of radiation on corrosion. The inner oxides on irradiated samples were found to be depleted in chromium when compared to the inner oxides on unirradiated samples exposed to the same conditions. Additionally, hematite was found on the oxide surfaces of irradiated samples, but not on unirradiated samples. Sample areas which were not directly irradiated but were exposed to the flow of irradiated water also exhibited chromium-deficient inner oxides and had hematite on their surfaces, so it is concluded that water radiolysis is the primary driver of both effects. Thermodynamic calculations and radiolysis modeling were used to show that radiolytic production of hydrogen peroxide was sufficient to raise corrosion potential high enough to cause the dissolution of chromium-rich spinel oxides which make up the inner oxide layer on stainless steel in high temperature water.

  15. HANARO instrumented capsule development for supporting a study on the irradiation damage of stainless steels for nuclear applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Y. H.; Cho, M. S.; Sohn, J. M.; Kim, H. R.; Lee, B. C.; Kim, K. H

    2000-10-01

    As a part of the program for the maximum utilization of HANARO by MOST, Korea, an instrumented capsule (00M-01U) was designed and fabricated for supporting a study on the irradiation damage of stainless steels for nuclear applications. The basic structure of the capsule for the irradiation of Stainless steels was based on that of the 99M-01K capsule irradiated successfully in HANARO. To satisfy the user requirements such as irradiation temperature and neutron fluence, the optimal arrangement of test specimens was done in the axial and circumferential direction. The temperature distribution and thermal stress of a capsule with multi-holes were obtained by a finite element analysis code, ANSYS. From these analyzed data, this capsule was found to be compatible with HANARO design requirement. Various types of specimens such as small tensile, Charpy, TEM and EPMA specimens were inserted in the capsule. The specimens will be irradiated in the IR2 test hole of HANARO at 288, 300 and 350 deg C up to a fast neutron fluence of 1.0x10{sup 20}(n/cm{sup 2})(E>1.0MeV)

  16. Friction welding of titanium to 304L stainless steel using interlayers; Reibschweissen von Titan an nichtrostendem Stahl 304L unter Anwendung von Zwischenschichten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashfaq, Mohammad [King Saud Univ., Riyadh (Saudi Arabia). FARCAMT, Dept. of Industrial Engineering; Prasad Rao K.; Khalid Rafi H.; Murty, B.S. [Indian Institute of Technology Madras (IITM), Chennai (India). Dept. of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering; Dey, H.C.; Bhaduri, A.K. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India). Materials Technology Div.

    2011-04-15

    Friction welding of commercially pure titanium to austenitic stainless steel (AISI 304L SS) using intermediate layers was studied. The interlayers used were commercially pure nickel, tantalum and vanadium in the form of thin foils. The interlayers were aimed at avoiding direct contact between the base materials which may otherwise lead to formation of mainly Ti-Fe intermetallic phases at the interface which may seriously affect the weld properties. Interlayer foils were used individually and in combination (nickel-tantalum and nickelvanadium) suitably called in the present work as single and double interlayer joint systems respectively. Same interlayer behaved differently with respect to extrudability in these two systems. All the joints showed moderate strengths in tensile test. However, joints with single interlayer exhibited poor bend ductility, and double interlayers improved it to about 40 . Microhardness studies revealed a peak in nickel single interlayer system alone, confirming presence of hard phases at the interface. (orig.)

  17. Effect of post weld heat treatment on the microstructure and mechanical properties of ITER-grade 316LN austenitic stainless steel weldments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Jijun; Fang, Chao; Song, Yuntao; Wei, Jing; Xu, Shen; Wu, Jiefeng

    2017-04-01

    The effect of postweld heat treatment (PWHT) on the microstructure and mechanical properties of ITER-grade 316LN austenitic stainless steel joints with ER316LMn filler material was investigated. PWHT aging was performed for 1 h at four different temperatures of 600 °C, 760 °C, 870 °C and 920 °C, respectively. The microstructure revealed the sigma phase precipitation occurred in the weld metals heat-treated at the temperature of 870 °C and 920 °C. The PWHT temperatures have the less effect on the tensile strength, and the maximum tensile strength of the joints is about 630 MPa, reaching the 95% of the base metal, whereas the elongation is enhanced with the rise of PWHT temperatures. Meanwhile, the sigma phase precipitation in the weld metals reduces the impact toughness.

  18. 汽车排气系统用超纯铁素体不锈钢的焊接%Welding of Ultra-pure Ferrite Stainless Steel for Automotive Exhaust System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛春霞; 朱云龙

    2012-01-01

    分析了超纯铁素体不锈钢的焊接性,概括了汽车排气系统不锈钢管常用的焊接方法和焊接工艺.分析认为,超纯铁素体不锈钢焊接时的主要问题是焊接接头易产生晶间腐蚀和脆化,用超纯铁素体不锈钢制造汽车排气管,需要选择能量集中、热输入小、保护效果好的焊接方法和焊接参数.主要焊接方法有钨极氩弧焊、激光焊、高频焊和等离子弧焊.此外,组合焊接技术尤其是激光与其他热源复合加热的铁素体不锈钢管焊接研究等,是汽车排气管先进焊接方法的发展方向.%In this article, the weldability of ultra-pure ferrite stainless steel was analyzed, the welding methods and technologies which were commonly used on the stainless steel pipes for automotive exhaust system were summarized. The results indicated that the main problems which appear in welding of ultra-pure ferrite stainless steel are the intercrystalline corrosion and embrittlement in the welded joints. It should select some welding methods and welding parameters with the characteristics of energy concentration, low-heat input and good protective effect, such as argon tungsten arc welding, laser welding, high frequency welding and plasma arc welding to produce automotive exhaust system using ultra-pure ferrite stainless steel. In addition, the composite welding technologies are the developing direction of advanced welding methods used for automotive exhaust pipes, especially for the research on compound heating welding ferrite stainless steel pipes by laser and other heat sources.

  19. Performance analysis of a pneumatic to servo converted system for electrode actuation in resistance spot welding using 304L austenitic stainless steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nachimani Charde

    2016-01-01

    A high current, AC waveform controller with C-type body frame of spot welder (75 kVA), was examined for the electrode actuating system whose pneumatically driven system has been redesigned and refitted for the servo based system without any vertical spring assistance in the 50 mm movable distance. Moreover, the pressing mechanism was carefully handled during the entire pressing tasks as to ensure that no catastrophic reaction happens for the electrodes’ caps, electrodes’ holders as well as the other part of mechanical assembly. With the mechanically originated-pneumatic and also the converted-servo systems, the stainless steels are welded for both systems to characterize the improvements. While the welding processes were carried out, the electrical signals have been captured to compute the signals’ representation of entire sequences. Later, the welded samples were underwent the tensile shear test, metallurgical observation and hardness test. The analytical results show distinct changes in the force profiles which has led to profound changes in mechanical properties of welded specimens.

  20. Estimation of Fatigue Life of Laser Welded AISI304 Stainless Steel T-Joint Based on Experiments and Recommendations in Design Codes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lambertsen, Søren Heide; Damkilde, Lars; Kristensen, Anders Schmidt;

    2013-01-01

    In this paper the fatigue behavior of laser welded T-joints of stainless steel AISI304 is investigated experimentally. In the fatigue experiments 36 specimens with a sheet thickness of 1 mm are exposed to one-dimensional cyclic loading. Three different types of specimens are adopted. Three groups....... The non-welded specimens are used to study the influence of heat and surface effects on the fatigue life. The fatigue life from the experiments is compared to fatigue life calculated from the guidelines in the standards DNV-RP-C203 and EUROCODE 3 EN-1993-1-9. Insignificant differences in fatigue life...... of the welded and non-welded specimens are observed in the experiments and the largest difference is found in the High Cycle Fatigue (HCF) area. The specimens show a lower fatigue life compared to DNV-RP-C203 and EUROCODE 3 EN-1993-1-9 when the spe-cimens are exposed to less than 4.0 1E06 cycles. Therefore, we...

  1. Effects of annealing time on the recovery of Charpy V-notch properties of irradiated high-copper weld metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iskander, S.K.; Sokolov, M.A.; Nanstad, R.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.

    1994-12-31

    One of the options to mitigate the effects of irradiation on reactor pressure vessels is to thermally anneal them to restore the toughness properties that have been degraded by neutron irradiation. An important issue to be resolved is the effect on the toughness properties of reirradiating a vessel that has been annealed. This paper describes the annealing response of irradiated high-copper submerged-arc weld HSSI 73W. For this study, the weld has been annealed at 454 C (850 F) for lengths of time varying between 1 and 14 days. The Charpy V-notch 41-J (30-ft-lb) transition temperature (TT{sub 41J}) almost fully recovered for the longest period studied, but recovered to a lesser degree for the shorter periods. No significant recovery of the TT{sub 41J} was observed for a 7-day anneal at 343 C (650 F). At 454 C for the durations studied, the values of the upper-shelf impact energy of irradiated and annealed weld metal exceeded the values in the unirradiated condition. Similar behavior was observed after aging the unirradiated weld metal at 460 and 490 C for 1 week.

  2. Susceptibility to intergranular corrosion of welded joints of Super 13Cr stainless steels; Suscetibilidade a corrosao intergranular de juntas soldadas de acos inoxidaveis Super 13Cr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rovere, C.A.D.; Ribeiro, C.R.; Kuri, S.E. [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCar), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia de Materiais], e-mail: dellarovere@superig.com.br

    2006-07-01

    The susceptibility to intergranular corrosion was evaluated in distinct regions of radial friction welded joints of super 13 Cr martensitic stainless steel, using the electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation test in the double loop version (DL-EPR). The thermal cycle and the plastic deformation associated to radial friction process alter significantly the microstructure of heat affected zone and thermo-mechanically affected zone, fact that causes a low value in the I{sub r}/I{sub a} ratio of these regions in comparison to the quenching and tempering condition of the base metal. (author)

  3. Optimization of process parameters of the activated tungsten inert gas welding for aspect ratio of UNS S32205 duplex stainless steel welds

    OpenAIRE

    G. Magudeeswaran; Sreehari R. Nair; Sundar, L.; N. Harikannan

    2014-01-01

    The activated TIG (ATIG) welding process mainly focuses on increasing the depth of penetration and the reduction in the width of weld bead has not been paid much attention. The shape of a weld in terms of its width-to-depth ratio known as aspect ratio has a marked influence on its solidification cracking tendency. The major influencing ATIG welding parameters, such as electrode gap, travel speed, current and voltage, that aid in controlling the aspect ratio of DSS joints, must be optimized to...

  4. Optimization of the pulsed current gas tungsten arc welding (PCGTAW) parameters for corrosion resistance of super duplex stainless steel (UNS S32760) welds using the Taguchi method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yousefieh, M., E-mail: m.yousefieh@ma.iut.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shamanian, M., E-mail: shamanian@cc.iut.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Saatchi, A. [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-01-21

    Research highlights: > Among the four factors and three levels tested, it was concluded that the pulse current had the most significant effect on the pitting potential and the background current had the next most significant effect. The effects of pulse frequency and % on time are less important when compared to the other factors. > The percentage contributions of the pulse current, the background current, % on time, and pulse frequency to the corrosion resistance are 66.28%, 25.97%, 2.71% and 5.04%, respectively. > The optimum conditions within the selected parameter values were found as the second level of pulse current (120 A), second level of background current (60 A), third level of % on time (80%) and third level of pulse frequency (5 Hz). > The confirmation test was carried out at optimum working conditions. Pitting potential was increased to 1.06 V{sub SCE} by setting the control factors. Predicted (1.04 V{sub SCE}) and observed (1.06 V{sub SCE}) pitting potential values are close to each other, which are the highest values obtained in the present study. - Abstract: In the present work, a design of experiment (DOE) technique, the Taguchi method, has been used to optimize the pulsed current gas tungsten arc welding (PCGTAW) parameters for the corrosion resistance of super duplex stainless steel (UNS S32760) welds. A L{sub 9} (3{sup 4}) orthogonal array (OA) of Taguchi design which involves nine experiments for four parameters (pulse current, background current, % on time, pulse frequency) with three levels was used. Corrosion resistance in 3.5%NaCl solution was evaluated by anodic polarization tests at room temperature. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) is performed on the measured data and S/N (signal to noise) ratios. The higher the better response category was selected to obtain optimum conditions. The optimum conditions providing the highest pitting potential were estimated. The optimum conditions were found as the second level of pulse current (120 A

  5. Irradiation performance of 9--12 Cr ferritic/martensitic stainless steels and their potential for in-core application in LWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, R.H.; Gelles, D.S.

    1993-08-01

    Ferritic-martensitic stainless steels exhibit radiation stability and stress corrosion resistance that make them attractive replacement materials for austenitic stainless steels for in-core applications. Recent radiation studies have demonstrated that 9% Cr ferritic/martensitic stainless steel had less than a 30C shift in ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) following irradiation at 365C to a dose of 14 dpa. These steels also exhibit very low swelling rates, a result of the microstructural stability of these alloys during radiation. The 9 to 12% Cr alloys to also exhibit excellent corrosion and stress corrosion resistance in out-of-core applications. Demonstration of the applicability of ferritic/martensitic stainless steels for in-core LWR application will require verification of the irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking behavior, measurement of DBTT following irradiation at 288C, and corrosion rates measurements for in-core water chemistry.

  6. Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Earl; And Others

    The curriculum guide for welding instruction contains 16 units presented in six sections. Each unit is divided into the following areas, each of which is color coded: terminal objectives, specific objectives, suggested activities, and instructional materials; information sheet; transparency masters; assignment sheet; test; and test answers. The…

  7. Weld repair of helium degraded reactor vessel material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanne, W.R. Jr.; Lohmeier, D.A.; Louthan, M.R. Jr.; Rankin, D.T.; Franco-Ferreira, E.A. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)); Bruck, G.J.; Madeyski, A.; Shogan, R.P.; Lessmann, G.G. (Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Science and Technology Center)

    1990-01-01

    Welding methods for modification or repair of irradiated nuclear reactor vessels are being evaluated at the Savannah River Site. A low-penetration weld overlay technique has been developed to minimize the adverse effects of irradiation induced helium on the weldability of metals and alloys. This technique was successfully applied to Type 304 stainless steel test plates that contained 3 to 220 appm helium from tritium decay. Conventional welding practices caused significant cracking and degradation in the test plates. Optical microscopy of weld surfaces and cross sections showed that large surface toe cracks formed around conventional welds in the test plates but did not form around overlay welds. Scattered incipient underbead cracks (grain boundary separations) were associated with both conventional and overlay test welds. Tensile and bend tests were used to assess the effect of base metal helium content on the mechanical integrity of the low-penetration overlay welds. The axis of tensile specimens was perpendicular to the weld-base metal interface. Tensile specimens were machined after studs were resistance welded to overlay surfaces.

  8. Weld repair of helium degraded reactor vessel material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanne, W.R. Jr.; Lohmeier, D.A.; Louthan, M.R. Jr.; Rankin, D.T.; Franco-Ferreira, E.A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Bruck, G.J.; Madeyski, A.; Shogan, R.P.; Lessmann, G.G. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Science and Technology Center

    1990-12-31

    Welding methods for modification or repair of irradiated nuclear reactor vessels are being evaluated at the Savannah River Site. A low-penetration weld overlay technique has been developed to minimize the adverse effects of irradiation induced helium on the weldability of metals and alloys. This technique was successfully applied to Type 304 stainless steel test plates that contained 3 to 220 appm helium from tritium decay. Conventional welding practices caused significant cracking and degradation in the test plates. Optical microscopy of weld surfaces and cross sections showed that large surface toe cracks formed around conventional welds in the test plates but did not form around overlay welds. Scattered incipient underbead cracks (grain boundary separations) were associated with both conventional and overlay test welds. Tensile and bend tests were used to assess the effect of base metal helium content on the mechanical integrity of the low-penetration overlay welds. The axis of tensile specimens was perpendicular to the weld-base metal interface. Tensile specimens were machined after studs were resistance welded to overlay surfaces.

  9. Study of Compatibility of Stainless Steel Weld Joints with Liquid Sodium-Potassium Coolants for Fission Surface Power Reactors for Lunar and Space Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossbeck, Martin [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Qualls, Louis [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-07-31

    To make a manned mission to the surface of the moon or to Mars with any significant residence time, the power requirements will make a nuclear reactor the most feasible source of energy. To prepare for such a mission, NASA has teamed with the DOE to develop Fission Surface Power technology with the goal of developing viable options. The Fission Surface Power System (FSPS) recommended as the initial baseline design includes a liquid metal reactor and primary coolant system that transfers heat to two intermediate liquid metal heat transfer loops. Each intermediate loop transfers heat to two Stirling heat exchangers that each power two Stirling converters. Both the primary and the intermediate loops will use sodium-potassium (NaK) as the liquid metal coolant, and the primary loop will operate at temperatures exceeding 600°C. The alloy selected for the heat exchangers and piping is AISI Type 316L stainless steel. The extensive experience with NaK in breeder reactor programs and with earlier space reactors for unmanned missions lends considerable confidence in using NaK as a coolant in contact with stainless steel alloys. However, the microstructure, chemical segregation, and stress state of a weld leads to the potential for corrosion and cracking. Such failures have been experienced in NaK systems that have operated for times less than the eight year goal for the FSPS. For this reason, it was necessary to evaluate candidate weld techniques and expose welds to high-temperature, flowing NaK in a closed, closely controlled system. The goal of this project was to determine the optimum weld configuration for a NaK system that will withstand service for eight years under FSPS conditions. Since the most difficult weld to make and to evaluate is the tube to tube sheet weld in the intermediate heat exchangers, it was the focus of this research. A pumped loop of flowing NaK was fabricated for exposure of candidate weld specimens at temperatures of 600°C, the expected

  10. Parameters optimization of hybrid fiber laser-arc butt welding on 316L stainless steel using Kriging model and GA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhongmei; Shao, Xinyu; Jiang, Ping; Cao, Longchao; Zhou, Qi; Yue, Chen; Liu, Yang; Wang, Chunming

    2016-09-01

    It is of great significance to select appropriate welding process parameters for obtaining optimal weld geometry in hybrid laser-arc welding. An integrated optimization approach by combining Kriging model and GA is proposed to optimize process parameters. A four-factor, five-level experiment using Taguchi L25 is conducted considering laser power (P), welding current (A), distance between laser and arc (D) and traveling speed (V). Kriging model is adopted to approximate the relationship between process parameters and weld geometry, namely depth of penetration (DP), bead width (BW) and bead reinforcement (BR). The constructed Kriging model was used for parameters optimization by GA to maximize DP, minimize BW and ensure BR at a desired value. The effects of process parameters on weld geometry are analyzed. Microstructure and micro-hardness are also discussed. Verification experiments demonstrate that the obtained optimum values are in good agreement with experimental results.

  11. Laser welding method for removal of instruments debris from root canals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagiwara, Ryoichi; Suehara, Masataka; Fujii, Rie; Kato, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Kan-ichi; Oda, Yutaka

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the viability of a novel method for removing debris from broken instruments from root canals using a laser apparatus. Laser welding was performed on stainless steel or nickel titanium files using an Nd:YAG laser. Retention force between the files and extractors was measured. Increase in temperature on the root surface during laser irradiation was recorded and the irradiated areas evaluated with a scanning electron microscope. Retention force on stainless steel was significantly greater than that on nickel titanium. The maximum temperature increase was 4.1°C. The temperature increase on the root surface was greater in the vicinity of the welded area than that at the apical area. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the files and extractors were welded together. These results indicate that the laser welding method is effective in removing debris from broken instruments from root canals.

  12. Ultrasonic Phased Array Testing of Austenitic Stainless Steel Welds%奥氏体不锈钢焊缝的相控阵超声检测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡栋; 王强; 肖琨; 刘富君

    2013-01-01

    The ultrasonic testing(UT) of austenitic stainless steel welds defects is always difficult because its coarse-grained material and anisotropic structure which lead to aberration and scattering of the ultrasonic waves. In this paper, ultrasonic testing properties of austenitic welds were analyzed. Ultrasonic test and ultrasonic phased array test were performed in an austenitic stainless steel welds test block. The results reveal that 14 dB signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is obtained by ultrasonic phased array test while by ultrasonic test only 6 dB SNR is obtained to the defects in 10 mm depth. But both of these two tests cannot detect the defects in 30 mm depth.%由于奥氏体不锈钢焊缝晶粒组织粗大以及结构的各向异性导致超声声束的散射和畸变,其超声检测比较困难.本文分析了奥氏体不锈钢焊缝超声检测特性,在奥氏体不锈钢焊缝试块上进行了常规超声和相控阵超声检测试验.研究结果表明:对于10 mm深焊缝缺陷,相控阵超声检测信噪比可达14 dB,而常规超声技术仅获得6 dB的信噪比,对于30 mm深内部缺陷,均未取得较好的效果.

  13. The formation of radiation-induced segregation at twin bands in ion-irradiated austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Hyung-Ha; Lee, Gyeong-Geun; Kwon, Junhyun; Hwang, Seong Sik [Nuclear Materials Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Chansun, E-mail: c.shin@mju.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Myongji University, 116 Myongji-ro, Cheoin-gu, Youngin, Gyeonggi-do 449-728 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    Radiation-induced segregation (RIS) at twins was investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for ion-irradiated austenitic stainless steel. Significant RIS was found to occur at twin boundaries. TEM analysis indicates that interfacial dislocations at partially coherent twin boundaries are potential sites for strong RIS phenomenon. The RIS causes the formation of thin bands having a higher Ni and lower Cr concentration in twin bands with a width less than 15 nm. In wider twin bands, strong RIS occurs only at the outer twin boundaries, but not inside the band. The possible mechanism for the formation of the RIS thin band is discussed.

  14. Structural Stability Analysis of Weld Stainless Steel Subway Car Body%不锈钢点焊地铁车车体结构稳定性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘婷婷; 刘海涛; 陈秉智

    2013-01-01

    以不锈钢点焊地铁车为载体,应用HYPERMESH软件和有限元分析软件ANSYS进行有限元建模和稳定性计算,得到不锈钢点焊车发生屈曲的部位以及屈曲因子λ.发现该车局部结构失稳现象严重,不能满足设计要求,并提出改进意见,为不锈钢点焊车的在生产和研发提供必要的理论依据.%Using weld stainless steel subway cars as a carrier, the softwares of Hypermesh and Ansys are em-ployed to construct the model and simulate its stability, and the bulking part and factor A of the weld car are obtained. It is found that the instability of local structural is serious, which cannot meet the design require-ments. Thus the improvement opinion is proposed, which can provide the necessary theoretical basis for the re-search and development of the weld cars.

  15. Optimization of process parameters of the activated tungsten inert gas welding for aspect ratio of UNS S32205 duplex stainless steel welds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Magudeeswaran

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The activated TIG (ATIG welding process mainly focuses on increasing the depth of penetration and the reduction in the width of weld bead has not been paid much attention. The shape of a weld in terms of its width-to-depth ratio known as aspect ratio has a marked influence on its solidification cracking tendency. The major influencing ATIG welding parameters, such as electrode gap, travel speed, current and voltage, that aid in controlling the aspect ratio of DSS joints, must be optimized to obtain desirable aspect ratio for DSS joints. Hence in this study, the above parameters of ATIG welding for aspect ratio of ASTM/UNS S32205 DSS welds are optimized by using Taguchi orthogonal array (OA experimental design and other statistical tools such as Analysis of Variance (ANOVA and Pooled ANOVA techniques. The optimum process parameters are found to be 1 mm electrode gap, 130 mm/min travel speed, 140 A current and 12 V voltage. The aspect ratio and the ferrite content for the DSS joints fabricated using the optimized ATIG parameters are found to be well within the acceptable range and there is no macroscopically evident solidification cracking.

  16. Optimization of process parameters of the activated tungsten inert gas welding for aspect ratio of UNS S32205 duplex stainless steel welds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G. MAGUDEESWARAN; Sreehari R. NAIR; L. SUNDAR; N. HARIKANNAN

    2014-01-01

    The activated TIG (ATIG) welding process mainly focuses on increasing the depth of penetration and the reduction in the width of weld bead has not been paid much attention. The shape of a weld in terms of its width-to-depth ratio known as aspect ratio has a marked influence on its solidification cracking tendency. The major influencing ATIG welding parameters, such as electrode gap, travel speed, current and voltage, that aid in controlling the aspect ratio of DSS joints, must be optimized to obtain desirable aspect ratio for DSS joints. Hence in this study, the above parameters of ATIG welding for aspect ratio of ASTM/UNS S32205 DSS welds are optimized by using Taguchi orthogonal array (OA) experimental design and other statistical tools such as Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and Pooled ANOVA techniques. The optimum process parameters are found to be 1 mm electrode gap, 130 mm/min travel speed, 140 A current and 12 V voltage. The aspect ratio and the ferrite content for the DSS joints fabricated using the optimized ATIG parameters are found to be well within the acceptable range and there is no macroscopically evident solidification cracking.

  17. Effects of helium pre-implantation on the microstructure and mechanical properties of irradiated 316 stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toloczko, M.B.; Tedeski, G.R.; Lucas, G.E.; Odette, G.R. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering; Stoller, R.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hamilton, M.L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-11-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) specimens of a First Core heat of 316 stainless steel, in both the solution annealed and 20% cold worked condition, were irradiated to 46 dpa at 420 C, to 49 dpa at 520 C, and to 34 dpa at 600 C in FFTF/MOTA. Prior to irradiation, about half of the specimens were pre-implanted with approximately 100 appm of helium, and of these, several of the solution annealed and pre-implanted specimens were aged at 800 C for 2 hr. Post-irradiation density measurements showed little difference in density between the unimplanted alloys and their helium implanted counterparts. Microstructural observations on specimens irradiated at 420 C and 520 C showed relatively minor differences in defect distributions between the unimplanted and the helium implanted materials; in all cases the defect sizes and number densities were consistent with data in the literature. Where possible, irradiation hardening of the alloys was experimentally evaluated by microhardness and shear punch; experimentally obtained values were compared to values calculated using a computer model based on barrier hardening and the microstructural data. All methods indicated relatively small effects of helium implantation, and both measured and calculated values were in agreement with the range of values reported in the literature.

  18. Microstructure and Property Relationships in Resistance Spot Weld between 7114 Interstitial Free Steel and 304 Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ahmet Hasanba(s)o(g)lu; Ramazan Ka(c)ar

    2006-01-01

    Due to the differences in physical, chemical and mechanical properties of the base metals, the resistance spot welding of dissimilar materials is generally more challenging than that of similar materials. The influence of the primary welding parameters affecting the heat input such as peak current on the morphology, microhardness,and tensile shear load bearing capacity of dissimilar welds between 304 grades austenitic and 7114 grade interstitial free steel has been investigated in this study. The optimum welding parameters producing maximum joint strength were established at a peak current of 9 kA, where the electrode force is kept 6×10-5 Pa and weld time is kept constant 17 cycles, respectively. The primary cause of weakening the weldment is identified as the excessive grain growing region of heat affected zone (HAZ) in case of 7114 grade interstitial free steel.

  19. Post-irradiation annealing of Ni–Mn–Si-enriched clusters in a neutron-irradiated RPV steel weld using Atom Probe Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Styman, P.D., E-mail: paul.styman@materials.ox.ac.uk [National Nuclear Laboratory, 168 Harwell Business Centre, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QT (United Kingdom); Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Hyde, J.M. [National Nuclear Laboratory, 168 Harwell Business Centre, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QT (United Kingdom); Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); School of Materials, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Parfitt, D.; Wilford, K. [Rolls-Royce, PO BOX 2000, Raynesway, Derby DE21 7XX (United Kingdom); Burke, M.G. [School of Materials, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); English, C.A. [National Nuclear Laboratory, 168 Harwell Business Centre, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QT (United Kingdom); Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); School of Materials, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Efsing, P. [Vattenfall Ringhals AB, Väröbacka (Sweden)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Characterisation of high Ni neutron irradiated RPV surveillance samples at high fluence. • Post-irradiation annealing performed to give insight into the formation mechanisms of Ni–Mn–Si precipitates. • Dissolution of Ni–Mn–Si clusters appears to be lead by the removal of Mn. - Abstract: Atom Probe Tomography has been performed on as-irradiated and post-irradiation annealed surveillance weld samples from Ringhals Unit 3. The weld contains low Cu (0.07 at.%) and high Ni (1.5 at.%). A high number density (∼4 × 10{sup 23} m{sup −3}) of Ni–Mn–Si-enriched clusters was observed in the as-irradiated material. The onset of recovery was observed during the annealing for 30 min at 450 °C. Much more significant dissolution of clusters occurred during the 10 min 500 °C anneal, resulting in a reduction in mean cluster size and a halving of their volume fraction. Detailed analyses of the changes in microstructure demonstrate that the dissolution process is driven by migration of Mn atoms from the clusters. This may indicate a strong correlation between Mn and point defects. Dissolution of the clusters is shown to correlate with recovery of mechanical properties in this material.

  20. Simulation of Friction Stir Processing in 304L Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miles M.P.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A major dilemma facing the nuclear industry is repair or replacement of stainless steel reactor components that have been exposed to neutron irradiation. When conventional fusion welding is used for weld repair, the high temperatures and thermal stresses inherent in the process enhance the growth of helium bubbles, causing intergranular cracking in the heat-affected zone (HAZ. Friction stir processing (FSP has potential as a weld repair technique for irradiated stainless steel, because it operates at much lower temperatures than fusion welding, and is therefore less likely to cause cracking in the HAZ. Numerical simulation of the FSP process in 304L stainless steel was performed using an Eulerian finite element approach. Model input required flow stresses for the large range of strain rates and temperatures inherent in the FSP process. Temperature predictions in three locations adjacent to the stir zone were accurate to within 4% of experimentally measure values. Prediction of recrystallized grain size at a location about 6mm behind the tool center was less accurate, because the empirical model employed for the prediction did not account for grain growth that occurred after deformation in the experiment was halted.

  1. Laser welding in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaukler, W. F.; Workman, G. L.

    1991-01-01

    Autogenous welds in 304 stainless steel were performed by Nd-YAG laser heating in a simulated space environment. Simulation consists of welding on the NASA KC-135 aircraft to produce the microgravity and by containing the specimen in a vacuum chamber. Experimental results show that the microgravity welds are stronger, harder in the fusion zone, have deeper penetration and have a rougher surface rippling of the weld pool than one-g welds. To perform laser welding in space, a solar-pumped laser concept that significantly increases the laser conversion efficiency and makes welding viable despite the limited power availability of spacecraft is proposed.

  2. Effects of thermal aging on fracture toughness and Charpy-impact strength of stainless steel pipe welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavenda, D.J.; Michaud, W.F.; Galvin, T.M.; Burke, W.F.; Chopra, O.K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1996-05-01

    Degradation of fracture toughness, tensile, and Charpy-impact properties of Type 304 and 304/308 SS pipe welds due to thermal aging was studied at room temperature and 290 C. Thermal aging of SS welds results in moderate decreases in charpy-impact strength and fracture toughness. Upper-shelf energy decreased by 50-80 J/cm{sup 2}. Decrease in fracture toughness J-R curve or J{sub IC} is relatively small. Thermal aging had no or little effect on tensile strength of the welds. Fracture properties of SS welds are controlled by the distribution and morphology of second-phase particles. Failure occurs by formation and growth of microvoids near hard inclusions; such processes are relatively insensitive to thermal aging. The ferrite phase has little or no effect on fracture properties of the welds. Differences in fracture resistance of the welds arise from differences in the density and size of inclusions. Mechanical-property data from the present study are consistent with results from other investigations. The existing data have been used to establish minimum expected fracture properties for SS welds.

  3. Effect of Weld Process on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Welded Joint of SUS444 Ferritic Stainless Steel%焊接工艺对SUS444铁素体不锈钢焊接接头组织和力学性能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王飞翔

    2013-01-01

    Three kinds of weld processes were designed to weld SUS444 ferritic stainless steel, and the microstructure and mechanical properties of welded joints were investigated by metallographic observation, bend, tensile and impact test The results show that the good welded joints with both bending and tensile capacities can be obtained after welding by three kinds of processes; the width of heat affected zone (HAZ) and grain size is smallest, and the room temperature impact toughness is highest, which show dimple fracture, when the welding line energy of both passes welding is less than l0kJ/cm: the filling austenitic stainless steel welding wire can make sure that the weld seam has enough impact toughness, while without filling welding wire, the impact energy of the weld seam is only 10J, appearing brittle fracture morphology.%设计了三种焊接工艺焊接SUS444铁素体不锈钢,通过金相、弯曲、拉伸和冲击等方法研究了其焊接接头的微观组织和力学性能.结果表明:三种焊接工艺都能得到抗弯性能和抗拉性能较好的焊接接头,采用线能量小于10k.J/cm两道次焊接的热影响区最窄,晶粒尺寸最小,常温冲击功最高,冲击断口为韧窝断口;填充奥氏体不锈钢焊丝可以保证焊缝具有足够的韧性,不填焊丝焊缝冲击功只有10J,呈现脆性断裂形貌.

  4. Microstructural characterization and model of hardening for the irradiated austenitic stainless steels of the internals of pressurized water reactors; Caracterisation microstructurale et modelisation du durcissement des aciers austenitiques irradies des structures internes des reacteurs a eau pressurisee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokor, C

    2003-07-01

    The core internals of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) are composed of SA 304 stainless steel plates and CW 316 stainless steel bolts. These internals undergo a neutron flux at a temperature between 280 deg C and 380 deg C which modifies their mechanical properties. These modifications are due to the changes in the microstructure of these materials under irradiation which depend on flux, dose and irradiation temperature. We have studied, by Transmission Electron Microscopy, the microstructure of stainless steels SA 304, CW 316 and CW 316Ti irradiated in a mixed flux reactor (OSIRIS at 330 deg C between 0,8 dpa et 3,4 dpa) and in a fast breeder reactor at 330 deg C (BOR-60) up to doses of 40 dpa. Moreover, samples have been irradiated at 375 deg C in a fast breeder reactor (EBR-II) up to doses of 10 dpa. The microstructure of the irradiated stainless steels consists in faulted Frank dislocation loops in the [111] planes of austenitic, with a Burgers vector of [111]. It is possible to find some voids in the solution annealed samples irradiated at 375 deg C. The evolution of the dislocations loops and voids has been simulated with a 'cluster dynamic' model. The fit of the model parameters has allowed us to have a quantitative description of our experimental results. This description of the microstructure after irradiation was coupled together with a hardening model by Frank loops that has permitted us to make a quantitative description of the hardening of SA 304, CW 316 and CW 316Ti stainless steels after irradiation at a certain dose, flux and temperature. The irradiation doses studied grow up to 90 dpa, dose of the end of life of PWR internals. (author)

  5. Welding of silver nanowire networks via flash white light and UV-C irradiation for highly conductive and reliable transparent electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Wan-Ho; Kim, Sang-Ho; Kim, Hak-Sung

    2016-08-01

    In this work, silver nanowire inks with hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) binders were coated on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates and welded via flash white light and ultraviolet C (UV-C) irradiation to produce highly conductive transparent electrodes. The coated silver nanowire films were firmly welded and embedded into PET substrate successfully at room temperature and under ambient conditions using an in-house flash white light welding system and UV-C irradiation. The effects of light irradiation conditions (light energy, irradiation time, pulse duration, and pulse number) on the silver nanowire networks were studied and optimized. Bending fatigue tests were also conducted to characterize the reliability of the welded transparent conductive silver nanowire films. The surfaces of the welded silver nanowire films were analyzed via scanning electron microscopy (SEM), while the transmittance of the structures was measured using a spectrophotometer. From the results, a highly conductive and transparent silver nanowire film with excellent reliability could be achieved at room temperature under ambient conditions via the combined flash white light and UV-C irradiation welding process.

  6. Comparative study of pulsed Nd:YAG laser welding of AISI 304 and AISI 316 stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Nikhil; Mukherjee, Manidipto; Bandyopadhyay, Asish

    2017-02-01

    Laser welding is a potentially useful technique for joining two pieces of similar or dissimilar materials with high precision. In the present work, comparative studies on laser welding of similar metal of AISI 304SS and AISI 316SS have been conducted forming butt joints. A robotic control 600 W pulsed Nd:YAG laser source has been used for welding purpose. The effects of laser power, scanning speed and pulse width on the ultimate tensile strength and weld width have been investigated using the empirical models developed by RSM. The results of ANOVA indicate that the developed models predict the responses adequately within the limits of input parameters. 3-D response surface and contour plots have been developed to find out the combined effects of input parameters on responses. Furthermore, microstructural analysis as well as hardness and tensile behavior of the selected weld of 304SS and 316SS have been carried out to understand the metallurgical and mechanical behavior of the weld. The selection criteria are based on the maximum and minimum strength achieved by the respective weld. It has been observed that the current pulsation, base metal composition and variation in heat input have significant influence on controlling the microstructural constituents (i.e. phase fraction, grain size etc.). The result suggests that the low energy input pulsation generally produce fine grain structure and improved mechanical properties than the high energy input pulsation irrespective of base material composition. However, among the base materials, 304SS depict better microstructural and mechanical properties than the 316SS for a given parametric condition. Finally, desirability function analysis has been applied for multi-objective optimization for maximization of ultimate tensile strength and minimization of weld width simultaneously. Confirmatory tests have been conducted at optimum parametric conditions to validate the optimization techniques.

  7. Influence of temperature histories during reactor startup periods on microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of austenitic stainless steel irradiated with neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasahara, Shigeki; Kitsunai, Yuji; Chimi, Yasuhiro; Chatani, Kazuhiro; Koshiishi, Masato; Nishiyama, Yutaka

    2016-11-01

    This paper addresses influence of two different temperature profiles during startup periods in the Japan Materials Testing Reactor and a boiling water reactor upon microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of austenitic stainless steel irradiated with neutrons to about 1 dpa and 3 dpa. One of the temperature profiles was that the specimens experienced neutron irradiation in both reactors, under which the irradiation temperature transiently increased to 290 °C from room temperature with increasing reactor power during reactor startup periods. Another was that the specimens were pre-heated to about 150 °C prior to the irradiation to suppress the transient temperature increase. Tensile tests at 290 °C and Vickers hardness tests at room temperature were carried out, and their microstructures were observed by FEG-TEM. Difference of the temperature profiles was observed obviously in interstitial cluster formation, in particular, growth of Frank loops. Although influence of neutron irradiation involving transient temperature increase to 290 °C from room temperature on the yield strength and the Vickers hardness is buried in the trend curves of existing data, the influence was also found certainly in increment of in yield strength, existence of modest yield drop, and loss of strain hardening capacity and ductility. As a result, Frank loops, which were observed in austenitic stainless steel irradiated at doses of 1 dpa or more, seemed to have important implications regarding the interpretation of not irradiation hardening, but deformation of the austenitic stainless steel.

  8. Effect of the temperature and welding on the corrosion of austenitic stainless steel in polluted phosphoric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakour, S.; Guenbour, A.; Ben Bachir, A. [University Mohammed V-Agdal, Lab. Corrosion-Electrochimie, Faculty of Sciences, Rabat (Morocco); Garcia-Anton, J.; Blasco-Tamarit, E.; Garcia-Garcia, D.M. [Valencia Univ. Politecnica, Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear. ETSI Industriales, Valencia (Spain)

    2009-07-01

    This study enabled us to elucidate the effect of welding and the temperature, the impurities on the corrosion resistance of a super-alloy in phosphoric acid using electrochemical methods and microstructural analyses. The analysis of the electrochemical parameters, resulting from the potentio-kinetic curves realized on alloy 59 in the electrolytic medium showed that the process of welding weakens the behaviour with the materials of corrosion and that the increase in the temperature accentuates the aggressiveness of the medium. The tests carried out on the base metal, the zone affected thermically and the weld bead in polluted phosphoric medium showed that the base metal is the zone most corrosion resistant in a structure welded in the range of temperature 20-80 C, and that the rate of corrosion is very high on the level of the weld bead. The images of surfaces of the three electrodes obtained in real time simultaneously with the electrochemical data acquisition did not reveal the localised corrosion. The microstructural examination carried out by the MEB coupled by analysis EDS, showed that welding causes a variation in the microstructure of alloy 59 on the level of morphology and the composition. (authors)

  9. Evaluation of the Effect of Dynamic Sodium on the Low Cycle Fatigue Properties of 316L(N) Stainless Steel Base and Weld Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, V.; Kannan, R.; Mariappan, K.; Sukumaran, G.; Sandhya, R.; Rao, K. Bhanu Sankara

    2012-06-01

    Low cycle fatigue (LCF) tests on 316L(N) austenitic stainless steel base and weld joints were at 823 K and 873 K at a constant strain rate of 3 × 10 -3 s -1 with strain ranges varying from {±}0.4% to {±}1.0% in a servo-hydraulic fatigue test system under flowing sodium environment. The cyclic stress response exhibited a similar trend as that in air comprising of an initial rapid hardening, followed by a slight softening stage before saturation. The fatigue lives are significantly improved in sodium environment when compared to identical testing conditions in air environment. The lack of oxidation in sodium environment is attributed to the delayed crack initiation, reduced crack propagation rate and consequent increase in fatigue life. Comparison of the data evaluated in sodium with RCC-MR design code, derived on the basis of data obtained from air shows that the design based on air tests is conservative.

  10. The hardiness of numerical simulation of TIG welding. Application to stainless steel 316L structures; La robustesse de la simulation numerique du soudage TIG. Application sur des structures en acier 316L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Ahmar, Walid; Jullien, Jean-Francois [INSA-Lyon, LaMCoS, CNRS UMR 551, 20 Avenue Albert Einstein, 69621 Villeurbanne, (France); Gilles, Philippe [AREVA NP, 92084 Paris La Defense, (France); Taheri, Said [EDF, 92141 Clamart, (France); Boitout, Frederic [ESI-GROUP, 69458 Lyon, (France)

    2006-07-01

    The welding numerical simulation is considered as one of the mechanics problems the most un-linear on account of the great number of the parameters required. The analysis of the hardiness of the welding numerical simulation is a current questioning whose expectation is to specify welding numerical simulation procedures allowing to guarantee the reliability of the numerical result. In this work has been quantified the aspect 'uncertainties-sensitivity' imputable to different parameters which occur in the simulation of stainless steel 316L structures welded by the TIG process: that is to say the mechanical and thermophysical parameters, the types of modeling, the adopted behaviour laws, the modeling of the heat contribution.. (O.M.)

  11. Void denuded zone formation for Fe–15Cr–15Ni steel and PNC316 stainless steel under neutron and electron irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekio, Yoshihiro, E-mail: sekio.yoshihiro@jaea.go.jp [Oarai Research and Development Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan); Yamashita, Shinichiro [Oarai Research and Development Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan); Sakaguchi, Norihito [Center for Advanced Research of Energy Technology, Hokkaido University, Hokkaido 060-0808 (Japan); Takahashi, Heishichiro [Oarai Research and Development Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan); Center for Advanced Research of Energy Technology, Hokkaido University, Hokkaido 060-0808 (Japan)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Austenitic stainless steel developed to improve void swelling was used. • Void denuded zone formed near grain boundary can be affected by vacancy mobility. • Vacancy migration energy was estimated from void denuded zone width in the steel. - Abstract: Irradiation-induced void denuded zone (VDZ) formation near grain boundaries was studied to clarify the effects of minor alloying elements on vacancy diffusivity during irradiation in practical PNC316 stainless steel developed for nuclear reactor core materials. The test materials were Fe–15Cr–15Ni steel without additives and PNC316 stainless steel; the latter contains minor alloying elements to improve the void swelling resistance. These steels were neutron-irradiated in the experimental fast reactor JOYO at temperatures from 749 K to 775 K and fast neutron doses of 18–103 dpa, and electron irradiation was also carried out using 1 MeV high voltage electron microscopy at temperatures of 723 K and 773 K and doses up to 14.4 dpa. VDZ formation was analyzed by TEM microstructural observation after irradiation by considering radiation-induced segregation near the grain boundaries. VDZs were formed near random grain boundaries with higher misfit angles in both Fe–15Cr–15Ni and PNC316 steels. The VDZ widths in the PNC316 stainless steel were narrower than those for the Fe–15Cr–15Ni steel for all neutron and electron irradiations. The VDZ width analysis implied that the vacancy diffusivity was reduced in PNC316 stainless steel as a result of interaction of vacancies with minor alloying elements.

  12. Precipitation examination of δ, σ, and γ phases using modified Cr/Ni equivalent ratios during the multipass welding of stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Dong-Yih; Hsieh, Chih-Chun

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to discuss the precipitation tendencies of δ, σ, and γ phases using a modified Cr/Ni equivalent ratio with 309L filler after welding dissimilar steels (SUS 304L and AISI 1017) while adding various Si contents of 0.25 wt.%, 0.45 wt.%, and 0.65 wt.% and hot rolling in AISI 309LSi stainless steels at 1200 °C for 2 h. The elemental compositions of δ, σ, and γ phases were performed by EDS in as-hot-rolled AISI 309LSi as well as dissimilar welded samples, and the Creq/Nieq ratios were calculated by Hammer & Svensson's equation. In this research, the Creq/Nieq of phase and matrix were presented as [Creq/Nieq]phase and [Creq/Nieq]matrix, respectively. The modified equation ([Creq/Nieq]modified) was equal to [Creq/Nieq]phase/[Creq/Nieq]matrix, and it was used to examine the effect of materials and processes in the δ, σ, and γ phases. The results indicated the Creq/Nieq ratios of the δ, σ, and γ phases were 2.557˜1.304, over 3.143, and 1.229, respectively.

  13. Control of exposure to hexavalent chromium and ozone in gas metal arc welding of stainless steels by use of a secondary shield gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, John H; French, Michael J; Hewitt, Peter J; Mortazavi, Seyed B; Redding, Christopher A J

    2002-01-01

    Previous work has demonstrated that the shield gas composition in gas metal arc welding can have a considerable effect on hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] concentration in the fume and on ozone concentrations near the arc. Normally a single shield gas is used. This paper describes a double shroud torch that allows used of concentric shield gases of different compositions. A solid stainless steel wire was used for welding. The double shroud torch used secondary shield gases containing small amounts of the reducing agents NO and C2H4. The Cr(VI) concentration in the fume and ozone concentration at a fixed point relative to the arc were measured and compared with results when using a single shield gas. Use of the reducing agents in secondary shielding using the double shroud torch was found to offer advantages for ozone concentration reduction compared with use in a conventional torch, but this was not found to be an advantage for reducing Cr(VI) concentrations.

  14. Fatigue and corrosion fatigue behavior of 13Cr and duplex stainless steel and a welded nickel alloy employed in oil and gas production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, R.M. [Department of Metallurgy Engineering, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre (Brazil); Juca Batista, Ipanema, Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul CEP (Brazil); Mueller, I.L. [Department of Metallurgy Engineering, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre (Brazil); Aneron Correia de Oliveira, Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil)

    2009-05-15

    The materials used in off-shore oil and gas production, e.g. in risers, are often exposed to cyclic loads from the water movement because of their contact with seawater. These factors acting together can develop a corrosion fatigue (CF) process. A duplex and a 13% chromium (13Cr) wrought stainless steel (SS) and a welded nickel base alloy Inconel 625 were tested at different cyclic load magnitudes in an eccentric fatigue machine type. The specimens were tested in the presence of a corrosive environment at low loading frequencies (0.3 Hz). The medium used was an aqueous solution with 115.000 ppm of chloride, pH adjusted to 4, and CO{sub 2} bubbling inside the solution during the test. The end of the test was determined in maximum 500.000 cycles (23 days for frequency of 0.3 Hz) if no fracture occurred before. In the 13Cr steel the fissure seems to propagate in a uniform unique path, while in the duplex steel the crack changes the direction when passing from the ferritic to austenitic grains. The propagation speed seems to be different in the ferrite and in the austenitic structures. Among the materials tested the Inconel 625 alloy, even being in the welded condition, showed higher CF strength than the SSs; 13Cr shows better results when compared with the duplex steel, even though the last one would be more corrosion resistant. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  15. Laser desensitization of austenitic stainless steel weld AHZ. Desensibilizacion con Laser de la zona afectada por el calor (ZAC) en aceros inoxidables austeniticos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, C.H.; Kim, K.C.; Chang, R.W. (Welding Research Center Research Institute of Industrial Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of))

    1994-01-01

    This paper addressed the fundamental understanding of sensitization phenomena in the weld HAZ of austenitic stainless steel and a method of desensitization utilizing LASER, without degradation of other corrosion resistance (pitting resistance). Sensitization in the weld HAZ was due to a formation of CR depleted zone along grain boundaries and twin boundaries by precipitation of Cr[sub 2]3C[sub 6] which contains 70-80% Cr and a small amount of Fe having a cubic-cubic relationship with the austenite matrix. Common morphologies of carbides were found to be of bar and globular shapes. As the holding time increased, carbides with coarsened globular (iodomorph) and dendrite shapes were also found. However, there was no significant variation in the composition of carbides and width of the Cr depleted zone with morphology. Laser desensitization could be obtained with a proper choice of the beam power and travel speed under a constant beam size. As long as the beam density reached a critical amount, carbides and Cr depleted zone completed zone completely disappeared. The critical travel speed increased with higher beam power, but was constant regardless of the original degree of sensitization. Pitting resistance of the LASER desensitized base metal and HAZ appeared to be far superior to that found in the sensitized condition. The protection potential in the hysteresis loop test was very sensitive to the degree of sensitization, revealing that the protection potential was dependent upon the propagation of the pits through the Cr depleted grain boundaries. (Author) 10 refs.

  16. In situ post-weld heat treatment on martensitic stainless steel turbine runners using a robotic induction heating process to control temperature distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreault, E.; Hazel, B.; Côté, J.; Godin, S.

    2014-03-01

    A new robotic heat treatment process is developed. Using this solution it is now possible to perform local heat treatment on large steel components. Crack, cavitation and erosion repairs on turbine blades and Pelton buckets are among the applications of this technique. The proof of concept is made on a 13Cr-4Ni stainless steel designated "CA6NM". This alloy is widely used in the power industry for modern system components. Given the very tight temperature tolerance (600 to 630 °C) for post-weld heat treatment on this alloy, 13Cr-4Ni stainless steel is very well suited for demonstrating the possibilities of this process. To achieve heat treatment requirements, an induction heating system is mounted on a compact manipulator named "Scompi". This robot moves a pancake coil in order to control the temperature distribution. A simulator using thermal finite element analysis is first used for path planning. A feedback loop adjusts parameters in function of environmental conditions.

  17. Experimental investigation of Ti–6Al–4V titanium alloy and 304L stainless steel friction welded with copper interlayer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Kumar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The basic principle of friction welding is intermetallic bonding at the stage of super plasticity attained with self-generating heat due to friction and finishing at upset pressure. Now the dissimilar metal joints are especially popular in defense, aerospace, automobile, bio-medical, refinery and nuclear engineerings. In friction welding, some special alloys with dual phase are not joined successfully due to poor bonding strength. The alloy surfaces after bonding also have metallurgical changes in the line of interfacing. The reported research work in this area is scanty. Although the sound weld zone of direct bonding between Ti–6Al–4V and SS304L was obtained though many trials, the joint was not successful. In this paper, the friction welding characteristics between Ti–6Al–4V and SS304L into which pure oxygen free copper (OFC was introduced as interlayer were investigated. Box–Behnken design was used to minimize the number of experiments to be performed. The weld joint was analyzed for its mechanical strength. The highest tensile strength between Ti–6Al–4V and SS304L between which pure copper was used as insert metal was acquired. Micro-structural analysis and elemental analysis were carried out by EDS, and the formation of intermetallic compound at the interface was identified by XRD analysis.

  18. Experimental investigation of Tie6Ale4V titanium alloy and 304L stainless steel friction welded with copper interlayer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R. KUMAR; M. BALASUBRAMANIAN

    2015-01-01

    The basic principle of friction welding is intermetallic bonding at the stage of super plasticity attained with self-generating heat due to friction and finishing at upset pressure. Now the dissimilar metal joints are especially popular in defense, aerospace, automobile, bio-medical, refinery and nuclear engineerings. In friction welding, some special alloys with dual phase are not joined successfully due to poor bonding strength. The alloy surfaces after bonding also have metallurgical changes in the line of interfacing. The reported research work in this area is scanty. Although the sound weld zone of direct bonding between Tie6Ale4V and SS304L was obtained though many trials, the joint was not successful. In this paper, the friction welding characteristics between Tie6Ale4V and SS304L into which pure oxygen free copper (OFC) was introduced as interlayer were investigated. BoxeBehnken design was used to minimize the number of experiments to be performed. The weld joint was analyzed for its mechanical strength. The highest tensile strength between Tie6Ale4V and SS304L between which pure copper was used as insert metal was acquired. Micro-structural analysis and elemental analysis were carried out by EDS, and the formation of intermetallic compound at the interface was identified by XRD analysis.

  19. Effects of helium content of microstructural development in Type 316 stainless steel under neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maziasz, P.J.

    1985-11-01

    This work investigated the sensitivity of microstructural evolution, particularly precipitate development, to increased helium content during thermal aging and during neutron irradiation. Helium (110 at. ppM) was cold preinjected into solution annealed (SA) DO-heat type 316 stainess steel (316) via cyclotron irradiation. These specimens were then exposed side by side with uninjected samples. Continuous helium generation was increased considerably relative to EBR-II irradiation by irradiation in HFIR. Data were obtained from quantitative analytical electron microscopy (AEM) in thin foils and on extraction replicas. 480 refs., 86 figs., 19 tabs.

  20. Cluster dynamics modeling of the effect of high dose irradiation and helium on the microstructure of austenitic stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brimbal, Daniel; Fournier, Lionel; Barbu, Alain

    2016-01-01

    A mean field cluster dynamics model has been developed in order to study the effect of high dose irradiation and helium on the microstructural evolution of metals. In this model, self-interstitial clusters, stacking-fault tetrahedra and helium-vacancy clusters are taken into account, in a configuration well adapted to austenitic stainless steels. For small helium-vacancy cluster sizes, the densities of each small cluster are calculated. However, for large sizes, only the mean number of helium atoms per cluster size is calculated. This aspect allows us to calculate the evolution of the microstructural features up to high irradiation doses in a few minutes. It is shown that the presence of stacking-fault tetrahedra notably reduces cavity sizes below 400 °C, but they have little influence on the microstructure above this temperature. The binding energies of vacancies to cavities are calculated using a new method essentially based on ab initio data. It is shown that helium has little effect on the cavity microstructure at 300 °C. However, at higher temperatures, even small helium production rates such as those typical of sodium-fast-reactors induce a notable increase in cavity density compared to an irradiation without helium.

  1. Swelling and microstructure of austenitic stainless steel ChS-68 CW after high dose neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porollo, S.I.; Konobeev, Yu.V. [State Scientific Center of Russian Federation - Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE), Obninsk, Kaluga Region (Russian Federation); Garner, F.A., E-mail: frank.garner@dslextreme.co [Radiation Effects Consulting, 2003 Howell Avenue, Richland, WA 99354 (United States)

    2009-08-15

    Austenitic stainless steel ChS-68 serving as fuel pin cladding was irradiated in the 20% cold-worked condition in the BN-600 fast reactor in the range 56-84 dpa. This steel was developed to replace EI-847 which was limited by its insufficient resistance to void swelling. Comparison of swelling between EI-847 and ChS-68 under similar irradiation conditions showed improvement of the latter steel by an extended transient regime of an additional approx10 dpa. Concurrent with swelling was the development of a variety of phases. In the temperature range 430-460 deg. S where the temperature peak of swelling was located, the principal type of phase generated during irradiation was G-phase, with volume fraction increasing linearly with dose to approx0.5% at 84 dpa. While the onset of swelling is concurrent with formation of G-phase, the action of G-phase cannot be confidently ascribed to significant removal from solution of swelling-suppressive elements such as silicon. A plausible mechanism for the higher resistance to void swelling of ChS-68 as compared with EI-847 may be related to an observed higher stability of faulted dislocation loops in ChS-68 that impedes the formation of a glissile dislocation network. The higher level of boron in ChS-68 is thought to be one contributor that might play this role.

  2. In situ TEM study of G-phase precipitates under heavy ion irradiation in CF8 cast austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Wei-Ying [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Li, Meimei; Zhang, Xuan; Kirk, Marquis A.; Baldo, Peter M. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Lian, Tiangan [Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Thermally-aged cast austenitic stainless steels (CASS) CF8 was irradiated with 1 MeV Kr ions at 300, 350 and 400 °C to 1.88 × 10{sup 19} ions/m{sup 2} (∼3 dpa) at the IVEM-Tandem Facility at the Argonne National Laboratory. Before irradiation, the distribution of G-phase precipitates in the ferrite showed spatial variations, and both their size and density were affected by the ferrite–austenite phase boundary and presence of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides. Under 300 °C irradiation, in situ TEM observation showed G-phase precipitates were relatively unchanged in the vicinity of the phase boundary M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides, while the density of G-phase precipitates increased with increasing dose within the ferrite matrix. Coarsening of G-phase precipitates was observed in the vicinity of phase boundary M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides at 350 °C and 400 °C.

  3. Mechanical and Microstructural Properties of Friction Welded AISI 304 Stainless Steel to AISI 1060 Steel AISI 1060

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ates H.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Rotary Friction welding is one of the most popular methods of joining similar and dissimilar materials. It is widely used with metals and thermoplastics in a wide variety of aviation, transport and aerospace industrial component designs. This study investigates the influence of friction and upsetting pressures on the hardness, tensile properties and microstructure of the welds. The experimental results showed that as the friction and upsetting pressures increased, the hardness and tensile strength values increased, as well. The tensile fracture of welded joint occurred in the AISI 1060 side. The friction processed joints were evaluated for their integrity and quality aspects by optical and scanning electron microscopy. For the perfect interfacial bonding, sufficient upsetting and friction pressures are necessary to reach the optimal temperature and severe plastic deformation to bring these materials within the attraction range.

  4. Weldability of Additive Manufactured Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matilainen, Ville-Pekka; Pekkarinen, Joonas; Salminen, Antti

    Part size in additive manufacturing is limited by the size of building area of AM equipment. Occasionally, larger constructions that AM machines are able to produce, are needed, and this creates demand for welding AM parts together. However there is very little information on welding of additive manufactured stainless steels. The aim of this study was to investigate the weldability aspects of AM material. In this study, comparison of the bead on plate welds between AM parts and sheet metal parts is done. Used material was 316L stainless steel, AM and sheet metal, and parts were welded with laser welding. Weld quality was evaluated visually from macroscopic images. Results show that there are certain differences in the welds in AM parts compared to the welds in sheet metal parts. Differences were found in penetration depths and in type of welding defects. Nevertheless, this study presents that laser welding is suitable process for welding AM parts.

  5. Short Communication on "Self-welding susceptibility of NiCr-B hardfaced coating with and without NiCr-B coating on 316LN stainless steel in flowing sodium at elevated temperature"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Hemant; Ramakrishnan, V.; Albert, S. K.; Bhaduri, A. K.; Ray, K. K.

    2017-02-01

    The self-welding susceptibility between NiCr-B coated 316LN stainless steel and the base metal, and that between NiCr-B hardfaced coatings has been evaluated in flowing sodium at 823 K for 90 and 135 days under contact stress of 8.0 and 11.0 MPa using a fabricated set-up. Neither any self-welding could be observed nor could any damage be detected on the specimen surfaces of the selected materials under the imposed experimental conditions, which indicate their satisfactory potential for applications in Fast Breeder Reactors.

  6. Impact of nuclear irradiation on helium bubble nucleation at interfaces in liquid metals coupled to permeation through stainless steels

    CERN Document Server

    Fradera, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    The impact of nucleating gas bubbles in the form of a dispersed gas phase on hydrogen isotope permeation at interfaces between liquid metals, like LLE, and structural materials, like stainless steel, has been studied. Liquid metal to structural material interfaces involving surfaces, may lower the nucleation barrier promoting bubble nucleation at active sites. Hence, hydrogen isotope absorption into gas bubbles modelling and control at interfaces may have a capital importance regarding design, operation and safety. He bubbles as a permeation barrier principle is analysed showing a significant impact on hydrogen isotope permeation, which may have a significant effect on liquid metal systems, e.g., tritium extraction systems. Liquid metals like LLE under nuclear irradiation in, e.g., breeding blankets of a nuclear fusion reactor would generate tritium which is to be extracted and recirculated as fuel. At the same time that tritium is bred, helium is also generated and may precipitate in the form of nano bubbles...

  7. Surface Nanocrystallization of 3Cr13 Stainless Steel Induced by High-Current Pulsed Electron Beam Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyong Han

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The nanocrystalline surface was produced on 3Cr13 martensite stainless steel surface using high-current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB technique. The structures of the nanocrystallized surface were characterized by X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy. Two nanostructures consisting of fine austenite grains (50–150 nm and very fine carbides precipitates are formed in melted surface layer after multiple bombardments via dissolution of carbides and crater eruption. It is demonstrated that the dissolution of the carbides and the formation of the supersaturated Fe (C solid solution play a determining role on the microstructure evolution. Additionally, the formation of fine austenite structure is closely related to the thermal stresses induced by the HCPEB irradiation. The effects of both high carbon content and high value of stresses increase the stability of the austenite, which leads to the complete suppression of martensitic transformation.

  8. Effect of reversion treatment on strength and ductility of low C, Cr-Ni martensitic stainless steel with high resistance to weld softening. Yosetsu nanka teiko no takai teitanso Cr-Ni maruten saito kei stainless ko no kyodo, ensei ni oyobosu gyaku hentai shori no eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igawa, T.; Takemoto, T.; Uematsu, Y. (Nisshin Steel Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan). Steel R and D Lab.); Hoshino, K. (Nisshin Steel Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1993-08-01

    Like the stainless steel and the stainless steel belt used in the rolling stock, materials treated by process and weld has a high strength and a good ductility, moreover, was expected that weld softening would not occurred. In this study, formation of the ultra-fine crystal grains based on the M to [gamma] reversion transformation of low C, Cr-Ni martensitic stainless steel and effect of Si on change of mechanical properties were investigated. A high-strength stainless steel with a good ductility and without weld softening was developed. Main results obtained are as follows: After a steel was cold-rolled, the reversion treatment at the region between As and Af temperatures (600 to 640[degree]C) was carried out, a duplex structure with diameter of the ultra-fine grains of about 0.5 micron meter that is composed of [gamma] phase concentrated Ni and sintered M phase was formatted, and excellent mechanical properties with a high strength and a good ductility could be obtained, diameter of reversion [gamma] grains was dependent on reversion temperature. Diameter of [gamma] grains became large, and more homogeneous and uniform at higher reversion temperature. 20 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Irradiation creep and stress-enhanced swelling of Fe-16Cr-15Ni-Nb austenitic stainless steel in BN-350

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorobjev, A.N.; Porollo, S.I.; Konobeev, Yu.V. [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering, Obninsk (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Irradiation creep and void swelling will be important damage processes for stainless steels when subjected to fusion neutron irradiation at elevated temperatures. The absence of an irradiation device with fusion-relevant neutron spectra requires that data on these processes be collected in surrogate devices such as fast reactors. This paper presents the response of an annealed austenitic steel when exposed to 60 dpa at 480{degrees}C and to 20 dpa at 520{degrees}C. This material was irradiated as thin-walled argon-pressurized tubes in the BN-350 reactor located in Kazakhstan. These tubes were irradiated at hoop stresses ranging from 0 to 200 MPa. After irradiation both destructive and non-destructive examination was conducted.

  10. 76 FR 67473 - Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings from Italy, Malaysia, and The Philippines; Institution of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    ...-weld pipe fittings from Italy, Malaysia, and the Philippines (71 FR 71530). The Commission is now...), and part 207, subparts A, D, E, and F (19 CFR part 207), as most recently amended at 74 FR 2847... Philippines (66 FR 11257). Following five-year reviews by Commerce and the Commission, effective December...

  11. Tensile properties of explosively formed 316L(N)-IG stainless steel with and without an electron beam weld

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hegeman, J.B.J.; Luzginova, N.V.; Jong, M.; Groeneveld, H.D.; Borsboom, A.; Stuivinga, M.E.C.; Laan, J.G. van der

    2011-01-01

    The mechanical properties of two explosively formed saddle shaped 60 mm thick plates of 316L(N)-IG steel with and without an electron beam weld have been investigated. Two different conditions have been characterized: (1) Reference condition and (2) ITER relevant condition. The reference material ex

  12. Thermal treatments effect on the austenite-ferrite equilibrium in a duplex stainless steel weld beads; Effet des traitements thermiques sur l equilibre austenite - ferrite dans un cordon de soudure en acier inoxydable duplex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belkessa, Brahim; Badji, Riad; Bettahar, Kheireddine; Maza, Halim [Division de la Metallurgie et Mecanique. Centre de Recherche Scientifique et Technique en Soudage et Controle. B.P 64, Route de Dely Ibrahim, Cheraga, Alger (Algeria)

    2006-07-01

    Heat treatments in the temperature range between 800 to 1200 C, with a keeping at high temperature of 60 min, followed by a water quenching at 20 C, have been carried out on austeno-ferritic stainless steel welds (of type SAF 2205-UNS S31803). The heat treatments carried out at temperatures below 1000 C have modified the structure of the duplex stainless steel 2205 in inducing the formation of precipitates, identified by X-ray diffraction as being the intermetallic compound {sigma} and the chromium carbides M{sub 23}C{sub 6}. The treatments applied to temperatures superior to 1000 C shift the {delta}-{gamma} equilibrium towards the {delta} phase. Indeed, the increase of the ferrite rate with the treatment temperature is approximately linear. The ferrite rates are higher in the heat-affected zone, which has been submitted to a ferritizing due to the welding thermal effects. (O.M.)

  13. 76 FR 37320 - Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipes From the Republic of Korea: Notice of Court Decision Not in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-27

    ... indexing methodology; and (4) the application of the major input rule with regard to hot-rolled stainless... average annual cost recovery test that incorporated an indexing methodology. On September 17, 2010, the... liquidation of the subject merchandise pending the expiration of the period of appeal or, if appealed,...

  14. 不锈钢焊接烟尘中 Cr(遇)的研究进展%Progress on Cr(Ⅵ) in Stainless Steel Welding Fumes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    栗卓新; 白建涛; TILLMANN Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    综述了不锈钢焊接烟尘中六价铬(Cr(遇))的影响因素、检测及控制、产生机制,指出:1)保护气体氧化性越高,焊接烟尘中 Cr(遇)占烟尘中总 Cr 质量比越高;气体保护焊(gas metal arc welding, GMAW)时,短路过渡比射流过渡烟尘中 Cr(遇)占总 Cr 的质量比高.2)焊材中的 K、Na 易同烟尘中 Cr(遇)化合物离子 CrO2-4、Cr2 O2-7形成稳定的 Na2 CrO4和 K2 CrO4,应将其限制在一定的范围内.3)固-液提取检测方法检测 Cr(遇)与固态物种检测相比具有造价低、易操作和适合定量检测的优点.%In this paper, the related influencing factors, detection, control and generation mechanism of hexavalent chromium ( Cr( Ⅵ)) in stainless steel welding fumes were reviewed and analyzed. It was found that the proportion of amount of Cr(VI) in the whole Cr in the fumes increased with the increase of oxidation of welding shielding gas. The K and Na elements in welding consumables, having tendency to cause chemical reactions with CrO2 -4 and Cr2 O2 -7 to form stable Cr(Ⅵ) compounds, should be limited to a certain range. Furthermore, the solid-liquid extraction detection method has remarkable advantages of low cost, easy operation, and suitable for the quantitative detection compared with the solid species detection method.

  15. Some pitfalls in welding of duplex stainless steels Algumas armadilhas na soldagem de aços inoxidáveis duplex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demian J. Kotecki

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Duplex stainless steels (DSS, including super duplex stainless steels {SDSS} have proven to be very useful engineering materials, albeit with somewhat different welding requirements than those of the more familiar austenitic stainless steels. Despite a generally good track record in welding of duplex stainless steels, certain pitfalls have been encountered with enough frequency that they deserve review. Inappropriate base metal specification often leads to unsuitable heat affected zone (HAZ properties. Autogenous fusion zones are also of concern. This issue centers around nitrogen limits. The most frequently encountered is applying the UNS S31803 composition for 2205 DSS, instead of the S32205 composition. Inappropriate welding heat input arises most frequently with SDSS. While 0.5 to 1.5 kJ/mm is a normal heat input recommendation for SDSS, either a root pass or many small beads towards the low end of this heat input range tends to result in precipitation and/or secondary austenite formation in weld metal subjected to repeated thermal cycles from multiple weld passes. Inappropriate PWHT occurs when the enhanced nickel filler metals (typically 9% Ni are used. DSS are not normally given PWHT, but extensive forming of heads, for example, or repair welding of castings, may require a postweld anneal. Specifications such as ASTM A790 and A890 call for annealing at 1040ºC minimum, and the fabricator tends to use temperatures close to that minimum. However, the enhanced nickel filler metals require higher temperatures to dissolve sigma phase that forms during heating to the annealing temperature.Aços inoxidáveis duplex (AID, incluindo os aços super duplex, AISD provaram ser materiais de engenharia muito úteis, embora com requerimentos de soldagem em alguma medida diferentes daqueles dos aços inoxidáveis austeníticos mais usuais. Apesar do histórico geralmente bom dos aços inoxidáveis duplex quanto a soldagem, algumas dificuldades têm sido

  16. Irradiation effects on fracture toughness of two high-copper submerged-arc welds, HSSI Series 5. Volume 1, Main report and Appendices A, B, C, and D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanstad, R.K.; Haggag, F.M.; McCabe, D.E.; Iskander, S.K.; Bowman, K.O. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Menke, B.H. [Materials Engineering Associates, Inc., Lanham, MD (United States)

    1992-10-01

    The Fifth Irradiation Series in the Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program obtained a statistically significant fracture toughness data base on two high-copper (0.23 and 0.31 wt %) submerged-arc welds to determine the shift and shape of the K{sub Ic} curve as a consequence of irradiation. Compact specimens with thicknesses to 101.6 mm (4 in) in the irradiated condition and 203.2 mm (8 in) in the unirradiated condition were tested, in addition to Charpy impact, tensile, and drop-weight specimens. Irradiations were conducted at a nominal temperature of 288{degree}C and an average fluence of 1.5 {times} 10{sup 19} neutrons/cm{sup 2} (>l MeV). The Charpy 41-J temperature shifts are about the same as the corresponding drop-weight NDT temperature shifts. The irradiated welds exhibited substantial numbers of cleavage pop-ins. Mean curve fits using two-parameter (with fixed intercept) nonlinear and linearized exponential regression analysis revealed that the fracture toughness 100 MPa{lg_bullet}{radical}m shifts exceeded the Charpy 41-J shifts for both welds. Analyses of curve shape changes indicated decreases in the slopes of the fracture toughness curves, especially for the higher copper weld. Weibull analyses were performed to investigate development of lower bound curves to the data, including the use of a variable K{sub min} parameter which affects the curve shape.

  17. Phase diffusionless γ↔α transformations and their effect on physical, mechanical and corrosion properties of austenitic stainless steels irradiated with neutrons and charged particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimkin, O. P.

    2016-04-01

    The work presents relationships of γ→α' and α'→γ-transformations in reactor 12Cr18Ni10Ti and 08Cr16Ni11Mo3 austenitic stainless steels induced by cold work, irradiation and/or temperature. Energy and mechanical parameters of nucleation and development of deformation-induced martensitic α'-phase in the non-irradiated and irradiated steels are given. The mechanisms of localized static deformation were investigated and its effect on martensitic γ→α' transformation is determined. It has been shown that irradiation of 12Cr18Ni10Ti steel with heavy Kr ions (1.56MeV/nucleon, fluence of 1·1015 cm-2) results in formation of α'-martensite in near-surface layer of the sample. Results of systematic research on reversed α'→γ-transformation in austenitic metastable stainless steels irradiated with slow (VVR-K) and fast (BN-350) neutrons are presented. The effect of annealing on strength and magnetic characteristics was determined. It was found that at the temperature of 400 °C in the irradiated with neutrons samples (59 dpa) an increase of ferromagnetic α'-phase and microhardness was observed. The obtained results could be used during assessment of operational characteristics of highly irradiated austenitic steels during transportation and storage of Fuel Assemblies for fast nuclear reactors.

  18. Field emission study from an array of hierarchical micro protrusions on stainless steel surface generated by femtosecond pulsed laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, A. K.; Suryawanshi, Sachin R.; More, M. A.; Basu, S.; Sinha, Sucharita

    2017-02-01

    This paper reports our results on femtosecond (fs) pulsed laser induced surface micro/nano structuring of stainless steel 304 (SS 304) samples and their characterization in terms of surface morphology, formed material phases on laser irradiation and field emission studies. Our investigations reveal that nearly uniform and dense array of hierarchical micro-protrusions (density: ∼5.6 × 105 protrusions/cm2) is formed upon laser treatment. Typical tip diameters of the generated protrusions are in the range of 2-5 μm and these protrusions are covered with submicron sized features. Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) analysis of the laser irradiated sample surface has shown formation mainly of iron oxides and cementite (Fe3C) phases in the treated region. These laser micro-structured samples have shown good field emission properties such as low turn on field (∼4.1 V/μm), high macroscopic field enhancement factor (1830) and stable field emission current under ultra high vacuum conditions.

  19. Q345R与SAF2507超级双相钢焊接及质量控制%Welding of Q345R and SAF2507 Duplex Stainless Steel and Quality Control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨平平

    2015-01-01

    对国内应用较少、耐蚀性强的SAF2507超级双相钢的特点进行分析,对比Q345R与SAF2507焊接性,参考异种钢焊接,利用舍弗勒图选取合适焊材。针对Q345R与SAF2507超级双相钢焊接进行试验分析并归纳其焊接工艺,提出了防止缺陷产生的焊接方法和保证焊接质量的措施。%In this article, the features of deluxe stainless steel SAF2507, which is seldom used in China and is well anticorrosive, were analyzed. With the comparison of the weldabilities of Q345R and SAF2507 and the reference for welding of heterogeneous steels, the appropriate welding consumers were selected by using Schaeffler diagram. Welding tests for Q345R and SAF2507 were carried out. After the analysis and summarization of their welding procedures, the welding method which can protect the occurrence of welding defects and measures for controlling quality were proposed.

  20. Modelling of microstructural creep damage in welded joints of 316L stainless steel; Modelisation de l'endommagement a haute temperature dans le metal d'apport des joints soudes d'acier inoxydable austenitique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouche, G

    2000-07-01

    Welded joints of 316L stainless steel under service conditions at elevated temperature are known to be preferential sites of creep damage, as compared to the base material. This damage results in the formation of cavities and the development of creep cracks which can lead to a premature failure of welded components. The complex two-phase microstructure of 316L welds was simulated by manually filling a mould with longitudinal deposited weld beads. The moulded material was then aged during 2000 hours at 600 deg. C. High resolution Scanning Electron Microscopy was largely used to examine the microstructure of the simulated material before and after ageing. Smooth and notched creep specimens were cut from the mould and tested at 600 deg. C under various stress levels. A comparison of the lifetime versus nominal stress curves for the base and welded materials shows a greater dependence of the welded material to creep phenomena. Observation and EBSD analysis show that damage is preferentially located along the austenite grain boundaries. The stress and strain fields in the notched specimens were calculated by finite element method. A correlation of this field to the observed damage was made in order to propose a predictive law relating the creep damage to the mechanical conditions applied locally. Further mechanical tests and simulation on CT specimens and mode II tubular specimens allowed validating the model under various multiaxial loading conditions. (author)

  1. 地铁不锈钢车体波纹板缝焊工艺分析%Seam Welding Process Analysis of Metro Stainless Steel Car-body Corrugated Sheet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张健涌

    2016-01-01

    基于缝焊焊接方式的原理,结合公司新购的UICS -280-13型不锈钢波纹板缝焊机系统特性,根据不锈钢车体波纹板材料、规格、制造要求等特点,分析地铁不锈钢车体波纹板的缝焊焊接工艺。%Base on the principle of seam welding,combined with the system characteristics of the UICS-280-13 seam welding equipment,according to the material,specification,and manufacture requirement of corrugated sheet,this paper analyzes the seam welding process of the metro stainless steel car-body corrugated sheet.

  2. Effect of Alternate Supply of Shielding Gases of Tungsten Inert Gas Welding on Mechanical Properties of Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinde, Neelam Vilas; Telsang, Martand Tamanacharya

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, an attempt is made to study the effect of alternate supply of the shielding gas in comparison with the conventional method of TIG welding with pure argon gas. The two sets of combination are used as 10-10 and 40-20 s for alternate supply of the Argon and Helium shielding gas respectively. The effect of alternate supply of shielding gas is studied on the mechanical properties like bend test, tensile test and impact test. The full factorial experimental design is applied for three set of combinations. The ANOVA is used to find significant parameters for the process and regression analysis used to develop the mathematical model. The result shows that the alternate supply of the shielding gas for 10-10 s provides better result for the bend, tensile and impact test as compared with the conventional argon gas and the alternate supply of 40-20 s argon and helium gas respectively. Welding speed can be increased for alternate supply of the shielding gas that can reduce the total welding cost.

  3. Effect of massive transformation on formation of acicular structure in austenitic stainless steel weld metal solidified as ferritic single phase. Report 5. Study on solidification and subsequent transformation of Cr-Ni stainless steel weld metals; Feraito tanso de gyokosuru osutenaito kei sutenresu ko yosetsu kinzoku ni okeru ashikyura jo soshiki no keisei ni oyobosu masshibu hentai no eikyo.5. Cr-Ni kei sutenresu ko yosetsu kinzoku no gyoko/hentai ni kansuru kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, H.; Koseki, T.; Okita, S.; Fuji, M. [Nippon Steel Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-05-05

    The authors clarified that massive transformation occurs at two phase region under To temperature and there is K-S relation between the massive formation phase and base phase using {gamma} stainless steel that solidifies at F mode and forms acicular structure at room temperature structure. There is a possibility of massive transformation in weld metals because the cooling rate below the high temperature To was high even for normal welding process. Thereupon, in this report, whether the massive transformation effects the formation of acicular structure or not was studied as for {gamma} stainless steel weld metal that solidifies at F mode and room temperature structure becomes acicular form of two {delta} and {gamma} phase. As a result, it was clarified that massive transformation occurs at two phase region with temperature below To, and the room temperature structure was acicular form structure irrespective to massive transformation in case of composition with small Cr/Ni ratio even in case of stainless steel that solidifies at F mode. 20 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Lung tumor production and tissue metal distribution after exposure to manual metal ARC-stainless steel welding fume in A/J and C57BL/6J mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeidler-Erdely, Patti C; Battelli, Lori A; Salmen-Muniz, Rebecca; Li, Zheng; Erdely, Aaron; Kashon, Michael L; Simeonova, Petia P; Antonini, James M

    2011-01-01

    Stainless steel welding produces fumes that contain carcinogenic metals. Therefore, welders may be at risk for the development of lung cancer, but animal data are inadequate in this regard. Our main objective was to examine lung tumor production and histopathological alterations in lung-tumor-susceptible (A/J) and -resistant C57BL/6J (B6) mice exposed to manual metal arc-stainless steel (MMA-SS) welding fume. Male mice were exposed to vehicle or MMA-SS welding fume (20 mg/kg) by pharyngeal aspiration once per month for 4 mo. At 78 wk postexposure, gross tumor counts and histopathological changes were assessed and metal analysis was done on extrapulmonary tissue (aorta, heart, kidney, and liver). At 78 wk postexposure, gross lung tumor multiplicity and incidence were unremarkable in mice exposed to MMA-SS welding fume. Histopathology revealed that only the exposed A/J mice contained minimal amounts of MMA-SS welding fume in the lung and statistically increased lymphoid infiltrates and alveolar macrophages. A significant increase in tumor multiplicity in the A/J strain was observed at 78 wk. Metal analysis of extrapulmonary tissue showed that only the MMA-SS-exposed A/J mice had elevated levels of Cr, Cu, Mn, and Zn in kidney and Cr in liver. In conclusion, this study further supports that MMA-SS welding fume does not produce a significant tumorigenic response in an animal model, but may induce a chronic lung immune response. In addition, long-term extrapulmonary tissue alterations in metals in the susceptible A/J mouse suggest that the adverse effects of this fume might be cumulative.

  5. Observations of Ferrite/Austenite Transformations in the Heat Affected Zone of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel Spot Welds Using Time Resolved X-Ray Diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, T; Elmer, J; Babu, S

    2003-10-29

    Time Resolved X-Ray Diffraction (TRXRD) measurements are made in the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel (DSS) spot welds. Both the {gamma} {yields} {delta} and {delta} {yields} {gamma} transformations are monitored as a function of time during the rapid spot weld heating and cooling cycles. These observations are then correlated with calculated thermal cycles. Where the peak temperatures are highest ({approx}1342 C), the {gamma} {yields} {delta} transformation proceeds to completion, leaving a ferritic microstructure at the end of heating. With lower peak temperatures, the {gamma} {yields} {delta} transformation proceeds to only partial completion, resulting in a microstructure containing both transformed and untransformed austenite. Further analyses of the individual diffraction patterns show shifts in the peak positions and peak widths as a function of both time and temperature. In addition, these changes in the peak characteristics are correlated with measured changes in the ferrite volume fraction. Such changes in the peak positions and widths during the {gamma} {yields} {delta} transformation provide an indication of changes occurring in each phase. These changes in peak properties can be correlated with the diffusion of nitrogen and other substitutional alloying elements, which are recognized as the primary mechanisms for this transformation. Upon cooling, the {delta} {yields} {gamma} transformation is observed to proceed from both the completely and partially transformed microstructural regions in the TRXRD data. An examination of the resulting microstructures confirms the TRXRD observation as the evidence shows that austenite both nucleates and grows from the ferritic microstructure at locations closest to the fusion zone boundary and grows from untransformed austenite grains at locations further from this boundary.

  6. Molecular desorption of stainless steel vacuum chambers irradiated with 42 MeV/u lead ions

    CERN Document Server

    Mahner, E; Laurent, Jean Michel; Madsen, N

    2003-01-01

    In preparation for the heavy ion program of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, accumulation and cooling tests with lead ion beams have been performed in the Low Energy Antiproton Ring. These tests have revealed that due to the unexpected large outgassing of the vacuum system, the dynamic pressure of the ring could not be maintained low enough to reach the required beam intensities. To determine the actions necessary to lower the dynamic pressure rise, an experimental program has been initiated for measuring the molecular desorption yields of stainless steel vacuum chambers by the impact of 4.2 MeV/u lead ions with the charge states +27 and +53. The test chambers were exposed either at grazing or at perpendicular incidence. Different surface treatments (glow discharges, nonevaporable getter coating) are reported in terms of the molecular desorption yields for H/sub 2 /, CH/sub 4/, CO, Ar, and CO/sub 2/. (16 refs).

  7. Structural Transformations in Austenitic Stainless Steel Induced by Deuterium Implantation: Irradiation at 295 K

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Morozov, Oleksandr; Zhurba, Volodymir; Neklyudov, Ivan; Mats, Oleksandr; Progolaieva, Viktoria; Boshko, Valerian

    2016-01-01

    ...—the linear region of high implantation doses (8 × 1017 to 2.7 × 1018 D/cm2). During the process of deuterium ion irradiation, the coefficient of deuterium retention in steel varies in discrete steps...

  8. Experimental tests of irradiation-anneal-reirradiation effects on mechanical properties of RPV plate and weld materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawthorne, J.R. [Materials Engineering Associates, Inc., Lanham, MD (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The Charpy-V (C{sub V}) notch ductility and tension test properties of three reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel materials were determined for the 288{degree}C (550{degree}F) irradiated (I), 288{degree}C (550{degree}F) irradiated + 454{degree}C (850{degree}F)-168 h postirradiation annealed (IA), and 288{degree}C (550{degree}F) reirradiated (IAR) conditions. Total fluences of the I condition and the IAR condition were, respectively, 3.33 {times} 10{sup 19} n/cm{sup 2} and 4.18 {times} 10{sup 19} n/cm{sup 2}, E > 1 MeV. The irradiation portion of the IAR condition represents an incremental fluence increase of 1. 05 {times} 10{sup 19} n/cm{sup 2}, E > 1 MeV, over the I-condition fluence. The materials (specimens) were supplied by the Yankee Atomic Electric Company and represented high and low nickel content plates and a high nickel, high copper content weld deposit prototypical of the Yankee-Rowe reactor vessel. The promise of the IAR method for extending the fluence tolerance of radiation-sensitive steels and welds is clearly shown by the results. The annealing treatment produced full C{sub V} upper shelf recovery and full or nearly full recovery in the C{sub V} 41 J (30 ft-lb) transition temperature. The C{sub V} transition temperature increases produced by the reirradiation exposure were 22% to 43% of the increase produced by the first cycle irradiation exposure. A somewhat greater radiation embrittlement sensitivity and a somewhat greater reirradiation embrittlement sensitivity was exhibited by the low nickel content plate than the high nickel content plate. Its high phosphorus content is believed to be responsible. The IAR-condition properties of the surface vs. interior regions of the low nickel content plate are also compared.

  9. Cavity nucleation and growth in dual beam irradiated 316L industrial austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jublot-Leclerc, S.; Li, X.; Legras, L.; Fortuna, F.; Gentils, A.

    2017-10-01

    Thin foils of 316L were simultaneously ion irradiated and He implanted in situ in a Transmission Electron Microscope at elevated temperatures. The resulting microstructure is carefully investigated in comparison with previous single ion irradiation experiments with a focus on the nucleation and growth of cavities. Helium is found to strongly enhance the nucleation of cavities in dual beam experiments. On the contrary, it does not induce more nucleation when implanted consecutively to an in situ ion irradiation but rather the growth of cavities by absorption at existing cavities, which shows the importance of synergistic effects and He injection mode on the microstructural changes. In both dual beam and single beam experiments, the characteristics of the populations of cavities, either stabilized by He or O atoms, are in qualitative agreement with the predictions of rate theory models for cavity growth. The evolutions of cavity population as a function of irradiation conditions can be reasonably well explained by the concept of relative sink strength of cavities and dislocations and the resulting partitioning of defects at sinks, or conversely recombination when either of the sinks dominates. The dislocations whose presence is a prerequisite to cavity growth in rate theory models are not observed in all studied conditions. In this case, the net influx of vacancies to cavities necessary to their growth and conversion to voids is believed to result from free surface effects, and possibly also segregation of elements close to the cavity surface. In any studied condition, the measured swelling is low, which is ascribed to the dilution of gaseous atoms among a high density of cavities as well as a high rate of point defect recombination and loss at traps. This high rate of recombination enhanced when dislocations are absent appears to result in the formation of overpressurized He bubbles.

  10. Electrochemical behaviour of gold and stainless steel under proton irradiation and active RedOx couples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leoni, E. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, DEN/DANS/DPC/SCCME, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France)], E-mail: elisa.leoni@polytechnique.edu; Corbel, C. [Laboratoire des Solides Irradies, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France)], E-mail: catherine.corbel@polytechnique.fr; Cobut, V. [Laboratoire Atomes et Molecules en Astrophysique, Universite de Cergy-Pontoise, 5 Mail Gay-Lussac, Neuville/Oise, 95031 Cergy-Pontoise Cedex (France); Simon, D. [CNRS-CERI 3a rue de la Ferollerie, 45071 Cedex 2 Orleans (France); Feron, D. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, DEN/DANS/DPC/SCCME, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France)], E-mail: Damien.FERON@cea.fr; Roy, M.; Raquet, O. [Commissariat a l' Energi