WorldWideScience

Sample records for welded wire fabric

  1. Behavior of Short Columns Reinforced with Welded Wire Fabric as Transverse Reinforcement under Concentric Loading

    OpenAIRE

    Satjapan LEELATANON; Trakool ARAMRAKS

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the behavior of concrete columns reinforced by Welded Wire Fabric, WWF, as transverse reinforcement under concentric loading and to compare the results with concrete columns reinforced by round bar as tie reinforcement when the volumetric ratio of transverse reinforcement was equal. Additionally, the effect of the spacing of transverse tie reinforcement on strength and ductility of the columns was studied by testing six different types of column sp...

  2. Dual wire weld feed proportioner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, R. E.

    1968-01-01

    Dual feed mechanism enables proportioning of two different weld feed wires during automated TIG welding to produce a weld alloy deposit of the desired composition. The wires are fed into the weld simultaneously. The relative feed rates of the wires and the wire diameters determine the weld deposit composition.

  3. Dual wire welding torch and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez, Fernando Martinez; Stump, Kevin S.; Ludewig, Howard W.; Kilty, Alan L.; Robinson, Matthew M.; Egland, Keith M.

    2009-04-28

    A welding torch includes a nozzle with a first welding wire guide configured to orient a first welding wire in a first welding wire orientation, and a second welding wire guide configured to orient a second welding wire in a second welding wire orientation that is non-coplanar and divergent with respect to the first welding wire orientation. A method of welding includes moving a welding torch with respect to a workpiece joint to be welded. During moving the welding torch, a first welding wire is fed through a first welding wire guide defining a first welding wire orientation and a second welding wire is fed through a second welding wire guide defining a second welding wire orientation that is divergent and non-coplanar with respect to the first welding wire orientation.

  4. Filler wire for aluminum alloys and method of welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorkman, Jr., Gerald W. O. (Inventor); Cho, Alex (Inventor); Russell, Carolyn K. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A weld filler wire chemistry has been developed for fusion welding 2195 aluminum-lithium. The weld filler wire chemistry is an aluminum-copper based alloy containing high additions of titanium and zirconium. The additions of titanium and zirconium reduce the crack susceptibility of aluminum alloy welds while producing good weld mechanical properties. The addition of silver further improves the weld properties of the weld filler wire. The reduced weld crack susceptibility enhances the repair weldability, including when planishing is required.

  5. 75 FR 60480 - In the Matter of Certain Bulk Welding Wire Containers and Components Thereof and Welding Wire...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-30

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Bulk Welding Wire Containers and Components Thereof and Welding Wire... importation, or the sale within the United States after importation of certain bulk welding wire containers, components thereof, and welding wire by reason of infringement of certain claims of United States Patent Nos...

  6. Laser welding of NiTi wires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gugel, H. [Institute for Materials, Materials Technology, Ruhr-University Bochum, Bochum (Germany)], E-mail: hajo.gugel@rub.de; Schuermann, A.; Theisen, W. [Institute for Materials, Materials Technology, Ruhr-University Bochum, Bochum (Germany)

    2008-05-25

    The special properties of nickel-titanium shape memory alloys are currently used in micro-engineering and medical technology. In order to integrate NiTi components into existing parts and modules, they often need to be joined to other materials. For this reason, the present contribution deals with the laser welding of thin pseudoelastic NiTi wires (100 {mu}m) with an Nd:YAG laser. Based on extensive parameter studies, faultless joints were produced. This study deals with the structural changes occurring in the fusion and heat-affected zones, the performance of the joints in static tensile tests and their functional fatigue. It can be shown that NiTi/NiTi joints reach about 75% of the ultimate tensile strength of pure NiTi wires. For welding NiTi to steel, no interlayer was used. The dissimilar NiTi/steel joints provide a bonding strength in the fusion and heat-affected zones higher than the plateau stress level. NiTi/steel joints of thin wires, as a new aspect, enable the possibility to benefit from the pseudoelastic properties of the NiTi component.

  7. Filler-wire positioner for electron beam welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaupre, W. M.; Fueg, L. B.; Phillips, J. A.

    1970-01-01

    Miniaturized positioner is installed in any electron beam vacuum chamber for use with wire feed applications requiring filler wire. Horizontal and vertical control of the positioner is maintained from a console while chamber is under vacuum. Device permits more positive positioning of welding filler wire.

  8. The impact of welding wire on the mechanical properties of welded joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Mazur

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results of the mechanical properties of Hardox 450 steel welded joints. These welded joints were made in accordance with welding procedure specifications (WPS, which was prepared and  applied in the Wielton company. Fillers were provided by welding wires with two different diameters. The welding wire was G4Sil with diameter of 1.0 mm and 1.2 mm. The aim of this study was to examine whether the thickness of the welding wire has a direct effect on the properties of welded joints. Test specimens were made in similar parameters of the welding process. Then they were subjected to macroscopic research, tensile strength, impact strength and hardness

  9. New technique of skin embedded wire double-sided laser beam welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bing; Tao, Wang; Chen, Yanbin

    2017-06-01

    In the aircraft industry, double-sided laser beam welding is an approved method for producing skin-stringer T-joints on aircraft fuselage panels. As for the welding of new generation aluminum-lithium alloys, however, this technique is limited because of high hot cracking susceptibility and strengthening elements' uneven distributions within weld. In the present study, a new technique of skin embedded wire double-sided laser beam welding (LBW) has been developed to fabricate T-joints consisting of 2.0 mm thick 2060-T8/2099-T83 aluminum-lithium alloys using eutectic alloy AA4047 filler wire. Necessary dimension parameters of the novel groove were reasonably designed for achieving crack-free welds. Comparisons were made between the new technique welded T-joint and conventional T-joint mainly on microstructure, hot crack, elements distribution features and mechanical properties within weld. Excellent crack-free microstructure, uniform distribution of silicon and superior tensile properties within weld were found in the new skin embedded wire double-sided LBW T-joints.

  10. Laser Indirect Shock Welding of Fine Wire to Metal Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao; Huang, Tao; Luo, Yapeng; Liu, Huixia

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present an advanced method for welding fine wire to metal sheet, namely laser indirect shock welding (LISW). This process uses silica gel as driver sheet to accelerate the metal sheet toward the wire to obtain metallurgical bonding. A series of experiments were implemented to validate the welding ability of Al sheet/Cu wire and Al sheet/Ag wire. It was found that the use of a driver sheet can maintain high surface quality of the metal sheet. With the increase of laser pulse energy, the bonding area of the sheet/wire increased and the welding interfaces were nearly flat. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) results show that the intermetallic phases were absent and a short element diffusion layer which would limit the formation of the intermetallic phases emerging at the welding interface. A tensile shear test was used to measure the mechanical strength of the welding joints. The influence of laser pulse energy on the tensile failure modes was investigated, and two failure modes, including interfacial failure and failure through the wire, were observed. The nanoindentation test results indicate that as the distance to the welding interface decreased, the microhardness increased due to the plastic deformation becoming more violent. PMID:28895900

  11. [The effects of different welding wires on the mechanical properties of laser welding joints].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qing-feng; Zhang, Jian-zhong; Jiang, Wei-dong; Li, Quan; Yu, Jin-xing

    2006-08-01

    To evaluate the mechanical properties and microstructure of laser-welded joints with different welding wires for clinical use of welding wire. The standard tensile test and three-point bending test rods were made from Co-Cr and Ni-Cr alloy, and were laser-welded with different welding wire (commercially welding wire and casting wire). Then the tensile rods were tested for the ultimate tensile strength (UTS), and the bending rods for the ultimate bending strength (UBS). The results was analyzed by one-way ANOVA. The tensile fracture surface were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Metallurgical analysis were also performed on polished longitudinal sectioned samples. For Co-Cr alloy, the UTS of casting wire group and commercially welding wire group was respectively (606.40+/-82.53)MPa and (693.61+/-47.68)MPa; the UBS was respectively (997.95+/-88.89)MPa and (1160.76+/-91.59)MPa. ANOVA showed a significant difference of UTS and UBS between the two groups at the 0.05 level (Pwelding wire group was respectively (558.14+/-46.75)MPa and (582.32+/-35.43)MPa; the UBS was respectively (1084.75+/-46.02)MPa and (1078.29+/-36.25)MPa. There was no significant difference between the two groups (P>0.05). SEM and metallurgical examination showed the welded zone exhibiting more cracks in the casting wire group than in the commercially welding wire group. It would be advisable to work with commercially welding wire for the joints that need better strength.

  12. Improvement of Energy and Materials Efficiencies by Introducing Multiple-Wire Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bajcer, B.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with a study and comparison between welding with several wires in different shielding atmospheres and single-wire welding. The first part treats the equipment for multiple-wire electrode welding and a comparison between single-wire welding and twin-wire welding. The second part deals with the melting rate as a basis for determining the productivity of welding processes, and the third one with the energy efficiency as a criterion of cost-effectiveness of welding. Some results obtained regarding strength of submerged arc welded joints are shown.

  13. Joining characteristics of orthodontic wires with laser welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Masahiro; Brantley, William A; Yuasa, Toshihiro; Muguruma, Takeshi; Kawashima, Isao; Mizoguchi, Itaru

    2008-01-01

    Laser welding 0.016 x 0.022 in. beta-Ti, Ni-Ti, and Co-Cr-Ni orthodontic wires was investigated by measuring joint tensile strength, measuring laser penetration depth, determining metallurgical phases using micro X-ray diffraction (micro-XRD), and examining microstructures with an scanning electron microscope (SEM). Welding was performed from 150 to 230 V. Mean tensile strength for Ni-Ti groups was significantly lower (p Ni was significantly lower than for control specimens joined by silver soldering, it was sufficient for clinical use. The beta-Ti orthodontic wire showed deeper penetration depth from laser welding than the Ni-Ti and Co-Cr-Ni orthodontic wires. Micro-XRD patterns of laser-welded beta-Ti and Ni-Ti obtained 2 mm from the boundary were similar to as-received specimens, indicating that original microstructures were maintained. When output voltages of 190 V and higher were used, most peaks from joint areas disappeared or were much weaker, perhaps because of a directional solidification effect, evidenced by SEM observation of fine striations in welded beta-Ti. Laser welding beta-Ti and Co-Cr-Ni wires may be acceptable clinically, since joints had sufficient strength and metallurgical phases in the original wires were not greatly altered.

  14. Thermite welding of Cu-Nb microcomposite wires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visniakov, Nikolaj; Mikalauskas, Gediminas; Lukauskaite, Raimonda; Cernasejus, Olegas; Rudzinskas, Vitalijus [Vilnius Gediminas Technical Univ. (Lithuania). Faculty of Mechanics; Skamat, Jelena; Boris, Renata [Vilnius Gediminas Technical Univ. (Lithuania). Inst. of Thermal Insulation

    2017-10-15

    Thermite welding of Cu-Nb microcomposite wires was investigated. Suitable compositions of thermite material and slag were determined from the equation of the exothermic combustion synthesis reaction. The phase compositions of the thermite mixture and slag determined by X-ray diffraction analysis correspond to those assessed from the equation. According to non-destructive radiographic testing, the joint structure does not have welding defects. Microstructural examination of the joint cross-section with scanning electron microscopy showed that the Cu-Nb wire retained its shape and microstructure and only a thin surface layer of wire was melted during welding. The difference in electrical resistances of the conductor and welded joint was below 20 %. The thermite joint can withstand a maximum load equal to 62.5 % of the load-bearing capacity of microcomposite conductor.

  15. Emission of dust and gases in tubular cored wire welding of steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matusiak, Jolanta; Rams, Beata

    2003-01-01

    The emission of dusts and gases, which are generated during tubular cored wire welding and which are hazardous to health and the environment, were studied. Tests included various kinds of tubular electrode wires used for welding steel, that is, rutile flux cored wires, basic flux cored wires, and metal cored wires for welding unalloyed, low-alloy, and high-alloy steels as well as self-shielded flux cored wires used for welding low-alloy steels. The research results make it possible to assess the influence of the type of wire and welding conditions on the emission volume and to compare chemical hazards generated during tubular cored wire welding with those typical for other arc welding processes.

  16. Electromagnetic characteristic of twin-wire indirect arc welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chuanwei; Zou, Yong; Zou, Zengda; Wu, Dongting

    2015-01-01

    Traditional welding methods are limited in low heat input to workpiece and high welding wire melting rate. Twin-wire indirect arc(TWIA) welding is a new welding method characterized by high melting rate and low heat input. This method uses two wires: one connected to the negative electrode and another to the positive electrode of a direct-current(DC) power source. The workpiece is an independent, non-connected unit. A three dimensional finite element model of TWIA is devised. Electric and magnetic fields are calculated and their influence upon TWIA behavior and the welding process is discussed. The results show that with a 100 A welding current, the maximum temperature reached is 17 758 K, arc voltage is 14.646 V while maximum current density was 61 A/mm2 with a maximum Lorene force of 84.5 μN. The above mentioned arc parameters near the cathode and anode regions are far higher than those in the arc column region. The Lorene force is the key reason for plasma velocity direction deviated and charged particles flowed in the channel formed by the cathode, anode and upper part of arc column regions. This led to most of the energy being supplied to the polar and upper part of arc column regions. The interaction between electric and magnetic fields is a major determinant in shaping TWIA as well as heat input on the workpiece. This is a first study of electromagnetic characteristics and their influences in the TWIA welding process, and it is significant in both a theoretical and practical sense.

  17. Arc characteristics of submerged arc welding with stainless steel wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ke; Wu, Zhi-sheng; Liu, Cui-rong; Chen, Feng-hua

    2014-08-01

    The arc characteristics of submerged arc welding (SAW) with stainless steel wire were studied by using Analysator Hannover (AH). The tests were carried out under the same preset arc voltage combined with different welding currents. By comparing the probability density distribution (PDD) curves of arc voltage and welding current, the changes were analyzed, the metal transfer mode in SAW was deduced, and the characteristics of a stable arc were summarized. The analysis results show that, with an increase of welding parameters, the short-circuiting peak in the PDD curves of arc voltage decreases gradually until it disappears, and the dominant metal transfer mode changes from flux-wall guided transfer to projected transfer and then to streaming transfer. Moreover, when the PDD curves of arc voltage are both unimodal and generally symmetrical, the greater the peak probability and the smaller the peak span, the more stable the arc becomes.

  18. Aluminum Lithium Alloy 2195 Fusion Welding Improvements with New Filler Wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, C.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this research was to assess the B218 weld filler wire for Super Lightweight External Tank production, which could improve current production welding and repair productivity. We took the following approaches: (1) Perform a repair weld quick look evaluation between 4043/B218 and B218/B218 weld filler wire combinations and evaluation tensile properties for planished and unplanished conditions; and (2) Perform repair weld evaluation on structural simulation panel using 4043-B218 and B218/B218 weld filler wire combinations and evaluation tensile and simulated service fracture properties for planished and unplanished conditions.

  19. 49 CFR 192.153 - Components fabricated by welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Components fabricated by welding. 192.153 Section....153 Components fabricated by welding. (a) Except for branch connections and assemblies of standard... welding, whose strength cannot be determined, must be established in accordance with paragraph UG-101 of...

  20. Numerical simulation of temperature field in multiple-wire submerged arc welding of X80 pipeline steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Chunyan; Jiang, Han; Wu, Lichao; Kan, Chenxia; Yu, Wen

    2018-01-01

    Three dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) simulation was implemented to predict the temperature distribution during multiple-wire submerged arc welding (SAW) throughout the welded joint of X80 pipeline steel. A moving heat source model based on Goldak’s double-ellipsoid heat flux distribution was applied in the simulation to capture the heating effect of the welding arc. Effects of welding speed, wire spacing and leading wire current on temperature distribution were further investigated. The simulation results show that both welding speed and wire spacing have significant effects on welding temperature distribution in X80 pipeline steel welded joint.

  1. Gas emission during welding with metal cored and self-shielded wire

    OpenAIRE

    Popović, Olivera; Prokić-Cvetković, Radica; Lukić, Uroš; Jovičić, Radomir; Burzić, Meri; Beljić, Biljana

    2015-01-01

    The use of flux cored and self-shielded wires as filler materials for gas metal arc welding is growing constantly due to increased productivity and efficiency, better weld quality and easer operation. On the other hand, one of the major drawbacks of these wires is the increased amount of fumes and gases and insufficient data of their harmful effects, especially in the case of self shielded wire. Therefore, in now days, one of the most important requirements is environmentally and health reque...

  2. Research, fabrication and applications of Bi-2223 HTS wires

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this book is to cover all aspects of Bi-2223 superconducting wires from fundamental research, fabrication process to applications. This book contains many chapters written by distinguished experts in the world.

  3. Fabrication of Metal Microtool Applying Wire Electrochemical Machining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuang Liu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Metal microtools with various shapes can be used for micromachining technologies due to their specific characteristics. Wire electrochemical machining (wire ECM shows high potential to produce complex microstructures with repetitive usage of wire electrode and absence of thermal effects. This study presented an investigation of feasibility on fabricating metal microtool with various shapes using microwire ECM process. The experiments were conducted under a condition of ø300 μm tungsten rod as anodic specimen, ø20 μm tungsten wire as cathode, KOH as electrolytic solution, and ultrashort pulsed current as power supply. Effects of pulse-on time, applied voltage, wire feeding rate, and solution concentration on overcut and machining stability were evaluated in order to obtain optimal process parameters. Microtools with various shapes were fabricated thereafter with the optimal condition. The results reveal that the presented approach is capable of producing microtools with complex shapes effectively.

  4. Development of Process Maps in Two-Wire Tandem Submerged Arc Welding Process of HSLA Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiran, D. V.; Alam, S. A.; De, A.

    2013-04-01

    Appropriate selection of welding conditions to guarantee requisite weld joint mechanical properties is ever difficult because of their complex interactions. An approach is presented here to identify suitable welding conditions in typical two-wire tandem submerged arc welding (SAW-T) that involves many welding variables. First, an objective function is defined, which depicts the squared error between the mechanical properties of weld joint and of base material. A set of artificial neural network (ANN)-based models are developed next to estimate the weld joint properties as function of welding conditions using experimentally measured results. The neural network model-based predictions are used next to create a set of process map contours that depict the minimum achievable values of the objective function and the corresponding welding conditions. In typical SAW-T of HSLA steel, welding speed from 9.0 to 11.5 mm/s, leading wire current from 530 to 580 A, and trailing wire negative current from 680 to 910 A are found to be the most optimal.

  5. Effect of different filler wires on weld formation for fiber laser welding 6A02 Aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, F.; Chen, L.; Lu, W.; He, E. G.

    2017-12-01

    6A02 aluminum alloy was welded by fibre laser welding with two different filler wires (ER4043 and ER5356). The weld apperance, microstructure and mechanical properties were analysed. The results show the welding course with ER4043 is more stable than that with ER5356, and the welding spatters of the former are smaller than that of the latter. The microsturtrue of the weld zone, including columnar-grains near the fusion zone and mixed microstructures (columnar grains and equiaxed grains) in the weld center zone, is finer with ER5356 than that with ER4043. So the average microhardness value of the former is higher than the latter. A great number of low melting point eutectic phases disperse in grains boundary. Due to the eutectic phases distributing more in two zones (overheat zone near the fusion zone and the weld center zone) than other zones, the welded joints have these two low hardness and weak strength zones. The ultimate strength and the elongations after fracture of the welded joints with ER4043 are lower than that with ER5356 slihgtly. However, the former are improved obviously and higher than the latter after heat treatment. The tensile properties of all joints can reach to the base material level. And the tensile fractures always occur near the fusion zone.

  6. Tensile Residual Stress Mitigation Using Low Temperature Phase Transformation Filler Wire in Welded Armor Plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Zhili [ORNL; Bunn, Jeffrey R [ORNL; Tzelepis, Demetrios A [ORNL; Payzant, E Andrew [ORNL; Yu, Xinghua [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) has been a persistent issue in welding of high-strength steels. Mitigating residual stresses is one of the most efficient ways to control HIC. The current study develops a proactive in-process weld residual stress mitigation technique, which manipulates the thermal expansion and contraction sequence in the weldments during welding process. When the steel weld is cooled after welding, martensitic transformation will occur at a temperature below 400 C. Volume expansion in the weld due to the martensitic transformation will reduce tensile stresses in the weld and heat affected zone and in some cases produce compressive residual stresses in the weld. Based on this concept, a customized filler wire which undergoes a martensitic phase transformation during cooling was developed. The new filler wire shows significant improvement in terms of reducing the tendency of HIC in high strength steels. Bulk residual stress mapping using neutron diffraction revealed reduced tensile and compressive residual stresses in the welds made by the new filler wire.

  7. Characterization of HAZ of API X70 Microalloyed Steel Welded by Cold-Wire Tandem Submerged Arc Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadijoo, Mohsen; Kenny, Stephen; Collins, Laurie; Henein, Hani; Ivey, Douglas G.

    2017-05-01

    High-strength low-carbon microalloyed steels may be adversely affected by the high-heat input and thermal cycle that they experience during tandem submerged arc welding. The heat-affected zone (HAZ), particularly the coarse-grained heat-affected zone (CGHAZ), i.e., the region adjacent to the fusion line, has been known to show lower fracture toughness compared with the rest of the steel. The deterioration in toughness of the CGHAZ is attributed to the formation of martensite-austenite (M-A) constituents, local brittle zones, and large prior austenite grains (PAG). In the present work, the influence of the addition of a cold wire at various wire feed rates in cold-wire tandem submerged arc welding, a recently developed welding process for pipeline manufacturing, on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the HAZ of a microalloyed steel has been studied. The cold wire moderates the heat input of welding by consuming the heat of the trail electrode. Macrostructural analysis showed a decrease in the CGHAZ size by addition of a cold wire. Microstructural evaluation, using both tint etching optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, indicated the formation of finer PAGs and less fraction of M-A constituents with refined morphology within the CGHAZ when the cold wire was fed at 25.4 cm/min. This resulted in an improvement in the HAZ impact fracture toughness. These improvements are attributed to lower actual heat introduced to the weldment and lower peak temperature in the CGHAZ by cold-wire addition. However, a faster feed rate of the cold wire at 76.2 cm/min adversely affected the toughness due to the formation of slender M-A constituents caused by the relatively faster cooling rate in the CGHAZ.

  8. Hybrid 2D-3D modelling of GTA welding with filler wire addition

    KAUST Repository

    Traidia, Abderrazak

    2012-07-01

    A hybrid 2D-3D model for the numerical simulation of Gas Tungsten Arc welding is proposed in this paper. It offers the possibility to predict the temperature field as well as the shape of the solidified weld joint for different operating parameters, with relatively good accuracy and reasonable computational cost. Also, an original approach to simulate the effect of immersing a cold filler wire in the weld pool is presented. The simulation results reveal two important observations. First, the weld pool depth is locally decreased in the presence of filler metal, which is due to the energy absorption by the cold feeding wire from the hot molten pool. In addition, the weld shape, maximum temperature and thermal cycles in the workpiece are relatively well predicted even when a 2D model for the arc plasma region is used. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Alkaline cleaner replacement for printed wiring board fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldammer, S.E.; Pemberton, S.E.; Tucker, D.R.

    1997-04-01

    A replacement alkaline cleaning chemistry was qualified for the copper cleaning process used to support printed wiring board fabrication. The copper cleaning process was used to prepare copper surfaces for enhancing the adhesion of dry film photopolymers (photoresists and solder masks) and acrylic adhesives. The alkaline chemistry was used to remove organic contaminates such as fingerprints.

  10. Wire Array Solar Cells: Fabrication and Photoelectrochemical Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurgeon, Joshua Michael

    Despite demand for clean energy to reduce our addiction to fossil fuels, the price of these technologies relative to oil and coal has prevented their widespread implementation. Solar energy has enormous potential as a carbon-free resource but is several times the cost of coal-produced electricity, largely because photovoltaics of practical efficiency require high-quality, pure semiconductor materials. To produce current in a planar junction solar cell, an electron or hole generated deep within the material must travel all the way to the junction without recombining. Radial junction, wire array solar cells, however, have the potential to decouple the directions of light absorption and charge-carrier collection so that a semiconductor with a minority-carrier diffusion length shorter than its absorption depth (i.e., a lower quality, potentially cheaper material) can effectively produce current. The axial dimension of the wires is long enough for sufficient optical absorption while the charge-carriers are collected along the shorter radial dimension in a massively parallel array. This thesis explores the wire array solar cell design by developing potentially low-cost fabrication methods and investigating the energy-conversion properties of the arrays in photoelectrochemical cells. The concept was initially investigated with Cd(Se, Te) rod arrays; however, Si was the primary focus of wire array research because its semiconductor properties make low-quality Si an ideal candidate for improvement in a radial geometry. Fabrication routes for Si wire arrays were explored, including the vapor-liquid-solid growth of wires using SiCl4. Uniform, vertically aligned Si wires were demonstrated in a process that permits control of the wire radius, length, and spacing. A technique was developed to transfer these wire arrays into a low-cost, flexible polymer film, and grow multiple subsequent arrays using a single Si(111) substrate. Photoelectrochemical measurements on Si wire array

  11. Potential for Fabric Damage by Welding Electron Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragomeni, James M.; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Welding electron beam effects on Nextel AF-62 ceramic fabric enable a preliminary, tentative interpretation of electron beam fabric damage. Static surface charging does not protect fabric from beam penetration, but penetration occurs only after a delay time. The delay time is thought to be that required for the buildup of outgassing products at the fabric surface to a point where arcing occurs. Extra long delays are noted when the gun is close enough to the surface to be shut off by outgassing emissions. Penetration at long distances is limited by beam attenuation from electronic collisions with the chamber atmosphere.

  12. Gas Metal Arc Welding Using Novel CaO-Added Mg Alloy Filler Wire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minjung Kang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Novel “ECO Mg” alloys, i.e., CaO-added Mg alloys, which exhibit oxidation resistance during melting and casting processes, even without the use of beryllium or toxic protection gases such as SF6, have recently been introduced. Research on ECO Mg alloys is still continuing, and their application as welding filler metals was investigated in this study. Mechanical and metallurgical aspects of the weldments were analysed after welding, and welding behaviours such as fume generation and droplet transfer were observed during welding. The tensile strength of welds was slightly increased by adding CaO to the filler metal, which resulted from the decreased grain size in the weld metal. When welding Mg alloys, fumes have been unavoidable so far because of the low boiling temperature of Mg. Fume reduction was successfully demonstrated with a wire composed of the novel ECO Mg filler. In addition, stable droplet transfer was observed and spatter suppression could be expected by using CaO-added Mg filler wire.

  13. Present and future wire fabrication techniques for high {Tc} superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, S. [AT and T Bell Labs., Murray Hill, NJ (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Fabrication of high-J{sub c},, long-length conductors is essential for successful applications of the high {Tc} superconductors. Several different approaches for high-J{sub c} wire fabrications have been demonstrated, however, none of them meets all the requirements in terms of desirable length, critical currents, and operating temperature ranges. High-J{sub c} YBCO wires have been made only in length less than a meter. The BSCCO wires/ribbons exhibit high J{sub c} and can be made long but they are not particularly useful for major applications above {approximately}30K. For TBCCO, neither high-J{sub c} long wire comparable to BSCCO material nor sufficient flux pinning comparable to YBCO has been demonstrated, even with the promising single Tl-O layered compound. This paper describes various microstructural and processing problems limiting the development of desirable long-length superconductors, and discusses some alternative approaches that may be utilized to overcome the problems.

  14. Arc Interference Behavior during Twin Wire Gas Metal Arc Welding Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dingjian Ye

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to study arc interference behavior during twin wire gas metal arc welding process, the synchronous acquisition system has been established to acquire instantaneous information of arc profile including dynamic arc length variation as well as relative voltage and current signals. The results show that after trailing arc (T-arc is added to the middle arc (M-arc in a stable welding process, the current of M arc remains unchanged while the agitation increases; the voltage of M arc has an obvious increase; the shape of M arc changes, with increasing width, length, and area; the transfer frequency of M arc droplet increases and the droplet itself becomes smaller. The wire extension length of twin arc turns out to be shorter than that of single arc welding.

  15. Solar cell fabricated on welded thin flexible silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hessmann Maik Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a thin-film crystalline silicon solar cell with an AM1.5 efficiency of 11.5% fabricated on welded 50 μm thin silicon foils. The aperture area of the cell is 1.00 cm2. The cell has an open-circuit voltage of 570 mV, a short-circuit current density of 29.9 mA cm-2 and a fill factor of 67.6%. These are the first results ever presented for solar cells on welded silicon foils. The foils were welded together in order to create the first thin flexible monocrystalline band substrate. A flexible band substrate offers the possibility to overcome the area restriction of ingot-based monocrystalline silicon wafers and the feasibility of a roll-to-roll manufacturing. In combination with an epitaxial and layer transfer process a decrease in production costs can be achieved.

  16. [Plasma temperature calculation and coupling mechanism analysis of laser-double wire hybrid welding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Kai; Li, Huan; Yang, Li-Jun; Gu, Xiao-Yan; Gao, Ying

    2013-04-01

    The plasma radiation of laser-double wire hybrid welding was collected by using fiber spectrometer, the coupling mechanism of arc with laser was studied through high-speed photography during welding process, and the temperature of hybrid plasma was calculated by using the method of Boltzmann plot. The results indicated that with laser hybrid, luminance was enhanced; radiation intensity became stronger; arc was attracted to the laser point; cross section contracted and arc was more stable. The laser power, welding current and arc-arc distance are important factors that have great influence on electron temperature. Increase in the laser power, amplification of welding current and reduction of arc-arc distance can all result in the rise of temperature.

  17. Peculiarities of welding pool degassing at surface deposition of aluminium alloys with powder wire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Володимир Якович Зусін

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The article contains the analysis of the conventional methods of surface deposition of aluminium alloys. It was shown that at surface deposition of aluminium alloys interstices, arising at hydrogen bubbles formation in the weld pool lat the moment of its crystallization are the most probable defects. An additional source of hydrogen supply into the weld pool springs up at surface deposition of aluminium alloys-this is the powder electrode charge. So, a model of formation of gas bubbles with due regard to this factor was developed. Presence of various surface defects, like cavities, shears, and micro-cracks is a factor, promoting formation of gaseous hydrogen phase inside a drop of electrode metal. Further development of gas bubbles, entrapped into the weld pool goes on by their consolidation and hydrogen diffusion from the molten metal into gaseous section. Intensification of bubble degassing, both at the stage of molten metal drop and at the welding pool stage is the most efficient way. The process of degassing depends on the amount of hydrogen, introduced into the weld pool. Proposed was an analytical dependence of evaluation of the original hydrogen concentration in the weld pool upon the coefficient of powder wire filling and dimensions of the charge particles. Experimental research of the influence of the parameters of powder wire upon the porosity of deposited metal made it possible to determine an optimal range of charge granulation and the coefficient of powder wire filling, ensuring intensive degassing during the period of its existence in liquid state and reaching deposited metal with sufficient density

  18. Fabrication of niobium superconducting accelerator cavity by electron beam welded joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, T. K.; Mondal, J.; Mittal, K. C.; Bhushan, K. G.; Bapat, A. V.

    2012-11-01

    Fabrication of superconducting cavities has been taken up as a part of the development of accelerator driven sub critical system (ADSS) by Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. Large grain (RRR>99) pure niobium was chosen as the material for the cavity. Niobium,for its application as superconductor requires extremely high quality joints, feasible only by electron beam welding at high vacuum environment. An indigenously developed 100kV, 4kW high vacuum electron beam welding machine has been utilized to carry out the welding operations. Planning of the weld sequences was chalked out. Holding fixtures for the cavity, consists of seven numbers of joints have been fabricated beforehand. A few coupons were welded for optimization of the weld parameters and for inspection of the weld purity by indigenously developed secondary ion mass spectroscopy. The report describes the welding equipment and the stage wise joining operations of the cavity in details and also discusses the qualification testing of the welded cavity.

  19. Fabrication of Copper-Rich Cu-Al Alloy Using the Wire-Arc Additive Manufacturing Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Bosheng; Pan, Zengxi; Shen, Chen; Ma, Yan; Li, Huijun

    2017-09-01

    An innovative wire-arc additive manufacturing (WAAM) process is used to fabricate Cu-9 at. pct Al on pure copper plates in situ, through separate feeding of pure Cu and Al wires into a molten pool, which is generated by the gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process. After overcoming several processing problems, such as opening the deposition molten pool on the extremely high-thermal conductive copper plate and conducting the Al wire into the molten pool with low feed speed, the copper-rich Cu-Al alloy was successfully produced with constant predesigned Al content above the dilution-affected area. Also, in order to homogenize the as-fabricated material and improve the mechanical properties, two further homogenization heat treatments at 1073 K (800 °C) and 1173 K (900 °C) were applied. The material and mechanical properties of as-fabricated and heat-treated samples were compared and analyzed in detail. With increased annealing temperatures, the content of precipitate phases decreased and the samples showed gradual improvements in both strength and ductility with little variation in microstructures. The present research opened a gate for in-situ fabrication of Cu-Al alloy with target chemical composition and full density using the additive manufacturing process.

  20. Fabrication of Copper-Rich Cu-Al Alloy Using the Wire-Arc Additive Manufacturing Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Bosheng; Pan, Zengxi; Shen, Chen; Ma, Yan; Li, Huijun

    2017-12-01

    An innovative wire-arc additive manufacturing (WAAM) process is used to fabricate Cu-9 at. pct Al on pure copper plates in situ, through separate feeding of pure Cu and Al wires into a molten pool, which is generated by the gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process. After overcoming several processing problems, such as opening the deposition molten pool on the extremely high-thermal conductive copper plate and conducting the Al wire into the molten pool with low feed speed, the copper-rich Cu-Al alloy was successfully produced with constant predesigned Al content above the dilution-affected area. Also, in order to homogenize the as-fabricated material and improve the mechanical properties, two further homogenization heat treatments at 1073 K (800 °C) and 1173 K (900 °C) were applied. The material and mechanical properties of as-fabricated and heat-treated samples were compared and analyzed in detail. With increased annealing temperatures, the content of precipitate phases decreased and the samples showed gradual improvements in both strength and ductility with little variation in microstructures. The present research opened a gate for in-situ fabrication of Cu-Al alloy with target chemical composition and full density using the additive manufacturing process.

  1. [Arc spectrum diagnostic and heat coupling mechanism analysis of double wire pulsed MIG welding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yong-qiang; Li, Huan; Yang, Li-jun; Zheng, Kai; Gao, Ying

    2015-01-01

    A double wire pulsed MIG welding test system was built in the present paper, in order to analyze the heat-coupling mechanism of double wire pulsed MIG welding, and study are temperature field. Spectroscopic technique was used in diagnostic analysis of the are, plasma radiation was collected by using hollow probe method to obtain the arc plasma optical signal The electron temperature of double wire pulsed MIG welding arc plasma was calculated by using Boltzmann diagram method, the electron temperature distribution was obtained, a comprehensive analysis of the arc was conducted combined with the high speed camera technology and acquisition means of electricity signal. The innovation of this paper is the combination of high-speed camera image information of are and optical signal of arc plasma to analyze the coupling mechanism for dual arc, and a more intuitive analysis for are temperature field was conducted. The test results showed that a push-pull output was achieved and droplet transfer mode was a drop in a pulse in the welding process; Two arcs attracted each other under the action of a magnetic field, and shifted to the center of the arc in welding process, so a new heat center was formed at the geometric center of the double arc, and flowing up phenomenon occurred on the arc; Dual arc electronic temperature showed an inverted V-shaped distribution overall, and at the geometric center of the double arc, the arc electron temperature at 3 mm off the workpiece surface was the highest, which was 16,887.66 K, about 4,900 K higher than the lowest temperature 11,963.63 K.

  2. Optimum Design and Development of High Strength and Toughness Welding Wire for Pipeline Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cuixin; Xue, Haitao; Yin, Fuxing; Peng, Huifen; Zhi, Lei; Wang, Sixu

    Pipeline steel with higher strength(>800MPa) has been gradually used in recent years, so how to achieve good match of base metal and weld deposit is very important for its practical application. Based on the alloy system of 0.02-0.04%C, 2.0%Mn and 0.5%Si, four different kinds of welding wires were designed and produced. The effects of alloy elements on phase transformation and mechanical properties were analyzed. Experimental results show that the designed steels with the addition of 2-4% Ni+Cr+Mo and 800MPa) and good elongation (>15%). The microstructure of deposits metal is mainly composed of granular bainite and M-A constituents with the mean size of 0.2-07μm are dispersed on ferritic matrix. The deposited metals have good match of strength (>800MPa) and impact toughness (>130J) which well meet the requirement of pipeline welding.

  3. Advanced Process Possibilities in Friction Crush Welding of Aluminum, Steel, and Copper by Using an Additional Wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besler, Florian A.; Grant, Richard J.; Schindele, Paul; Stegmüller, Michael J. R.

    2017-12-01

    Joining sheet metal can be problematic using traditional friction welding techniques. Friction crush welding (FCW) offers a high speed process which requires a simple edge preparation and can be applied to out-of-plane geometries. In this work, an implementation of FCW was employed using an additional wire to weld sheets of EN AW5754 H22, DC01, and Cu-DHP. The joint is formed by bringing together two sheet metal parts, introducing a wire into the weld zone and employing a rotating disk which is subject to an external force. The requirements of the welding preparation and the fundamental process variables are shown. Thermal measurements were taken which give evidence about the maximum temperature in the welding center and the temperature in the periphery of the sheet metals being joined. The high welding speed along with a relatively low heat input results in a minimal distortion of the sheet metal and marginal metallurgical changes in the parent material. In the steel specimens, this FCW implementation produces a fine grain microstructure, enhancing mechanical properties in the region of the weld. Aluminum and copper produced mean bond strengths of 77 and 69 pct to that of the parent material, respectively, whilst the steel demonstrated a strength of 98 pct. Using a wire offers the opportunity to use a higher-alloyed additional material and to precisely adjust the additional material volume appropriate for a given material alignment and thickness.

  4. Laser fabrication nanocrystalline coatings using simultaneous powders/wire feed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianing; Zhai, Tongguang; Zhang, Yuanbin; Shan, Feihu; Liu, Peng; Ren, Guocheng

    2016-07-01

    Laser melting deposition (LMD) fabrication is used to investigate feasibilty of simultaneously feeding TC17 wire and the Stellite 20-Si3N4-TiC-Sb mixed powders in order to increase the utilization ratio of materials and also quality of LMD composite coatings on the TA1 substrate. SEM images indicated that such LMD coating with metallurgical joint to substrate was formed free of the obvious defects. Lots of the ultrafine nanocrystals (UNs) were produced, which distributed uniformly in some coating matrix location, retarding growth of the ceramics in a certain extent; UNs were intertwined with amorphous, leading the yarn-shape materials to be produced. Compared with substrate, an improvement of wear resistance was achieved for such LMD coating.

  5. Double Fillet Welding of Carbon Steel T-Joint by Double Channel Shielding Gas Metal Arc Welding Method Using Metal Cored Wire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mert T.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Low carbon steel material and T-joints are frequently used in ship building and steel constructions. Advantages such as high deposition rates, high quality and smooth weld metals and easy automation make cored wires preferable in these industries. In this study, low carbon steel materials with web and flange thicknesses of 6 mm, 8 mm and 10 mm were welded with conventional GMAW and double channel shielding gas metal arc welding (DMAG method to form double fillet T-joints using metal cored wire. The difference between these two methods were characterized by measurements of mean welding parameters, Vickers hardness profiles, weld bead and HAZ geometry of the joints and thermal camera temperature measurements. When weld bead and HAZ geometries are focused, it was seen filler metal molten area increased and base metal molten area decreased in DMAG of low carbon steel. When compared with traditional GMAW, finer and acicular structures in weld metal and more homogenous and smaller grains in HAZ are obtained with double channel shielding gas metal arc welding.

  6. Fabrication of complex structures or assemblies by Hot Isostatic Pressure (HIP) welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashurst, A. N.; Goldstein, M.; Ryan, M. J.; Lessmann, G. G.; Bryant, W. A.

    1974-01-01

    HIP welding is effective method for fabricating complex structures or assemblies such as alternator rotors, regeneratively-cooled rocket-motor thrust chambers, and jet engine turbine blades. It can be applied to fabrication of many assemblies which require that component parts be welded together along complex interfaces.

  7. Influence of different brazing and welding methods on tensile strength and microhardness of orthodontic stainless steel wire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Jens Johannes; Fraenzel, Wolfgang; Bailly, Jacqueline; Gernhardt, Christian Ralf; Fuhrmann, Robert Andreas Werner

    2008-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the mechanical strength and microhardness of joints made by conventional brazing and tungsten inert gas (TIG) and laser welding. A standardized end-to-end joint configuration of the orthodontic wire material in spring hard quality was used. The joints were made using five different methods: brazing (soldering > 450 degrees C) with universal silver solder, two TIG, and two laser welders. Laser parameters and welding conditions were used according to the manufacturers' guidance. The tensile strengths were measured with a universal testing machine (Zwick 005). The microhardness measurements were carried out with a hardness tester (Zwick 3202). Data were analysed using one-way analysis of variance and Bonferroni's post hoc correction (P TIG or laser welding were found. The highest means were observed for TIG welding (699-754 MPa). Laser welding showed a significantly lower mean tensile strength (369-520 MPa) compared with TIG welding. Significant differences (P welded area. The mean microhardness differed significantly between brazing (1.99 GPa), TIG (2.22-2.39 GPa) and laser welding (2.21-2.68 GPa). For orthodontic purposes, laser and TIG welding are solder-free alternatives to joining metal. TIG welding with a lower investment cost is comparable with laser welding. However, while expensive, the laser technique is a sophisticated and simple method.

  8. Systems and Methods for Fabricating Structures Including Metallic Glass-Based Materials Using Ultrasonic Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Douglas C. (Inventor); Roberts, Scott N. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Systems and methods in accordance with embodiments of the invention fabricate objects including metallic glass-based materials using ultrasonic welding. In one embodiment, a method of fabricating an object that includes a metallic glass-based material includes: ultrasonically welding at least one ribbon to a surface; where at least one ribbon that is ultrasonically welded to a surface has a thickness of less than approximately 150.mu.m; and where at least one ribbon that is ultrasonically welded to a surface includes a metallic glass-based material.

  9. The Laser Welding with Hot Wire of 316LN Thick Plate Applied on ITER Correction Coil Case

    CERN Document Server

    Fang, Chao; Wu, Weiyue; Wei, Jing; Zhang, Shuquan; Li, Hongwei; Dolgetta, N; Libeyre, P; Cormany, C; Sgobba, S

    2014-01-01

    ITER correction coil (CC) cases have characteristics of small cross section, large dimensions, and complex structure. The cases are made of heavy thick (20 mm), high strength and high toughness austenitic stainless steel 316LN. The multi-pass laser welding with hot wire technology is used for the case closure welding, due to its low heat input and deformation. In order to evaluate the reliability of this welding technology, 20 mm welding samples with the same groove structure and welding depth as the cases were welded. High purity argon was used as the shielding gas to prevent oxidation because of the narrowness and depth of the weld. In this paper investigation of, microstructure characteristics and mechanical properties of welded joints using optimized welding parameters are presented. The results show that the base metal, fusion metal, and heat affected zone (HAZ) are all have fully austenitic microstructure, and that the grain size of fusion metal was finer than that of the base metal. The welding resulte...

  10. Evaluation of ARAA steel E-beam welding characteristics for the fabrication of KO HCCR TBM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Jae Sung, E-mail: jsyoon2@kaeri.re.kr [Korea Atomic Research Energy Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Suk-Kwon; Lee, Eo Hwak; Jin, Hyung Gon; Lee, Dong Won [Korea Atomic Research Energy Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Kyu In [Gentec Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Seungyon [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • For confirming the evaluation of ARAA steel E-beam welding characteristics for the fabrication of KO HCCR TBM, the followings are performed. • E-beam welding in ARAA plate. • Evaluation for the penetration depth and beam width according to the E-beam welding current. • Performed micro-hardness and Charpy impact test after PWHT. • Determine the optimized PWHT condition. - Abstract: Korea has designed a helium cooled ceramic reflector (HCCR) test blanket module (TBM), including a TBM shield, called a TBM set, that will be tested in ITER. Korean RAFM steel was developed as a structural material for the HCCR TBM, and advanced reduced activation alloy (ARAA) was selected as the primary candidate from various program alloys. Fabrication technologies for the HCCR TBM were developed using ARAA to provide the method and procedure for fabricating the TBM for testing in ITER based on RCC-MRx, which was selected as the design and fabrication code and standard for the HCCR TBM. To establish and optimize welding procedures for electron beam welding of an ARAA material, variations in welding current and speed were investigated. A series of performance tests was performed before and after post-weld heat treatment to evaluate the welded specimen under the determined welding conditions.

  11. Numerical analysis on temperature field in single-wire flux-aided backing-submerged arc welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Juan; Wu, Ming Fang; Pan, Haichao

    2017-07-01

    Single-wire flux-aided backing-submerged arc welding (FAB-SAW) technology has been widely used to weld thick steel plate due to its easy assembly and high heat input. The microstructure and property of welded joint are closely related to the thermal field of FAB-SAW process. In this research, the feature of thermal field for single-wire FAB-SAW was investigated. Based on the heat transfer mechanism, a three-dimensional transient model for thermal field was developed based on the influence of steel thickness, groove angle and ceramic backing. The temperature profile in single-wire FAB-SAW of D36 steel under different welding conditions was simulated by ANSYS. The characteristic of thermal field was analyzed and the influences of groove angle on temperature field for different plate thicknesses were discussed. The calculated geometries and dimensions of weld cross-section under different conditions show a good agreement with the experimental results. This newly built model can describe the thermal field accurately, which would be helpful to understanding the thermophysical mechanism of FAB-SAW and optimizing the welding process.

  12. Inclusions and Microstructure of Ce-Added Weld Metal Coarse Grain Heat-Affected Zone in Twin-Wire Submerged-Arc Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, S. F.; Yan, N.; Chen, Y.

    2016-06-01

    In high heat-input multi-pass twin-wire submerged-arc welding, weld metal of previous pass will be affected by the heat input of subsequent one and form coarse-grained heat-affected zone (CGHAZ). This study focused on the effects of welding thermal cycle on the inclusions and microstructure of Ce-alloyed weld metal CGHAZ. According to the study of inclusions and microstructure of weld metal CGHAZ, it was found that the composition and type of the inclusions did not change under the effect of welding thermal cycle. Although the inclusions were coarsened slightly, the promoting ability to acicular ferrite (AF) was not deprived after thermal cycling. There are three types of AF in weld metal CGHAZ, which include oxy-sulfides of Ce inclusions-promoted AF, home-position-precipitated AF, and sympathetic AF. Results showed more than 80% of microstructure was AF, which greatly benefited the mechanical properties of weld metal CGHAZ, even though granular bainite and M-A constituents were generated.

  13. The effect of electric spot-welding on the mechanical properties of different orthodontic wire alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonard Euler Andrade Gomes Nascimento

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that there is a direct relationship between surface structure and tensile strength of orthodontic alloys submitted to different levels of welding current. Three types of alloys were assessed. One hundred and eight cross-sectional test specimens ("X" were made, 18 for each wire combination, and divided into 6 groups: SS (steel-steel; SN (steel-NiTi; SB (steel-Beta-Ti; NN (NiTi-NiTi; NB (NiTi-Beta-Ti and BB (Beta-Ti-Beta-Ti, submitted to 6 spot-welding procedures at different levels of current (Super Micro Ponto 3000. Student-Newman-Keuls, Wilcoxon signed-rank, and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used (p < .05. Statistical difference was found between SN group and all the other alloy combinations (p < .05. Initial roughness of alloys ranged from .04 to .55 Ra, with statistical difference between groups (p < .001. The hypothesis was rejected and the tensile strength of Ti-alloys combinations Steel × Beta-Ti was significantly affected by the current level at P50, which changed the properties and structure of the wires.

  14. Optical characterisation of photonic wire and photonic crystal waveguides fabricated using nanoimprint lithography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borel, Peter Ingo; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2006-01-01

    We have characterised photonic-crystal and photonic-wire waveguides fabricated by thermal nanoimprint lithography. The structures, with feature sizes down below 20 nm, are benchmarked against similar structures defined by direct electron beam lithography.......We have characterised photonic-crystal and photonic-wire waveguides fabricated by thermal nanoimprint lithography. The structures, with feature sizes down below 20 nm, are benchmarked against similar structures defined by direct electron beam lithography....

  15. Pipeline welding with Flux Cored and Metal Cored Wire; Soldagem de dutos com processos Arame Tubular e de Alma Metalica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Ubirajara Pereira da [ITW Soldagem Brasil Miller-Hobart, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2003-07-01

    Different welding process like SMAW, Semi-Automatic FCAW Gas-shielded and Self-shielded and Mechanized GMAW-MAG with Solid Wire are suggested to weld Transmission Pipelines. Presently, the largest extensions of Transmission Pipelines under construction, are in China like Lines West-East, Zong-Wu, Shan-Jing Fuxian and some others, totalizing about 8.000 km, and all using Semi-Automatic Self Shielded Flux Cored Arc Welding Process. Also, several papers and magazines that covers Transmission Pipelines Welding, not frequently mention Operational aspects of the process and some other variables like environment and site geography. This presentation intends to cover some of the Operational aspects of the Flux Cored Arc Welding and GMAW-Metal Cored in order to give sufficient information for Construction, Engineering, Projects e Contractors so they can evaluate these Process against the SMAW or even Mechanized Systems, considering the Operation Factor, Efficiency and Deposition Rate. We will not cover operational details of the GMAW Mechanized Systems but only suggest that be evaluated the possibility to replace the GMAW-Solid Wire by the GMAW-Metal Cored Wire. (author)

  16. Novel magnetic wire fabrication process by way of nanoimprint lithography for current induced magnetization switching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsukasa Asari

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Nanoimprint lithography (NIL is an effective method to fabricate nanowire because it does not need expensive systems and this process is easier than conventional processes. In this letter, we report the Current Induced Magnetization Switching (CIMS in perpendicularly magnetized Tb-Co alloy nanowire fabricated by NIL. The CIMS in Tb-Co alloy wire was observed by using current pulse under in-plane external magnetic field (HL. We successfully observed the CIMS in Tb-Co wire fabricated by NIL. Additionally, we found that the critical current density (Jc for the CIMS in the Tb-Co wire fabricated by NIL is 4 times smaller than that fabricated by conventional lift-off process under HL = 200Oe. These results indicate that the NIL is effective method for the CIMS.

  17. Novel magnetic wire fabrication process by way of nanoimprint lithography for current induced magnetization switching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asari, Tsukasa; Shibata, Ryosuke; Awano, Hiroyuki

    2017-05-01

    Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) is an effective method to fabricate nanowire because it does not need expensive systems and this process is easier than conventional processes. In this letter, we report the Current Induced Magnetization Switching (CIMS) in perpendicularly magnetized Tb-Co alloy nanowire fabricated by NIL. The CIMS in Tb-Co alloy wire was observed by using current pulse under in-plane external magnetic field (HL). We successfully observed the CIMS in Tb-Co wire fabricated by NIL. Additionally, we found that the critical current density (Jc) for the CIMS in the Tb-Co wire fabricated by NIL is 4 times smaller than that fabricated by conventional lift-off process under HL = 200Oe. These results indicate that the NIL is effective method for the CIMS.

  18. Overview on the welding technologies of CLAM steel and the DFLL TBM fabrication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junyu Zhang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Dual Functional Lithium Lead (DFLL blanket was proposed for its advantages of high energy exchange efficiency and on-line tritium extraction, and it was selected as the candidate test blanket module (TBM for China Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR and the blanket for Fusion Design Study (FDS series fusion reactors. Considering the influence of high energy fusion neutron irradiation and high heat flux thermal load on the blanket, China Low Activation Martensitic (CLAM steel was selected as the structural material for DFLL blanket. The structure of the blanket and the cooling internal components were pretty complicated. Meanwhile, high precision and reliability were required in the blanket fabrication. Therefore, several welding techniques, such as hot isostatic pressing diffusion bonding, tungsten inner gas welding, electron beam welding and laser beam welding were developed for the fabrication of cooling internals and the assembly of the blanket. In this work, the weldability on CLAM steel by different welding methods and the properties of as-welded and post-weld heat-treated joints were investigated. Meanwhile, the welding schemes and the assembly strategy for TBM fabrication were raised. Many tests and research efforts on scheme feasibility, process standardization, component qualification and blanket assembly were reviewed.

  19. Development of End Plug Welding Technique for SFR Fuel Rod Fabrication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Won Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In Korea, R&D on a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR was begun in 1997, as one of the national long-term nuclear R&D programs. As one fuel option for a prototype SFR, a metallic fuel, U-Zr alloy fuel, was selected and is currently being developed. For the fabrication of SFR metallic fuel rods, the end plug welding is a crucial process. The sealing of the end plug to the cladding tube should be hermetically perfect to prevent a leakage of fission gases and to maintain a good reactor performance. In this study, the welding technique, welding equipment, welding conditions, and parameters were developed for the end plug welding of SFR metallic fuel rods. A gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW technique was adopted and the welding joint design was developed. In addition, the optimal welding conditions and parameters were established. Based on the establishment of the welding conditions, the GTAW technique was qualified for the end plug welding of SFR metallic fuel rods.

  20. Fabricating Superior NiAl Bronze Components through Wire Arc Additive Manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donghong Ding

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Cast nickel aluminum bronze (NAB alloy is widely used for large engineering components in marine applications due to its excellent mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. Casting porosity, as well as coarse microstructure, however, are accompanied by a decrease in mechanical properties of cast NAB components. Although heat treatment, friction stir processing, and fusion welding were implemented to eliminate porosity, improve mechanical properties, and refine the microstructure of as-cast metal, their applications are limited to either surface modification or component repair. Instead of traditional casting techniques, this study focuses on developing NAB components using recently expanded wire arc additive manufacturing (WAAM. Consumable welding wire is melted and deposited layer-by-layer on substrates producing near-net shaped NAB components. Additively-manufactured NAB components without post-processing are fully dense, and exhibit fine microstructure, as well as comparable mechanical properties, to as-cast NAB alloy. The effects of heat input from the welding process and post-weld-heat-treatment (PWHT are shown to give uniform NAB alloys with superior mechanical properties revealing potential marine applications of the WAAM technique in NAB production.

  1. Stir Friction Welding Used in Ares I Upper Stage Fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Under the goals of the Vision for Space Exploration, Ares I is a chief component of the cost-effective space transportation infrastructure being developed by NASA's Constellation Program. This transportation system will safely and reliably carry human explorers back to the moon, and then onward to Mars and other destinations in the solar system. The Ares I effort includes multiple project element teams at NASA centers and contract organizations around the nation, and is managed by the Exploration Launch Projects Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MFSC). ATK Launch Systems near Brigham City, Utah, is the prime contractor for the first stage booster. ATK's subcontractor, United Space Alliance of Houston, is designing, developing and testing the parachutes at its facilities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston hosts the Constellation Program and Orion Crew Capsule Project Office and provides test instrumentation and support personnel. Together, these teams are developing vehicle hardware, evolving proven technologies, and testing components and systems. Their work builds on powerful, reliable space shuttle propulsion elements and nearly a half-century of NASA space flight experience and technological advances. Ares I is an inline, two-stage rocket configuration topped by the Crew Exploration Vehicle, its service module, and a launch abort system. This HD video image depicts friction stir welding used in manufacturing aluminum panels that will fabricate the Ares I upper stage barrel. The aluminum panels are subjected to confidence panel tests during which the bent aluminum is stressed to breaking point and thoroughly examined. The panels are manufactured by AMRO Manufacturing located in El Monte, California. (Highest resolution available)

  2. The Effects of Pulse Parameters on Weld Geometry and Microstructure of a Pulsed Laser Welding Ni-Base Alloy Thin Sheet with Filler Wire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongsheng Chai

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Due to its excellent resistance to corrosive environments and its superior mechanical properties, the Ni-based Hastelloy C-276 alloy was chosen as the material of the stator and rotor cans of a nuclear main pump. In the present work, the Hastelloy C-276 thin sheet 0.5 mm in thickness was welded with filler wire by a pulsed laser. The results indicated that the weld pool geometry and microstructure were significantly affected by the duty ratio, which was determined by the pulse duration and repetition rate under a certain heat input. The fusion zone area was mainly affected by the duty ratio, and the relationship was given by a quadratic polynomial equation. The increase in the duty ratio coarsened the grain size, but did not obviously affect microhardness. The weld geometry and base metal dilution rate was manipulated by controlling pulsed parameters without causing significant change to the performance of the weld. However, it should be noted that, with a larger duty ratio, the partial molten zone is a potential weakness of the weld.

  3. Surface Modification and Nanojunction Fabrication with Molecular Metal Wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-21

    We thank the National Science Council and the Ministry of Education of the Republic of China for financial support. We are also grateful to Mr Wei...Acknowledgements The authors acknowledge the National Science Council and the Ministry of Education of Taiwan for financial support. References 1 Extended Linear...considered to be potential molecular electronic devices [1]. The general expectation is to transport an electron through the continua of metal wire-like

  4. Mechanical properties and aesthetics of FRP orthodontic wire fabricated by hot drawing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, T; Watari, F; Yamagata, S; Kobayashi, M; Nagayama, K; Toyoizumi, Y; Nakamura, S

    1998-12-01

    The FRP wires 0.5 mm in diameter with a multiple fiber structure were fabricated by drawing the fiber polymer complex at 250 degrees C for an esthetic, transparent orthodontic wire. Biocompatible CaO-P2O5-SiO2-Al2O3 (CPSA) glass fibers of 8-20 microm in diameter were oriented unidirectionally in the longitudinal direction in PMMA matrix. The mechanical properties were investigated by 3-point flexural test. The FRP wire showed sufficient strength and a very good elastic recovery after deformation. Young's modulus and the flexural load at deflection 1 mm were nearly independent of the fiber diameter and linearly increased with the fiber fraction. The dependence on fiber fraction obeys well the rule of mixture. This FRP wire could cover the range of strength corresponding to the conventional metal orthodontic wires from Ni-Ti used in the initial stage of orthodontic treatments to Co-Cr used in the final stage by changing the volume ratio of glass fibers with the same external diameter. The estheticity in external appearance was excellent. Thus the new FRP wire can satisfy both mechanical properties necessary for an orthodontic wire and enough estheticity, which was not possible for the conventional metal wire.

  5. Mechanical and Functional Properties of Laser-Welded Ti-55.8 Wt Pct Ni Nitinol Wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, B.; Khan, M. I.; Zhou, Y.

    2011-08-01

    As interest increases in incorporating Nitinol alloys in different microapplications and devices, the development of effective procedures for laser microwelding (LMW) these alloys becomes necessary. Laser welding processes applied to Nitinol have been shown to lower strength, induce inclusions of intermetallic compounds (IMCs), and alter the pseudoelastic and shape memory effects. Inconsistency in reported weld properties has also suggested that further studies are required. The current study details the mechanical, microstructural, and phase transformation properties of Nd:YAG LMW crossed Ti-55.8 wt pct Ni Nitinol wires. The effects of surface oxide on joint performance were also investigated. Fracture strength, weld microstructure, and phase transformation temperatures at varying peak power inputs were studied and compared to the unaffected base metal. Results showed good retention of strength and pseudoelastic properties, while the fusion zone exhibited higher phase transformation temperatures, which altered the active functional properties at room temperature.

  6. Welded-woven fabrics for use as synthetic, minimally invasive orthopaedic implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodts, Timothy W.

    The treatment of osteoarthritis in healthcare today focuses on minimizing pain and retaining mobility. Osteoarthritis of the knee is a common disease and known to be associated with traumatic injuries, among other factors. An identified trend is that patients are younger and have expectations of life with the preservation of an active lifestyle. As a result, great strain is placed on the available offerings of healthcare professionals and device manufacturers alike. This results in numerous design challenges for managing pain and disease over an extended period of time. The available treatments are being extended into younger populations, which increasingly suffer traumatic knee injuries. However, these patients are not good candidates for total joint replacement. A common problem for young patients is localized cartilage damage. This can heal, but often results in a painful condition that requires intervention. A welded-woven three-dimensional polymer fabric was developed to mimic the properties of articular cartilage. A process for the laser welding reinforcement of the surface layers of three-dimensional fabrics was investigated. Confined compression creep and pin-on-disc wear studies were conducted to characterize the contribution of the surface welding reinforcement. All materials used in the studies have previously been used in orthopaedic devices or meet the requirements for United States Pharmacopeial Convention (USP) Class VI biocompatibility approval. The compressive behavior of three-dimensional fabrics was tailored by the inclusion of surface welds. The compressive properties of the welded-woven fabrics were shown to better approximate articular cartilage compressive properties than conventional woven materials. The wear performance was benchmarked against identical fabrics without welding reinforcement. The wear rates were significantly reduced and the lifespan of the fabrics was markedly improved due to surface welding. Welding reinforcement offers a

  7. Effects of the use of a flat wire electrode in gas metal arc welding and fuzzy logic model for the prediction of weldment shape profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karuthapandi, Sripriyan; Thyla, P. R. [PSG College of Technology, Coimbatore (India); Ramu, Murugan [Amrita University, Ettimadai (India)

    2017-05-15

    This paper describes the relationships between the macrostructural characteristics of weld beads and the welding parameters in Gas metal arc welding (GMAW) using a flat wire electrode. Bead-on-plate welds were produced with a flat wire electrode and different combinations of input parameters (i.e., welding current, welding speed, and flat wire electrode orientation). The macrostructural characteristics of the weld beads, namely, deposition, bead width, total bead width, reinforcement height, penetration depth, and depth of HAZ were investigated. A mapping technique was employed to measure these characteristics in various segments of the weldment zones. Results show that the use of a flat wire electrode improves the depth-to-width (D/W) ratio by 16.5 % on average compared with the D/W ratio when a regular electrode is used in GMAW. Furthermore, a fuzzy logic model was established to predict the effects of the use of a flat electrode on the weldment shape profile with varying input parameters. The predictions of the model were compared with the experimental results.

  8. Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Vocational Education.

    This curriculum guide is designed for use by South Carolina vocational education teachers as a continuing set of lesson plans for a two-year course on welding. Covered in the individual sections of the guide are the following topics: an orientation to welding, oxyacetylene welding, advanced oxyacetylene welding, shielded metal arc welding, TIG…

  9. Potential for EMU Fabric Damage by Electron Beam and Molten Metal During Space Welding for the International Space Welding Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragomeni, James M.

    1998-01-01

    As a consequence of preparations concerning the International Space Welding Experiment (ISWE), studies were performed to better understand the effect of molten metal contact and electron beam impingement with various fabrics for space suit applications. The question arose as to what would occur if the electron beam from the Ukrainian Universal Hand Tool (UHT) designed for welding in space were to impinge upon a piece of Nextel AF-62 ceramic cloth designed to withstand temperatures up to 1427 C. The expectation was that the electron beam would lay down a static charge pattern with no damage to the ceramic fabric. The electron beam is capable of spraying the fabric with enough negative charge to repel further electrons from the fabric before significant heating occurs. The static charge pattern would deflect any further charge accumulation except for a small initial amount of leakage to the grounded surface of the welder. However, when studies were made of the effect of the electron beam on the insulating ceramic fabric it was surprisingly found that the electron beam did indeed burn through the ceramic fabric. It was also found that the shorter electron beam standoff distances had longer burnthrough times than did some greater electron beam standoff distances. A possible explanation for the longer burnthrough times for the small electron beam standoff distance would be outgassing of the fabric which caused the electron beam hand-tool to cycle on and off to provide some protection for the cathodes. The electron beam hand tool was observed to cycle off at the short standoff distance of two inches likely due to vapors being outgassed. During the electron beam welding process there is an electron leakage, or current leakage, flow from the fabric. A static charge pattern is initially laid down by the electron beam current flow. The static charge makes up the current leakage flow which initially slightly heats up the fabric. The initially laid down surface charge leaks a

  10. Fabrication Flaw Density and Distribution In Repairs to Reactor Pressure Vessel and Piping Welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GJ Schuster, FA Simonen, SR Doctor

    2008-04-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing a generalized fabrication flaw distribution for the population of nuclear reactor pressure vessels and for piping welds in U.S. operating reactors. The purpose of the generalized flaw distribution is to predict component-specific flaw densities. The estimates of fabrication flaws are intended for use in fracture mechanics structural integrity assessments. Structural integrity assessments, such as estimating the frequency of loss-of-coolant accidents, are performed by computer codes that require, as input, accurate estimates of flaw densities. Welds from four different reactor pressure vessels and a collection of archived pipes have been studied to develop empirical estimates of fabrication flaw densities. This report describes the fabrication flaw distribution and characterization in the repair weld metal of vessels and piping. This work indicates that large flaws occur in these repairs. These results show that repair flaws are complex in composition and sometimes include cracks on the ends of the repair cavities. Parametric analysis using an exponential fit is performed on the data. The relevance of construction records is established for describing fabrication processes and product forms. An analysis of these records shows there was a significant change in repair frequency over the years when these components were fabricated. A description of repair flaw morphology is provided with a discussion of fracture mechanics significance. Fabrication flaws in repairs are characterized using optimized-access, high-sensitivity nondestructive ultrasonic testing. Flaw characterizations are then validated by other nondestructive evaluation techniques and complemented by destructive testing.

  11. Radiation-Tolerant, SpaceWire-Compatible Switching Fabric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzman, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    Current and future near-Earth and deep space exploration programs and space defense programs require the development of robust intra-spacecraft serial data transfer electronics that must be reconfigurable, fault-tolerant, and have the ability to operate effectively for long periods of time in harsh environmental conditions. Existing data transfer systems based on state-of-the-art serial data transfer protocols or passive backplanes are slow, power-hungry, and poorly reconfigurable. They provide limited expandability and poor tolerance to radiation effects and total ionizing dose (TID) in particular, which presents harmful threats to modern submicron electronics. This novel approach is based on a standard library of differential cells tolerant to TID, and patented, multi-level serial interface architecture that ensures the reliable operation of serial interconnects without application of a data-strobe or other encoding techniques. This proprietary, high-speed differential interface presents a lowpower solution fully compatible with the SpaceWire (SW) protocol. It replaces a dual data-strobe link with two identical independent data channels, thus improving the system s tolerance to harsh environments through additional double redundancy. Each channel incorporates an automatic line integrity control circuitry that delivers error signals in case of broken or shorted lines.

  12. MICROSTRUCTURE FEATURES OF CHROME-NICKEL COATING WELDED WITH FILLER WIRE PL AN-111 WITH A 50% OVERLAP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Belik

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The paper involves investigation of microstructure features of the coating welded with filler wire PL AN-111 with a 50% beads overlap. Methodology. Wear-resistant layer was formed by means of electric arc deposit welding using filler wire PL AN-111 on the plate from steel 09G2S. Deposit welding was conducted under the following parameters: welding current is of 650-750 A; arc voltage is of 30-34 V; welding speed is of 32 m/h. Microstructure was researched with application of optical microscopies “Neophot-21”, “Nikon Eclipse M200” and electron scanning microscopy JEOL JSM-6510 LV. Microhardness of structural constituentswas measuredwithtesterFM-300 (Future-Tech under loading of 10-50 g. Findings. It is shown that the overlap of the beads leads to the formation of inhomogeneous microstructure in the cross section that varies by zones from free-carbide austenite to hypereutectic microstructure with primary chromium carbides. The analysis of the microhardness of the structural constituents in various coating areas was carried out. It was found that hardness of austenite, carbide eutectic and carbides M7C3 varies in coatings in the range of 3 100-3 850 МPа, 4 100-6 800 МPа and 12 100-15 100 МPа, accordingly. Originality. Authors determined that Cr-Ni coating comprises substantially austenitic-carbide eutectic with different density and thickness of carbide fibers within eutectic colonies. Along the border “base/coating” a single-phase austenitic layer lies which turns into a layer with a hypoeutectic structure. In the heat affected zone from beads fusion austenite disintegration with the granular carbides formation was recorded. This leads to decreasing of matrix corrosion resistance due to chromium depletion. Above the zone of beads fusion, the coating has a hypereutectic structure with the presence of large primary chromium carbides. Practical value. It is shown that deposit welding with filler wire PL AN-111 with a 50

  13. Upgraded HFIR Fuel Element Welding System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sease, John D [ORNL

    2010-02-01

    The welding of aluminum-clad fuel plates into aluminum alloy 6061 side plate tubing is a unique design feature of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) fuel assemblies as 101 full-penetration circumferential gas metal arc welds (GMAW) are required in the fabrication of each assembly. In a HFIR fuel assembly, 540 aluminum-clad fuel plates are assembled into two nested annular fuel elements 610 mm (24-inches) long. The welding process for the HFIR fuel elements was developed in the early 1960 s and about 450 HFIR fuel assemblies have been successfully welded using the GMAW process qualified in the 1960 s. In recent years because of the degradation of the electronic and mechanical components in the old HFIR welding system, reportable defects in plate attachment or adapter welds have been present in almost all completed fuel assemblies. In October 2008, a contract was awarded to AMET, Inc., of Rexburg, Idaho, to replace the old welding equipment with standard commercially available welding components to the maximum extent possible while maintaining the qualified HFIR welding process. The upgraded HFIR welding system represents a major improvement in the welding system used in welding HFIR fuel elements for the previous 40 years. In this upgrade, the new inner GMAW torch is a significant advancement over the original inner GMAW torch previously used. The innovative breakthrough in the new inner welding torch design is the way the direction of the cast in the 0.762 mm (0.030-inch) diameter aluminum weld wire is changed so that the weld wire emerging from the contact tip is straight in the plane perpendicular to the welding direction without creating any significant drag resistance in the feeding of the weld wire.

  14. Influence of Filler Wire Feed Rate in Laser-Arc Hybrid Welding of T-butt Joint in Shipbuilding Steel with Different Optical Setups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unt, Anna; Poutiainen, Ilkka; Salminen, Antti

    In this paper, a study of laser-arc hybrid welding featuring three different process fibres was conducted to build knowledge about process behaviour and discuss potential benefits for improving the weld properties. The welding parameters affect the weld geometry considerably, as an example the increase in welding speed usually decreases the penetration and a larger beam diameter usually widens the weld. The laser hybrid welding system equipped with process fibres with 200, 300 and 600 μm core diameter were used to produce fillet welds. Shipbuilding steel AH36 plates with 8 mm thickness were welded with Hybrid-Laser-Arc-Welding (HLAW) in inversed T configuration, the effects of the filler wire feed rate and the beam positioning distance from the joint plane were investigated. Based on the metallographic cross-sections, the effect of process parameters on the joint geometry was studied. Joints with optimized properties (full penetration, soundness, smooth transition from bead to base material) were produced with 200 μm and 600 μm process fibres, while fiber with 300 μm core diameter produced welds with unacceptable levels of porosity.

  15. Robotic-Controlled, Autonomous Friction Stir Welding Processes for In-Situ Fabrication, Maintenance, and Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, W.

    NASA s new vision of human and robotic missions to the Moon Mars and beyond will demand large and permanent infrastructures on the Moon and other planets including power plants communication towers human and biomass habitats launch and landing facilities fabrication and repair workshops and research facilities so that material utilization and product development can be carried out and subsisted in-situ The conventional approach of transporting pre-constructed fabricated structures from earth to the Moon planets will no longer be feasible due to limited lifting capacity and extremely high transportation costs associated with long duration space travel To minimize transport of pre-made large structures between earth and the Moon planets minimize crew time for the fabrication and assembly of infrastructures on the Moon planets and to assure crew safety and maintain quality during the operation there is a strong need for robotic capabilities for in-situ fabrication maintenance and repair Clearly development of innovative autonomous in-situ fabrication maintenance and repair technologies is crucial to the success of both NASA s unmanned preparation missions and manned exploration missions In-space material joining is not new to NASA Many lessons were learned from NASA s International Space Welding Experiment which employed the Electron Beam Welding process for space welding experiments Significant safety concerns related to high-energy beams arcing spatter elecromagnetic fields and molten particles were

  16. In-depth study of the mechanical properties for Fe{sub 3}Al based iron aluminide fabricated using the wire-arc additive manufacturing process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Chen; Pan, Zengxi, E-mail: zengxi@uow.edu.au; Cuiuri, Dominic; Dong, Bosheng; Li, Huijun

    2016-07-04

    An innovative wire-arc additive manufacturing (WAAM) process is used to fabricate iron aluminide alloy in-situ, through separate feeding of pure Fe and Al wires into a molten pool that is generated by the gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process. This paper investigates the morphologies, chemical compositions and mechanical properties of the as-fabricated 30 at% Al iron aluminide wall components, and how these properties vary at different locations within the buildup wall. The tensile properties are also measured in different loading orientations; as epitaxial growth of large columnar grains is observed in the microstructures. Fe{sub 3}Al is the only phase detected in the middle buildup section of the wall structure, which constitutes the majority of the deposited material. The bottom section of the structure contains a dilution affected region where some acicular Fe{sub 3}AlC{sub 0.5} precipitates can be observed, induced by carbon from the steel substrate that was used for fabrication. The microhardness and chemical composition indicate relatively homogeneous material properties throughout the buildup wall. However, the tensile properties are very different in the longitudinal direction and normal directions, due to epitaxial growth of large columnar grains. In general, the results have demonstrated that the WAAM process is capable of producing full density in-situ-alloyed iron aluminide components with tensile properties that are comparable to powder metallurgy methods.

  17. Control of Hydrogen Embrittlement in High Strength Steel Using Special Designed Welding Wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    microstructure 4. A low near ambient temperature is reached. • All four factor must be simultaneously present 3 Mitigating HIC and Improving Weld Fatigue...Performance Through Weld Residual Stress Control UNCLASIFIED:DISTRIBUTION A. Approved for public release: distribution unlimited. Click to edit Master...title style 4 • Welding of Armor Steels favors all these conditions for HIC • Hydrogen Present in Sufficient Degree – Derived from moisture in the

  18. Gas Metal Arc Welding Using Novel CaO-Added Mg Alloy Filler Wire

    OpenAIRE

    Minjung Kang; Youngnam Ahn; Cheolhee Kim

    2016-01-01

    Novel “ECO Mg” alloys, i.e., CaO-added Mg alloys, which exhibit oxidation resistance during melting and casting processes, even without the use of beryllium or toxic protection gases such as SF6, have recently been introduced. Research on ECO Mg alloys is still continuing, and their application as welding filler metals was investigated in this study. Mechanical and metallurgical aspects of the weldments were analysed after welding, and welding behaviours such as fume generation and droplet tr...

  19. Recent advances in high-temperature superconductor wire fabrication and applications development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, J.R.; Uherka, K.L.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, recent advances in fabrication of HTS wires are summarized, and detailed discussion is provided for developments in near- and intermediate-term applications. Near-term applications, using presently obtainable current densities, include: liquid-nitrogen depth sensors, cryostat current leads, and magnetic bearings. Intermediate-term applications, using current densities expected to be available in the near future include fault-current limiters and short transmission lines. 25 refs.

  20. Recent advances in high-temperature superconductor wire fabrication and applications development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, J.R.; Uherka, K.L.

    1992-08-01

    In this paper, recent advances in fabrication of HTS wires are summarized, and detailed discussion is provided for developments in near- and intermediate-term applications. Near-term applications, using presently obtainable current densities, include: liquid-nitrogen depth sensors, cryostat current leads, and magnetic bearings. Intermediate-term applications, using current densities expected to be available in the near future include fault-current limiters and short transmission lines. 25 refs.

  1. Self-assembled peptide nanotubes as an etching material for the rapid fabrication of silicon wires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Martin Benjamin Barbour Spanget; Andersen, Karsten Brandt; Svendsen, Winnie Edith

    2011-01-01

    This study has evaluated self-assembled peptide nanotubes (PNTS) and nanowires (PNWS) as etching mask materials for the rapid and low-cost fabrication of silicon wires using reactive ion etching (RIE). The self-assembled peptide structures were fabricated under mild conditions and positioned on c...... characterization by SEM and I-V measurements. Additionally, the fabricated silicon structures were functionalized with fluorescent molecules via a biotin-streptavidin interaction in order to probe their potential in the development of biosensing devices.......This study has evaluated self-assembled peptide nanotubes (PNTS) and nanowires (PNWS) as etching mask materials for the rapid and low-cost fabrication of silicon wires using reactive ion etching (RIE). The self-assembled peptide structures were fabricated under mild conditions and positioned...... on clean silicon wafers, after which these biological nanostructures were exposed to an RIE etching process. Following this treatment, the structure of the remaining nanotubes and nanowires were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Important differences in the behavior of the nanotubes...

  2. The fabrication and characterisation of quantum dots, wires and wire net works

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Q

    1996-01-01

    luminescent materials probably involves pi bonded carbon. The size distributions of both kinds of the nanoclusters obtained by TEM suggest that a quantum-confined size effect can also apply to the blue PL. The strong blue emission is related with the crystallisation of the nanodots by annealing. The PL excitation dependence is explained by an increase in the conduction band density of states deep in the band, and the formation of a band tail. The work in this thesis includes two aspects as described below: 1. Freshly produced red, yellow and green emitting porous Si have been fabricated and studied by NEXAFS and EXAFS. The emission peaks are at 690, 580 and 520 nm, which almost covers the fall visible range that direct anodization can achieve. The correlation between the co-ordination numbers of the first, second and third Si neighbour shells from Fourier transform fitting of EXAFS and both emission peak energies and optical bandgaps estimated by PLE (photoluminescence excitation dependence) suggests that the...

  3. Microstructure and mechanical properties of China low activation martensitic steel joint by TIG multi-pass welding with a new filler wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bo; Zhang, Junyu; Wu, Qingsheng

    2017-07-01

    Tungsten Inner Gas (TIG) welding is employed for joining of China low activation martensitic (CLAM) steel. A new filler wire was proposed, and the investigation on welding with various heat input and welding passes were conducted to lower the tendency towards the residual of δ ferrite in the joint. With the optimized welding parameters, a butt joint by multi-pass welding with the new filler wire was prepared to investigate the microstructure and mechanical properties. The microstructure of the joint was observed by optical microscope (OM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The hardness, Charpy impact and tensile tests of the joint were implemented at room temperature (25 °C). The results revealed that almost full martensite free from ferrite in the joints were obtained by multipass welding with the heat input of 2.26 kJ/mm. A certain degree of softening occurred at the heat affected zone of the joint according to the results of tensile and hardness tests. The as welded joints showed brittle fracture in the impact tests. However, the joints showed toughness fracture after tempering and relatively better comprehensive performance were achieved when the joints were tempered at 740 °C for 2 h.

  4. Radiation cross-linking of small electrical wire insulator fabricated from NR/LDPE blends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siri-Upathum, Chyagrit [Department of Nuclear Technology, Faculty of Engineering Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand)], E-mail: chyagrit@chula.ac.th; Punnachaiya, Suvit [Department of Nuclear Technology, Faculty of Engineering Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand)

    2007-12-15

    A low voltage, radiation-crosslinked wire insulator has been fabricated from blends of natural rubber block (STR-5L) and LDPE with phthalic anhydride (PA) as a compatibilizer. Physical properties of the NR/LDPE blend ratios of 50/50 and 60/40 with 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 wt% PA were evaluated. The gel content increased as the radiation dose increased. Tensile at break exhibited a maximum value of 12 MPa at 120 kGy for 1.0 and 1.5 wt% PA of both blend ratios. A higher PA content yielded a higher modulus for the same blend ratio. Blends of 60/40 ratio with 1.0 wt% PA and 0.8 wt% antimony oxide flame retardant gave the highest limiting oxygen index (LOI) of >30% at above 150 kGy. Other electrical properties of the wire insulator were investigated. It was found that an insulator fabricated from a PA content of 1.0 wt% in the NR/LDPE blend ratio of 50/50, after gamma ray cross-linked at a dose of 180 kGy in low vacuum (1 mm Hg), met the Thai Industrial Standard 11-2531 for low voltage wire below 1.0 kV. To comply with the standard for vertical flame test, a more suitable flame retardant was needed for the insulator.

  5. Defects detection on the welded reinforcing steel with self-shielded wires by vibration tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crâştiu Ion

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is the development and validation of a vibroacustic technique to welding defects detection, especially for welded reinforcing structures. In welded structures subjected to dynamic cyclic loads may appear and propagate fatigue cracks due to local structural damage. These cracks may initiate due to the technological parameters used in welding process, or due to environmental operating conditions. By the means of Finite Element Method (FEM, the natural frequencies and shape modes of more welded steel specimens are determined. The analysis is carried out in undamaged condition as well as damaged one, after artificially induced damages. The experimental measurement of the vibroacustic response is carried out by using a condenser microphone, which is suitable for high-fidelity acoustic measurements in the frequency range of 20 – 20.000 Hz. The vibration responses of the welded specimens, in free-free conditions, are carried out using algorithms based on Fast Fourier Transform (FFT, and Prony's series. The results are compared to modal parameters estimated using FE Analysis.

  6. Tensile Behaviour of Welded Wire Mesh and Hexagonal Metal Mesh for Ferrocement Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanawade, A. G.; Modhera, C. D.

    2017-08-01

    Tension tests were conducted on welded mesh and hexagonal Metal mesh. Welded Mesh is available in the market in different sizes. The two types are analysed viz. Ø 2.3 mm and Ø 2.7 mm welded mesh, having opening size 31.75 mm × 31.75 mm and 25.4 mm × 25.4 mm respectively. Tensile strength test was performed on samples of welded mesh in three different orientations namely 0°, 30° and 45° degrees with the loading axis and hexagonal Metal mesh of Ø 0.7 mm, having opening 19.05 × 19.05 mm. Experimental tests were conducted on samples of these meshes. The objective of this study was to investigate the behaviour of the welded mesh and hexagonal Metal mesh. The result shows that the tension load carrying capacity of welded mesh of Ø 2.7 mm of 0° orientation is good as compared to Ø2.3 mm mesh and ductility of hexagonal Metal mesh is good in behaviour.

  7. Using Powder Cored Tubular Wire Technology to Enhance Electron Beam Freeform Fabricated Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Devon; Liu, Stephen; Domack, Marcia; Hafley, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication (EBF3) is an additive manufacturing technique, developed at NASA Langley Research Center, capable of fabricating large scale aerospace parts. Advantages of using EBF3 as opposed to conventional manufacturing methods include, decreased design-to-product time, decreased wasted material, and the ability to adapt controls to produce geometrically complex parts with properties comparable to wrought products. However, to fully exploit the potential of the EBF3 process development of materials tailored for the process is required. Powder cored tubular wire (PCTW) technology was used to modify Ti-6Al-4V and Al 6061 feedstock to enhance alloy content, refine grain size, and create a metal matrix composite in the as-solidified structures, respectively.

  8. Influences of Cr/Ni equivalent ratios of filler wires on pitting corrosion and ductility-dip cracking of AISI 316L weld metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y. H.; Kim, D. G.; Sung, J. H.; Kim, I. S.; Ko, D. E.; Kang, N. H.; Hong, H. U.; Park, J. H.; Lee, H. W.

    2011-02-01

    To study the pitting corrosion of AISI 316L weld metals according to the chromium/nickel equivalent ratio (Creq/Nieq ratio), three filler wires were newly designed for the flux-cored arc welding process. The weld metal with delta-ferrite at less than 3 vol.%, was observed for ductility-dip cracking (DDC) in the reheated region after multi-pass welding. The tensile strength and yield strength increased with increasing Creq/Nieq ratio. The result of anodic polarization tests in a 0.1 M NaCl solution at the room temperature (25) for 45 min, revealed that the base metal and weld metals have a similar corrosion potential of -0.34 VSCE. The weld metal with the highest content of Cr had the highest pitting potential (0.39 VSCE) and the passivation range (0.64 VSCE) was higher than the base metal (0.21 VSCE and 0.46 VSCE, respectively). Adding 0.001 M Na2S to the 0.1M NaCl solution, the corrosion occurred more severely by H2S. The corrosion potentials of the base metal and three weld metals decreased to -1.0 VSCE. DDC caused the decrease of the pitting potential by inducing a locally intense corrosion attack around the crack openings.

  9. Fabrication of Aluminum Tubes Filled with Aluminum Alloy Foam by Friction Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hangai, Yoshihiko; Nakano, Yukiko; Koyama, Shinji; Kuwazuru, Osamu; Kitahara, Soichiro; Yoshikawa, Nobuhiro

    2015-10-23

    Aluminum foam is usually used as the core of composite materials by combining it with dense materials, such as in Al foam core sandwich panels and Al-foam-filled tubes, owing to its low tensile and bending strengths. In this study, all-Al foam-filled tubes consisting of ADC12 Al-Si-Cu die-cast aluminum alloy foam and a dense A1050 commercially pure Al tube with metal bonding were fabricated by friction welding. First, it was found that the ADC12 precursor was firmly bonded throughout the inner wall of the A1050 tube without a gap between the precursor and the tube by friction welding. No deformation of the tube or foaming of the precursor was observed during the friction welding. Next, it was shown that by heat treatment of an ADC12-precursor-bonded A1050 tube, gases generated by the decomposition of the blowing agent expand the softened ADC12 to produce the ADC12 foam interior of the dense A1050 tube. A holding time during the foaming process of approximately t H = 8.5 min with a holding temperature of 948 K was found to be suitable for obtaining a sound ADC12-foam-filled A1050 tube with sufficient foaming, almost uniform pore structures over the entire specimen, and no deformation or reduction in the thickness of the tube.

  10. Fabrication of Aluminum Tubes Filled with Aluminum Alloy Foam by Friction Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiko Hangai

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum foam is usually used as the core of composite materials by combining it with dense materials, such as in Al foam core sandwich panels and Al-foam-filled tubes, owing to its low tensile and bending strengths. In this study, all-Al foam-filled tubes consisting of ADC12 Al-Si-Cu die-cast aluminum alloy foam and a dense A1050 commercially pure Al tube with metal bonding were fabricated by friction welding. First, it was found that the ADC12 precursor was firmly bonded throughout the inner wall of the A1050 tube without a gap between the precursor and the tube by friction welding. No deformation of the tube or foaming of the precursor was observed during the friction welding. Next, it was shown that by heat treatment of an ADC12-precursor-bonded A1050 tube, gases generated by the decomposition of the blowing agent expand the softened ADC12 to produce the ADC12 foam interior of the dense A1050 tube. A holding time during the foaming process of approximately tH = 8.5 min with a holding temperature of 948 K was found to be suitable for obtaining a sound ADC12-foam-filled A1050 tube with sufficient foaming, almost uniform pore structures over the entire specimen, and no deformation or reduction in the thickness of the tube.

  11. Stress-strain effects in alumina-Cu reinforced Nb{sub 3}Sn wires fabricated by the tube process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murase, Satoru; Nakayama, Shigeo; Masegi, Tamaki; Koyanagi, Kei; Nomura, Shunji [Toshiba Corp., Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan). Research and Development Center; Shiga, Noriyuki; Kobayashi, Norio; Watanabe, Kazuo

    1997-09-01

    In order to fabricate a large-bore, high-field magnet which achieves a low coil weight and volume, a high strength compound superconducting wire is required. For those demands we have developed the reinforced Nb{sub 3}Sn wire using alumina dispersion strengthened copper (alumina-Cu) as a reinforcement material and the tube process of the Nb{sub 3}Sn wire fabrication. The ductility study of the composites which consisted of the reinforcement, Nb tube, Cu, and Cu clad Sn brought a 1 km long alumina-Cu reinforced Nb{sub 3}Sn wire successfully. Using fabricated wires measurements and evaluations of critical current density as parameters of magnetic field, tensile stress, tensile strain, and transverse compressive stress, and those of stress-strain curves at 4.2 K were performed. They showed superior performance such as high 0.3% proof stress (240 MPa at 0.3% strain) and high maximum tolerance stress (320 MPa) which were two times as large as those of conventional Cu matrix Nb{sub 3}Sn wire. The strain sensitivity parameters were obtained for the reinforced Nb{sub 3}Sn wire and the Cu matrix one using the scaling law. Residual stress of the component materials caused by cooling down to 4.2 K from heat-treatment temperature was calculated using equivalent Young`s modulus, equivalent yield strength, thermal expansion coefficient and other mechanical parameters. Calculated stress-strain curves at 4.2 K for the reinforced Nb{sub 3}Sn wire and the Cu matrix one based on calculation of residual stress, had good agreement with the experimental values. (author)

  12. The defects and microstructure in the fusion zone of multipass laser welded joints with Inconel 52M filler wire for nuclear power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Lu, Xiaofeng; Zhu, Xiaolei; Huang, Jian; Liu, Luwei; Wu, Yixiong

    2017-09-01

    The defects and microstructure in the fusion zone of multipass laser welded joints with Inconel 52M filler wire are investigated for nuclear power plants. Experimental results indicate that the incomplete fusion forms as the deposited metals do not completely cover the groove during multipass laser welding. The dendritic morphologies are observed on the inner surface of the porosity in the fusion zone. Many small cellular are found in the zones near the fusion boundary. With solidification preceding, cellular gradually turn into columnar dendrites and symmetrical columnar dendrites are exhibited in the weld center of the fusion zone. The fine equiaxed grains form and columnar dendrites disappear in the remelted zone of two passes. The dendrite arm spacing in the fusion zone becomes widened with increasing welding heat input. Nb-rich carbides/carbonitrides are preferentially precipitated in the fusion zone of multipass laser welded joints. In respect to high cooling rate during multipass laser welding, element segregation could be insufficient to achieve the component of Laves phase.

  13. Welding skate with computerized controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, W. A., Jr.

    1968-01-01

    New welding skate concept for automatic TIG welding of contoured or double-contoured parts combines lightweight welding apparatus with electrical circuitry which computes the desired torch angle and positions a torch and cold-wire guide angle manipulator.

  14. Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Earl; And Others

    The curriculum guide for welding instruction contains 16 units presented in six sections. Each unit is divided into the following areas, each of which is color coded: terminal objectives, specific objectives, suggested activities, and instructional materials; information sheet; transparency masters; assignment sheet; test; and test answers. The…

  15. Laser Hot Wire Process: A Novel Process for Near-Net Shape Fabrication for High-Throughput Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottman, Michael; Zhang, Shenjia; McGuffin-Cawley, James; Denney, Paul; Narayanan, Badri K.

    2015-03-01

    The laser hot wire process has gained considerable interest for additive manufacturing applications, leveraging its high deposition rate, low dilution, thermal stability, and general metallurgical control including the ability to introduce and preserve desired meta-stable phases. Recent advancements in closed-loop process control and laser technology have increased productivity, process stability, and control of deposit metallurgy. The laser hot wire process has shown success in several applications: repairing and rejuvenating casting dies, depositing a variety of alloys including abrasion wear-resistant overlays with solid and tubular wires, and producing low-dilution (<5%) nickel alloy overlays for corrosion applications. The feasibility of fabricating titanium buildups is being assessed for aerospace applications.

  16. Electrochemical properties of Sn/C nanoparticles fabricated by redox treatment and pulsed wire evaporation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ju-Seok; Cho, Gyu-Bong; Ahn, Jou-Hyeon; Cho, Kwon-Koo

    2017-09-01

    Tin (Sn) based anode materials are the most promising anode materials for lithium-ion batteries due to their high theoretical capacity corresponding to the formation of Li4.4Sn composition (Li4.4Sn, 994 mAh/g). However, the applications of tin based anodes to lithium-ion battery system are generally limited by a large volume change (>260%) during lithiation and delithiation cycle, which causes pulverize and poor cycling stability. In order to overcome this shortcoming, we fabricate a Sn/C nanoparticle with a yolk-shell structure (Sn/void/C) by using pulsed wire evaporation process and oxidation/reduction heat treatment. Sn nanoparticles are encapsulated by a conductive carbon layer with structural buffer that leaves enough room for expansion and contraction during lithium insertion/desertion. We expect that the yolk-shell structure has the ability to accommodate the volume changes of tin and leading to an improved cycle performance. The Sn/Void/C anode with yolk-shell structure shows a high specific capacity of 760 mAh/g after 50 cycles.

  17. Iron oxide nanoparticles fabricated by electric explosion of wire: focus on magnetic nanofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beketov, I. V.; Safronov, A. P.; Medvedev, A. I.; Alonso, J.; Kurlyandskaya, G. V.; Bhagat, S. M.

    2012-06-01

    Nanoparticles of iron oxides (MNPs) were prepared using the electric explosion of wire technique (EEW). The main focus was on the fabrication of de-aggregated spherical nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution. According to XRD the major crystalline phase was magnetite with an average diameter of MNPs, depending on the fraction. Further separation of air-dry EEW nanoparticles was performed in aqueous suspensions. In order to provide the stability of magnetite suspension in water, we found the optimum concentration of the electrostatic stabilizer (sodium citrate and optimum pH level) based on zeta-potential measurements. The stable suspensions still contained a substantial fraction of aggregates which were disintegrated by the excessive ultrasound treatment. The separation of the large particles out of the suspension was performed by centrifuging. The structural features, magnetic properties and microwave absorption of MNPs and their aqueous solutions confirm that we were able to obtain an ensemble in which the magnetic contributions come from the spherical MNPs. The particle size distribution in fractionated samples was narrow and they showed a similar behaviour to that expected of the superparamagnetic ensemble. Maximum obtained concentration was as high as 5 % of magnetic material (by weight). Designed assembly of de-aggregated nanoparticles is an example of on-purpose developed magnetic nanofluid.

  18. Improved J/sub c/ in mechanically fabricated Nb/sub 3/Al wires and ribbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eagar, T.W.; Rose, R.M.

    1975-03-01

    Nb/sub 3/Al wire which is essentially all Al5 may be fabricated by powder or rod composite techniques, with subsequent reaction and ordering anneals. Several of the previously existing problems, including aluminum loss and Kirkendall porosity, have been identified and solved, and transverse-field critical current densities well into the 10/sup 5/ A/cm/sup 2/ range can be produced. However, reproducibility of the critical current density seems to depend on reproducible control of grain size. The internal oxidation techniques which succeed for Nb/sub 3/Sn do not appear to work for Nb/sub 3/Al. A possible solution to the grain size problem, and to the problem of manufacture of Nb/sub 3/Al in stabilized form, is to lower the initial reaction temperature. To achieve the latter, the scale of the elemental composite was reduced to a required diffusion distance of about 3000 A before reaction. Substantial quantities of Al5 could be produced at 1100/sup 0/C, but for several reasons it is believed finer composites will be necessary.

  19. Plasma arc torch with coaxial wire feed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Frederick M

    2002-01-01

    A plasma arc welding apparatus having a coaxial wire feed. The apparatus includes a plasma arc welding torch, a wire guide disposed coaxially inside of the plasma arc welding torch, and a hollow non-consumable electrode. The coaxial wire guide feeds non-electrified filler wire through the tip of the hollow non-consumable electrode during plasma arc welding. Non-electrified filler wires as small as 0.010 inches can be used. This invention allows precision control of the positioning and feeding of the filler wire during plasma arc welding. Since the non-electrified filler wire is fed coaxially through the center of the plasma arc torch's electrode and nozzle, the wire is automatically aimed at the optimum point in the weld zone. Therefore, there is no need for additional equipment to position and feed the filler wire from the side before or during welding.

  20. Crack repair welding by CMT brazing using low melting point filler wire for long-term used steam turbine cases of Cr-Mo-V cast steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadoi, Kota, E-mail: kadoi@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Hiroshima University, 1-4-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8527 (Japan); Murakami, Aoi; Shinozaki, Kenji; Yamamoto, Motomichi [Graduate School of Engineering, Hiroshima University, 1-4-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8527 (Japan); Matsumura, Hideo [Chugoku Electric Power Co., 3-9-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-0046 (Japan)

    2016-06-01

    Surface melting by gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding and overlaying by cold metal transfer (CMT) brazing using low melting point filler wire were investigated to develop a repair process for cracks in worn cast steel of steam turbine cases. Cr-Mo-V cast steel, operated for 188,500 h at 566 °C, was used as the base material. Silver and gold brazing filler wires were used as overlaying materials to decrease the heat input into the base metal and the peak temperature during the welding thermal cycle. Microstructural analysis revealed that the worn cast steel test samples contained ferrite phases with intragranular precipitates of Cr{sub 7}C{sub 3}, Mo{sub 2}C, and CrSi{sub 2} and grain boundary precipitates of Cr{sub 23}C{sub 6} and Mo{sub 2}C. CMT brazing using low melting point filler wire was found to decrease the heat input and peak temperature during the thermal cycle of the process compared with those during GTA surface melting. Thus, the process helped to inhibit the formation of hardened phases such as intermetallics and martensite in the heat affected zone (HAZ). Additionally, in the case of CMT brazing using BAg-8, the change in the hardness of the HAZ was negligible even though other processes such as GTA surface melting cause significant changes. The creep-fatigue properties of weldments produced by CMT brazing with BAg-8 were the highest, and nearly the same as those of the base metal owing to the prevention of hardened phase formation. The number of fracture cycles using GTA surface melting and CMT brazing with BAu-4 was also quite small. Therefore, CMT brazing using low melting point filler wire such as BAg-8 is a promising candidate method for repairing steam turbine cases. However, it is necessary to take alloy segregation during turbine operation into account to design a suitable filler wire for practical use.

  1. Development of sensor augmented robotic weld systems for aerospace propulsion system fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, C. S.; Gangl, K. J.

    1986-01-01

    In order to meet stringent performance goals for power and reuseability, the Space Shuttle Main Engine was designed with many complex, difficult welded joints that provide maximum strength and minimum weight. To this end, the SSME requires 370 meters of welded joints. Automation of some welds has improved welding productivity significantly over manual welding. Application has previously been limited by accessibility constraints, requirements for complex process control, low production volumes, high part variability, and stringent quality requirements. Development of robots for welding in this application requires that a unique set of constraints be addressed. This paper shows how robotic welding can enhance production of aerospace components by addressing their specific requirements. A development program at the Marshall Space Flight Center combining industrial robots with state-of-the-art sensor systems and computer simulation is providing technology for the automation of welds in Space Shuttle Main Engine production.

  2. Fabrication of Chemically Doped, High Upper Critical Field Magnesium Diboride Superconducting Wires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marzik, James, V.

    2005-10-13

    Controlled chemical doping of magnesium diboride (MgB2) has been shown to substantially improve its superconducting properties to the levels required for high field magnets, but the doping is difficult to accomplish through the usual route of solid state reaction and diffusion. Further, superconducting cables of MgB2 are difficult to fabricate because of the friable nature of the material. In this Phase I STTR project, doped and undoped boron fibers were made by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Several >100m long batches of doped and undoped fiber were made by CVD codeposition of boron plus dopants. Bundles of these fibers infiltrated with liquid magnesium and subsequently converted to MgB2 to form Mg-MgB2 metal matrix composites. In a parallel path, doped boron nano-sized powder was produced by a plasma synthesis technique, reacted with magnesium to produce doped MgB2 superconducting ceramic bodies. The doped powder was also fabricated into superconducting wires several meters long. The doped boron fibers and powders made in this program were fabricated into fiber-metal composites and powder-metal composites by a liquid metal infiltration technique. The kinetics of the reaction between boron fiber and magnesium metal was investigated in fiber-metal composites. It was found that the presence of dopants had significantly slowed the reaction between magnesium and boron. The superconducting properties were measured for MgB2 fibers and MgB2 powders made by liquid metal infiltration. Properties of MgB2 products (Jc, Hc2) from Phase I are among the highest reported to date for MgB2 bulk superconductors. Chemically doped MgB2 superconducting magnets can perform at least as well as NbTi and NbSn3 in high magnetic fields and still offer an improvement over the latter two in terms of operating temperature. These characteristics make doped MgB2 an effective material for high magnetic field applications, such as magnetic confined fusion, and medical MRI devices. Developing

  3. Effects of thermal aging and neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties of three-wire stainless steel weld overlay cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haggag, F.M.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1997-05-01

    Thermal aging of three-wire series-arc stainless steel weld overlay cladding at 288{degrees}C for 1605 h resulted in an appreciable decrease (16%) in the Charpy V-notch (CVN) upper-shelf energy (USE), but the effect on the 41-J transition temperature shift was very small (3{degrees}C). The combined effect of aging and neutron irradiation at 288{degrees}C to a fluence of 5 x 10{sup 19} neutrons/cm{sup 2} (> 1 MeV) was a 22% reduction in the USE and a 29{degrees}C shift in the 41-J transition temperature. The effect of thermal aging on tensile properties was very small. However, the combined effect of irradiation and aging was an increase in the yield strength (6 to 34% at test temperatures from 288 to {minus}125{degrees}C) but no apparent change in ultimate tensile strength or total elongation. Neutron irradiation reduced the initiation fracture toughness (J{sub Ic}) much more than did thermal aging alone. Irradiation slightly decreased the tearing modulus, but no reduction was caused by thermal aging alone. Other results from tensile, CVN, and fracture toughness specimens showed that the effects of thermal aging at 288 or 343{degrees}C for 20,000 h each were very small and similar to those at 288{degrees}C for 1605 h. The effects of long-term thermal exposure time (50,000 h and greater) at 288{degrees}C will be investigated as the specimens become available in 1996 and beyond.

  4. Lunar Module Wiring Design Considerations and Failure Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interbartolo, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the considerations for the design of wiring for the Lunar Module. Included are a review of the choice of conductors and insulations, the wire splicing (i.e., crimping, and soldering), the wire connectors, and the fabrication of the wire harnesses. The problems in fabrication include the wires being the wrong length, the damage due to the sharp edges, the requried use of temproary protective covers and inadequate training. The problems in the wire harness installation include damge from sharp eges, work on adjacent harnesses, connector damage, and breaking wires. Engineering suggestions from the Apollo-era in reference to the conductors that are reviewed include: the use of plated conductors, and the use of alloys for stronger wiring. In refernce to insulation, the suggestions from Apollo era include the use of polymer tape-wrap wire insulation due to the light weight, however, other types of modern insulation might be more cost-effective. In reference to wire splices and terminal boards the suggestions from the Apollo Era include the use of crimp splices as superior to solder splices, joining multiple wire to a common point using modular plug-ins might be more reliable, but are heavier than crimp splicing. For connectors, the lessons from the Apollo era indicate that a rear environmental seal that does not require additional potting is preferred, and pins should be crimped or welded to the incoming wires and be removable from the rear of the connector.

  5. Direct write fabrication of waveguides and interconnects for optical printed wiring boards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingeldein, Joseph C.

    Current copper based circuit technology is becoming a limiting factor in high speed data transfer applications as processors are improving at a faster rate than are developments to increase on board data transfer. One solution is to utilize optical waveguide technology to overcome these bandwidth and loss restrictions. The use of this technology virtually eliminates the heat and cross-talk loss seen in copper circuitry, while also operating at a higher bandwidth. Transitioning current fabrication techniques from small scale laboratory environments to large scale manufacturing presents significant challenges. Optical-to-electrical connections and out-of-plane coupling are significant hurdles in the advancement of optical interconnects. The main goals of this research are the development of direct write material deposition and patterning tools for the fabrication of waveguide systems on large substrates, and the development of out-of-plane coupler components compatible with standard fiber optic cabling. Combining these elements with standard printed circuit boards allows for the fabrication of fully functional optical-electrical-printed-wiring-boards (OEPWBs). A direct dispense tool was designed, assembled, and characterized for the repeatable dispensing of blanket waveguide layers over a range of thicknesses (25-225 μm), eliminating waste material and affording the ability to utilize large substrates. This tool was used to directly dispense multimode waveguide cores which required no UV definition or development. These cores had circular cross sections and were comparable in optical performance to lithographically fabricated square waveguides. Laser direct writing is a non-contact process that allows for the dynamic UV patterning of waveguide material on large substrates, eliminating the need for high resolution masks. A laser direct write tool was designed, assembled, and characterized for direct write patterning waveguides that were comparable in quality to those

  6. Design, Fabrication and Testing of Fixture for Implementation of a New Approach to Incorporate Tool tilting in Friction Stir Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awang Mokhtar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Friction Stir Welding (FSW is solid-state process for joining materials by using frictional heat generated due to rotating tool along the weld line. Since its invention about two decades ago, wide spread use of FSW is still restricted due to very expensive purpose built FSW machines available in the market. As an alternative, a milling machine can be used to carry out the FSW depending on the capabilities of the machine. In cases where milling machines have a fixed head, limitation of zero degree tool tilt angle results in substantial defects (e.g. tunnel defect in weldments. The objective of this study is to design and fabricate an adjustable-angle fixture to incorporate tool tilting in a CNC milling machine with fixed spindle head. The testing of the fabricated fixture is then carried out by running the FSW experiments at different tilt angles.

  7. Design and fabrication of a 30 T superconducting solenoid using overpressure processed Bi2212 round wire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flanagan, Gene [Muons, Inc., Batavia, IL (United States); Johnson, Rolland [Muons, Inc., Batavia, IL (United States)

    2016-02-18

    High field superconducting magnets are used in particle colliders, fusion energy devices, and spectrometers for medical imaging and advanced materials research. Magnets capable of generating fields of 20-30 T are needed by future accelerator facilities. A 20-30 T magnet will require the use of high-temperature superconductors (HTS) and therefore the challenges of high field HTS magnet development need to be addressed. Superconducting Bi2Sr2CaCu2Ox (Bi2212) conductors fabricated by the oxide-powder-in-tube (OPIT) technique have demonstrated the capability to carry large critical current density of 105 A/cm2 at 4.2 K and in magnetic fields up to 45 T. Available in round wire multi-filamentary form, Bi2212 may allow fabrication of 20-50 T superconducting magnets. Until recently the performance of Bi2212 has been limited by challenges in realizing high current densities (Jc ) in long lengths. This problem now is solved by the National High Magnetic Field Lab using an overpressure (OP) processing technique, which uses external pressure to process the conductor. OP processing also helps remove the ceramic leakage that results when Bi-2212 liquid leaks out from the sheath material and reacts with insulation, coil forms, and flanges. Significant advances have also been achieved in developing novel insulation materials (TiO2 coating) and Ag-Al sheath materials that have higher mechanical strengths than Ag-0.2wt.% Mg, developing heat treatment approaches to broadening the maximum process temperature window, and developing high-strength, mechanical reinforced Bi-2212 cables. In the Phase I work, we leveraged these new opportunities to prototype overpressure processed solenoids and test them in background fields of up to 14 T. Additionally a design of a fully superconducting 30 T solenoid was produced. This work in conjunction with the future path outlined in the Phase II proposal would

  8. High cycle fatigue behavior of the IN718/M247 hybrid element fabricated by friction welding at elevated temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tran Hung Tra

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A hybrid element has been fabricated by friction welding, joining two superalloys Inconel 718 and Mar-M247. The high cycle fatigue behavior of this welded element was investigated at 500 °C and 700 °C. The fabrication could obtain excellent fatigue strength in which the fracture is located in the base metal Mar-M247 side and takes place outside the welded zone. The behavior of the joint under loadings is discussed through a simulation by the numerical finite element method.

  9. The Effect of Filler Wire and Flux Compositions on the Microstructure and Properties of Microalloyed Steel Weld Metal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-08-01

    bainite, or even 0 T-2942 19 I if- N..4 oil ’ 100 Fiur 5. Eapl fwedmtl ccla erie (F fon in -iraloe HSL stes (%, th 1500x 1 ,I. KT-2942 20 0 h.. V U -CL...deoxidation and/or desulphurisation practice on the weld metal toughness of high dilution welds, Given in Proc. Intl. Conf. on The effects of

  10. Compact, lower-power-consumption wavelength tunable laser fabricated with silicon photonic-wire waveguide micro-ring resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Tao; Fujioka, Nobuhide; Ishizaka, Masashige

    2009-08-03

    A wavelength tunable laser with an SOA and external double micro-ring resonator, which is fabricated with silicon photonic-wire waveguides, is demonstrated. To date, it is the first wavelength tunable laser fabricated with silicon photonic technology. The device is ultra compact, and its external resonator footprint is 700 x 450 microm, which is about 1/25 that of conventional tunable lasers fabricated with SiON waveguides. The silicon resonator shows a wide tuning range covering the C or L bands for DWDM optical communication. We obtained a maximum tuning span of 38 nm at a tuning power consumption of 26 mW, which is about 1/8 that of SiON-type resonators.

  11. Design and fabrication of a three-finger prosthetic hand using SMA muscle wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simone, Filomena; York, Alexander; Seelecke, Stefan

    2015-03-01

    Bio-inspired hand-like gripper systems based on shape memory alloy (SMA) wire actuation have the potential to enable a number of useful applications in, e.g., the biomedical field or industrial assembly systems. The inherent high energy density makes SMA solutions a natural choice for systems with lightweight, low noise and high force requirements, such as hand prostheses or robotic systems in a human/machine environment. The focus of this research is the development, design and realization of a SMA-actuated prosthetic hand prototype with three fingers. The use of thin wires (100 μm diameter) allows for high cooling rates and therefore fast movement of each finger. Grouping several small wires mechanically in parallel allows for high force actuation. To save space and to allow for a direct transmission of the motion to each finger, the SMA wires are attached directly within each finger, across each phalanx. In this way, the contraction of the wires will allow the movement of the fingers without the use of any additional gears. Within each finger, two different bundles of wires are mounted: protagonist ones that create bending movement and the antagonist ones that enable stretching of each phalanx. The resistance change in the SMA wires is measured during actuation, which allows for monitoring of the wire stroke and potentially the gripping force without the use of additional sensors. The hand is built with modern 3D-printing technologies and its performance while grasping objects of different size and shape is experimentally investigated illustrating the usefulness of the actuator concept.

  12. Exploration of new superconductors and functional materials, and fabrication of superconducting tapes and wires of iron pnictides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosono, Hideo; Tanabe, Keiichi; Takayama-Muromachi, Eiji; Kageyama, Hiroshi; Yamanaka, Shoji; Kumakura, Hiroaki; Nohara, Minoru; Hiramatsu, Hidenori; Fujitsu, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    This review shows the highlights of a 4-year-long research project supported by the Japanese Government to explore new superconducting materials and relevant functional materials. The project found several tens of new superconductors by examining ∼1000 materials, each of which was chosen by Japanese experts with a background in solid state chemistry. This review summarizes the major achievements of the project in newly found superconducting materials, and the fabrication wires and tapes of iron-based superconductors; it incorporates a list of ∼700 unsuccessful materials examined for superconductivity in the project. In addition, described are new functional materials and functionalities discovered during the project. PMID:27877784

  13. Wearable Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Fabrics Produced by Knitting Flexible Wire Electrodes for the Decontamination of Chemical Warfare Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Heesoo; Seo, Jin Ah; Choi, Seungki

    2017-01-01

    One of the key reasons for the limited use of atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) is its inability to treat non-flat, three-dimensional (3D) surface structures, such as electronic devices and the human body, because of the rigid electrode structure required. In this study, a new APP system design—wearable APP (WAPP)—that utilizes a knitting technique to assemble flexible co-axial wire electrodes into a large-area plasma fabric is presented. The WAPP device operates in ambient air with a fully enclosed power electrode and grounded outer electrode. The plasma fabric is flexible and lightweight, and it can be scaled up for larger areas, making it attractive for wearable APP applications. Here, we report the various plasma properties of the WAPP device and successful test results showing the decontamination of toxic chemical warfare agents, namely, mustard (HD), soman (GD), and nerve (VX) agents.

  14. Optimization of a Non-arsenic Iron-based Superconductor for Wire Fabrication

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Jonathan E.; Hillesheim, Daniel A.; Bridges, Craig A.; Paranthaman, M. Parans; Gofryk, Kris; Rindfleisch, Mike; Tomsic, Mike; Sefat, Athena S.

    2014-01-01

    We report on the optimization of synthesis of iron-selenide (non-arsenic) superconducting powders that are based on '122' composition, with optimal Tc = 38 K and Jc = 10^5 A/cm2 (4 K). We also report on the wire proof-of concept for these materials, by producing ~ 40 ft of wire that produce Ic. The 122 selenides are more difficult to synthesize and have more complex crystal structures compared to '11' selenides (FeSe and FeSe1-xTex), but they do offer higher Tc and might provoke a natural ext...

  15. Thermal Conductivity of Industrial Nb3Sn Wires Fabricated by Various Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Bonura, Marco

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a new experimental setup specifically designed for measuring thermal conductivity on technical superconductors in the range of temperatures from 3 to 330 K in magnetic fields up to 21 T. Three Nb3Sn wires, produced by the powder in tube technique, the bronze route and the internal tin restacked rod process, respectively, have been investigated. We show that, due to the complexity of the architecture of these wires, direct measurement of thermal conductivity is required for a correct estimation of thermal stability in superconducting magnets.

  16. Fabrication and characterization of gold nano-wires templated on virus-like arrays of tobacco mosaic virus coat proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wnęk, M.; Górzny, M. Ł.; Ward, M. B.; Wälti, C.; Davies, A. G.; Brydson, R.; Evans, S. D.; Stockley, P. G.

    2013-01-01

    The rod-shaped plant virus tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) is widely used as a nano-fabrication template, and chimeric peptide expression on its major coat protein has extended its potential applications. Here we describe a simple bacterial expression system for production and rapid purification of recombinant chimeric TMV coat protein carrying C-terminal peptide tags. These proteins do not bind TMV RNA or form disks at pH 7. However, they retain the ability to self-assemble into virus-like arrays at acidic pH. C-terminal peptide tags in such arrays are exposed on the protein surface, allowing interaction with target species. We have utilized a C-terminal His-tag to create virus coat protein-templated nano-rods able to bind gold nanoparticles uniformly. These can be transformed into gold nano-wires by deposition of additional gold atoms from solution, followed by thermal annealing. The resistivity of a typical annealed wire created by this approach is significantly less than values reported for other nano-wires made using different bio-templates. This expression construct is therefore a useful additional tool for the creation of chimeric TMV-like nano-rods for bio-templating.

  17. Friction Stir Welding: Standards and Specifications in Today's U.S. Manufacturing and Fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    New welding and technology advancements are reflected in the friction stir welding (FSW) specifications used in the manufacturing sector. A lack of publicly available specifications as one of the reasons that the FSW process has not propagate through the manufacturing sectors. FSW specifications are an integral supporting document to the legal agreement written between two entities for deliverable items. Understanding the process and supporting specifications is essential for a successful FSW manufacturing operation. This viewgraph presentation provides an overview of current FSW standards in the industry and discusses elements common to weld specifications.

  18. High-performance dense MgB2 superconducting wire fabricated from mechanically milled powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Motomune; Suzuki, Takaaki; Tanaka, Hideki; Okishiro, Kenji; Okamoto, Kazutaka; Nishijima, Gen; Matsumoto, Akiyoshi; Yamamoto, Akiyasu; Shimoyama, Jun-ichi; Kishio, Kohji

    2017-04-01

    Owing to the relatively high critical temperature and the low manufacturing cost, MgB2 superconducting wires are promising for liquid helium-free superconducting applications. Today, commercially available MgB2 wires are manufactured by either an in situ or ex situ powder-in-tube process, the in situ process being more effective to obtain high critical current density. In in situ-processed wires, however, the critical current density is seriously suppressed by the high porosity of MgB2 filaments. To resolve this problem, we propose an innovative method of using precursor powder prepared by mechanical milling of magnesium, boron, and coronene powders. This precursor powder has a metal-matrix-composite structure, in which boron particles are dispersed in a magnesium matrix. The plastic deformation of the precursor powder through wire processing leads to compact packing, and a dense MgB2 filament is generated after heat treatment. As a result, the limitation of critical current density that occurs for the typical in situ process is overcome, and the practical critical current density of 103 A mm-2 is obtained at 10 K and 6.1 T, at 15 K and 4.8 T, and at 20 K and 3.3 T.

  19. Laser welding of pre-functionalized glass substrates: a fabrication and chemical stability study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, R. R.; Reuvekamp, S.; Zuilhof, H.; Blom, M. T.; Vrouwe, E. X.

    2018-01-01

    Low-temperature bonding of glass substrates is of great interest in the field of microfluidic-based biosensing, and we study how laser welding could be used for this. This technology allows for the modification of glass channels with temperature-sensitive materials prior to bonding. We study the effects of the welding process by investigation of the thermal degradation of a biotin monolayer and whether it retains the ability to conjugate with fluorescently-labelled streptavidin.

  20. A six-year follow-up of full-arch immediate restorations fabricated with an intraoral welding technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degidi, Marco; Nardi, Diego; Piattelli, Adriano

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the 6-year effectiveness of maxillary and mandibular full-arch immediately loaded prostheses fabricated using an intraoral welding technique. All patients received the same day of surgery a fixed, full-arch prosthesis supported by an intraorally welded titanium framework created directly in the patient's mouth using a titanium bar. Life table analysis of implant survival, complications, and any other adverse events were recorded at yearly follow-up for a period of 6 years. One hundred twenty-four (86.11%) of 144 implants placed in maxillary cases and 87 (77.68%) of 112 implants placed in mandible cases completed the planned 6-year follow-up. At the 72-month follow-up, the accumulated mean marginal bone loss was, respectively, 1.39 mm (SD = 0.67) for the implants placed in the maxilla (n = 124) and 1.29 mm (SD = 0.71) for the implants placed in the mandible (n = 87). Fracturing of the composite resin superstructure was the most common adverse event. After a 6-year follow-up period, the intraoral welding technique proved to be a predictable technique for successfully rehabilitating the fully edentulous patient with a fixed and immediate prosthesis.

  1. Corrosion fatigue performance in simulated sea water of aluminium 6061-T651 welded using ER4043 filler wire

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mutombo, K

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The fatigue life of Al6061-T651 for various applied stress amplitudes in the unwelded and welded conditions was significantly lower in 3.5% NaCl simulated sea water solution, compared to that in air. The damage ratio increased with a decrease...

  2. Fabrication and superconducting properties of a simple-structured jelly-roll Nb{sub 3}Al wire with low-temperature heat-treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, L.J. [National Engineering Laboratory for Superconducting Materials (NELSM), Western Superconducting Technologies (WST) Co. Ltd., Xi’an 710018 (China); Yan, G., E-mail: gyan@c-wst.com [National Engineering Laboratory for Superconducting Materials (NELSM), Western Superconducting Technologies (WST) Co. Ltd., Xi’an 710018 (China); Pan, X.F. [National Engineering Laboratory for Superconducting Materials (NELSM), Western Superconducting Technologies (WST) Co. Ltd., Xi’an 710018 (China); Zhang, P.X. [National Engineering Laboratory for Superconducting Materials (NELSM), Western Superconducting Technologies (WST) Co. Ltd., Xi’an 710018 (China); Northwest Institute for Nonferrous Metal Research (NIN), Xi’an 710016 (China); Qi, M. [Northwest Institute for Nonferrous Metal Research (NIN), Xi’an 710016 (China); Liu, X.H.; Feng, Y. [National Engineering Laboratory for Superconducting Materials (NELSM), Western Superconducting Technologies (WST) Co. Ltd., Xi’an 710018 (China); Chen, Y.L.; Zhao, Y. [Key Laboratory of Magnetic Levitation Technologies and Maglev Trains, Superconductivity and New Energy R& D Center, Southwest Jiaotong University (SWJTU), Chengdu 610031 (China)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Nb{sub 3}Al superconducting wires with Cu-matrix and different filament numbers were prepared by the jelly-roll method. • The length of 18-cores Nb{sub 3}Al superconducting wire reaches 100 m without any breakage and intermediate anneal. • This wire has the uniform filament-shapes and fine long-wire homogeneity. • This Nb{sub 3}Al long wire has the T{sub c} of 13.4 K and J{sub c} of 4.7 × 10{sup 4} A/cm{sup 2} at 4.2 K and 12 T. - Abstract: With extremely high critical current density (J{sub c}) and excellent strain tolerance, Nb{sub 3}Al superconductor is considered as an alternative to Nb{sub 3}Sn for application of high-field magnets. However, owing to their complex structure, Nb{sub 3}Al superconducting wires can hardly meet the requirement of engineering application at present. In this work, a novel simple-structured Nb{sub 3}Al superconducting wires with Cu-matrix and different filament numbers were prepared by the conventional jelly-roll method, as well as a heat-treatment of 800–850 °C for 20–50 h. The results show that a 18-filament superconducting wire with length longer than 100 m can be successfully prepared by this method, and also this Nb{sub 3}Al long wire has the T{sub c} of 13.4 K and J{sub c} of 4.7 × 10{sup 4} A/cm{sup 2} at 4.2 K and 12 T. These suggest that with further optimization, the simple-structured Nb{sub 3}Al superconducting wires are very promising to fabricate the km-grade long wires to meet the requirement of engineering application.

  3. Optimization of Welding Parameters of Submerged Arc Welding Using Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) Based on Taguchi Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, A.; Roy, J.; Majumder, A.; Saha, S. C.

    2014-04-01

    The present paper reports a new procedure using an analytic hierarchy process (AHP) based Taguchi method for the selection of the best welding parameters to fabricate submerged arc welding of plain carbon steel. Selection of best welding parameters is an unstructured decision problem involving process parameters for multiple weldments. In the present investigation, three process parameter variables i.e. wire feed rate (Wf), stick out (So) and traverse speed (Ts) and the three response parameters i.e. penetration, bead width and bead reinforcement have been considered. The objective of the present work is thus to improve the quality of the welded elements by using AHP analysis based Taguchi method. Taguchi L16 orthogonal array is used to perform with less number of experimental runs. Taguchi approach is insufficient to solve a multi response optimization problem. In order to overcome this limitation, a multi criteria decision making method, AHP is applied in the present study. The optimal condition to have a quality weld (i.e. bead geometry) is found at 210 mm/min of wire feed rate, 15 mm of stick out and 0.75 m/min of traverse speed and also observed that the effect of wire feed rate on the overall bead geometry properties is more significant than other welding parameters. Finally, a confirmatory test has been carried out to verify the optimal setting so obtained.

  4. Fabrication and Characterization of Ni-CNT Composites by Electrical Explosion of Wire in Different Liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thuyet-Nguyen M.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, Ni-CNT powders and colloids were synthesized via the Electrical explosion of wire (EEW in different liquid conditions. The influence of ambient solvents (D.I. Water, ethanol, methanol, acetone and ethylene-glycol on characteristics of the as-synthesized Ni-CNT was investigated. The morphology and size were observed by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM. The Ni particles were spherical or near spherical shape. The phase of the composite powders analyzed via X-ray diffraction demonstrate the presence of CNTs in composite powders is not affect the structure of Ni. However, the phase of the composites was changed based on the changing of liquid conditions. Stability of colloids was investigated by Turbiscan technique. Magnetic properties were also investigated by Vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM at room temperature. The as-synthesized composite powders revealed a ferromagnetic characteristic material.

  5. MOD Buffer/YBCO Approach to Fabricate Low-Cost Second Generation HTS Wires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans [ORNL; Sathyamurthy, Srivatsan [ORNL; Bhuiyan, Md S [ORNL; Martin, Patrick M [ORNL; Aytug, Tolga [ORNL; Kim, Kyunghoon [ORNL; Fayek, Mostafa [ORNL; Leonard, Keith J [ORNL; Li, Jing [ORNL; Zhang, W. [American Superconductor Corporation, Westborough, MA; Rupich, Marty [American Superconductor Corporation, Westborough, MA

    2007-01-01

    The metal organic deposition (MOD) of buffer layers on RABiTS substrates is considered a potential, low-cost approach to manufacturing high performance Second Generation (2G) high temperature superconducting (HTS) wires. The typical architecture used by American Superconductor in their 2G HTS wire consists of a Ni-W (5 at.%) substrate with a reactively sputtered Y2O3 seed layer, YSZ barrier layer and a CeO2 cap layer. This architecture supports critical currents of over 300 A/cm-width (77 K, self-field) with 0.8 mum YBCO films deposited by the TFA-MOD process. The main challenge in the development of the MOD buffers is to match or exceed the performance of the standard vacuum deposited buffer architecture. We have recently shown that the texture and properties of MOD - La2Zr2Ogamma (LZO) barrier layers can be improved by inserting a thin sputtered Y2O3 seed layer and prepared MOD deposited LZO layers followed by MOD or RF sputtered CeO2 cap layers that support MOD-YBCO films with Ic's of 200 and 255 A/cm-width, respectively. Detailed X-ray and microstructural characterizations indicated that MOD - CeO2 cap reacted completely with MOD YBCO to form BaCeOs. However, sputtered CeO2 cap/MOD YBCO interface remains clean. By further optimizing the coating conditions and reducing the heat-treatment temperatures, we have demonstrated an Ic of 336 A/cm with improved LZO layers and sputtered CeO2 cap and exceeded the performance of that of standard vacuum deposited buffers.

  6. Wire + Arc Additive Manufacturing

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Stewart W.; Martina, Filomeno; Addison, Adrian C.; Ding, Jialuo; Pardal, Goncalo; Colegrove, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Depositing large components (>10 kg) in titanium, aluminium, steel and other metals is possible using Wire + Arc Additive Manufacturing. This technology adopts arc welding tools and wire as feedstock for additive manufacturing purposes. High deposition rates, low material and equipment costs, and good structural integrity make Wire+Arc Additive Manufacturing a suitable candidate for replacing the current method of manufacturing from solid billets or large forgings, especially with regards to ...

  7. The Low Pressure Gas Effects On The Potency Of An Electron Beam On Ceramic Fabric Materials For Space Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.; Fragomeni, James M.; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This investigation was undertaken to evaluate if molten metal or electron beam impingement could damage or burn through the fabric of the astronauts Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) during electron beam welding exercises performed in space. An 8 kilovolt electron beam with a current in the neighborhood of 100 milliamps from the Ukrainian space welding "Universal Hand Tool" burned holes in Nextel AF-62 ceramic cloth designed to withstand temperatures up to 1427 C. The burnthrough time was on the order of 8 seconds at standoff distances between UHT and cloth ranging from 6 to 24 inches. At both closer (2") and farther (48") standoff distances the potency of the beam against the cloth declined and the burnthrough time went up significantly. Prior to the test it had been expected that the beam would lay down a static charge on the cloth and be deflected without damaging the cloth. The burnthrough is thought to be an effect of partial transmission of beam power by a stream of positive ions generated by the high voltage electron beam from contaminant gas in the "vacuum" chamber. A rough quantitative theoretical computation appears to substantiate this possibility.

  8. Numerical Simulation of Ti/Al Bimetal Composite Fabricated by Explosive Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Li

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a 2D numerical model that is more physically realistic was established to simulate the complete process of Ti/Al explosive welding. Basing on the ANSYS/AUTODYN software package, the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH and arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE were used for running this simulation. The numerical model can capture the typical physics in the explosive welding process, including the expansion of explosives, flyer plate bending, the impact of metal plates, jetting, and the wavy interface. The variable physical parameters during the explosive welding process were discussed. Most parts of the jet originated from the aluminum plate. According to the model, the jet velocity reached 7402 m/s. The pressure at the detonation point was too small to make the two plates to bond. The pressure could reach an order of magnitude of 107 kPa when the detonation energy tended to be stable and was far more than the yield strength of both materials, which resulted in an obvious narrow region of plastic strain emerging close to the collision zone. The signs of shear stresses between the two plates were the opposite. The interface morphology changed from straight to wave along the propagation of the detonation wave in the simulation, which was consistent with the experimental results.

  9. Fabrication of Nb{sub 3}Al superconducting wires by utilizing the mechanically alloyed Nb(Al){sub ss} supersaturated solid-solution with low-temperature annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, X.F. [National Engineering Laboratory for Superconducting Material, Western Superconducting Technologies (WST) Co., Ltd., Xi’an 710018 (China); Superconducting Materials Center, Northwest Institute for Nonferrous Metal Research, Xi’an 710016 (China); Yan, G., E-mail: gyan@c-nin.com [National Engineering Laboratory for Superconducting Material, Western Superconducting Technologies (WST) Co., Ltd., Xi’an 710018 (China); Superconducting Materials Center, Northwest Institute for Nonferrous Metal Research, Xi’an 710016 (China); Qi, M. [Superconducting Materials Center, Northwest Institute for Nonferrous Metal Research, Xi’an 710016 (China); Cui, L.J. [National Engineering Laboratory for Superconducting Material, Western Superconducting Technologies (WST) Co., Ltd., Xi’an 710018 (China); Chen, Y.L.; Zhao, Y. [Key Laboratory of Magnetic Levitation Technologies and Maglev Trains (Ministry of Education of China), Superconductivity and New Energy R and D Center, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Li, C.S. [Superconducting Materials Center, Northwest Institute for Nonferrous Metal Research, Xi’an 710016 (China); Liu, X.H. [National Engineering Laboratory for Superconducting Material, Western Superconducting Technologies (WST) Co., Ltd., Xi’an 710018 (China); Feng, Y.; Zhang, P.X. [National Engineering Laboratory for Superconducting Material, Western Superconducting Technologies (WST) Co., Ltd., Xi’an 710018 (China); Key Laboratory of Magnetic Levitation Technologies and Maglev Trains (Ministry of Education of China), Superconductivity and New Energy R and D Center, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Liu, H.J. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Hefei 230031 (China); and others

    2014-07-15

    Highlights: • This paper reported superconducting properties of the powder-in-tube Nb{sub 3}Al wires. • The Nb{sub 3}Al wires were made by using Nb(Al){sub ss} supersaturated solid solution powders. • The Cu-matrix Nb{sub 3}Al superconducting wires have been successfully fabricated. • The transport J{sub c} of Nb{sub 3}Al wires at 4.2 K, 10 T is up to 12,700 A/cm{sup 2}. - Abstract: High-performance Nb{sub 3}Al superconducting wire is a promising candidate to the application of high-field magnets. However, due to the production problem of km-grade wires that are free from low magnetic field instability, the Nb{sub 3}Al wires made by rapid heating, quenching and transformation (RHQT) are still not available to the large-scale engineering application. In this paper, we reported the properties of the in situ powder-in-tube (PIT) Nb{sub 3}Al superconducting wires, which were made by using the mechanically alloyed Nb(Al){sub ss} supersaturated solid solution, as well as the low temperature heat-treatment at 800 °C for 10 h. The results show that Nb{sub 3}Al superconductors in this method possess very fine grains and well superconducting properties, though a little of Nb{sub 2}Al and Nb impurities still keep being existence at present work. At the Nb{sub 3}Al with a nominal 26 at.% Al content, the onset T{sub c} reaches 15.8 K. Furthermore, a series of Nb{sub 3}Al wires and tapes with various sizes have been fabricated; for the 1.0 mm-diameter wire, the J{sub c} at 4.2 K, 10 T and 14 T have achieved 12,700 and 6900 A/cm{sup 2}, respectively. This work suggests it is possible to develop high-performance Cu-matrix Nb{sub 3}Al superconducting wires by directly using the Nb(Al){sub ss} supersaturated solid-solution without the complex RHQT heat-treatment process.

  10. Single wire radial junction photovoltaic devices fabricated using aluminum catalyzed silicon nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Y.; Wang, X.; Weng, X. J.; Kendrick, C. E.; Yu, Y. A.; Eichfeld, S. M.; Yoon, H. P.; Redwing, J. M.; Mayer, T. S.; Habib, Y. M.

    2011-11-01

    Single nanowire radial junction solar cell devices were fabricated using Si nanowires synthesized by Al-catalyzed vapor-liquid-solid growth of the p + core (Al auto-doping) and thin film deposition of the n + -shell at temperatures below 650 °C. Short circuit current densities of ~ 11.7 mA cm - 2 were measured under 1-sun AM1.5G illumination, showing enhanced optical absorption. The power conversion efficiencies were limited to junction shunt leakage promoted by the high p + /n + doping. This demonstration of a radial junction device represents an important advance in the use of Al-catalyzed Si nanowire growth for low cost photovoltaics.

  11. Microstructural Characteristics and Mechanical Properties of 2205/AZ31B Laminates Fabricated by Explosive Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Li

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available A bimetal composite of 2205 duplex stainless steel and AZ31B magnesium alloy was cladded successfully through the method of explosive welding. The microstructural characteristics and mechanical properties of 2205/AZ31B bimetal composite are discussed. The interface of 2205/AZ31B bimetallic composite was a less regular wavy morphology with locally melted pockets. Adiabatic shear bands occurred only in the AZ31B side near explosive welding interface. The microstructure observed with EBSD showed a strong refinement near the interface zones. Line scan confirmed that the interface had a short element diffusion zone which would contribute to the metallurgical bonding between 2205 duplex stainless steel and AZ31B magnesium alloy. The value of micro-hardness near the bonding interface of composite plate increased because of work hardening and grain refinement. The tensile shear strength of bonding interface of 2205/AZ31B composite was 105.63 MPa. Tensile strength of 2205/AZ31B composite material was higher than the base AZ31B. There were two abrupt drops in stress in the stress–strain curves of the 2205/AZ31B composite materials.

  12. Comparação do desempenho operacional e das características do cordão na soldagem com diferentes arames tubulares Comparison of operational performance and bead characteristics when welding with different tubular wires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cícero Murta Diniz Starling

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho objetivou o estudo comparativo das características do cordão produzido por arames tubulares nacionais dos tipos rutílico (ASME SFA-5.20: E71T-1/E71T-9/E71T-9M, básico (ASME SFA-5.20: E71T-5/E71T-5M e "metal cored" (ASME SFA-5.18: E70C3M com 1,2 mm, destinados à soldagem de aços estruturais de baixo e médio teor de carbono. Realizaram-se testes de soldagem, na posição plana, sobre chapas grossas (espessura de 12 mm de aço carbono comum de baixo carbono utilizando-se uma fonte operando no modo "tensão constante" e com monitoração dos sinais de corrente e tensão do arco e velocidade de alimentação (fusão do arame. Variaram-se, na soldagem com cada tipo de arame tubular, a composição do gás de proteção (75%Ar-25%CO2 e 100%CO2 e a velocidade de alimentação do arame (7 e 9 m/min. Os demais parâmetros foram mantidos fixos, incluindo-se a polaridade do eletrodo (CC+ e os comprimentos energizado do eletrodo (16 mm e do arco (3,5 mm. Para os diferentes arames tubulares, avaliaram-se comparativamente as principais características do cordão, incluindo a sua geometria (penetração, reforço, largura, área fundida, área depositada e diluição, presença de descontinuidades, microestrutura e dureza. Levantaram-se as condições operacionais associadas a um cordão com características adequadas à soldagem de chapas grossas de aços estruturais.This paper compares the bead characteristics of welds deposited of carbon steel tubular wires. Three tubular wires of 1.2 mm produced in Brazil were used: rutilic (ASME SFA-5.20: E71T-1/E71T-9/E71T-9M, basic (ASME SFA-5.20: E71T-5/E71T-5M and metal cored (ASME SFA-5.18: E70C-3M. Welding trials were performed in downhand position on thick (12 mm low-carbon steel plates using a constant voltage power supply. Welding current and voltage, and wire feed rate were monitored in all trials. For each tubular wire type, the shielding gas composition (75%Ar-25%CO2 and 100%CO2 and wire

  13. Fabrication of Aluminum Foam-Filled Thin-Wall Steel Tube by Friction Welding and Its Compression Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hangai, Yoshihiko; Saito, Masaki; Utsunomiya, Takao; Kitahara, Soichiro; Kuwazuru, Osamu; Yoshikawa, Nobuhiro

    2014-09-19

    Aluminum foam has received considerable attention in various fields and is expected to be used as an engineering material owing to its high energy absorption properties and light weight. To improve the mechanical properties of aluminum foam, combining it with dense tubes, such as aluminum foam-filled tubes, was considered necessary. In this study, an aluminum foam-filled steel tube, which consisted of ADC12 aluminum foam and a thin-wall steel tube, was successfully fabricated by friction welding. It was shown that a diffusion bonding layer with a thickness of approximately 10 μm was formed, indicating that strong bonding between the aluminum foam and the steel tube was realized. By the X-ray computed tomography observation of pore structures, the fabrication of an aluminum foam-filled tube with almost uniform pore structures over the entire specimen was confirmed. In addition, it was confirmed that the aluminum foam-filled steel tube exhibited mechanical properties superior to those of the ADC12 aluminum foam and steel tube. This is considered to be attributed to the combination of the aluminum foam and steel tube, which particularly prevents the brittle fracture and collapse of the ADC12 foam by the steel tube, along with the strong metal bonding between the aluminum foam and the steel tube.

  14. Fabrication of Aluminum Foam-Filled Thin-Wall Steel Tube by Friction Welding and Its Compression Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiko Hangai

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum foam has received considerable attention in various fields and is expected to be used as an engineering material owing to its high energy absorption properties and light weight. To improve the mechanical properties of aluminum foam, combining it with dense tubes, such as aluminum foam-filled tubes, was considered necessary. In this study, an aluminum foam-filled steel tube, which consisted of ADC12 aluminum foam and a thin-wall steel tube, was successfully fabricated by friction welding. It was shown that a diffusion bonding layer with a thickness of approximately 10 μm was formed, indicating that strong bonding between the aluminum foam and the steel tube was realized. By the X-ray computed tomography observation of pore structures, the fabrication of an aluminum foam-filled tube with almost uniform pore structures over the entire specimen was confirmed. In addition, it was confirmed that the aluminum foam-filled steel tube exhibited mechanical properties superior to those of the ADC12 aluminum foam and steel tube. This is considered to be attributed to the combination of the aluminum foam and steel tube, which particularly prevents the brittle fracture and collapse of the ADC12 foam by the steel tube, along with the strong metal bonding between the aluminum foam and the steel tube.

  15. Characterization on strength and toughness of welded joint for Q550 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Q550 high strength steel was welded using gas shielded arc welding and three different welding wires without pre- or post-heat treatments. The paper investigates the influence of welding wire on the microstructure, tensile strength and impact toughness of Q550 steel weld joints. Results showed that the ...

  16. Characterization on strength and toughness of welded joint for Q550 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Q550 high strength steel was welded using gas shielded arc welding and three different welding wires without pre- or post-heat treatments. The paper investigates the influence of welding wire on the microstructure, tensile strength and impact toughness of Q550 steel weld joints. Results showed that the microstructure of ...

  17. Fabrication and application of mesoporous TiO{sub 2} film coated on Al wire by sol-gel method with EISA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Linkang; Lu, Jianjun, E-mail: lujianjunktz@tyut.edu.cn

    2017-04-30

    Highlights: • Successfully fabricated mesoporous TiO{sub 2} thin film on Al wire by sol-gel method with EISA. • Ni supported on this film and exhibits good methanation performance. • Investigate the decomposition temperature of template agent F127 in TiO{sub 2} precursor system. - Abstract: Mesoporous TiO{sub 2} film on Al wire was fabricated by sol-gel method with evaporation induced self assembly (EISA) process using F127 as templating agent in the mixed solution of ethanol and Tetra-n-butyl Titanate. The Ni/TiO{sub 2} film catalyst supported on Al wire was prepared by impregnation and the catalytic performance on methanation was carried out in a titanium alloy micro-reactor tube. It was shown that anatase mesoporous TiO{sub 2} film was prepared in this conditions (1 g F127,calcined at 400 °C and aged for 24 h), which has specific surface area of 127 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} and narrow pore size distribution of 5.3 nm. Low calcined temperature (300 °C) cannot transfer film to anatase and decompose F127 completely. Ni/TiO{sub 2} film on Al wire catalyst was proved to be active in CO methanation reaction. And the CO conversion reaches 99% and CH{sub 4} selectivity close is to 80% when the reaction temperature is higher 360 °C.

  18. Wire EDM for Refractory Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zellars, G. R.; Harris, F. E.; Lowell, C. E.; Pollman, W. M.; Rys, V. J.; Wills, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    In an attempt to reduce fabrication time and costs, Wire Electrical Discharge Machine (Wire EDM) method was investigated as tool for fabricating matched blade roots and disk slots. Eight high-strength nickel-base superalloys were used. Computer-controlled Wire EDM technique provided high quality surfaces with excellent dimensional tolerances. Wire EDM method offers potential for substantial reductions in fabrication costs for "hard to machine" alloys and electrically conductive materials in specific high-precision applications.

  19. Contribution of precipitate on migrated grain boundaries to ductility-dip cracking in Alloy 625 weld joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Jin; Kim, Youn Soo; Shin, Yong Taek; Jeon, Eon Chan; Lee, Sang Hwa; Lee, Hyo-Jong; Lee, Sung Keun; Lee, Jun Hee; Lee, Hae Woo

    2010-10-01

    We investigated the crack properties in Alloy 625 weld metals and their characteristics using experimentally designed filler wires fabricated by varying the niobium and manganese contents in the flux with the shield metal arc welding (SMAW) process. The fast diffusivity of niobium on the migrated grain boundary (MGB) under strong restraint tensile stress, which was induced by the hardened matrix in weld metal containing high niobium and manganese, accelerated the growth of niobium carbide (NbC) in multipass deposits. Coalescence of microvoids along with incoherent NbC and further propagation induced ductility-dip cracking (DDC) on MGB.

  20. Photovoltaic fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-22

    system described above, and connected to the PLC , is used to identify primary and secondary OPV wires and signal the PLC when a wire is positioned...problem centered on our inability to weld PV wires in an automated process. A completely automated system must   2    comprise three functions. The...been automated . Second, a vision system that is capable of distinguishing the primary and secondary electrodes has been demonstrated and installed as

  1. Weld procedure produces quality welds for thick sections of Hastelloy-X

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flens, F. J.; Fletcher, C. W.; Glasier, L. F., Jr.

    1967-01-01

    Welding program produces premium quality, multipass welds in heavy tube sections of Hastelloy-X. It develops semiautomatic tungsten/inert gas procedures, weld wire procurement specifications material weld properties, welder-operator training, and nondestructive testing inspection techniques and procedures.

  2. Caracterização do cordão na soldagem FCAW com um arame tubular "metal cored" Bead characterization on FCAW welding of a metal cored tubular wire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cícero Murta Diniz Starling

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho objetivou o estudo do efeito de algumas condições operacionais nas características do cordão produzido por um arame tubular "metal cored" (ASME SFA-5.18: E70C-3M de fabricação nacional com 1,2 mm de diâmetro, destinado à soldagem de aços carbono comuns estruturais de baixo e médio teor de carbono. Realizaram-se testes de soldagem, na posição plana, sobre chapas grossas (espessura de 12 mm de aço de baixo carbono utilizando-se uma fonte operando no modo "tensão constante" e com monitoração dos sinais de corrente e tensão do arco e velocidade de alimentação (fusão do arame. Variaram-se a composição do gás de proteção (75%Ar-25%CO2 e 100%CO2, a polaridade do eletrodo (positiva e negativa e a velocidade de alimentação do arame (7 e 9 m/min. Os demais parâmetros de soldagem foram mantidos fixos, incluindo-se os comprimentos energizado do eletrodo (16 mm e do arco (3,5 mm. Avaliaram-se os efeitos das condições operacionais nas principais características do cordão incluindo a sua geometria (penetração, reforço, largura, área fundida, área depositada e diluição, presença de descontinuidades, microestrutura e dureza. Levantaram-se, para o arame "metal cored", as condições operacionais de maior produtividade (maior taxa de deposição associadas a um cordão com características adequadas à soldagem de chapas grossas de aços estruturais.This work evaluates the relationship between operational conditions and the characteristics of weld beads deposited with a 1.2 mm produced in Brazil metal cored tubular wire (ASME SFA-5.18: E70C-3M. Welding trials were performed in downhand position on 12mm thick low-carbon steel plates using a constant voltage power supply. Welding current and voltage, and wire feed rate were monitored in all trials. While the shielding gas composition (75%Ar-25%CO2 and 100%CO2, wire polarity, and wire feed rate (7 and 9 m/min were changed, other process variables, including

  3. Evaluation of a new method for chemical coating of aluminum wire with molecularly imprinted polymer layer. Application for the fabrication of triazines selective solid-phase microextraction fiber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djozan, Djavanshir, E-mail: djozan@tabrizu.ac.ir [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ebrahimi, Bahram [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahkam, Mehrdad [Chemistry Department, Azarbaijan University of Tarbiat Moallem, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Farajzadeh, Mir Ali [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-07-26

    A new solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fiber is fabricated through ultra violet irradiation polymerization of ametryn-molecularly imprinted polymer on the surface of anodized-silylated aluminum wire. The prepared fiber is durable with very good chemical and thermal stability which can be coupled to GC and GC/MS. The effective parameters on the fabrication and application procedures such as spraying mode, ultra violet irradiation (polymerization) time, number of sprayings and polymerizations, pH and ionic strength of sample and extraction time were optimized. This fiber shows high selectivity with great extraction capacity toward triazines. SPME and GC analysis of ametryn, prometryn, terbutryn, atrazine, simazine, propazine and cyanazine using the fabricated fiber result in the detection limits of 9, 32, 27, 43, 51, 74 and 85 ng mL{sup -1}, respectively. The reliability of the prepared fiber in real samples has been investigated and proved by using spiked tap water, rice, maize and onion samples.

  4. Effect of Hot-Bending Process on Microstructure and Mechanical Property of K65 Submerged ARC Welded Pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Liming; Zhang, Yu; Pan, Xin; Wang, Yinbai

    Hot-bended pipes are essential parts in the construction of long distance pipeline. They are usually made from longitudinally submerged arc welding (LSAW) pipes subjected to hot bending process including quenching and tempering process, which often deteriorates the impact property of the welded pipe. A hot-bended LSAW pipe with a wall thickness of 30.8 mm was fabricated by double-sided four wires submerged arc welding with solid wire and fused flux. Microstructural and property of both as-weld and as-bended pipe were examined. The pipes in two states show a similar tensile strength of 665-670 MPa, and fail in the heat affected zone during the tensile test. The weld metal of as-welded pipe consists of acicular ferrite and small fraction bainite and M-A constituents, while mixture of polygonal ferrite, degenerate perlite and precipitated carbides of metal elements was found in the weld metal of the as-bended pipe. The hot bending process decreases the fraction of acicular ferrite from 66.4 to 47.5%, and the fraction of high angle grain boundary from 76.8 to 67.1%. Therefore, both the type of microstructure and the fraction of ductile microstructures were the influencing factors of weld metal impact toughness, which lead to a reduction from 162 J to 84 J at -40°C.

  5. Self-Reacting Friction Stir Welding for Aluminum Alloy Circumferential Weld Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorkman, Gerry; Cantrell, Mark; Carter, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Friction stir welding is an innovative weld process that continues to grow in use, in the commercial, defense, and space sectors. It produces high quality and high strength welds in aluminum alloys. The process consists of a rotating weld pin tool that plasticizes material through friction. The plasticized material is welded by applying a high weld forge force through the weld pin tool against the material during pin tool rotation. The high weld forge force is reacted against an anvil and a stout tool structure. A variation of friction stir welding currently being evaluated is self-reacting friction stir welding. Self-reacting friction stir welding incorporates two opposing shoulders on the crown and root sides of the weld joint. In self-reacting friction stir welding, the weld forge force is reacted against the crown shoulder portion of the weld pin tool by the root shoulder. This eliminates the need for a stout tooling structure to react the high weld forge force required in the typical friction stir weld process. Therefore, the self-reacting feature reduces tooling requirements and, therefore, process implementation costs. This makes the process attractive for aluminum alloy circumferential weld applications. To evaluate the application of self-reacting friction stir welding for aluminum alloy circumferential welding, a feasibility study was performed. The study consisted of performing a fourteen-foot diameter aluminum alloy circumferential demonstration weld using typical fusion weld tooling. To accomplish the demonstration weld, weld and tack weld development were performed and fourteen-foot diameter rings were fabricated. Weld development consisted of weld pin tool selection and the generation of a process map and envelope. Tack weld development evaluated gas tungsten arc welding and friction stir welding for tack welding rings together for circumferential welding. As a result of the study, a successful circumferential demonstration weld was produced leading

  6. Influência das correntes de soldagem do processo plasma-MIG sobre a geometria do cordão de solda e taxa de fusão do arame Influence of welding current in plasma-MIG weld process on the bead weld geometry and wire fusion rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Alves de Resende

    2009-12-01

    literature, there are shortage of information related to the process, and most of them remote from 70’s and 80’s years, when the available technology was not able to make the process viable for the industry. However, in the last years, the diffusion of new electronic power sources used in welding brought up again the interest in Plasma-MIG process. In this context, this work aimed to contribute to the studies related to the influence of the MIG and Plasma current balance on the geometry of the bead weld and wire fusion rate. Bead-on-plates weld were carried out with a Plasma and MIG/MAG current combinations at 3 levels each, keeping, by welding speed corrections, the bead volume the same. It was observed that the introduction of the Plasma current over the MIG/MG current reduces penetration and dilution and lead to less convex beads. On the other hand, the use of Plasma current increases the MIG/MAG wire fusion rate. However, it seems that the intensity of the Plasma current is not the governing parameter on those changes.

  7. Weld overlay cladding with iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodwin, G.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-08-01

    The hot and cold cracking tendencies of some early iron aluminide alloy compositions have limited their use in applications where good weldability is required. Using hot crack testing techniques invented at ORNL, and experimental determinations of preheat and postweld heat treatment needed to avoid cold cracking, we have developed iron aluminide filler metal compositions which can be successfully used to weld overlay clad various substrate materials, including 9Cr-1Mo steel, 2-1/4Cr-1Mo steel, and 300-series austenitic stainless steels. Dilution must be carefully controlled to avoid crack-sensitive deposit compositions. The technique used to produce the current filler metal compositions is aspiration-casting, i.e. drawing the liquid from the melt into glass rods. Future development efforts will involve fabrication of composite wires of similar compositions to permit mechanized gas tungsten arc (GTA) and/or gas metal arc (GMA) welding.

  8. Fabrication, Structural Characterization and Uniaxial Tensile Properties of Novel Sintered Multi-Layer Wire Mesh Porous Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liuyang Duan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available There is an increasing interest in developing porous metals or metallic foams for functional and structural applications. The study of the physical and mechanical properties of porous metals is very important and helpful for their application. In this paper, a novel sintered multilayer wire mesh porous plate material (WMPPs with a thickness of 0.5 mm–3 mm and a porosity of 10–35% was prepared by winding, pressing, rolling, and subsequently vacuum sintering them. The pore size and total size distribution in the as-prepared samples were investigated using the bubble point method. The uniaxial tensile behavior of the WMPPs was investigated in terms of the sintering temperature, porosity, wire diameter, and manufacturing technology. The deformation process and the failure mechanism under the tensile press was also discussed based on the appearance of the fractures (SEM figures. The results indicated that the pore size and total size distribution were closely related to the raw material used and the sintering temperature. For the WMPPs prepared by the wire mesh, the pore structures were inerratic and the vast majority of pore size was less than 10 μm. On the other hand, for the WMPPs that were prepared by wire mesh and powder, the pore structures were irregular and the pore size ranged from 0 μm–50 μm. The experimental data showed that the tensile strength of WMPPs is much higher than any other porous metals or metallic foams. Higher sintering temperatures led to coarser joints between wires and resulted in higher tensile strength. The sintering temperature decreased from 1330 °C to 1130 °C and the tensile strength decreased from 296 MPa to 164 MPa. Lower porosity means that there are more metallurgical joints and metallic frameworks resisting deformation per unit volume. Therefore, lower porosities exhibit higher tensile strength. An increase of porosity from 17.14% to 32.5% led to the decrease of the tensile strength by 90 MPa. The

  9. Effect of Tool-Path on Morphology and Mechanical Properties of Ti-6Al-4V Fabricated by Wire and Arc Additive Manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Jie

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ti-6Al-4V components are widely used in aerospace industry. However, it’s not economic to manufacture them in traditional subtractive methods. Wire and arc additive manufacturing (WAAM is a promising alternative technology for fabricating it efficiently and economically. Tool-path planning strategy is a very important step in WAAM process. This paper investigated the influence of the lap way between layers and layers in tool-path on the Ti-6Al-4V samples fabricated by WAAM. It has been found that the lap way between layers and layers in tool-path do influence the forming quality and especially mechanical properties of the fabricated samples. Samples have different surface quality (smooth or undulating and defects inside or on the surface of the components. The highest and smallest ultra tensile strength of the fabricated samples are respectively 907.86 MPa, 684.82 MPa. But it has few effect on the grains of the fabricated samples, and they all have cross-sectional columnar grains.

  10. Temperature Changes of Pulp Chamber during In Vitro Laser Welding of Orthodontic Attachments

    Science.gov (United States)

    İşman, Eren; Okşayan, Rıdvan; Sökücü, Oral; Üşümez, Serdar

    2014-01-01

    The use of lasers has been suggested for orthodontists to fabricate or repair orthodontic appliances by welding metals directly in the mouth. This work aimed to evaluate the temperature changes in the pulp chamber during welding of an orthodontic wire to an orthodontic molar band using Nd : YAG laser in vitro. A freshly extracted human third molar with eliminated pulpal tissues was used. J-type thermocouple wire was positioned in the pulp chamber. A conductor gel was used in the transferring of outside temperature changes to the thermocouple wire. An orthodontic band was applied to the molar tooth and bonded using light cured orthodontic cement. Twenty five mm length of 0.6 mm diameter orthodontic stainless steel wires was welded to the orthodontic band using Nd : YAG laser operated at 9.4 watt. Temperature variation was determined as the change from baseline temperature to the highest temperature was recorded during welding. The recorded temperature changes were between 1.8 and 6.8°C (mean: 3.3 ± 1.1°C). The reported critical 5.5°C level was exceeded in only one sample. The results of this study suggest that intraoral use of lasers holds great potential for the future of orthodontics and does not present a thermal risk. Further studies with larger samples and structural analysis are required. PMID:24550714

  11. Temperature Changes of Pulp Chamber during In Vitro Laser Welding of Orthodontic Attachments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eren İşman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of lasers has been suggested for orthodontists to fabricate or repair orthodontic appliances by welding metals directly in the mouth. This work aimed to evaluate the temperature changes in the pulp chamber during welding of an orthodontic wire to an orthodontic molar band using Nd : YAG laser in vitro. A freshly extracted human third molar with eliminated pulpal tissues was used. J-type thermocouple wire was positioned in the pulp chamber. A conductor gel was used in the transferring of outside temperature changes to the thermocouple wire. An orthodontic band was applied to the molar tooth and bonded using light cured orthodontic cement. Twenty five mm length of 0.6 mm diameter orthodontic stainless steel wires was welded to the orthodontic band using Nd : YAG laser operated at 9.4 watt. Temperature variation was determined as the change from baseline temperature to the highest temperature was recorded during welding. The recorded temperature changes were between 1.8 and 6.8°C (mean: 3.3 ± 1.1°C. The reported critical 5.5°C level was exceeded in only one sample. The results of this study suggest that intraoral use of lasers holds great potential for the future of orthodontics and does not present a thermal risk. Further studies with larger samples and structural analysis are required.

  12. Evaluation and Optimization of a Hybrid Manufacturing Process Combining Wire Arc Additive Manufacturing with Milling for the Fabrication of Stiffened Panels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Li

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a hybrid WAAM (wire arc additive manufacturing and milling process (HWMP, and highlights its application in the fabrication of stiffened panels that have wide applications in aviation, aerospace, and automotive industries, etc. due to their light weight and strong load-bearing capability. In contrast to existing joining or machining methods, HWMP only deposits stiffeners layer-by-layer onto an existing thin plate, followed by minor milling of the irregular surfaces, which provides the possibility to significantly improve material utilization and efficiency without any loss of surface quality. In this paper, the key performances of HWMP in terms of surface quality, material utilization and efficiency are evaluated systematically, which are the results of the comprehensive effects of the deposition parameters (e.g., travel speed, wire-feed rate and the milling parameters (e.g., spindle speed, tool-feed rate. In order to maximize its performances, the optimization is also performed to find the best combination of the deposition and the milling parameters. The case study shows that HWMP with the optimal process parameters improves the material utilization by 57% and the efficiency by 32% compared against the traditional machining method. Thus, HWMP is believed to be a more environmental friendly and sustainable method for the fabrication of stiffened panels or other similar structures.

  13. Caracterização do cordão na soldagem FCAW com um srame tubular rutílico Bead characterization on FCAW welding of a rutilic tubular wire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cícero Murta Diniz Starling

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho objetivou o estudo do efeito de algumas condições operacionais nas características do cordão produzido por um arame tubular rutílico (ASME SFA-5.20: E71T-1/E71T-9/E71T-9M de fabricação nacional com 1,2mm de diâmetro, destinado à soldagem de aços carbono comuns estruturais de baixo e médio teor de carbono. Realizaram-se testes de soldagem, na posição plana, sobre chapas grossas (espessura de 12mm de aço carbono comum de baixo carbono utilizando-se uma fonte operando no modo "tensão constante" e com monitoração dos sinais de corrente e tensão do arco e velocidade de alimentação (fusão do arame. Variaram-se a composição do gás de proteção (75%Ar-25%CO2 e 100%CO2, a polaridade do eletrodo (positiva e negativa e a velocidade de alimentação do arame (7 e 9m/min. Os demais parâmetros de soldagem foram mantidos fixos, incluindo-se os comprimentos energizado do eletrodo (16mm e do arco (3,5mm. Avaliaram-se os efeitos das condições operacionais nas principais características do cordão incluindo a sua geometria (penetração, reforço, largura, área fundida, área depositada e diluição, presença de descontinuidades, microestrutura e dureza. Levantaram-se, para o arame rutílico, as condições operacionais de maior produtividade (maior taxa de deposição associadas a um cordão com características adequadas à soldagem de chapas grossas de aços estruturais.This paper studies the effect of operational conditions on bead shape characteristics in FCA welding with a Brazilian made wire with rutilic flux (ASME SFA-5.20: E71T-1/E71T-9/E71T-9M of 1.2mm diameter. Bead-on-plate downhand welding trials were performed on 12mm thick low carbon steel plates with a constant voltage power supply. A digital data logging system was used to measure the welding current and voltage, and wire feed rate. While the shielding gas composition (75%Ar-25%CO2 and 100%CO2, wire polarity and feed rate (7 and 9m/min were varied

  14. 49 CFR 179.300-9 - Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding. 179.300-9 Section 179.300-9... Specifications for Multi-Unit Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-106A and 110AW) § 179.300-9 Welding. (a) Longitudinal... fusion welded on class DOT-110A tanks. Welding procedures, welders and fabricators must be approved in...

  15. TECHNOLOGICAL ISSUES IN MECHANISED FEED WIG/TIG WELDING SURFACING OF WELDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BURCA Mircea

    2016-09-01

    manual welding tests in the light of using the process for welding surfacing being known that in such applications mechanised operations are recommended whenever possible given the latter strengths i.e. increased productivity and quality deposits. The research also aims at achieving a comparative a study between wire mechanised feed based WIG manual welding and the manual rod entry based manual welding in terms of geometry deposits, deposits aesthetics, operating technique, productivity, etc . In this regard deposits were made by means of two welding procedures, and subsequently welding surfacing was made with the optimum values of the welding parameters in this case.

  16. An Assessment of Molten Metal Detachment Hazards During Electron Beam Welding in the Space Shuttle Bay at LEO for the International Space Welding Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragomeni, James M.

    1996-01-01

    possible causes such as welder procedural error, externally applied impulsive forces(s), filler wire entrainment and snap-out, cutting expulsion, and puddle expulsion. Molten metal detachment from either the weld/cut substrate or weld wire could present harm to a astronaut in the space environment it the detachment was ti burn through the fabric of the astronaut Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMC). In this paper an experimental test was performed in a 4 ft. x 4 ft. vacuum chamber at MSFC enabling protective garment to be exposed to the molten metal drop detachments to over 12 inches. The chamber was evacuated to vacuum levels of at least 1 x 10(exp -5) torr (50 micro-torr) during operation of the 1.0 kW Universal Hand Tool (UHT). The UHT was manually operated at the power mode appropriate for each material and thickness. The space suit protective welding garment, made of Teflon fabric (10 oz. per yard) with a plain weave, was placed on the floor of the vacuum chamber to catch the molten metal drop detachments. A pendulum release mechanism consisting of four hammers, each weighing approximately 3.65 lbs, was used to apply an impact forces to the weld sample/plate during both the electron beam welding and cutting exercises. Measurements were made of the horizontal fling distances of the detached molten metal drops. The volume of a molten metal drop can also be estimated from the size of the cut. Utilizing equations, calculations were made to determine chande in surafec area (Delat a(surface)) for 304 stainless steel for cutting based on measurements of metal drop sizes at the cut edges. For the cut sample of 304 stainless steel based on measurement of the drop size at the edge, Delta-a(surface) was determined to be 0.0054 2 in . Calculations have indicated only a small amount of energy is required to detach a liquid metal drop. For example, approximately only 0.000005 ft-lb of energy is necessary to detach a liquid metal steel drop based on the above theoretical analysis

  17. Computer-aided design and fabrication of wire-wrap (trademark) type circuit boards: A new symbolism and its implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montminy, B.; Carbonneau, R.; Laflamme, A.; Lessard, M.; Blanchard, A.

    1982-02-01

    We define here an encoding symbolism that permits, with a minimum of statements, a thorough description of the numerous interconnections of complex electronic circuitry. This symbolism has been integrated at the Defence Research Establishment Valcartier in a computer-aided method that considerably eases the passage between an engineering electronic schematic and the related interconnection matrix required for Wire-Wrap (Trademark) hardware. Electronics prototyping has been dramatically speeded up with this technique because of the time savings in the preparatory reduction of interconnection data.

  18. Wire core reactor for NTP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harty, R. B.

    1991-01-01

    The development of the wire core system for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) that took place from 1963 to 1965 is discussed. A wire core consists of a fuel wire with spacer wires. It's an annular flow core having a central control rod. There are actually four of these, with beryllium solid reflectors on both ends and all the way around. Much of the information on the concept is given in viewgraph form. Viewgraphs are presented on design details of the wire core, the engine design, engine weight vs. thrust, a technique used to fabricate the wire fuel element, and axial temperature distribution.

  19. Virtual Welded - Joint Design Integrating Advanced Materials and Processing Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Zhishang; Ludewig, Howard W.; Babu, S. Suresh

    2005-06-30

    Virtual Welede-Joint Design, a systematic modeling approach, has been developed in this project to predict the relationship of welding process, microstructure, properties, residual stress, and the ultimate weld fatique strength. This systematic modeling approach was applied in the welding of high strength steel. A special welding wire was developed in this project to introduce compressive residual stress at weld toe. The results from both modeling and experiments demonstrated that more than 10x fatique life improvement can be acheived in high strength steel welds by the combination of compressive residual stress from the special welding wire and the desired weld bead shape from a unique welding process. The results indicate a technology breakthrough in the design of lightweight and high fatique performance welded structures using high strength steels.

  20. Dynamics of space welding impact and corresponding safety welding study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragomeni, James M; Nunes, Arthur C

    2004-03-01

    This study was undertaken in order to be sure that no hazard would exist from impingement of hot molten metal particle detachments upon an astronauts space suit during any future electron beam welding exercises or experiments. The conditions under which molten metal detachments might occur in a space welding environment were analyzed. The safety issue is important during welding with regards to potential molten metal detachments from the weld pool and cold filler wire during electron beam welding in space. Theoretical models were developed to predict the possibility and size of the molten metal detachment hazards during the electron beam welding exercises at low earth orbit. Some possible ways of obtaining molten metal drop detachments would include an impulse force, or bump, to the weld sample, cut surface, or filler wire. Theoretical models were determined for these detachment concerns from principles of impact and kinetic energies, surface tension, drop geometry, surface energies, and particle dynamics. A weld pool detachment parameter for specifying the conditions for metal weld pool detachment by impact was derived and correlated to the experimental results. The experimental results were for the most part consistent with the theoretical analysis and predictions. c2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Dynamics of space welding impact and corresponding safety welding study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragomeni, James M.; Nunes, Arthur C.

    2004-03-01

    This study was undertaken in order to be sure that no hazard would exist from impingement of hot molten metal particle detachments upon an astronauts space suit during any future electron beam welding exercises or experiments. The conditions under which molten metal detachments might occur in a space welding environment were analyzed. The safety issue is important during welding with regards to potential molten metal detachments from the weld pool and cold filler wire during electron beam welding in space. Theoretical models were developed to predict the possibility and size of the molten metal detachment hazards during the electron beam welding exercises at low earth orbit. Some possible ways of obtaining molten metal drop detachments would include an impulse force, or bump, to the weld sample, cut surface, or filler wire. Theoretical models were determined for these detachment concerns from principles of impact and kinetic energies, surface tension, drop geometry, surface energies, and particle dynamics. A weld pool detachment parameter for specifying the conditions for metal weld pool detachment by impact was derived and correlated to the experimental results. The experimental results were for the most part consistent with the theoretical analysis and predictions.

  2. Gas tungsten arc welding of ZrB2–SiC based ultra high temperature ceramic composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.V. Krishnarao

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The difficulty in fabricating the large size or complex shape limits the application of ZrB2–SiC composites. Joining them by fusion welding without or with preheating, controlled cooling under protective gas shield leads to thermal shock failure or porosity at the weld interface. In the present work, a filler material of (ZrB2–SiC–B4C–YAG composite with oxidation resistance and thermal shock resistance was produced in the form of welding wire. Using the filler, gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW was performed without employing preheating, post controlled cooling and extraneous protective gas shield to join hot pressed ZrB2–SiC (ZS, and pressureless sintered ZrB2–SiC–B4C–YAG (ZSBY composites to themselves. The fusion welding resulted in cracking and non-uniform joining without any filler material. The weld interfaces of the composites were very clean and coherent. The Vickers micro-hardness across the weld interface was found to increase due to the increase in the volume % of both SiC and B4C in the filler material. The shear strength of the weld was about 50% of the flextural strength of the parent composite.

  3. Influence of the Gap Width on the Geometry of the Welded Joint in Hybrid Laser-Arc Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turichin, G.; Tsibulskiy, I.; Kuznetsov, M.; Akhmetov, A.; Mildebrath, M.; Hassel, T.

    The aim of this research was the experimental investigation of the influence of the gap width and speed of the welding wire on the changes of the geometry in the welded joint in the hybrid laser-arc welding of shipbuilding steel RS E36. The research was divided into three parts. First, in order to understand the influence of the gap width on the welded joint geometry, experimental research was done using continuous wave fiber laser IPG YLS-15000 with arc rectifier VDU-1500DC. The second part involved study of the geometry of the welded joint and hardness test results. Three macrosections from each welded joint were obtained. Influence of the gap width and welding wire speed on the welded joint geometry was researched in the three lines: in the right side of the plates, middle welded joint and in the root welded joint.

  4. Mechanical Properties of Zirconium/Steel Bimetal Fabricated by Means of Explosive Welding at Varied Detonation Velocities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prażmowski M.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper assesses the effect of various values of detonation velocity on the quality of the bond zone, and thus the properties of bimetal zirconium (Zr 700 - steel (P355NL. The research was carried out for as-bonded welds, i.e. immediately following explosion welding. The results of shearing, peeling and tensile tests as well as macro-scale structural analyses were presented. In order to determine the changes in the value of strain hardening, the microhardness measurements across the interface were carried out. Based on the performed analyses it can be claimed that, depending on the applied technological settings of welding, most cases displayed wavy bond with highly diversified parameters of the wave. The changes observed with the detonation velocity are non-monotonic. High detonation velocities favored the formation of waves with large height and length and strongly affect the increase of the volume of brittle melted zones. Increased volume of the melted regions results in strong decrease of strength properties of the clad. The analysis of strength test results allows claiming that a small volume of melted regions in the bond considerably improves the strength of the bond.

  5. Laser-TIG Welding of Titanium Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turichin, G.; Tsibulsky, I.; Somonov, V.; Kuznetsov, M.; Akhmetov, A.

    2016-08-01

    The article presents the results of investigation the technological opportunity of laser-TIG welding of titanium alloys. The experimental stand for implementation of process with the capability to feed a filler wire was made. The research of the nature of transfer the filler wire into the welding pool has been demonstrated. The influence of distance between the electrode and the surface of the welded plates on the stability of the arc was shown. The relationship between welding velocity, the position of focal plane of the laser beam and the stability of penetration of plates was determined.

  6. Influence of low nickel (0.09 wt%) content on microstructure and toughness of P91 steel welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arivazhagan, B.; Vasudevan, M.; Kamaraj, M.

    2015-05-01

    Modified 9Cr-1Mo (P91) steel is widely used as a high temperature structural material in the fabrication of power plant components. Alloying elements significantly influences the microstructure and mechanical properties of P91 steel weldments. The alloying elements manganese and nickel significantly influence the lower critical phase transformation temperature (AC1) as well as tempering response of welds. In the existing published information there was wide spread use of high Mn+Ni filler wire. In the present study, weldment preparation was completed using GTA filler wire having low Nickel content (Mn+Ni of 0.58 wt% including nickel content of 0.09 wt%). Microstructure and mechanical properties characterization was done. There is a requirement on minimum toughness of 47 Joules for P91 steel tempered welds at room temperature. Microstructural observation revealed that the GTA welds have low δ-ferrite content (<0.5%) in the martensite matrix. In the as-weld condition, the toughness was 28 Joules whereas after PWHT at 760 °C-2 h it was 115 Joules. In the present study, toughness of low nickel weld was higher due to low δ-ferrite content (<0.5%), multipass grain refinement and weld metal deposition of single pass per layer of weldment.

  7. Friction Stir Welding of Al-B4C Composite Fabricated by Accumulative Roll Bonding: Evaluation of Microstructure and Mechanical Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi Faradonbeh, Alireza; Shamanian, Morteza; Edris, Hossein; Paidar, Moslem; Bozkurt, Yahya

    2018-01-01

    In this investigation, friction stir welding (FSW) of Al-B4C composite fabricated by 10 cycles accumulative roll bonding was conducted. In order to investigate the influences of pin geometry on microstructure and mechanical properties, four different pin geometries (cylindrical, square, triangular and hexagonal) were selected. It was found that FSW parameters had a major effect on the fragmentation and distribution of reinforcement particles in stir zone. When the tool travel speed was increased, the distribution of B4C particles was become gradually uniform in the aluminum matrix. The effect of tool rotational speed on the peak temperature was determined to be greater than the tool travel speed. The attained data of tensile properties and microhardness tests showed that the tool travel speed had bilateral effect on the tensile strength. The maximum tensile joint efficiency was obtained as 238% for FSWed of Al-2%B4C composite to annealed base Al sheet.

  8. Studies of welded joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Krupa

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Studies of a welded joint were described. The joint was made as a result of the reconstruction of a truss and one of the possible means to make a repair. The studies were of a simulation character and were targeted at the detection of welding defects and imperfections thatshould be eliminated in a real structure. A model was designed and on this model the tests and examinations were carried out. The modelwas made under the same conditions as the conditions adopted for repair. It corresponded to the real object in shape and dimensions, and in the proposed technique of welding and welding parameters. The model was composed of five plates joined together with twelve beads.The destructive and non-destructive tests were carried out; the whole structure and the respective welds were also examined visually. Thedefects and imperfections in welds were detected by surface methods of inspection, penetration tests and magnetic particle flaw detection.The model of the welded joint was prepared by destructive methods, a technique that would never be permitted in the case of a realstructure. For the investigations it was necessary to cut out the specimens from the welded joint in direction transverse to the weld run. The specimens were subjected to metallographic examinations and hardness measurements. Additionally, the joint cross-section was examined by destructive testing methods to enable precise determination of the internal defects and imperfections. The surface methods were applied again, this time to determine the severity of welding defects. The analysis has proved that, fabricated under proper conditions and with parameters of the welding process duly observed, the welded joint has good properties and repairs of this type are possible in practice.

  9. An Assessment of Molten Metal Detachment Hazards During Electron Beam Welding in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragomeni, James M.; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    The safety issue has been raised with regards to potential molten metal detachments from the weld pool and cold filler wire during electron beam welding in space. This investigation was undertaken to evaluate if molten metal could detach and come in contact with astronauts and burn through the fabric of the astronauts' Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) during electron beam welding in space. Molten metal detachments from either the weld/cut substrate or weld wire could present harm to a astronaut if the detachment was to burn through the fabric of the EMU. Theoretical models were developed to predict the possibility and size of the molten metal detachment hazards during the electron beam welding exercises at Low Earth Orbit (LEO). The primary molten metal detachment concerns were those cases of molten metal separation from the metal surface due to metal cutting, weld pool splashing, entrainment and release of molten metal due to filler wire snap-out from the weld puddle, and molten metal accumulation and release from the end of the weld wire. Some possible ways of obtaining molten metal drop detachments would include an impulse force, or bump, to the weld sample, cut surface, or filler wire. Theoretical models were developed for these detachment concerns from principles of impact and kinetic energies, surface tension, drop geometry, surface energies, and particle dynamics. The surface tension represents the force opposing the liquid metal drop from detaching whereas the weight of the liquid metal droplet represents a force that is tending to detach the molten metal drop. Theoretical calculations have indicated that only a small amount of energy is required to detach a liquid metal drop; however, much of the energy of an impact is absorbed in the sample or weld plate before it reaches the metal drop on the cut edge or surface. The tendency for detachment is directly proportional to the weld pool radius and metal density and inversely proportional to the surface

  10. Vertically p-n-junctioned GaN nano-wire array diode fabricated on Si(111) using MOCVD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji-Hyeon; Kim, Min-Hee; Kissinger, Suthan; Lee, Cheul-Ro

    2013-04-07

    We demonstrate the fabrication of n-GaN:Si/p-GaN:Mg nanowire arrays on (111) silicon substrate by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) method .The nanowires were grown by a newly developed two-step growth process. The diameter of as-grown nanowires ranges from 300-400 nm with a density of 6-7 × 10(7) cm(-2). The p- and n-type doping of the nanowires is achieved with Mg and Si dopant species. Structural characterization by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) indicates that the nanowires are relatively defect-free. The room-temperature photoluminescence emission with a strong peak at 370 nm indicates that the n-GaN:Si/p-GaN:Mg nanowire arrays have potential application in light-emitting nanodevices. The cathodoluminscence (CL) spectrum clearly shows a distinct optical transition of GaN nanodiodes. The nano-n-GaN:Si/p-GaN:Mg diodes were further completed using a sputter coating approach to deposit Au/Ni metal contacts. The polysilazane filler has been etched by a wet chemical etching process. The n-GaN:Si/p-GaN:Mg nanowire diode was fabricated for different Mg source flow rates. The current-voltage (I-V) measurements reveal excellent rectifying properties with an obvious turn-on voltage at 1.6 V for a Mg flow rate of 5 sccm (standard cubic centimeters per minute).

  11. Comparação do desempenho operacional e das caracter��sticas do cordão na soldagem com diferentes arames tubulares em polaridade negativa Comparison of operational performance and bead characteristics when welding with different tubular wires in negative polarity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cícero Murta Diniz Starling

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho objetivou o estudo comparativo das características do cordão produzido por arames tubulares nacionais dos tipos rutílico (ASME SFA-5.20: E71T-1/E71T-9/E71T-9M, básico (ASME SFA-5.20: E71T-5/E71T-5M e "metal cored" (ASME SFA-5.18: E70C-3M com 1,2 mm, destinados à soldagem de aços estruturais de baixo e médio teor de carbono. Realizaram-se testes de soldagem com o eletrodo na polaridade negativa (CC-, na posição plana, sobre chapas grossas (espessura de 12 mm de aço carbono comum de baixo carbono utilizando-se uma fonte operando no modo "tensão constante" e com monitoração dos sinais de corrente e tensão do arco e velocidade de alimentação (fusão do arame. Variaram-se, na soldagem com cada tipo de arame tubular, a composição do gás de proteção (75%Ar-25%CO2 e 100%CO2 e a velocidade de alimentação do arame (7 e 9 m/min. Os demais parâmetros foram mantidos fixos, incluindo-se, além da polaridade negativa do eletrodo, os comprimentos energizado do eletrodo (16 mm e do arco (3,5 mm. Para os diferentes arames tubulares, avaliaram-se comparativamente as principais características do cordão, incluindo a sua geometria (penetração, reforço, largura, área fundida, área depositada e diluição, presença de descontinuidades, microestrutura e dureza. Levantaram-se as condições operacionais associadas a um cordão com características adequadas à soldagem de chapas grossas de aços estruturais com a polaridade do eletrodo negativa.This paper compares the bead characteristics of welds deposited of carbon steel tubular wires. Three tubular wires of 1.2mm produced in Brazil were used: rutilic (ASME SFA-5.20: E71T-1/E71T-9/E71T-9M, basic (ASME SFA-5.20: E71T-5/E71T-5M and metal cored (ASME SFA-5.18: E70C-3M. Welding trials were performed in downhand position on thick (12 mm low-carbon steel plates using a constant voltage power supply in negative wire polarity (CC-. Welding current and voltage, and wire feed rate

  12. Investigation on various welding consumables on properties of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this present work, the influence of different consumables on weld properties of carbon steel plate was studied by automatic gas metal arc welding under constant voltage mode. ... Mechanical properties such as yield strength, tensile strength, elongation and joint efficiency remained high for solid wire relative to cored wire.

  13. BioWires: Conductive DNA Nanowires in a Computationally-Optimized, Synthetic Biological Platform for Nanoelectronic Fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecchioni, Simon; Toomey, Emily; Capece, Mark C.; Rothschild, Lynn; Wind, Shalom

    2017-01-01

    DNA is an ideal template for a biological nanowire-it has a linear structure several atoms thick; it possesses addressable nucleobase geometry that can be precisely defined; and it is massively scalable into branched networks. Until now, the drawback of DNA as a conducting nanowire been, simply put, its low conductance. To address this deficiency, we extensively characterize a chemical variant of canonical DNA that exploits the affinity of natural cytosine bases for silver ions. We successfully construct chains of single silver ions inside double-stranded DNA, confirm the basic dC-Ag+-dC bond geometry and kinetics, and show length-tunability dependent on mismatch distribution, ion availability and enzyme activity. An analysis of the absorbance spectra of natural DNA and silver-binding, poly-cytosine DNA demonstrates the heightened thermostability of the ion chain and its resistance to aqueous stresses such as precipitation, dialysis and forced reduction. These chemically critical traits lend themselves to an increase in electrical conductivity of over an order of magnitude for 11-base silver-paired duplexes over natural strands when assayed by STM break junction. We further construct and implement a genetic pathway in the E. coli bacterium for the biosynthesis of highly ionizable DNA sequences. Toward future circuits, we construct a model of transcription network architectures to determine the most efficient and robust connectivity for cell-based fabrication, and we perform sequence optimization with a genetic algorithm to identify oligonucleotides robust to changes in the base-pairing energy landscape. We propose that this system will serve as a synthetic biological fabrication platform for more complex DNA nanotechnology and nanoelectronics with applications to deep space and low resource environments.

  14. Automatic welding of stainless steel tubing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clautice, W. E.

    1978-01-01

    The use of automatic welding for making girth welds in stainless steel tubing was investigated as well as the reduction in fabrication costs resulting from the elimination of radiographic inspection. Test methodology, materials, and techniques are discussed, and data sheets for individual tests are included. Process variables studied include welding amperes, revolutions per minute, and shielding gas flow. Strip chart recordings, as a definitive method of insuring weld quality, are studied. Test results, determined by both radiographic and visual inspection, are presented and indicate that once optimum welding procedures for specific sizes of tubing are established, and the welding machine operations are certified, then the automatic tube welding process produces good quality welds repeatedly, with a high degree of reliability. Revised specifications for welding tubing using the automatic process and weld visual inspection requirements at the Kennedy Space Center are enumerated.

  15. Solar array welding developement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elms, R. V., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The present work describes parallel gap welding as used for joining solar cells to the cell interconnect system. Sample preparation, weldable cell parameter evaluation, bond scheduling, bond strength evaluation, and bonding and thermal shock tests are described. A range of weld schedule parameters - voltage, time, and force - can be identified for various cell/interconnect designs that will provide adequate bond strengths and acceptably small electrical degradation. Automation of solar array welding operations to a significant degree has been achieved in Europe and will be receiving increased attention in the U.S. to reduce solar array fabrication costs.

  16. Development of automated welding process for field fabrication of thick walled pressure vessels. Technical progress report, second quarter, FY 1980, ending March 28, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, U.A.

    1980-01-01

    Progress on a metallurgical contract is reported: (1) specifications of 2 1/4 chromium-1 molybdenum low alloy steel plate for a coal gasification project; (2) methods of welding and analyses of helium-argon mixtures for welding; and (3) tensile properties of welded joints. (LTN)

  17. Fabrication and application of zinc-zinc oxide nanosheets coating on an etched stainless steel wire as a selective solid-phase microextraction fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wenlan; Guo, Mei; Zhang, Yida; Zhang, Min; Wang, Xuemei; Du, Xinzhen

    2015-03-06

    A novel zinc-zinc oxide (Zn-ZnO) nanosheets coating was directly fabricated on an etched stainless steel wire substrate as solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fiber via previous electrodeposition of robust Zn coating. The scanning electron micrograph of the Zn-ZnO nanosheets coated fiber exhibits a flower-like nanostructure with high surface area. The SPME performance of as-fabricated fiber was investigated for the concentration and determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, phthalates and ultraviolet (UV) filters coupled to high performance liquid chromatography with UV detection (HPLC-UV). It was found that the Zn-ZnO nanosheets coating exhibited high extraction capability, good selectivity and rapid mass transfer for some UV filters. The main parameters affecting extraction performance were investigated and optimized. Under the optimized conditions, the calibration graphs were linear over the range of 0.1-200μgL(-1). The limits of detection of the proposed method were 0.052-0.084μgL(-1) (S/N=3). The single fiber repeatability varied from 5.18% to 7.56% and the fiber-to-fiber reproducibility ranged from 6.74% to 8.83% for the extraction of spiked water with 50μgL(-1) UV filters (n=5). The established SPME-HPLC-UV method was successfully applied to the selective concentration and sensitive determination of target UV filters from real environmental water samples with recoveries from 85.8% to 105% at the spiking level of 10μgL(-1) and 30μgL(-1). The relative standard deviations were below 9.7%. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Nanocrystalline Si/SiO{sub 2} core-shell network with intense white light emission fabricated by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, Y., E-mail: ymatsumo@cinvestav.mx; Dutt, A. [SEES, Electrical Engineering Department, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Cinvestav-IPN, Mexico, D.F. 07360 (Mexico); Santana-Rodríguez, G. [Institute of Material Research, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Coyoacán 04510 (Mexico); Santoyo-Salazar, J. [Department of Physics, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Cinvestav-IPN, Mexico, D.F. 07360 (Mexico); Aceves-Mijares, M. [Departament of Electronics, Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica Óptica y Electrónica, Tonantzintla, Puebla 72000 (Mexico)

    2015-04-27

    We report the fabrication of a stable Si/SiO{sub 2} core-shell network using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition on a silicon substrate at a relatively low substrate temperature of 200 °C. Structural investigations using transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction confirm the presence of nanocrystalline silicon and silicon dioxide quantum dots in the form of a core-shell network embedded in the amorphous SiO{sub x} matrix, while selected area electron diffraction confirms the formation of a core-shell structure. The core-shell structure exhibits a bright white emission that can be seen with the unaided eye at room temperature without any post-annealing treatments, and the observed photoemission does not alter in color or intensity after prolonged laser exposure. Additional measurements are performed while varying the laser power and optical gain is found in the as-deposited material. Intense stable white luminescence is observed and shows the prospective for various optical and biological applications in the future.

  19. Possibilities of using welding-on technologies in crane wheel ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    Abstract. The paper deals with analysis of welds-on quality of traverse crane wheels made from gr. 90–60 mate- rial, ASTM A148. Three types of welding-on technology with various filling materials were used. On wheel after wearing was welded-on one interlayer by a combination of additional materials, wire A 106 with F 11 ...

  20. 49 CFR 179.100-9 - Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding. 179.100-9 Section 179.100-9... Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114 and 120) § 179.100-9 Welding. (a) All..., appendix W (IBR, see § 171.7 of this subchapter). Welding procedures, welders and fabricators shall be...

  1. 49 CFR 179.220-10 - Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding. 179.220-10 Section 179.220-10... Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) § 179.220-10 Welding. (a) All joints... of this subchapter). Welding procedures, welders, and fabricators shall be approved. (b) Radioscopy...

  2. 49 CFR 179.400-11 - Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding. 179.400-11 Section 179.400-11...-11 Welding. (a) Except for closure of openings and a maximum of two circumferential closing joints in... subchapter). (d) Each welding procedure, welder, and fabricator must be approved. [Amdt. 179-32, 48 FR 27708...

  3. 49 CFR 179.200-10 - Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding. 179.200-10 Section 179.200-10... Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) § 179.200-10 Welding. (a) All joints... W (IBR, see § 171.7 of this subchapter). Welding procedures, welders and fabricators shall be...

  4. 49 CFR 179.11 - Welding certification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding certification. 179.11 Section 179.11 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Design Requirements § 179.11 Welding certification. (a) Welding procedures, welders and fabricators shall...

  5. Mechanical properties of 5083 aluminium welds after manual and automatic pulsed gas metal arc welding using E5356 filler

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mutombo, K

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Semi-automatic and automatic pulsed gas metal arc welding (GMAW) of aluminium alloy 5083 with ER5356 filler wire causes considerable softening in the weld. The tensile strength of dressed automatic welds approaches that of the base metal...

  6. Additive manufactured Ti-6Al-4V using welding wire: comparison of laser and arc beam deposition and evaluation with respect to aerospace material specifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandl, E.; Baufeld, B.; Leyens, C.; Gault, R.

    In this paper, the results of two different wire based additive-layer-manufacturing systems are compared: in one system Ti-6Al4V is deposited by a Nd:YAG laser beam, in the other by an arc beam (tungsten inert gas process). Mechanical properties of the deposits and of plate material are presented and evaluated with respect to aerospace material specifications. The mechanical tests including static tension and high cycle fatigue were performed in as-built, stress-relieved and annealed conditions. Generally, the mechanical properties of the components are competitive to cast and even wrought material properties and can attain properties suitable for space or aerospace applications.

  7. Controlling Arc Length in Plasma Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iceland, W. F.

    1986-01-01

    Circuit maintains arc length on irregularly shaped workpieces. Length of plasma arc continuously adjusted by control circuit to maintain commanded value. After pilot arc is established, contactor closed and transfers arc to workpiece. Control circuit then half-wave rectifies ac arc voltage to produce dc control signal proportional to arc length. Circuit added to plasma arc welding machines with few wiring changes. Welds made with circuit cleaner and require less rework than welds made without it. Beads smooth and free of inclusions.

  8. Aircraft Wiring Support Equipment Integration Laboratory (AWSEIL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose:The Aircraft Wiring Support Equipment Integration Laboratory (AWSEIL) provides a variety of research, design engineering and prototype fabrication services...

  9. Effects of heat input rates on T-1 and T-1A steel welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, R. A.; Olsen, M. G.; Worden, S. W.

    1967-01-01

    Technology of T-1 and T-1A steels is emphasized in investigation of their weld-fabrication. Welding heat input rate, production weldment circumstances, and standards of welding control are considered.

  10. Topology Optimized Photonic Wire Splitters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn; Borel, Peter Ingo; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard

    2006-01-01

    Photonic wire splitters have been designed using topology optimization. The splitters have been fabricated in silicon-on-insulator material and display broadband low-loss 3dB splitting in a bandwidth larger than 100 nm.......Photonic wire splitters have been designed using topology optimization. The splitters have been fabricated in silicon-on-insulator material and display broadband low-loss 3dB splitting in a bandwidth larger than 100 nm....

  11. Microstructure and Dry Sliding Wear Behavior of Fe-Based (Cr, Fe)7C3 Composite Coating Fabricated by PTA Welding Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Y. L.; Li, Z. G.

    2013-11-01

    Using Cr3C2 and Fe-CrNiBSi powder blends as raw materials, an α-Fe matrix composite coating reinforced by in situ (Cr, Fe)7C3 rods, with a thickness of about 3.6 mm, was fabricated on the surface of AISI A36 low carbon steel by means of plasma-transferred arc welding. The results of microstructural analysis show that in the coating, a large number of carbides, (Cr, Fe)7C3, in rod shape grow, and radiate around some half-dissolved Cr3C2 particles. The results of dry sliding wear tests at loads 100, 200, and 300 N show that the wear resistances of (Cr, Fe)7C3-reinforced coating, respectively, are about 6.9, 14.9, and 17 times higher than that of nonreinforced pure Fe-CrNiBSi alloy coating; the average value and fluctuation range of friction coefficient (FC) of (Cr, Fe)7C3-reinforced coating are less than those of pure Fe-CrNiBSi alloy coating; the main wear mechanisms of pure Fe-CrNiBSi alloy coating are ploughing, deformation, and adhesive wear, whereas those of (Cr, Fe)7C3-reinforced coating are microcutting, abrasive, and oxidation wear; the cracks on surfaces of (Cr, Fe)7C3 rods increased with the increasing loads; and the matrix α-Fe can prevent them from extending further in the composite coating.

  12. Effect of Welding Processes on the Microstructure, Mechanical Properties and Residual Stresses of Plain 9Cr-1Mo Steel Weld Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraju, S.; Vasantharaja, P.; Brahadees, G.; Vasudevan, M.; Mahadevan, S.

    2017-12-01

    9Cr-1Mo steel designated as P9 is widely used in the construction of power plants and high-temperature applications. It is chosen for fabricating hexcan fuel subassembly wrapper components of fast breeder reactors. Arc welding processes are generally used for fabricating 9Cr-1Mo steel weld joints. A-TIG welding process is increasingly being adopted by the industries. In the present study, shielded metal arc (SMA), tungsten inert gas (TIG) and A-TIG welding processes are used for fabricating the 9Cr-1Mo steel weld joints of 10 mm thickness. Effect of the above welding processes on the microstructure evolution, mechanical properties and residual stresses of the weld joints has been studied in detail. All the three weld joints exhibited comparable strength and ductility values. 9Cr-1Mo steel weld joint fabricated by SMAW process exhibited lower impact toughness values caused by coarser grain size and inclusions. 9Cr-1Mo steel weld joint fabricated by TIG welding exhibited higher toughness due to finer grain size, while the weld joint fabricated by A-TIG welding process exhibited adequate toughness values. SMA steel weld joint exhibited compressive residual stresses in the weld metal and HAZ, while TIG and A-TIG weld joint exhibited tensile residual stresses in the weld metal and HAZ.

  13. Welding Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This competency-based curriculum guide is a handbook for the development of welding trade programs. Based on a survey of Alaskan welding employers, it includes all competencies a student should acquire in such a welding program. The handbook stresses the importance of understanding the principles associated with the various elements of welding.…

  14. Forming Completely Penetrated Welded T-joints when Pulsed Arc Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krampit, N. Yu; Krampit, M. A.; Sapozhkov, A. S.

    2016-04-01

    The paper is focused on revealing the influence of welding parameters on weld formation when pulsed arc welding. As an experimental sample a T-joint over 10 mm was selected. Welding was carried out in flat position, which required no edge preparation but provided mono-directional guaranteed root penetration. The following parameters of welding were subjected to investigation: gap in the joint, wire feed rate and incline angles of the torch along and across the weld axis. Technological recommendations have been made with respect to pulsed arc welding; the cost price of product manufacturing can be reduced on their basis due to reduction of labor input required by machining, lowering consumption of welding materials and electric power.

  15. 1 mil gold bond wire study.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huff, Johnathon; McLean, Michael B.; Jenkins, Mark W.; Rutherford, Brian Milne

    2013-05-01

    In microcircuit fabrication, the diameter and length of a bond wire have been shown to both affect the current versus fusing time ratio of a bond wire as well as the gap length of the fused wire. This study investigated the impact of current level on the time-to-open and gap length of 1 mil by 60 mil gold bond wires. During the experiments, constant current was provided for a control set of bond wires for 250ms, 410ms and until the wire fused; non-destructively pull-tested wires for 250ms; and notched wires. The key findings were that as the current increases, the gap length increases and 73% of the bond wires will fuse at 1.8A, and 100% of the wires fuse at 1.9A within 60ms. Due to the limited scope of experiments and limited data analyzed, further investigation is encouraged to confirm these observations.

  16. Welding/brazing for Space Station repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, David W.; Babel, H. W.; Conaway, H. R.; Hooper, W. H.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on welding/brazing for space station repair are presented. Topics covered include: fabrication and repair candidates; debris penetration of module panel; welded repair patch; mechanical assembly of utility fluid line; space station utility systems; Soviet aerospace fabrication - an overview; and processes under consideration.

  17. WOOD WELDING

    OpenAIRE

    Marcos Theodoro Muller; Rafael Rodolfo de Melo; Diego Martins Stangerlin

    2010-01-01

    The term "wood welding" designates what can be defined as "welding of wood surfaces". This new process, that it provides the joint of wood pieces without the use of adhesives or any other additional material, provokes growing interest in the academic environment, although it is still in laboratorial state. Linear friction welding induced bymechanical vibration yields welded joints of flat wood surfaces. The phenomenon of the welding occurs in less time than 10 seconds, with the temperature in...

  18. Weld procedure development with OSLW - optimization software for laser welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuerschbach, P.W.; Eisler, G.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Steele, R.J. [Naval Air Warfare Center, China Lake, CA (United States)

    1998-06-01

    Weld procedure development can require extensive experimentation, in-depth process knowledge, and is further complicated by the fact that there are often multiple sets of parameters that will meet the weld requirements. Choosing among these multiple weld procedures can be hastened with computer models that find parameters to meet selected weld dimensional requirements while simultaneously optimizing important figures of merit. Software is described that performs this task for CO{sub 2} laser beam welding. The models are based on dimensionless parameter correlations that are derived from solutions to the moving heat source equations. The use of both handbook and empirically verified thermophysical property values allows OSLW to be extended to many different materials. Graphics displays show the resulting solution on contour plots that can be used to further probe the model. The important figures of merit for laser beam welding are energy transfer efficiency and melting efficiency. The application enables the user to input desired weld shape dimensions, select the material to be welded, and to constrain the search problem to meet the application requirements. Successful testing of the software at a laser welding fabricator has validated this tool for weld procedure development.

  19. Wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1967-01-01

    Magnetoscriptive readout wire chamber.Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  20. Wire Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Magnetoscriptive readout wire chamber. Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  1. wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Proportional multi-wire chamber. Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle. Proportional wire chambers allow a much quicker reading than the optical or magnetoscriptive readout wire chambers.

  2. New materials for welding and surfacing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyrev, N. A.; Galevsky, G. V.; Kryukov, R. E.; Titova, D. A.; Shurupov, V. M.

    2016-09-01

    The paper provides description of research into the influence of new materials and technologies on quality parameters of welds and deposited metal carried out in the research and production centre “Welding processes and technologies”. New welding technologies of tanks for northern conditions are considered, as well as technologies of submerged arc welding involving fluxing agents AN - 348, AN - 60, AN - 67, OK.10.71 and carbon-fluorine containing additives; new flux cored wires and surfacing technologies, teaching programs and a trainer for welders are designed.

  3. MFDC - technological improvement in resistance welding controls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somani, A.K.; Naga Bhaskar, V.; Chandramouli, J.; Rameshwara Rao, A. [Nuclear Fuel Complex, Dept. of Atomic Energy, Hyderabad (India)

    2008-07-01

    Among the various Resistance Welding operations carried out in the production line of a fuel bundle end plug welding is the most critical operation. Welding controllers play a very vital role in obtaining consistent weld quality by regulating and controlling the weld current. Conventional mains synchronized welding controllers are at best capable of controlling the weld current at a maximum speed of the mains frequency. In view of the very short welding durations involved in the various stages of a fuel bundle fabrication, a need was felt for superior welding controllers. Medium Frequency Welding Controllers offer a solution to these limitations in addition to offering other advantages. Medium Frequency power sources offer precise welding current control as they regulate and correct the welding current faster, typically twenty times faster when operated at 1000Hz. An MFDC was employed on one of the welding machines and its performance was studied. This paper discusses about the various advantages of MFDCs with other controllers employed at NFC to end plug welding operation. (author)

  4. Transverse-Weld Tensile Properties of a New Al-4Cu-2Si Alloy as Filler Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampath, K.

    2009-12-01

    AA2195, an Al-Cu-Li alloy in the T8P4 age-hardened condition, is a candidate aluminum armor for future combat vehicles, as this material offers higher static strength and ballistic protection than current aluminum armor alloys. However, certification of AA2195 alloy for armor applications requires initial qualification based on the ballistic performance of welded panels in the as-welded condition. Currently, combat vehicle manufacturers primarily use gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process to meet their fabrication needs. Unfortunately, a matching GMAW consumable electrode is currently not commercially available to allow effective joining of AA2195 alloy. This initial effort focused on an innovative, low-cost, low-risk approach to identify an alloy composition suitable for effective joining of AA2195 alloy, and evaluated transverse-weld tensile properties of groove butt joints produced using the identified alloy. Selected commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) aluminum alloy filler wires were twisted to form candidate twisted filler rods. Representative test weldments were produced using AA2195 alloy, candidate twisted filler rods and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process. Selected GTA weldments produced using Al-4wt.%Cu-2wt.%Si alloy as filler metal consistently provided transverse-weld tensile properties in excess of 275 MPa (40 ksi) UTS and 8% El (over 25 mm gage length), thereby showing potential for acceptable ballistic performance of as-welded panels. Further developmental work is required to evaluate in detail GMAW consumable wire electrodes based on the Al-Cu-Si system containing 4.2-5.0 wt.% Cu and 1.6-2.0 wt.% Si.

  5. Effect of weld spacing on microstructure and mechanical properties of CLAM electron beam welding joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhai, Yutao; Huang, Bo, E-mail: aufa0007@163.com; Zhang, Junyu; Zhang, Baoren; Liu, Shaojun; Huang, Qunying

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • The welded joints of CLAM steel with different weld spacings have been fabricated with electron beam welding, and a simplified model of CLAM sheet was proposed. • The microstructure and mechanical properties such as microhardness, impact and tensile were investigated at different welding spacing for both conditions of as-welded and post weld heat treatment (PWHT). • The effect of the welding thermal cycle was significantly when the weld spacings were smaller than 4 mm. • When the weld spacing was small enough, the original microstructures would be fragmented with the high heat input. - Abstract: China low activation martensitic (CLAM) steel has been chosen as the primary structural material in the designs of dual function lithium-lead (DFLL) blanket for fusion reactors, China helium cooled ceramic breeder (HCCB) test blanket module (TBM) for ITER and China fusion engineering test reactor (CFETR) blanket. The cooling components of the blankets are designed with high density cooling channels (HDCCs) to remove the high nuclear thermal effectively. Hence, the welding spacing among the channels are small. In this paper, the welded joints of CLAM steel with different weld spacings have been fabricated with electron beam welding (EBW). The weld spacing was designed to be 2 mm, 3 mm, 4 mm, 6 mm and 8 mm. The microstructure and mechanical properties such as microhardness, impact and tensile were investigated at different welding spacing for both conditions of as-welded and post weld heat treatment (PWHT). The PWHT is tempering at 740 °C for 120 min. The results showed that the grain size in the heat affected zone (HAZ) increased with the increasing weld spacing, and the joint with small weld spacing had a better performance after PWHT. This work would give useful guidance to improve the preparation of the cooling components of blanket.

  6. Towards Unconventional Applications of Wire Bonding

    OpenAIRE

    Schröder, Stephan

    2018-01-01

    This thesis presents novel heterogeneous integration approaches of wire materials to fabricated and package MEMS devices by exploring unconventional applications of wire bonding technology. Wire bonding, traditionally endemic in the realm of device packaging to establish electrical die-to-package interconnections, is an attractive back-end technology, offering promising features, such as high throughput, flexibility and placement accuracy. Exploiting the advantages of state-of-the-art wire bo...

  7. Advanced Welding Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Four advanced welding techniques and their use in NASA are briefly reviewed in this poster presentation. The welding techniques reviewed are: Solid State Welding, Friction Stir Welding (FSW), Thermal Stir Welding (TSW) and Ultrasonic Stir Welding.

  8. Double-sided laser beam welded T-joints for aluminum-lithium alloy aircraft fuselage panels: Effects of filler elements on microstructure and mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bing; Tao, Wang; Chen, Yanbin; Li, Hao

    2017-08-01

    In the current work, T-joints consisting of 2.0 mm thick 2060-T8/2099-T83 aluminum-lithium alloys for aircraft fuselage panels have been fabricated by double-sided fiber laser beam welding with different filler wires. A new type wire CW3 (Al-6.2Cu-5.4Si) was studied and compared with conventional wire AA4047 (Al-12Si) mainly on microstructure and mechanical properties. It was found that the main combined function of Al-6.2%Cu-5.4%Si in CW3 resulted in considerable improvements especially on intergranular strength, hot cracking susceptibility and hoop tensile properties. Typical non-dendritic equiaxed zone (EQZ) was observed along welds' fusion boundary. Hot cracks and fractures during the load were always located within the EQZ, however, this typical zone could be restrained by CW3, effectively. Furthermore, changing of the main intergranular precipitated phase within the EQZ from T phase by AA4047 to T2 phase by CW3 also resulted in developments on microscopic intergranular reinforcement and macroscopic hoop tensile properties. In addition, bridging caused by richer substructure dendrites within CW3 weld's columnar zone resulted in much lower hot cracking susceptibility of the whole weld than AA4047.

  9. Resistance welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Zhang, Wenqi; Rasmussen, Mogens H.

    2003-01-01

    Resistance welding comprises not only the well known spot welding process but also more complex projection welding operations, where excessive plastic deformation of the weld point may occur. This enables the production of complex geometries and material combinations, which are often not possible...... to weld by traditional spot welding operations. Such joining processes are, however, not simple to develop due to the large number of parameters involved. Development has traditionally been carried out by large experimental investigations, but the development of a numerical programme system has changed...

  10. Method for defect free keyhole plasma arc welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwig, Dennis D. (Inventor); Hunt, James F. (Inventor); Ryan, Patrick M. (Inventor); Fisher, Walter J. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A plasma arc welding process for welding metal of increased thickness with one pass includes operating the plasma arc welding apparatus at a selected plasma gas flow rate, travel speed and arc current, to form a weld having a penetration ratio to weld height to weld width, and maintaining the penetration ratio at less than 0.74. Parameters for the plasma gas flow rate, travel speed and arc current are adjusted to a steady state condition during a start up period and maintained during the steady state condition to complete a weld. During a terminal stopping period, the travel speed is stopped and instantaneously replaced by filler wire which adds material to fill the keyhole that had been formed by the welding process. Parameters are subsequently adjusted during the stopping period to terminate the weld in a sound manner.

  11. Investigation on Mechanical Properties of Austenitic Stainless-Steel Pipes Welded by TIG Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mushtaq Albdiry

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the mechanical properties of austenitic stainless steel (type 204 pipes welded by Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG welding process. Testing of hardness (HRC, tensile strength and bending strength was performed for the steel pipes welded at two different welding temperatures (700 °C and 900 °C with and without using the weld filler wire. The microstructure of the welding regions was examined by using an optical microscopy. The properties showed that the steel pipes welded by 900 °C with using the weld filler obtained the highest tensile strength and bending strength versus these welded by 700 °C without the use of the weld filler. This is attributed to the weld filler heated and melt at sufficient temperature (900 °C and compensate losing in the Ni metal occurred in the base steel metal during the welding process.

  12. wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Was used in ISR (Intersecting Storage Ring) split field magnet experiment. Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  13. wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1985-01-01

    Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  14. wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  15. Wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  16. Influence of Heat Input on Martensite Formation and Impact Property of Ferritic-Austenitic Dissimilar Weld Metals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    M. Mukherjee T.K. Pal

    2012-01-01

    .... The welded joints were evaluated by microstructure and charpy impact toughness. The dependence of weld metal microstructure on heat input and filler wires were determined by dilution calculation, Creq/Nieq ratio, stacking fault energy (SFE...

  17. Models for selecting GMA Welding Parameters for Improving Mechanical Properties of Weld Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasa Rao, P.; Ramachandran, Pragash; Jebaraj, S.

    2016-02-01

    During the process of Gas Metal Arc (GMAW) welding, the weld joints mechanical properties are influenced by the welding parameters such as welding current and arc voltage. These parameters directly will influence the quality of the weld in terms of mechanical properties. Even small variation in any of the cited parameters may have an important effect on depth of penetration and on joint strength. In this study, S45C Constructional Steel is taken as the base metal to be tested using the parameters wire feed rate, voltage and type of shielding gas. Physical properties considered in the present study are tensile strength and hardness. The testing of weld specimen is carried out as per ASTM Standards. Mathematical models to predict the tensile strength and depth of penetration of weld joint have been developed by regression analysis using the experimental results.

  18. Tailoring defect free fusion welds based on phenomenological modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amit

    In the last few decades, phenomenological models of fusion welding have provided important understanding and information about the welding processes and welded materials. For example, numerical calculations of heat transfer and fluid flow in welding have enabled accurate quantitative calculations of thermal cycles and fusion zone geometry in fusion welding. In many simple systems such as gas tungsten arc (GTA) butt welding, the computed thermal cycles have been used to quantitatively understand weld metal phase compositions, grain sizes and inclusion structure. However, fabrication of defect free welds with prescribed attributes based on scientific principles still remains to be achieved. In addition, higher fabrication speeds are often limited by the occurrence of humping defects which are characterized by periodic bead-like appearance. Furthermore, phenomenological models have not been applied to tailor welds with given attributes. The goal of the present work is to apply the principles of heat transfer and fluid flow to attain defects free welds with prescribed attributes. Since there are a large number of process variables in welding, the desired weld attributes such as the weld geometry and structure are commonly produced by empirically adjusting the welding variables. However, this approach does not always produce optimum welds and inappropriate choice of variables can lead to poor welds. The existing transport phenomena based models of welding can only predict weld characteristics for a given set of input welding variables. What is needed, and not currently available, is a capability to systematically determine multiple paths to tailor weld geometry and assess robustness of each individual solution to achieve safe, defect free welds. Therefore, these heat transfer and fluid flow based models are restructured to predict the welding conditions to achieve the defect free welds with desired attributes. Systematic tailoring of weld attributes based on scientific

  19. Welding Technician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ken

    2009-01-01

    About 95% of all manufactured goods in this country are welded or joined in some way. These welded products range in nature from bicycle handlebars and skyscrapers to bridges and race cars. The author discusses what students need to know about careers for welding technicians--wages, responsibilities, skills needed, career advancement…

  20. Thermal insulation of wet shielded metal arc welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Patrick J.

    1993-06-01

    Computational and experimental studies were performed to determine the effect of static thermal insulation on the quality of wet shielded metal arc welds (SMAW). A commercially available heat flow and fluid dynamics spectral-element computer program was used to model a wet SMAW and to determine the potential effect on the weld cooling rate of placing thermal insulation adjacent to the weld line. Experimental manual welds were made on a low carbon equivalent (0.285) mild steel and on a higher carbon equivalent (0.410) high tensile strength steel, using woven fabrics of alumina-boria-silica fibers to insulate the surface of the plate being welded. The effect of the insulation on weld quality was evaluated through the use of post-weld Rockwell Scale hardness measurements on the surface of the weld heat affected zones (HAZ's) and by visual inspection of sectioned welds at 10 X magnification. The computational simulation demonstrated a 150% increase in surface HAZ peak temperature and a significant decrease in weld cooling rate with respect to uninsulated welds, for welds in which ideal insulation had been placed on the base plate surface adjacent to the weld line. Experimental mild steel welds showed a reduction in surface HAZ hardness attributable to insulation at a 77% significance level. A visual comparison of the cross-sections of two welds made in 0.410 carbon equivalent steel-with approximately equivalent heat input-revealed underbead cracking in the uninsulated weld but not in the insulated weld.

  1. Effect of Chemical Composition on Susceptibility to Weld Solidification Cracking in Austenitic Weld Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadoi, Kota; Shinozaki, Kenji

    2017-09-01

    The influence of the chemical composition, especially the niobium content, chromium equivalent Creq, and nickel equivalent Nieq, on the weld solidification cracking susceptibility in the austenite single-phase region in the Schaeffler diagram was investigated. Specimens were fabricated using the hot-wire laser welding process with widely different compositions of Creq, Nieq, and niobium in the region. The distributions of the susceptibility, such as the crack length and brittle temperature range (BTR), in the Schaeffler diagram revealed a region with high susceptibility to solidification cracking. Addition of niobium enhanced the susceptibility and changed the distribution of the susceptibility in the diagram. The BTR distribution was in good agreement with the distribution of the temperature range of solidification (ΔT) calculated by solidification simulation based on Scheil model. ΔT increased with increasing content of alloying elements such as niobium. The distribution of ΔT was dependent on the type of alloying element owing to the change of the partitioning behavior. Thus, the solidification cracking susceptibility in the austenite single-phase region depends on whether the alloy contains elements. The distribution of the susceptibility in the region is controlled by the change in ΔT and the segregation behavior of niobium with the chemical composition.

  2. Effect of Chemical Composition on Susceptibility to Weld Solidification Cracking in Austenitic Weld Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadoi, Kota; Shinozaki, Kenji

    2017-12-01

    The influence of the chemical composition, especially the niobium content, chromium equivalent Creq, and nickel equivalent Nieq, on the weld solidification cracking susceptibility in the austenite single-phase region in the Schaeffler diagram was investigated. Specimens were fabricated using the hot-wire laser welding process with widely different compositions of Creq, Nieq, and niobium in the region. The distributions of the susceptibility, such as the crack length and brittle temperature range (BTR), in the Schaeffler diagram revealed a region with high susceptibility to solidification cracking. Addition of niobium enhanced the susceptibility and changed the distribution of the susceptibility in the diagram. The BTR distribution was in good agreement with the distribution of the temperature range of solidification (Δ T) calculated by solidification simulation based on Scheil model. Δ T increased with increasing content of alloying elements such as niobium. The distribution of Δ T was dependent on the type of alloying element owing to the change of the partitioning behavior. Thus, the solidification cracking susceptibility in the austenite single-phase region depends on whether the alloy contains elements. The distribution of the susceptibility in the region is controlled by the change in Δ T and the segregation behavior of niobium with the chemical composition.

  3. Survey of welding processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-07-01

    The current KYTC SPECIAL PROVISION NO. 4 WELDING STEEL BRIDGES prohibits the use of welding processes other than shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) and submerged arc welding (SAW). Nationally, bridge welding is codified under ANSI/AASHTO/AWS D1....

  4. Efecto del procedimiento de soldadura sobre las propiedades de uniones soldadas de aceros microaleados para cañería Welding procedure effect on the properties of microalloyed steel welded joints for metal fabrication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Zalazar

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo del trabajo fue, en esta primera etapa, comparar las propiedades mecánicas y la microestructura del acero HIC, aleado al Nb-Ti-Cu-Ni, resistente a la corrosión, con las del acero normal NOR, microaleado con Nb-V-Ti, ambos caracterizados mediante análisis químico, mediciones de dureza, estudios metalográficos y ensayos de tracción e impacto. Con el fin de establecer la temperatura de precalentamiento óptima se realizaron ensayos de soldabilidad Tekken a distintas temperaturas y de acuerdo con la Norma JIS Z 3158. Luego se llevaron a cabo soldaduras circunferenciales de cañerías fabricadas con ambos aceros diseñándose procedimientos para la utilización, por un lado, de electrodos revestidos (SMAW: shielded metal arc welding, electrodos de distintos proveedores para todas las pasadas y por el otro, la primera pasada usando soldadura automática con alambre macizo bajo CO2 (GMAW: gas metal arc welding y el resto de las mismas con alambre tubular autoprotegido (FCAW-S: flux cored arc welding-selfshielded. Las soldaduras fueron calificadas de acuerdo con el Código API 1104. Los resultados de los análisis metalográficos y los ensayos mecánicos de tracción, dureza e impacto de las juntas soldadas revelaron la influencia de los consumibles de soldadura y del metal base en las propiedades de las uniones. Se observaron diferencias en las propiedades de las uniones soldadas con consumibles de igual especificación y distintos proveedores. De las diferentes combinaciones ensayadas se definieron valores óptimos para la soldadura de estos aceros.The objective of this work was, in this first step, to compare mechanical property and microstructure of the steel HIC, alloyed with Nb-Ti-Cu-Ni, corrosion resistant, to those of a normal steel NOR, microlloyed with Nb-V-Ti, characterized through chemical analysis, hardness measurements, metallographic studies and tensile and Charpy-V properties. The preheating temperature was established

  5. Laser welding to expand the allowable gap in bore welding for ITER blanket hydraulic connection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanigawa, Hisashi, E-mail: tanigawa.hisashi@jaea.go.jp; Maruyama, Takahito; Noguchi, Yuto; Takeda, Nobukazu; Kakudate, Satoshi

    2015-10-15

    For application to bore welding of hydraulic connection in the ITER blanket module, laser welding presents the following benefits: low weld heat input is preferred for re-welding of the irradiated material. Its contactless process can intrinsically avoid a failure mode of the tool sticking on the weld. The exact requirements for pipe alignment were assessed in comparison with the assembly tolerance. The groove geometry was modified to expand the allowable initial gap. The groove was machined to be partially thick to obviate the filler wire. First, plates with partially thick grooves were welded to elucidate the preferred groove geometry and welding conditions. With the modified groove, the plates were welded for the initial gap of 1.0 mm. Then the groove geometry and welding conditions were adjusted based on results of pipe welding tests. By application of the additional 0.5-mm-thick and 2.5-mm-wide metal in the groove, pipes with an initial gap of 0.7 mm were welded successfully.

  6. Microstructural characteristics on bead on plate welding of AISI 904 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the present work, bead-on -plate welds were carried out on AISI 904 L super austenitic stainless steel sheets using Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) process. In this present investigation AISI 904 L solid wire having 1.2 mm diameter was used as an electrode with direct current electrode positive polarity. Argon was ...

  7. Microstructural characteristics on bead on plate welding of AISI 904 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Abstract. In the present work, bead-on -plate welds were carried out on AISI 904 L super austenitic stainless steel sheets using Gas. Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) process. In this present investigation AISI 904 L solid wire having 1.2 mm diameter was used as an electrode with direct current electrode positive polarity.

  8. Soldadura (Welding). Spanish Translations for Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohhertz, Durwin

    Thirty transparency masters with Spanish subtitles for key words are provided for a welding/general mechanical repair course. The transparency masters are on such topics as oxyacetylene welding; oxyacetylene welding equipment; welding safety; different types of welds; braze welding; cutting torches; cutting with a torch; protective equipment; arc…

  9. Welding Emissions in Shipbuilding and Repair (Briefing Charts)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-03

    gas – GTAW –uses shield gas, but low emissions –aka TIG – SAW – lowest rate, solid wire weld covered with flux material 7 Naval Facilities...Engineering Service Center Welding Emissions in Shipbuilding and Repair Kathleen M Paulson, PE Port Hueneme, CA 3 September 2009 Report...REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2009 to 00-00-2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Welding Emissions in Shipbuilding and Repair 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b

  10. WELDING TORCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correy, T.B.

    1961-10-01

    A welding torch into which water and inert gas are piped separately for cooling and for providing a suitable gaseous atmosphere is described. A welding electrode is clamped in the torch by a removable collet sleeve and a removable collet head. Replacement of the sleeve and head with larger or smaller sleeve and head permits a larger or smaller welding electrode to be substituted on the torch. (AEC)

  11. Variable polarity plasma arc welding on the Space Shuttle external tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.; Bayless, E. O., Jr.; Jones, C. S., III; Munafo, P. M.; Biddle, A. P.; Wilson, W. A.

    1984-01-01

    Variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA) techniques used at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center for the fabrication of the Space Shuttle External Tank are presentedd. The high plasma arc jet velocities of 300-2000 m/s are produced by heating the plasma gas as it passes through a constraining orifice, with the plasma arc torch becoming a miniature jet engine. As compared to the GTA jet, the VPPA has the following advantages: (1) less sensitive to contamination, (2) a more symmetrical fusion zone, and (3) greater joint penetration. The VPPA welding system is computerized, operating with a microprocessor, to set welding variables in accordance with set points inputs, including the manipulator and wire feeder, as well as torch control and power supply. Some other VPPA welding technique advantages are: reduction in weld repair costs by elimination of porosity; reduction of joint preparation costs through elimination of the need to scrape or file faying surfaces; reduction in depeaking costs; eventual reduction of the 100 percent-X-ray inspection requirements. The paper includes a series of schematic and block diagrams.

  12. Microstructures and mechanical properties of bonding layers between low carbon steel and alloy 625 processed by gas tungsten arc welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Shuai; Lee, Seul Bi; Nam, Dae-Geun; Choi, Yoon Suk

    2017-11-01

    A filler metal wire, Alloy 625, was cladded on a plate of a low carbon streel, SS400, by gas tungsten arc welding, and the morphology of the weld bead and resulting dilution ratio were investigated under different welding parameter values (the input current, weld speed and wire feed speed). The wire feed speed was found to be most influential in controlling the dilution ratio of the weld bead, and seemed to limit the influence of other welding parameters. Two extreme welding conditions (with the minimum and maximum dilution ratios) were identified, and the corresponding microstructures, hardness and tensile properties near the bond line were compared between the two cases. The weld bead with the minimum dilution ratio showed superior hardness and tensile properties, while the formation lath martensite (due to relatively fast cooling) affected mechanical properties in the heat affected zone of the base metal with the maximum dilution ratio.

  13. Analysis of welding distortion due to narrow-gap welding of upper port plug

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biswas, Pankaj, E-mail: panu012@yahoo.co.i [Department of Ocean Engineering and Naval Architecture, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, Pin 721302 (India); Mandal, N.R., E-mail: nrm@naval.iitkgp.ernet.i [Department of Ocean Engineering and Naval Architecture, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, Pin 721302 (India); Vasu, Parameswaran, E-mail: parameswaran.vasu@iter-india.or [ITER-India, Institute of Plasma Research, Ahmedabad (India); Padasalag, Shrishail B., E-mail: subhasis.panja@iter-india.or [ITER-India, Institute of Plasma Research, Ahmedabad (India)

    2010-08-15

    Narrow-gap welding is a low distortion welding process. This process allows very thick plates to be joined using fewer weld passes as compared to conventional V-groove or double V-groove welding. In case of narrow-gap arc welding as the heat input and weld volume is low, it reduces thermal stress leading to reduction of both residual stress and distortion. In this present study the effect of narrow-gap welding was studied on fabrication of a scaled down port plug in the form of a trapezoidal box made of 10 mm thick mild steel (MS) plates using gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). Inherent strain method was used for numerical prediction of resulting distortions. The numerical results compared well with that of the experimentally measured distortion. The validated numerical scheme was used for prediction of weld induced distortion due to narrow-gap welding of full scale upper port plug made of 60 mm thick SS316LN material as is proposed for use in ITER project. It was observed that it is feasible to fabricate the said port plug keeping the distortions minimum within about 7 mm using GTAW for root pass welding followed by SMAW for filler runs.

  14. Plasma arc welding weld imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor); Mcgee, William F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A welding torch for plasma arc welding apparatus has a transparent shield cup disposed about the constricting nozzle, the cup including a small outwardly extending polished lip. A guide tube extends externally of the torch and has a free end adjacent to the lip. First and second optical fiber bundle assemblies are supported within the guide tube. Light from a strobe light is transmitted along one of the assemblies to the free end and through the lip onto the weld site. A lens is positioned in the guide tube adjacent to the second assembly and focuses images of the weld site onto the end of the fiber bundle of the second assembly and these images are transmitted along the second assembly to a video camera so that the weld site may be viewed continuously for monitoring the welding process.

  15. Experimental setup to detect superconducting wire motion

    OpenAIRE

    K. Ruwali; A. Yamanaka; Y. Teramoto; K. Nakanishi; K. Hosoyama

    2009-01-01

    An experimental setup was designed and fabricated to study superconducting wire motion under the influence of electromagnetic force. Experiments were conducted at 4.2 K by varying the experimental conditions such as the tension to the superconducting wire and different insulating materials at the interface of the superconducting wire and head part. The insulating materials used in the experiments were polyimide film and a high strength polyethylene fiber cloth, Dyneema. Details of the experim...

  16. Improving Fatigue Performance of AHSS Welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Zhili [ORNL; Yu, Xinghua [ORNL; ERDMAN III, DONALD L [ORNL; Wang, Yanli [ORNL; Kelly, Steve [ArcelorMittal USA; Hou, Wenkao [ArcelorMittal USA; Yan, Benda [ArcelorMittal USA; Wang, Zhifeng [Colorado School of Mines, Golden; Yu, Zhenzhen [Colorado School of Mines, Golden; Liu, Stephen [Colorado School of Mines, Golden

    2015-03-01

    Reported herein is technical progress on a U.S. Department of Energy CRADA project with industry cost-share aimed at developing the technical basis and demonstrate the viability of innovative in-situ weld residual stresses mitigation technology that can substantially improve the weld fatigue performance and durability of auto-body structures. The developed technology would be costeffective and practical in high-volume vehicle production environment. Enhancing weld fatigue performance would address a critical technology gap that impedes the widespread use of advanced high-strength steels (AHSS) and other lightweight materials for auto body structure light-weighting. This means that the automotive industry can take full advantage of the AHSS in strength, durability and crashworthiness without the concern of the relatively weak weld fatigue performance. The project comprises both technological innovations in weld residual stress mitigation and due-diligence residual stress measurement and fatigue performance evaluation. Two approaches were investigated. The first one was the use of low temperature phase transformation (LTPT) weld filler wire, and the second focused on novel thermo-mechanical stress management technique. Both technical approaches have resulted in considerable improvement in fatigue lives of welded joints made of high-strength steels. Synchrotron diffraction measurement confirmed the reduction of high tensile weld residual stresses by the two weld residual stress mitigation techniques.

  17. Emissions of chromium (VI) from arc welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heung, William; Yun, Myoung-Jin; Chang, Daniel P Y; Green, Peter G; Halm, Chris

    2007-02-01

    The presence of Cr in the +6 oxidation state (Cr[VI]) is still observed in ambient air samples in California despite steps taken to reduce emissions from plating operations. One known source of emission of Cr(VI) is welding, especially with high Cr-content materials, such as stainless steels. An experimental effort was undertaken to expand and update Cr(VI) emission factors by conducting tests on four types of arc-welding operations: gas-metal arc welding (GMAW), shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), fluxcore arc welding, and pulsed GMAW. Standard American Welding Society hood results were compared with a total enclosure method that permitted isokinetic sampling for particle size-cut measurement, as well as total collection of the aerosol. The fraction of Cr(VI) emitted per unit mass of Cr electrode consumed was determined. Consistent with AP-42 data, initial results indicate that a significant fraction of the total Cr in the aerosol is in the +6 oxidation state. The fraction of Cr(VI) and total aerosol mass produced by the different arc welding methods varies with the type of welding process used. Self-shielded electrodes that do not use a shield gas, for example, SMAW, produce greater amounts of Cr(VI) per unit mass of electrode consumed. The formation of Cr(VI) from standard electrode wires used for welding mild steel was below the method detection limit after eliminating an artifact in the analytical method used.

  18. Effects of flux composition on the element transfer and mechanical properties of weld metal in submerged arc welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Kook-soo; Park, Chan; Jung, Hong-chul; Lee, Jong-bong

    2009-06-01

    Submerged arc welding was performed using metal-cored wires and fluxes with different compositions. The effects of wire/flux combination on the chemical composition, tensile strength, and impact toughness of the weld metal were investigated and interpreted in terms of element transfer between the slag and the weld metal, i.e., Δ quantity. Both carbon and manganese show negative Δ quantity in most combinations, indicating the transfer of the elements from the weld metal to the slag during welding. The amount of transfer, however, is different depending on the flux composition. More basic fluxes yield less negative Δ C and Δ Mn through the reduction of oxygen content in the weld metal and presumably higher Mn activity in the slag, respectively. The transfer of silicon, however, is influenced by Al2O3, TiO2 and ZrO2 contents in the flux. Δ Si becomes less negative and reaches a positive value of 0.044 as the oxides contents increase. This is because Al, Ti, and Zr could replace Si in the SiO2 network, leaving more Si free to transfer from the slag to the weld metal. Accordingly, the Pcm index of weld metals calculated from chemical compositions varies from 0.153 to 0.196 depending on the wire/flux combination, and it almost has a linear relationship with the tensile strength of the weld metal.

  19. Add-On Shielding for Unshielded Wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, J. C.; Billitti, J. W.; Tallon, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Fabrication sequence used to produce compact shields slipped into place from free ends of wires already soldered into connectors at other ends. Single shields are formed into harnesses by connecting grounding jumpers. Technique is especially useful for small diameter wire attached to microminiature connectors.

  20. Localized Corrosion of Alloy 22 -Fabrication Effects-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebak, R B

    2005-11-05

    This report deals with the impact of fabrication processes on the localized corrosion behavior of Alloy 22 (N06022). The four fabrication processes that were analyzed are: (1) Surface stress mitigation of final closure weld, (2) Manufacturing of the mockup container, (3) Black annealing of the container and (4) Use of different heats of Alloy 22 for container fabrication. Immersion and Electrochemical tests performed in the laboratory are generally aggressive and do not represent actual repository environments in Yucca Mountain. For example, to determine the intergranular attack in the heat affected zone of a weldment, tests are conducted in boiling acidic and oxidizing solutions according to ASTM standards. These solutions are used to compare the behavior of differently treated metallic coupons. Similarly for electrochemical tests many times pure sodium chloride or calcium chloride solutions are used. Pure chloride solutions are not representative of the repository environment. (1) Surface Stress Mitigation: When metallic plates are welded, for example using the Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) method, residual tensile stresses may develop in the vicinity of the weld seam. Processes such as Low Plasticity Burnishing (LPB) and Laser Shock Peening (LSP) could be applied locally to eliminate the residual stresses produced by welding. In this study, Alloy 22 plates were welded and then the above-mentioned surface treatments were applied to eliminate the residual tensile stresses. The aim of the current study was to comparatively test the corrosion behavior of as-welded (ASW) plates with the corrosion behavior of plates with stress mitigated surfaces. Immersion and electrochemical tests were performed. Results from both immersion and electrochemical corrosion tests show that the corrosion resistance of the mitigated plates was not affected by the surface treatments applied. (2) Behavior of Specimens from a Mockup container: Alloy 22 has been extensively tested for

  1. WELDING METHOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell, A.A.; Dunbar, J.V.; Ruffner, J.H.

    1959-09-29

    A semi-automatic method is described for the weld joining of pipes and fittings which utilizes the inert gasshielded consumable electrode electric arc welding technique, comprising laying down the root pass at a first peripheral velocity and thereafter laying down the filler passes over the root pass necessary to complete the weld by revolving the pipes and fittings at a second peripheral velocity different from the first peripheral velocity, maintaining the welding head in a fixed position as to the specific direction of revolution, while the longitudinal axis of the welding head is disposed angularly in the direction of revolution at amounts between twenty minutas and about four degrees from the first position.

  2. Optimization of welding parameters for gas transportation steel pipes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Cvetkovski

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to define optimization of welding conditions for Submerged Arc Welding (SAW of steel pipes for gas transportation. Fine grain steel X-52 with thickness of 8 mm were used as a base material. Welding was performed from inner and outer side. Two wires, inclined under different angles, were feed separately. Eleven samples divided in three series were experimentally welded. Performed investigations indicated that the best properties showed weldments from series III, welded with the highest heat input. On the contrary of our expectations, welds from series II, using self made equipment, showed pretty bead properties and improper geometry. So, improving of this this equipment and obtaining welds with better properties is the target in future investigations.

  3. Laser Peening Effects on Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatamleh, Omar

    2011-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a welding technique that uses frictional heating combined with forging pressure to produce high strength bonds. It is attractive for aerospace applications. Although residual stresses in FSW are generally lower when compared to conventional fusion welds, recent work has shown that significant tensile residual stresses can be present in the weld after fabrication. Therefore, laser shock peening was investigated as a means of moderating the tensile residual stresses produced during welding. This slide presentation reviews the effect of Laser Peening on the weld, in tensile strength, strain, surface roughness, microhardness, surface wear/friction, and fatigue crack growth rates. The study concluded that the laser peening process can result in considerable improvement to crack initiaion, propagation and mechanical properties in FSW.

  4. Ultrasonic Stir Welding Development for Ground-Based and In Situ Fabrication and Repair for In-Space Propulsion Systems/Commercial Space Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    The completed Center Innovation Fund (CIF) project used the upgraded Ultrasonic Stir Weld (USW) Prototype System (built in 2013/2014) to begin characterizing the weld process using 2219 aluminum (fig. 1). This work is being done in Bldg. 4755 at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The capabilities of the USW system provides the means to precisely control and document individual welding parameters. The current upgraded system has the following capabilities: (1) Ability to 'pulse' ultrasonic (US) energy on and off and adjust parameters real-time (travel speed, spindle rpm, US amplitude, X and Z axis positions, and plunge and pin axis force; (2) Means to measure draw force; (3) Ability to record US power versus time; (4) Increasing stiffness of Z axis drive and reduce head deflection using laser technology; (5) Adding linear encoder to better control tool penetration setting; (6) Ultrasonic energy integrated into stir rod and containment plate; (7) Maximum 600 rpm; (8) Maximum Z force 15,000 lb; (9) Real-time data acquisition and logging capabilities at a minimum frequency of 10 Hz; and (10) Two separate transducer power supplies operating at 4.5 kW power.

  5. STUDY OF ARC IMPULSE FREQUENCY EFFECT ON THE STRUCTURE AND PROPERTIES OF WELDED CONNECTION ELEMENTS IN ALUMINIUM PIPELINE SYSTEMS, MADE WITH MASTERTIG 3500

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr. Pavel V. Bakhmatov

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Summary . The article focuses on the arc impulse frequency effect on the structure and properties of welded connections in aluminum pipeline systems hand-operated with argon-arc welding nonconsumable rod on MasterTig3500. It was revealed that the frequency of the welding current impulses plays an important role in the forming of the welded connection. The authors determined the optimal value of the welding current frequency significantly accelerating the welding process to ensure consistent quality of the weld. The authors detailed some features of cleaning assembly parts with a wire brush prior to welding process.

  6. After Effects of Welding Armor Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-31

    the coating and moisture • Different electrodes causes different hydrogen content in the weld metal • SMAW electrodes produce the widest range of...Low Hydrogen Processes – SMAW – FCAW • Electrode Selection – Solid Core Wires or Metal Core – Non- Low Hydrogen Rods • Electrode Storage – Rod

  7. In Planta Synthesis of Designer-Length Tobacco Mosaic Virus-Based Nano-Rods That Can Be Used to Fabricate Nano-Wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Keith; Lomonossoff, George P

    2017-01-01

    We have utilized plant-based transient expression to produce tobacco mosaic virus (TMV)-based nano-rods of predetermined lengths. This is achieved by expressing RNAs containing the TMV origin of assembly sequence (OAS) and the sequence of the TMV coat protein either on the same RNA molecule or on two separate constructs. We show that the length of the resulting nano-rods is dependent upon the length of the RNA that possesses the OAS element. By expressing a version of the TMV coat protein that incorporates a metal-binding peptide at its C-terminus in the presence of RNA containing the OAS we have been able to produce nano-rods of predetermined length that are coated with cobalt-platinum. These nano-rods have the properties of defined-length nano-wires that make them ideal for many developing bionanotechnological processes.

  8. In Planta Synthesis of Designer-Length Tobacco Mosaic Virus-Based Nano-Rods That Can Be Used to Fabricate Nano-Wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Keith; Lomonossoff, George P.

    2017-01-01

    We have utilized plant-based transient expression to produce tobacco mosaic virus (TMV)-based nano-rods of predetermined lengths. This is achieved by expressing RNAs containing the TMV origin of assembly sequence (OAS) and the sequence of the TMV coat protein either on the same RNA molecule or on two separate constructs. We show that the length of the resulting nano-rods is dependent upon the length of the RNA that possesses the OAS element. By expressing a version of the TMV coat protein that incorporates a metal-binding peptide at its C-terminus in the presence of RNA containing the OAS we have been able to produce nano-rods of predetermined length that are coated with cobalt-platinum. These nano-rods have the properties of defined-length nano-wires that make them ideal for many developing bionanotechnological processes. PMID:28878782

  9. Unraveling the Processing Parameters in Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Judy; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    In friction stir welding (FSW), a rotating threaded pin tool is translated along a weld seam, literally stirring the edges of the seam together. To determine optimal processing parameters for producing a defect free weld, a better understanding of the resulting metal deformation flow path or paths is required. In this study, various markers are used to trace the flow paths of the metal. X-ray radiographs record the segmentation and position of the wire. Several variations in the trajectories can be differentiated within the weld zone.

  10. An Approach to Maximize Weld Penetration During TIG Welding of P91 Steel Plates by Utilizing Image Processing and Taguchi Orthogonal Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Akhilesh Kumar; Debnath, Tapas; Dey, Vidyut; Rai, Ram Naresh

    2017-10-01

    P-91 is modified 9Cr-1Mo steel. Fabricated structures and components of P-91 has a lot of application in power and chemical industry owing to its excellent properties like high temperature stress corrosion resistance, less susceptibility to thermal fatigue at high operating temperatures. The weld quality and surface finish of fabricated structure of P91 is very good when welded by Tungsten Inert Gas welding (TIG). However, the process has its limitation regarding weld penetration. The success of a welding process lies in fabricating with such a combination of parameters that gives maximum weld penetration and minimum weld width. To carry out an investigation on the effect of the autogenous TIG welding parameters on weld penetration and weld width, bead-on-plate welds were carried on P91 plates of thickness 6 mm in accordance to a Taguchi L9 design. Welding current, welding speed and gas flow rate were the three control variables in the investigation. After autogenous (TIG) welding, the dimension of the weld width, weld penetration and weld area were successfully measured by an image analysis technique developed for the study. The maximum error for the measured dimensions of the weld width, penetration and area with the developed image analysis technique was only 2 % compared to the measurements of Leica-Q-Win-V3 software installed in optical microscope. The measurements with the developed software, unlike the measurements under a microscope, required least human intervention. An Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) confirms the significance of the selected parameters. Thereafter, Taguchi's method was successfully used to trade-off between maximum penetration and minimum weld width while keeping the weld area at a minimum.

  11. Optimization of operator and physical parameters for laser welding of dental materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, C; le Petitcorps, Y; Albingre, L; Dupuis, V

    2004-04-10

    Interactions between lasers and materials are very complex phenomena. The success of laser welding procedures in dental metals depends on the operator's control of many parameters. The aims of this study were to evaluate factors relating to the operator's dexterity and the choice of the welding parameters (power, pulse duration and therefore energy), which are recognized determinants of weld quality. In vitro laboratory study. FeNiCr dental drawn wires were chosen for these experiments because their properties are well known. Different diameters of wires were laser welded, then tested in tension and compared to the control material as extruded, in order to evaluate the quality of the welding. Scanning electron microscopy of the fractured zone and micrograph observations perpendicular and parallel to the wire axis were also conducted in order to analyse the depth penetration and the quality of the microstructure. Additionally, the micro-hardness (Vickers type) was measured both in the welded and the heat-affected zones and then compared to the non-welded alloy. Adequate combination of energy and pulse duration with the power set in the range between 0.8 to 1 kW appears to improve penetration depth of the laser beam and success of the welding procedure. Operator skill is also an important variable. The variation in laser weld quality in dental FeNiCr wires attributable to operator skill can be minimized by optimization of the physical welding parameters.

  12. Analysis of the Corrosion Behavior of an A-TIG Welded SS 409 Weld Fusion Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidyarthy, R. S.; Dwivedi, D. K.

    2017-11-01

    AISI 409 (SS 409) ferritic stainless steel is generally used as the thick gauge section in freight train wagons, in ocean containers, and in sugar refinery equipment. Activating the flux tungsten inert gas (A-TIG) welding process can reduce the welding cost during fabrication of thick sections. However, corrosion behavior of the A-TIG weld fusion zone is a prime concern for this type of steel. In the present work, the effect of the A-TIG welding process parameters on the corrosion behavior of a weld fusion zone made of 8-mm-thick AISI 409 ferritic stainless-steel plate has been analyzed. Potentiodynamic polarization tests were performed to evaluate the corrosion behavior. The maximum corrosion potential ( E corr) was shown by the weld made using a welding current of 215 A, a welding speed of 95 mm/min, and a flux coating density of 0.81 mg/cm2. The minimum E corr was observed in the weld made using a welding current of 190 A, a welding speed of 120 mm/min, and a flux coating density of 1.40 mg/cm2. The current study also presents the inclusive microstructure-corrosion property relationships using the collective techniques of scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction.

  13. Development of New Materials and Technologies for Welding and Surfacing at Research and Production Center "Welding Processes and Technologies"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyrev, N. A.; Kryukov, R. E.; Galevsky, G. V.; Titov, D. A.; Shurupov, V. M.

    2015-09-01

    The paper provides description of research into the influence of new materials and technologies on quality parameters of welds and added metal carried out at research and production center «Welding processes and technologies». New welding technologies of tanks for northern conditions are considered, as well as technologies of submerged arc welding involving fluxing agents AN - 348, AN - 60, AN - 67, OK. 10.71 and carbon-fluorine containing additives, new flux cored wires and surfacing technologies, teaching programs and a trainer for welders are designed.

  14. Development and actual application of new welding process for weld-type piston crown in LMC diesel engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatano, H.; Shimizu, H.; Fujiwara, F.; Tokuoka, T.; Nishimoto, T.; Fujita, R.; Matsui, S.; Nakayama, S.

    1985-04-01

    In the improved LMC diesel engines for saving fuel oil, the piston crown becomes more rigid. Unibody casting cannot achieve sufficiently high quality for piston crowns, in the smoothness of the inner surface of the cooling hole, for example. A welded piston crown would solve this problem, in which various pieces could be machined smoothly and then welded together. Joint locations are selected to satisfy welding and design requirements. Welding sequence and welding restraint are analysed using the finite element method. Because pistons can be welded from outside only, narrow gap TIG welding is applied to obtain a smooth bead. Then, narrow gap MAG welding is applied to reduce welding time. TIG-MAG combined welding equipment including welding torchs manipulator, positioner and controller is designed, fabricated, and assembled. Utilizing this equipment, experiments such as welding condition test, restraint crack test, joint property test, operation tests, and mock-up tests are carried out. Then, the products are welded and welds are inspected by an optical fiber for the appearance of the bead and also by ultrasonic and magnetic tests for defects.

  15. Syllabus in Trade Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development.

    The syllabus outlines material for a course two academic years in length (minimum two and one-half hours daily experience) leading to entry-level occupational ability in several welding trade areas. Fourteen units covering are welding, gas welding, oxyacetylene welding, cutting, nonfusion processes, inert gas shielded-arc welding, welding cast…

  16. Electromyographic and discomfort analysis of confined-space shipyard welding processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, B D; Wurzelbacher, S J; Shulman, S A; Hudock, S D

    2001-06-01

    This study examined muscle fatigue and discomfort in a confined-space welding operation at a shipyard. Surface electromyography (SEMG) was recorded from seven upper extremity and torso muscles of welders welding in a mock-up of the work environment. Following spectral transform of the SEMG data the percentage of the total signal power in the 10-30 Hz frequency band was compared over time during welding. For the conventional stick electrode welding process (SMAW) several muscles exhibited an increase in the percent of the total signal power in the low-frequency band. Fewer muscles exhibited this fatigue-related spectral density shift with a wire welding process (FCAW) the shipyard has considered adopting. This finding suggests that localized muscle fatigue may be reduced by a change to the wire welding process. Subjectively reported discomfort was generally low for both processes, but confirmed the finding that discomfort in the low back and shoulder regions is experienced in this welding operation.

  17. The propagation of ultrasound in an austenitic weld

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halkjær, Søren; Sørensen, Mads Peter; Kristensen, Anders Wang

    2000-01-01

    The propagation of ultrasound through an austenitic weld is investigated experimentally as well as in a numerical simulation. The weld is insonified at normal incidence to the fusion line with a longitudinal contact transducer. In order to experimentally trace the ultrasound through the weld......, slices of different thicknesses from the original weld have been fabricated. Through-transmission A-scans have then been produced for each weld slice and compared with the corresponding numerical simulation. A comparison of the direction of ultrasound propagation through the weld for the two approaches...... shows quite good agreement. However, attenuation due to scattering at grain boundaries in the weld is poorly modelled in the simulation. In order to improve this, a better model of the weld is needed....

  18. Fabrication of U-10 wt.%Zr Metallic Fuel Rodlets for Irradiation Test in BOR-60 Fast Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki-Hwan Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The fabrication technology for metallic fuel has been developed to produce the driver fuel in a PGSFR in Korea since 2007. In order to evaluate the irradiation integrity and validate the in-reactor of the starting metallic fuel with FMS cladding for the loading of the metallic fuel, U-10 wt.%Zr fuel rodlets were fabricated and evaluated for a verification of the starting driver fuel through an irradiation test in the BOR-60 fast reactor. The injection casting method was applied to U-10 wt.%Zr fuel slugs with a diameter of 5.5 mm. Consequently, fuel slugs per melting batch without casting defects were fabricated through the development of advanced casting technology and evaluation tests. The optimal GTAW welding conditions were also established through a number of experiments. In addition, a qualification test was carried out to prove the weld quality of the end plug welding of the metallic fuel rodlets. The wire wrapping of metallic fuel rodlets was successfully accomplished for the irradiation test. Thus, PGSFR fuel rodlets have been soundly fabricated for the irradiation test in a BOR-60 fast reactor.

  19. NiTi SMA Wires Coupled with Kevlar Fabric: a Real Application of an Innovative Aircraft LE Slat System in SMAHC Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guida, M.; Marulo, F.; Russo, S.

    2017-08-01

    This paper investigates experimentally and numerically the response of a smart hybrid thermoplastic aircraft slat system subjected to a short-duration and high-frequency event like a birdstrike. The focus of the paper is to exploit the ability that superelastic shape memory alloys have to absorb and dissipate energy compared to conventional composite structures. The final objective of the work is to develop an innovative thermoplastic wing leading edge slat able to resist to an impact of 4-lb (1.8 kg) bird at speed of 350 kts (132 m/s), as requested by the aeronautical requirements. Aircraft leading edges must be certified for a proven level of bird impact resistance. In particular, the main structural requirement is to protect the torsion box and control devices from any significant damage caused by birdstrike in order to allow the aircraft to land safely. A clear increase of the composites toughness and higher absorbed energy levels before failure were also observed. This is due to the fact that SMA wires can absorb kinetic energy during the impact due to their remarkably large failure and recoverable strain and to their superelastic and hysteretic behaviour. The activities have been performed within the European Project COALESCE "Cost Efficient Advanced Leading Edge Structure", funded by the Seventh Framework Program Theme 7 Transport (incl. Aeronautics).

  20. Study of MA Effect on Yield Strength and Ductility of X80 Linepipe Steels Weld

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huda, Nazmul; Lazor, Robert; Gerlich, Adrian P.

    2017-09-01

    Multipass GMAW (Gas Metal Arc Welding) welding was used to join X80 linepipe materials using two weld metals of slightly different compositions. Welding wires with diameters of 0.984 and 0.909 mm were used while applying the same heat input in each pass. The slight difference in the wire diameters resulted in different HAZ microstructures. The microstructures in the doubly reheated HAZ of both welds were found to contain bainite-ferrite. However, etching also revealed a difference in martensite-austenite (MA) fraction in these reheated zones. The MA exhibited twice the hardness of ferrite when measured by nanoindentation. Tensile testing from the reheated zone of both welds revealed a difference in yield strength, tensile strength and elongation of the transverse weld specimens. In the reheated zone of weld A, (produced with a 0.984 mm wire) a higher fraction of MA was observed, which resulted in higher strength but lower elongation compared to weld B. The ductility of weld A was found severely impaired (to nearly half of weld B) due to formation of closely spaced voids around the MA, along with debonding of MA from the matrix, which occurs just above the yield stress.

  1. Microsoldering and microminiature welding with lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jellison, J.L.; Keicher, D.M.

    1988-01-01

    Miniature welding of electronic and electromechanical components with lasers is a rapidly maturing technology. Extending the use of lasers to microsoldering and microminiature welding applications has also generated moderate interest. Use of lasers for microminiature soldering or welding permits the delivery of accurately controlled amounts of heat to the precise area required. By applying small amounts of heat locally, rework can be accomplished in densely packed circuits without damaging heat sensitive components to conductors. Also, localization of heat obviates the need for using solder alloys of different melting points, which can simplify design. Laser soldering has been applied to conductors ranging from 25 ..mu..m dia. wires to coaxial cables in the 0.3 to 1.25 mm range. For the most part, these conductors were soldered to metallized alumina substrates, although in some instances soft substrates were also used. The potential advantages of microminiature welding have also been explored. 9 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Virtual Welded-Joint Design Integrating Advanced Materials and Processing Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Z.; Dong, P.; Liu, S.; Babu, S.; Olson, G.; DebRoy, T.

    2005-04-15

    The primary goal of this project is to increase the fatigue life of a welded-joint by 10 times and to reduce energy use by 25% through product performance and productivity improvements using an integrated modeling approach. The fatigue strength of a welded-joint is currently the bottleneck to design high performance and lightweight welded structures using advanced materials such as high strength steels. In order to achieve high fatigue strength in a welded-joint it is necessary to manage the weld bead shape for lower stress concentration, produce preferable residual stress distribution, and obtain the desired microstructure for improved material toughness and strength. This is a systems challenge that requires the optimization of the welding process, the welding consumable, the base material, as well as the structure design. The concept of virtual welded-joint design has been proposed and established in this project. The goal of virtual welded-joint design is to develop a thorough procedure to predict the relationship of welding process, microstructure, property, residual stress, and the ultimate weld fatigue strength by a systematic modeling approach. The systematic approach combines five sub-models: weld thermal-fluid model, weld microstructure model, weld material property model, weld residual stress model, and weld fatigue model. The systematic approach is thus based on interdisciplinary applied sciences including heat transfer, computational fluid dynamics, materials science, engineering mechanics, and material fracture mechanics. The sub-models are based on existing models with further development. The results from modeling have been validated with critical experiments. The systematic modeling approach has been used to design high fatigue resistant welds considering the combined effects of weld bead geometry, residual stress, microstructure, and material property. In particular, a special welding wire has been developed in this project to introduce

  3. THE IMPACT OF SELECTED PROCESSES AND TECHNOLOGICAL PARAMETERS ON THE GEOMETRY OF THE WELD POOL WHEN WELDING IN SHIELS GAS ATMOSPHERE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Bradáč

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper is focused on welding with a consumable electrode in a gas shield atmosphere and its main aim is to show the influence of selected processes and technological parameters on the geometry of the weld pool in terms of theoretical and experimental views. For this purpose, the parametric areas defined by the change of the welding current and welding rate were determined. Apart from the influence of these parametric areas, the influence of other technological input variables, including the wire diameter and preheating temperature, was also studied. The experimentally obtained geometric data of the weld pool can be used for technological welding procedures WPS and especially for simulation calculations to obtain a more accurate numerical model of the heat source. This makes it possible to get accurate simulation results and to better understand the impact of other variables that influence the welding process. This all helps to the optimization of the welding process for several applications.

  4. Weld-brazing of titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bales, T. T.; Royster, D. M.; Arnold, W. E., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    A joining process, designated weld-brazing, which combines resistance spotwelding and brazing has been developed at the NASA Langley Research Center. Resistance spot-welding is employed to position and align the parts and to establish a suitable faying surface gap for brazing; it contributes to the integrity of the joint. Brazing enhances the properties of the joint and reduces the stress concentrations normally associated with spotwelds. Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy joints have been fabricated using 3003 aluminum braze both in a vacuum furnace and in a retort containing an inert gas environment.

  5. Application of welding science to welding engineering: A lumped parameter gas metal arc welding dynamic process model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, P.E.; Smartt, H.B.; Johnson, J.A. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1997-12-31

    We develop a model of the depth of penetration of the weld pool in gas metal arc welding (GMAW) which demonstrates interaction between the arc, filler wire and weld pool. This model is motivated by the observations of Essers and Walter which suggest a relationship between droplet momentum and penetration depth. A model of gas metal arc welding was augmented to include an improved model of mass transfer and a simple model of accelerating droplets in a plasma jet to obtain the mass and momentum of impinging droplets. The force of the droplets and depth of penetration is correlated by a dimensionless linear relation used to predict weld pool depth for a range of values of arc power and contact tip to workpiece distance. Model accuracy is examined by comparing theoretical predictions and experimental measurements of the pool depth obtained from bead on plate welds of carbon steel in an argon rich shielding gas. Moreover, theoretical predictions of pool depth are compared to the results obtained from the heat conduction model due to Christensen et al. which suggest that in some cases the momentum of impinging droplets is a better indicator of the depth of the weld pool and the presence of a deep, narrow penetration.

  6. Multi-Objective Optimization of Submerged Arc Welding Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurav Datta

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Submerged arc welding (SAW is an important metal fabrication technology specially applied to join metals of large thickness in a single pass. In order to obtain an efficient joint, several process parameters of SAW need to be studied and precisely selected to improve weld quality. Many methodologies were proposed in the past research to address this issue. However, a good number of past work seeks to optimize SAWprocess parameters with a single response only. In practical situations, not only is the influence of process parameters and their interactive effects on output responses are to be critically examined but also an attempt is to be made to optimize more than one response, simultaneously. To this end, the present study considers four process control parameters viz. voltage (OCV, wire feed rate, traverse speed and electrode stick-out. The selected weld quality characteristics related to features of bead geometry are depth of penetration, reinforcement and bead width. In the present reporting, an integrated approach capable of solving the simultaneous optimization of multi-quality responses in SAW was suggested. In the proposed approach, the responses were transformed into their individual desirability values by selecting appropriate desirability function. Assuming equal importance for all responses, these individual desirability values were aggregated to calculate the overall desirability values. Quadratic Response Surface Methodology (RSM was applied to establish a mathematical model representing overall desirability as a function involving linear, quadratic and interaction effect of process control parameters. This model was optimized finally within the experimental domain using PSO (Particle Swarm Optimization algorithm. A confirmatory test showed a satisfactory result. A detailed methodology of RSM, desirability function (DF and a PSO-based optimization approach was illustrated in the paper.

  7. Joining of Materials with Diferent Properties Through Submerged Arc Welding Process and Destructive and Non-Destructive Testing of the Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yakup Kaya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, X60, X65 and X70 steels used in petroleum and natural gas pipeline were joined with Submerged Arc Welding by using different type of welding fluxes (LN761 and P223 and wires (S1 and S2Mo. Initially, visual and radiographic inspection techniques were subjected to welded joints for determining surface and subsurface defects. After that, spectral analyses were carried out in order to determine the compositions of wire-flux-base metal on the joints. Impact toughness test were performed for determining toughness properties the joints. Furthermore, hardness and microstructure studies were also carried out on the samples. As a result of the visual and radiographic inspection on the welded samples, there were no weld defects on joints were observed. It was clearly understood that carbon ratio in the compositions of weld metal higher than base metal but lower than filler metal in terms of spectral analyses results. According to impact toughness test results, the joints obtained by using S2Mo welding wire and P223 welding flux had better impact toughness value than the joints obtained by S1 welding wire and LN 761 welding flux. With respect to hardness test, the highest hardness values were measured on weld metal. When the microstructure images were examined, it is clearly understood that similar images for all the joints were shown adjacent zones to weld metals heat affected zones and welding boundary, due to heat input constant.

  8. Low-loss, compact, and fabrication-tolerant Si-wire 90° waveguide bend using clothoid and normal curves for large scale photonic integrated circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujisawa, Takeshi; Makino, Shuntaro; Sato, Takanori; Saitoh, Kunimasa

    2017-04-17

    Ultimately low-loss 90° waveguide bend composed of clothoid and normal curves is proposed for dense optical interconnect photonic integrated circuits. By using clothoid curves at the input and output of 90° waveguide bend, straight and bent waveguides are smoothly connected without increasing the footprint. We found that there is an optimum ratio of clothoid curves in the bend and the bending loss can be significantly reduced compared with normal bend. 90% reduction of the bending loss for the bending radius of 4 μm is experimentally demonstrated with excellent agreement between theory and experiment. The performance is compared with the waveguide bend with offset, and the proposed bend is superior to the waveguide bend with offset in terms of fabrication tolerance.

  9. Hydrogen mitigation in submerged arc welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimowicz, Steven

    With the role of hydrogen in weld metal well understood in its relation to cold cracking, there has been a push to produce welds with lower and lower diffusible hydrogen contents. The push for lower diffusible hydrogen contents has placed pressure on consumables manufactures to create consumables that can achieve the requirements for lower diffusible hydrogen content. Currently EM12K flux is produced so that it can achieve below 4 ml of diffusible hydrogen for every 100g of weld metal deposited (ml/100g) for submerged arc welding (SAW). The recent trend for industry is to preferentially achieve diffusible hydrogen contents below 3 ml/100g. Making it necessary to find a way to modify the flux to achieve a lower diffusible hydrogen content for the welds it produces. To achieve this goal a two phase plan was developed. The first phase was to characterize the entire welding system for hydrogen. Since the goal of the project is hydrogen mitigation, any amount of hydrogen that could be reduced is helpful and therefore must first be discovered. Sources of hydrogen may be found by analyzing the welding wire and base metal, as well as breaking the flux down into its components and production steps. The wire was analyzed for total hydrogen content as was the base metal. The flux and its components were analyzed using differential thermal analysis-simultaneous thermal analysis (DTA-STA) and later vacuum degassing for moisture content. The analysis of the wire showed that the copper coating on the wire was the largest contributor of hydrogen. There was lubricant present on the wire surface as well, but it did not contribute as much as the copper coating. It was found that a simple low temperature baking of the wire was enough to remove the lubricant and coating moisture. The base metal was found to have a similar total hydrogen content to that of the wire. The breakdown of the flux and production process for moisture content analysis revealed that the production process

  10. Damage Tolerance Behavior of Friction Stir Welds in Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, Preston; Burkholder, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Friction stir welding is a solid state welding process used in the fabrication of various aerospace structures. Self-reacting and conventional friction stir welding are variations of the friction stir weld process employed in the fabrication of cryogenic propellant tanks which are classified as pressurized structure in many spaceflight vehicle architectures. In order to address damage tolerance behavior associated with friction stir welds in these safety critical structures, nondestructive inspection and proof testing may be required to screen hardware for mission critical defects. The efficacy of the nondestructive evaluation or the proof test is based on an assessment of the critical flaw size. Test data describing fracture behavior, residual strength capability, and cyclic mission life capability of friction stir welds at ambient and cryogenic temperatures have been generated and will be presented in this paper. Fracture behavior will include fracture toughness and tearing (R-curve) response of the friction stir welds. Residual strength behavior will include an evaluation of the effects of lack of penetration on conventional friction stir welds, the effects of internal defects (wormholes) on self-reacting friction stir welds, and an evaluation of the effects of fatigue cycled surface cracks on both conventional and selfreacting welds. Cyclic mission life capability will demonstrate the effects of surface crack defects on service load cycle capability. The fracture data will be used to evaluate nondestructive inspection and proof test requirements for the welds.

  11. Weld-brazing - a new joining process. [combination resistance spot welding and brazing of titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bales, T. T.; Royster, D. M.; Arnold, W. E., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A joining process designated weld brazing which combines resistance spot welding and brazing has been developed. Resistance spot welding is used to position and align the parts as well as to establish a suitable faying surface gap for brazing. Fabrication is then completed by capillary flow of the braze alloy into the joint. The process has been used successfully to fabricate Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy joints using 3003 aluminum braze alloy. Test results obtained on single overlap and hat-stiffened structural specimens show that weld brazed joints are superior in tensile shear, stress rupture, fatigue, and buckling than joint fabricated by spotwelding or brazing. Another attractive feature of the process is that the brazed joints is hermetically sealed by the braze material.

  12. Development of IN-RAFM steel and fabrication technologies for Indian TBM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, S.K., E-mail: shaju@igcar.gov.in [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Laha, K.; Bhaduri, A.K.; Jayakumar, T. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Rajendrakumar, E. [TBM Division, Institute of Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • India specific RAFM steel IN-RAFM has been produced in commercial scale and physical property data for the same have been generated. • Mechanical properties of the commercial heats are comparable to that of the laboratory heats. • IN-RAFM steel filler wires has been produced indigenously. • Process parameters have been optimized so that toughness of the fusion zone of the EB and laser welds is comparable to that of the base metal even at sub-zero temperatures. • Fabrication of the mock ups of different components of Indian TBM has been initiated. - Abstract: India has indigenously developed its own Indian Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic Steel (IN-RAFM steel) which, it is proposed to use for fabrication of Indian TBM to be installed in ITER. With an objective of qualifying this material for use in ITER, extensive testing of this material to generate the necessary data required to offer this material for Particular Material Appraisal of ITER has been undertaken. Accordingly, data generation on creep, fatigue and physical properties of this steel is in progress. Physical properties like thermal diffusivity, heat capacity and thermal expansion coefficient for this steel at various temperatures have been measured and thermal conductivity estimated from the measured physical properties. Values obtained for these physical properties are comparable with those reported for other RAFM steels. Results of creep tests that are in progress also indicate that creep is comparable to that of other RAFM steels. Low cycle fatigue (LCF) behaviour of this steel has been studied in air with total strain control in the strain amplitude range of ±0.25–1% and temperatures range of 300–873 K at a constant strain rate of 3 × 10{sup −3} s{sup −1}. Results confirm that fatigue life of IN-RAFM steel is at par with that of the European Union grade Eurofer 97 RAFM steel. During production of IN-RAFM steel plates of different thicknesses, it is observed

  13. A Study to Increase Weld Penetration in P91 Steel During TIG Welding by using Activating Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Akhilesh Kumar; Kumar, Mayank; Dey, Vidyut; Naresh Rai, Ram

    2017-08-01

    Activated Flux TIG (ATIG) welding is a unique joining process, invented at Paton Institute of electric welding in 1960. ATIG welding process is also known as flux zoned TIG (FZTIG). In this process, a thin layer of activating flux is applied along the line on the surface of the material where the welding is to be carries out. The ATIG process aids to increase the weld penetration in thick materials. Activating fluxes used in the literature show the use of oxides like TiO2, SiO2, Cr2O3, ZnO, CaO, Fe2O3, and MnO2 during welding of steels. In the present study, ATIG was carried out on P-91 steel. Though, Tungsten Inert Gas welding gives excellent quality welds, but the penetration obtained in such welding is still demanding. P91 steel which is ferritic steel is used in high temperature applications. As this steel is, generally, used in thick sections, fabrication of such structures with TIG welding is limited, due to its low depth of penetration. To increase the depth of penetration in P91while welding with ATIG, the role of various oxides were investigated. Apart from the oxides mentioned above, in the present study the role of B2O3, V2O5 and MgO, during ATIG welding of P91 was investigated. It was seen that, compared to TIG welding, there was phenomenal increase in weld penetration during ATIG welding. Amongst all the oxides used in this study, maximum penetration was achieved in case of B2O3. The measurements of weld penetration, bead width and heat affected zone of the weldings were carried out using an image analysis technique.

  14. Particulate and gaseous emissions when welding aluminum alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Homer; Epstein, Seymour; Peace, Jon

    2007-09-01

    Fabrication and repair of aluminum components and structures commonly involves the use of electric arc welding. The interaction of the arc and the metal being welded generates ultraviolet radiation, metallic oxides, fumes, and gases. Aluminum is seldom used as the pure metal but is often alloyed with other metals to improve strength and other physical properties. Therefore, the exact composition of any emissions will depend on the welding process and the particular aluminum alloy being welded. To quantify such emissions, The Aluminum Association sponsored several studies to characterize arc welding emissions by the gas metal arc welding (GMAW) and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) processes for various combinations of base and filler alloys. In all cases, the tests were conducted under conditions that could be found in a production weld shop without forced ventilation. The concentrations of each analyte that a welder could be exposed to were greatly affected by the welding process, the composition of the base and filler alloys, the position of the welder, and the welding helmet. The results obtained can be used by employers to identify and control potential hazards associated with the welding of aluminum alloys and can provide the basis for hazard communication to employees involved in the welding of these alloys.

  15. CLOSURE WELD DEVELOPMENT FOR 3013 OUTER CONTAINERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daugherty, W.; Howard, S.; Peterson, K.; Stokes, M.

    2009-11-10

    Excess plutonium materials in the DOE complex are packaged and stored in accordance with DOE-STD-3013. This standard specifies requirements for the stabilization of such materials and subsequent packaging in dual nested seal-welded containers. Austenitic stainless steels have been selected for container fabrication. The inner 3013 container provides contamination control while the outer 3013 container is the primary containment vessel and is the focus of this paper. Each packaging site chose a process for seal welding the outer 3013 containers in accordance with its needs and expertise. The two processes chosen for weld closure were laser beam welding (LBW) and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). Following development efforts, each system was qualified in accordance with DOE-STD-3013 prior to production use. The 3013 outer container closure weld joint was designed to accommodate the characteristics of a laser weld. This aspect of the joint design necessitated some innovative process and equipment considerations in the application of the GTAW process. Details of the weld requirements and the development processes are presented and several potential enhancements for the GTAW system are described.

  16. Experimental setup to detect superconducting wire motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruwali, K.; Yamanaka, A.; Teramoto, Y.; Nakanishi, K.; Hosoyama, K.

    2009-04-01

    An experimental setup was designed and fabricated to study superconducting wire motion under the influence of electromagnetic force. Experiments were conducted at 4.2 K by varying the experimental conditions such as the tension to the superconducting wire and different insulating materials at the interface of the superconducting wire and head part. The insulating materials used in the experiments were polyimide film and a high strength polyethylene fiber cloth, Dyneema. Details of the experimental setup and the test results are reported in this paper.

  17. Experimental setup to detect superconducting wire motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Ruwali

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available An experimental setup was designed and fabricated to study superconducting wire motion under the influence of electromagnetic force. Experiments were conducted at 4.2 K by varying the experimental conditions such as the tension to the superconducting wire and different insulating materials at the interface of the superconducting wire and head part. The insulating materials used in the experiments were polyimide film and a high strength polyethylene fiber cloth, Dyneema. Details of the experimental setup and the test results are reported in this paper.

  18. The radiological risk in arc welding; El riesgo radiologico en la soldadura por arco

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alegria, N.; Campos, M.; Carrion, A.; Herranz, M.; Idoeta, R.; Legarda, F.; Nunez-Lagos, R.; Perez, C.; Rodriguez, S.; Rozas, S.; Sanchez, P.

    2011-07-01

    We present the current status of a project funded by the Nuclear Safety Council, for the study of the potential radiological risk in arc welding. In the coating of filler material of the electrodes and the soul of the continuous tubular wire welding material are located NORM who present a radioactive activity.

  19. Distortion Control during Welding

    OpenAIRE

    Akbari Pazooki, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    The local material expansion and contraction involved in welding result in permanent deformations or instability i.e., welding distortion. Considerable efforts have been made in controlling welding distortion prior to, during or after welding. Thermal Tensioning (TT) describes a group of in-situ methods to control welding distortion. In these methods local heating and/or cooling strategies are applied during welding. Additional heating and/or cooling sources can be implemented either stationa...

  20. Laser-multi-pass-narrow-gap-welding of hot crack sensitive thick aluminum plates

    OpenAIRE

    Dittrich, D.; Schedewy, R.; Brenner, B.; Standfuß, J.

    2013-01-01

    Although the current process limitations for laser beam welding of thick aluminum plates (>10 mm) have been overcome by high brilliant multi-kilowatt laser, there are still difficulties resulting from the material physical properties, e.g. the high heat conductivity, the large heat capacity and the high thermal expansion coefficient of aluminum. Especially for very deep weld seams, insufficient dilution of filler wire material in the root of the weld seam and the danger of hot cracks increase...

  1. Welding vacuum jacketed piping at the Kennedy Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clautice, W. E.

    1975-01-01

    The present work describes fabrication, welding, and repair procedures and specifications for the vacuum jacketed piping used for conveying cryogenic fuels at space vehicle launch sites. The weld inspection procedures are described, and some examples of modifications of the piping are presented.

  2. The development of a quality prediction system for aluminum laser welding to measure plasma intensity using photodiodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Ji Young [Technical Research Center, Hyundai Steel Company, Dangjin (Korea, Republic of); Sohn, Yong Ho [Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando (United States); Park, Young Whan; Kwak, Jae Seob [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Pukyong National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Lightweight metals have been used to manufacture the body panels of cars to reduce the weight of car bodies. Typically, aluminum sheets are welded together, with a focus on weld quality assurance. A weld quality prediction system for the laser welding of aluminum was developed in this research to maximize welding production. The behavior of the plasma was also analyzed, dependent on various welding conditions. The light intensity of the plasma was altered with heat input and wire feed rate conditions, and the strength of the weld and sensor signals correlated closely for this heat input condition. Using these characteristics, a new algorithm and program were developed to evaluate the weld quality. The design involves a combinatory algorithm using a neural network model for the prediction of tensile strength from measured signals and a fuzzy multi-feature pattern recognition algorithm for the weld quality classification to improve predictability of the system.

  3. Optimization of Fiber Laser Welding of DP980 Steels Using RSM to Improve Weld Properties for Formability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, K.; Panda, S. K.; Saha, P.

    2016-06-01

    The effect of laser parameters on weld quality is a critical laboratory study before implementation of newly developed high-strength dual-phase steels in fabrication of auto-bodies. In present work, dual-phase steels having tensile strength of 980 MPa (DP980) were welded using different welding speeds by Yb-fiber laser source to fabricate similar material combinations laser-welded blanks (LWBs). The weld zone microhardness, microstructure, and formability of DP980 LWBs were compared with those of the DP600 and micro-alloyed interstitial free high-strength steel (IFHS) LWBs. It was found that the formation of soft zone at the outer side of the HAZ was responsible for significant reduction in formability of DP980 LWBs due to strain localization and premature failure. Hence, response surface methodology based on Box-Behnken design was implemented to establish a mathematical model which could correlate the influence of laser process parameters such as power, welding speed, and focal position on weld quality in terms of aspect ratio of fusion zone, width of the soft zone, and surface roughness of weld to improve formability. The model was successfully implemented to optimize the laser parameters, and approximately 13.58% improvement in Erichsen cup height was achieved due to complete weld penetration with simultaneous 67% reduction in soft zone width and 55% reduction in softening. However, the failure was still observed to occur in the soft zone propagating parallel to weld in radial direction.

  4. Automatic wire twister.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J F; Rodeheaver, G T; Thacker, J G; Morgan, R F; Chang, D E; Fariss, B L; Edlich, R F

    1988-06-01

    This automatic wire twister used in surgery consists of a 6-inch needle holder attached to a twisting mechanism. The major advantage of this device is that it twists wires significantly more rapidly than the conventional manual techniques. Testing has found that the ultimate force required to disrupt the wires twisted by either the automatic wire twister or manual techniques did not differ significantly and was directly related to the number of twists. The automatic wire twister reduces the time needed for wire twisting without altering the security of the twisted wire.

  5. A study of gas flow pattern, undercutting and torch modification in variable polarity plasma arc welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcclure, John C.; Hou, Haihui Ron

    1994-01-01

    A study on the plasma and shield gas flow patterns in variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA) welding was undertaken by shadowgraph techniques. Visualization of gas flow under different welding conditions was obtained. Undercutting is often present with aluminum welds. The effects of torch alignment, shield gas flow rate and gas contamination on undercutting were investigated and suggestions made to minimize the defect. A modified shield cup for the welding torch was fabricated which consumes much less shield gas while maintaining the weld quality. The current torch was modified with a trailer flow for Al-Li welding, in which hot cracking is a critical problem. The modification shows improved weldablility on these alloys.

  6. Effective silver-assisted welding of YBCO blocks: mechanical versus electrical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartolome, E [Escola Universitaria Salesiana de Sarria (associated with the University Autonoma of Barcelona), Passeig Sant Joan Bosco 74, E-08017 Barcelona (Spain); Roa, J J; Segarra, M [Centro DIOPMA, Departamento Ciencia de los Materiales e IngenierIa Metalurgica, Instituto de Nanociencia y NanotecnologIa de la Universidad de Barcelona (IN2UB), Facultad de Quimica, Universidad de Barcelona, MartI i Franques 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Bozzo, B; Granados, X [Institut de Ciencia de Materials de Barcelona-CSIC, Campus UAB, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain)

    2010-04-15

    Superconducting welding of bulk YBCO is a key technology allowing the fabrication of large, complex-shaped pieces for applications such as levitation, bearings or large magnets. Ideally, the electrical and mechanical properties of welds should be comparable to that of the joint grains. In this paper, we have investigated the correlation between the microstructural, mechanical and critical current density performances of melt-textured [001]-tilt YBCO welds fabricated by the silver welding technique. The hardness reduction across the weld, measured by nanoindentation, correlates linearly with the decrease of intergranular critical current density, measured at 77 K and self-field by magnetic Hall mapping. Remarkably, we show that high quality zero-angle welds could be fabricated with unaltered current and hardness performances across the joint, paving the way for the implementation of silver welds in large-scale systems.

  7. WELDING PROCESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambrow, J.; Hausner, H.

    1957-09-24

    A method of joining metal parts for the preparation of relatively long, thin fuel element cores of uranium or alloys thereof for nuclear reactors is described. The process includes the steps of cleaning the surfaces to be jointed, placing the sunfaces together, and providing between and in contact with them, a layer of a compound in finely divided form that is decomposable to metal by heat. The fuel element members are then heated at the contact zone and maintained under pressure during the heating to decompose the compound to metal and sinter the members and reduced metal together producing a weld. The preferred class of decomposable compounds are the metal hydrides such as uranium hydride, which release hydrogen thus providing a reducing atmosphere in the vicinity of the welding operation.

  8. Stretched Wire Mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowden, Gordon; /SLAC

    2005-09-06

    Stretched wires are beginning to play an important role in the alignment of accelerators and synchrotron light sources. Stretched wires are proposed for the alignment of the 130 meter long LCLS undulator. Wire position technology has reached sub-micron resolution yet analyses of perturbations to wire straightness are hard to find. This paper considers possible deviations of stretched wire from the simple 2-dimensional catenary form.

  9. Fabrication of ciprofloxacin molecular imprinted polymer coating on a stainless steel wire as a selective solid-phase microextraction fiber for sensitive determination of fluoroquinolones in biological fluids and tablet formulation using HPLC-UV detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzajani, Roya; Kardani, Fatemeh

    2016-04-15

    A molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) fiber on stainless steel wire using ciprofloxacin template with a mild template removal condition was synthetized and evaluated for fiber solid phase microextraction (SPME) of fluoroquinolones (FQs) from biological fluids and pharmaceutical samples, followed by high performance liquid chromatography analysis with UV detection (HPLC-UV). The developed MIP fiber exhibited high selectivity for the analytes in complex matrices. The coating of the fibers were inspected using fourier transform infrared spectrophotometry, thermogaravimetric analysis, energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy as well as by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The fiber shows high thermal stability (up to 300°C), good reproducibility and long lifetime. The composite coating did not swell in organic solvents nor did it strip off from the substrate. It was also highly stable and extremely adherent to the surface of the stainless steel fiber. The fabricated fiber exclusively exhibited excellent extraction efficiency and selectivity for some FQs. The effective parameters influencing the microextraction efficiency such as pH, extraction time, desorption condition, and stirring rate were investigated. Under optimized conditions, the limits of detection of the four FQs ranged from 0.023-0.033 μg L(-1) (S/N=5) and the calibration graphs were linear in the concentration range from 0.1-40 μg L(-1), the inter-day and intraday relative standard deviations (RSD) for various FQs at three different concentration level (n=5) using a single fiber were 1.1-4.4% and the fiber to fiber RSD% (n=5) was 4.3-6.7% at 5 μg L(-1) of each anlyetes. The method was successfully applied for quantification of FQs in real samples including serum, plasma and tablet formulation with the recoveries between 97 to 102%. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Welding processes handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Weman, Klas

    2011-01-01

    Offers an introduction to the range of available welding technologies. This title includes chapters on individual techniques that cover principles, equipment, consumables and key quality issues. It includes material on such topics as the basics of electricity in welding, arc physics, and distortion, and the weldability of particular metals.$bThe first edition of Welding processes handbook established itself as a standard introduction and guide to the main welding technologies and their applications. This new edition has been substantially revised and extended to reflect the latest developments. After an initial introduction, the book first reviews gas welding before discussing the fundamentals of arc welding, including arc physics and power sources. It then discusses the range of arc welding techniques including TIG, plasma, MIG/MAG, MMA and submerged arc welding. Further chapters cover a range of other important welding technologies such as resistance and laser welding, as well as the use of welding techniqu...

  11. Gas tungsten arc welding of vanadium alloys with impurity control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossbeck, M. L.; King, J. F.; Nagasaka, T.; David, S. A.

    2002-12-01

    Gas tungsten arc welding in vanadium alloys is controlled by interstitial impurities. Techniques have been developed to weld V-4Cr-4Ti in a high-purity argon atmosphere resulting in a DBTT of -20 °C. The atmosphere was controlled by a Zr-Al getter which is activated at high temperature to obtain a clean surface then cooled and allowed to absorb hydrogen and oxygen impurities. Through the use of low-oxygen base metal and high-purity weld filler wire, a DBTT of -145 °C was obtained. Experiments using electron beam welding have shown that grain size also has an important effect on weld ductility. Introduction of nitrogen and yttrium has been used to study their effect on grain size. Using a combination of atmosphere control, alloy purity control, and grain size control, it is anticipated that V-Cr-Ti alloys will be weldable in field conditions.

  12. Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process invented in 1991 at The Welding Institute in the United Kingdom. A weld is made in the FSW process by translating a rotating pin along a weld seam so as to stir the sides of the seam together. FSW avoids deleterious effects inherent in melting and promises to be an important welding process for any industries where welds of optimal quality are demanded. This article provides an introduction to the FSW process. The chief concern is the physical effect of the tool on the weld metal: how weld seam bonding takes place, what kind of weld structure is generated, potential problems, possible defects for example, and implications for process parameters and tool design. Weld properties are determined by structure, and the structure of friction stir welds is determined by the weld metal flow field in the vicinity of the weld tool. Metal flow in the vicinity of the weld tool is explained through a simple kinematic flow model that decomposes the flow field into three basic component flows: a uniform translation, a rotating solid cylinder, and a ring vortex encircling the tool. The flow components, superposed to construct the flow model, can be related to particular aspects of weld process parameters and tool design; they provide a bridge to an understanding of a complex-at-first-glance weld structure. Torques and forces are also discussed. Some simple mathematical models of structural aspects, torques, and forces are included.

  13. The analysis of spot welding joints of steel sheets with closed profile by ultrasonic method

    OpenAIRE

    Dariusz Ulbrich; Jakub Kowalczyk; Marian Jósko; Jarosław Selech

    2015-01-01

    Resistance spot welding is widely used in the fabrication of vehicle bodies and parts of their equipment. The article presents the methodology and the results of non-destructive ultrasonic testing of resistance spot welded joints of thin steel sheet with closed profile. Non-destructive test results were verified on the basis of welded joint area after destructive testing. The obtained results were used to develop an assessment technique for spot welded joints of closed profile with steel shee...

  14. Height control of laser metal-wire deposition based on iterative learning control and 3D scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heralić, Almir; Christiansson, Anna-Karin; Lennartson, Bengt

    2012-09-01

    Laser Metal-wire Deposition is an additive manufacturing technique for solid freeform fabrication of fully dense metal structures. The technique is based on robotized laser welding and wire filler material, and the structures are built up layer by layer. The deposition process is, however, sensitive to disturbances and thus requires continuous monitoring and adjustments. In this work a 3D scanning system is developed and integrated with the robot control system for automatic in-process control of the deposition. The goal is to ensure stable deposition, by means of choosing a correct offset of the robot in the vertical direction, and obtaining a flat surface, for each deposited layer. The deviations in the layer height are compensated by controlling the wire feed rate on next deposition layer, based on the 3D scanned data, by means of iterative learning control. The system is tested through deposition of bosses, which is expected to be a typical application for this technique in the manufacture of jet engine components. The results show that iterative learning control including 3D scanning is a suitable method for automatic deposition of such structures. This paper presents the equipment, the control strategy and demonstrates the proposed approach with practical experiments.

  15. IIW Commission V - NDT and quality assurance of welded products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sjerve, E., E-mail: esjerve@irisndt.com [IRISNDT Corp., Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

    2013-09-15

    The IIW (International Institute of Welding) is an active international organization in the area of weld based topics. Within a structure of 16 independent Commissions and other working committees, the IIW gathers together leading people from the perspectives of fabrication, maintenance and inspection to discuss and forward the state of the art in welding. Within this framework, Commission V is dedicated to NDT and Quality Assurance of Welded Products. This paper describes Commission V activities from the 2012 IIW Annual Assembly in Denver, USA. (author)

  16. Surface cracking in resistance seam welding of coated steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adonyi, Y.; Kimchi, M.

    1994-12-31

    In this experimental work, the focus was on the understanding the electrode-wheel/coated steel surface phenomena by building operational lobes and by correlating the weld quality with static-and dynamic-contact-resistance variation during welding. Conventional AC, DC, and electrode-wire resistance-seam weldability of printed zinc-coated and hot-dipped tin-coated steel was performed in this work, as compared with traditional lead-tin (terne) coating used as reference material. Variables included steel substrate type, welding equipment type, electrode-wheel cleaning practice, and electrode-wire geometry. Optic and electron microscopy were used for the evaluation of specimens extracted from longitudinal cross-sections of representative welds. The size and morphology of surface cracks was characterized and correlated with variations in the above-mentioned parameters. It was found that the tin-coated (unpainted) steel sheet had a superior all-together performance to the zinc-coated steel and terne-coated steel, both in terms of wider weldability lobes and lesser surface cracking. The extent of surface cracking was greatly reduced by using the electrode-wire seam welding process using a longitudinally grooved wire profile, which also widened the corresponding weldability lobes. It was also found that the extent of cracking depended on the electrode knurl geometry, substrate type, and the presence of conductive paint applied on top of the metallic coating. An attempt was made to characterize the specific mechanisms governing the LME phenomenon for the lead-, zinc and tin-based coating systems and to assess the potential for crack propagation in the welds. The dynamic contact resistance was found to be a good measure of the welding process stability and an indicator of defect formation. It was found that the ratio between the static and dynamic contact resistances of the tin-coated sheet was considerably lower than similar ratios for bare and zinc-coated sheet.

  17. Impact of different welding techniques on biological effect markers in exhaled breath condensate of 58 mild steel welders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmeyer, Frank; Raulf-Heimsoth, Monika; Lehnert, Martin; Kendzia, Benjamin; Bernard, Sabine; Berresheim, Hans; Düser, Maria; Henry, Jana; Weiss, Tobias; Koch, Holger M; Pesch, Beate; Brüning, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Total mass and composition of welding fumes are predominantly dependent on the welding technique and welding wire applied. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of welding techniques on biological effect markers in exhaled breath condensate (EBC) of 58 healthy welders. The welding techniques applied were gas metal arc welding with solid wire (GMAW) (n=29) or flux cored wire (FCAW) (n=29). Welding fume particles were collected with personal samplers in the breathing zone inside the helmets. Levels of leukotriene B(4) (LTB(4)), prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), and 8-isoprostane (8-iso-PGF(2α)) were measured with immunoassay kits and the EBC pH was measured after deaeration. Significantly higher 8-iso-PGF(2α) concentrations and a less acid pH were detected in EBC of welders using the FCAW than in EBC of welders using the GMAW technique. The lowest LTB(4) concentrations were measured in nonsmoking welders applying a solid wire. No significant influences were found in EBC concentrations of PGE(2) based upon smoking status or type of welding technique. This study suggests an enhanced irritative effect in the lower airways of mild steel welders due to the application of FCAW compared to GMAW, most likely associated with a higher emission of welding fumes.

  18. Weld-brazing of titanium. [resistance spot welding combined with brazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bales, T. T.; Royster, D. M.; Arnold, W. E., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    A joining process, designated weld-brazing, which combines resistance spot-welding and brazing has been developed at the NASA Langley Research Center. Resistance spot-welding is employed to position and aline the parts and to establish a suitable faying surface gap for brazing and contributes to the integrity of the joint. Brazing enhances the properties of the joint and reduces the stress concentrations normally associated with spotwelds. Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy joints have been fabricated using 3003 aluminum braze both in a vaccum furnace and in a retort containing an inert gas environment.

  19. Effect of Multipass TIG and Activated TIG Welding Process on the Thermo-Mechanical Behavior of 316LN Stainless Steel Weld Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, K. C.; Balasubramanian, K. R.; Vasudevan, M.; Vasantharaja, P.; Chandrasekhar, N.

    2016-04-01

    The primary objective of this work was to develop a finite element model to predict the thermo-mechanical behavior of an activated tungsten inert gas (ATIG)-welded joint. The ATIG-welded joint was fabricated using 10 mm thickness of 316LN stainless steel plates in a single pass. To distinguish the merits of ATIG welding process, it was compared with manual multipass tungsten inert gas (MPTIG)-welded joint. The ATIG-welded joint was fabricated with square butt edge configuration using an activating flux developed in-house. The MPTIG-welded joint was fabricated in thirteen passes with V-groove edge configuration. The finite element model was developed to predict the transient temperature, residual stress, and distortion of the welded joints. Also, microhardness, impact toughness, tensile strength, ferrite measurement, and microstructure were characterized. Since most of the recent publications of ATIG-welded joint was focused on the molten weld pool dynamics, this research work gives an insight on the thermo-mechanical behavior of ATIG-welded joint over MPTIG-welded joint.

  20. Introduction to Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortney, Clarence; Gregory, Mike

    This curriculum guide provides six units of instruction on basic welding. Addressed in the individual units of instruction are the following topics: employment opportunities for welders, welding safety and first aid, welding tools and equipment, basic metals and metallurgy, basic math and measuring, and procedures for applying for a welding job.…

  1. Distortion Control during Welding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akbari Pazooki, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    The local material expansion and contraction involved in welding result in permanent deformations or instability i.e., welding distortion. Considerable efforts have been made in controlling welding distortion prior to, during or after welding. Thermal Tensioning (TT) describes a group of in-situ

  2. Electron Beam Welding: study of process capability and limitations towards development of nuclear components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadolia, Gautam R.; Premjit Singh, K.

    2017-04-01

    Electron Beam Welding (EBW) technology is an established and widely adopted technique in nuclear research and development area. Electron beam welding was thought of as a candidate process for ITER Vacuum Vessel Fabrication. Dhruva Reactor at BARC, Mumbai and Niobium superconducting accelerator cavity at BARC has adopted the EB welding technique as a fabrication route. Study of process capability and limitations based on available literature is consolidated in this short review paper.

  3. In-Situ Measurement of Metal Drop Temperature in GMA Short-Circuiting Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Yoshinori; Onda, Masahiko; Nagaki, Hayato; Ohji, Takayoshi

    Temperatures of metal drop in GMA short-circuiting welding process were in-situ measured using newly developed instrument designed on the basis of two-color pyrometry, which consisted of optical lenses, interference filters for two colors and two sets of high sensitive CCD cameras with fast shutter. In order to avoid radiation from arc plasma, temperature measurement was carried out immediately after molten drop at electrode wire tip was contacted with weld pool and arc was extinguished. Welding current in arcing period was adjusted from 50 A to 250 A using experimental power source in Ar + 20%CO2 mixture gas shielded GMA welding with mild steel wire of 1.2 mm in diameter. It is shown through in-situ measurement that average temperature of metal drop ranges from 2200 K to 2700 K, depending on level and period of arc current governing electrode wire melting.

  4. Advanced Welding Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Some of the applications of advanced welding techniques are shown in this poster presentation. Included are brief explanations of the use on the Ares I and Ares V launch vehicle and on the Space Shuttle Launch vehicle. Also included are microstructural views from four advanced welding techniques: Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) weld (fusion), self-reacting friction stir welding (SR-FSW), conventional FSW, and Tube Socket Weld (TSW) on aluminum.

  5. Manufacturing of New Welding Fluxes Using Silicomanganese Slag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryukov, Roman E.; Kozyrev, Nikolay A.; Kozyreva, Olga A.; Usoltsev, Aleksander A.

    2017-10-01

    There were developed the composition and manufacturing technology of new welding flux using industrial products such as slag of silicomanganese production. The effect of fractional composition on welding and fabrication characteristics was studied. It was found that using of small-sized fracture of welding flux at a rate of 30–40% decreases the oxide non-metallic impurity rating of the weld and herewith doesn’t affect its constituents. To increase technical-and-economic indexes it was suggested to mix small-sized fracture and water glass. The use of ceramic flux made by mixing the dust fraction of silicomanganese slug with fraction size less than 0.45 mm and water glass provides the decrease of non-metallic impurity rating of the weld. Herewith the increase of its content from 15 to 40% doesn’t have a significant influence on the non-metallic impurity rating of the weld and its constituents.

  6. Highly stretchable wrinkled gold thin film wires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Joshua, E-mail: joshuk7@uci.edu; Park, Sun-Jun; Nguyen, Thao [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Chu, Michael [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Pegan, Jonathan D. [Department of Materials and Manufacturing Technology, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Khine, Michelle, E-mail: mkhine@uci.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States)

    2016-02-08

    With the growing prominence of wearable electronic technology, there is a need to improve the mechanical reliability of electronics for more demanding applications. Conductive wires represent a vital component present in all electronics. Unlike traditional planar and rigid electronics, these new wearable electrical components must conform to curvilinear surfaces, stretch with the body, and remain unobtrusive and low profile. In this paper, the piezoresistive response of shrink induced wrinkled gold thin films under strain demonstrates robust conductive performance in excess of 200% strain. Importantly, the wrinkled metallic thin films displayed negligible change in resistance of up to 100% strain. The wrinkled metallic wires exhibited consistent performance after repetitive strain. Importantly, these wrinkled thin films are inexpensive to fabricate and are compatible with roll to roll manufacturing processes. We propose that these wrinkled metal thin film wires are an attractive alternative to conventional wires for wearable applications.

  7. Intraoral laser welding: ultrastructural and mechanical analysis to compare laboratory laser and dental laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornaini, Carlo; Passaretti, Francesca; Villa, Elena; Rocca, Jean-Paul; Merigo, Elisabetta; Vescovi, Paolo; Meleti, Marco; Manfredi, Maddalena; Nammour, Samir

    2011-07-01

    The Nd:YAG laser has been used since 1970 in dental laboratories to weld metals on dental prostheses. Recently in several clinical cases, we have suggested that the Nd:YAG laser device commonly utilized in the dental office could be used to repair broken fixed, removable and orthodontic prostheses and to weld metals directly in the mouth. The aim of this work was to evaluate, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), the quality of the weld and its mechanical strength, comparing a device normally used in dental laboratory and a device normally used in the dental office for oral surgery, the same as that described for intraoral welding. Metal plates of a Co-Cr-Mo dental alloy and steel orthodontic wires were subjected to four welding procedures: welding without filler metal using the laboratory laser, welding with filler metal using the laboratory laser, welding without filler metal using the office laser, and welding with filler metal using the office laser. The welded materials were then analysed by SEM, EDS and DMA. SEM analysis did not show significant differences between the samples although the plates welded using the office laser without filler metal showed a greater number of fissures than the other samples. EDS microanalysis of the welding zone showed a homogeneous composition of the metals. Mechanical tests showed similar elastic behaviours of the samples, with minimal differences between the samples welded with the two devices. No wire broke even under the maximum force applied by the analyser. This study seems to demonstrate that the welds produced using the office Nd:YAG laser device and the laboratory Nd:YAG laser device, as analysed by SEM, EDS and DMA, showed minimal and nonsignificant differences, although these findings need to be confirmed using a greater number of samples.

  8. Tensile Strength and Hardness Correlations with Microscopy in Friction welded Aluminium to Copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satish, Rengarajan; Seshagiri Rao, Vaddi; Ananthapadmanaban, Dattaguru; Ravi, Balappa

    2016-01-01

    Aluminium and copper are good conductors of heat and electricity, copper being the better conductor, is a costly metal indeed. On the other hand, aluminium is cheap, easily available and also has a lower density than copper. Hence, worldwide efforts are being made to partially replace copper wire. Solid state welding should be used to join aluminium to copper. This is because the use of fusion welding results in brittle phases formed in the weld interface. One of the solid state welding techniques used for joining aluminium to copper is friction welding. In this paper, an attempt has been made to join aluminium to copper by friction welding by varying the friction welding parameters, namely friction pressure, upset pressure, burn-off length and speed of rotation of the workpiece. Nine different friction welding parameter combinations were used during welding in accordance with ASTM standards and results have been reported. Tensile strength and hardness tests were carried out for each parameter combination. Optimum friction welding parameter combination was identified with respect to tensile strength. Scanning Electron Microscopy and Electron dispersive spectroanalysis were obtained to identify modes of fracture and presence of intermetallic phases for each friction welding combination with the aim to narrow down friction welding parameters that give good properties on the whole.

  9. Wire bonding in microelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Harman, George G

    2010-01-01

    Wire Bonding in Microelectronics, Third Edition, has been thoroughly revised to help you meet the challenges of today's small-scale and fine-pitch microelectronics. This authoritative guide covers every aspect of designing, manufacturing, and evaluating wire bonds engineered with cutting-edge techniques. In addition to gaining a full grasp of bonding technology, you'll learn how to create reliable bonds at exceedingly high yields, test wire bonds, solve common bonding problems, implement molecular cleaning methods, and much more. Coverage includes: Ultrasonic bonding systems and technologies, including high-frequency systems Bonding wire metallurgy and characteristics, including copper wire Wire bond testing Gold-aluminum intermetallic compounds and other interface reactions Gold and nickel-based bond pad plating materials and problems Cleaning to improve bondability and reliability Mechanical problems in wire bonding High-yield, fine-pitch, specialized-looping, soft-substrate, and extreme-temperature wire bo...

  10. The mechanical properties of high speed GTAW weld and factors of nonlinear multiple regression model under external transverse magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lin; Chang, Yunlong; Li, Yingmin; He, Youyou

    2013-05-01

    A transverse magnetic field was introduced to the arc plasma in the process of welding stainless steel tubes by high-speed Tungsten Inert Gas Arc Welding (TIG for short) without filler wire. The influence of external magnetic field on welding quality was investigated. 9 sets of parameters were designed by the means of orthogonal experiment. The welding joint tensile strength and form factor of weld were regarded as the main standards of welding quality. A binary quadratic nonlinear regression equation was established with the conditions of magnetic induction and flow rate of Ar gas. The residual standard deviation was calculated to adjust the accuracy of regression model. The results showed that, the regression model was correct and effective in calculating the tensile strength and aspect ratio of weld. Two 3D regression models were designed respectively, and then the impact law of magnetic induction on welding quality was researched.

  11. Weld overlay cladding with iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodwin, G.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-12-01

    The author has established a range of compositions for these alloys within which hot cracking resistance is very good, and within which cold cracking can be avoided in many instances by careful control of welding conditions, particularly preheat and postweld heat treatment. For example, crack-free butt welds have been produced for the first time in 12-mm thick wrought Fe{sub 3}Al plate. Cold cracking, however, still remains an issue in many cases. The author has developed a commercial source for composite weld filler metals spanning a wide range of achievable aluminum levels, and are pursuing the application of these filler metals in a variety of industrial environments. Welding techniques have been developed for both the gas tungsten arc and gas metal arc processes, and preliminary work has been done to utilize the wire arc process for coating of boiler tubes. Clad specimens have been prepared for environmental testing in-house, and a number of components have been modified and placed in service in operating kraft recovery boilers. In collaboration with a commercial producer of spiral weld overlay tubing, the author is attempting to utilize the new filler metals for this novel application.

  12. An overview of the welding technologies of CLAM steels for fusion application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Xizhang, E-mail: kernel.chen@gmail.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, ZhenJiang, Jiangsu 212013 (China); Huang Yuming [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, ZhenJiang, Jiangsu 212013 (China); Madigan, Bruce [Montana Tech. of University of Montana, Butte, MT 59701 (United States); Zhou Jianzhong [School of Mechanical Engineering, Jiangsu University, ZhenJiang, Jiangsu 221013 (China)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Welding technologies of China Low Activation Martensitic steel is overviewed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Most welding technologies in use are discussed and suggestions are given. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proper welding technologies could ensure weld properties but more detailed work are necessary. - Abstract: China Low Activation Martensitic steel (CLAMs), a kind of RAFM steel with Chinese intellectual property rights, is considered as the primary structural material for the China-designed ITER test blanket module (TBM). As one of the key issues in the fabrication of the fusion reactor, the welding technologies of CLAMs are reviewed. Emphasis is placed on the weldability of CLAMs by different welding methods, and on the properties of as-welded and post-weld heat-treated joints. Recent highlights in research and development for the welding of CLAMs show that proper welding procedure could provide welds with adequate tensile strength but the welds exhibit lower impact toughness compared with the base metal. Post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) and the application of ultrasonic energy during TIG welding could dramatically improve impact toughness. Research also shows that welds in CLAMs have sufficient resistance to swelling under irradiation as well as suitable compatibility with liquid LiPb. The microstructure, mechanical and other physical properties of welds are significantly different from those of the base metal due to the complicated welding thermal cycle. The weld joint is the area most likely to fail one or more of the design requirements within the fusion reactor. Therefore significant additional research is necessary to ensure safe application of welded CLAM steel for fusion reactor construction.

  13. Laser Wire Stripper

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    NASA-developed space shuttle technology is used in a laser wire stripper designed by Raytheon Company. Laser beams cut through insulation on a wire without damaging conductive metal, because laser radiation that melts plastic insulation is reflected by the metal. The laser process is fast, clean, precise and repeatable. It eliminates quality control problems and the expense of rejected wiring.

  14. Damage Tolerance Assessment of Friction Pull Plug Welds in an Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, Preston; Burkholder, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Friction stir welding is a solid state welding process used in the fabrication of cryogenic propellant tanks. Self-reacting friction stir welding is one variation of the friction stir weld process being developed for manufacturing tanks. Friction pull plug welding is used to seal the exit hole that remains in a circumferential self-reacting friction stir weld. A friction plug weld placed in a self-reacting friction stir weld results in a non-homogenous weld joint where the initial weld, plug weld, their respective heat affected zones and the base metal all interact. The welded joint is a composite plastically deformed material system with a complex residual stress field. In order to address damage tolerance concerns associated with friction plug welds in safety critical structures, such as propellant tanks, nondestructive inspection and proof testing may be required to screen hardware for mission critical defects. The efficacy of the nondestructive evaluation or the proof test is based on an assessment of the critical flaw size. Test data relating residual strength capability to flaw size in an aluminum alloy friction plug weld will be presented.

  15. Application of new GMAW welding methods used in prefabrication of P92 (X10CrWMoVNb9-2) pipe butt welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urzynicok, Michal [Boiler Elements Factory ' ZELKOT' , Koszecin (Poland); Kwiecinski, Krzysztof; Slania, Jacek [Instytut Spawalnictwa, Gliwice (Poland); Szubryt, Marian [TUEV Nord, Katowice (Poland)

    2010-07-01

    Welding of collector pipes, flat heads, dished ends and connector pipes performed with high temperature and creep-resistant steels most often has been performed using TIG process combined with MMA processes. Progress in MAG process and availability of high quality filler materials (solid wires) enables welding of the above connections also using this method. In order to prove its efficiency, this article presents the results of related tests. The range of tests was similar to that applied during the qualification of welding technology. The investigation also involved microscopic and fractographic examinations. The results reveal that welding with new methods such as GMAW is by no means inferior to a currently applied MMA method yet the time of the process is shorter by 50%. The article present the world's first known positive results in welding of P92 grade steel using GMAW welding method. (orig.)

  16. A Weld Position Recognition Method Based on Directional and Structured Light Information Fusion in Multi-Layer/Multi-Pass Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinle Zeng

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Multi-layer/multi-pass welding (MLMPW technology is widely used in the energy industry to join thick components. During automatic welding using robots or other actuators, it is very important to recognize the actual weld pass position using visual methods, which can then be used not only to perform reasonable path planning for actuators, but also to correct any deviations between the welding torch and the weld pass position in real time. However, due to the small geometrical differences between adjacent weld passes, existing weld position recognition technologies such as structured light methods are not suitable for weld position detection in MLMPW. This paper proposes a novel method for weld position detection, which fuses various kinds of information in MLMPW. First, a synchronous acquisition method is developed to obtain various kinds of visual information when directional light and structured light sources are on, respectively. Then, interferences are eliminated by fusing adjacent images. Finally, the information from directional and structured light images is fused to obtain the 3D positions of the weld passes. Experiment results show that each process can be done in 30 ms and the deviation is less than 0.6 mm. The proposed method can be used for automatic path planning and seam tracking in the robotic MLMPW process as well as electron beam freeform fabrication process.

  17. Zero-flow : A novel approach to continuous ultrasonic welding of CF/PPS thermoplastic composite plates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Senders, F.; van Beurden, M.; Palardy, G.; Fernandez Villegas, I.

    2016-01-01

    Continuous ultrasonic welding of plastic films, fabrics, and even thermoplastic composite prepreg tape is a common industrial practice. However, continuous ultrasonic welding of stiff thermoplastic composite plates is challenging due to squeeze flow of resin at the welding interface, and significant

  18. Flicking-wire drag tensioner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dassele, M. A.; Fairall, H.

    1978-01-01

    Wire-drag system improves wire profile and applies consistent drag to wire. Wire drag is continuously adjustable from zero drag to tensile strength of wire. No-sag wire drag is easier to thread than former system and requires minimal downtime for cleaning and maintenance.

  19. Case Study Regarding the Design of a Direct Current Electromagnet for the MIG Welding of Metallic Materials Part I: Description of the Welding Methods and Preliminary Calculus of the Electromagnet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tudorel Ene

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper refers to the design of a direct current electromagnet, located on the head of a swan neck welding gun of a MIG welding equipment and used for magnetising the rotation space of two additional electric arches, in order to preheat the electrode wire and of the protective gas, partially turned into plasma jet. One describes the MIG welding method in which the electromagnet is used as well as its preliminary calculus.

  20. PS wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1970-01-01

    A wire chamber used at CERN's Proton Synchrotron accelerator in the 1970s. Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  1. Effect of wire shape on wire array discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimomura, N.; Tanaka, Y.; Yushita, Y.; Nagata, M. [University of Tokushima, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Tokushima (Japan); Teramoto, Y.; Katsuki, S.; Akiyama, H. [Kumamoto University, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Kumamoto (Japan)

    2001-09-01

    Although considerable investigations have been reported on z-pinches to achieve nuclear fusion, little attention has been given from the point of view of how a wire array consisting of many parallel wires explodes. Instability existing in the wire array discharge has been shown. In this paper, the effect of wire shape in the wire array on unstable behavior of the wire array discharge is represented by numerical analysis. The claws on the wire formed in installation of wire may cause uniform current distribution on wire array. The effect of error of wire diameter in production is computed by Monte Carlo Method. (author)

  2. Bond strength of gold alloys laser welded to cobalt-chromium alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Ikuya; Wallace, Cameron

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the joint properties between cast gold alloys and Co-Cr alloy laser-welded by Nd:YAG laser. Cast plates were fabricated from three types of gold alloys (Type IV, Type II and low-gold) and a Co-Cr alloy. Each gold alloy was laser-welded to Co-Cr using a dental laser-welding machine. Homogeneously-welded and non-welded control specimens were also prepared. Tensile testing was conducted and data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA. The homogeneously-welded groups showed inferior fracture load compared to corresponding control groups, except for Co-Cr. In the specimens welded heterogeneously to Co-Cr, Type IV was the greatest, followed by low-gold and Type II. There was no statistical difference (Palloys tested, the Type IV gold alloy was the most suitable alloy for laser-welding to Co-Cr.

  3. Process stability during fiber laser-arc hybrid welding of thick steel plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunaziv, Ivan; Frostevarg, Jan; Akselsen, Odd M.; Kaplan, Alexander F. H.

    2018-03-01

    Thick steel plates are frequently used in shipbuilding, pipelines and other related heavy industries, and are usually joined by arc welding. Deep penetration laser-arc hybrid welding could increase productivity but has not been thoroughly investigated, and is therefore usually limited to applications with medium thickness (5-15 mm) sections. A major concern is process stability, especially when using modern welding consumables such as metal-cored wire and advanced welding equipment. High speed imaging allows direct observation of the process so that process behavior and phenomena can be studied. In this paper, 45 mm thick high strength steel was welded (butt joint double-sided) using the fiber laser-MAG hybrid process utilizing a metal-cored wire without pre-heating. Process stability was monitored under a wide range of welding parameters. It was found that the technique can be used successfully to weld thick sections with appropriate quality when the parameters are optimized. When comparing conventional pulsed and the more advanced cold metal transfer pulse (CMT+P) arc modes, it was found that both can provide high quality welds. CMT+P arc mode can provide more stable droplet transfer over a limited range of travel speeds. At higher travel speeds, an unstable metal transfer mechanism was observed. Comparing leading arc and trailing arc arrangements, the leading arc configuration can provide higher quality welds and more stable processing at longer inter-distances between the heat sources.

  4. Reprocessing weld and method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Killian, M.L.; Lewis, H.E.

    1993-08-03

    A process is described for improving the fatigue resistance of a small primary structural weld at a joint between structural members of a weldment, the weld having been made with the welding energy input of E[sub 1], the process comprising: applying a reprocessing weld on at least a portion of either one or both toes of the primary structural weld, thereby covering said toe portion, the reprocessing weld containing a filler metal and having a cross-sectional area which is less than the corresponding cross-sectional area of the primary structural weld, the reprocessing weld extending onto the face of the primary structural weld at one side of the toe portion covered and onto the structural member at the other side of the toe portion covered, and the total welding energy input, E[sub 2], used in said reprocessing the primary structural weld being less than the welding energy input E[sub 1] of the primary structural weld.

  5. Grain fragmentation in ultrasonic-assisted TIG weld of pure aluminum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qihao; Lin, Sanbao; Yang, Chunli; Fan, Chenglei; Ge, Hongliang

    2017-11-01

    Under the action of acoustic waves during an ultrasonic-assisted tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding process, a grain of a TIG weld of aluminum alloy is refined by nucleation and grain fragmentation. Herein, effects of ultrasound on grain fragmentation in the TIG weld of aluminum alloy are investigated via systematic welding experiments of pure aluminum. First, experiments involving continuous and fixed-position welding are performed, which demonstrate that ultrasound can break the grain of the TIG weld of pure aluminum. The microstructural characteristics of an ultrasonic-assisted TIG weld fabricated by fixed-position welding are analyzed. The microstructure is found to transform from plane crystal, columnar crystal, and uniform equiaxed crystal into plane crystal, deformed columnar crystal, and nonuniform equiaxed crystal after application of ultrasound. Second, factors influencing ultrasonic grain fragmentation are investigated. The ultrasonic amplitude and welding current are found to have a considerable effect on grain fragmentation. The degree of fragmentation first increases and then decreases with an increase in ultrasonic amplitude, and it increases with an increase in welding current. Measurement results of the vibration of the weld pool show that the degree of grain fragmentation is related to the intensity of acoustic nonlinearity in the weld pool. The greater the intensity of acoustic nonlinearity, the greater is the degree of grain fragmentation. Finally, the mechanism of ultrasonic grain fragmentation in the TIG weld of pure aluminum is discussed. A finite element simulation is used to simulate the acoustic pressure and flow in the weld pool. The acoustic pressure in the weld pool exceeds the cavitation threshold, and cavitation bubbles are generated. The flow velocity in the weld pool does not change noticeably after application of ultrasound. It is concluded that the high-pressure conditions induced during the occurrence of cavitation, lead to grain

  6. Bond Strength of Gold Alloys Laser Welded to Cobalt-Chromium Alloy

    OpenAIRE

    Watanabe, Ikuya; Wallace, Cameron

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the joint properties between cast gold alloys and Co-Cr alloy laser-welded by Nd:YAG laser. Cast plates were fabricated from three types of gold alloys (Type IV, Type II and low-gold) and a Co-Cr alloy. Each gold alloy was laser-welded to Co-Cr using a dental laser-welding machine. Homogeneously-welded and non-welded control specimens were also prepared. Tensile testing was conducted and data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA. The homogeneo...

  7. Quantification of Residual Stresses in External Attachment Welding Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alhajri, R.; Liu, S.; Yu, Z.

    2017-01-01

    It is uncertain whether postweld heat treatment (PWHT) should be required for external attachment welds in petrochemical industry applications where stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is a possibility. An industrial criterion established by NACE SP0472 indicates that PWHT is not required if residual...... stresses don’t extend through the entire thickness. To investigate this problem, a finite-element analysis (FEA) software, Sysweld™, was utilized to analyze the extent and level of residual stresses of such welds through the thickness of the pressure vessel shell. The study also used the gas metal arc...... welding (GMAW) process to deposit single beadonplate welds with ER70S6 wire on ASTM516 grade 70 pressure vessel steel plates of 6.3, 12.7, and 19 mm thicknesses. Microstructural analysis, temperature, and distortion measurements of weldments were performed to qualify the FEA modeling results. In addition...

  8. Handbook of Plastic Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Aminul

    The purpose of this document is to summarize the information about the laser welding of plastic. Laser welding is a matured process nevertheless laser welding of micro dimensional plastic parts is still a big challenge. This report collects the latest information about the laser welding of plastic...... materials and provides an extensive knowhow on the industrial plastic welding process. The objectives of the report include: - Provide the general knowhow of laser welding for the beginners - Summarize the state-of-the-art information on the laser welding of plastics - Find the technological limits in terms...... of design, materials and process - Find the best technology, process and machines adaptive to Sonion’s components - Provide the skills to Sonion’s Design Engineers for successful design of the of the plastic components suitable for the laser welding The ultimate goal of this report is to serve...

  9. PDC IC WELD FAILURE EVALUATION AND RESOLUTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korinko, P.; Howard, S.; Maxwell, D.; Fiscus, J.

    2012-04-16

    During final preparations for start of the PDCF Inner Can (IC) qualification effort, welding was performed on an automated weld system known as the PICN. During the initial weld, using a pedigree canister and plug, a weld defect was observed. The defect resulted in a hole in the sidewall of the canister, and it was observed that the plug sidewall had not been consumed. This was a new type of failure not seen during development and production of legacy Bagless Transfer Cans (FB-Line/Hanford). Therefore, a team was assembled to determine the root cause and to determine if the process could be improved. After several brain storming sessions (MS and T, R and D Engineering, PDC Project), an evaluation matrix was established to direct this effort. The matrix identified numerous activities that could be taken and then prioritized those activities. This effort was limited by both time and resources (the number of canisters and plugs available for testing was limited). A discovery process was initiated to evaluate the Vendor's IC fabrication process relative to legacy processes. There were no significant findings, however, some information regarding forging/anneal processes could not be obtained. Evaluations were conducted to compare mechanical properties of the PDC canisters relative to the legacy canisters. Some differences were identified, but mechanical properties were determined to be consistent with legacy materials. A number of process changes were also evaluated. A heat treatment procedure was established that could reduce the magnetic characteristics to levels similar to the legacy materials. An in-situ arc annealing process was developed that resulted in improved weld characteristics for test articles. Also several tack welds configurations were addressed, it was found that increasing the number of tack welds (and changing the sequence) resulted in decreased can to plug gaps and a more stable weld for test articles. Incorporating all of the process

  10. Fabrication of elliptical SRF cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, W.

    2017-03-01

    The technological and metallurgical requirements of material for high-gradient superconducting cavities are described. High-purity niobium, as the preferred metal for the fabrication of superconducting accelerating cavities, should meet exact specifications. The content of interstitial impurities such as oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon must be below 10 μg g-1. The hydrogen content should be kept below 2 μg g-1 to prevent degradation of the quality factor (Q-value) under certain cool-down conditions. The material should be free of flaws (foreign material inclusions or cracks and laminations) that can initiate a thermal breakdown. Traditional and alternative cavity mechanical fabrication methods are reviewed. Conventionally, niobium cavities are fabricated from sheet niobium by the formation of half-cells by deep drawing, followed by trim machining and electron beam welding. The welding of half-cells is a delicate procedure, requiring intermediate cleaning steps and a careful choice of weld parameters to achieve full penetration of the joints. A challenge for a welded construction is the tight mechanical and electrical tolerances. These can be maintained by a combination of mechanical and radio-frequency measurements on half-cells and by careful tracking of weld shrinkage. The main aspects of quality assurance and quality management are mentioned. The experiences of 800 cavities produced for the European XFEL are presented. Another cavity fabrication approach is slicing discs from the ingot and producing cavities by deep drawing and electron beam welding. Accelerating gradients at the level of 35-45 MV m-1 can be achieved by applying electrochemical polishing treatment. The single-crystal option (grain boundary free) is discussed. It seems that in this case, high performance can be achieved by a simplified treatment procedure. Fabrication of the elliptical resonators from a seamless pipe as an alternative is briefly described. This technology has yielded good

  11. Self-Reacting Friction Stir Welding for Aluminum Complex Curvature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Randy J.; Martin, W.; Schneider, J.; Hartley, P. J.; Russell, Carolyn; Lawless, Kirby; Jones, Chip

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph representation provides an overview of sucessful research conducted by Lockheed Martin and NASA to develop an advanced self-reacting friction stir technology for complex curvature aluminum alloys. The research included weld process development for 0.320 inch Al 2219, sucessful transfer from the 'lab' scale to the production scale tool and weld quality exceeding strenght goals. This process will enable development and implementation of large scale complex geometry hardware fabrication. Topics covered include: weld process development, weld process transfer, and intermediate hardware fabrication.

  12. Influence of Material Model on Prediction Accuracy of Welding Residual Stress in an Austenitic Stainless Steel Multi-pass Butt-Welded Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Dean; Zhang, Chaohua; Pu, Xiaowei; Liang, Wei

    2017-04-01

    Both experimental method and numerical simulation technology were employed to investigate welding residual stress distribution in a SUS304 steel multi-pass butt-welded joint in the current study. The main objective is to clarify the influence of strain hardening model and the yield strength of weld metal on prediction accuracy of welding residual stress. In the experiment, a SUS304 steel butt-welded joint with 17 passes was fabricated, and the welding residual stresses on both the upper and bottom surfaces of the middle cross section were measured. Meanwhile, based on ABAQUS Code, an advanced computational approach considering different plastic models as well as annealing effect was developed to simulate welding residual stress. In the simulations, the perfect plastic model, the isotropic strain hardening model, the kinematic strain hardening model and the mixed isotropic-kinematic strain hardening model were employed to calculate the welding residual stress distributions in the multi-pass butt-welded joint. In all plastic models with the consideration of strain hardening, the annealing effect was also taken into account. In addition, the influence of the yield strength of weld metal on the simulation result of residual stress was also investigated numerically. The conclusions drawn by this work will be helpful in predicting welding residual stresses of austenitic stainless steel welded structures used in nuclear power plants.

  13. Self-limited plasmonic welding of silver nanowire junctions

    KAUST Repository

    Garnett, Erik C.

    2012-02-05

    Nanoscience provides many strategies to construct high-performance materials and devices, including solar cells, thermoelectrics, sensors, transistors, and transparent electrodes. Bottom-up fabrication facilitates large-scale chemical synthesis without the need for patterning and etching processes that waste material and create surface defects. However, assembly and contacting procedures still require further development. Here, we demonstrate a light-induced plasmonic nanowelding technique to assemble metallic nanowires into large interconnected networks. The small gaps that form naturally at nanowire junctions enable effective light concentration and heating at the point where the wires need to be joined together. The extreme sensitivity of the heating efficiency on the junction geometry causes the welding process to self-limit when a physical connection between the wires is made. The localized nature of the heating prevents damage to low-thermal-budget substrates such as plastics and polymer solar cells. This work opens new avenues to control light, heat and mass transport at the nanoscale. © 2012 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  14. Selecting Processes to Minimize Hexavalent Chromium from Stainless Steel Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    KEANE, M.; SIERT, A.; STONE, S.; CHEN, B.; SLAVEN, J.; CUMPSTON, A.; ANTONINI, J.

    2015-01-01

    Eight welding processes/shielding gas combinations were assessed for generation of hexavalent chromium (Cr6+) in stainless steel welding fumes. The processes examined were gas metal arc welding (GMAW) (axial spray, short circuit, and pulsed spray modes), flux cored arc welding (FCAW), and shielded metal arc welding (SMAW). The Cr6+ fractions were measured in the fumes; fume generation rates, Cr6+ generation rates, and Cr6+ generation rates per unit mass of welding wire were determined. A limited controlled comparison study was done in a welding shop including SMAW, FCAW, and three GMAW methods. The processes studied were compared for costs, including relative labor costs. Results indicate the Cr6+ in the fume varied widely, from a low of 2800 to a high of 34,000 ppm. Generation rates of Cr6+ ranged from 69 to 7800 μg/min, and Cr6+ generation rates per unit of wire ranged from 1 to 270 μg/g. The results of field study were similar to the findings in the laboratory. The Cr6+ (ppm) in the fume did not necessarily correlate with the Cr6+ generation rate. Physical properties were similar for the processes, with mass median aerodynamic diameters ranging from 250 to 336 nm, while the FCAW and SMAW fumes were larger (360 and 670 nm, respectively). Conclusion: The pulsed axial spray method was the best choice of the processes studied based on minimal fume generation, minimal Cr6+ generation, and cost per weld. This method is usable in any position, has a high metal deposition rate, and is relatively simple to learn and use. PMID:26690276

  15. Welding Course Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genits, Joseph C.

    This guide is intended for use in helping students gain a fundamental background on the major aspects of the welding trade. The course emphasis is on mastery of the manipulative skills necessary to develop successful welding techniques and on acquisition of an understanding of the specialized tools and equipment used in welding. The first part…

  16. Instructional Guidelines. Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fordyce, H. L.; Doshier, Dale

    Using the standards of the American Welding Society and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, this welding instructional guidelines manual presents a course of study in accordance with the current practices in industry. Intended for use in welding programs now practiced within the Federal Prison System, the phases of the program are…

  17. A tool for measuring the bending length in thin wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzini, M; Cagnoli, G; Cesarini, E; Losurdo, G; Martelli, F; Piergiovanni, F; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A

    2013-03-01

    Great effort is currently being put into the development and construction of the second generation, advanced gravitational wave detectors, Advanced Virgo and Advanced LIGO. The development of new low thermal noise suspensions of mirrors, based on the experience gained in the previous experiments, is part of this task. Quasi-monolithic suspensions with fused silica wires avoid the problem of rubbing friction introduced by steel cradle arrangements by directly welding the wires to silica blocks bonded to the mirror. Moreover, the mechanical loss level introduced by silica (φfs ∼ 10(-7) in thin fused silica wires) is by far less than the one associated with steel. The low frequency dynamical behaviour of the suspension can be computed and optimized, provided that the wire bending shape under pendulum motion is known. Due to the production process, fused silica wires are thicker near the two ends (necks), so that analytical bending computations are very complicated. We developed a tool to directly measure the low frequency bending parameters of fused silica wires, and we tested it on the wires produced for the Virgo+ monolithic suspensions. The working principle and a set of test measurements are presented and explained.

  18. Rapid Prototyping of Electrically Small Spherical Wire Antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Oleksiy S.

    2014-01-01

    It is shown how modern rapid prototyping technologies can be applied for quick and inexpensive, but still accurate, fabrication of electrically small wire antennas. A well known folded spherical helix antenna and a novel spherical zigzag antenna have been fabricated and tested, exhibiting the imp...

  19. An Assessment of Molten Metal Detachment Hazards for Electron Beam Welding in the Space Environment: Analysis and Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.; Russell, C.; Bhat, B.; Fragomeni, J. M.

    1998-01-01

    Conditions under which molten metal detachments might occur in a space welding environment are analyzed. A weld pool detachment parameter specifying conditions for pool detachment by impact is derived and corroborated by experimental evidence. Impact detachment for the pool is unlikely. Impact detachment for a drop of metal on the end of the weld wire may be possible under extreme conditions. Other potential causes of molten metal detachment considered, vaporization pressure forces and wire flickout from the pool, did not appear to present significant detachment threats.

  20. Superconducting properties of internally stabilized Nb{sub 3}Al wires fabricated by rapid-quenched and transformed process; Naibu anteika kyunetsu kyurei{center_dot}hentai ho Nb{sub 3}Al senzai no chodendo tokusei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tagawa, K. [Hitachi Cable, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); National Research Institute for Metals, Tokyo (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Corp., Saitama (Japan); Nakagawa, K. [Hitachi Cable, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Takeuchi, T.; Banno, N.; Kiyoshi, T.; Ito, K.; Wada, H. [National Research Institute for Metals, Tokyo (Japan); Yuyama, M.; Kosuge, M. [National Research Institute for Metals, Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-05-29

    Nb{sub 3}AL wire using Ag coated by Nb as stabilizer was manufactured as trial and the critical current density Jc was examined. Compared Ag with Nb as fill-in core bar, Jc of wire using silver filament core bar was higher than one using Nb filament core. It was considered that uniform current in Ag caused to produce homogeneous solid solution. Jc also increased by about 45% following processing of decreasing area after rapid heating and quench. N value also showed at least a value above and equal to 25 at the 21 T magnetic field. (NEDO)Nb{sub 3}AL wire using Ag coated by Nb as stabilizer was manufactured as trial and the critical current density Jc was examined. Compared Ag with Nb as fill-in core bar, Jc of wire using silver filament core bar was higher than one using Nb filament core. It was considered that uniform current in Ag caused to produce homogeneous solid solution. Jc also increased by about 45% following processing of decreasing area after rapid heating and quench. N value also showed at least a value above and equal to 25 at the 21 T magnetic field. (NEDO)

  1. Microstructure and corrosion behaviour of gas tungsten arc welds of maraging steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Madhusudhan Reddy

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Superior properties of maraging steels make them suitable for the fabrication of components used for military applications like missile covering, rocket motor casing and ship hulls. Welding is the main process for fabrication of these components, while the maraging steels can be fusion welded using gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW process. All these fabricated components require longer storage life and a major problem in welds is susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC. The present study is aimed at studying the SCC behaviour of MDN 250 (18% Ni steel and its welds with respect to microstructural changes. In the present study, 5.2 mm thick sheets made of MDN 250 steel in the solution annealed condition was welded using GTAW process. Post-weld heat treatments of direct ageing (480 °C for 3 h, solutionizing (815 °C for 1 h followed by ageing and homogenizing (1150 °C for 1 h followed by ageing were carried out. A mixture of martensite and austenite was observed in the microstructure of the fusion zone of solutionized and direct aged welds and only martensite in as-welded condition. Homogenization and ageing treatment have eliminated reverted austenite and elemental segregation. Homogenized welds also exhibited a marginal improvement in the corrosion resistance compared to those in the as-welded, solutionized and aged condition. Constant load SCC test data clearly revealed that the failure time of homogenized weld is much longer compared to other post weld treatments, and the homogenization treatment is recommended to improve the SCC life of GTA welds of MDN 250 Maraging steel.

  2. Fatigue performance of matching and dissimilar joints in aluminium alloys 5083-H111 and 6061-T651 after fully automatic pulsed GAMW using ER5356 filler wire

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mutombo, K

    2010-08-31

    Full Text Available The tensile strength and fatigue properties of Al5083-H111 welded with aluminium-magnesium alloyed ER5356 filler wire appeared similar to those of the base metal. This joint failed in the weld metal as a result of a slight reduction in hardness...

  3. Residual stresses and deformation in dissimilar girth welds: numerical simulations and experimental verifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasquale, P.; Burget, W.; Pfeiffer, W. [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Werkstoffmechanik (IWM), Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany)

    2001-03-01

    Weld fabrication of dissimilar girth welds made of the austenitic steel X3 CrNiMoN 17-13, the ferritic 9% Cr-steel X10 CrMoVNb 9-1 and a Ni-weld metal was simulated numerically based on the application of the program system SYSWELD+. A three-dimensional (3D) and an axisymmetrical finite element model of the girth weld were established. According to the real dissimilar weld the model is divided into three different material zones, the austenitic, the ferritic and the Ni-weld metal zone neglecting the heat-affected zone in the ferritic base metal. The results obtained in this study are presented in terms of temperature distributions during welding and just after welding. The residual stresses calculated for the dissimilar girth welds are shown both for the axial and the circumferential orientations. The calculated residual stress distributions are compared to residual stresses measured by X-ray diffraction. It is shown that the calculated residual stresses are in good agreement with the residual stresses determined experimentally. Residual stress distributions in dissimilar girth welds are discussed on the basis of variable weld fabrication conditions and different boundary conditions selected for the numerical calculations. (orig.)

  4. Review of high thickness welding analysis using SYSWELD for a fusion grade reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prakash, Ravi, E-mail: prakash@ipr.res.in; Gangradey, Ranjana, E-mail: ranjana@ipr.res.in

    2013-10-15

    Vacuum vessel and Cryostat for a fusion grade machine are massive structures involving fabrication of chambers with high thickness, about thickness up to 60 mm or more, made of special grade steels. Such machines require accurate planning of welding as the distortions and tolerance levels are stringent. Vacuum vessel of ITER has “D” shaped profile and is toroidal double walled huge steel cage of about 6 m width and 19 m diameter, and the Cryostat of 30 m height and width. The huge vacuum chamber will be fabricated in various parts/sectors due to huge size and then welded with countless weld joints to give the final components. High thickness welding of vacuum vessel is considered to be one of the most important elements in building a reactor of fusion grade due to large ineluctable distortions of welded parts after welding process as it is not easy to correct the large deformations after the welding process and finally the corrections are very expensive. The present paper demonstrates results of welding simulation done using SYSWELD software. Simulation results are of review studies of identified welding process like MIG, MAG, NG-TIG, TIG and EBW for welding large structural D shaped vacuum vessel profile as a case study. Simulation has carried out for SS316LN in clamped as well as unclamped condition for a distortion tolerance of ±2 mm with various weld factors and the local–global approach.

  5. Charpak hemispherical wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1970-01-01

    pieces. Mesures are of the largest one. Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  6. Photovoltaic Wire Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovation Research Phase I project will investigate a new architecture for photovoltaic devices based on nanotechnology: photovoltaic wire. The...

  7. Pin Tool Geometry Effects in Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Querin, J. A.; Rubisoff, H. A.; Schneider, J. A.

    2009-01-01

    In friction stir welding (FSW) there is significant evidence that material can take one of two different flow paths when being displaced from its original position in front of the pin tool to its final position in the wake of the weld. The geometry of the pin tool, along with the process parameters, plays an important role in dictating the path that the material takes. Each flow path will impart a different thermomechanical history on the material, consequently altering the material microstructure and subsequent weld properties. The intention of this research is to isolate the effect that different pin tool attributes have on the flow paths imparted on the FSWed material. Based on published weld tool geometries, a variety of weld tools were fabricated and used to join AA2219. Results from the tensile properties and microstructural characterization will be presented.

  8. Heat flow in variable polarity plasma arc welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelmessih, Amanie N.

    1992-01-01

    The space shuttle external tank and the space station Freedom are fabricated by the variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA) welding. Heat sink effects (taper) are observed when there are irregularities in the work-piece configuration especially if these irregularities are close to the weld bead. These heat sinks affect the geometry of the weld bead, and in extreme cases they could cause defects such as incomplete fusion. Also, different fixtures seem to have varying heat sink effects. The objective of the previous, present, and consecutive research studies is to investigate the effect of irregularities in the work-piece configuration and fixture differences on the weld bead geometry with the ultimate objective to compensate automatically for the heat sink effects and achieve a perfect weld.

  9. Narrow gap HST welding process and its application to candidate pipe material for 700 C USC boiler component

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, Gang; Sato, Takashi; Fukuda, Yuji [Babcock-Hitachi K.K., Hiroshima (Japan). Kure Research Lab.; Mitsuhata, Koichi [Babcock-Hitachi K.K., Hiroshima (Japan). Kure Div.

    2008-07-01

    Increasing steam temperature and pressure conditions of 700 C USC (Ultra Super Critical) power plants under consideration require the adoption of Ni-based alloys. One of the most crucial issues for the application of 700 C USC power plants is the establishment of welding technology for the thick-walled components. This paper reports the research results on the practicability of candidate material for the thickwalled components. The weld test was conducted on Ni-based Alloy617 (52Ni-22Cr- 13Co-9Mo-Ti-Al) by using the narrow gap HST (Hot wire Switching TIG) welding process developed by Babcock-Hitachi K.K with the matching filler wire of Alloy617. The weldability and strength properties of weld joint were examined. The sound weld joint was achieved. The advantages of narrow gap HST welding process for the thick-walled components of Ni-based alloy were discussed from the viewpoints of weld metal chemical composition and creep rupture strength. Due to the good shielding effect, the melting loss of alloy elements in the weld consumable during the narrow gap HST welding procedure was suppressed successfully. The narrow gap HST weld joint showed comparable strength with the parent metal. (orig.)

  10. Evaluation of Distortion in Welding Unions of 304 Stainless Steel with Elliptic Trajectory Using a Welding Robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco-González, L. A.; Hurtado-Delgado, E.; Reyes-Valdés, F. A.

    The aim of this investigation is to evaluate the distortions generated in welding unions of stainless steel 304 by effect of the welding temperature and the microestructural changes. The joint design is a 100 × 100 mm steel plate of 3 mm thickness. The plate was joined to a tube of 50 mm diameter and 2 mm thickness, which has a defined angular cut; therefore, the trajectory followed by the seam has an elliptic form. Temperature data acquisition was developed by type K thermocouples, placed in pairs at 0°, 90°, 180° and 270° along the welding trajectory and connected to a data acquisition device yo obtain the measures to generate time-temperature plots. The welding process was executed by a KUKA ®; KR16 welding robot with an integrated GMAW (Gas metal arc welding) process where the input parameters of voltage, wire feed and travel speed are set to constant. The distortion of the work piece was measured using a laser scanning technique that generates a point cloud with the VXelements TM software for comparison between the pre and post-weld condition. Microstructural evaluation was performed on transversal sections of the seam, at the mentioned angles for correlation.

  11. 1998 wire development workshop proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-04-01

    This report consists of vugraphs of the presentations at the conference. The conference was divided into the following sessions: (1) First Generation Wire Development: Status and Issues; (2) First Generation Wire in Pre-Commercial Prototypes; (3) Second Generation Wire Development: Private Sector Progress and Issues; (4) Second Generation Wire Development: Federal Laboratories; and (5) Fundamental Research Issues for HTS Wire Development.

  12. Localized Corrosion of Alloy 22 -Fabrication Effects-FY05 Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebak, R B

    2005-10-06

    This report deals with the impact of fabrication processes on the localized corrosion behavior of Alloy 22 (N06022). The four fabrication processes that were analyzed are: (1) Surface stress mitigation of final closure weld, (2) Manufacturing of the mockup container, (3) Black annealing of the container and (4) Use of different heats of Alloy 22 for container fabrication. Immersion and Electrochemical tests performed in the laboratory are generally aggressive and do not represent actual repository environments in Yucca Mountain. For example, to determine the intergranular attack in the heat affected zone of a weldment, tests are conducted in boiling acidic and oxidizing solutions according to ASTM standards. These solutions are used to compare the behavior of differently treated metallic coupons. Similarly for electrochemical tests many times pure sodium chloride or calcium chloride solutions are used. Pure chloride solutions are not representative of the repository environment. (1) Surface Stress Mitigation--When metallic plates are welded, for example using the Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) method, residual tensile stresses may develop in the vicinity of the weld seam. Processes such as Low Plasticity Burnishing (LPB) and Laser Shock Peening (LSP) could be applied locally to eliminate the residual stresses produced by welding. In this study, Alloy 22 plates were welded and then the above-mentioned surface treatments were applied to eliminate the residual tensile stresses. The aim of the current study was to comparatively test the corrosion behavior of as-welded (ASW) plates with the corrosion behavior of plates with stress mitigated surfaces. Immersion and electrochemical tests were performed. Results from both immersion and electrochemical corrosion tests show that the corrosion resistance of the mitigated plates was not affected by the surface treatments applied. (2) Behavior of Specimens from a Mockup container--Alloy 22 has been extensively tested for

  13. The effects of alloying elements on microstructures and mechanical properties of tungsten inert gas welded AZ80 magnesium alloys joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Zhang, Jiansheng; Ding, Rongrong

    2017-11-01

    The effects of alloying elements on the macrostructures, microstructures and tensile strength of AZ80 Mg alloy weldments were studied in the present study. The results indicate that with the decrease of Al element content of filler wire, the welding defects of seam are gradually eliminated and the β-Mg17Al12 phases at α-Mg boundaries are refined and become discontinuous, which are beneficial to the improvement of tensile strength. With AZ31 Mg alloy filler wire, the maximum tensile strength of AZ80 weldment is 220 MPa and fracture occurs at the welding seam of joint. It is experimentally proved that robust AZ80 Mg alloy joints can be obtained by tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding process with AZ31 Mg alloy filler wire. However, further study is required to improve the microstructures and reduce welding defects of joint in order to further improve the joining strength of AZ80 Mg alloy joint.

  14. Physics of arc welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagar, T. W.

    1982-05-01

    A discussion of the factors controlling the size and shape of the weld fusion zone is presented along with a description of current theories of heat and fluid flow phenomena in the plasma and the molten metal weld pool. Although experimental results confirm that surface tension, plasma jets, and weld pool convection all strongly influence the fusion zone shape; no comprehensive model is available from which to predict welding behavior. It is proposed that the lack of such an understanding is a major impediment to development of automated welding processes. In addition, sensors for weld torch positioning are reviewed in terms of the mechnical and electromagnetic energy spectra which have been used. New developments in this area are also needed in order to advance the technology of automated welding.

  15. Submerged arc welding of heavy plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    The submerged arc process is particularly suitable for heavy plate welding because of its ability to combine very high deposit rates along with excellent quality. It does these things without the smoke and spatter often accompanying other processes. It is available today in several forms that are pointed to the fabricators of heavy sections with long, short or round about welds. Tandem arc full automatic equipment is particularly suitable for those long heavy welds where speed and deposit rate are of the first order. An attachment called long stick-out which makes use of the IR drop on long electrode extensions can be included on this equipment to increase deposition rates 50% or more.

  16. A new route to process diamond wires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcello Filgueira

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available We propose an original route to process diamond wires, denominated In Situ Technology, whose fabrication involves mechanical conformation processes, such as rotary forging, copper tubes restacking, and thermal treatments, such as sintering and recrystallisation of a bronze 4 wt.% diamond composite. Tensile tests were performed, reaching an ultimate tensile strength (UTS of 230 MPa for the diameter of Æ = 1.84 mm. Scanning electron microscopy showed the diamond crystals distribution along the composite rope during its manufacture, as well as the diamond adhesion to the bronze matrix. Cutting tests were carried out with the processed wire, showing a probable performance 4 times higher than the diamond sawing discs, however its probable performance was about 5 to 8 times less than the conventional diamond wires (pearl system due to the low abrasion resistance of the bronze matrix, and low adhesion between the pair bronze-diamond due to the use of not metallised diamond single crystals.

  17. Effects of different brazing and welding methods on the fracture load of various orthodontic joining configurations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Jens J; Bailly, Jacqueline; Fuhrmann, Robert A

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the fracture load of different joints made by conventional brazing, tungston inert gas (TIG) and laser welding. Six standardized joining configurations of spring hard quality orthodontic wire were investigated: end-to-end, round, cross, 3 mm length, 9 mm length and 6.5 mm to orthodontic band. The joints were made by five different methods: brazing with universal silver solder, two TIG and two laser welding devices. The fracture loads were measured with a universal testing machine (Zwick 005). Data were analysed with the Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon and Kruskal-Wallis tests. The significance level was set at PTIG or laser welding (Pwelding (826 N). No differences between the various TIG or laser welding devices were demonstrated, although it was not possible to join an orthodontic wire to an orthodontic band using TIG welding. For orthodontic purposes laser and TIG welding are solder free alternatives. TIG welding and laser welding showed similar results. The laser technique is an expensive, but sophisticated and simple method.

  18. Optimization of Gas Metal Arc Welding Process Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amit; Khurana, M. K.; Yadav, Pradeep K.

    2016-09-01

    This study presents the application of Taguchi method combined with grey relational analysis to optimize the process parameters of gas metal arc welding (GMAW) of AISI 1020 carbon steels for multiple quality characteristics (bead width, bead height, weld penetration and heat affected zone). An orthogonal array of L9 has been implemented to fabrication of joints. The experiments have been conducted according to the combination of voltage (V), current (A) and welding speed (Ws). The results revealed that the welding speed is most significant process parameter. By analyzing the grey relational grades, optimal parameters are obtained and significant factors are known using ANOVA analysis. The welding parameters such as speed, welding current and voltage have been optimized for material AISI 1020 using GMAW process. To fortify the robustness of experimental design, a confirmation test was performed at selected optimal process parameter setting. Observations from this method may be useful for automotive sub-assemblies, shipbuilding and vessel fabricators and operators to obtain optimal welding conditions.

  19. Heavy-section welding with very high power laser beams: the challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goussain, Jean-Claude; Becker, Ahim; Chehaibou, A.; Leca, P.

    1997-08-01

    The 45 kW CO2 laser system of Institut de Soudure was used to evaluate and explore the possibilities offered by the high power laser beams for welding different materials in various thickness and in different welding positions. Stainless steels, low carbon steels, aluminum and titanium alloys were studied. Butt joints in 10 to 35 mm thick plates were achieved and evaluated by radiographic, metallurgical and mechanical tests. Gaps and alignment tolerances were determined with and without filler wire in order to obtain acceptable welds concerning the weld geometry, the aspect on front and end root sides. The main problem raised by heavy section welding concerns weld porosity in the weld which increases drastically with the thickness of the weld. Indications are given on their origin and the way to proceed in order to better control them. Lastly some large parts, recently welded on the system, are presented and discussed before drawing some conclusions on the prospects of very high power laser welding.

  20. Control of surface defects on plasma-MIG hybrid welds in cryogenic aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hee-Keun; Chun, Kwang-San; Park, Sang-Hyeon; Kang, Chung-Yun

    2015-07-01

    Lately, high production rate welding processes for Al alloys, which are used as LNG FPSO cargo containment system material, have been developed to overcome the limit of installation and high rework rates. In particular, plasma-metal inert gas (MIG) hybrid (PMH) welding can be used to obtain a higher deposition rate and lower porosity, while facilitating a cleaning effect by preheating and post heating the wire and the base metal. However, an asymmetric undercut and a black-colored deposit are created on the surface of PMH weld in Al alloys. For controlling the surface defect formation, the wire feeding speed and nozzle diameter in the PMH weld was investigated through arc phenomena with high-speed imaging and metallurgical analysis.

  1. Control of surface defects on plasma-MIG hybrid welds in cryogenic aluminum alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee-Keun Lee

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Lately, high production rate welding processes for Al alloys, which are used as LNG FPSO cargo containment system material, have been developed to overcome the limit of installation and high rework rates. In particular, plasma-metal inert gas (MIG hybrid (PMH welding can be used to obtain a higher deposition rate and lower porosity, while facilitating a cleaning effect by preheating and post heating the wire and the base metal. However, an asymmetric undercut and a black-colored deposit are created on the surface of PMH weld in Al alloys. For controlling the surface defect formation, the wire feeding speed and nozzle diameter in the PMH weld was investigated through arc phenomena with high-speed imaging and metallurgical analysis.

  2. Transport in quantum wires

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This motivated us to study the LL model of a quantum wire, with Fermi liquid leads and the unusual feature of ... of quantized conductance even in clean quantum wires and a novel odd–even effect in the presence of a .... But in one dimension, it is well-known that the FL theory breaks down, and the ground state is a ...

  3. Commercial and Industrial Wiring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltwasser, Stan; Flowers, Gary

    This module is the third in a series of three wiring publications, includes additional technical knowledge and applications required for job entry in the commercial and industrial wiring trade. The module contains 15 instructional units that cover the following topics: blueprint reading and load calculations; tools and equipment; service;…

  4. Improvement on fabrication process of CANDU type reactor fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Chang Bum; Chung, Sang Tae; Kim, Hyung Soo; Park, Choon Ho

    1993-05-01

    The study on fabrication of the nuclear fuel for heavy water cooled reactor is performed. Among the fabrication processes of nuclear fuel, welding thickness between fuel rod and end cap can occur a serious error in total fuel length. Therefore, for nuclear fuel design, the thickness of end cap and changed weight of zircaloy-4 tube must be measured accurately. For welding performance, microstructure of welding point is investigated successfully. The result of the study shows the possibility of cost reduction and quality improvement by simplification of fabrication process of nuclear fuel. (Author).

  5. Heat sink welding of austenitic stainless steel pipes to control distortion and residual stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, H.; Albert, S.K.; Bhaduri, A.K. [Materials Technology Div., Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    2007-07-01

    Construction of India's Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) involves extensive welding of austenitic stainless steels pipes of different dimensions. Due to high thermal expansion coefficient and poor thermal conductivity of this class of steels, welding can result in significant distortion of these pipes. Attempts to arrest this distortion can lead to high levels of residual stresses in the welded parts. Heat sink welding is one of the techniques often employed to minimize distortion and residual stress in austenitic stainless steel pipe welding. This technique has also been employed to repair welding of the piping of the Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) subjected to radiation induced intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). In the present study, a comparison of the distortion in two pipe welds, one made with heat sink welding and another a normal welds. Pipes of dimensions 350{phi} x 250(L) x 8(t) mm was fabricated from 316LN plates of dimensions 1100 x 250 x 8 mm by bending and long seam (L-seam) welding by SMAW process. Two fit ups with a root gap of 2 mm, land height of 1mm and a groove angle of 70 were prepared using these pipes for circumferential seam (C-seam) welding. Dimensions at predetermined points in the fit up were made before and after welding to check the variation in radius, circumference and and ovality of the pipes. Root pass for both the pipe fit up were carried out using conventional GTAW process with 1.6 mm AWS ER 16-8-2 as consumables. Welding of one of the pipe fit ups were completed using conventions GTAW process while the other was completed using heat sink welding. For second and subsequent layers of welding using this process, water was sprayed at the root side of the joint while welding was in progress. Flow rate of the water was {proportional_to}6 1/minute. Welding parameters employed were same as those used for the other pipe weld. Results of the dimensional measurements showed that there is no circumferential shrinkage in

  6. Open Source Laser Polymer Welding System: Design and Characterization of Linear Low-Density Polyethylene Multilayer Welds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J. Laureto

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The use of lasers to weld polymer sheets provides a means of highly-adaptive and custom additive manufacturing for a wide array of industrial, medical, and end user/consumer applications. This paper provides an open source design for a laser polymer welding system, which can be fabricated with low-cost fused filament fabrication and off-the-shelf mechanical and electrical parts. The system is controlled with free and open source software and firmware. The operation of the machine is validated and the performance of the system is quantified for the mechanical properties (peak load and weld width of linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE lap welds manufactured with the system as a function of linear energy density. The results provide incident laser power and machine parameters that enable both dual (two layers and multilayer (three layers while welding only two sheets polymer welded systems. The application of these parameter sets provides users of the open source laser polymer welder with the fundamental requirements to produce mechanically stable LLDPE multi-layer welded products, such as heat exchangers.

  7. Gas and RRR distribution in high purity Niobium EB welded in Ultra-High Vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anakhov, S.; Singer, X.; Singer, W.; Wen, H.

    2006-05-01

    Electron beam (EB) welding in UHV (ultra-high vacuum, 10-5÷10-8 mbar) is applied in the standard fabrication of high gradient niobium superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities of TESLA design. The quality of EB welding is critical for cavity performance. Experimental data of gas content (H2, O2, N2) and RRR (residual resistivity ratio) measurements in niobium (Nb) welding seams are presented. EB welding in UHV conditions allow to preserve low gas content (1÷3 wt. ppm hydrogen and 5÷7 ppm oxygen and nitrogen), essential for high values of RRR — 350÷400 units. Gas content redistribution in the electron beam welded and heat affected region take place in the welding process. Correlation between gas solubility parameters, RRR and thermal conductivity are presented. Mechanisms of gas solubility in EB welding process are discussed.

  8. Fundamental Studies on Phase Transformations and Mechanical Properties of Fusion Welds in Advanced Naval Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-31

    ofNUCu steel as a replacement for conventional structural plate material permits material and fabrication cost savings approaching 20% - 35...previous weld pass. Welding with the use of multiple weld passes is common practice in the joining of thick plates in naval applications. Figure 1 shows...shows that the Ms and Mr temperatures are relatively constant across all the cooling rates. The Ms temperature is 685 ± 38 K (412°C) and the Mr

  9. Multiple pass and multiple layer friction stir welding and material enhancement processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhili [Knoxville, TN; David, Stan A [Knoxville, TN; Frederick, David Alan [Harriman, TN

    2010-07-27

    Processes for friction stir welding, typically for comparatively thick plate materials using multiple passes and multiple layers of a friction stir welding tool. In some embodiments a first portion of a fabrication preform and a second portion of the fabrication preform are placed adjacent to each other to form a joint, and there may be a groove adjacent the joint. The joint is welded and then, where a groove exists, a filler may be disposed in the groove, and the seams between the filler and the first and second portions of the fabrication preform may be friction stir welded. In some embodiments two portions of a fabrication preform are abutted to form a joint, where the joint may, for example, be a lap joint, a bevel joint or a butt joint. In some embodiments a plurality of passes of a friction stir welding tool may be used, with some passes welding from one side of a fabrication preform and other passes welding from the other side of the fabrication preform.

  10. Welding arc plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Bruce L.

    1990-01-01

    The problems of weld quality control and weld process dependability continue to be relevant issues in modern metal welding technology. These become especially important for NASA missions which may require the assembly or repair of larger orbiting platforms using automatic welding techniques. To extend present welding technologies for such applications, NASA/MSFC's Materials and Processes Lab is developing physical models of the arc welding process with the goal of providing both a basis for improved design of weld control systems, and a better understanding of how arc welding variables influence final weld properties. The physics of the plasma arc discharge is reasonably well established in terms of transport processes occurring in the arc column itself, although recourse to sophisticated numerical treatments is normally required to obtain quantitative results. Unfortunately the rigor of these numerical computations often obscures the physics of the underlying model due to its inherent complexity. In contrast, this work has focused on a relatively simple physical model of the arc discharge to describe the gross features observed in welding arcs. Emphasis was placed of deriving analytic expressions for the voltage along the arc axis as a function of known or measurable arc parameters. The model retains the essential physics for a straight polarity, diffusion dominated free burning arc in argon, with major simplifications of collisionless sheaths and simple energy balances at the electrodes.

  11. Generation rate of carbon monoxide from CO2 arc welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojima, Jun

    2013-01-01

    CO poisoning has been a serious industrial hazard in Japanese workplaces. Although incomplete combustion is the major cause of CO generation, there is a risk of CO poisoning during some welding operations. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the generation rate of CO from CO2 arc welding under controlled laboratory conditions and estimate the ventilation requirements for the prevention of CO poisoning. Bead on plate welding was carried out with an automatic welding robot on a rolled steel base metal under several conditions. The concentration of emitted CO from the welding was measured by a real-time CO monitor in a well-ventilated laboratory that was free from ambient CO contamination. The generation rate of CO was obtained from the three measurements-the flow rate of the welding exhaust gas, CO concentration in the exhaust gas and the arcing time. Then the ventilation requirement to prevent CO poisoning was calculated. The generation rate of CO was found to be 386-883 ml/min with a solid wire and 331-1,293 ml/min with a flux cored wire respectively. It was found that the CO concentration in a room would be maintained theoretically below the OSHA PEL (50 ppm) providing the ventilation rate in the room was 6.6-25.9 m3/min. The actual ventilation requirement was then estimated to be 6.6-259 m3/min considering incomplete mixing. In order to prevent CO poisoning, some countermeasures against gaseous emission as well as welding fumes should be taken eagerly.

  12. Application of Expectation Maximization Method for Purchase Decision-Making Support in Welding Branch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kujawińska Agnieszka

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a study of applying the proposed method of cluster analysis to support purchasing decisions in the welding industry. The authors analyze the usefulness of the non-hierarchical method, Expectation Maximization (EM, in the selection of material (212 combinations of flux and wire melt for the SAW (Submerged Arc Welding method process. The proposed approach to cluster analysis is proved as useful in supporting purchase decisions.

  13. Computerized adaptive control weld skate with CCTV weld guidance project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, W. A.

    1976-01-01

    This report summarizes progress of the automatic computerized weld skate development portion of the Computerized Weld Skate with Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) Arc Guidance Project. The main goal of the project is to develop an automatic welding skate demonstration model equipped with CCTV weld guidance. The three main goals of the overall project are to: (1) develop a demonstration model computerized weld skate system, (2) develop a demonstration model automatic CCTV guidance system, and (3) integrate the two systems into a demonstration model of computerized weld skate with CCTV weld guidance for welding contoured parts.

  14. Thick-section Laser and Hybrid Welding of Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujanpää, Veli

    Austenitic stainless steels are generally known to have very good laser weldability, when ordinary grades of sheets are concerned. But it is not necessarily the case, if special grades of fully austenitic structures with e.g. high molybdenum, or thick-section are used. It is also known that hot cracking susceptibility is strictly controlled by composition and welding parameters. If solidification is primary ferritic, hot cracking resistance is dramatically increased. It is also well known that laser welding needs a careful control of weld edge preparation and air gap between the edges. The dependence on edge quality can be decreased by using filler metal, either cold wire, hot wire or hybrid laser-arc welding. An additional role is high molybdenum contents where micro segregation can cause low local contents in weld which can decrease the corrosion properties, if filler metal is not used. Another feature in laser welding is its incomplete mixing, especially in thick section applications. It causes inhomogeneity, which can make uneven microstructure, as well as uneven mechanical and corrosion properties In this presentation the features of laser welding of thick section austenitic stainless steels are highlighted. Thick section (up to 60 mm) can be made by multi-pass laser or laser hybrid welding. In addition to using filler metal, it requires careful joint figure planning, laser head planning, weld parameter planning, weld filler metal selection, non-destructive and destructive testing and metallography to guarantee high-quality welds in practice. In addition some tests with micro segregation is presented. Also some examples of incomplete mixing is presented.

  15. 46 CFR 54.20-5 - Welding qualification tests and production testing (modifies UW-26, UW-28, UW-29, UW-47, and UW-48).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding qualification tests and production testing... OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Fabrication by Welding § 54.20-5 Welding qualification tests and production testing (modifies UW-26, UW-28, UW-29, UW-47, and UW-48). (a...

  16. Modern Methods of Rail Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyrev, Nikolay A.; Kozyreva, Olga A.; Usoltsev, Aleksander A.; Kryukov, Roman E.; Shevchenko, Roman A.

    2017-10-01

    Existing methods of rail welding, which are enable to get continuous welded rail track, are observed in this article. Analysis of existing welding methods allows considering an issue of continuous rail track in detail. Metallurgical and welding technologies of rail welding and also process technologies reducing aftereffects of temperature exposure are important factors determining the quality and reliability of the continuous rail track. Analysis of the existing methods of rail welding enable to find the research line for solving this problem.

  17. Bound Electron States in Skew-symmetric Quantum Wire Intersections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    for electronic transport studies was to confine resonant- tunneling heterostructures laterally with a fabrication-imposed po- tential. This approach...Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 Quantum Wires, Crossed Nanowires , Trapped Electron States, Quantum Dots REPORT...realistic systems such as semiconductor nanowire films and carbon nanotube bundles. Bound electron states in skew-symmetric quantum wire intersections by

  18. ‘Chrysanthemum petal’ arrangements of silver nano wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Hui-Wang; Jiu, Jin-Ting; Sugahara, Tohru; Nagao, Shijo; Suganuma, Katsuaki; Uchida, Hiroshi

    2014-12-01

    Highly ordered ‘Chrysanthemum petal’ arrangements of silver nano wires were fabricated in a biodegradable polymer of polyvinyl alcohol using a simple one-step blending method without any template. The degree of the arrangement increased with the decreasing content of polyvinyl alcohol. The mechanism for the formation of these ‘Chrysanthemum petal’ arrangements was discussed specifically. These ‘Chrysanthemum petal’ arrangements will be helpful to increase the electrical conductivity of silver nano wires films.

  19. Printing Outside the Box: Additive Manufacturing Processes for Fabrication of Large Aerospace Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babai, Majid; Peters, Warren

    2015-01-01

    To achieve NASA's mission of space exploration, innovative manufacturing processes are being applied to the fabrication of propulsion elements. Liquid rocket engines (LREs) are comprised of a thrust chamber and nozzle extension as illustrated in figure 1 for the J2X upper stage engine. Development of the J2X engine, designed for the Ares I launch vehicle, is currently being incorporated on the Space Launch System. A nozzle extension is attached to the combustion chamber to obtain the expansion ratio needed to increase specific impulse. If the nozzle extension could be printed as one piece using free-form additive manufacturing (AM) processes, rather than the current method of forming welded parts, a considerable time savings could be realized. Not only would this provide a more homogenous microstructure than a welded structure, but could also greatly shorten the overall fabrication time. The main objective of this study is to fabricate test specimens using a pulsed arc source and solid wire as shown in figure 2. The mechanical properties of these specimens will be compared with those fabricated using the powder bed, selective laser melting technology at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. As printed components become larger, maintaining a constant temperature during the build process becomes critical. This predictive capability will require modeling of the moving heat source as illustrated in figure 3. Predictive understanding of the heat profile will allow a constant temperature to be maintained as a function of height from substrate while printing complex shapes. In addition, to avoid slumping, this will also allow better control of the microstructural development and hence the properties. Figure 4 shows a preliminary comparison of the mechanical properties obtained.

  20. Fracture strength of different soldered and welded orthodontic joining configurations with and without filling material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Jens Johannes; Bailly, Jacqueline; Gernhardt, Christian Ralf; Fuhrmann, Robert Andreas Werner

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the mechanical strength of different joints made by conventional brazing, TIG and laser welding with and without filling material. Five standardized joining configurations of orthodontic wire in spring hard quality were used: round, cross, 3 mm length, 9 mm length and 7 mm to orthodontic band. The joints were made by five different methods: brazing, tungsten inert gas (TIG) and laser welding with and without filling material. For the original orthodontic wire and for each kind of joint configuration or connecting method 10 specimens were carefully produced, totalizing 240. The fracture strengths were measured with a universal testing machine (Zwick 005). Data were analyzed by ANOVA (p=0.05) and Bonferroni post hoc test (p=0.05). In all cases, brazing joints were ruptured on a low level of fracture strength (186-407 N). Significant differences between brazing and TIG or laser welding (pwelding with filling material and 3 mm joint length (998 N). Using filling materials, there was a clear tendency to higher mean values of fracture strength in TIG and laser welding. However, statistically significant differences were found only in the 9-mm long joints (pwelded joints was positively influenced by the additional use of filling material. TIG welding was comparable to laser welding except for the impossibility of joining orthodontic wire with orthodontic band.

  1. Challenges to Resistance Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Quanfeng

    This report originates from the compulsory defense during my Ph.D. study at the Technical University of Denmark. Resistance welding is an old and well-proven technology. Yet the emergence of more and more new materials, new designs, invention off new joining techniques, and more stringent...... requirement in quality have imposed challenges to the resistance welding. More some research and development have to be done to adapt the old technology to the manufacturing industry of the 21st century. In the 1st part of the report, the challenging factors to the resistance welding are reviewed. Numerical...... simulation of resistance welding has been under development for many years. Yet it is no easy to make simulation results reliable and accurate because of the complexity of resistance welding process. In the 2nd part of the report numerical modeling of resistance welding is reviewed, some critical factors...

  2. Ultrasonic Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabors, Sammy

    2015-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Ultrasonic Stir Welding (USW) to join large pieces of very high-strength metals such as titanium and Inconel. USW, a solid-state weld process, improves current thermal stir welding processes by adding high-power ultrasonic (HPU) energy at 20 kHz frequency. The addition of ultrasonic energy significantly reduces axial, frictional, and shear forces; increases travel rates; and reduces wear on the stir rod, which results in extended stir rod life. The USW process decouples the heating, stirring, and forging elements found in the friction stir welding process allowing for independent control of each process element and, ultimately, greater process control and repeatability. Because of the independent control of USW process elements, closed-loop temperature control can be integrated into the system so that a constant weld nugget temperature can be maintained during welding.

  3. Carbon nanotube wires with continuous current rating exceeding 20 Amperes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cress, Cory D.; Ganter, Matthew J.; Schauerman, Christopher M.; Soule, Karen; Rossi, Jamie E.; Lawlor, Colleen C.; Puchades, Ivan; Ubnoske, Stephen M.; Bucossi, Andrew R.; Landi, Brian J.

    2017-07-01

    A process to fabricate carbon nanotube (CNT) wires with diameters greater than 1 cm and continuous current carrying capability exceeding 20 A is demonstrated. Wires larger than 5 mm are formed using a multi-step radial densification process that begins with a densified CNT wire core followed by successive wrapping of additional CNT material to increase the wire size. This process allows for a wide range of wire diameters to be fabricated, with and without potassium tetrabromoaurate (KAuBr4) chemical doping, and the resulting electrical and thermal properties to be characterized. Electrical measurements are performed with on/off current steps to obtain the maximum current before reaching a peak CNT wire temperature of 100 °C and before failure, yielding values of instantaneous currents in excess of 45 A for KAuBr4 doped CNT wires with a diameter of 6 mm achieved prior to failure. The peak temperature of the wires at failure (˜530 °C) is correlated with the primary decomposition peak observed in thermal gravimetric analysis of a wire sample confirming that oxidation is the primary failure mode of CNT wires operated in air. The in operando stability of doped CNT wires is confirmed by monitoring the resistance and temperature, which remain largely unaltered over 40 days and 1 day for wires with 1.5 mm and 11.2 mm diameters, respectively. The 100 °C continuous current rating, or ampacity, is measured for a range of doped CNT wire diameters and corresponding linear mass densities ρL. To describe the results, a new form of the fuse-law, where the critical current is defined as I ∝ρL3 /4, is developed and shows good agreement with the experimental data. Ultimately, CNT wires are shown to be stable electrical conductors, with failure current densities in excess of 50 A in the case of a convectively cooled 11.2 mm doped CNT wire, and amenable for use in applications that have long-term, high-current demands.

  4. Residual Stresses in Thick Bi-metallic Fusion Welds : A Neutron Diffraction Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ohms, C.

    2013-01-01

    Welding is applied in many industrial sectors to join components, and has become an important manufacturing process because it enables the fabrication of structures that could not otherwise be constructed. Weld regions have inhomogeneous microstructures and are more susceptible to crack initiation

  5. Design, construction, and characterization of a novel robotic welding fume generator and inhalation exposure system for laboratory animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonini, James M; Afshari, Aliakbar A; Stone, Sam; Chen, Bean; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Fletcher, W Gary; Goldsmith, W Travis; Vandestouwe, Kurt H; McKinney, Walter; Castranova, Vincent; Frazer, David G

    2006-04-01

    Respiratory effects observed in welders have included lung function changes, metal fume fever, bronchitis, and a possible increase in the incidence of lung cancer. Many questions remain unanswered regarding the causality and possible underlying mechanisms associated with the potential toxic effects of welding fume inhalation. The objective of the present study was to construct a completely automated, computer-controlled welding fume generation and inhalation exposure system to simulate real workplace exposures. The system comprised a programmable six-axis robotic welding arm, a water-cooled arc welding torch, and a wire feeder that supplied the wire to the torch at a programmed rate. For the initial studies, gas metal arc welding was performed using a stainless steel electrode. A flexible trunk was attached to the robotic arm of the welder and was used to collect and transport fume from the vicinity of the arc to the animal exposure chamber. Undiluted fume concentrations consistently ranged from 90-150 mg/m(3) in the animal chamber during welding. Temperature and humidity remained constant in the chamber during the welding operation. The welding particles were composed of (from highest to lowest concentration) iron, chromium, manganese, and nickel as measured by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. Size distribution analysis indicated the mass median aerodynamic diameter of the generated particles to be approximately 0.24 microm with a geometric standard deviation (sigma(g)) of 1.39. As determined by transmission and scanning electron microscopy, the generated aerosols were mostly arranged as chain-like agglomerates of primary particles. Characterization of the laboratory-generated welding aerosol has indicated that particle morphology, size, and chemical composition are comparable to stainless steel welding fume generated in other studies. With the development of this novel system, it will be possible to establish an animal model using

  6. Gold Wire-networks: Particle Array Guided Evaporation Lithograpy

    KAUST Repository

    Lone, Saifullah

    2015-06-29

    We exploited the combination of dry deposition of monolayer of 2D (two dimensional) templates, lift-up transfer of 2D template onto flat surfaces and evaporation lithography [1] to fabricate gold micro- and submicron size wire networks. The approach relies upon the defect free dry deposition of 2D monolayer of latex particles [2] on patterned silicon template and flat PDMS-substrate to create square centered and honey-comb wire networks respectively. The process is followed by lift-up transfer of 2D latex crystal on glass substrate. Subsequently, a small amount of AuNP-suspension is doped on top of the transferred crystal; the suspension is allowed to spread instantaneously and dried at low temperature. The liquid evaporates uniformly to the direction perpendicular to glass substrate. During evaporation, AuNPs are de-wetted along with the movement of liquid to self-assemble in-between the inter-particle spaces and therefore, giving rise to liquid-bridge networks which upon delayed evaporation, transforms into wire networks. The approach is used to fabricate both micro- and submicron wire-networks by simply changing the template dimensions. One of the prime motives behind this study is to down-scale the existing particle array template-based evaporation lithography process to fabricate connected gold wire networks at both micro- and submicron scale. Secondly, the idea of combining the patterned silicon wafer with lifted latex particle template creates an opportunity to clean and res-use the patterned wafer more often and thereby, saving fabrication time and resources. Finally, we illustrated the validity of this approach by creating an easy and high-speed approach to develop gold wire networks on a flexible substrate with a thin deposited adhesive. These advances will not only serve as a platform to scale up the production, but also demonstrated that the fabrication method can produce metallic wire networks of different scale and onto a variety of substrates.

  7. Aircraft wire system laboratory development : phase I progress report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinallo, Michael Anthony; Lopez, Christopher D.

    2003-08-01

    An aircraft wire systems laboratory has been developed to support technical maturation of diagnostic technologies being used in the aviation community for detection of faulty attributes of wiring systems. The design and development rationale of the laboratory is based in part on documented findings published by the aviation community. The main resource at the laboratory is a test bed enclosure that is populated with aged and newly assembled wire harnesses that have known defects. This report provides the test bed design and harness selection rationale, harness assembly and defect fabrication procedures, and descriptions of the laboratory for usage by the aviation community.

  8. SRF Cavity Fabrication and Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Singer, W

    2014-07-17

    The technological and metallurgical requirements of material for highgradient superconducting cavities are described. High-purity niobium, as the preferred metal for the fabrication of superconducting accelerating cavities, should meet exact specifications. The content of interstitial impurities such as oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon must be below 10μg/g. The hydrogen content should be kept below 2μg/g to prevent degradation of the Q-value under certain cool-down conditions. The material should be free of flaws (foreign material inclusions or cracks and laminations) that can initiate a thermal breakdown. Defects may be detected by quality control methods such as eddy current scanning and identified by a number of special methods. Conventional and alternative cavity fabrication methods are reviewed. Conventionally, niobium cavities are fabricated from sheet niobium by the formation of half-cells by deep drawing, followed by trim machining and Electron-Beam Welding (EBW). The welding of half-cells is a delicate...

  9. Robot welding process control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romine, Peter L.

    1991-01-01

    This final report documents the development and installation of software and hardware for Robotic Welding Process Control. Primary emphasis is on serial communications between the CYRO 750 robotic welder, Heurikon minicomputer running Hunter & Ready VRTX, and an IBM PC/AT, for offline programming and control and closed-loop welding control. The requirements for completion of the implementation of the Rocketdyne weld tracking control are discussed. The procedure for downloading programs from the Intergraph, over the network, is discussed. Conclusions are made on the results of this task, and recommendations are made for efficient implementation of communications, weld process control development, and advanced process control procedures using the Heurikon.

  10. Explosive Welding of Pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drennov, Oleg; Drennov, Andrey; Burtseva, Olga

    2013-06-01

    For connection by welding it is suggested to use the explosive welding method. This method is rather new. Nevertheless, it has become commonly used among the technological developments. This method can be advantageous (saving material and physical resources) comparing to its statical analogs (electron-beam welding, argon-arc welding, plasma welding, gas welding, etc.), in particular, in hard-to-reach areas due to their geographic and climatic conditions. Explosive welding of cylindrical surfaces is performed by launching of welded layer along longitudinal axis of construction. During this procedure, it is required to provide reliable resistance against radial convergent strains. The traditional method is application of fillers of pipe cavity, which are dense cylindrical objects having special designs. However, when connecting pipes consecutively in pipelines by explosive welding, removal of the fillers becomes difficult and sometimes impossible. The suggestion is to use water as filler. The principle of non-compressibility of liquid under quasi-dynamic loading is used. In one-dimensional gasdynamic and elastic-plastic calculations we determined non-deformed mass of water (perturbations, which are moving in the axial direction with sound velocity, should not reach the layer end boundaries for 5-7 circulations of shock waves in the radial direction). Linear dimension of the water layer from the zone of pipe coupling along axis in each direction is >= 2R, where R is the internal radius of pipe.

  11. Metallography of Battery Resistance Spot Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, J. E.; Johannes, L. B.; Gonzalez, D.; Yayathi, S.; Figuered, J. M.; Darcy, E. C.; Bilc, Z. M.

    2015-01-01

    Li-ion cells provide an energy dense solution for systems that require rechargeable electrical power. However, these cells can undergo thermal runaway, the point at which the cell becomes thermally unstable and results in hot gas, flame, electrolyte leakage, and in some cases explosion. The heat and fire associated with this type of event is generally violent and can subsequently cause damage to the surrounding system or present a dangerous risk to the personnel nearby. The space flight environment is especially sensitive to risks particularly when it involves potential for fire within the habitable volume of the International Space Station (ISS). In larger battery packs such as Robonaut 2 (R2), numerous Li-ion cells are placed in parallel-series configurations to obtain the required stack voltage and desired run-time or to meet specific power requirements. This raises a second and less obvious concern for batteries that undergo certification for space flight use: the joining quality at the resistance spot weld of battery cells to component wires/leads and battery tabs, bus bars or other electronic components and assemblies. Resistance spot welds undergo materials evaluation, visual inspection, conductivity (resistivity) testing, destructive peel testing, and metallurgical examination in accordance with applicable NASA Process Specifications. Welded components are cross-sectioned to ensure they are free of cracks or voids open to any exterior surface. Pore and voids contained within the weld zone but not open to an exterior surface, and are not determined to have sharp notch like characteristics, shall be acceptable. Depending on requirements, some battery cells are constructed of aluminum canisters while others are constructed of steel. Process specific weld schedules must be developed and certified for each possible joining combination. The aluminum canisters' positive terminals were particularly difficult to weld due to a bi-metal strip that comes ultrasonically

  12. Friction stir weld tools having fine grain structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Glenn J.; Frye, John G.; Kim, Jin Yong; Lavender, Curt A.; Weil, Kenneth Scott

    2016-03-15

    Tools for friction stir welding can be made with fewer process steps, lower cost techniques, and/or lower cost ingredients than other state-of-the-art processes by utilizing improved compositions and processes of fabrication. Furthermore, the tools resulting from the improved compositions and processes of fabrication can exhibit better distribution and homogeneity of chemical constituents, greater strength, and/or increased durability. In one example, a friction stir weld tool includes tungsten and rhenium and is characterized by carbide and oxide dispersoids, by carbide particulates, and by grains that comprise a solid solution of the tungsten and rhenium. The grains do not exceed 10 micrometers in diameter.

  13. Size-separated particle fractions of stainless steel welding fume particles - A multi-analytical characterization focusing on surface oxide speciation and release of hexavalent chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, N; Belleville, L; Cha, Y; Olofsson, U; Odnevall Wallinder, I; Persson, K-A; Hedberg, Y S

    2018-01-15

    Welding fume of stainless steels is potentially health hazardous. The aim of this study was to investigate the manganese (Mn) and chromium (Cr) speciation of welding fume particles and their extent of metal release relevant for an inhalation scenario, as a function of particle size, welding method (manual metal arc welding, metal arc welding using an active shielding gas), different electrodes (solid wires and flux-cored wires) and shielding gases, and base alloy (austenitic AISI 304L and duplex stainless steel LDX2101). Metal release investigations were performed in phosphate buffered saline (PBS), pH 7.3, 37°, 24h. The particles were characterized by means of microscopic, spectroscopic, and electroanalytical methods. Cr was predominantly released from particles of the welding fume when exposed in PBS [3-96% of the total amount of Cr, of which up to 70% as Cr(VI)], followed by Mn, nickel, and iron. Duplex stainless steel welded with a flux-cored wire generated a welding fume that released most Cr(VI). Nano-sized particles released a significantly higher amount of nickel compared with micron-sized particle fractions. The welding fume did not contain any solitary known chromate compounds, but multi-elemental highly oxidized oxide(s) (iron, Cr, and Mn, possibly bismuth and silicon). Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Update On Monolithic Fuel Fabrication Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. R Clark; J. M. Wight; G. C. Knighton; G. A. Moore; J. F. Jue

    2005-11-01

    Efforts to develop a viable monolithic research reactor fuel plate have continued at Idaho National Laboratory. These efforts have concentrated on both fabrication process refinement and scale-up to produce full sized fuel plates. Advancements have been made in the production of U-Mo foil including full sized foils. Progress has also been made in the friction stir welding and transient liquid phase bonding fabrication processes resulting in better bonding, more stable processes and the ability to fabricate larger fuel plates.

  15. Ultrathin Nanocrystalline Magnetic Wires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horia Chiriac

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The magnetic characteristics of FINEMET type glass-coated nanowires and submicron wires are investigated by taking into account the structural evolution induced by specific annealing all the way from a fully amorphous state to a nanocrystalline structure. The differences between the magnetic properties of these ultrathin wires and those of the thicker glass-coated microwires and “conventional” wires with similar structures have been emphasized and explained phenomenologically. The domain wall propagation in these novel nanowires and submicron wires, featuring a combination between an amorphous and a crystalline structure, has also been studied, given the recent interest in the preparation and investigation of new materials suitable for the development of domain wall logic applications.

  16. High-Powered, Ultrasonically Assisted Thermal Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert

    2013-01-01

    distance equal to the thickness of the material being welded. The TSW process can be significantly improved by reducing the draw forces. This can be achieved by reducing the friction forces between the weld workpieces and the containment plates. High-power ultrasonic (HPU) vibrations of the containment plates achieve friction reduction in the TSW process. Furthermore, integration of the HPU energy into the TSW stir rod can increase tool life of the stir rod, and can reduce shear forces to which the stir rod is subjected during the welding process. TSW has been used to successfully join 0.500-in (˜13-mm) thick commercially pure (CP) titanium, titanium 6AL- 4V, and titanium 6AL-4V ELI in weld joint lengths up to 9 ft (˜2.75-m) long. In addition, the TSW process was used to fabricate a sub-scale hexagonally shaped gun turret component for the U.S. Navy. The turret is comprised of six 0.5000-in (˜13-mm) thick angled welds. Each angled weld joint was prepared by machining the mating surfaces to 120deg. The angled weld joint was then fixtured using an upper and lower containment plate of the same geometry of the angled weld joint. The weld joint was then stirred by the stir rod as it and the upper and lower containment plates traverse through the angled joint prep.

  17. Equipment for Solid State Stir Welding of High Temperature Materials Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Stir welding generates high-quality joints in fabricated structure and is the baseline joining process for most NASA aluminum alloy structures such as cryogenic...

  18. A fitness-for-purpose evaluation of fracture critical electro-slag welds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    A fitness-for-purpose evaluation was performed on the electro-slag flange welds of the West Fremont bridge approach : superstructures, per the request of FHWA. This evaluation required gathering knowledge of the material properties, fabrication : def...

  19. The Microstructure and Pitting Resistance of Weld Joints of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mingfang; Liu, Fei; Pu, Juan; Anderson, Neil E.; Li, Leijun; Liu, Dashuang

    2017-11-01

    2205 duplex stainless steel (DSS) was welded by submerged arc welding. The effects of both heat input and groove type on the ferrite/austenite ratio and elemental diffusion of weld joints were investigated. The relationships among welding joint preparation, ferrite/austenite ratio, elemental diffusion, and pitting corrosion resistance of weld joints were analyzed. When the Ni content of the weld wire deposit was at minimum 2-4% higher than that of 2205 DSS base metal, the desired ratio of ferrite/austenite and elemental partitioning between the austenite and ferrite phases were obtained. While the pitting sensitivity of weld metal was higher than that of base metal, the self-healing capability of the passive film of weld metal was better than that of the base metal when a single V-type groove was used. Furthermore, the heat input should be carefully controlled since pitting corrosion occurred readily in the coarse-grained heat-affected zone near the fusion line of welded joints.

  20. Simulation model of Al-Ti dissimilar laser welding-brazing and its experimental verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behúlová, M.; Babalová, E.; Nagy, M.

    2017-02-01

    Formation of dissimilar weld joints of light metals and alloys including Al-Ti joints is interesting mainly due to demands on the weight reduction and corrosion resistance of components and structures in automotive, aircraft, aeronautic and other industries. Joining of Al-Ti alloys represents quite difficult problem. Generally, the fusion welding of these materials can lead to the development of different metastable phases and formation of brittle intermetallic compounds. The paper deals with numerical simulation of the laser welding-brazing process of titanium Grade 2 and EN AW 5083 aluminum alloy sheets using the 5087 aluminum filler wire. Simulation model for welding-brazing of testing samples with the dimensions of 50 × 100 × 2 mm was developed in order to perform numerical experiments applying variable welding parameters and to design proper combination of these parameters for formation of sound Al-Ti welded-brazed joints. Thermal properties of welded materials in the dependence on temperature were computed using JMatPro software. The conical model of the heat source was exploited for description of the heat input to the weld due to the moving laser beam source. The sample cooling by convection and radiation to the surrounding air and shielding argon gas was taken into account. Developed simulation model was verified by comparison of obtained results of numerical simulation with the temperatures measured during real experiments of laser welding-brazing by the TruDisk 4002 disk laser.

  1. Rocket plume temperature measurement by wire welded thermocouples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qiang

    2006-05-01

    The plume of solid rocket motor is a high velocity flow with high temperature. Temperature distribution in the plume is of great interest for analyzing the compatibility of rocket weapon system. The high temperature exhausted flow field would cause damage on certain equipment and loading vehicles. An instantaneous temperature field with sharp step is established by the exhausted flow field of rocket motor. The increasing rate of the step depends on the flow velocity at cross section of nozzle exit. To perform an accurate measurement of temperature inside the flow field, a thermocouple must be sturdy enough to endure the flow impingement. In the meantime, the thermocouple must have a short time constant to trace the temperature fluctuation in flow field and a small size to avoid disturbing the flow field severely. The dynamic performance of the thermocouples used in exhausted flow temperature measurement must be evaluated before the experiment. The thermocouple which can be used in measuring the temperature distribution in rocket plume was presented in this paper. A NAMNAC (R) self-renew-erode thermocouples with a nominal time constant of 10 microseconds was used as a reference in a dynamic calibration test for this kind of thermocouple. The thermocouple could trace the temperature increase in the exhausted flow perfectly. This kind of thermocouples was used in several real tests of rocket motors, such as the temperature in free exhausted flow field of a stationary rocket motor test, the stagnate temperature in a shock flow field during the launching of a rocket, and the temperature in a launch tube.

  2. Copper wire bonding

    CERN Document Server

    Chauhan, Preeti S; Zhong, ZhaoWei; Pecht, Michael G

    2014-01-01

    This critical volume provides an in-depth presentation of copper wire bonding technologies, processes and equipment, along with the economic benefits and risks.  Due to the increasing cost of materials used to make electronic components, the electronics industry has been rapidly moving from high cost gold to significantly lower cost copper as a wire bonding material.  However, copper wire bonding has several process and reliability concerns due to its material properties.  Copper Wire Bonding book lays out the challenges involved in replacing gold with copper as a wire bond material, and includes the bonding process changes—bond force, electric flame off, current and ultrasonic energy optimization, and bonding tools and equipment changes for first and second bond formation.  In addition, the bond–pad metallurgies and the use of bare and palladium-coated copper wires on aluminum are presented, and gold, nickel and palladium surface finishes are discussed.  The book also discusses best practices and re...

  3. Theoretical and experimental contributions regarding the impact on work environment of welding processes in MIG / MAG protective gas medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gh. Amza

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the main factors that cause environmental pollution in the case of the welding procedure in a protective gas environment. In the research the MIG and MAG welding processes were taken into account. The materials used in the experiments were 8TiCr170 stainless steel as the base material and as filler materials 4 types of welding wires were used, characterized by different chemical compositions. To assess the impact on the work environment of such welding processes the pollution coefficient Cp was defined based on the material balance equation as the ratio of the mass of all materials used in the welding process Mt and the effective mass of the welded performed Mu.

  4. Evaluation of welding by MIG in martensitic stainless steel; Avaliacao da soldagem pelo processo MIG em aco inoxidavel martensitico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, M.A. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil); Mariano, N.A.; Marinho, D.H.C. Marinho, E-mail: neideaparecidamariano@gmail.co [Universidade Federal de Alfenas (UNIFAL), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    This work evaluated structure's characterization and mechanical properties after the welding process of the stainless steel CA6NM. The employed welding process was the metal active gas with tubular wire. The control of the thermal cycle in the welding process has fundamental importance regarding the properties of the welded joint, particularly in the thermally affected zone. The mechanical properties were appraised through impact resistance tests and the hardness and microstructure through metallographic characterization and Ray-X diffraction. The parameters and the process of welding used promoted the hardness and toughness appropriate to the applications of the steel. Welding energy's control becomes an essential factor that can affect the temperature of carbide precipitation and the nucleation of the retained austenite in the in the region of the in the thermally affected zone. (author)

  5. Notched K-wire for low thermal damage bone drilling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yao; Belmont, Barry; Wang, Yiwen; Tai, Bruce; Holmes, James; Shih, Albert

    2017-07-01

    The Kirschner wire (K-wire) is a common bone drilling tool in orthopedic surgery to affix fractured bone. Significant heat is produced due to both the cutting and the friction between the K-wire and the bone debris during drilling. Such heat can result in high temperatures, leading to osteonecrosis and other secondary injuries. To reduce thermal injury and other high-temperature associated complications, a new K-wire design with three notches along the three-plane trocar tip fabricated using a thin micro-saw tool is studied. These notches evacuate bone debris and reduce the clogging and heat generation during bone drilling. A set of four K-wires, one without notches and three notched, with depths of 0.5, 0.75, and 1mm, are evaluated. Bone drilling experiments conducted on bovine cortical bone show that notched K-wires could effectively decrease the temperature, thrust force, and torque during bone drilling. K-wires with notches 1mm deep reduced the thrust force and torque by approximately 30%, reduced peak temperatures by 43%, and eliminated blackened burn marks in bone. This study demonstrates that a simple modification of the tip of K-wires can effectively reduce bone temperatures during drilling. Copyright © 2017 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Degradation Processes of Al-Zn Welded Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Votava

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Welding of metal materials belongs to non-demountable joints. Current trend especially in an automotive industry is to join materials with a different melting temperature. Most of all, there are dural profiles with ferrite or austenite steel. The reason for this is the effort to lower the weight of the whole construction and at the same time preserve sufficient mechanical characteristics. However, there is a big risk of different electrical potentials of both of these metals in this type of non-demountable joints. The experimental part of this paper brings evaluation of mechanical-corrosion processes of overlapped joints produced by the CMT (cold metal transfer method. The base material for weld bead is dural sheet AlMg3 and dural sheet with a surface treatment aluzinc DX51D+AZ 150. Material AlSi5 in the form of a wire was used as an additional material for a welding bath. Method CMT was used in order to create a weld bead. Initial analysis of weld bead was done visually using a binocular microscope. Further, a metallographic analysis of weld bead and base material was processed. The aim was to identify the heat affected area around the welded joint. Microhardness of intermetallic aluminium phases was measured, after the identification of intermetallic phases a chemical analysis EDS was processed. Prepared samples underwent corrosion degradation in a salt spray environment in compliance with the norm ČSN EN ISO 9227. Visual and metallographic evaluation of the individual samples was processed after every week of exposition to the salt spray environment. The goal of this experiment was to record the initial impulse of galvanic corrosion which consists in corrosion degradation in the area of welded joint.

  7. Measuring weld heat to evaluate weld integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schauder, V., E-mail: schauder@hks-prozesstechnik.de [HKS-Prozesstechnik GmbH, Halle (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    Eddy current and ultrasonic testing are suitable for tube and pipe mills and have been used for weld seam flaw detection for decades, but a new process, thermography, is an alternative. By measuring the heat signature of the weld seam as it cools, it provides information about weld integrity at and below the surface. The thermal processes used to join metals, such as plasma, induction, laser, and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW), have improved since they were developed, and they get better with each passing year. However, no industrial process is perfect, so companies that conduct research in flaw detection likewise continue to develop and improve the technologies used to verify weld integrity: ultrasonic testing (UT), eddy current testing (ET), hydrostatic, X-ray, magnetic particle, and liquid penetrant are among the most common. Two of these are used for verifying the integrity of the continuous welds such as those used on pipe and tube mills: UT and ET. Each uses a transmitter to send waves of ultrasonic energy or electrical current through the material and a receiver (probe) to detect disturbances in the flow. The two processes often are combined to capitalize on the strengths of each. While ET is good at detecting flaws at or near the surface, UT penetrates the material, detecting subsurface flaws. One drawback is that sound waves and electrical current waves have a specific direction of travel, or an alignment. A linear defect that runs parallel to the direction of travel of the ultrasonic sound wave or a flaw that is parallel to the coil winding direction of the ET probe can go undetected. A second drawback is that they don't detect cold welds. An alternative process, thermography, works in a different fashion: It monitors the heat of the material as the weld cools. Although it measures the heat at the surface, the heat signature provides clues about cooling activity deep in the material, resulting in a thorough assessment of the weld's integrity It

  8. The analysis of spot welding joints of steel sheets with closed profile by ultrasonic method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dariusz Ulbrich

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Resistance spot welding is widely used in the fabrication of vehicle bodies and parts of their equipment. The article presents the methodology and the results of non-destructive ultrasonic testing of resistance spot welded joints of thin steel sheet with closed profile. Non-destructive test results were verified on the basis of welded joint area after destructive testing. The obtained results were used to develop an assessment technique for spot welded joints of closed profile with steel sheet, which could be used in factories employing such joints. In addition, the article makes comparison between the costs of the developed assessment technique and currently used destructive method.

  9. Fine welding with lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLellan, D

    2008-01-01

    The need for micro joining metallic alloys for surgical instruments, implants and advanced medical devices is driving a rapid increase in the implementation of laser welding technology in research, development and volume production. This article discusses the advantages of this welding method and the types of lasers used in the process.

  10. Laser Welding in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Gary L.; Kaukler, William F.

    1989-01-01

    Solidification type welding process experiments in conditions of microgravity were performed. The role of convection in such phenomena was examined and convective effects in the small volumes obtained in the laser weld zone were observed. Heat transfer within the weld was affected by acceleration level as indicated by the resulting microstructure changes in low gravity. All experiments were performed such that both high and low gravity welds occurred along the same weld beam, allowing the effects of gravity alone to be examined. Results indicate that laser welding in a space environment is feasible and can be safely performed IVA or EVA. Development of the hardware to perform the experiment in a Hitchhiker-g platform is recomended as the next step. This experiment provides NASA with a capable technology for welding needs in space. The resources required to perform this experiment aboard a Shuttle Hitchhiker-pallet are assessed. Over the four year period 1991 to 1994, it is recommended that the task will require 13.6 manyears and $914,900. In addition to demonstrating the technology and ferreting out the problems encountered, it is suggested that NASA will also have a useful laser materials processing facility for working with both the scientific and the engineering aspects of materials processing in space. Several concepts are also included for long-term optimization of available solar power through solar pumping solid state lasers directly for welding power.

  11. DC arc weld starter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campiotti, Richard H.; Hopwood, James E.

    1990-01-01

    A system for starting an arc for welding uses three DC power supplies, a high voltage supply for initiating the arc, an intermediate voltage supply for sustaining the arc, and a low voltage welding supply directly connected across the gap after the high voltage supply is disconnected.

  12. Effect of Welding Consumables on Fatigue Performance of Shielded Metal Arc Welded High Strength, Q&T Steel Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magudeeswaran, G.; Balasubramanian, V.; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.

    2009-02-01

    Quenched and Tempered (Q&T) steels are widely used in the construction of military vehicles due to their high strength-to-weight ratio and high hardness. These steels are prone to hydrogen-induced cracking in the heat affected zone (HAZ) after welding. The use of austenitic stainless steel consumables to weld the above steel was the only remedy because of higher solubility for hydrogen in austenitic phase. Recent studies proved that high nickel steel and low hydrogen ferritic steel consumables can be used to weld Q&T steels, which can give very low hydrogen levels in the weld deposits. In this investigation an attempt has been made to study the effect of welding consumables on high cycle fatigue properties of high strength, Q&T steel joints. Three different consumables namely (i) austenitic stainless steel, (ii) low hydrogen ferritic steel, and (iii) high nickel steel have been used to fabricate the joints by shielded metal arc (SMAW) welding process. The joints fabricated using low hydrogen ferritic steel electrodes showed superior fatigue properties than other joints.

  13. Increased risk of parkinsonism associated with welding exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racette, Brad A; Criswell, Susan R; Lundin, Jessica I; Hobson, Angela; Seixas, Noah; Kotzbauer, Paul T; Evanoff, Bradley A; Perlmutter, Joel S; Zhang, Jing; Sheppard, Lianne; Checkoway, Harvey

    2012-10-01

    Manganese (Mn), an established neurotoxicant, is a common component of welding fume. The neurological phenotype associated with welding exposures has not been well described. Prior epidemiologic evidence linking occupational welding to parkinsonism is mixed, and remains controversial. This was a cross-sectional and nested case-control study to investigate the prevalence and phenotype of parkinsonism among 811 shipyard and fabrication welders recruited from trade unions. Two reference groups included 59 non-welder trade workers and 118 newly diagnosed, untreated idiopathic PD patients. Study subjects were examined by a movement disorders specialist using the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale motor subsection 3 (UPDRS3). Parkinsonism cases were defined as welders with UPDRS3 score ≥15. Normal was defined as UPDRS3welding. Adjusted prevalence ratios for parkinsonism were calculated in relation to quartiles of welding years. The overall prevalence estimate of parkinsonism was 15.6% in welding exposed workers compared to 0% in the reference group. Among welders, we observed a U-shaped dose-response relation between weighted welding exposure-years and parkinsonism. UPDRS3 scores for most domains were similar between welders and newly diagnosed idiopathic Parkinson disease (PD) patients, except for greater frequency of rest tremor and asymmetry in PD patients. This work-site based study among welders demonstrates a high prevalence of parkinsonism compared to nonwelding-exposed workers and a clinical phenotype that overlaps substantially with PD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Welding stainless steels for structures operating at liquid helium temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witherell, C.E.

    1980-04-18

    Superconducting magnets for fusion energy reactors require massive monolithic stainless steel weldments which must operate at extremely low temperatures under stresses approaching 100 ksi (700 MPa). A three-year study was conducted to determine the feasibility of producing heavy-section welds having usable levels of strength and toughness at 4.2/sup 0/K for fabrication of these structures in Type 304LN plate. Seven welding processes were evaluated. Test weldments in full-thickness plate were made under severe restraint to simulate that of actual structures. Type 316L filler metal was used for most welds. Welds deposited under some conditions and which solidify as primary austenite have exhibited intergranular embrittlement at 4.2/sup 0/K. This is believed to be associated with grain boundary metal carbides or carbonitrides precipitated during reheating of already deposited beads by subsequent passes. Weld deposits which solidify as primary delta ferrite appear immune. Through use of fully austenitic filler metals of low nitrogen content under controlled shielded metal arc welding conditions, and through use of filler metals solidifying as primary delta ferrite where only minimum residuals remain to room temperature, welds of Type 316L composition have been made with 4.2K yield strength matching that of Type 304LN plate and acceptable levels of soundness, ductility and toughness.

  15. Heat sink effects in variable polarity plasma arc welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelmessih, Amanie N.

    1991-01-01

    The Space Shuttle External Tank is fabricated by the variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA) welding process. In VPPA welding, a noble gas, usually argon, is directed through an arc to emerge from the torch as a hot plasma jet. This jet is surrounded by a shielding gas, usually helium, to protect the weld from contamination with air. The high velocity, hot plasma jet completely penetrates the workpiece (resembling a line heat source) when operated in the 'keyhole' mode. The metal melts on touching the side of the jet, as the torch travels in the perpendicular direction to the direction of the jet, and melted metal moves around the plasma jet in the keyhole forming a puddle which solidifies behind the jet. Heat sink effects are observed when there are irregularities in the workpiece configuration, especially, if these irregularities are close to the weld bead. These heat sinks affect the geometry of the weld bead, i.e., in extreme cases they could cause defects such as incomplete fusion. Also, different fixtures seem to have varying heat sink effects. The objective of this research is to study the effect of irregularities in workpiece configuration and fixture differences (heat sink effects) on the weld bead geometry with the ultimate objective to compensate for the heat sink effects and achieve a perfect weld. Experiments were performed on different workpiece geometries and compared to approximate models.

  16. Assessment of Nugget Size of Spot Weld using Neutron Radiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Triyono

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Resistance spot welding (RSW has been widely used for many years in the fabrication of car body structures, mainly due to the cost and time considerations. The weld quality as well as the nugget size is an issue in various manufacturing and processes due to the strong link between the weld quality and safety. It has led to the development of various destructive and non-destructive tests for spot welding such as peel testing, ultrasonic inspections, digital shearography, and infrared thermography. However, such methods cannot show spot weld nugget visually and the results are very operator’s skill dependent. The present work proposes a method to visualize the nugget size of spot welds using neutron radiography. Water, oil and various concentrations of gadolinium oxide-alcohol mixture were evaluated as a contrast media to obtain the best quality of radiography. Results show that mixture of 5 g gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3 in 25 ml alcohol produces the best contrast. It provides the possibility to visualize the shape and size of the nugget spot weld. Furthermore, it can discriminate between nugget and corona bond. The result of neutron radiography evaluation shows reasonable agreement with that of destructive test.

  17. Effect of welding processes and consumables on fatigue crack growth behaviour of armour grade quenched and tempered steel joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Magudeeswaran

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Quenched and Tempered (Q&T steels are widely used in the construction of military vehicles due to its high strength to weight ratio and high hardness. These steels are prone to hydrogen induced cracking (HIC in the heat affected zone (HAZ after welding. The use of austenitic stainless steel (ASS consumables to weld the above steel was the only available remedy because of higher solubility for hydrogen in austenitic phase. The use of stainless steel consumables for a non-stainless steel base metal is not economical. Hence, alternate consumables for welding Q&T steels and their vulnerability to HIC need to be explored. Recent studies proved that low hydrogen ferritic steel (LHF consumables can be used to weld Q&T steels, which can give very low hydrogen levels in the weld deposits. The use of ASS and LHF consumables will lead to distinct microstructures in their respective welds. This microstructural heterogeneity will have a drastic influence in the fatigue crack growth resistance of armour grade Q&T steel welds. Hence, in this investigation an attempt has been made to study the influence of welding consumables and welding processes on fatigue crack growth behaviour of armour grade Q&T Steel joints. Shielded metal arc welding (SMAW and Flux cored arc welding (FCAW were used for fabrication of joints using ASS and LHF consumables. The joints fabricated by SMAW process using LHF consumable exhibited superior fatigue crack growth resistance than all other joints.

  18. Leak in spiral weld in a 16 inches gas pipeline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fazzini, Pablo G.; Bona, Jeremias de [GIE S.A., Mar del Plata (Argentina); Otegui, Jose L. [University of Mar del Plata (Argentina)

    2009-07-01

    This paper discusses a failure analysis after a leak in the spiral weld of a 16 inches natural gas pipeline, in service since 1974. The leak was the result of the coalescence of two different defects, on each surface of the pipe wall, located in the center of the inner cord of the helical DSAW weld. Fractographic and metallographic studies revealed that the leak was a combination of three conditions. During fabrication of the pipe, segregation in grain boundary grouped in mid weld. During service, these segregations underwent a process of selective galvanic corrosion. One of these volumetric defects coincided with a tubular pore in the outer weld. Pigging of the pipeline in 2005 for cleaning likely contributed to the increase of the leak flow, when eliminating corrosion product plugs. Although these defects are likely to repeat, fracture mechanics shows that a defect of this type is unlikely to cause a blowout. (author)

  19. A Study on the Application of Submerged Arc Welding for Thin Plate of A-Grade 3.2 Thickness Steel in Ship Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong-Soo; Yun, Jin-Oh; Lim, Dong-Yong; Jang, Yong-Won; Kim, Bong-Joon; Oh, Chong-In

    2010-06-01

    This paper is focused on application submerged arc welding process, which offers many advantages compared to conventional CO2 welding process, for thin plate in ship structure. For this purpose, optimized welding conditions are determined according to combination of wire & flux, relationship between welding parameters, bead shapes and mechanical tests such as tensile, bend and hardness. Also finite element(FE) based numerical simulation of thermal history and welding residual stress in welded joint of A-grade 3.2 thickness steel has been checked to qualitative tendency in this paper. In conclusion our company applied to this method in work piece and it was no problem. From the result of this study, it makes substantial saving of time and manufacturing cost and raises the welding quality of product.

  20. Fracture strength of different soldered and welded orthodontic joining configurations with and without filling material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Johannes Bock

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the mechanical strength of different joints made by conventional brazing, TIG and laser welding with and without filling material. Five standardized joining configurations of orthodontic wire in spring hard quality were used: round, cross, 3 mm length, 9 mm length and 7 mm to orthodontic band. The joints were made by five different methods: brazing, tungsten inert gas (TIG and laser welding with and without filling material. For the original orthodontic wire and for each kind of joint configuration or connecting method 10 specimens were carefully produced, totalizing 240. The fracture strengths were measured with a universal testing machine (Zwick 005. Data were analyzed by ANOVA (p=0.05 and Bonferroni post hoc test (p=0.05. In all cases, brazing joints were ruptured on a low level of fracture strength (186-407 N. Significant differences between brazing and TIG or laser welding (p<0.05, Bonferroni post hoc test were found in each joint configuration. The highest fracture strength means were observed for laser welding with filling material and 3 mm joint length (998 N. Using filling materials, there was a clear tendency to higher mean values of fracture strength in TIG and laser welding. However, statistically significant differences were found only in the 9-mm long joints (p<0.05, Bonferroni post hoc test. In conclusion, the fracture strength of welded joints was positively influenced by the additional use of filling material. TIG welding was comparable to laser welding except for the impossibility of joining orthodontic wire with orthodontic band.

  1. Evaluation of methods to predict safe welding conditions and maximum HAZ hardness in steel welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tronskar, J.P. [Det Norske Veritas Industry, Oslo (Norway)

    1995-02-01

    During the last ten years new structural steels of improved weldability have been introduced. In particular, structural steels for the fabrication of offshore structures have been greatly improved in this respect throughout this period. These steels have lean chemical compositions which are generally outside the range for which the existing HAZ hardness criteria and the International Institute of Welding carbon equivalent (CEIIW) formula were originally developed. This paper presents the results from investigations of the weldability of three normalized (R{sub e} min 350 MPa) and three quenched and tempered (R{sub e} min 500 MPa) offshore structural steels. Weldability testing was conducted to study the relative performance of the different steels and to obtain a comparison between the capability of the different methods to predict safe welding conditions to avoid cold cracking in steel welding. It has become a widespread practice in welding high-strength steels to incorporate maximum HAZ hardness restrictions in fabrication specifications, particularly so in the offshore industry. This paper presents some of the more successful approaches proposed to date and compares their performance.

  2. Wire grid polarizers for visible wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Joshua Hans

    Detailed analysis of wire-grid (WG) polarizers for visible wavelengths is presented. Rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA) is used to model their performance. The optimum choice of metal for the wires is identified, and the effects of different substrate indices of refraction are considered. The polarization properties are considered with changes in the physical parameters, including period, duty cycle, and wire thickness. It is shown that the performance of WG polarizers improves with increasing angle of incidence. The effect of non-square wire profiles is considered, as is the effect of adding additional dielectric layers between the wires and the substrate. The effect of metal oxide layers forming on the wires is also modeled. While most of this work concerns WG polarizers used in transmission, the performance in reflection is also discussed. Several visible-wavelength WG polarizers were fabricated at the Cornell Nanofabrication Facility (CNF) in Ithaca, NY. Electron-beam lithography was used to write the patterns for these devices, and two different methods of pattern transfer were compared. These were the lift-off method and reactive-ion etching (RIE). We found that lift-off could not produce wires thick enough for good polarization properties. RIE could produce much thicker wires with good profiles and was used for all of the experimental work presented here. Two different methods for metal film deposition, evaporation and sputtering were also compared. Films deposited by sputtering were found to have much lower indices of refraction and to not respond to etching as well. Thermally evaporated films performed much better in WG polarizers. Alternative methods for the mass-production of visible-wavelength WG polarizers are also discussed. The performance of the fabricated WG polarizers is compared to theory. When the measured physical parameters are used in RCWA to predict the performance, the measured extinction ratio is found to be much lower than the

  3. THE ROLE OF SHIELDING GAS ON MECHANICAL, METALLURGICAL AND CORROSION PROPERTIES OF CORTEN STEEL WELDED JOINTS OF RAILWAY COACHES USING GMAW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byju John

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This analysis lays emphasis on finding a suitable combination of shielding gas for welding underframe members such as sole bar of Railway Coaches made of corten steel; for improved mechanical, metallurgical and corrosion properties of welds using copper coated solid MIG/MAG welding filler wire size 1.2 mm conforming to AWS/SFA 5.18 ER 70 S in Semi-automatic GMAW process. Solid filler wire is preferred by welders due to less fumes, practically no slag and easy manipulation of welding torch with smooth wire flow during corrosion repair attention, when compared to Flux cored wire. Three joints using Gas metal arc welding (GMAW with shielding gases viz., Pure CO2, (80% Ar – 20% CO2 and (90% Ar – 10% CO2 were made from test pieces cut from Sole bar material of Railway Coach. Study of Mechanical properties such as tensile strength, hardness and toughness revealed that welded joint made using shielding gas (80% Ar – 20% CO2 has better Mechanical properties compared to the other two shielding gases and comparable to that of Parent metal. Type of Shielding gas used has influence on the chemical composition and macro & micro structures. The Tafel extrapolation study of freshly ground samples in 3.5% NaCl solution revealed that the welded joint made using shielding gas (80% Ar – 20% CO2 has also better corrosion resistance which is comparable to the Parent metal as well as similar commercial steels.

  4. Welding method, and welding device for use therein, and method of analysis for evaluating welds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aendenroomer, A.J.; Den Ouden, G.; Xiao, Y.H.; Brabander, W.A.J.

    1995-01-01

    Described is a method of automatically welding pipes, comprising welding with a pulsation welding current and monitoring, by means of a sensor, the variations occurring in the arc voltage caused by weld pool oscillations. The occurrence of voltage variations with only frequency components below 100

  5. Thermoplastic welding apparatus and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsen, Marc R.; Negley, Mark A.; Geren, William Preston; Miller, Robert James

    2017-03-07

    A thermoplastic welding apparatus includes a thermoplastic welding tool, at least one tooling surface in the thermoplastic welding tool, a magnetic induction coil in the thermoplastic welding tool and generally encircling the at least one tooling surface and at least one smart susceptor in the thermoplastic welding tool at the at least one tooling surface. The magnetic induction coil is adapted to generate a magnetic flux field oriented generally parallel to a plane of the at least one smart susceptor.

  6. Laser forming and welding processes

    CERN Document Server

    Yilbas, Bekir Sami; Shuja, Shahzada Zaman

    2013-01-01

    This book introduces model studies and experimental results associated with laser forming and welding such as laser induced bending, welding of sheet metals, and related practical applications. The book provides insight into the physical processes involved with laser forming and welding. The analytical study covers the formulation of laser induced bending while the model study demonstrates the simulation of bending and welding processes using the finite element method. Analytical and numerical solutions for laser forming and welding problems are provided.

  7. Uranium nitride fuel fabrication for SP-100 reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Richard E.; Chidester, Kenneth M.; Hoth, Carl W.; Matthews, Bruce R.

    Fuel pins of uranium mononitride clad in Nb-1 percent Zr were fabricated for irradiation tests in EBR-II. Laboratory scale process parameters to synthesize UN powders and fabricate UN pellets were developed. Uranium mononitride was prepared by converting UO2 to UN. Fuel pellets were prepared by communition of UN briquettes, uniaxial pressing, and high temperature sintering. Techniques for machining, cleaning, and welding Nb-1 percent Zr cladding components were developed. End caps were electron beam welded to the tubing. Helium back-fill holes were sealed with a laser weld.

  8. Accuracy of temporary laser welding of FPDs by Nd:YAG laser in the oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Chiharu; Miura, Hiroyuki; Okada, Daizo; Yamazaki, Ariko

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the accuracy of temporary fixation with laser welding for fixed partial dentures (FPDs). Five kinds of experimental FPD with different welding/soldering gaps were fabricated (0, 20, 50 microm for welding; 300 microm for soldering). Then, FPDs were temporary-fixed by laser welding or with a self-curing resin. Fixation accuracy was evaluated by the change in distance and the angular deformation between two retainers. The change in distance and the angular deformation between two retainers of the FPD without welding/soldering gap were significantly larger than the other FPDs (pimplants especially in the mesiodistal direction, and by taking into account the inevitable errors of the indirect method, it seemed reasonable to provide a welding space of approximately 20 microm.

  9. Microstructural changes in welded joints of 316 SS by dual-ion irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohyama, A.; Kohno, Y.; Baba, K.; Katoh, Y.; Hishinuma, A.

    1992-09-01

    As a part of the activity to establish joining methods to fabricate in-vessel components and to evaluate their performance under fusion environment, microstructural evolution was studied by means of the dual-ion irradiation method. The base material used in this study was solution annealed 316 stainless steel. Welded joints were made by the tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding method and electron beam (EB) welding method. For the prospective improvement of swelling in welded joints, modified TIG or EB welding procedures utilizing titanium or nickel foil insertions were investigated. TEM disk specimens from various positions of welded joints were irradiated to 25 dpa at 673, 773 and 873 K. He/dpa ratio in Ni/He dual-ion irradiation was 15 appm He/dpa. The present results indicate some concern about the microstructures which result in the fusion zone and heat affected zones.

  10. Laser-welded V-Cr-Ti alloys: Microstructure and mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.; Smith, D.L.; Xu, Z.; Leong, K.H. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1998-09-01

    A systematic study has been in progress at Argonne National Laboratory to examine the use of YaG or CO{sub 2} lasers to weld sheet materials of V-Cr-Ti alloys and to characterize the microstructural and mechanical properties of the laser-welded materials. In addition, several postwelding heat treatments are being applied to the welded samples to evaluate their benefits, if any, to the structure and properties of the weldments. Hardness measurements are made across the welded regions of different samples to evaluate differences in the characteristics of various weldments. Several weldments were used to fabricate specimens for four-point bend tests. Several additional weldments were made with a YaG laser; here, the emphasis was on determining the optimal weld parameters to achieve deep penetration in the welds. A preliminary assessment was then made of the weldments on the basis of microstructure, hardness profiles, and defects.

  11. Selecting Processes to Minimize Hexavalent Chromium from Stainless Steel Welding: Eight welding processes/shielding gas combinations were assessed for generation of hexavalent chromium in stainless steel welding fumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, M; Siert, A; Stone, S; Chen, B; Slaven, J; Cumpston, A; Antonini, J

    2012-09-01

    Eight welding processes/shielding gas combinations were assessed for generation of hexavalent chromium (Cr(6+)) in stainless steel welding fumes. The processes examined were gas metal arc welding (GMAW) (axial spray, short circuit, and pulsed spray modes), flux cored arc welding (FCAW), and shielded metal arc welding (SMAW). The Cr(6+) fractions were measured in the fumes; fume generation rates, Cr(6+) generation rates, and Cr(6+) generation rates per unit mass of welding wire were determined. A limited controlled comparison study was done in a welding shop including SMAW, FCAW, and three GMAW methods. The processes studied were compared for costs, including relative labor costs. Results indicate the Cr(6+) in the fume varied widely, from a low of 2800 to a high of 34,000 ppm. Generation rates of Cr(6+) ranged from 69 to 7800 μg/min, and Cr(6+) generation rates per unit of wire ranged from 1 to 270 μg/g. The results of field study were similar to the findings in the laboratory. The Cr(6+) (ppm) in the fume did not necessarily correlate with the Cr(6+) generation rate. Physical properties were similar for the processes, with mass median aerodynamic diameters ranging from 250 to 336 nm, while the FCAW and SMAW fumes were larger (360 and 670 nm, respectively). The pulsed axial spray method was the best choice of the processes studied based on minimal fume generation, minimal Cr(6+) generation, and cost per weld. This method is usable in any position, has a high metal deposition rate, and is relatively simple to learn and use.

  12. Life extension of boilers using weld overlay protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, G.; Hulsizer, P. [Welding Services Inc., Norcross, GA (United States); Brooks, R. [Welding Services Inc., Welding Services Europe, Spijkenisse (Netherlands)

    1998-12-31

    The presentation describes the status of modern weld overlay technology for refurbishment, upgrading and life extension of boilers. The approaches to life extension of boilers include field overlay application, shop-fabricated panels for replacement of the worn, corroded waterwall and shop-fabricated overlay tubing for replacement of individual tubes in superheaters, generating banks and other areas. The characteristics of weld overlay products are briefly described. Also discussed are successful applications of various corrosion-resistant overlays for life extension of boiler tubes in waste-to-energy boilers, coal-fired boilers and chemical recovery boilers. Types of corrosion and selection of weld overlay alloys in these systems are also discussed. (orig.) 14 refs.

  13. Welding processes handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Weman, Klas

    2003-01-01

    Deals with the main commercially significant and commonly used welding processes. This title takes the student or novice welder through the individual steps involved in each process in an easily understood way. It covers many of the requirements referred to in European Standards including EN719, EN 729, EN 729 and EN 287.$bWelding processes handbook is a concise, explanatory guide to the main commercially significant and commonly-used welding processes. It takes the novice welder or student through the individual steps involved in each process in a clear and easily understood way. It is intended to provide an up-to-date reference to the major applications of welding as they are used in industry. The contents have been arranged so that it can be used as a textbook for European welding courses in accordance with guidelines from the European Welding Federation. Welding processes and equipment necessary for each process are described so that they can be applied to all instruction levels required by the EWF and th...

  14. Processing and structure of in situ Fe-Al alloys produced by gas tungsten arc welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banovic, S.W.; DuPont, J.N.; Marder, A.R. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States). Energy Research Center

    1997-02-14

    Iron aluminide weld overlays are being investigated for corrosion and erosion protection of boiler tubes in low NOx burners. The primary objective of the research is to identify overlay compositions which can be deposited in a crack-free condition and provide corrosion protection in moderately reducing environments. In the current phase of work, Fe-Al alloy weld overlays were produced by depositing commercially pure aluminum wire on to low carbon steel substrates using Gas Tungsten Arc Welding. A systematic variation of the wire feed speed and current, two major factors affecting dilution, resulted in a variation in aluminum contents of the welds ranging from 3--42 wt% aluminum. The aluminum content was observed to increase with wire feed speed and a decrease in the current. The aluminum content was also found to affect the cracking susceptibility of the overlays. At 10wt% aluminum, few to no cracks were observed in the deposits. Above this value, cracking was prevalent throughout the weld. In addition, two types of microstructures were found correlating to different concentrations of aluminum. A homogeneous matrix with second phase particles consisting of coarse columnar grains was found for low aluminum concentrations. With higher aluminum contents, a two-phase constituent was observed to surround primary dendrites growing from the substrate. The transition of the microstructures occurred between 24 and 32 wt% Al.

  15. Structure and Properties of Coatings Made with Self Shielded Cored Wire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gucwa M.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The welding technologies are widely used for design of protection layer against wear and corrosion. Hardfacing, which is destined for obtaining coatings with high hardness, takes special place in these technologies. One of the most effective way of hardfacing is using self shielded flux cored arc welding (FCAW-S. Chemical composition obtained in flux cored wire is much more rich in comparison to this obtained in solid wire. The filling in flux cored wires can be enriched for example with the mixture of hard particles or phases with specified ratio, which is not possible for solid wires. This is the reason why flux cored wires give various possibilities of application of this kind of filler material for improving surface in mining industry, processing of minerals, energetic etc. In the present paper the high chromium and niobium flux cored wire was used for hardfacing process with similar heat input. The work presents studies of microstructures of obtained coatings and hardness and geometric properties of them. The structural studies were made with using optical microscopy and X-ray diffraction that allowed for identification of carbides and other phases obtained in the structures of deposited materials. Investigated samples exhibit differences in coating structures made with the same heat input 4,08 kJ/mm. There are differences in size, shape and distribution of primary and eutectic carbides in structure. These differences cause significant changes in hardness of investigated coatings.

  16. Microstructure and fatigue resistance of high strength dual phase steel welded with gas metal arc welding and plasma arc welding processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahiale, Godwin Kwame; Oh, Yong-Jun; Choi, Won-Doo; Lee, Kwang-Bok; Jung, Jae-Gyu; Nam, Soo Woo

    2013-09-01

    This study presents the microstructure and high cycle fatigue performance of lap shear joints of dual phase steel (DP590) welded using gas metal arc welding (GMAW) and plasma arc welding (PAW) processes. High cycle fatigue tests were conducted on single and double lap joints under a load ratio of 0.1 and a frequency of 20 Hz. In order to establish a basis for comparison, both weldments were fabricated to have the same weld depth in the plate thickness. The PAW specimens exhibited a higher fatigue life, a gentle S-N slope, and a higher fatigue limit than the GMAW specimens. The improvement in the fatigue life of the PAW specimens was primarily attributed to the geometry effect that exhibited lower and wider beads resulting in a lower stress concentration at the weld toe where cracks initiate and propagate. Furthermore, the microstructural constituents in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of the PAW specimens contributed to the improvement. The higher volume fraction of acicular ferrite in the HAZ beneath the weld toe enhanced the PAW specimen's resistance to fatigue crack growth. The double lap joints displayed a higher fatigue life than the single lap joints without changing the S-N slope.

  17. Welding fixture for joining bar-wound stator conductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Souza, Urban J.; Rhoads, Frederick W.; Hanson, Justin

    2017-09-12

    A fixture assembly for welding a plurality of stator wire end pairs may include an anvil, a movable clamp configured to translate between an unclamped state and a clamped state, a first grounding electrode, and a second grounding electrode. The movable clamp may be configured to urge the plurality of stator wire ends against the anvil when in the clamped state. The moveable clamp includes a separator feature that generally extends toward the anvil. Each of the first grounding electrode and second grounding electrodes may be configured to translate between a clamped state and an unclamped state. When in the clamped state, each of the first and second grounding electrodes is configured to urge a pair of the plurality of stator wire end pairs against the separator feature.

  18. Modern wiring practice

    CERN Document Server

    Steward, W E

    2012-01-01

    Continuously in print since 1952, Modern Wiring Practice has now been fully revised to provide an up-to-date source of reference to building services design and installation in the 21st century. This compact and practical guide addresses wiring systems design and electrical installation together in one volume, creating a comprehensive overview of the whole process for contractors and architects, as well as electricians and other installation engineers. Best practice is incorporated throughout, combining theory and practice with clear and accessible explanation, all

  19. Wiring and lighting

    CERN Document Server

    Kitcher, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Wiring and Lighting provides a comprehensive guide to DIY wiring around the home. It sets out the regulations and legal requirements surrounding electrical installation work, giving clear guidelines that will enable the reader to understand what electrical work they are able to carry out, and what the testing and certification requirements are once the work is completed. Topics covered include: Different types of circuits; Types of cables and cable installation under floors and through joists; Isolating, earthing and bonding; Accessory boxes and fixings; Voltage bands; Detailed advice on safe

  20. Electric wiring domestic

    CERN Document Server

    Coker, A J

    1992-01-01

    Electric Wiring: Domestic, Tenth Edition, is a clear and reliable guide to the practical aspects of domestic electric wiring. Intended for electrical contractors, installation engineers, wiremen and students, its aim is to provide essential up to date information on modern methods and materials in a simple, clear, and concise manner. The main changes in this edition are those necessary to bring the work into line with the 16th Edition of the Regulations for Electrical Installations issued by the Institution of Electrical Engineers. The book begins by introducing the basic features of domestic

  1. Nickel base welds in nuclear components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinovitch, M.; Faure, F. [Societe Franco-Americaine de Constructions Atomiques (FRAMATOME), 92 - Paris La Defense, (France). Material and Technology Dept.; Dunand-Roux, L. [Societe Fanco-Amaricaine de Constructions Atomiques (FRAMATOME), Saint Marcel (France). Manufacturing Div.; Buisine, D.; Milleville, P.H.; Vaillant, F. [Electricite de France, 77 - Moret-sur-Loing (France). Research and Development Div.; Vidal, P. [Electricite de France, 91 - Evry (France). Metallurgy and Technology Dept.

    1997-07-01

    By the end of 1991, FRAMATOME and EDF decided to replace all the nickel base alloy 600 components in the primary side of power plants by alloy 690 with higher chromium content and to look for a new filler metal, corrosion resistant and having a weldability as good as the welding products (alloys 182 et 82) presently used. Inconel 152 et 52 developed by INCO ALLOYS INTERNATIONAL have been selected after qualification tests and they have been implemented into the fabrication process since the beginning of 1993. The main results of studies made by FRAMATOME and EDF to evaluate are presented. These studies include: mechanical properties of undiluted weld deposit and of the interface with low alloy steels; weldability by means of Varestraint tests, and by the performance of numerous welding operations in industrial manufacturing conditions; structural stability after long term aging. All this work was done to qualify these new products, and demonstrate their corrosion resistance, making it possible to use them in fabrication. (author)

  2. Evaluation of anodic behavior of commercially pure titanium in tungsten inert gas and laser welds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsi, Iara Augusta; Raimundo, Larica B; Bezzon, Osvaldo Luiz; Nóbilo, Mauro Antonio de Arruda; Kuri, Sebastião E; Rovere, Carlos Alberto D; Pagnano, Valeria Oliveira

    2011-12-01

    This study evaluated the resistance to corrosion in welds made with Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) in specimens made of commercially pure titanium (cp Ti) in comparison with laser welds. A total of 15 circular specimens (10-mm diameter, 2-mm thick) were fabricated and divided into two groups: control group-cp Ti specimens (n = 5); experimental group-cp Ti specimens welded with TIG (n = 5) and with laser (n = 5). They were polished mechanically, washed with isopropyl alcohol, and dried with a drier. In the anodic potentiodynamic polarization assay, measurements were taken using a potentiostat/galvanostat in addition to CorrWare software for data acquisition and CorrView for data visualization and treatment. Three curves were made for each working electrode. Corrosion potential values were statistically analyzed by the Student's t-test. Statistical analysis showed that corrosion potentials and passive current densities of specimens welded with TIG are similar to those of the control group, and had lower values than laser welding. TIG welding provided higher resistance to corrosion than laser welding. Control specimens welded with TIG were more resistant to local corrosion initiation and propagation than those with laser welding, indicating a higher rate of formation and growth of passive film thickness on the surfaces of these alloys than on specimens welded with laser, making it more difficult for corrosion to occur. © 2011 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  3. Application of infrared imaging for quality inspection in resistance spot welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Wanchuck; Chin, Charles W.; Feng, Zhili; Wang, Hsin; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Hanbing; Sklad, Philip S.

    2009-05-01

    Infrared thermal imaging method was applied for the development of a non-destructive inspection technique to determine the quality of resistance spot welds. The current work is an initial feasibility study based on post-mortem inspection. First, resistance spot welds were fabricated on dual phase steel sheets (DP 590 steel) with carefullycontrolled welding parameters. It created welds with desirable and undesirable qualities in terms of nugget size, indentation depth, and voids and cracks. Second, five different heating and cooling methods were evaluated. The heating or cooling source was applied on one side of the weld stack while the surface temperature change on the other side of the weld was recorded using an infrared camera. Correlation between the weld quality and the "thermal signature" of each weld was established. Finally, a simplified thermal finite element analysis was developed to simulate the heat flow during inspection. The thermal model provided insight into the effect of the nugget size and indentation depth on the peak temperature and heating rate. The results reported in this work indicate that the IR thermography technique is feasible for weld quality inspection due to the distinguish temperature profiles for different welds and the repeatability and consistency in measurement.

  4. Thermal stir welding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A welding method is provided for forming a weld joint between first and second elements of a workpiece. The method includes heating the first and second elements to form an interface of material in a plasticized or melted state interface between the elements. The interface material is then allowed to cool to a plasticized state if previously in a melted state. The interface material, while in the plasticized state, is then mixed, for example, using a grinding/extruding process, to remove any dendritic-type weld microstructures introduced into the interface material during the heating process.

  5. Thermal stir welding apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A welding method and apparatus are provided for forming a weld joint between first and second elements of a workpiece. The method includes heating the first and second elements to form an interface of material in a plasticized or melted state interface between the elements. The interface material is then allowed to cool to a plasticized state if previously in a melted state. The interface material, while in the plasticized state, is then mixed, for example, using a grinding/extruding process, to remove any dendritic-type weld microstructures introduced into the interface material during the heating process.

  6. Review of Welding Terminology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelika Petrėtienė

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses welding terms in accordance with the Lithuanian standard LST EN 1792 „Welding. The multilingual list of welding terms and similar processes”, „The Russian–Lithuanian dictionary of the terms of mechanical engineering technology and welding“ and the examples from postgraduates‘ final works. It analyses the infringement of lexical, word-building and morphological rules. First-year students should already be familiar with the standardized terms of their speciality. More active propagation of the terms should help to avoid terminology mistakes in various scientific spheres.

  7. Analysis of void formation in thermoplastic composites during resistance welding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shi, H.; Fernandez Villegas, I.; Bersee, H.E.N.

    2016-01-01

    The process-induced voids during resistance welding of glass fabric-reinforced polyetherimide was investigated. The mechanisms of void formation in adherends, in particular, the residual volatile-induced voids and the fibre de-compaction-induced voids, were analysed. Due to the non-uniform

  8. Volume gratings and welding of glass/plastic by femtosecond laser direct writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Wataru

    2018-01-01

    Femtosecond laser direct writing is used to fabricate diffractive optical elements in three dimensions and to weld glass and/or plastic. In this paper, we review volume gratings in plastics and welding of glass/plastic by femtosecond laser direct writing. Volume gratings were embedded inside polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) by femtosecond laser pulses. The diffraction efficiency of the gratings increased after fabrication and reached the maximum. After an initial slow decrease within first several days after the fabrication, the efficiency increased again. This phenomena was called regeneration of the grating. We also demonstrate welding of PMMA by dendrite pattern using femtosecond laser pulses. Laser pulses are focused at the interface of two PMMA substrates with an air gap and melted materials in laser-irradiated region spread within a gap of the substrates and dendrite morphology of melted PMMA was observed outside the laser irradiated area. Finally, we show welding of glass/plastic and metal.

  9. Optimization of hybrid laser arc welding of 42CrMo steel to suppress pore formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Chen, Genyu; Mao, Shuai; Zhou, Cong; Chen, Fei

    2017-06-01

    The hybrid laser arc welding (HLAW) of 42CrMo quenched and tempered steel was conducted. The effect of the processing parameters, such as the relative positions of the laser and the arc, the shielding gas flow rate, the defocusing distance, the laser power, the wire feed rate and the welding speed, on the pore formation was analyzed, the morphological characteristics of the pores were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The results showed that the majority of the pores were invasive. The pores formed at the leading a laser (LA) welding process were fewer than those at the leading a arc (AL) welding process. Increasing the shielding gas flow rate could also facilitate the reduction of pores. The laser power and the welding speed were two key process parameters to reduce the pores. The flow of the molten pool, the weld cooling rate and the pore escaping rate as a result of different parameters could all affect pore formation. An ideal pore-free weld was obtained for the optimal welding process parameters.

  10. Robotic system for orbital welding of pipes; Sistema robotizado para soldagem orbital de dutos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bracarense, Alexandre Queiroz; Lima II, Eduardo Jose; Torres, Guilherme Fortunato; Ramalho, Frederico [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Felizardo, Ivanilza; Zanon, Gislaine Pires [ROTECH Tecnologia Robotica Ltda., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    This work presents the robotic system projected for orbital welding of pipelines of oil and gas. The system consists of a controller (microcomputer), that allows the execution of all the referring tasks to the welding in an autonomous way, and two manipulates, to what are coupled the welding torches that are connected to a welding power source with double wire feeders. With this system, GMA W process is used to execute the root pass, while FCA W process, besides the GMA W, is used for the filling and finishing passes. The system has four degrees of freedom, allowing the control of stick out, travel speed, torch angle and positioning. Besides these, the arc voltage and and welding current are also controlled during the process. Knowing that for each welding position (plane, vertical up and down and over head) a great group of parameters must be used, several tests were accomplished. With these values a controlled variation could be accomplished in an uninterrupted way when welding position changes, getting the increase of the productivity and also the quality of the weld performed by a robotic system. (author)

  11. Optimization of hybrid laser arc welding of 42CrMo steel to suppress pore formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yan [Hunan University, State Key Laboratory of Advanced Design and Manufacturing for Vehicle Body, Changsha (China); Hunan Institute of Science and Technology, College of Mechanical Engineering, Yueyang (China); Chen, Genyu; Mao, Shuai; Zhou, Cong; Chen, Fei [Hunan University, State Key Laboratory of Advanced Design and Manufacturing for Vehicle Body, Changsha (China)

    2017-06-15

    The hybrid laser arc welding (HLAW) of 42CrMo quenched and tempered steel was conducted. The effect of the processing parameters, such as the relative positions of the laser and the arc, the shielding gas flow rate, the defocusing distance, the laser power, the wire feed rate and the welding speed, on the pore formation was analyzed, the morphological characteristics of the pores were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The results showed that the majority of the pores were invasive. The pores formed at the leading a laser (LA) welding process were fewer than those at the leading a arc (AL) welding process. Increasing the shielding gas flow rate could also facilitate the reduction of pores. The laser power and the welding speed were two key process parameters to reduce the pores. The flow of the molten pool, the weld cooling rate and the pore escaping rate as a result of different parameters could all affect pore formation. An ideal pore-free weld was obtained for the optimal welding process parameters. (orig.)

  12. Percutaneous Kirschner wire (K-wire) fixation for humerus shaft ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the present study, Kirschner wires (K-wire) were used to achieve a closed intramedullary fixation of humeral shaft fractures. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of intramedullary K-wires for the treatment of humeral shaft fracture in children. Patients and Methods: This prospective study was conducted in ...

  13. Hybrid laser-arc welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hybrid laser-arc welding (HLAW) is a combination of laser welding with arc welding that overcomes many of the shortfalls of both processes. This important book gives a comprehensive account of hybrid laser-arc welding technology and applications. The first part of the book reviews...... the characteristics of the process, including the properties of joints produced by hybrid laser-arc welding and ways of assessing weld quality. Part II discusses applications of the process to such metals as magnesium alloys, aluminium and steel as well as the use of hybrid laser-arc welding in such sectors as ship...... building and the automotive industry. With its distinguished editor and international team of contributors, Hybrid laser-arc welding, will be a valuable source of reference for all those using this important welding technology. Professor Flemming Ove Olsen works in the Department of Manufacturing...

  14. Wiring for space applications program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammoud, Ahmad

    1994-01-01

    The insulation testing and analysis consists of: identifying and prioritizing NASA wiring requirements; selecting candidate wiring constructions; developing test matrix and formulating test program; managing, coordinating, and conducting tests; and analyzing and documenting data, establishing guidelines and recommendations.

  15. Manufacture and quality control of interconnecting wire harnesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    Four-volume series of documents has been prepared as standard reference. Each volume may be used separately and covers wire and cable preparation as well as harness fabrication and installation. Series should be useful addition to libraries of manufactures of electrical and electronic equipment.

  16. Photonic wires sidewall roughness measures using AFM capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malureanu, Radu; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn

    2008-01-01

    Within the last years, interest in photonic wires and photonic crystals grew due to their demonstrated ability of controlling light propagation and characteristics. One of the limitations of such devices is due to the induced roughness during the fabrication process. Generally, an increase in rou...... be quantified and thus actions in decreasing it can be taken improving the device's performance....

  17. Debate: Wired versus Wireless.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeks, Glenn; Nair, Prakash

    2000-01-01

    Debates the issue of investing in wiring schools for desktop computer networks versus using laptops and wireless networks. Included are cost considerations and the value of technology for learning. Suggestions include using wireless networks for existing schools, hardwiring computers for new construction, and not using computers for elementary…

  18. Wired vs. Wireless.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, Randall

    2000-01-01

    Presents a debate on which technology will be in tomorrow's classrooms and the pros and cons of wiring classrooms and using a wireless network. Concluding comments address the likelihood, and desirability, of placing computers throughout the entire educational process and what types of computers and capabilities are needed. (GR)

  19. Wired to freedom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Kim Sune Karrasch; Bertilsson, Margareta

    2017-01-01

    dimension of life science through a notion of public politics adopted from the political theory of John Dewey. We show how cochlear implantation engages different social imaginaries on the collective and individual levels and we suggest that users share an imaginary of being “wired to freedom” that involves...

  20. Gaseous wire detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Va' vra, J.

    1997-08-01

    This article represents a series of three lectures describing topics needed to understand the design of typical gaseous wire detectors used in large high energy physics experiments; including the electrostatic design, drift of electrons in the electric and magnetic field, the avalanche, signal creation, limits on the position accuracy as well as some problems one encounters in practical operations.

  1. 3D Wire 2015

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jordi, Moréton; F, Escribano; J. L., Farias

    This document is a general report on the implementation of gamification in 3D Wire 2015 event. As the second gamification experience in this event, we have delved deeply in the previous objectives (attracting public areas less frequented exhibition in previous years and enhance networking) and have...

  2. Practical wiring in SI units

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Henry A

    2013-01-01

    Practical Wiring, Volume 1 is a 13-chapter book that first describes some of the common hand tools used in connection with sheathed wiring. Subsequent chapters discuss the safety in wiring, cables, conductor terminations, insulating sheathed wiring, conductor sizes, and consumer's control equipments. Other chapters center on socket outlets, plugs, lighting subcircuits, lighting accessories, bells, and primary and secondary cells. This book will be very valuable to students involved in this field of interest.

  3. Multispot fiber laser welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schutt Hansen, Klaus

    This dissertation presents work and results achieved in the field of multi beam fiber laser welding. The project has had a practical approach, in which simulations and modelling have been kept at a minimum. Different methods to produce spot patterns with high power single mode fiber lasers have...... been examined and evaluated. It is found that both diamond turned DOE’s in zinc sulphide and multilevel etched DOE’s (Diffractive Optical Elements) in fused silica have a good performance. Welding with multiple beams in a butt joint configuration has been tested. Results are presented, showing it has...... been possible to control the welding width in incremental steps by adding more beams in a row. The laser power was used to independently control the keyhole and consequently the depth of fusion. An example of inline repair of a laser weld in butt joint configuration was examined. Zinc powder was placed...

  4. Friction stir welding tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolle,; Charles R. , Clark; Denis E. , Barnes; Timothy, A [Ammon, ID

    2008-04-15

    A friction stir welding tool is described and which includes a shank portion; a shoulder portion which is releasably engageable with the shank portion; and a pin which is releasably engageable with the shoulder portion.

  5. CHARACTERIZATION OF DEFECTS IN ALLOY 152, 52 AND 52M WELDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruemmer, Stephen M.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Seffens, Rob J.; Efsing, Pal G.

    2009-08-27

    , defect characteristics and weld residual strains were examined by optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Industry-supplied mock-up welds were characterized including alloy 52 and 152 weldments, alloy 52M overlay and inlay welds, and an alloy 52 overlay. II. WELDMENTS II.A. Alloy 52 and 152 Weld Mockups The alloy 52 and 152 weld mockups were fabricated by MHI for the Kewaunee reactor and were obtained from the EPRI NDE Center. The mockups were U-groove welds joining two plates of 304SS as shown in Figure 1. Alloy 152 butter (heat 307380) was placed on the U-groove surface for both mockups by shielded metal arc welding (SMAW). For the alloy 152 weld mockup, the alloy 152 fill (heat 307380) was also applied using SMAW while for the alloy 52 weld mockup, the alloy 52 fill (heat NX2686JK) was applied using gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). Welding parameters for the fill materials were substantially different with the alloy 152 SMAW having a deposition speed of 4-25 cm/min with a current of 95-145 A and the alloy 52 GTAW having a deposition speed of 4-10 cm/min with a current of 150-300 A. One prominent feature in these mockup welds is the presence of a crack starting at the 304SS butt joint at the bottom of the U-groove and extending up into the weld. It appears that the 304SS plate on either side of the butt joint acted as an anchor for the weld resulting in a stress rise across the slit that drove crack formation and extension up into the fill weld. As will be shown in the next section, the extent of the cracking around this stress riser was much greater in the MHI 52 weld mockup.

  6. Concurrent ultrasonic weld evaluation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Donald W.; Johnson, John A.; Smartt, Herschel B.

    1987-01-01

    A system for concurrent, non-destructive evaluation of partially completed welds for use in conjunction with an automated welder. The system utilizes real time, automated ultrasonic inspection of a welding operation as the welds are being made by providing a transducer which follows a short distance behind the welding head. Reflected ultrasonic signals are analyzed utilizing computer based digital pattern recognition techniques to discriminate between good and flawed welds on a pass by pass basis. The system also distinguishes between types of weld flaws.

  7. Nozzle fabrication technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Dennis L. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    This invention relates to techniques for fabricating hour glass throat or convergent divergent nozzle shapes, and more particularly to new and improved techniques for forming rocket nozzles from electrically conductive material and forming cooling channels in the wall thereof. The concept of positioning a block of electrically conductive material so that its axis is set at a predetermined skew angle with relation to a travelling electron discharge machine electrode and thereafter revolving the body about its own axis to generate a hyperbolic surface of revolution, either internal or external is novel. The method will generate a rocket nozzle which may be provided with cooling channels using the same control and positioning system. The configuration of the cooling channels so produced are unique and novel. Also the method is adaptable to nonmetallic material using analogous cutting tools, such as, water jet, laser, abrasive wire and hot wire.

  8. STUDY OF THE INFLUENCE OF THE HEAT INPUT ON MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF C-Mn STEEL WELD METALS OBTAINED BY SUBMERGED ARC PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erick de Sousa Marouço

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The present work is part of a research program that aims to evaluate the technical feasibility of increasing productivity in the manufacturing of tubular components for offshore oil industry, which are fully welded by automatic submerged arc welding process, with high heat input, but with no impairment on the impact toughness of the weld metal. Multipass welds were produced by the submerged arc welding process, with a combination of F7A4-EM12K (wire/flux, by using a 3.2 mm-diameter wire, preheating at 80°C, with direct current, in flat position, with heat input varying from 3.5 kJ/mm to 12 kJ/mm. After welding, tensile tests and Charpy-V impact tests at –60°C, –40°C, –20°C, 0°C and 20°C were carried out, as well as metallographic examination by both optical (OM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM, of specimens obtained entirely from the weld metal, allowing the discussion over the toughness X microstructure relationship. The weld metals have shown higher toughness levels in relation to the minimum required for use with low-alloy C-Mn steels welding with requirements of impact toughness of 27 J at 0°C for heat input up to 12 kJ/mm allowing an increase in productivity of 58% on the effective manufacturing time.

  9. Weld formation control at electron beam welding with beam oscillations

    OpenAIRE

    Trushnikov, Dmitriy; Koleva, Elena; Mladenov, Georgy; A. Shcherbakov

    2014-01-01

    Electron beam welding is used extensively to produce essential machine parts. The control of the basic beam parameters beam power or beam current at constant accelerating voltage, welding speed, current of focusing lens and distance between electron gun and welded sample surface is not enough to obtain at most of the regimes sound welds. Control of the focus position using analysis of the high frequency component of the current, collected by plasma, at periodic interactions on the beam (the o...

  10. Predicting welding residual stresses in a dissimilar metal girth welded pipe using 3D finite element model with a simplified heat source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Dean, E-mail: deandeng@cqu.edu.c [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Shazheng Street 174, Shapingba, Chongqing 400044 (China); Kiyoshima, Shoichi [Research Center of Computational Mechanics, Inc., Togoshi NI-Bldg., 1-7-1 Togoshi, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 142-0041 (Japan); Ogawa, Kazuo [Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization, TOKYU REIT Toranomon Bldg, 3-17-1, Toranomon, Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-0001 (Japan); Yanagida, Nobuyoshi [Hitachi Ltd. 1-1, Saiwa-cho 3-chome, Hitachi-shi, Ibaraki-ken 317-8511 (Japan); Saito, Koichi [Hitachi-GE Nuclear Energy, Ltd. 2-2, Omika-cho, 5-chome, Hitachi-shi, Ibaraki-ken 319-1221 (Japan)

    2011-01-15

    Research highlights: Welding residual stresses have asymmetrical distributions in the dissimilar metal pipe. Variable length heat source model can largely save computing time. Besides welding, other thermal processes also affect residual stresses. - Abstract: Dissimilar metal welds are commonly used in nuclear power plants to connect low alloy steel components and austenitic stainless steel piping systems. The integrity assessment and life estimation for such welded structures require consideration of residual stresses induced by manufacturing processes. Because the fabrication process of dissimilar metal weld joints is considerably complex, it is very difficult to accurately predict residual stresses. In this study, both numerical simulation technology and experimental method were used to investigate welding residual stress distribution in a dissimilar metal pipe joint with a medium diameter, which were performed by a multi-pass welding process. Firstly, an experimental mock-up was fabricated to measure the residual stress distributions on the inside and the outside surfaces. Then, a time-effective 3-D finite element model was developed to simulate welding residual stresses through using a simplified moving heat source. The simplified heat source method could complete the thermo-mechanical analysis in an acceptable time, and the simulation results generally matched the measured data near the weld zone. Through comparing the simulation results and the experimental measurements, we can infer that besides the multi-pass welding process other key manufacturing processes such as cladding, buttering and heat treatment should also be taken into account to accurately predict residual stresses in the whole range of the dissimilar metal pipe.

  11. Comparison of 22MnB5-steel with and without AlSi-coating during laser hybrid arc welding

    OpenAIRE

    Norman, Peter; Wiklund, Greger; Janiak, P.; Kaplan, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    22MnB5/Usibor1500 is a hot-dip aluminized manganese-boron steel grade that is used withinthe car manufacturing industry and as lasers are increasingly used for welding of the car bodythe amount of research concerning laser welding of this material follows. For thicker materialthe laser hybrid arc welding process has grown to a well-known tool to increase productivity,but for thinner materials the advantages are less obvious. In the present research the melt pooland wire drop transfer was obse...

  12. Alternate Welding Processes for In-Service Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-24

    Conducting weld repairs and attaching hot tap tees onto pressurized pipes has the advantage of avoiding loss of service and revenue. However, the risks involved with in-service welding need to be managed by ensuring that welding is performed in a rep...

  13. Certification of a weld produced by friction stir welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obaditch, Chris; Grant, Glenn J

    2013-10-01

    Methods, devices, and systems for providing certification of friction stir welds are disclosed. A sensor is used to collect information related to a friction stir weld. Data from the sensor is compared to threshold values provided by an extrinsic standard setting organizations using a certification engine. The certification engine subsequently produces a report on the certification status of the weld.

  14. Epitaxially aligned cuprous oxide nanowires for all-oxide, single-wire solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brittman, Sarah; Yoo, Youngdong; Dasgupta, Neil P; Kim, Si-in; Kim, Bongsoo; Yang, Peidong

    2014-08-13

    As a p-type semiconducting oxide that can absorb visible light, cuprous oxide (Cu2O) is an attractive material for solar energy conversion. This work introduces a high-temperature, vapor-phase synthesis that produces faceted Cu2O nanowires that grow epitaxially along the surface of a lattice-matched, single-crystal MgO substrate. Individual wires were then fabricated into single-wire, all-oxide diodes and solar cells using low-temperature atomic layer deposition (ALD) of TiO2 and ZnO films to form the heterojunction. The performance of devices made from pristine Cu2O wires and chlorine-exposed Cu2O wires was investigated under one-sun and laser illumination. These faceted wires allow the fabrication of well-controlled heterojunctions that can be used to investigate the interfacial properties of all-oxide solar cells.

  15. Improved TIG weld joint strength in aluminum alloy 2219-T87 by filler metal substitution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorman, R. M.; Lovoy, C. V.

    1972-01-01

    The results of an investigation on weld joint characteristics of aluminum alloy 2219-T87 are given. Five different alloys were utilized as filler material. The mechanical properties of the joints were determined at ambient and cryogenic temperatures for weldments in the as-welded condition and also, for weldments after elevated temperature exposures. Other evaluations included hardness surveys, stress corrosion susceptibility, and to a limited extent, the internal metallurgical weld structures. The overall results indicate that M-943 filler weldments are superior in strength to weldments containing either the standard 2319 filler or fillers 2014, 2020, and a dual wire feed consisting of three parts 2319 and one part 5652. In addition, no deficiencies were evident in M-934 filler weldments with regard to ductility, joint strength after elevated temperature exposure, weld hardness, metallographic structures, or stress corrosion susceptibility.

  16. Welding defects at friction stir welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Podržaj

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an overview of different types of defects at friction stir welding. In order to explain the reasons for their occurrence a short theoretical background of the process is given first. The main emphasis is on the parameters that influence the process. An energy supply based division of defects into three disjoint groups was used. The occurring defects are demonstrated on various materials.

  17. Workmanship standards for fusion welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, M. D.

    1967-01-01

    Workmanship standards manual defines practices, that adhere to rigid codes and specifications, for fusion welding of component piping, assemblies, and systems. With written and pictorial presentations, it is part of the operating procedure for fusion welding.

  18. Pulsed current and dual pulse gas metal arc welding of grade AISI: 310S austenitic stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mathivanan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The transverse shrinkage, mechanical and metallurgical properties of AISI: 310S ASS weld joints prepared by P-GMAW and DP-GMAW processes were investigated. It was observed that the use of the DP-GMAW process improves the aforementioned characteristics in comparison to that of the P-GMAW process. The enhanced quality of weld joints obtained with DP-GMAW process is primarily due to the combined effect of pulsed current and thermal pulsation (low frequency pulse. During the thermal pulsation period, there is a fluctuation of wire feed rate, which results in the further increase in welding current and the decrease in arc voltage. Because of this synchronization between welding current and arc voltage during the period of low frequency pulse, the DP-GMAW deposit introduces comparatively more thermal shock compared to the P-GMAW deposit, thereby reducing the heat input and improves the properties of weld joints.

  19. Fabrication of stable Pd nanowire assisted by hydrogen in solution

    OpenAIRE

    Kiguchi, M.; Murakoshi, K

    2006-01-01

    We have mechanically fabricated a Pd nanowire in solution under electrochemical potential control. A clear feature appeared in the conductance histogram when the electrochemical potential of the Pd wire was kept at the hydrogen evolution potential. Conductance traces showed the Pd wire was stretched 0.4 nm in length just before breaking, suggesting that at least two Pd atoms might contribute to the formation of the Pd wire. The results indicate that a certain atomic configuration of the Pd na...

  20. Correlation of Stress Concentration Factors for T-Welded Connections – Finite Element Simulations and Fatigue Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Terán Méndez

    Full Text Available Abstract The stress concentration factors (SCFs in welded connections usually occur at zones with high stress levels. Stress concentrations reduce the fatigue behavior of welded connections in offshore structures and cracking can develop. By using the grinding technique, cracking can be eliminated. Stress concentration factors are defined as a ratio of maximum stress at the intersection to nominal stress on the brace. Defining the stress concentration factor is an important stage in the fatigue behavior of welded connections. Several approaches have evolved for designing structures with the classical S-N approach for estimating total life. This work correlates to the stress concentration factors of T-welded connections and the fatigue behavior. Stress concentration factors were computed with the finite element employing 3D T-welded connections with intact and grinding depth conditions. Then, T-welded connections were constructed with A36 plate steel and welded with E6013 electrodes to obtain the stress-life (S-N approach. The methodology from previous works was used to compute the SCF and fabricate the T-welded connections. The results indicated that the grinding process could restore the fatigue life of the T-welded connections for SCFs values in the range of 1.29. This value can be considered to be a low SCF value in T-welded connection. However, for higher SCF values, the fatigue life decreased, compromising and reducing the structural integrity of the T-welded connections.

  1. Obelix Wire Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1986-01-01

    Two wire chambers made originally for the R807 Experiment at CERN's Intersecting Storage Rings. In 1986 they were used for the PS 201 experiment (Obelix Experiment) at LEAR, the Low Energy Antiproton Ring. The group of researchers from Turin, using the chambers at that time, changed the acquisition system using for the first time 8 bit (10 bit non linear) analog to digital conversion for incoming signals from the chambers. The acquisition system was controlled by 54 CPU and 80 digital signal processors. The power required for all the electronics was 40 kW. For the period, this system was one of the most powerful on-line apparatus in the world. The Obelix Experiment was closed in 1996. To find more about how a wire chamber works, see the description for object CERN-OBJ-DE-038.

  2. Analysis of Smut Formation Phenomena on MIG and Plasma-MIG Hybrid Weld of Cryogenic Al-Mg Alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hee-keun [Daewoo Shipbuilding and Marine Engineering, Geoje (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Tae-jin; Kang, Chung-yun [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    Black deposits (smut) are created on MIG welds in cryogenic Al alloys. The smut should be removed because it ruins the appearance of the end product and affects surface treatments such as painting. It was recently reported that plasma–MIG hybrid (PMH) welding controls the formation of smut during welding. In order to determine the reason for this, smut formation using both MIG and PMH welding was investigated through metallurgy and arc phenomena analysis. Smut on MIG welds is a Mg–Al–O amorphous layer that includes nano-sized MgO particles less than 100 nm in diameter and MgO particles 1–2 µm in diameter. Smut on MIG welds is created by large amounts of metal vapor from the arc explosion generated between the welding wire and the weld pool after a short circuit transfer. However, smut on PMH welds is not created owing to the small amount of metal vapor produced from a stable globular transfer rather than a short circuit transfer and arc explosion.

  3. Welding and Brazing Silicon Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, T. J.

    1986-01-01

    Hot isostatic pressing and conventional furnace brazing effective under right conditions. Study performed showed feasibility of welding SiC using several welding and brazing techniques. Use of SiC improves engine efficiency by allowing increase in operating temperature. SiC successfully hot-pressure-welded at 3,550 degrees F (1,950 degrees C) in argon. Refinements of solid-state welding and brazing procedures used sufficient for some specific industrial applications.

  4. Command Wire Sensor Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    NPS anechoic chamber is located in Spanagel Hall, Room 604. Although the chamber was built for instruction purposes only, it can be used for research...thesis is to investigate the wire scattering behavior and clutter characteristics through measurements performed in the NPS anechoic chamber. The...research has successfully resolved the various multipath components within the anechoic chamber. The transmit-receive coupling between the antennas was

  5. Validation of welding technology for ITER TF coil structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chida, Yutaka, E-mail: chida.yutaka@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan); Iguchi, Masahide; Takano, Katutoshi; Nakajima, Hideo [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan); Oosemochi, Koichi [Toshiba Corporation (Japan); Niimi, Kenichiro; Tokai, Daisuke [Kawasaki Heavy Industries, LTD. (Japan); Gallix, Remy [ITER Organization (France)

    2011-12-15

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), acting as the Japan Domestic Agency (JADA) in the ITER project is responsible for the procurement of 9 Toroidal Field (TF) coil winding packs (WPs), structures for 19 TF coils (including one spare), and assembly of the WPs and the coil structures for 9 TF coils . The TF Coil structures which support large electromagnetic force generated in TF coils under the cryogenic temperature (about 4 K), are very large welded structures composed of a coil case and structural attachments made of high strength and high toughness stainless steel. JAEA has been performing welding trials for heavy thickness materials since 2008 and is planning fabrication of full-scale mock-ups of main sub-components (1 set for the inboard side and 1 set for the outboard side) in 2011 in order to investigate the technical issues for manufacturing the TF coil structures. This paper presents the results of welding trials and the status of full scale mock-ups fabrication to confirm the validity of welding technology and manufacturing design before fabricating the actual products.

  6. Temperature distribution of multipass TIG welded AISI 304L stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esme, Ugur; Guven, Onur [Mersin Univ., Tarsus (Turkey); Bayramoglu, Melih; Serin, Hasan [Cukurova Univ., Adana (Turkey); Aydin, Hakan [Uludag Unaiv., Bursa (Turkey); Kazancoglu, Yigit [Izmir Univ. of Economics (Turkey). Dept. of Business Administration

    2011-07-01

    Tungsten inert gas welding (TIG) is one of the most important material-joining processes widely used in industry. AISI type 304L stainless steel plates with 8 and 10 mm thicknesses are widely used in the fabrication of pressure vessels and other components. These plates are mostly joined together by multipass welding methods. The temperature distribution that occurs during multipass welding affects the material microstructure, hardness, mechanical properties, and the residual stresses that will be present in the welded material. Very limited experimental data regarding temperature distribution during multipass welding of plates is available in the literature. Experimental work was carried out to find out the temperature distribution during multipass welding of the AISI 304L stainless steel plates. The temperature distribution curves obtained during the experiments are presented. The average maximum temperature rise during each pass of welding is calculated and plotted against the distance from the weld pad centre line. From these plots, the maximum temperature rise expected in the base plate region during any pass of welding operation can be estimated. (orig.)

  7. Microstructure change in the interface of co2 laser welded zirconium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutarek, N.; Azzougui, B.; Saidi, D.; Neggache, M.

    2009-11-01

    Welding is a joining procedure that offers some benefits over mechanical fasteners such as weight reduction and absence of notches induced by machining operations. CO2 laser beam welding with a continuous wave is a high energy density and low heat input process. The result of this is a small heat-affected zone (HAZ), which cools very rapidly with very little distortion, and a high depth-to-width ratio for the Welding is a necessary process during fabricating fuel rods and fuel assemblies with Zircaloy-4 cladding, and electron beam welding is one of the commonly- used method. In this work, the joining of zirconium alloys was attempted by laser beam welding. A 2 kW CO2 laser is used and the joints are obtained from similar materials, which are plates of Zircaloy-4 (2 mm thick). A series of zirconium alloys were welded and investigated in a tow-fold approach: (1) process optimisation: the laser processing parameters are optimized to obtain welds with minimum defects, and (2) material characterisation: weld microstructures were evaluated. The microstructure and the phases present in the resolidified zone of the laser -welded specimens were analyzed by optical and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and also by the realization of micro hardness diagrams. A particular attention was made to study the correlation between surface structure and mechanical behaviour.

  8. Mechanical properties of friction stir welded aluminum alloys 5083 and 5383

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeom Kee Paik

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of high-strength aluminum alloys is increasing in shipbuilding industry, particularly for the design and construction of war ships, littoral surface craft and combat ships, and fast passenger ships. While various welding methods are used today to fabricate aluminum ship structures, namely gas metallic arc welding (GMAW, laser welding and friction stir welding (FSW, FSW technology has been recognized to have many advantages for the construction of aluminum structures, as it is a low-cost welding process. In the present study, mechanical properties of friction stir welded aluminum alloys are examined experimentally. Tensile testing is undertaken on dog-bone type test specimen for aluminum alloys 5083 and 5383. The test specimen includes friction stir welded material between identical alloys and also dissimilar alloys, as well as unwelded (base alloys. Mechanical properties of fusion welded aluminum alloys are also tested and compared with those of friction stir welded alloys. The insights developed from the present study are documented together with details of the test database. Part of the present study was obtained from the Ship Structure Committee project SR-1454 (Paik, 2009, jointly funded by its member agencies.

  9. PRODUCTION OF METAL CHEMICAL WELDING ADDITIVE WITH NANODISPERSED PARTICLES OF TITANIUM DIOXIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BOLDYREV Alexander Mikhaylovich

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available When welding bridge structures automatic welding under a gumboil layer with metal chemical additive (MCA is widely applied in the modern bridge building. MCA consists of a chopped welding wire (granulated material, which is powdered by modifying chemical additive of titanium dioxide (TiO₂ in the cylindrical mixer «drunk cask». Chemical composition of all welding materials including welding wire, gumboil, electrodes, are strictly normalized and controlled. However, the existing technology of producing MCA doesn’t allow precise controlling of its structure under working conditions and that causes an impact on the stability of welded connections properties. Therefore the aim of this work is to develop a technology to produce stable MCA structure. The paper compares the existing and proposed manufacturing techniques of the metal chemical additive (MCA which is applied in automatic welding of butt connections for bridge structures. It is shown that production of MCA in a high-energy planetary mill provides more stable structure of the additive introduced into a welded joint. The granulometric analysis of the powder TiO₂ showed that when processing MCA in a planetary mill TiO₂ particles are crashed to nanodimensional order. This process is accompanied by crushing of granulated material too. The proposed method for production of MCA in a planetary mill provides stronger cohesion of dioxide with the granulate surface and, as a consequence, more stable MCA chemical structure. Application of MCA which has been mechanical intensified in a planetary mill, increases stability of mechanical properties, if compare with applied technology, in single-order by breaking point and almost twice by impact viscosity.

  10. Welding. Performance Objectives. Basic Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Kenneth

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of eight terminal objectives for a basic welding course. The materials were developed for a 36-week (2 hours daily) course developed to teach the fundamentals of welding shop work, to become familiar with the operation of the welding shop…

  11. Welding. Performance Objectives. Intermediate Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Kenneth

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of nine terminal objectives for an intermediate welding course. The materials were developed for a 36-week (3 hours daily) course designed to prepare the student for employment in the field of welding. Electric welding and specialized (TIG & MIG)…

  12. Weld Development for Aluminum Fission Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, Carl Edward [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Martinez, Jesse Norris [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-05-16

    The Sigma welding team was approached to help fabricate a small fission chamber (roughly ½ inch dia. x ½ inch tall cylinder). These chambers are used as radiation sensors that contain small traces of radionuclides (Cf 252, U 235, and U 238) that serve to ionize gas atoms in addition to external radiation. When a voltage is applied within the chamber, the resulting ion flow can be calibrated and monitored. Aluminum has the advantage of not forming radioactive compounds when exposed to high external radiation (except from minor Na alloy content). Since aluminum has not been used before in this application, this presented an unexplored challenge.

  13. Friction stir welding tool and process for welding dissimilar materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J; Jana, Saumyadeep; Mattlin, Karl F

    2013-05-07

    A friction stir welding tool and process for lap welding dissimilar materials are detailed. The invention includes a cutter scribe that penetrates and extrudes a first material of a lap weld stack to a preselected depth and further cuts a second material to provide a beneficial geometry defined by a plurality of mechanically interlocking features. The tool backfills the interlocking features generating a lap weld across the length of the interface between the dissimilar materials that enhances the shear strength of the lap weld.

  14. Ultrasonic Evaluation of Weld Strength for Aluminum Ultrasonic Spot Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffari, Bita; Hetrick, Elizabeth T.; Mozurkewich, George; Reatherford, Larry V.

    2005-04-01

    The goal of this work is to determine the feasibility of using an ultrasonic, non-destructive technique for post-process evaluation of aluminum ultrasonic spot welds. A focused immersion transducer was utilized to obtain a C-scan of the weld interface, from which a weighted ultrasonic contact area was estimated. Weldments were subsequently tested destructively to determine the weld strength. The square root of the weld contact area displayed a relatively good correlation with weld strength, r2=0.85.

  15. 3-D Characteristics of the Residual Stress in the Plate Butt Weld Between SA508 and F316L SS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyoung Soo; Kim, Tae Ryong [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jai Hak [Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Man Won [GNEC, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Seon Yeong [KLES, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-04-15

    This study is performed to check the three dimensional characteristics of residual stress in the dissimilar metal weld. Although two dimensional analysis has been widely used for the assessment of weld residual stress, it has limitations to understand the stress distribution of the third direction. 3-D analysis was done to understand residual stress distribution of the welded plate. A simple butt-welded plate was considered to show the stress variation on all direction. A mock-up plate weldment was fabricated with SA-508 and F316L, which are widely used in nuclear power plants. The analysis results were validated with the measured values in the mock-up.

  16. Adhesion strength study of IBAD-MOCVD-based 2G HTS wire using a peel test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y., E-mail: yzhang@superpower-inc.com [SuperPower Inc., 450 Duane Avenue, Schenectady, NY 12304 (United States); Hazelton, D.W.; Knoll, A.R.; Duval, J.M.; Brownsey, P.; Repnoy, S.; Soloveichik, S.; Sundaram, A.; McClure, R.B. [SuperPower Inc., 450 Duane Avenue, Schenectady, NY 12304 (United States); Majkic, G.; Selvamanickam, V. [University of Houston, 4800 Calhoun Road, Houston, TX 77204 (United States)

    2012-02-15

    A peel test was used to study the adhesion strength of a commercial grade 2G HTS wire which features a characteristic multilayer structure with the rare earth-based MOCVD superconducting film deposited on an IBAD-MgO template. The peel test could be carried out at various peeling angles (from 90 Degree-Sign to 180 Degree-Sign) and the peel strength of a wire was defined as the steady-state peeling load determined from a load-displacement curve. The test results had good reproducibility and accuracy, making the test a reliable and useful method for studying the adhesion strength of the wire. By characterizing the peeled surfaces the weakest interface in a wire could be identified. The peel strength data of the wire was analyzed together with the performance of the experimental magnet coils fabricated using the wire. The effect of the silver contact layer annealing on the peel strength is discussed.

  17. Prediction of multi performance characteristics of wire EDM process using grey ANFIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumanan, Somasundaram; Nair, Anish

    2017-09-01

    Super alloys are used to fabricate components in ultra-supercritical power plants. These hard to machine materials are processed using non-traditional machining methods like Wire cut electrical discharge machining and needs attention. This paper details about multi performance optimization of wire EDM process using Grey ANFIS. Experiments are designed to establish the performance characteristics of wire EDM such as surface roughness, material removal rate, wire wear rate and geometric tolerances. The control parameters are pulse on time, pulse off time, current, voltage, flushing pressure, wire tension, table feed and wire speed. Grey relational analysis is employed to optimise the multi objectives. Analysis of variance of the grey grades is used to identify the critical parameters. A regression model is developed and used to generate datasets for the training of proposed adaptive neuro fuzzy inference system. The developed prediction model is tested for its prediction ability.

  18. AC loss properties of MgB{sub 2} multifilament wires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Kazuhide; Funaki, Kazuo; Sueyoshi, Takahiro; Sasashige, Yushi; Kajikawa, Kazuhiro; Iwakuma, Masataka [Kyushu University Graduate School of Information Science and Electrical Engineering, 744 Moto-oka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Okada, Michiya [HRL Hitachi, Ltd, 7-1-1 Oomika, Hitachi 319-1292 (Japan); Kumakura, Hiroaki [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Hayashi, Hidemi [Kyushu Electric Power Co., Incorporated, 2-1-47 Shiobaru, Minami-ku, Fukuoka 815-8520 (Japan)], E-mail: kazuhide.tanaka.je@hitachi.com

    2008-09-15

    We designed and fabricated two types of composite wires with 6 MgB{sub 2} filaments. One is a Cu-sheathed Nb-barrier wire and the other is a CuNi-sheathed Ta-barrier wire. The transverse-field losses of the trial wires were measured with a standardized pickup coil system in liquid helium. We evaluated the observed AC losses using two structural models, a multifilament conductor model and a hollow-cylindrical one. For the CuNi-sheathed Ta-barrier wire, the AC loss property can be explained by the usual model of multifilament conductors. Further reductions in AC loss can be expected by making the filaments thinner. For the Cu-sheathed Nb-barrier wire, theoretical considerations suggest the multifilament structure behaves as a hollow-cylindrical superconductor in the AC loss property. Thus, we need to pay particular attention to designing the barrier material for reduction in the AC loss.

  19. Fluid-structure-interaction analysis for welded pipes with flow-accelerated corrosion wall thinning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, L.; Ding, Y., E-mail: lan.sun@cnl.ca [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    The flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC) entrance effect results in enhanced wall thinning immediately downstream of a weld if the weld connects an upstream FAC-resistant material with a downstream less resistant material. The weld regions, especially those with local repairs, are susceptible to cracking due to the high residual stresses induced by fabrication. The combined effects of the FAC entrance effect and high stresses at a weld might compromise the structural integrity of the piping and lead to a failure. Weld degradation by FAC entrance effect has been observed at nuclear and fossil power plants. This paper describes an application using fluid-structure-interaction (FSI) modelling to study the combined effects of FAC wall thinning, weld residual stresses, and in-service loads on welded structures. Simplified cases analyzed were based on CANDU outlet feeder conditions. The analysis includes the flow and mass transfer modelling of the FAC entrance effect using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and nonlinear structural analyses of the welded structures with wall thinning and an assumed weld residual stress and strain distribution. The FSI analyses were performed using ANSYS Workbench, an integrated platform that enables the coupling of CFD and structural analysis solutions. The obtained results show that the combination of FAC, weld residual stresses, in-service loads (including the internal pressure) and (or) extreme loads could cause high stresses and affect the integrity of the welded pipes. The present work demonstrated that the FSI modelling can be used as an effective approach to assess the integrity of welded structures. (author)

  20. Weld bead profile of laser welding dissimilar joints stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Ghusoon R.; Ishak, M.; Aqida, S. N.; Abdulhadi, Hassan A.

    2017-10-01

    During the process of laser welding, the material consecutively melts and solidifies by a laser beam with a peak high power. Several parameters such as the laser energy, pulse frequency, pulse duration, welding power and welding speed govern the mode of the welding process. The aim of this paper is to investigate the effect of peak power, incident angle, and welding speed on the weld bead geometry. The first investigation in this context was conducted using 2205-316L stainless steel plates through the varying of the welding speed from 1.3 mm/s to 2.1 mm/s. The second investigation was conducted by varying the peak power from 1100 W to 1500 W. From the results of the experiments, the welding speed and laser power had a significant effect on the geometry of the weld bead, and the variation in the diameter of the bead pulse-size. Due to the decrease in the heat input, welding speed affected penetration depth more than bead width, and a narrow width of heat affected zone was achieved ranging from 0.2 to 0.5 mm. Conclusively, weld bead geometry dimensions increase as a function of peak power; at over 1350 W peak power, the dimensions lie within 30 μm.