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Sample records for welded az31 magnesium

  1. Residual stresses of a magnesium alloy (AZ31 welded by the friction stir welding processes

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    Kouadri-Henni A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the residual stresses of FSW welding magnesium alloys (AZ31. The results show that the FSW processes lead to the formation of several distinct zones with differing mechanical properties. The residual stresses evolution have been explained by the heterogeneous modifications of the microstructure particularly a marked decrease in the grain size, a high modification of the crystallographic texture and the different anisotropic properties resulting from plasticity induced by the FSW process.

  2. Fatigue behaviour of welded joints from magnesium alloy (AZ31) according to the local strain concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karakas, Oe.; Guelsoez, A. [Engineering Faculty, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University Pamukkale, Denizli (Turkey); Kaufmann, H.; Sonsino, C.M. [Fraunhofer - Institute for Structural Durability and System Reliability, LBF, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2010-02-15

    In the present study, the results of fatigue tests with the magnesium alloy AZ31 (ISO-MgAl3Zn1) in the material states base metal, heat affected zone and weld metal obtained under strain control at room temperature within a range from 2.10{sup 2} to 5 .10 {sup 6} cycles are presented. The fatigue behaviour was characterized by the Coffin-Manson-Basquin equations and the stress - strain behaviour by the Ramberg-Osgood equation. The data can be used to assess welded magnesium joints according to the local strain concept. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  3. Effect of fiber laser parameters on laser welded AZ31B Magnesium alloys

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    Mat Salleh Naqiuddin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the usage of Magnesium (Mg alloys has been hugely applied in the industrial application such as in automotive, marine, and electronic due to its advantages of recyclability and lightweight. This alloys required low heat input to be weld since it is easily evaporated due to the Magnesium Oxide (MgO at the surface and it also possesses lower melting point compared to steel. Laser welding is more convenient to weld Mg alloys due to its high power and lower heat input. AZ31B was selected since it has strong mechanical properties among others Mg alloys due to the major alloying elements; Aluminium (Al and Zinc (Zn. Low power fiber laser machine with wavelength of 900 nm was used in this experiment. The intention of this work was to investigate the effect of low power fiber laser parameters and effect of shielding gas on weld penetration and microstructure. Another aim in this work was to produce the joint for this thin sheets metal. Penetration depth and microstructure evaluation were emphasized in the analysis section. Bead-on-Plate (BOP and laser lap welding was conducted on AZ31B with thicknesses of 1.0 mm and 0.6 mm for feasibility study using pulsed wave (PW mode. Defocusing features was used in order to find better focal position, which has less occurrence of evaporation (underfill. The effect of different angle of irradiation was also investigated. Two types of shielding gases, Argon (Ar and Nitrogen (N2 were used in order to study the effect of shielding gas. Lastly, the effect of pulsed energy on penetration types and depth of BOP welded samples was investigated. Focus point was found at focal length of 156 mm with 393.75 μm. For BOP experiment, higher pulsed energy used contributes to melt through defect. Meanwhile, Ns shielding gas proved to be better shielding gas in laser welding the AZ31B. Higher angle of irradiation could reduce the underfill defect. Fillet Lap joint of similar metal was successfully done where 2.0 J of

  4. Laser offset welding of AZ31B magnesium alloy to 316 stainless steel

    OpenAIRE

    Casalino, G.; Guglielmi, P; LORUSSO, V.D.; MORTELLO, M; PEYRE, P; Sorgente, D.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the feasibility of using a fiber laser to perform a dissimilar metal joining was explored. AZ31B magnesium and 316 stainless steel were autogenously joined in butt configuration. The weldability between different materials is often compromised by a large difference in thermal properties and poor metallurgical compatibility. Thus, the beam was focused onto the top surface of the magnesium plate, at a certain distance from the interfaces (offset), and without using any interlayer...

  5. Investigation on the Effect of Pulsed Energy on Strength of Fillet Lap Laser Welded AZ31B Magnesium Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salleh, M. N. M.; Ishak, M.; Aiman, M. H.; Idris, S. R. A.; Romlay, F. R. M.

    2017-09-01

    AZ31B magnesium alloy have been hugely applied in the aerospace, automotive, and electronic industries. However, welding thin sheet AZ31B was challenging due to its properties which is easily to evaporated especially using conventional fusion welding method such as metal inert gas (MIG). Laser could be applied to weld this metal since it produces lower heat input. The application of fiber laser welding has been widely since this type of laser could produce better welding product especially in the automotive sectors. Low power fiber laser was used to weld this non-ferrous metal where pulse wave (PW) mode was used. Double fillet lap joint was applied to weld as thin as 0.6 mm thick of AZ31B and the effect of pulsed energy on the strength was studied. Bond width, throat length, and penetration depth also was studied related to the pulsed energy which effecting the joint. Higher pulsed energy contributes to the higher fracture load with angle of irradiation lower than 3 °

  6. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Fiber-Laser-Welded and Diode-Laser-Welded AZ31 Magnesium Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, S. M.; Chen, D. L.; Bhole, S. D.; Powidajko, E.; Weckman, D. C.; Zhou, Y.

    2011-07-01

    The microstructures, tensile properties, strain hardening, and fatigue strength of fiber-laser-welded (FLW) and diode-laser-welded (DLW) AZ31B-H24 magnesium alloys were studied. Columnar dendrites near the fusion zone (FZ) boundary and equiaxed dendrites at the center of FZ, with divorced eutectic β-Mg17Al12 particles, were observed. The FLW joints had smaller dendrite cell sizes with a narrower FZ than the DLW joints. The heat-affected zone consisted of recrystallized grains. Although the DLW joints fractured at the center of FZ and exhibited lower yield strength (YS), ultimate tensile strength (UTS), and fatigue strength, the FLW joints failed at the fusion boundary and displayed only moderate reduction in the YS, UTS, and fatigue strength with a joint efficiency of ~91 pct. After welding, the strain rate sensitivity basically vanished, and the DLW joints exhibited higher strain-hardening capacity. Stage III hardening occurred after yielding in both base metal (BM) and welded samples. Dimple-like ductile fracture characteristics appeared in the BM, whereas some cleavage-like flat facets together with dimples and river marking were observed in the welded samples. Fatigue crack initiated from the specimen surface or near-surface defects, and crack propagation was characterized by the formation of fatigue striations along with secondary cracks.

  7. Resistance-Spot-Welded AZ31 Magnesium Alloys: Part I. Dependence of Fusion Zone Microstructures on Second-Phase Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, L.; Liu, L.; Zhou, Y.; Esmaeili, S.

    2010-03-01

    A comparison of microstructural features in resistance spot welds of two AZ31 magnesium (Mg) alloys, AZ31-SA (from supplier A) and AZ31-SB (from supplier B), with the same sheet thickness and welding conditions, was performed via optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). These alloys have similar chemical composition but different sizes of second-phase particles due to manufacturing process differences. Both columnar and equiaxed dendritic structures were observed in the weld fusion zones of these AZ31 SA and SB alloys. However, columnar dendritic grains were well developed and the width of the columnar dendritic zone (CDZ) was much larger in the SB alloy. In contrast, columnar grains were restricted within narrow strip regions, and equiaxed grains were promoted in the SA alloy. Microstructural examination showed that the as-received Mg alloys contained two sizes of Al8Mn5 second-phase particles. Submicron Al8Mn5 particles of 0.09 to 0.4 μm in length occured in both SA and SB alloys; however, larger Al8Mn5 particles of 4 to 10 μm in length were observed only in the SA alloy. The welding process did not have a great effect on the populations of Al8Mn5 particles in these AZ31 welds. The earlier columnar-equiaxed transition (CET) is believed to be related to the pre-existence of the coarse Al8Mn5 intermetallic phases in the SA alloy as an inoculant of α-Mg heterogeneous nucleation. This was revealed by the presence of Al8Mn5 particles at the origin of some equiaxed dendrites. Finally, the columnar grains of the SB alloy, which did not contain coarse second-phase particles, were efficiently restrained and equiaxed grains were found to be promoted by adding 10 μm-long Mn particles into the fusion zone during resistance spot welding (RSW).

  8. Dual-beam laser welding of AZ31B magnesium alloy in zero-gap lap joint configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harooni, Masoud; Carlson, Blair; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2014-03-01

    Porosity within laser welds of magnesium alloys is one of the main roadblocks to achieving high quality joints. One of the causes of pore formation is the presence of pre-existing coatings on the surface of magnesium alloy such as oxide or chromate layers. In this study, single-beam and dual-beam laser heat sources are investigated in relation to mitigation of pores resulting from the presence of the as-received oxide layer on the surface of AZ31B-H24 magnesium alloy during the laser welding process. A fiber laser with a power of up to 4 kW is used to weld samples in a zero-gap lap joint configuration. The effect of dual-beam laser welding with different beam energy ratios is studied on the quality of the weld bead. The purpose of this paper is to identify the beam ratio that best mitigates pore formation in the weld bead. The laser molten pool and the keyhole condition, as well as laser-induced plasma plume are monitored in real-time by use of a high speed charge-coupled device (CCD) camera assisted with a green laser as an illumination source. Tensile and microhardness tests were used to measure the mechanical properties of the laser welded samples. Results showed that a dual-beam laser configuration can effectively mitigate pore formation in the weld bead by a preheating-welding mechanism.

  9. Influence of tool material and rotational speed on mechanical properties of friction stir welded AZ31B magnesium alloy

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    Ugender Singarapu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this investigation, the effect of friction stir welding (FSW parameters such as tool material rotational speed, and welding speed on the mechanical properties of tensile strength, hardness and impact energy of magnesium alloy AZ31B was studied. The experiments were carried out as per Taguchi parametric design concepts and an L9 orthogonal array was used to study the influence of various combinations of process parameters. Statistical optimization technique, ANOVA, was used to determine the optimum levels and to find the significance of each process parameter. The results indicate that rotational speed (RS and traverse speed (TS are the most significant factors, followed by tool material (TM, in deciding the mechanical properties of friction stir processed magnesium alloy. In addition, mathematical models were developed to establish relationship between different process variables and mechanical properties.

  10. Interfacial Reaction Characteristics and Mechanical Properties of Welding-brazing Bonding Between AZ31B Magnesium Alloy and PRO500 Ultra-high Strength Steel

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    CHEN Jian-hua

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Experiments were carried out with TIG welding-brazing of AZ31B magnesium alloy to PRO500 steel using TIG arc as heat source. The interfacial reaction characteristics and mechanical properties of the welding-brazing bonding were investigated. The results show that an effective bonding is achieved between AZ31B magnesium alloy and PRO500 steel by using TIG welding-brazing method. Some spontaneous oxidation reactions result in the formation of a transition zone containing AlFe3 phase with rich oxide. The micro-hardness value of the interfacial transition zone is between that of the AZ31B and the PRO500. Temper softening zone appears due to the welding thermal cycle nearby the bonding position in the interface. A higher heat input makes an increase of the brittle phases and leads to an obvious decrease of the bonding strength.

  11. Enhanced mechanical properties of tungsten inert gas welded AZ31 magnesium alloy joint using two-pass friction stir processing with rapid cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Nan, E-mail: xunan@hhu.edu.cn; Bao, Yefeng

    2016-02-08

    In this study, tungsten inert gas (TIG) welded AZ31 magnesium alloy joint was subjected to two-pass rapid cooling friction stir processing (RC-FSP). The main results show that, two-pass RC-FSP causes the significant dissolution of the coarse eutectic β-Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12} phase into the magnesium matrix and the remarkable grain refinement in the stir zone. The low-hardness region which frequently located at heat-affected zone was eliminated. The stir zone showed ultrafine grains of 3.1 μm, and exhibited a good combination of ultrahigh tensile strength of 284 MPa and large elongation of 7.1%. This work provides an effective strategy to enhance the strength of TIG welded magnesium alloy joint without ductility loss.

  12. Grain refinement of AZ31 magnesium alloy by electromagnetic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The effects of electromagnetic stirring and Al4C3 grain refiner on the grain refinement of semicontinuously cast AZ31 magnesium alloy were discussed in this investigation. The results indicate that electromagnetic stirring has an effective refining effect on the grain size of AZ31 magnesium alloy under the effect of Al4C3 ...

  13. Microstructural characterization and mechanical properties of dissimilar friction welding of 1060 aluminum to AZ31B magnesium alloy

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    Liang, Zhida; Qin, Guoliang, E-mail: glqin@sdu.edu.cn; Wang, Liyuan; Meng, Xiangmeng; Li, Fei

    2015-10-01

    Dissimilar welding of aluminum bars and magnesium bars was produced by the friction welding technique. The interfacial microstructure characteristics was evaluated after friction welding of Al–Mg alloy using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, as well as X-ray diffraction analysis. Friction and forge pressure were selected as variable parameters. The friction time was maintained at 10 s for a rotational speed of 2800 rpm. The chemical compositions of the interfaces of the welded joints were determined by using energy dispersive spectroscopy. Experimental results showed that intermetallic compounds (IMCs), consisting of phase β-Al{sub 3}Mg{sub 2} and γ-Al{sub 12}Mg{sub 17}, were generated in the interfaces of the Al and Mg alloys. When the friction and forge pressure increased the thickness of IMCs layer at the interfaces decreased as a result of more mass discarded from the welding interfaces. Heavy thickness of IMCs layer seriously deteriorated the mechanical properties of the joints. Microcracks were generated along the welded interfaces of all the welded samples. Formation of microcracks could be controlled effectively under the higher friction and forge pressure. Mechanical evaluations were conducted by determining microhardness and the tensile tests. It was observed that the tensile strength of the joints depended on the friction and forge pressure and the maximum tensile strength was 138 MPa.

  14. Microstructural Characteristics and Mechanical Properties of 2205/AZ31B Laminates Fabricated by Explosive Welding

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    Yan Li

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available A bimetal composite of 2205 duplex stainless steel and AZ31B magnesium alloy was cladded successfully through the method of explosive welding. The microstructural characteristics and mechanical properties of 2205/AZ31B bimetal composite are discussed. The interface of 2205/AZ31B bimetallic composite was a less regular wavy morphology with locally melted pockets. Adiabatic shear bands occurred only in the AZ31B side near explosive welding interface. The microstructure observed with EBSD showed a strong refinement near the interface zones. Line scan confirmed that the interface had a short element diffusion zone which would contribute to the metallurgical bonding between 2205 duplex stainless steel and AZ31B magnesium alloy. The value of micro-hardness near the bonding interface of composite plate increased because of work hardening and grain refinement. The tensile shear strength of bonding interface of 2205/AZ31B composite was 105.63 MPa. Tensile strength of 2205/AZ31B composite material was higher than the base AZ31B. There were two abrupt drops in stress in the stress–strain curves of the 2205/AZ31B composite materials.

  15. Grain refinement of AZ31 magnesium alloy by electromagnetic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    cess are discussed; furthermore, effect of holding time on the refinement of AZ31 magnesium alloy was investigated. 2. Experimental. Al4C3 grain refiner was synthesized by powder metallurgy. The raw materials included aluminum powder (99·8% pure,. 50 μm in diameter), graphite powder (99·6% pure, 50 μm in diameter) ...

  16. The Corrosion Protection of Magnesium Alloy AZ31B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danford, M. D.; Mendrek, M. J.; Mitchell, M. L.; Torres, P. D.

    1997-01-01

    Corrosion rates for bare and coated Magnesium alloy AZ31B have been measured. Two coatings, Dow-23(Trademark) and Tagnite(Trademark), have been tested by electrochemical methods and their effectiveness determined. Electrochemical methods employed were the scanning reference electrode technique (SRET), the polarization resistance technique (PR) and the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy technique (EIS). In addition, general corrosion and stress corrosion methods were employed to examine the effectiveness of the above coatings in 90 percent humidity. Results from these studies are presented.

  17. Numerical Simulation and Experiment Study on Extrusion of AZ31 Magnesium Alloy Tube

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    SUN Ying-di

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The extrusion process of typical AZ31 magnesium alloy tube was simulated by using the constitutive model of AZ31 alloys and ALE-based HyperXtrude software. The changes of stress distribution and velocity distribution were analyzed under different conditions, through the adjustment of three structural parameters, including the height, big round corner and gradient of weld chamber. The results show that the pressure near the work zone in the weld chamber decrease with the increase of the height of weld chamber, the maximum value and average value of the pressure in the weld chamber are decreasing with the increase of big round corner of weld chamber, and the pressure in the port holes and weld chamber increases with the increase of the gradient of weld chamber. The minimum variance of metal flow rate is achieved in the height of weld chamber with 16mm, big round corner with 18mm and gradient of weld chamber with 15°. The optimized structure alleviates the issues of stress concentration and non-homogeneous flowing velocity. The final die is proved to be capable of producing the qualified products and the microstructure after extrusion is uniform and fine.

  18. High speed cutting of AZ31 magnesium alloy

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    Liwei Lu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Using LBR-370 numerical control lathe, high speed cutting was applied to AZ31 magnesium alloy. The influence of cutting parameters on microstructure, surface roughness and machining hardening were investigated by using the methods of single factor and orthogonal experiment. The results show that the cutting parameters have an important effect on microstructure, surface roughness and machine hardening. The depth of stress layer, roughness and hardening present a declining tendency with the increase of the cutting speed and also increase with the augment of the cutting depth and feed rate. Moreover, we established a prediction model of the roughness, which has an important guidance on actual machining process of magnesium alloy.

  19. Electrochemical properties of fine-grained AZ31 magnesium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadzima, Branislav; Bukovina, Michal [Univ. of Zilina (Slovakia). Dept. of Materials Engineering; Janecek, Milos; Kral, Robert [Charles Univ., Dept. of Physics of Materials, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2009-09-15

    The influence of equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) on the microstructure changes of magnesium alloy AZ31 was investigated. The microstructure changes were correlated with electrochemical characteristics of the surface. Eight passes of ECAP resulted in significant grain refinement (factor 100) of the initial squeeze-cast (SC) alloy. The influence of microstructure changes on electrochemical properties of the surface was evaluated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The variation of electrochemical characteristics of the surface of the SC and ECAP alloy was determined after 3 and 7-day exposure in the corrosion solution of 0.1 M NaCl. The fine-grained deformed structure after ECAP was found to have significantly higher charge transfer resistance as compared to the squeeze-cast material. (orig.)

  20. Comportamiento de la corrosión de aleaciones de magnesio AZ31-B en ambiente marino, modificadas por el proceso de fricción-agitación Corrosion behavior in marine environment of magnesium alloy AZ31-B welded by friction-agitation process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willian Aperador Chaparro

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available En el presente artículo se estudia el comportamiento de la corrosión de la aleación de magnesio AZ31-B en ambiente marino simulado, modificada mediante el proceso de fricción-agitación (PFA, con el fin de determinar el efecto de las variables del proceso, velocidad de rotación y velocidad de avance. Se llevaron a cabo análisis mediante espectroscopia de impedancia electroquímica y curvas de polarización potencio-dinámicas (Tafel. Adicionalmente, se determinó la microestructura en las zonas del cordón de soldadura a través de metalografía óptica. Finalmente, se analizaron los productos de corrosión formados en la superficie de las muestras por medio del microscopio electrónico de barrido (SEM equipado con el analizador químico por EDS. Se observó que una relación de velocidad de avance/velocidad de rotación mayor produce menor velocidad de corrosión y con ello mayor resistencia a la corrosión en medios salinos, al parecer relacionados con el gran tamaño de grano en la zona agitada, que corresponde a más entrada de calor.The corrosion behavior of AZ31B magnesium alloy modified by friction stir processing (FSP was studied in simulated marine environment, in order to determine the effect of process variables rotation speed and travel speed. The corrosion analysis was carried upon by means of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potentiodynamic polarization curves (Tafel, metallographic analysis of the welded zones was done by optical microscopy and the chemical analysis of the corrosion products were done by using scanning electron microscope (SEM, equipped with EDS analyzer. It was observed that the increase of the rate rotation speed/travel speed of the process produces a decrease in the corrosion rate and the corresponding increase of the corrosion resistance in marine environment, apparently related to the higher grain size found in the stir zone, corresponding to a higher heat input.

  1. Parameters optimization for friction spot welding of AZ31 magnesium alloy by Taguchi method Otimização dos parâmetros de soldagem por fricção por ponto da liga de magnésio AZ31 pelo método de Taguchi

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    Leonardo Contri Campanelli

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Friction spot welding (FSpW is a solid state welding process suitable for producing spot-like joints, especially in lightweight materials, which are particularly interesting due to the weight saving potential. The plunging of an especially designed non-consumable and rotating tool creates a connection between overlapped sheets through frictional heat and plastic deformation. Minimum material loss is observed, and therefore a fully consolidated joint with flat surface (no keyhole is obtained. In the current study, the effect of FSpW parameters, such as rotational speed, plunge depth and dwell time, on lap shear strength of AZ31 magnesium alloy joints was investigated. The optimization of input process parameters was carried out through Taguchi approach of DOE. Analysis of variance was applied to determine the individual importance of each parameter. Main effect plots were used to indicate the best levels for maximizing lap shear strength. The results show that tool plunge depth has the higher effect on the weld strength, followed by rotational speed and dwell time.A soldagem por fricção por ponto (FSpW é um processo de soldagem no estado sólido adequado para a produção de juntas pontuais, especialmente em materiais leves, que são particularmente interessantes devido ao potencial de redução de peso. A penetração de uma ferramenta não-consumível e rotacional especialmente desenvolvida cria uma junção entre as placas sobrepostas através de calor por fricção e deformação plástica. A perda de material é mínima, obtendo-se, portanto, uma junta totalmente consolidada com superfície plana (sem furo. Neste trabalho, investigou-se o efeito dos parâmetros do FSpW, tais como velocidade de rotação, profundidade de penetração e tempo de residência, na resistência ao cisalhamento das juntas de liga de magnésio AZ31. A otimização dos parâmetros de entrada do processo foi realizada através do método de Taguchi de DOE. A an

  2. Fabrication of bimodal size SiCp reinforced AZ31B magnesium matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, M.J., E-mail: smjiekaka@163.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Wang, X.J., E-mail: xjwang@hit.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Zhang, M.F. [Hisense Ronshen Co., Ltd., Yingkou 115000 (China); Hu, X.S.; Zheng, M.Y.; Wu, K. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2014-04-01

    Bimodal sized (Micro-particles: m and Nano-particles: n) SiC particulates (SiCp) reinforced magnesium matrix composites with different volume fractions of micro-particles (1n+4p, 1n+9p and 1n+14p) were prepared by a semisolid stirring assisted ultrasonic vibration method. Both the as-cast SiCp/AZ31B composites and the AZ31B alloy were extruded at 350 °C with the extrusion ratio of 12:1 at a constant ram speed of 15 mm/s. The microstructure investigation was carried out by optical microscope (OM), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results show that the distribution of bimodal size SiCp and the mechanical properties of the AZ31B alloy were significantly improved after hot extrusion. When the volume fraction of nano SiCp is 1 vol%, both the yield strength and ultimate tensile strength of the AZ31B/SiC/1n+14p composite are stronger than that of the AZ31B/SiC/1n+4p and AZ31B/SiC/1n+9p composites, while the elongation to fracture was decreased comparing with the AZ31B/SiC/1n+4p and AZ31B/SiC/1n+9p composites.

  3. Joining of AZ31 and AZ91 Mg alloys by friction stir welding

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    B. Ratna Sunil

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Two dissimilar magnesium (Mg alloy sheets, one with low aluminium (AZ31 and another with high aluminium (AZ91 content, were successfully joined by friction stir welding (FSW. The effect of process parameters on the formation of hot cracks was investigated. A sound metallurgical joint was obtained at optimized process parameters (1400 rpm with 25 mm/min feed which contained fine grains and distributed β (Mg17Al12 phase within the nugget zone. An increasing trend in the hardness measurements has also confirmed more amount of dissolution of aluminium within the nugget zone. A sharp interface between nugget zone and thermo mechanical affected zone (TMAZ was clearly noticed at the AZ31 Mg alloy side (advancing but not on the AZ91 Mg alloy side (retreating. From the results it can be concluded that FSW can be effectively used to join dissimilar metals, particularly difficult to process metals such as Mg alloys, and hot cracking can be completely eliminated by choosing appropriate process parameters to achieve sound joint.

  4. Rapid coating of AZ31 magnesium alloy with calcium deficient hydroxyapatite using microwave energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Yufu, E-mail: Yufu.Ren@rockets.utoledo.edu [Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Zhou, Huan [Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Health Sciences, Changzhou University, Changzhou, Jiangsu (China); Nabiyouni, Maryam [Department of Bioengineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Bhaduri, Sarit B. [Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Division of Dentistry, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Due to their unique biodegradability, magnesium alloys have been recognized as suitable metallic implant materials for degradable bone implants and bioresorbable cardiovascular stents. However, the extremely high degradation rate of magnesium alloys in physiological environment has restricted its practical application. This paper reports the use of a novel microwave assisted coating technology to improve the in vitro corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of Mg alloy AZ31. Results indicate that a dense calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA) layer was uniformly coated on a AZ31 substrate in less than 10 min. Weight loss measurement and SEM were used to evaluate corrosion behaviors in vitro of coated samples and of non-coated samples. It was seen that CDHA coatings remarkably reduced the mass loss of AZ31 alloy after 7 days of immersion in SBF. In addition, the prompt precipitation of bone-like apatite layer on the sample surface during immersion demonstrated a good bioactivity of the CDHA coatings. Proliferation of osteoblast cells was promoted in 5 days of incubation, which indicated that the CDHA coatings could improve the cytocompatibility of the AZ31 alloy. All the results suggest that the CDHA coatings, serving as a protective layer, can enhance the corrosion resistance and biological response of magnesium alloys. Furthermore, this microwave assisted coating technology could be a promising method for rapid surface modification of biomedical materials. - Highlights: • A microwave assisted coating process for biodegradable Mg alloy. • CDHA coatings were successfully developed on AZ31 alloy in minutes. • The as-deposited CDHA coatings significantly reduced the degradation rate of AZ31 alloy. • The CDHA coated AZ31 alloy showed good bioactivity and biocompatibility in vitro. • The microwave assisted coating process can be used as rapid surface modification for bioimplants.

  5. Effects of organic acid pickling on the corrosion resistance of magnesium alloy AZ31 sheet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nwaogu, Ugochukwu Chibuzoh; Blawert, C.; Scharnagl, N.

    2010-01-01

    Organic acids were used to clean AZ31 magnesium alloy sheet and the effect of the cleaning processes on the surface condition and corrosion performance of the alloy was investigated. Organic acid cleanings reduced the surface impurities and enhanced the corrosion resistance. Removal of at least 4...

  6. Notch sensitivity of cast AZ31 magnesium alloy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kunz, Ludvík; Lukáš, Petr; Estrin, Y.; Zúberová, Z.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 3 (2005), s. 88-91 ISSN 1335-0803. [Degradácia konštrukčných materiálov 2005. Terchová - Biely Potok, 05.09.2005-07.09.2005] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1P05ME804 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : notch sensitivity * magnesium alloy * fatigue lifetime Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy

  7. Hammer forging process of lever drop forging from AZ31 magnesium alloy

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    A. Gontarz

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The results of theoretical and experimental analysis of hammer forging process of lever drop forging from AZ31 magnesium alloy are presented in this paper. In order to design a process guaranteeing obtaining a proper product, numerous simulations were made, in which material flow kinematics, strain and damage criterion distributions and forging energy were analyzed. On the basis of the obtained results, the analysis of limiting phenomena, which could appear during the process, was made. Experimental tests in industrial conditions according to designed technology were carried out. Good quality of drop forgings were obtained. On the basis of conducted research, it was stated that hammer forging of lever drop forging from AZ31 magnesium alloy is possible.

  8. Theoretical and experimental research of hammer forging process of RIM from AZ31 magnesium alloy

    OpenAIRE

    Gontarz, A.

    2014-01-01

    The results of theoretical analysis and experimental tests of hammer forging process of rim part from AZ31 magnesium alloy are presented in this paper. On the basis of numerical simulation results, the analysis of limiting phenomena was made. These phenomena include: possibility of overlapping presence, not filling of die impression, overheating of material and cracks. The results of theoretical analysis provided the support for planning of experimental tests in industrial conditions. Forging...

  9. Hammer forging process of lever drop forging from AZ31 magnesium alloy

    OpenAIRE

    Gontarz, A.; Z. Pater; K. Drozdowski

    2013-01-01

    The results of theoretical and experimental analysis of hammer forging process of lever drop forging from AZ31 magnesium alloy are presented in this paper. In order to design a process guaranteeing obtaining a proper product, numerous simulations were made, in which material flow kinematics, strain and damage criterion distributions and forging energy were analyzed. On the basis of the obtained results, the analysis of limiting phenomena, which could appear during the process, was made. Exper...

  10. RGDC Peptide-Induced Biomimetic Calcium Phosphate Coating Formed on AZ31 Magnesium Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Lin; Wang, Lina; Fan, Lingying; Xiao, Wenjun; Lin, Bingpeng; Xu, Yimeng; Liang, Jun; Cao, Baocheng

    2017-01-01

    Magnesium alloys as biodegradable metal implants have received a lot of interest in biomedical applications. However, magnesium alloys have extremely high corrosion rates a in physiological environment, which have limited their application in the orthopedic field. In this study, calcium phosphate compounds (Ca–P) coating was prepared by arginine–glycine–aspartic acid–cysteine (RGDC) peptide-induced mineralization in 1.5 simulated body fluid (SBF) to improve the corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of the AZ31 magnesium alloys. The adhesion of Ca–P coating to the AZ31 substrates was evaluated by a scratch test. Corrosion resistance and cytocompatibility of the Ca–P coating were investigated. The results showed that the RGDC could effectively promote the nucleation and crystallization of the Ca–P coating and the Ca–P coating had poor adhesion to the AZ31 substrates. The corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of the biomimetic Ca–P coating Mg alloys were greatly improved compared with that of the uncoated sample. PMID:28772717

  11. Characteristics of AZ31 Mg alloy joint using automatic TIG welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong-tao; Zhou, Ji-xue; Zhao, Dong-qing; Liu, Yun-teng; Wu, Jian-hua; Yang, Yuan-sheng; Ma, Bai-chang; Zhuang, Hai-hua

    2017-01-01

    The automatic tungsten-inert gas welding (ATIGW) of AZ31 Mg alloys was performed using a six-axis robot. The evolution of the microstructure and texture of the AZ31 auto-welded joints was studied by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and electron backscatter diffraction. The ATIGW process resulted in coarse recrystallized grains in the heat affected zone (HAZ) and epitaxial growth of columnar grains in the fusion zone (FZ). Substantial changes of texture between the base material (BM) and the FZ were detected. The {0002} basal plane in the BM was largely parallel to the sheet rolling plane, whereas the c-axis of the crystal lattice in the FZ inclined approximately 25° with respect to the welding direction. The maximum pole density increased from 9.45 in the BM to 12.9 in the FZ. The microhardness distribution, tensile properties, and fracture features of the AZ31 auto-welded joints were also investigated.

  12. Transition in Deformation Mechanism of AZ31 Magnesium Alloy during High-Temperature Tensile Deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masafumi Noda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium alloys can be used for reducing the weight of various structural products, because of their high specific strength. They have attracted considerable attention as materials with a reduced environmental load, since they help to save both resources and energy. In order to use Mg alloys for manufacturing vehicles, it is important to investigate the deformation mechanism and transition point for optimizing the material and vehicle design. In this study, we investigated the transition of the deformation mechanism during the high-temperature uniaxial tensile deformation of the AZ31 Mg alloy. At a test temperature of 523 K and an initial strain rate of 3×10−3 s-1, the AZ31 Mg alloy (mean grain size: ~5 μm exhibited stable deformation behavior and the deformation mechanism changed to one dominated by grain boundary sliding.

  13. Theoretical and experimental research of hammer forging process of RIM from AZ31 magnesium alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gontarz

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The results of theoretical analysis and experimental tests of hammer forging process of rim part from AZ31 magnesium alloy are presented in this paper. On the basis of numerical simulation results, the analysis of limiting phenomena was made. These phenomena include: possibility of overlapping presence, not filling of die impression, overheating of material and cracks. The results of theoretical analysis provided the support for planning of experimental tests in industrial conditions. Forging tests were conducted in one of Polish forming plants, applying steam-air hammer of blow energy 63 kJ. On the basis of experimental verification, it was stated that it is possible to obtain rim forging from AZ31 alloy of assumed quality in the hammer forging process.

  14. Mechanical properties and microstructural evaluation of AA1100 to AZ31 dissimilar friction stir welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azizieh, M., E-mail: azizieh@gmail.com [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Ahvaz Branch, Islamic Azad University, Ahvaz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadeghi Alavijeh, A. [School of Mechatronic Systems Engineering, Simon Fraser University, 250-13450 102 Avenue, Surrey, BC V3T 0A3 (Canada); Abbasi, M. [High Temperature Energy Materials, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul, 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Balak, Z. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Ahvaz Branch, Islamic Azad University, Ahvaz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kim, H.S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang, 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    In this paper, microstructure and mechanical properties of dissimilar friction stir welds of AA1100 and AZ31 were investigated to understand the effects of rotational and travel speed as well as pin position. The tensile results of welded samples revealed that the sound welds were formed when the stirring pin deviated from the centreline to the AZ31 side. The X-ray diffraction shows that Al{sub 3}Mg{sub 2} and Al{sub 12}Mg{sub 17} intermetallics formation occurs in the stir zone during the welding process. High hardness of these intermetallic phases increased the hardness of the stir zone to 110 Hv. The best tensile results were obtained in the sample processed in the range of 28–32 (rev/mm) rotational to travel speed ratio. - Highlights: • For Al to Mg friction stir welding, tool offset must be to Mg side. • There is an optimum rotational speed for obtain the highest strength. • Intermetallics form in any welding condition. • The volume fraction of intermetallic is directly related to FSW peak temperature.

  15. Diffusion Bonding Behavior and Characterization of Joints Made Between 316L Stainless Steel Alloy and AZ31 Magnesium Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elthalabawy, Waled Mohamed

    The 316L austenitic stainless steel and AZ31 magnesium alloy have physical and mechanical properties which makes these alloys suitable in a number of high technology based industries such as the aerospace and automotive sectors. However, for these alloys to be used in engineering applications, components must be fabricated and joined successfully. The differences in the physical and metallurgical properties between these two alloys prevents the use of conventional fusion welding processes commonly employed in aerospace and transport industry. Therefore, alternative techniques need to be developed and diffusion bonding technology is a process that has considerable potential to join these two dissimilar alloys. In this research work both solid-state and transient liquid phase (TLP) bonding processes were applied. The solid-state bonding of 316L steel to AZ31 magnesium alloy was possible at a bonding temperature of 550°C for 120 minutes using a pressure of 1.3 MPa. The interface characterization of the joint showed a thin intermetallic zone rich in Fe-Al was responsible for providing a metallurgical bond. However, low joint shear strengths were recorded and this was attributed to the poor surface to surface contact. The macro-deformation of the AZ31 alloy prevented the use of higher bonding pressures and longer bonding times. In order to overcome these problems, the TLP bonding process was implemented using pure Cu and Ni foils as interlayers which produced a eutectic phase at the bonding temperature. This research identified the bonding mechanism through microstructural and differential scanning calorimetry investigations. The microstructural characterization of the TLP joints identified intermetallics which became concentrated along the 316L steel/AZ31 bond interface due to the "pushing effect" of the solid/liquid interface during isothermal solidification stage of bonding. The size and concentration of the intermetallics had a noticeable effect on the final joint

  16. Corrosion behavior of friction stir welded AZ31B Mg alloy - Al6063 alloy joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ratna Sunil

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, AZ31B Mg alloy and Al6063 alloy-rolled sheets were successfully joined by friction stir welding. Microstructural studies revealed a sound joint with good mechanical mixing of both the alloys at the nugget zone. Corrosion performance of the joint was assessed by immersing in 3.5% NaCl solution for different intervals of time and the corrosion rate was calculated. The joint has undergone severe corrosion attack compared with both the base materials (AZ31B and Al6063 alloys. The predominant corrosion mechanism behind the high corrosion rate of the joint was found to be high galvanic corrosion. From the results, it can be suggested that the severe corrosion of dissimilar Mg–Al joints must be considered as a valid input while designing structures intended to work in corroding environment.

  17. Corrosion of magnesium alloy AZ31 screws is dependent on the implantation site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willbold, E. [Laboratory for Biomechanics and Biomaterials, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Hannover Medical School, Anna-von-Borries-Strasse 1-7, D - 30625 Hannover (Germany); Kaya, A.A. [Mugla University, Engineering Faculty, Metallurgy and Materials Engineering Department, Mugla (Turkey); Kaya, R.A. [MedicalPark Hospital, Kueltuer Sok No:1, 34160 Bahcelievler, Istanbul (Turkey); Beckmann, F. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Institute of Materials Research, Max-Planck-Str.1, D - 21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Witte, F., E-mail: witte.frank@mh-hannover.de [Laboratory for Biomechanics and Biomaterials, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Hannover Medical School, Anna-von-Borries-Strasse 1-7, D - 30625 Hannover (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    The corrosion of biodegradable materials is a crucial issue in implant development. Among other materials, magnesium and magnesium based alloys are one of the most promising candidates. Since the corrosion of biodegradable materials depends on different physiological parameters like pH or ion concentrations, the corrosion might be different in different biological environments. To investigate this issue, we produced screws from magnesium alloy AZ31 and implanted them into the hip bone of 14 sheep. After 3 and 6 months, the screws were explanted and analyzed with synchrotron-radiation based micro-computed tomography and hard tissue histology. We found considerable differences in the corrosion behavior of the magnesium screws with respect to its original tissue location. However, we could detect a normal immunological tissue response.

  18. Influence of inorganic acid pickling on the corrosion resistance of magnesium alloy AZ31 sheet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nwaogu, Ugochukwu Chibuzoh; Blawert, C.; Scharnagl, N.

    2009-01-01

    the corrosion resistance of the alloy. The cleaning efficiency of the three acids used and the corrosion protection mechanisms were found to be remarkably different. Best corrosion results were obtained with nitric acid, followed closely by phosphoric acid. Only the sulphuric acid failed more or less when......Surface contaminants as a result of thermo-mechanical processing of magnesium alloys, e.g. sheet rolling, can have a negative effect on the corrosion resistance of magnesium alloys. Especially contaminants such as Fe, Ni and Cu, left on the surface of magnesium alloys result in the formation...... of micro-galvanic couples and can therefore increase corrosion attack on these alloys. Due to this influence they should be removed to obtain good corrosion resistance. In this study, the effect of inorganic acid pickling on the corrosion behaviour of a commercial AZ31 magnesium alloy sheet...

  19. Mechanical properties of homogenized twin-roll cast and conventionally cast AZ31 magnesium alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariia Zimina

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The improvement of mechanical properties of magnesium alloys nowadays is very important, because of the variety of industrial applications. For this goal, the number of casting techniques and further treatments were developed. Among the continuous casting techniques, which allow producing long strips of the alloys, is twin-roll casting. Using this process one can get the magnesium alloy with finest microstructure and higher specific strength. In this paper the comparison of tensile properties of conventionally cast and twin-roll cast AZ31 magnesium alloys was made. Tensile tests were carried out with constant strain rate 10-3 s-1 at temperatures ranging from 100 to 300 °C. Both materials were tested in as-cast state and after homogenization treatment at 450 °C for 10 hours. The investigation showed that there are no significant changes in ductility of AZ31 conventionally cast alloy even after heat treatment, while the ductility of twin-roll cast alloy increases.

  20. Effect of rolling temperature of the magnesium alloy AZ31B formability; Efeito da temperatura de laminacao na deformabilidade da liga de magnesio AZ31B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catorceno, L.L.C.; Zimmermann, A.J.O.; Padilha, A.F., E-mail: litzy.catorceno@poli.usp.b [Universidade de Sao Paulo (DEMM/EP/USP), SP (Brazil). Escola Politecnica. Dept. de Engenharia Metalurgica e de Materiais

    2010-07-01

    The magnesium alloy AZ31B presents an interesting set of properties, which makes it potential candidate for applications in automotive and aeronautics. The main limitation of magnesium alloys is the low capacity of plastic forming at room temperature. The main motivation of this project is to understand and control the microstructure and crystallographic texture of magnesium alloys, to improve their formability. The effect of rolling temperature on the formability of the alloy was studied in this stage of the project. The alloy in the form of annealed and recrystallized sheets (2 mm thick) was deformed by rolling at four different temperatures: 25, 100, 200 and 250 deg C. The microstructural characterization was achieved using several complementary techniques of microstructural analysis, such as optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray analysis by energy dispersive, X-ray diffraction and microhardness. Results about the effect of rolling temperature on the alloy formability were presented and discussed. (author)

  1. Dynamic recrystallization behavior of AZ31 magnesium alloy processed by alternate forward extrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng; Liu, Yang; Li, Xu-Bo

    2017-09-01

    One of the important factors that affect the microstructure and properties of extruded products is recrystallization behavior. Alternate forward extrusion (AFE) is a new type of metal extrusion process with strong potential. In this paper, we carried out the AFE process experiments of as-cast AZ31 magnesium alloy and obtained extrusion bar whose microstructure and deformation mechanism were analyzed by means of optical microscopy, electron backscattered diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The experimental results indicated that homogeneous fine-grained structure with mean grain size of 3.91 μm was obtained after AFE at 573 K. The dominant reason of grain refinement was considered the dynamic recrystallization (DRX) induced by strain localization and shear plastic deformation. In the 573-673 K range, the yield strength, tensile strength and elongation of the composite mechanical properties are reduced accordingly with the increase of the forming temperature. Shown as in relevant statistics, the proportion of the large-angle grain boundaries decreased significantly. The above results provide an important scientific basis of the scheme formulation and active control on microstructure and property for AZ31 magnesium alloy AFE process.

  2. Durability of AZ31 magnesium biodegradable alloys polydopamine aided: Part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tullio Monetta

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of magnesium alloys, as a biodegradable medical device, is an interesting challenge for the biomaterials field. Its rapid degradation and the release of hydrogen, when exposed to biological fluids, are the main drawbacks for clinical applications. In this work, a coating made of polydopamine (PDOPA, is used as an intermediate layer to decrease the degradation rate of AZ31 magnesium alloy/polymeric coating system, when exposed to Hank's solution. Experimental results highlighted: (i the formation of a thin PDOPA layer, (ii an increased adhesion in the organic coating/metallic substrate system, (iii a decrease of two orders of magnitude of the corrosion rate when the PDOPA film is used together with an external organic coating, (iv the efficacy in the use of PDODA due to the synergistic effect of both, physical and chemical, interactions between the PDOPA layer and the organic coating.

  3. TiO2 Deposition on AZ31 Magnesium Alloy Using Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leon White

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO has been used in the past as a useful surface treatment technique to improve the anticorrosion properties of Mg alloys by forming protective layer. Coatings were prepared on AZ31 magnesium alloy in phosphate electrolyte with the addition of TiO2 nanoparticles using plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO. This present work focuses on developing a TiO2 functional coating to create a novel electrophotocatalyst while observing the surface morphology, structure, composition, and corrosion resistance of the PEO coating. Microstructural characterization of the coating was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM followed by image analysis and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDX. The corrosion resistance of the PEO treated samples was evaluated with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS and DC polarization tests in 3.5 wt.% NaCl. The XRD pattern shows that the components of the oxide film include Mg from the substrate as well as MgO and Mg2TiO4 due to the TiO2 nanoparticle addition. The results show that the PEO coating with TiO2 nanoparticles did improve the corrosion resistance when compared to the AZ31 substrate alloy.

  4. Influence of second phase particles on fracture toughness in AZ31 magnesium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, T.; Somekawa, H. [Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Osaka Prefecture Univ., Sakai (Japan); Takara, A.; Nishikawa, Y. [Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd., Osaka (Japan); Higashi, K. [Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Osaka Prefecture Univ., Sakai (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    Three kinds of thin AZ31 wrought magnesium alloys sheets were used in order to investigate the influence of the second phase particles on fracture toughness. From the theoretical model, the ratio of {lambda}{sub p}/d{sub p} would be estimated 5 {proportional_to} 6. On the other hand, from the microstructural observation, average particle spacing on each material was sample A: 13.1 {mu}m, sample B: 14.1, and sample C: 12 {mu}. In addition, average particle size on each sample was sample A: 2.1, sample B: 1.9, and sample C: 2.3 {mu}m. Therefore, the ratio of {lambda}{sub p}/d{sub p} calculated from fracture surface observation would be predicted 6 {proportional_to} 7. In comparison with the result of the prediction by theoretical analysis was in good agreement with the result of fracture toughness observation. It was found that the variation in plane-strain fracture toughness on AZ31 were affected by both of particle spacing and particle size. (orig.)

  5. Effect of Mucin and Bicarbonate Ion on Corrosion Behavior of AZ31 Magnesium Alloy for Airway Stents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongseok Jang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The biodegradable ability of magnesium alloys is an attractive feature for tracheal stents since they can be absorbed by the body through gradual degradation after healing of the airway structure, which can reduce the risk of inflammation caused by long-term implantation and prevent the repetitive surgery for removal of existing stent. In this study, the effects of bicarbonate ion (HCO3− and mucin in Gamble’s solution on the corrosion behavior of AZ31 magnesium alloy were investigated, using immersion and electrochemical tests to systematically identify the biodegradation kinetics of magnesium alloy under in vitro environment, mimicking the epithelial mucus surfaces in a trachea for development of biodegradable airway stents. Analysis of corrosion products after immersion test was performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX and X-ray diffraction (XRD. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS was used to identify the effects of bicarbonate ions and mucin on the corrosion behavior of AZ31 magnesium alloys with the temporal change of corrosion resistance. The results show that the increase of the bicarbonate ions in Gamble’s solution accelerates the dissolution of AZ31 magnesium alloy, while the addition of mucin retards the corrosion. The experimental data in this work is intended to be used as foundational knowledge to predict the corrosion behavior of AZ31 magnesium alloy in the airway environment while providing degradation information for future in vivo studies.

  6. Effect of surface treatment on wear behavior of magnesium alloy AZ31

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Fouad

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, wear test has been performed on wrought magnesium alloy AZ31 samples. The test samples were in different conditions as; in the as cast alloy or after undergoing different surface treatment of the wrought alloy. The surface treatments included ball burnishing, swaging and shot peening. The shot peening is done at two main pressure loads; 0.1 and 0.3 bars, while other parameters are held constant. The test results show that the wear worst results were observed in the as cast sample at pressure load 0.3 bars, while the shot peening sample has the worst wear rate among all samples at pressure load of 0.1 bars. On the other hand, the hardness test showed that the swaged sample has the highest hardness value among all samples.

  7. HIGH STRAIN RATE BEHAVIOUR OF AN AZ31 + 0.5 Ca MAGNESIUM ALLOY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Pešička

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reports behaviour of magnesium alloy AZ31 (nominal composition 3 % Al - 1 % Zn – balance Mg with an addition of 0.5 wt. % Ca at high strain rates. Samples were prepared by the squeeze cast technology. Dynamic compression Hopkinson tests were performed at room temperature with impact velocities ranging from 11.2 to 21.9 m.s-1. A rapid increase of the flow stress and the strain rate sensitivity was observed at high strain rates. Transmission electron microscopy showed extremely high dislocation density and mechanical twins of two types. Adiabatic shear banding is discussed as the reason for the observed behaviour at high strain rates.

  8. Chitosan coatings crosslinked with genipin for corrosion protection of AZ31 magnesium alloy sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Y Pozzo, Ludmila; da Conceição, Thiago F; Spinelli, Almir; Scharnagl, Nico; Pires, Alfredo T N

    2018-02-01

    In this study, coatings of chitosan crosslinked with genipin were prepared on sheets of AZ31 magnesium alloy and their corrosion protection properties were characterized by means of potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The coatings were also characterized by means of FTIR and XPS. It was observed that the crosslinking process decreases the corrosion current and shifts the corrosion potential of the alloy to less negative values. The EIS analysis demonstrated that the crosslinking process increases the maximum impedance after short and long exposure times. The superior performance of the crosslinked coatings is related to a lower degree of swelling, as observed in the swelling tests carried out on free-standing films. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Grain boundary sliding mechanism during high temperature deformation of AZ31 Magnesium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roodposhti, Peiman Shahbeigi, E-mail: pshahbe@ncsu.edu [North Carolina State University (United States); University of Connecticut (United States); Sarkar, Apu; Murty, Korukonda Linga [North Carolina State University (United States); Brody, Harold [University of Connecticut (United States); Scattergood, Ronald [North Carolina State University (United States)

    2016-07-04

    High temperature tensile creep tests were conducted on AZ31 Magnesium alloy at low stress range of 1–13 MPa to clarify the existence of grain boundary sliding (GBS) mechanism during creep deformation. Experimental data within the GBS regime shows the stress exponent is ~2 and the activation energy value is close to that for grain boundary diffusion. Analyses of the fracture surface of the sample revealed that the GBS provides many stress concentrated sites for diffusional cavities formation and leads to premature failure. Scanning electron microscopy images show the appearances of both ductile and brittle type fracture mechanism. X-ray diffraction line profile analysis (based on Williamson-Hall technique) shows a reduction in dislocation density due to dynamic recovery (DRV). A correlation between experimental data and Langdon's model for GBS was also demonstrated.

  10. Electrochemical Performance Estimation of Anodized AZ31B Magnesium Alloy as Function of Change in the Current Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girón, L.; Aperador, W.; Tirado, L.; Franco, F.; Caicedo, J. C.

    2017-08-01

    The anodized AZ31B magnesium alloys were synthesized via electrodeposition processes. The aim of this work was to determine the electrochemical behavior of magnesium alloys by using anodized alloys as a protective coating. The anodized alloys were characterized by x-ray diffraction, exhibiting the crystallography orientation for Mg and MgO phases. The x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to determine the chemical composition of anodized magnesium alloys. By using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and Tafel curves, it was possible to estimate the electrochemical behavior of anodized AZ31B magnesium alloys in Hank's balanced salt solution (HBSS). Scanning electron microscopy was performed to analyze chemical changes and morphological surface changes on anodized Mg alloys due to the reaction in HBSS/anodized magnesium surface interface. Electrochemical behavior in HBSS indicates that the coatings may be a promising material for biomedical industry.

  11. On numerical modeling of low-head direct chill ingot caster for magnesium alloy AZ31

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mainul Hasan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive 3D turbulent CFD study has been carried out to simulate a Low-Head (LH vertical Direct Chill (DC rolling ingot caster for the common magnesium alloy AZ31. The model used in this study takes into account the coupled laminar/turbulent melt flow and solidification aspects of the process and is based on the control-volume finite-difference approach. Following the aluminum/magnesium DC casting industrial practices, the LH mold is taken as 30 mm with a hot top of 60 mm. The previously verified in-house code has been modified to model the present casting process. Important quantitative results are obtained for four casting speeds, for three inlet melt pouring temperatures (superheats and for three metal-mold contact heat transfer coefficients for the steady state operational phase of the caster. The variable cooling water temperatures reported by the industry are considered for the primary and secondary cooling zones during the simulations. Specifically, the temperature and velocity fields, sump depth and sump profiles, mushy region thickness, solid shell thickness at the exit of the mold and axial temperature profiles at the center and at three strategic locations at the surface of the slab are presented and discussed.

  12. Study of twinning behaviors of rolled AZ31 magnesium alloy by interrupted in situ compressive tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Dewen [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Magnesium Alloys, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Liu, Tianmo, E-mail: tmliu@cqu.edu.cn [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Magnesium Alloys, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Shi, Dongfeng; Chen, Huicong [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Magnesium Alloys, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Chen, Hongbing [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); College of Engineering and Technology, Southwest University, Chongqing 400716 (China)

    2016-01-20

    In this paper rolled AZ31 magnesium alloy was deformed by interrupted in situ compressive tests. Compressive and re-compressive tests were conducted along rolling direction (RD). It is discovered that the yield strength of re-compression is enhanced due to grain refinement by {10–12} tensile twins. Twinning activation and evolution are evidenced by electron backscatter diffraction. Correlations with grain orientation and boundary misorientation are observed in the region of twins that arise at grain boundaries. The distributions of grain boundary misorientation associated with twin nucleation are mapped. It is found that nucleation of twin is mainly controlled by the initial texture, and is more easy at low misorientation grain boundaries. The growth of twins depend on two modes: the thickening of the existing twin lamellae and new twins is nucleated at grain boundary. With increasing compressive strain, the growth and coalescence of twins eventually encompassed the whole grain. Meanwhile, the basal texture is weaker after compression due to the propagation and coalescence of tensile twins.

  13. Wettability and corrosion of alumina embedded nanocomposite MAO coating on nanocrystalline AZ31B magnesium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gheytani, M.; Aliofkhazraei, M., E-mail: maliofkh@gmail.com; Bagheri, H.R.; Masiha, H.R.; Rouhaghdam, A. Sabour

    2015-11-15

    In this paper, micro- and nanocrystalline AZ31B magnesium alloy were coated by micro-arc oxidation method. In order to fabricate nanocrystalline surface layer, surface mechanical attrition treatment was performed and nano-grains with average size of 5–10 nm were formed on the surface of the samples. Coating process was carried out at different conditions including two coating times and two types of electrolyte. Alumina nanoparticles were utilized as suspension in electrolyte to form nanocomposite coatings by micro-arc oxidation method. Potentiodynamic polarization, percentage of porosity, and wettability tests were performed to study various characteristics of the coated samples. The results of scanning electron microscope imply that samples coated in silicate-based electrolyte involve much lower surface porosity (∼25%). Besides, the results of wettability test indicated that the maximum surface tension with deionized water is for nanocrystalline sample. In this regard, the sample coated in silicate-based suspension was 4 times more hydrophilic than the microcrystalline sample. - Highlights: • MAO in phosphate electrolyte needs higher energy as compared to silicate electrolyte. • Less porosity and finer grain size on free surface of the silicate-based coatings. • Observed porosity from top surface of coating shows the effect of the final MAO sparks. • SMAT affects surface roughness and accelerates growth kinetics.

  14. Variant selection of primary extension twins in AZ31 magnesium deformed at 400 °C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, X., E-mail: liuxiao0105@163.com [College of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Xiangtan, Hunan 411201 (China); State Key Laboratory of Advanced Design and Manufacturing for Vehicle Body, Hunan University, Changsha, Hunan 410082 (China); Jonas, J.J. [Department of Materials Engineering, McGill University, 3610 University St., Montreal, QC, Canada H3A 2B2 (Canada); Zhu, B.W. [College of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Xiangtan, Hunan 411201 (China); Wang, T. [Department of Materials Engineering, McGill University, 3610 University St., Montreal, QC, Canada H3A 2B2 (Canada); Li, L.X. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Design and Manufacturing for Vehicle Body, Hunan University, Changsha, Hunan 410082 (China)

    2016-01-01

    Uniaxial compression tests were performed at 400 °C and a strain rate of 0.3 s{sup −1} on samples of as-extruded AZ31 magnesium alloy. At a true strain of −0.1, many extension twins were detected. The orientations of selected twins and their host matrix grains were determined by electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) techniques. The Schmid factors (SFs) and accommodation strains associated with both the observed and absent potential twins were calculated. Analysis of the data indicated that some of the selected twins obeyed a Schmid factor criterion and others did not. In the latter cases, it was the accommodation strain that controlled the formation of the non-Schmid twins. Potential high SF twins did not form if this would have required the operation of ‘difficult’ deformation modes (i.e. prismatic or pyramidal slip and twinning). Their place was taken by low SF twins whose formation required little accommodation work. Thus it appears that the variant selection criteria originally derived for ambient temperature straining continue to apply at 400 °C, despite the much lower values of the CRSS’s of the difficult deformation modes.

  15. Dynamic tensile behavior of AZ31B magnesium alloy at ultra-high strain rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geng Changjian

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The samples having {0001} parallel to extruding direction (ED present a typical true stress–true strain curve with concave-down shape under tension at low strain rate. Ultra-rapid tensile tests were conducted at room temperature on a textured AZ31B magnesium alloy. The dynamic tensile behavior was investigated. The results show that at ultra-high strain rates of 1.93 × 102 s−1 and 1.70 × 103 s−1, the alloy behaves with a linear stress–strain response in most strain range and exhibits a brittle fracture. In this case, {10-12}  extension twinning is basic deformation mode. The brittleness is due to the macroscopic viscosity at ultra-high strain rate, for which the external critical shear stress rapidly gets high to result in a cleavage fracture before large amounts of dislocations are activated. Because {10-12} tension twinning, {10-11} compressive twinning, basal slip, prismatic slip and pyramidal slip have different critical shear stresses (CRSS, their contributions to the degree of deformation are very differential. In addition, Schmid factor plays an important role in the activity of various deformation modes and it is the key factor for the samples with different strain rates exhibit various mechanical behavior under dynamic tensile loading.

  16. Evaluation of self-healing ability of Ce–V conversion coating on AZ31 magnesium alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Jiang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the influence of cerium nitrate in vanadate solutions on the properties of Ce–V conversion coatings on AZ31 magnesium alloys, and evaluated the self-healing behavior of the Ce–V conversion coating for AZ31 magnesium alloy. The results showed that the additions of cerium nitrate prevented pentavalent vanadium from reducing to tetravalent vanadium in the coatings during conversion reaction process. Adding appropriate cerium nitrate to vanadate solution led to a thicker coating with a more compact CeVO4 layer. The corrosion behavior of the Ce–V conversion coating was investigated by the electrochemical tests and the scratch immersion test in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. The self-healing ability of the coating was confirmed from all tests. The surface analysis revealed that the self-healing effect of the Ce–V conversion coating was only provided by the release and migration of vanadium compounds.

  17. Mathematical Modeling of the Twin Roll Casting Process for AZ31 Magnesium Alloy - Effect of Set-Back Distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadadzadeh, Amir; Wells, Mary; Essadiqi, Elhachmi

    A 2-D coupled thermal-fluid-stress model was developed and used to simulate the twin roll casting (TRC) of an AZ31 magnesium alloy using the commercial software package, ALSIM. The model was used to predict the fluid flow, temperature distribution and mechanical behavior of AZ31 magnesium alloy in the roll bite. An important parameter in controlling the TRC process is the set-back distance; the distance between the nozzle entry to the kissing point of the rolls. There are two approaches to increase the set-back: 1) increasing the entry thickness and 2) decreasing the final strip thickness. In this study the effect of set-back distance and casting speed on the thermo-mechanical behavior of the strip during TRC has been studied. The thermo-mechanical behavior of the strip has a significant effect on the final quality as defect formation depends on such behavior.

  18. A Study on Compressive Anisotropy and Nonassociated Flow Plasticity of the AZ31 Magnesium Alloy in Hot Rolling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoqiang Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Effect of anisotropy in compression is studied on hot rolling of AZ31 magnesium alloy with a three-dimensional constitutive model based on the quadratic Hill48 yield criterion and nonassociated flow rule (non-AFR. The constitutive model is characterized by compressive tests of AZ31 billets since plastic deformations of materials are mostly caused by compression during rolling processes. The characterized plasticity model is implemented into ABAQUS/Explicit as a user-defined material subroutine (VUMAT based on semi-implicit backward Euler's method. The subroutine is employed to simulate square-bar rolling processes. The simulation results are compared with rolled specimens and those predicted by the von Mises and the Hill48 yield function under AFR. Moreover, strip rolling is also simulated for AZ31 with the Hill48 yield function under non-AFR. The strip rolling simulation demonstrates that the lateral spread generated by the non-AFR model is in good agreement with experimental data. These comparisons between simulation and experiments validate that the proposed Hill48 yield function under non-AFR provides satisfactory description of plastic deformation behavior in hot rolling for AZ31 alloys in case that the anisotropic parameters in the Hill48 yield function and the non-associated flow rule are calibrated by the compressive experimental results.

  19. Orientation dependent slip and twinning during compression and tension of strongly textured magnesium AZ31 alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Samman, T., E-mail: al-samman@imm.rwth-aachen.de [Institut fuer Metallkunde und Metallphysik, RWTH Aachen, Kopernikusstr. 14, D-52064 Aachen (Germany); Li, X. [Institut fuer Metallkunde und Metallphysik, RWTH Aachen, Kopernikusstr. 14, D-52064 Aachen (Germany); Chowdhury, S. Ghosh [CSIR National Metallurgical Laboratory, MST Division, Jamshedpur 831007 (India)

    2010-06-15

    Over recent years there have been a remarkable number of studies dealing with compression of magnesium. A literature search, however, shows a noticeably less number of papers concerned with tension and a very few papers comparing both modes, systematically, in one study. The current investigation reports the anisotropic deformation behavior and concomitant texture and microstructure evolution investigated in uniaxial tension and compression tests in two sample directions performed on an extruded commercial magnesium alloy AZ31 at different Z conditions. For specimens with the loading direction parallel to the extrusion axis, the tension-compression strength anisotropy was pronounced at high Z conditions. Loading at 45{sup o} from the extrusion axis yielded a tension-compression strength behavior that was close to isotropic. During tensile loading along the extrusion direction the extrusion texture resists twinning and favors prismatic slip (contrary to compression). This renders the shape change maximum in the basal plane and equal to zero along the c-axis, which resulted in the orientation of individual grains remaining virtually intact during all tension tests at different Z conditions. For the other investigated sample direction, straining was accommodated along the c-axis, which was associated with a lattice rotation, and thus, a change of crystal orientation. Uniaxial compression at a low Z condition (400 deg. C/10{sup -4} s{sup -1}) yielded a desired texture degeneration, which was explained on the basis of a more homogeneous partitioning of slip systems that reduces anisotropy and enhanced dynamic recrystallization (DRX), which counteracts the strong deformation texture. The critical strains for the nucleation of DRX in tensiled specimens at the highest investigated Z condition (200 deg. C/10{sup -2} s{sup -1}) were found to range between 4% and 5.6%.

  20. Analysis of the microstructure and deformation mechanisms by compression along normal direction in a rolled AZ31 magnesium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Dewen [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Magnesium Alloys, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Liu, Tianmo, E-mail: tmliu@cqu.edu.cn [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Magnesium Alloys, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Chen, Huicong; Shi, Dongfeng; Ran, Chunhua; Pan, Fusheng [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Magnesium Alloys, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2016-04-13

    The twinning and slipping modes of a rolled AZ31 magnesium alloy sheet were investigated through in situ compressive tests. A method based on scanning electron microscopy and electron backscattered diffraction measurements was used to identify activated twinning and slip systems. {10-12} tensile twins were present, but only occasionally. Contraction twins were not observed. Post deformation examination revealed the dominance of pyramidal slip.

  1. Simulation of Flow Stress Characteristic During Two-stage Hot Deformation Process in AZ31B Magnesium Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DENG Xiaohu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A 2-D CA model has been developed to simulate two-stage hot deformation processing of magnesium (Mg alloy. Based on the fact that Mg has an HCP crystal structure with six-fold symmetry, the model employs hexagonal CA lattice. The physically-based model has integrated the effects of individual metallurgical phenomena related with the hot deformation, including dynamic recrystallization (DRX, static recovery, static recrystallization (SRX, meta-dynamic recrystallization (MDRX and grain growth, etc. The model is validated by simulating single-stage and two-stage hot compression tests of AZ31B. The effects of temperature, strain rate, the interval and pre-strain on stress-strain curves are investigated. The calculated results are compared with the available experimental findings in AZ31B Mg alloy, and the simulated results agree well with the experimental results and theoretical models.

  2. Low cycle fatigue properties and an energy-based approach for as-extruded AZ31 magnesium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, S. H.; Song, K. S.; Shin, K. S.; Kwun, S. I.

    2011-04-01

    Low cycle fatigue tests were conducted to investigate the cyclic deformation behavior and the energy-based criterion of AZ31 magnesium alloy. The alloy exhibited an asymmetric hysteresis loop due to the twinning and detwinning effect. The cyclic stress responses showed cyclic hardening at all total strain amplitudes. To evaluate the plastic strain energy, the Halford-Morrow equation and a modified equation for magnesium alloy were compared. The effect of twinning on the total plastic strain energy dissipated during fatigue life was discussed. The variations of the twin and dislocation densities were also investigated using optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, respectively.

  3. Systematic understanding of corrosion behavior of plasma electrolytic oxidation treated AZ31 magnesium alloy using a mouse model of subcutaneous implant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Yongseok [Engineering Research Center for Revolutionizing Metallic Biomaterials (ERC-RMB), North Carolina A and T State University, Greensboro, NC, 27411 (United States); Tan, Zongqing [Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Cincinnati, OH 45211 (United States); Jurey, Chris [Luke Engineering, Wadsworth, OH 44282 (United States); Collins, Boyce [Engineering Research Center for Revolutionizing Metallic Biomaterials (ERC-RMB), North Carolina A and T State University, Greensboro, NC, 27411 (United States); Badve, Aditya [Business and Biology, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC 27514 (United States); Dong, Zhongyun [Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Cincinnati, OH 45211 (United States); Park, Chanhee; Kim, Cheol Sang [Department of Bio-nano System Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju, Jeonbuk 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Sankar, Jagannathan [Engineering Research Center for Revolutionizing Metallic Biomaterials (ERC-RMB), North Carolina A and T State University, Greensboro, NC, 27411 (United States); Yun, Yeoheung, E-mail: yyun@ncat.edu [Engineering Research Center for Revolutionizing Metallic Biomaterials (ERC-RMB), North Carolina A and T State University, Greensboro, NC, 27411 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    This study was conducted to identify the differences between corrosion rates, corrosion types, and corrosion products in different physiological environments for AZ31 magnesium alloy and plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) treated AZ31 magnesium alloy. In vitro and in vivo tests were performed in Hank's Balanced Salt Solution (HBSS) and mice for 12 weeks, respectively. The corrosion rates of both AZ31 magnesium alloy and PEO treated AZ31 magnesium alloy were calculated based on DC polarization curves, volume of hydrogen evolution, and the thickness of corrosion products formed on the surface. Micro X-ray computed tomography (Micro-CT), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to analyze morphological and chemical characterizations of corrosion products. The results show that there is more severe localized corrosion after in vitro test in HBSS; however, the thicknesses of corrosion products formed on the surface for AZ31 magnesium alloy and PEO treated AZ31 magnesium alloy in vivo were about 40% thicker than the thickness of corrosion products generated in vitro. The ratio of Ca and P (Ca/P) in the corrosion products also differed. The Ca deficient region and higher content of Al in corrosion product than AZ31 magnesium alloy were identified after in vivo test in contrast with the result of in vitro test. - Highlights: • Effects of plasma electrolytic oxidation on AZ31 in vitro and in vivo • Retardation of degradation via plasma electrolytic oxidation in vitro and in vivo • Differentiation of in vitro and in vivo corrosion types and products.

  4. Preparation and corrosion resistance of magnesium phytic acid/hydroxyapatite composite coatings on biodegradable AZ31 magnesium alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Cai, Shu; Zhang, Feiyang; Xu, Guohua; Wang, Fengwu; Yu, Nian; Wu, Xiaodong

    2017-06-01

    In this work, a magnesium phytic acid/hydroxyapatite composite coating was successfully prepared on AZ31 magnesium alloy substrate by chemical conversion deposition technology with the aim of improving its corrosion resistance and bioactivity. The influence of hydroxyapatite (HA) content on the microstructure and corrosion resistance of the coatings was investigated. The results showed that with the increase of HA content in phytic acid solution, the cracks on the surface of the coatings gradually reduced, which subsequently improved the corrosion resistance of these coated magnesium alloy. Electrochemical measurements in simulated body fluid (SBF) revealed that the composite coating with 45 wt.% HA addition exhibited superior surface integrity and significantly improved corrosion resistance compared with the single phytic acid conversion coating. The results of the immersion test in SBF showed that the composite coating could provide more effective protection for magnesium alloy substrate than that of the single phytic acid coating and showed good bioactivity. Magnesium phytic acid/hydroxyapatite composite, with the desired bioactivity, can be synthesized through chemical conversion deposition technology as protective coatings for surface modification of the biodegradable magnesium alloy implants. The design idea of the new type of biomaterial is belong to the concept of "third generation biomaterial". Corrosion behavior and bioactivity of coated magnesium alloy are the key issues during implantation. In this study, preparation and corrosion behavior of magnesium phytic acid/hydroxyapatite composite coatings on magnesium alloy were studied. The basic findings and significance of this paper are as follows: 1. A novel environmentally friendly, homogenous and crack-free magnesium phytic acid/hydroxyapatite composite coating was fabricated on AZ31 magnesium alloy via chemical conversion deposition technology with the aim of enhancing its corrosion resistance and

  5. Mussel-inspired functionalization of PEO/PCL composite coating on a biodegradable AZ31 magnesium alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Peng; Xu, Demin; Liu, Xuanyong

    2016-05-01

    The rapid degradation of magnesium-based implants in physiological environments in vivo not only will quickly deteriorate their mechanical strengths but will also lead to a severe change of the micro-environment around the implants, which may cause the final failure of magnesium-based implants. In this work, a polycaprolactone (PCL) layer was prepared to seal the plasma electrolytic oxidization coating (PEO) to form a PEO/PCL composite coating on a biodegradable AZ31 magnesium alloy, followed by further surface functionalization with polydopamine. The in vitro degradation behaviors of the bare AZ31 alloy and coated samples were evaluated in a simulated body fluid (SBF) using the potentiodynamic polarization curve test and the static immersion test. The bioactivity of the samples was investigated using the SBF soaking test. The cytocompatibility of all samples was evaluated using the cytotoxicity test and analysis of the adhesion and proliferation of osteoblast cells (MC3T3-E1) directly cultivated on the sample surface. The results showed that the PCL layer successfully sealed the pores of the PEO coating, and then the polydopamine layer formed on its surface. The in vitro degradation tests showed that the PEO/PCL composite coating improved the corrosion resistance of the AZ31 alloy in SBF with a more positive corrosion potential and a lower corrosion current density. Due to the protection of the PEO/PCL composite coating, the surrounding environment showed nearly no influence on the degradation of the coated sample, which led to no obvious local alkalization and hydrogen evolution. Moreover, compared with the AZ31 alloy and PEO coating, the PEO/PCL composite coating was more suitable for cell adhesion and proliferation. After further surface functionalization by polydopamine, the corrosion resistance of the composite coating was maintained, while its bioactivity was significantly enhanced with a large amount of hydroxyapatite (HA) formed on its surface after

  6. A study of deformation twinning in magnesium alloy AZ31B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majkut, Marta

    Crystals with a hexagonal close-packed crystal structure are inherently anisotropic, and have a limited number of independent slip systems, which lead to strong deformation textures and reduced formability in polycrystalline products. In magnesium (Mg), all of the easy slip systems have a Burgers vector in the direction making twinning necessary for arbitrary shape changes. The most common twinning system which allows extension along the c-axis is {1012}. A good predictor of slip is the global Schmid factor, which resolves the externally applied force onto the slip plane and direction of a crystal. The critically resolved shear stress (CRSS) at which a grain twins is not readily measured by experiment and the CRSS for twin initiation often appears larger than for twin propagation. In polycrystals, twin variants with both low and high Schmid factors have been observed indicating that this Schmid factor is inappropriate to predict twinning and more local effects play an important, though still uncertain role. In this work, experiments were devised to dynamically study extension twinning in a polycrystalline Mg alloy AZ31B with a strong basal rolling texture by tensile deformation parallel to the plate normal. Three-dimensional X-ray diffraction using a synchrotron source was used to map the centre-of-mass positions, orientations, and grain-resolved elastic strain tensors of over 1000 grains in-situ up to a true strain of 1.4%. The majority of twins formed in grains with a high local Schmid factor; however, low-ranked twin variants were common. The average grain-resolved stress did not always select the highest twin variant and resulted in some negative Schmid factors. The internal stress state of parent grains and twinned grains did not differ significantly within the large measurement uncertainties. The misorientations between grains ideally oriented for twinning and their nearest neighbours could not explain cases of no twin activity. Results suggest that the

  7. Characteristics of friction welded AZ31B magnesium–commercial pure titanium dissimilar joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.K. Lakshminarayanan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available It is essential to understand the weld interface characteristics and mechanical properties of dissimilar joints to improve its quality. This study is aimed at exploring the properties of friction welded magnesium–titanium dissimilar joint using tensile testing coupled with digital image correlation, optical and scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction and microhardness measurements. Microstructurally different regions such as contact zone, dynamic recrystallized zone, thermo-mechanically affected zone, and partially deformed zone in the magnesium side were observed. No discernible regions were observed in the titanium side, as it had not undergone any significant plastic deformation. Phase analysis indicated that the aluminium from the magnesium side diffused toward the weld interface and formed a thin continuous intermetallic layer by reacting with the titanium. Microhardness mapping showed a steep hardness gradient from the titanium to magnesium side. Critical analysis is done on the tensile characteristics of the specimen and the response of the local regions to the deformation process is mapped.

  8. Dynamic behaviors of a Ca-P coated AZ31B magnesium alloy during in vitro and in vivo degradations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Qiang [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Tan Lili, E-mail: lltan@imr.ac.cn [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Xu Wenli; Zhang Bingchun [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Yang Ke, E-mail: kyang@imr.ac.cn [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2011-12-15

    Surface modification can be an effective way to control the biodegradation behavior of magnesium alloys and even improve their biological properties. Much attention has been paid to the initial protection ability and biological properties of magnesium alloys coating. In this work, the dynamic behaviors of a Ca-P coated AZ31B magnesium alloy during the degradations in vitro and in vivo, including hemolysis, mechanical loading capability and implantation in animals, were investigated. The hemolytic rates of the alloy with and without coating were all declined to be lower than 5% after more than 20 days immersion in PBS, though an increase happened to the alloy at the early immersion of 3-7 days. Reduction of the mechanical loading capacity was gradually evolved for the coated alloy and the peak load retention of 85% was still maintained after 120 days degradation. The in vivo implantation indicated that the Ca-P coated AZ31B alloy showed a more suitable time dependent degradation behavior which was favorable for growth of the new tissue and the healing dynamics of bones, making it a promising choice for medical application.

  9. Corrosion protection and improved cytocompatibility of biodegradable polymeric layer-by-layer coatings on AZ31 magnesium alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrowski, Nicole; Lee, Boeun; Enick, Nathan; Carlson, Benjamin; Kunjukunju, Sangeetha; Roy, Abhijit; Kumta, Prashant N

    2013-11-01

    Composite coatings of electrostatically assembled layer-by-layer anionic and cationic polymers combined with an Mg(OH)2 surface treatment serve to provide a protective coating on AZ31 magnesium alloy substrates. These ceramic conversion coating and layer-by-layer polymeric coating combinations reduced the initial and long-term corrosion progression of the AZ31 alloy. X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirmed the successful application of coatings. Potentiostatic polarization tests indicate improved initial corrosion resistance. Hydrogen evolution measurements over a 2 week period and magnesium ion levels over a 1 week period indicate longer range corrosion protection and retention of the Mg(OH)2 passivation layer in comparison to the uncoated substrates. Live/dead staining and DNA quantification were used as measures of biocompatibility and proliferation while actin staining and scanning electron microscopy were used to observe the cellular morphology and integration with the coated substrates. The coatings simultaneously provided improved biocompatibility, cellular adhesion and proliferation in comparison to the uncoated alloy surface utilizing both murine pre-osteoblast MC3T3 cells and human mesenchymal stem cells. The implementation of such coatings on magnesium alloy implants could serve to improve the corrosion resistance and cellular integration of these implants with the native tissue while delivering vital drugs or biological elements to the site of implantation. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Electrochemical characteristics of calcium-phosphatized AZ31 magnesium alloy in 0.9 % NaCl solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadzima, Branislav; Mhaede, Mansour; Pastorek, Filip

    2014-05-01

    Magnesium alloys suffer from their high reactivity in common environments. Protective layers are widely created on the surface of magnesium alloys to improve their corrosion resistance. This article evaluates the influence of a calcium-phosphate layer on the electrochemical characteristics of AZ31 magnesium alloy in 0.9 % NaCl solution. The calcium phosphate (CaP) layer was electrochemically deposited in a solution containing 0.1 M Ca(NO3)2, 0.06 M NH4H2PO4 and 10 ml l(-1) of H2O2. The formed surface layer was composed mainly of brushite [(dicalcium phosphate dihidrate (DCPD)] as proved by energy-dispersive X-ray analysis. The surface morphology was observed by scanning electron microscopy. Immersion test was performed in order to observe degradation of the calcium phosphatized surfaces. The influence of the phosphate layer on the electrochemical characteristics of AZ31, in 0.9 % NaCl solution, was evaluated by potentiodynamic measurements and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The obtained results were analysed by the Tafel-extrapolation method and equivalent circuits method. The results showed that the polarization resistance of the DCPD-coated surface is about 25 times higher than that of non-coated surface. The CaP electro-deposition process increased the activation energy of corrosion process.

  11. Optimization of process factors for self-healing vanadium-based conversion coating on AZ31 magnesium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Kun; Liu, Junyao [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Lei, Ting, E-mail: tlei@mail.csu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Xiao, Tao [2nd Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410011 (China)

    2015-10-30

    Highlights: • The optimum operating conditions were determined by an orthogonal experiment. • The coating is composed of oxides and hydroxides of V{sup 5+}, V{sup 4+} and Mg(OH){sub 2}. • The self-healing performance was investigated by cross-cut immersion test. • The vanadia conversion coating provided active corrosion protection to AZ31 alloy. - Abstract: A self-healing vanadium-based conversion coating was prepared on AZ31 magnesium alloy. The optimum operating conditions including vanadia solution concentration, pH and treating temperature for obtaining the best corrosion protective vanadia coatings and improved localized corrosion resistance to the magnesium substrate were determined by an orthogonal experiment design. Surface morphology and composition of the resultant conversion coatings were investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The self-healing behavior of the coating was investigated by cross-cut immersion test and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements in 3.5% NaCl solution.

  12. Development of mechanical properties in a CaO added AZ31 magnesium alloy processed by equal-channel angular pressing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Seong-Hwan [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Metal Forming Technology R& D Group, Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Ki Ho; Shin, Young-Chul; Yoon, Duk Jae [Metal Forming Technology R& D Group, Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Kawasaki, Megumi, E-mail: megumi@hanyang.ac.kr [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Departments of Aerospace & Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089-1453 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Processing through the application of equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP) is recognized as one of the attractive severe plastic deformation techniques where the processed bulk metals generally achieve ultrafine-grained microstructure leading to improved physical characteristics and mechanical properties. Magnesium has received much attention to date for its lightweight, high strength and excellent elasticity. Mg alloys with addition of CaO is reported to provide the successful casting procedure without usage of greenhouse gas, SF{sub 6}, whereas it is generally used for preventing the oxidation of Mg during casting. In the present investigation, a CaO added AZ31 (AZ31-CaO) magnesium alloy was processed by ECAP at elevated temepratures with a few steps of reduction which result in significant grain refinement to ~ 1.5 μm after 6 passes. Compression testing at room temperature demonstrated the AZ31-CaO alloy after ECAP showed enhanced yield strength more than the as-processed commercial AZ31 alloy while both alloys maintained ductility in spite of significant reduction in grain size. The improved strength in the AZ31-CaO alloy was attributed to the formation of fine Al{sub 2}Ca precipitates which experience breaking-up through ECAP and accelerate the microstructural refinement. Moreover, the preservation of ductility was attributed to the enhancement of strain hardening capability in the AZ31 alloy at room temperature. This study discusses the feasibility of using ECAP to improve both strength and ductility on magnesium alloys by applying the diagram describing the paradox of strength and ductility. - Highlights: • AZ31 and AZ31-CaO magnesium alloys were processed by ECAP up to 6 passes. • AZ31-CaO alloy after ECAP showed improved yield strength without losing ductility. • CaO in AZ31 forms fine Al{sub 2}Ca accelerating microstructural refinement during ECAP. • Feasibility of using ECAP was shown to improve both strength and ductility in Mg.

  13. Effects of carbon dioxide plasma immersion ion implantation on the electrochemical properties of AZ31 magnesium alloy in physiological environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Ruizhen; Yang, Xiongbo; Zhang, Xuming; Wang, Mei; Li, Penghui; Zhao, Ying; Wu, Guosong; Chu, Paul K., E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk

    2013-12-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) is conducted to improve the intrinsically poor corrosion properties of biodegradable AZ31 magnesium alloy in the physiological environment. Carbon dioxide is implanted into the samples and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy are used to characterize the materials. The corrosion properties are systematically studied by potentiodynamic polarization tests in two simulated physiological environments, namely simulated body fluids and cell culture medium. The plasma-implanted materials exhibit a lower initial corrosion rate. Being a gaseous ion PIII technique, conformal ion implantation into an object with a complex shape such as an orthopedic implant can be easily accomplished and CO{sub 2} PIII is a potential method to improve the biological properties of magnesium and its alloys in clinical applications.

  14. In-process tool rotational speed variation with constant heat input in friction stir welding of AZ31 sheets with variable thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffa, Gianluca; Campanella, Davide; Forcellese, Archimede; Fratini, Livan; Simoncini, Michela

    2017-10-01

    In the present work, friction stir welding experiments on AZ31 magnesium alloy sheets, characterized by a variable thickness along the welding line, were carried out. The approach adapted during welding consisted in maintaining constant the heat input to the joint. To this purpose, the rotational speed of the pin tool was increased with decreasing thickness and decreased with increasing thickness in order to obtain the same temperatures during welding. The amount by which the rotational speed was changed as a function of the sheet thickness was defined on the basis of the results given by FEM simulations of the FSW process. Finally, the effect of the in-process variation of the tool rotational speed on the mechanical and microstructural properties of FSWed joints was analysed by comparing both the nominal stress vs. nominal strain curves and microstructure of FSWed joints obtained in different process conditions. It was observed that FSW performed by keeping constant the heat input to the joint leads to almost coincident results both in terms of the curve shape, ultimate tensile strength and ultimate elongation values, and microstructure.

  15. Influence of welding parameter on texture distribution and plastic deformation behavior of as-rolled AZ31 Mg alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xin, Renlong, E-mail: rlxin@cqu.edu.cn [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing (China); State Key Laboratory of Mechanical Transmission, Chongqing University, Chongqing (China); Liu, Dejia; Shu, Xiaogang; Li, Bo; Yang, Xiaofang; Liu, Qing [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing (China)

    2016-06-15

    Friction stir welding (FSW) has promising application potential for Mg alloys. However, softening was frequently occurred in FSW Mg joints because of the presence of a β-type fiber texture. The present study aims to understand the influence of texture distribution in stir zone (SZ) on deformation behavior and joint strength of FSW Mg welds. AZ31 Mg alloy joints were obtained by FSW with two sets of welding speed and rotation rate. Detailed microstructure and texture evolutions were examined on Mg welds by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) techniques. It was found that the changes of welding parameters can affect texture distribution and the characteristic of texture in the transition region between SZ and thermal-mechanical affected zone (TMAZ). As a consequence, the activation ability of basal slip and extension twinning was changed, which therefore influenced joint strength, inhomogeneous plastic deformation and fracture behaviors. The present work provided some insights into understanding the texture–property relationship in FSW Mg welds and indicated that it is effective to tailor the joint performance by texture control. - Highlights: • Welding parameters largely affect the inclination angle of SZ/TMAZ boundary. • Fracture morphology is associated with the characteristic of SZ/TMAZ boundary. • The characteristic of plastic deformation is explained from the activation of basal slip.

  16. Very high cycle fatigue behaviour of as-extruded AZ31, AZ80, and ZK60 magnesium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novy, Frantisek; Skorik, Viktor [Zilina Univ. (Slovakia). Dept. of Materials Engineering; Janecek, Milos [Charles Univ., Prague (Czech Republic). Dept. of Physics of Materials; Mueller, Julia; Wagner, Lothar [Technische Univ. Clausthal, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany). Inst. of Materials Science and Technology

    2009-03-15

    The very high cycle fatigue properties of extruded AZ31, AZ80, and ZK60 magnesium alloys were investigated. Fatigue tests were performed at ultrasonic cyclic frequency and at a load ratio of R = -1 at ambient temperature using smooth electropolished specimens. Fatigue failures were observed at lifetimes above 10{sup 9} cycles. The fatigue life was found to increase with decreasing stress amplitude. The fracture surfaces and fracture profiles of selected specimens cycled until failure were examined. The purpose of the study was to determine the role of the microstructure on the fatigue crack nucleation and growth. Furthermore, the fatigue properties were discussed on the basis of microstructure and the presence of inclusions which are known as crack initiation sites. In AZ31 and AZ80 alloys only surface-induced fatigue cracks were observed. On the other hand, in the ZK60 alloy both surface- and interior-induced fatigue cracks were observed. Both mechanisms operate in the ZK60 also at a lifetime of around 10{sup 1}0 cycles. Interior-induced fatigue cracks were accompanied by clear fish-eye marks on the fracture surfaces of the ZK60 alloy. (orig.)

  17. Evolution processes of the corrosion behavior and structural characteristics of plasma electrolytic oxidation coatings on AZ31 magnesium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dong; Wang, Ruiqiang; Huang, Zhiquan; Wu, Yekang; Zhang, Yi; Wu, Guorui; Li, Dalong; Guo, Changhong; Jiang, Guirong; Yu, Shengxue; Shen, Dejiu; Nash, Philip

    2018-03-01

    Evolution processes of the corrosion behavior and structural characteristics of the plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) coated AZ31 magnesium alloy were investigated by using scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), potentio-dynamic polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. Detached coating samples were fabricated by an electrochemical method and more details of the internal micro-structure of coatings were clearly observed on the fractured cross-section morphologies of the samples compared to general polished cross-section morphologies. Evolution mechanisms of the coating corrosion behavior in relation to the evolution of micro-structural characteristics were discussed in detail.

  18. Surface morphology, microstructure and properties of as-cast AZ31 magnesium alloy irradiated by high intensity pulsed ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xuesong; Zhang, Gang; Wang, Guotian; Zhu, Guoliang; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Jun; Sun, Baode

    2014-08-01

    High intensity pulsed ion beam (HIPIB) irradiation was performed as surface modification to improve the properties of as-cast AZ31 magnesium (Mg) alloys. The surface morphology and microstructure of the irradiated Mg alloys were characterized and their microhardness, wear resistance and corrosion resistance before and after HIPIB irradiation were measured. The results show that the formation of crater on the surface was attributed to the particles impacted from the irradiated cathode material. HIPIB irradiation resulted in more vacancy defects on the surface of the material. Moreover, new dislocations were generated by the reaction between vacancies, and the dislocation configuration was also changed. These variations caused by the HIPIB are beneficial for improving the material properties. After 10 shots of irradiation, the average microhardness increased by 27.1% but the wear rate decreased by 38.5%. The corrosion rate was reduced by 24.8% according to the salt spray corrosion experiment.

  19. Nano-hydroxyapatite reinforced AZ31 magnesium alloy by friction stir processing: a solid state processing for biodegradable metal matrix composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratna Sunil, B; Sampath Kumar, T S; Chakkingal, Uday; Nandakumar, V; Doble, Mukesh

    2014-04-01

    Friction stir processing (FSP) was successfully adopted to fabricate nano-hydroxyapatite (nHA) reinforced AZ31 magnesium alloy composite as well as to achieve fine grain structure. The combined effect of grain refinement and the presence of embedded nHA particles on enhancing the biomineralization and controlling the degradation of magnesium were studied. Grain refinement from 56 to ~4 and 2 μm was observed at the stir zones of FSP AZ31 and AZ31-nHA composite respectively. The immersion studies in super saturated simulated body fluid (SBF 5×) for 24 h suggest that the increased wettability due to fine grain structure and nHA particles present in the AZ31-nHA composite initiated heterogeneous nucleation which favored the early nucleation and growth of calcium-phosphate mineral phase. The nHA particles as nucleation sites initiated rapid biomineralization in the composite. After 72 h of immersion the degradation due to localized pitting was observed to be reduced by enhanced biomineralization in both the FSPed AZ31 and the composite. Also, best corrosion behavior was observed for the composite before and after immersion test. MTT assay using rat skeletal muscle (L6) cells showed negligible toxicity for all the processed and unprocessed samples. However, cell adhesion was observed to be more on the composite due to the small grain size and incorporated nHA.

  20. Processing, microstructure and mechanical properties of bimodal size SiCp reinforced AZ31B magnesium matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.J. Shen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The bimodal size SiC particulates (SiCp reinforced magnesium matrix composites with different ratios of micron SiCp and nano SiCp (M-SiCp:N-SiCp = 14.5:0.5, 14:1, and 13.5:1.5 were prepared by semisolid stirring assisted ultrasonic vibration method. The AZ31B alloy and all as-cast SiCp/AZ31B composites were extruded at 350 °C with the ratio of 12:1. Microstructural characterization of the extruded M14 + N1 (M-SiCp:N-SiCp = 14:1 composite revealed the uniform distribution of bimodal size SiCp and significant grain refinement. Optical Microscopy(OM observation showed that, compared with the M14.5 + N0.5 (M-SiCp:N-SiCp = 14.5:0.5 composite, there are more recrystallized grains in M14 + N1 (M-SiCp:N-SiCp = 14:1 and M13.5 + N1.5 (M-SiCp:N-SiCp = 13.5:1.5 composites, but in comparison to the M13.5 + N1.5 composite, the average grain size of the M14 + N1 composite is slightly decreased. The evaluation of mechanical properties indicated that the yield strength and ultimate tensile strength of the M14 + N1 composite were obviously increased compared with other composites.

  1. Transient liquid phase bonding of magnesium alloys AZ31 using nickel coatings and high frequency induction heat sintering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.N. AlHazaa

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Transient liquid phase (TLP bonding process was applied to join magnesium alloy AZ31 samples with minimum microstructural changes. The magnesium samples were coated by 5 μm nickel prior to the TLP bonding. Bonding conditions of 8 MPa uniaxial pressure and 520 °C bonding temperature were applied for all bonds at various bonding times. The microstructure across the joint regions was examined as a function of bonding time (5–60 min. Investigating the change in Ni contents was examined by EDS line scan. It was noticed that Ni coating could not be observed by SEM for bonds made at 30 and 60 min due to complete dissolution of the Ni coating. Second phase particles containing Mg2Ni intermetallics were observed by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS near the joint region. The shear strength of the bonds initially increases with the increase in bonding time till 20 min. On the other hand, with bonding times over 20 min the shear strength decreases. Therefore the optimum bonding time at the conditions applied was concluded to be 20 min.

  2. Development of a Ballistic Specification for Magnesium Alloy AZ31B

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jones, Tyrone L; DeLorme, Richard D

    2008-01-01

    .... The magnesium alloy plates were parametrically compared with the minimum performance requirements of aluminum alloy 5083-H131 temper rolled plate using various armor-piercing and fragment-simulating projectiles (FSPs...

  3. Microstructure Correlation with Formability for Biaxial Stretching of Magnesium Alloy AZ31B at Mildly Elevated Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelladurai, Isaac; Miles, Michael P.; Fullwood, David T.; Carsley, John E.; Mishra, Raj K.; Beyerlein, Irene J.; Knezevic, Marko

    2017-05-01

    Magnesium AZ31B sheets of 2 mm thickness were stretch formed with a 101.6-mm-diameter punch at temperatures from 25°C to 150°C, in 25°C increments. Surface strains were measured with a digital image correlation method. The punch height versus load curve was found to be the same for temperatures of 25°C and for 50°C, whereas at 75°C and above, the load for a given punch height started to decrease, indicating a potential change in deformation mechanism. Electron backscatter diffraction was used to quantify features of the microstructure in the tested specimens. In particular, the gradual decrease in twinning activity as a result of easier thermally activated slip with increasing temperatures is quantified across this range. Moreover, twin activity was found to predominantly involve the formation of \\{{10\\bar{1}1} \\} compression twins that rapidly transform to create secondary twins for easier strain accommodation.

  4. Halogen-Free Phosphonate Ionic Liquids as Precursors of Abrasion Resistant Surface Layers on AZ31B Magnesium Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tulia Espinosa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface coatings formed by immersion in the ionic liquids (ILs 1,3-dimethylimidazolium methylphosphonate (LMP101, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium methylphosphonate (LMP102 and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium ethylphosphonate (LEP102 on magnesium alloy AZ31B at 50 °C have been studied. The purpose of increasing the temperature was to reduce the immersion time, from 14 days at room temperature, to 48 hours at 50 °C. The abrasion resistance of the coated alloy was studied by microscratching under progressively increasing load, and compared with that of the uncoated material. The order of abrasion resistance as a function of the IL is LEP102 > LMP101 > LMP102, which is in agreement with the order obtained for the coatings grown at room temperature. The maximum reduction in penetration depth with respect to the uncovered alloy, of a 44.5%, is obtained for the sample treated with the ethylphosphonate LEP102. However, this reduction is lower than that obtained when the coating is grown at room temperature. This is attributed to the increased thickness and lower adhesion of the coatings obtained at 50 °C, particularly those obtained from methylphosphonate ionic liquids. The results are discussed from SEM-EDX and profilometry.

  5. Corrosion performance of atmospheric plasma sprayed alumina coatings on AZ31B magnesium alloy under immersion environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Thirumalaikumarasamy

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Plasma sprayed ceramic coatings are successfully used in many industrial applications, where high wear and corrosion resistance with thermal insulation are required. The alumina powders were plasma sprayed on AZ31B magnesium alloy with three different plasma spraying parameters. In the present work, the influence of plasma spray parameters on the corrosion behavior of the coatings was investigated. The corrosion behavior of the coated samples was evaluated by immersion corrosion test in 3.5 wt% NaCl solution. Empirical relationship was established to predict the corrosion rate of plasma sprayed alumina coatings by incorporating process parameters. The experiments were conducted based on a three factor, five-level, central composite rotatable design matrix. The developed relationship can be effectively used to predict the corrosion rate of alumina coatings at 95% confidence level. The results indicate that the input power has the greatest influence on corrosion rate, followed by stand-off distance and powder feed rate.

  6. The Effect of Short Duration Electric Current on the Quasi-Static Tensile Behavior of Magnesium AZ31 Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trung Thien Nguyen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of a single pulse of electric current with short duration on the quasi-static tensile behavior of a magnesium AZ31 alloy is experimentally investigated. A single pulse of electric current with duration less than 1 second is applied to the specimen, while the specimen is being deformed in the plastic region under quasi-static tensile loads. After a nearly instant decrease of flow stress at the pulse of electric current, the flow stress shows strain hardening until the failure of the specimen. The experimental result shows that the strain-hardening parameters (the strength coefficient and the strain-hardening exponent of the hardening curve after the electric current strongly depend on the applied electric energy density (electric energy per unit volume. Empirical expressions are suggested to describe the hardening behavior after the pulse as a function of the electric energy density and are compared with the empirical expressions suggested for advanced high-strength steels.

  7. Development of Rolling Schedules for Equal Channel Angular Extrusion (ECAE)-Processed AZ31 Magnesium Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    on metal- ceramic composite assemblies to reduce back-face penetration, wherein often aluminum is used as the metal component. Depending on its...10 μm) magnesium alloy matrix . Furthermore, the as-rolled microstructure is banded, containing alternating layers of coarser and finer grains. These...ability to fabricate sheet material from the ECAE plates strongly depends on their initial texture. Moreover, texture A produces greater asymmetry in the

  8. The one-step electroposition of superhydrophobic surface on AZ31 magnesium alloy and its time-dependence corrosion resistance in NaCl solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yuxing; Hu, Jin; Zhang, Yufen; Tang, Shawei

    2018-01-01

    A calcium myristic superhydrophobicity coating with a hierarchical micro-nanostructure was fabricated on AZ31 magnesium alloy by one-step electroposition. The effects of deposition time on the coating structure, such as morphology, thickness, wettability and phase composition of the coating were studied. The corrosion behavior of the coated samples in 3.5% NaCl solution was also investigated and the corrosion mechanism was discussed. It was found that the deposition time has a visible effect on the morphology, thickness and wettability, which distinctly affects the corrosion resistance of coatings. The corrosion resistance of the coating gradually decreases with the increase in the immersion time due to the disappearance of the air layer which exists on the coating surface. The superhydrophobic surfaces present the temporal limitations to the corrosion resistance of AZ31 magnesium alloy.

  9. A novel simple strategy for in situ deposition of apatite layer on AZ31B magnesium alloy for bone tissue regeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mousa, Hamouda M. [Department of Bionanosystem Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju, Jeonbuk 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Engineering Materials and Mechanical Design, Faculty of Engineering, South Valley University, Qena 83523 (Egypt); Lee, Do Hee [Department of Bionanosystem Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju, Jeonbuk 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Chan Hee, E-mail: biochan@jbnu.ac.kr [Department of Bionanosystem Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju, Jeonbuk 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Division of Mechanical Design Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju, Jeonbuk 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Cheol Sang, E-mail: chskim@jbnu.ac.kr [Department of Bionanosystem Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju, Jeonbuk 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Division of Mechanical Design Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju, Jeonbuk 561-756 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Anodizing process was used for the surface modification of AZ31B magnesium alloy. • An appetite-like film was deposited on the surface of AZ31B magnesium alloy. • Ceramic film was investigated by XRD and XPS. • Nano-plates growth are observed though the implemented experimental design. • Significant increase in the substrate hardness and surface roughness was observed. - Abstract: In this study, for the first time, the degradation performance of AZ31B Mg alloy was tuned by an in situ deposition of apatite thin layer within a short time in one step. Using Taguchi method for experimental design, anodization process was designed under control conditions (time and voltage), and simulated body fluid (SBF) was used as the electrolyte to nucleate apatite-like compounds. The coated alloy was characterized through field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), EDS, X-ray diffraction and XPS analysis. The results show that the applied voltage has a significant effect on the formation of apatite-like layers. Compared to the uncoated samples, microhardness and surface roughness of the coated samples showed remarkably different values. The potentiodynamic polarization results demonstrate that the polarization resistance of the anodized samples is higher than the substrate polarization resistance, thus improving the alloy corrosion resistant. Based on the experimental results, the proposed nanostructure apatite-like coating can offer a promising way to improve the biocompatibility and degradability properties of the Mg alloy for bone tissue regeneration.

  10. Preparation and characterization of HA microflowers coating on AZ31 magnesium alloy by micro-arc oxidation and a solution treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang Hui [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Yu Dezhen [School of Material Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Luo Yan [Department of Chemistry, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Wang Fuping, E-mail: hitth001@yahoo.cn [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydroxyapatite microflowers coating is fabricated by micro-arc oxidation and a solution treatment on AZ31 magnesium alloy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The corrosion resistance of the magnesium alloy has been enhanced by micro-arc oxidation and solution treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The coating fabricated by micro-arc oxidation and solution treatment exhibits a high ability to form apatite. - Abstract: Magnesium and its alloys are potential biodegradable implant materials due to their attractive biological properties. But the use of magnesium is still hampered by its poor corrosion resistance in physiological fluids. In this work, hydroxyapatite microflowers coating is fabricated by micro-arc oxidation and a solution treatment on AZ31 magnesium alloy. The microstructure and composition are analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy are studied in simulated body fluid (SBF) solution, and the apatite-forming ability is studied also. The results show that the corrosion resistance of the magnesium alloy has been enhanced by MAO coating. And the solution treatment can improve the corrosion resistance of the MAO sample, by forming a barrier layer on the surface of the MAO coating, and by penetrating into the outer layer of the MAO film, sealing the micropores and micro-cracks existed in the MAO coating. In addition, the MAO-ST coating also exhibits a high ability to form apatite.

  11. Influence of Accumulative Roll Bonding on the Texture and Tensile Properties of an AZ31 Magnesium Alloy Sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzanka Trojanová

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Deformation behaviour of rolled AZ31 sheets that were subjected to the accumulative roll bonding was investigated. Substantially refined microstructure of samples was achieved after the first and second pass through the rolling mill. Sheets texture was investigated using an X-ray diffractometer. Samples for tensile tests were cut either parallel or perpendicular to the rolling direction. Tensile tests were performed at temperatures ranging from room temperature up to 300 °C. Tensile plastic anisotropy, different from the anisotropy observed in AZ31 sheets by other authors, was observed. This anisotropy decreases with an increasing number of rolling passes and increasing deformation temperature. Grain refinement and texture are the crucial factors influencing the deformation behaviour.

  12. Influence of mixed organosilane coatings with variable RGD surface densities on the adhesion and proliferation of human osteosarcoma Saos-2 cells to magnesium alloy AZ31

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxi Yang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, the use of magnesium and its alloys as biodegradable implant materials has become increasingly accepted. However, surface modification of these materials to control the degradation rate in the early stages of healing and improve their biocompatibility is crucial to the successful implementation of magnesium alloy implants in medicine. Cell adhesion and proliferation at the implant surface is a vital factor for successful integration of a biomaterial within the body. Cells accomplish this task by binding to ligands such as the arginine-glycine-aspartic acid peptide sequence (RGD commonly found on adhesive proteins present in the extracellular matrix. In this paper, we report a biomimetic surface modification strategy involving deposition of a mixed organosilane layer on Mg AZ31 followed by covalent immobilization of RGD peptides through a heterobifunctional cross-linker molecule. Our results indicate that with optimized deposition conditions uniform organosilane coatings were successfully deposited on the Mg AZ31 substrate. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that the surface density of immobilized RGD can be varied by depositing organosilane layers from solutions containing two different organosilanes in specified ratios. Increases in cell adhesion and cell proliferation were observed on the surface modified substrates.

  13. The fluoride coated AZ31B magnesium alloy improves corrosion resistance and stimulates bone formation in rabbit model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Wei; Zhang, Guangdao [Department of Prosthodontics, School of Stomatology, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Tan, Lili; Yang, Ke [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Ai, Hongjun, E-mail: aihongjuna@sina.com [Department of Prosthodontics, School of Stomatology, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China)

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of fluorine coated Mg alloy and clarify its mechanism in bone formation. We implanted the fluorine coated AZ31B Mg alloy screw (group F) in rabbit mandibular and femur in vivo. Untreated AZ31B Mg alloy screw (group A) and titanium screw (group T) were used as control. Then, scanning electron microscopy, the spectral energy distribution analysis, hard and decalcified bone tissues staining were performed. Immunohistochemistry was employed to examine the protein expressions of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) and collagen type I in the vicinity of the implant. Compared with the group A, the degradation of the alloy was reduced, the rates of Mg corrosion and Mg ion release were slowed down, and the depositions of calcium and phosphate increased in the group F in the early stage of implantation. Histological results showed that fluorine coated Mg alloy had well osteogenic activity and biocompatibility. Moreover, fluoride coating obviously up-regulated the expressions of collagen type I and BMP-2. This study confirmed that the fluorine coating might improve the corrosion resistance of AZ31B Mg alloy and promote bone formation by up-regulated the expressions of collagen type I and BMP-2. - Highlights: • Fluoride coating inhibited the degradation of the alloy in the early implantation. • Fluorine coating could slow down the rate of Mg corrosion and Mg ion release. • Fluorine coating could promote the deposition of Ca and P in vivo. • Fluorine coated Mg alloy had well osteogenic activity and biocompatibility. • Fluorine coating up-regulated the expression of BMP-2 and collagen type I protein.

  14. Friction welding; Magnesium; Finite element; Shear test.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Contri Campanelli

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Friction spot welding (FSpW is one of the most recently developed solid state joining technologies. In this work, based on former publications, a computer aided draft and engineering resource is used to model a FSpW joint on AZ31 magnesium alloy sheets and subsequently submit the assembly to a typical shear test loading, using a linear elastic model, in order to conceive mechanical tests results. Finite element analysis shows that the plastic flow is concentrated on the welded zone periphery where yield strength is reached. It is supposed that “through the weld” and “circumferential pull-out” variants should be the main failure behaviors, although mechanical testing may provide other types of fracture due to metallurgical features.

  15. Corrosion resistance and adhesion strength of a spin-assisted layer-by-layer assembled coating on AZ31 magnesium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan-Bin; Liu, Han-Peng; Li, Chang-Yang; Chen, Yong; Li, Shuo-Qi; Zeng, Rong-Chang; Wang, Zhen-Lin

    2018-03-01

    A polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)/polyacrylic acid (PAA) layer-by-layer (LbL) assembled composite coating with a multilayer structure for the corrosion protection of AZ31 magnesium alloy was prepared by a novel spin-casting method. The microstructure and composition of this coating were investigated by means of SEM, XRD and FT-IR measurements. Moreover, electrochemical, immersion and scratch tests in vitro were performed to measure the corrosion performance and the adhesion strength. These results indicated that the (PVP/PAA)10 composite coating with defect-free, dense and uniform morphologies could be successfully deposited on the surface of magnesium alloy. The coating had excellent corrosion resistance and adhesion strength.

  16. Internal microstructure observation of enhanced grain-boundary sliding at room temperature in AZ31 magnesium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, D., E-mail: daisuke.ando.c4@tohoku.ac.jp; Sutou, Y.; Koike, J.

    2016-06-01

    The origin of grain boundary sliding (GBS) is known to be slip-induced due to plastic incompatibility near the grain boundary at room temperature. In this study, the relationship between GBS and crystal orientation was investigated in AZ31 Mg alloy rolled sheets at room temperature. The GBS tendency was determined as related to basal dislocation slip where the GBS boundaries were generally located between the grains with respectively high and low or high and high Schmid factors for basal slip. The results indicate that GBS is attributed to the plastic incompatibility caused by anisotropic basal and prismatic slip. Furthermore, GBS was located in regions with localized deformation near grain boundaries. Cross-sectional focused ion beam/transmission electron microscopy (FIB/TEM) observations of these regions revealed seriately arranged subgrains adjacent to a grain boundary. Therefore, we propose that RT-GBS in AZ31 can be caused by localized crystal rotation due to dynamic recover and recrystallization by stress concentration near the grain boundary but not ordinary GBS.

  17. Effect of Casting Parameters on the Microstructural and Mechanical Behavior of Magnesium AZ31-B Alloy Strips Cast on a Single Belt Casting Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Changizi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Strips of magnesium alloy AZ31-B were cast on a simulator of a horizontal single belt caster incorporating a moving mold system. Mixtures of CO2 and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6 gases were used as protective atmosphere during melting and casting. The castability of the AZ31-B strips was investigated for a smooth, low carbon steel substrate, and six copper substrates with various textures and roughnesses. Graphite powder was used to coat the substrates. The correlation between strip thickness and heat flux was investigated. It was found that the heat flux from the forming strip to the copper substrate was higher than that to the steel substrate, while coated substrates registered lower heat fluxes than uncoated substrates. The highest heat flux from the strip was recorded for casting on macrotextured copper substrates with 0.15 mm grooves. As the thickness of the strip decreased, the net heat flux decreased. As the heat flux increased, the grain sizes of the strips were reduced, and the SDAS decreased. The mechanical properties were improved when the heat flux increased. The black layers which formed on the strips’ surfaces were analyzed and identified as nanoscale MgO particles. Nano-Scale particles act as light traps and appeared black.

  18. Effect of biologically relevant ions on the corrosion products formed on alloy AZ31B: an improved understanding of magnesium corrosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yongseok; Collins, Boyce; Sankar, Jagannathan; Yun, Yeoheung

    2013-11-01

    Simulated physiological solutions mimicking human plasma have been utilized to study the in vitro corrosion of biodegradable metals. However, corrosion and corrosion product formation are different for different solutions with varied responses and, hence, the prediction of in vivo degradation behavior is not feasible based on these studies alone. This paper reports the role of physiologically relevant salts and their concentrations on the corrosion behavior of a magnesium alloy (AZ31B) and subsequent corrosion production formation. Immersion tests were performed for three different concentrations of Ca(2+), HPO4(2-), HCO3(-) to identify the effect of each ion on the corrosion of AZ31B assessed at 1, 3 and 10 days. Time-lapse morphological characterization of the samples was performed using X-ray computed tomography and scanning electron microscopy. The chemical composition of the surface corrosion products was determined by electron dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The results show that: (1) calcium is not present in the corrosion product layer when only Cl(-) and OH(-) anions are available; (2) the presence of phosphate induces formation of a densely packed amorphous magnesium phosphate corrosion product layer when HPO4(2-) and Cl(-) are present in solution; (3) octacalcium phosphate and hydroxyapatite (HAp) are deposited on the surface of the magnesium alloy when HPO4(2-) and Ca(2+) are present together in NaCl solution (this coating limits localized corrosion and increases general corrosion resistance); (4) addition of HCO3(-) accelerates the overall corrosion rate, which increases with increasing bicarbonate concentration; (5) the corrosion rate decreases due to the formation of insoluble HAp on the surface when HCO3(-), Ca(2+), and HPO4(2-) are present together. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The Influence of Deformation Mechanisms on Rupture of AZ31B Magnesium Alloy Sheet at Elevated Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniswamy, Aravindha R.; Carpenter, Alexander J.; Carter, Jon T.; Hector, Louis G.; Taleff, Eric M.

    Gas-pressure bulge tests were conducted on Mg alloy AZ31B wrought sheet until rupture at temperatures from 250 to 450°C. The rupture orientation was observed to change with forming pressure, which controls the forming strain rate, at 350 to 450°C. This phenomenon is a result of associated changes in the mechanisms of plastic deformation. At slow strain rates (≤ 3 × 10-2 s-1), cavity interlinkage associated with grain boundary sliding (GBS) creep induced rupture along the sheet rolling direction (RD). At fast strain rates (≥ 3 × 10-2 s-1), flow localization (necking) associated with dislocation-climb-controlled (DC) creep induced rupture along the long-transverse direction (LTD), a result of mild planar anisotropy. Biaxial bulge specimens tested at 250 to 300°C ruptured explosively, hence preventing any further analysis.

  20. A combined coating strategy based on atomic layer deposition for enhancement of corrosion resistance of AZ31 magnesium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiangmei; Yang, Qiuyue; Li, Zhaoyang; Yuan, Wei; Zheng, Yufeng; Cui, Zhenduo; Yang, Xianjin; Yeung, Kelvin W. K.; Wu, Shuilin

    2018-03-01

    Rapid corrosion restricts the wide application of Mg and Mg-based alloys. In this work, a combined surface strategy was employed to modify the surface of AZ31 Mg Alloy. An atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique was utilized to prepare ZrO2 nanofilm on Mg substrate. During this course, the film thickness could be precisely controlled by adjusting the ALD cycles with a deposition rate of 0.117 nm/cycle. The subsequent PLGA grafting on ZrO2 nanofilm was carried out by a spin-coating process to further enhance the corrosion resistance. The nanoscratch tests showed that this hybrid coating had good bonding strength with substrate and similar Young's modulus to natural bone. In vitro corrosion tests demonstrated that a thicker ZrO2 nanofilm on the surface could reduce the corrosion rate of Mg substrate when compared to a thinner coating. When increasing ZrO2 deposition cycles from 25 to 100, the corrosion resistance could be significantly increased by two or three orders of magnitude. Hydrogen evolution tests revealed the synergetic effects of both galvanic corrosion and local acidic action could accelerate the corrosion of the AZ31 modified with the PLGA/ZrO2 coating once the ZrO2 nanofilm was damaged. Therefore, by changing the ALD cycles, the corrosion resistance of both ZrO2 thin film and ZrO2/PLGA hybrid coatings can be adjusted. This work provides an effective combined surface strategy that can be employed to adjust the corrosion resistance of Mg-based alloys for biomedical applications.

  1. Effect of asymmetric rolling process on the microstructure, mechanical properties and texture of AZ31 magnesium alloys sheets produced by twin roll casting technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selda Ucuncuoglu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Symmetric rolling (SR and asymmetric rolling (ASR processes were carried out on 6 mm thick AZ31 magnesium alloy sheets that were produced by twin roll casting (TRC technique. Before rolling processes, sheets were heat treated in order to obtain a homogenized microstructure. In this study, for the ASR process the rolling speed ratio between upper roller and lower was selected as 1.25. Both SR and ASR processes were utilized with 40% reduction per passes using 2 pass schedule for a total reduction ratio of 0.67. Symmetric and asymmetric rolled sheets were characterized using optical microscopy (OM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM techniques. Texture measurements were performed by using X-ray diffraction (XRD technique and mechanical properties were investigated by tensile tests and also hardness measurements.

  2. Experimental Characterization and Material Modelling of an AZ31 Magnesium Sheet Alloy at Elevated Temperatures under Consideration of the Tension-Compression Asymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, B.-A.; Bouguecha, A.; Bonk, C.; Dykiert, M.

    2017-09-01

    Magnesium sheet alloys have a great potential as a construction material in the aerospace and automotive industry. However, the current state of research regarding temperature dependent material parameters for the description of the plastic behaviour of magnesium sheet alloys is scarce in literature and accurate statements concerning yield criteria and appropriate characterization tests to describe the plastic behaviour of a magnesium sheet alloy at elevated temperatures in deep drawing processes are to define. Hence, in this paper the plastic behaviour of the well-established magnesium sheet alloy AZ31 has been characterized by means of convenient mechanical tests (e. g. tension, compression and biaxial tests) at temperatures between 180 and 230 °C. In this manner, anisotropic and hardening behaviour as well as differences between the tension-compression asymmetry of the yield locus have been estimated. Furthermore, using the evaluated data from the above mentioned tests, two different yield criteria have been parametrized; the commonly used Hill’48 and an orthotropic yield criterion, CPB2006, which was developed especially for materials with hexagonal close packed lattice structure and is able to describe an asymmetrical yielding behaviour regarding tensile and compressive stress states. Numerical simulations have been finally carried out with both yield functions in order to assess the accuracy of the material models.

  3. Corrosion resistance of Zn-Al layered double hydroxide/poly(lactic acid) composite coating on magnesium alloy AZ31

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Rong-Chang; Li, Xiao-Ting; Liu, Zhen-Guo; Zhang, Fen; Li, Shuo-Qi; Cui, Hong-Zhi

    2015-12-01

    A Zn-Al layered double hydroxide (ZnAl-LDH) coating consisted of uniform hexagonal nano-plates was firstly synthesized by co-precipitation and hydrothermal treatment on the AZ31 alloy, and then a poly(lactic acid) (PLA) coating was sealed on the top layer of the ZnAl-LDH coating using vacuum freeze-drying. The characteristics of the ZnAl-LDH/PLA composite coatings were investigated by means of XRD, SEM, FTIR and EDS. The corrosion resistance of the coatings was assessed by potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results showed that the ZnAl-LDH coating contained a compact inner layer and a porous outer layer, and the PLA coating with a strong adhesion to the porous outer layer can prolong the service life of the ZnAl-LDH coating. The excellent corrosion resistance of this composite coating can be attributable to its barrier function, ion-exchange and self-healing ability.

  4. Transient Liquid Phase Bonding of Magnesium Alloy AZ31 Using Cu Coatings and Cu Coatings with Sn Interlayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulaziz Nasser AlHazaa

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Transient liquid phase bonding (TLP of AZ31 samples has been investigated using Cu coatings and Cu coatings with Sn interlayer. Copper coatings were used for one set of the bonds, and a combination of Cu coatings and Sn interlayer was used for the other set of bonds. The bonding temperature was fixed at 520 °C, and various bonding times were applied. This study shows that the bonds produced using only Cu coatings have shown weaker bonds compared to the bonds made using Cu coatings and Sn interlayer. The Cu2Mg particles were detected at the joint region of both bonds made by Cu coatings and Cu coatings with Sn interlayer by X-ray diffraction (XRD. However, it has been observed that the joint region was dominated by solid solution which is rich in Mg. Sn interlayer was not contributed to the intermetallic compound (IMC at the joint region, and therefore it was diffused away through the Mg matrix. Within the joint interface, a slight increase of micro-hardness was observed compared to Mg base metal alloy. This was attributed to the formation and presence of IMC’s within the joint region. It was noticed that the presence of the Sn interlayer improved the joint strength by reducing the pores at the joint region. Pores were clearly observed for those bonds made using Cu coatings—especially for region where the fracture occurs; this was accomplished by scanning electron microscope (SEM.

  5. Optimization of Aluminium-to-Magnesium Ultrasonic Spot Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panteli, A.; Chen, Y.-C.; Strong, D.; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Prangnell, P. B.

    2012-03-01

    The ability to join dissimilar materials in the automotive industry will result in more efficient multimaterial structures. However, welding of aluminium (Al) to magnesium (Mg) alloys is problematic because of the rapid formation of brittle intermetallic phases at the weld interface. Ultrasonic welding (USW) is a solid-state joining technology that may offer a potential solution, but USW of Al to Mg is currently not well understood. Here, we have investigated the effect of process variables and energy input on joint formation between Al-6111 and Mg-AZ31 alloys, and we report on the optimum welding conditions, heat generation, and the formation of a significant intermetallic reaction layer. Furthermore, the factors influencing the interface reaction rate and the advantages of precoating the Mg with Al are discussed.

  6. Corrosion behaviors and effects of corrosion products of plasma electrolytic oxidation coated AZ31 magnesium alloy under the salt spray corrosion test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yan; Huang, Zhiquan; Yan, Qin; Liu, Chen; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Yi [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Guo, Changhong; Jiang, Guirong [College of Mechanical Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Shen, Dejiu, E-mail: DejiuShen@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Corrosion behaviors of a PEO coating was investigated after the salt spray test. • Corrosion products have significant effects on corrosion behaviors of the coating. • An electrochemical corrosion model is proposed. - Abstract: The effects of corrosion products on corrosion behaviors of AZ31 magnesium alloy with a plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) coating were investigated under the salt spray corrosion test (SSCT). The surface morphology, cross-sectional microstructure, chemical and phase compositions of the PEO coating were determined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), respectively. Further, the corrosion process of the samples under the SSCT was examined in a non-aqueous electrolyte (methanol) using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) coupled with equivalent circuit. The results show that the inner layer of the coating was destroyed firstly and the corrosion products have significant effects on the corrosion behaviors of the coating. The results above are discussed and an electrochemical corrosion model is proposed in the paper.

  7. Study of the effect of Pyrophosphate in low voltage Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation on the corrosion resistance of AZ31B Magnesium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Jae Gon; Kim, Eng Chan [Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ki Hong [Catholic University of Daegu, Gyeongsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    In this study, low voltage Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation (PEO) was utilized to eliminate the drawbacks of high voltage PEO such as high cost, dimensional deformation, and porosity. Low voltage PEO produces a thin coating, which leads to low corrosion resistance. In order to solve this problem, 0.1⁓0.6 M pyrophosphates were added to a bath containing 1.4 M NaOH and 0.35 M Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 3}.PEO at 70V was conducted at 25℃ for 3 minutes. The chemical composition, morphology, and corrosion resistance of the anodized coating were analyzed. The anodized film was composed of MgO, Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}, and Mg{sub 2}O{sub 7}P{sub 2}. Themorphology of the film showed a inappropriately dense structure and low porosity in the anodized layers. It is found that low voltage Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation in cooperation with phosphating treatment can provide good corrosion protection for the AZ31B magnesium alloy.

  8. A study on the relationships between corrosion properties and chemistry of thermally oxidised surface films formed on polished commercial magnesium alloys AZ31 and AZ61

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feliu, Sebastián, E-mail: sfeliu@cenim.csic.es [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalúrgicas CSIC, Avda. Gregorio del Amo 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Samaniego, Alejandro [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalúrgicas CSIC, Avda. Gregorio del Amo 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Barranco, Violeta [Instituto de Ciencias de Materiales de Madrid, ICMM, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, CSIC, Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, 3, Cantoblanco, 28049, Madrid (Spain); El-Hadad, A.A. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Al-Azhar University, Nasr City 11884, Cairo (Egypt); Llorente, Irene [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalúrgicas CSIC, Avda. Gregorio del Amo 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Serra, Carmen [Servicio de Nanotecnologia y Análisis de Superficies, CACTI, Universidade de Vigo, 36310 Vigo (Spain); Galván, J.C. [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalúrgicas CSIC, Avda. Gregorio del Amo 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-03-01

    Highlights: • Surface chemistry of heat treated magnesium alloys. • Relation between heat treatment and aluminium subsurface enrichment. • Relation between surface composition and corrosion behaviour. - Abstract: This paper studies the changes in chemical composition of the thin oxide surface films induced by heating in air at 200 °C for time intervals from 5 min to 60 min on the freshly polished commercial AZ31 and AZ61 alloys with a view to better understanding their protective properties. This thermal treatment resulted in the formation of layers enriched in metallic aluminium at the interface between the outer MgO surface films and the bulk material. A strong link was found between the degree of metallic Al enrichment in the subsurface layer (from 10 to 15 at.%) observed by XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) in the AZ61 treated samples and the increase in protective properties observed by EIS (electrochemical impedance spectroscopy) in the immersion test in 0.6 M NaCl. Heating for 5–60 min in air at 200 °C seems to be an effective, easy to perform and inexpensive method for increasing the corrosion resistance of the AZ61 alloy by approximately two or three times.

  9. Simulation of Flow Stress Characteristic During Two-stage Hot Deformation Process in AZ31B Magnesium Alloy

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Xiaohu; Hu, Xiaodong; Zhao, Hongyang; Ju, Dongying

    2017-01-01

    A 2-D CA model has been developed to simulate two-stage hot deformation processing of magnesium (Mg) alloy. Based on the fact that Mg has an HCP crystal structure with six-fold symmetry, the model employs hexagonal CA lattice. The physically-based model has integrated the effects of individual metallurgical phenomena related with the hot deformation, including dynamic recrystallization (DRX), static recovery, static recrystallization (SRX), meta-dynamic recrystallization (MDRX) and grain grow...

  10. Mesoscale Modeling and Validation of Texture Evolution during Asymmetric Rooling and Static Recrystallization of Magnesium Alloy AZ31B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radhakrishnan, Balasubramaniam [ORNL; Gorti, Sarma B [ORNL; Stoica, Grigoreta M [ORNL; Muralidharan, Govindarajan [ORNL; Stoica, Alexandru Dan [ORNL; Wang, Xun-Li [ORNL; Specht, Eliot D [ORNL; Kenik, Edward A [ORNL; Muth, Thomas R [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    The focus of the present research is to develop an integrated deformation and recrystallization model for magnesium alloys at the microstructural length scale. It is known that in magnesium alloys nucleation of recrystallized grains occurs at various microstructural inhomogeneities such as twins and localized deformation bands. However, there is a need to develop models that can predict the evolution of the grain structure and texture developed during recrystallization and grain growth, especially when the deformation process follows a complicated deformation path such as in asymmetric rolling. The deformation model is based on a crystal plasticity approach implemented at the length scale of the microstructure that includes deformation mechanisms based on dislocation slip and twinning. The recrystallization simulation is based on a Monte Carlo technique that operates on the output of the deformation simulations. The nucleation criterion during recrystallization is based on the local stored energy and the Monte Carlo technique is used to simulate the growth of the nuclei due to local stored energy differences and curvature. The model predictions are compared with experimental data obtained through electron backscatter analysis and neutron diffraction.

  11. In vitro corrosion behavior of magnesium alloy AZ31B-hydroxyapatite metallic matrix composites processed via friction stir processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Yee-Hsien

    Magnesium and its alloys have been considered for load-bearing implant materials due to their similar mechanical properties to the natural bone, excellent biocompatibility, good bioactivity, and biodegradation. Nevertheless, the uncontrollable corrosion rate in biological environment restrains their application. Hydroxyapatite (HA, Ca10(PO4)6(OH 2) is a widely used bio-ceramic which has bone-like mineral structure for bone fixation. Poor fracture toughness of HA makes it not suitable for load-bearing application as a bulk. Thus, HA is introduced into metallic surface in various forms for improving biocompatibility. Recently friction stir processing (FSP) has emerged as a surface modification tool for surface/substrate grain refinement and homogenization of microstructure in biomaterial. In the present efforts, Mg-nHA composite surface on with 5-20 wt% HA on Mg substrate were fabricated by FSP for biodegradation and bioactivity study. The results of electrochemical measurement indicated that lower amount ( 5% wt%) of Ca in Mg matrix can enhance surface localized corrosion resistance. The effects of microstructure, the presence of HA particle and Mg-Ca intermetallic phase precipitates on in vitro behavior of Mg alloy were investigated by TEM, SEM, EDX, XRD, and XPS. The detailed observations will be discussed during presentation.

  12. High Temperature Plasticity of Bimetallic Magnesium and Aluminum Friction Stir Welded Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regev, Michael; El Mehtedi, Mohamad; Cabibbo, Marcello; Quercetti, Giovanni; Ciccarelli, Daniele; Spigarelli, Stefano

    2014-02-01

    The high temperature deformation of a bimetallic AZ31/AA6061 Friction Stir Welded joint was investigated in the present study by constant load creep experiments carried out at 473 K (200 °C). The microstructural analysis revealed the strongly inhomogeneous nature of the weld, which was characterized by an extremely fine grain size in the magnesium-rich zones and by the extensive presence of intermetallic phases. In the high stress regime, the creep strain was concentrated in the refined and particle-rich microstructure of the weld zone, while the AA6061 base metal remained undeformed. In the low stress regime, deformation became more homogeneously distributed between the AZ31 base metal and the weld zone. The creep behavior of the weld was found to obey the constitutive equation describing the minimum creep rate dependence on applied stress for the base AZ31, slightly modified to take into account the finer microstructure and the role of secondary phase particles, i.e., the retardation of grain growth and the obstruction of grain boundary sliding.

  13. In Vitro Studies on the Degradability, Bioactivity, and Cell Differentiation of PRP/AZ31B Mg Alloys Composite Scaffold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Zou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, more and more methods have been developed to improve the bioactivity of the biodegradable materials in bone tissue regeneration. In present study, we used rat mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs to evaluate the outcomes of Mg alloys (AZ31B, Magnesium, and Aluminum and Platelet-rich plasma (PRP/Mg alloys on rMSCs biocompatibility and osteogenic differentiation. Water absorption experiments indicated that both bare AZ31B and PRP/AZ31B were capable of absorbing large amounts of water. But the water absorption ratio for PRP/AZ31B was significantly higher than that for bare AZ31B. The degradability experiments implied that both samples degraded at same speed. rMSCs on the surface of AZ31B distributed more and better than those on the AZ31B scaffold. In ALP activity experiment, the activity of rMSCs on the PRP/AZ31B was markedly higher than that on the AZ31B scaffolds on the 7th day and 14th day. qRT-PCR also showed that OPN and OCN were expressed in both samples. OPN and OCN expression in PRP/AZ31B sample were higher than those in bare AZ31B samples. In summary, the in vitro study implied that AZ31B combined with PRP could remarkably improve cell seeding, attachment, proliferation, and differentiation.

  14. Corrosion behaviour and in vitro/in vivo biocompatibility of surface-modified AZ31 alloy; Comportamiento frente a la corrosion y biocompatibilidad in vitrolin vivo de la aleacion AZ31 modificada superficialmente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carboneras, M.; Iglesias, C.; Perez-Maceda, B. T.; Valle, J. A. de; Garcia-Alonso, M. C.; Alobera, M. A.; Clemente, C.; Rubio, J. C.; Escudero, M. I.; Lozano, R. M.

    2011-07-01

    The present work evaluates the corrosion behaviour and the in vitro/in vivo biocompatibility of the AZ31 magnesium alloy, which fulfills the mechanical requirements of bone. The corrosion kinetic of as-received AZ31 alloy was not compatible with the cell growth. To improve its performance, the AZ31 alloy was surface modified by a chemical conversion treatment in hydrofluoric acid. The magnesium fluoride layer generated by the surface treatment of AZ31 alloy enhances its corrosion behaviour, allowing the in vitro growth of osteoblastic cells over the surface and the in vivo formation of a highly compact layer of new bone tissue. These results lead to consider the magnesium fluoride coating as necessary for potential use of the AZ31 alloy as biodegradable and absorbable implant for bone repair. (Author) 18 refs.

  15. Liquid phase formation of alkyl- and perfluoro-phosphonic acid derived monolayers on magnesium alloy AZ31 and their chemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizaki, Takahiro; Teshima, Katsuya; Masuda, Yoshitake; Sakamoto, Michiru

    2011-08-01

    Alkyl- and perfluoro-phosphonic acid derived SAMs were successfully formed on Mg alloy by liquid phase method for the first time. The chemical and anticorrosive properties of the prepared SAMs on magnesium alloys were characterized using contact angle measurements, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and electrochemical measurements. Water contact angle measurements revealed that the maximum advancing/receding water contact angles of n-octyl (OP: CH(3)(CH(2))(7)PO(OH)(2)), n-dodecyl (DP: CH(3)(CH(2))(11)PO(OH)(2)), n-octadecyl (ODP: CH(3)(CH(2))(17)PO(OH)(2)) phosphonic acid, and 2-(perfluorohexyl)ethyl (PFEP: CF(3)(CF(2))(5)CH(2)CH(2)PO(OH)(2)) phosphonic acid were 105.1/64.7°, 108.3/69.6°, 111.9/75.2°, and 115.2/67.4° respectively. In the case of alkylphosphonic acid SAMs (OP, DP, and ODP), the advancing and receding water contact angles increased with an increase in the preparation time. The angle-resolved XPS (AR-XPS) data revealed that the film thicknesses of the OP, DP, ODP, PFEP on Mg alloy were estimated to be 0.8, 1.2, 1.7, and 1.1 nm, respectively. The XPS O 1s data support that the phosphonic acid derived SAM is covalently bound to the oxide or hydroxide surface of the Mg alloy in a monodenate or bidenate manner. Chemical stability of the alkyl- and perfluoro-phosphonic acid modified Mg alloy surfaces was investigated using aqueous solutions at pH=4.0, 7.0, and 10.0. The contact angles of OP, DP, and PFEP modified Mg surface decreased rapidly within the first 5 min after immersion in all the aqueous solutions and were less than 20°. On the other hand, the contact angles of the ODP modified Mg alloy after immersion in aqueous solutions at pH 4, 7 and 10 for 5 min were 45.1°, 89.3,° and 85.5°, respectively. The ODP modified Mg alloy had highest chemical stability in four types of the phosphonic acid derived SAMs used in this study, indicating that the molecular density of ODP on Mg alloy would be higher than those

  16. Influence of the microstructural changes and induced residual stresses on tensile properties of wrought magnesium alloy friction stir welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Commin, Loreleie, E-mail: lorelei.commin@kit.edu [LMPF, Arts et Metiers ParisTech, rue St Dominique, 51000 Chalons en Champagne (France); Dumont, Myriam [Aix-Marseille Universite, CNRS, IM2NP (UMR 6242), Faculte St-Jerome, Case 261, Av. Escadrille Normandie-Niemen, 13 397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France); Rotinat, Rene; Pierron, Fabrice [LMPF, Arts et Metiers ParisTech, rue St Dominique, 51000 Chalons en Champagne (France); Masse, Jean-Eric; Barrallier, Laurent [MecaSurf, Arts et Metiers ParisTech, 2 cours des Arts et Metiers, 13100 Aix en Provence (France)

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Study of AZ31 FSW mechanical behaviour. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Early yielding occurs in the TMAZ, the nugget and base metal zones undergo almost no plastic strains. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Texture gradient in the TMAZ localises the deformations in this area. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Residual stresses have a major influence in FSW mechanical behaviour. - Abstract: Friction stir welding induces a microstructural evolution and residual stresses that will influence the resulting mechanical properties. Friction stir welds produced from magnesium alloy hot rolled plates were studied. Electron back scattered diffraction was used to determine the texture evolution, residual stresses were analysed using X ray diffraction and tensile tests coupled with speckle interferometry were performed. The residual stresses induced during friction stir welding present a major influence on the final mechanical properties.

  17. Friction Stir Welding of Magnesium Die Castings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skar, Jan Ivar; Gjestland, Haavard; Oosterkamp, Ljiljana Djapic; Albright, Darryl L.

    Friction stir welding (FSW), being a solid-state process, is an attractive method for joining magnesium die castings. In this study, FSW of AZ91D and AM50A plates was performed both on the individual alloys and to join them together. The welds were sound and free from defects, except for small surface cracks in AM50A; a fine microstructure characterized the weld zones. The tensile properties of specimens transverse to the weld zone were measured, as were the corrosion properties. The tensile properties were somewhat lower than the base metal, with the largest percentage decrease found in the elongation of AM50A, perhaps due to the surface cracking. The corrosion resistance of the weld zone was relatively poor, most likely due to iron contamination from wearing of the tool. Further optimization of the FSW tool design and process parameters must take place to improve the reliability of FSW for magnesium die castings.

  18. Research Progress in Plasma arc welding of Magnesium Alloys and Magnesium Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Li; Yang, Zou; Yongbo, Li; Lei, Jiao; Ruijun, Hou

    2017-11-01

    Magnesium alloys and magnesium matrix composites by means of its excellent performance have wide application prospect in electronics, automotive, biotechnology, aerospace field, and welding technology has become a key of restricting its application. This paper describes the welding characteristics of magnesium, the obvious advantages in the application and the domestic and foreign research advance technology of plasma arc welding of magnesium, and summarizes the existing problems and development trends of plasma arc welding technology of magnesium.

  19. Analysis of dynamic deformation behavior of AZ31 using Taylor Rod on Anvil Impact Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Maruwada Sukanya; Kirtley, Daniel; Gokhale, Arun; Thadhani, Naresh

    2017-06-01

    The dynamic behavior and detailed microstructural characterization of rolled magnesium alloy AZ31 is described in this work. Magnesium alloys have gained considerable importance as they possess a high strength-to-weight ratio. The goal of the current work is to provide an insight on the dynamic deformation of AZ31 magnesium alloys. Taylor rod-on-anvil impact tests have been conducted at different velocities, on rods machined along the rolling and transverse directions of the as-rolled AZ31 plate, in order to capture the effects of anisotropy on the dynamic deformation behavior. The experiments used laser beam interruption to measure the impact velocity of the samples and high-speed digital imaging to capture transient deformation states. The impacted samples showed anisotropic deformation resulting in an elliptical impact surface foot print. Additionally, detailed orientation maps and micrographs revealed extensive twinning along with some cracks on the impact faces of the samples. Quantitative microscopy revealed that the surface area per unit volume of twins at least tripled under all impact conditions. In this presentation evolution of microstructure and anisotropy in rolled AZ31 samples subjected to Taylor rod-on-anvil impact tests will be discussed.

  20. CO2 laser welding of magnesium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhahri, Mohammed; Masse, Jean Eric; Mathieu, J. F.; Barreau, Gerard; Autric, Michel L.

    2000-02-01

    Metallic alloys with a low mass density can be considered to be basic materials in aeronautic and automotive industry. Magnesium alloys have better properties than aluminum alloys in respect of their low density and high resistance to traction. The main problems of magnesium alloy welding are the inflammability, the crack formation and the appearance of porosity during the solidification. The laser tool is efficient to overcome the difficulties of manufacturing by conventional processing. Besides, the laser processing mainly using shielding gases allows an effective protection of the metal against the action of oxygen and a small heat affected zone. In this paper, we present experimental results about 5 kW CO2 laser welding of 4 mm-thick magnesium alloy plates provided by Eurocopter France. The focused laser beam has about 0.15 mm of diameter. We have investigated the following sample: WE43, alloy recommended in aeronautic and space applications, is constituted with Mg, Y, Zr, rare earth. More ductile, it can be used at high temperatures until 250 degrees Celsius for times longer than 5000 hours without effects on its mechanical properties. A sample of RZ5 (French Norm: GZ4TR, United States Norm ZE41) is composed of Mg, Zn, Zr, La, rare earth. This alloy has excellent properties of foundry and it allows to the realization of components with complex form. Also, it has a good resistance and important properties of tightness. The parameters of the process were optimized in the following fields: laser power: 2 to 5 kW, welding speed: 1 to 4.5 m/min, focal position: -3 mm to +3 mm below or on the top of the metal surface, shielding gas: helium with a flow of 10 to 60 l/min at 4 bars. Metallurgical analyses and mechanical control are made (macroscopic structure, microscopic structure, interpretations of the structures and localization of possible defects, analyse phases, chemical composition, hardness, tensile test etc.) to understand the parameters influence of welding

  1. Properties of the AZ31 Magnesium Alloy Round Bars Obtained in Different Rolling Processes / Własności Prętów Okrągłych Ze Stopu Magnezu AZ31 Otrzymanych W Różnych Procesach Walcowania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanik A.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Currently magnesium alloy bars are manufactured mainly in the extrusion process. This method has some drawbacks, which include: low process capacity, considerable energy demand, small length of finished products. Therefore it is purposeful to develop efficient methods for manufacturing of Mg alloy products in the form of bars, such methods include groove rolling and three-high skew rolling processes. Modified stretching passes provide change in material plastic flow, which contributes to the occurrence of the better distribution of stress and strain state than in the case of rolling in classical stretching passes. One of the modern method of Mg alloy bars production is rolling in a three-high skew rolling mill, which allows to set in a single pass a larger deformation compared to the rolling in the stretching passes.

  2. Study on Corrosion and Stress Corrosion Cracking Behaviors of AZ31 Alloy in Sodium Sulfate Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiuli; Yan, Zhifeng; Liang, Hongyu; Wei, Yinghui

    2017-05-01

    The potentiodynamic polarization test and slow strain rate tensile test were carried out in 3.5 wt.% Na2SO4 solution with different pH values (2, 7, and 12). It was found that the SCC susceptibility of AZ31 magnesium alloy in 3.5 wt.% Na2SO4 solution was deteriorated significantly with the decreasing pH. This was consistent with the electrochemical properties. There were filiform corrosion forms on the specimen surface after slow strain rate tensile test in 3.5 wt.% Na2SO4 solution, which indicated the characteristics of general corrosion. Moreover, there were multiple stress corrosion crack initiation sources. The SCC fracture of AZ31 magnesium alloy in air was a mix type, while it was cleavage fracture in 3.5 wt.% Na2SO4 solution.

  3. Synthesis of dittmarite/Mg(OH){sub 2} composite coating on AZ31 using hydrothermal treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Qing, E-mail: qzhaoyuping@bit.edu.cn; Mahmood, Waqas; Zhu, Yanying

    2016-03-30

    Highlights: • Synthesis of dittmarite Mg(OH){sub 2} coating on AZ31 alloy by hydrothermal method. • The mechanism of composite coating growth and its characterizations. • The coating is corrosion resistant significantly. • Lack of hydroxyl deposition on the coating surface. • Strong adhesion between the coating and the substrate. • The synthesized coating meets the cytotoxicity standards. - Abstract: In this work, we have used hydrothermal method for the synthesis of dittmarite/Mg(OH){sub 2} composite (DMC) layer on AZ31 alloy of magnesium. The synthesized coating was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). In a test immersion into the Hank's mixture for 31 days, the synthesized coating inhibited corrosion of AZ31 significantly and the amorphous calcium apatite precursor deposited on the coating surface. In another tape test, we noticed strong adhesion between the coating and substrate that eventually concludes that the synthesized coating is hydrophilic and a promising candidate to be used in the absorbable implant materials. Besides, the cytotoxicity of the AZ31 alloy with DMC coating, grown under different conditions on L-929 cells in vitro was examined indirectly through the growth inhibition method (MTT assay). The cytotoxicity of the deposited coating lie between 0 ∼ 1 that indicates it as a promising biomaterial.

  4. Effects of sintering temperature on the corrosion behavior of AZ31 alloy with Ca–P sol–gel coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu, Bo [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Liaoning University of Technology, Jinzhou, Liaoning Province, 121001 (China); Shi, Ping, E-mail: p_shi@sohu.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Liaoning University of Technology, Jinzhou, Liaoning Province, 121001 (China); Wei, Donghua [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Liaoning University of Technology, Jinzhou, Liaoning Province, 121001 (China); E, Shanshan [School of Mathematics and Physics, Bohai University, Jinzhou, Liaoning Province, 121013 (China); Li, Qiang; Chen, Yang [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Liaoning University of Technology, Jinzhou, Liaoning Province, 121001 (China)

    2016-04-25

    To slow down the initial biodegradation rate of magnesium alloy, calcium phosphate (Ca–P) coatings were prepared on AZ31 magnesium alloy by a sol–gel technique. To study the effects of sintering temperature on microstructure, bonding strength and corrosion behavior of the coatings, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and an adhesive strength test were used to characterize the coatings. The corrosion resistance of the coatings was investigated by immersion test and electrochemical corrosion techniques in simulated body fluid (SBF) solution. It shows that the sol–gel coatings consist of Ca{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7}, mixture of Ca{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7}, Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} and hydroxyapatite, and hydroxyapatite, by sintering respectively at 300 °C, 400 °C and 500 °C. There are major cracks on the coatings. The crack area portion on the coating and the bonding strength at the interface between the calcium phosphate coating and the bare AZ31 increases, and the corrosion resistance of the coated AZ31 in SBF decreases with increasing sintering temperatures from 300 °C to 500 °C. Based on our investigations, the corrosion resistance of the coated AZ31 in SBF depends mainly on the crack area portion on the coatings, rather than on the coating phase stability. - Highlights: • Ca–P coating was prepared on AZ31 alloy by a sol–gel technique. • Crack area portion in the coating increases with temperatures. • Bonding strength between Ca–P coating and substrate increases with temperatures. • Corrosion resistance of the coated AZ31 in SBF decreases with temperatures. • Corrosion resistance of the coated AZ31 depends mainly on the crack area portion.

  5. Effect of thermal tempering on microstructure and mechanical properties of Mg-AZ31/Al-6061 diffusion bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jafarian, Mojtaba [Young Researchers and Elite Club, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rizi, Mohsen Saboktakin, E-mail: M.saboktakin@Pa.iut.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 8415683111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Industrial Engineering, Lenjan Branch, Islamic Azad University, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jafarian, Morteza [Young Researchers and Elite Club, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Honarmand, Mehrdad [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tiran Branch, Islamic Azad University, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Javadinejad, Hamid Reza; Ghaheri, Ali [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 8415683111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Industrial Engineering, Lenjan Branch, Islamic Azad University, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bahramipour, Mohammad Taghi [Materials Engineering Department, Hakim Sabzevari University, Sabzevar, 397 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ebrahimian, Marzieh [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 8415683111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Industrial Engineering, Lenjan Branch, Islamic Azad University, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of the types thermal tempering of aluminum alloy on microstructure and mechanical properties of AZ31-O Mg and Al 6061-T6 diffusion bonding. Using Optical Microscope (OM) and Scanning Electron Microscopes (SEM) equipped with EDS analysis and line scan the interfaces of joints were evaluated. The XRD analysis was carried out to characterize phase constitution near the interface zone. The mechanical properties of joints were measured using Vickers micro-hardness and shear strength. According to the results in bonding of AZ31-Mg/Al-6061-O, in less plastic deformation in magnesium alloy, diffusion rate of most magnesium atoms occurred to aluminum alloy and formation of diffusion zone with minimum micro-hardness (140 HV) and maximum shear strength (32 MPa) compared to Al 6061-T6/Mg-AZ31 bonding. Evaluation of fracture surfaces indicates an occurrence of failure from the brittle intermetallic phases. - Highlights: • Diffusion bonding AZ31 to Al-6061withoutany interlayer was successful. • Thermal tempered aluminum alloy plays a vital role in the mechanical properties of joint. • Less thickness of reaction layers and micro-hardness in bonding annealed Al- 6061 layers to AZ31 was achieved. • Fracture surfaces indicated that the onset of fracture from intermetallic compounds resulted in fracture of the cleavage.

  6. Lap shear strength and fatigue behavior of friction stir spot welded dissimilar magnesium-to-aluminum joints with adhesive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chowdhury, S.H. [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3 (Canada); Chen, D.L., E-mail: dchen@ryerson.ca [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3 (Canada); Bhole, S.D. [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3 (Canada); Cao, X.; Wanjara, P. [National Research Council Canada Aerospace, 5145 Decelles Avenue, Montreal, Quebec H3T 2B2 (Canada)

    2013-02-01

    Lightweighting is currently considered as an effective way in improving fuel efficiency and reducing anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. The structural applications of lightweight magnesium and aluminum alloys in the aerospace and automotive sectors unavoidably involve welding and joining while guaranteeing the safety and durability of motor vehicles. The objective of this study was to evaluate the lap shear strength and fatigue properties of friction stir spot welded (FSSWed) dissimilar AZ31B-H24 Mg alloy and Al alloy (AA) 5754-O in three combinations, i.e., (top) Al/Mg (bottom), Al/Mg with an adhesive interlayer, and Mg/Al with an adhesive interlayer. For all the dissimilar Mg-to-Al weld combinations, FSSW induced an interfacial layer in the stir zone (SZ) that was composed of intermetallic compounds of Al{sub 3}Mg{sub 2} and Al{sub 12}Mg{sub 17}, which led to an increase in hardness. Both Mg/Al and Al/Mg dissimilar adhesive welds had significantly higher lap shear strength, failure energy and fatigue life than the Al/Mg dissimilar weld without adhesive. Two different types of fatigue failure modes were observed. In the Al/Mg adhesive weld, at high cyclic loads nugget pull-out failure occurred due to fatigue crack propagation circumferentially around the nugget. At low cyclic loads, fatigue failure occurred in the bottom Mg sheet due to the stress concentration of the keyhole leading to crack initiation followed by propagation perpendicular to the loading direction. In the Mg/Al adhesive weld, nugget pull-out failure mode was primarily observed at both high and low cyclic loads.

  7. High temperature formability of graphene nanoplatelets-AZ31 composites fabricated by stir-casting method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Rashad

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Outstanding mechanical properties of graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs make them ideal reinforcement for mass production of composites. In this research, the composites were fabricated by stir-casting method. GNPs were added in 1.5 and 3.0 wt.% into Mg–3wt.% Al–1wt.% Zn (AZ31 magnesium alloy. As cast ingots were preheated for one hour and extruded at 350 °C with extrusion ratio of 5.2:1. As extruded AZ31-GNPs composites were micro-structurally characterized with X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Vickers micro-hardness of synthesized materials was investigated both in parallel and perpendicular to extrusion directions. Room temperature mechanical testing revealed that with increasing GNP's content, tensile fracture strain was remarkably increased without significant compromise in tensile strength. Furthermore, as extruded AZ31-3GNPs composites were subjected to tensile testing at temperatures ranging from 75 °C to 300 °C with initial strain rate of 2 × 10−3 s−1 to evaluate high temperature formability of composite. It was found that like CNTs, GNPs also have the potential to sustain tensile strength at high temperatures.

  8. The effects of alloying elements on microstructures and mechanical properties of tungsten inert gas welded AZ80 magnesium alloys joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Zhang, Jiansheng; Ding, Rongrong

    2017-11-01

    The effects of alloying elements on the macrostructures, microstructures and tensile strength of AZ80 Mg alloy weldments were studied in the present study. The results indicate that with the decrease of Al element content of filler wire, the welding defects of seam are gradually eliminated and the β-Mg17Al12 phases at α-Mg boundaries are refined and become discontinuous, which are beneficial to the improvement of tensile strength. With AZ31 Mg alloy filler wire, the maximum tensile strength of AZ80 weldment is 220 MPa and fracture occurs at the welding seam of joint. It is experimentally proved that robust AZ80 Mg alloy joints can be obtained by tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding process with AZ31 Mg alloy filler wire. However, further study is required to improve the microstructures and reduce welding defects of joint in order to further improve the joining strength of AZ80 Mg alloy joint.

  9. Analysis of the Deformability of Two-Layer Materials AZ31/Eutectic / Analiza Możliwości Odkształcania Plastycznego Materiału Dwuwarstwowego AZ31/Eutektyka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mola R.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper present the results of physical simulation of the deformation of the two-layered AZ31/eutectic material using the Gleeble 3800 metallurgical processes simulator. The eutectic layer was produced on the AZ31 substrate using thermochemical treatment. The specimens of AZ31 alloy were heat treated in contact with aluminium powder at 445°C in a vacuum furnace. Depending on the heating time, Al-enriched surface layers with a thickness of 400, 700 and 1100 μm were fabricated on a substrate which was characterized by an eutectic structure composed of the Mg17Al12 phase and a solid solution of aluminium in magnesium. In the study, physical simulation of the fabricated two-layered specimens with a varying thickness of the eutectic layer were deformed using the plane strain compression test at various values of strain rates. The testing results have revealed that it is possible to deform the two-layered AZ31/eutectic material at low strain rates and small deformation values.

  10. Simulation of cylindrical cup drawing of AZ31 sheet metal with crystal plasticity finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Weiqin; Li, Dayong; Zhang, Shaorui; Peng, Yinghong

    2013-12-01

    As a light-weight structural material, magnesium alloys show good potential in improving the fuel efficiency of vehicles and reducing CO2 emissions. However, it is well known that polycrystalline Mg alloys develop pronounced crystallographic texture and plastic anisotropy during rolling, which leads to earing phenomenon during deep drawing of the rolled sheets. It is vital to predict this phenomenon accurately for application of magnesium sheet metals. In the present study, a crystal plasticity model for AZ31 magnesium alloy that incorporates both slip and twinning is established. Then the crystal plasticity model is implemented in the commercial finite element software ABAQUS/Explicit through secondary development interface (VUMAT). Finally, the stamping process of a cylindrical cup is simulated using the developed crystal plasticity finite element model, and the predicting method is verified by comparing with experimental results from both earing profile and deformation texture.

  11. Electrochemical Investigations of Polycaprolactone-Coated AZ31 Mg Alloy in Earle's Balance Salt Solution and Conventional Simulated Body Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilke, Benjamin M.; Zhang, Lei

    2016-06-01

    Polycaprolactone (PCL) coating has been shown to increase the corrosion resistance of magnesium alloys when exposed to a simulated body fluid. A PCL dip coating was applied to AZ31 Mg alloy. Samples were immersed in both Earle's Balance Salt Solution (EBSS) and conventional simulated body fluids (c-SBF) up to 14 days. Microscopic morphology, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and potentiodynamic polarization tests were performed to evaluate the corrosion behavior changes of PCL coatings against immersion times in EBSS and c-SBF as compared to the uncoated AZ31 substrate. PCL-coated samples demonstrated improved corrosion resistance compared to bare AZ31 in both EBSS and c-SBF, indicating that the PCL coating exhibited good corrosion protection of AZ31 in simulated body fluid. Samples immersed in EBSS showed significantly higher electrochemical impedance values and slower corrosion progression as compared to the samples in c-SBF, because of the decreased chloride content and CO2 buffering mechanism of the EBSS.

  12. Study of the corrosion behavior of magnesium alloy weldings in NaCl solutions by gravimetric tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Segarra, José A.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the corrosion behavior of commercial AZ31 welded plates in aqueous chloride media was investigated by means of gravimetric techniques and Neutral Salt Spray tests (NSS. The AZ31 samples tested were welded using Gas Tugsten Arc Welding (GTAW and different filler materials. Material microstructures were investigated by optical microscopy to stablish the influence of those microstructures in the corrosion behavior. Gravimetric and NSS tests indicate that the use of more noble filler alloys for the sample welding, preventing the reduction of aluminum content in weld beads, does not imply a better corrosion behavior.En este artículo se ha investigado el comportamiento frente a la corrosión en medios acuosos salinos de chapas soldadas de aleación AZ31 mediante técnicas gravimétricas y ensayo en cámara de niebla salina. Las muestras estudiadas han sido soldadas mediante soldadura TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas y con diferentes materiales de aporte. En el estudio se ha empleado microscopía óptica para analizar la microestructura. Los ensayos de gravimetría y los ensayos de niebla salina indican que el empleo de materiales de aporte más nobles para soldar las muestras evitando la disminución del contenido en aluminio en los cordones, no implica un mejor comportamiento frente a la corrosión.

  13. Cytotoxicity studies of AZ31D alloy and the effects of carbon dioxide on its biodegradation behavior in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jiali, E-mail: wangjialicsu@yahoo.cn [Center for Translational Medicine Research and Development, Institute of Biomedical and Health Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Musculoskeletal Research Laboratory, Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR (China); Qin, Ling [Center for Translational Medicine Research and Development, Institute of Biomedical and Health Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Musculoskeletal Research Laboratory, Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR (China); Wang, Kai [School of Humanities and Social Sciences, Hunan University of Chinese Medicine, Changsha 410208 (China); Wang, Jue; Yue, Ye [Center for Translational Medicine Research and Development, Institute of Biomedical and Health Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Li, Yangde [Guangdong Innovation Team for Biodegradable Magnesium and Medical Implants, E-ande, Dongguan 523660 (China); Tang, Jian [Center for Translational Medicine Research and Development, Institute of Biomedical and Health Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Li, Weirong [Guangdong Innovation Team for Biodegradable Magnesium and Medical Implants, E-ande, Dongguan 523660 (China)

    2013-10-01

    Magnesium alloys have been advocated as potential artificial bone materials due to their biocompatibility and biodegradability. The understanding of their corrosive mechanism in physiological environments is therefore essential for making application-orientated designs. Thus, this in vitro study was designed to assess the effects of CO{sub 2} on corrosive behavior of AZ31D to mimic in vivo special ingredient. Electrochemical technologies accompanied with Scanning electron microscope, Fourier transform infrared, X-ray diffraction, Energy dispersive spectroscopy and hydrogen evolution measurement were employed to analyze corrosive rates and mechanisms of AZ31D. Moreover, the biocompatibility of AZ31D was assessed with a direct cell attachment assay and an indirect cytotoxicity test in different diluted extracts. The ion concentrations in extracts were measured using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry to offer explanations on the differences of cell viability in the indirect test. The results of the direct cytotoxicity assay showed that the corrosive rate of AZ31D was too rapid to allow for cell adhesion. Extracts diluted less than 20 times would cause adverse effects on cell proliferation, likely due to excessive ions and gas release. Moreover, the presence of CO{sub 2} did not cause significant differences on corrosive behavior of AZ31D according to the results of electrochemical testing and hydrogen evolution measurement. This might be caused by the simultaneous process of precipitation and dissolution of MgCO{sub 3} due to the penetration role of CO{sub 2}. This analysis of corrosive atmospheres on the degradation behavior of magnesium alloys would contribute to the design of more scientific in vitro testing systems in the future. - Highlights: • We evaluate the effects of CO{sub 2} on corrosion behavior of magnesium alloys. • We assess the feasibility of commercial AZ31D alloy as potential implants. • CO{sub 2} is not the key factor to minimize

  14. A Survey on Friction Stir Welding Of Dissimilar Magnesium Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unnikrishnan, M. A.; Raja, Dhas. J. Edwin

    2017-10-01

    There is a consistent demand for superior materials in every industry. The areas on demand are automobile and aerospace sectors in major.. The most commonly used material in these fields is Aluminium.Though it possess all the properties up to some extent constant demand is pushing for alternate materials. Dissimilar alloys have been a relatively new approach towards these fields.. Friction stir welding dissimilar alloys is a big leap in Automobile sector. In this paper a detailed review of Friction stir welding of Dissimilar Magnesium alloys has been done. This work will serve as a reference to subsequent researchers.

  15. Tailoring degradation of AZ31 alloy by surface pre-treatment and electrospun PCL fibrous coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanas, T. [Medical Materials Laboratory, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); School of Nano Science and Technology, National Institute of Technology Calicut, Calicut, Kerala 673601 (India); Sampath Kumar, T.S., E-mail: tssk@iitm.ac.in [Medical Materials Laboratory, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Perumal, Govindaraj; Doble, Mukesh [Department of Biotechnology - Bhupat and Jyoti Mehta School of Biosciences, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India)

    2016-08-01

    AZ31 magnesium alloy was coated with polycaprolactone (PCL) nano-fibrous layer using electrospinning technique so as to control degradation in physiological environment. Before coating, the alloy was treated with HNO{sub 3} to have good adhesion between the coating and substrate. To elucidate the role of pre-treatment and coating, samples only with PCL coating as well as HNO{sub 3} treatment only were prepared for comparison. Best coating adhesion of 4B grade by ASTM D3359–09 tape test was observed for pre-treated samples. The effect of coating on in vitro degradation and biomineralization was studied using supersaturated simulated body fluid (SBF 5 ×). The weight loss and corrosion results obtained by immersion test showed that the combination of HNO{sub 3} pre-treatment and PCL coating is very effective in controlling the degradation rate and improving bioactivity. Cytotoxicity studies using L6 cells showed that PCL coated sample has better cell adhesion and proliferation compared to uncoated samples. Nano-fibrous PCL coating combined with prior acid treatment seems to be a promising method to tailor degradation rate with enhanced bioactivity of Mg alloys. - Highlights: • PCL electrospun coating on HNO{sub 3} pre-treated AZ31 alloy controls biodegradation. • Acid pre-treatment stabilizes the substrate - coating interface. • Electrospun porous coating improves biomineralization. • Coating similar to extracellular matrix enhances cell adhesion.

  16. Investigation of the chemical vicinity of defects in Mg and AZ31 with positron coincident Doppler boarding spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stadlbauer, Martin

    2008-03-10

    Within the scope of the present work, two main goals have been achieved: Firstly, the coincident Doppler broadening spectrometer (CDBS) at the high intense positron source NEPOMUC has been elaborately improved in order to increase the spatial resolution for defect mapping measurements and to investigate samples with shallow positron trapping sites which are present e. g. in magnesium. Secondly, as an application, the chemical vicinity of defects in the industrially used magnesium based alloy AZ31 has been examined by means of the detailed investigation of ion-irradiated specimen with positron annihilation spectroscopy. Detailed simulations with the finite-element simulation tool COMSOL were used to optimize the focal diameter of the positron beam at the sample position in order to increase the spatial resolution. With a value of 0.3 mm, sub-mm resolution has now been reached. The CDBS has been furthermore equipped with a sample cooling unit in order to reach liquid nitrogen temperature, maintaining the feature of scanning the sample for defect mapping. Defects and their chemical surrounding in ion irradiated magnesium and the magnesium based alloy AZ31 were then investigated on an atomic scale with the CDBS. In the respective spectra the chemical information and the defect contribution have been thoroughly separated. For this purpose, samples of annealed Mg were irradiated with Mg-ions in order to create exclusively defects. In addition Al- and Zn-ion irradiations on Mg-samples were performed in order to create samples with both defects and impurity atoms. The ion irradiated area on the samples was investigated with laterally and depth resolved positron Doppler broadening spectroscopy (DBS) and compared with SRIM-simulations of the vacancy distribution. The investigation of the chemical vicinity of crystal defects in AZ31 was performed with CDBS on Mg-ion irradiated AZ31 with Mg-ion irradiated Mg. The outer tail of the energy distribution in the annihilation

  17. Korozní odolnost tvářených hořčíkových slitin AZ31 a AZ61 v Hankovì roztoku

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tkacz, J.; Slouková, K.; Minda, J.; Drábiková, J.; Fintová, Stanislava; Doležal, P.; Wasserbauer, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 4 (2016), s. 101-106 ISSN 1804-1213 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : corrosion * AZ31 magnesium alloy * AZ61 magnesium alloy Subject RIV: JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials https://www.degruyter.com/view/j/kom.2016.60.issue-4/kom-2016-0016/kom-2016-0016. xml ?format=INT

  18. In vitro degradation, hemolysis, and cytocompatibility of PEO/PLLA composite coating on biodegradable AZ31 alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zhongling; Tian, Peng; Liu, Xuanyong; Zhou, Bangxin

    2015-02-01

    Magnesium and its alloys have large potential as degradable and absorbable biomaterials because of their mechanical properties and biocompatibility. However, their corrosion resistance is usually inadequate especially in physiological environment, which limits their broad applications in biomedical areas. In this work, plasma electrolytic oxidized/poly(l-lactide) (PEO/PLLA) composite coating was successfully fabricated on biodegradable AZ31 alloy by combing PEO process and sealing with PLLA. The microstructure, elemental composition, and phase composition of the PEO/PLLA composite coating were investigated. The in vitro degradation of the PEO/PLLA composite coating in simulated body fluid (SBF) was also systematically evaluated. The results revealed that the PEO/PLLA composite coating improved the corrosion resistance of AZ31 alloy significantly. The corrosion potential shifted from -1.663V to more positive position -1.317 V and the corrosion current density was reduced with six-order of magnitude. The Mg(2+) ions, hydrogen release, and pH value change of solution caused by degradation were all decreased significantly. Moreover, the PEO process played a critical role in sustaining the integrity of the implant in long-term service. The result of hemolysis test showed that the PEO/PLLA composite coating vested AZ31 alloy a low hemolysis ratio (0.806 ± 0.771)%, which is much lower than the safe value of 5% according to ISO 10993-4. For the cytocompatibility test, compared with bare AZ31 alloy and PEO coating, MC3T3-E1 cells showed much better adhesion and proliferation on the PEO/PLLA composite coating with nearly 4-fold increase of cells after 7-day cultivation, indicating that the PEO/PLLA composite coating has good biocompatibility for biomedical applications. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Comportamiento frente a la corrosión y biocompatibilidad in vitro/in vivo de la aleación AZ31 modificada superficialmente

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Escudero, M. L.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The present work evaluates the corrosion behaviour and the in vitro/in vivo biocompatibility of the AZ31 magnesium alloy, which fulfills the mechanical requirements of bone. The corrosion kinetic of as-received AZ31 alloy was not compatible with the cell growth. To improve its performance, the AZ31 alloy was surface modified by a chemical conversion treatment in hydrofluoric acid. The magnesium fluoride layer generated by the surface treatment of AZ31 alloy enhances its corrosion behaviour, allowing the in vitro growth of osteoblastic cells over the surface and the in vivo formation of a highly compact layer of new bone tissue. These results lead to consider the magnesium fluoride coating as necessary for potential use of the AZ31 alloy as biodegradable and absorbable implant for bone repair.En el presente trabajo se ha estudiado el comportamiento frente a la corrosión y la biocompatibilidad in vitro/in vivo de la aleación de magnesio AZ31, cuyas propiedades mecánicas son superiores a los requisitos mecánicos del hueso. La aleación en estado de recepción ha mostrado una cinética de corrosión no compatible con el crecimiento celular. Para mejorar su comportamiento, el material ha sido modificado superficialmente mediante tratamiento de conversión química en ácido fluorhídrico. La capa de fluoruro de magnesio generada tras este tratamiento mejora el comportamiento del material frente a la corrosión, permitiendo el crecimiento in vitro de células osteoblásticas sobre su superficie y la formación in vivo de una capa de nuevo tejido óseo muy compacta. Estos resultados permiten concluir que el recubrimiento de fluoruro de magnesio es necesario para que el material AZ31 pueda ser potencialmente aplicado como implante biodegradable y reabsorbible en reparaciones óseas.

  20. Enhancing Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of AZ31-MWCNT Nanocomposites through Mechanical Alloying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Jayakumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs reinforced Mg alloy AZ31 nanocomposites were fabricated by mechanical alloying and powder metallurgy technique. The reinforcement material MWCNTs were blended in three weight fractions (0.33%, 0.66%, and 1% with the matrix material AZ31 (Al-3%, zinc-1% rest Mg and blended through mechanical alloying using a high energy planetary ball mill. Specimens of monolithic AZ31 and AZ31-MWCNT composites were fabricated through powder metallurgy technique. The microstructure, density, hardness, porosity, ductility, and tensile properties of monolithic AZ31 and AZ31-MWCNT nano composites were characterized and compared. The characterization reveals significant reduction in CNT (carbon nanoTube agglomeration and enhancement in microstructure and mechanical properties due to mechanical alloying through ball milling.

  1. In vitro degradation behavior and cytocompatibility of biodegradable AZ31 alloy with PEO/HT composite coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Peng; Liu, Xuanyong; Ding, Chuanxian

    2015-04-01

    Biodegradable magnesium-based implants have attracted much attention recently in orthopedic applications because of their good mechanical properties and biocompatibility. However, their rapid degradation in vivo will not only reduce their mechanical strength, but also induce some side effects, such as local alkalization and gas cavity, which may lead to a failure of the implant. In this work, a hydroxyapatite (HA) layer was prepared on plasma electrolytic oxidization (PEO) coating by hydrothermal treatment (HT) to fabricate a PEO/HT composite coating on biodegradable AZ31 alloy. The in vitro degradation behaviors of all samples were evaluated in simulated body fluid (SBF) and their surface cytocompatibility was also investigated by evaluating the adhesion and proliferation of osteoblast cells (MC3T3-E1). The results showed that the HA layer consisted of a dense inner layer and a needle-like outer layer, which successfully sealed the PEO coating. The in vitro degradation tests showed that the PEO/HT composite coating improved the corrosion resistance of AZ31 alloy in SBF, presenting nearly no severe local alkalization and hydrogen evolution. The lasting corrosion resistance of the PEO/HT composite coating may attribute to the new hydroxyapatite formation during the degradation process. Moreover, compared with AZ31 alloy and PEO coating, PEO/HT composite coating was more suitable for cells adhesion and proliferation, indicating improved surface cytocompatibility. The results show that the PEO/HT composite coating is promising as protective coating on biodegradable magnesium-based implants to enhance their corrosion resistance as well as improve their surface cytocompatibility for orthopedic applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. On the deformation twinning of Mg AZ31B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdolvand, Hamidreza; Majkut, Marta; Oddershede, Jette

    2015-01-01

    Crystals with a hexagonal close-packed (HCP) structure are inherently anisotropic, and have a limited number of independent slip systems, which leads to strong deformation textures and reduced formability in polycrystalline products. Tension along the c-axis of the crystal ideally activates...... extension twinning as a deformation mode due to the lack of easy-slip systems. In this work, experiments were devised to study extension twinning in a polycrystalline Mg alloy AZ31B with a strong basal rolling texture by tensile deformation parallel to the plate normal. Three-dimensional synchrotron X......-ray diffraction (3DXRD) was used to map the center-of-mass positions, volumes, orientations, elastic strains, and stress tensors of over 1400 grains in-situ up to a true strain of 1.4%. More than 700 tensile twins were observed to form in the mapped volume under deformation. The measured center-of-mass positions...

  3. A review on the effect of welding on the corrosion of magnesium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, N. S.; Alias, J.

    2017-10-01

    Welding is an important joining technique for lightweight alloys with their increasing applications in aerospace, aircraft, automotive, electronics and other industries. The applications of lightweight alloys particularly magnesium alloys increased rapidly due to their beneficial properties such as low density, high strength-to-mass ratio, good dimensional stability, electromagnetic shielding and good recyclability. The effect of welding on the corrosion of magnesium alloys are reviewed in this paper, which closely related to the developed microstructure by the welding process. The paper focuses particularly on friction stir and laser welding. The basic principles of friction stir and laser welding are discussed, to present the likelihood of defects which significantly affect the corrosion of magnesium alloy. The finding in corrosion demonstrated the morphology of corrosion occurrence on each welded region, and observation on the potential and current values are also included.

  4. Fibre Laser Cutting and Chemical Etching of AZ31 for Manufacturing Biodegradable Stents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Gökhan Demir

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of magnesium-alloy stents shows promise as a less intrusive solution for the treatment of cardiovascular pathologies as a result of the high biocompatibility of the material and its intrinsic dissolution in body fluids. However, in addition to requiring innovative solutions in material choice and design, these stents also require a greater understanding of the manufacturing process to achieve the desired quality with improved productivity. The present study demonstrates the manufacturing steps for the realisation of biodegradable stents in AZ31 magnesium alloy. These steps include laser microcutting with a Q-switched fibre laser for the generation of the stent mesh and subsequent chemical etching for the cleaning of kerf and surface finish. Specifically, for the laser microcutting step, inert and reactive gas cutting conditions were compared. The effect of chemical etching on the reduction in material thickness, as well as on spatter removal, was also evaluated. Prototype stents were produced, and the material composition and surface quality were characterised. The potentialities of combining nanosecond laser microcutting and chemical etching are shown and discussed.

  5. Texture-based formability prediction for Mg wrought alloys ZE10 and AZ31

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steglich, D.; Jeong, Y.

    2017-10-01

    A viscoplastic self-consistent crystal plasticity model was employed to study the formability of two magnesium sheet alloys, i.e., AZ31 and ZE10 at 200 °C. The flow stress-strain curves obtained by uniaxial tension tests at various strain rates and the crystallographic texture were used to determine the model parameters. The crystal plasticity model was incorporated with the Marciniak-Kuczyński model in order to address the forming limits of the magnesium sheets. Model predictions were matched with the experimental data obtained by Nakajima tests by tuning the respective parameters. The model was further applied to quantify the effect of the initial crystallographic texture on the formability. Virtual textures representing realistic outcome from mechanical working (rolling, extrusion) were generated. The respective effects on the formability were quantified. The resulting forming limit diagrams demonstrate that the variations of crystallographic texture can either lead to an improvement or to a detrimental reduction of the forming strain in particular in stretch-forming operations.

  6. A Review: Effect of Friction Stir Welding on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Magnesium Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yajie Li

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir welding (FSW is well recognized as a very practical technology for joining magnesium alloys. Although, a large amount of progress have been made on the FSW of magnesium alloys, it should be emphasized that many challenges still remain in joining magnesium using FSW. In this article, we briefly review the background of friction stir welding of magnesium alloys, and then focus on the effects of the friction stir welding on the macrostructure, microstructure evolution, texture distribution, and the mechanical properties of the welding joints. The macro-defects in welds and their relationship to the welding parameters such as welding speed, rotation speed, and axial force were also discussed. The review concluded with some suggested methods improvement and future challenges related to FSW of magnesium alloys. The purpose of the present review paper is to fully understand the relationships between the microstructure and the properties, and then establish a global, state-of-the-art FSW of magnesium alloys.

  7. Microstructural Aspects in FSW and TIG Welding of Cast ZE41A Magnesium Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlone, Pierpaolo; Astarita, Antonello; Rubino, Felice; Pasquino, Nicola

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, magnesium ZE41A alloy plates were butt joined through friction stir welding (FSW) and Tungsten Inert Gas welding processes. Process-induced microstructures were investigated by optical and SEM observations, EDX microanalysis and microhardness measurements. The effect of a post-welded T5 heat treatment on FSW joints was also assessed. Sound joints were produced by means of both techniques. Different elemental distributions and grain sizes were found, whereas microhardness profiles reflect microstructural changes. Post-welding heat treatment did not induce significant alterations in elemental distribution. The FSW-treated joint showed a more homogeneous hardness profile than the as-welded FSW joint.

  8. A systematic study of mechanical properties, corrosion behavior and biocompatibility of AZ31B Mg alloy after ultrasonic nanocrystal surface modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xiaoning; Qin, Haifeng; Gao, Hongyu; Mankoci, Steven; Zhang, Ruixia; Zhou, Xianfeng; Ren, Zhencheng; Doll, Gary L; Martini, Ashlie; Sahai, Nita; Dong, Yalin; Ye, Chang

    2017-09-01

    Magnesium alloys have tremendous potential for biomedical applications due to their good biocompatibility, osteoconductivity, and degradability, but can be limited by their poor mechanical properties and fast corrosion in the physiological environment. In this study, ultrasonic nanocrystal surface modification (UNSM), a recently developed surface processing technique that utilizes ultrasonic impacts to induce plastic strain on metal surfaces, was applied to an AZ31B magnesium (Mg) alloy. The mechanical properties, corrosion resistance, and biocompatibility of the alloy after UNSM treatment were studied systematically. Significant improvement in hardness, yield stress and wear resistance was achieved after the UNSM treatment. In addition, the corrosion behavior of UNSM-treated AZ31B was not compromised compared with the untreated samples, as demonstrated by the weight loss and released element concentrations of Mg and Al after immersion in alpha-minimum essential medium (α-MEM) for 24h. The in vitro biocompatibility of the AZ31B Mg alloys toward adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) before and after UNSM processing was also evaluated using a cell culture study. Comparable cell attachments were achieved between the two groups. These studies showed that UNSM could significantly improve the mechanical properties of Mg alloys without compromising their corrosion rate and biocompatibility in vitro. These findings suggest that UNSM is a promising method to treat biodegradable Mg alloys for orthopaedic applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The cold-rolling behaviour of AZ31 tubes for fabrication of biodegradable stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaowu; Kent, Damon; Wang, Gui; StJohn, David; Dargusch, Matthew S

    2014-11-01

    Mg alloys are receiving considerable attention for biomedical stents due to their combination of good mechanical properties and high biodegradability. Cold rolling is necessary to process Mg alloy tubes before final drawing and fabrication of the magnesium stents. In this paper, cold-rolled tubes were subjected to a cross-sectional reduction rate (ε) of up to 19.7%, and were further processed at various ratios of wall-thickness to diameter reduction (Q) from 0 to 2.24 with a constant ε of 19.7%. The results show that the cold-rolled tubes exhibited a rise in ultimate tensile strength (UTS), yield strength (YS), and a reduction in elongation as ε increased from 5.5% to 19.7%. UTS, YS and elongation decreased when Q was increased from 0 to 2.24. Mechanical twinning was observed and analysed. Extension twins increased with increasing ε and were almost saturated at a ε of 16.5%. Extension twins play an important role in determining the evolution of mechanical behaviour in the case of increasing ε, whilst contraction/double twins and secondary extension twins have a large effect on mechanical behaviour in the case of varying Q. The results indicate that the proportions and types of twins play a major role in determining the mechanical behaviour of the AZ31 tubes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Mono-carboxylate conversion coatings for AZ31 Mg alloy protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frignani, A.; Grassi, V.; Zucchi, F.; Zanotto, F. [Corrosion Study Centre A. Dacco, University of Ferrara (Italy)

    2011-11-15

    Conversion coatings on a magnesium alloy were obtained by dipping AZ31 specimens in aqueous solutions of sodium salts of mono-carboxylic acids (stearic, palmitic, myristic, lauric, mono-carboxylate ion concentration from 1 to 5 mM, depending on the salt solubility) for 24 and 72 h at room temperature, or 24 h at 50 C. The influence exerted by the treatment time, bath temperature and alkyl chain length on the efficiency of these coatings was studied. The performances of the coatings were evaluated by potentiodynamic polarization curve recording after 1 h immersion in 0.05 M Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution, while their temporal evolution was monitored by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) spectra during 24 h. Further and long lasting tests were carried out also in 0.1 M NaCl solution. The efficiency of the coatings depended on the aliphatic chain length, and increased as the treatment time and the bath temperature were increased. The coating of lower homologue only hindered the cathodic process, while those of the higher homologues markedly inhibited the anodic process too. The best performances were displayed by 24 h-50 C stearic conversion coating, which maintained a very high efficiency for over 800 h immersion in 0.05 M sulphate solution. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Effect of Forging on Microstructure, Texture, and Uniaxial Properties of Cast AZ31B Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toscano, D.; Shaha, S. K.; Behravesh, B.; Jahed, H.; Williams, B.

    2017-07-01

    The effect of open-die hot forging on cast AZ31B magnesium alloy was investigated in terms of the evolution of microstructure, texture, and mechanical properties. A refined microstructure with strong basal texture was developed in forged material. A significant increase in tensile yield and ultimate strengths by 143 and 23%, respectively, was determined as well. When tested in compression at room temperature, the forged alloy displayed significant in-plane asymmetry and unchanged yield strength compared to the cast alloy owing to the activation of 10\\bar{1}2} cast and forged conditions. However, the ultimate compressive strength for the forged material increased by 22 percent compared to the as-cast material. Microstructure and texture analysis of the fracture samples confirmed that the deformation of the forged samples was dominated by slip during tension and twin in compression. In comparison, both slip and twin were observed in the cast samples for similar testing conditions. The increase in strength of forging was attributed to the refinement of grains and the formation of strong basal texture, which activated the non-basal slip on the prismatic and pyramidal slip systems instead of extension twin.

  12. Fatigue Properties of Welded Butt Joint and Base Metal of MB8 Magnesium Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-xia YU

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The fatigue properties of welded butt joint and base metal of MB8 magnesium alloy were investigated. The comparative fatigue tests were carried out using EHF-EM200K2-070-1A fatigue testing machine for both welded butt joint and base metal specimens with the same size and shape. The fatigue fractures were observed and analyzed by a scanning electron microscope of 6360 LA type. The experimental results show that the fatigue performance of the welded butt joint of MB8 magnesium alloy is sharply decreased. The conditional fatigue limit (1×107 of base metal and welded butt joint is about 69.41 and 32.76 MPa, respectively. The conditional fatigue limit (1×107 of the welded butt joint is 47.2 % of that of base metal. The main reasons are that the welding can lead to stress concentration in the weld toe area, tensile welding residual stress in the welded joint, as well as grain coarsening in the welding seam. The cleavage steps or quasi-cleavage patterns present on the fatigue fracture surface, indicating the fracture type of the welded butt joint belongs to a brittle fracture.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.3.9132

  13. Corrosion Behavior of PEO Coatings Formed on AZ31 Alloy in Phosphate-Based Electrolytes with Calcium Acetate Additive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziyaei, E.; Atapour, M.; Edris, H.; Hakimizad, A.

    2017-07-01

    The PEO coating started on magnesium AZ31 using a unipolar DC power source. The coating was generated in the electrolyte based on Na3PO4·12H2O and KOH with calcium acetate as additive. The x-ray diffraction method showed some phases containing calcium and phosphate, which was created in the presence of additive. Also, the EDS tests of the sample's surfaces proved the existence of calcium on the surface. Based on the electrochemical tests results, the most corrosion resistance belongs to the sample with calcium acetate additive. In fact, the results of the EIS tests showed the coating with calcium acetate has the highest resistance but the lowest capacitance. However, this state belongs to the surface morphology, the lower porosity, and surface chemical composition.

  14. Examination of mechanical properties of magnesium plates joined by friction stir welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aydın Şık

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of magnesium, which is the latest metal of our age, is increasing in parallel with the advances in industry and technology. Due to its lightness, durability and long life, its usage is increasing in the automotive and space-craft industries. As a result of the advances in magnesium use, there are innovations in welding methods as well. The desired mechanical properties can't be obtained after welding. While there are some difficulties in fusion welding of magnesium material and its alloys, some of them can't be joined by fusion welding at all. Weldability of a material is the property that plays an important role in enabling its wider use and determines the method of producing products out of this material. Magnesium plates were joined successfully by friction stir welding method. Welded joints are exposed to various mechanic stresses and especially to dynamic loads. Cracks are observed to occur due to dynamic loads. Plates were joined in butt position and the mechanical properties of the occurring joint are examined.

  15. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of TIG Weld Joint of ZM5 Magnesium Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    QIN Ren-yao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The ZM5 magnesium alloy plates were welded by TIG welding method. The microstructural characteristics and mechanical properties of ZM5 magnesium alloy joint were studied by optical microscopy, microhardness and tensile testers. The results show that the TIG weld joint of ZM5 magnesium alloy is composed of heat affected zone, partially melted zone and weld metal. The heat affected zone is consisted of primary α-Mg phase and eutectic phase that is composed of eutectic α-Mg and eutectic β-Mg17Al12 phase and mainly precipitated at grain boundaries. In the partially melted zone, the eutectic phase is not only increasingly precipitated at grain boundaries, but also dispersed in grains, and the growth of the β-Mg17Al12 phase is obviously observed. The microstructure in the weld is the typical dendritic morphology. The dendrites are considered as primary α-Mg phase, and the interdendritic regions are α+β eutectic phase. The difference in the microstructure of the heat affected zone, partially melted zone and weld results in their various microhardness values, and leads to the smaller tensile strength and ductility in the ZM5 alloy weld joint than parent metal.

  16. Diffusion Bonding and Post-Weld Heat Treatment of Extruded AZ91 Magnesium Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei LIN

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The grain size of as-extruded AZ91 magnesium alloys was refined to 12.31 μm from 21.41 μm by recrystallization annealing. The vacuum diffusion welding of as-annealed AZ91 magnesium alloys was researched. The results showed that the maximum shear strength of joints reached 64.70 MPa in the situation of 10 MPa bonding pressure, 18 Pa vacuum degree, 470 °C bonding temperature and 90 min bonding time; both bonding temperature and time are the main influence factors on as-extruded AZ91 magnesium alloys diffusion welding. Then the diffusion welded specimens were annealed, and the shear strength of joints was further improved to 76.93 MPa.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.4.9699

  17. Research Progress in Friction Welding of Magnesium Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YOU Guo-qiang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The basic principles and features of friction welding were introduced.The research progresses in friction welding of Mg alloys were reviewed. The process, joining mechanism, microstructure and mechanical properties of Mg-Mg similar and Mg-Al dissimilar friction welded joints were primarily discussed. Meanwhile, the current problems were analyzed. It was pointed out that the temperature field, stress-strain field and plastic flow during the friction welding process of Mg alloys require further investigation. Furthermore, the future development should focus on the optimization of process and intermediate layer to obtain high quality joints.

  18. Effect of Extrusion Speed on the Microstructure and Tensile Properties of AZ31 Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Shengnan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The influences of extrusion speed on the microstructure and tensile properties of AZ31 alloy were investigated. The results suggested that the yield and tensile strength of AZ31 alloy decrease but elongation increases with the reduction of extruded speed. High speed extrusion produces fine grains with texture of c-axis perpendicular with extruded direction. The tension deformation is dominated by slip and the formed texture is obstructive for the basal slip, and also the inhomogeneous structure formed at high speed extrusion is harmful to the ductility. Samples extruded at low speed have comparatively homogeneous and coarse microstructure. Twinning provided more tension deformation and the lattice rotation induced by twinning is favorable for the activities of new slip systems, which induced the better ductility of AZ31 alloy.

  19. Grain Refinement and Deformation Mechanisms in Room Temperature Severe Plastic Deformed Mg-AZ31

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludwig Schultz

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A Ti-AZ31 composite was severely plastically deformed by rotary swaging at room temperature up to a logarithmic deformation strain of 2.98. A value far beyond the forming limit of pure AZ31 when being equivalently deformed. It is observed, that the microstructure evolution in Mg-AZ31 is strongly influenced by twinning. At low strains the {̅1011} (10̅12 and the {̅1012} (10̅11 twin systems lead to fragmentation of the initial grains. Inside the primary twins, grain refinement takes place by dynamic recrystallization, dynamic recovery and twinning. These mechanisms lead to a final grain size of ≈1 μm, while a strong centered ring fibre texture is evolved.

  20. The effect of extrusion conditions on the properties and textures of AZ31B alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Liu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The effect of extrusion conditions on the tensile properties and texture of AZ31B alloy has been investigated by means of optical microscopy (OM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD and tensile tests. It is found that the ultimate tensile strength (UTS, the yield strength (YS and elongation (EN of the extruded AZ31B alloy are more significantly influenced by extrusion velocities in contrast with temperature. Although the extrusion conditions are different, the {112¯0} 〈011¯0〉 texture is the chief texture in the AZ31B after extrusion. Moreover, the extrusion textures become scattered with increasing the temperatures at the same extrusion velocity. As the extrusion velocity is raised at the same temperature, the orientation density of textures increases and the separated textures become relatively concentrated. This leads to the changes of tensile properties at different extrusion conditions.

  1. Laser welding of aluminium-magnesium alloys sheets process optimization and welds characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, C. [GEMPPM (CALFETMAT), 69 - Villeurbanne (France); Fouquet, F. [GEMPPM (CALFETMAT), 69 - Villeurbanne (France); Robin, M. [GEMPPM (CALFETMAT), 69 - Villeurbanne (France)

    1996-12-31

    The purpose of the present study was to obtain good quality welds using a CO2 laser with Al-Mg alloys sheet. Defects formation mechanisms were analyzed and a welding procedure was defined, using several characterization technics, in order to realize low defects welding seams. After laser welding optimization, comparative tensile tests and microstructural analysis were carried out. (orig.)

  2. A Review of Dissimilar Welding Techniques for Magnesium Alloys to Aluminum Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liming Liu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Welding of dissimilar magnesium alloys and aluminum alloys is an important issue because of their increasing applications in industries. In this document, the research and progress of a variety of welding techniques for joining dissimilar Mg alloys and Al alloys are reviewed from different perspectives. Welding of dissimilar Mg and Al is challenging due to the formation of brittle intermetallic compound (IMC such as Mg17Al12 and Mg2Al3. In order to increase the joint strength, three main research approaches were used to eliminate or reduce the Mg-Al intermetallic reaction layer. First, solid state welding techniques which have a low welding temperature were used to reduce the IMCs. Second, IMC variety and distribution were controlled to avoid the degradation of the joining strength in fusion welding. Third, techniques which have relatively controllable reaction time and energy were used to eliminate the IMCs. Some important processing parameters and their effects on weld quality are discussed, and the microstructure and metallurgical reaction are described. Mechanical properties of welds such as hardness, tensile, shear and fatigue strength are discussed. The aim of the report is to review the recent progress in the welding of dissimilar Mg and Al to provide a basis for follow-up research.

  3. A Review of Dissimilar Welding Techniques for Magnesium Alloys to Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liming; Ren, Daxin; Liu, Fei

    2014-01-01

    Welding of dissimilar magnesium alloys and aluminum alloys is an important issue because of their increasing applications in industries. In this document, the research and progress of a variety of welding techniques for joining dissimilar Mg alloys and Al alloys are reviewed from different perspectives. Welding of dissimilar Mg and Al is challenging due to the formation of brittle intermetallic compound (IMC) such as Mg17Al12 and Mg2Al3. In order to increase the joint strength, three main research approaches were used to eliminate or reduce the Mg-Al intermetallic reaction layer. First, solid state welding techniques which have a low welding temperature were used to reduce the IMCs. Second, IMC variety and distribution were controlled to avoid the degradation of the joining strength in fusion welding. Third, techniques which have relatively controllable reaction time and energy were used to eliminate the IMCs. Some important processing parameters and their effects on weld quality are discussed, and the microstructure and metallurgical reaction are described. Mechanical properties of welds such as hardness, tensile, shear and fatigue strength are discussed. The aim of the report is to review the recent progress in the welding of dissimilar Mg and Al to provide a basis for follow-up research. PMID:28788646

  4. Microstructural developments and mechanical properties of friction stir welding of AZ91D magnesium alloy plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagabhushan Kumar Kadigithala

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir welding (FSW is an efficient technique which can be used particularly for magnesium and aluminum alloys that are difficult to fusion weld. In this work AZ91D Mg alloy plates 3mm thick were friction stir welded at different process variables such as rotational speed and welding speed. The range of rotational speeds varied from 1025 to 1525 rpm, and the welding speed varied from 25 to 75 mm/min. Good quality welds were obtained under 1025 rpm of rotational speed with the welding speeds range from 25 to 75 mm/min. The microstructure of the AZ91D alloy consists of primary α-phase, eutectic α-phase and eutectic β (Mg17Al12 phase in the received condition (gravity die cast. The original dendrite grain structure completely disappeared and was transformed to fine equiaxed grains in stir zone (SZ. It was observed that there was a slight increase in hardness in SZ, because of fine recrystallized grain structure. The transverse tensile test results of weld specimens indicated constant strength irrespective of traveling speed. Fractrographic analysis of the friction stir welded specimens showed the brittle failure.

  5. Use of high energy ball milling to study the role of graphene nanoplatelets and carbon nanotubes reinforced magnesium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashad, Muhammad, E-mail: rashadphy87@gmail.com [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Magnesium Alloys, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Pan, Fusheng, E-mail: fspan@cqu.edu.cn [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Magnesium Alloys, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Chongqing Academy of Science and Technology, Chongqing, Chongqing 401123 (China); Zhang, Jianyue [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Magnesium Alloys, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Asif, Muhammad [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2015-10-15

    Graphene nanoplatelets (few layer graphene) and carbon nanotubes were used as reinforcement fillers to enhance the mechanical properties of AZ31 magnesium alloy through high energy ball milling, sintering, and hot extrusion techniques. Experimental results revealed that tensile fracture strain of AZ31 magnesium alloy was enhanced by +49.6% with 0.3 wt.% graphene nanoplatelets compared to −8.3% regression for 0.3 wt.% carbon nanotubes. The tensile strength of AZ31 magnesium alloy was decreased (−11.2%) with graphene nanoplatelets addition, while increased (+7.7%) with carbon nanotubes addition. Unlike tensile test, compression tests showed different trend. The compression strength of carbon nanotubes-AZ31 composite was +51.2% greater than AZ31 magnesium alloy as compared to +0.6% increase for graphene nanoplatelets. The compressive fracture strain of carbon nanotubes-AZ31 composite was decreased (−14.1%) while no significant change in fracture strain of graphene nanoplatelets-AZ31 composite was observed. The X-ray diffraction results revealed that addition of reinforcement particles weaken the basal textures which affect the composite's yield asymmetry. Microstructure evaluation revealed the absence of intermetallic phase formation between reinforcements and matrix. The carbon reinforcements in AZ31 magnesium alloy dissolve and isolate β phases throughout the matrix. The increased fracture strain and mechanical strength of graphene nanoplatelets and carbon nanotubes-AZ31 composites are attributed to large specific surface area of graphene nanoplatelets and stiffer nature of carbon nanotubes respectively. - Highlights: • Powder metallurgy method was used to fabricate magnesium composites. • The AZ31-carbon materials composite were blended using ball milling. • The reinforcement particles weaken the basal texture which affects yield asymmetry of composites. • AZ31-graphene nanoplatelets composite exhibited impressive increase in tensile elongation

  6. マグネシウム合金AZ31Bろう付用フラックスおよびろう材の開発

    OpenAIRE

    渡辺, 健彦; 小松, 志行; 柳沢, 敦; 小沼, 静代; Watanabe, Takehiko; Komatu, Shiko; Yanagisawa, Atsushi; Konumu, Shizuyo

    2004-01-01

    This study was carried out to develop the flux and filler metals that enabled brazing a magnesium alloy plate of AZ31B at the temperature lower than 490℃. The following results were obtained in this study. The newly developed flux that consisted of CaCl2, LiCl and NaCl containing Ca ion and Liion could successfully removed the oxide film from the magnesium alloy surface at around 450℃, and enabled us to braze the magnesium alloy at the temperature lower than 490℃. In addition, we were success...

  7. Effect of tool offsetting on microstructure and mechanical properties dissimilar friction stir welded Mg-Al alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghdadi, Amir Hossein; Fazilah Mohamad Selamat, Nor; Sajuri, Zainuddin

    2017-09-01

    Automotive and aerospace industries are attempting to produce lightweight structure by using materials with low density such as aluminum and magnesium alloys to increase the fuel efficiency and consequently reduce the environmental pollution. It can be beneficial to join Mg to Al to acquire ideal performance in special applications. Friction stir welding (FSW) is solid state welding processes and relatively lower temperature of the process compared to fusion welding processes. This makes FSW a potential joining technique for joining of the dissimilar materials. In this study, Mg-Al butt joints were performed by FSW under different tool offset conditions, rotation rates (500-600 rpm) and traverse speeds (20 mm/min) with tool axis offset 1 mm shifted into AZ31B or Al6061 (T6), and without offset. During the welding process AZ31B was positioned at the advancing side (AS) and Al6061 (T6) was located at the retreating side (RS). Defect free AZ31B-Al6061 (T6) dissimilar metal FSW joints with good mechanical properties were obtained with the combination of intermediate rotation rate and low traverse speed pin is in the middle. When tool positioned in -1 mm or +1 mm offsetting, some defects were found in SZ of dissimilar FSWed joints such as cavity, tunnel, and crack. Furthermore, a thin layer of intermetallic compounds was observed in the stir zone at the interface between Mg-Al plates. The strength of the joint was influenced by FSW parameters. Good mechanical properties obtained with the combination of intermediate rotational speed of 600 rpm and low travelling speed of 20 mm/min by locating Mg on advancing side when pin is in the middle. Also, Joint efficiency of the welds prepared in the present study was between 29% and 68% for the different welding parameters.

  8. Enhanced corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of AZ31 Mg alloy using PCL/ZnO NPs via electrospinning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinwoo; Mousa, Hamouda M.; Park, Chan Hee; Kim, Cheol Sang

    2017-02-01

    In the efforts to improve corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of magnesium alloys, polycarprolactone (PCL) and zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) composite coatings were applied onto AZ31 Mg alloys via electrospinning technique in this study. The PCL/ZnO composite coatings on Mg alloys were characterized by using FE-SEM, EDX, XPS, and FT-IR. Moreover, coating adhesion test, electrochemical corrosion test, and biocompatibility test in vitro were performed to measure coating performance. Our results revealed that the increase in the content of ZnO NPs in the composite coatings not only improved the coating adhesion of composite coatings on Mg alloys, but also increased the corrosion resistance. Furthermore, the biocompatibility of MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts of the PCL/ZnO composite coated samples was superior to the biocompatibility of the bare samples. Such data suggest that applying PCL/ZnO composite coating to the magnesium alloys has suitable potential in biomedical applications.

  9. Enhanced corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of AZ31 Mg alloy using PCL/ZnO NPs via electrospinning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jinwoo [Department of Bionanosystem Engineering, Graduate School, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Mousa, Hamouda M. [Department of Bionanosystem Engineering, Graduate School, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Engineering Materials and Mechanical Design, Faculty of Engineering, South Valley University, Qena 83523 (Egypt); Park, Chan Hee, E-mail: biochan@jbnu.ac.kr [Department of Bionanosystem Engineering, Graduate School, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Division of Mechanical Design Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju, Jeonbuk 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Cheol Sang, E-mail: chskim@jbnu.ac.kr [Department of Bionanosystem Engineering, Graduate School, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Division of Mechanical Design Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju, Jeonbuk 561-756 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • PCL/ZnO composite coating layer by electrospinning techniques showed the nano-scaled and porous surface structure. • Addition of zinc oxide NPs in the PCL fibers led to enhanced coating adhesion and corrosion resistance. • The composite coated surfaces on Mg substrates improved cell attachment and proliferation. - Abstract: In the efforts to improve corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of magnesium alloys, polycarprolactone (PCL) and zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) composite coatings were applied onto AZ31 Mg alloys via electrospinning technique in this study. The PCL/ZnO composite coatings on Mg alloys were characterized by using FE-SEM, EDX, XPS, and FT-IR. Moreover, coating adhesion test, electrochemical corrosion test, and biocompatibility test in vitro were performed to measure coating performance. Our results revealed that the increase in the content of ZnO NPs in the composite coatings not only improved the coating adhesion of composite coatings on Mg alloys, but also increased the corrosion resistance. Furthermore, the biocompatibility of MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts of the PCL/ZnO composite coated samples was superior to the biocompatibility of the bare samples. Such data suggest that applying PCL/ZnO composite coating to the magnesium alloys has suitable potential in biomedical applications.

  10. Comportamiento mecánico de la aleación AZ31 reforzada con nanofibras de carbono

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeva, P.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of reinforcing AZ31 with carbon nanofibres. The materials AZ31, AZ31-1 % C y AZ31-2 % C were produced by a conventional powder metallurgy route consisting of mechanical mixing of nanofibres and powders of AZ31, cool compactation and extrusion at 350 °C. After extrusion the three materials exhibited a recrystallized microstructure of similar grain size, fine and rather inhomogeneous. Furthermore, they presented a weak fibre texture with basal plane parallel to the extrusion direction. The tensile properties were affected by the nanofibres presence only at 100 °C. At this temperature, yield strength and tensile strength were 30% higher than in the unreinforced alloy.

    En este trabajo se ha estudiado el efecto de la adición de nanofibras de carbono en las propiedades mecánicas de la aleación AZ31 procesada por una ruta pulvimetalúrgica convencional. Se prepararon tres materiales, AZ31, AZ31- 1 % C y AZ31-2 % C. Tras una mezcla mecánica de las nanofibras con los polvos de AZ31, se precompactaron en frío y se extruyeron a 350 °C. Los tres presentan una microestructura recristalizada con un tamaño de grano similar, fino aunque algo heterogéneo. Los tres materiales presentan una débil textura de fibra con el plano basal paralelo a la dirección de extrusión. Las propiedades mecánicas a tracción únicamente se ven afectadas por la presencia de nanofibras a 100 °C superando los materiales reforzados en un 30 % a los valores de límite elástico y resistencia de la aleación sin reforzar.

  11. Hemocompatibility and selective cell fate of polydopamine-assisted heparinized PEO/PLLA composite coating on biodegradable AZ31 alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zhongling; Tian, Peng; Liu, Xuanyong; Zhou, Bangxin

    2014-09-01

    Biodegradable magnesium and its alloys have attracted much attention, as they have been used as cardiovascular stents recently because of their biodegradation after implantation. However, their corrosion resistance, hemocompatibility and surface biocompatibility are needed for practical applications. In this work, heparinization of the plasma electrolytic oxidation/poly(l-lactic acid) (PEO/PLLA) composite coating on biodegradable AZ31 alloy was achieved by the strong adhesion of mussel-inspired polydopamine (PDAM). The corrosion resistance of the coated substrates was evaluated in simulated body fluid. In particular, the hemolysis ratio and platelet adhesion tests were conducted to evaluate the hemocompatibility of the composite coatings. The in vitro cytotoxicity of the composite coatings was evaluated with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The adhesion and proliferation of HUVECs and human umbilical artery smooth muscle cells (HUASMCs) directly incubated on the composite coatings were also investigated. The results showed that although PDAM modification and further heparinization reduced the corrosion resistance of the PEO/PLLA composite coating, the protection of the coating for the substrate was mainly maintained. Moreover, PDAM modification and further heparinization significantly suppressed the adhesion of platelets and had little influence on sustaining a low hemolysis ratio thus resulting in good surface hemocompatibility of the composite coating. The in vitro cell test demonstrated that none of the composite coatings presented obvious cytotoxicity. Significantly, after surface heparinization, the composite coating became more suitable for HUVEC growth and simultaneously inhibited HUASMC growth. The results show that further modification of the PEO/PLLA composite coating on biodegradable magnesium alloy is a promising method to obtain good surface hemocompatibility for anticoagulation and to regulate the cell fate for fast re

  12. Experimental and numerical studies on the issues in laser welding of light-weight alloys in a zero-gap lap joint configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harooni, Masoud

    It is advantageous for the transportation industry to use lightweight components in the structure in order to save mass and reduce CO2 emissions. One of the lightest structural metals, magnesium, fulfills the need for mass reduction within the automotive industry. Many of the body structure components in the automotive industry are assembled using joining processes such as fusion welding. Furthermore, laser welding offers a low heat impact, high process rate, joining method which is becoming increasingly popular as the cost for laser systems continues to decrease. However, there is a limited body of work investigating the laser welding of magnesium and therefore, in the current study, different techniques and methods for laser welding of magnesium alloys are numerically and experimentally studied in order to optimize process parameters to achieve high quality welds. A feasibility study was designed in order to study the effect of various laser welding process parameters (such as laser power levels and welding speeds) on weld quality. Three regression models were developed to find the best fit model that relates process parameters to the shear load of the weld. Furthermore, to understand the effect of laser welding parameters on temperature distribution in laser welding of AZ31B magnesium alloy, a numerical model was developed. A rotary Gaussian volumetric body heat source was applied in this study to obtain the temperature history during the laser welding process. Cross-sectional views of the weld beads, temperature history recorded by thermocouples, and temperature history recorded by infrared camera were used to validate the numerical model. In order to study the real-time dynamic behavior of the molten pool and the keyhole during the welding process, a high speed charge-coupled device (CCD) assisted with a green laser as an illumination source was used. In order to observe the presence of pores, prior studies destructively evaluated the weld bead however; in the

  13. Mechanical Behavior of AZ31B Mg Alloy Sheets under Monotonic and Cyclic Loadings at Room and Moderately Elevated Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ngoc-Trung Nguyen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Large-strain monotonic and cyclic loading tests of AZ31B magnesium alloy sheets were performed with a newly developed testing system, at different temperatures, ranging from room temperature to 250 °C. Behaviors showing significant twinning during initial in-plane compression and untwinning in subsequent tension at and slightly above room temperature were recorded. Strong yielding asymmetry and nonlinear hardening behavior were also revealed. Considerable Bauschinger effects, transient behavior, and variable permanent softening responses were observed near room temperature, but these were reduced and almost disappeared as the temperature increased. Different stress–strain responses were inherent to the activation of twinning at lower temperatures and non-basal slip systems at elevated temperatures. A critical temperature was identified to account for the transition between the twinning-dominant and slip-dominant deformation mechanisms. Accordingly, below the transition point, stress–strain curves of cyclic loading tests exhibited concave-up shapes for compression or compression following tension, and an unusual S-shape for tension following compression. This unusual shape disappeared when the temperature was above the transition point. Shrinkage of the elastic range and variation in Young’s modulus due to plastic strain deformation during stress reversals were also observed. The texture-induced anisotropy of both the elastic and plastic behaviors was characterized experimentally.

  14. Characterization of a high strength Al-alloy interlayer for mechanical bonding of Ti to AZ31 and associated tri-layered clad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasser Fouad

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The Al 6081 alloy is proposed as a favorable interlayer alloy with satisfactory deformability characteristics; high strength; least reactivity and melting temperature for high temperature joining of pure Ti and AZ 31. Titanium and Magnesium sheets with Al–0.81 Mg–0.9 Si alloy interlayer plate were joined by cold-roll bonding and subsequent annealing treatment. The maximum strength after annealing at 550 °C is due to the combined effect of the precipitation strengthening of Al–Mg–Zn interlayer and static strain aging. The most pronounced increase in the Vickers microhardness (from 49.2 to 74.5 Hv was observed in the Al 6081 interface with AZ31 and Ti, thus indicating Al 6081 as a sound bonding interlayer with a lower melting temperature, initial excellent deformability and high strength after joining. With the increase in heat-treatment temperature, the tensile strength increased initially up to 550 °C and then decreased with the increase in annealing temperature to levels above 550 °C. The threshold deformation is about 44% of the total rolling reduction in a single rolling pass. The highest mechanical properties were 35 MPa in the composite – which was obtained by 550 °C/2 h annealing treatment.

  15. Influence of Friction Stir Welding on Mechanical Properties of Butt Joints of AZ61 Magnesium Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Ju Sun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effect of heat input on the mechanical properties and fracture behaviors of AZ61 magnesium alloy joints has been studied. Magnesium alloy AZ61 plates with thickness of 5 mm were welded at different ratios of tool rotational speed to welding speed (ω/ν. The average ultimate tensile strength of all weld conditions satisfying a ω/ν ratio of 3 reached 100% of the strength of the base material. Fractures occurred at the interface between the thermomechanical affected zone at advancing side and the stir zone in all welded specimens. From the scanning electron microscope and electron backscatter diffraction analysis, it was determined that the interface between the thermomechanical affected zone and the stir zone, which is the region where the grain orientation changes, was the weakest part; the advancing side region was relatively weaker than the retreating side region because the grain orientation change occurred more dramatically in the advancing side region.

  16. Modeling of transverse welds formation during liquid–solid extrusion directly following vacuum infiltration of magnesium matrix composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Liu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Liquid–solid extrusion directly following vacuum infiltration (LSEVI is an infiltration–extrusion integrated forming technique, and transverse weld between upper residual magnesium alloy and magnesium matrix composites is a common internal defect, which can severely reduce the yield of composite products. To improve current understanding on the mechanism of transverse welding phenomenon, a thermo-mechanical numerical model of LSEVI for magnesium matrix composites was developed. The formation of transverse weld during extrusion was visualized using finite element simulation method, and the formation mechanism was discussed from the aspect of velocity field using a point tracking technique. The simulation results were verified by the experimental results in term of weld shape.

  17. Propiedades mecánicas de la aleación AZ31 procesada por una ruta eco-sostenible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D’Errico, F.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently it has been proved that molding of defect-free components of various commercial alloys of magnesium can be carried out succesfully when small amounts of CaO are added to the melt, making unnecessary the use of SF6 coverage. In the case of AZ alloys, this process also remarkably improves their mechanical properties not only by the greater cleaning of alloys but also by the formation of CaAl2 phase. This work, part of the Green project Metallurgy (http://www.green-metallurgy.eu funded by the European Union (LIFE+2009, studies the influence of different CaO additions on the microstructure and mechanical properties of AZ31 Eco-Mg alloy. The alloy was processed by a conventional route involving extrusion of as-cast rods as well as by a powder metallurgy route (PM using chips as starting material. The objective was to analyze the viability of recycling machining chips to manufacture components for the automobile industry and transportation in general, because of its low cost and environmental impact. It has been demostrated that alloys processed from chips exhibit the highest tensile stress values, close to 320 MPa.Recientemente se ha demostrado la posibilidad de fabricar por moldeo, componentes libres de defectos de diferentes aleaciones comerciales de magnesio, añadiendo CaO al caldo, sin emplear SF6. En el caso de las aleaciones AZ este proceso, además, mejora notablemente las propiedades mecánicas, no sólo por la mayor limpieza de las aleaciones sino también por la presencia de la fase CaAl2 que se forma por la incorporación de calcio al caldo. Este trabajo, enmarcado dentro del proyecto Green Metallurgy (http://www.green-metallurgy.eu financiado por la Unión Europea (Programa LIFE+2009, estudia la influencia de diferentes adiciones de CaO en la microestructura y propiedades mecánicas de la aleación Eco-Mg AZ31. El estudio se lleva a cabo en aleaciones AZ31 con 0,5, 1 y 1,5% CaO procesadas por dos rutas diferentes, aleaciones

  18. EBSD characterization of repetitive grain refinement in AZ31 magnesium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fatemi-Varzaneh, S.M. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zarei-Hanzaki, A., E-mail: zareih@ut.ac.ir [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Cabrera, J.M.; Calvillo, P.R. [Departamento de Ciencia de Materialese Ingeniería Metalúrgica, ETSEIB, Polytecnic University of Catalonia, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Fundación CTM, Plaza de la Ciencai 2, 08243 Manresa (Spain)

    2015-01-15

    A polycrystalline Mg–3Al–1Zn was subjected to high plastic strains by applying accumulative back extrusion (ABE) process. Electron back scatter diffraction analyses were used to explore the grain refinement mechanisms. A novel grain refinement trend was found at large strains, where new recrystallized grains were repetitively refined through dynamic recrystallization. The grain size was diminishing continuously up to the fourth ABE pass, after which no further grain refinement was noticed upon successive passes. - Highlights: • Boundaries and sub-boundaries evolutions were characterized. • Discontinuous recrystallization was operative at initial stages of deformation. • A novel repetitive grain refinement trend was realized.

  19. Microstructural Effects on the Spall Properties of ECAE-Processed AZ31B Magnesium Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    prepared to study the micro- structure of the as-processed material. The investigation was performed in the plane of the specimen, which is normal to...P-4000) grit SiC paper, which was followed by final polish- ing with a 0.05 μm colloidal silica suspension . Subsequently, in order to remove damaged...EBSDmap collected from the (unshocked) specimen in the plane normal to the shock direction (for refer- ence, see the schematic drawing of the specimen

  20. The Influence of Novel Alloying Additions on the Performance of Magnesium Alloy AZ31B

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    alloys are based on a rather small group of alloying elements, there are often limited differences between them in properties (strength, corrosion...the first year of the project. 2. Introduction To date, the majority of Mg alloys have used a rather small group of alloying elements (such as...and subsequently processed using Equal Channel Angular Extrusion ( ECAE ) in an attempt to obtain ultra-fine-grained samples. Detailed evaluation of

  1. A Limited Dynamic Investigation of Magnesium Alloy AZ31B in 3 Orientations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    infinite, penetration characterization, WAPEN, effective flow stress (EFS) 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT UU 18...Historically, it has not been perceived to have properties suitable for armor applications. However, over the last decade, the US Army Research...ductility, important factors in the application of Mg in lightweight armors. This report continues the effort, exploring the ballistic performance

  2. Multi-response optimization of process parameters in friction stir welded AM20 magnesium alloy by Taguchi grey relational analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash Kumar Sahu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to optimize the process parameter to get the better mechanical properties of friction stir welded AM20 magnesium alloy using Taguchi Grey relational analysis (GRA. The considered process parameters are welding speed, tool rotation speed, shoulder diameter and plunging depth. The experiments were carried out by using Taguchi's L18 factorial design of experiment. The processes parameters were optimized and ranked the parameters based on the GRA. The percentage influence of each process parameter on the weld quality was also quantified. A validation experimental run was conducted using optimal process condition, which was obtained from the analysis, to show the improvement in mechanical properties of the joint. This study also shows the feasibility of the GRA with Taguchi technique for improvement in welding quality of magnesium alloy.

  3. Investigation of residual stresses in welded joints of heat-resistant magnesium alloy ML10 after electrodynamic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.M. Lobanov

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In repair of aircraft structures of magnesium alloy ML10, the argon arc non-consumable electrode welding is used. In this case, the residual welding stresses occur in repair welds, being one of the causes for reducing the service characteristics of the restored products. Residual stresses arise as a result of welding. Post-weld heat treatment is used to reduce the residual stresses. The heat treatment, which occurs after welding, increases the cost of repair. This leads to the search for alternative methods to control the stressed state of welded joints, one of which is electrodynamic treatment, which reduces the level of residual stresses in repair welds, and as a consequence, the cost of the welding repair in restoring aircraft structures. It was found from the results of experiments carried out, that the electrodynamic treatment allows reduces the initial level of stresses in welded joints, reaching 120 MPa, to 30 MPa, and at definite geometric characteristics of the specimens forming the field of compressive stresses, the values of which are equal to –50 MPa. It is shown that the optimum distance between the zones of treatment, being 5 mm, provides the guaranteed covering the zones of electrodynamic effect and, as a consequence, the maximum efficiency of the electric dynamic treatment.

  4. Detection and assessment of flaws in friction stir welded metallic plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakih, Mohammad Ali; Mustapha, Samir; Tarraf, Jaafar; Ayoub, Georges; Hamade, Ramsey

    2017-04-01

    Investigated is the ability of ultrasonic guided waves to detect flaws and assess the quality of friction stir welds (FSW). AZ31B magnesium plates were friction stir welded. While process parameters of spindle speed and tool feed were fixed, shoulder penetration depth was varied resulting in welds of varying quality. Ultrasonic waves were excited at different frequencies using piezoelectric wafers and the fundamental symmetric (S0) mode was selected to detect the flaws resulting from the welding process. The front of the first transmitted wave signal was used to capture the S0 mode. A damage index (DI) measure was defined based on the amplitude attenuation after wave interaction with the welded zone. Computed Tomography (CT) scanning was employed as a nondestructive testing (NDT) technique to assess the actual weld quality. Derived DI values were plotted against CT-derived flaw volume resulting in a perfectly linear fit. The proposed approach showed high sensitivity of the S0 mode to internal flaws within the weld. As such, this methodology bears great potential as a future predictive method for the evaluation of FSW weld quality.

  5. Metallurgical Joining of Magnesium Alloys by the FSW Process

    OpenAIRE

    Tomáš Kupec; Ivana Hlavačová; Milan Turňa

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with welding AZ 31Mg alloy by FSW (Friction Stir Welding) technology. Welds were fabricated with new equipment supplied from China for VUZ-PI Bratislava (Welding Research Institute — Industrial Institute). Welding parameters and conditions were proposed and tested. Joint quality was assessed by optical microscopy and microhardness measurements. The fabricated joints were sound, apart from minor inhomogeneities (cracks). It is considered that after certain adaptations of the w...

  6. Metallurgical Joining of Magnesium Alloys by the FSW Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Kupec

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with welding AZ 31Mg alloy by FSW (Friction Stir Welding technology. Welds were fabricated with new equipment supplied from China for VUZ-PI Bratislava (Welding Research Institute — Industrial Institute. Welding parameters and conditions were proposed and tested. Joint quality was assessed by optical microscopy and microhardness measurements. The fabricated joints were sound, apart from minor inhomogeneities (cracks. It is considered that after certain adaptations of the welding parameters, and perhaps also of the welding tool, that this equipment will be capable of producing welded joints of excellent quality that can compete with any fusion welding technologies, including concentrated power sources.

  7. Effect of laser pulse on alternative current arc discharge during laser-arc hybrid welding of magnesium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Minghua; Xin, Lijun; Zhou, Qi; He, Lijia; Wu, Fufa

    2018-01-01

    The coupling effect between a laser and arc plasma was studied in situations in which the laser acts at the positive and negative waveforms of the arc discharge during the laser-arc hybrid welding of magnesium alloy. Using the methods of direct observation, high speed imaging, and spectral analysis, the surface status of weld seams, weld penetration depths, plasma behavior, and spectral characteristics of welding plasma were investigated, respectively. Results show that, as compared with the laser pulse acting at the negative waveform of the arc plasma discharge, a better weld seam formation can be achieved when the laser pulse acts at the positive waveform of the arc discharge. At the same time, the radiation intensity of Mg atoms in the arc plasma increases significantly. However, the weld penetration depth is weaker. The findings show that when the laser pulse is acting at the negative waveform of the arc plasma discharge, the position of the arc plasma discharge on the workpiece can be restrained by the laser action point, which improves the energy density of the welding arc.

  8. Evolution of rheocast microstructure of AZ31 alloy in semisolid state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Bo

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Semisolid rheoforming (SSR is a promising technology for the production of Mg wrought alloy in foundry settings. In order to realize SSR, it is necessary to characterize the grain structure evolution during slurry preparation. In this paper, slurry of AZ31 alloy was produced by a novel rheocast process known as self-inoculation method (SIM. Interrupted quenching technology was applied to investigate the primary α-Mg evolution during continuous cooling and isothermal holding. Results indicate that the initial microstructure of slurry produced by SIM is a mixture of irregular grains, which becomes ideally globular when the slurry slowly cools to 620 ℃ and isothermally held for at least 30 s. The local solute diffusion leads to dendritic fragmentation and forms separated particles. During prolonged holding, the particle surface gradually becomes smooth because of protuberance melting and groove advancement. Coarsening of α-Mg grains in isothermal holding was analyzed using Lifshitz-Slyozov-Wagner theory. Results suggest that coalescence is most likely the dominant coarsening mechanism in the early stage while Ostwald ripening tends to be the principal one later. The EDS results indicate that a longer holding time leads to Al solute element segregation at the grain boundaries, but Zn distribution within liquid matrix has no obvious change.

  9. A study of strontium doped calcium phosphate coatings on AZ31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Satish S., E-mail: sss42@pitt.edu [Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Roy, Abhijit, E-mail: abr20@pitt.edu [Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Lee, Boeun E.; Ohodnicki, John; Loghmanian, Autrine [Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Banerjee, Ipsita [Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Kumta, Prashant N., E-mail: pkumta@pitt.edu [Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Center for Craniofacial Regeneration, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Calcium phosphate (CaP) coatings have been studied to tailor the uncontrolled non-uniform corrosion of Mg based alloys while simultaneously enhancing bioactivity. The use of immersion techniques to deposit CaP coatings is attractive due to the ability of the approach to coat complex structures. In the current study, AZ31 substrates were subjected to various pretreatment conditions prior to depositing Sr{sup 2+} doped and undoped CaP coatings. It was hypothesized that the bioactivity and corrosion protection of CaP coatings could be improved by doping with Sr{sup 2+}. Heat treatment to elevated temperatures resulted in the diffusion of alloying elements, Mg and Zn, into the pretreated layer. Sr{sup 2+} doped and undoped CaP coatings formed on the pretreated substrates consisted of biphasic mixtures of β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) and hydroxyapatite (HA). Electrochemical corrosion experiments indicated that the extent of Sr{sup 2+} doping and pretreatment both influenced the corrosion protection. Cytotoxicity was evaluated with MC3T3-E1 mouse preosteoblasts and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). For both cell types, proliferation decreased upon increasing the Sr{sup 2+} concentration. However, both osteogenic gene and protein expression significantly increased upon increasing Sr{sup 2+} concentration. These results suggest that Sr{sup 2+} doped coatings are capable of promoting osteogenic differentiation on degradable Mg alloys, while also enhancing corrosion protection, in comparison to undoped CaP coatings.

  10. The Effects of Carbon Nanotubes on the Mechanical and Wear Properties of AZ31 Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyang Zhou

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotube (CNT-reinforced AZ31 matrix nanocomposites were successfully fabricated using a powder metallurgy method followed by hot extrusion. The influence of CNTs on microstructures, mechanical properties, and wear properties were systematically investigated by optical microscope (OM, scanning electron microscope (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, hardness test, tensile test, and wear test. The results revealed that the nanocomposites showed a slightly smaller grain size compared with the matrix and uniform distribution that CNTs could achieve at proper content. As a result, the addition of CNTs could weaken basal plane texture. However, the yield strength and ultimate tensile strength of the composites were enhanced as the amount of CNTs increased up to 2.0 wt. %, reaching maximum values of 241 MPa (+28.2% and 297 MPa (+6.1%, respectively. The load transfer mechanism, Orowan mechanism, and thermal mismatch mechanism played important roles in the enhancement of the yield strength, and several classical models were employed to predict the theoretical values. The effect of CNT content on the friction coefficient and weight loss of the nanocomposites was also studied. The relationships between the amount of CNTs, the friction coefficient, and weight loss could be described by the exponential decay model and the Boltzmann model, respectively.

  11. In vivo response of AZ31 alloy as biliary stents: a 6 months evaluation in rabbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Zheng, Shengmin; Li, Nan; Guo, Huahu; Zheng, Yufeng; Peng, Jirun

    2017-01-01

    Mg-based metallic materials have been making continuing progress as vascular stents. However, the research of Mg-based materials as non-vascular stents is still at its primary stage. AZ31 stents hereby were implanted into the common bile duct of rabbits for 6 months. The results revealed an existence of 93.82 ± 1.36% and 30.89 ± 2.46% of the original volume after 1 and 3 month, respectively. Whole blood tests indicated an inflammation decreasing to normal level after 3 month implantation. A benign host response was observed via H&E staining. Nonuniform corrosion at the two ends of the stents was observed and considered the results of flow or local inflammation. Moreover, the application of Mg-based materials for different stenting treatment were reviewed and compared. Esophagus was hypothesized most destructive, whilst blood vessel and bile duct considered similar and less destructive. Trachea and nasal cavity were thought to be mildest.

  12. Magnesium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the body, including regulating muscle and nerve function, blood sugar levels, and blood pressure and making protein , bone, and DNA . How much magnesium do I need? The amount of magnesium you ...

  13. Study of the effect of low-power pulse laser on arc plasma and magnesium alloy target in hybrid welding by spectral diagnosis technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liming; Hao, Xinfeng

    2008-10-01

    In order to study the effect of laser pulses on arc plasma and target metal in the hybrid welding process, the spectra of the plasmas in the welding process of magnesium alloys are analysed in this paper. The acquisition system of plasma spectra is set up and the spectral lines of welding plasma are acquired. Compared with tungsten-inert gas (TIG) welding, the intensities of the spectral lines of magnesium increase sharply while those of Ar decrease for strong evaporation and ionization of magnesium alloys in low-power laser/arc hybrid welding. The electron temperature and density are estimated by the Boltzmann plot method and the Stark broadening effect. The result shows that the electron temperature of arc plasma in the hybrid welding process is much lower than that in TIG welding, especially in the laser beam-affected zone. In contrast, the electron density of the plasma is enhanced. The influences of laser parameters on electron temperature are also studied. The changes in electron temperature and density indicate that the effect of laser pulse on the target metal is the dominant factor influencing the electron temperature and density in low-power laser/arc hybrid welding.

  14. A comparative corrosion behavior of Mg, AZ31 and AZ91 alloys in 3.5% NaCl solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.B. Singh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behavior of Mg, AZ31 and AZ91 has been evaluated in 3.5% NaCl solution using weight loss, electrochemical polarization and impedance measurements. Corrosion rate derived from the weight losses demonstrated the occurrence of steeply fast corrosion reaction on AZ91 alloy after three hours of immersion, indicating the start of galvanic corrosion. An increase of corrosion rate with immersion time was also observed for AZ31 but with lesser extent than AZ91 alloy. Whereas Mg metals showed a decrease of corrosion rate with immersion time, suggesting the formation of a protective layer on their surfaces. In contrast, the corrosion current density (Icorr derived from the Tafel plots, exhibited their corrosion resistances in order of Mg > AZ91 > AZ31. Electrochemical charge transfer resistance (Rct and double layer capacitance measured by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS, are well in accordance with the measured Icorr. EIS measurements with time and microstructural examination of the corroded and uncorroded samples are helpful in elucidation of results measured by electrochemical polarization.

  15. Enhanced mechanical properties and increased corrosion resistance of a biodegradable magnesium alloy by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Leon; Koo, Youngmi; Neralla, Sudheer; Sankar, Jagannathan; Yun, Yeoheung

    2016-06-01

    We report the enhanced mechanical properties of AZ31 magnesium alloys by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) coating in NaOH, Na2SiO3, KF and NaH2PO4·2H2O containing electrolytes. Mechanical properties including wear resistance, surface hardness and elastic modulus were increased for PEO-coated AZ31 Mg alloys (PEO-AZ31). DC polarization in Hank's solution indicating that the corrosion resistance significantly increased for PEO-coating in KF-contained electrolyte. Based on these results, the PEO coating method shows promising potential for use in biodegradable implant applications where tunable corrosion and mechanical properties are needed.

  16. Magnesium alloys as a biomaterial for degradable craniofacial screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Sarah E; Verdelis, Konstantinos; Maiti, Spandan; Pal, Siladitya; Chung, William L; Chou, Da-Tren; Kumta, Prashant N; Almarza, Alejandro J

    2014-05-01

    Recently, magnesium (Mg) alloys have received significant attention as potential biomaterials for degradable implants, and this study was directed at evaluating the suitability of Mg for craniofacial bone screws. The objective was to implant screws fabricated from commercially available pure Mg and alloy AZ31 in vivo in a rabbit mandible. First, Mg and AZ31 screws were compared to stainless steel screws in an in vitro pull-out test and determined to have a similar holding strength (∼40N). A finite-element model of the screw was created using the pull-out test data, and this model can be used for future Mg alloy screw design. Then, Mg and AZ31 screws were implanted for 4, 8 and 12weeks, with two controls of an osteotomy site (hole) with no implant and a stainless steel screw implanted for 12weeks. Microcomputed tomography was used to assess bone remodeling and Mg/AZ31 degradation, both visually and qualitatively through volume fraction measurements for all time points. Histological analysis was also completed for the Mg and AZ31 at 12weeks. The results showed that craniofacial bone remodeling occurred around both Mg and AZ31 screws. Pure Mg had a different degradation profile than AZ31; however, bone growth occurred around both screw types. The degradation rate of both Mg and AZ31 screws in the bone marrow space and the muscle were faster than in the cortical bone space at 12weeks. Furthermore, it was shown that by alloying Mg, the degradation profile could be changed. These results indicate the promise of using Mg alloys for craniofacial applications. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Vocational Education.

    This curriculum guide is designed for use by South Carolina vocational education teachers as a continuing set of lesson plans for a two-year course on welding. Covered in the individual sections of the guide are the following topics: an orientation to welding, oxyacetylene welding, advanced oxyacetylene welding, shielded metal arc welding, TIG…

  18. Forge Welding of Magnesium Alloy to Aluminum Alloy Using a Cu, Ni, or Ti Interlayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, Hideki; Sumioka, Junji; Kakiuchi, Shigeki; Tomida, Shogo; Takeda, Kouichi; Shimazaki, Kouichi

    2015-08-01

    The forge-welding process was examined to develop a high-strength bonding application of magnesium (Mg) alloy to aluminum (Al) alloy under high-productivity conditions. The effect of the insert material on the tensile strength of the joints, under various preheat temperatures and pressures, was investigated by analyzing the reaction layers of the bonded interface. The tensile strengths resulting from direct bonding, using pure copper (Cu), pure nickel (Ni), and pure titanium (Ti) inserts were 56, 100, 119, and 151 MPa, respectively. The maximum joint strength reached 93 pct with respect to the Mg cast billet. During high-pressure bonding, a microscopic plastic flow occurred that contributed to an anchor effect and the generation of a newly formed surface at the interface, particularly prominent with the Ti insert in the form of an oxide layer. The bonded interfaces of the maximum-strength inserts were investigated using scanning electron microscopy-energy-dispersive spectroscopy and electron probe microanalysis. The diffusion reaction layer at the bonded interface consisted of brittle Al-Mg intermetallics having a thickness of approximately 30 μm. In contrast, for the three inserts, the thicknesses of the diffusion reaction layer were infinitely thin. For the pure Ti insert, exhibiting the maximum tensile strength value among the inserts tested, focused ion beam-transmission electron microscopy-EDS analysis revealed a 60-nm-thick Al-Ti reaction layer, which had formed at the bonded interface on the Mg alloy side. Thus, a high-strength Al-Mg bonding method in air was demonstrated, suitable for mass production.

  19. Quasi Static and Dynamic Characterization of Equal Channel Angular Extrusion (ECAE) Processed and Rolled AZ31 Magnesium Alloy Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    results indicated that it is unlikely that Mg alloys will directly replace steel or aluminum as a monolithic armor material, it could be potentially...used as a component in composite structures. With a density of about a quarter of steel , Mg may find a unique and/or niche utilization in...The experimental setup, including the load frame , is shown schematically in Fig. 7. The testing load frame consists of a stiff frame , 2 ball bearing

  20. Effect of Rolling Route on Microstructure and Tensile Properties of Twin-Roll Casting AZ31 Mg Alloy Sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Luo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Twin-roll casting AZ31 Mg alloy sheets have been fabricated by normal unidirectional-rolling, head-to-tail rolling, and clock-rolling, respectively. It has been demonstrated that head-to-tail rolling is the most effective to refine the microstructure and weaken the basal texture among the three rolling routes. Excellent integrated tensile properties can be obtained by the head-to-tail rolling. The yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, and plastic elongation are 196 MPa, 301 MPa, and 28.9%, respectively. The strength can benefit from the fine grains (average value of 4.0 μm of the AZ31 alloy processed by the head-to-tail rolling route, while the excellent plastic elongation is achieved owing to the weakened basal texture besides the fine grains. Results obtained here can be used as a basis for further study of some simple rolling methods, which is critical to the development of Mg alloys with high strength and plasticity.

  1. Fabrication of AZ31/MWCNTs Surface Metal Matrix Composites by Friction Stir Processing: Investigation of Microstructure and Mechanical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arab, Seyed Mohammad; Zebarjad, Seyed Mojtaba; Jahromi, Seyed Ahmad Jenabali

    2017-11-01

    The surface metal matrix composites of AZ31 Mg alloy reinforced with multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) have been fabricated through the friction stir processing by a conventional and two stepped tools. The microstructure and mechanical properties of fabricated composites were studied by optical and electron microscopy, microhardness and tensile tests, respectively. The processing has developed a fine-grain structure along with good distribution of reinforcements. The hardness and tensile strength of fabricated MWCNT/AZ31 composites are generally higher than as-received and FSPed samples. The accumulative effect of grain refinement and reinforcing nanotubes is assumed to be the reason for increasing the ductility after friction stir processing. The hardness is nearly doubled for FSPed samples and some more for nanocomposites compared with the as-received sample. The elongation of nanocomposites is about two times greater than that of the as-rolled sample. The speed ratio, pass number and CNT amount are three important factors influencing the resulting microstructure and mechanical properties. The stepped tools also give a more uniform distribution of reinforcement and higher grain refinement.

  2. Stress corrosion cracking of high-strength AZ31 processed by high-ratio differential speed rolling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiming Shi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Stress corrosion cracking (SCC in distilled water was studied for AZ31, processed by differential-speed-rolling to different strengths, using Linear Increasing Stress Tests (LISTs. The stress corrosion crack velocity was 5.0 ± 2.5 × 10−9 m s−1, independent of applied stress rate and independent of material strength. SCC susceptibility was greater at lower applied stress rates manifest most importantly as a lower threshold stress for stress corrosion crack initiation. SCC susceptibility could be characterised by the ratio of threshold stress to yield stress, which was dependent on processing details and was as low as 0.3.

  3. Evaluation of Microstructure, Mechanical Properties and Corrosion Resistance of Friction Stir-Welded Aluminum and Magnesium Dissimilar Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Jagesvar; Taiwade, Ravindra V.; Sapate, Sanjay G.; Patil, Awanikumar P.; Dhoble, Ashwinkumar S.

    2017-10-01

    Microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of dissimilar friction stir-welded aluminum and magnesium alloys were investigated by applying three different rotational speeds at two different travel speeds. Sound joints were obtained in all the conditions. The microstructure was examined by an optical and scanning electron microscope, whereas localized chemical information was studied by energy-dispersive spectroscopy. Stir zone microstructure showed mixed bands of Al and Mg with coarse and fine equiaxed grains. Grain size of stir zone reduced compared to base metals, indicated by dynamic recrystallization. More Al patches were observed in the stir zone as rotational speed increased. X-ray diffraction showed the presence of intermetallics in the stir zone. Higher tensile strength and hardness were obtained at a high rotational speed corresponding to low travel speed. Tensile fractured surface indicated brittle nature of joints. Dissimilar friction stir weld joints showed different behaviors in different corrosive environments, and better corrosion resistance was observed at a high rotational speed corresponding to low travel speed (FW3) in a sulfuric and chloride environments. Increasing travel speed did not significantly affect on microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance as much as the rotational speed.

  4. Evaluation of Microstructure, Mechanical Properties and Corrosion Resistance of Friction Stir-Welded Aluminum and Magnesium Dissimilar Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Jagesvar; Taiwade, Ravindra V.; Sapate, Sanjay G.; Patil, Awanikumar P.; Dhoble, Ashwinkumar S.

    2017-09-01

    Microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of dissimilar friction stir-welded aluminum and magnesium alloys were investigated by applying three different rotational speeds at two different travel speeds. Sound joints were obtained in all the conditions. The microstructure was examined by an optical and scanning electron microscope, whereas localized chemical information was studied by energy-dispersive spectroscopy. Stir zone microstructure showed mixed bands of Al and Mg with coarse and fine equiaxed grains. Grain size of stir zone reduced compared to base metals, indicated by dynamic recrystallization. More Al patches were observed in the stir zone as rotational speed increased. X-ray diffraction showed the presence of intermetallics in the stir zone. Higher tensile strength and hardness were obtained at a high rotational speed corresponding to low travel speed. Tensile fractured surface indicated brittle nature of joints. Dissimilar friction stir weld joints showed different behaviors in different corrosive environments, and better corrosion resistance was observed at a high rotational speed corresponding to low travel speed (FW3) in a sulfuric and chloride environments. Increasing travel speed did not significantly affect on microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance as much as the rotational speed.

  5. Experimental Investigation of the Corrosion Behavior of Friction Stir Welded AZ61A Magnesium Alloy Welds under Salt Spray Corrosion Test and Galvanic Corrosion Test Using Response Surface Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Dhanapal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Extruded Mg alloy plates of 6 mm thick of AZ61A grade were butt welded using advanced welding process and friction stir welding (FSW processes. The specimens were exposed to salt spray conditions and immersion conditions to characterize their corrosion rates on the effect of pH value, chloride ion concentration, and corrosion time. In addition, an attempt was made to develop an empirical relationship to predict the corrosion rate of FSW welds in salt spray corrosion test and galvanic corrosion test using design of experiments. The corrosion morphology and the pit morphology were analyzed by optical microscopy, and the corrosion products were examined using scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction analysis. From this research work, it is found that, in both corrosion tests, the corrosion rate decreases with the increase in pH value, the decrease in chloride ion concentration, and a higher corrosion time. The results show the usage of the magnesium alloy for best environments and suitable applications from the aforementioned conditions. Also, it is found that AZ61A magnesium alloy welds possess low-corrosion rate and higher-corrosion resistance in the galvanic corrosion test than in the salt spray corrosion test.

  6. Sea water magnesium fuel cell power supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Robert; Mainert, Jan; Glaw, Fabian; Lang, K.-D.

    2015-08-01

    An environmentally friendly magnesium fuel cell system using seawater electrolyte and atmospheric oxygen was tested under practical considerations for use as maritime power supply. The hydrogen rate and therefore the power density of the system were increased by a factor of two by using hydrogen evolution cathodes with a gas separation membrane instead of submerged cathodes without gas separation. Commercial magnesium AZ31 rolled sheet anodes can be dissolved in seawater for hydrogen production, down to a thickness below 100 μm thickness, resulting in hydrogen generation efficiency of the anode of over 80%. A practical specific energy/energy density of the alloy of more than 1200 Wh/kg/3000 Wh/l was achieved when coupled to a fuel cell with atmospheric air breathing cathode. The performance of several AZ31 alloy anodes was tested as well as the influence of temperature, electrolyte concentration and anode - cathode separation. The excess hydrogen produced by the magnesium hydrogen evolving cell, due to the negative difference effect, is proportional to the cell current in case of the AZ31 alloys, which simplifies system control considerably. Stable long-term operation of the system was demonstrated at low pressures which can be maintained in an open-seawater-submerged hydrogen generator.

  7. Extension twin variant selection during uniaxial compression of a magnesium alloy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pei, Y.; Godfrey, A.; Jiang, J.

    2012-01-01

    Samples of the magnesium alloy AZ31 have been deformed by compression to strains of 5% and 10% and microstructural observations made to investigate the activation of specific {1 0 1¯ 2} extension twin variants. The twinning has been analyzed on a grain-by-grain basis for more than 260 grains...

  8. Corrosion performance of MAO coatings on AZ31 Mg alloy in simulated body fluid vs. Earle's Balance Salt Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilke, Benjamin M.; Zhang, Lei; Li, Weiping; Ning, Chengyun; Chen, Cheng-fu; Gu, Yanhong

    2016-02-01

    Earle's Balance Salt Solution (EBSS) provides an alternative to the conventional simulated body fluids (c-SBF) and has been shown to better simulate the corrosion conditions in vivo. In this work, a series of tests were conducted to explore the corrosion performance of MAO-coated AZ31 samples in EBSS vs. c-SBF. Samples were produced by varying MAO process parameters and then immersed up to 21 days in both EBSS and c-SBF. The corrosion rates were evaluated by the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potentiodynamic scanning. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to compare the progression of microcracks across the surface of the coatings. The evaluation of cross-sectional thickness showed an increase in MAO coating thickness with the process voltage. MAO samples with a thicker coating generally have higher impedance and lower current density at the initial immersion time point of 0.5 h. Samples in EBSS showed higher initial impedance and lower current density values as compared to c-SBF counterparts for all process groups. Samples in EBSS demonstrated a much slower corrosion rate than c-SBF samples because of the decreased chloride content and CO2 buffering mechanism of the EBSS.

  9. Robust Slippery Coating with Superior Corrosion Resistance and Anti-Icing Performance for AZ31B Mg Alloy Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jialei; Gu, Changdong; Tu, Jiangping

    2017-03-29

    Biomimetic slippery liquid-infused porous surfaces (SLIPSs) are developed as a potential alternative to superhydrophobic surfaces (SHSs) to resolve the issues of poor durability in corrosion protection and susceptibility to frosting. Herein, we fabricated a double-layered SLIPS coating on the AZ31 Mg alloy for corrosion protection and anti-icing application. The porous top layer was infused by lubricant, and the compact underlayer was utilized as a corrosion barrier. The water-repellent SLIPS coating exhibits a small sliding angle and durable corrosion resistance compared with the SHS coating. Moreover, the SLIPS coating delivers durable anti-icing performance for the Mg alloy substrate, which is obviously superior to the SHS coating. Multiple barriers in the SLIPS coating, including the infused water-repellent lubricant, the self-assembled monolayers coated porous top layer, and the compact layered double hydroxide-carbonate composite underlayer, are suggested as being responsible for the enhanced corrosion resistance and anti-icing performance. The robust double-layered SLIPS coating should be of great importance to expanding the potential applications of light metals and their alloys.

  10. Thermal Conductivity of Magnesium Alloys in the Temperature Range from -125 °C to 400 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sanghyun; Ham, Hye Jeong; Kwon, Su Yong; Kim, Sok Won; Suh, Chang Min

    2013-12-01

    Magnesium alloys have been widely used in recent years as lightweight structural materials in the manufacturing of automobiles, airplanes, and portable computers. Magnesium alloys have extremely low density (as low as 1738 kg · m-3) and high rigidity, which makes them suitable for such applications. In this study, the thermal conductivity of two different magnesium alloys made by twin-roll casting was investigated using the laser-flash technique and differential scanning calorimetry for thermal diffusivity and specific heat capacity measurements, respectively. The thermal diffusivity of the magnesium alloys, AZ31 and AZ61, was measured over the temperature range from -125 °C to 400 °C. The alloys AZ31 and AZ61 are composed of magnesium, aluminum, and zinc. The thermal conductivity gradually increased with temperature. The densities of AZ31 and AZ61 were 1754 kg · m-3 and 1777 kg · m-3, respectively. The thermal conductivity of AZ31 was about 25 % higher than that of AZ61, and this is attributed to the amount of precipitation.

  11. Evolution of the Corrosion Morphology on AZ31B Tracked Electrochemically and by In Situ Microscopy in Chloride-Containing Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melia, M. A.; Cain, T. W.; Briglia, B. F.; Scully, J. R.; Fitz-Gerald, J. M.

    2017-11-01

    The evolution of open-circuit corrosion morphology as a function of immersion time for Mg alloy AZ31B in 0.6-M NaCl solution was investigated. Real-time optical microscopy accompanied by simultaneous electrochemical characterization was used to characterize the filiform corrosion (FFC) of AZ31B. Specifically, the behavior of propagating corrosion filaments on the metal surface was observed, and correlations among polarization resistance, filament propagation rates, open-circuit potential, and active coverage of local corrosion sites were revealed. Three distinct stages of corrosion were observed in 0.6-M NaCl. An initial passive region, during which a slow potential rise occurred (termed stage I), a second FFC region (termed stage II) with shallow penetrating, distinct filaments, and a final FFC region (termed stage III) with deeper penetrating filaments, aligned to form a linear front. The electrochemical properties of each stage are discussed, providing insights into the penetration rates and corrosion model.

  12. Investigation of Interface Bonding Mechanism of an Explosively Welded Tri-Metal Titanium/Aluminum/Magnesium Plate by Nanoindentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, T. T.; Wang, W. X.; Zhou, J.; Cao, X. Q.; Yan, Z. F.; Wei, Y.; Zhang, W.

    2017-08-01

    A tri-metal titanium/aluminum/magnesium (Ti/Al/Mg) cladding plate, with an aluminum alloy interlayer plate, was fabricated for the first time by explosive welding. Nanoindentation tests and associated microstructure analysis were conducted to investigate the interface bonding mechanisms of the Ti/Al/Mg cladding plate. A periodic wavy bonding interface (with an amplitude of approximately 30 μm and a wavelength of approximately 160 μm) without a molten zone was formed between the Ti and Al plates. The bonding interface between the Al and the Mg demonstrated a similar wavy shape, but the wave at this location was much larger with an amplitude of approximately 390 μm and a wavelength of approximately 1580 μm, and some localized melted zones also existed at this location. The formation of the wavy interface was found to result from a severe deformation at the interface, which was caused by the strong impact or collision. The nanoindentation tests showed that the material hardness decreased with increasing distance from the bonding interface. Material hardness at a location was found to be correlated with the degree of plastic deformation at that site. A larger plastic deformation was correlated with an increase in hardness.

  13. Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Earl; And Others

    The curriculum guide for welding instruction contains 16 units presented in six sections. Each unit is divided into the following areas, each of which is color coded: terminal objectives, specific objectives, suggested activities, and instructional materials; information sheet; transparency masters; assignment sheet; test; and test answers. The…

  14. Corrosion-Mitigating, Bondable, Fluorinated Barrier Coating for Anodized Magnesium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Defense and the automotive and aerospace industries because of their high strength-to-weight ratio. The use of Mg alloys as engineering materials for...Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. 1 1. Introduction Magnesium (Mg) alloys are of interest to the US Department of...An NEC Pelletron (Model 5SDH-2) was used to conduction RBS analysis of the as received and treated, anodized Mg alloy AZ31B (Technology

  15. Effect of process parameters on microstructure and mechanical behaviors of friction stir linear welded aluminum to magnesium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, H.M. [Research & Development Division, Hitachi America Ltd., Farmington Hills, MI 48335 (United States); Ghaffari, B. [Research and Advanced Engineering, Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI 48121 (United States); Yuan, W., E-mail: wei.yuan@hitachi-automotive.us [Research & Development Division, Hitachi America Ltd., Farmington Hills, MI 48335 (United States); Jordon, J.B. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Badarinarayan, H. [Research & Development Division, Hitachi America Ltd., Farmington Hills, MI 48335 (United States)

    2016-01-10

    The microstructure and lap-shear behaviors of friction stir linear welded wrought Al alloy AA6022-T4 to cast Mg alloy AM60B joints were examined. A process window was developed to initially identify the potential process conditions. Multitudes of welds were produced by varying the tool rotation rate and tool traverse speed. Welds produced at 1500 revolutions per minute (rpm) tool rotation rate and either 50 mm/min or 75 mm/min tool traverse speed displayed the highest quasi-static failure load of ~3.3 kN per 30 mm wide lap-shear specimens. Analysis of cross sections of untested coupons indicated that the welds made at these optimum welding parameters had negligible microvoids and displayed a favorable weld geometry for the cold lap and hook features at the faying surface, compared to welds produced using other process parameters. Cross sections of the tested coupons indicated that the dominant crack initiated on the advancing side and progressed through the weld nugget, which consists of intermetallic compounds (IMC). This study demonstrates the feasibility of welding wrought Al and cast Mg alloy via friction stir linear welding with promising lap-shear strength results.

  16. Enhanced mechanical properties and increased corrosion resistance of a biodegradable magnesium alloy by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Leon; Koo, Youngmi [FIT BEST Laboratory, Engineering Research Center, Department of Chemical, Biological, and Bio Engineering, North Carolina A& T State University, Greensboro, NC 27411 (United States); Neralla, Sudheer [Jet-Hot LLC, Burlington, NC 27215 (United States); Sankar, Jagannathan [FIT BEST Laboratory, Engineering Research Center, Department of Chemical, Biological, and Bio Engineering, North Carolina A& T State University, Greensboro, NC 27411 (United States); Yun, Yeoheung, E-mail: yyun@ncat.edu [FIT BEST Laboratory, Engineering Research Center, Department of Chemical, Biological, and Bio Engineering, North Carolina A& T State University, Greensboro, NC 27411 (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Highlights: • Plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) method was developed to control corrosion, porosity, and mechanical property. • Mechanical properties of PEO-coated AZ31 alloys were affected by the different electrolyte. • Mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of PEO-coated AZ31 alloys were compared with uncoated one. - Abstract: We report the enhanced mechanical properties of AZ31 magnesium alloys by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) coating in NaOH, Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 3}, KF and NaH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}·2H{sub 2}O containing electrolytes. Mechanical properties including wear resistance, surface hardness and elastic modulus were increased for PEO-coated AZ31 Mg alloys (PEO-AZ31). DC polarization in Hank's solution indicating that the corrosion resistance significantly increased for PEO-coating in KF-contained electrolyte. Based on these results, the PEO coating method shows promising potential for use in biodegradable implant applications where tunable corrosion and mechanical properties are needed.

  17. Microstructure, Residual Stress, Corrosion and Wear Resistance of Vacuum Annealed TiCN/TiN/Ti Films Deposited on AZ31

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haitao Li

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Composite titanium carbonitride (TiCN thin films deposited on AZ31 by DC/RF magnetron sputtering were vacuum annealed at different temperatures. Vacuum annealing yields the following on the structure and properties of the films: the grain grows and the roughness increases with an increase of annealing temperature, the structure changes from polycrystalline to single crystal, and the distribution of each element becomes more uniform. The residual stress effectively decreases compared to the as-deposited film, and their corrosion resistance is much improved owing to the change of structure and fusion of surface defects, whereas the wear-resistance is degraded due to the grain growth and the increase of surface roughness under a certain temperature.

  18. Mechanical Behavior of Lithium-Ion Batteries and Fatigue Behavior of Ultrasonic Weld-Bonded Lap-Shear Specimens of Dissimilar Magnesium and Steel Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Wei-Jen

    The mechanical behaviors of LiFePO4 battery cell and module specimens under in-plane constrained compression were investigated for simulations of battery cells, modules and packs under crush conditions. The experimental stress-strain curves were correlated to the deformation patterns of battery cell and module specimens. Analytical solutions were developed to estimate the buckling stresses and to provide a theoretical basis for future design of representative volume element cell and module specimens. A physical kinematics model for formation of kinks and shear bands in battery cells was developed to explain the deformation mechanism for layered battery cells under in-plane constrained compression. A small-scale module constrained punch indentation test was also conducted to benchmark the computational results. The computational results indicate that macro homogenized material models can be used to simulate battery modules under crush conditions. Fatigue behavior and failure modes of ultrasonic spot welds in lap-shear specimens of magnesium and steel sheets with and without adhesive were investigated. For ultrasonic spot welded lap-shear specimens, the failure mode changes from the partial nugget pullout mode under low-cycle loading conditions to the kinked crack failure mode under high-cycle loading conditions. For adhesive-bonded and weld-bonded lap-shear specimens, the test results show the near interface cohesive failure mode and the kinked crack failure mode under low-cycle and high-cycle loading conditions, respectively. Next, the analytical effective stress intensity factor solutions for main cracks in lap-shear specimens of three dissimilar sheets under plane strain conditions were developed and the solutions agreed well with the computational results. The analytical effective stress intensity factor solutions for kinked cracks were compared with the computational results at small kink lengths. The results indicate that the computational results approach to

  19. Analysis of formability of Ca-added magnesium alloy sheets at low temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Se-Jong; Lee, Young-Seon; Kim, Daeyong, E-mail: daeyong@kims.re.kr

    2016-03-15

    The formability of sheets of the Ca-added magnesium alloy AZX311 was analyzed. The parameters affecting the sheet formability, such as the strain-hardening rate and the strain-rate sensitivity, did not seem to be higher in the alloy AZX311 at temperatures of room temperature (RT) and 200 °C. In addition, the critical stress for fracture at RT was lower in AZX311 than in AZ31. However, AZX311 exhibited higher stretchability and formability at low temperatures than AZ31. Electron back-scattered diffraction microscopy revealed that AZX311 had a weaker basal texture as well as broadened basal poles along the transverse direction. Polycrystal plasticity simulations confirmed that this weaker basal texture increases the activity of basal slip over thickness strain, resulting in the higher formability of AZX311. - Highlights: • A weak basal texture with broadening basal poles along the TD in AZX311 • Lower critical stress for fracture at RT in AZX311 than in AZ31 • Lower strain-hardening rates at low temperatures in the AZX311 than in the AZ31 • Higher formability at low temperatures in AZX311 because of the weak basal texture.

  20. Effect of the chemistry and structure of the native oxide surface film on the corrosion properties of commercial AZ31 and AZ61 alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feliu, Sebastian, E-mail: sfeliu@cenim.csic.es [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalurgicas CSIC, Avda. Gregorio del Amo 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Maffiotte, C. [CIEMAT-DT edificio 30, Avda. Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Samaniego, A.; Galvan, Juan Carlos [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalurgicas CSIC, Avda. Gregorio del Amo 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Barranco, Violeta [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalurgicas CSIC, Avda. Gregorio del Amo 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Ciencias de Materiales de Madrid, ICMM, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, CSIC, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz, 3, Cantoblanco, 28049, Madrid (Spain)

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study has been to advance in knowledge of the chemical composition, structure and thickness of the thin native oxide film formed spontaneously in contact with the laboratory atmosphere on the surface of freshly polished commercial AZ31 and AZ61 alloys with a view to furthering the understanding of protection mechanisms. For comparative purposes, and to more fully describe the behaviour of the native oxide film, the external oxide films formed as a result of the manufacturing process (as-received condition) have been characterised. The technique applied in this research to study the thin oxide films (thickness of just a few nanometres) present on the surface of the alloys has basically been XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) in combination with ion sputtering. Corrosion properties of the alloys were studied in 0.6 M NaCl by measuring charge transfer resistance values, which are deduced from EIS (electrochemical impedance spectroscopy) measurements after 1 h of exposure. Alloy AZ61 generally showed better corrosion resistance than AZ31, and the freshly polished alloys showed better corrosion resistance than the alloys in as-received condition. This is attributed to a combination of (1) higher thickness of the native oxide film on the AZ61 alloy and (2) greater uniformity of the oxide film in the polished condition. The formation of an additional oxide layer composed by a mixture of spinel (MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}) and MgO seems to diminish the protective properties of the passive layer on the surface of the alloys in as-received condition.

  1. Establishing empirical relationships to predict porosity level and corrosion rate of atmospheric plasma-sprayed alumina coatings on AZ31B magnesium alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Thirumalaikumarasamy

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasma sprayed ceramic coatings are successfully used in many industrial applications, where high wear and corrosion resistance with thermal insulation are required. In this work, empirical relationships were developed to predict the porosity and corrosion rate of alumina coatings by incorporating independently controllable atmospheric plasma spray operational parameters (input power, stand-off distance and powder feed rate using response surface methodology (RSM. A central composite rotatable design with three factors and five levels was chosen to minimize the number of experimental conditions. Within the scope of the design space, the input power and the stand-off distance appeared to be the most significant two parameters affecting the responses among the three investigated process parameters. A linear regression relationship was also established between porosity and corrosion rate of the alumina coatings. Further, sensitivity analysis was carried out and compared with the relative impact of three process parameters on porosity level and corrosion rate to verify the measurement errors on the values of the uncertainty in estimated parameters.

  2. Prediction and optimization of process variables to maximize the Young's modulus of plasma sprayed alumina coatings on AZ31B magnesium alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Thirumalaikumarasamy

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Like other manufacturing techniques, plasma spraying has also a non-linear behavior because of the contribution of many coating variables. This characteristic results in finding optimal factor combination difficult. Subsequently, the issue can be solved through effective and strategic statistical procedures integrated with systematic experimental data. Plasma spray parameters such as power, stand-off distance and powder feed rate have significant influence on coating characteristics like Young's modulus. This paper presents the use of statistical techniques in specifically response surface methodology (RSM, analysis of variance, and regression analysis to develop empirical relationship to predict Young's modulus of plasma-sprayed alumina coatings. The developed empirical relationships can be effectively used to predict Young's modulus of plasma-sprayed alumina coatings at 95% confidence level. Response graphs and contour plots were constructed to identify the optimum plasma spray parameters to attain maximum Young's modulus in alumina coatings. A linear regression relationship was established between porosity and Young's modulus of the alumina coatings.

  3. Influence of laser power on microstructure and mechanical properties of laser welded-brazed Mg to Ni coated Ti alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Caiwang; Lu, Qingshuang; Chen, Bo; Song, Xiaoguo; Li, Liqun; Feng, Jicai; Wang, Yang

    2017-03-01

    AZ31B Magnesium (Mg) and Ti-6Al-4V titanium (Ti) alloys with Ni coating were joined by laser welding-brazing process using AZ92 Mg based filler. The influence of laser power on microstructure and mechanical properties were investigated. Ni coating was found to significantly promote good wetting-spreading ability of molten filler on the Ti sheet. Acceptable joints without obvious defects were obtained within a relatively wide processing window. In the process metallurgical bonding was achieved by the formation of Ti3Al phase at direct irradiation zone and Al-Ni phase followed by a layer of Mg-Al-Ni ternary compound adjacent to the fusion zone at the intermediate zone. The thickness of reaction layers increased slowly with the increasing laser power. The tensile-shear test indicated that joints produced at the laser power of 1300 W reached 2387 N fracture load, representing 88.5% joint efficiency with respect to the Mg base metal. The corresponding failure occurred in the fusion zone of the Mg base metal, while joints fractured at the interface at lower/higher laser power due to the crack or excessive intermetallic compound (IMC) formation along the interface.

  4. Influence of r-GO addition on enhancement of corrosion and wear behavior of AZ31 MMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavimani, V.; Soorya Prakash, K.; Arun Pandian, M.

    2017-08-01

    In this research, magnesium-based metal matrix composite (MMC) is fabricated through a novel powder metallurgy route, in which synthesized r-GO (reduced graphene oxide) nanosheet at different weight percentages (wt%) is used as reinforcement. The microstructural characterization along with X-ray mapping revealed the appropriate dispersion of r-GO nanosheets into Mg matrix. Effect of r-GO addition on wear loss is studied under dry-sliding condition with constant influencing parameter and electrochemical corrosion behavior of developed MMC is studied at 3.5% NaCl solution. The addition of r-GO improves the hardness value up to 64 HV, likewise wear loss of MMC decreases up to 0.38 g with respect to r-GO addition. Formation of tribolayer over worn out surface is visualized by means of SEM micrographs. Even though the addition of r-GO improvises the wear behavior, the corrosion resistance of MMC reduces after a certain level of r-GO addition; Mg composites with 0.3 wt% of r-GO depicts low corrosion rate of 3.57 × 10-7 mpy and further addition of r-GO results in increment in their corrosion rate (4.07 × 10-5 mpy). Investigation over the SEM micrographs on corroded surface marked the occurrence of galvanic corrosion.

  5. Tensile-Shear Fatigue Behavior of Aluminum and Magnesium Lap-Joints obtained by Ultrasonic Welding and Adhesive Bonding

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carboni, Michele; Moroni, Fabrizio

    2011-01-01

    ...€‹ï€Œï€‡ï€‹ï€… www.elsevier.com/locate/procedia ICM11 Tensile-Shear Fatigue Behavior of Aluminum and Magnesium Lap-Joints obtained by Ultrasonic...

  6. Flow-induced corrosion behavior of absorbable magnesium-based stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Giridharan, Venkataraman; Shanov, Vesselin; Xu, Zhigang; Collins, Boyce; White, Leon; Jang, Yongseok; Sankar, Jagannathan; Huang, Nan; Yun, Yeoheung

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this work was to study corrosion behavior of magnesium (Mg) alloys (MgZnCa plates and AZ31 stents) under varied fluid flow conditions representative of the vascular environment. Experiments revealed that fluid hydrodynamics, fluid flow velocity and shear stress play essential roles in the corrosion behavior of absorbable magnesium-based stent devices. Flow-induced shear stress (FISS) accelerates the overall corrosion (including localized, uniform, pitting and erosion corrosions) due to the increased mass transfer and mechanical force. FISS increased the average uniform corrosion rate, the localized corrosion coverage ratios and depths and the removal rate of corrosion products inside the corrosion pits. For MgZnCa plates, an increase of FISS results in an increased pitting factor but saturates at an FISS of ∼0.15Pa. For AZ31 stents, the volume loss ratio (31%) at 0.056Pa was nearly twice that (17%) at 0Pa before and after corrosion. Flow direction has a significant impact on corrosion behavior as more severe pitting and erosion corrosion was observed on the back ends of the MgZnCa plates, and the corrosion product layer facing the flow direction peeled off from the AZ31 stent struts. This study demonstrates that flow-induced corrosion needs be understood so that Mg-based stents in vascular environments can be effectively designed. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of Initial Microstructure on the Microstructural Evolution and Joint Efficiency of a WE43 Alloy During Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    reported values by Chang et al. [28] and Commin et al. [29] for AZ 31 and Mg alloys. The activation energy was assumed to be the lattice diffusion...the strain rate, the gas constant, the temperature, Q the activation energy , the maximum deformed length, the tool advance per revolution, the tool...Viejo, P. Skeldon, G.E. Thompson, “Corrosion resistance of WE43 and AZ91D magnesium alloys with phosphate PEO coatings,” Corrosion Science 50 (2008

  8. Characterization and corrosion behavior of phytic acid coatings, obtained by chemical conversion on magnesium substrates in physiological solution; Caracterizacion y comportamiento frente a la corrosion de recubrimientos de acido fitico, obtenidos por conversion quimica, sobre substratos de magnesio en solucion fisiologica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Alvarado, L. A.; Lomeli, M. A.; Hernandez, L. S.; Miranda, J. M.; Narvaez, L.; Diaz, I.; Garcia-Alonso, M. C.; Escudero, M. L.

    2014-10-01

    In order to improve the corrosion resistance of biodegradable magnesium and AZ31 magnesium alloy implants, a phytic acid coating has been applied on both substrates and their protective effect against corrosion has been assessed. The morphology and the chemical nature of the conversion coating were analyzed by SEM/EDX, XRD and FTIR. The spectra showed that the conversion coating was amorphous, and it was composed of Mg, O, and P on magnesium surface, along with Al, Zn and C on AZ31 alloy. The main coating components were chelate compounds formed by phytic acid and metallic ions. The corrosion resistance of bare and coated samples was evaluated by potentiodynamic polarization technique in Hank's solution at 37 degree centigrade. The results indicate that phytic acid conversion coatings provided a very effective protection to the magnesium substrates studied. (Author)

  9. Study on vertical mandibular distraction osteogenesis using magnesium alloy on canine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengyue Wang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The bone formation feasibility by a novel magnesium alloy device was evaluated using a canine vertical mandibular distraction osteogenesis (DO model. Osteotomies were performed in the area where last 3 star׳s teeth of left mandibular were pulled out before 3 months. Both AZ31 magnesium alloy (n=6 and 316L stainless steel (n=6 distraction devices were implanted. The distraction osteogenesis was carried out with a latency of 5 days after mandibular osteotomy. Distraction proceeded at a rate of 0.3 mm/8 h for 7 days and followed by 4 weeks of consolidations. The evaluations were conducted by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and histological examinations. There were osteoblasts and trabecular bones formations manifestly in both groups. There was no significant difference in the bone mineral density between the two groups. The surface of the magnesium alloy was much more cracked and uneven, resulting from the surface pitting corrosion. The crew nails were closely combined with the surrounding bone tissue. AZ31 magnesium alloy exhibited a certain degradation rate in mandibular and did not post a negative effect on the kidney and liver. The observations in magnesium alloys group is consistent with the stainless steel group.

  10. A new method for grain refinement in magnesium alloy: High speed extrusion machining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yao, E-mail: liuyao@ustb.edu.cn [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Cai, Songlin [China Electric Power Research Institute, State Grid Corporation of China, Beijing 100192 (China); Dai, Lanhong [State Key Laboratory of Nonlinear Mechanics, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2016-01-10

    Magnesium alloys have received broad attentions in industry due to their competitive strength to density ratio, but the poor ductility and strength limit their wide range of applications as engineering materials. A novel severe plastic deformation (SPD) technique of high speed extrusion machining (HSEM) was used here. This method could improve the aforementioned disadvantages of magnesium alloys by one single processing step. In this work, systematic HSEM experiments with different chip thickness ratios were conducted for magnesium alloy AZ31B. The microstructure of the chips reveals that HSEM is an effective SPD method for attaining magnesium alloys with different grain sizes and textures. The magnesium alloy with bimodal grain size distribution has increased mechanical properties than initial sample. The electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analysis shows that the dynamic recrystallization (DRX) affects the grain refinement and resulting hardness in AZ31B. Based on the experimental observations, a new theoretical model is put forward to describe the effect of DRX on materials during HSEM. Compared with the experimental measurements, the theoretical model is effective to predict the mechanical property of materials after HSEM.

  11. Hybrid laser-arc welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hybrid laser-arc welding (HLAW) is a combination of laser welding with arc welding that overcomes many of the shortfalls of both processes. This important book gives a comprehensive account of hybrid laser-arc welding technology and applications. The first part of the book reviews...... the characteristics of the process, including the properties of joints produced by hybrid laser-arc welding and ways of assessing weld quality. Part II discusses applications of the process to such metals as magnesium alloys, aluminium and steel as well as the use of hybrid laser-arc welding in such sectors as ship...... building and the automotive industry. With its distinguished editor and international team of contributors, Hybrid laser-arc welding, will be a valuable source of reference for all those using this important welding technology. Professor Flemming Ove Olsen works in the Department of Manufacturing...

  12. Effect of Native Oxide Film on Commercial Magnesium Alloys Substrates and Carbonate Conversion Coating Growth and Corrosion Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feliu, Sebastián; Samaniego, Alejandro; Bermudez, Elkin Alejandro; El-Hadad, Amir Abdelsami; Llorente, Irene; Galván, Juan Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Possible relations between the native oxide film formed spontaneously on the AZ31 and AZ61 magnesium alloy substrates with different surface finish, the chemistry of the outer surface of the conversion coatings that grows after their subsequent immersion on saturated aqueous NaHCO3 solution treatment and the enhancement of corrosion resistance have been studied. The significant increase in the amount of aluminum and carbonate compounds on the surface of the conversion coating formed on the AZ61 substrate in polished condition seems to improve the corrosion resistance in low chloride ion concentration solutions. In contrast, the conversion coatings formed on the AZ31 substrates in polished condition has little effect on their protective properties compared to the respective as-received surface. PMID:28788582

  13. A kinematic hardening constitutive model for the uniaxial cyclic stress–strain response of magnesium sheet alloys at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhitao; Chen, Wufan; Wang, Fenghua; Feng, Miaolin

    2017-11-01

    A kinematic hardening constitutive model is presented, in which a modified form of von Mises yield function is adopted, and the initial asymmetric tension and compression yield stresses of magnesium (Mg) alloys at room temperature (RT) are considered. The hardening behavior was classified into slip, twinning, and untwinning deformation modes, and these were described by two forms of back stress to capture the mechanical response of Mg sheet alloys under cyclic loading tests at RT. Experimental values were obtained for AZ31B-O and AZ31B sheet alloys under both tension–compression–tension (T–C–T) and compression–tension (C–T) loadings to calibrate the parameters of back stresses in the proposed model. The predicted parameters of back stresses in the twinning and untwinning modes were expressed as a cubic polynomial. The predicted curves based on these parameters showed good agreement with the tests.

  14. Analysis Methods of Magnesium Chips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmann, Sven; Ditze, André; Scharf, Christiane

    2015-11-01

    The quality of recycled magnesium from chips depends strongly on their exposure to inorganic and organic impurities that are added during the production processes. Different kinds of magnesium chips from these processes were analyzed by several methods. In addition, the accuracy and effectiveness of the methods are discussed. The results show that the chips belong either to the AZ91, AZ31, AM50/60, or AJ62 alloy. Some kinds of chips show deviations from the above-mentioned normations. Different impurities result mainly from transition metals and lime. The water and oil content does not exceed 25%, and the chip size is not more than 4 mm in the diameter. The sieve analysis shows good results for oily and wet chips. The determination of oil and water shows better results for the application of a Soxhlet compared with the addition of lime and vacuum distillation. The most accurate values for the determination of water and oil are obtained by drying at 110°C (for water) and washing with acetone (for oil) by hand.

  15. Experimental Investigation of the Corrosion Behavior of Friction Stir Welded AZ61A Magnesium Alloy Welds under Salt Spray Corrosion Test and Galvanic Corrosion Test Using Response Surface Methodology

    OpenAIRE

    Dhanapal, A.; S. RAJENDRA BOOPATHY; Balasubramanian, V.; Chidambaram, K.; A. R. Thoheer Zaman

    2013-01-01

    Extruded Mg alloy plates of 6 mm thick of AZ61A grade were butt welded using advanced welding process and friction stir welding (FSW) processes. The specimens were exposed to salt spray conditions and immersion conditions to characterize their corrosion rates on the effect of pH value, chloride ion concentration, and corrosion time. In addition, an attempt was made to develop an empirical relationship to predict the corrosion rate of FSW welds in salt spray corrosion test and galvanic corrosi...

  16. Enhanced corrosion resistance by sol-gel-based ZrO{sub 2}-CeO{sub 2} coatings on magnesium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phani, A.R.; Haefke, H. [Micro and Nanomaterials Section, CSEM Swiss Center for Electronics and Microtechnology, Inc., Rue Jaquet-Droz 1, CH-2007 Neuchatel (Switzerland); Gammel, F.J.; Hack, T. [EADS Deutschland GmbH, Corporate Research Center Germany, D-81663 Munich (Germany)

    2005-02-01

    The physical, chemical and mechanical properties of magnesium alloys make them attractive materials for automotive and aerospace applications. However, these materials are susceptible to corrosion and wear. This work discusses the potential of using sol-gel based coatings consisting of ZrO{sub 2} and 15 wt.% of CeO{sub 2}. The CeO{sub 2} component provides enhanced corrosion protection, while ZrO{sub 2} impart corrosion as well as wear resistance. Coating deposition was performed by the dip coating technique on two magnesium alloy substrates with different surface finishes: AZ91D (as-casted, sand-blasted, and machined) and AZ31 (rolled and machined). All as-deposited coatings (xerogel coatings) were then subjected to 10 h annealing: a temperature of 180 C was applied to the AZ91D alloy and 140 C to the AZ31 alloy. Morphological and structural properties of the annealed coatings were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Coating composition was examined using energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Adhesion of the annealed ZrO{sub 2}-CeO{sub 2} coatings on the substrates, assessed by scratch tests, showed critical loads indicative of coating perforation of up to 32 N. Hardness and elasticity, measured using depth-sensing nanoindentation tests, gave a hardness and elastic modulus of 4.5 GPa and 98 GPa, respectively. Salt spray corrosion tests performed on these coatings showed superior corrosion resistance for AZ91D (as-casted and machined) and AZ31 (machined), while severe corrosion was observed for the AZ31 (rolled) and AZ91D (sand-blasted) magnesium alloy substrates. (Abstract Copyright [2005], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  17. Preparation of Phytic Acid/Silane Hybrid Coating on Magnesium Alloy and Its Corrosion Resistance in Simulated Body Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fengwu; Cai, Shu; Shen, Sibo; Yu, Nian; Zhang, Feiyang; Ling, Rui; Li, Yue; Xu, Guohua

    2017-09-01

    In order to decrease the corrosion rate and improve the bioactivity of magnesium alloy, phytic acid/saline hybrid coatings were synthesized on AZ31 magnesium alloys by sol-gel dip-coating method. It was found that the mole ratio of phytic acid to γ-APS had a great influence on coating morphology and the corresponding corrosion resistance of the coated magnesium alloys. When the mole ratio of phytic acid to γ-APS was 1:1, the obtained hybrid coating was integral and without cracks, which was ascribed to the strong chelate capability of phytic acid and Si-O-Si network derived from silane. Electrochemical test result indicated that the corrosion resistance of the coated magnesium alloy was about 27 times larger than that of the naked counterpart. In parallel, immersion test showed that the phytic acid/silane hybrid coating could induce CaP-mineralized product deposition, which offered another protection for magnesium alloy.

  18. Magnesium Gluconate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnesium gluconate is used to treat low blood magnesium. Low blood magnesium is caused by gastrointestinal disorders, prolonged vomiting or ... disease, or certain other conditions. Certain drugs lower magnesium levels as well.This medication is sometimes prescribed ...

  19. Electromagnetic field simulation and crack analysis of electromagnetic forming of Magnesium alloy tube

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Z. F.; Piao, F. X.; Wang, Z.Y.; Cui, J.Z.; Ma, M. X.

    2011-01-01

    The AZ31 magnesium alloy tube was used for electromagnetic forming experiment of three kinds of input voltages. The stress-strain state of tube forming was analyzed. It was shown that the cause of oblique crack of tube was σr of axial inhomogeneous distribution and σz, and the cause of longitudinal crack was σr and σè of inhomogeneous distribution in circumferential direction. Moreover, the electromagnetic field and force field during electromagnetic forming was simulated by ANSYS software. T...

  20. Structure and Properties of "Magnesium Alloy - Carbon Nanotubes" Nanocomposite and their Optimization Using Design of Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, M.; Shamanian, M.; Niroumand, B.

    2017-07-01

    A nanocomposite obtained by introduction of carbon nanotubes into the surface layer of magnesium alloy AZ31B by the method of friction stir processing is studied. Dependences of the hardness and wear resistance on the speed of motion of the friction tool, the speed of rotation of the friction head, the number of passes of the tool and the relative content of carbon nanotubes in the layer are determined. The method of design of experiment is used to find the optimum modes for production of a nanocomposite with high hardness and wear resistance.

  1. Silica-Based Sol-Gel Coating on Magnesium Alloy with Green Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Upadhyay

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the performances of several natural organic inhibitors were investigated in a sol-gel system (applied on the magnesium alloy Mg AZ31B substrate. The inhibitors were quinaldic acid (QDA, betaine (BET, dopamine hydrochloride (DOP, and diazolidinyl urea (DZU. Thin, uniform, and defect-free sol-gel coatings were prepared with and without organic inhibitors, and applied on the Mg AZ31B substrate. SEM and EDX were performed to analyze the coating surface properties, the adhesion to the substrate, and the thickness. Electrochemical measurements, including electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS and anodic potentiodynamic polarization scan (PDS, were performed on the coated samples to characterize the coatings’ protective properties. Also, hydrogen evolution measurement—an easy method to measure magnesium corrosion—was performed in order to characterize the efficiency of coating protection on the magnesium substrate. Moreover, scanning vibrating electrode technique (SVET measurements were performed to examine the efficiency of the coatings loaded with inhibitors in preventing and containing corrosion events in defect areas. From the testing results it was observed that the formulated sol-gel coatings provided a good barrier to the substrate, affording some protection even without the presence of inhibitors. Finally, when the inhibitors’ performances were compared, the QDA-doped sol-gel was able to contain the corrosion event at the defect.

  2. Fatigue property of a bioabsorbable magnesium alloy with a hydroxyapatite coating formed by a chemical solution deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiromoto, Sachiko; Tomozawa, Masanari; Maruyama, Norio

    2013-09-01

    A hydroxyapatite (HAp) coating was directly formed on an extruded AZ31 magnesium alloy by a single-step chemical solution deposition. The HAp coating consists of an outer porous HAp layer, an inner continuous HAp layer, and a thin intermediate MgO layer, and the inner HAp and MgO layers are composed of nanocrystals. Tensile and fatigue tests were performed on the HAp-coated AZ31 in air. The HAp coating microscopically showed neither crack nor detachment at 5% static elongation (1.5% residual strain). With further elongation under tensile stress, cracks were formed perpendicularly to the tensile direction, and fragments of the coating detached with a fracture inside the inner continuous HAp layer. The fatigue strengths at 10(7) cycles (fatigue limit) of HAp-coated and mechanically polished AZ31 were ca. 80 MPa and ca. 90 MPa, respectively. The slight decrease in the fatigue limit with the HAp coating is attributed to small pits with a depth of ca. 10 μm formed on the substrate during the HAp-coating treatment. The HAp coating remained on the specimen without cracks after 10(7) cycles at the fatigue limit, which provides ca. 3% cyclic elongation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Estimación de la corrosión intergranular en la aleación de magnesio AZ31B soldada por fricción - agitación

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willian Aperador Chaparro

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se evalúa la corrosión intergranular, que se presenta en las soldaduras de la aleación de magnesio AZ31B unidas por los procesos de fricción-agitación y comparada con la soldadura con arco de tungsteno y gas, con el fin de evaluar y comparar el comportamiento a la corrosión de ambas soldaduras por medio la técnica de Espectroscopia de Impedancias Electroquímica. Adicionalmente se realizaron análisis microestructurales de los límites de grano por medio del microscopio. Los resultados obtenidos en esta investigación muestran una mayor resistencia a la corrosión de las muestras obtenidas con el proceso de fricción-agitación.

  4. Surface characterization and cytotoxicity response of biodegradable magnesium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pompa, Luis; Rahman, Zia Ur; Munoz, Edgar; Haider, Waseem, E-mail: haiderw@utpa.edu

    2015-04-01

    Magnesium alloys have raised an immense amount of interest to many researchers because of their evolution as a new kind of third generation materials. Due to their biocompatibility, density, and mechanical properties, magnesium alloys are frequently reported as prospective biodegradable implant materials. Moreover, magnesium alloys experience a natural phenomenon to biodegrade in aqueous solutions due to its corrosion activity, which is excellent for orthopedic and cardiovascular applications. However, a major concern with such alloys is fast and non-uniform corrosion degradation. Controlling the degradation rate in the physiological environment determines the success of biodegradable implants. In this investigation, three different grades of magnesium alloys: AZ31B, AZ91E and ZK60A were studied for their corrosion resistance and biocompatibility. Scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and contact angle meter are used to study surface morphology, chemistry, roughness and wettability, respectively. Additionally, the cytotoxicity of the leached metal ions was evaluated by using a tetrazolium based bio-assay, MTS. - Highlights: • Micro-textured features formed after the anodization of magnesium alloys. • Contact angle increased and surface free energy decreased by anodization. • Corrosion rate increased for anodized surfaces compared to untreated samples. • Cell viability was greater than 75% implying the cytocompatibility of Mg alloys.

  5. Magnesium, magnesium alloys, and magnesium composites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gupta, M; Sharon, Nai Mui Ling

    2011-01-01

    "Properties of Magnesium Composites for Material Scientists, Engineers and Selectors is the first book-length reference to provide an insight into current and future magnesium-based materials in terms...

  6. Sub-micrometric surface texturing of AZ31 Mg-alloy through two-beam direct laser interference patterning with a ns-pulsed green fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlan, Valentina; Biondi, Marco; Demir, Ali Gökhan; Pariani, Giorgio; Previtali, Barbara; Bianco, Andrea

    2017-11-01

    Two-beam direct laser interference patterning (DLIP) is the method that employs two beams and provides control over the pattern geometry by regulating the angle between the beams and the wavelength of the beam. Despite the simplistic optical arrangement required for the method, the feasibility of sub-micrometric patterning of a surface depends on the correct manipulation of the process parameters, especially in the case of metallic materials. Magnesium alloys, from this point of view, exhibit further difficulty in processability due to low melting point and high reactivity. With biocompatibility and biodegradability features, Mg-alloy implants can take further advantage of surface structuring for tailoring the biological behaviour. In this work, a two-beam DLIP setup has been developed employing an industrial grade nanosecond-pulsed fiber laser emitting at 532 nm. The high repetition rate and ramped pulse profile provided by the laser were exploited for a more flexible control over the energy content deposited over the heat-sensitive Mg-alloy. The paper describes the strategies developed for controlling ramped laser emission at 20 kHz repetition rate. The process feasibility window was assessed within a large range of parameters. Within the feasibility window, a complete experimental plan was applied to investigate the effect of main laser process parameters on the pattern dimensions. Periodic surface structures with good definition down to 580 nm ± 20 nm spacing were successfully produced.

  7. Magnesium basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketteler, Markus

    2012-01-01

    As a cofactor in numerous enzymatic reactions, magnesium fulfils various intracellular physiological functions. Thus, imbalance in magnesium status—primarily hypomagnesaemia as it is seen more often than hypermagnesaemia—might result in unwanted neuromuscular, cardiac or nervous disorders. Measuring total serum magnesium is a feasible and affordable way to monitor changes in magnesium status, although it does not necessarily reflect total body magnesium content. The following review focuses on the natural occurrence of magnesium and its physiological function. The absorption and excretion of magnesium as well as hypo- and hypermagnesaemia will be addressed. PMID:26069819

  8. Magnesium basics

    OpenAIRE

    Jahnen-Dechent, Wilhelm; Ketteler, Markus

    2012-01-01

    As a cofactor in numerous enzymatic reactions, magnesium fulfils various intracellular physiological functions. Thus, imbalance in magnesium status?primarily hypomagnesaemia as it is seen more often than hypermagnesaemia?might result in unwanted neuromuscular, cardiac or nervous disorders. Measuring total serum magnesium is a feasible and affordable way to monitor changes in magnesium status, although it does not necessarily reflect total body magnesium content. The following review focuses o...

  9. Drawability Studies of Magnesium Alloy Sheets at Elevated Temperature / Badania Tłoczności Blach Ze Stopów Magnezu W Podwyższonej Temperaturze

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyrcza-Michalska M.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of a study of drawability of thin AZ31 magnesium alloy metal sheets. These studies are a continuation of experiences in presenting the characteristics of technological plasticity of strips made of magnesium alloy which have been cast between rolls in vertical and horizontal systems called ‘twin-roll casting’. In the context of previous experiments conducted at the Institute of Material Technology of the Silesian University of Technology in cooperation with the Technical University - Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany, drawability of these strips at elevated temperatures has been comprehensively defined while using forming limit curves. Due to low formability of magnesium alloys at ambient temperature, formability tests - including cup forming tests presented in this paper - have been carried out in heated dies at temperature range of 200°C to 350°C. A modern AutoGrid digital local strain analyzer has been used in the examinations and the method of image analysis of deformed coordination nets has been applied. Quantitative and qualitative impact of deformation temperature upon the drawability effects of AZ31 magnesium alloys products have been evaluated.

  10. Corrosion behavior of magnesium-graphene composites in sodium chloride solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Rashad

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Coating of graphene and graphene/polymer composites on metals improves the corrosion resistance of metal substrates. On other hand, graphene embedded inside metal (especially Mg matrices increases or decreases corrosion, is a crucial factor and must be explored. In present study, electrochemical behaviors of magnesium alloys (AZ31 and AZ61 and their composites reinforced with graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs were carried out in 3.5% NaCl solution by polarization method. The surface morphology of composites before and after corrosion tests were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. Experimental results revealed that presence of graphene nanoplatelets in different matrices decrease corrosion resistance of composites. This may be attributed to presence of graphene nanoplatelets which activates the corrosion of magnesium/alloys due to the occurrence of galvanic corrosion and this effect increases with increasing graphene nanoplatelets content. Further, an appropriate model describing the corrosion mechanism was proposed.

  11. The effect of rare earth elements on the texture and formability of asymmetrically rolled magnesium sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alderman, Dr. Martyn [Magnesium Elektron North America; Cavin, Odis Burl [ORNL; Davis, Dr. Bruce [Magnesium Elektron North America; Muralidharan, Govindarajan [ORNL; Muth, Thomas R [ORNL; Peter, William H [ORNL; Randman, David [Magnesium Elektron North America; Watkins, Thomas R [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    The lack of formability is a serious issue when considering magnesium alloys for various applications. Standard symmetric rolling introduces a strong basal texture that decreases the formability; however, asymmetric rolling has been put forward as a possible route to produce sheet with weaker texture and greater ductility. It has also been shown in recent work that weaker textures can be produced through the addition of rare earth elements to magnesium alloys. Therefore, this study has been carried out to investigate the effect of rare earth additions on the texture changes during asymmetric rolling. Two alloys have been used, AZ31B and ZEK100. The effect that the rare earth additions have on the texture of asymmetrically rolled sheet and the subsequent changes in formability will be discussed.

  12. Discontinuous Dynamic Recrystallization during Accumulative Back Extrusion of a Magnesium Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M. Fatemi-Varzaneh

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The study of nucleation mechanism of new grains during severe plastic deformation of magnesium alloys is of great importance to control the characteristics of final microstructures.  To investigate the role of discontinuous recrystallization, a wrought AZ31 magnesium alloy was deformed by accumulative back extrusion process at 330 °C.  The obtained microstructures were studied using optical and field emission microscopy as well as electron back scattered diffraction techniques.  The results demonstrated that the fine and ultrafine grains formed along the prior grain boundaries yielding a bimodal structure.  The EBSD analysis showed that the new grains exhibit a similar basal texture to deformed grains, which may confirm the operation of strain induced boundary migration mechanism.

  13. Modeling of anisotropic and asymmetric behaviour of magnesium alloys at elevated temperature coupled with ductile damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, K.; Badreddine, H.; Labergere, C.; Saanouni, K.

    2017-09-01

    Poor formability of Magnesium alloys at room temperature is due to their Hexagonal Closed Packed (HCP) crystal structure. These materials also have a pronounced Strength Differential (SD) effect. In the present work, an improved constitutive model of thermo-elasto-Dviscoplasticity with mixed nonlinear isotropic and kinematic hardening strongly coupled with isotropic ductile damage is developed. The induced anisotropy as well as tension compression asymmetry are carefully considered including their interaction with thermal effects. The numerical implementation of the developed model into ABAQUS/Explicit FE is made through the user subroutine VUMAT. The proposed model is used to simulate material responses of AZ31 Magnesium alloy during sheet metal forming processes at elevated temperature.

  14. Design and Fabrication of a Novel Stimulus-Feedback Anticorrosion Coating Featured by Rapid Self-Healing Functionality for the Protection of Magnesium Alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, ChenDi; Xu, JianHua; Tong, Ling; Gong, GuangCai; Jiang, Wei; Fu, Jiajun

    2017-06-21

    Corrosion potential stimulus-responsive smart nanocontainers (CP-SNCs) are designed and synthesized based on the installation of the supramolecular assemblies (bipyridinium ⊂ water-soluble pillar[5]arenes) onto the exterior surface of magnetic nanovehicles (Fe 3 O 4 @mSiO 2 ), linked by disulfide linkers. The supramolecular assemblies with high binding affinity as gatekeepers effectively block the encapsulated organic corrosion inhibitor, 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-HQ), within the mesopores of Fe 3 O 4 @mSiO 2 . When the corrosion potential of the magnesium alloy (-1.5 V vs SHE) is exerted, 8-HQ is released instantly because of the cleavage of disulfide linkers and the removal of the supramolecular assemblies. CP-SNCs were incorporated into the hybrid organic-inorganic sol-gel coating to construct a corrosion potential stimulus-feedback anticorrosion coating (CP-SFAC) that was then deposited on the magnesium alloy, AZ31B. With the aid of a magnetic field, CP-SNCs were gathered in the proximity of the surface of AZ31B. CP-SFAC showed a satisfactory anticorrosion performance, more importantly, through the evaluation of microzone electrochemical techniques. CP-SFAC presented the rapid self-healing functionality when the localized corrosion occurred. Shortening the distance between CP-SNCs and the surface of AZ31B enhances the availability of the incorporated CP-SNCs and makes most of the CP-SNCs to timely respond to the corrosion potential stimulus and facilitates the formation of a compact molecular protective film before the corrosion products pile up. The characteristics of fast response time and quick self-healing rate meet the requirements of the magnesium alloy for self-healing in local regions.

  15. Effects of process parameters on microstructure and mechanical properties of friction stir lap linear welded 6061 aluminum alloy to NZ30K magnesium alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Tan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The microstructures and lap-shear behaviors of friction stir lap linear welded as-extruded 6061 Al alloy to as-cast Mg–3.0Nd–0.2Zn–0.7Zr (wt.% (NZ30K alloy joints were examined. Various tool rotation and travel speeds were adopted to prepare the joints. The analysis of temperature field indicates that the peak temperature for each sample can reach 450 °C, which exceeds the eutectic reaction temperatures of 437 °C and 450 °C according to the binary phase diagram of Al–Mg system. The fierce intermixing can be found at the interface between Al and Mg alloys, forming the intermetallic of Al3Mg2. Welds with the rotation speed of 900 rpm and travel speed of 120 mm/min display the highest tensile shear failure load of about 2.24 kN. The value was increased by 13% after the sample was heat treated at 400 °C for 0.5 h.

  16. Magnesium Hydroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnesium hydroxide is used on a short-term basis to treat constipation.This medication is sometimes prescribed for ... Magnesium hydroxide come as a tablet and liquid to take by mouth. It usually is taken as needed ...

  17. Magnesium Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnesium is an element your body needs to function normally. Magnesium oxide may be used for different reasons. Some people use it as ... daily depending on which brand is used and what condition you have. Follow the directions on the ...

  18. Facile formation of biomimetic color-tuned superhydrophobic magnesium alloy with corrosion resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizaki, Takahiro; Sakamoto, Michiru

    2011-03-15

    The design of color-tuned magnesium alloy with anticorrosive properties and damping capacity was created by means of a simple and inexpensive method. The vertically self-aligned nano- and microsheets were formed on magnesium alloy AZ31 by a chemical-free immersion process in ultrapure water at a temperature of 120 °C, resulting in the color expression. The color changed from silver with metallic luster to some specific colors such as orange, green, and orchid, depending on the immersion time. The color-tuned magnesium alloy showed anticorrosive performance and damping capacity. In addition, the colored surface with minute surface textures was modified with n-octadecyltrimethoxysilane (ODS), leading to the formation of color-tuned superhydrophobic surfaces. The corrosion resistance of the color-tuned superhydrophobic magnesium alloy was also investigated using electrochemical potentiodynamic measurements. Moreover, the color-tuned superhydrophobic magnesium alloy showed high hydrophobicity not just for pure water but also for corrosive liquids, such as acidic, basic, and some aqueous salt solutions. In addition, the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard D 3359-02 cross cut tape test was performed to investigate the adhesion of the color-tuned superhydrophobic film to the magnesium alloy surface.

  19. Polydopamine mediated assembly of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles and bone morphogenetic protein-2 on magnesium alloys for enhanced corrosion resistance and bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yanan; Wang, Bi; Jia, Zhanrong; Lu, Xiong; Fang, Liming; Wang, Kefeng; Ren, Fuzeng

    2017-10-01

    Magnesium alloys have the great potential to be used as orthopedic implants due to their biodegradability and mechanical resemblance to human cortical bone. However, the rapid degradation in physiological environment with the evolution of hydrogen gas release hinders their clinical applications. In this study, we developed a novel functional and biocompatible coating strategy through polydopamine mediated assembly of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles and growth factor, bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2), onto the surface of AZ31 Mg alloys. Such functional coating has strong bonding with the substrate and can increase surface hydrophilicity of magnesium alloys. In vitro electrochemical corrosion and hydrogen evolution tests demonstrate that the coating can significantly enhance the corrosion resistance and therefore slow down the degradation of AZ31 Mg alloys. In vitro cell culture reveals that immobilization of HA nanoparticles and BMP-2 can obviously promote cell adhesion and proliferation. Furthermore, in vivo implantation tests indicate that with the synergistic effects of HA nanoparticles and BMP-2, the coating does not cause obvious inflammatory response and can significantly reduce the biodegradation rate of the magnesium alloys and induce the new bone formation adjacent to the implants. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 2750-2761, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Lightweight Heat Pipes Made from Magnesium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, John N.; Zarembo, Sergei N.; Eastman, G. Yale

    2010-01-01

    Magnesium has shown promise as a lighter-weight alternative to the aluminum alloys now used to make the main structural components of axially grooved heat pipes that contain ammonia as the working fluid. Magnesium heat-pipe structures can be fabricated by conventional processes that include extrusion, machining, welding, and bending. The thermal performances of magnesium heat pipes are the same as those of equal-sized aluminum heat pipes. However, by virtue of the lower mass density of magnesium, the magnesium heat pipes weigh 35 percent less. Conceived for use aboard spacecraft, magnesium heat pipes could also be attractive as heat-transfer devices in terrestrial applications in which minimization of weight is sought: examples include radio-communication equipment and laptop computers.

  1. Metal Forming of Lightweight Magnesium Alloys for Aviation Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Śliwa R.E.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The work presents an analysis of selected magnesium alloys as structural materials to be used in production of aircraft parts as well as their technological parameters in some manufacturing processes. Upsetting test, backward extrusion and Kobo extrusion of complex cross-sectional profiles and forging process were realized using magnesium alloys AZ31, AZ61, AZ80, WE 43 and Mg alloy with Li for production of thin - walled aircraft profiles and forged aviation parts. The range of temperatures and extrusion rate for the manufacturing these profiles were determined. Tests also covered the analysis of microstructure of Mg alloys in the initial state as well as after the extrusion process. It has been proved that the proper choice of parameters in the case of a specific profile extruded from magnesium alloys allows the manufacturing of products of complex cross-sections and the quality required in aerospace industry. This has been demonstrated on the examples of complex cross-sectional profiles using elements of varied wall thickness and examples of forged aviation parts: aircraft wheel hub and helicopter lever for control system.

  2. Collagen Self-Assembly on Orthopedic Magnesium Biomaterials Surface and Subsequent Bone Cell Attachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Nan; Zhu, Donghui

    2014-01-01

    Magnesium (Mg) biomaterials are a new generation of biodegradable materials and have promising potential for orthopedic applications. After implantation in bone tissues, these materials will directly interact with extracellular matrix (ECM) biomolecules and bone cells. Type I collagen, the major component of bone ECM, forms the architecture scaffold that provides physical support for bone cell attachment. However, it is still unknown how Mg substrate affects collagen assembly on top of it as well as subsequent cell attachment and growth. Here, we studied the effects of collagen monomer concentration, pH, assembly time, and surface roughness of two Mg materials (pure Mg and AZ31) on collagen fibril formation. Results showed that formation of fibrils would not initiate until the monomer concentration reached a certain level depending on the type of Mg material. The thickness of collagen fibril increased with the increase of assembly time. The structures of collagen fibrils formed on semi-rough surfaces of Mg materials have a high similarity to that of native bone collagen. Next, cell attachment and growth after collagen assembly were examined. Materials with rough surface showed higher collagen adsorption but compromised bone cell attachment. Interestingly, surface roughness and collagen structure did not affect cell growth on AZ31 for up to a week. Findings from this work provide some insightful information on Mg-tissue interaction at the interface and guidance for future surface modifications of Mg biomaterials. PMID:25303459

  3. Collagen self-assembly on orthopedic magnesium biomaterials surface and subsequent bone cell attachment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Zhao

    Full Text Available Magnesium (Mg biomaterials are a new generation of biodegradable materials and have promising potential for orthopedic applications. After implantation in bone tissues, these materials will directly interact with extracellular matrix (ECM biomolecules and bone cells. Type I collagen, the major component of bone ECM, forms the architecture scaffold that provides physical support for bone cell attachment. However, it is still unknown how Mg substrate affects collagen assembly on top of it as well as subsequent cell attachment and growth. Here, we studied the effects of collagen monomer concentration, pH, assembly time, and surface roughness of two Mg materials (pure Mg and AZ31 on collagen fibril formation. Results showed that formation of fibrils would not initiate until the monomer concentration reached a certain level depending on the type of Mg material. The thickness of collagen fibril increased with the increase of assembly time. The structures of collagen fibrils formed on semi-rough surfaces of Mg materials have a high similarity to that of native bone collagen. Next, cell attachment and growth after collagen assembly were examined. Materials with rough surface showed higher collagen adsorption but compromised bone cell attachment. Interestingly, surface roughness and collagen structure did not affect cell growth on AZ31 for up to a week. Findings from this work provide some insightful information on Mg-tissue interaction at the interface and guidance for future surface modifications of Mg biomaterials.

  4. Welding Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This competency-based curriculum guide is a handbook for the development of welding trade programs. Based on a survey of Alaskan welding employers, it includes all competencies a student should acquire in such a welding program. The handbook stresses the importance of understanding the principles associated with the various elements of welding.…

  5. WOOD WELDING

    OpenAIRE

    Marcos Theodoro Muller; Rafael Rodolfo de Melo; Diego Martins Stangerlin

    2010-01-01

    The term "wood welding" designates what can be defined as "welding of wood surfaces". This new process, that it provides the joint of wood pieces without the use of adhesives or any other additional material, provokes growing interest in the academic environment, although it is still in laboratorial state. Linear friction welding induced bymechanical vibration yields welded joints of flat wood surfaces. The phenomenon of the welding occurs in less time than 10 seconds, with the temperature in...

  6. Magnesium, magnesium alloys, and magnesium composites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gupta, M; Sharon, Nai Mui Ling

    2011-01-01

    .... With the popularity of magnesium-based materials in the automotive, aerospace, electronics, and sports equipment industries, and its unique role as a lightweight, energy-saving and high-performance...

  7. Magnesium, magnesium alloys, and magnesium composites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gupta, M; Sharon, Nai Mui Ling

    2011-01-01

    ... of science, characteristics, and applications. It emphasizes the properties of magnesium-based composites and the effects of different types of reinforcements, from micron length to nanometer scale, on the properties of the resulting composites...

  8. Deformation behavior and microstructure evolution of wrought magnesium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shouren; Song, Linghui; Kang, Sukbong; Cho, Jaehyung; Wang, Yingzi

    2013-05-01

    There are many researches on the deformation behavior of wrought magnesium alloys, such as AZ31, AZ80, AZ91, and ZK60 magnesium alloys at different temperatures and strain rates, but few of them focuses on the deformation behavior of AZ41M and ZK60M alloys, especially under the twin-roll casting (TRC) state. Meanwhile, the existing researches only focus on the grain refinement law of the magnesium alloys under deformation conditions, the deformation mechanism has not been revealed yet. The hot compression behavior of AZ41M and ZK60M magnesium alloys under the temperature and strain rate ranges of 250-400 °C and 0.001-1 s-1 are studied by thermal simulation methods using Gleeble 1500 machine and virtual simulation using finite element analysis software. Simulation results show that sine hyperbolic law is the most suitable flow stress model for wider deformation conditions. The most reasonable selected deformation conditions of ZK60M alloy is 350 °C/0.1 s-1 for TRC and 350 °C/1 s-1 for conventional casting (CC), while AZ41M alloy is 300 °C/0.01 s-1 for TRC and 350 °C/0.1 s-1 for CC. Deformation behavior and dynamic recrystallization (DRX) mechanism of them are analyzed at the same deformation conditions. The microstructures of AZ41M and ZK60M alloys are observed at different deformed conditions by optical microscopy (OM) and electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD) and it reveals the flow behavior and deformation mechanism of them. Working harden and work soften contribute to the activation of basal, non-basal slip systems which promote DRX. The proposed research reveals the deformation behavior and mechanism of the AZ41M and ZK 60M magnesium alloys and concludes their optimized deformation parameters and processes and provides a theory basis for their manufacturing and application.

  9. Femtosecond fiber laser welding of dissimilar metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huan; Yang, Lih-Mei; Bai, Shuang; Liu, Jian

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, welding of dissimilar metals was demonstrated for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, by using a high-energy high-repetition-rate femtosecond fiber laser. Metallurgical and mechanical properties were investigated and analyzed under various processing parameters (pulse energy, repetition rate, and welding speed). Results showed that the formation of intermetallic brittle phases and welding defects could be effectively reduced. Strong welding quality with more than 210 MPa tensile strength for stainless steel-aluminum and 175 MPa tensile strength for stainless steel-magnesium has been demonstrated. A minimal heat affected zone and uniform and homogenous phase transformation in the welding region have been demonstrated. This laser-welding technique can be extended for various applications in semiconductor, automobile, aerospace, and biomedical industries.

  10. Advanced Welding Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Four advanced welding techniques and their use in NASA are briefly reviewed in this poster presentation. The welding techniques reviewed are: Solid State Welding, Friction Stir Welding (FSW), Thermal Stir Welding (TSW) and Ultrasonic Stir Welding.

  11. Resistance welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Zhang, Wenqi; Rasmussen, Mogens H.

    2003-01-01

    Resistance welding comprises not only the well known spot welding process but also more complex projection welding operations, where excessive plastic deformation of the weld point may occur. This enables the production of complex geometries and material combinations, which are often not possible...... to weld by traditional spot welding operations. Such joining processes are, however, not simple to develop due to the large number of parameters involved. Development has traditionally been carried out by large experimental investigations, but the development of a numerical programme system has changed...

  12. Purely inorganic coatings based on nanoparticles for magnesium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feil, Florian [DECHEMA e.V., Karl-Winnacker-Institut, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)], E-mail: feil@dechema.de; Fuerbeth, Wolfram; Schuetze, Michael [DECHEMA e.V., Karl-Winnacker-Institut, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2009-03-30

    The chemical nanotechnology is offering a chance to apply stable inorganic coatings onto magnesium alloys. The cast alloy AZ91 as well as the wrought alloy AZ31 could be dip-coated with aqueous dispersions based on commercially available silica particles and various additives. The high surface activity of the nanoparticles and appropriate additives, e.g. boron, aluminium or alkali salts, help to densify these coatings under moderate conditions even suitable for those thermally precarious magnesium alloys. Another coating technique is based on the electrophoretic deposition of nanoparticles already containing all sintering aids. These particles could be synthesised by a base-catalysed sol-gel process. Polydiethoxysiloxane can act as an adhesion promoter for these coatings. Additionally concentration gradients of different oxides within these particles can adjust the coating properties, too. Usually single coatings are very thin (200-500 nm). However, multiple coating applications as well as a process involving special particle mixtures lead to coatings with a thickness of up to several micrometers. Even after thermal treatment at 200 or 400 deg. C these coatings stay crack-free. The composition and texture of these coatings were studied using IR, atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and other techniques. Electrochemical impedance measurements show an improvement of the corrosion performance by these coatings. The coating resistance is improving with the coating thickness.

  13. Welding Technician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ken

    2009-01-01

    About 95% of all manufactured goods in this country are welded or joined in some way. These welded products range in nature from bicycle handlebars and skyscrapers to bridges and race cars. The author discusses what students need to know about careers for welding technicians--wages, responsibilities, skills needed, career advancement…

  14. Simulation of Temperature Distribution in TIG Spot Welds of(Al-Mg) Alloy Using Finite Element Method

    OpenAIRE

    Ahlam Abid Ameer Alkhafajy; Abdul Hussain G. Al-Maliky; Muna K Abbas

    2008-01-01

    This research concern to analyse and simulate the temperature distribution in the spot welding joints using tungsten arc welding shielded with inert gas (TIG Spot) for the aluminum-magnesium alloy type (5052-O). The effect of and the quantity of the heat input that enter the weld zone has been investigated welding current, welding time and arc length on temperature distribution. The finite element method (by utilizing programme ANSYS 5.4) is presented the temperature distribution in a circula...

  15. Finite Element Based Physical Chemical Modeling of Corrosion in Magnesium Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesh Vijayaraghavan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium alloys have found widespread applications in diverse fields such as aerospace, automotive, bio-medical and electronics industries due to its relatively high strength-to-weight ratio. However, stress corrosion cracking of these alloys severely restricts their applications in several novel technologies. Hence, it will be useful to identify the corrosion mechanics of magnesium alloys under external stresses as it can provide further insights on design of these alloys for critical applications. In the present study, the corrosion mechanics of a commonly used magnesium alloy, AZ31, is studied using finite element simulation with a modified constitutive material damage model. The data obtained from the finite element modeling were further used to formulate a mathematical model using computational intelligence algorithm. Sensitivity and parametric analysis of the derived model further corroborated the mechanical response of the alloy in line with the corrosion physics. The proposed approach is anticipated to be useful for materials engineers for optimizing the design criteria for magnesium alloys catered for high temperature applications.

  16. Production of magnesium metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blencoe, James G [Harriman, TN; Anovitz, Lawrence M [Knoxville, TN; Palmer, Donald A [Oliver Springs, TN; Beard, James S [Martinsville, VA

    2010-02-23

    A process of producing magnesium metal includes providing magnesium carbonate, and reacting the magnesium carbonate to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The carbon dioxide is used as a reactant in a second process. In another embodiment of the process, a magnesium silicate is reacted with a caustic material to produce magnesium hydroxide. The magnesium hydroxide is reacted with a source of carbon dioxide to produce magnesium carbonate. The magnesium carbonate is reacted to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The invention further relates to a process for production of magnesium metal or a magnesium compound where an external source of carbon dioxide is not used in any of the reactions of the process. The invention also relates to the magnesium metal produced by the processes described herein.

  17. Submerged Friction-Stir Welding (SFSW) Underwater and Under Liquid Nitrogen: An Improved Method to Join Al Alloys to Mg Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mofid, Mohammad Ammar; Abdollah-Zadeh, Amir; Ghaini, Farshid Malek; Gür, Cemil Hakan

    2012-12-01

    Submerged friction-stir welding (SFSW) underwater and under liquid nitrogen is demonstrated as an alternative and improved method for creating fine-grained welds in dissimilar metals. Plates of AZ31 (Mg alloy) and AA5083 H34 were joined by friction-stir welding in three different environments, i.e., in air, water, and liquid nitrogen at 400 rpm and 50 mm/min. The temperature profile, microstructure, scanning electron microscopy (SEM)-energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD), hardness, and tensile testing results were evaluated. In the stir zone of an air-welded specimen, formation of brittle intermetallic compounds of Al3Mg2, Al12Mg17, and Al2Mg3 contributed to cracking in the weld nugget. These phases were formed because of constitutional liquation. Friction-stir welding underwater and under liquid nitrogen significantly suppresses the formation of intermetallic compounds because of the lower peak temperature. Furthermore, the temperature profiles plotted during this investigation indicate that the largest amount of ∆ T is generated by the weld under liquid nitrogen, which is performed at the lowest temperature. It is shown that in low-temperature FSW, the flow stress is higher, plastic contribution increases, and so adiabatic heating, a result of high strain and high strain-rate deformation, drives the recrystallization process beside frictional heat.

  18. Survey of welding processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-07-01

    The current KYTC SPECIAL PROVISION NO. 4 WELDING STEEL BRIDGES prohibits the use of welding processes other than shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) and submerged arc welding (SAW). Nationally, bridge welding is codified under ANSI/AASHTO/AWS D1....

  19. [Magnesium for nutrient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Mieko

    2012-08-01

    Magnesium is essential nutrient. Here is magnesium for nutrient. Magnesium has a large number of biological or biochemical functions. It's distribution, absorption, deficiency, excess disorder, requirement, supply sources, and especially status and issue of magnesium intake in Japanese are reviewed.

  20. Study of a fiber laser assisted friction stir welding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casalino, G.; Campanelli, S.; Ludovico, A. D.; Contuzzi, N.; Angelastro, A.

    2012-03-01

    Friction stir welding is a relatively new joining technique. This technique, which is considered a derivative of the more common friction welding method, was developed mainly for aluminum and its alloys. In recent years, this method has been used to join various other alloys. FSW has many advantages, including the following: the welding procedure is relatively simple with no consumables or filler metal; joint edge preparation is not needed; oxide removal prior to welding is unnecessary; high joint strength has been achieved in aluminum and magnesium alloys; FSW can be used with alloys that cannot be fusion welded due to crack sensitivity. The drawbacks of FSW include the need for powerful fixtures to clamp the workpiece to the welding table, the high force needed to move the welding tool forward, the relatively high wear rate of the welding tool, and weld speeds in FSW are slower, which can lead to longer process times. To overcome these drawbacks, a fiber laser-assisted friction stir welding system was designed (FLAFSW). The system combined a conventional commercial friction machine and a fiber pumped laser system. The scope is to investigate the influence of the laser assistance on the weld quality. A number of different aluminum plates, which are still mentioned to be difficult to be joint as intermetallic phases appear during melting welding techniques, were used. The evaluation of quality was performed through analysis of appearance, mechanical and microstructure characterization of the weld.

  1. Soldadura (Welding). Spanish Translations for Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohhertz, Durwin

    Thirty transparency masters with Spanish subtitles for key words are provided for a welding/general mechanical repair course. The transparency masters are on such topics as oxyacetylene welding; oxyacetylene welding equipment; welding safety; different types of welds; braze welding; cutting torches; cutting with a torch; protective equipment; arc…

  2. WELDING TORCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correy, T.B.

    1961-10-01

    A welding torch into which water and inert gas are piped separately for cooling and for providing a suitable gaseous atmosphere is described. A welding electrode is clamped in the torch by a removable collet sleeve and a removable collet head. Replacement of the sleeve and head with larger or smaller sleeve and head permits a larger or smaller welding electrode to be substituted on the torch. (AEC)

  3. Magnesium compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, D.A.

    2012-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 57 percent of magnesium compounds produced in the United States in 2011. Dead-burned magnesia was produced by Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties LLC from well brines in Michigan. Caustic-calcined magnesia was recovered from seawater by Premier Magnesia LLC in Florida, from well brines in Michigan by Martin Marietta and from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Magnesia. Intrepid Potash Wendover LLC and Great Salt Lake Minerals Corp. recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Magnesium hydroxide was produced from seawater by SPI Pharma Inc. in Delaware and Premier Magnesia in Florida, and by Martin Marietta from its brine operation in Michigan.

  4. Production of magnesium metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blencoe, James G [Harriman, TN; Anovitz, Lawrence M [Knoxville, TN; Palmer, Donald A [Oliver Springs, TN; Beard, James S [Martinsville, VA

    2012-04-10

    A process of producing magnesium metal includes providing magnesium carbonate, and reacting the magnesium carbonate to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The carbon dioxide is used as a reactant in a second process. In another embodiment of the process, a magnesium silicate is reacted with a caustic material to produce magnesium hydroxide. The magnesium hydroxide is reacted with a source of carbon dioxide to produce magnesium carbonate. The magnesium carbonate is reacted to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The invention also relates to the magnesium metal produced by the processes described herein.

  5. Plasma arc welding weld imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor); Mcgee, William F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A welding torch for plasma arc welding apparatus has a transparent shield cup disposed about the constricting nozzle, the cup including a small outwardly extending polished lip. A guide tube extends externally of the torch and has a free end adjacent to the lip. First and second optical fiber bundle assemblies are supported within the guide tube. Light from a strobe light is transmitted along one of the assemblies to the free end and through the lip onto the weld site. A lens is positioned in the guide tube adjacent to the second assembly and focuses images of the weld site onto the end of the fiber bundle of the second assembly and these images are transmitted along the second assembly to a video camera so that the weld site may be viewed continuously for monitoring the welding process.

  6. Magnesium compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, D.A.

    2007-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 52 percent of U.S. magnesium compounds production in 2006. Dead-burned magnesia was produced by Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties from well brines in Michigan. Caustic-calcined magnesia was recovered from sea-water by Premier Chemicals in Florida; from well brines in Michigan by Martin Marietta and Rohm and Haas; and from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Chemicals. Intrepid Potash-Wendover and Great Salt Lake Minerals recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Magnesium hydroxide was produced from brucite by Applied Chemical Magnesias in Texas, from seawater by SPI Pharma in Delaware and Premier Chemicals in Florida, and by Martin Marietta and Rohm and Haas from their operations mentioned above. About 59 percent of the magnesium compounds consumed in the United States was used for refractories that are used mainly to line steelmaking furnaces. The remaining 41 percent was consumed in agricultural, chemical, construction, environmental and industrial applications.

  7. Grain size and microhardness evolution during annealing of a magnesium alloy processed by high-pressure torsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Raquel C. Malheiros

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available High-pressure torsion (HPT was used to impose severe plastic deformation on a magnesium alloy AZ31. The material was processed for 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 5 and 7 turns at room temperature under a pressure of 6.0 GPa. Samples were annealed for 1800 s at temperatures of 373 K, 423 K, 473 K, 573 K and 673 K. Microhardness tests and metallography were used to determine the evolution of strength and grain size as a function of the annealing temperature. The results show that recrystallization takes place at temperatures higher than 423 K. The annealing behavior is independent of the number of turns in HPT.

  8. Corrosion behavior of mesoporous bioglass-ceramic coated magnesium alloy under applied forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feiyang; Cai, Shu; Xu, Guohua; Shen, Sibo; Li, Yan; Zhang, Min; Wu, Xiaodong

    2016-03-01

    In order to research the corrosion behavior of bioglass-ceramic coated magnesium alloys under applied forces, mesoporous 45S5 bioactive glass-ceramic (45S5 MBGC) coatings were successfully prepared on AZ31 substrates using a sol-gel dip-coating technique followed by a heat treatment at the temperature of 400°C. In this work, corrosion behavior of the coated samples under applied forces was characterized by electrochemical tests and immersion tests in simulated body fluid. Results showed that the glass-ceramic coatings lost the protective effects to the magnesium substrate in a short time when the applied compressive stress was greater than 25MPa, and no crystallized apatite was formed on the surface due to the high Mg(2+) releasing and the peeling off of the coatings. Whereas, under low applied forces, apatite deposition and crystallization on the coating surface repaired cracks to some extent, thus improving the corrosion resistance of the coated magnesium during the long-term immersion period. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Characterization of Mg/Al butt joints welded by gas tungsten arc filling with Zn–29.5Al–0.5Ti filler metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Fei; Wang, Hongyang; Liu, Liming, E-mail: liulm@dlut.edu.cn

    2014-04-01

    The multivariate alloying design of a welding joint is used in the Mg to Al welding process. A Zn–29.5Al–0.5Ti alloy is added as filler metal in gas tungsten arc welding of Mg and Al alloy joint based on the analysis of Al and Mg alloy characteristics. The tensile strength, microstructure, and phase constitution of the weld seam are analyzed. The formation of brittle and hard Mg–Al intermetallic compounds is avoided because of the effects of Zn, Al, and Ti. The average tensile strength of the joint is 148 MPa. Al{sub 3}Ti is first precipitated and functions as the nucleus of heterogeneous nucleation during solidification. Moreover, the precipitated Al–MgZn{sub 2} hypoeutectic phase exhibited a feather-like structure, which enhances the property of the Mg–Al dissimilar joint. - Highlights: • Mg alloy AZ31B and Al alloy 6061 are butt welded by fusion welding. • The effect of Ti in filler metal is investigated. • The formation of Mg–Al intermetallic compounds is avoided.

  10. WELDING METHOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell, A.A.; Dunbar, J.V.; Ruffner, J.H.

    1959-09-29

    A semi-automatic method is described for the weld joining of pipes and fittings which utilizes the inert gasshielded consumable electrode electric arc welding technique, comprising laying down the root pass at a first peripheral velocity and thereafter laying down the filler passes over the root pass necessary to complete the weld by revolving the pipes and fittings at a second peripheral velocity different from the first peripheral velocity, maintaining the welding head in a fixed position as to the specific direction of revolution, while the longitudinal axis of the welding head is disposed angularly in the direction of revolution at amounts between twenty minutas and about four degrees from the first position.

  11. An in vivo model to assess magnesium alloys and their biological effect on human bone marrow stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizawa, Sayuri; Chaya, Amy; Verdelis, Kostas; Bilodeau, Elizabeth A; Sfeir, Charles

    2015-12-01

    Magnesium (Mg) alloys have many unique qualities which make them ideal candidates for bone fixation devices, including biocompatibility and degradation in vivo. Despite a rise in Mg alloy production and research, there remains no standardized system to assess their degradation or biological effect on human stem cells in vivo. In this study, we developed a novel in vivo model to assess Mg alloys for craniofacial and orthopedic applications. Our model consists of a collagen sponge seeded with human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) around a central Mg alloy rod. These scaffolds were implanted subcutaneously in mice and analyzed after eight weeks. Alloy degradation and biological effect were determined by microcomputed tomography (microCT), histological staining, and immunohistochemistry (IHC). MicroCT showed greater volume loss for pure Mg compared to AZ31 after eight weeks in vivo. Histological analysis showed that hBMSCs were retained around the Mg implants after 8 weeks. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry showed the expression of dentin matrix protein 1 and osteopontin around both pure Mg and AZ31 with implanted hBMSCs. In addition, histological sections showed a thin mineral layer around all degrading alloys at the alloy-tissue interface. In conclusion, our data show that degrading pure Mg and AZ31 implants are cytocompatible and do not inhibit the osteogenic property of hBMSCs in vivo. These results demonstrate that this model can be used to efficiently assess the biological effect of corroding Mg alloys in vivo. Importantly, this model may be modified to accommodate additional cell types and clinical applications. Magnesium (Mg) alloys have been investigated as ideal candidates for bone fixation devices due to high biocompatibility and degradation in vivo, and there is a growing need of establishing an efficient in vivo material screening system. In this study, we assessed degradation rate and biological effect of Mg alloys by transplanting Mg alloy rod with

  12. MAGNESIUM IN CLINICAL PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. L. Trisvetova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium is a macronutrient that is needed for normal body functions. Magnesium deficiency resulting from the influence of exogenous and endogenous factors, is diagnosed by clinical manifestations, resembling the known disease. Magnesium deficiency corrected with the magnesium therapy. Studies show the effectiveness of magnesium orotate for many cardiovascular diseases.

  13. MAGNESIUM IN CLINICAL PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. L. Trisvetova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium is a macronutrient that is needed for normal body functions. Magnesium deficiency resulting from the influence of exogenous and endogenous factors, is diagnosed by clinical manifestations, resembling the known disease. Magnesium deficiency corrected with the magnesium therapy. Studies show the effectiveness of magnesium orotate for many cardiovascular diseases.

  14. MAGNESIUM IN CLINICAL PRACTICE

    OpenAIRE

    E. L. Trisvetova

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium is a macronutrient that is needed for normal body functions. Magnesium deficiency resulting from the influence of exogenous and endogenous factors, is diagnosed by clinical manifestations, resembling the known disease. Magnesium deficiency corrected with the magnesium therapy. Studies show the effectiveness of magnesium orotate for many cardiovascular diseases.

  15. The Role of Mechanical Connection during Friction Stir Keyholeless Spot Welding Joints of Dissimilar Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Liu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Contrast experiments of lap joints among dissimilar AZ31B Mg alloy, Mg99.50, zinc-coated DP600 sheet, and non-zinc-coated DP600 sheet were made by friction stir keyholeless spot welding (FSKSW and vacuum diffusion welding (VDW, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM and energy disperse spectroscopy (EDS were used to investigate the microstructures and components of the joints welded. The experimental results show that the FSKSW bonding method is a kind of compound mode that contains a mechanical connection and element diffusion fusion connection, in which mechanical connection has the main decisive function on joints of Mg/steel. Elements diffusion exists in the interfacial region of the joints and the elements diffusion extent is basically the same to that of VDW. The elements’ diffusion in Mg/steel using FSKSW is defined in the reaction between small amounts elements of the base metal and zinc-coated metals. The intermetallic compounds and composite oxide perform some reinforcement on the mechanical connection strength.

  16. Syllabus in Trade Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development.

    The syllabus outlines material for a course two academic years in length (minimum two and one-half hours daily experience) leading to entry-level occupational ability in several welding trade areas. Fourteen units covering are welding, gas welding, oxyacetylene welding, cutting, nonfusion processes, inert gas shielded-arc welding, welding cast…

  17. Finite element analyses for design evaluation of biodegradable magnesium alloy stents in arterial vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Wei [Laboratory of Biological Structure Mechanics, Structural Engineering Department, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milan (Italy); Gastaldi, Dario, E-mail: dario.gastaldi@polimi.it [Laboratory of Biological Structure Mechanics, Structural Engineering Department, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milan (Italy); Yang Ke; Tan Lili [Division of Specialized Materials and Devices, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang (China); Petrini, Lorenza; Migliavacca, Francesco [Laboratory of Biological Structure Mechanics, Structural Engineering Department, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milan (Italy)

    2011-12-15

    Biodegradable magnesium alloy stents (MAS) can provide a great benefit for diseased vessels and avoid the long-term incompatible interactions between vessels and permanent stent platforms. However, the existing MAS showed insufficient scaffolding to the target vessels due to short degradation time. In this study, a three dimensional finite element model combined with a degradable material model of AZ31 (Al 0.03, Zn 0.01, Mn 0.002 and Mg balance, mass percentage) was applied to three different MAS designs including an already implanted stent (Stent A), an optimized design (Stent B) and a patented stent design (Stent C). One ring of each design was implanted through a simulation in a vessel model then degraded with the changing interaction between outer stent surface and the vessel. Results showed that a proper stent design (Stent B) can lead to an increase of nearly 120% in half normalized recoil time of the vessel compared to the Stent A; moreover, the expectation that the MAS design, with more mass and optimized mechanical properties, can increase scaffolding time was verified numerically. The Stent C has more materials than Stent B; however, it only increased the half normalized recoil time of the vessel by nearly 50% compared to the Stent A because of much higher stress concentration than that of Stent B. The 3D model can provide a convenient design and testing tool for novel magnesium alloy stents.

  18. Magnesium: Nutrition and Homoeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Vormann

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The essential mineral magnesium is involved in numerous physiological processes. Recommended dietary intake is often not met and a low magnesium status increases the risk for various diseases. Magnesium status is regulated by several magnesium transport systems either in cellular or paracellular pathways. Numerous drugs either interfere with magnesium absorption in the intestines or the reabsorption from primary urine in the kidney. Low magnesium status has been identified as a significant risk factor for several diseases, including type-2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, arrhythmias, as well as general muscular and neurological problems. Therefore, an adequate magnesium supply would be of special benefit to our overall health.

  19. Influence of Zn Interlayer on Interfacial Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of TIG Lap-Welded Mg/Al Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qiong; Wang, Kehong

    2016-03-01

    This study explored 6061 Al alloy and AZ31B Mg alloy joined by TIG lap welding with Zn foils of varying thicknesses, with the additional Zn element being imported into the fusion zone to alloy the weld seam. The microstructures and chemical composition in the fusion zone near the Mg substrate were examined by SEM and EDS, and tensile shear strength tests were conducted to investigate the mechanical properties of the Al/Mg joints, as well as the fracture surfaces, and phase compositions. The results revealed that the introduction of an appropriate amount of Zn transition layer improves the microstructure of Mg/Al joints and effectively reduces the formation of Mg-Al intermetallic compounds (IMCs). The most common IMCs in the fusion zone near the Mg substrate were Mg-Zn and Mg-Al-Zn IMCs. The type and distribution of IMCs generated in the weld zone differed according to Zn additions; Zn interlayer thickness of 0.4 mm improved the sample's mechanical properties considerably compared to thicknesses of less than 0.4 mm; however, any further increase in Zn interlayer thickness of above 0.4 mm caused mechanical properties to deteriorate.

  20. Distortion Control during Welding

    OpenAIRE

    Akbari Pazooki, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    The local material expansion and contraction involved in welding result in permanent deformations or instability i.e., welding distortion. Considerable efforts have been made in controlling welding distortion prior to, during or after welding. Thermal Tensioning (TT) describes a group of in-situ methods to control welding distortion. In these methods local heating and/or cooling strategies are applied during welding. Additional heating and/or cooling sources can be implemented either stationa...

  1. Effects of self-assembly of 3-phosphonopropionic acid, 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane and dopamine on the corrosion behaviors and biocompatibility of a magnesium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Chang-Jiang, E-mail: swjtupcj@163.com [Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory for Interventional Medical Devices, Huaiyin Institute of Technology, Huai' an 223003 (China); Hou, Yu; Wang, Ya-Nan [Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory for Interventional Medical Devices, Huaiyin Institute of Technology, Huai' an 223003 (China); Gao, Fei [Zhejiang Zylox Medical Devices Co., Ltd., Hangzhou 310000 (China); Liu, Tao; Hou, Yan-Hua; Zhu, Yu-Fu; Ye, Wei; Wang, Ling-Ren [Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory for Interventional Medical Devices, Huaiyin Institute of Technology, Huai' an 223003 (China)

    2016-10-01

    Magnesium based alloys are attracting tremendous interests as the novel biodegradable metallic biomaterials. However, the rapid in vivo degradation and the limited surface biocompatibility restrict their clinical applications. Surface modification represents one of the important approaches to control the corrosion rate of Mg based alloys and to enhance the biocompatibility. In the present study, in order to improve the corrosion resistance and surface biocompatibility, magnesium alloy (AZ31B) was modified by the alkali heating treatment followed by the self-assembly of 3-phosphonopropionic acid, 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APTMS) and dopamine, respectively. The results of attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) indicated that the molecules were successfully immobilized on the magnesium alloy surface by the self-assembly. An excellent hydrophilic surface was obtained after the alkali heating treatment and the water contact angle increased to some degree after the self-assembly of dopamine, APTMS and 3-phosphonopropionic acid, however, the hydrophilicity of the modified samples was better than that of the pristine magnesium substrate. Due to the formation of the passivation layer after the alkali heating treatment, the corrosion resistance of the magnesium alloy was obviously improved. The corrosion rate further decreased to varying degrees after the self-assembly surface modification. The blood compatibility of the pristine magnesium was significantly improved after the surface modification. The hemolysis rate was reduced from 56% of the blank magnesium alloy to 18% of the alkali heating treated sample and the values were further reduced to about 10% of dopamine-modified sample and 7% of APTMS-modified sample. The hemolysis rate was below 5% for the 3-phosphonopropionic acid modified sample. As compared to the pristine magnesium alloy, fewer platelets were attached and activated on the

  2. WELDING PROCESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambrow, J.; Hausner, H.

    1957-09-24

    A method of joining metal parts for the preparation of relatively long, thin fuel element cores of uranium or alloys thereof for nuclear reactors is described. The process includes the steps of cleaning the surfaces to be jointed, placing the sunfaces together, and providing between and in contact with them, a layer of a compound in finely divided form that is decomposable to metal by heat. The fuel element members are then heated at the contact zone and maintained under pressure during the heating to decompose the compound to metal and sinter the members and reduced metal together producing a weld. The preferred class of decomposable compounds are the metal hydrides such as uranium hydride, which release hydrogen thus providing a reducing atmosphere in the vicinity of the welding operation.

  3. Welding processes handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Weman, Klas

    2011-01-01

    Offers an introduction to the range of available welding technologies. This title includes chapters on individual techniques that cover principles, equipment, consumables and key quality issues. It includes material on such topics as the basics of electricity in welding, arc physics, and distortion, and the weldability of particular metals.$bThe first edition of Welding processes handbook established itself as a standard introduction and guide to the main welding technologies and their applications. This new edition has been substantially revised and extended to reflect the latest developments. After an initial introduction, the book first reviews gas welding before discussing the fundamentals of arc welding, including arc physics and power sources. It then discusses the range of arc welding techniques including TIG, plasma, MIG/MAG, MMA and submerged arc welding. Further chapters cover a range of other important welding technologies such as resistance and laser welding, as well as the use of welding techniqu...

  4. Choline Magnesium Trisalicylate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choline magnesium trisalicylate is used to relieve the pain, tenderness, inflammation (swelling), and stiffness caused by arthritis and painful ... used to relieve pain and lower fever. Choline magnesium trisalicylate is in a class of nonsteroidal anti- ...

  5. Low magnesium level

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... low magnesium may develop. Common causes of low magnesium include: Alcohol use Burns that affect a large area of the body Chronic diarrhea Excessive urination (polyuria), such as in uncontrolled diabetes and during recovery from acute kidney failure High ...

  6. Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process invented in 1991 at The Welding Institute in the United Kingdom. A weld is made in the FSW process by translating a rotating pin along a weld seam so as to stir the sides of the seam together. FSW avoids deleterious effects inherent in melting and promises to be an important welding process for any industries where welds of optimal quality are demanded. This article provides an introduction to the FSW process. The chief concern is the physical effect of the tool on the weld metal: how weld seam bonding takes place, what kind of weld structure is generated, potential problems, possible defects for example, and implications for process parameters and tool design. Weld properties are determined by structure, and the structure of friction stir welds is determined by the weld metal flow field in the vicinity of the weld tool. Metal flow in the vicinity of the weld tool is explained through a simple kinematic flow model that decomposes the flow field into three basic component flows: a uniform translation, a rotating solid cylinder, and a ring vortex encircling the tool. The flow components, superposed to construct the flow model, can be related to particular aspects of weld process parameters and tool design; they provide a bridge to an understanding of a complex-at-first-glance weld structure. Torques and forces are also discussed. Some simple mathematical models of structural aspects, torques, and forces are included.

  7. Measurement of the composition change in Al5754 alloy during long pulsed Nd : YAG laser welding based on LIBS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jandaghi, M; Parvin, P [Physics Department, Amir Kabir University of Technology, PO Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Torkamany, M J; Sabbaghzadeh, J, E-mail: Parvin@aut.ac.i [Iranian National Centre for Laser Science and Technology (INLC), PO Box 14665-576, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-10-21

    Weld metal composition change in aluminium alloy 5754 in keyhole mode welding, using a long pulsed Nd : YAG laser, was investigated theoretically and supported with experimental measurements. A comprehensive model for the calculation of vaporization rates was developed based on the kinetic theory of gases and the thermodynamic laws. During the laser welding process, the significant variables were pulse duration and power density. It was predicted in the model and concurred experimentally that the concentration of magnesium in the weld metal decreases with an increase in the laser pulse duration, while the aluminium concentration increases. Moreover, the concentrations of aluminium and magnesium elements in the weld metal were determined by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for different welding conditions.

  8. Magnesium and Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Scott M.; Zwart, Sara R.

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium is an essential nutrient for muscle, cardiovascular, and bone health on Earth, and during space flight. We sought to evaluate magnesium status in 43 astronauts (34 male, 9 female; 47 ± 5 years old, mean ± SD) before, during, and after 4–6-month space missions. We also studied individuals participating in a ground analog of space flight (head-down-tilt bed rest; n = 27 (17 male, 10 female), 35 ± 7 years old). We evaluated serum concentration and 24-h urinary excretion of magnesium, along with estimates of tissue magnesium status from sublingual cells. Serum magnesium increased late in flight, while urinary magnesium excretion was higher over the course of 180-day space missions. Urinary magnesium increased during flight but decreased significantly at landing. Neither serum nor urinary magnesium changed during bed rest. For flight and bed rest, significant correlations existed between the area under the curve of serum and urinary magnesium and the change in total body bone mineral content. Tissue magnesium concentration was unchanged after flight and bed rest. Increased excretion of magnesium is likely partially from bone and partially from diet, but importantly, it does not come at the expense of muscle tissue stores. While further study is needed to better understand the implications of these findings for longer space exploration missions, magnesium homeostasis and tissue status seem well maintained during 4–6-month space missions. PMID:26670248

  9. Magnesium and Space Flight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott M. Smith

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium is an essential nutrient for muscle, cardiovascular, and bone health on Earth, and during space flight. We sought to evaluate magnesium status in 43 astronauts (34 male, 9 female; 47 ± 5 years old, mean ± SD before, during, and after 4–6-month space missions. We also studied individuals participating in a ground analog of space flight (head-down-tilt bed rest; n = 27 (17 male, 10 female, 35 ± 7 years old. We evaluated serum concentration and 24-h urinary excretion of magnesium, along with estimates of tissue magnesium status from sublingual cells. Serum magnesium increased late in flight, while urinary magnesium excretion was higher over the course of 180-day space missions. Urinary magnesium increased during flight but decreased significantly at landing. Neither serum nor urinary magnesium changed during bed rest. For flight and bed rest, significant correlations existed between the area under the curve of serum and urinary magnesium and the change in total body bone mineral content. Tissue magnesium concentration was unchanged after flight and bed rest. Increased excretion of magnesium is likely partially from bone and partially from diet, but importantly, it does not come at the expense of muscle tissue stores. While further study is needed to better understand the implications of these findings for longer space exploration missions, magnesium homeostasis and tissue status seem well maintained during 4–6-month space missions.

  10. Magnesium in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Magnesium is an essential mineral for human nutrition. Function Magnesium is needed for more than 300 biochemical reactions ... It helps to maintain normal nerve and muscle function, supports a healthy ... the role of magnesium in preventing and managing disorders such as high ...

  11. Introduction to Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortney, Clarence; Gregory, Mike

    This curriculum guide provides six units of instruction on basic welding. Addressed in the individual units of instruction are the following topics: employment opportunities for welders, welding safety and first aid, welding tools and equipment, basic metals and metallurgy, basic math and measuring, and procedures for applying for a welding job.…

  12. Distortion Control during Welding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akbari Pazooki, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    The local material expansion and contraction involved in welding result in permanent deformations or instability i.e., welding distortion. Considerable efforts have been made in controlling welding distortion prior to, during or after welding. Thermal Tensioning (TT) describes a group of in-situ

  13. Optimized polymer coating for magnesium alloy-based bioresorbable scaffolds for long-lasting drug release and corrosion resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Yagoshi, Kai; Koga, Yuki; Sasaki, Makoto; Niidome, Takuro

    2018-03-01

    Magnesium (Mg) alloy-based bioresorbable scaffolds (BRSs) are attracting interest as next-generation stents. However, because medical Mg alloy materials degrade relatively quickly in physiological media, surface corrosion protection via biodegradable polymer coatings is important for clinical applications. Herein, the influence of biodegradable polymer coatings on the BRS corrosion was investigated. First, elution of the drug sirolimus (SRL) from various biodegradable polymers was estimated, including poly(d,l-lactic acid) (PDLLA), poly(d,l-lactic acid-co-ε-caprolactone) (PLCL) and poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL). Among these, the PDLLA polymer exhibited the slowest release and the best character as a drug reservoir because of its slow degradation rate and semi-glass state in a biological environment. However, the corrosion rate of the PDLLA-coated Mg alloy (AZ31)-based platform was as rapid as the non-coated platform, while critical defects, cracking and desorption were observed in the PDLLA layer. Coatings comprising PCL and PLCL exhibited a prolonged platform corrosion resistance compared with that of PDLLA. To combine the advantages of each polymer, therefore, a pre-coating of PCL or PLCL was applied to the interface between the platform and the external SRL-loaded PDLLA layer. This layering exhibited an enhanced platform corrosion resistance, and will be an important foundational procedure for the development of a coronary scaffold comprising magnesium alloys. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of Na2SiO3 solution concentration of micro-arc oxidation process on lap-shear strength of adhesive-bonded magnesium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Haitao; Zhang, Meng; Yang, Xin; Huang, Ping; Xu, Kewei

    2014-09-01

    Micro-arc oxidation films are fabricated on the surface of AZ31B magnesium alloy in the Na2SiO3 electrolyte. The mechanical performance of magnesium alloy bonding with the adhesive is examined by single lap-shear test, and the morphology and composition of the oxidation film are characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The data indicate that the increase of Na2SiO3 solution concentration results in the decrease of bonding strength of magnesium alloy joints, while the porosity has no directly relation with the variation of the lap-shear strength. The results also show that Na2SiO3 participates into the film formation and the fabricated film is mainly composed of MgO and Mg2SiO4. In particular, with the increase of Na2SiO3 solution concentration, the content of MgO decreased while that of Mg2SiO4 increased. Moreover, MgO could initiate the formation of the hydroxyl group, which potentially enhances surface wettability and hydrogen bonding with the adhesive. This rationale is strongly supported by the results of Fourier Transform infrared spectra (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and contact angle measuring.

  15. Novel biodegradable calcium phosphate/polymer composite coating with adjustable mechanical properties formed by hydrothermal process for corrosion protection of magnesium substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaabi Falahieh Asl, Sara; Nemeth, Sandor; Tan, Ming Jen

    2016-11-01

    Ceramic type coatings on metallic implants, such as calcium phosphate (Ca-P), are generally stiff and brittle, potentially leading to the early failure of the bone-implant interface. To reduce material brittleness, polyacrylic acid and carboxymethyl cellulose were used in this study to deposit two types of novel Ca-P/polymer composite coatings on AZ31 magnesium alloy using a one-step hydrothermal process. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy showed that the deposited Ca-P crystal phase and morphology could be controlled by the type and concentration of polymer used. Incorporation of polymer in the Ca-P coatings reduced the coating elastic modulus bringing it close to that of magnesium and that of human bone. Nanoindentation test results revealed significantly decreased cracking tendency with the incorporation of polymer in the Ca-P coating. Apart from mechanical improvements, the protective composite layers had also enhanced the corrosion resistance of the substrate by a factor of 1000 which is sufficient for implant application. Cell proliferation studies indicated that the composite coatings induced better cell attachment compared with the purely inorganic Ca-P coating, confirming that the obtained composite materials could be promising candidates for surface protection of magnesium for implant application with the multiple functions of corrosion protection, interfacial stress reduction, and cell attachment/cell growth promotion. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 1643-1657, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Advanced Welding Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Some of the applications of advanced welding techniques are shown in this poster presentation. Included are brief explanations of the use on the Ares I and Ares V launch vehicle and on the Space Shuttle Launch vehicle. Also included are microstructural views from four advanced welding techniques: Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) weld (fusion), self-reacting friction stir welding (SR-FSW), conventional FSW, and Tube Socket Weld (TSW) on aluminum.

  17. Magnesium Metabolism and its Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Swaminathan, R.

    2003-01-01

    Magnesium is the fourth most abundant cation in the body and plays an important physiological role in many of its functions. Magnesium balance is maintained by renal regulation of magnesium reabsorption. The exact mechanism of the renal regulation is not fully understood. Magnesium deficiency is a common problem in hospital patients, with a prevalence of about 10%. There are no readily available and easy methods to assess magnesium status. Serum magnesium and the magnesium tolerance test are ...

  18. Biodegradability and platelets adhesion assessment of magnesium-based alloys using a microfluidic system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lumei Liu

    Full Text Available Magnesium (Mg-based stents are extensively explored to alleviate atherosclerosis due to their biodegradability and relative hemocompatibility. To ensure the quality, safety and cost-efficacy of bioresorbable scaffolds and full utilization of the material tunability afforded by alloying, it is critical to access degradability and thrombosis potential of Mg-based alloys using improved in vitro models that mimic as closely as possible the in vivo microenvironment. In this study, we investigated biodegradation and initial thrombogenic behavior of Mg-based alloys at the interface between Mg alloys' surface and simulated physiological environment using a microfluidic system. The degradation properties of Mg-based alloys WE43, AZ31, ZWEK-L, and ZWEK-C were evaluated in complete culture medium and their thrombosis potentials in platelet rich plasma, respectively. The results show that 1 physiological shear stress increased the corrosion rate and decreased platelets adhesion rate as compared to static immersion; 2 secondary phases and impurities in material composition induced galvanic corrosion, resulting in higher corrosion resistance and platelet adhesion rate; 3 Mg-based alloys with higher corrosion rate showed higher platelets adhesion rate. We conclude that a microfluidic-based in vitro system allows evaluation of biodegradation behaviors and platelets responses of Mg-based alloys under specific shear stress, and degradability is related to platelets adhesion.

  19. Magnesium alloys: predicting in vivo corrosion with in vitro immersion testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Jemimah; Shadanbaz, Shaylin; Kirkland, Nicholas T; Stace, Edward; Woodfield, Tim; Staiger, Mark P; Dias, George J

    2012-05-01

    Magnesium (Mg) and its alloys have been proposed as degradable replacements to commonly used orthopedic biomaterials such as titanium alloys and stainless steel. However, the corrosion of Mg in a physiological environment remains a difficult characteristic to accurately assess with in vitro methods. The aim of this study was to identify a simple in vitro immersion test that could provide corrosion rates similar to those observed in vivo. Pure Mg and five alloys (AZ31, Mg-0.8Ca, Mg-1Zn, Mg-1Mn, Mg-1.34Ca-3Zn) were immersed in either Earle's balanced salt solution (EBSS), minimum essential medium (MEM), or MEM-containing 40 g/L bovine serum albumin (MEMp) for 7, 14, or 21 days before removal and assessment of corrosion by weight loss. This in vitro data was compared to in vivo corrosion rates of the same materials implanted in a subcutaneous environment in Lewis rats for equivalent time points. The results suggested that, for the alloys investigated, the EBSS buffered with sodium bicarbonate provides a rate of degradation comparable to those observed in vivo. In contrast, the addition of components such as (4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazineethanesulfonic acid) (HEPES), vitamins, amino acids, and albumin significantly increased corrosion rates. Based on these findings, it is proposed that with this in vitro protocol, immersion of Mg alloys in EBSS can be used as a predictor of in vivo corrosion. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Texture and microstructure development during hot deformation of ME20 magnesium alloy: Experiments and simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, X. [Institut fuer Metallkunde und Metallphysik, RWTH-Aachen University, 52056 Aachen (Germany); Al-Samman, T., E-mail: alsamman@imm.rwth-aachen.de [Institut fuer Metallkunde und Metallphysik, RWTH-Aachen University, 52056 Aachen (Germany); Mu, S.; Gottstein, G. [Institut fuer Metallkunde und Metallphysik, RWTH-Aachen University, 52056 Aachen (Germany)

    2011-10-15

    Highlights: {yields} Second phase precipitates in ME20 hindered activation of tensile twinning at 300 deg. C. {yields} New off-basal sheet texture during c-axis compression at low Z conditions. {yields} Ce amplifies the role of pyramidal -slip over prismatic slip at 0.3T{sub m}. {yields} Prismatic slip becomes equally important to deformation at 0.6T{sub m}. {yields} Accurate texture predictions using a cluster-type Taylor model with grain interaction. - Abstract: The influence of deformation conditions and starting texture on the microstructure and texture evolution during hot deformation of a commercial rare earth (RE)-containing magnesium alloy sheet ME20 was investigated and compared with a conventional Mg sheet alloy AZ31. For all the investigated conditions, the two alloys revealed obvious distinctions in the flow behavior and the development of texture and microstructure, which was primarily attributed to the different chemistry of the two alloys. The presence of precipitates in the fine microstructure of the ME20 sheet considerably increased the recrystallization temperature and suppressed tensile twinning. This gave rise to an uncommon Mg texture development during deformation. Texture simulation using an advanced cluster-type Taylor approach with consideration of grain interaction was employed to correlate the unique texture development in the ME20 alloy with the activation scenarios of different deformation modes.

  1. Magnesium in disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanner, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    Although the following text will focus on magnesium in disease, its role in healthy subjects during physical exercise when used as a supplement to enhance performance is also noteworthy. Low serum magnesium levels are associated with metabolic syndrome, Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and hypertension; consequently, some individuals benefit from magnesium supplementation: increasing magnesium consumption appears to prevent high blood pressure, and higher serum magnesium levels are associated with a lower risk of developing a metabolic syndrome. There are, however, conflicting study results regarding magnesium administration with myocardial infarction with and without reperfusion therapy. There was a long controversy as to whether or not magnesium should be given as a first-line medication. As the most recent trials have not shown any difference in outcome, intravenous magnesium cannot be recommended in patients with myocardial infarction today. However, magnesium has its indication in patients with torsade de pointes and has been given successfully to patients with digoxin-induced arrhythmia or life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. Magnesium sulphate as an intravenous infusion also has an important established therapeutic role in pregnant women with pre-eclampsia as it decreases the risk of eclamptic seizures by half compared with placebo. PMID:26069818

  2. Magnesium and Osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferda Özdemir

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis (OP is a condition of bone fragility resulting from micro-architectural deterioration and decreased bone mass. OP depends on the interaction of genetic, hormonal, environmental and nutritional factors. Chronic low intakes of vitamin D and possibly magnesium, zinc, fluoride and vitamins K, B12, B6 and folic acid may predispose to osteoporosis. Magnesium is a mineral needed by every cell of your body. It helps maintain normal muscle and nerve function, keeps heart rhythm steady, and bones strong. Mg serves as co-factors for enzymes that help build bone matrix. Magnesium deficiency occurs due to excessive loss of magnesium in urine, gastrointestinal system disorders that cause a loss of magnesium or limit magnesium absorption, or a chronic low intake of magnesium. Signs of magnesium deficiency include confusion, disorientation, loss of appetite, depression, muscle contractions and cramps, tingling, numbness, abnormal heart rhythms, coronary spasm, and seizures. Magnesium deficiency alters calcium metabolism and the hormones that regulates calcium. Several studies have suggested that magnesium supplementation may improve bone mineral density and prevent fractures.

  3. Assessment of Stress Corrosion Cracking Resistance of Activated Tungsten Inert Gas-Welded Duplex Stainless Steel Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwin, B.; Lakshminarayanan, A. K.; Vasudevan, M.; Vasantharaja, P.

    2017-11-01

    The stress corrosion cracking behavior of duplex stainless steel (DSS) weld joint largely depends on the ferrite-austenite phase microstructure balance. This phase balance is decided by the welding process used, heat input, welding conditions and the weld metal chemistry. In this investigation, the influence of activated tungsten inert gas (ATIG) and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding processes on the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance of DSS joints was evaluated and compared. Boiling magnesium chloride (45 wt.%) environment maintained at 155 °C was used. The microstructure and ferrite content of different weld zones are correlated with the outcome of sustained load, SCC test. Irrespective of the welding processes used, SCC resistance of weld joints was inferior to that of the base metal. However, ATIG weld joint exhibited superior resistance to SCC than the TIG weld joint. The crack initiation and final failure were in the weld metal for the ATIG weld joint; they were in the heat-affected zone for the TIG weld joint.

  4. Assessment of Stress Corrosion Cracking Resistance of Activated Tungsten Inert Gas-Welded Duplex Stainless Steel Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwin, B.; Lakshminarayanan, A. K.; Vasudevan, M.; Vasantharaja, P.

    2017-12-01

    The stress corrosion cracking behavior of duplex stainless steel (DSS) weld joint largely depends on the ferrite-austenite phase microstructure balance. This phase balance is decided by the welding process used, heat input, welding conditions and the weld metal chemistry. In this investigation, the influence of activated tungsten inert gas (ATIG) and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding processes on the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance of DSS joints was evaluated and compared. Boiling magnesium chloride (45 wt.%) environment maintained at 155 °C was used. The microstructure and ferrite content of different weld zones are correlated with the outcome of sustained load, SCC test. Irrespective of the welding processes used, SCC resistance of weld joints was inferior to that of the base metal. However, ATIG weld joint exhibited superior resistance to SCC than the TIG weld joint. The crack initiation and final failure were in the weld metal for the ATIG weld joint; they were in the heat-affected zone for the TIG weld joint.

  5. Magnesium in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Lynne M; Ní Fhloinn, Deirdre M; Gaydadzhieva, Gergana T; Mazurkiewicz, Ola M; Leeson, Heather; Wright, Ciara P

    2016-09-01

    Magnesium deficiency is prevalent in women of childbearing age in both developing and developed countries. The need for magnesium increases during pregnancy, and the majority of pregnant women likely do not meet this increased need. Magnesium deficiency or insufficiency during pregnancy may pose a health risk for both the mother and the newborn, with implications that may extend into adulthood of the offspring. The measurement of serum magnesium is the most widely used method for determining magnesium levels, but it has significant limitations that have both hindered the assessment of deficiency and affected the reliability of studies in pregnant women. Thus far, limited studies have suggested links between magnesium inadequacy and certain conditions in pregnancy associated with high mortality and morbidity, such as gestational diabetes, preterm labor, preeclampsia, and small for gestational age or intrauterine growth restriction. This review provides recommendations for further study and improved testing using measurement of red cell magnesium. Pregnant women should be counseled to increase their intake of magnesium-rich foods such as nuts, seeds, beans, and leafy greens and/or to supplement with magnesium at a safe level. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Life Sciences Institute. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Therapeutic uses of magnesium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrera, Mary P; Volpe, Stella Lucia; Mao, Jun James

    2009-07-15

    Magnesium is an essential mineral for optimal metabolic function. Research has shown that the mineral content of magnesium in food sources is declining, and that magnesium depletion has been detected in persons with some chronic diseases. This has led to an increased awareness of proper magnesium intake and its potential therapeutic role in a number of medical conditions. Studies have shown the effectiveness of magnesium in eclampsia and preeclampsia, arrhythmia, severe asthma, and migraine. Other areas that have shown promising results include lowering the risk of metabolic syndrome, improving glucose and insulin metabolism, relieving symptoms of dysmenorrhea, and alleviating leg cramps in women who are pregnant. The use of magnesium for constipation and dyspepsia are accepted as standard care despite limited evidence. Although it is safe in selected patients at appropriate dosages, magnesium may cause adverse effects or death at high dosages. Because magnesium is excreted renally, it should be used with caution in patients with kidney disease. Food sources of magnesium include green leafy vegetables, nuts, legumes, and whole grains.

  7. Reprocessing weld and method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Killian, M.L.; Lewis, H.E.

    1993-08-03

    A process is described for improving the fatigue resistance of a small primary structural weld at a joint between structural members of a weldment, the weld having been made with the welding energy input of E[sub 1], the process comprising: applying a reprocessing weld on at least a portion of either one or both toes of the primary structural weld, thereby covering said toe portion, the reprocessing weld containing a filler metal and having a cross-sectional area which is less than the corresponding cross-sectional area of the primary structural weld, the reprocessing weld extending onto the face of the primary structural weld at one side of the toe portion covered and onto the structural member at the other side of the toe portion covered, and the total welding energy input, E[sub 2], used in said reprocessing the primary structural weld being less than the welding energy input E[sub 1] of the primary structural weld.

  8. Handbook of Plastic Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Aminul

    The purpose of this document is to summarize the information about the laser welding of plastic. Laser welding is a matured process nevertheless laser welding of micro dimensional plastic parts is still a big challenge. This report collects the latest information about the laser welding of plastic...... materials and provides an extensive knowhow on the industrial plastic welding process. The objectives of the report include: - Provide the general knowhow of laser welding for the beginners - Summarize the state-of-the-art information on the laser welding of plastics - Find the technological limits in terms...... of design, materials and process - Find the best technology, process and machines adaptive to Sonion’s components - Provide the skills to Sonion’s Design Engineers for successful design of the of the plastic components suitable for the laser welding The ultimate goal of this report is to serve...

  9. Effect of parylene C coating on the antibiocorrosive and mechanical properties of different magnesium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surmeneva, M. A.; Vladescu, A.; Cotrut, C. M.; Tyurin, A. I.; Pirozhkova, T. S.; Shuvarin, I. A.; Elkin, B.; Oehr, C.; Surmenev, R. A.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, parylene C coating with the thickness of 2 μm was deposited on different magnesium alloy substrates (AZ31, WE43 and AZ91). The structure and phase composition of parylene C coating was analysed by Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD). In addition, extensive surface characterization was done using atomic force microscopy. The corrosion performance of polymer-coated magnesium alloys was investigated by electrochemical measurements in Hanks' balanced salts solution that simulates bodily fluids at 37 ± 0.5 °C. The depth-dependent mechanical properties including Young's modulus and nanohardness of parylene C films were investigated using nanoindentation technique. The effect of the penetration depth on the properties on nano- and microscale level have been described in detail. The percentage of elastic recovery was used to characterize the elastic properties of the polymeric coatings. The results of XRD showed (020) preferred orientation of the monoclinic unit cell of the alpha phase of parylene C. The parylene C revealed a semicrystalline structure with nanocrystalline blocks of 4.9 nm. The parylene C film shows a uniform surface morphology with a higher roughness level at micro and nanoscales compared to magnesium alloy surfaces. All of the uncoated substrates exhibited a low corrosion resistance compared to the coated samples, indicating that the corrosion resistance of the magnesium alloys could be improved by parylene C coating. The resulting average nanohardness and Young's modulus of the parylene C coatings deposited onto different substrates were in the range of 0.18-0.25 GPa and 4.19-5.14 GPa, respectively. Furthermore, a higher percentage of elastic recovery of the polymer coating indicated a higher elasticity as compared to the magnesium alloy surface. The polymer coating has revealed the ability to recover elastically. Therefore, parylene C coating can not only improve corrosion resistance, but also

  10. A layer-by-layer approach to natural polymer-derived bioactive coatings on magnesium alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunjukunju, Sangeetha; Roy, Abhijit; Ramanathan, Madhumati; Lee, Boeun; Candiello, Joe E; Kumta, Prashant N

    2013-11-01

    The development of polyelectrolyte multilayered coatings on magnesium alloy substrates that can be used for controlled delivery of growth factors and required biomolecules from the surface of these degradable implants could have a significant impact in the field of bone tissue regeneration. The current work reports on the fabrication of multilayered coatings of alginate and poly-L-lysine on alkaline- and fluoride-pretreated AZ31 substrates using a layer-by-layer (LbL) technique under physiological conditions. Furthermore, these coatings were surface functionalized by chemical cross-linking and fibronectin immobilization, and the resultant changes in surface properties have been shown to influence the cellular activity of these multilayered films. The physicochemical characteristics of these coated substrates have been investigated using attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Cytocompatibility studies using MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts show that the fluoride-pretreated, cross-linked and fibronectin-immobilized LbL-coated substrates are more bioactive and less cytotoxic than the hydroxide-pretreated, cross-linked and fibronectin-immobilized LbL-coated samples. The in vitro degradation results show that the multilayered coatings of these natural polysaccharide- and synthetic polyamino acid-based polyelectrolytes do not alter the degradation kinetics of the substrates; however, the pretreatment conditions have a significant impact on the overall coating degradation behavior. These preliminary results collectively show the potential use of LbL coatings on magnesium-based degradable scaffolds to improve their surface bioactivity. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Electrochemical behavior of magnesium alloys as biodegradable materials in Hank's solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghoneim, A.A., E-mail: Azzaghoneim@gmail.co [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Cairo University, Giza 12613 (Egypt); Fekry, A.M.; Ameer, M.A. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Cairo University, Giza 12613 (Egypt)

    2010-08-01

    The electrochemical behavior of extruded AZ31E and AZ91E alloys was investigated in Hank's solution at 37 {sup o}C. The behavior of the two alloys was studied with immersion time using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), potentiodynamic polarization and weight loss tests. It was found that the corrosion resistance of AZ31E alloy is higher than that of AZ91E. Also, the effect of adding different concentrations of a commercial drug called glucosamine sulphate (as inhibitor) to Hank's solution was studied for AZ31E alloy. The corrosion was effectively inhibited by the addition of 0.01 mM glucosamine sulphate that reacts with AZ31E alloy and forms a protective film on its surface. The results were confirmed by surface examination via scanning electron microscope.

  12. Welding Course Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genits, Joseph C.

    This guide is intended for use in helping students gain a fundamental background on the major aspects of the welding trade. The course emphasis is on mastery of the manipulative skills necessary to develop successful welding techniques and on acquisition of an understanding of the specialized tools and equipment used in welding. The first part…

  13. Instructional Guidelines. Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fordyce, H. L.; Doshier, Dale

    Using the standards of the American Welding Society and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, this welding instructional guidelines manual presents a course of study in accordance with the current practices in industry. Intended for use in welding programs now practiced within the Federal Prison System, the phases of the program are…

  14. Nutrition and magnesium absorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, E.J.

    1992-01-01

    The influence of various nutrients present in dairy products and soybean-based products on absorption of magnesium has been investigated. The studies demonstrate that soybean protein versus casein lowers apparent magnesium absorption in rats through its phytate component. However, true

  15. Magnesium in subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergh, W.M. (Walter Marcel) van den

    2004-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis was to determine the role of serum magnesium in the pathophysiology after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and to assess the effect of magnesium treatment in reducing cerebral ischemia in experimental SAH and in improving clinical outcome in patients with

  16. Magnesium for Hydrogen Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigeholm, B.; Kjøller, John; Larsen, Bent

    1980-01-01

    The reaction of hydrogen with commercially pure magnesium powder (above 99.7%) was investigated in the temperature range 250–400 °C. Hydrogen is readily sorbed above the dissociation pressure. During the initial exposure the magnesium powder sorbs hydrogen slowly below 400 °C but during the second...

  17. Extracellular Calcium and Magnesium

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. The cause of preeclampsia remains unknown and calcium and magnesium supplement are being suggested as means of prevention. The objective of this study was to assess magnesium and calcium in the plasma and cerebrospinal fluid of Nigerian women with preedamp sia and eclampsia. Setting was ...

  18. Hot workability of magnesium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwembela, Aaron Absalom

    For the alloy AZ91 (Mg-9.OAl-0.7Zn-0.13Mn) die cast specimens were subjected to torsion testing at 150, 180, 240, 300, 420 and 450°C at 0.05 0.5 and 5.0 s--1 The as-cast specimens exhibited hot shortness at 360°C and above; however in that domain, after prior thermomechanical processing (TMP) at 300°C, they showed much improved properties (which were reported along with as-cast properties at 300°C and below). For AZ31-Mn (Mg-3.2Al-1-1Zn-0.34Mn), AZ31 (Mg-2-8Al-0-88Zn-0.01Mn), AZ63 (Mg-5-5Al-2.7Zn-0.34Mn) and ZK60 (Mg-5.7Zn-0.65Zr-O-O1A]), the specimens were subjected to hot torsion testing in the range 180 to 450°C and 0.01, 0.1, and 1.0 s--1. In the temperature range below 300°C flow curves rise to a peak with failure occurring immediately thereafter. Above 300°C the flow curves exhibited a peak and a gradual decline towards steady state. The temperature and strain rate dependence of the strength is described by a sinh-Arrhenius equation with QHW between 125 and 144 kJ/mol; this indicates control by climb in comparison with creep in the range 200--400°C. The alloy strength and activation energy declined in the order AZ63, AZ31-Mn AZ91, AZ31 and ZK60, while ductility increased with decreasing strength. In working of Mg alloys from 150 to 450°C, the flow curves harden to a peak and work soften to a steady state regime above 300°C. At temperatures below 300°C, twinning is observed initially to bring grains into more suitable slip orientations. At high T a substructure develops due to basal and prismatic slip, Forming cells of augmented misorientation first near the grain boundaries and later towards the grain cores. Near the peak, new grains appear along the old boundaries (mantle) as a result of dynamic recrystallization DRX but not in the core of the initial grains. As T rises, the new grains are larger and the mantle broader, enhanced DRX results in higher ductility. At intermediate T, shear bands form through alignment of mantle zones resulting in

  19. Physics of arc welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagar, T. W.

    1982-05-01

    A discussion of the factors controlling the size and shape of the weld fusion zone is presented along with a description of current theories of heat and fluid flow phenomena in the plasma and the molten metal weld pool. Although experimental results confirm that surface tension, plasma jets, and weld pool convection all strongly influence the fusion zone shape; no comprehensive model is available from which to predict welding behavior. It is proposed that the lack of such an understanding is a major impediment to development of automated welding processes. In addition, sensors for weld torch positioning are reviewed in terms of the mechnical and electromagnetic energy spectra which have been used. New developments in this area are also needed in order to advance the technology of automated welding.

  20. Magnesium and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serefko, Anna; Szopa, Aleksandra; Poleszak, Ewa

    2016-03-01

    Magnesium is one of the most important elements in the human body and is involved in a number of biochemical processes crucial for the proper functioning of the cardiovascular, alimentary, endocrine, and osteoarticular systems. It also plays a vital modulatory role in brain biochemistry, influencing several neurotransmission pathways associated with the development of depression. Personality changes, including apathy, depression, agitation, confusion, anxiety, and delirium are observed when there is a deficiency of this element. Rodents receiving a diet deficient in magnesium displayed depressive behaviour that was reversed by antidepressant drugs. Poor nutrition, gastrointestinal and renal diseases, insulin resistance and/or type 2 diabetes, alcoholism, stress, and certain medications may lead to magnesium deficiency. Since the extracellular concentration of magnesium ions may not reflect their intracellular level, none of the current methods of evaluating magnesium status is regarded as satisfactory. The mood-improving potential of magnesium compounds have been confirmed by the results of numerous pre-clinical and clinical studies. It seems that magnesium supplementation is well-tolerated and enhances the efficacy of conventional antidepressant treatments, and as such could be a valuable addition to the standard treatments for depression, although differences in bioavailability between inorganic and organic compounds should be taken into consideration.

  1. Structure of MMCs with SiC Particles after Gas-tungsten Arc Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przełożyńska E.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The gas-tungsten arc (GTA welding behaviors of a magnesium matrix composite reinforced with SiC particles were examined in terms of microstructure characteristics and process efficiencies. This study focused on the effects of the GTAW process parameters (like welding current in the range of 100/200 A on the size of the fusion zone (FZ. The analyses revealed the strong influence of the GTA welding process on the width and depth of the fusion zone and also on the refinement of the microstructure in the fusion zone. Additionally, the results of dendrite arm size (DAS measurements were presented.

  2. Dual wire weld feed proportioner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, R. E.

    1968-01-01

    Dual feed mechanism enables proportioning of two different weld feed wires during automated TIG welding to produce a weld alloy deposit of the desired composition. The wires are fed into the weld simultaneously. The relative feed rates of the wires and the wire diameters determine the weld deposit composition.

  3. Discussion about magnesium phosphating

    OpenAIRE

    Pokorny, P.; Tej, P.; Szelag, P.

    2016-01-01

    The paper describes results from recently published research focused on production of non-conventional magnesium phosphate Mg3(PO4)2・4H2O – bobierrite, or MgHPO4・3H2O – newberyite) coating for both magnesium alloys and/or mild steel. This new kind of coating is categorized in the context of current state of phosphating technology and its potential advantages and crystal structure is discussed. At the same time, the suitable comparison techniques for magnesium phosphate coating and convention...

  4. Discussion about magnesium phosphating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Pokorny

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes results from recently published research focused on production of non-conventional magnesium phosphate Mg3(PO42・4H2O – bobierrite, or MgHPO4・3H2O – newberyite coating for both magnesium alloys and/or mild steel. This new kind of coating is categorized in the context of current state of phosphating technology and its potential advantages and crystal structure is discussed. At the same time, the suitable comparison techniques for magnesium phosphate coating and conventional zinc phosphate coating are discussed.

  5. Susceptibility testing for welding of AlMg alloys intended for extrusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Borowski

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of research was to determine the weldability, using Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG of extruded sections made of hard-deformable 5xxx series aluminum alloys with differing magnesium content, i.e. AlMg3, AlMg4,5, AlMg5, AlMg7. Welded joints were obtained as a result of a welding process consisting of several steps. Only welds characterized by very good appearance and quality were selected for tests. As a result of conducted research, TIG welding parameters were determined for sections with a thickness of 8 mm. It was observed that alloys of differing Mg content are characterized by high weldability and do not exhibit a significant reduction of the yield point. Moreover, joints exhibit uniform hardness distribution in the welded joint and heat-affected zone. Tensile strength is reduced.

  6. Life Cycle Assessment of ECO-Magnesium® Alloy Produced by Green Metallurgy EU Project Process Route

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Errico, Fabrizio; Plaza, Gerardo Garces; Giger, Franz; Kim, Shae K.

    Employing AZ31B Eco-Magnesium® (Eco-Mg) alloy in the European project Green Metallurgy (Green Metallurgy Project) process route provides the lowest carbon footprint since precursor materials. Chips produced from the machining phase can be used directly in the cold compaction step, and followed by direct extrusion to produce fully densified semifinished bars. These materials are of great interest in certain manufacturing sectors as they can impact future market scenarios based on the high rate of recycled material. Specifically, there are two key-points which can be considered sources of improvement: a) Eco-Mg alloys contribute to drastically reduce of the Global Warming Potential (GWP) of the entire process route as recycled chips have been used as feedstock material; b) Eco-Mg are less expensive materials, and therefore of interest to the automobile sectors for cost-driven lightweight components. Using 30% in-situ recycled chips material allows manufacturers to keep the total GWP of semifinished bar produced by the tested process route to about 76.2 kgC02eq per kg of bar.

  7. Crystallographic Analysis of Fatigue Crack Initiation Behavior in Coarse-Grained Magnesium Alloy Under Tension-Tension Loading Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamada, Kazuhiro; Kakiuchi, Toshifumi; Uematsu, Yoshihiko

    2017-07-01

    Plane bending fatigue tests are conducted to investigate fatigue crack initiation mechanisms in coarse-grained magnesium alloy, AZ31, under the stress ratios R = -1 and 0.1. The initial crystallographic structures are analyzed by an electron backscatter diffraction method. The slip or twin operation during fatigue tests is identified from the line angle analyses based on Euler angles of the grains. Under the stress ratio R = -1, relatively thick tension twin bands are formed in coarse grains. Subsequently, compression twin or secondary pyramidal slip operates within the tension twin band, resulting in the fatigue crack initiation. On the other hand, under R = 0.1 with tension-tension loading cycles, twin bands are formed on the specimen surface, but the angles of those bands do not correspond to tension twins. Misorientation analyses of c-axes in the matrix grain and twin band reveal that double twins are activated. Under R = 0.1, fatigue crack initiates along the double twin boundaries. The different manners of fatigue crack initiation at R = -1 and 0.1 are related to the asymmetricity of twining under tension and compression loadings. The fatigue strengths under different stress ratios cannot be estimated by the modified Goodman diagram due to the effect of stress ratio on crack initiation mechanisms.

  8. Welding arc plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Bruce L.

    1990-01-01

    The problems of weld quality control and weld process dependability continue to be relevant issues in modern metal welding technology. These become especially important for NASA missions which may require the assembly or repair of larger orbiting platforms using automatic welding techniques. To extend present welding technologies for such applications, NASA/MSFC's Materials and Processes Lab is developing physical models of the arc welding process with the goal of providing both a basis for improved design of weld control systems, and a better understanding of how arc welding variables influence final weld properties. The physics of the plasma arc discharge is reasonably well established in terms of transport processes occurring in the arc column itself, although recourse to sophisticated numerical treatments is normally required to obtain quantitative results. Unfortunately the rigor of these numerical computations often obscures the physics of the underlying model due to its inherent complexity. In contrast, this work has focused on a relatively simple physical model of the arc discharge to describe the gross features observed in welding arcs. Emphasis was placed of deriving analytic expressions for the voltage along the arc axis as a function of known or measurable arc parameters. The model retains the essential physics for a straight polarity, diffusion dominated free burning arc in argon, with major simplifications of collisionless sheaths and simple energy balances at the electrodes.

  9. Magnesium, calcium and cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Anghileri, Leopoldo J

    2009-01-01

    Magnesium ion (Mg(2+)) and calcium ion (Ca(2+)) control a diverse and important range of cellular processes, such as gene transcription, cell proliferation, neoplastic transformation, immune response and therapeutic treatment...

  10. Welding skate with computerized controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, W. A., Jr.

    1968-01-01

    New welding skate concept for automatic TIG welding of contoured or double-contoured parts combines lightweight welding apparatus with electrical circuitry which computes the desired torch angle and positions a torch and cold-wire guide angle manipulator.

  11. Computerized adaptive control weld skate with CCTV weld guidance project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, W. A.

    1976-01-01

    This report summarizes progress of the automatic computerized weld skate development portion of the Computerized Weld Skate with Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) Arc Guidance Project. The main goal of the project is to develop an automatic welding skate demonstration model equipped with CCTV weld guidance. The three main goals of the overall project are to: (1) develop a demonstration model computerized weld skate system, (2) develop a demonstration model automatic CCTV guidance system, and (3) integrate the two systems into a demonstration model of computerized weld skate with CCTV weld guidance for welding contoured parts.

  12. Analysis of Bubble Flow in the Deep-Penetration Molten Pool of Vacuum Electron Beam Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yi; Wan, Rui; Zhu, Yang; Xie, Xiaojian

    2015-03-01

    Based on the vacuum electron beam welding with deep-penetration process, the convection phenomenon of the bubble flow in partially penetrated and fully penetrated molten pool of AZ91D magnesium alloy was simulated under the unsteady-state conditions. At the same time, the distributions of the cavity-type defects in deep-penetration weld were studied. The results showed that the cavity-type defects are more prone to distribute at the bottom of the weld and accumulate along the axis of the weld for the partially penetrated weld seam; there is a high incidence of cavity-type defects in the middle of the weld for the fully penetrated weld seam. As a smooth escape channel for the gas phase is formed in the fully penetrated molten pool, the possibility of gas escaping is much higher than that in the partially penetrated molten pool. A high liquid convection velocity is more conducive to the escape of the gas in molten pool. The liquid convection velocity in the fully penetrated molten pool is higher than that in the partially penetrated molten pool. So, the final gas fraction in the fully penetrated molten pool is low. Therefore, the appearance of cavity-type defects in the fully penetrated weld seam is less than that in the partially penetrated weld seam.

  13. Magnesium and cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shechter, Michael

    2010-06-01

    Hypomagnesemia is common in hospitalized patients, especially in the elderly with coronary artery disease (CAD) and/or those with chronic heart failure. Hypomagnesemia is associated with an increased incidence of diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, mortality rate from CAD and all causes. Magnesium supplementation improves myocardial metabolism, inhibits calcium accumulation and myocardial cell death; it improves vascular tone, peripheral vascular resistance, afterload and cardiac output, reduces cardiac arrhythmias and improves lipid metabolism. Magnesium also reduces vulnerability to oxygen-derived free radicals, improves human endothelial function and inhibits platelet function, including platelet aggregation and adhesion, which potentially gives magnesium physiologic and natural effects similar to adenosine-diphosphate inhibitors such as clopidogrel. The data regarding its use in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is conflicting. Although some previous, relatively small randomized clinical trials demonstrated a remarkable reduction in mortality when administered to relatively high risk AMI patients, two recently published large-scale randomized clinical trials (the Fourth International Study of Infarct Survival and Magnesium in Coronaries) failed to show any advantage of intravenous magnesium over placebo. Nevertheless, there are theoretical potential benefits of magnesium supplementation as a cardioprotective agent in CAD patients, as well as promising results from previous work in animal and humans. These studies are cost effective, easy to handle and are relatively free of adverse effects, which gives magnesium a role in treating CAD patients, especially high-risk groups such as CAD patients with heart failure, the elderly and hospitalized patients with hypomagnesemia. Furthermore, magnesium therapy is indicated in life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias such as Torsades de Pointes and intractable ventricular tachycardia.

  14. [Magnesium and bronchopulmonary dysplasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridman, Elena; Linder, Nehama

    2013-03-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is a chronic lung disease that occurs in premature infants who have needed mechanical ventilation and oxygen therapy. BPD is defined as the presence of persistent respiratory symptoms, the need for supplemental oxygen to treat hypoxemia, and an abnormal chest radiograph at 36 weeks gestational age. Proinflammatory cytokines and altered angiogenic gene signaling impair prenatal and postnatal lung growth, resulting in BPD. Postnatal hyperoxia exposure further increases the production of cytotoxic free radicals, which cause lung injury and increase the levels of proinflammatory cytokines. Magnesium is the fourth most abundant metal in the body. It is commonly used for the treatment of preeclamsia, as well as for premature labor alleviation. Magnesium's role in BPD development is not clear. A significant association between high magnesium levels at birth and respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), pulmonary interstitial emphysema in the extremely low birth weight, respiratory failure, and later development BPD was found. Conversely, low magnesium intake is associated with lower lung functions, and hypomagnesemia was found in 16% of patients with acute pulmonary diseases. Magnesium is used for the treatment of asthmatic attacks. Magnesium deficiency in pregnant women is frequently seen due to low intake. Hypomagnesemia was also found among preterm neonates and respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). Experimental hypomagnesemia evokes an inflammatory response, and oxidative damage of tissues. These were accompanied by changes in gene expression mostly involved in regulation of cell cycle, apoptosis and remodeling, processes associated with BPD. It is rational to believe that hypomagnesemia can contribute to BPD pathogenesis.

  15. Modern Methods of Rail Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyrev, Nikolay A.; Kozyreva, Olga A.; Usoltsev, Aleksander A.; Kryukov, Roman E.; Shevchenko, Roman A.

    2017-10-01

    Existing methods of rail welding, which are enable to get continuous welded rail track, are observed in this article. Analysis of existing welding methods allows considering an issue of continuous rail track in detail. Metallurgical and welding technologies of rail welding and also process technologies reducing aftereffects of temperature exposure are important factors determining the quality and reliability of the continuous rail track. Analysis of the existing methods of rail welding enable to find the research line for solving this problem.

  16. Electrodeposition of magnesium and magnesium/aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, A.

    1988-01-21

    Electrolytes and plating solutions for use in processes for electroplating and electroforming pure magnesium and alloys of aluminum and magnesium and also electrodeposition processes. An electrolyte of this invention is comprised of an alkali metal fluoride or a quaternary ammonium halide, dimethyl magnesium and/or diethyl magnesium, and triethyl aluminum and/or triisobutyl aluminum. An electrolyte may be dissolved in an aromatic hydrocarbon solvent to form a plating solution. The proportions of the component compounds in the electrolyte are varied to produce essentially pure magnesium or magnesium/aluminum alloys having varying selected compositions.

  17. Challenges to Resistance Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Quanfeng

    This report originates from the compulsory defense during my Ph.D. study at the Technical University of Denmark. Resistance welding is an old and well-proven technology. Yet the emergence of more and more new materials, new designs, invention off new joining techniques, and more stringent...... requirement in quality have imposed challenges to the resistance welding. More some research and development have to be done to adapt the old technology to the manufacturing industry of the 21st century. In the 1st part of the report, the challenging factors to the resistance welding are reviewed. Numerical...... simulation of resistance welding has been under development for many years. Yet it is no easy to make simulation results reliable and accurate because of the complexity of resistance welding process. In the 2nd part of the report numerical modeling of resistance welding is reviewed, some critical factors...

  18. Ultrasonic Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabors, Sammy

    2015-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Ultrasonic Stir Welding (USW) to join large pieces of very high-strength metals such as titanium and Inconel. USW, a solid-state weld process, improves current thermal stir welding processes by adding high-power ultrasonic (HPU) energy at 20 kHz frequency. The addition of ultrasonic energy significantly reduces axial, frictional, and shear forces; increases travel rates; and reduces wear on the stir rod, which results in extended stir rod life. The USW process decouples the heating, stirring, and forging elements found in the friction stir welding process allowing for independent control of each process element and, ultimately, greater process control and repeatability. Because of the independent control of USW process elements, closed-loop temperature control can be integrated into the system so that a constant weld nugget temperature can be maintained during welding.

  19. Dual wire welding torch and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez, Fernando Martinez; Stump, Kevin S.; Ludewig, Howard W.; Kilty, Alan L.; Robinson, Matthew M.; Egland, Keith M.

    2009-04-28

    A welding torch includes a nozzle with a first welding wire guide configured to orient a first welding wire in a first welding wire orientation, and a second welding wire guide configured to orient a second welding wire in a second welding wire orientation that is non-coplanar and divergent with respect to the first welding wire orientation. A method of welding includes moving a welding torch with respect to a workpiece joint to be welded. During moving the welding torch, a first welding wire is fed through a first welding wire guide defining a first welding wire orientation and a second welding wire is fed through a second welding wire guide defining a second welding wire orientation that is divergent and non-coplanar with respect to the first welding wire orientation.

  20. Studies of welded joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Krupa

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Studies of a welded joint were described. The joint was made as a result of the reconstruction of a truss and one of the possible means to make a repair. The studies were of a simulation character and were targeted at the detection of welding defects and imperfections thatshould be eliminated in a real structure. A model was designed and on this model the tests and examinations were carried out. The modelwas made under the same conditions as the conditions adopted for repair. It corresponded to the real object in shape and dimensions, and in the proposed technique of welding and welding parameters. The model was composed of five plates joined together with twelve beads.The destructive and non-destructive tests were carried out; the whole structure and the respective welds were also examined visually. Thedefects and imperfections in welds were detected by surface methods of inspection, penetration tests and magnetic particle flaw detection.The model of the welded joint was prepared by destructive methods, a technique that would never be permitted in the case of a realstructure. For the investigations it was necessary to cut out the specimens from the welded joint in direction transverse to the weld run. The specimens were subjected to metallographic examinations and hardness measurements. Additionally, the joint cross-section was examined by destructive testing methods to enable precise determination of the internal defects and imperfections. The surface methods were applied again, this time to determine the severity of welding defects. The analysis has proved that, fabricated under proper conditions and with parameters of the welding process duly observed, the welded joint has good properties and repairs of this type are possible in practice.

  1. Robot welding process control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romine, Peter L.

    1991-01-01

    This final report documents the development and installation of software and hardware for Robotic Welding Process Control. Primary emphasis is on serial communications between the CYRO 750 robotic welder, Heurikon minicomputer running Hunter & Ready VRTX, and an IBM PC/AT, for offline programming and control and closed-loop welding control. The requirements for completion of the implementation of the Rocketdyne weld tracking control are discussed. The procedure for downloading programs from the Intergraph, over the network, is discussed. Conclusions are made on the results of this task, and recommendations are made for efficient implementation of communications, weld process control development, and advanced process control procedures using the Heurikon.

  2. Explosive Welding of Pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drennov, Oleg; Drennov, Andrey; Burtseva, Olga

    2013-06-01

    For connection by welding it is suggested to use the explosive welding method. This method is rather new. Nevertheless, it has become commonly used among the technological developments. This method can be advantageous (saving material and physical resources) comparing to its statical analogs (electron-beam welding, argon-arc welding, plasma welding, gas welding, etc.), in particular, in hard-to-reach areas due to their geographic and climatic conditions. Explosive welding of cylindrical surfaces is performed by launching of welded layer along longitudinal axis of construction. During this procedure, it is required to provide reliable resistance against radial convergent strains. The traditional method is application of fillers of pipe cavity, which are dense cylindrical objects having special designs. However, when connecting pipes consecutively in pipelines by explosive welding, removal of the fillers becomes difficult and sometimes impossible. The suggestion is to use water as filler. The principle of non-compressibility of liquid under quasi-dynamic loading is used. In one-dimensional gasdynamic and elastic-plastic calculations we determined non-deformed mass of water (perturbations, which are moving in the axial direction with sound velocity, should not reach the layer end boundaries for 5-7 circulations of shock waves in the radial direction). Linear dimension of the water layer from the zone of pipe coupling along axis in each direction is >= 2R, where R is the internal radius of pipe.

  3. Local reinforcement of magnesium components by friction processing. Determination of bonding mechanisms and assessment of joint properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinheiro, G.A. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Materialforschung

    2008-07-01

    The development of new creep-resistant and cost effective die casting magnesium alloys, such as AE, MRI, MEZ, ACM, AXJ, AJ, WE, have emerged as an alternative, to fulfil the modern demands in structurally relevant applications, such as engine blocks, gears and converter boxes. However, in most cases, magnesium components are screwed with aluminium and steel bolts, which lead the screwed joints to lose the preload force, due to relaxation. This barrier thereby limits the broad use of magnesium within this segment and should somehow find an adequate solution to help overcome this limitation. Furthermore, together with alloy development and the addition of reinforcement (MMCs), local material engineering processes have been conceived and are considered a method to improve the properties and therefore expand the number of potential applications for magnesium alloys. In this context, Friction Welding (FW) and particularly Friction Hydro Pillar Processing (FHPP), which can be described as a drill and fill process, appear to be an alternative to make the use of magnesium more widespread. For this reason, FHPP is intended to be used, to locally reinforce the mechanically fastened magnesium components. With this approach, regions submitted to the stresses imposed by tightening forces can be compensated by the use of a material with superior properties. It is not required to fabricate the whole structure from an expensive material, thus saving costs and thereby satisfying the economic pressures of an increasingly competitive global market. In the present work, a preliminary experimental matrix was defined and used to determine the optimal welding conditions for each specific material combination selected. Further, elaborate experimental techniques are used to describe the process parameters-microstructure-properties relationships and the consequent mechanisms leading to bonding in FHPP welds in similar and dissimilar configurations. The welds were performed using a hydraulic

  4. [Plasma ionized magnesium concentration following cardiopulmonary bypass].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya, Fumimasa; Fukui, Michihiko; Tsuruta, Hiroshi; Kooguchi, Kunihiko; Shimosato, Goshun

    2002-06-01

    We performed a retrospective study to analyze plasma ionized magnesium concentration following cardiopulmonary bypass. Severe decrease of ionized magnesium concentration associated with frequent abnormal ECG sign was found in a patient with magnesium-free cardioplegia. Cardioplegia containing 16 mmol.l-1 of magnesium ion maintained ionized magnesium concentration within normal ranges without postoperative magnesium loading. Use of cardioplegia containing magnesium or adequate magnesium supplement is thought to be essential for patients receiving cardiopulmonary bypass.

  5. Magnesium Borohydride: From Hydrogen Storage to Magnesium Battery**

    OpenAIRE

    Mohtadi, Rana; Matsui, Masaki; Arthur, Timothy S.; Hwang, Son-Jong

    2012-01-01

    Beyond hydrogen storage: The first example of reversible magnesium deposition/stripping onto/from an inorganic salt was seen for a magnesium borohydride electrolyte. High coulombic efficiency of up to 94 % was achieved in dimethoxyethane solvent. This Mg(BH_4)_2 electrolyte was utilized in a rechargeable magnesium battery.

  6. 21 CFR 184.1434 - Magnesium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium phosphate. 184.1434 Section 184.1434 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1434 Magnesium phosphate. (a) Magnesium phosphate includes both magnesium phosphate, dibasic, and magnesium phosphate, tribasic. Magnesium phosphate, dibasic (MgHPO4·3H2O...

  7. Aluminum Hydroxide and Magnesium Hydroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluminum Hydroxide, Magnesium Hydroxide are antacids used together to relieve heartburn, acid indigestion, and upset stomach. They ... They combine with stomach acid and neutralize it. Aluminum Hydroxide, Magnesium Hydroxide are available without a prescription. ...

  8. INVESTIGATION OF MAGNESIUM ALLOYS MACHINABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berat Barıs BULDUM

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium is the lightest structural metal. Magnesium alloys have a hexagonal lattice structure, which affects the fundamental properties of these alloys. Plastic deformation of the hexagonal lattice is more complicated than in cubic latticed metals like aluminum, copper and steel. Magnesium alloy developments have traditionally been driven by industry requirements for lightweight materials to operate under increasingly demanding conditions. Magnesium alloys have always been attractive to designers due to their low density, only two thirds that of aluminium and its alloys [1]. The element and its alloys take a big part of modern industry needs. Especially nowadays magnesium alloys are used in automotive and mechanical (trains and wagons manufacture, because of its lightness and other features. Magnesium and magnesium alloys are the easiest of all metals to machine, allowing machining operations at extremely high speed. All standard machining operations such as turning, drilling, milling, are commonly performed on magnesium parts.

  9. Role of magnesium in hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sontia, Bruno; Touyz, Rhian M

    2007-02-01

    Magnesium affects blood pressure by modulating vascular tone and reactivity. It acts as a calcium channel antagonist, it stimulates production of vasodilator prostacyclins and nitric oxide and it alters vascular responses to vasoactive agonists. Magnesium deficiency has been implicated in the pathogenesis of hypertension with epidemiological and experimental studies demonstrating an inverse correlation between blood pressure and serum magnesium levels. Magnesium also influences glucose and insulin homeostasis, and hypomagnesemia is associated with metabolic syndrome. Although most epidemiological and experimental studies support a role for low magnesium in the pathophysiology of hypertension, data from clinical studies have been less convincing. Furthermore, the therapeutic value of magnesium in the management of hypertension is unclear. The present review addresses the role of magnesium in the regulation of vascular function and blood pressure and discusses the implications of magnesium deficiency in experimental and clinical hypertension, in metabolic syndrome and in pre-eclampsia.

  10. Measuring weld heat to evaluate weld integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schauder, V., E-mail: schauder@hks-prozesstechnik.de [HKS-Prozesstechnik GmbH, Halle (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    Eddy current and ultrasonic testing are suitable for tube and pipe mills and have been used for weld seam flaw detection for decades, but a new process, thermography, is an alternative. By measuring the heat signature of the weld seam as it cools, it provides information about weld integrity at and below the surface. The thermal processes used to join metals, such as plasma, induction, laser, and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW), have improved since they were developed, and they get better with each passing year. However, no industrial process is perfect, so companies that conduct research in flaw detection likewise continue to develop and improve the technologies used to verify weld integrity: ultrasonic testing (UT), eddy current testing (ET), hydrostatic, X-ray, magnetic particle, and liquid penetrant are among the most common. Two of these are used for verifying the integrity of the continuous welds such as those used on pipe and tube mills: UT and ET. Each uses a transmitter to send waves of ultrasonic energy or electrical current through the material and a receiver (probe) to detect disturbances in the flow. The two processes often are combined to capitalize on the strengths of each. While ET is good at detecting flaws at or near the surface, UT penetrates the material, detecting subsurface flaws. One drawback is that sound waves and electrical current waves have a specific direction of travel, or an alignment. A linear defect that runs parallel to the direction of travel of the ultrasonic sound wave or a flaw that is parallel to the coil winding direction of the ET probe can go undetected. A second drawback is that they don't detect cold welds. An alternative process, thermography, works in a different fashion: It monitors the heat of the material as the weld cools. Although it measures the heat at the surface, the heat signature provides clues about cooling activity deep in the material, resulting in a thorough assessment of the weld's integrity It

  11. Fine welding with lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLellan, D

    2008-01-01

    The need for micro joining metallic alloys for surgical instruments, implants and advanced medical devices is driving a rapid increase in the implementation of laser welding technology in research, development and volume production. This article discusses the advantages of this welding method and the types of lasers used in the process.

  12. Laser Welding in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Gary L.; Kaukler, William F.

    1989-01-01

    Solidification type welding process experiments in conditions of microgravity were performed. The role of convection in such phenomena was examined and convective effects in the small volumes obtained in the laser weld zone were observed. Heat transfer within the weld was affected by acceleration level as indicated by the resulting microstructure changes in low gravity. All experiments were performed such that both high and low gravity welds occurred along the same weld beam, allowing the effects of gravity alone to be examined. Results indicate that laser welding in a space environment is feasible and can be safely performed IVA or EVA. Development of the hardware to perform the experiment in a Hitchhiker-g platform is recomended as the next step. This experiment provides NASA with a capable technology for welding needs in space. The resources required to perform this experiment aboard a Shuttle Hitchhiker-pallet are assessed. Over the four year period 1991 to 1994, it is recommended that the task will require 13.6 manyears and $914,900. In addition to demonstrating the technology and ferreting out the problems encountered, it is suggested that NASA will also have a useful laser materials processing facility for working with both the scientific and the engineering aspects of materials processing in space. Several concepts are also included for long-term optimization of available solar power through solar pumping solid state lasers directly for welding power.

  13. DC arc weld starter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campiotti, Richard H.; Hopwood, James E.

    1990-01-01

    A system for starting an arc for welding uses three DC power supplies, a high voltage supply for initiating the arc, an intermediate voltage supply for sustaining the arc, and a low voltage welding supply directly connected across the gap after the high voltage supply is disconnected.

  14. INVESTIGATION OF MAGNESIUM ALLOYS MACHINABILITY

    OpenAIRE

    Berat Barıs BULDUM; Aydın SIK; Iskender OZKUL

    2013-01-01

    Magnesium is the lightest structural metal. Magnesium alloys have a hexagonal lattice structure, which affects the fundamental properties of these alloys. Plastic deformation of the hexagonal lattice is more complicated than in cubic latticed metals like aluminum, copper and steel. Magnesium alloy developments have traditionally been driven by industry requirements for lightweight materials to operate under increasingly demanding conditions. Magnesium alloys have always been attra...

  15. DEALLOYING, MICROSTRUCTURE AND THE CORROSION/PROTECTION OF CAST MAGNESIUM ALLOYS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sieradzki, Karl; Aiello, Ashlee; McCue, Ian

    2017-12-15

    The purpose of this project was to develop a greater understanding of micro-galvanic corrosion effects in cast magnesium alloys using both experimental and computational methods. Experimental accomplishments have been made in the following areas of interest: characterization, aqueous free-corrosion, atmospheric corrosion, ionic liquid dissolution, rate kinetics of oxide dissolution, and coating investigation. Commercial alloys (AZ91D, AM60, and AZ31B), binary-phase alloys (αMg-2at.%Al, αMg-5at.%Al, and Mg-8at.%Al), and component phases (Mg, Al, β-Mg, β-1%Zn, MnAl3) were obtained and characterized using energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Full immersion in aqueous chloride was used to characterize the corrosion behavior of alloys. Rotating disc electrodes (RDEs) were used to observe accelerated long-term corrosion behavior. Al surface redistribution for freely corroded samples was analyzed using SEM, EDS, and lithium underpotential deposition (Li UPD). Atmospheric corrosion was observed using contact angle evolution, overnight pH monitoring, and surface pH evolution studies. Ionic liquid corrosion characterization was performed using linear sweep voltammetry and potentiostatic dissolution in 150° choline chloride-urea (cc-urea). Two surface coatings were investigated: (1) Li-carbonate and (2) cc-urea. Li-carbonate coatings were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), SEM, and aqueous free corrosion potential monitoring. Hydrophobic cc-urea coatings were characterized using contact angle measurements and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Oxide dissolution rate kinetics were studied using inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS). Computational accomplishments have been made through the development of Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations which model time- and composition-dependent effects on the microstructure due to spatial redistribution of alloying

  16. The role of strain accommodation during the variant selection of primary twins in magnesium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonas, John J., E-mail: john.jonas@mcgill.ca [Materials Engineering, McGill University, Montreal (Canada); Mu, Sijia; Al-Samman, Talal; Gottstein, Guenter [Institut fuer Metallkunde and Metallphysik, RWTH Aachen (Germany); Jiang, Lan; Martin, Etienne [Materials Engineering, McGill University, Montreal (Canada)

    2011-03-15

    Samples of magnesium alloys AM30 and AZ31 were deformed in tension at room temperature and a strain rate of 0.1 s{sup -1} to strains of 0.08 and 0.15. Of the numerous contraction twins that formed, the orientations of 977 were determined by electron backscatter diffraction techniques. The orientations of their host grains were also measured, so that the Schmid factors (SFs) applicable to each of the six contraction twins that could potentially form in each grain could also be calculated. About half of the observed twins were of the 'high SF' (0.3-0.5) type, while nearly half had 'low' SFs (0.15-0.30). Furthermore, 5% of the observed twins had associated Schmid factors of only 0.03-0.15, i.e. these were of the 'very low SF' type. Of particular interest is the observation that many potential 'high Schmid factor' twins did not form. The presence of the low and very low SF twins and the absence of many potential high SF twins are explained in terms of the accommodation strains that are or would be required to permit their formation. These were calculated by rotating the twinning shear displacement gradient tensor into the crystallographic reference frame of the neighboring grain. It is shown that the very high plastic anisotropy of Mg grains permits the 'easy' accommodations to take place but conversely prevents accommodation of the potential twinning shears when these are 'difficult' (when these involve high critical resolved shear stresses). The twins that appear require little or no 'difficult' accommodation.

  17. A Quick Reference on Magnesium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, Shane W

    2017-03-01

    This article serves as a quick reference on the distribution, handling, and supplementation of magnesium. It also lists the manifestations and causes of magnesium deficit and provides criteria for the diagnosis of a magnesium deficit. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Magnesium - distribution and basic metabolism

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    where it is regulated by parathyroid hormone'and. 1,25(OHb-D3. Most of the remaining magnesium pool is intracellular, plasma magnesium accounting ... various cell membrane functions.2 The recommended dietary allowance of magnesium varies from 5 mg/kg/d in healthy adult males to 6 mg/kg/d in children or during ...

  19. Welding method, and welding device for use therein, and method of analysis for evaluating welds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aendenroomer, A.J.; Den Ouden, G.; Xiao, Y.H.; Brabander, W.A.J.

    1995-01-01

    Described is a method of automatically welding pipes, comprising welding with a pulsation welding current and monitoring, by means of a sensor, the variations occurring in the arc voltage caused by weld pool oscillations. The occurrence of voltage variations with only frequency components below 100

  20. Thermoplastic welding apparatus and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsen, Marc R.; Negley, Mark A.; Geren, William Preston; Miller, Robert James

    2017-03-07

    A thermoplastic welding apparatus includes a thermoplastic welding tool, at least one tooling surface in the thermoplastic welding tool, a magnetic induction coil in the thermoplastic welding tool and generally encircling the at least one tooling surface and at least one smart susceptor in the thermoplastic welding tool at the at least one tooling surface. The magnetic induction coil is adapted to generate a magnetic flux field oriented generally parallel to a plane of the at least one smart susceptor.

  1. Laser forming and welding processes

    CERN Document Server

    Yilbas, Bekir Sami; Shuja, Shahzada Zaman

    2013-01-01

    This book introduces model studies and experimental results associated with laser forming and welding such as laser induced bending, welding of sheet metals, and related practical applications. The book provides insight into the physical processes involved with laser forming and welding. The analytical study covers the formulation of laser induced bending while the model study demonstrates the simulation of bending and welding processes using the finite element method. Analytical and numerical solutions for laser forming and welding problems are provided.

  2. Magnesium oxychloride cement concrete

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    ting. It is used in industrial floorings, ship decks, railway passenger coach floorings, hospital floors, ammunition factory floors, missile silos and underground armament factories and bunkers. Recently, concrete of high compres- sive and tensile strength prepared with magnesium oxy- chloride cement and recycled rubber ...

  3. Welding processes handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Weman, Klas

    2003-01-01

    Deals with the main commercially significant and commonly used welding processes. This title takes the student or novice welder through the individual steps involved in each process in an easily understood way. It covers many of the requirements referred to in European Standards including EN719, EN 729, EN 729 and EN 287.$bWelding processes handbook is a concise, explanatory guide to the main commercially significant and commonly-used welding processes. It takes the novice welder or student through the individual steps involved in each process in a clear and easily understood way. It is intended to provide an up-to-date reference to the major applications of welding as they are used in industry. The contents have been arranged so that it can be used as a textbook for European welding courses in accordance with guidelines from the European Welding Federation. Welding processes and equipment necessary for each process are described so that they can be applied to all instruction levels required by the EWF and th...

  4. FOCUS ON MAGNESIUM BASED DRUGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. I. Esenova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium deficiency in the organism is one of the most common human deficiency states. The prevalence of magnesium deficiency is about 15%, and suboptimal magnesium level is observed more than in 30% of people in the general population. Clinical signs of hypomagnesaemia are observed in 40% of patients in general care hospitals, in 70% of patients - in intensive care units, and magnesium deficiency occurs in 90% of patients with acute coronary syndrome. Magnesium metabolic disorders in the organism accelerate significantly development of complications of coronary heart disease, hypertension, type 2 diabetes, asthma and a number of neurological and psychiatric diseases. The value of this macro in the body is well studied, and its daily need is identified depending on age and sex. It is known that magnesium intake with the food does not cover an organism need. It is a rationale for preventive and therapeutic use of magnesium based drugs in various diseases. Organic salts of magnesium are recommended for these purposes. Magnesium metabolic disorders, approaches to pharmacotherapeutic correction of magnesium deficiency, advantages of magnesium salts of orotic acid are reviewed.

  5. Magnesium homeostasis and alcohol consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romani, Andrea M P

    2008-12-01

    Clinical and experimental evidence indicates alcohol consumption as one of the major causes of magnesium loss from several tissues. As a result of this loss, serum magnesium tends to decrease while urinary magnesium excretion increases 2-3 fold. Experimental data confirm that chronic consumption of 6% ethanol in the Lieber De-Carli diet for 3 weeks results in a marked decrease in total tissue magnesium content in rats. This decrease affects brain, liver and all skeletal muscle, including heart, to a varying extent. While a full picture of the implications of magnesium loss in these tissues is still lacking, it is becoming progressively clear that magnesium loss affects energy production, protein synthesis, cell cycle, and specific functions in the various organs affected. In addition, as magnesium regulated cytokine production and secretion, especially in macrophages and leukocytes, a major role of magnesium deficiency in alcohol-induced inflammatory processes can be envisioned. Considering all these various aspects together, it becomes apparent that magnesium loss may represent a predisposing factor to the onset of alcohol-induced pathologies including brain stroke, sarcopenia, cardiomyopathy, steatohepatitis and cirrhosis. The present review will attempt to clarify some of the mechanisms by which ethanol impairs magnesium transport and homeostasis in brain, brain vasculature, skeletal muscle, heart and liver cells, as a first step towards more mechanistic studies aimed at relating magnesium loss with the incurrence of short- and long-term ethanol-induced complications in these organs.

  6. Myth or Reality?Transdermal Magnesium?

    OpenAIRE

    Gr?ber, Uwe; Werner, Tanja; Vormann, J?rgen; Kisters, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    In the following review, we evaluated the current literature and evidence-based data on transdermal magnesium application and show that the propagation of transdermal magnesium is scientifically unsupported. The importance of magnesium and the positive effects of magnesium supplementation are extensively documented in magnesium deficiency, e.g., cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus. The effectiveness of oral magnesium supplementation for the treatment of magnesium deficiency has been ...

  7. Thermal stir welding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A welding method is provided for forming a weld joint between first and second elements of a workpiece. The method includes heating the first and second elements to form an interface of material in a plasticized or melted state interface between the elements. The interface material is then allowed to cool to a plasticized state if previously in a melted state. The interface material, while in the plasticized state, is then mixed, for example, using a grinding/extruding process, to remove any dendritic-type weld microstructures introduced into the interface material during the heating process.

  8. Thermal stir welding apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A welding method and apparatus are provided for forming a weld joint between first and second elements of a workpiece. The method includes heating the first and second elements to form an interface of material in a plasticized or melted state interface between the elements. The interface material is then allowed to cool to a plasticized state if previously in a melted state. The interface material, while in the plasticized state, is then mixed, for example, using a grinding/extruding process, to remove any dendritic-type weld microstructures introduced into the interface material during the heating process.

  9. Solar array welding developement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elms, R. V., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The present work describes parallel gap welding as used for joining solar cells to the cell interconnect system. Sample preparation, weldable cell parameter evaluation, bond scheduling, bond strength evaluation, and bonding and thermal shock tests are described. A range of weld schedule parameters - voltage, time, and force - can be identified for various cell/interconnect designs that will provide adequate bond strengths and acceptably small electrical degradation. Automation of solar array welding operations to a significant degree has been achieved in Europe and will be receiving increased attention in the U.S. to reduce solar array fabrication costs.

  10. Review of Welding Terminology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelika Petrėtienė

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses welding terms in accordance with the Lithuanian standard LST EN 1792 „Welding. The multilingual list of welding terms and similar processes”, „The Russian–Lithuanian dictionary of the terms of mechanical engineering technology and welding“ and the examples from postgraduates‘ final works. It analyses the infringement of lexical, word-building and morphological rules. First-year students should already be familiar with the standardized terms of their speciality. More active propagation of the terms should help to avoid terminology mistakes in various scientific spheres.

  11. Corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of magnesium alloy modified by alkali heating treatment followed by the immobilization of poly (ethylene glycol), fibronectin and heparin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Changjiang; Hu, Youdong; Hou, Yu; Liu, Tao; Lin, Yuebin; Ye, Wei; Hou, Yanhua; Gong, Tao

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, magnesium alloys are attracting more and more attention as a kind of biodegradable metallic biomaterials, however, their uncontrollable biodegradation speed in vivo and the limited surface biocompatibility hinder their clinical applications. In the present study, with the aim of improving the corrosion resistance and biocompatibility, the magnesium alloy (AZ31B) surface was modified by alkali heating treatment followed by the self-assembly of 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APTMS). Subsequently, poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) and fibronectin or fibronectin/heparin complex were sequentially immobilized on the modified surface. The results of attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirmed that the above molecules were successfully immobilized on the magnesium alloy surface. An excellent hydrophilic surface was obtained after the alkali heating treatment while the hydrophilicity decreased to some degree after the self-assembly of APTMS, the surface hydrophilicity was gradually improved again after the immobilization of PEG, fibronectin or fibronectin/heparin complex. The corrosion resistance of the control magnesium alloy was significantly improved by the alkali heating treatment. The self-assembly of APTMS and the following immobilization of PEG further enhanced the corrosion resistance of the substrates, however, the grafting of fibronectin or fibronectin/heparin complex slightly lowered the corrosion resistance. As compared to the pristine magnesium alloy, the samples modified by the immobilization of PEG and fibronectin/heparin complex presented better blood compatibility according to the results of hemolysis assay and platelet adhesion as well as the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT). In addition, the modified substrates had better cytocompatibility to endothelial cells due to the improved anticorrosion and the introduction of fibronectin. The substrates

  12. Multispot fiber laser welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schutt Hansen, Klaus

    This dissertation presents work and results achieved in the field of multi beam fiber laser welding. The project has had a practical approach, in which simulations and modelling have been kept at a minimum. Different methods to produce spot patterns with high power single mode fiber lasers have...... been examined and evaluated. It is found that both diamond turned DOE’s in zinc sulphide and multilevel etched DOE’s (Diffractive Optical Elements) in fused silica have a good performance. Welding with multiple beams in a butt joint configuration has been tested. Results are presented, showing it has...... been possible to control the welding width in incremental steps by adding more beams in a row. The laser power was used to independently control the keyhole and consequently the depth of fusion. An example of inline repair of a laser weld in butt joint configuration was examined. Zinc powder was placed...

  13. Friction stir welding tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolle,; Charles R. , Clark; Denis E. , Barnes; Timothy, A [Ammon, ID

    2008-04-15

    A friction stir welding tool is described and which includes a shank portion; a shoulder portion which is releasably engageable with the shank portion; and a pin which is releasably engageable with the shoulder portion.

  14. Concurrent ultrasonic weld evaluation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Donald W.; Johnson, John A.; Smartt, Herschel B.

    1987-01-01

    A system for concurrent, non-destructive evaluation of partially completed welds for use in conjunction with an automated welder. The system utilizes real time, automated ultrasonic inspection of a welding operation as the welds are being made by providing a transducer which follows a short distance behind the welding head. Reflected ultrasonic signals are analyzed utilizing computer based digital pattern recognition techniques to discriminate between good and flawed welds on a pass by pass basis. The system also distinguishes between types of weld flaws.

  15. 21 CFR 184.1425 - Magnesium carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... a solution of magnesium sulfate or by carbonation of a slurry of magnesium hydroxide followed by... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium carbonate. 184.1425 Section 184.1425 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1425 Magnesium carbonate. (a) Magnesium carbonate (molecular...

  16. Magnesium for Hydrogen Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Allan Schrøder; Kjøller, John; Larsen, B.

    1983-01-01

    A study of the hydrogenation characteristics of fine magnesium powder during repeated cycling has been performed using a high-pressure microbalance facility. No effect was found from the cycling regarding kinetics and storage capacity. The reaction rate of the absorption process was fast at tempe......A study of the hydrogenation characteristics of fine magnesium powder during repeated cycling has been performed using a high-pressure microbalance facility. No effect was found from the cycling regarding kinetics and storage capacity. The reaction rate of the absorption process was fast...... at temperatures around 600 K and above, but the reversed reaction showed somewhat slower kinetics around 600 K. At higher temperatures the opposite was found. The enthalpy and entropy change by the hydrogenation, derived from pressure-concentration isotherms, agree fairly well with those reported earlier....

  17. Cellular magnesium homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romani, Andrea M P

    2011-08-01

    Magnesium, the second most abundant cellular cation after potassium, is essential to regulate numerous cellular functions and enzymes, including ion channels, metabolic cycles, and signaling pathways, as attested by more than 1000 entries in the literature. Despite significant recent progress, however, our understanding of how cells regulate Mg(2+) homeostasis and transport still remains incomplete. For example, the occurrence of major fluxes of Mg(2+) in either direction across the plasma membrane of mammalian cells following metabolic or hormonal stimuli has been extensively documented. Yet, the mechanisms ultimately responsible for magnesium extrusion across the cell membrane have not been cloned. Even less is known about the regulation in cellular organelles. The present review is aimed at providing the reader with a comprehensive and up-to-date understanding of the mechanisms enacted by eukaryotic cells to regulate cellular Mg(2+) homeostasis and how these mechanisms are altered under specific pathological conditions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Collision Welding of Dissimilar Materials by Vaporizing Foil Actuator: A Breakthrough Technology for Dissimilar Metal Joining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daehn, Glenn S. [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Vivek, Anupam [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Liu, Bert C. [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    2016-09-30

    This work demonstrated and further developed Vaporizing Foil Actuator Welding (VFAW) as a viable technique for dissimilar-metal joining for automotive lightweighting applications. VFAW is a novel impact welding technology, which uses the pressure developed from electrically-assisted rapid vaporization of a thin aluminum foil (the consumable) to launch and ultimately collide two of more pieces of metal to create a solid-state bond between them. 18 dissimilar combinations of automotive alloys from the steel, aluminum and magnesium alloy classes were screened for weldability and characterized by metallography of weld cross sections, corrosion testing, and mechanical testing. Most combinations, especially a good number of Al/Fe pairs, were welded successfully. VFAW was even able to weld combinations of very high strength materials such as 5000 and 6000 series aluminum alloys to boron and dual phase steels, which is difficult to impossible by other joining techniques such as resistance spot welding, friction stir welding, or riveting. When mechanically tested, the samples routinely failed in a base metal rather than along the weld interface, showing that the weld was stronger than either of the base metals. As for corrosion performance, a polymer-based protective coating was used to successfully combat galvanic corrosion of 5 Al/Fe pairs through a month-long exposure to warm salt fog. In addition to the technical capabilities, VFAW also consumes little energy compared to conventional welding techniques and requires relatively light, flexible tooling. Given the technical and economic advantages, VFAW can be a very competitive joining technology for automotive lightweighting. The success of this project and related activities has resulted in substantial interest not only within the research community but also various levels of automotive supply chain, which are collaborating to bring this technology to commercial use.

  19. Hazard of ultraviolet radiation emitted in gas tungsten arc welding of aluminum alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Hitoshi; Utsunomiya, Akihiro; Fujii, Nobuyuki; Okuno, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) emitted during arc welding frequently causes keratoconjunctivitis and erythema. The extent of the hazard of UVR varies depending on the welding method and conditions. Therefore, it is important to identify the levels of UVR that are present under various conditions. In this study, we experimentally evaluated the hazard of UVR emitted in gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) of aluminum alloys. The degree of hazard of UVR is measured by the effective irradiance defined in the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists guidelines. The effective irradiances measured in this study are in the range 0.10-0.91 mW/cm(2) at a distance of 500 mm from the welding arc. The maximum allowable exposure times corresponding to these levels are only 3.3-33 s/day. This demonstrates that unprotected exposure to UVR emitted by GTAW of aluminum alloys is quite hazardous in practice. In addition, we found the following properties of the hazard of UVR. (1) It is more hazardous at higher welding currents than at lower welding currents. (2) It is more hazardous when magnesium is included in the welding materials than when it is not. (3) The hazard depends on the direction of emission from the arc.

  20. A non-conventional technique for evaluating welded joints based on the electrical conductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, T.G.; Sorger, G., E-mail: telmo.santos@fct.unl.pt, E-mail: lgs18243@campus.fct.unl.pt [Universidade Nova de Lisboa, UNIDEMI, Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica e Industrial, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Caparica (Portugal); Vilaca, P., E-mail: pedro.vilaca@aalto.fi [Aalto Univ., Dept. of Engineering Design and Production, School of Engineering, Aalto (Finland); Miranda, R., E-mail: rmiranda@fct.unl.pt [Universidade Nova de Lisboa, UNIDEMI, Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica e Industrial, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Caparica (Portugal)

    2015-01-15

    Recent studies showed that electrical conductivity is a valuable technique to identify the different zones of solid-state welded joints with a good correlation with the microstructure and hardness. This is a relevant result since this technique is fast and, in some cases, non destructive, The concept was applied to other welding processes such as the ones involving fusion to a wide range of materials, For this, a comprehensive study was performed using friction stir welding, tungsten inert gas (TlG) and gas metal arc (MAG) welding processes in either bead on plate or butt joints in: carbon steel, magnesium and titanium, Eddy current nondestructive testing (NDT) was used to measure the electrical conductivity at different depths in transverse sections of the processed materials. The profiles were compared to the hardness profiles in the same sections. As a result, a correlation was observed in most materials welded by solid state and by fusion processes. The variation of the electrical conductivity closely follows that measured in the hardness. Another interesting conclusion is that, even for fusion welding of carbon steels, the technique has potential to complement the hardness measurements and microstructural observations, allowing the identification of the distinct zones of welds in materials commonly used in industry. (author)

  1. Magnesium in Prevention and Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gröber, Uwe; Schmidt, Joachim; Kisters, Klaus

    2015-09-23

    Magnesium is the fourth most abundant mineral in the body. It has been recognized as a cofactor for more than 300 enzymatic reactions, where it is crucial for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) metabolism. Magnesium is required for DNA and RNA synthesis, reproduction, and protein synthesis. Moreover, magnesium is essential for the regulation of muscular contraction, blood pressure, insulin metabolism, cardiac excitability, vasomotor tone, nerve transmission and neuromuscular conduction. Imbalances in magnesium status-primarily hypomagnesemia as it is seen more common than hypermagnesemia-might result in unwanted neuromuscular, cardiac or nervous disorders. Based on magnesium's many functions within the human body, it plays an important role in prevention and treatment of many diseases. Low levels of magnesium have been associated with a number of chronic diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, insulin resistance and type-2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension, cardiovascular disease (e.g., stroke), migraine headaches, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

  2. Weld formation control at electron beam welding with beam oscillations

    OpenAIRE

    Trushnikov, Dmitriy; Koleva, Elena; Mladenov, Georgy; A. Shcherbakov

    2014-01-01

    Electron beam welding is used extensively to produce essential machine parts. The control of the basic beam parameters beam power or beam current at constant accelerating voltage, welding speed, current of focusing lens and distance between electron gun and welded sample surface is not enough to obtain at most of the regimes sound welds. Control of the focus position using analysis of the high frequency component of the current, collected by plasma, at periodic interactions on the beam (the o...

  3. Magnesium in Prevention and Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Uwe Gröber; Joachim Schmidt; Klaus Kisters

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium is the fourth most abundant mineral in the body. It has been recognized as a cofactor for more than 300 enzymatic reactions, where it is crucial for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) metabolism. Magnesium is required for DNA and RNA synthesis, reproduction, and protein synthesis. Moreover, magnesium is essential for the regulation of muscular contraction, blood pressure, insulin metabolism, cardiac excitability, vasomotor tone, nerve transmission and neuromuscular conduction. Imbalances ...

  4. Alternate Welding Processes for In-Service Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-24

    Conducting weld repairs and attaching hot tap tees onto pressurized pipes has the advantage of avoiding loss of service and revenue. However, the risks involved with in-service welding need to be managed by ensuring that welding is performed in a rep...

  5. Certification of a weld produced by friction stir welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obaditch, Chris; Grant, Glenn J

    2013-10-01

    Methods, devices, and systems for providing certification of friction stir welds are disclosed. A sensor is used to collect information related to a friction stir weld. Data from the sensor is compared to threshold values provided by an extrinsic standard setting organizations using a certification engine. The certification engine subsequently produces a report on the certification status of the weld.

  6. Welding defects at friction stir welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Podržaj

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an overview of different types of defects at friction stir welding. In order to explain the reasons for their occurrence a short theoretical background of the process is given first. The main emphasis is on the parameters that influence the process. An energy supply based division of defects into three disjoint groups was used. The occurring defects are demonstrated on various materials.

  7. Workmanship standards for fusion welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, M. D.

    1967-01-01

    Workmanship standards manual defines practices, that adhere to rigid codes and specifications, for fusion welding of component piping, assemblies, and systems. With written and pictorial presentations, it is part of the operating procedure for fusion welding.

  8. Welding and Brazing Silicon Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, T. J.

    1986-01-01

    Hot isostatic pressing and conventional furnace brazing effective under right conditions. Study performed showed feasibility of welding SiC using several welding and brazing techniques. Use of SiC improves engine efficiency by allowing increase in operating temperature. SiC successfully hot-pressure-welded at 3,550 degrees F (1,950 degrees C) in argon. Refinements of solid-state welding and brazing procedures used sufficient for some specific industrial applications.

  9. Self-Reacting Friction Stir Welding for Aluminum Alloy Circumferential Weld Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorkman, Gerry; Cantrell, Mark; Carter, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Friction stir welding is an innovative weld process that continues to grow in use, in the commercial, defense, and space sectors. It produces high quality and high strength welds in aluminum alloys. The process consists of a rotating weld pin tool that plasticizes material through friction. The plasticized material is welded by applying a high weld forge force through the weld pin tool against the material during pin tool rotation. The high weld forge force is reacted against an anvil and a stout tool structure. A variation of friction stir welding currently being evaluated is self-reacting friction stir welding. Self-reacting friction stir welding incorporates two opposing shoulders on the crown and root sides of the weld joint. In self-reacting friction stir welding, the weld forge force is reacted against the crown shoulder portion of the weld pin tool by the root shoulder. This eliminates the need for a stout tooling structure to react the high weld forge force required in the typical friction stir weld process. Therefore, the self-reacting feature reduces tooling requirements and, therefore, process implementation costs. This makes the process attractive for aluminum alloy circumferential weld applications. To evaluate the application of self-reacting friction stir welding for aluminum alloy circumferential welding, a feasibility study was performed. The study consisted of performing a fourteen-foot diameter aluminum alloy circumferential demonstration weld using typical fusion weld tooling. To accomplish the demonstration weld, weld and tack weld development were performed and fourteen-foot diameter rings were fabricated. Weld development consisted of weld pin tool selection and the generation of a process map and envelope. Tack weld development evaluated gas tungsten arc welding and friction stir welding for tack welding rings together for circumferential welding. As a result of the study, a successful circumferential demonstration weld was produced leading

  10. In vivo characterization of magnesium alloy biodegradation using electrochemical H2 monitoring, ICP-MS, and XPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Daoli; Wang, Tingting; Nahan, Keaton; Guo, Xuefei; Zhang, Zhanping; Dong, Zhongyun; Chen, Shuna; Chou, Da-Tren; Hong, Daeho; Kumta, Prashant N; Heineman, William R

    2017-03-01

    The effect of widely different corrosion rates of Mg alloys on four parameters of interest for in vivo characterization was evaluated: (1) the effectiveness of transdermal H2 measurements with an electrochemical sensor for noninvasively monitoring biodegradation compared to the standard techniques of in vivo X-ray imaging and weight loss measurement of explanted samples, (2) the chemical compositions of the corrosion layers of the explanted samples by XPS, (3) the effect on animal organs by histology, and (4) the accumulation of corrosion by-products in multiple organs by ICP-MS. The in vivo biodegradation of three magnesium alloys chosen for their widely varying corrosion rates - ZJ41 (fast), WKX41 (intermediate) and AZ31 (slow) - were evaluated in a subcutaneous implant mouse model. Measuring H2 with an electrochemical H2 sensor is a simple and effective method to monitor the biodegradation process in vivo by sensing H2 transdermally above magnesium alloys implanted subcutaneously in mice. The correlation of H2 levels and biodegradation rate measured by weight loss shows that this non-invasive method is fast, reliable and accurate. Analysis of the insoluble biodegradation products on the explanted alloys by XPS showed all of them to consist primarily of Mg(OH)2, MgO, MgCO3 and Mg3(PO4)2 with ZJ41 also having ZnO. The accumulation of magnesium and zinc were measured in 9 different organs by ICP-MS. Histological and ICP-MS studies reveal that there is no significant accumulation of magnesium in these organs for all three alloys; however, zinc accumulation in intestine, kidney and lung for the faster biodegrading alloy ZJ41 was observed. Although zinc accumulates in these three organs, no toxicity response was observed in the histological study. ICP-MS also shows higher levels of magnesium and zinc in the skull than in the other organs. Biodegradable devices based on magnesium and its alloys are promising because they gradually dissolve and thereby avoid the need

  11. Welding. Performance Objectives. Basic Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Kenneth

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of eight terminal objectives for a basic welding course. The materials were developed for a 36-week (2 hours daily) course developed to teach the fundamentals of welding shop work, to become familiar with the operation of the welding shop…

  12. Welding. Performance Objectives. Intermediate Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Kenneth

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of nine terminal objectives for an intermediate welding course. The materials were developed for a 36-week (3 hours daily) course designed to prepare the student for employment in the field of welding. Electric welding and specialized (TIG & MIG)…

  13. Function of magnesium aluminate hydrate and magnesium nitrate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MgO was added both as spinel (MgAl2O4) forming precursor i.e. magnesium aluminate hydrate, and magnesium nitrate. Sintering investigations were conducted in the temperature range 1500–1600°C with 2 h soaking. Structural study of sintered pellets was carried out by extensive XRD analysis. Scanning electron mode ...

  14. Function of magnesium aluminate hydrate and magnesium nitrate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. Chemically pure reactive alumina (α-Al2O3) which is commercially available was used for densifi- cation study in presence of widely accepted dopant MgO as additive. MgO was added both as spinel. (MgAl2O4) forming precursor i.e. magnesium aluminate hydrate, and magnesium nitrate. Sintering investiga-.

  15. Friction stir welding tool and process for welding dissimilar materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J; Jana, Saumyadeep; Mattlin, Karl F

    2013-05-07

    A friction stir welding tool and process for lap welding dissimilar materials are detailed. The invention includes a cutter scribe that penetrates and extrudes a first material of a lap weld stack to a preselected depth and further cuts a second material to provide a beneficial geometry defined by a plurality of mechanically interlocking features. The tool backfills the interlocking features generating a lap weld across the length of the interface between the dissimilar materials that enhances the shear strength of the lap weld.

  16. Ultrasonic Evaluation of Weld Strength for Aluminum Ultrasonic Spot Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffari, Bita; Hetrick, Elizabeth T.; Mozurkewich, George; Reatherford, Larry V.

    2005-04-01

    The goal of this work is to determine the feasibility of using an ultrasonic, non-destructive technique for post-process evaluation of aluminum ultrasonic spot welds. A focused immersion transducer was utilized to obtain a C-scan of the weld interface, from which a weighted ultrasonic contact area was estimated. Weldments were subsequently tested destructively to determine the weld strength. The square root of the weld contact area displayed a relatively good correlation with weld strength, r2=0.85.

  17. Selective Laser Melting of Magnesium and Magnesium Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gieseke, Matthias; Noelke, Christian; Kaierle, Stefan; Wesling, Volker; Haferkamp, Heinz

    Selective Laser Melting (SLM) offers the possibility to create three dimensional parts by having full freedom of design. Therefore prototypes can be produced faster and conventionally manufactured parts can be shaped individually, including an optimized design regarding potential loads and parts weight. The manufacturing of biocompatible metals like 316L and TiA16V4 is already industrially established. Because of the corrosive and mechanical properties of magnesium and the advantages of the SLM process, using magnesium is of great interest for manufacturing individual biodegradable implants. Recent investigations on SLM of magnesium have not led to successful operation so far. Due to the low vaporizing temperature, manufacturing non-porous and three dimensional parts from magnesium was not possible yet. Following a new strategy, using an industrial SLM system with an overpressure building chamber, investigations on SLM of magnesium are now carried out in order to overcome these difficulties and produce fully dense three dimensional parts.

  18. Weld bead profile of laser welding dissimilar joints stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Ghusoon R.; Ishak, M.; Aqida, S. N.; Abdulhadi, Hassan A.

    2017-10-01

    During the process of laser welding, the material consecutively melts and solidifies by a laser beam with a peak high power. Several parameters such as the laser energy, pulse frequency, pulse duration, welding power and welding speed govern the mode of the welding process. The aim of this paper is to investigate the effect of peak power, incident angle, and welding speed on the weld bead geometry. The first investigation in this context was conducted using 2205-316L stainless steel plates through the varying of the welding speed from 1.3 mm/s to 2.1 mm/s. The second investigation was conducted by varying the peak power from 1100 W to 1500 W. From the results of the experiments, the welding speed and laser power had a significant effect on the geometry of the weld bead, and the variation in the diameter of the bead pulse-size. Due to the decrease in the heat input, welding speed affected penetration depth more than bead width, and a narrow width of heat affected zone was achieved ranging from 0.2 to 0.5 mm. Conclusively, weld bead geometry dimensions increase as a function of peak power; at over 1350 W peak power, the dimensions lie within 30 μm.

  19. Weld Nugget Temperature Control in Thermal Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A control system for a thermal stir welding system is provided. The control system includes a sensor and a controller. The sensor is coupled to the welding system's containment plate assembly and generates signals indicative of temperature of a region adjacent and parallel to the welding system's stir rod. The controller is coupled to the sensor and generates at least one control signal using the sensor signals indicative of temperature. The controller is also coupled to the welding system such that at least one of rotational speed of the stir rod, heat supplied by the welding system's induction heater, and feed speed of the welding system's weld material feeder are controlled based on the control signal(s).

  20. Magnesium Hall Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, James J.

    2015-01-01

    This Phase II project is developing a magnesium (Mg) Hall effect thruster system that would open the door for in situ resource utilization (ISRU)-based solar system exploration. Magnesium is light and easy to ionize. For a Mars- Earth transfer, the propellant mass savings with respect to a xenon Hall effect thruster (HET) system are enormous. Magnesium also can be combusted in a rocket with carbon dioxide (CO2) or water (H2O), enabling a multimode propulsion system with propellant sharing and ISRU. In the near term, CO2 and H2O would be collected in situ on Mars or the moon. In the far term, Mg itself would be collected from Martian and lunar regolith. In Phase I, an integrated, medium-power (1- to 3-kW) Mg HET system was developed and tested. Controlled, steady operation at constant voltage and power was demonstrated. Preliminary measurements indicate a specific impulse (Isp) greater than 4,000 s was achieved at a discharge potential of 400 V. The feasibility of delivering fluidized Mg powder to a medium- or high-power thruster also was demonstrated. Phase II of the project evaluated the performance of an integrated, highpower Mg Hall thruster system in a relevant space environment. Researchers improved the medium power thruster system and characterized it in detail. Researchers also designed and built a high-power (8- to 20-kW) Mg HET. A fluidized powder feed system supporting the high-power thruster was built and delivered to Busek Company, Inc.

  1. Numerical simulation of welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jan Langkjær; Thorborg, Jesper

    Aim of project:To analyse and model the transient thermal field from arc welding (SMAW, V-shaped buttweld in 15mm plate) and to some extend the mechanical response due to the thermal field. - To implement this model in a general purpose finite element program such as ABAQUS.The simulation...... stress is also taken into account.Work carried out:With few means it is possible to define a thermal model which describes the thermal field from the welding process in reasonable agreement with reality. Identical results are found with ABAQUS and Rosenthal’s analytical solution of the governing heat...... transfer equation under same conditions. It is relative easy tointroduce boundary conditions such as convection and radiation where not surprisingly the radiation has the greatest influence especially from the high temperature regions in the weld pool and the heat affected zone.Due to the large temperature...

  2. Extravehicular activity welding experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, J. Kevin

    1989-01-01

    The In-Space Technology Experiments Program (INSTEP) provides an opportunity to explore the many critical questions which can only be answered by experimentation in space. The objective of the Extravehicular Activity Welding Experiment definition project was to define the requirements for a spaceflight experiment to evaluate the feasibility of performing manual welding tasks during EVA. Consideration was given to experiment design, work station design, welding hardware design, payload integration requirements, and human factors (including safety). The results of this effort are presented. Included are the specific objectives of the flight test, details of the tasks which will generate the required data, and a description of the equipment which will be needed to support the tasks. Work station requirements are addressed as are human factors, STS integration procedures and, most importantly, safety considerations. A preliminary estimate of the cost and the schedule for completion of the experiment through flight and postflight analysis are given.

  3. Pulsed welding plasma source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knyaz'kov, A.; Pustovykh, O.; Verevkin, A.; Terekhin, V.; Shachek, A.; Tyasto, A.

    2016-04-01

    It is shown that in order to form the current pulse of a near rectangular shape, which provides conversion of the welding arc into a dynamic mode, it is rational to connect a forming element made on the basis of an artificial forming line in series to the welding DC circuit. The paper presents a diagram of a pulsed device for welding with a non-consumable electrode in argon which was developed using the forming element. The conversion of the arc into the dynamic mode is illustrated by the current and voltage oscillograms of the arc gap and the dynamic characteristic of the arc within the interval of one pulse generation time in the arc gap. The background current travels in the interpulse interval.

  4. Electrolytes for magnesium electrochemical cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrell, Anthony K.; Sa, Niya; Proffit, Danielle Lee; Lipson, Albert; Liao, Chen; Vaughey, John T.; Ingram, Brian J.

    2017-07-04

    An electrochemical cell includes a high voltage cathode configured to operate at 1.5 volts or greater; an anode including Mg.sup.0; and an electrolyte including an ether solvent and a magnesium salt; wherein: a concentration of the magnesium salt in the ether is 1 M or greater.

  5. Hydrostatic extrusion of magnesium alloys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sillekens, W.H.; Bohlen, J.

    2012-01-01

    This chapter deals with the capabilities and limitations of the hydrostatic extrusion process for the manufacturing of magnesium alloy sections. Firstly, the process basics for the hydrostatic extrusion of materials in general and of magnesium in particular are introduced. Next, some recent research

  6. [Magnesium homeostasis and its disturbances].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakai, Kentaro

    2012-08-01

    Magnesium homeostasis is maintained through normal functions of the kidney, intestine, and bone. In the kidney, approximately 80% magnesium is filtered by the glomeruli. In general, 95% filtered magnesium is collectively reabsorbed in the proximal tubule (15%-20%) , thick ascending limb of Henle (TAL, 65%-75%) , and the distal convoluted tubule (DCT, 5%-10%) . In the TAL, magnesium reabsorption regulated by the paracellular pathway via claudin-16 is driven by electrochemical voltage. Chloride channel Kb and renal outer medullary potassium channels control this lumen-positive voltage. In the DCT, the transcellular pathway via transient receptor potential melastatin 6 (TRPM6) plays a fundamental role in the final 5%-10% magnesium reabsorption. The functions of TRPM6 depend on Na-Cl co-transporters and Na( + )-K( + )-ATPase. Defects in these regulatory proteins may cause inherited or drug-induced disorders of magnesium metabolism. Recently, some proteins have been confirmed to be responsible for magnesium homeostasis ; however, further research is required to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the maintenance of magnesium homeostasis.

  7. Ternary gas plasma welding torch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor); Mcgee, William F. (Inventor); Waldron, Douglas J. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A plasma arc welding torch is discussed. A first plasma gas is directed through the body of the welding torch and out of the body across the tip of a welding electrode disposed at the forward end of the body. A second plasma gas is disposed for flow through a longitudinal bore in the electrode. The second plasma gas enters one end of the electrode and exits the electrode at the tip thereof for co-acting with the electric welding arc to produce the desired weld. A shield gas is directed through the torch body and circulates around the head of the torch adjacent to the electrode tip.

  8. Magnesium in Prevention and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Gröber

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium is the fourth most abundant mineral in the body. It has been recognized as a cofactor for more than 300 enzymatic reactions, where it is crucial for adenosine triphosphate (ATP metabolism. Magnesium is required for DNA and RNA synthesis, reproduction, and protein synthesis. Moreover, magnesium is essential for the regulation of muscular contraction, blood pressure, insulin metabolism, cardiac excitability, vasomotor tone, nerve transmission and neuromuscular conduction. Imbalances in magnesium status—primarily hypomagnesemia as it is seen more common than hypermagnesemia—might result in unwanted neuromuscular, cardiac or nervous disorders. Based on magnesium’s many functions within the human body, it plays an important role in prevention and treatment of many diseases. Low levels of magnesium have been associated with a number of chronic diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease, insulin resistance and type-2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension, cardiovascular disease (e.g., stroke, migraine headaches, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD.

  9. Magnesium in Prevention and Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gröber, Uwe; Schmidt, Joachim; Kisters, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium is the fourth most abundant mineral in the body. It has been recognized as a cofactor for more than 300 enzymatic reactions, where it is crucial for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) metabolism. Magnesium is required for DNA and RNA synthesis, reproduction, and protein synthesis. Moreover, magnesium is essential for the regulation of muscular contraction, blood pressure, insulin metabolism, cardiac excitability, vasomotor tone, nerve transmission and neuromuscular conduction. Imbalances in magnesium status—primarily hypomagnesemia as it is seen more common than hypermagnesemia—might result in unwanted neuromuscular, cardiac or nervous disorders. Based on magnesium’s many functions within the human body, it plays an important role in prevention and treatment of many diseases. Low levels of magnesium have been associated with a number of chronic diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease, insulin resistance and type-2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension, cardiovascular disease (e.g., stroke), migraine headaches, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). PMID:26404370

  10. Magnesium--essentials for anesthesiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herroeder, Susanne; Schönherr, Marianne E; De Hert, Stefan G; Hollmann, Markus W

    2011-04-01

    Magnesium plays a fundamental role in many cellular functions, and thus there is increasing interest in its role in clinical medicine. Although numerous experimental studies indicate positive effects of magnesium in a variety of disease states, large clinical trials often give conflicting results. However, there is clear evidence for magnesium to benefit patients with eclampsia or torsades de pointes arrhythmias. In addition, magnesium seems to have antinociceptive and anesthetic as well as neuroprotective effects, yet well-designed large clinical trials are required to determine its actual efficacy in pain management or in the state of stroke or subarachnoid hemorrhage. The current review aims to provide an overview of current knowledge and available evidence with respect to physiologic aspects of magnesium and proposed indications and recommendations for its use in the clinical setting.

  11. Effect of Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 3} solution concentration of micro-arc oxidation process on lap-shear strength of adhesive-bonded magnesium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Haitao; Zhang, Meng [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049, Shaanxi (China); Yang, Xin, E-mail: xin.x.yang@gm.com [General Motors China Science Lab, Shanghai 201206 (China); Huang, Ping, E-mail: huangping@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049, Shaanxi (China); Xu, Kewei, E-mail: kwxu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049, Shaanxi (China); Department of Physics and Opt-electronic Engineering, Xi’an University of Arts and Science, Xi’an 710065, Shaanxi (China)

    2014-09-30

    Highlights: • We report effect of MAO electrolyte concentration on lap shear strength of Mg alloy. • MgO in film composition decreases as electrolyte concentration increases. • Adhesive bonded strength of Mg alloy decreases as electrolyte concentration increases. • MgO in film composition was related with bonding strength of MAO films. • Hydroxyl groups initiated by MgO afford hydrogen bonding and better wettability. - Abstract: Micro-arc oxidation films are fabricated on the surface of AZ31B magnesium alloy in the Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 3} electrolyte. The mechanical performance of magnesium alloy bonding with the adhesive is examined by single lap-shear test, and the morphology and composition of the oxidation film are characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The data indicate that the increase of Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 3} solution concentration results in the decrease of bonding strength of magnesium alloy joints, while the porosity has no directly relation with the variation of the lap-shear strength. The results also show that Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 3} participates into the film formation and the fabricated film is mainly composed of MgO and Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}. In particular, with the increase of Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 3} solution concentration, the content of MgO decreased while that of Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} increased. Moreover, MgO could initiate the formation of the hydroxyl group, which potentially enhances surface wettability and hydrogen bonding with the adhesive. This rationale is strongly supported by the results of Fourier Transform infrared spectra (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and contact angle measuring.

  12. Integrated sensors for robotic laser welding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iakovou, D.; Aarts, Ronald G.K.M.; Meijer, J.; Beyer, E.; Dausinger, F; Ostendorf, A; Otto, A.

    2005-01-01

    A welding head is under development with integrated sensory systems for robotic laser welding applications. Robotic laser welding requires sensory systems that are capable to accurately guide the welding head over a seam in three-dimensional space and provide information about the welding process as

  13. Sensor integration for robotic laser welding processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iakovou, D.; Aarts, Ronald G.K.M.; Meijer, J.; Ostendorf, A; Hoult, A.; Lu, Y.

    2005-01-01

    The use of robotic laser welding is increasing among industrial applications, because of its ability to weld objects in three dimensions. Robotic laser welding involves three sub-processes: seam detection and tracking, welding process control, and weld seam inspection. Usually, for each sub-process,

  14. Acoustic-Emission Weld-Penetration Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maram, J.; Collins, J.

    1986-01-01

    Weld penetration monitored by detection of high-frequency acoustic emissions produced by advancing weld pool as it melts and solidifies in workpiece. Acoustic emission from TIG butt weld measured with 300-kHz resonant transducer. Rise in emission level coincides with cessation of weld penetration due to sudden reduction in welding current. Such monitoring applied to control of automated and robotic welders.

  15. Weld procedure development with OSLW - optimization software for laser welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuerschbach, P.W.; Eisler, G.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Steele, R.J. [Naval Air Warfare Center, China Lake, CA (United States)

    1998-06-01

    Weld procedure development can require extensive experimentation, in-depth process knowledge, and is further complicated by the fact that there are often multiple sets of parameters that will meet the weld requirements. Choosing among these multiple weld procedures can be hastened with computer models that find parameters to meet selected weld dimensional requirements while simultaneously optimizing important figures of merit. Software is described that performs this task for CO{sub 2} laser beam welding. The models are based on dimensionless parameter correlations that are derived from solutions to the moving heat source equations. The use of both handbook and empirically verified thermophysical property values allows OSLW to be extended to many different materials. Graphics displays show the resulting solution on contour plots that can be used to further probe the model. The important figures of merit for laser beam welding are energy transfer efficiency and melting efficiency. The application enables the user to input desired weld shape dimensions, select the material to be welded, and to constrain the search problem to meet the application requirements. Successful testing of the software at a laser welding fabricator has validated this tool for weld procedure development.

  16. Welding. Student Learning Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palm Beach County Board of Public Instruction, West Palm Beach, FL.

    This student learning guide contains 30 modules for completing a course in welding. It is designed especially for use in secondary schools in Palm Beach County, Florida. Each module covers one task, and consists of a purpose, performance objective, enabling objectives, learning activities keyed to resources, information sheets, student self-check…

  17. Thermal Stresses in Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jan Langkjær

    1998-01-01

    Studies of the transient temperature fields and the hereby induced deformations and stressses in a butt-welded mild steel plate modelledrespectively in 2D plane stress state (as well as plane strain state) and in full 3D have been done. The model has been implemented in the generalpurpose FE...

  18. Elementary TIG Welding Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, John E., III

    The text was prepared to help deaf students develop the skills needed by an employed welder. It uses simplified language and illustrations to present concepts which should be reinforced by practical experience with welding skills. Each of the 12 lessons contains: (1) an information section with many illustrations which presents a concept or…

  19. Influence of Laser Power on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of a Laser Welded-Brazed Mg Alloy/Ni-Coated Steel Dissimilar Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Caiwang; Xiao, Liyuan; Liu, Fuyun; Chen, Bo; Song, Xiaoguo; Li, Liqun; Feng, Jicai

    2017-05-01

    In this work, we describe a method to improve the bonding of an immiscible Mg/steel system using Ni as an interlayer by coating it on the steel surface. Laser welding-brazing of AZ31B Mg alloy to Ni-coated Q235 steel using Mg-based filler was performed in a lap configuration. The influence of laser power on the weld characteristics, including joint appearance, formation of interfacial reaction layers and mechanical properties was investigated. The results indicated that the presence of the Ni-coating promoted the wetting of the liquid filler metal on the steel surface. A thermal gradient along the interface led to the formation of heterogeneous interfacial reaction layers. When using a low laser power of 1600 W, the reaction products were an FeAl phase in the direct laser irradiation zone, an AlNi phase close to the intermediate zone and mixtures of AlNi phase and an (α-Mg + Mg2Ni) eutectic structure near the interface at the seam head zone. For high powers of more than 2000 W, the FeAl phase grew thicker in the direct laser irradiation zone and a new Fe(Ni) transition layer formed at the interface of the intermediate zone and the seam head zone. However, the AlNi phase and (α-Mg + Mg2Ni) eutectic structure were scattered at the Mg seam. All the joints fractured at the fusion zone, indicating that the improved interface was not the weakest joint region. The maximum tensile-shear strength of the Mg/Ni-coated steel joint reached 190 N/mm, and the joint efficiency was 70% with respect to the Mg alloy base metal.

  20. Magnesium deficiency: What is our status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low magnesium intake has been implicated in a broad range of cardiometabolic conditions, including diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease. Dietary magnesium and total body magnesium status have a widely-used but imperfect biomarker in serum magnesium. Despite serum magnesium’s limitation...

  1. Mineral resource of the month: magnesium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Deborah A.

    2012-01-01

    Magnesium is the eighthmost abundant element in Earth’s crust, and the second-most abundant metal ion in seawater. Although magnesium is found in more than 60 minerals, only brucite, dolomite, magnesite and carnallite are commercially important for their magnesium content. Magnesium and its compounds also are recovered from seawater, brines found in lakes and wells, and bitterns (salts).

  2. 21 CFR 184.1426 - Magnesium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium chloride. 184.1426 Section 184.1426 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1426 Magnesium chloride. (a) Magnesium chloride (MgC12·6H2O, CAS... hydrochloric acid solution and crystallizing out magnesium chloride hexahydrate. (b) The ingredient meets the...

  3. 21 CFR 184.1431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... powder (light) or a relatively dense white powder (heavy) by heating magnesium hydroxide or carbonate... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium oxide. 184.1431 Section 184.1431 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Magnesium oxide (MgO, CAS Reg. No. 1309-48-4...

  4. 21 CFR 184.1443 - Magnesium sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... magnesium oxide, hydroxide, or carbonate with sulfuric acid and evaporating the solution to crystallization... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium sulfate. 184.1443 Section 184.1443 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1443 Magnesium sulfate. (a) Magnesium sulfate (MgSO4·7H2O, CAS...

  5. 21 CFR 184.1428 - Magnesium hydroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium hydroxide. 184.1428 Section 184.1428 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1428 Magnesium hydroxide. (a) Magnesium hydroxide (Mg(OH)2, CAS... a white precipitate by the addition of sodium hydroxide to a water soluble magnesium salt or by...

  6. effect of post-weld heat treatment on the microstructure

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    among others are shielded metal arc welding, submerge arc welding, gas metal arc welding, plasma arc welding, gas ... welding (SMAW) technique is preferable to the other techniques ..... studies''International Journal of Innovative Research.

  7. A new electrolytic magnesium production process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ram A.

    1996-10-01

    In this article, existing magnesium chloride electrolysis and thermal magnesium oxide reduction processes for producing magnesium are described and their limitations are pointed out. The theoretical background of a patented new process is outlined. In this process, magnesium oxide is dissolved in a rare-earth-chloride-containing electrolyte and electrolyzed to produce magnesium and oxygen like that of alumina in the Hall-Héroult process. It is also shown that the efficiency of the existing magnesium chloride electrolysis process should be improved greatly by adding a rare-earth chloride. In both cases, the magnesium produced is expected to be free from detrimental iron, nickel, copper, and boron impurities.

  8. SHADOW: a new welding technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Thorsten; Olowinsky, Alexander M.; Durand, Friedrich

    2002-06-01

    The new welding technique 'SHADOW ' is introduced. SHADOW means the use of a single pulse to generate a quasi continuous weld of several millimeters in length. HET processing time is defined by the pulse duration of the pulsed laser. At present, a state-of-the-art laser is capable of a maximum pulse duration of 20 ms. The variation of the laser power depend on time is a vital capability of the pulsed laser to adapt the energy deposition into the workpiece. Laser beam welds of several watch components were successfully performed. Similar metals like crowns and axes made out of stainless steel have been welded using pulsed laser radiation. Applying a series of about 130 single pulses for the crown-axis combination the total energy accumulates to 19.5 J. The use of the SHADOW welding technique reduces the energy to 2.5 J. While welding dissimilar metals like stainless steel and bras, the SHADOW welding reduces drastically the contamination as well as the distortion. Laser beam welding of copper has a low process reliability due to the high reflection and the high thermal conductivity. SHADOW welds of 3.6 mm length were performed on 250 micrometers thick copper plates with very high reproducibility. As a result, a pilot plant for laser beam welding of copper plates has been set up. The work to be presented has partly been funded by the European Commission in a project under the contract BRPR-CT-0634.

  9. Experimental Investigation and Prediction of Mechanical Properties of Friction Stir Welded Aluminium Metal Matrix Composite Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahya BOZKURT

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir welding (FSW is a relatively contemporary solid state welding process and has been employed in aerospace, railway, automotive and marine industries for joining of aluminum, magnesium, zinc, titanium, copper alloys, dissimilar metals and thermoplastics. The FSW process parameters such as tool rotation speed, tool traverse speed and tilt angle play an important role in deciding the joining quality. The present study defines the effect of FSW process on the tensile properties of the AA2124/SiC/25p metal matrix composite (MMC plates. Obtained results showed that the joint efficiency decreases by increasing the tool traverse speed while tool rotation speed was kept constant. Second contribution of this study is the application of decision tree technique to predict the tensile properties of friction stir welded MMC plates. It is seen that methodology can be applied with great accuracy.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.18.4.3092

  10. A study on heat-flow analysis of friction stir welding on a rotation affected zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Sung Wook; Jang, Beom Seon [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae Woong [Daewoo Shipbuilding and Marine Engineering Co., Soeul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    In recent years, as interest in environmental protection and energy conservation rose, technological development for lightweight efficiency of transport equipment, such as aircrafts, railcars, automobiles and vessels, have been briskly proceeding. This has led to an expansion of the application of lightweight alloys such as aluminum and magnesium. For the welding of these lightweight alloys, friction stir welding has been in development by many researchers. Heat-flow analysis of friction stir welding is one such research. The flow and energy equation is solved using the computational fluid dynamic commercial program 'Fluent'. In this study, a rotation affected zone concept is imposed. The rotation affected zone is a constant volume. In this volume, flow is rotated the same as the tool rotation speed and so plastic dissipation occurs. Through this simulation, the temperature distribution results are calculated and the simulation results are compared with the experimental results.

  11. Welding residual stress distributions for dissimilar metal nozzle butt welds in pressurized water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji Soo; Kim, Ju Hee; Bae, Hong Yeol; OH, Chang Young; Kim, Yun Jae [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyungsoo [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Song, Tae Kwang [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15

    In pressurized water nuclear reactors, dissimilar metal welds are susceptible to primary water stress corrosion cracking. To access this problem, accurate estimation of welding residual stresses is important. This paper provides general welding residual stress profiles in dissimilar metal nozzle butt welds using finite element analysis. By introducing a simplified shape for dissimilar metal nozzle butt welds, changes in the welding residual stress distribution can be seen using a geometry variable. Based on the results, a welding residual stress profile for dissimilar metal nozzle butt welds is proposed that modifies the existing welding residual stress profile for austenitic pipe butt welds.

  12. In-field Welding and Coating Protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-12

    Gas Technology Institute (GTI) and Edison Welding Institute (EWI) created both laboratory and infield girth weld samples to evaluate the effects of weld geometry and hydrogen off-gassing on the performance of protective coatings. Laboratory made plat...

  13. Closed circuit TV system monitors welding operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilman, M.

    1967-01-01

    TV camera system that has a special vidicon tube with a gradient density filter is used in remote monitoring of TIG welding of stainless steel. The welding operations involve complex assembly welding tools and skates in areas of limited accessibility.

  14. The role of advanced corrosion research methods for magnesium alloys in automotive applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eliezer, A.; Haddad, J. [Sami Shamoon College of Engineering, Corrosion Research Center, P.O.B. 45, Beer-Sheva 84100 (Israel); Gutman, E.M. [Dept. of Materials Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, P.O.B.653, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel)

    2004-07-01

    The guide direction today is reduction of vehicle weight and saving of fuel consumption. Magnesium is the lightest of all the commonly used metals and is very attractive for applications in automotive industry. However, environmentally assisted fracture significantly decreases the fatigue and creep resistance, mechanical stability and durability of high-strength Mg alloys. For example, such magnesium applications as wheels, transmission housings, pedals, etc. require good fatigue resistance in corrosive atmosphere. In order to produce parts for the automotive industry it is necessary to develop alloys with formability and durability in active environments. Until recently, corrosion resistance and creep resistance have been considered to be the main issues for long-term durability, reliability and applicability of Mg-based structural materials. These problems traditionally have been separated as corrosion behavior in non-stressed states and creep in non-corrosive conditions. In recent years the importance of environmental effects in many types of fracture processes has been recognized and it seems worthwhile therefore to examine more closely the role of environment in creep rupture as combined stress-environmental effects. So, the investigation of environmental assisted creep is very important as a tool to discover a mechanism of processes going in the tip of a crack and as the phenomenon very influencing mechanical stability of alloys in real service conditions. However, mechanical and corrosion processes develop simultaneously in real environment conditions, and inevitably lead to the appearance of new synergistic effects which significantly reduce the lifetime of Mg-alloys. Corrosive environment (3.5% NaCl) significantly decreases fatigue life of die-cast and extruded Mg-alloys (AZ91D, AM50, AZ31, etc.). Extruded alloys show a higher sensitivity to the action of NaCl solution in comparison with die-cast alloys; however, their corrosion fatigue life is longer than

  15. Factors affecting weld root morphology in laser keyhole welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frostevarg, Jan

    2018-02-01

    Welding production efficiency is usually optimised if full penetration can be achieved in a single pass. Techniques such as electron and laser beam welding offer deep high speed keyhole welding, especially since multi-kilowatt lasers became available. However, there are limitations for these techniques when considering weld imperfections such as weld cap undercuts, interior porosity or humps at the root. The thickness of sheets during full penetration welding is practically limited by these root humps. The mechanisms behind root morphology formation are not yet satisfactory understood. In this paper root humping is studied by reviewing previous studies and findings and also by sample examination and process observation by high speed imaging. Different process regimes governing root quality are presented, categorized and explained. Even though this study mainly covers laser beam and laser arc hybrid welding, the presented findings can generally be applied full penetration welding in medium to thick sheets, especially the discussion of surface tension effects. As a final result of this analysis, a map of methods to optimise weld root topology is presented.

  16. Dynamics of space welding impact and corresponding safety welding study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragomeni, James M; Nunes, Arthur C

    2004-03-01

    This study was undertaken in order to be sure that no hazard would exist from impingement of hot molten metal particle detachments upon an astronauts space suit during any future electron beam welding exercises or experiments. The conditions under which molten metal detachments might occur in a space welding environment were analyzed. The safety issue is important during welding with regards to potential molten metal detachments from the weld pool and cold filler wire during electron beam welding in space. Theoretical models were developed to predict the possibility and size of the molten metal detachment hazards during the electron beam welding exercises at low earth orbit. Some possible ways of obtaining molten metal drop detachments would include an impulse force, or bump, to the weld sample, cut surface, or filler wire. Theoretical models were determined for these detachment concerns from principles of impact and kinetic energies, surface tension, drop geometry, surface energies, and particle dynamics. A weld pool detachment parameter for specifying the conditions for metal weld pool detachment by impact was derived and correlated to the experimental results. The experimental results were for the most part consistent with the theoretical analysis and predictions. c2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Dynamics of space welding impact and corresponding safety welding study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragomeni, James M.; Nunes, Arthur C.

    2004-03-01

    This study was undertaken in order to be sure that no hazard would exist from impingement of hot molten metal particle detachments upon an astronauts space suit during any future electron beam welding exercises or experiments. The conditions under which molten metal detachments might occur in a space welding environment were analyzed. The safety issue is important during welding with regards to potential molten metal detachments from the weld pool and cold filler wire during electron beam welding in space. Theoretical models were developed to predict the possibility and size of the molten metal detachment hazards during the electron beam welding exercises at low earth orbit. Some possible ways of obtaining molten metal drop detachments would include an impulse force, or bump, to the weld sample, cut surface, or filler wire. Theoretical models were determined for these detachment concerns from principles of impact and kinetic energies, surface tension, drop geometry, surface energies, and particle dynamics. A weld pool detachment parameter for specifying the conditions for metal weld pool detachment by impact was derived and correlated to the experimental results. The experimental results were for the most part consistent with the theoretical analysis and predictions.

  18. Fundamental Laser Welding Process Investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Claus; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    1998-01-01

    In a number of systematic laboratory investigations the fundamental behavior of the laser welding process was analyzed by the use of normal video (30 Hz), high speed video (100 and 400 Hz) and photo diodes. Sensors were positioned to monitor the welding process from both the top side and the rear...... side of the specimen.Special attention has been given to the dynamic nature of the laser welding process, especially during unstable welding conditions. In one series of experiments, the stability of the process has been varied by changing the gap distance in lap welding. In another series...... video pictures (400 Hz), a clear impact on the seam characteristics has been identified when a hump occurs.Finally, a clear correlation between the position of the focus point, the resultant process type and the corresponding signal intensity and signal variation has been found for sheets welded...

  19. Magnesium Repair by Cold Spray

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Champagne, V. K; Leyman, P.F; Helfritch, D. J

    2008-01-01

    .... Army Research Laboratory has developed a cold spray process to reclaim magnesium components that shows significant improvement over existing methods and is in the process of qualification for use on rotorcraft...

  20. Magnesium salts as compounds of the preparation of magnesium oxide from Tunisian natural brines

    OpenAIRE

    Behij Souheil; Hammi Halim; Hamzaoui Hichem Ahmed; M’nif Adel

    2013-01-01

    Magnesium oxide is one of the most important magnesium compounds used in industry. The production of MgO is often done from calcined magnesium carbonate or from natural magnesium saline solutions (sea water and brines). In the case of these solutions, magnesium oxide is precipitated after the addition of a strong base (eg. Ammonia). Magnesium hydroxide is calcined after its separation from the excess resulting from the strong base through filtration. Thus, magnesia qualities may differ ...

  1. Pulsed ultrasonic stir welding system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An ultrasonic stir welding system includes a welding head assembly having a plate and a rod passing through the plate. The rod is rotatable about a longitudinal axis thereof. During a welding operation, ultrasonic pulses are applied to the rod as it rotates about its longitudinal axis. The ultrasonic pulses are applied in such a way that they propagate parallel to the longitudinal axis of the rod.

  2. Ultralight Magnesium-Lithium Alloys

    OpenAIRE

    A. Białobrzeski; K. Saja; Hubner, K.

    2007-01-01

    The article gives basic information on the chief constituents of Mg-Li alloys and on their expected properties. A schematic representation and technical performance of a pilot stand for melting and pouring of reactive ultralight magnesium-based alloys have been presented. The preliminary data regarding the manufactured magnesium alloys with about 2-3 % Li and about 10 % Li have been given in the form of microstructures and chemical compositions.

  3. Development of magnesium diecasting alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, J.F. (Magnesium Elektron, Manchester (United Kingdom))

    1998-01-01

    Although there are many fascinating aspects of the development of magnesium diecasting alloys, the volume potential of the automotive industry has always had a major influence on justifying the significant R and D expenditure necessary for this task. Apart from a review of the history of magnesium diecasting alloy development, I would therefore like to focus this presentation on aspects of development specifically relevant to current automotive requirements. (orig.)

  4. [Adjuvants in modern anesthesia - magnesium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picardi, Susanne; Lirk, Philipp; Blobner, Manfred; Schönherr, Marianne E; Hollmann, Markus W

    2015-06-01

    Magnesium plays a key role in many cellular functions and there is growing interest in its role in perioperative medicine. While experimental studies provided promising results for several disease states, clinical trials mainly gave conflicting results. This review article summarizes current knowledge on the homeostasis of magnesium as well as on its proposed indications and recommendations in the clinical setting. © Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Comparison of Welding Residual Stresses of Hybrid Laser-Arc Welding and Submerged Arc Welding in Offshore Steel Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Michael Joachim; Yu, Zhenzhen; Liu, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    In the offshore industry, welding-induced distortion and tensile residual stresses have become a major concern in relation to the structural integrity of a welded structure. Particularly, the continuous increase in size of welded plates and joints needs special attention concerning welding induced...... residual stresses. These stresses have a negative impact on the integrity of the welded joint as they promote distortion, reduce fatigue life, and contribute to corrosion cracking and premature failure in the weld components. This paper deals with the influence and impact of welding method on the welding...... induced residual stresses. It is also investigated whether the assumption of residual stresses up to yield strength magnitude are present in welded structures as stated in the design guidelines. The fatigue strength for welded joints is based on this assumption. The two welding methods investigated...

  6. The effect of post-welding conditions in friction stir welds: From weld simulation to Ductile Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hattel, Jesper Henri; Nielsen, Kim Lau; Tutum, Cem Celal

    2012-01-01

    effect of the post-welding conditions when subjecting a friction stir weld to loading transverse to the weld line. The numerical model of the friction stir welded joint, employs a step-wise modeling approach to combine an in-situ weld simulation with a post-welding failure analysis. Using the commercial......The post-welding stress state, strain history and material conditions of friction stir welded joints are often strongly idealized when used in subsequent modeling analyses, typically by neglecting one or more of the features above. But, it is obvious that the conditions after welding do influence...... the weld performance. The objective of this paper is to discuss some of the main conflicts that arise when taking both the post-welding material conditions and stressestrain state into account in a subsequent structural analysis. The discussion is here based on a preliminary numerical study of the possible...

  7. Pulsed ultrasonic stir welding method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method of performing ultrasonic stir welding uses a welding head assembly to include a plate and a rod passing through the plate. The rod is rotatable about a longitudinal axis thereof. In the method, the rod is rotated about its longitudinal axis during a welding operation. During the welding operation, a series of on-off ultrasonic pulses are applied to the rod such that they propagate parallel to the rod's longitudinal axis. At least a pulse rate associated with the on-off ultrasonic pulses is controlled.

  8. Reconditioning medical prostheses by welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rontescu, C.; Cicic, D. T.; Vasile, I. M.; Bogatu, A. M.; Amza, C. G.

    2017-08-01

    After the technological process of making, some of the medical prostheses may contain imperfections, which can lead to framing the product in the spoilage category. This paper treats the possibility of reconditioning by welding of the prosthesis made of titanium alloys. The paper presents the obtained results after the reconditioning by welding, using the GTAW process, of a intramedullary rod type prosthesis in which was found a crack after the non-destructive examination. The obtained result analysis, after the micrographic examination of the welded joint areas, highlighted that the process of reconditioning by welding can be applied successfully in such situations.

  9. Portable electron beam weld chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, J. R.; Dimino, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    Development and characteristics of portable vacuum chamber for skate type electron beam welding are discussed. Construction and operational details of equipment are presented. Illustrations of equipment are provided.

  10. Corrosion Resistance of the Superhydrophobic Mg(OH2/Mg-Al Layered Double Hydroxide Coatings on Magnesium Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fen Zhang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Coatings of the Mg(OH2/Mg-Al layered double hydroxide (LDH composite were formed by a combined co-precipitation method and hydrothermal process on the AZ31 alloy substrate in alkaline condition. Subsequently, a superhydrophobic surface was successfully constructed to modify the composite coatings on the AZ31 alloy substrate using stearic acid. The characteristics of the composite coatings were investigated by means of X-ray diffractometer (XRD, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, scanning electronic microscope (SEM and contact angle (CA. The corrosion resistance of the coatings was assessed by potentiodynamic polarization, the electrochemical impedance spectrum (EIS, the test of hydrogen evolution and the immersion test. The results showed that the superhydrophobic coatings considerably improved the corrosion resistant performance of the LDH coatings on the AZ31 alloy substrate.

  11. Gas Metal Arc Welding. Welding Module 5. Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This guide is intended to assist vocational educators in teaching an eight-unit module in gas metal arc welding. The module is part of a welding curriculum that has been designed to be totally integrated with Missouri's Vocational Instruction Management System. The following topics are covered in the module: safety and testing, gas metal arc…

  12. Magnesium and fetal growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, K.

    1988-01-01

    Fetal growth retardation and premature labor are major problems in perinatal medicine today and account for a great deal of the observed fetal morbidity. While the neonatal death rate has steadily declined over the past decade, there has been a lack of concommitant decrease in these two leading problems. Magnesium (Mg/sup ++/) plays a major role in both of these areas of concern. The fact that it is used as a treatment for premature labor has led investigators to look at low Mg/sup ++/ as a possible cause of this poorly understood phenomenon. The second major cause of small for gestational age infants is intrauterine growth retardation, a condition which may be of either fetal or maternal origin. In either case, Mg/sup ++/ may be implicated since it exerts a strong influence on the underlying pathophysiology of placental failure and maternal hypertension. Both of these conditions are mediated by vascular and platelet hyperactivity as well as by and increase in the ration of thromboxane to prostacyclin. Studies in both the human and animal species are beginning to show how Mg/sup ++/ interacts in these conditions to produce such a damaging fetal outcome. The recent use of Doppler velocimetry of the developing fetus has shown reduced fetal vascular and maternal uterine vascular compliance as early as 14 weeks of gestation in those who would be so affected.

  13. [New welding processes and health effects of welding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Vecchia, G Marina; Maestrelli, Piero

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes some of the recent developments in the control technology to enhance capability of Pulse Gas Metal Arc Welding. Friction Stir Welding (FSW) processing has been also considered. FSW is a new solid-state joining technique. Heat generated by friction at the rotating tool softens the material being welded. FSW can be considered a green and energy-efficient technique without deleterious fumes, gas, radiation, and noise. Application of new welding processes is limited and studies on health effects in exposed workers are lacking. Acute and chronic health effects of conventional welding have been described. Metal fume fever and cross-shift decline of lung function are the main acute respiratory effects. Skin and eyes may be affected by heat, electricity and UV radiations. Chronic effects on respiratory system include chronic bronchitis, a benign pneumoconiosis (siderosis), asthma, and a possible increase in the incidence of lung cancer. Pulmonary infections are increased in terms of severity, duration, and frequency among welders.

  14. Modeling Stress-Strain State in Butt-Welded Joints after TIG Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Atroshenko

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper mathematical model was developed for definition of thermal-welding cycle influence on welding deformations distribution in flat samples of austenitic steels after TIG welding and developed recommendations to reduce the welding deformation on o the machinery for welding with a copper backing.

  15. Welding--Trade or Profession?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albright, C. E.; Smith, Kenneth

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses a collaborative program between schools with the purpose of training and providing advanced education in welding. Modern manufacturing is turning to automation to increase productivity, but it can be a great challenge to program robots and other computer-controlled welding and joining systems. Computer programming and…

  16. Metal Working and Welding Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    This student guide, one of a series of correspondence training courses designed to improve the job performance of members of the Marine Corps, deals with the skills needed by metal workers and welders. Addressed in the six individual units of the course are the following topics: weldable metals and their alloys, arc welding, gas welding,…

  17. Weld bonding of stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santos, I. O.; Zhang, Wenqi; Goncalves, V.M.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive theoretical and experimental investigation of the weld bonding process with the purpose of evaluating its relative performance in case of joining stainless steel parts, against alternative solutions based on structural adhesives or conventional spot-welding. Th...

  18. Ultrasound-assisted synthesis of magnesium hydroxide nanoparticles from magnesium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baidukova, Olga; Skorb, Ekaterina V

    2016-07-01

    Acoustic cavitation in water provides special kinetic and thermodynamic conditions for chemical synthesis and nanostructuring of solids. Using cavitation phenomenon, we obtained magnesium hydroxide from pure magnesium. This approach allows magnesium hydroxide to be synthesized without the requirement of any additives and non-aqueous solvents. Variation of sonochemical parameters enabled a total transformation of the metal to nanosized brucite with distinct morphology. Special attention is given to the obtaining of platelet-shaped, nanometric and de-agglomerated powders. The products of the synthesis were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electron diffraction (ED), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. 29 CFR 1910.255 - Resistance welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Resistance welding. 1910.255 Section 1910.255 Labor... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Welding, Cutting and Brazing § 1910.255 Resistance welding. (a.... Ignitron tubes used in resistance welding equipment shall be equipped with a thermal protection switch. (3...

  20. 46 CFR 154.660 - Pipe welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pipe welding. 154.660 Section 154.660 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR... § 154.660 Pipe welding. (a) Pipe welding must meet Part 57 of this chapter. (b) Longitudinal butt welds...

  1. 49 CFR 179.300-9 - Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding. 179.300-9 Section 179.300-9... Specifications for Multi-Unit Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-106A and 110AW) § 179.300-9 Welding. (a) Longitudinal... fusion welded on class DOT-110A tanks. Welding procedures, welders and fabricators must be approved in...

  2. METHOD AND SYSTEM FOR LASER WELDING

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    The invention relates to laser welding of at least two adjacent, abutting or overlapping work pieces in a welding direction using multiple laser beams guided to a welding region, wherein at least two of the multiple laser beams are coupled into the welding region so as to form a melt and at least...

  3. Magnetic Deflection Of Welding Electron Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinzak, R. Michael; Booth, Gary N.

    1991-01-01

    Electron-beam welds inside small metal parts produced with aid of magnetic deflector. Beam redirected so it strikes workpiece at effective angle. Weld joint positioned to where heavy microfissure concentration removed when subsequent machining required, increasing likelihood of removing any weld defects located in face side of electron-beam weld.

  4. Clamp and Gas Nozzle for TIG Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gue, G. B.; Goller, H. L.

    1982-01-01

    Tool that combines clamp with gas nozzle is aid to tungsten/inert-gas (TIG) welding in hard-to-reach spots. Tool holds work to be welded while directing a stream of argon gas at weld joint, providing an oxygen-free environment for tungsten-arc welding.

  5. Hot cracking in Al-Mg-Si alloy laser welding - operating parameters and their effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cicala, E. [Polytechnic University, Mechanical Faculty, 1 blv. Mihai Viteazu, 300222 Timisoara (Romania); Duffet, G. [Universite de Bourgogne, Laboratoire Laser et Traitements des Materiaux (LTm), 12 rue de la Fonderie, 71200 Le Creusot (France)]. E-mail: g.duffet@u-bourgogne.fr; Andrzejewski, H. [Universite de Bourgogne, Laboratoire Laser et Traitements des Materiaux (LTm), 12 rue de la Fonderie, 71200 Le Creusot (France); Grevey, D. [Universite de Bourgogne, Laboratoire Laser et Traitements des Materiaux (LTm), 12 rue de la Fonderie, 71200 Le Creusot (France); Ignat, S. [Polytechnic University, Mechanical Faculty, 1 blv. Mihai Viteazu, 300222 Timisoara (Romania); Universite de Bourgogne, Laboratoire Laser et Traitements des Materiaux (LTm), 12 rue de la Fonderie, 71200 Le Creusot (France)

    2005-03-25

    Hot cracking is a phenomenon that frequently occurs in the laser welding of some 'special' alloys, such as the aluminium-magnesium-silicon type. Each occurrence of this phenomenon needs to be studied in itself, taking into account not only the individual, but also the interactive, influences of the various parameters. The advantage of using laser beams in welding processes lies in the speeds that can be reached. The disadvantage, however, is that, owing to the high cooling rates characteristic of the interaction between the laser beam and the material, the welding speed itself becomes a cause of hot cracking. The aim of this paper is to see how this disadvantage may be eliminated. We consider what the most important parameters may be, relating to tensile strength and the quantity of cracks produced, that might influence the presence or absence of hot cracking. The most influential factors in avoiding hot cracking are the welding speed and wire parameters. Also important is welding stability, as instability generates cracks. We can then determine a technological window, useful for industrial applications, which takes into account the values of these influential factors and stability.

  6. Comparison of Welding Residual Stresses of Hybrid Laser-Arc Welding and Submerged Arc Welding in Offshore Steel Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Andreassen, Michael Joachim; Yu, Zhenzhen; Liu, Stephen; Guerrero-Mata, Martha Patricia

    2016-01-01

    In the offshore industry, welding-induced distortion and tensile residual stresses have become a major concern in relation to the structural integrity of a welded structure. Particularly, the continuous increase in size of welded plates and joints needs special attention concerning welding induced residual stresses. These stresses have a negative impact on the integrity of the welded joint as they promote distortion, reduce fatigue life, and contribute to corrosion cracking and premature fail...

  7. Research on stress corrosion behavior of CCSE40 welded by underwater wet welding with austenitic welding rod in seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Y.; Bai, Q.; Dong, S.; Yang, Z. L.; Gao, Y.

    2017-09-01

    The stress corrosion behavior of CCSE40 welded by underwater wet welding with austenitic welding rod in seawater was studied. Microstructure, mechanical property and stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of the underwater wet welding joint were analyzed by metallographic observation, tensile and bending tests, slow strain rate test (SSRT) and SEM. The results indicated that the weld zone (WZ) and the heat affected zone (HAZ) were all sensitive to the stress corrosion, and the WZ was more sensitive than the HAZ.

  8. Research on the Effects of Technical Parameters on the Molding of the Weld by A-TIG Welding

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Kai; Pan, Wu

    2012-01-01

    The effects of welding parameters on the molding of weld by A-TIG welding of a 4mm thickness mild steel plate is studied in the present paper. The results obtained show that: as welding current increases A-TIG welding penetration gets deeper than TIG welding; size and shape of HAZ has remarkable change; A-TIG welding has the narrower weld pool width than TIG welding.

  9. Effect of oxygen on the hydrogenation properties of magnesium films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostenfeld, Christopher Worsøe; Chorkendorff, Ib

    2006-01-01

    The effect of magnesium oxide on the magnesium and hydrogen desorption properties of magnesium films have been investigated. We find that by capping metallic magnesium films with oxide overlayers the apparent desorption energy of magnesium is increased from 146 kJ/mol to 314 kJ/mol. The results...... are discussed in light of previous investigations of ball-milled magnesium powders....

  10. Alkoxide-based magnesium electrolyte compositions for magnesium batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Sheng; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Liao, Chen; Guo, Bingkun

    2018-01-30

    Alkoxide magnesium halide compounds having the formula: RO--Mg--X (1) wherein R is a saturated or unsaturated hydrocarbon group that is unsubstituted, or alternatively, substituted with one or more heteroatom linkers and/or one or more heteroatom-containing groups comprising at least one heteroatom selected from fluorine, nitrogen, oxygen, sulfur, and silicon; and X is a halide atom. Also described are electrolyte compositions containing a compound of Formula (1) in a suitable polar aprotic or ionic solvent, as well as magnesium batteries in which such electrolytes are incorporated.

  11. System and process for production of magnesium metal and magnesium hydride from magnesium-containing salts and brines

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrail, Peter B.; Nune, Satish K.; Motkuri, Radha K.; Glezakou, Vassiliki-Alexandra; Koech, Phillip K.; Adint, Tyler T.; Fifield, Leonard S.; Fernandez, Carlos A.; Liu, Jian

    2016-11-22

    A system and process are disclosed for production of consolidated magnesium metal products and alloys with selected densities from magnesium-containing salts and feedstocks. The system and process employ a dialkyl magnesium compound that decomposes to produce the Mg metal product. Energy requirements and production costs are lower than for conventional processing.

  12. Automatic welding of stainless steel tubing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clautice, W. E.

    1978-01-01

    The use of automatic welding for making girth welds in stainless steel tubing was investigated as well as the reduction in fabrication costs resulting from the elimination of radiographic inspection. Test methodology, materials, and techniques are discussed, and data sheets for individual tests are included. Process variables studied include welding amperes, revolutions per minute, and shielding gas flow. Strip chart recordings, as a definitive method of insuring weld quality, are studied. Test results, determined by both radiographic and visual inspection, are presented and indicate that once optimum welding procedures for specific sizes of tubing are established, and the welding machine operations are certified, then the automatic tube welding process produces good quality welds repeatedly, with a high degree of reliability. Revised specifications for welding tubing using the automatic process and weld visual inspection requirements at the Kennedy Space Center are enumerated.

  13. Automatic welding systems for large ship hulls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arregi, B.; Granados, S.; Hascoet, JY.; Hamilton, K.; Alonso, M.; Ares, E.

    2012-04-01

    Welding processes represents about 40% of the total production time in shipbuilding. Although most of the indoor welding work is automated, outdoor operations still require the involvement of numerous operators. To automate hull welding operations is a priority in large shipyards. The objective of the present work is to develop a comprehensive welding system capable of working with several welding layers in an automated way. There are several difficulties for the seam tracking automation of the welding process. The proposed solution is the development of a welding machine capable of moving autonomously along the welding seam, controlling both the position of the torch and the welding parameters to adjust the thickness of the weld bead to the actual gap between the hull plates.

  14. Magnesium sulphate for fetal neuroprotection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bickford, Celeste D; Magee, Laura A; Mitton, Craig

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to assess the cost-effectiveness of administering magnesium sulphate to patients in whom preterm birth at ... sensitivity analyses were used to compare the administration of magnesium sulphate with the alternative of no treatment. Two separate cost perspectives were utilized in this series of analyses: a health system and a societal perspective. In addition, two separate measures of effectiveness were utilized: cases...... of cerebral palsy (CP) averted and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). RESULTS: From a health system and a societal perspective, respectively, a savings of $2,242 and $112,602 is obtained for each QALY gained and a savings of $30,942 and $1,554,198 is obtained for each case of CP averted when magnesium...

  15. Microstructural and technological optimisation of magnesium alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Facchinelli, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    Magnesium is one of the most abundance element in nature, and it's characterised by a lower density than aluminium. These characteristics confer great potential to magnesium alloys, which are so used for specialised applications, like for military purposes and in the aerospace industry. While some magnesium alloys, including the AM60B alloy, are historically associated to high pressure die casting, for such applications the magnesium alloy components are usually produced by the gravity castin...

  16. Magnesium removal in the electrolytic zinc industry

    OpenAIRE

    Booster, J.L.

    2003-01-01

    Electrolytic zinc plants need to take measures to control the magnesium content in their process liquors, because the natural magnesium bleed does not balance the input from concentrates. Presently used methods are environmentally unfriendly (due to the production of large amounts of waste gypsum) or expensive. Therefore, an alternative process route is explored in which magnesium is removed from zinc electrolyte by selective precipitation of magnesium fluoride (sellaite). As standard applica...

  17. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of an Ultrasonic Spot Welded Aluminum Alloy: The Effect of Welding Energy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    He Peng; Daolun Chen; Xianquan Jiang

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the microstructures, tensile lap shear strength, and fatigue resistance of 6022-T43 aluminum alloy joints welded via a solid-state welding technique-ultrasonic spot welding (USW...

  18. Versatile Friction Stir Welding/Friction Plug Welding System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Robert

    2006-01-01

    A proposed system of tooling, machinery, and control equipment would be capable of performing any of several friction stir welding (FSW) and friction plug welding (FPW) operations. These operations would include the following: Basic FSW; FSW with automated manipulation of the length of the pin tool in real time [the so-called auto-adjustable pin-tool (APT) capability]; Self-reacting FSW (SRFSW); SR-FSW with APT capability and/or real-time adjustment of the distance between the front and back shoulders; and Friction plug welding (FPW) [more specifically, friction push plug welding] or friction pull plug welding (FPPW) to close out the keyhole of, or to repair, an FSW or SR-FSW weld. Prior FSW and FPW systems have been capable of performing one or two of these operations, but none has thus far been capable of performing all of them. The proposed system would include a common tool that would have APT capability for both basic FSW and SR-FSW. Such a tool was described in Tool for Two Types of Friction Stir Welding (MFS- 31647-1), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 30, No. 10 (October 2006), page 70. Going beyond what was reported in the cited previous article, the common tool could be used in conjunction with a plug welding head to perform FPW or FPPW. Alternatively, the plug welding head could be integrated, along with the common tool, into a FSW head that would be capable of all of the aforementioned FSW and FPW operations. Any FSW or FPW operation could be performed under any combination of position and/or force control.

  19. Real time computer controlled weld skate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, W. A., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A real time, adaptive control, automatic welding system was developed. This system utilizes the general case geometrical relationships between a weldment and a weld skate to precisely maintain constant weld speed and torch angle along a contoured workplace. The system is compatible with the gas tungsten arc weld process or can be adapted to other weld processes. Heli-arc cutting and machine tool routing operations are possible applications.

  20. Corrosion Properties of Laser Welded Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weldingh, Jakob; Olsen, Flemmming Ove

    1997-01-01

    In this paper the corrosion properties of laser welded AISI 316L stainless steel are examined. A number of different welds has been performed to test the influence of the weld parameters of the resulting corrosion properties. It has been chosen to use the potential independent critical pitting...... temperature (CPT) test as corrosion test. The following welding parameters are varied: Welding speed, lsser power, focus point position and laser operation mode (CW or pulsed)....