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Sample records for welded aa6061 aluminium

  1. Heat input effect of friction stir welding on aluminium alloy AA 6061-T6 welded joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedmak Aleksandar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the heat input and maximum temperature developed during friction stir welding with different parameters. Aluminium alloy (AA 6061-T6 has been used for experimental and numerical analysis. Experimental analysis is based on temperature measurements by using infrared camera, whereas numerical analysis was based on empirical expressions and finite element method. Different types of defects have been observed in respect to different levels of heat input.

  2. Predicting tensile strength of friction stir welded AA6061 aluminium alloy joints by a mathematical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elangovan, K.; Balasubramanian, V.; Babu, S.

    2009-01-01

    AA6061 aluminium alloy (Al-Mg-Si alloy) has gathered wide acceptance in the fabrication of light weight structures requiring a high strength-to weight ratio and good corrosion resistance. Compared to the fusion welding processes that are routinely used for joining structural aluminium alloys, friction stir welding (FSW) process is an emerging solid state joining process in which the material that is being welded does not melt and recast. This process uses a non-consumable tool to generate frictional heat in the abutting surfaces. The welding parameters such as tool rotational speed, welding speed, axial force etc., and tool pin profile play a major role in deciding the joint strength. An attempt has been made to develop a mathematical model to predict tensile strength of the friction stir welded AA6061 aluminium alloy by incorporating FSW process parameters. Four factors, five levels central composite design has been used to minimize number of experimental conditions. Response surface method (RSM) has been used to develop the model. Statistical tools such as analysis of variance (ANOVA), student's t-test, correlation co-efficient etc. have been used to validate the developed model. The developed mathematical model can be effectively used to predict the tensile strength of FSW joints at 95% confidence level

  3. Influences of pulsed current tungsten inert gas welding parameters on the tensile properties of AA 6061 aluminium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senthil Kumar, T.; Balasubramanian, V.; Sanavullah, M.Y.

    2007-01-01

    Medium strength aluminium alloy (Al-Mg-Si alloy) has gathered wide acceptance in the fabrication of light weight structures requiring a high strength-to-weight ratio, such as transportable bridge girders, military vehicles, road tankers and railway transport systems. In any structural application of this alloy consideration its weldability is of utmost importance as welding is largely used for joining of structural components. The preferred welding process of aluminium alloy is frequently tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding due to its comparatively easier applicability and better economy. In the case of single pass TIG welding of thinner section of this alloy, the pulsed current has been found beneficial due to its advantages over the conventional continuous current process. The use of pulsed current parameters has been found to improve the mechanical properties of the welds compared to those of continuous current welds of this alloy due to grain refinement occurring in the fusion zone. Many considerations come into the picture and one need to carefully balance various pulse current parameters to arrive at an optimum combination. Hence, in this investigation an attempt has been made to study the influence of pulsed current TIG welding parameters on tensile properties of AA 6061 aluminium alloy weldments

  4. Study of Dissimilar Welding AA6061 Aluminium Alloy and AZ31B Magnesium Alloy with ER5356 Filler Using Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahamud, M. I. I.; Ishak, M.; Halil, A. M.

    2017-09-01

    This paper is to study of dissimilar welding AA6061 aluminium alloy and AZ31B magnesium alloy with ER5356 filler using friction stir welding. 2 mm thick plates of aluminium and magnesium were used. Friction stir welding operations were performed at different rotation and travel speeds and used the fixed tilt angle which is 3°. The rotation speeds varied from 800 to 1100 rpm, and the travel speed varied from 80 to 100 mm/min. In the range rotation speed of 800 to 1000 rpm and welding speed of 80 to 100 mm/min there are no defect at the weld. Tensile test show the higher tensile strength is 198 MPa and the welding efficiency is about 76%.

  5. The speciation of Si and other alloying elements in the oxide surface film of galvanically corroded weld fusion zone of laser welded AA6061 aluminium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mujibur Rahman, A.B.M.; Kumar, Sunil [Ian Wark Research Institute, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes Campus, Mawson Lakes, South Australia 5095 (Australia); Gerson, Andrea R. [Applied Centre for Structural and Synchrotron Studies, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes Campus, Mawson Lakes, South Australia 5095 (Australia)], E-mail: Andrea.Gerson@unisa.edu.au

    2008-05-15

    It has recently been proposed that on galvanic corrosion of laser weldments of AA6061 aluminium alloy the temporal increase in galvanic corrosion resulted from either the build up of intermetallic phases in the surface oxide layer and/or a significant increase in the surface area of the cathodic weld fusion zone due to the porous nature of the surface layer. This proposition has motivated a comprehensive surface analytical study of the incorporation of alloying elements into the oxide surface film, which is composed predominately of alumina. Si is found to be present as silicate and silicides. The Gibbs free energy of formation, per cation, of silicate is more negative than that for alumina and hence silicate formation is thermodynamically, relatively, favourable. In contrast the Gibbs free energy for oxide formation, per cation, for the other alloying elements is less negative and hence relatively unfavourable compared to the formation of alumina. We propose therefore that Fe, Cu and Cr are present in the metallic form, possibly as silicides, within the oxide surface layer. Magnesium is found to be depleted relative to the weld fusion zone presumably due to dissolution within the electrolyte.

  6. The speciation of Si and other alloying elements in the oxide surface film of galvanically corroded weld fusion zone of laser welded AA6061 aluminium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mujibur Rahman, A.B.M.; Kumar, Sunil; Gerson, Andrea R.

    2008-01-01

    It has recently been proposed that on galvanic corrosion of laser weldments of AA6061 aluminium alloy the temporal increase in galvanic corrosion resulted from either the build up of intermetallic phases in the surface oxide layer and/or a significant increase in the surface area of the cathodic weld fusion zone due to the porous nature of the surface layer. This proposition has motivated a comprehensive surface analytical study of the incorporation of alloying elements into the oxide surface film, which is composed predominately of alumina. Si is found to be present as silicate and silicides. The Gibbs free energy of formation, per cation, of silicate is more negative than that for alumina and hence silicate formation is thermodynamically, relatively, favourable. In contrast the Gibbs free energy for oxide formation, per cation, for the other alloying elements is less negative and hence relatively unfavourable compared to the formation of alumina. We propose therefore that Fe, Cu and Cr are present in the metallic form, possibly as silicides, within the oxide surface layer. Magnesium is found to be depleted relative to the weld fusion zone presumably due to dissolution within the electrolyte

  7. A three-dimensional fully coupled thermo-mechanical model for Self-reacting Friction Stir Welding of Aluminium AA6061 sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Piyush; Biswas, Pankaj; Kore, Sachin D.

    2016-01-01

    In the present work a three dimensional model of self-reacting friction stir welding in aluminium alloy AA6061 has been developed based on the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) approach using COMSOL Multiphysics software. The temperature dependent material properties have been incorporated in the model from available literature. A slip-stick contact between the workpiece and tool surface has been considered with the slip factor varying linearly with distance. The methodology adopted has been validated with experimental results available in the literature. The temperature distribution observed has been found to be asymmetric about the weld centre line. The maximum temperature has been observed on the advancing side of the weld. However, the temperature distribution across the thickness has been found to be almost symmetric about the mid thickness plane. An hourglass shaped temperature distribution has been observed across the cross-section of the weld. The material flow velocity distribution shows that the deformation zone is limited to a very small region around the tool. (paper)

  8. Galvanic corrosion of laser weldments of AA6061 aluminium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, A.B.M. Mujibur; Kumar, S.; Gerson, A.R.

    2007-01-01

    Galvanic corrosion of laser welded AA6061 aluminium alloy, arising from the varying rest potentials of the various weldment regions, was examined. The weld fusion zone is found to be the most cathodic region of the weldment while the base material is the most anodic region. The rate of galvanic corrosion, controlled by the cathodic process at the weld fusion zone, increases with time until a steady state maximum is reached. On galvanic corrosion the corrosion potential of the weld fusion zone shifts in the positive direction and the free corrosion current increases. It is proposed that the cathodic process at the weld fusion zone causes a local increase in pH that in turn causes dissolution of the surface film resulting in the loss of Al to solution and the increase of intermetallic phases. The increase in galvanic corrosion may result from either the build up of the intermetallic phases in the surface layer and/or significant increase in surface area of the weld fusion zone due to the porous nature of the surface layer

  9. Experimental investigation of hardness of FSW and TIG joints of Aluminium alloys of AA7075 and AA6061

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chetan Patil

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports hardness testing conducted on welded butt joints by FSW and TIG welding process on similar and dissimilar aluminium alloys. FSW joints were produced for similar alloys of AA7075T651 and dissimilar alloys of AA7075T651- AA6061T6. The Friction stir welds of AA7075 & AA6061 aluminium alloy were produced at different tool rotational speeds of 650,700, 800, 900, 1000 and transverse speed of 30, 35, 40 mm/min. TIG welding was conducted along the rolling direction of similar and dissimilar aluminium plates. The Brinell hardness testing techniques were employed to conduct the tests; these tests were conducted on the welds to ascertain the joint integrity before characterization to have an idea of the quality of the welds

  10. The role of silicon in the corrosion of AA6061 aluminium alloy laser weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, A.B.M. Mujibur; Kumar, Sunil [Ian Wark Research Institute, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes Campus, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095 (Australia); Gerson, Andrea R. [Applied Centre for Structural and Synchrotron Studies, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes Campus, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095 (Australia)], E-mail: Andrea.Gerson@unisa.edu.au

    2010-06-15

    The galvanic corrosion temporal increase observed on examination of the weld fusion zone (WFZ) of AA6061 laser weldments in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution cannot be attributed to electron tunnelling as the surface oxide layer is too thick, or the presence of Cl{sup -} within the surface layer as this element was not found to be present. Aluminium alloy and WFZ galvanic and surface analyses indicate that the cathodic WFZ corrosion characteristics are due to increases in silicate concentrations in the surface oxide layer, leading to increased ionic and/or p-type semi-conductor conductivity, intermetallic concentrations and surface area.

  11. The role of silicon in the corrosion of AA6061 aluminium alloy laser weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, A.B.M. Mujibur; Kumar, Sunil; Gerson, Andrea R.

    2010-01-01

    The galvanic corrosion temporal increase observed on examination of the weld fusion zone (WFZ) of AA6061 laser weldments in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution cannot be attributed to electron tunnelling as the surface oxide layer is too thick, or the presence of Cl - within the surface layer as this element was not found to be present. Aluminium alloy and WFZ galvanic and surface analyses indicate that the cathodic WFZ corrosion characteristics are due to increases in silicate concentrations in the surface oxide layer, leading to increased ionic and/or p-type semi-conductor conductivity, intermetallic concentrations and surface area.

  12. Microstructure and hardness performance of AA6061 aluminium composite using friction stir processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, C. D.; Fatchurrohman, N.

    2018-04-01

    Rice husk ash (RHA) is an industrial waste that has become a potential reinforced material for aluminium matrix composite (AMCs) due to low cost and abundantly available resources. Friction stir processing (FSP) has been introduced as a method to modify surface properties of the metal and alloy including theirs composite as well. The present work reports the production and characterization of AA6061 and AA6061/5 vol% RHA using FSP using parameters rotation speed 1000 rpm and traversed speed 25 mm/min. The microstructure was studied using optical microscopy (OM). A homogenous dispersion of RHA particles was obtained in the composite. No agglomeration or segregation was observed. The produced composite exhibited a fine grain structure. An improvement in hardness profile was observed as AA6061/5 vol% RHA improves in hardness compared to FSPed of AA6061 without reinforcement.

  13. Friction stir welding (FSW) of AA 6061 T6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabot, Pedro; Monglioni, Alberto; Carella, Eduardo

    2002-01-01

    The friction-stir process (FSW) developed by England's TWI in the last decade is a new concept in solid phase friction welding that is particularly appropriate for soldering aluminum and its alloys. It offers interesting aspects and can advantageously replace the usual arch processes. It is an automatic process that solders together long pieces by butt or lap welding and, therefore, overcomes the greater limitation of the conventional friction process that can be applied only to pieces with revolution symmetry. FSW is based essentially on the use of a cylindrical tool with a special profile, which is inserted between the surfaces where the materials meet to join them together at a certain rotation speed and under a specific force. The pieces must be rigidly butt bonded or overlapped to prevent movement when the tool moves forward along the joint producing the dispersion of oxides, local plastisizing of the material and the weld. Since its creation FSW has been the subject of many international publications, but until the present work there was no technologically relevant data about tools and procedures. For this reason, when its promising and novel nature was noticed, the CNEA began its own development project in 1997. The main characteristics of the tool are reviewed here and the results of tests carried out to evaluate the influence of the feed velocity on the mechanical properties of the butt joining of a 6.25 mm thick AA6061 T6 plate. Different accumulated aspects of the experience are discussed as well (cw)

  14. Fabrication of AA6061-T6 Plate Type Fuel Assembly Using Electron Beam Welding Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Soosung; Seo, Kyoungseok; Lee, Donbae; Park, Jongman; Lee, Yoonsang; Lee, Chongtak

    2014-01-01

    AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy is easily welded by conventional GTAW (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding), LBW (Laser Beam Welding) and EBW. However, certain characteristics, such as solidification cracking, porosity, HAZ (Heat-affected Zone) degradation must be considered during welding. Because of high energy density and low heat input, especially LBW and EBW processes possess the advantage of minimizing the fusing zone and HAZ and producing deeper penetration than arc welding processes. In present study, to apply for the nuclear fuel plate fabrication and assembly, a fundamental EBW experiment using AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy specimens was conducted. Furthermore, to establish the welding process, and satisfy the requirements of the weld quality, EBW apparatus using an electron welding gun and vacuum chamber was developed, and preliminary investigations for optimizing the welding parameters of the specimens using AA6061-T6 aluminum plates were also performed. The EB weld quality of AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy for the fuel plate assembly has been also studied by the shrinkage measurement and weld inspection using computed tomography. This study was carried out to determine the suitable welding parameters and to evaluate tensile strength of AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy. In the present experiment, satisfactory electron beam welding process of the full-sized sample was being developed. Based on this fundamental study, fabrication of the plate-type fuel assembly will be provided for the future Ki-Jang research reactor project

  15. Partially melted zone cracking in AA6061 welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad Rao, K.; Ramanaiah, N.; Viswanathan, N.

    2008-01-01

    Partially melted zone (PMZ) cracking susceptibility in AA6061 alloy was studied. Role of prior thermal history, gas tungsten arc welding techniques such as continuous current (CC) and pulsed current (PC) and use of different fillers (AA4043 and AA5356) were studied. Role of different grain refiners such as scandium, zirconium and Tibor in the above fillers was studied. Varestraint test was used to study the PMZ cracking susceptibility. Metallurgical analysis was done to corroborate the results. PMZ cracking was severe in T6 temper than in T4 irrespective of filler material. PMZ cracking susceptibility was more with AA5356 than in AA4043. It was less with pulsed current GTAW. PMZ cracking susceptibility was reduced with addition of grain refiners. Out of all, lowest PMZ cracking susceptibility was observed with 0.5%Sc addition to fusion zone through AA4043 filler and PC technique. The concentrations of magnesium and silicon were reduced at the PMZ grain boundaries with grain refiner additions to fusion zone through AA5356 or AA4043

  16. Partially melted zone cracking in AA6061 welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad Rao, K. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai (India)], E-mail: kpr@iitm.ac.in; Ramanaiah, N. [Sri Kalahasteeswara Institute of Technology, Srikalahasti (India); Viswanathan, N. [Defence Research and Development Laboratory, Hyderabad (India)

    2008-07-01

    Partially melted zone (PMZ) cracking susceptibility in AA6061 alloy was studied. Role of prior thermal history, gas tungsten arc welding techniques such as continuous current (CC) and pulsed current (PC) and use of different fillers (AA4043 and AA5356) were studied. Role of different grain refiners such as scandium, zirconium and Tibor in the above fillers was studied. Varestraint test was used to study the PMZ cracking susceptibility. Metallurgical analysis was done to corroborate the results. PMZ cracking was severe in T6 temper than in T4 irrespective of filler material. PMZ cracking susceptibility was more with AA5356 than in AA4043. It was less with pulsed current GTAW. PMZ cracking susceptibility was reduced with addition of grain refiners. Out of all, lowest PMZ cracking susceptibility was observed with 0.5%Sc addition to fusion zone through AA4043 filler and PC technique. The concentrations of magnesium and silicon were reduced at the PMZ grain boundaries with grain refiner additions to fusion zone through AA5356 or AA4043.

  17. Evaluation of Electron Beam Welding Performance of AA6061-T6 Plate-type Fuel Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Soo-Sung; Seo, Kyoung-Seok; Lee, Don-Bae; Park, Jong-Man; Lee, Yoon-Sang; Lee, Chong-Tak

    2014-01-01

    As one of the most commonly used heat-treatable aluminum alloys, AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy is available in a wide range of structural materials. Typically, it is used in structural members, auto-body sheet and many other applications. Generally, this alloy is easily welded by conventional GTAW (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding), LBW (Laser Beam Welding) and EBW(Electron Beam Welding). However, certain characteristics, such as solidification cracking, porosity, HAZ (Heat-affected Zone) degradation must be considered during welding. Because of high energy density and low heat input, especially LBW and EBW processes possess the advantage of minimizing the fusing zone and HAZ and producing deeper penetration than arc welding processes. In present study, to apply for the plate-type nuclear fuel fabrication and assembly, a fundamental electron beam welding experiment using AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy specimens was conducted. Furthermore, to establish the suitable welding process, and satisfy the requirements of the weld quality, EBW apparatus using an electron welding gun and vacuum chamber was developed, and preliminary investigations for optimizing the welding parameters of the specimens using AA6061-T6 aluminum plates were also performed. The EB weld quality of AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy for the plate-type fuel assembly has been also studied by the weld penetrations of side plate to end fitting and fixing bar and weld inspections using computed tomography

  18. Optimization of friction stir welding process parameters to maximize tensile strength of stir cast AA6061-T6/AlNp composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashok Kumar, B.; Murugan, N.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • AA6061/AlN p cast composite was welded by FSW process. • Regression models were developed to predict UTS and elongation of the FS welded joint. • FS welded joint using the optimized parameters exhibited maximum UTS and joint efficiency. • Defect free weld joint was obtained with optimized parameters value. - Abstract: Aluminium Matrix Composites (AMCs) reinforced with particulate form of reinforcement has replaced monolithic alloys in many engineering industries due to its superior mechanical properties and tailorable thermal and electrical properties. As aluminium nitride (AlN) has high specific strength, high thermal conductivity, high electrical resistivity, low dielectric constant, low coefficient of thermal expansion and good compatibility with aluminium alloy, Al/AlN composite is extensively used in electronic packaging industries. Joining of AMCs is unavoidable in many engineering applications. Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is one of the most suitable welding process to weld the AMCs reinforced with particulate form of ceramics without deteriorating its superior mechanical properties. An attempt has been made to develop regression models to predict the Ultimate Tensile Strength (UTS) and Percent Elongation (PE) of the friction stir welded AA6061 matrix composite reinforced with aluminium nitride particles (AlN p ) by correlating the significant parameters such as tool rotational speed, welding speed, axial force and percentage of AlN p reinforcement in the AA6061 matrix. Statistical software SYSTAT 12 and statistical tools such as analysis of variance (ANOVA) and student’s t test, have been used to validate the developed models. It was observed from the investigation that these factors independently influenced the UTS and PE of the friction stir welded composite joints. The developed regression models were optimized to maximize UTS of friction stir welded AA6061/AlN p composite joints

  19. Tensile behavior of friction stir welded AA 6061-T4 aluminum alloy joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidarzadeh, A.; Khodaverdizadeh, H.; Mahmoudi, A.; Nazari, E.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Range of parameters for defect-free friction stir welded AA 6061-T4 was reached. ► A model was developed for predicting UTS and EL of friction stir welded AA 6061-T4. ► The maximum values of UTS and EL of joints were estimated by developed model. ► The optimum values of FSW process parameters were determined. -- Abstract: In this investigation response surface methodology based on a central composite rotatable design with three parameters, five levels and 20 runs, was used to develop a mathematical model predicting the tensile properties of friction stir welded AA 6061-T4 aluminum alloy joints at 95% confidence level. The three welding parameters considered were tool rotational speed, welding speed and axial force. Analysis of variance was applied to validate the predicted model. Microstructural characterization and fractography of joints were examined using optical and scanning electron microscopes. Also, the effects of the welding parameters on tensile properties of friction stir welded joints were analyzed in detail. The results showed that the optimum parameters to get a maximum of tensile strength were 920 rev/min, 78 mm/min and 7.2 kN, where the maximum of tensile elongation was obtained at 1300 rev/min, 60 mm/min and 8 kN.

  20. Cold metal transfer spot plug welding of AA6061-T6-to-galvanized steel for automotive applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, R.; Huang, Q.; Chen, J.H.; Wang, Pei-Chung

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Two Al-to-galvanized steel spot plug welding joints were studied by CMT method. • The optimum process variables for the two joints were gotten by orthogonal test. • Connection mechanism of the two joints were discussed. -- Abstract: In this study, cold metal transfer (CMT) spot plug joining of 1 mm thick Al AA6061-T6 to 1 mm thick galvanized steel (i.e., Q235) was studied. Welding variables were optimized for a plug weld in the center of a 25 mm overlap region with aluminum 4043 wire and 100% argon shielding gas. Microstructures and elemental distributions were characterized by scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer. Mechanical testing of CMT spot plug welded joints was conducted. It was found that it is feasible to join Al AA6061T6-to-galvanized steel by CMT spot plug welding method. The process variables for two joints with Al AA6061T6-to-galvanized mild steel and galvanized mild steel-to-Al AA6061T6 are optimized. The strength of CMT spot welded Al AA6061T6-to-galvanized mild steel is determined primarily by the strength and area of the brazed interface. While, the strength of the galvanized mild steel-to-Al AA6061T6 joint is mainly dependent upon the area of the weld metal

  1. Fundamental Study of Electron Beam Welding of AA6061-T6 Aluminum Alloy for Nuclear Fuel Plate Assembly (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Soosung; Lee, Haein; Lee, Donbae; Park, Jongman; Lee, Yoonsang

    2013-01-01

    Certain characteristics, such as solidification cracking, porosity, HAZ (Heat-affected Zone) degradation must be considered during welding. Because of high energy density and low heat input, especially LBW and EBW processes posses the advantage of minimizing the fusing zone and HAZ and producing deeper penetration than arc welding processes. In present study, to apply for the nuclear fuel plate fabrication and assembly, a fundamental EBW experiment using AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy specimens was conducted. Furthermore, to establish the welding process, and satisfy the requirements of the weld quality, EBW apparatus using a electron welding gun and vacuum chamber was developed, and preliminary investigations for optimizing the welding parameters of the specimens using AA6061-T6 aluminum plates were also performed. In this experiment, a feasibility test was carried out by tensile tester, bead-on-plate welding and metallographic examination to comply with the aluminum welding procedure. The EB weld quality of AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy for the fuel plate assembly has been also studied by the mechanical testing and microstructure examinations. This study was carried out to determine the suitable welding process and to investigate tensile strength of AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy. In the present experiment, satisfactory EBW of the square butt weld specimens was developed. In comparison with the rolling directions of test specimens, the tensile strengths were no difference between the longitudinal and transverse welds. Based on this fundamental study, fabrication and assembly of the nuclear fuel plates will be provided for the future Kijang research reactor project

  2. Effect of pin tool design on the material flow of dissimilar AA7075-AA6061 friction stir welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Mohammed M.; Ishak, M.; Rejab, M. R. M.

    2017-10-01

    Tool design is the most influential aspect in the friction stir welding (FSW) technology. Influence of pin tool geometry on material flow pattern are studied in this work during the FSW of dissimilar AA7075 and AA6061 aluminium alloys. Three truncated pin tool profiles (threaded, threaded with single flat, and unthreaded with single flat) were used to prepare the weldments. The workpieces were joined using a custom-made clamping system under 1100 rpm of spindle speed, 300 mm/min of traverse rate and 3° of tilt angle. The metallographic analysis showed that defect-free welds can be produced using the three pin tools with significant changes in the mixing stir zone structure. The results declared that the introducing of the flat on the cone of the probe deviates the pattern of the onion rings without changing the chemical composition of the created layers. This in turn improves the hardness distribution and tensile strength of the welded joint. It was also noted that both heat affected zone (HAZ) and thermal-mechanical affected zone (TMAZ) are similar in composition to their corresponding base materials (BM).

  3. A Preliminary Report on the Strength and Metallography of a Bimetallic Friction Stir Weld Joint Between AA6061 and MIL-DTL-46100E High Hardness Steel Armor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-26

    bimetallic friction stir weld joint between AA6061 and MIL-DTL-46100E High Hardness steel armor. ABSTRACT One half inch thick plates of 6061-T6 aluminum...alloy and High Hardness steel armor (MIL- STD-46100) were successfully joined by the friction stir welding (FSW) process using a tungsten-rhenium...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A preliminary report on the strength and metallography of a bimetallic friction stir weld joint between AA6061 and MIL-DTL

  4. Special grain boundaries in the nugget zone of friction stir welded AA6061-T6 under various welding parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Wang [Key Lab of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Yong, Zou, E-mail: yzou@sdu.edu.cn [Key Lab of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Xuemei, Liu [Key Lab of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Matsuda, Kenji [Department of Materials Science and Technology, Faculty of Engineering, University of Toyama, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan)

    2016-08-01

    The age hardenable AA6061-T6 plate was butt welded by friction stir welding. The total heat input, generated by friction between the tool and work piece and plastic deformation, results in a consumption of meta-stable phases in the nugget zone. Precipitation phenomena were closely related to the diffusion of the solute atoms. The existence of special grain boundaries like Σ1a and Σ3 will increase the difficulty in diffusion, which will improve the hardness in the nugget zone. Furthermore, the formation of Σ3 grain boundaries can result from an impingement of re-crystallized grains coming from texture components in twin relationship already. An appropriate strain level may benefit the development of the twin components with a similar intensity. The welding parameters have an effect on heat source mode and the strain level. Then, the type of dynamic re-crystallization and distribution of the special grain boundaries was altered by changing the parameters.

  5. Effect of gaussian beam on microstructural and mechanical properties of dissimilarlaser welding ofAA5083 and AA6061 alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, B.; Cheepu, Muralimohan; Sivaprasad, K.; Muthupandi, V.

    2018-03-01

    The present study focuses on a sheet thickness of 4 mm using different laser power and welding rate by the laser beam welding (LBW) at a beam size180 μm. The observations on the weldments are showing that thermal conductivity of the materials plays a major role on microstructural changes. The as-welded mechanical properties were studied by correlation with its microstructures. Due to the steeper temperature gradient during the laser beam welding AA6061 was showing the greater variation compares with AA5083 side in the micro hardness studies.Also, the tensile strength of 241 MPa has been reported as highest with the welds made of laser powerat 3.5 kW and welding rate at 3.5 mmin-1.

  6. Mechanical Properties Of AA 6061-T6 Aluminum Alloy Friction Stir Welds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asmaa M. Abdullah

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The different parameters on mechanical and microstructural properties of aluminium alloy 6061-T6 Friction stir-welded (FSW joints were investigated in the present study. Different welded specimens were produced by employing variable rotating speeds and welding speeds. Tensile strength of the produced joints was tested at room temperature and the the effecincy was assessed, it was 75% of the base metal at rotational speed 1500 rpm and weld speed 50 mm/min. Hardness of various zones of FSW welds are presented and analyzed by means of brinell hardness number . Besides to thess tests the bending properties investigated and showed good results in some specimen and not in onother the mamximum stress was 240 N/mm2 at rotational speed 1500 rpm and weld speed 50 mm/min , while the maximum stress at 1250 rpm and 75 mm/min 94 N/mm2 , hardness results shwed lower values in heat affected and nugget zones than the base metal with improving of hardness at 1500 rpm, 75 mm/min .

  7. Effect of the weld thermal cycles by the modified indirect electric arc (MIEA) on the mechanical properties of the AA6061-T6 alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambriz, R. A.; Barrera, G.; Garcia, R.; Lopez, V. H.

    2009-01-01

    Results of temperature measurements during welding of 12.7 mm thick AA6061-T6 alloy plates by modified indirect electric arc (MIEA) are presented. This study describes the thermal cycles of the heat affected zone (HAZ) and also in the fusion zone. Depending upon the position of the transducers, the maximum temperatures measured in the HAZ range from 308 to 693 degree centigrade, these measurements were related with the tensile test results, and the failure zone reported previously by the authors. It was observed that, there is a decrease in the mechanical strength of the welded joints, due to the microstructural changes suffered by AA6061-T6 alloy in which formation of the βoccurs according to the TTT transformation diagram. The inherent cooling conditions of the weld pool observed for the MIEA technique (only one pass of welding), have permitted to establish the characteristics of solidification and microstructure for a specific cooling rate. (Author) 24 refs

  8. Heat input effect of friction stir welding on aluminum alloy AA 6061-T6 welded joint

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sedmak, A.; Kumar, R.; Chattopadhyaya, S.; Hloch, Sergej; Tadić, S.; Djurdjević, A. A.; Čeković, I. R.; Dončeva, E.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 2 (2016), s. 637-641 ISSN 0354-9836 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : friction stir welding * defect * heat input * maximum temperature Subject RIV: JQ - Machines ; Tools Impact factor: 1.093, year: 2016 http://www.doiserbia.nb.rs/img/doi/0354-9836/2016/0354-98361500147D.pdf

  9. Parametric optimisation of heat treated recycling aluminium (AA6061) by response surface methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, A.; Lajis, M. A.; Yusuf, N. K.; Shamsudin, S.; Zhong, Z. W.

    2017-09-01

    Alternating typical primary aluminium production with recycling route should benefit various parties, including the environment since the need of high cost and massive energy consumption will be ruled out. At present, hot extrusion is preferred as the effective solid-state recycling process compared to the typical method of melting the swarf at high temperature. However, the ideal properties of extruded product can only be achieved through a controlled process used to alter the microstructure to impart properties which benefit the working life of a component, which also known as heat treatment process. To that extent, this work ought to investigate the effect of extrusion temperature and ageing time on the hardness of the recycled aluminium chips. By employing Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) for full factorial design with centre point, a total of 11 runs were carried out randomly. Three dissimilar extrusion temperatures were used to obtain gear-shape billet. Extruded billets were cut and ground before entering the treatment phase at three different ageing times. Ageing time was found as the influential factor to affect the material hardness, rather than the extrusion temperature. Sufficient ageing time allows the impurity atoms to interfere the dislocation phenomena and yield great hardness. Yet, the extrusion temperatures still act to assist the bonding activities via interparticle diffusion transport matter.

  10. Design and Analysis of Wind Turbine Blade Hub using Aluminium Alloy AA 6061-T6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravikumar, S.; Jaswanthvenkatram, V.; Sai kumar, Y. J. N. V.; Sohaib, S. Md.

    2017-05-01

    This work presents the design and analysis of horizontal axis wind turbine blade hub using different material. The hub is very crucial part of the wind turbine, which experience the loads from the blades and the loads were transmitted to the main shaft. At present wind turbine is more expensive and weights more than a million pounds, with the nacelle, rotor hub and blades accounting for most of the weight. In this work Spheroidal graphite cast iron GGG 40.3 is replaced by aluminium alloy 6061-T6 to enhance the casting properties and also to improve the strength-weight ratio. This transition of material leads to reduction in weight of the wind turbine. All the loads caused by wind and extreme loads on the blades are transferred to the hub. Considering the IEC 61400-1 standard for defining extreme loads on the hub the stress and deflection were calculated on the hub by using Finite element Analysis. Result obtained from ANSYS is compared and discussed with the existing design.

  11. Effect of the weld thermal cycles by the modified indirect electric arc (MIEA) on the mechanical properties of the AA6061-T6 alloy; Efecto de los ciclo termicos de soldadura por arco electrico indirecto modificado (AEIM) en las propiedades mecanicas de la aleacion AA6061-T6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambriz, R. A.; Barrera, G.; Garcia, R.; Lopez, V. H.

    2009-07-01

    Results of temperature measurements during welding of 12.7 mm thick AA6061-T6 alloy plates by modified indirect electric arc (MIEA) are presented. This study describes the thermal cycles of the heat affected zone (HAZ) and also in the fusion zone. Depending upon the position of the transducers, the maximum temperatures measured in the HAZ range from 308 to 693 degree centigrade, these measurements were related with the tensile test results, and the failure zone reported previously by the authors. It was observed that, there is a decrease in the mechanical strength of the welded joints, due to the microstructural changes suffered by AA6061-T6 alloy in which formation of the {beta}occurs according to the TTT transformation diagram. The inherent cooling conditions of the weld pool observed for the MIEA technique (only one pass of welding), have permitted to establish the characteristics of solidification and microstructure for a specific cooling rate. (Author) 24 refs.

  12. Effect of friction stir welding on microstructure, mechanical and wear properties of AA6061/ZrB2 in situ cast composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinaharan, I.; Murugan, N.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Application of FSW to join AA6061/ZrB 2 in situ composites. ► Homogenous distribution of ZrB 2 particles in the weld zone. ► Clusters in the parent composite are fragmented by the stirring action of the tool. ► Hardening of weld zone. ► FSW enhanced the wear resistance of the composite. - Abstract: Inadequate development of fabrication methods restricts the applications of new families of aluminum matrix composites (AMCs). Friction stir welding (FSW) is a potential candidate to join AMCs without any defects associated with conventional fusion welding processes. The primary objective of the present work is to apply FSW process to join AA6061/(0, 5 and 10 wt.%) ZrB 2 in situ cast composites and evaluate the joint properties. The composites were prepared by reacting inorganic salts K 2 ZrF 6 and KBF 4 with molten aluminum and joined using a FSW machine at a tool rotational speed of 1150 rpm, welding speed of 50 mm/min and axial force of 6 kN. The joints showed the presence of various zones such as weld zone (WZ), thermomechanically affected zone (TMAZ) and heat affected zone (HAZ). The weld zone was characterized with a homogenous distribution of ZrB 2 particles. The stirring action of the tool resulted in fragmentation of several clusters present in the parent composite. The weld zone exhibited higher hardness than that of the parent composite. The tensile strength of welded joints was comparable to that of parent composites. The wear resistance of the composites improved subsequent to FSW.

  13. Multi-Objective Optimization of Friction Stir Welding Process Parameters of AA6061-T6 and AA7075-T6 Using a Biogeography Based Optimization Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehran Tamjidy

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The development of Friction Stir Welding (FSW has provided an alternative approach for producing high-quality welds, in a fast and reliable manner. This study focuses on the mechanical properties of the dissimilar friction stir welding of AA6061-T6 and AA7075-T6 aluminum alloys. The FSW process parameters such as tool rotational speed, tool traverse speed, tilt angle, and tool offset influence the mechanical properties of the friction stir welded joints significantly. A mathematical regression model is developed to determine the empirical relationship between the FSW process parameters and mechanical properties, and the results are validated. In order to obtain the optimal values of process parameters that simultaneously optimize the ultimate tensile strength, elongation, and minimum hardness in the heat affected zone (HAZ, a metaheuristic, multi objective algorithm based on biogeography based optimization is proposed. The Pareto optimal frontiers for triple and dual objective functions are obtained and the best optimal solution is selected through using two different decision making techniques, technique for order of preference by similarity to ideal solution (TOPSIS and Shannon’s entropy.

  14. Multi-Objective Optimization of Friction Stir Welding Process Parameters of AA6061-T6 and AA7075-T6 Using a Biogeography Based Optimization Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamjidy, Mehran; Baharudin, B T Hang Tuah; Paslar, Shahla; Matori, Khamirul Amin; Sulaiman, Shamsuddin; Fadaeifard, Firouz

    2017-05-15

    The development of Friction Stir Welding (FSW) has provided an alternative approach for producing high-quality welds, in a fast and reliable manner. This study focuses on the mechanical properties of the dissimilar friction stir welding of AA6061-T6 and AA7075-T6 aluminum alloys. The FSW process parameters such as tool rotational speed, tool traverse speed, tilt angle, and tool offset influence the mechanical properties of the friction stir welded joints significantly. A mathematical regression model is developed to determine the empirical relationship between the FSW process parameters and mechanical properties, and the results are validated. In order to obtain the optimal values of process parameters that simultaneously optimize the ultimate tensile strength, elongation, and minimum hardness in the heat affected zone (HAZ), a metaheuristic, multi objective algorithm based on biogeography based optimization is proposed. The Pareto optimal frontiers for triple and dual objective functions are obtained and the best optimal solution is selected through using two different decision making techniques, technique for order of preference by similarity to ideal solution (TOPSIS) and Shannon's entropy.

  15. Influencia de los parámetros de la soldadura metálica fría en las aleaciones AA5083 y AA6061//Influence of the colt metal welding parameters on the AA5083 and AA6061 aluminum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Eduardo de‐Luna‐Alanís

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available El trabajo tuvo como objetivo evaluar la influencia de la velocidad de la soldadura y de las correcciones del arco y pulso en el proceso de Transferencia Metálica Fría sobre las propiedades mecánicas de las aleaciones AA5083 y AA6061. Se desarrolló un diseño experimental de tipo factorial multinivel, con 4 factores independientes (Corrección de Arco, Pulso, Velocidad de Soldadura y Aleación. Los parámetros fundamentales fueron: Corriente de base 250 A; Voltaje de arco 21 V y Polaridad (Direct current electrode positive, DCEP. La evaluación se realizó a través de un ensayo de tracción transversal sobre probetas planas obtenidas de los cupones soldados. Se demuestra que el modelo aplicado es adecuado, revelándose en los experimentos diferencias sustanciales en las propiedades Tensión de fluencia 29,56 %, Módulo de elasticidad 51,16 % y Trabajo específico de deformación elástica 42,30 %, el cual no posee una dependencia lineal con elresto de las propiedades anteriores.Palabras claves: transferencia metálica fría, aleación AA5083, aleación AA6061, propiedades mecánicas._______________________________________________________________________________AbstractThe work objective was to evaluatethe influence of Cold Metal Transfer process arc and pulse corrections and welding speed on the mechanical properties of AA5083 and AA6061 aluminum alloys. For it, a Factorial Multilevel experimental design whit 4 independent factor (arc correction, pulse correction, welding speed and alloy was developed. The essential welding parameters employed were: base current 250 A; arc voltage 21 V and polarity (DCEP. The evaluation was made whit a transverse traction test of plate welded coupons. The experimental model applied wasadequate and substantial differences was showed between yield tensile strength 29,56 %, elasticity module (51,16 % and specific work of elastic deformation 42,30 %, which it does not possess a lineal dependence whit the rest

  16. Thermal efficiency on welding of AA6061-T6 alloy by modified indirect electric arc and current signals digitalisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambriz, R. R.; Barrera, G.; Garcia, R.; Lopez, V. H.

    2009-01-01

    The results of the thermal efficiency on welding by modified indirect electric arc technique (MIEA) [1] of the 6061- T6 aluminum alloy are presented. These values are in a range of 90 to 94 %, which depend of the preheating employed. Thermal efficiency was obtained by means of a balance energy which considers the heat input, the amount of melted mass of the welding profiles, and welding parameters during the joining, especially of the arc current data acquisition. Also, some dimensionless parameters were employed in order to determine the approximation grade of the melted pool, the heat affected zone (HAZ), and their corresponding values with the experimental results. (Author) 13 refs

  17. Formation And Distribution of Brittle Structures in Friction Stir Welding of AA 6061 To Copper. Influence of Preheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Vahid Safi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, apart from introducing brand – new warm friction stir welding (WFSW method, the effect of preheating on friction stir welded of copper and aluminum alloys sheets and its influence on improving the mechanical properties of the weld were investigated. Sheets of aluminum alloy 6061 and copper with thickness of 5mm were used. The tool was made of tool steel of grade H13 with a threaded cone shape. Rotational speeds (w of 1200-1400 rpm and traverse speeds (v of 50-100 mm/min were used for better understanding the behavior of the tools during the heat input. The sheets were kept in furnace with temperature of 75 ˚C and 125˚C and welding was done afterwards. At last, tensile and micro hardness tests were done to compare the mechanical properties of the welds. Considering to the high thermal conductivity of both copper and aluminum, the reason of increase in strength of the joints could be related to the low temperature gradient between the weld zone and base metal because the heat gets out of the stir zone with lower steep. A significant increase in hardness is observed in the SZ for the following reasons: (i the presence of concentric grains with intensely refined recrystallization and (ii the presence of intermetallic compounds. The tensile test results showed 85% increase in the strength of preheated joints. The maximum strength occurs for preheating of 75˚C, rotational speed of 1200 rpm and traverse speed of 50 mm/min. In the present study, intermetallic compounds and the precipitates are moved to the grain boundaries during the welding process. These precipitates act as strong obstacles to the movements of dislocations and increase the deformation resistance of material. This phenomenon may result in locking of grain boundaries and consequently decrease of grain size. This grain refinement can improve the mechanical properties of welds. Accordingly, hardness and strength of the material will be increased.

  18. Mechanical Behaviour Investigation Of Aluminium Alloy Tailor Welded Blank Developed By Using Friction Stir Welding Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwi Anggono, Agus; Sugito, Bibit; Hariyanto, Agus; Subroto; Sarjito

    2017-10-01

    The objective on the research was to investigate the mechanical properties and microstructure of tailor welded blank (TWB) made from AA6061-T6 and AA1100 using friction stir welding (FSW) process. Due to the dissimilar mechanical properties of the two aluminium alloys, microhardness test was conducted to measure the hardness distribution across the weld nugget. The mixing of two distinct materials was influenced by tool rotation speed. Therefore, microstructure analysis was carried out to investigate the grain size and shape. The grain size of AA6061-T6 has increased in the heat affected zone (HAZ) while for AA1100 has decreased. In the weld nugget, it has found a hook defects in the dissimilar aluminium joining. By using monotonic tensile load, the different weld line direction was observed with the expansion in tool rotation. The joints failure were consistently on the area of AA1100 series. Furthermore, two specimens were investigated, one through the dissimilar aluminium and the other through similiar material. Inspection of the weld nugget hardness was shown that nonhomogen material intermixing during the stiring process as confirmed by microhardness measurement.

  19. Influence of tool pin in friction stir welding on activated carbon reinforced aluminium metal matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    DijuSamuel, G.; Raja Dhas, J. Edwin

    2017-10-01

    This paper focus on impact of tool pin in friction stir welding on activated carbon reinforced aluminium metal matrix composite. For fabrication of metal matrix composite AA6061 is used as matrix and activated carbon is used as reinforcement and it is casted using modified stir casting technique. After casting metal matrix composite has undergone various microstructure tests like SEM,EDAX and XRD. FSW is carried out in this metal matrix composite by choosing various tool pin profile like square,round,Threaded round, hexagon and taper. The quality of welded plates is measured in terms of ultimate tensile strength and hardness.

  20. Microstructure, mechanical properties and texture of an AA6061/AA5754 composite fabricated by cross accumulative roll bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verstraete, K., E-mail: kevin.verstraete@u-psud.fr [Université Paris-Sud, SP2M, ICMMO, UMR CNRS 8182, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Helbert, A.L. [Université Paris-Sud, SP2M, ICMMO, UMR CNRS 8182, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Brisset, F. [Université Paris-Sud, ICMMO, UMR CNRS 8182, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Benoit, A.; Paillard, P. [Institut des Matériaux Jean Rouxel (IMN), UMR 6502, Polytech’Nantes, Nantes Cedex (France); Baudin, T. [Université Paris-Sud, SP2M, ICMMO, UMR CNRS 8182, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2015-07-29

    AA6061 alloy is a widely used material in the automotive and aerospace industries, but is prone to hot cracking, which limits its weldability. To prevent this phenomenon, the AA6061/AA5754 composite was formed using a severe plastic deformation technique, Cross Accumulative Roll Bonding (CARB), at an elevated temperature (350 °C) to ensure good bonding between layers. This technique was efficient to maintain a small grain size, even under the process temperature conditions, and consequently, preserve good mechanical properties. The composite had better mechanical properties than the initial aluminium alloys. Microstructure and texture remained stable after two cycles and yield stress tended towards an equal value in the rolling and the transverse directions. After two cycles, the main component was the {001}〈110〉 rotated Cube, which was maintained for up to 10 cycles. Diffusion was more effective as the strain increased. Finally, a tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding process was performed on the composite and confirmed resistance to hot cracking.

  1. Influence of Welding Process and Post Weld Heat Treatment on Microstructure and Pitting Corrosion Behavior of Dissimilar Aluminium Alloy Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkata Ramana, V. S. N.; Mohammed, Raffi; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.; Srinivasa Rao, K.

    2018-03-01

    Welding of dissimilar Aluminum alloy welds is becoming important in aerospace, shipbuilding and defence applications. In the present work, an attempt has been made to weld dissimilar aluminium alloys using conventional gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and friction stir welding (FSW) processes. An attempt was also made to study the effect of post weld heat treatment (T4 condition) on microstructure and pitting corrosion behaviour of these welds. Results of the present investigation established the differences in microstructures of the base metals in T4 condition and in annealed conditions. It is evident that the thickness of the PMZ is relatively more on AA2014 side than that of AA6061 side. In FS welds, lamellar like shear bands are well noticed on the top of the stir zone. The concentration profile of dissimilar friction stir weld in T4 condition revealed that no diffusion has taken place at the interface. Poor Hardness is observed in all regions of FS welds compared to that of GTA welds. Pitting corrosion resistance of the dissimilar FS welds in all regions was improved by post weld heat treatment.

  2. Laser welding of aluminium alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Forsman, Tomas

    2000-01-01

    This thesis treats laser welding of aluminium alloys from a practical perspective with elements of mathematical analysis. The theoretical work has in all cases been verified experimentally. The aluminium alloys studied are from the 5xxx and 6xxx groups which are common for example in the automotive industry. Aluminium has many unique physical properties. The properties which more than others have been shown to influence the welding process is its high reflection, high thermal conductivity, lo...

  3. Thermal efficiency on welding of AA6061-T6 alloy by modified indirect electric arc and current signals digitalisation; Eficiencia termica en soldadura de la aleacion AA6061-T6 por arco electrico indirecto modificado y digitalizacion de senales de intensidad de corriente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambriz, R. R.; Barrera, G.; Garcia, R.; Lopez, V. H.

    2009-07-01

    The results of the thermal efficiency on welding by modified indirect electric arc technique (MIEA) [1] of the 6061- T6 aluminum alloy are presented. These values are in a range of 90 to 94 %, which depend of the preheating employed. Thermal efficiency was obtained by means of a balance energy which considers the heat input, the amount of melted mass of the welding profiles, and welding parameters during the joining, especially of the arc current data acquisition. Also, some dimensionless parameters were employed in order to determine the approximation grade of the melted pool, the heat affected zone (HAZ), and their corresponding values with the experimental results. (Author) 13 refs.

  4. Multi-Objective Optimization of Friction Stir Welding of Aluminium Alloy Using Grey Relation Analysis with Entropy Measurement Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SAURABH KUMAR GUPTA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present research focus on optimization of Friction Stir Welding (FSW process parameters for joining of AA6061 aluminium alloy using hybrid approach. The FSW process parameters considered are tool rotational speed, welding speed and axial force. The quality characteristics considered are tensile strength (TS and percentage of tensile elongation (TE. Taguchi based experimental design L9 orthogonal array is used for determining the experimental results. The value of weights corresponding to each quality characteristic is determined by using the entropy measurement method so that their importance can be properly explained. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA is used to determine the contribution of FSW process parameters. The confirmation tests also have been done for verifying the results.

  5. Electron beam welding of aluminium components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maajid, Ali; Vadali, S.K.; Maury, D.K.

    2015-01-01

    Aluminium is one of the most widely used materials in industries like transportation, shipbuilding, manufacturing, aerospace, nuclear, etc. The challenges in joining of aluminium are distortion, cleanliness and quality. Main difficulties faced during fusion welding of aluminium components are removal of surface oxide layer, weld porosity, high heat input requirement, distortion, hot cracking, etc. Physical properties of aluminium such as its high thermal conductivity, high coefficient of thermal expansion, no change in colour at high temperature, large difference in the melting points of the metal and its oxide (∼ 1400 °C) compound the difficulties faced during welding. Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW), Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW), Plasma Arc Welding (PAW), etc are generally used in industries for fusion welding of aluminium alloys. However in case of thicker jobs the above processes are not suitable due to requirements of elaborate edge preparation, preheating of jobs, fixturing to prevent distortion, etc. Moreover, precise control over the heat input during welding and weld bead penetration is not possible with above processes. Further, if heat sensitive parts are located near the weld joint then high energy density beam welding process like Electron Beam Welding (EBW) is the best possible choice for aluminium welding.This paper discusses EB welding of aluminium components, typical geometry of components, selection/optimization of welding parameters, problems faced during standardization of welding and process parameters and their remedies etc.

  6. Influence of in situ formed ZrB2 particles on microstructure and mechanical properties of AA6061 metal matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinaharan, I.; Murugan, N.; Parameswaran, Siva

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → In situ fabrication of aluminium metal matrix composite reinforced ZrB 2 particles. → Colour metallography of composites. → Improvement of matrix properties by ZrB 2 particles. → Sliding wear behaviour of in situ composites. - Abstract: Particulate reinforced metal matrix composites (PMMCs) have gained considerable amount of research emphasis and attention in the present era. Research is being carried out across the globe to produce new combination of PMMCs. PMMCs are prepared by adding a variety of ceramic particles with monolithic alloys using several techniques. An attempt has been made to produce aluminium metal matrix composites reinforced with zirconium boride (ZrB 2 ) particles by the in situ reaction of K 2 ZrF 6 and KBF 4 salts with molten aluminium. The influence of in situ formed ZrB 2 particles on the microstructure and mechanical properties of AA6061 alloy was studied in this work. The in situ formed ZrB 2 particles significantly refined the microstructure and enhanced the mechanical properties of AA6061 alloy. The weight percentage of ZrB 2 was varied from 0 to 10 in steps of 2.5. Improvement of hardness, ultimate tensile strength and wear resistance of AA6061 alloy was observed with the increase in ZrB 2 content.

  7. Experimental analysis of cut welding in aluminium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dorph, Pernille; De Chiffre, Leonardo; Bay, Niels

    1993-01-01

    Cut welding is a newly developed cold pressure welding process. In the present work, an experimental investigation was carried out analyzing the mechanisms involved in cut welding of a block to a strip. Experiments were carried out in technically pure aluminium. The investigation has involved...... tensile testing and metallographic investigations of the welds. The results show that this variant of cut welding is a very reproducible process giving a weld strength equal to 30-40% the strength of the parent material. The experiments have shown that the reason for this relatively low strength...... is an uneven pressure distribution along the weld due to a wave formed during sliding. Attempts to alter the material flow during sliding are presented....

  8. Friction stir welding of single crystal aluminium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonda, Richard Warren; Wert, John A.; Reynolds, A.P.

    2007-01-01

    Friction stir welds were prepared in different orientations in an aluminium single crystal. The welds were quenched to preserve the microstructure surrounding the tool and then electron backscattered diffraction was used to reveal the generation of grain boundaries and the evolution...... of crystallographic texture around the tool in each weld. The extent of both dynamic recrystallisation and conventional recrystallisation varied considerably as a function of weld orientation. As the base plate begins to interact with the deformation field surrounding the tool, regions of the single crystal rotate...

  9. Friction Welding of Aluminium and Aluminium Alloys with Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Ambroziak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents our actual knowledge and experience in joining dissimilar materials with the use of friction welding method. The joints of aluminium and aluminium alloys with the different types of steel were studied. The structural effects occurring during the welding process were described. The mechanical properties using, for example, (i microhardness measurements, (ii tensile tests, (iii bending tests, and (iv shearing tests were determined. In order to obtain high-quality joints the influence of different configurations of the process such as (i changing the geometry of bonding surface, (ii using the interlayer, or (iii heat treatment was analyzed. Finally, the issues related to the selection of optimal parameters of friction welding process were also investigated.

  10. Orbital friction stir welding of aluminium pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelhard, G.; Hillers, T.

    2002-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) was originally developed for flat plates. This contribution shows how it can be applied to the welding of aluminium pipes. Pipes made of AlMG 3 (EN5754), AlMg 4.5Mn (EN5083) and AlMgSi 0.5 (EN6106) with dimensions of Da 600 and 520 x 10-8 mm were welded. The FSW orbital system comprises an annular cage with integrated FSW head, a hydraulic system, and a control unit. The welds were tested successfully according to EN 288. The mechanical and technical properties of the welds were somewhat better than with the TIG orbital process, and welding times were about 40 percent shorter [de

  11. Friction stir welding (FSW of aluminium foam sandwich panels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bušić

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on the influence of welding speed and tool tilt angle upon the mechanical properties at the friction stir welding of aluminium foam sandwich panels. Double side welding was used for producing butt welds of aluminium sandwich panels applying insertion of extruded aluminium profile. Such insertion provided lower pressure of the tool upon the aluminium panels, providing also sufficient volume of the material required for the weldment formation. Ultimate tensile strength and flexural strength for three-point bending test have been determined for samples taken from the welded joints. Results have confirmed anticipated effects of independent variables.

  12. Effects of pH and chloride concentration on pitting corrosion of AA6061 aluminum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaid, B.; Saidi, D.; Benzaid, A.; Hadji, S.

    2008-01-01

    Effects of pH solution and chloride (Cl - ) ion concentration on the corrosion behaviour of alloy AA6061 immersed in aqueous solutions of NaCl have been investigated using measurements of weight loss, potentiodynamic polarisation, linear polarisation, cyclic polarisation experiment combined with open circuit potential transient technique and optical or scanning electron microscopy. The corrosion behaviour of the AA6061 aluminum alloy was found to be dependant on the pH and chloride concentration [NaCl] of solution. In acidic or slightly neutral solutions, general and pitting corrosion occurred simultaneously. In contrast, exposure to alkaline solutions results in general corrosion. Experience revealed that the alloy AA6061 was susceptible to pitting corrosion in all chloride solution of concentration ranging between 0.003 wt% and 5.5 wt% NaCl and an increase in the chloride concentration slightly shifted both the pitting E pit and corrosion E cor potentials to more active values. In function of the conditions of treatment, the sheets of the alloy AA6061 undergo two types of localised corrosion process, leading to the formation of hemispherical and crystallographic pits. Polarisation resistance measurements in acidic (pH = 2) and alkaline chloride solutions (pH = 12) which are in good agreement with those of weight loss, show that the corrosion kinetic is minimised in slightly neutral solutions (pH = 6)

  13. Application of full factorial design to study the tribological properties of AA6061-B4C and AA6061-B4C-MoS2 composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monikandan V. V.

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This study statistically analyzes the tribological properties of AA6061-10 wt. % B4C mono composite and AA6061-10 wt.% B4C-7.5 wt. % MoS2 hybrid composite. The tribological behavior of the composites was studied at atmospheric conditions using a pin-on-disk tribo-tester. The tribological experiments were conducted as per the full factorial design (FFD experimental scheme. The ANOVA analysis of the wear rate revealed that the three factors, A (MoS2 particles addition, B (applied load, and D (sliding distance presented the physical and statistical significance on the wear rate. The ANOVA analysis of the friction coefficient revealed that the factors B (applied load and C (sliding speed and interaction AB (interaction of MoS2 particles addition and applied load presented the physical and statistical significance on the friction coefficient. It is observed from the main effects plots of the wear rate and friction coefficient that the increase in the levels of factors B (applied load and D (sliding distance increased the wear rate and friction coefficient. However, the wear rate and friction coefficient decreased with the increase in the level of factor A (MoS2 particles addition.

  14. Interdependent effect of chemical composition and thermal history on artificial aging of AA6061

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pogatscher, S.; Antrekowitsch, H.; Uggowitzer, P.J.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the interdependent effect of chemical composition and thermal history on artificial aging was investigated for the aluminum alloy AA6061. Based on thermodynamic calculations, including Al, Fe, Cr, Zn, Ti, Mg, Si and Cu, model alloys exhibiting a maximum variation of the reachable solute super-saturation of elements relevant for precipitation hardening within the compositional limits of AA6061 were produced. The artificial aging behavior of these alloys at 175 °C was studied by tensile testing for two thermal histories, including very short- and long-term room temperature storage after quenching. Precipitation during artificial aging was investigated by an analysis of yield strength data. As generally expected, precipitation kinetics was found to depend strongly on the solute super-saturation in the case of very short room temperature storage. For artificial aging after long-term room temperature storage the kinetics showed almost no dependence on the chemical composition. This seems to be an exception from simple precipitation kinetics and can be explained based on the complex role of quenched-in vacancies in artificial aging of AA6061.

  15. Argon-arc welding of heat resisting aluminium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryazantsev, V.I.; Fedoseev, V.A.

    1997-01-01

    Welding of aluminium heat resisting alloys of the Al-Cu-Mg system is studied. The hot-shortness of heat-resistant alloys M40, 1150 and 1151 are at the level of aluminium alloys 1201 and by 2-3 times lower as compared to the aluminium alloy AMg6. The M40, 1150 and 1151 alloys have unquestionable advantages against other know aluminium alloys only at temperatures of welded structures operation, beginning with 150-2000 deg C and especially at 250 deg C

  16. The effects of various reinforcements on dry sliding wear behaviour of AA 6061 nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeyasimman, D.; Narayanasamy, R.; Ponalagusamy, R.; Anandakrishnan, V.; Kamaraj, M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Wear and friction coefficient of nanocomposites were investigated. • The worn surface morphologies of nanocomposites were analysed. • The wear rate was increased with increasing load and sliding velocity. • The friction coefficient was decreased with increasing load and sliding velocity. - Abstract: The present work aims to investigate the dry sliding wear behaviour of AA 6061 nanocomposites reinforced with various nanolevel reinforcements, such as titanium carbide (TiC), gamma phase alumina (γ-Al 2 O 3 ) and hybrid (TiC + Al 2 O 3 ) nanoparticles with two weight percentages (wt.%) prepared by 30 h of mechanical alloying (MA). The tests were performed using a pin-on-disk wear tester by sliding these pin specimens at sliding speeds of 0.6, 0.9 and 1.2 m/s against an oil-hardened non-shrinking (OHNS) steel disk at room temperature. Wear tests were conducted for normal loads of 5, 7 and 10 N at different sliding speeds at room temperature. The variations of the friction coefficient and the wear rate with the sliding distances (500 m, 1000 m and 1600 m) for different normal loads and sliding velocities were plotted and investigated. To observe the wear characteristics and to investigate the wear mechanism, the morphologies of the worn surfaces were analysed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The formation of an oxide layer on the worn surface was examined by energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The wear rate was found to increase with the load and sliding velocity for all prepared nanocomposites. Hybrid (TiC + Al 2 O 3 ) reinforced AA 6061 nanocomposites had lower wear rates and friction coefficients compared with TiC and Al 2 O 3 reinforced AA 6061 nanocomposites

  17. Friction Stir Welding of three dissimilar aluminium alloy used in aeronautics industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boşneag, A.; Constantin, M. A.; Niţu, E.; Iordache, M.

    2017-10-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is an innovative solid-state joining process. This process was, in first time, develop to join the similar aluminum plates but now the technology can be used to weld a large area of materials similar or dissimilar. Taking these into account FSW process, for dissimilar materials are increasingly required, more than traditional arc welding, in industrial environment. More than that FSW is used in aeronautics industry because of very good result and very good weldability between aluminum alloy used at building of airplanes, where the body of airplane are 20% aluminum alloy and this percent can be increaser in future. In this paper is presented an experimental study which includes welding three dissimilar aluminum alloy, with different properties, used in aeronautics industry, this materials are: AA 2024, AA6061 and AA7075. After welding with different parameters, the welding join and welding process will be analyzed considering process temperature, process vertical force, and roughnessof welding seams, visual aspect and microhardness.

  18. Rare earth conversion coatings grown on AA6061 aluminum alloys. Corrosion studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brachetti S, S. B. [Instituto Tecnologico de Ciudad Madero, Av. 1o. de Mayo y Sor Juana I. de la Cruz, Col. Los Mangos, 89440 Ciudad Madero, Tanaulipas (Mexico); Dominguez C, M. A.; Torres H, A. M.; Onofre B, E. [IPN, Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada - Altamira, Carretera Tampico-Puerto Industrial Altamira Km. 14.5, 89600 Altamira, Tamaulipas (Mexico); De la Cruz H, W., E-mail: mdominguezc@ipn.mx [UNAM, Centro de Nanociencias y Nanotecnologia, Apdo. Postal 2681, 22800 Ensenada, Baja California (Mexico)

    2014-07-01

    The present work is aimed to investigate the corrosion resistance of rare earth protective coatings deposited by spontaneous deposition on AA6061 aluminum alloy substrates. Coatings were deposited from water-based Ce(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} and La(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} solutions by varing parameters such as rare earth solution concentration, bath temperature and immersion time. The values of the Tafel slopes indicate that the cathodic process is favored by concentration polarization rather than activation polarization. Chemical and morphological characterizations of the surface before and after electrochemical evaluations were performed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. (Author)

  19. Rare earth conversion coatings grown on AA6061 aluminum alloys. Corrosion studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachetti S, S. B.; Dominguez C, M. A.; Torres H, A. M.; Onofre B, E.; De la Cruz H, W.

    2014-01-01

    The present work is aimed to investigate the corrosion resistance of rare earth protective coatings deposited by spontaneous deposition on AA6061 aluminum alloy substrates. Coatings were deposited from water-based Ce(NO 3 ) 3 and La(NO 3 ) 3 solutions by varing parameters such as rare earth solution concentration, bath temperature and immersion time. The values of the Tafel slopes indicate that the cathodic process is favored by concentration polarization rather than activation polarization. Chemical and morphological characterizations of the surface before and after electrochemical evaluations were performed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. (Author)

  20. Long term immersion test of aluminum alloy AA 6061 used for fuel cladding in MTR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linardi, Evelina M.; Rodriguez, Sebastian; Haddad, Roberto; Lanzani, Liliana

    2009-01-01

    In this work we present the results of long term immersion tests performed in the aluminum alloy AA 6061, used for fuel cladding in MTR type reactors. The tests were performed at open circuit potential in high purity water (ρ = 18.2 MΩ.cm) and in 10 -3 M NaCl solution. Two kinds of assemblies were studied: simple sheets and artificial crevices, immersed during 6, 12 and 18 months at room temperature. In both media and both assemblies, the aluminum hydroxide phases crystalline bayerite and bohemite were identified. It was found that a kind of localized attack named alkaline attack occurs around the iron-rich intermetallics. These particles were confirmed to control the corrosion of the AA 6061 alloy in an aerated medium. Immersion times for up to 18 months did not increase the oxide growth or the alkaline attack on the AA 6061 alloy. (author)

  1. Production and characterization of AA6061-B4C stir cast composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalaiselvan, K.; Murugan, N.; Parameswaran, Siva

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Stir casting of AA6061-B 4 C Composite. Color metallographic of composites → Enhanced wetting of B 4 C particles by K 2 TiF 6 flux. → Effect of B 4 C particles on mechanical properties of AA6061. -- Abstract: This work focuses on the fabrication of aluminum (6061-T6) matrix composites (AMCs) reinforced with various weight percentage of B 4 C particulates by modified stir casting route. The wettability of B 4 C particles in the matrix has been improved by adding K 2 TiF 6 flux into the melt. The microstructure and mechanical properties of the fabricated AMCs are analyzed. The optical microstructure and scanning electron microscope (SEM) images reveal the homogeneous dispersion of B 4 C particles in the matrix. The reinforcement dispersion has also been identified with X-ray diffraction (XRD). The mechanical properties like hardness and tensile strength have improved with the increase in weight percentage of B 4 C particulates in the aluminum matrix.

  2. Rapidly solidified aluminium for optical applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gubbels, G.P.H.; Venrooy, B.W.H. van; Bosch, A.J.; Senden, R.

    2008-01-01

    This paper present the results of a diamond turning study of a rapidly solidified aluminium 6061 alloy grade, known as RSA6061. It is shown that this small grain material can be diamond turned to smaller roughness values than standard AA6061 aluminium grades. Also, the results are nearly as good as

  3. Friction stir spot welding of dissimilar aluminium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozkurt, Yahya

    2016-01-01

    Friction stir spot welding (FSSW) has been proposed as an effective technology to spot weld the so-called “difficult to be welded” metal alloys such as thin sheets aluminum alloys and dissimilar materials. FSSW is derived from friction stir welding technology, its principle benefit being low cost joining, lower welding temperature and shorter welding time than conventional welding methods. In this study, dissimilar AlMg 3 and AlCu 4 Mg 1 aluminium alloy plates were FSSWed by offsetting the low strength sheet on upper side of the weld. The effects of tool rotation speed on the microstructure, lap shear fracture load (LSFL), microhardness and fracture features of the weld are investigated by constant welding parameters. The maximum LSFL was obtained by increasing the tool rotational speed. However, the joints exhibited pull-out nugget fracture mode under lap shear tensile testing conditions. The largest completely bonded zone was observed as 5.86 mm which was narrower at the opposite position of the joint. Key words: friction stir spot welding, aluminium alloys, mechanical properties, dissimilar joint, welding parameters

  4. Results of the Experiment: Welding of Aluminium Alloy in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferretti, S.; Amadori, K.; Boccalatte, A.; Alessandrini, M.; Freddi, A.; Persiani, F.; Poli, G.

    2002-01-01

    An experiment on "dendritic growth in aluminium alloy welding" was performed by the UNIBO team during the 3rd Student Parabolic Flight Campaign and the 30th Professional Parabolic Flight Campaign organised by ESA. Its purpose was to achieve a better understanding of crystal growth during tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding of an aluminium alloy to define the main parameters affecting the process under microgravity condition. The experiment had 4 phases : The paper discusses different aspects of the research, paying particularly attention not only to the influence of gravity, but also to other factors influencing welding microstructure, such as the Marangoni effect and the thermal transfer from the electrode to the material. The paper conclude the dissertation of the results offering new perspectives for welding studies and proposing a new approach to the scientific community to investigate this materials processes for manufacturing.

  5. Friction stir welding of Aluminium matrix composites – A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramanya Prabhu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir welding (FSW is established as one of the prominent welding techniques to join aluminium matrix composites (AMCs. It is a solid state welding process, takes place well below the melting temperature of the material, eliminates the detrimental effects of conventional fusion welding process. Although the process is capable to join AMCs, challenges are still open that need to be fulfill to widen its applications. This paper gives the outline of the friction stir welding technique used to join AMCs. Effect of process variables on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the joints, behavior of reinforcing materials during welding, effect of tool profiles on the joint strength are discussed in detail. Few improvements and direction for future research are also proposed.

  6. Influence of extrusion parameters on sic distribution and properties of AA6061/SiC composites produced by kobo method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WoĨniak, Jarosáaw; Kostecki, Marek; Broniszewski, Kamil; Olszyna, Andrzej [Faculty of Material Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Warsaw (Poland); Bochniak, Wáodzimierz [Faculty of Non-Ferrous Metals, AGH University of Science and Technology, Cracow (Poland)

    2013-07-01

    The influence of extrusion parameters on reinforcements distribution and properties of AA6061+x% vol. SiC p (x=0; 2.5; 5; 7.5; 10) composites was discussed in this paper The averages size of AA6061 and SiC particles were 10.6 μ m and 0.42 μ m, respectively. The composites were consolidated via powder metallurgy processing (without the sintering) and extruded by KoBo method. The microstructure was examined on each steps of production. High values of density for all produced composites were achieved. Additionally, hardness and Young’s modulus were investigated. The best reinforcement distribution and mechanical properties were obtained for composites extruded with the highest extrusion ratio. Key words: aluminum alloy, extrusion, aged hardening, metal matrix composites, microstructure.

  7. Friction stir welding of 6061 aluminium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel Rahman, M.A.M.S.

    2009-01-01

    6061 AA (Al-Mg-Si alloy) has gathered wide acceptance in the fabrication of light weight structures requiring a high strength-to-weight ratio and good corrosion resistance such as marine frames, pipelines, storage tanks, and aircraft components [1]. It is also used for the manufacturing of fuel elements in the nuclear research reactors. Compared to many of the fusion welding processes that are routinely used for joining structural alloys, friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state joining process in which the material that is being welded is not melted and recast [2]. The welding parameters such as tool rotational speed, welding traverse speed, and tool profile play a major role in deciding the weld quality. Several FSW tools (differ from each other in pin angle, shoulder diameter, and shoulder concavity) have been used to fabricate a number of joints in order to obtain a tool with which a sound weld can be produced. It was found that the FSW tool with tapered cone pin, concave shoulder, and shoulder diameter equal to four times the welded plate thickness is suitable to produce a sound weld. The effect of the traverse speed on the global and local tensile properties of friction stir welded joints has been investigated in the 6061-T6 AA. The global tensile properties of the FSW joints were improved with increasing the traverse speed at constant rotation rate. It is found that the global tensile strength of the FSW joint is limited by the local tensile strength of the nearest region to the weld center at which the cross section is composed mainly of the HAZ. The effect of the initial butt surface on the formation of the zigzag line on the tensile properties of the welds was examined by using three types of welding samples differ in the preparation of the initial butt surface. The first type of samples welded without removing the oxide layer from the initial butt surface (uncleaned butt surfaces joint). In the second type of samples the oxide layer was removed from

  8. Efecto de los ciclos térmicos de soldadura por arco eléctrico indirecto modificado (AEIM en las propiedades mecánicas de la aleación AA6061-T6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambriz, Ricardo R.

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Results of temperature measurements during welding of 12.7 mm thick AA6061-T6 alloy plates by modified indirect electric arc (MIEA are presented. This study describes the thermal cycles of the heat affected zone (HAZ and also in the fusion zone. Depending upon the position of the transducers, the maximum temperatures measured in the HAZ range from 308 to 693 °C, these measurements were related with the tensile test results, and the failure zone reported previously by the authors [1]. It was observed that, there is a decrease in the mechanical strength of the welded joints, due to the microstructural changes suffered by AA6061-T6 alloy in which formation of the β’ occurs according to the TTT transformation diagram. The inherent cooling conditions of the weld pool observed for the MIEA technique (only one pass of welding, have permitted to establish the characteristics of solidification and microstructure for a specific cooling rate.

    Se presentan los resultados de medición de temperatura durante la soldadura por arco eléctrico indirecto modificado (AEIM de la aleación AA6061-T6. Éstas, describen los ciclos térmicos de la zona afectada por el calor (ZAC y en la zona de fusión. Los resultados muestran que las temperaturas máximas medidas en la ZAC se encuentran en un rango de 308 a 693 °C, dependiendo de la posición de los sensores, estas mediciones fueron correlacionadas con los resultados de resistencia a la tracción y la zona de fallo, reportados previamente por los autores[1]. Se observó que existe una disminución en la resistencia mecánica de las uniones, debido a los cambios microestructurales por la formación de precipitados sobreenvejecidos, β’, de acuerdo con su diagrama de transformación (TTT. Las condiciones de enfriamiento en el baño fundido inherentes a la técnica por AEIM (un solo paso de soldadura, permitieron establecer las características de solidificación y microestructura esperada

  9. Study of the corrosion of AA 6061 in spent fuel materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, Sebastian; Haddad, Roberto; Lanzani, Liliana A.

    2003-01-01

    Localized attack induced by dust or other particles deposited on alloy AA 6061 surface under water has been addressed as a matter of concern after completion of an IAEA Coordinated Research Program (CRP) on the corrosion of aluminum clad spent fuel during storage in water basins. This attack has been observed in all kinds of waters, although it is more pronounced in those of higher conductivity. In these cases a strong attack (similar to pitting corrosion) up to several hundred microns in depth and about a millimeter in length has been found beneath the aluminum hydroxide blister formed in those places where specks had seated on. As this problem could seriously affect the fission product containing capacity of stored spent fuel even in well maintained high quality water, it is important to learn about the involved mechanism of attack and find out about the influence of particle composition, in order to establish the convenience or disapproval of the use of materials and procedures in storage basins. With this objective, an experimental approach has been developed to study the mechanism of corrosion attack linked with the deposition of particles of different composition on aluminum surfaces; this include two kinds of iron flakes, concrete powder, and sand particles. Immersion tests of up to 40 days have been conducted in nuclear grade demineralized water and sodium citrate solutions of several conductivities. The position of sediments was marked and followed through the process and the final state of the aluminum surfaces was assessed by optical and electron microscopy and other microanalysis techniques. Other complementary activities carried on in relation with this work are: through characterization of intermetallic particles in AA 6061, and the study of the electrochemical behavior of precipitates in high purity water. Mg 2 Si particles perform very actively, dissolving even in high pure water at open circuit potential, leaving a small hole on the surface. Iron

  10. Effective corrosion protection of AA6061 aluminum alloy by sputtered Al-Ce coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dominguez-Crespo, M.A., E-mail: mdominguezc@ipn.m [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, GIPMAT CICATA-Altamira, km 14.5, Carretera Tampico-Puerto Industrial Altamira, C.P. 89600 Altamira, Tamps (Mexico); Torres-Huerta, A.M. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, GIPMAT CICATA-Altamira, km 14.5, Carretera Tampico-Puerto Industrial Altamira, C.P. 89600 Altamira, Tamps (Mexico); Rodil, S.E. [Instituto de Investigacion en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Exterior s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, Del. Coyoacan, C.P. 04510 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Ramirez-Meneses, E. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, GIPMAT CICATA-Altamira, km 14.5, Carretera Tampico-Puerto Industrial Altamira, C.P. 89600 Altamira, Tamps (Mexico); Suarez-Velazquez, G.G. [Alumna del PTA del CICATA-Altamira IPN, km 14.5, Carretera Tampico-Puerto Industrial Altamira, C.P. 89600 Altamira, Tamps (Mexico); Hernandez-Perez, M.A. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, ESIQIE, C.P. 07738 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2009-12-30

    Al-Ce coatings were deposited on silicon and AA6061 aluminum alloy substrates by DC magnetron sputtering using aluminum in combination with pure cerium targets. The materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in order to consider their application as high corrosion resistance coatings. The corrosion behavior of the films was studied using a NaCl aqueous solution (3.5 wt%). As for the characterization results, an apparent amorphous phase of aluminum oxide with small cerium compounds embedded in the matrix was detected by the X-ray diffraction patterns and HRTEM on the deposited films at 200 W and 4 Pa. At these conditions, AFM and SEM images evidenced crack-free coatings with low-roughness nanometric structures and columnar growth. EIS and Tafel results converged to indicate an inhibition of the corrosion reactions. The film displayed good stability in the aggressive medium and after 1 day of exposure underwent very little degradation. The variations in the impedance and Tafel characteristics were found to occur as a function of cerium content, which provokes important changes in the film protective properties.

  11. Tensile and fracture behavior of AA6061-T6 aluminum alloys: micro-mechanical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Y.

    2012-01-01

    The AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy was chosen as the material for the core vessel of the future Jules Horowitz testing reactor (JHR). The objective of this thesis is to understand and model the tensile and fracture behavior of the material, as well as the origin of damage anisotropy. A micro-mechanical approach was used to link the microstructure and mechanical behavior. The microstructure of the alloy was characterized on the surface via Scanning Electron Microscopy and in the 3D volume via synchrotron X-ray tomography and laminography. The damage mechanism was identified by in-situ SEM tensile testing, ex-situ X-ray tomography and in-situ laminography on different levels of triaxiality. The observations have shown that damage nucleated at lower strains on Mg 2 Si coarse precipitates than on iron rich intermetallics. The identified scenario and the in-situ measurements were then used to develop a coupled GTN damage model incorporating nucleation, growth and coalescence of cavities formed by coarse precipitates. The relationship between the damage and the microstructure anisotropies was explained and simulated. (author)

  12. Effective corrosion protection of AA6061 aluminum alloy by sputtered Al-Ce coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominguez-Crespo, M.A.; Torres-Huerta, A.M.; Rodil, S.E.; Ramirez-Meneses, E.; Suarez-Velazquez, G.G.; Hernandez-Perez, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    Al-Ce coatings were deposited on silicon and AA6061 aluminum alloy substrates by DC magnetron sputtering using aluminum in combination with pure cerium targets. The materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in order to consider their application as high corrosion resistance coatings. The corrosion behavior of the films was studied using a NaCl aqueous solution (3.5 wt%). As for the characterization results, an apparent amorphous phase of aluminum oxide with small cerium compounds embedded in the matrix was detected by the X-ray diffraction patterns and HRTEM on the deposited films at 200 W and 4 Pa. At these conditions, AFM and SEM images evidenced crack-free coatings with low-roughness nanometric structures and columnar growth. EIS and Tafel results converged to indicate an inhibition of the corrosion reactions. The film displayed good stability in the aggressive medium and after 1 day of exposure underwent very little degradation. The variations in the impedance and Tafel characteristics were found to occur as a function of cerium content, which provokes important changes in the film protective properties.

  13. Development of non-dendritic microstructures in AA6061 cast billets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, X.-D.; Chadwick, T.A.; Bryant, J.D. [Reynolds Metals Co., Chester, VA (United States)

    2000-07-01

    Non-dendritic structures have been shown to have many advantages over conventional, dendritic structures in castable aluminum alloys. Examples include high structural integrity, reduced porosity, excellent formability and enhanced near net-shape forming capability. Non-dendritic materials are characterized by an equiaxed, globularized grain structure. Previous work has focused on the application of these structures in traditional casting alloys such as A356 and A357, and on the processing of these alloys during semi-solid forming and squeeze casting. There is considerably less information on the impact of non-dendritic microstructures upon solid state deformation, and the use of such microstructures in the processing of traditional wrought aluminum alloys. In this paper, we will present our recent work in casting non-dendritic AA6061 alloy using different techniques, and discuss the effects of cast structure on deformation behavior during solid state processing at elevated temperatures. Cast microstructures were modified during direct chill casting using three different methods: magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) agitation, mechanical stirring, and high loadings of grain refiner. A detailed microstructure characterization will be presented and discussed in terms of structural integrity, grain morphology, and their effects on deformation in the solid state. (orig.)

  14. Effect of rotation speed and welding speed on Friction Stir Welding of AA1100 Aluminium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, P.; Bojanampati, S.; Karthikeyan, R.; Ganithi, R.

    2018-04-01

    Aluminum AA1100 is the most widely used grade of Aluminium due to its excellent corrosion resistance, high ductility and reflective finish, the selected material was welded with Friction Stir Welding (FSW) process on a CNC machine, using a combination of different tool rotation speed (1500 rpm, 2500 rpm, 3500 rpm) and welding speed (10 mm/min, 30 mm/min, 50 mm/min) as welding parameters. The effect of FSW using this welding parameter was studied by measuring the ultimate tensile strength of the welded joints. A high-speed steel tool was prepared for welding the Aluminium AA1100 alloy having an 8mm shoulder diameter and pin dimension of 4mm diameter and 2.8 mm length. The welded joints were tested using the universal testing machine. It was found that Ultimate Tensile Strength of FSW specimen was highest with a value of 98.08 MPa when the weld was performed at rotation speed of 1500 RPM and welding speed of 50 mm/min.

  15. Designing aluminium friction stir welded joints against multiaxial fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Susmel

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The present paper investigates the accuracy of the Modified Wöhler Curve Method (MWCM in estimating multiaxial fatigue strength of aluminium friction stir (FS welded joints. Having developed a bespoke joining technology, circumferentially FS welded tubular specimens of Al 6082-T6 were tested under proportional and non-proportional tension and torsion, the effect of non-zero mean stresses being also investigated. The validation exercise carried out using the experimental results have demonstrated that the MWCM applied in terms of nominal stresses, notch stresses, and also the Point Method is accurate in predicting the fatigue lifetime of the tested FS welded joints, with its use resulting in life estimates that fall within the uniaxial and torsional calibration scatter bands.

  16. Microstructural development from interdiffusion and reaction between U−Mo and AA6061 alloys annealed at 600° and 550 °C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, E., E-mail: Emmanuel.Perez@inl.gov [Nuclear Fuels and Materials Division, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6188 (United States); Keiser, D.D., E-mail: dennis.keiser@inl.gov [Nuclear Fuels and Materials Division, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6188 (United States); Sohn, Y.H., E-mail: yongho.sohn@ucf.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Central Florida, 4000 Central Florida Blvd., Orlando, FL 32816 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    The U.S. Material Management and Minimization Reactor Conversion Program is developing low enrichment fuel systems encased in Al-alloy for use in research and test reactors. Monolithic fuel plates have local regions where the U−Mo fuel plate may come into contact with the Al-alloy 6061 (AA6061) cladding. This results in the development of interdiffusion zones with complex microstructures with multiple phases. In this study, the microstructural development of diffusion couples, U−7 wt%Mo, U−10 wt%Mo, and U−12 wt%Mo vs. AA6061, annealed at 600 °C for 24 h and at 550 °C for 1, 5, and 20 h, were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy with x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy. The microstructural development and kinetics were compared to diffusion couples U−Mo vs. high purity Al and binary Al−Si alloys. The diffusion couples developed complex interaction regions where phase development was influenced by the alloying additions of the AA6061. - Highlights: • Diffusion couples of U−7Mo, U−10Mo, and U−12Mo vs. AA6061 were analyzed by SEM with XEDS. • The couples were annealed at 600 °C for 24 h and at 550 °C for 1, 5 and 20 h. • The interaction regions were more complex than those in diffusion couples of U−Mo vs. high purity Al and Al−Si alloys. • Analysis showed that the alloying additions of the AA6061 were present in the interaction regions. • Phase development was significantly influenced by the alloying additions of the AA6061.

  17. Mechanical properties of 5083 aluminium welds after manual and automatic pulsed gas metal arc welding using E5356 filler

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mutombo, K

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Semi-automatic and automatic pulsed gas metal arc welding (GMAW) of aluminium alloy 5083 with ER5356 filler wire causes considerable softening in the weld. The tensile strength of dressed automatic welds approaches that of the base metal...

  18. Numerical/experimental research on welded joints in aluminium truss girders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hove, B.W.E.M.; Soetens, F.; Mazzolani, F.M.; Bellucci, F.; Faggiano, B.; Squillace, A.

    2016-01-01

    Welded joints in a 30 meter span aluminium truss girder were investigated numerically and experimentally. Since aluminium design rules for welded K-and N-joints in CHS truss girders were lacking the joints were checked using steel design rules. Calculations showed that the N-joints were governing

  19. Study of corrosion processes on Al-AA 6061 crevices immersed in high purity water and sodium citrate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, Sebastian A.; Haddad, Roberto; Lanzani, Liliana A.

    2004-01-01

    An experimental approach has been developed to study the corrosion behavior of artificial crevices manufactured with high purity aluminum and AA 6061 alloy, immersed in dematerialised water and sodium citrate solution (96,5 μS/cm). Alkaline attack was found on the surrounding of iron rich particles in the external zone of the crevice, as a result of localized oxygen reduction reaction on these sites. This attack was not observed in the zone inside the crevice. Study of the phase Mg 2 Si by EDS allowed establishing that there is not preferential dissolution inside the crevice. The formation of a stable and non-soluble complex between Al and citrate anion inhibited the production of Al(OH) 3 precipitate, which was observed on the surface of specimens immersed in pure water. Investigations of the aluminum oxide evolution on AA 6061 surfaces in water showed that it was composed by two layers: an internal one made of Bohemite and an external one in direct contact with the water, with a Bayerite structure. The surface analysis was accomplished using XR, OM and SEM techniques. (author) [es

  20. Tensile Strength and Hardness Correlations with Microscopy in Friction welded Aluminium to Copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satish, Rengarajan; Seshagiri Rao, Vaddi; Ananthapadmanaban, Dattaguru; Ravi, Balappa

    2016-01-01

    Aluminium and copper are good conductors of heat and electricity, copper being the better conductor, is a costly metal indeed. On the other hand, aluminium is cheap, easily available and also has a lower density than copper. Hence, worldwide efforts are being made to partially replace copper wire. Solid state welding should be used to join aluminium to copper. This is because the use of fusion welding results in brittle phases formed in the weld interface. One of the solid state welding techniques used for joining aluminium to copper is friction welding. In this paper, an attempt has been made to join aluminium to copper by friction welding by varying the friction welding parameters, namely friction pressure, upset pressure, burn-off length and speed of rotation of the workpiece. Nine different friction welding parameter combinations were used during welding in accordance with ASTM standards and results have been reported. Tensile strength and hardness tests were carried out for each parameter combination. Optimum friction welding parameter combination was identified with respect to tensile strength. Scanning Electron Microscopy and Electron dispersive spectroanalysis were obtained to identify modes of fracture and presence of intermetallic phases for each friction welding combination with the aim to narrow down friction welding parameters that give good properties on the whole.

  1. A nano-indentation study on the mechanical behaviour of the matrix material in an AA6061-Al2O3 MMC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mussert, K.M.; Vellinga, W.P.; Bakker, A.; Zwaag, van der S.

    2002-01-01

    The nano-indentation technique is a suitable technique to measure hardness and elastic moduli profiles of AA6061 reinforced with Al2O3 particles, since it allows measurements of mechanical properties on a micrometer range. To investigate possible local variations in mechanical behaviour of the

  2. Effect of pulsed current and post weld aging treatment on tensile properties of argon arc welded high strength aluminium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balasubramanian, V.; Ravisankar, V.; Reddy, G. Madhusudhan

    2007-01-01

    This paper reveals the effect of pulsed current and post weld aging treatment on tensile properties of argon arc welded AA7075 aluminium alloy. This alloy has gathered wide acceptance in the fabrication of light weight structures requiring high strength-to-weight ratio, such as transportable bridge girders, military vehicles, road tankers and railway transport systems. The preferred welding processes of high strength aluminium alloy are frequently gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process and gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process due to their comparatively easier applicability and better economy. Weld fusion zones typically exhibit coarse columnar grains because of the prevailing thermal conditions during weld metal solidification. This often results inferior weld mechanical properties and poor resistance to hot cracking. In this investigation, an attempt has been made to refine the fusion zone grains by applying pulsed current welding technique. Four different welding techniques have been used to fabricate the joints and they are: (i) continuous current GTAW (CCGTAW), (ii) pulsed current GTAW (PCGTAW), (iii) continuous current GMAW (CCGMAW) and (iv) pulsed current GMAW (PCGMAW) processes. As welded joint strength is much lower than the base metal strength and hence, a simple aging treatment has been given to improve the tensile strength of the joints. Current pulsing leads to relatively finer and more equi-axed grain structure in GTA and GMA welds. In contrast, conventional continuous current welding resulted in predominantly columnar grain structures. Post weld aging treatment is accompanied by an increase in tensile strength and tensile ductility

  3. Effect of the reinforced boron carbide particulate content of AA6061 alloy on formation of the passive film in seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katkar, V.A.; Gunasekaran, G.; Rao, A.G.; Koli, P.M.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Presence of boron carbide increases the corrosion rate of A6061 alloy in seawater. → Increasing the B 4 C content decreases passive layer thickness. → Passive films formed on A6061 and its B 4 C composites are n-type semiconductors. - Abstract: The effect of boron carbide (B 4 C) reinforcement on the corrosion of AA6061 alloy was studied by investigating passive films formed in seawater. The higher passive current and its potential-dependence for these composites indicated formation of porous passive film. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) graph suggests that the alloy surface is partly or totally active. The formed passive film is n-type semiconductor junction in nature. The difference between corrosion potential (E corr ) and potential at zero charge (PZC) suggests that the chloride ions responsible for film breakdown exist within the passive film. A suitable mechanism is proposed for the passive film breakdown.

  4. Microstructure, cold workability and strain hardening behavior of trimodaled AA 6061-TiO2 nanocomposite prepared by mechanical alloying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivasankaran, S.; Sivaprasad, K.; Narayanasamy, R.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Trimodaled composites consisting of UFG and CG matrix phases and ceramic phase were produced successfully. → Cold deformation behavior was investigated. → The 15% CG trimodaled composite yielded a high compressive strength of 935 MPa. → The 30% CG composite exhibited higher ductility while maintaining strength and toughness. - Abstract: In the present work, the improvement of compressive ductility while maintaining high strength and toughness for nanocrystalline materials by cold upsetting (incremental loads) of bulk trimodaled composite was studied. Mechanically alloyed nanocrystalline (NC) AA 6061 alloy powders reinforced with nano TiO 2 were blended with 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 wt.% coarse grain (CG) elemental powders related to AA 6061 alloy composition to produce trimodal microstructure. The synthesized composite preforms were characterized by optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope and X-ray diffraction. The room temperature compressive deformation behavior was evaluated under triaxial stress state condition. With increasing percentage of CG phase in the nanocomposite, the gradual improvement in compressive ductility was observed at the cost of a small amount of strength but it favored the ease of deformation. The 15% CG trimodal composite exhibited an extremely high compressive strength of 935 MPa due to non-coalescence of individual CG particles and effective load transfer occurred in multi scale microstructures. But the 30% CG trimodal composite showed an incremental compressive ductility of around 16% while sacrificing a small amount of strength (845 MPa) and this composite displayed improved toughness (area under true effective stress and true effective strain curve) of over 600% than nanocomposite (0% CG). Also, the percentage cold workability of 30% CG composite was six times higher than that of 0% CG composite. Hence, the 30% CG trimodal composite was observed to be the good one as

  5. Weld metal grain refinement of aluminium alloy 5083 through controlled additions of Ti and B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schempp, Philipp; Rethmeier, Michael [Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing BAM, Berlin (Germany). Div. ' ' Safety of Joined Components' ' ; Fraunhofer Institute for Production Systems and Design Technology IPK, Berlin (Germany). Dept. ' ' Joining and Coating Technology' ' ; Schwenk, Christopher; Cross, Carl Edward [Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und -pruefung (BAM), Berlin (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The refinement of the weld metal grain structure may lead to a significant change in its mechanical properties and in the weldability of the base metal. One possibility to achieve weld metal grain refinement is the inoculation of the weld pool. In this study, it is shown how additions of titanium and boron influence the weld metal grain structure of GTA welds of the aluminium alloy 5083 (Al Mg4.5Mn0.7). For this purpose, inserts consisting of base metal and additions of the master alloy Al Ti5B1 have been cast, deposited in the base metal and fused in a GTA welding process. The increase of the Ti and B content led to a significant decrease of the weld metal mean grain size and to a change in grain shape. The results provide a basis for a more precise definition of the chemical composition of commercial filler wires and rods for aluminium arc welding. (orig.)

  6. Characterisation of weld zone reactions in dissimilar glass-to-aluminium pulsed picosecond laser welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciuca, Octav P., E-mail: octav.ciuca@manchester.ac.uk [School of Materials, University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Carter, Richard M. [Institute of Photonics and Quantum Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh, EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); Prangnell, Philip B. [School of Materials, University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Hand, Duncan P. [Institute of Photonics and Quantum Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh, EH14 4AS (United Kingdom)

    2016-10-15

    Precision welded joints, produced between fused silica glass and aluminium by a newly-developed picosecond-pulse laser technique, have been analysed for the first time using a full range of electron microscopy methods. The welds were produced as lap joints by focusing a 1.2 μm diameter laser beam through the transparent glass top sheet, slightly below the surface of the metal bottom sheet. Despite the extremely short interaction time, extensive reaction was observed in the weld zone, which involved the formation of nanocrystalline silicon and at least two transitional alumina phases, γ- and δ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The weld formation process was found to be complex and involved: the formation of a constrained plasma cavity at the joint interface, non-linear absorption in the glass, and the creation of multiple secondary keyholes in the metal substrate by beam scattering. The joint area was found to expand outside of the main interaction volume, as the energy absorbed into the low conductivity and higher melting point silica glass sheet melted the aluminium surface across a wider contact area. The reasons for the appearance of nanocrystalline Si and transitional alumina reaction products within the welds are discussed. - Highlights: •Pulsed laser welding of dissimilar materials causes extensive chemical reactivity. •Metastable Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} phases form due to laser-induced highly-transient thermal regime. •Fused silica is reduced by Al to form nanocrystalline Si. •Mechanism of joint formation is discussed.

  7. Effect of weld morphology on mechanical response and failure of friction stir welds in a naturally aged aluminium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imam, Murshid; Biswas, Kajal; Racherla, Vikranth

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Friction stir welds of AA 6063-T4 are obtained using three tool pin profiles. ► Signature of weld defects in mechanical response of welds is investigated. ► Correlation between peak temperatures in HAZs and their hardness is studied. ► Reasons for strengthening of WNZ and softening of HAZs are found using TEM and XRD. ► A FEM model for the weld zone is developed and validated. -- Abstract: Friction stir butt welds in 6063-T4 aluminium alloy were obtained using square and two tapered tool pin profiles. Tensile tests at 0°, 45°, and 90° to the weld line, hardness contours in the weld cross-section, temperatures in the heat affected zones, cross-sectional macrographs, transmission electron micrographs, and X-ray diffraction studies were used to characterize the welds. In transverse weld specimen, tunnel defects appearing at higher weld speeds for tapered pin profiles, were found to result in mechanical instabilities, i.e. sharp drops in load–displacement curves, much before macroscopic necking occured. Further, in comparison to the base metal, a marked reduction in ductility was observed even in transverse specimen with defect free welds. Hardness contours in the weld cross-section suggest that loss in ductility is due to significant softening in heat affected zone on the retreating side. Transmission electron microscopy images demonstrate that while recovery and overaging are responsible for softening in the heat affected zone, grain size refinement from dynamic recrystallization is responsible for strengthening of the weld nugget zone. X-ray diffraction studies in the three weld zones: weld nugget zone, heat affected zone, and the base metal corroborate these findings. A weld zone model, for use in forming simulations on friction stir welded plates of naturally aged aluminium alloys, was proposed based on mechanical characterization tests. The model was validated using finite element analysis.

  8. An investigation on compression strength analysis of commercial aluminium tube to aluminium 2025 tube plate by using TIG welding process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kannan, S., E-mail: kannan.dgl201127@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mining Machinery Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology (ISM), Dhanbad, Jharkhand, India, 826004 (India); Senthil Kumaran, S., E-mail: sskumaran@ymail.com [Research and Development Center, Department of Mechanical Engineering, RVS Educational Trust' s Group of Institutions, RVS School of Engineering and Technology, Dindigul, Tamilnadu, India, 624005 (India); Kumaraswamidhas, L.A., E-mail: lakdhas1978@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mining Machinery Engineering, Indian School of Mines University, Dhanbad, Jharkhand, India, 826004 (India)

    2016-05-05

    In this present study, Tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding was applied to weld the dissimilar materials and authenticate the mechanical and metallurgical properties of tube to tube plate made up of commercial aluminium and Al 2025 respectively using an Zirconiated tungsten electrode along with filler material aluminium ER 2219. In total, twenty five pieces has been subjected to compression strength and hardness value to evaluate the optimal joint strength. The three optimization technique has been used in this experiment. Taguchi L{sub 25} orthogonal array is used to identify the most influencing process parameter which affects the joint strength. ANOVA method is measured for both compression strength and hardness to calculate the percentage of contribution for each process parameter. Genetic algorithm is used to validate the results obtained from the both experimental value and optimization value. The micro structural study is depicted the welding joints characterization in between tube to tube plate joints. The radiograph test is conducted to prove the welds are non-defective and no flaws are found during the welding process. The mechanical property of compression strength and hardness has been measured to obtain the optimal joint strength of the welded sample was about 174.846 MPa and 131.364 Hv respectively. - Highlights: • Commercial Al tube and Al 2025 tube plate successfully welded by TIG welding. • Compression strength and hardness value proves to obtain optimal joint strength. • The maximum compression and hardness was achieved in various input parameters.

  9. An investigation on compression strength analysis of commercial aluminium tube to aluminium 2025 tube plate by using TIG welding process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kannan, S.; Senthil Kumaran, S.; Kumaraswamidhas, L.A.

    2016-01-01

    In this present study, Tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding was applied to weld the dissimilar materials and authenticate the mechanical and metallurgical properties of tube to tube plate made up of commercial aluminium and Al 2025 respectively using an Zirconiated tungsten electrode along with filler material aluminium ER 2219. In total, twenty five pieces has been subjected to compression strength and hardness value to evaluate the optimal joint strength. The three optimization technique has been used in this experiment. Taguchi L_2_5 orthogonal array is used to identify the most influencing process parameter which affects the joint strength. ANOVA method is measured for both compression strength and hardness to calculate the percentage of contribution for each process parameter. Genetic algorithm is used to validate the results obtained from the both experimental value and optimization value. The micro structural study is depicted the welding joints characterization in between tube to tube plate joints. The radiograph test is conducted to prove the welds are non-defective and no flaws are found during the welding process. The mechanical property of compression strength and hardness has been measured to obtain the optimal joint strength of the welded sample was about 174.846 MPa and 131.364 Hv respectively. - Highlights: • Commercial Al tube and Al 2025 tube plate successfully welded by TIG welding. • Compression strength and hardness value proves to obtain optimal joint strength. • The maximum compression and hardness was achieved in various input parameters.

  10. Mechanisms of joint and microstructure formation in high power ultrasonic spot welding 6111 aluminium automotive sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakavos, D.; Prangnell, P.B.

    2010-01-01

    Resistance spot welding (RSW) is difficult to apply to aluminium automotive alloys. High power ultrasonic spot welding (HP-USW) is a new alternative method which is extremely efficient, using ∼2% of the energy of RSW. However, to date there have been few studies of the mechanisms of bond formation and the material interactions that take place with this process. Here, we report on a detailed investigation where we have used X-ray tomography, high resolution SEM, and EBSD, and dissimilar alloy welds, to track the interface position and characterise the stages of weld formation, and microstructure evolution, as a function of welding energy. Under optimum conditions high quality welds are produced, showing few defects. Welding proceeds by the development and spread of microwelds, until extensive plastic deformation occurs within the weld zone, where the temperature reaches ∼380 deg. C. The origin of the weld interface 'flow features' characteristic of HP-USW are discussed.

  11. Laser welding of SSM Cast A356 aluminium alloy processed with CSIR-Rheo technology

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Akhter, R

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Samples of aluminium alloy A356 were manufactured by Semi Solid Metals HPDC technology, developed recently in CSIR, Pretoria. They were butt welded in as cast conditions using as Nd: YAG laser. The best metal and weld microstructure were presented...

  12. Microstructural Characterization of the U-9.1Mo Fuel/AA6061 Cladding Interface in Friction-Bonded Monolithic Fuel Plates Irradiated in the RERTR-6 Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiser, Dennis D.; Jue, Jan-Fong; Miller, Brandon; Gan, Jian; Robinson, Adam; Medvedev, Pavel; Madden, James; Wachs, Dan; Clark, Curtis; Meyer, Mitch

    2015-09-01

    Low-enrichment (235U < 20 pct) U-Mo monolithic fuel is being developed for use in research and test reactors. The earliest design for this fuel that was investigated via reactor testing consisted of a nominally U-10Mo fuel foil encased in AA6061 (Al-6061) cladding. For a fuel design to be deemed adequate for final use in a reactor, it must maintain dimensional stability and retain fission products throughout irradiation, which means that there must be good integrity at the fuel foil/cladding interface. To investigate the nature of the fuel/cladding interface for this fuel type after irradiation, fuel plates were fabricated using a friction bonding process, tested in INL's advanced test reactor (ATR), and then subsequently characterized using optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Results of this characterization showed that the fuel/cladding interaction layers present at the U-Mo fuel/AA6061 cladding interface after fabrication became amorphous during irradiation. Up to two main interaction layers, based on composition, could be found at the fuel/cladding interface, depending on location. After irradiation, an Al-rich layer contained very few fission gas bubbles, but did exhibit Xe enrichment near the AA6061 cladding interface. Another layer, which contained more Si, had more observable fission gas bubbles. In the samples produced using a focused ion beam at the interaction zone/AA6061 cladding interface, possible indications of porosity/debonding were found, which suggested that the interface in this location is relatively weak.

  13. Cold pressure welding of aluminium-steel blanks: Manufacturing process and electrochemical surface preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Hans Christian; Homberg, Werner; Orive, Alejandro Gonzalez; Grundmeier, Guido; Hordych, Illia; Maier, Hans Jürgen

    2018-05-01

    In this study the manufacture of aluminium-steel blanks by cold pressure welding and their preparation for a welding process through electrochemical surface treatment are investigated and discussed. The cold pressure welding process was done with an incremental rolling tool that allows for the partial pressure welding of two blanks along a prepared path. The influence of the surface preparation by electrochemical deposition of bond promoting organosilane-based agents and roughening on a nano-scale is investigated and compared to conventional surface treatments. Coating the surfaces with a thin organosilane-based film incorporating specific functional groups should promote additional bonding between the mating oxide layers; its influence on the total weld strength is studied. Pressure welding requires suitable process strategies, and the current advances in the proposed incremental rolling process for the combination of mild steel and aluminium are presented.

  14. Mechanical properties and corrosion behaviour of MIG welded 5083 aluminium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durmus, Huelya [Celal Bayar Univ., Turgutlu-Manisa (Turkey)

    2011-07-01

    For this study 5083 Aluminium alloy plates, as used in automobiles and watercraft, were experimentally MIG welded. The plates were joined with different wires and at various currents. The effects of welding with different parameters on the mechanical and corrosion properties were investigated. The corrosion behaviour of the MIG welded 5083 Aluminium base material was also investigated. The effects of the chemical composition of the filler material on the mechanical properties were examined by metallographic inspection and tensile testing. By EDS and XRD analyses of specimens it turned out that different structures in the weld metal (Cu3Si) affect its mechanical properties. The mechanical properties of the specimens welded with 5356 filler metal were found as quite well improved as compared to those specimens welded with 4043 and 5183 filler material. The results of the metallographic analysis, and mechanical and corrosion tests exhibited that the 5356 filler material was most suitable for the 5083 Al alloy base material. (orig.)

  15. Development of the electron beam welding of the aluminium alloy 6061-T6 for the Jules Horowitz reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leblanc, Y.

    2013-01-01

    The aluminium alloy 6061-T6 has been selected for the construction of the Jules Horowitz's reactor vessel. This reactor vessel is pressurized and will be made through butt welding of ∼ 2 cm thick aluminium slabs. The electron beam welding process has been tested and qualified. It appears that this welding process allows: -) welding without pre-heating, -) vacuum welding, -) welding of 100% of the thickness in one passage, -) very low deforming welding process, -) very low density and very low volume of blow holes, -) weak ZAT (Thermal Affected Zones), and -) high reproducibility that permits automation. (A.C.)

  16. Dynamic analysis of I cross beam section dissimilar plate joined by TIG welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sani, M. S. M.; Nazri, N. A.; Rani, M. N. Abdul; Yunus, M. A.

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, finite element (FE) joint modelling technique for prediction of dynamic properties of sheet metal jointed by tungsten inert gas (TTG) will be presented. I cross section dissimilar flat plate with different series of aluminium alloy; AA7075 and AA6061 joined by TTG are used. In order to find the most optimum set of TTG welding dissimilar plate, the finite element model with three types of joint modelling were engaged in this study; bar element (CBAR), beam element and spot weld element connector (CWELD). Experimental modal analysis (EMA) was carried out by impact hammer excitation on the dissimilar plates that welding by TTG method. Modal properties of FE model with joints were compared and validated with model testing. CWELD element was chosen to represent weld model for TTG joints due to its accurate prediction of mode shapes and contains an updating parameter for weld modelling compare to other weld modelling. Model updating was performed to improve correlation between EMA and FEA and before proceeds to updating, sensitivity analysis was done to select the most sensitive updating parameter. After perform model updating, average percentage of error of the natural frequencies for CWELD model is improved significantly.

  17. Effect Of Milling Time On Microstructure Of AA6061 Composites Fabricated Via Mechanical Alloying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomiczek B.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to determine the effect of manufacturing conditions, especially milling time, on the microstructure and crystallite size of a newly developed nanostructural composite material with the aluminium alloy matrix reinforced with halloysite nanotubes. Halloysite, being a clayey mineral of volcanic origin, is characterized by high porosity and large specific surface area. Thus it can be used as an alternative reinforcement in metal matrix composite materials. In order to obtain this goal, composite powders with fine microstructures were fabricated using high-energy mechanical alloying, cold compacting and hot extrusion techniques. The obtained composite powders of aluminium alloy reinforced with 5, 10 and 15 wt% of halloysite nanotubes were characterized with SEM, TEM and XRD analysis. It has been proven that the use of mechanical alloying leads to a high degree of deformation, which, coupled with a decreased grain size below 100 nm and the dispersion of the refined reinforcing particles–reinforces the material very well.

  18. Braze Welding TIG of Titanium and Aluminium Alloy Type Al – Mg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winiowski A.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the course and the results of technological tests related to TIG-based arc braze welding of titanium and AW-5754 (AlMg3 aluminium alloy. The tests involved the use of an aluminium filler metal (Al99.5 and two filler metals based on Al-Si alloys (AlSi5 and AlSi12. Braze welded joints underwent tensile tests, metallographic examinations using a light microscope as well as structural examinations involving the use of a scanning electron microscope and an X-ray energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS. The highest strength and quality of welds was obtained when the Al99.5 filler metal was used in a braze welding process. The tests enabled the development of the most convenient braze welding conditions and parameters.

  19. Numerical simulation of the laser welding process for the prediction of temperature distribution on welded aluminium aircraft components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsirkas, S. A.

    2018-03-01

    The present investigation is focused to the modelling of the temperature field in aluminium aircraft components welded by a CO2 laser. A three-dimensional finite element model has been developed to simulate the laser welding process and predict the temperature distribution in T-joint laser welded plates with fillet material. The simulation of the laser beam welding process was performed using a nonlinear heat transfer analysis, based on a keyhole formation model analysis. The model employs the technique of element ;birth and death; in order to simulate the weld fillet. Various phenomena associated with welding like temperature dependent material properties and heat losses through convection and radiation were accounted for in the model. The materials considered were 6056-T78 and 6013-T4 aluminium alloys, commonly used for aircraft components. The temperature distribution during laser welding process has been calculated numerically and validated by experimental measurements on different locations of the welded structure. The numerical results are in good agreement with the experimental measurements.

  20. On use of weld zone temperatures for online monitoring of weld quality in friction stir welding of naturally aged aluminium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imam, Murshid; Biswas, Kajal; Racherla, Vikranth

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • FSWs for 6063-T4 AA are done at different process parameters and sheet thicknesses. • Weld nugget zone and heat affected zone temperatures are monitored for each case. • Microstructural and mechanical characterisation of welds is done in all cases. • Weld ductility is found to be particularly sensitive to weld zone temperatures. • Strong correlation is found between WNZ and HAZ temperatures and weld properties. - Abstract: 6063-T4 aluminium alloy sheets of 3 and 6 mm thicknesses were friction stir butt welded using a square tool pin at a wide range of tool rotational speeds. Properties of obtained welds were characterised using tensile tests, optical micrographs, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. Shape, size, and distribution of precipitates in weld zones, and strength and ductility of welds were seen to directly correlate with peak temperatures in weld nugget and heat affected zones, independent of sheet thickness. In addition, fluctuations in measured temperature profiles, for 3 mm sheets, were seen to correlate with an increase in scatter of weld nugget zone properties for 3 mm sheets. Optimal weld strength and ductility were obtained for peak weld nugget zone temperatures of around 450 °C and corresponding peak heat affected zone temperatures of around 360–380 °C. Results obtained suggest that, at least for naturally aged aluminium alloys, nature of temperature evolution and magnitudes of peak temperatures in weld nugget and heat affected zones provide information on uniformity of properties in weld zones, overaging of heat affected zones, and formation of tunnel defects from improper material mixing at low weld zone temperatures

  1. Effect of pulsed current welding on fatigue behaviour of high strength aluminium alloy joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balasubramanian, V.; Ravisankar, V.; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.

    2008-01-01

    High strength aluminium alloys (Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys) have gathered wide acceptance in the fabrication of light weight structures requiring high strength-to weight ratio, such as transportable bridge girders, military vehicles, road tankers and railway transport systems. The preferred welding processes of high strength aluminium alloy are frequently gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process and gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process due to their comparatively easier applicability and better economy. Weld fusion zones typically exhibit coarse columnar grains because of the prevailing thermal conditions during weld metal solidification. This often results inferior weld mechanical properties and poor resistance to hot cracking. In this investigation, an attempt has been made to refine the fusion zone grains by applying pulsed current welding technique. Rolled plates of 6 mm thickness have been used as the base material for preparing single pass welded joints. Single V butt joint configuration has been prepared for joining the plates. The filler metal used for joining the plates is AA 5356 (Al-5Mg (wt%)) grade aluminium alloy. Four different welding techniques have been used to fabricate the joints and they are: (i) continuous current GTAW (CCGTAW), (ii) pulsed current GTAW (PCGTAW), (iii) continuous current GMAW (CCGMAW) and (iv) pulsed current GMAW (PCGMAW) processes. Argon (99.99% pure) has been used as the shielding gas. Fatigue properties of the welded joints have been evaluated by conducting fatigue test using rotary bending fatigue testing machine. Current pulsing leads to relatively finer and more equi-axed grain structure in gas tungsten arc (GTA) and gas metal arc (GMA) welds. In contrast, conventional continuous current welding resulted in predominantly columnar grain structures. Grain refinement is accompanied by an increase in fatigue life and endurance limit

  2. Butt pressure welding of wheels from vehicles consisting of steel and aluminium; Pressstumpfschweissen von Fahrzeugraedern aus Stahl und Aluminium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grobelin, K. [Hess Engineering AG, Frauenfeld (Switzerland)

    2001-07-01

    Every year in Europe 35 million wheels for vehicles are produced. Most of them are wheels consisting of metal tapes, both of steel and of aluminium alloys. The manufacturing of wheels is explained, in detail the method known as DC upset welding used for butt joints of wheel-rims. The engaged machinery, the specials of welding various materials, the limits of the method, and the quality assurance are discussed. Advantages of the applied method are joints of first-class quality, high productivity, energy saving and environmental cleanness. (orig.)

  3. Microstructural evolution and properties of friction stir welded aluminium alloy AA2219

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, R. K.; Biju, S.; Ghosh, B. R.; Sinha, P. P.

    2007-01-01

    Low weld strength of fusion welded joints of aluminium alloy AA2219 is a concern in fabrication of pressure vessels and is attributable to the presence of weld defects, as well as various metallurgical factors. Friction stir welding (FSW), being a solid state joining process has obvious advantages over fusion welding. Results of preliminary FSW experiments conducted on 10 mm thick plate using a particular tool configuration are presented here. Microscopic studies show the presence of very fine equiaxed recrystallised grain at the weld nugget and a flow pattern of grains due to heavy deformation in defect-free weld coupons. Mechanical properties are correlated with the microstructure and process variables. Fractographic analysis complements the observations of optical microscopy and mechanical properties

  4. Hot-crack test for aluminium alloys welds using TIG process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niel, A.; Deschaux-Beaume, F.; Bordreuil, C.; Fras, G.

    2010-06-01

    Hot cracking is a critical defect frequently observed during welding of aluminium alloys. In order to better understand the interaction between cracking phenomenon, process parameters, mechanical factors and microstructures resulting from solidification after welding, an original hot-cracking test during welding is developed. According to in-situ observations and post mortem analyses, hot cracking mechanisms are investigated, taking into account the interaction between microstructural parameters, depending on the thermal cycles, and mechanical parameters, depending on geometry and clamping conditions of the samples and on the thermal field on the sample. Finally, a process map indicating the limit between cracking and non-cracking zones according to welding parameters is presented.

  5. Comparative study on laser welding and TIG welding of semi-solid high pressure die cast A356 aluminium alloy

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Govender, G

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available components. The low porosity levels in SSM high pressure die castings (HPDC) improves the weldability of these components. The aim of the current research was to perform a comparative study of laser and TIG welding of SSM HPDC aluminium alloy A356. SSM...

  6. European welding technology for an Australian yacht in aluminium; Soudage a l'europeenne pour un yacht australien en aluminium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2005-02-01

    It is a European welding technology which has been retained for the Australian shipbuilding yard: 'Shipworks' for manufacturing a luxury yacht in aluminium. This yacht has been manufactured under the American standards specifications. (O.M.)

  7. Human biomonitoring of aluminium after a single, controlled manual metal arc inert gas welding process of an aluminium-containing worksheet in nonwelders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, Jens; Brand, Peter; Hartmann, Laura; Schettgen, Thomas; Kossack, Veronika; Lenz, Klaus; Purrio, Ellwyn; Reisgen, Uwe; Kraus, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    Several existing field studies evaluate aluminium welding works but no thoroughly controlled exposure scenario for welding fume has been described yet. This study provides information about the uptake and elimination of aluminium from welding fumes under controlled conditions. In the Aachen Workplace Simulation Laboratory, we are able to generate welding fumes of a defined particle mass concentration. We exposed 12, until then occupationally unexposed participants with aluminium-containing welding fumes of a metal inert gas (MIG) welding process of a total dust mass concentration of 2.5 mg/m(3) for 6 h. Room air filter samples were collected, and the aluminium concentration in air derived. Urine and plasma samples were collected directly before and after the 6-h lasting exposure, as well as after 1 and 7 days. Human biomonitoring methods were used to determine the aluminium content of the samples with high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry. Urinary aluminium concentrations showed significant changes after exposure compared to preexposure levels (mean t(1) (0 h) 13.5 µg/L; mean t(2) (6 h) 23.5 µg/L). Plasma results showed the same pattern but pre-post comparison did not reach significance. We were able to detect a significant increase of the internal aluminium burden of a single MIG aluminium welding process in urine, while plasma failed significance. Biphasic elimination kinetic can be observed. The German BAT of 60 µg/g creatinine was not exceeded, and urinary aluminium returned nearly to baseline concentrations after 7 days.

  8. Corrosion Properties of Dissimilar Friction Stir Welded 6061 Aluminum and HT590 Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Bosung; Song, Kuk Hyun; Park, Kwangsuk

    2018-05-01

    Corrosion properties of dissimilar friction stir welded 6061 aluminum and HT590 steel were investigated to understand effects of galvanic corrosion. As cathode when coupled, HT590 was cathodically protected. However, the passivation of AA6061 made the aluminum alloy cathode temporarily, which leaded to corrosion of HT590. From the EIS analysis showing Warburg diffusion plot in Nyquist plots, it can be inferred that the stable passivation layer was formed on AA6061. However, the weld as well as HT590 did not show Warburg diffusion plot in Nyquist plots, suggesting that there was no barrier for corrosion or even if it exists, the barrier had no function for preventing and/or retarding charge transport through the passivation layer. The open circuit potential measurements showed that the potential of the weld was similar to that of HT590, which lied in the pitting region for AA6061, making the aluminum alloy part of the weld keep corrosion state. That resulted in the cracked oxide film on AA6061 of the weld, which could not play a role of corrosion barrier.

  9. Laser beam welding of high strength aluminium-lithium alloys; Laserstrahlschweissen von hochfesten Aluminium-Lithium Legierungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enz, Josephin

    2012-07-01

    The present development in aircraft industry determined by the demand for a higher cost-effectiveness. Laser beam welding is one of the most promising joining technologies for the application in the aircraft industry through the considerable reduction of the production costs. Furthermore the weight of an aircraft structure can be reduced by the use of light and high strength aluminium alloys. This paper deals with the development of a process for the laser beam welding of a skin-stringer-joint where the Al-Li-alloy AA2196 is used as stringer material and the Al-Li-alloy AA2198 is used as skin and stringer material. By the use of design of experiments the optimal welding process parameters for different material combinations were determined which will be used for the welding of a 5-stringer panel. Therefore the weld seams of the joints were tested for irregularities and microstructural characteristics. In addition several mechanical tests were performed, which define the quality of the welded joint. Furthermore the influence of the oxide layer and the welding preparation on the welding performance was investigated. (orig.) [German] Die derzeitigen Entwicklungen im Flugzeugbau werden durch die allgemeine Forderung nach einer Steigerung der Wirtschaftlichkeit bestimmt. Das Laserstrahlschweissen ist dabei eines der vielversprechendsten Fuegeverfahren fuer die Anwendung im Flugzeugbau durch das die Herstellungskosten deutlich reduziert werden koennen. Zudem kann durch die Verwendung von leichten und hochfesten Aluminium-Legierungen das Gewicht einer Flugzeugstruktur zusaetzlich reduziert werden. Die vorliegende Arbeit befasst sich mit der Entwicklung eines Prozesses zum Laserstrahlschweissen einer Skin-Stringer-Verbindung aus den Aluminium-Lithium-Legierungen AA2196 (als Stringer-Werkstoff) und AA2198 (als Skin- und Stringer-Werkstoff). Unter Verwendung der statistischen Versuchsplanung wurden die optimalen Einstellungen der Schweissprozessparameter fuer die

  10. The effect of tensioning and sectioning on residual stresses in aluminium AA7749 friction stir welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altenkirch, J.; Steuwer, A.; Peel, M.; Richards, D.G.; Withers, P.J.

    2008-01-01

    Using synchrotron X-ray diffraction the residual stress distribution has been measured in a series of AA7449-W51 aluminium friction stir welds that had been tensioned to different loads during welding. By modifying the stress accumulation path, the application of a tensioning stress has reduced the tensile magnitude of the final residual weld stresses. In the present case the residual stresses were minimised when the applied load is ∼35% of the room temperature yield stress of the parent material. Subsequent sectioning of the weld into shorter test lengths, as might be necessary for weld testing, resulted in a progressive and significant relaxation of the residual stress field. The effect of tensioning on the weld component distortion also has been investigated

  11. Finite element modelling and updating of friction stir welding (FSW joint for vibration analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahari Siti Norazila

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir welding of aluminium alloys widely used in automotive and aerospace application due to its advanced and lightweight properties. The behaviour of FSW joints plays a significant role in the dynamic characteristic of the structure due to its complexities and uncertainties therefore the representation of an accurate finite element model of these joints become a research issue. In this paper, various finite elements (FE modelling technique for prediction of dynamic properties of sheet metal jointed by friction stir welding will be presented. Firstly, nine set of flat plate with different series of aluminium alloy; AA7075 and AA6061 joined by FSW are used. Nine set of specimen was fabricated using various types of welding parameters. In order to find the most optimum set of FSW plate, the finite element model using equivalence technique was developed and the model validated using experimental modal analysis (EMA on nine set of specimen and finite element analysis (FEA. Three types of modelling were engaged in this study; rigid body element Type 2 (RBE2, bar element (CBAR and spot weld element connector (CWELD. CBAR element was chosen to represent weld model for FSW joints due to its accurate prediction of mode shapes and contains an updating parameter for weld modelling compare to other weld modelling. Model updating was performed to improve correlation between EMA and FEA and before proceeds to updating, sensitivity analysis was done to select the most sensitive updating parameter. After perform model updating, total error of the natural frequencies for CBAR model is improved significantly. Therefore, CBAR element was selected as the most reliable element in FE to represent FSW weld joint.

  12. Tensile behavior of dissimilar friction stir welded joints of aluminium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shanmuga Sundaram, N.; Murugan, N.

    2010-01-01

    The heat treatable aluminium alloy AA2024 is used extensively in the aircraft industry because of its high strength to weight ratio and good ductility. The non-heat treatable aluminium alloy AA5083 possesses medium strength and high ductility and used typically in structural applications, marine, and automotive industries. When compared to fusion welding processes, friction stir welding (FSW) process is an emerging solid state joining process which is best suitable for joining these alloys. The friction stir welding parameters such as tool pin profile, tool rotational speed, welding speed, and tool axial force influence the mechanical properties of the FS welded joints significantly. Dissimilar FS welded joints are fabricated using five different tool pin profiles. Central composite design with four parameters, five levels, and 31 runs is used to conduct the experiments and response surface method (RSM) is employed to develop the model. Mathematical regression models are developed to predict the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and tensile elongation (TE) of the dissimilar friction stir welded joints of aluminium alloys 2024-T6 and 5083-H321, and they are validated. The effects of the above process parameters and tool pin profile on tensile strength and tensile elongation of dissimilar friction stir welded joints are analysed in detail. Joints fabricated using Tapered Hexagon tool pin profile have the highest tensile strength and tensile elongation, whereas the Straight Cylinder tool pin profile have the lowest tensile strength and tensile elongation. The results are useful to have a better understanding of the effects of process parameters, to fabricate the joints with desired tensile properties, and to automate the FS welding process.

  13. Effect of post-weld aging treatment on mechanical properties of Tungsten Inert Gas welded low thickness 7075 aluminium alloy joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temmar, M.; Hadji, M.; Sahraoui, T.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The effects of post-weld aging treatment on the properties of joints is studied. → The post-weld aging treatment increases the tensile strength of TIG welded joints. → The strengthening is due to a balance of dissolution, reversion and precipitation. → Simple post-weld aging at 140 o C enhances the properties of the welded joints. -- Abstract: This paper reports the influence of post-weld aging treatment on the microstructure, tensile strength, hardness and Charpy impact energy of weld joints low thickness 7075 T6 aluminium alloy welded by Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG). Hot cracking occurs in aluminium welds when high levels of thermal stress and solidification shrinkage are present while the weld is undergoing various degrees of solidification. Weld fusion zones typically exhibit microstructure modifications because of the thermal conditions during weld metal solidification. This often results in low weld mechanical properties and low resistance to hot cracking. It has been observed that the mechanical properties are very sensitive to microstructure of weld metal. Simple post-weld aging treatment at 140 o C applied to the joints is found to be beneficial to enhance the mechanical properties of the welded joints. Correlations between microstructures and mechanical properties were discussed.

  14. INVESTIGATION OF SINGLE-PASS/DOUBLE-PASS TECHNIQUES ON FRICTION STIR WELDING OF ALUMINIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.A.A. Sathari

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to study the effects of single-pass/ double-pass techniques on friction stir welding of aluminium. Two pieces of AA1100 with a thickness of 6.0 mm were friction stir welded using a CNC milling machine at rotational speeds of 1400 rpm, 1600 rpm and 1800 rpm respectively for single-pass and double-pass. Microstructure observations of the welded area were studied using an optical microscope. The specimens were tested by using a tensile test and Vickers hardness test to evaluate their mechanical properties. The results indicated that, at low rotational speed, defects such as ‘surface lack of fill’ and tunnels in the welded area contributed to a decrease in mechanical properties. Welded specimens using double-pass techniques show increasing values of tensile strength and hardness. From this investigation it is found that the best parameters of FSW welded aluminium AA1100 plate were those using double-pass techniques that produce mechanically sound joints with a hardness of 56.38 HV and 108 MPa strength at 1800 rpm compared to the single-pass technique. Friction stir welding, single-pass/ double-pass techniques, AA1100, microstructure, mechanical properties.

  15. Features of argon-arc welding of aluminium alloy AD1 to stainless steel 12Kh18N10T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadov, I.I.

    1982-01-01

    Welding of pipes made of the 12Kh18N10T stainless steel and the AD1 aluminium alloy is proposed to perform using one-sided aluminizing. It is recommended to use shields in order to protect internal and external surfaces of pipes, aluminizing of which is impossible. It is shown that developed technological process for welded joints made of aluminium and stainless steel for cryogenic apparatus permits to create light-duty cryostat assembly using aluminium alloys instead of copper alloys, to increase reliability of apparatus (usage of welded joints instead of soldered ones), and to improve labour conditions

  16. Material Characterization of Dissimilar Friction Stir Spot Welded Aluminium and Copper Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanusi, K. O.; Akinlabi, E. T.

    2017-08-01

    In this research study, material characterization of dissimilar friction stir spot welded Aluminium and Copper was evaluated. Rotational speeds of 800 rpm and transverse speeds of 50 mm/min, 150 mm/min and 250 mm/min were used. The total numbers of samples evaluated were nine altogether. The spot welds were characterised by microstructure characterization using optical microscope (OEM) and scanning electron microscopy technique (SEM) by observing the evolution of the microstructure across the weld’s cross-section. lap-shear test of the of the spot weld specimens were also done. From the results, it shows that welding of metals and alloys using Friction stir spot welding is appropriate and can be use in industrial applications.

  17. On the hot cracking susceptibility of a semisolid aluminium 6061 weld: Application of a coupled solidification- thermomechanical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajani, H R Zareie; Phillion, A B

    2015-01-01

    A coupled solidification-thermomechanical model is presented that investigates the hot tearing susceptibility of an aluminium 6061 semisolid weld. Two key phenomena are considered: excessive deformation of the semisolid weld, initiating a hot tear, and the ability of the semisolid weld to heal the hot tear by circulation of the molten metal. The model consists of two major modules: weld solidification and thermomechanical analysis. 1) By means of a multi-scale model of solidification, the microstructural evolution of the semisolid weld is simulated in 3D. The semisolid structure, which varies as a function of welding parameters, is composed of solidifying grains and a network of micro liquid channels. The weld solidification module is utilized to obtain the solidification shrinkage. The size of the micro liquid channels is used as an indicator to assess the healing ability of the semisolid weld. 2) Using the finite element method, the mechanical interaction between the weld pool and the base metal is simulated to capture the transient force field deforming the semisolid weld. Thermomechanical stresses and shrinkage stresses are both considered in the analysis; the solidification contractions are extracted from the weld solidification module and applied to the deformation simulation as boundary conditions. Such an analysis enables characterization of the potential for excessive deformation of the weld. The outputs of the model are used to study the effect of welding parameters including welding current and speed, and also welding constraint on the hot cracking susceptibility of an aluminium alloy 6061 semisolid weld. (paper)

  18. Microstructural analysis of as-processed U-10 wt.%Mo monolithic fuel plate in AA6061 matrix with Zr diffusion barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, E.; Yao, B. [Advanced Materials Processing and Analysis Center, Department of Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816 (United States); Keiser, D.D. [Nuclear Fuels and Materials Division, Idaho National Laboratory, Scoville, ID 83415 (United States); Sohn, Y.H., E-mail: ysohn@mail.ucf.ed [Advanced Materials Processing and Analysis Center, Department of Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816 (United States)

    2010-07-01

    For higher U-loading in low-enriched U-10 wt.%Mo fuels, monolithic fuel plate clad in AA6061 is being developed as a part of Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) program. This paper reports the first characterization results from a monolithic U-10 wt.%Mo fuel plate with a Zr diffusion barrier that was fabricated as part of a plate fabrication campaign for irradiation testing in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). Both scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM) were employed for analysis. At the interface between the Zr barrier and U-10 wt.%Mo, going from Zr to U(Mo), UZr{sub 2}, {gamma}-UZr, Zr solid-solution and Mo{sub 2}Zr phases were observed. The interface between AA6061 cladding and Zr barrier plate consisted of four layers, going from Al to Zr, (Al, Si){sub 2}Zr, (Al, Si)Zr{sub 3} (Al, Si){sub 3}Zr, and AlSi{sub 4}Zr{sub 5}. Irradiation behavior of these intermetallic phases is discussed based on their constituents. Characterization of as-fabricated phase constituents and microstructure would help understand the irradiation behavior of these fuel plates, interpret post-irradiation examination, and optimize the processing parameters of monolithic fuel system.

  19. Microstructural analysis of as-processed U-10 wt.%Mo monolithic fuel plate in AA6061 matrix with Zr diffusion barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, E.; Yao, B.; Keiser, D. D., Jr.; Sohn, Y. H.

    2010-07-01

    For higher U-loading in low-enriched U-10 wt.%Mo fuels, monolithic fuel plate clad in AA6061 is being developed as a part of Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) program. This paper reports the first characterization results from a monolithic U-10 wt.%Mo fuel plate with a Zr diffusion barrier that was fabricated as part of a plate fabrication campaign for irradiation testing in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). Both scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM) were employed for analysis. At the interface between the Zr barrier and U-10 wt.%Mo, going from Zr to U(Mo), UZr 2, γ-UZr, Zr solid-solution and Mo 2Zr phases were observed. The interface between AA6061 cladding and Zr barrier plate consisted of four layers, going from Al to Zr, (Al, Si) 2Zr, (Al, Si)Zr 3 (Al, Si) 3Zr, and AlSi 4Zr 5. Irradiation behavior of these intermetallic phases is discussed based on their constituents. Characterization of as-fabricated phase constituents and microstructure would help understand the irradiation behavior of these fuel plates, interpret post-irradiation examination, and optimize the processing parameters of monolithic fuel system.

  20. Effect of Manganese on the Mechanical Properties of Welded As-Cast Aluminium Joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isiaka Oluwole OLADELE

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The effects of manganese on the mechanical properties of welded and un-weld as-cast 6063 aluminium alloy has been studied. Alloys of varying percentage of manganese from 0.019 to 0.24 were sand cast. A wooden pattern of dimensions 200×100×100mm was used, the aluminium (500g was charged into an induction furnace and heated to 750°C for 15 minutes, this was followed by the addition of weighed powdered manganese, stirred and heated at the same temperature for another 5 minutes and thereafter poured into the already prepared sand mould at a temperature of 690°C. The as-cast aluminium samples, were sectioned into two equal parts of 45mm each using power hack saw; a weld groove was created between the sides of the samples using an electric hand grinding machine, the groove served as the path along which the filler metal was deposited on the aluminium, a single v butt joint was produced from each sample and Metal Inert Gas Welding process was carried out to produce the required joint design. The different cast samples were machined to the different test pieces after which they were assessed to determine their mechanical properties (impact, hardness (welded joint and heat affected zone and tensile tests. The microstructures of the welded samples were also studied. From the results, it was observed that Sample F, which has 0.172% Mn, has the best hardness and impact strength while sample C with 0.160% Mn has the highest ultimate tensile strength.

  1. Studies on post weld heat treatment of dissimilar aluminum alloys by laser beam welding technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, B.; Krishna, N. Murali; Cheepu, Muralimohan; Sivaprasad, K.; Muthupandi, V.

    2018-03-01

    The present study mainly focuses on post weld heat treatment (PWHT) of AA5083 and AA6061 alloys by joining these using laser beam welding at three different laser power and two different beam spot sizes and three different welding speeds. Effects of these parameters on microstructural and mechanical properties like hardness, tensile strength were studied at PWHT condition and significant changes had been observed. The PWHT used was artificial aging technique. The microstructural observations revealed that there was a appreciable changes were taken place in the grain size. The microhardness observations proven that the change in the hardness profile in AA6061 was appreciable than in the AA5083. The tensile strength of 246 MPa was recorded as highest. The fractured surfaces observed are predominantly ductile in nature.

  2. Effects of heat treatments on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a 6061 aluminium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maisonnette, D.; Suery, M.; Nelias, D.; Chaudet, P.; Epicier, T.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Description of the mechanical behavior of AA6061-T6 at RT after various thermal histories. → A fast-heating device has been designed to reproduce those thermal histories on tensile specimens. → The thermal loadings are representative of the temperature change observed in the HAZ during welding. → The variation of mechanical properties is the result of metallurgical evolution observed by TEM. → The yield stress at RT decreases with the maximum temperature reached during the thermal cycle. - Abstract: This paper describes the mechanical behavior of the 6061-T6 aluminium alloy at room temperature for various previous thermal histories representative of an electron beam welding. A fast-heating device has been designed to control and apply thermal loadings on tensile specimens. Tensile tests show that the yield stress at ambient temperature decreases if the maximum temperature reached increases or if the heating rate decreases. This variation of the mechanical properties is the result of microstructural changes which have been observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM).

  3. Microstructural features of friction stir welded dissimilar Aluminium alloys AA2219-AA7475

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman Khan, Noor; Ubaid, Mohammed; Siddiquee, Arshad Noor; Khan, Zahid A.; Al-Ahmari, Abdulrahman; Chen, Xizhang; Haider Abidi, Mustufa

    2018-05-01

    High strength, good corrosion resistance, light weight make aluminium alloys a material of choice in many industrial sectors like aerospace, marine etc. Problems associated with welding of these alloys by fusion welding processes restricted their use in various industries. Friction stir welding (FSW), a clean solid-state joining process, easily overcomes various difficulties encountered during conventional fusion welding processes. In the present work, the effect of rotational speed (710 rpm, 900 rpm and 1120 rpm) on micro-hardness distribution and microstructure of FSWed dissimilar aluminium alloy joints were analyzed. Plates of AA7475-T761 and AA2219-O having thickness of 2.5 mm were welded by fixing AA7475 on retreating side (RS) and AA2219 on advancing side (AS). Welded joints were characterized by Vickers micro-hardness testing, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy (OM). Results revealed that rotational speed significantly affects the micro-hardness due to increase in grain size, coarsening and dissolution of strengthening precipitates and re-precipitation. Higher micro-hardness values were observed in stir zone due to grain refinement and re-precipitation. Minimum micro-hardness value was observed at the TMAZ/HAZ of advancing side due to thermal softening.

  4. Effect of process parameters on tensile strength of friction stir welding A356/C355 aluminium alloys joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwivedi, Shashi Prakash [Noida Institute of Engineering and Technology, Greater Noida (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-15

    In the present investigation, A356/C355 aluminium alloys are welded by friction stir welding by controlling various welding parameters. A356 and C355 aluminium alloys materials have a set of mechanical and physical properties that are ideally suited for application in aerospace and automobile industries and not widely used because of its poor weldebility. To overcome this barrier, weldebility analysis of A356 and C355 aluminium alloys with high speed steel (Wc-Co) tool has been investigated. An attempt has been made to investigate the influence of the rotational speed of the tools, the axial force and welding speed on tensile strength of A356/C355 aluminium alloys joint. The experiments were conducted on a milling machine. The main focus of investigation is to determine good tensile strength. Response surface methodology (box Behnken design) is chosen to design the optimum welding parameters leading to maximum tensile strength. The result shows that axial force increases, tensile strength decreases. Whereas tool rotational speed and welding speed increase, tensile strength increases. Optimum values of axial force (3 /KN), tool rotational speed (900 RPM) and welding speed (75 mm/min.) during welding of A356/C355 aluminium alloys joint to maximize the tensile strength (Predicted 223.2 MPa) have been find out.

  5. Effect of process parameters on tensile strength of friction stir welding A356/C355 aluminium alloys joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dwivedi, Shashi Prakash

    2014-01-01

    In the present investigation, A356/C355 aluminium alloys are welded by friction stir welding by controlling various welding parameters. A356 and C355 aluminium alloys materials have a set of mechanical and physical properties that are ideally suited for application in aerospace and automobile industries and not widely used because of its poor weldebility. To overcome this barrier, weldebility analysis of A356 and C355 aluminium alloys with high speed steel (Wc-Co) tool has been investigated. An attempt has been made to investigate the influence of the rotational speed of the tools, the axial force and welding speed on tensile strength of A356/C355 aluminium alloys joint. The experiments were conducted on a milling machine. The main focus of investigation is to determine good tensile strength. Response surface methodology (box Behnken design) is chosen to design the optimum welding parameters leading to maximum tensile strength. The result shows that axial force increases, tensile strength decreases. Whereas tool rotational speed and welding speed increase, tensile strength increases. Optimum values of axial force (3 /KN), tool rotational speed (900 RPM) and welding speed (75 mm/min.) during welding of A356/C355 aluminium alloys joint to maximize the tensile strength (Predicted 223.2 MPa) have been find out.

  6. An experimental study on joining of severe plastic deformed aluminium materials with friction welding method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahin, Mumin [Mechanical Engineering Department, Trakya University, 22030 Edirne (Turkey)], E-mail: mumins@trakya.edu.tr; Erol Akata, H.; Ozel, Kaan [Mechanical Engineering Department, Trakya University, 22030 Edirne (Turkey)

    2008-07-01

    In this study, 5083 aluminium alloys, which were exposed to severe plastic deformation, were joined with friction welding method and the variation in mechanical properties of the joints was experimentally investigated. Severe plastic deformation methods can be classified as equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) (in other words, equal cross section lateral extrusion - ECSLE) and cyclic extrusion-compression. Aluminium alloy as test material 5083 and square cross-sectional equal channel angular pressing die for severe plastic deformation were used in the study. Firstly 5083 alloys, as purchased, were joined with friction welding method. The optimum parameters for friction time, upset time, friction pressure and upset pressure, which are necessary for welding, were obtained. Afterwards, 5083 aluminium materials as purchased were prepared as square cross-section and then 1-pass severe plastic deformation was applied to specimen by equal channel angular pressing die. The obtained parts as square form were prepared as cylindrical form by machining and then the parts were joined by continuous drive friction welding equipment that was designed and produced in laboratory conditions before. Later, the tensile strengths of the parts, obtained at optimum conditions, were compared with those of the joined parts as purchased form. Then, hardness variations and microstructures of joints were examined. Finally, the obtained results were commented on.

  7. Aluminium alloys welding with high-power Nd:YAG lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Orza, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    Aluminium alloys have good mechanical properties (high strength-to-weight ratio, corrosion resistance) and good workability. their applications are growing up, specially in the transportation industry. Weldability is however poorer than in other materials; recent advances in high power YAG laser are the key to obtain good appearance welds and higher penetration, at industrial production rates. Results of the combination of high power YAG beams with small fiber diameters and specific filler wires are presented. It is also characterized the air bone particulate material, by-product of the laser process: emission rates, size distribution and chemical composition are given for several aluminium alloys. (Author) 6 refs

  8. Hot-crack test for aluminium alloys welds using TIG process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deschaux-beaume F.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Hot cracking is a critical defect frequently observed during welding of aluminium alloys. In order to better understand the interaction between cracking phenomenon, process parameters, mechanical factors and microstructures resulting from solidification after welding, an original hot-cracking test during welding is developed. According to in-situ observations and post mortem analyses, hot cracking mechanisms are investigated, taking into account the interaction between microstructural parameters, depending on the thermal cycles, and mechanical parameters, depending on geometry and clamping conditions of the samples and on the thermal field on the sample. Finally, a process map indicating the limit between cracking and non-cracking zones according to welding parameters is presented.

  9. Microstructure of friction stir welded joints of 2017A aluminium alloy sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mroczka, K; Dutkiewicz, J; Pietras, A

    2010-03-01

    The present study examines a friction stir welded 2017A aluminium alloy. Transmission electron microscope investigations of the weld nugget revealed the average grain size of 5 microm, moderate density of dislocations as well as the presence of nanometric precipitates located mostly in grains interiors. Scanning electron microscope observations of fractures showed the presence of ductile fracture in the region of the weld nugget with brittle precipitates in the lower part. The microhardness analysis performed on the cross-section of the joints showed fairly small changes; however, after the artificial ageing process an increase in hardness was observed. The change of the joint hardness subject to the ageing process indicates partial supersaturation in the material during friction stir welding and higher precipitation hardening of the joint.

  10. Analysing the strength of friction stir welded dissimilar aluminium alloys using Sugeno Fuzzy model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barath, V. R.; Vaira Vignesh, R.; Padmanaban, R.

    2018-02-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a promising solid state joining technique for aluminium alloys. In this study, FSW trials were conducted on two dissimilar plates of aluminium alloy AA2024 and AA7075 by varying the tool rotation speed (TRS) and welding speed (WS). Tensile strength (TS) of the joints were measured and a Sugeno - Fuzzy model was developed to interconnect the FSW process parameters with the tensile strength. From the developed model, it was observed that the optimum heat generation at WS of 15 mm.min-1 and TRS of 1050 rpm resulted in dynamic recovery and dynamic recrystallization of the material. This refined the grains in the FSW zone and resulted in peak tensile strength among the tested specimens. Crest parabolic trend was observed in tensile strength with variation of TRS from 900 rpm to 1200 rpm and TTS from 10 mm.min-1 to 20 mm.min-1.

  11. Multiaxial fatigue of aluminium friction stir welded joints: preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Hattingh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present research is to check the accuracy of the Modified Wöhler Curve Method (MWCM in estimating the fatigue strength of friction stir (FS welded tubular joints of Al 6082-T6 subjected to in-phase and out-of-phase multiaxial fatigue loading. The welded samples being investigated were manufactured by equipping an MTS I-STIR process development system with a retracting tool that was specifically designed and optimised for this purpose. These specimens were tested under proportional and non-proportional tension and torsion, the effect of non-zero mean stresses being also investigated. The validation exercise carried out by using the generated experimental results allowed us to prove that the MWCM (applied in terms of nominal stresses is highly accurate in predicting the fatigue strength of the tested FS welded joints, its usage resulting in estimates falling with the uniaxial and torsional calibration scatter bands.

  12. Mechanical properties of friction stir welded butt joint of steel/aluminium alloys: effect of tool geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syafiq, W. M.; Afendi, M.; Daud, R.; Mazlee, M. N.; Majid, M. S. Abdul; Lee, Y. S.

    2017-10-01

    This paper described the mechanical properties from hardness testing and tensile testing of Friction Stir Welded (FSW) materials. In this project, two materials of aluminium and steel are welded using conventional milling machine and tool designed with different profile and shoulder size. During welding the temperature along the weld line is collected using thermocouples. Threaded pins was found to produce stronger joints than cylindrical pins. 20 mm diameter shoulder tool welded a slightly stronger joint than 18 mm diameter one, as well as softer nugget zone due to higher heat input. Threaded pins also contributed to higher weld temperature than cylindrical pins due to increase in pin contact surface. Generally, higher temperatures were recorded in aluminium side due to pin offset away from steel.

  13. Experimental and numerical investigation on under-water friction stir welding of armour grade AA2519-T87 aluminium alloy

    OpenAIRE

    Sree Sabari, S.; Malarvizhi, S.; Balasubramanian, V.; Madusudhan Reddy, G.

    2016-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a promising welding process that can join age hardenable aluminium alloys with high joint efficiency. However, the thermal cycles experienced by the material to be joined during FSW resulted in the deterioration of mechanical properties due to the coarsening and dissolution of strengthening precipitates in the thermo-mechanical affected zone (TMAZ) and heat affected zone (HAZ). Under water friction stir welding (UWFSW) is a variant of FSW process which can maint...

  14. Corrosion fatigue behaviour of aluminium 5083-H111 welded using gas metal arc welding method

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mutombo, K

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium and its alloys are widely used as engineering materials on account of their low density, high strength-to-weight ratios, excellent formability and good corrosion resistance in many environments. Pure aluminium has a density of only 2.70 g...

  15. Influence of friction stir welding parameters on properties of 2024 T3 aluminium alloy joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eramah Abdsalam M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to analyse the process of friction stir welding (FSW of 3mm thick aluminium plates made of high strength aluminium alloy - 2024 T3, as well as to assess the mechanical properties of the produced joints. FSW is a modern procedure which enables joining of similar and dissimilar materials in the solid state, by the combined action of heat and mechanical work. This paper presents an analysis of the experimental results obtained by testing the butt welded joints. Tensile strength of the produced joints is assessed, as well as the distribution of hardness, micro-and macrostructure through the joints (in the base material, nugget, heat affected zone and thermo-mechanically affected zone. Different combinations of the tool rotation speed and the welding speed are used, and the dependence of the properties of the joints on these parameters of welding technology is determined. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 34018 i br. TR 35006

  16. Laser beam welding and friction stir welding of 6013-T6 aluminium alloy sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, R.; Dalle Donne, C.; Staniek, G.

    2000-01-01

    Butt welds of 1.6 mm thick 6013-T6 sheet were produced using laser beam welding and friction stir welding processes. Employing the former joining technique, filler powders of the alloys Al-5%Mg and Al-12%Si were used. Microstructure, hardness profiles, tensile properties and the corrosion behaviour of the welds in the as-welded condition were investigated. The hardness in the weld zone was lower compared to that of the base material in the peak-aged temper. Hardness minima were measured in the fusion zone and in the thermomechanically affected zone for laser beam welded and friction stir welded joints, respectively. Metallographic and fractographic examinations revealed pores in the fusion zone of the laser beam welds. Porosity was higher in welds made using the filler alloy Al-5%Mg than using the filler metal Al-12%Si. Transmission electron microscopy indicated that the β '' (Mg 2 Si) hardening precipitates were dissolved in the weld zone due to the heat input of the joining processes. Joint efficiencies achieved for laser beam welds depended upon the filler powders, being about 60 and 80% using the alloys Al-5%Mg and Al-12%Si, respectively. Strength of the friction stir weld approached over 80% of the ultimate tensile strength of the 6013-T6 base material. Fracture occurred in the region of hardness minima unless defects in the weld zone led to premature failure. The heat input during welding did not cause a degradation of the corrosion behaviour of the welds, as found in continuous immersion tests in an aqueous chloride-peroxide solution. In contrast to the 6013-T6 parent material, the weld zone was not sensitive to intergranular corrosion. Alternate immersion tests in 3.5% NaCl solution indicated high stress corrosion cracking resistance of the joints. For laser beam welded sheet, the weld zone of alternately immersed specimens suffered severe degradation by pitting and intergranular corrosion, which may be associated with galvanic coupling of filler metal and

  17. Multi-objective Optimization of Friction Welding Process Parameters using Grey Relational Analysis for Joining Aluminium Metal Matrix Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreenivasan KONGANAPURAM SUNDARARAJAN

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium metal matrix composites has gained importance in recent time because of its improved mechanical and metallurgical properties. The welding of aluminium metal matrix composites using conventional welding process has got many demerits so in order to overcome them a solid state welding process is to be employed. To achieve a good strength weld in the aluminium metal matrix composite bars an efficient and most preferred technique is friction welding. In this work the aluminium metal matrix composite AA7075 + 10 % vol SiC-T6 is selected and friction welded. The combination of friction welding process parameters such as spindle speed, friction pressure, upset pressure and burn-off- length for joining the AA7075 + 10 % vol SiCP-T6 metal matrix composite bars are selected by Taguchi’s design of experiment. The optimum friction welding parameters were determined for achieving improved ultimate tensile strength and the hardness using grey relational analysis. A combined grey relational grade is found from the determined grey relational coefficient of the output responses and the optimum friction welding process parameters were obtained as spindle speed – 1200 rpm, friction pressure – 100 MPa, upset pressure – 250 MPa, Burn-off-Length – 2 mm. Analysis of variance (ANOVA performed shows that the friction pressure is the most significant friction welding parameter that influences the both the ultimate tensile strength and hardness of friction welded AA7075 + 10 % volSiCP-T6 joints. The fractured surface under microstructure study also revealed good compliance with the grey relational grade result. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.24.2.17725

  18. Influence of friction stir welding process and tool parameters on strength properties of AA7075-T6 aluminium alloy joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajakumar, S.; Muralidharan, C.; Balasubramanian, V.

    2011-01-01

    The aircraft aluminium alloys generally present low weldability by traditional fusion welding process. The development of the friction stir welding has provided an alternative improved way of satisfactorily producing aluminium joints, in a faster and reliable manner. In this present work, the influence of process and tool parameters on tensile strength properties of AA7075-T 6 joints produced by friction stir welding was analysed. Square butt joints were fabricated by varying process parameters and tool parameters. Strength properties of the joints were evaluated and correlated with the microstructure, microhardness of weld nugget. From this investigation it is found that the joint fabricated at a tool rotational speed of 1400 rpm, welding speed of 60 mm/min, axial force of 8 kN, using the tool with 15 mm shoulder diameter, 5 mm pin diameter, 45 HRc tool hardness yielded higher strength properties compared to other joints.

  19. Weldability of AA 5052 H32 aluminium alloy by TIG welding and FSW process - A comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanavas, S.; Raja Dhas, J. Edwin

    2017-10-01

    Aluminium 5xxx series alloys are the strongest non-heat treatable aluminium alloy. Its application found in automotive components and body structures due to its good formability, good strength, high corrosion resistance, and weight savings. In the present work, the influence of Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welding parameters on the quality of weld on AA 5052 H32 aluminium alloy plates were analyzed and the mechanical characterization of the joint so produced was compared with Friction stir (FS) welded joint. The selected input variable parameters are welding current and inert gas flow rate. Other parameters such as welding speed and arc voltage were kept constant throughout the study, based on the response from several trial runs conducted. The quality of the weld is measured in terms of ultimate tensile strength. A double side V-butt joints were fabricated by double pass on one side to ensure maximum strength of TIG welded joints. Macro and microstructural examination were conducted for both welding process.

  20. Characteristic evaluation of process parameters of friction stir welding of aluminium 2024 hybrid composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadashiva, M.; Shivanand, H. K.; Vidyasagar, H. N.

    2018-04-01

    The Current work is aimed to investigate the effect of process parameters in friction stir welding of Aluminium 2024 base alloy and Aluminium 2024 matrix alloy reinforced with E Glass and Silicon Carbide reinforcements. The process involved a set of synthesis techniques incorporating stir casting methodology resulting in fabrication of the composite material. This composite material that is synthesized is then machined to obtain a plate of dimensions 100 mm * 50 mm * 6 mm. The plate is then friction stir welded at different set of parameters viz. the spindle speed of 600 rpm, 900 rpm and 1200 rpm and feed rate of 40 mm/min, 80 mm/min and 120 mm/min for analyzing the process capability. The study of the given set of parameters is predominantly important to understand the physics of the process that may lead to better properties of the joint, which is very much important in perspective to its use in advanced engineering applications, especially in aerospace domain that uses Aluminium 2024 alloy for wing and fuselage structures under tension.

  1. Influence of the Aluminium Alloy Type on Defects Formation in Friction Stir Lap Welding of Thin Sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Costa

    Full Text Available Abstract The weldability in Friction Stir Lap Welding (FSLW of heat and non-heat treatable aluminium alloys, the AA6082-T6 and the AA5754-H22 aluminium alloys, respectively, are compared. For both alloys, welds were produced in very thin sheets, using the same welding parameters and procedures, and strong differences in welds morphology were found. The strength of the welds was evaluated by performing tensile-shear tests under monotonic and cyclic loading conditions. As-welded and heat-treated samples of the AA6082- T6 were tested. It was found that the heat-treatable alloy is more sensitive to defects formation, in lap welding, than the non-heat-treatable alloy. The presence of defects has a strong influence on the monotonic and fatigue behaviour of the welds. In spite of this, for very high-applied stresses, the heat-treatable alloy welds perform better in fatigue than the non-heat-treatable alloy welds.

  2. Natural aging behaviour of friction stir welded 6005A-T6 aluminium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Peng; Sun, Daqian; Li, Hongmei, E-mail: lihongmei@jlu.edu.cn

    2013-08-01

    By local thermal cycles and hardness measurements, supported by transmission electron microscopy, the post-weld natural aging behaviour of friction stir welded 6005A-T6 aluminium alloy was investigated. The results show that the softening in the nugget zone and thermo-mechanically affected zone immediately after welding is mainly caused by the high peak temperatures and rapid cooling rates, resulting in the original β″ precipitates dissolving and restraining re-precipitation. On the one hand, the hardness recovery in both microstructural zones during post-weld natural aging is attributed to the formation of clusters or GP zones depending on the natural aging time. On the other hand, the softening in the heat-affected zone after welding is due to the transformation of the β′′ to β′ precipitates and the precipitation of Q′. Natural aging has little effect on the microstructure and hardness of the heat-affected zone. The mechanism of natural aging behaviour was discussed.

  3. In temperature forming of friction stir lap welds in aluminium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruni, Carlo; Cabibbo, Marcello; Greco, Luciano; Pieralisi, Massimiliano

    2018-05-01

    The objective of such investigation is the study in depth of the forming phase of welds realized on three sheet metal blanks in aluminium alloys by friction stir lap welding. Such forming phase was performed by upsetting at different constant forming temperatures varying from 200°C to 350°C with constant ram velocities of 0.01 and 0.1 mm/s. The temperature values were obtained by the use of heating strips applied on the upper tool and on the lower tool. It was observed an increase in the friction factor, acting at the upsetting tool-workpiece interface, with increasing temperature that is very useful in producing the required localized deformation with which to improve the weld. It was also confirmed that the forming phase allows to realize a required thickness in the weld area allowing to neglect the surficial perturbation produced by the friction stir welding tool shoulder. The obtained thickness could be subjected to springback when too low temperatures are considered.

  4. Radiographic and ultrasonic testings of welded joints of 6063 aluminium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira e Silva Mury, A.G. de.

    1980-05-01

    A study on evaluation of weld defects in aluminium butt joints was made in a comparative way through the radiographic and ultrasonic testing. This work was conducted with pipes 5 IPS (6,35 mm thickness) of 6063 aluminium alloy, circumferential TIG welded, due to the difficulty on performing non-destructive testing with this schedule. It was concluded thta ultrasonic testing has adequate sensitivity when setting gain adjustment is made with aid of a reference curve constructed by using a Reference Block (among others studied) with 1,5 mm dia. Hole as reference reflector, and a 5 MHz angle beam search-unit. In this case the ultrasonic testing is more accurate than radiographic testing to detect planar defects like lack of fusion and lack of penetration. Defect sizing by ultrasonic methods employed were 6 and 20 dB drop methods. In spite of your observed limitations concerning the establishment of the real size of defects, the procedure applied was precise for locate and define the weld defects that where found in this study. (author) [pt

  5. Microstructure, local and global mechanical properties of friction stir welds in aluminium alloy 6005A-T6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simar, A.; Brechet, Y.; Meester, B. de; Denquin, A.; Pardoen, T.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of the welding speed on the microstructure, local and overall mechanical properties of friction stir welded joints has been investigated in the aluminium alloy 6005A-T6. The fine hardening precipitation within the heat-affected zone has been characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Post-welding heat treatments have been applied to obtain indications on the level of solid solution supersaturation in the as welded state. The local mechanical behaviour was determined using thin specimens extracted from various regions of the weld. The overall properties were measured on samples cut perpendicular to the weld. Specific attention was devoted to the relationship between the local microstructure and local hardening properties in the weakest region, which govern the overall strength and ductility of the welds

  6. Identification of mechanical properties of weld joints of AlMgSi07.F25 aluminium alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Kopas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present the analysis of selected mechanical properties of weld joints of AlMgSi07.F25 aluminium alloy. We will focus on the influence of the test bar neck shape on the tensile strength characteristics and the course of hardness in the weld joint cross-section. For the welding process using TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas technology we considered AlSi5 as the additive material. This paper also includes a short study of numerical modelling of the test bar welding.

  7. Assessment of the biological effects of welding fumes emitted from metal inert gas welding processes of aluminium and zinc-plated materials in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, L; Bauer, M; Bertram, J; Gube, M; Lenz, K; Reisgen, U; Schettgen, T; Kraus, T; Brand, P

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate biological effects and potential health risks due to two different metal-inert-gas (MIG) welding fumes (MIG welding of aluminium and MIG soldering of zinc coated steel) in healthy humans. In a threefold cross-over design study 12 male subjects were exposed to three different exposure scenarios. Exposures were performed under controlled conditions in the Aachener Workplace Simulation Laboratory (AWSL). On three different days the subjects were either exposed to filtered ambient air, to welding fumes from MIG welding of aluminium, or to fumes from MIG soldering of zinc coated materials. Exposure was performed for 6 h and the average fume concentration was 2.5 mg m(-3). Before, directly after, 1 day after, and 7 days after exposure spirometric and impulse oscillometric measurements were performed, exhaled breath condensate (EBC) was collected and blood samples were taken and analyzed for inflammatory markers. During MIG welding of aluminium high ozone concentrations (up to 250 μg m(-3)) were observed, whereas ozone was negligible for MIG soldering. For MIG soldering, concentrations of high-sensitivity CRP (hsCRP) and factor VIII were significantly increased but remained mostly within the normal range. The concentration of neutrophils increased in tendency. For MIG welding of aluminium, the lung function showed significant decreases in Peak Expiratory Flow (PEF) and Mean Expiratory Flow at 75% vital capacity (MEF 75) 7 days after exposure. The concentration of ristocetin cofactor was increased. The observed increase of hsCRP during MIG-soldering can be understood as an indicator for asymptomatic systemic inflammation probably due to zinc (zinc concentration 1.5 mg m(-3)). The change in lung function observed after MIG welding of aluminium may be attributed to ozone inhalation, although the late response (7 days after exposure) is surprising. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Process parameters-weld bead geometry interactions and their influence on mechanical properties: A case of dissimilar aluminium alloy electron beam welds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Mastanaiah

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Prediction of weld bead geometry is always an interesting and challenging research topic as it involves understanding of complex multi input and multi output system. The weld bead geometry has a profound impact on the load bearing capability of a weld joint, which in-turn decides the performance in real time service conditions. The present study introduces a novel approach of detecting a relationship between weld bead geometry and mechanical properties (e.g. tensile load for the purpose of catering the best the process could offer. The significance of the proposed approach is demonstrated by a case of dissimilar aluminium alloy (AA2219 and AA5083 electron beam welds. A mathematical model of tensile braking load as a function of geometrical attributes of weld bead geometry is presented. The results of investigation suggests the effective thickness of weld – a geometric parameter of weld bead has the most significant influence on tensile breaking load of dissimilar weld joint. The observations on bead geometry and the mechanical properties (microhardness, ultimate tensile load and face bend angle are correlated with detailed metallurgical analysis. The fusion zone of dissimilar electron beam weld has finer grain size with a moderate evaporation and segregation of alloying elements magnesium and copper respectively. The mechanical properties of weld joint are controlled by optimum bead geometry and HAZ softening in weaker AA5083 Al alloy. Keywords: Electron beam welding, AA2219, AA5083, Bead geometry, Tensile breaking load

  9. Effect of post weld heat treatment on tensile properties and microstructure characteristics of friction stir welded armour grade AA7075-T651 aluminium alloy

    OpenAIRE

    Sivaraj, P.; Kanagarajan, D.; Balasubramanian, V.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports the effects of post weld heat treatments, namely artificial ageing and solution treatment followed by artificial ageing, on microstructure and mechanical properties of 12 mm thick friction stir welded joints of precipitation hardenable high strength armour grade AA7075-T651 aluminium alloy. The tensile properties, such as yield strength, tensile strength, elongation and notch tensile strength, are evaluated and correlated with the microhardness and microstructural features....

  10. TIG and MIG welding of 6061 and 7020 aluminium alloys. Microstructural studies and mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez de Salazar, J.M.; Urena, A.; Villauriz, E.; Manzanedo, S.; Barrena, I.

    1998-01-01

    The aluminium alloys of the 6XXX and 7XXX series, are actually considered of medium and high strength, and are been profusely used in different industries such as aeronautical, automotive, etc.However, its wide application as structural material needs of the proper development of their joining process. The present work describes the results obtained from the microstructural evaluation, both with optical and scanning electronic micros copies (OM) and SEM), and of the mechanical one (hardness changes) of the weld produced in the alloys using different arc welding techniques: FTAW (TIG) and GMAW (MIG). For the last one, a filler metal with a composition of Al-5Mg, AWS denomination A5.10-92 (AA5356), has been used. (Author) 5 refs

  11. The Tungsten Inert GAS (TIG) Process of Welding Aluminium in Microgravity: Technical and Economic Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferretti, S.; Amadori, K.; Boccalatte, A.; Alessandrini, M.; Freddi, A.; Persiani, F.; Poli, G.

    2002-01-01

    The UNIBO team composed of students and professors of the University of Bologna along with technicians and engineers from Alenia Space Division and Siad Italargon Division, took part in the 3rd Student Parabolic Flight Campaign of the European Space Agency in 2000. It won the student competition and went on to take part in the Professional Parabolic Flight Campaign of May 2001. The experiment focused on "dendritic growth in aluminium alloy weldings", and investigated topics related to the welding process of aluminium in microgravity. The purpose of the research is to optimise the process and to define the areas of interest that could be improved by new conceptual designs. The team performed accurate tests in microgravity to determine which phenomena have the greatest impact on the quality of the weldings with respect to penetration, surface roughness and the microstructures that are formed during the solidification. Various parameters were considered in the economic-technical optimisation, such as the type of electrode and its tip angle. Ground and space tests have determined the optimum chemical composition of the electrodes to offer longest life while maintaining the shape of the point. Additionally, the power consumption has been optimised; this offers opportunities for promoting the product to the customer as well as being environmentally friendly. Tests performed on the Al-Li alloys showed a significant influence of some physical phenomena such as the Marangoni effect and thermal diffusion; predictions have been made on the basis of observations of the thermal flux seen in the stereophotos. Space transportation today is a key element in the construction of space stations and future planetary bases, because the volumes available for launch to space are directly related to the payload capacity of rockets or the Space Shuttle. The research performed gives engineers the opportunity to consider completely new concepts for designing structures for space applications

  12. Neutron and synchrotron measurements of residual strain in TIG welded aluminium alloy 2024

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, R.A.; Preston, R.V.; Withers, P.J.; Shercliff, H.R.; Webster, P.J.

    2003-01-01

    Tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding is one method of joining aluminium alloys with potential application in the aerospace industry. However, for it to be seriously considered as an alternative to mechanical fasteners the interrelated problems of residual stress and distortion need to be addressed. In this paper neutron, laboratory and synchrotron X-ray diffraction methods are used to provide non-destructive information about the residual stress field in TIG-welded 2024 Al alloy. The results compare well despite the differing penetration and sampling volumes associated with each technique. It is found that the magnitudes of the tensile longitudinal stresses decrease along the plate due to progressive heating up of the plate ahead of the arc during welding, so that steady-state conditions are not achieved. Comparison of the data with a finite element model indicates that softening of the heat-affected region must be included to simulate the resulting stress field. The FE model is found to be in good agreement with the data especially in the vicinity of the weld slope-out

  13. Effect of friction stir lap welding conditions on joint strength of aluminium alloy 6060

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yazdanian, S; Chen, Z W

    2009-01-01

    Strength of lap joints made by friction stir welding (FSW) depends strongly on how material flows forming the weld nugget zone during FSW and also on how the joint is loaded during testing. Understanding of this processing-property relationship is currently inadequate. In this study, the effects of pin length, welding speed and rotation rate on weld strength using aluminium alloy 6060 were investigated. It has been found that the pin length needed to be slightly greater than the thickness of the sheet for an adequate joint to be established. However, further increase in pin length did not benefit the joint strength. The major factor affecting joint strength has been found to be the rotation speed. An increase in rotation speed resulted in lowering the joint strength. Various modes of fracture have been observed and these modes relate to the degree of hooking and softening. Explanation of how the speed values relate to heat input and material flow and then to the joint strength is given.

  14. Hot Press as a Sustainable Direct Recycling Technique of Aluminium: Mechanical Properties and Surface Integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusuf, Nur Kamilah; Lajis, Mohd Amri; Ahmad, Azlan

    2017-08-03

    Meltless recycling technique has been utilized to overcome the lack of primary resources, focusing on reducing the usage of energy and materials. Hot press was proposed as a novel direct recycling technique which results in astoundingly low energy usage in contrast with conventional recycling. The aim of this study is to prove the technical feasibility of this approach by characterizing the recycled samples. For this purpose, AA6061 aluminium chips were recycled by utilizing hot press process under various operating temperature (T s = 430, 480, and 530 °C) and holding times (t s = 60, 90, and 120 min). The maximum mechanical properties of recycled chip are Ultimate tensile strength (UTS) = 266.78 MPa, Elongation to failure (ETF) = 16.129%, while, for surface integrity of the chips, the calculated microhardness is 81.744 HV, exhibited at T s = 530 °C and t s = 120 min. It is comparable to theoretical AA6061 T4-temper where maximum UTS and microhardness is increased up to 9.27% and 20.48%, respectively. As the desired mechanical properties of forgings can only be obtained by means of a final heat treatment, T5-temper, aging after forging process was employed. Heat treated recycled billet AA6061 (T5-temper) are considered comparable with as-received AA6061 T6, where the value of microhardness (98.649 HV) at 175 °C and 120 min of aging condition was revealed to be greater than 3.18%. Although it is quite early to put a base mainly on the observations in experimental settings, the potential for significant improvement offered by the direct recycling methods for production aluminium scrap can be clearly demonstrated. This overtures perspectives for industrial development of solid state recycling processes as environmentally benign alternatives of current melting based practices.

  15. The effect of residual stress relaxation by the vibratory stress relief technique on the textures of grains in AA 6061 aluminum alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jia-Siang; Hsieh, Chih-Chun; Lin, Chi-Ming; Chen, Erh-Chiang; Kuo, Che-Wei; Wu, Weite, E-mail: wwu@dragon.nchu.edu.tw

    2014-05-01

    The textures and crystallographic orientations beneath the treatment area in AA 6061 aluminum alloy after vibratory stress relief (VSR) process were investigated by combining the electron backscatter diffraction analysis of the misoriented low- or high-angle boundaries, the (inverse) pole figures, the line scans and the various grain orientations. The relaxation effect caused by compressive residual stress in the intermediate region is superior to that of tensile residual stress on both sides of the cantilever by means of X-ray diffraction techniques. The residual stress relaxation that occurs due to vibrational stress excitation accompanies the “orientation of banding” disintegration, the decreases in the dislocation density, the strain energy, and the fraction of low-angle boundaries within each type of grain orientation, such as Copper {112} 〈111〉, S {123} 〈634〉, Goss {110} 〈001〉, and Brass {110} 〈112〉, excepting the Cube (or near-Cube) {100} 〈001〉 grain orientation. The maintained invariance in the Cube texture can be attributed to the maximum number of active primary slip systems, resulting in an interaction that results from hindered slip on intersecting families of the planes.

  16. Enhancing Corrosion and Wear Resistance of AA6061 by Friction Stir Processing with Fe78Si₉B13 Glass Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lingyu; Liu, Yan; Shen, Kechang; Song, Chaoqun; Yang, Min; Kim, Kibuem; Wang, Weimin

    2015-08-07

    The AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy samples including annealed Fe 78 Si₉B 13 particles were prepared by friction stir processing (FSP) and investigated by various techniques. The Fe 78 Si₉B 13 -reinforced particles are uniformly dispersed in the aluminum alloy matrix. The XRD results indicated that the lattice parameter of α-Al increases and the preferred orientation factors F of (200) plane of α-Al reduces after friction stir processing. The coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) for FSP samples increases at first with the temperature but then decreases as the temperature further increased, which can be explained by the dissolving of Mg and Si from β phase and Fe 78 Si₉B 13 particles. The corrosion and wear resistance of FSP samples have been improved compared with that of base metal, which can be attributed to the reduction of grain size and the CTE mismatch between the base metal and reinforced particles by FSP, and the lubrication effect of Fe 78 Si₉B 13 particles also plays a role in improving wear resistance. In particular, the FSP sample with reinforced particles in amorphous state exhibited superior corrosion and wear resistance due to the unique metastable structure.

  17. Enhancing Corrosion and Wear Resistance of AA6061 by Friction Stir Processing with Fe78Si9B13 Glass Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingyu Guo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy samples including annealed Fe78Si9B13 particles were prepared by friction stir processing (FSP and investigated by various techniques. The Fe78Si9B13-reinforced particles are uniformly dispersed in the aluminum alloy matrix. The XRD results indicated that the lattice parameter of α-Al increases and the preferred orientation factors F of (200 plane of α-Al reduces after friction stir processing. The coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE for FSP samples increases at first with the temperature but then decreases as the temperature further increased, which can be explained by the dissolving of Mg and Si from β phase and Fe78Si9B13 particles. The corrosion and wear resistance of FSP samples have been improved compared with that of base metal, which can be attributed to the reduction of grain size and the CTE mismatch between the base metal and reinforced particles by FSP, and the lubrication effect of Fe78Si9B13 particles also plays a role in improving wear resistance. In particular, the FSP sample with reinforced particles in amorphous state exhibited superior corrosion and wear resistance due to the unique metastable structure.

  18. The effect of residual stress relaxation by the vibratory stress relief technique on the textures of grains in AA 6061 aluminum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jia-Siang; Hsieh, Chih-Chun; Lin, Chi-Ming; Chen, Erh-Chiang; Kuo, Che-Wei; Wu, Weite

    2014-01-01

    The textures and crystallographic orientations beneath the treatment area in AA 6061 aluminum alloy after vibratory stress relief (VSR) process were investigated by combining the electron backscatter diffraction analysis of the misoriented low- or high-angle boundaries, the (inverse) pole figures, the line scans and the various grain orientations. The relaxation effect caused by compressive residual stress in the intermediate region is superior to that of tensile residual stress on both sides of the cantilever by means of X-ray diffraction techniques. The residual stress relaxation that occurs due to vibrational stress excitation accompanies the “orientation of banding” disintegration, the decreases in the dislocation density, the strain energy, and the fraction of low-angle boundaries within each type of grain orientation, such as Copper {112} 〈111〉, S {123} 〈634〉, Goss {110} 〈001〉, and Brass {110} 〈112〉, excepting the Cube (or near-Cube) {100} 〈001〉 grain orientation. The maintained invariance in the Cube texture can be attributed to the maximum number of active primary slip systems, resulting in an interaction that results from hindered slip on intersecting families of the planes

  19. Effect of annealing, thickness ratio and bend angle on springback of AA6061-T6 with non-uniform thickness section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan M.F.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-uniform thickness section section is considered one of the most effective approaches to reduce automotive part weight. Reduction in term of mass and size result in less fuel consumption and greenhouse gases. Thickness is the most significant parameter to formability, therefore forming a section with non-uniform thickness becomes a great challenge. Improper process and incorrect decision may lead to severe defect and one of the main concerns is the springback. This study will focus on springback behaviour of non-uniform thickness AA6061 strip with complex profile using Taguchi Method. Profile projector (PC 3000 is used to measure the spring back and two-line technique is applied to measure angles (after loading between two lines. Three parameters (i.e. annealing temperature, thickness ratio and bend angle are studied, and results determine that the most significant parameter is bend angle, followed by thickness ratio, and then by the annealing temperature of the specimen during bending process.

  20. Effect of post weld heat treatment on tensile properties and microstructure characteristics of friction stir welded armour grade AA7075-T651 aluminium alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Sivaraj

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the effects of post weld heat treatments, namely artificial ageing and solution treatment followed by artificial ageing, on microstructure and mechanical properties of 12 mm thick friction stir welded joints of precipitation hardenable high strength armour grade AA7075-T651 aluminium alloy. The tensile properties, such as yield strength, tensile strength, elongation and notch tensile strength, are evaluated and correlated with the microhardness and microstructural features. The scanning electron microscope is used to characterie the fracture surfaces. The solution treatment followed by ageing heat treatment cycle is found to be marginally beneficial in improving the tensile properties of friction stir welds of AA7075-T651 aluminium alloy.

  1. Design of Laser Welding Parameters for Joining Ti Grade 2 and AW 5754 Aluminium Alloys Using Numerical Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mária Behúlová

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Joining of dissimilar Al-Ti alloys is very interesting from the point of view of weight reduction of components and structures in automotive or aerospace industries. In the dependence on cooling rate and chemical composition, rapid solidification of Al-Ti alloys during laser welding can lead to the formation of metastable phases and brittle intermetallic compounds that generally reduce the quality of produced weld joints. The paper deals with design and testing of welding parameters for preparation of weld joints of two sheets with different thicknesses from titanium Grade 2 and AW 5754 aluminium alloy. Temperature fields developed during the formation of Al-Ti butt joints were investigated by numerical simulation in ANSYS software. The influence of laser welding parameters including the laser power and laser beam offset on the temperature distribution and weld joint formation was studied. The results of numerical simulation were verified by experimental temperature measurement during laser beam welding applying the TruDisk 4002 disk laser. The microstructure of produced weld joints was assessed by light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. EDX analysis was applied to determine the change in chemical composition across weld joints. Mechanical properties of weld joints were evaluated using tensile tests and Vickers microhardness measurements.

  2. Experimental characterization of nanoparticles emissions during Laser Shock Processing of AA6061, AISI304 and Ti6Al4V

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João F. Gomes

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an experimental study on the emission of nanometric size particles during laser shock processing of metallic materials: stainless steel, aluminum and titanium alloys which are the most common ones processed by this technique. The emission of nanometric size particles was confirmed to consist of aggregates composed of smaller spherical particles in the range of 10-20 nm, covered by a small concentric “layer” probably of metal oxides. The analysis of the nanoparticles showed the presence of the main elements present in the tested alloys as well as high oxygen content, which is another indication of the presence of oxides of Fe, Al and Ti. The amount of emitted nanoparticles, showed considerable increases over the baseline measured for the working environment, and these increases correspond to the more intense pulses of the laser beam. The material density was seen to highly affect the quantity of emitted nanoparticles. During LSP of aluminium alloy (the lighter material a large quantity of nanoparticles was measured, while in LSP of stainless steel few nanoparticles were observed, and this is the denser material, among the three tested. Titanium alloy results in intermediate values. The study of these emissions is innovative and relevant for industrial environments where the manufacturing process is in use.

  3. On the Role of Processing Parameters in Producing Recycled Aluminum AA6061 Based Metal Matrix Composite (MMC-AlR) Prepared Using Hot Press Forging (HPF) Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Azlan; Lajis, Mohd Amri; Yusuf, Nur Kamilah

    2017-09-19

    Solid-state recycling, which involves the direct recycling of scrap metal into bulk material using severe plastic deformation, has emerged as a potential alternative to the conventional remelting and recycling techniques. Hot press forging has been identified as a sustainable direct recycling technique that has fewer steps and maintains excellent material performance. An experimental investigation was conducted to explore the hardness and density of a recycled aluminum-based metal matrix composite by varying operating temperature and holding time. A mixture of recycled aluminum, AA6061, and aluminum oxide were simultaneously heated to 430, 480, and 530 °C and forged for 60, 90, and 120 min. We found a positive increase in microhardness and density for all composites. The hardness increased approximately 33.85%, while density improved by about 15.25% whenever the temperature or the holding time were increased. Based on qualitative analysis, the composite endures substantial plastic deformation due to the presence of hardness properties due to the aluminum oxide embedded in the aluminum matrix. These increases were significantly affected by the operating temperature; the holding time also had a subordinate role in enhancing the metal matrix composite properties. Furthermore, in an effort to curb the shortage of primary resources, this study reviewed the promising performance of secondary resources produced by using recycled aluminum and aluminum oxide as the base matrix and reinforcement constituent, respectively. This study is an outline for machining practitioners and the manufacturing industry to help increase industry sustainability with the aim of preserving the Earth for our community in the future.

  4. Growth kinetics and microstructural evolution during hot isostatic pressing of U-10 wt.% Mo monolithic fuel plate in AA6061 cladding with Zr diffusion barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Y.; Yoo, J.; Huang, K.; Keiser, D.D.; Jue, J.F.; Rabin, B.; Moore, G.; Sohn, Y.H.

    2014-01-01

    Phase constituents and microstructure changes in RERTR fuel plate assemblies as functions of temperature and duration of hot-isostatic pressing (HIP) during fabrication were examined. The HIP process was carried out as functions of temperature (520, 540, 560 and 580 °C for 90 min) and time (45–345 min at 560 °C) to bond 6061 Al-alloy to the Zr diffusion barrier that had been co-rolled with U-10 wt.% Mo (U10Mo) fuel monolith prior to the HIP process. Scanning and transmission electron microscopies were employed to examine the phase constituents, microstructure and layer thickness of interaction products from interdiffusion. At the interface between the U10Mo and Zr, following the co-rolling, the UZr 2 phase was observed to develop adjacent to Zr, and the α-U phase was found between the UZr 2 and U10Mo, while the Mo 2 Zr was found as precipitates mostly within the α-U phase. The phase constituents and thickness of the interaction layer at the U10Mo-Zr interface remained unchanged regardless of HIP processing variation. Observable growth due to HIP was only observed for the (Al,Si) 3 Zr phase found at the Zr/AA6061 interface, however, with a large activation energy of 457 ± 28 kJ/mole. Thus, HIP can be carried to improve the adhesion quality of fuel plate without concern for the excessive growth of the interaction layer, particularly at the U10Mo-Zr interface with the α-U, Mo 2 Zr, and UZr 2 phases

  5. Growth kinetics and microstructural evolution during hot isostatic pressing of U-10 wt.% Mo monolithic fuel plate in AA6061 cladding with Zr diffusion barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Y.; Yoo, J.; Huang, K. [Advanced Materials Processing and Analysis Center, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816 (United States); Keiser, D.D.; Jue, J.F.; Rabin, B.; Moore, G. [Idaho National Laboratory, PO Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83401 (United States); Sohn, Y.H., E-mail: Yongho.sohn@ucf.edu [Advanced Materials Processing and Analysis Center, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816 (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Phase constituents and microstructure changes in RERTR fuel plate assemblies as functions of temperature and duration of hot-isostatic pressing (HIP) during fabrication were examined. The HIP process was carried out as functions of temperature (520, 540, 560 and 580 °C for 90 min) and time (45–345 min at 560 °C) to bond 6061 Al-alloy to the Zr diffusion barrier that had been co-rolled with U-10 wt.% Mo (U10Mo) fuel monolith prior to the HIP process. Scanning and transmission electron microscopies were employed to examine the phase constituents, microstructure and layer thickness of interaction products from interdiffusion. At the interface between the U10Mo and Zr, following the co-rolling, the UZr{sub 2} phase was observed to develop adjacent to Zr, and the α-U phase was found between the UZr{sub 2} and U10Mo, while the Mo{sub 2}Zr was found as precipitates mostly within the α-U phase. The phase constituents and thickness of the interaction layer at the U10Mo-Zr interface remained unchanged regardless of HIP processing variation. Observable growth due to HIP was only observed for the (Al,Si){sub 3}Zr phase found at the Zr/AA6061 interface, however, with a large activation energy of 457 ± 28 kJ/mole. Thus, HIP can be carried to improve the adhesion quality of fuel plate without concern for the excessive growth of the interaction layer, particularly at the U10Mo-Zr interface with the α-U, Mo{sub 2}Zr, and UZr{sub 2} phases.

  6. Growth kinetics and microstructural evolution during hot isostatic pressing of U-10 wt.% Mo monolithic fuel plate in AA6061 cladding with Zr diffusion barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Y.; Yoo, J.; Huang, K.; Keiser, D. D.; Jue, J. F.; Rabin, B.; Moore, G.; Sohn, Y. H.

    2014-04-01

    Phase constituents and microstructure changes in RERTR fuel plate assemblies as functions of temperature and duration of hot-isostatic pressing (HIP) during fabrication were examined. The HIP process was carried out as functions of temperature (520, 540, 560 and 580 °C for 90 min) and time (45-345 min at 560 °C) to bond 6061 Al-alloy to the Zr diffusion barrier that had been co-rolled with U-10 wt.% Mo (U10Mo) fuel monolith prior to the HIP process. Scanning and transmission electron microscopies were employed to examine the phase constituents, microstructure and layer thickness of interaction products from interdiffusion. At the interface between the U10Mo and Zr, following the co-rolling, the UZr2 phase was observed to develop adjacent to Zr, and the α-U phase was found between the UZr2 and U10Mo, while the Mo2Zr was found as precipitates mostly within the α-U phase. The phase constituents and thickness of the interaction layer at the U10Mo-Zr interface remained unchanged regardless of HIP processing variation. Observable growth due to HIP was only observed for the (Al,Si)3Zr phase found at the Zr/AA6061 interface, however, with a large activation energy of 457 ± 28 kJ/mole. Thus, HIP can be carried to improve the adhesion quality of fuel plate without concern for the excessive growth of the interaction layer, particularly at the U10Mo-Zr interface with the α-U, Mo2Zr, and UZr2 phases.

  7. On the Role of Processing Parameters in Producing Recycled Aluminum AA6061 Based Metal Matrix Composite (MMC-AlR Prepared Using Hot Press Forging (HPF Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azlan Ahmad

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Solid-state recycling, which involves the direct recycling of scrap metal into bulk material using severe plastic deformation, has emerged as a potential alternative to the conventional remelting and recycling techniques. Hot press forging has been identified as a sustainable direct recycling technique that has fewer steps and maintains excellent material performance. An experimental investigation was conducted to explore the hardness and density of a recycled aluminum-based metal matrix composite by varying operating temperature and holding time. A mixture of recycled aluminum, AA6061, and aluminum oxide were simultaneously heated to 430, 480, and 530 °C and forged for 60, 90, and 120 min. We found a positive increase in microhardness and density for all composites. The hardness increased approximately 33.85%, while density improved by about 15.25% whenever the temperature or the holding time were increased. Based on qualitative analysis, the composite endures substantial plastic deformation due to the presence of hardness properties due to the aluminum oxide embedded in the aluminum matrix. These increases were significantly affected by the operating temperature; the holding time also had a subordinate role in enhancing the metal matrix composite properties. Furthermore, in an effort to curb the shortage of primary resources, this study reviewed the promising performance of secondary resources produced by using recycled aluminum and aluminum oxide as the base matrix and reinforcement constituent, respectively. This study is an outline for machining practitioners and the manufacturing industry to help increase industry sustainability with the aim of preserving the Earth for our community in the future.

  8. Effect of Welding Speed on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties due to The Deposition of Reinforcements on Friction Stir Welded Dissimilar Aluminium Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baridula Ravinder Reddy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The strength of the welded joint obtained by solid state stir welding process was found to be improved as compared to fusion welding process. The deposition of reinforcements during friction stir welding process can further enhance the strength of the welded joint by locking the movement of grain boundaries. In the present study, the aluminium alloys AA2024 and AA7075 were welded effectively by depositing the multi-walled carbon nanotubes in to the stir zone. The mechanical properties and microstructures were studied by varying the traverse speed at constant rotational speed. The results show that rotating tool pin stirring action and heat input play an important role in controlling the grain size. The carbon nanotubes were found to be distributed uniformly at a welding speed (traverse speed of 80mm/min. This enhanced the mechanical properties of the welded joint. The microstructure and Electron dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX studies indicate that the deposition of carbon nanotubes in the stir zone was influenced by the traverse speed.

  9. Analysis of Thermo-Elastic Fracture Problem during Aluminium Alloy MIG Welding Using the Extended Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuanfang He

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermo-elastic fracture problem and equations are established for aluminium alloy Metal Inert Gas (MIG welding, which include a moving heat source and a thermoelasticity equation with the initial and boundary conditions for a plate structure with a crack. The extended finite element method (XFEM is implemented to solve the thermo-elastic fracture problem of a plate structure with a crack under the effect of a moving heat source. The combination of the experimental measurement and simulation of the welding temperature field is done to verify the model and solution method. The numerical cases of the thermomechanical parameters and stress intensity factors (SIFs of the plate structure in the welding heating and cooling processes are investigated. The research results provide reference data and an approach for the analysis of the thermomechanical characteristics of the welding process.

  10. Effect of friction time on the properties of friction welded YSZ‐alumina composite and 6061 aluminium alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uday M. Basheer

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study the effect of friction time on the microstructure and mechanical properties of alumina 0, 25, 50 wt% yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ composite and 6061 aluminium alloy joints formed by friction welding. The alumina-YSZ composites were prepared through slip casting in plaster of Paris molds (POP and subsequently sintered at 1600°C, while the aluminium rods were machined down using a lathe machine to the dimension required. The welding process was carried out under different rotational speeds and friction times, while friction force (0.5 ton-force was kept constant. Scanning electron microscopy was used to characterize the interface of the joints structure. The experimental results showed that the friction time has a significant effect on joint structure and mechanical properties.

  11. Advanced shipbuilding in aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, H.; Svensson, L.E.; Karlsson, L.

    1997-01-01

    The applicability of two different welding techniques for welding ships in aluminium is discussed. Conventional MIG welding and the recently developed Friction Super Stir Welding (FSSW) are compared concerning weld metal microstructures and mechanical properties. Results from testing of FSSW welds are also presented. It was observed that the grain size was smaller in FSSW welds are also presented. It was observed that the grain size was smaller in FSSW welds than in MIG welds whereas precipitates generally were larger in FSSW welds. The two methods produced welds with comparable mechanical properties. Good fatigue behaviour was obtained for FSSW welds. Advantages of the welding methods are also discussed. (Author) 7 refs

  12. Effect of tool shape and welding parameters on mechanical properties and microstructure of dissimilar friction stir welded aluminium alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Chetan Aneja; Amit Handa

    2016-01-01

    In the present experimental study, dissimilar aluminum alloy AA5083 and AA6082 were friction stir welded by varying tool shape, welding speed and rotary speed of the tool in order to investigate the effect of varying tool shape and welding parameters on the mechanical properties as well as microstructure. The friction stir welding (FSW) process parameters have great influence on heat input per unit length of weld. The outcomes of experimental study prove that mechanical properties increases w...

  13. Experimental and numerical investigation on under-water friction stir welding of armour grade AA2519-T87 aluminium alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sree Sabari

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir welding (FSW is a promising welding process that can join age hardenable aluminium alloys with high joint efficiency. However, the thermal cycles experienced by the material to be joined during FSW resulted in the deterioration of mechanical properties due to the coarsening and dissolution of strengthening precipitates in the thermo-mechanical affected zone (TMAZ and heat affected zone (HAZ. Under water friction stir welding (UWFSW is a variant of FSW process which can maintain low heat input as well as constant heat input along the weld line. The heat conduction and dissipation during UWFSW controls the width of TMAZ and HAZ and also improves the joint properties. In this investigation, an attempt has been made to evaluate the mechanical properties and microstructural characteristics of AA2519-T87 aluminium alloy joints made by FSW and UWFSW processes. Finite element analysis has been used to estimate the temperature distribution and width of TMAZ region in both the joints and the results have been compared with experimental results and subsequently correlated with mechanical properties.

  14. Laser transmission welding of polylactide to aluminium thin films for applications in the food-packaging industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, Nunziante; Campana, Giampaolo; Fiorini, Maurizio; Morelli, Raffaele

    2017-06-01

    Laser transmission welding is a suitable technology to join thin films of similar or dissimilar materials without any addition of chemical solvents or adhesives. This process represents a very important opportunity in the case of packaging applications (for example in food and pharmaceutical sectors) where the realisation of strong welds by avoiding the contact between the thermal source and the processed materials and, furthermore, without using any third material that could contaminate the contents, is reliable and relevant. The aim of this paper is to prove the feasibility of the laser transmission welding of polylactide to aluminium thin films by means of laser transmission welding through the use of a low power pulsed wave fibre laser. Laser joint samples were realised, analysed by optical microscopy to reveal possible defects and to evaluate the weld width and tested to measure the mechanical tensile strength. An accurate relationship between the joint quality and both the welding speed and the k-factor, which represents the delivered energy per unit length and affects the bonding mechanism at the interface, was determined. The achieved feasibility area is extremely narrow and possible only for the higher value of the average power. The joint tensile strength was proven to be in a proportional relationship with the effective bonded area and reached satisfactory values.

  15. Fatigue crack growth rate behaviour of friction-stir aluminium alloy AA2024-T3 welds under transient thermal tensioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilman, M.N.; Kusmono,; Iswanto, P.T.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • FSW enables unweldable aircraft material AA2024-T3 to be welded without cracking. • FSW applied to aircraft structure is required to have superior fatigue resistance. • Transient thermal tensioning (TTT) is being developed for stress relieving in FSW. • The fatigue crack growth rates of FSW joints under TTT are studied. - Abstract: Friction stir welding (FSW) has become a serious candidate technology to join metallic fuselage panels for the next generation of civil aircrafts. However, residual stress introduced during welding which subsequently affects fatigue performance is still a major problem that needs to be paid attention. The present investigation aims to improve fatigue crack growth resistance of friction stir aluminium alloy AA2024-T3 welds using transient thermal tensioning (TTT) treatment. In this investigation, aluminium alloy AA2024-T3 plates were joined using FSW process with and without TTT. The welding parameters used including tool rotation speed (Rt) and the plate travelling speed (v) were 1450 rpm and 30 mm/min respectively. The TTT treatments were carried out by heating both sides of friction stir weld line using moving electric heaters ahead of, beside and behind the tool at a heating temperature of 200 °C. Subsequently, a sequence of tests was carried out including microstructural examination, hardness measurement, tensile test and fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR) test in combination with fractography using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The FCGR test was carried out using a constant amplitude fatigue experiment with stress ratio (R) of 0.1 and frequency (f) of 11 Hz whereas specimens used were centre-crack tension (CCT) type with the initial crack located at the weld nugget. Results of this investigation showed that at low ΔK, typically below 9 MPa m 0.5 , the friction stir welds under TTT treatments lowered fatigue crack growth rate (da/dN) and the lowest (da/dN) was achieved as the heaters were located ahead of

  16. Corrosion of aluminium-clad spent fuel in LVR-15 research reactor storage facilities. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Splichal, K.; Berka, J.; Keilova, E.

    2006-03-01

    The corrosion of the research reactor aluminium clad spent fuel in water was investigated in two storage facilities. The standard racks were delivered by the IAEA and consisted of two aluminium alloys AA 6061 and Szav-1 coupons. Bimetallic couples create aluminium alloy and stainless steel 304 coupons. Rolled and extruded AA 6061 material was also tested. Single coupons, bimetallic and crevice couples were exposed in the at-reactor basin (ARB) and the high-level wastage pool (HLW). The water chemistry parameters were monitored and sedimentation of impurities was measured. The content of impurities of mainly Cl and SO 4 was in the range of 2 to 15 μg/l in the HLW pool; it was about one order higher in ARB. The Fe content was below 2 μg/l for both facilities. After two years of exposure the pitting was evaluated as local corrosion damage. The occurrence of pits was evaluated predominantly on the surfaces of single coupons and on the outer and inner surfaces of bimetallic and crevices coupons. No correlation was found between the pitting initiation and the type of aluminium alloys and rolled and extruded materials. In bimetallic couples the presence of stainless coupons did not have any effect on local corrosion. The depth of pits was lower than 50 μm for considerable areas of coupons and should be compared with the results of other participating institutes. (author)

  17. Welding of 6061-T651 Aluminium and the relationship of tensile properties to hardness in the heat affect zone. ENG919 Dissertation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stathers, P.

    2000-11-01

    Two objectives are envisaged for this work; the first is to conduct a literature review of 6061 aluminium and welding practices for this alloy and current best welding practice with an emphasis on welding for nuclear applications. Recent developments in the use of innovative welding practice will also be reviewed. The intention is to provide a background of information in order to avoid weld-related problems that have the potential to shorten the life of expensive and difficult-to-replace critical components. The literature survey will include a review of the base alloy and the effect of welding on the mechanical properties in the weld zone (weld metal and heat affected zone (HAZ)). Included, as part of this objective is to review the welding of aluminium to create an awareness of potential difficulties for future critical welding applications. The literature survey would also include the aspect of nuclear-induced changes in properties, particularly within the weld zone. This element of the survey would investigate factors for consideration in selecting the welding method and filler material. The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) have a nuclear Code Case (N519) 14 covering the use of 6061 aluminium in nuclear core components. This Code Case calls for the implementation of a surveillance program to monitor changes in properties during service. The literature survey will address this requirement and make a set of recommendations as a first step towards implementing such a program. A second objective is to develop a model that relates mechanical properties to hardness measurements in the weld zone. This model has the potential to be used as a tool for checking weld metal properties and the extent of changes in HAZ properties. The intention is to thermally overage the base alloy to various hardness values and relate the hardness to tensile and Charpy impact toughness values. Welded test plates will be prepared using Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) and

  18. Effect of tool shape and welding parameters on mechanical properties and microstructure of dissimilar friction stir welded aluminium alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chetan Aneja

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present experimental study, dissimilar aluminum alloy AA5083 and AA6082 were friction stir welded by varying tool shape, welding speed and rotary speed of the tool in order to investigate the effect of varying tool shape and welding parameters on the mechanical properties as well as microstructure. The friction stir welding (FSW process parameters have great influence on heat input per unit length of weld. The outcomes of experimental study prove that mechanical properties increases with decreasing welding speed. Furthermore mechanical properties were also found to improve as the rotary speed increases and the same phenomenon was found to happen while using straight cylindrical threaded pin profile tool. The microstructure of the dissimilar joints revealed that at low welding speeds, the improved material mixing was observed. The similar phenomenon was found to happen at higher rotational speeds using straight cylindrical threaded tool.

  19. Process Parameters Optimization for Friction Stir Welding of Pure Aluminium to Brass (CuZn30 using Taguchi Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elfar O. M. R.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the friction stir welding of dissimilar commercial pure aluminium and brass (CuZn30 plates was investigated and the process parameters were optimized using Taguchi L9 orthogonal array. The considered process parameters were the rotational speed, traverse speed and pin offset. The optimum setting was determined with reference to ultimate tensile strength of the joint. The predicted optimum value of ultimate tensile strength was confirmed by experimental run using optimum parameters. Analysis of variance revealed that traverse speed is the most significant factor in controlling the joint tensile strength and pin offset also plays a significant role. In this investigation, the optimum tensile strength is 50% of aluminium base metal. Metallographic examination revealed that intermetallic compounds were formed in the interface of the optimum joint where the tensile failure was observed to take place.

  20. An Analysis of Microstructure and Mechanical Properties on Friction Stir Welded Joint of Dissimilar 304 Stainless Steel and Commercially Pure Aluminium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balamagendiravarman M.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, friction stir welding of dissimilar 304 stainless steel and commercially pure aluminium was performed under the following condition of tool rotational speed 1000 rpm, traverse speed 60 mm/min and tool tilt angle 2 degree. Microstructural characterisation was carried out by optical microscope, scanning electron microscope (SEM. Optical images shows that the microstructural change is very minimum in steel side when compared to aluminium side due to the difference in mechanical and thermal properties. The intermetallic compound Al3Fe was observed at the interfacial region and stir region of the welded joint. The maximum ultimate tensile strength is 78% of commercially pure aluminium base metal. Microhardness profile was measured across the weld interface and the maximum value reaches at the stir zone due to the formation of intermettalics.

  1. Inhibitive Behaviour of Corrosion of Aluminium Alloy in NaCl by Mangrove Tannin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solhan Yahya; Afidah Abdul Rahim; Affaizza Mohd Shah; Rohana Adnan

    2011-01-01

    Anticorrosion potential of mangrove tannins on aluminium alloys AA6061 in NaCl solution has been studied using potentiodynamic polarisation method and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The study was carried out in different pH of corrosive medium in the absence and presence of various concentrations of tannin. The corrosion inhibition behaviour of the mangrove tannin on AA6061 aluminium alloy corrosion was found to be dependant on the pH of NaCl solution. Our results showed that the inhibition efficiency increased with increasing tannins concentration in chloride solution at pH 6. Treatment of aluminium alloy 6061 with all concentrations of mangrove tannins reduced the current density, thus decreased the corrosion rate. Tannins behaved as mixed inhibitors at pH 6 and reduction in current density predominantly affected in cathodic reaction. Meanwhile, at pH 12, addition of tannins shifted the corrosion potential to more cathodic potentials and a passivating effect was observed in anodic potentials. SEM studies have shown that the addition of tannins in chloride solution at pH 12 reduced the surface degradation and the formation of pits. (author)

  2. New generation of welded semiautomatic for production of structures out of steels and aluminium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belousov, A.N.; Poloskov, S.I.; Efanov, V.A.; Sedov, Yu.S.; Bukhta, O.Ya.

    1988-01-01

    Analysis of the type of semiautomatic welding machines, produced in our country and abroad, is presented. New designs, realized in the 80th, are described. Design of KOMBI-500 and PRM-4M semiautomatic welding machines is described

  3. Seam gap bridging of laser based processes for the welding of aluminium sheets for industrial applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aalderink, B.J.; Aalderink, Benno; Pathiraj, B.; Aarts, Ronald G.K.M.

    2010-01-01

    Laser welding has a large potential for the production of tailor welded blanks in the automotive industry, due to the low heat input and deep penetration. However, due to the small laser spot and melt pool, laser-based welding processes in general have a low tolerance for seam gaps. In this paper,

  4. On the Prediction of Hot Tearing in Al-to-Steel Welding by Friction Melt Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Mena, N.; Jacques, P. J.; Drezet, J. M.; Simar, A.

    2018-04-01

    Aluminum alloy AA6061 was welded to dual-phase steel 980 (DP980) by the friction melt bonding (FMB) process. Hot tears have been suppressed by controlling the thermomechanical cycle. In particular, the welding speed and the thermal conductivity of the backing plate have been optimized. A finite-element thermomechanical model coupled with the Rappaz-Drezet-Gremaud (RDG) criterion has been used to explain these experimental observations. The hot tear susceptibility has been reduced with large thermal gradients and with the formation of a cellular microstructure. Both effects are favored by a backing plate made of a material with high thermal conductivity, such as copper.

  5. Grain structure, texture and mechanical property evolution of automotive aluminium sheet during high power ultrasonic welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haddadi, Farid; Tsivoulas, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    High power ultrasonic spot welding (HPUSW) is a joining technique which is performed within less than a second and provides a more energy-efficient alternative to friction stir spot welding (FSSW), which is considered a longer cycle manufacturing process for joining automotive alloys. To date, only a few reports exist on the deformation mechanisms that take place during high power ultrasonic spot welding. In this work, dynamic recrystallization and grain growth were examined using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). HPUSW causes extensive deformation within the weld zone where the temperature increases to 440 °C. An ultra-fine grain structure was observed in a thin band of flat weld interface within a short welding time of 0.10 s. With increasing welding time the interface was displaced and ‘folds’ or ‘crests’ appeared together with shear bands. The weld interface progressively changed from flat to sinusoidal and eventually to a convoluted wave-like pattern when the tool fully penetrated the workpiece, having a wavelength of ~ 1 mm after 0.40 s. Finally, the microstructure and texture varied significantly depending on the location within the weld. Although the texture near the weld interface was relatively weak, a shift was observed with increasing welding time from an initially Cube-dominated texture to one where the typical β-fibre Brass component prevailed. - Highlights: •Lap shear strength of ~2.9 kN was achieved in 0.30 sec welding time. •Temperature approached 440 °C along the weld centreline for the highest welding time. •The texture near the teeth was dominated by Brass, P and S components at optimum condition. •The weld interface showed typical β-fibre deformation texture at optimum condition.

  6. Grain structure, texture and mechanical property evolution of automotive aluminium sheet during high power ultrasonic welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haddadi, Farid, E-mail: farid.haddadi@gmail.com [Clemson University–International Center for Automotive Research (CU-ICAR), #347, 4 Research Drive, Greenville, SC 29607 (United States); School of Materials, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Tsivoulas, Dimitrios, E-mail: dim.tsivoulas@gmail.com [School of Materials, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Clean Energy/Nuclear Services, Amec Foster Wheeler, 601 Faraday Street, Birchwood Park, Warrington WA3 6GN (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-15

    High power ultrasonic spot welding (HPUSW) is a joining technique which is performed within less than a second and provides a more energy-efficient alternative to friction stir spot welding (FSSW), which is considered a longer cycle manufacturing process for joining automotive alloys. To date, only a few reports exist on the deformation mechanisms that take place during high power ultrasonic spot welding. In this work, dynamic recrystallization and grain growth were examined using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). HPUSW causes extensive deformation within the weld zone where the temperature increases to 440 °C. An ultra-fine grain structure was observed in a thin band of flat weld interface within a short welding time of 0.10 s. With increasing welding time the interface was displaced and ‘folds’ or ‘crests’ appeared together with shear bands. The weld interface progressively changed from flat to sinusoidal and eventually to a convoluted wave-like pattern when the tool fully penetrated the workpiece, having a wavelength of ~ 1 mm after 0.40 s. Finally, the microstructure and texture varied significantly depending on the location within the weld. Although the texture near the weld interface was relatively weak, a shift was observed with increasing welding time from an initially Cube-dominated texture to one where the typical β-fibre Brass component prevailed. - Highlights: •Lap shear strength of ~2.9 kN was achieved in 0.30 sec welding time. •Temperature approached 440 °C along the weld centreline for the highest welding time. •The texture near the teeth was dominated by Brass, P and S components at optimum condition. •The weld interface showed typical β-fibre deformation texture at optimum condition.

  7. Friction stir scribe welding technique for dissimilar joining of aluminium and galvanised steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Tianhao [Center for Friction Stir Processing, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX, USA; Sidhar, Harpreet [Center for Friction Stir Processing, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX, USA; Mishra, Rajiv S. [Center for Friction Stir Processing, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX, USA; Hovanski, Yuri [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Energy Materials and Manufacturing, Richland, WA, USA; Upadhyay, Piyush [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Energy Materials and Manufacturing, Richland, WA, USA; Carlson, Blair [General Motors Technical Center, Warren, MI, USA

    2017-10-04

    Friction stir scribe technology, a derivative of friction stir welding, was applied for the dissimilar lap welding of an aluminum alloy and galvanized mild steel sheets. During the process, the rotating tool with a cobalt steel scribe first penetrated the top material — aluminum — and then the scribe cut the bottom material — steel. The steel was displaced into the upper material to produce a characteristic hook feature. Lap welds were shear tested, and their fracture paths were studied. Welding parameters affected the welding features including hook height, which turned out to be highly related to fracture position. Therefore, in this paper, the relationships among welding parameters, hook height, joint strength and fracture position are presented. In addition, influence of zinc coating on joint strength was also studied. Keywords: friction stir scribe technology; dissimilar material welding; zinc coating; hook height; joint strength; fracture position

  8. Parametric Investigation on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Ultrasonic spot welded Aluminium to Copper sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad Satpathy, Mantra; Das Mohapatra, Kasinath; Sahoo, Ananda Kumar; Sahoo, Susanta Kumar

    2018-03-01

    Ultrasonic welding is one of the promising solid state welding methods which have been widely used to join highly conductive materials like aluminum and copper. Despite these applications in the automotive field, other industries also have a strong interest to adopt this process for joining of various advanced alloys. In some of its applications, poor weld strength and sticking of the workpiece to the tool are issues. Thus, an attempt has been taken in the present study to overcome these issues by performing experiments with a suitable range of weld parameters. The major objectives of this study are to obtain a good joint strength with a reduced sticking phenomenon and microstructure of Al-Cu weld coupons. The results uncovered the mechanical strength of the joint increased up to 0.34 sec of weld time and afterward, it gradually decreased. Meantime, the plastic deformation in the weld zone enhanced the formation of an intermetallic layer of 1.5 μm thick, and it is composed of mainly Al2Cu compound. The temperature evolved during the welding process is also measured by thermocouples to show its relationship with the plastic deformation. The present work exemplifies a finer understanding of the failure behavior of joints and provides an insight of ultrasonic welding towards the improvement in the quality of weld.

  9. Effects of various tool pin profiles on mechanical and metallurgical properties of friction stir welded joints of cryorolled AA2219 aluminium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal Babu, Karupannan; Panneerselvam, Kavan; Sathiya, Paulraj; Noorul Haq, Abdul Haq; Sundarrajan, Srinivasan; Mastanaiah, Potta; Srinivasa Murthy, Chunduri Venkata

    2018-02-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) process was conducted on cryorolled (CR) AA2219 plate using different tool pin profiles such as cylindrical pin, threaded cylindrical pin, square pin and hexagonal pin profiles. The FSW was carried out with pairs of 6 mm thick CR aluminium plates with different tool pin profiles. The different tool pin profile weld portions' behaviors like mechanical (tensile strength, impact and hardness) and metallurgical characteristics were analyzed. The results of the mechanical analysis revealed that the joint made by the hexagonal pin tool had good strength compared to other pin profiles. This was due to the pulsating action and material flow of the tool resulting in dynamic recrystallization in the weld zone. This was confirmed by the ultra fine grain structure formation in Weld Nugget (WN) of hexagonal pin tool joint with a higher percentage of precipitate dissolution. The fractograph of the hexagonal tool pin weld portion confirmed the finer dimple structure morphology without having any interior defect compared to other tool pin profiles. The lowest weld joint strength was obtained from cylindrical pin profile weld joint due to insufficient material flow during welding. The Transmission Electron Microscope and EDX analysis showed the dissolution of the metastable θ″, θ' (Al2Cu) partial precipitates in the WN and proved the influence of metastable precipitates on enhancement of mechanical behavior of weld. The XRD results also confirmed the Al2Cu precipitation dissolution in the weld zone.

  10. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy study of the microstructural changes occurring in aluminium matrix composites reinforced with SiC particles during casting and welding: interface reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urena; Gomez De Salazar JM; Gil; Escalera; Baldonedo

    1999-11-01

    Processing of aluminium matrix composites (AMCs), especially those constituted by a reactive system such as Al-SiC, presents great difficulties which limit their potential applications. The interface reactivity between SiC and molten Al generates an aluminium carbide which degrades the composite properties. Scanning and transmission electron microscopes equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopes are essential tools for determining the structure and chemistry of the Al-SiC interfaces in AMCs and changes occurring during casting and arc welding. In the present work, an aluminium-copper alloy (AA2014) reinforced with three different percentages of SiC particles was subjected to controlled remelting tests, at temperatures in the range 750-900 degrees C for 10 and 30 min. Arc welding tests using a tungsten intert gas with power inputs in the range 850-2000 W were also carried out. The results of these studies showed that during remelting there is preferential SiC particle consumption with formation of Al4C3 by interface reaction between the solid SiC particle and the molten aluminium matrix. The formation of Al4C3 by the same mechanism has also been detected in molten pools of arc welded composites. However, in this case there was formation of an almost continuous layer of Al4C3, which protects the particle against further consumption, and formation of aciculate aluminium carbide on the top weld. Both are formed by fusion and dissolution of the SiC in molten aluminium followed by reaction and precipitation of the Al4C3 during cooling.

  11. Mechanisms of the porosity formation during the fiber laser lap welding of aluminium alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Wang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available When joining the aluminum alloys, one of the biggest challenges is the formation of porosity, which deteriorates mechanical properties of welds. In this study, the lap welding was conducted on an aluminum alloy 5754 metal sheets with a thickness of 2 mm. The effects of various laser welding parameters on the weld quality were investigated. The porosity content was measured by X-ray inspections. The key is to control the solidification duration of molten pool. When the solidification duration of molten pool is large enough, more bubbles can escape from the molten pool and less remain as porosity.

  12. The effect of welding parameters on surface quality of AA6351 aluminium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yacob, S; Ariffin, N; Ali, R; Arshad, A; Wahab, M I A; Ismail, S A; Roji, NS M; Din, W B W; Zakaria, M H; Abdullah, A; Yusof, M I; Kamarulzaman, K Z; Mahyuddin, A; Hamzah, M N; Roslan, R; MAli, M A; Ahsan, Q

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, the effects of gas metal arc welding-cold metal transfer (GMAW-CMT) parameters on surface roughness are experimentally assessed. The purpose of this study is to develop a better understanding of the effects of welding speed, material thickness and contact tip to work distance on the surface roughness. Experiments are conducted using single pass gas metal arc welding-cold metal transfer (GMAW-CMT) welding technique to join the material. The material used in this experiment was AA6351 aluminum alloy with the thickness of 5mm and 6mm. A Mahr Marsuft XR 20 machine was used to measure the average roughness (Ra) of AA6351 joints. The main and interaction effect analysis was carried out to identify process parameters that affect the surface roughness. The results show that all the input process parameters affect the surface roughness of AA6351 joints. Additionally, the average roughness (Ra) results also show a decreasing trend with increased of welding speed. It is proven that gas metal arc welding-cold metal transfer (GMAW-CMT)welding process has been successful in term of providing weld joint of good surface quality for AA6351 based on the low value surface roughness condition obtained in this setup. The outcome of this experimental shall be valuable for future fabrication process in order to obtained high good quality weld. (paper)

  13. Effect of strengthening mechanisms on cold workability and instantaneous strain hardening behavior during grain refinement of AA 6061-10 wt.% TiO2 composite prepared by mechanical alloying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivasankaran, S.; Sivaprasad, K.; Narayanasamy, R.; Iyer, Vijay Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Various strengthening mechanisms such as solid solution, grain size, precipitate, dislocation and dispersion strengthening promoted yield strength of the composites → The 5 h sintered composite yielded a large plastic strain (23%) at ambient temperature. → The domination of interparticle friction effects, grain size and dislocation strengthening diminished the deformation capacity of the composites greater than 5 h of milling. → Ultra-fine grained composite (40 h) yielded a high strength (>1000 MPa). → The proposed instantaneous new Poisson's ratio and the instantaneous strain hardening index used to study the extent of plastic zone and strain levels of the composite. - Abstract: The mechanical alloying (MA) of AA 6061 alloy reinforced with 10 wt.% fine anatase-titania composites powder milled with different timings (1, 5, 10, 20, 30, and 40 h) was cold consolidated and sintered. The main purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of microstructure and the various strengthening mechanisms such as solid solution, grain size, precipitate, dislocation and dispersion strengthening during grain refinement of AA 6061-10 wt.% TiO 2 composite via MA on cold working and strain hardening behavior. The sintered composite preforms were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope, and transmission electron microscope. The strengthening mechanisms were estimated by using simplified models available in the literatures. The evaluation of cold deformation behavior under triaxial stress condition through room temperature cold-upsetting tests (incremental loads) was studied by correlating the strengthening mechanisms. Among the developed strengthening mechanisms the grain size and dislocation strengthening mechanisms diminished the deformation capacity of the composites. The strain hardening behavior was also examined by proposing instantaneous strain hardening index (n i ). The value of maximum instantaneous strain

  14. Study on microstructure and tensile properties of fly ash AMCs welded by FSW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachinkumar, Narendranath, S.; Chakradhar, D.

    2018-04-01

    Aluminum matrix composite (AMCs) constitute a new class of light weight and high strength materials which have widespread applications in almost all engineering sectors. But the cost of AMCs is the only barrier to increase their applications still. Hence there is a huge demand for the composites containing low cost reinforcement with less weight, keeping this in mind, in the present work, Friction stir welding (FSW) of AA6061/SiC/fly ash was carried out successfully. Microstructural study on the welded specimens was performed using optical microscopy (OM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results indicate that fly ash particles were uniformly distributed in the weld nugget area because of the stirring action of the FSW tool also promoted the grain refinement of the matrix material with complete elimination of clusters present in matrix material which resulting in sound welds without any defects for AA6061/SiC/fly ash composites. 82% of joint efficiency is obtained for selected AMCs. Transverse tensile test results showed that all welds fractured in HAZ.

  15. Examination of the effect of Sc on 2000 and 7000 series aluminium alloy castings: for improvements in fusion welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norman, A.F.; Hyde, K.; Costello, F.; Thompson, S.; Birley, S.; Prangnell, P.B.

    2003-01-01

    It has been reported that small additions of scandium (Sc) can improve the weldability and mechanical properties of some aluminium aerospace alloys that are normally considered to be 'unweldable'. In order to determine the mechanisms by which these improvements occur, and more rapidly arrive at optimum Sc addition levels, small wedge-shaped castings have been used to simulate the cooling rates found in MIG/TIG welds. Using this technique, a range of Sc addition levels have been made to two typical Al-aerospace alloys, 2024 and 7475. It has been found that when the Sc level exceeds a critical concentration, small Al 3 Sc primary particles form in the melt and act as very efficient grain nucleants, resulting in simulated fusion zone grain sizes as fine as 15 μm. This exceptional level of grain refinement produced an unusual grain structure that exhibited no dendritic, or cellular, substructure and a large increase in strength and ductility of the castings. Sc also produced changes in the alloy's freezing paths, which cannot yet be fully explained, but led to the appearance of the W phase in the 2024 alloy and, in both alloys, an overall reduction in the amount of eutectic formed during solidification. When coupled with the high level of grain refinement, this behaviour could be used to explain the increased strength and ductility of the castings. In 2000 and 7000 series aluminium alloys, it is therefore, anticipated that optimised Sc bearing filler wires will significantly improve the mechanical properties of the weld metal, as well as reducing the tendency for solidification cracking

  16. Emission of nanoparticles during friction stir welding (FSW) of aluminium alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, J F; Miranda, R M; Santos, T J; Carvalho, P A

    2014-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is now well established as a welding process capable of joining some different types of metallic materials, as it was (1) found to be a reliable and economical way of producing high quality welds, and (2) considered a "clean" welding process that does not involve fusion of metal, as is the case with other traditional welding processes. The aim of this study was to determine whether the emission of particles during FSW in the nanorange of the most commonly used aluminum (Al) alloys, AA 5083 and AA 6082, originated from the Al alloy itself due to friction of the welding tool against the item that was being welded. Another goal was to measure Al alloys in the alveolar deposited surface area during FSW. Nanoparticles dimensions were predominantly in the 40- and 70-nm range. This study demonstrated that microparticles were also emitted during FSW but due to tool wear. However, the biological relevance and toxic manifestations of these microparticles remain to be determined.

  17. Structure and properties of an aluminium alloy welded by electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruzimov, Sh.M.; Palvanov, S.R.; Pogrebnjak, A.D.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: In the given work the experimental results on research of influence of electronic beams on structure of an aluminum alloy are submitted. As a basis of samples the alloy Al-Mg-Zn-Cu by the additives Se-0.5 % and Nb-0.15 % is chosen. Samples from a cast aluminum alloy by thickness of 3 mm such as B-96 were welded with an electronic beam in three different modes at radius circle of a root of a welded seam of 5 mm. The welding was carried out by an alloy Amg 63 and Sv-1571 with application electron team welding joint of parts. The basic influence on the given process makes energy - allocation of an electronic beam. For research of phase structure used of X-ray beams (XRD), DRON-2 in copper K α - Cu measurement. For research of structure and morphology of a surface used optical microscope with increase 800-1500 times and electronic microscope with the microanalysis. On figures of optical microscopy the morphology of a seam sharply differs from morphology of an initial part. The microanalysis carried out with a place of a seam, has shown presence of the whole spectrum of elements, such as, Al; Zn; Na; Mg; Cu; and Mn. All measurements carried out in welding zone and in frontier zones that it was possible to carry out the comparative analysis. The element structure of these zones essentially differs in dependence of a condition of welding

  18. Fatigue resistance of welded joints in aluminium high-speed craft : A total stress concept

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Den Besten, J.H.

    2015-01-01

    Crew transfers, surveillance duties and {security, rescue, interception} operations at sea typically require high-speed craft. Aluminium is quite often selected as hull structure material because of its weight save potential in comparison to steel. The fatigue strength, however, may become a point

  19. Fatigue strength evaluation of friction stir welded aluminium joints using the nominal and notch stress concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barsoum, Z.; Khurshid, M.; Barsoum, I.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Fatigue testing and evaluation of friction stir welded butt and overlap joints. ► Evaluation based on nominal and effective notch stress concept. ► Comparison with different design recommendations and codes. ► Higher fatigue strength and SN-slopes is observed. ► New fatigue design recommendations proposed for FSW joints. -- Abstract: In this study the fatigue strength is investigated for Friction Stir Welded (FSW) overlap and butt welded joints in different thicknesses based on nominal and effective notch stress concepts. The fatigue test results are compared with fatigue strength recommendations according to EN 1999-1-3 and International Institute of Welding (IIW). The results are also compared with available published data and Finite Element Analysis (FEA) is carried out to investigate the effect of plate thickness and nugget size on the fatigue strength of overlap joints. 3–3 mm butt welded joints shows the highest fatigue strength in comparison with 3–5 mm butt welded and overlap joints. Slopes of the SN-curves for two different joint types differ from the slope recommended by IIW. A specific failure trend is observed in overlap FSW joints. However, the slopes of the SN-curves are in close agreement with slopes found in EN 1999-1-3. The slopes of various published results and test results presented in this study are in good agreement with each other. The suggested fatigue design curves for the nominal and effective notch stress concept have a higher slope than given for fusion welds by IIW.

  20. Wear characteristics and defects analysis of friction stir welded joint of aluminium alloy 6061-t6

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kumar, R.; Chattopadhyaya, S.; Hloch, Sergej; Krolczyk, G.; Legutko, S.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 1 (2016), s. 128-135 ISSN 1507-2711 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : Friction stir welding (FSW) * grinding machine * Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM) Subject RIV: JQ - Machines ; Tools Impact factor: 1.145, year: 2016 http://www.ein.org.pl/2016-01-17

  1. Changes of structure and properties in the heat-affected zone during the welding of high-strength aluminium alloys. Gefuege- und Eigenschaftsaenderungen in der Waermeeinflusszone beim Schweissen hochfester Aluminiumlegierungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umgeher, A. (Tyrolitschleifmittelwerke Swarovski KG, Schwaz (Austria)); Cerjak, H. (Technische Univ., Graz (Austria))

    High strength aluminium alloys like AlZnMgCu 1.5 are usually classified as 'non-weldable' alloys. If welding technologies such as TIG-plasma keyhole welding are used, it is possible to weld these alloys successfully. However, the heat input during welding affects the base material adjacent to the fusion zone. The main objective of this investigation was to study the change of microstructure and properties in this heat affected zone (HAZ) of high strength aluminium alloys. The base material was a high strength wrought aluminium alloy AlZnMgCu 1.5 (7075) in the T6 condition. The specimens were welded by TIG-plasma keyhole welding. Additionally, Gleeble welding simulation techniques were used. The specimens were investigated in the 'as welded' condition, 'naturally aged', 'artificially aged', and after a complete post weld heat treatment. The microstructure was investigated using light and electron microscopy. Hardness and electric resistivity measurements and DSC-analysis were made. (orig.)

  2. Analysis of microstructure and mechanical properties of aluminium-copper joints welded by FSW process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iordache, M.; Sicoe, G.; Iacomi, D.; Niţu, E.; Ducu, C.

    2017-08-01

    The research conducted in this article aimed to check the quality of joining some dissimilar materials Al-Cu by determining the mechanical properties and microstructure analysis. For the experimental measurements there were used tin alloy Al - EN-AW-1050A with a thickness of 2 mm and Cu99 sheet with a thickness of 2 mm, joined by FSW weld overlay. The main welding parameters were: rotating speed of the rotating element 1400 rev/min, speed of the rotating element 50 mm/min. The experimental results were determined on samples specially prepared for metallographic analysis. In order to prepare samples for their characterization, there was designed and built a device that allowed simultaneous positioning and fixing for grinding. The characteristics analyzed in the joint welded samples were mictrostructure, microhardness and residual stresses. The techniques used to determine these characteristics were optical microscopy, electron microscopy with fluorescence radioactive elemental analysis (EDS), Vickers microhardness line - HV0.3 and X-ray diffractometry.

  3. Experimental Study on Dissimilar Friction Stir welding of Aluminium Alloys (5083-H111 and 6082-T6) to investigate the mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, H. M. Anil; Venkata Ramana, V.; Pawar, Mayur

    2018-03-01

    Friction stir welding is an innovative technology in the joining realm of metals and alloys. This technique is highly economical and suitable especially for non ferrous alloys compared to ferrous alloys. It finds many applications in various fields of aeronautics, automobile, ship building industries etc. The paper presents the comparative results of mechanical properties such as tensile strength, microstructure, macro structure and hardness on the similar and dissimilar aluminum alloys AA5083-H111 and AA6082-T6 under certain selected variables - constant tool rotational speed, its tilt angle, welding speed using friction stir welding process. It is observed from the experimental results that joint efficiency of dissimilar aluminium alloys is higher than the similar aluminum alloys.

  4. Development of aluminium viscous damper by high speed MIG welding process; Kosoku MIG yosetsuho ni yoru aluminium sei viscous damper no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hino, H; Hotta, M [Nippon Light Metal Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Maeda, Y; Shimizu, H [Fukoku Co. Ltd., Saitama (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    We have developed a welded aluminum viscous damper to improve the joining strength between the case and the cover of the conventional damper mechanically fastened by adhesion. The distortion of the welded damper was decreased to an acceptable level using the high speed MIG welding process. Sound quality and good appearance were obtained by optimizing the initial speed of the filler wire and by controlling the welding conditions at the starting part and in the lap part. The leakage load and the fatigue limit of the welded damper were 5 and 10 times those of the conventional damper, respectively. 3 refs., 15 figs.

  5. Analysis of the tool plunge in friction stir welding - comparison of aluminium alloys 2024 T3 and 2024 T351

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veljić Darko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Temperature, plastic strain and heat generation during the plunge stage of the friction stir welding (FSW of high-strength aluminium alloys 2024 T3 and 2024 T351 are considered in this work. The plunging of the tool into the material is done at different rotating speeds. A three-dimensional finite element (FE model for thermomechanical simulation is developed. It is based on arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation, and Johnson-Cook material law is used for modelling of material behaviour. From comparison of the numerical results for alloys 2024 T3 and 2024 T351, it can be seen that the former has more intensive heat generation from the plastic deformation, due to its higher strength. Friction heat generation is only slightly different for the two alloys. Therefore, temperatures in the working plate are higher in the alloy 2024 T3 for the same parameters of the plunge stage. Equivalent plastic strain is higher for 2024 T351 alloy, and the highest values are determined under the tool shoulder and around the tool pin. For the alloy 2024 T3, equivalent plastic strain is the highest in the influence zone of the tool pin. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 34016 i br. TR 35006

  6. Microstructure and mechanical properties of similar and dissimilar joints of aluminium alloy and pure copper by friction stir welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.C. Sinha

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the microstructure and mechanical properties of similar and dissimilar friction stir welded joints of aluminium alloy (AlA and pure copper (Cu were evaluated at variable tool rotational speeds from 150 to 900 rpm in steps of 150 rpm at 60 mm/min travel speed and constant tilt angle 2°. The interfacial microstructures of the joints were characterised by optical and scanning electron microscopy. The Al4Cu9, AlCu, Al2Cu and Al2Cu3 intermetallic compounds have been observed at the interface and stir zone region of dissimilar Al/Cu FSWed joints. Variation in the grain size was observed in the stir zone depending upon the heat input value. Axial force, traverse force and torque value were analysed with variation in tool rotational speed. Residual stresses were measured at the stir zone by X-ray diffraction technique. Maximum ultimate tensile strength of ∼75% of AlA strength for AlA–AlA joints has been obtained at 750 rpm and for Cu–Cu joint tensile strength of ∼100% of tensile strength of Cu was obtained at 300 rpm. However, for Cu–AlA joint when processed at 600 rpm tool rotational speed achieved maximum ultimate tensile strength of ∼77% of AlA.

  7. Relation between size of contrast meter and radiographic density difference for radiographic test aluminium welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senda, Tomio; Hirayama, Kazuo; Masaoka, Naotoshi; Fujita, Minoru.

    1977-01-01

    The influence of contrast meter with difference surface area (5.0 mm x 5.0 mm, 10.0 mm x 10.0 mm, 15.0 mm x 15.0 mm, 30.0 mm x 30.0 mm) and separated type on radiographic density difference (Δ D) were investigated for radiographic test of aluminum welds. It was found that the effect of scattered radiation on contrast meter represented highest at test specimen thickness of 20 mm, and Δ D was constant as the size was increased from 10.0 mm x 10.0 mm to 15.0 mm x 15.0 mm for aluminum contrast meter. For this reason, a proposal of the contrast meter with 10.0 mm x 10.0 mm (surface area) has made to replace (15.0 mm x 15 mm) at amendment of JIS Z 3105. (auth.)

  8. Microstructure, mechanical and corrosion behavior of high strength AA7075 aluminium alloy friction stir welds – Effect of post weld heat treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Vijaya Kumar

    2015-12-01

    It was observed that the hardness and strength of weld were observed to be comparatively high in peak aged (T6 condition but the welds showed poor corrosion resistance. The resistance to pitting corrosion was improved and the mechanical properties were maintained by RRA treatment. The resistance to pitting corrosion was improved in RRA condition with the minimum loss of weld strength.

  9. Lanthanide based conversion coatings for long term wet storage of aluminium-clad spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, S.M.C.; Correa, O.V.; De Souza, J.A.; Ramanathan, L.V.

    2010-01-01

    Spent fuels from research reactors are stored in basins with water of less than desirable quality at many facilities around the world and instances of cladding failure caused by pitting corrosion have been reported. Conversion coatings have been used in many industries to protect different metals, including aluminium alloys. This paper presents the results of an ongoing investigation in which the corrosion resistance of lanthanide (cerium, lanthanum and praseodymium) based conversion coated RR fuel cladding alloys has been studied. Electrochemical tests in the laboratory revealed higher corrosion resistance of CeO 2 , La 2 O 3 and Pr 2 O 3 coated AA 1100 and AA 6061 alloys in NaCl solutions. Uncoated and CeO 2 coated coupons of these alloys exposed for 50 days to the spent fuel basin of the IEA-R1 research reactor in IPEN, Brazil, revealed marked reductions in the extent of pitting corrosion. (author)

  10. Study of mechanical properties on powdermetalurgy aluminium matrix composites fabricated by stamping or extrusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busquets, D.; Gomez, L.; Amigo, V.; Salvador-Moya, M. D.

    2005-01-01

    We have developed composite materials from AA6061 aluminium alloy powders used as matrix and ceramics powders of boron carbide, silicon carbide and boron nitride, used as reinforcements in 2.5, 5.0, 7.5 and 10% vol. by mechanical mixing and milling in planetary mill at 360 rpm vial velocity for 4 h followed of hot stamping and extrusion process on green compacts. Mechanical properties obtained from tensile tests are influenced by the heat treatment, reinforcement fractions and nature. Moreover, these mechanical characteristic are dependent from the processing route. Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy analysis revealed the microstructure of materials and let describe the tripartite relation; structure-processing-properties, of the developed materials. (Author) 20 refs

  11. Influence of tool geometry and processing parameters on welding defects and mechanical properties for friction stir welding of 6061 Aluminium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneji, A.; Ali, M.; Pervaiz, S.

    2018-04-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a form of solid state welding process for joining metals, alloys, and selective composites. Over the years, FSW development has provided an improved way of producing welding joints, and consequently got accepted in numerous industries such as aerospace, automotive, rail and marine etc. In FSW, the base metal properties control the material’s plastic flow under the influence of a rotating tool whereas, the process and tool parameters play a vital role in the quality of weld. In the current investigation, an array of square butt joints of 6061 Aluminum alloy was to be welded under varying FSW process and tool geometry related parameters, after which the resulting weld was evaluated for the corresponding mechanical properties and welding defects. The study incorporates FSW process and tool parameters such as welding speed, pin height and pin thread pitch as input parameters. However, the weld quality related defects and mechanical properties were treated as output parameters. The experimentation paves way to investigate the correlation between the inputs and the outputs. The correlation between inputs and outputs were used as tool to predict the optimized FSW process and tool parameters for a desired weld output of the base metals under investigation. The study also provides reflection on the effect of said parameters on a welding defect such as wormhole.

  12. Toughness study of an under matched welded joint: application to the mechanical integrity of the electron beam welded joint of 6016-T6 aluminium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rekik, Wissal

    2016-01-01

    For the demonstration of the integrity of the most sensitive nuclear components, conventional defects, as cracks for example, must be considered within the design step as required by the nuclear safety authority. This phase is particularly crucial for dimensioning of welded structures. To ensure a conservative prediction, the position of the initial crack within the welded joint must be the most detrimental in fracture behavior. Commonly used analyzes consider homogeneous structure with the behavior of the base metal of the welded joint, considered as the weakest metallurgical zone in the case of an overmatched weld. In contrast, similar analysis is not conservative in case of under matched weld. The thesis contributes by the development of an experimental and numerical methodology allowing the identification of the detrimental metallurgical zone in fracture behavior of an under matched welded joint. The methodology proposed is applied to an electron beam welded joint on al 6061-T6. To reach this goal, the gradient of the mechanical behavior along the welded joint was first identified. This is particularly interesting to conduct an advanced analysis based on a multi material approach. In a second step, the fracture behavior of the welded joint was studied on CT specimen. The transferability of the J integral at initiation was approved on another geometry: this represents an important foundation for the transferability assumption to structure. Finally, a numerical analysis on full scale tube was developed. Residual welding stresses and structural effects were considered. The results demonstrate that the heat affected zone located at 13 mm from the middle of the welded joint is the most detrimental zone for fracture analysis. This contradicts the conventional methods conducted on fracture analysis which consider a conventional defect within the fusion zone. (author) [fr

  13. Caratterizzazione microstrutturale e prove di resilienza su giunti Friction Stir Welding e Linear Friction Welding di compositi a matrice metallica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Merlin

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In questo studio sono stati caratterizzati giunti Friction Stir Welding e Linear Friction Welding su compositi a matrice in lega di alluminio e rinforzo particellare ceramico. Il processo FSW è stato applicato a due compositi ottenuti con processo fusorio, quindi estrusi e trattati termicamente T6: AA6061/20%vol.Al2O3p e AA7005/10%vol.Al2O3p. I giunti LFW sono stati invece realizzati su un composito con matrice in lega di alluminio e rinforzo particellare in carburo di silicio, ottenuto mediante metallurgia delle polveri, quindi forgiato e trattato termicamente T4: AA2124/25%vol.SiCp. Sono stati esaminati gli effetti della saldatura sullecaratteristiche microstrutturali dei giunti, avvalendosi di tecniche di microscopia ottica con analisi di immagine e di microscopia elettronica in scansione (SEM con microsonda a dispersione di energia (EDS. Sono state quindi condotte prove di resilienza con pendolo strumentato Charpy. Lo studio dei meccanismi di danneggiamento è stato effettuato mediante analisi al SEM delle superfici di frattura. Entrambi i processi di saldatura hanno portato a giunti sostanzialmente esenti da difetti. La microstruttura dei cordoni è risultata dipendente sia dalle caratteristiche microstrutturali iniziali dei compositi considerati, sia dalla tipologia di processo di saldatura. Nel caso dei compositi AA6061/20%Al2O3p e AA7005/10%Al2O3p saldati FSW si è osservato un sostanziale incremento di resilienza, rispetto al materiale base, in conseguenza dell’affinamento dei grani della matrice, della riduzione della dimensione media delle particelle di rinforzo e della loro spigolosità, indotte dal processo di saldatura. Il composito AA2124/25%SiCp saldato LFW ha presentato valori di resilienza confrontabili con quelli del materiale base, in conseguenza, soprattutto, dei limitati effetti della saldatura su dimensione e distribuzione delle particelle di rinforzo.

  14. Assessment of laserbeam-welded tubular overlap joints made of magnesium and aluminium under multiaxial loading; Bemessung laserstrahlgeschweisster Ueberlappverbindungen aus Magnesium und Aluminium unter mehrachsiger Beanspruchung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Exel, Nora; Wiebesiek, Jens; Sonsino, Cetin Morris [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Betriebsfestigkeit und Systemzuverlaessigkeit (LBF), Darmstadt (Germany); Hanselka, Holger [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Betriebsfestigkeit und Systemzuverlaessigkeit (LBF), Darmstadt (Germany); Technische Univ. Darmstadt (Germany). Fachgebiet ' ' Systemzuverlaessigkeit und Maschinenakustik' '

    2013-07-01

    The present paper compares the wrought light-metal alloys AlMg3.5Mn and MgAl3Zn1 based on the fatigue behaviour of laserbeam-welded overlapped tubular joints. The experiments were carried out under pure axial, pure torsional and combined proportional as well as nonproportional loading. The test results were assessed by applying the notch stress concept with a reference radius of r{sub ref} = 0,05 mm and compared with allowable stresses taken from a standard. Finally, two stress based multiaxial hypothesis are compared to each other based on the test results. (orig.)

  15. Corrosion behavior of Al6061 alloy weldment produced by friction stir welding process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Gharavi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the corrosion behavior of welded lap joints of AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy produced by friction stir welding process has been investigated. Corrosion properties of welded lap joints were studied by cyclic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy tests. All tests were performed in an aerated 0.6 mol L−1 NaCl aqueous solution with pH = 6.5 at a temperature of 30 °C to characterize corrosion morphology and realize corrosion features of weld regions as opposed to the parent alloy. The microstructure of weld nugget (WN, heated affected zone (HAZ, and parent alloy were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The experimental results indicated that the welding process has a major effect on the corrosion resistance, which possibly associated to the break-down and dissolution of intermetallic particles. It is supposed that an increasing in intermetallic distributed throughout the matrix of weld regions increases the galvanic corrosion couples. Furthermore, by decreasing the grain size in the weld regions, the susceptibility to corrosion is enhanced. The pitting corrosion and intergranular attack are the dominant corrosion types in the weld regions and the parent alloy.

  16. Improvements in and relating to welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, B.D.

    1979-01-01

    This invention concerns apparatus for use in welding, particularly welding which must be effected in a predetermined, for example, inert atmosphere, e.g. the welding of reactive materials such as zircaloy, titanium, magnesium, aluminium, etc. (U.K.)

  17. Influence of energy input in friction stir welding on structure evolution and mechanical behaviour of precipitation-hardening in aluminium alloys (AA2024-T351, AA6013-T6 and Al-Mg-Sc)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weis Olea, Cesar Afonso [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstofforschung

    2008-12-04

    Aluminium alloys AA2024 T351, AA6013 T6 and the recently developed Al-Mg-Sc for aircraft industry applications, which are usually considered difficult to weld by conventional fusion welding processes, demonstrate outstanding performance when joined by friction stir welding (FSW). The main feature of the process is to produce solid-state welds, where the maximum temperatures attained during the process are about 80 % that of the melting temperature of the base material. The process generates substantial plastic deformation, due to the solid-state stirring, and consequently creates a high dislocation density, which is a precursor to dynamic recrystallization, a metallurgical feature that characterizes the stir zone (weld centre). A relevant aspect considered, regarding precipitation-hardening aluminium alloys, is the deterioration of the mechanical properties in the weld zones, which are fundamentally attributed to changes in the characteristics of strengthening precipitates. Among the strengthening mechanisms acting in these aluminium alloys, the most important is basically dependent on the morphology, size and population of the precipitates. The thermal cycle and deformation generated during the FSW process alter the precipitation characteristics previously present in the base material. FSW input energy regulates the magnitude of the thermal cycle and the intensity of deformation taking place during the process, and it can be controlled by the welding parameters, affecting the precipitates evolution and consequently the mechanical properties of the joint. Nevertheless, there remains a lack of knowledge about the substructural evolution of these alloys during FSW, and its correlation with weld energy input and their respective mechanical properties, particularly for the Al-Mg-Sc alloy. The main objective of this work is to explain the micro and substructural evolution (emphasizing precipitates evolution) of AA2024- T351, AA6013-T6 and Al-Mg-Sc alloys in similar

  18. Evaluation of interfacial bonding in dissimilar materials of YSZ-alumina composites to 6061 aluminium alloy using friction welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uday, M.B.; Ahmad Fauzi, M.N.; Zuhailawati, H.; Ismail, A.B.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Friction-welding process. → Joining between ceramic composite and metal alloy. → Slip casting of the yttria stabilized zirconia/alumina composite samples. - Abstract: The interfacial microstructures characteristics of alumina ceramic body reinforced with yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) was evaluated after friction welding to 6061 aluminum alloy using optical and electron microscopy. Alumina rods containing 25 and 50 wt% yttria stabilized zirconia were fabricated by slip casting in plaster of Paris (POP) molds and subsequently sintered at 1600 deg. C. On the other hand, aluminum rods were machine down to the required dimension using a lathe machine. The diameter of the ceramic and the metal rods was 16 mm. Rotational speeds for the friction welding were varied between 900 and 1800 rpm. The friction pressure was maintained at 7 MPa for a friction time of 30 s. Optical and scanning electron microscopy was used to analyze the microstructure of the resultant joints, particularly at the interface. The joints were also examined with EDX line (energy dispersive X-ray) in order to determine the phases formed during the welding. The mechanical properties of the friction welded YSZ-Al 2 O 3 composite to 6061 alloy were determined with a four-point bend test and Vickers microhardness. The experimental results showed the degree of deformation varied significantly for the 6061 Al alloy than the ceramic composite part. The mechanical strength of friction-welded ceramic composite/6061 Al alloy components were obviously affected by joining rotational speed selected which decreases in strength with increasing rotational speed.

  19. Low-cycle fatigue of dissimilar friction stir welded aluminum alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, R.I. [The University of Alabama, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Jordon, J.B., E-mail: bjordon@eng.ua.edu [The University of Alabama, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Allison, P.G. [The University of Alabama, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Rushing, T.; Garcia, L. [Engineering Research and Development Center, Army Corps of Engineers, Vicksburg, MS 39180 (United States)

    2016-01-27

    In this work, experiments were conducted to quantify structure-property relations of low-cycle fatigue behavior of dissimilar friction stir welding (FSW) of AA6061-to-AA7050 high strength aluminum alloys. In addition, a microstructure-sensitive fatigue model is employed to further elucidate cause-effect relationships. Experimental strain-controlled fatigue testing revealed an increase in the cyclic strain hardening and the number-of cycles to failure as the tool rotational speed was increased. At higher applied strain amplitudes (>0.3%), the corresponding stress amplitude increased and the plastic strain amplitude decreased, as the number of cycles increased. However, at 0.2% strain amplitude, the plastic strain decreased until it was almost negligible. Inspection of the hysteresis loops demonstrated that at low strain amplitudes, there was an initial stage of strain hardening that increased until it reached a maximum strain hardening level, afterwards a nearly perfect elastic behavior was observed. Under fully-reversed fatigue loading, all samples failed at the region between the heat-affected and thermomechanically-affected zones. Inspection of the fractured surfaces under scanning electron microscopy revealed that the cracks initiated at either the crown or the root surface of the weld, and from secondary intermetallic particles located near the free surface of the weld. Lastly, a microstructure-sensitive multistage fatigue model was employed to correlate the fatigue life of the dissimilar FSW of AA6061-to-AA7050 considering microstructural features such as grain size, intermetallic particles and mechanical properties.

  20. Corrosion fatigue performance in simulated sea water of aluminium 6061-T651 welded using ER4043 filler wire

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mutombo, K

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The fatigue life of Al6061-T651 for various applied stress amplitudes in the unwelded and welded conditions was significantly lower in 3.5% NaCl simulated sea water solution, compared to that in air. The damage ratio increased with a decrease...

  1. Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Earl; And Others

    The curriculum guide for welding instruction contains 16 units presented in six sections. Each unit is divided into the following areas, each of which is color coded: terminal objectives, specific objectives, suggested activities, and instructional materials; information sheet; transparency masters; assignment sheet; test; and test answers. The…

  2. Numerical modeling of friction welding of bi-metal joints for electrical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velu, P. Shenbaga; Hynes, N. Rajesh Jesudoss

    2018-05-01

    In the manufacturing industries, and more especially in electrical engineering applications, the usage of non-ferrous materials plays a vital role. Today's engineering applications relies upon some of the significant properties such as a good corrosion resistance, mechanical properties, good heat conductivity and higher electrical conductivity. Copper-aluminum bi-metal joint is one such combination that meets the demands requirements for electrical applications. In this work, the numerical simulation of AA 6061 T6 alloy/Copper was carried out under joining conditions. By using this developed model, the temperature distribution along the length of the dissimilar joint is predicted and the time-temperature profile has also been generated. Besides, a Finite Element Model has been developed by using the numerical simulation Tool "ABAQUS". This developed FEM is helpful in predicting various output parameters during friction welding of this dissimilar joint combination.

  3. Aluminium production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winter, B.; Ayers, J.; Sammer, G.

    2001-01-01

    Aluminium is the most important non-ferrous metal by quantity. Aluminium is produced by electrolysis of aluminium oxide (also known as alumina). Alumina is produced by refining bauxite. The quantity of primary and secondary aluminium production in ECE-countries between 1992 and 1998 is shown. The European aluminium industry employs approximately 200 000 employees. The annual aluminium production in the European Union was 3.58 million tonnes in 1994, of which 44 % was secondary aluminium. In 1996 3.96 million tonnes of aluminium were produced in the EU, of which 44 % was secondary aluminium. (author)

  4. STUDY OF ARC IMPULSE FREQUENCY EFFECT ON THE STRUCTURE AND PROPERTIES OF WELDED CONNECTION ELEMENTS IN ALUMINIUM PIPELINE SYSTEMS, MADE WITH MASTERTIG 3500

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr. Pavel V. Bakhmatov

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Summary . The article focuses on the arc impulse frequency effect on the structure and properties of welded connections in aluminum pipeline systems hand-operated with argon-arc welding nonconsumable rod on MasterTig3500. It was revealed that the frequency of the welding current impulses plays an important role in the forming of the welded connection. The authors determined the optimal value of the welding current frequency significantly accelerating the welding process to ensure consistent quality of the weld. The authors detailed some features of cleaning assembly parts with a wire brush prior to welding process.

  5. JIS Z 3105 (methods of radiographic test and classification of radiographs for aluminium welds) and its explanatory note

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senda, Tomio

    1977-01-01

    The paragraphs of JIS Z 3105 revised in 1977 are explained, and the problems that were examined by the special committee before the JIS Z 3105 is put in force are reviewed. The JIS Z 3105 consists of a general rule, a method of radiography, a method of classification of the radiographs, and recording. The main problems which were examined are as follows: The radiation penetration testing method of a circumferencial welding portion of a tube was included in the old specifications JIS Z 3105 (1973), but it is excluded in the new specifications, because another specification JIS Z 3108 was established. The gradation meters of D1, D2, D3 and D4 types are added to the gradation meters of the existing A and B types. A restriction in accordance with both focusing dimension and thickness of the welded material is provided between a distance between the focal point and the penetrometer and a distance between the penetrometer and the film. Radiograph concentration of parts other than the penetrometer discrimination and defects of a testing part are specified in accordance with thickness of the base metal. Inclusion of copper and copper oxides are added to the blowholes, the inclusions, cracks, bad penetration and bad fusion as defects for classifying gradation. The gradation of the revised JIS is classified into four grades in lieu of the old three grades. (Iwakiri, K.)

  6. Thermal analysis of friction stir welding process and investigation into affective parameters using simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasi, Mahmoud [University of Kashan, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bagheri, Behrouz [Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Keivani, Rasoul [Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Friction stir welding (FSW) as an efficient solid state joining process has numerous applications in industries. Temperature distribution analysis through simulation not only brings the possibility to characterize the microstructure of different zones, but also enables one to save cost and energy as optimum welding variables are obtained with less concern. In the present study, the temperature distribution during the friction stir welding (FSW) process of AA6061-T6 was evaluated using finite element method (FEM). Since experimental measurements cannot be readily made in the weld region, it is difficult to understand physics in the stir zone of the welds without simulation. Abaqus software was applied to model the parts and simulate the process of welding, while Johnson-Cook law utilized to evaluate the effect of strain rate and generated heat. FE-results were verified by experimental results. The comparisons revealed a good compatibility between the results. The effect of probe shape on temperature distribution was also studied. It was found that spherical pins result in the highest temperatures at workpieces with respect to cylindrical and tapered pins. Additionally, it was concluded that more heat is generated in workpieces as pin angle increases.

  7. Thermal analysis of friction stir welding process and investigation into affective parameters using simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbasi, Mahmoud; Bagheri, Behrouz; Keivani, Rasoul

    2015-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) as an efficient solid state joining process has numerous applications in industries. Temperature distribution analysis through simulation not only brings the possibility to characterize the microstructure of different zones, but also enables one to save cost and energy as optimum welding variables are obtained with less concern. In the present study, the temperature distribution during the friction stir welding (FSW) process of AA6061-T6 was evaluated using finite element method (FEM). Since experimental measurements cannot be readily made in the weld region, it is difficult to understand physics in the stir zone of the welds without simulation. Abaqus software was applied to model the parts and simulate the process of welding, while Johnson-Cook law utilized to evaluate the effect of strain rate and generated heat. FE-results were verified by experimental results. The comparisons revealed a good compatibility between the results. The effect of probe shape on temperature distribution was also studied. It was found that spherical pins result in the highest temperatures at workpieces with respect to cylindrical and tapered pins. Additionally, it was concluded that more heat is generated in workpieces as pin angle increases.

  8. Eficiencia térmica en soldadura de la aleación AA6061-T6 por arco eléctrico indirecto modificado y digitalización de señales de intensidad de corriente

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambriz, R. R.

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The results of the thermal efficiency on welding by modified indirect electric arc technique (MIEA [1] of the 6061- T6 aluminum alloy are presented. These values are in a range of 90 to 94 %, which depend of the preheating employed. Thermal efficiency was obtained by means of a balance energy which considers the heat input, the amount of melted mass of the welding profiles, and welding parameters during the joining, especially of the arc current data acquisition. Also, some dimensionless parameters were employed in order to determine the approximation grade of the melted pool, the heat affected zone (HAZ, and their corresponding values with the experimental results.

    En el presente trabajo de investigación, se presentan los resultados de la eficiencia térmica en la soldadura de una aleación de aluminio 6061-T6 por medio de la técnica de arco eléctrico indirecto modificado (AEIM [1]. Los valores se encuentran en un rango de 90-94 % dependiendo de la temperatura de precalentamiento y fueron obtenidos a través de un balance térmico que considera a la energía aportada por el arco eléctrico, la cantidad de masa fundida de los perfiles de soldadura obtenidos y las variables operativas en el proceso de unión, poniendo especial atención en los datos recogidos en el proceso de digitalización para la intensidad de corriente del arco eléctrico. También se em - plearon algunos parámetros adimensionales para determinar el grado de aproximación de la porción del baño fundido, el ancho de la zona afectada por el calor (ZAC y sus correspondientes aproximaciones con los resultados experimentales.

  9. TIG welding of aluminium foams. Analysis of foaming operating parameters; Soldadura TIG de espumas de aluminio. Analisis de los parametros operacionales de espumado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portoles, A.; Berenguer, O.; Onoro, J.; Ranninger, C.

    2011-07-01

    In this work the influence of main parameters that take part during TIG welding process are analyzed. Some of these parameters belong to the welding process, as for example the welding speed, intensity and voltage while others are from the material and tooling features, as for example foaming material and tooling design. The result of this work shows a strong dependence on these parameters of the TIG welding process for metallic foams. (Author) 16 refs.

  10. Effect of Pre/Post T6 Heat Treatment on the Mechanical Properties of Laser Welded SSM Cast A356 Aluminium Alloy

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Akhter, R

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available HT) were butt welded, using an Nd: YAG laser. In another experiment, as cast welded samples were heat treated to T6 condition (post HT). The base metal and weld microstructures were presented. The effect of heat treatments on microstructure...

  11. Orbital welding technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeschen, W.

    2003-01-01

    The TIG (Tungsten-inert gas) orbital welding technique is applied in all areas of pipe welding. The process is mainly used for austenitic and ferritic materials but also for materials like aluminium, nickel, and titanium alloys are commonly welded according to this technique. Thin-walled as well as thick-walled pipes are welded economically. The application of orbital welding is of particular interest in the area of maintenance of thick-walled pipes that is described in this article. (orig.) [de

  12. Microstructural variation through weld thickness and mechanical properties of peened friction stir welded 6061 aluminum alloy joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdulstaar, Mustafa A., E-mail: mustafa.abdulstaar@gmail.com [Institute of Material Science and Engineering, Clausthal University of Technology, Agricolastr. 6, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Al-Fadhalah, Khaled J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering & Petroleum, Kuwait University, P.O. Box 5969, Safat 13060 (Kuwait); Wagner, Lothar [Institute of Material Science and Engineering, Clausthal University of Technology, Agricolastr. 6, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany)

    2017-04-15

    The current study examined the effect of microstructure variation on the development of mechanical properties in friction stir welded joints of 6061-T6 aluminum alloy, which were subsequently processed by shot peening (SP). Following to FSW, fatigue specimens were extracted perpendicularly to the welding direction. Surface Skimming to 0.5 mm from crown and root sides of the joint was made and SP was later applied on the two sides using ceramic shots of two different Almen intensities of 0.18 mmA and 0.24 mmA. Microstructural examination by electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD) indicated variation in the grain refinement of the weld zone, with coarsest grains (5 μm) at the crown side and finest grains (2 μm) at the root side. Reduction of microhardness to 60 HV occurred in the weld zone for samples in FSW condition. Application of SP promoted significant strain hardening at the crown side, with Almen intensities of 0.24 mmA providing maximum increase in microhardness to 120 HV. On the contrary, only a maximum microhardness of 75 HV was obtained at the root side. The difference in strain hardening capability at the two sides was strongly dependent on grain size. The two Almen intensities produced similar distribution of compressive residual stresses in the subsurface regions that led to enhance the fatigue strength to the level of base metal for N ≥ 10{sup 5} cycles. Yet, the increase in fatigue strength was more pronounced with increasing Almen intensity to 0.24 mmA, demonstrating further enhancement by strain hardening. - Highlights: • Grain refinement was observed after friction stir welding of AA 6061-T6. • Reduction in microhardness and fatigue strength were obtained after welding. • Variation in grain refinement led to different hardening behavior after peening. • Shot peening induced beneficial compressive residual stresses. • Shot peening and surface skimming markedly improved the fatigue performance.

  13. Optimization of Friction Stir Welding Tool Advance Speed via Monte-Carlo Simulation of the Friction Stir Welding Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Kirk A; St-Georges, Lyne; Kiss, Laszlo I

    2014-04-30

    Recognition of the friction stir welding process is growing in the aeronautical and aero-space industries. To make the process more available to the structural fabrication industry (buildings and bridges), being able to model the process to determine the highest speed of advance possible that will not cause unwanted welding defects is desirable. A numerical solution to the transient two-dimensional heat diffusion equation for the friction stir welding process is presented. A non-linear heat generation term based on an arbitrary piecewise linear model of friction as a function of temperature is used. The solution is used to solve for the temperature distribution in the Al 6061-T6 work pieces. The finite difference solution of the non-linear problem is used to perform a Monte-Carlo simulation (MCS). A polynomial response surface (maximum welding temperature as a function of advancing and rotational speed) is constructed from the MCS results. The response surface is used to determine the optimum tool speed of advance and rotational speed. The exterior penalty method is used to find the highest speed of advance and the associated rotational speed of the tool for the FSW process considered. We show that good agreement with experimental optimization work is possible with this simplified model. Using our approach an optimal weld pitch of 0.52 mm/rev is obtained for 3.18 mm thick AA6061-T6 plate. Our method provides an estimate of the optimal welding parameters in less than 30 min of calculation time.

  14. Nondestructive Evaluation of Friction Stir-Welded Aluminum Alloy to Coated Steel Sheet Lap Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, H.; Kumar, A.; Rajkumar, K. V.; Saravanan, T.; Jayakumar, T.; Pal, Tapan Kumar

    2015-11-01

    Dissimilar lap joints of aluminum sheet (AA 6061) of 2 mm thickness and zinc-coated steel sheet of 1 mm thickness were produced by friction stir welding with different combinations of rotational speed and travel speed. Ultrasonic C- and B-scanning, and radiography have been used in a complementary manner for detection of volumetric (cavity and flash) and planar (de bond) defects as the defects are in micron level. Advanced ultrasonic C-scanning did not provide any idea about the defects, whereas B-scanning cross-sectional image showed an exclusive overview of the micron-level defects. A digital x-ray radiography methodology is proposed for quality assessment of the dissimilar welds which provide three-fold increase in signal-to-noise ratio with improved defect detection sensitivity. The present study clearly shows that the weld tool rotational speed and travel speed have a decisive role on the quality of the joints obtained by the friction stir welding process. The suitability of the proposed NDE techniques to evaluate the joint integrity of dissimilar FSW joints is thus established.

  15. Study of the feasibility of friction STIR welding applied to the fabrication of monolithic fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabot, Pedro J.; Moglioni, A.; Mirandou, Marcela; Balart, Silvia N.

    2004-01-01

    The monolithic U-Mo fuel elements consist in a foil of a U-Mo alloy encased in Al. One of the techniques that is being tried to apply in their fabrication is Friction Stir Welding in the 'no contact at the interface' mode. The Laboratory of Welding at the National Atomic Energy Commission (Argentina) has a great experience in the conventional form of this technique so has started working on this new application. This paper describes the experiments performed to obtain the operative parameters. In the first experiments AA6061 T6 (Al) plates and sheets of AISI 316 (SS) were used to obtain the optimal operative parameters of the process. Welds were performed and evaluated for different operative variables such speed, angle and diameter of the tool and tool-interface gap keeping the rotation speed constant. Tensile test, pressure leak-proof test, bending test, non-destructive test and metallography were used to characterize the welds. Finally, SS and U-Mo foils were encased using the parameters selected from the first experiments. The samples prepared with U-Mo alloy will be used as diffusion couples and for the studies of interdiffusion under irradiation. (author)

  16. The origin of weld seam defects related to metal flow in the hot extrusion of aluminium alloys en AW-6060 and en AW-6082

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, A.J. den; Werkhoven, R.J.; Sillekens, W.H.; Katgerman, L.

    2014-01-01

    Longitudinal weld seams are an intrinsic feature in hollow extrusions produced with porthole dies. As these joins occur along the entire extruded length, it is desirable that these weld seams have a minimal impact on the structural integrity of the extrudate. In particular, defects associated with

  17. Modelling of plastic flow localization and damage development in friction stir welded 6005A aluminium alloy using physics based strain hardening law

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kim Lau; Pardoen, Thomas; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2010-01-01

    of these zones was extracted from micro-tensile specimens cut parallel to the welding direction. The measured material properties and weld topology were introduced into a 3D finite element model, fully coupled with the damage model. A Voce law hardening model involving a constant stage IV is used within...

  18. Experimental study on the effect of welding speed and tool pin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a novel solid state welding process for joining metallic alloys and ... compared with conventional welding methods such as TIG or MIG. ... Conventional fusion welding of aluminium alloys often produces a weld which .... Ti. 0.1%. Cr. 0.25%. Al. Balance. 3.1 Configuration of welding tool geometry.

  19. Weldability of Advanced High Strength Steels using Ytterbium:Yttrium Aluminium Garnet high power laser for Tailor-Welded Blank applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Rajashekhar Shivaram

    Use of a high power Yb:YAG laser is investigated for joining advanced high strength steel materials for use in tailor-welded blank (TWB) applications. TWB's are materials of different chemistry, coating or thicknesses that are joined before metal forming and other operations such as trimming, assembly and painting are carried out. TWB is becoming an important design tool in the automotive industry for reducing weight, improving fuel economy and passenger safety, while reducing the overall costs for the customer. Three advanced high strength steels, TRIP780, DP980 and USIBOR, which have many unique properties that are conducive to achieving these objectives, along with mild steel, are used in this work. The objective of this work is to ensure that high quality welds can be obtained using Yb:YAG lasers which are also becoming popular for metal joining operations, since they produce high quality laser beams that suffer minimal distortion when transported via fiber optic cables. Various power levels and speeds for the laser beam were used during the investigation. Argon gas was consistently used for shielding purposes during the welding process. After the samples were welded, metallographic examination of the fusion and heat-affected zones using optical and scanning electron microscopes were carried out to determine the microstructures as well as weld defects. Optical and scanning electron microscopes were also used to examine the top of welds as well as fracture surfaces. Additionally, cross-weld microhardness evaluations, tensile tests using Instron tester, limited fatigue tests as well as formability evaluations using OSU plane strain evaluation were carried out. The examinations included a 2-factor full factorial design of experiments to determine the impact of coatings on the surface roughness on the top of the welds. Tensile strengths of DP980, TRIP780 and mild steel materials as well as DP980 welded to TRIP780 and mild steel in the rolling direction as well as

  20. Aluminium bridges, aluminium bridge decks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soetens, F.; Straalen, IJ.J. van

    2003-01-01

    Applications of aluminium have grown considerably in building and civil engineering the last decade. In building and civil engineering the increase of aluminium applications is due to various aspects like light weight, durability and maintenance, use of extrusions, and esthetics. The paper starts

  1. Hybrid laser-arc welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hybrid laser-arc welding (HLAW) is a combination of laser welding with arc welding that overcomes many of the shortfalls of both processes. This important book gives a comprehensive account of hybrid laser-arc welding technology and applications. The first part of the book reviews...... the characteristics of the process, including the properties of joints produced by hybrid laser-arc welding and ways of assessing weld quality. Part II discusses applications of the process to such metals as magnesium alloys, aluminium and steel as well as the use of hybrid laser-arc welding in such sectors as ship...... building and the automotive industry. With its distinguished editor and international team of contributors, Hybrid laser-arc welding, will be a valuable source of reference for all those using this important welding technology. Professor Flemming Ove Olsen works in the Department of Manufacturing...

  2. Optimization of friction welding by taguchi and ANOVA method on commercial aluminium tube to Al 2025 tube plate with backing block using an external tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanna, S.; Kumaraswamidhs, L. A.; Kumaran, S. Senthil

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to optimize the Friction welding of tube to tube plate using an external tool (FWTPET) with clearance fit of commercial aluminum tube to Al 2025 tube plate using an external tool. Conventional frictional welding is suitable to weld only symmetrical joints either tube to tube or rod to rod but in this research with the help of external tool, the welding has been done by unsymmetrical shape of tube to tube plate also. In this investigation, the various welding parameters such as tool rotating speed (rpm), projection of tube (mm) and depth of cut (mm) are determined according to the Taguchi L9 orthogonal array. The two conditions were considered in this process to examine this experiment; where condition 1 is flat plate with plain tube Without holes [WOH] on the circumference of the surface and condition 2 is flat plate with plane tube has holes on its circumference of the surface With holes [WH]. Taguchi L9 orthogonal array was utilized to find the most significant control factors which will yield better joint strength. Besides, the most influential process parameter has been determined using statistical Analysis of variance (ANOVA). Finally, the comparison of each result has been done for conditions by means percentage of contribution and regression analysis. The general regression equation is formulated and better strength is obtained and it is validated by means of confirmation test. It was observed that value of optimal welded joint strength for both tube without holes and tube with holes are to be 319.485 MPa and 264.825 MPa, respectively.

  3. Optimization of friction welding by taguchi and ANOVA method on commercial aluminium tube to Al 2025 tube plate with backing block using an external tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanna, S.; Kumaraswamidhs, L. A. [Indian Institute of Technology, Dhanbad (India); Kumaran, S. Senthil [RVS School of Engineering and Technology, Dindigul (India)

    2016-05-15

    The aim of the present work is to optimize the Friction welding of tube to tube plate using an external tool (FWTPET) with clearance fit of commercial aluminum tube to Al 2025 tube plate using an external tool. Conventional frictional welding is suitable to weld only symmetrical joints either tube to tube or rod to rod but in this research with the help of external tool, the welding has been done by unsymmetrical shape of tube to tube plate also. In this investigation, the various welding parameters such as tool rotating speed (rpm), projection of tube (mm) and depth of cut (mm) are determined according to the Taguchi L9 orthogonal array. The two conditions were considered in this process to examine this experiment; where condition 1 is flat plate with plain tube Without holes [WOH] on the circumference of the surface and condition 2 is flat plate with plane tube has holes on its circumference of the surface With holes [WH]. Taguchi L9 orthogonal array was utilized to find the most significant control factors which will yield better joint strength. Besides, the most influential process parameter has been determined using statistical Analysis of variance (ANOVA). Finally, the comparison of each result has been done for conditions by means percentage of contribution and regression analysis. The general regression equation is formulated and better strength is obtained and it is validated by means of confirmation test. It was observed that value of optimal welded joint strength for both tube without holes and tube with holes are to be 319.485 MPa and 264.825 MPa, respectively.

  4. Thermomechanical conditions and stresses on the friction stir welding tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atthipalli, Gowtam

    Friction stir welding has been commercially used as a joining process for aluminum and other soft materials. However, the use of this process in joining of hard alloys is still developing primarily because of the lack of cost effective, long lasting tools. Here I have developed numerical models to understand the thermo mechanical conditions experienced by the FSW tool and to improve its reusability. A heat transfer and visco-plastic flow model is used to calculate the torque, and traverse force on the tool during FSW. The computed values of torque and traverse force are validated using the experimental results for FSW of AA7075, AA2524, AA6061 and Ti-6Al-4V alloys. The computed torque components are used to determine the optimum tool shoulder diameter based on the maximum use of torque and maximum grip of the tool on the plasticized workpiece material. The estimation of the optimum tool shoulder diameter for FSW of AA6061 and AA7075 was verified with experimental results. The computed values of traverse force and torque are used to calculate the maximum shear stress on the tool pin to determine the load bearing ability of the tool pin. The load bearing ability calculations are used to explain the failure of H13 steel tool during welding of AA7075 and commercially pure tungsten during welding of L80 steel. Artificial neural network (ANN) models are developed to predict the important FSW output parameters as function of selected input parameters. These ANN consider tool shoulder radius, pin radius, pin length, welding velocity, tool rotational speed and axial pressure as input parameters. The total torque, sliding torque, sticking torque, peak temperature, traverse force, maximum shear stress and bending stress are considered as the output for ANN models. These output parameters are selected since they define the thermomechanical conditions around the tool during FSW. The developed ANN models are used to understand the effect of various input parameters on the total

  5. Recent developments in advanced aircraft aluminium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dursun, Tolga; Soutis, Costas

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • To compete with composites, performance of aluminium alloys should be increased. • Al–Li alloys have higher strength, fracture and fatigue/corrosion resistance. • Improvements of aerospace Al alloys are due to optimised solute content and ratios. • In selecting new materials, there should be no reduction in the level of safety. • The use of hybrid materials could provide additional opportunities for Al alloys. - Abstract: Aluminium alloys have been the primary material for the structural parts of aircraft for more than 80 years because of their well known performance, well established design methods, manufacturing and reliable inspection techniques. Nearly for a decade composites have started to be used more widely in large commercial jet airliners for the fuselage, wing as well as other structural components in place of aluminium alloys due their high specific properties, reduced weight, fatigue performance and corrosion resistance. Although the increased use of composite materials reduced the role of aluminium up to some extent, high strength aluminium alloys remain important in airframe construction. Aluminium is a relatively low cost, light weight metal that can be heat treated and loaded to relatively high level of stresses, and it is one of the most easily produced of the high performance materials, which results in lower manufacturing and maintenance costs. There have been important recent advances in aluminium aircraft alloys that can effectively compete with modern composite materials. This study covers latest developments in enhanced mechanical properties of aluminium alloys, and high performance joining techniques. The mechanical properties on newly developed 2000, 7000 series aluminium alloys and new generation Al–Li alloys are compared with the traditional aluminium alloys. The advantages and disadvantages of the joining methods, laser beam welding and friction stir welding, are also discussed

  6. Microstructure and microtexture studies of a friction stir welded Al 6061 alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumbhar, N.T.; Tewari, R.; Dey, G.K.; Bhanumurthy, K.; Sahoo, S.K.; Samajdar, I.

    2009-01-01

    Friction stir welding is a solid state joining technique used extensively for the joining of various metals and alloys and also has been applied to the joining of steels. The friction stir welding of Al and its alloys has been extensively delt with over a period exceeding the last decade and a half due to its numerous advantages over other conventional fusion welding techniques in terms of weld quality, efficiency, cost effectiveness etc. to name a few. This technique is being increasingly seeked by industries in mass production/engineering such as the railways, marine and aerospace industries. The friction stir welding of a precipitation hardened Al 6061 alloy plates of 6 mm. thickness was performed at various tool rotation speeds and tool traverse speeds with a constant tilt of 3 deg using a high strength steel (HSS) tool of appropriate dimensions. The cross section of the weld perpendicular to the welding direction was analyzed for a detailed microstructural investigation using electron probe microanalysis, orientation imaging microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Various microstructural changes are observed in the various regions of the friction stir welded AA 6061. The nugget region which is highly deformed is characterized by the dissolution and reprecipitation of the coarse precipitates, grain size refinement and recrystallization. The adjoining regions near the nugget viz the thermomechanically affected zone (TMAZ) and the heat affected zone (HAZ) also show heterogeneous microstructure in terms of grain size and precipitation which is mainly attributed to the heating cycle experienced during welding. This heterogeneity is also evident from the plot of microhardness distribution across the cross section of the weld region. However, the electron probe microanalysis studies do not show any significant pickup of oxygen in the weld interior as compared to a little oxygen pickup upto 30 μm from the top surface. Further, using orientation imaging

  7. Mathematical Modelling of a Friction Stir Welding Process to Predict the Joint Strength of Two Dissimilar Aluminium Alloys Using Experimental Data and Genetic Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Yunus

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir welding (FSW is the most popular and efficient method of solid-state joining for similar as well as dissimilar metals and alloys. It is mostly used in applications for aerospace, rail, automotive, and marine industries. Many researchers are currently working with different perspectives on this FSW process for various combinations of materials. The general input process parameters are the thickness of the plate, axial load, rotational speed, welding speed, and tilt angle. The output parameters are joint hardness, % of elongation, and impact and yield strengths. Genetic programming (GP is a relatively new method of evolutionary computing with the principal advantage of this approach being to evaluate efficacious predictive mathematical models or equations without any prior assumption regarding the possible form of the functional relationship. This paper both defines and illustrates how GP can be applied to the FSW process to derive precise relationships between the output and input parameters in order to obtain a generalized prediction model. A GP model will assist engineers in quantifying the performance of FSW, and the results from this study can then be utilized to estimate future requirements based on the historical data to provide a robust solution. The obtained results from the GP models showed good agreement with experimental and target data at an average prediction error of 0.72%.

  8. Study of the feasibility of friction STIR welding applied to the fabrication of monolithic fuel elements; Estudio para la aplicacion del proceso de soldadura por friccion-agitacion (FSW) a la fabricacion de elementos combustibles monoliticos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabot, Pedro J; Moglioni, A [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, General San Martin (Argentina). Dept. ENDE; Mirandou, Marcela; Balart, Silvia N [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, General San Martin (Argentina). Dept. de Materiales

    2004-07-01

    The monolithic U-Mo fuel elements consist in a foil of a U-Mo alloy encased in Al. One of the techniques that is being tried to apply in their fabrication is Friction Stir Welding in the 'no contact at the interface' mode. The Laboratory of Welding at the National Atomic Energy Commission (Argentina) has a great experience in the conventional form of this technique so has started working on this new application. This paper describes the experiments performed to obtain the operative parameters. In the first experiments AA6061 T6 (Al) plates and sheets of AISI 316 (SS) were used to obtain the optimal operative parameters of the process. Welds were performed and evaluated for different operative variables such speed, angle and diameter of the tool and tool-interface gap keeping the rotation speed constant. Tensile test, pressure leak-proof test, bending test, non-destructive test and metallography were used to characterize the welds. Finally, SS and U-Mo foils were encased using the parameters selected from the first experiments. The samples prepared with U-Mo alloy will be used as diffusion couples and for the studies of interdiffusion under irradiation. (author)

  9. Dissimilar joining of galvanized high-strength steel to aluminum alloy in a zero-gap lap joint configuration by two-pass laser welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Junjie; Harooni, Masoud; Carlson, Blair; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Defect-free two-pass laser partially penetrated lap joint of galvanized steel to aluminum was achieved. • The thickness of the Al-rich intermetallic compounds could be controlled by optimal parameters. • The dynamic behavior of the molten pool and keyhole were monitored by a high speed charge-coupled device camera. • The presence of zinc in the intermetallic compounds could improve the strength of the lap joints. - Abstract: A welding procedure based on using two-pass laser scans is introduced for dissimilar joining of overlapped galvanized high-strength dual-phase (DP) steel DP590 to aluminum alloy (AA) 6061 sheets. The first pass is based on a defocused laser spot that scans across the top of the two overlapped sheets and heats the zinc coating at the faying surface to be melted and partially vaporized, while the second pass is executed with a focused laser spot in order to perform the welding. Completely defect-free galvanized steel to aluminum lap joints were obtained by using this two-pass laser welding procedure. An on-line machine vision system was applied to monitor the keyhole dynamics during the laser welding process. An energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) was carried out to determine the atomic percent of zinc, aluminum, and iron in the galvanized steel to aluminum lap joints. Mechanical testing and micro-hardness test were conducted to evaluate the mechanical properties of the galvanized steel to aluminum lap joints. The experimental results showed that the lap joint of galvanized steel to aluminum obtained by the two-pass laser welding approach had a higher failure value than those joints obtained when the zinc at the faying surface was mechanically removed under the same welding speed and laser power

  10. Metals welding by using laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Qaisy, R.A.W.

    1991-01-01

    In the present work, same welding ''conduction limited type'' under atmospheric conditions was performed using pulsed Ng:YAG laser to weld; low carbon steel (LCS), stainless steel (304) (SUS304), stainless steel (303) (SUS303), and brass. Microstructure of welded zone, heat affected zone (HAZ), and the laser energy on penetration depth and effective diameter were studied. Tensile test, micro-hardness, and surface roughness of welded and parent metals were also dealt with. Melting efficiency was worked out and an under vacuum seam welding of low carbon steel has been accomplished. Finally spot welding of aluminium tungsten, and platinium wires were employed using different layer energies. 34 tabs.; 82 figs.; 51 refs.; 1 app

  11. Investigate The Effect Of Welding Parameters On Mechanical Properties During The Welding Of Al-6061 Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra Prasad

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Friction welding is a solid state welding technique which is being used in recent times to weld similar as well as dissimilar metals for getting defect free weld. Many combinations like low carbon to stainless steel austenitic to ferrite stainless steel aluminium to copper and titanium to aluminium or steel have been tried out by various solid state welding processes with quite good results. In the present work the 3 level full factorial design has been employed to investigate the effect of welding parameters on tensile strength toughness and heat generation during the welding of Al-6061 alloy. Mathematical relationships between friction welding parameters and mechanical properties like heat generation tensile strength and toughness have also been developed. An attempt has also been made to examine the fracture surfaces of test specimens using SEM. It has been found that welding speed is the most significant parameter thats affect the heat generation tensile strength and toughness. it has been found that tensile strength and toughness during welding increases with increased in welding speed while tensile strength and toughness initially increased as the welding time increases after that it decreased with increase in welding time. The difference in weight of alloying elements can be clearly seen by analyzing spectrum of elements.

  12. Aluminium in human sweat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minshall, Clare; Nadal, Jodie; Exley, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    It is of burgeoning importance that the human body burden of aluminium is understood and is measured. There are surprisingly few data to describe human excretion of systemic aluminium and almost no reliable data which relate to aluminium in sweat. We have measured the aluminium content of sweat in 20 healthy volunteers following mild exercise. The concentration of aluminium ranged from 329 to 5329μg/L. These data equate to a daily excretion of between 234 and 7192μg aluminium and they strongly suggest that perspiration is the major route of excretion of systemic aluminium in humans. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Structure-property investigations on a laser beam welded dissimilar joint of aluminium AA6056 and titanium Ti6Al4V for aeronautical applications Part I: Local gradients in microstructure, hardness and strength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horstmann, M.; Ventzke, V.; Petrovski, B.; Kocak, M. [GKSS Research Centre Geesthacht (Germany). Institute of Materials Research, Materials Mechanics; Kocik, R.; Tempus, G. [AIRBUS Deutschland GmbH, Metal Technology, Bremen (Germany); Vaidya, W.V.

    2009-08-15

    Sheets of AA6056 and Ti6Al4V were butt-joined by inserting the Ti-sheet into the profiled Al-sheet and by melting the Al-alloy alone using a split beam Nd:YAG laser. To study microstructural effects on properties, the Al-alloy was used in two tempers; T4 followed by post weld heat treatment T6, and in T6 followed by a defined duration of natural ageing at room temperature. As a basic step for fatigue and fracture investigations, local gradients in properties of this dissimilar joint are investigated using microscopy, hardness and tensile tests. Possible sites, from which fracture may initiate, have been then identified. All property changes are found to confine to the aluminium side. An intermetallic layer, although very thin, is found to form on the interface. The changeovers, firstly between the fusion zone and the heat affected zone and secondly between the heat affected zone and the base material, are found to be associated with changes in microstructure, hardness and strength. These are identified as the possible critical sites in addition to the interface. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.) [German] Durch eine spezielle Stossvorbereitung wurden laserstrahlgeschweisster Mischverbindungen aus den Blechwerkstoffen AA6056 und Ti6Al4V hergestellt und zwar ohne die Verwendung von Zusatzwerkstoffen. Die grosse Differenz der Schmelztemperaturen erlaubt das selektive Erschmelzen des Aluminiumwerkstoffs, der wieder um den Titanwerkstoff benetzt, sodass es zur Ausbildung einer mechanisch-stabilen und tragfaehigen Verbindung kommt. Die Al-Legierung wurde in den Waermebehandlungszustaenden T4 und T6 verschweisst, um den mikrostrukturellen Einfluss auf die Eigenschaften der Verbindungen untersuchen zu koennen. Die Prozessfolgen sahen vor, dass beim Schweissen im Zustand T4 eine Warmauslagerung, beim Schweissen im Zustand T6 eine Kaltauslagerung definierter Dauer folgte. Die Charakterisierung lokaler Eigenschaftsgradienten hinsichtlich Gefuege, Mikrohaerte

  14. Genesis of the microstructures during friction stir welding of aluminium alloys of the series 2000 and 5000 and resulting mechanical behavior; Genese des microstructures lors du soudage par friction malaxage d'alliages d'aluminium de la serie 2000 et 5000 et comportement mecanique resultant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genevois, C.

    2004-09-15

    The 2024 alloy (Al-Cu-Mg) is used for minimizing the weight of structural components in the transportation industry. However, this alloy is not easy to weld by traditional techniques. Friction stir welding (FSW) is a recently developed solid state process which removes the solidification defects. In this study, the microstructures of FSW welds of this alloy were finely characterized by SAXS, DSC, TEM, SEM, EBSD and optical microscopy. In order to highlight the interactions between deformation, precipitation and recrystallization, which all take place during the welding of the 2024 alloy, model experiments were carried out as well as a comparative study between the alloys 5251 and 2024. The combination of the welding characterisation and the model experiments allow to define the metallurgical phenomena controlling the mechanical strength of the welded joints and their microstructure. In addition, a detailed characterisation of the mechanical behaviour of the welded joints was carried out, validated by a finite element model. (author)

  15. Human exposure to aluminium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exley, Christopher

    2013-10-01

    Human activities have circumvented the efficient geochemical cycling of aluminium within the lithosphere and therewith opened a door, which was previously only ajar, onto the biotic cycle to instigate and promote the accumulation of aluminium in biota and especially humans. Neither these relatively recent activities nor the entry of aluminium into the living cycle are showing any signs of abating and it is thus now imperative that we understand as fully as possible how humans are exposed to aluminium and the future consequences of a burgeoning exposure and body burden. The aluminium age is upon us and there is now an urgent need to understand how to live safely and effectively with aluminium.

  16. Pulsed magnetic welding application of fast breeder austenitic pins plugging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallizzi, H.; Colombe, G.

    1986-11-01

    For specific nuclear needs, we had to develop pulsed magnetic welding on high resistivity coefficient alloys as austenitic steels. The magnetic force produced by an explosive inductor is transmitted on weld pieces by the use of an aluminium driver. A theoretical work carried out permitted to compare pulsed magnetic welding with explosive welding. With specific recordings, it was possible to study electrical and magnetical behavior during the active welding phase. By means of these informations, we are able to specify and to realize, with the financial help of ANVAR organization, a low impedance high velocity generator permitting to weld with a non destructible inductor. 6 refs [fr

  17. Copper welding in solid phase; Svarka medi v tverdoj faze

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avagyan, V Sh

    1993-12-31

    An analysis of the publications on the technology of diffusion welding of copper in solid phase is carried out. The aspects of diffusion welding of copper with silver, aluminium, nickels, chromium, titanium, stainless steel and refractory metals are considered 35 refs.

  18. Welding hazards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    Welding technology is advancing rapidly in the developed countries and has converted into a science. Welding involving the use of electricity include resistance welding. Welding shops are opened in residential area, which was causing safety hazards, particularly the teenagers and children who eagerly see the welding arc with their naked eyes. There are radiation hazards from ultra violet rays which irritate the skin, eye irritation. Welding arc light of such intensity could damage the eyes. (Orig./A.B.)

  19. Pearson's Functions to Describe FSW Weld Geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacombe, D.; Coupard, D.; Tcherniaeff, S.; Girot, F.; Gutierrez-Orrantia, M. E.

    2011-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a relatively new joining technique particularly for aluminium alloys that are difficult to fusion weld. In this study, the geometry of the weld has been investigated and modelled using Pearson's functions. It has been demonstrated that the Pearson's parameters (mean, standard deviation, skewness, kurtosis and geometric constant) can be used to characterize the weld geometry and the tensile strength of the weld assembly. Pearson's parameters and process parameters are strongly correlated allowing to define a control process procedure for FSW assemblies which make radiographic or ultrasonic controls unnecessary. Finally, an optimisation using a Generalized Gradient Method allows to determine the geometry of the weld which maximises the assembly tensile strength.

  20. Welding Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This competency-based curriculum guide is a handbook for the development of welding trade programs. Based on a survey of Alaskan welding employers, it includes all competencies a student should acquire in such a welding program. The handbook stresses the importance of understanding the principles associated with the various elements of welding.…

  1. CERN: very large magnet with aluminium winding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittgenstein, F.A.

    1984-10-25

    The construction of an octagonal solenoid from trapezoidal plates of Al, 6m long and 6cm thick, assembled by electron beam welding, for installation in a laboratory 50m underground is described. The objective is to create a field of 0.5T in a volume of 1000m/sup 3/ for the L3 particle detector of the LEP accelerator project. Principal dimensions and weights of the structure are given and its three stages of implementation are described, with reference to the contributions from the Swiss aluminium industry.

  2. Aluminium in Infrastructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maljaars, J.

    2016-01-01

    Aluminium alloys are used in infrastructures such as pedestrian bridges or parts of it such as handrail. This paper demonstrates that aluminium alloys are in principle also suited for heavy loaded structures, such as decks of traffic bridges and helicopter landing platforms. Recent developments in

  3. Aluminium beverage can recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewinski, A von

    1985-08-01

    Canned beverages have become a controversial issue in this era of ecological sensitivity. METALL has already discussed the problem of can recycling. The present article discusses the technical aspects of aluminium can recycling. Two further articles will follow on aluminium can recycling in North America and on the results of European pilot projects.

  4. Characterization through nano indentation technique of mechanical properties of an aluminium alloy welded zone for hydrogen storage; Apport de la nanoindentation pour la caracterisation d'un cordon de soudure par faisceau d'electrons d'un reservoir d'hydrogene sous pression en alliage d'aluminium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delobelle, P.; Perreux, D.; Russo, C. [Universite de Franche-Comte, Institut FEMTO-ST, UMR 6174, Depart. LMARC, 25 - Besancon (France); Meunier, E. [CEA Valduc (DRMN/SMCM/LCSi), 21 - Is-sur-Tille (France); Decamps, B. [Laboratoire de Chimie Metallurgique des Terres Rares, UPR 209, 94 - Vitry-Thiais, (France)

    2008-07-01

    In this study we use the nano indentation technique which is a powerful tool to characterise the mechanical properties of a welded bond. The Berkovich indentation has the advantage to test small material volumes compared to the conventional tensile tests. The welded process with electrons beam of hydrogen vessels induces different regions and the aim of this study is to characterize the differences of the mechanical properties of the different zones of the weld. To identify the stress-strain curves of the tested material, F.E. inverse method has been used. After treatment, for one pass, the hardness of the melted zone is greater than those of the base material and for the two passes, the hardness is still lower than those of the base material. The interface zones present a hardness which is always higher than those of the weld. A relation of the Hall-Petch type which correlates the evolution of the hardness with the zinc concentration and the grain size has been proposed. Moreover a relation between the normalized hardness and the hydrogen concentration CH has been found. The parameters of the stress-strain curves of the four regions; base material, interface, one and two passes melted zones, have been deduced. The identified laws are used in a F.E. model of a welded sphere to model its radial deformation under internal pressure loading. (authors)

  5. Rows of Dislocation Loops in Aluminium Irradiated by Aluminium Ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, L.; Johansen, A.; Koch, J.

    1967-01-01

    Single-crystal aluminium specimens, irradiated with 50-keV aluminium ions, contain dislocation loops that are arranged in regular rows along <110 > directions. ©1967 The American Institute of Physics......Single-crystal aluminium specimens, irradiated with 50-keV aluminium ions, contain dislocation loops that are arranged in regular rows along directions. ©1967 The American Institute of Physics...

  6. Structure-property investigations on a laser beam welded dissimilar joint of aluminium AA6056 and titanium Ti6Al4V for aeronautical applications. Part II: resistance to fatigue crack propagation and fracture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horstmann, M.; Ventzke, V.; Petrovski, B.; Kocak, M. [GKSS Research Centre Geesthacht, Institute of Materials Research, Materials Mechanics, Geesthacht (Germany); Kocik, R.; Tempus, G. [AIRBUS Deutschland GmbH, Metal Technology, Bremen (Germany); Vaidya, W.V.

    2009-10-15

    Investigations were continued on the dissimilar laser beam welds of AA6056 and Ti6Al4V, fabricated by inserting Ti-sheet into the profiled Al-sheet and melting AA6056 alone. By using microstructure, hardness and strength as the criteria, sites exhibiting non-uniform microstructure and localized plastic deformation due to strength mismatch were investigated in two orientations: crack parallel to the weld and crack perpendicular to the weld for fatigue crack propagation and fracture toughness at room temperature. Effect of temper of AA6056 on these properties was studied for two conditions; welding in T4 followed by post weld heat treatment T6, and welding in T6 and naturally aged for a defined period. The orientation ''crack parallel to the weld'' was investigated in 3 locations on the side of AA6056: the interface and the two changeovers on the Al-side. Firstly, between the fusion zone and the heat affected zone (3 mm from the interface) and secondly, between (primary) heat affected zone and towards the base material (7 mm from the interface). Although brittle intermetallic TiAl{sub 3} had been formed at the interface, uncontrolled separation or debonding at the interface was not observed. Insofar the bond quality of the weld was good. However, the ranking of interface was the lowest since fatigue crack propagation was relatively faster than that in the fusion zone and heat affected zone, and fracture toughness was low. Therefore, unstable fatigue crack propagation is observed when the crack propagates perpendicular to the weld from AA6056 towards Ti6Al4V. The results have shown that the dissimilar joints exhibit improved performance when laser beam welded in the T6 condition. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.) [German] Teil II: Widerstand gegen Ermuedungsrissausbreitung und Bruch Die Untersuchungen an der laserstrahlgeschweissten Mischverbindung aus AA6056 und Ti6Al4V wurden fortgesetzt. Fuer die Ermuedungsrissausbreitungs

  7. Advanced Welding Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Four advanced welding techniques and their use in NASA are briefly reviewed in this poster presentation. The welding techniques reviewed are: Solid State Welding, Friction Stir Welding (FSW), Thermal Stir Welding (TSW) and Ultrasonic Stir Welding.

  8. Resistance seam welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schueler, A.W.

    1977-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of the resistance seam welding process are presented. Types of seam welds, types of seam welding machines, seam welding power supplies, resistance seam welding parameters and seam welding characteristics of various metals

  9. Joining of Aluminium Alloy and Steel by Laser Assisted Reactive Wetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liedl, Gerhard; Vázquez, Rodrigo Gómez; Murzin, Serguei P.

    2018-03-01

    Compounds of dissimilar materials, like aluminium and steel offer an interesting opportunity for the automotive industry to reduce the weight of a car body. Thermal joining of aluminium and steel leads to the formation of brittle intermetallic compounds, which negatively affects the properties of the welded joint. Amongst others, growth of such intermetallic compounds depends on maximum temperature and on the time at certain temperatures. Laser welding with its narrow well seam and its fast heating and cooling cycles provides an excellent opportunity to obtain an ultrathin diffusion zone. Joining of sheet metal DC01 with aluminium alloy AW6016 has been chosen for research. The performed experimental studies showed that by a variation of the beam power and scanning speed it is possible to obtain an ultrathin diffusion zone with narrow intermetallic interlayers. With the aim of supporting further investigation of laser welding of the respective and other dissimilar pairings a multi-physical simulation model has been developed.

  10. Recovery in aluminium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gundlach, Carsten

    2006-01-01

    In the present thesis the development of a unique experimental method for volume characterisation of individual embedded crystallites down to a radius of 150 nm is presented. This method is applied to in-situ studies of recovery in aluminium. The method is an extension of 3DXRD microscopy, an X...... are represented as strings. To identify the strings a combination of a 5D connected component type algorithm and multi-peak fitting was found to be superior. The first use of the method was a study of recovery of a deformed aluminium alloy (AA1050). The aluminium alloy was deformed by cold rolling to a thickness...

  11. Modelling the Thermomechanical Conditions in Friction Stir Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Henrik Nikolaj Blich

    Friction Stir Welding is a solid-state welding process invented by TWI in 1991. The FSW process is unique in the sense that joining of un-weldable alloys readily can be made. The thermomechanical conditions present in the workpiece during the welding process are of great interest since...... these control the properties of the weld. In the present work, a set of experimental, analytical and numerical analyses are carried out in order to evaluate the thermomechanical conditions descriptive for welding of aluminium, in this case AA2024-T3, under a specific set of welding parameters. Despite...... these specific data, the developed models can be applied for other alloys and welding parameters as well. A detailed experiment is carried out which constitutes the basis for the development and validation of the numerical and analytical models presented in this work. The contact condition at the tool...

  12. Welding Technician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ken

    2009-01-01

    About 95% of all manufactured goods in this country are welded or joined in some way. These welded products range in nature from bicycle handlebars and skyscrapers to bridges and race cars. The author discusses what students need to know about careers for welding technicians--wages, responsibilities, skills needed, career advancement…

  13. Resistance welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Zhang, Wenqi; Rasmussen, Mogens H.

    2003-01-01

    Resistance welding comprises not only the well known spot welding process but also more complex projection welding operations, where excessive plastic deformation of the weld point may occur. This enables the production of complex geometries and material combinations, which are often not possible...... to weld by traditional spot welding operations. Such joining processes are, however, not simple to develop due to the large number of parameters involved. Development has traditionally been carried out by large experimental investigations, but the development of a numerical programme system has changed...... this enabling prediction of the welding performance in details. The paper describes the programme in short and gives examples on industrial applications. Finally investigations of causes for failure in a complex industrial joint of two dissimilar metals are carried out combining numerical modelling...

  14. Modelling of End Milling of AA6061-TiCp Metal Matrix Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijay Kumar, S.; Cheepu, Muralimohan; Venkateswarlu, D.; Asohan, P.; Senthil Kumar, V.

    2018-03-01

    The metal-matrix composites (MMCs) are used in various applications hence lot of research has been carried out on MMCs. To increase the properties of Al-based MMCs many ceramic reinforcements have been identified, among which TiC is played vital role because of its properties like high hardness, stiffness and wear resistance. In the present work, a neural network and statistical modelling approach is going to use for the prediction of surface roughness (Ra) and cutting forces in computerised numerical control milling machine. Experiments conducted on a CNC milling machine based on the full factorial design and resulted data used to train and checking the network performance. The sample prepared from in-situ technique and heat treated to get uniform properties. The ANN model has shown satisfactory performance comparatively.

  15. A simple surface treatment and characterization of AA 6061 aluminum alloy surface for adhesive bonding applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleema, N.; Sarkar, D.K.; Paynter, R.W.; Gallant, D.; Eskandarian, M.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A very simple surface treatment method to achieve excellent and durable aluminum adhesive bonding. ► Our method involves simple immersion of aluminum in very dilute NaOH solution at room temperature with no involvement of strong acids or multiple procedures. ► Surface analysis via various surface characterization techniques showed morphological and chemical modifications favorable for obtaining highly durable bond strengths on the treated surface. ► Safe, economical, reproducible and simple method, easily applicable in industries. - Abstract: Structural adhesive bonding of aluminum is widely used in aircraft and automotive industries. It has been widely noted that surface preparation of aluminum surfaces prior to adhesive bonding plays a significant role in improving the strength of the adhesive bond. Surface cleanliness, surface roughness, surface wettability and surface chemistry are controlled primarily by proper surface treatment methods. In this study, we have employed a very simple technique influencing all these criteria by simply immersing aluminum substrates in a very dilute solution of sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and we have studied the effect of varying the treatment period on the adhesive bonding characteristics. A bi-component epoxy adhesive was used to join the treated surfaces and the bond strengths were evaluated via single lap shear (SLS) tests in pristine as well as degraded conditions. Surface morphology, chemistry, crystalline nature and wettability of the NaOH treated surfaces were characterized using various surface analytical tools such as scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM/EDX), optical profilometry, infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and contact angle goniometry. Excellent adhesion characteristics with complete cohesive failure of the adhesive were encountered on the NaOH treated surfaces that are comparable to the benchmark treatments such as anodization, which involve use of strong acids and multiple steps of treatment procedures. The NaOH treatment reported in this work is a very simple method with the use of a very dilute solution with simple ultrasonication being sufficient to produce durable joints.

  16. Ion nitriding of aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitz, T.

    2002-09-01

    The present study is devoted to the investigation of the mechanism of aluminium nitriding by a technique that employs implantation of low-energy nitrogen ions and diffusional transport of atoms. The nitriding of aluminium is investigated, because this is a method for surface modification of aluminium and has a potential for application in a broad spectrum of fields such as automobile, marine, aviation, space technologies, etc. However, at present nitriding of aluminium does not find any large scale industrial application, due to problems in the formation of stoichiometric aluminium nitride layers with a sufficient thickness and good quality. For the purposes of this study, ion nitriding is chosen, as an ion beam method with the advantage of good and independent control over the process parameters, which thus can be related uniquely to the physical properties of the resulting layers. Moreover, ion nitriding has a close similarity to plasma nitriding and plasma immersion ion implantation, which are methods with a potential for industrial application. (orig.)

  17. Raw materials for aluminium production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galushkin, N.V.

    1995-01-01

    This chapter of monograph is devoted to to raw materials which used in aluminium production. Therefore, the using of alumina, and fluoride salts in aluminium production was considered. The physical properties of alumina were studied.

  18. Fatal aluminium phosphide poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meena Mahesh Chand

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium phosphide (AlP is a cheap solid fumigant and a highly toxic pesticide which is commonly used for grain preservation. AlP has currently aroused interest with a rising number of cases in the past four decades due to increased use for agricultural and non-agricultural purposes. Its easy availability in the markets has increased also its misuse for committing suicide. Phosphine inhibits cellular oxygen utilization and can induce lipid peroxidation. Poisoning with AlP has often occurred in attempts to commit suicide, and that more often in adults than in teenagers. This is a case of suicidal consumption of aluminium phosphide by a 32-year-old young medical anesthetist. Toxicological analyses detected aluminium phosphide. We believe that free access of celphos tablets in grain markets should be prohibited by law.

  19. Constructions of aluminium electrolytic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galushkin, N.V.

    1995-01-01

    This chapter of monograph is devoted to constructions of aluminium electrolytic cells. Therefore, the general characteristic and classification of aluminium electrolytic cells was considered. The anode and cathode structure was studied. The lining of cathode casing, the process of collection of anode gases, electrolytic cell cover, and electrical insulation was studied as well. The installation and dismantling of aluminium electrolytic cells was described.

  20. Soldadura (Welding). Spanish Translations for Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohhertz, Durwin

    Thirty transparency masters with Spanish subtitles for key words are provided for a welding/general mechanical repair course. The transparency masters are on such topics as oxyacetylene welding; oxyacetylene welding equipment; welding safety; different types of welds; braze welding; cutting torches; cutting with a torch; protective equipment; arc…

  1. WELDING TORCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correy, T.B.

    1961-10-01

    A welding torch into which water and inert gas are piped separately for cooling and for providing a suitable gaseous atmosphere is described. A welding electrode is clamped in the torch by a removable collet sleeve and a removable collet head. Replacement of the sleeve and head with larger or smaller sleeve and head permits a larger or smaller welding electrode to be substituted on the torch. (AEC)

  2. Fatigue performance of matching and dissimilar joints in aluminium alloys 5083-H111 and 6061-T651 after fully automatic pulsed GAMW using ER5356 filler wire

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mutombo, K

    2010-08-31

    Full Text Available The tensile strength and fatigue properties of Al5083-H111 welded with aluminium-magnesium alloyed ER5356 filler wire appeared similar to those of the base metal. This joint failed in the weld metal as a result of a slight reduction in hardness...

  3. Welding stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poirier, J.; Barbe, B.; Jolly, N.

    1976-01-01

    The aim is to show how internal stresses are generated and to fix the orders of magnitude. A realistic case, the vertical welding of thick plates free to move one against the other, is described and the deformations and stresses are analyzed. The mathematical model UEDA, which accounts for the elastic modulus, the yield strength and the expansion coefficient of the metal with temperature, is presented. The hypotheses and results given apply only to the instantaneous welding of a welded plate and to a plate welded by a moving electrode [fr

  4. The effect of welding parameters on the corrosion behaviour of friction stir welded AA2024-T351

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jariyaboon, M; Davenport, A.J.; Ambat, Rajan

    2007-01-01

    The effect of welding parameters (rotation speed and travel speed) on the corrosion behaviour of friction stir welds in the high strength aluminium alloy AA2024-T351 was investigated. It was found that rotation speed plays a major role in controlling the location of corrosion attack. Localised...... intergranular attack was observed in the nugget region for low rotation speed welds, whereas for higher rotation speed welds, attack occurred predominantly in the heat-affected zone. The increase in anodic reactivity in the weld zone was due to the sensitisation of the grain boundaries leading to intergranular...... attack. Enhancement of cathodic reactivity was also found in the nugget as a result of the precipitation of S-phase. The results were compared with samples of AA2024-T351 that had been heat treated to simulate the thermal cycle associated with welding, and with samples that had been exposed to high...

  5. Effect of process parameters on the residual stresses in AA5083-H321 friction stir welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lombard, H. [NMMU, Gardham Avenue, PO Box 77000, 6031 Port Elizabeth (South Africa); University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom); Hattingh, D.G. [NMMU, Gardham Avenue, PO Box 77000, 6031 Port Elizabeth (South Africa); Steuwer, A. [NMMU, Gardham Avenue, PO Box 77000, 6031 Port Elizabeth (South Africa); FaME38 at the ILL-ESRF, 6 rue J Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom)], E-mail: steuwer@ill.fr; James, M.N. [NMMU, Gardham Avenue, PO Box 77000, 6031 Port Elizabeth (South Africa); University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom)

    2009-02-15

    This paper investigates the effect of varying welding parameters on the residual stress profiles in friction stir welds of aluminium alloy AA5083-H321, which were created on a fully instrumented friction welding machine. The residual stresses were determined non-destructively using synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The width and maximum of the residual stress profile show clear correlation with the heat input, and in particular feed rate, which was found to be the dominant parameter.

  6. Fire exposed aluminium structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maljaars, J.; Fellinger, J.E.J.; Soetens, F.

    2005-01-01

    Material properties and mechanical response models for fire design of steel structures are based on extensive research and experience. Contrarily, the behaviour of aluminium load bearing structures exposed to fire is relatively unexplored. This article gives an overview of physical and mechanical

  7. Activation Analysis of Aluminium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brune, Dag

    1961-01-15

    An analysis of pure aluminium alloyed with magnesium was per- formed by means of gamma spectrometry , Chemical separations were not employed. The isotopes to be determined were obtained in conditions of optimum activity by suitably choosing the time of irradiation and decay. The following elements were detected and measured quantitatively: Iron, zinc, copper, gallium, manganese, chromium, scandium and hafnium.

  8. Sintered aluminium powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepanova, M.G.; Matveev, B.I.

    1974-01-01

    The mechanical and physical properties of aluminium powder alloys and the various methods employed to produce them are considered. Data are given on the hardening of the alloys SAP and SPAK-4, as well as the powder-alloy system Al-Cr-Zr. (L.M.)

  9. Recent Developments and Research Progress on Friction Stir Welding of Titanium Alloys: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karna, Sivaji; Cheepu, Muralimohan; Venkateswarulu, D.; Srikanth, V.

    2018-03-01

    Titanium and its alloys are joined by various welding processes. However, Fusion welding of titanium alloys resulted solidification problems like porosity, segregation and columnar grains. The problems occurred in conventional welding processes can be resolved using a solid state welding i.e. friction stir welding. Aluminium and Magnesium alloys were welded by friction stir welding. However alloys used for high temperature applications such as titanium alloys and steels are arduous to weld using friction stir welding process because of tool limitations. Present paper summarises the studies on joining of Titanium alloys using friction stir welding with different tool materials. Selection of tool material and effect of welding conditions on mechanical and microstructure properties of weldments were also reported. Major advantage with friction stir welding is, we can control the welding temperature above or below β-transus temperature by optimizing the process parameters. Stir zone in below beta transus condition consists of bi-modal microstructure and microstructure in above β-transus condition has large prior β- grains and α/β laths present in the grain. Welding experiments conducted below β- transus condition has better mechanical properties than welding at above β-transus condition. Hardness and tensile properties of weldments are correlated with the stir zone microstructure.

  10. WELDING METHOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell, A.A.; Dunbar, J.V.; Ruffner, J.H.

    1959-09-29

    A semi-automatic method is described for the weld joining of pipes and fittings which utilizes the inert gasshielded consumable electrode electric arc welding technique, comprising laying down the root pass at a first peripheral velocity and thereafter laying down the filler passes over the root pass necessary to complete the weld by revolving the pipes and fittings at a second peripheral velocity different from the first peripheral velocity, maintaining the welding head in a fixed position as to the specific direction of revolution, while the longitudinal axis of the welding head is disposed angularly in the direction of revolution at amounts between twenty minutas and about four degrees from the first position.

  11. The welding of alloy 800

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, M.; Norman, P.L.

    1975-01-01

    This paper reviews the technical literature published on the welding of alloy 800. Much of this work has been carried out using the Varestraint and Gleeble tests to investigate the susceptibility of the alloy and of high nickel consumables to hot-cracking. Inspite of much reported work, it is pointed out that many years of experience in the use of alloy 800 shows it to be readily weldable without any major problems occurring due to hot-cracking. The elements investigated include titanium, aluminium, sulphur, phosphorus and carbon, and the effects of these elements are discuused in terms of their effects on the hot-ductility curves obtained by Gleeble testing. Conclusions reached by various researchers state that the individual effects of the above five elements may be masked by other unknown factors. It is concluded that with correct welding procedures alloy 800 can be welded without cracking problems even with high heat input welding processes using either high-nickel filler wires or a matching electrode. Matching composition filler wires have been used with success but none are at present available commercially. (author)

  12. On the microstructure analysis of FSW joints of aluminium components made via direct metal laser sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherillo, Fabio; Astarita, Antonello; di Martino, Daniela; Contaldi, Vincenzo; di Matteo, Luca; di Petta, Paolo; Casarin, Renzo; Squillace, Antonino; Langella, Antonio

    2017-10-01

    Additive Manufacturing (AM), applied to metal industry, is a family of processes that allow complex shape components to be realized from raw materials in the form of powders. The compaction of the powders can be achieved by local melting of the powder bed or by solid state sintering. Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) is an additive manufacturing process in which a focalized laser beam is the heat source that allows the powders to be compacted. By DMLS it is possible to realize complex shape components. One of the limits of DMLS, as for every additive layer manufacturing techniques, is the unfeasibility to realize large dimension parts. Due to this limit the study of joining process of parts made via ALM is of great interest. One of the most promising options is the Friction Stir Welding (FSW), a solid state welding technique that has been proven to be very effective in the welding of metals difficult to weld, above all aluminium alloys. Since FSW is a solid-state technique, the microstructure of the various zone of the weld bead depends not only by the process itself but also by the parent microstruct ure of the parts to be welded. Furthermore, parts made of aluminium alloy via DMLS have a particular microstructure that is the result of repeated severe thermal cycles. In the present work the authors, starting from the description of the parent microstructure of parts made of AlSi10Mg aluminium alloy, study the microstructure evolution occurred within the joint made by Friction Stir Welding, analysing in details the microstructure of the main well recognized zone of the weld bead. The structure of the parent material is characterized by the presence of melting pools with a very fine microstructure. In the joint the recrystallization, the grain refinement and, above all, the redistribution of intermetallic phases occurs, resulting in an homogenization of the microstructure and in an increase of micro hardness.

  13. Aluminium alloys containing iron and nickel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coriou, H.; Fournier, R.; Grall, L.; Hure, J.; Herenguel, J.; Lelong, P.

    1958-01-01

    The first part of this report addresses mechanism, kinetics and structure factors of aluminium alloys containing iron and nickel in water and high temperature steam. The studied alloys contain from 0.3 to 0.7 per cent of iron, and 0.2 to 1.0 per cent of nickel. Corrosion resistance and corrosion structure have been studied. The experimental installation, process and samples are presented. Corrosion structures in water at 350 C are identified and discussed (structure of corrosion products, structure of metal-oxide interface), and then in steam at different temperatures (350-395 C). Corrosion kinetics is experimentally studied (weight variation in time) in water at 350 C and in steam at different temperatures. Reactions occurring at over-heated steam (more than 400 C) are studied, and the case of welded alloys is also addressed. The second part addresses the metallurgical mechanism and processes influencing aluminium alloy resistance to corrosion by high temperature water as it appeared that separated phases protect the solid solution through a neighbourhood action. In order to avoid deep local corrosions, it seems necessary to multiply protective phases in an as uniform as possible way. Some processes enabling this result are described. They belong to conventional metallurgy or to powder metallurgy (with sintering and extrusion)

  14. Fatigue life estimation of welded joints of an aluminium alloy under superimposed random load waves (follow-up report). Effects of high frequency components; Jujo random kajuka ni okeru aluminium gokin yosetsu tsugite no hiro jumyo suitei (zokuho). Koshuha seibun no eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, I.; Maenaka, H.; Takada, A. [Ship Research Inst., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    In order to examine fatigue behavior of boxing welded joints of anticorrosion aluminum A 5083 P-O alloy, the residual stress measurements, static loading tests, elastic finite element analyses, constant amplitude fatigue tests, and random fatigue tests were conducted. For a load wave in the random loading fatigue tests, a direct current component, a zero-mean narrow band random process, and a high frequency component were combined and superimposed, to examine the effect of the high frequency component and the effect of the stress cycle count method and the mean stress correction on the life estimation. For the fatigue analysis, a reference stress, such as that considering the structural stress concentration, was proved effective in reducing the amount of scattering in the fatigue test results and in improving the life estimation accuracy. Accordingly, for the actual scale measurements, it is insufficient only to measure the stress at points far from the crack initiation place. It is required to analyze the fatigue by measuring the reference stress same as the basic data acquisition tests in the laboratory. 4 refs., 21 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Fatigue life estimation of welded joints of an aluminium alloy under superimposed random load waves (follow-up report). Effects of high frequency components; Jujo random kajuka ni okeru aluminium gokin yosetsu tsugite no hiro jumyo suitei (zokuho). Koshuha seibun no eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, I; Maenaka, H; Takada, A [Ship Research Inst., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-12-31

    In order to examine fatigue behavior of boxing welded joints of anticorrosion aluminum A 5083 P-O alloy, the residual stress measurements, static loading tests, elastic finite element analyses, constant amplitude fatigue tests, and random fatigue tests were conducted. For a load wave in the random loading fatigue tests, a direct current component, a zero-mean narrow band random process, and a high frequency component were combined and superimposed, to examine the effect of the high frequency component and the effect of the stress cycle count method and the mean stress correction on the life estimation. For the fatigue analysis, a reference stress, such as that considering the structural stress concentration, was proved effective in reducing the amount of scattering in the fatigue test results and in improving the life estimation accuracy. Accordingly, for the actual scale measurements, it is insufficient only to measure the stress at points far from the crack initiation place. It is required to analyze the fatigue by measuring the reference stress same as the basic data acquisition tests in the laboratory. 4 refs., 21 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Chapter 1. Economic aspects of aluminium production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanko, E.A.; Kabirov, Sh.O.; Safiev, Kh.; Azizov, B.S.; Mirpochaev, Kh.A.

    2011-01-01

    This article is devoted to economic aspects of aluminium production. Therefore, the perspectives of development of aluminium production, the base components of aluminium cost and economic security of enterprise are considered in this chapter.

  17. Welding process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul Nassir Ibrahim; Azali Muhammad; Ab. Razak Hamzah; Abd. Aziz Mohamed; Mohamad Pauzi Ismail

    2008-01-01

    For the final chapter of this book, there is basic introduction on welding process. The good radiography must know somehow on welding process so that they can know what kind of welding that must rejected or not. All of the exposure technique that mention in earlier chapter almost applicable in this field because welding process is critical problem if there is no inspection will be done. So, for this chapter, all the discontinuity that usually appeared will be discussed and there is another discontinuity maybe not to important and do not give big impact if found it, do not described here. On top of that, the decision to accept or reject based on code, standard and specification that agreed by both to make sure that decision that agreed is corrected and more meaningful.

  18. Roll bonding of strained aluminium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staun, Jakob M.

    2003-01-01

    This report investigates roll bonding of pre-strained (å ~ 4) aluminium sheets to produce high strain material from high purity aluminium (99.996%) and commercial pure aluminium (99.6%). The degree of bonding is investigated by optical microscopy and ultrasonic scanning. Under the right...... of the cross rolled volume fraction is found. To further asses this effect, and the anisotropy, it is necessary to acquire knowledge about both texture and microstructure, e.g. by TEM. Roll bonding of pre-strained aluminium is found to be a possible alternative to ARB in the quest for ultra-fine grained...

  19. Syllabus in Trade Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development.

    The syllabus outlines material for a course two academic years in length (minimum two and one-half hours daily experience) leading to entry-level occupational ability in several welding trade areas. Fourteen units covering are welding, gas welding, oxyacetylene welding, cutting, nonfusion processes, inert gas shielded-arc welding, welding cast…

  20. Weld metal microstructures of hardfacing deposits produced by self-shielded flux-cored arc welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumovic, M.; Monaghan, B.J.; Li, H.; Norrish, J.; Dunne, D.P.

    2015-01-01

    The molten pool weld produced during self-shielded flux-cored arc welding (SSFCAW) is protected from gas porosity arising from oxygen and nitrogen by reaction ('killing') of these gases by aluminium. However, residual Al can result in mixed micro-structures of δ-ferrite, martensite and bainite in hardfacing weld metals produced by SSFCAW and therefore, microstructural control can be an issue for hardfacing weld repair. The effect of the residual Al content on weld metal micro-structure has been examined using thermodynamic modeling and dilatometric analysis. It is concluded that the typical Al content of about 1 wt% promotes δ-ferrite formation at the expense of austenite and its martensitic/bainitic product phase(s), thereby compromising the wear resistance of the hardfacing deposit. This paper also demonstrates how the development of a Schaeffler-type diagram for predicting the weld metal micro-structure can provide guidance on weld filler metal design to produce the optimum microstructure for industrial hardfacing applications.

  1. Diffusion welding; Soudage par diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniault, J; Gillet, R [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-07-01

    After a brief recall of the principle, and of the advantages of the method, we give some examples of metallic bonding in a first part where we describe preliminary trials: Ta-Mo, Zr-Zr, Zr-Nb, Nb-stainless steel, Mo-stainless steel, aluminium-aluminium (A5-A5). The second part of the note is devoted to trials on construction elements: on tubular elements for bonding between Mo or Nb on one hand, and stainless steel on the other hand (We indicate in what conditions the bonding are tight and what are their mechanical strength and their resistance to thermic cycles). We indicate, in this chapter, a method to obtain radiation windows in Be welded on an element made of stainless steel. (authors) [French] pres un bref rappel du principe, et des avantages de la methode, on donne quelques exemples de liaisons metalliques dans une premiere partie qui traite d'essais preliminaires: Ta - Mo, Zr - Zr, Zr - Nb, Nb - acier inoxydable, molybdene - acier inoxydable, aluminium - aluminium (A5-A5). La deuxieme partie de la note est consacree a des essais sur elements de construction: sur des elements tabulaires, pour des liaisons entre molybdene ou niobium d'une part, et acier inoxydable d'autre part. On indique dans quelles conditions les liaisons sont etanches et quelles sont leurs resistances mecaniques et aux chocs thermiques. On indique, dans ce meme chapitre, une methode pour l'obtention de fenetres en beryllium soudees sur un support en acier inoxydable. (auteurs)

  2. Fatigue test on aluminium bridges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maljaars, J.; Soetens, F.; Straalen, van IJ.J.

    2005-01-01

    Traffic bridges are subjected to variable loads and should therefore be checked on fatigue. Especially low weight materials, like aluminium, are sensitive to fatigue, because the variable load is a substantial part of the total load. This paper shows the structural design of an aluminium bridge

  3. Aluminium alloys containing iron and nickel; Alliages d'aluminium contenant du fer et du nickel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coriou, H.; Fournier, R.; Grall, L.; Hure, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie atomique, Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, Departement de Metallurgie et de Chimie Appliquee (France); Herenguel, J.; Lelong, P. [Centre de Recherches d' Antony, des Trefileries et Laminoirs du Havre (France)

    1958-07-01

    The first part of this report addresses mechanism, kinetics and structure factors of aluminium alloys containing iron and nickel in water and high temperature steam. The studied alloys contain from 0.3 to 0.7 per cent of iron, and 0.2 to 1.0 per cent of nickel. Corrosion resistance and corrosion structure have been studied. The experimental installation, process and samples are presented. Corrosion structures in water at 350 C are identified and discussed (structure of corrosion products, structure of metal-oxide interface), and then in steam at different temperatures (350-395 C). Corrosion kinetics is experimentally studied (weight variation in time) in water at 350 C and in steam at different temperatures. Reactions occurring at over-heated steam (more than 400 C) are studied, and the case of welded alloys is also addressed. The second part addresses the metallurgical mechanism and processes influencing aluminium alloy resistance to corrosion by high temperature water as it appeared that separated phases protect the solid solution through a neighbourhood action. In order to avoid deep local corrosions, it seems necessary to multiply protective phases in an as uniform as possible way. Some processes enabling this result are described. They belong to conventional metallurgy or to powder metallurgy (with sintering and extrusion)

  4. Manufacture of thin-walled clad tubes by pressure welding of roll bonded sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Hans Christian; Grydin, Olexandr; Stolbchenko, Mykhailo; Homberg, Werner; Schaper, Mirko

    2017-10-01

    Clad tubes are commonly manufactured by fusion welding of roll bonded metal sheets or, mechanically, by hydroforming. In this work, a new approach towards the manufacture of thin-walled tubes with an outer diameter to wall thickness ratio of about 12 is investigated, involving the pressure welding of hot roll bonded aluminium-steel strips. By preparing non-welded edges during the roll bonding process, the strips can be zip-folded and (cold) pressure welded together. This process routine could be used to manufacture clad tubes in a continuous process. In order to investigate the process, sample tube sections with a wall thickness of 2.1 mm were manufactured by U-and O-bending from hot roll bonded aluminium-stainless steel strips. The forming and welding were carried out in a temperature range between RT and 400°C. It was found that, with the given geometry, a pressure weld is established at temperatures starting above 100°C. The tensile tests yield a maximum bond strength at 340°C. Micrograph images show a consistent weld of the aluminium layer over the whole tube section.

  5. Welding template

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Venue, R.J. of.

    1976-01-01

    A welding template is described which is used to weld strip material into a cellular grid structure for the accommodation of fuel elements in a nuclear reactor. On a base plate the template carries a multitude of cylindrical pins whose upper half is narrower than the bottom half and only one of which is attached to the base plate. The others are arrested in a hexagonal array by oblong webs clamped together by chuck jaws which can be secured by means of screws. The parts are ground very accurately. The template according to the invention is very easy to make. (UWI) [de

  6. Recycling of aluminium swarf by direct incorporation in aluminium melts

    OpenAIRE

    Puga, Hélder; Barbosa, J.; Soares, Delfim; Silva, Filipe Samuel; Ribeiro, Carlos Silva

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to recover a standard AlSi12Cu1 alloy from machining chips inside the foundry plant, by using an environmentally friend technique to produce cast ingots with characteristics similar to those of the commercially available 2nd melt raw material. The recyclability of aluminium swarf using different melting techniques and the influence of chips preparation in the aluminium alloy recovery rate and dross production was experimentally studied and evaluated...

  7. Aluminium, gallium, indium and thallium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Paul L.; Ekberg, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Aluminium can exist in a number of oxyhydroxide mineral phases including corundum, diaspore, boehmite and gibbsite. The stability constants at zero ionic strength reported for Al(OH) 3 (aq) vary linearly with respect to the inverse of absolute temperature. A full suite of thermodynamic parameters is available for all aluminium phases and hydrolysis species. Gallium hydrolyses to a greater extent than aluminium, with the onset of hydrolysis reactions occurring just above a pHof 1. In fact, even though aluminium has the smallest ionic radius of this series of metals, it has the weakest hydrolysis species and oxide/hydroxide phases.This is due to the presence of stabilising d-orbitals in the heavier metals, gallium, indium and thallium(III). There are few available data for the stability constants of indium(III) hydrolysis species. Of those that are available, the range in the proposed stability constants covers many orders of magnitude.

  8. WELDABILITY, WELDING METALLURGY, WELDING CHEMISTRY

    OpenAIRE

    Sarjito Jokosisworo

    2012-01-01

    Sambungan las merupakan bagian penting dari stuktur/bangunan yang dilas, dan kunci dari logam induk yang baik adalah kemampuan las (weld ability). Kemampuan las yang baik dan kemudahan dalam fabrikasi dari suatu logam merupakan pertimbangan dalam memilih suatu logam untuk konstruksi.

  9. Novel manufacturing method by using stainless steel pipes expanded into aluminium profiles for the ITER Neutral Beam cryopumps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dremel, Matthias, E-mail: matthias.dremel@iter.org; Boissin, Jean-Claude; Déléage, Vincent; Quinn, Eamonn; Pearce, Robert

    2015-10-15

    This paper describes the novel engineering and manufacturing solution of stainless steel pipe expansion into aluminium extrusion profiles for use at cryogenic temperatures up to 400 K. This fabrication method will be used for the thermal radiation shields and the cryopanels of the ITER Neutral Beam cryopumps. The use of stainless steel pipes expanded into aluminium extrusion profiles is a solution that combines standard stainless steel welding procedures for the manifolds of the cooling circuits with extended aluminium structures taking advantage of the high thermal conductivity of aluminium. The cryogenic cooling circuits of the pump are a first confinement barrier in the ITER vacuum vessel and the risk of a leakage needs to be minimized as far as possible. The expansion method avoids the need of joints of dissimilar materials in the primary confinement barrier. The fabrication method and results of the prototyping of full scaled components for the ITER Neutral Beam cryopumps are outlined in this paper.

  10. Investigation on fracture toughness of laser beam welded steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riekehr, S.; Cam, G.; Santos, J.F. dos; Kocak, M.; Klein, R.M.; Fischer, R.

    1999-01-01

    Laser beam welding is currently used in the welding of a variety of structural materials including hot and cold rolled steels, high strength low alloy and stainless steels, aluminium and titanium alloys, refractory and high temperature alloys and dissimilar materials. This high power density welding process has unique advantages of cost effectiveness, low distortion, high welding speed, easy automation, deep penetration, narrow bead width, and narrow HAZ compared to the conventional fusion welding processes. However, there is a need to understand the deformation and fracture properties of laser beam weld joints in order to use this cost effective process for fabrication of structural components fully. In the present study, an austenitic stainless steel, X5CrNi18 10 (1.4301) and a ferritic structural steel, RSt37-2 (1.0038), with a thickness of 4 mm were welded by 5 kW CO 2 laser process. Microhardness measurements were conducted to determine the hardness profiles of the joints. Flat micro-tensile specimens were extracted from the base metal, fusion zone, and heat affected zone of ferritic joint to determine the mechanical property variation across the joint and the strength mismatch ratio between the base metal and the fusion zone. Moreover, fracture mechanics specimens were extracted from the joints and tested at room temperature to determine fracture toughness, Crack Tip Opening Displacement (CTOD), of the laser beam welded specimens. The effect of the weld region strength mis-matching on the fracture toughness of the joints have been evaluated. Crack initiation, crack growth and crack deviation processes have also been examined. These results were used to explain the influence of mechanical heterogeneity of the weld region on fracture behaviour. This work is a part of the ongoing Brite-Euram project Assessment of Quality of Power Beam Weld Joints (ASPOW). (orig.)

  11. Analysing the Friction Stir Welded Joints of AA2219 Al-Cu Alloy in Different Heat-Treated-State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkateswarlu, D.; Cheepu, Muralimohan; Kranthi kumar, B.; Mahapatra, M. M.

    2018-03-01

    Aluminium alloy AA2219 is widely used in light weight structural applications where the good corrosion resistance and specific weight required. The fabrication of this alloy using friction stir welding process is gaining interest towards finding the characteristics of the weld metal properties, since this process involved in the welded materials does not melt and recast. In the present investigation, friction stir welding process was used for different heat treated conditions of 2219-T87 and 2219-T62 aluminium alloys to find the influence of base metal on characteristics of the joints. The experimental output results exhibited that, mechanical properties, weld metal characteristics and joint failure locations are significantly affected by the different heat treatment conditions of the substrate. The joints tensile and yield strength of the 2219-T87 welds was higher than the 2219-T62 welds. Hardness distribution in the stir zone was significantly varied between two different heat treaded material conditions. The microstructural features of the 2219-T62 welds reveal the coarse grains formation in the thermo-mechanically affected zone and heat affected zone. The joint efficiency of the 2219- T82 welds is 59.87%, while that of 2219-T62 welds is 39.10%. In addition, the elongation of the joint also varied and the joints failure location characteristics are different for two different types heat treated condition joints.

  12. WELDING PROCESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambrow, J.; Hausner, H.

    1957-09-24

    A method of joining metal parts for the preparation of relatively long, thin fuel element cores of uranium or alloys thereof for nuclear reactors is described. The process includes the steps of cleaning the surfaces to be jointed, placing the sunfaces together, and providing between and in contact with them, a layer of a compound in finely divided form that is decomposable to metal by heat. The fuel element members are then heated at the contact zone and maintained under pressure during the heating to decompose the compound to metal and sinter the members and reduced metal together producing a weld. The preferred class of decomposable compounds are the metal hydrides such as uranium hydride, which release hydrogen thus providing a reducing atmosphere in the vicinity of the welding operation.

  13. A Survey on Friction Stir Welding Of Dissimilar Magnesium Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unnikrishnan, M. A.; Raja, Dhas. J. Edwin

    2017-10-01

    There is a consistent demand for superior materials in every industry. The areas on demand are automobile and aerospace sectors in major.. The most commonly used material in these fields is Aluminium.Though it possess all the properties up to some extent constant demand is pushing for alternate materials. Dissimilar alloys have been a relatively new approach towards these fields.. Friction stir welding dissimilar alloys is a big leap in Automobile sector. In this paper a detailed review of Friction stir welding of Dissimilar Magnesium alloys has been done. This work will serve as a reference to subsequent researchers.

  14. Welding processes handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Weman, Klas

    2011-01-01

    Offers an introduction to the range of available welding technologies. This title includes chapters on individual techniques that cover principles, equipment, consumables and key quality issues. It includes material on such topics as the basics of electricity in welding, arc physics, and distortion, and the weldability of particular metals.$bThe first edition of Welding processes handbook established itself as a standard introduction and guide to the main welding technologies and their applications. This new edition has been substantially revised and extended to reflect the latest developments. After an initial introduction, the book first reviews gas welding before discussing the fundamentals of arc welding, including arc physics and power sources. It then discusses the range of arc welding techniques including TIG, plasma, MIG/MAG, MMA and submerged arc welding. Further chapters cover a range of other important welding technologies such as resistance and laser welding, as well as the use of welding techniqu...

  15. Alloys of uranium and aluminium with low aluminium content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabane, G.; Englander, M.; Lehmann, J.

    1955-01-01

    Uranium, as obtained after spinning in phase γ, presents an heterogeneous structure with large size grains. The anisotropic structure of the metal leads to an important buckling and surface distortion of the fuel slug which is incompatible with its tubular cladding for nuclear fuel uses. Different treatments have been made to obtain an isotropic structure presenting high thermal stability (laminating, hammering and spinning in phase α) without success. Alloys of uranium and aluminium with low aluminium content present important advantage in respect of non allied uranium. The introduction of aluminium in the form of intermetallic compound (UAl 2 ) gives a better resistance to thermal fatigue. Alloys obtained from raw casting present an improved buckling and surface distortion in respect of pure uranium. This improvement is obtained with uranium containing between 0,15 and 0,5 % of aluminium. An even more improvement in thermal stability is obtained by thermal treatments of these alloys. These new characteristics are explained by the fine dispersion of the UAl 2 particles in uranium. The results after treatments obtained from an alloy slug containing 0,4 % of aluminium show no buckling or surface distortion and no elongation. (M.P.)

  16. Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process invented in 1991 at The Welding Institute in the United Kingdom. A weld is made in the FSW process by translating a rotating pin along a weld seam so as to stir the sides of the seam together. FSW avoids deleterious effects inherent in melting and promises to be an important welding process for any industries where welds of optimal quality are demanded. This article provides an introduction to the FSW process. The chief concern is the physical effect of the tool on the weld metal: how weld seam bonding takes place, what kind of weld structure is generated, potential problems, possible defects for example, and implications for process parameters and tool design. Weld properties are determined by structure, and the structure of friction stir welds is determined by the weld metal flow field in the vicinity of the weld tool. Metal flow in the vicinity of the weld tool is explained through a simple kinematic flow model that decomposes the flow field into three basic component flows: a uniform translation, a rotating solid cylinder, and a ring vortex encircling the tool. The flow components, superposed to construct the flow model, can be related to particular aspects of weld process parameters and tool design; they provide a bridge to an understanding of a complex-at-first-glance weld structure. Torques and forces are also discussed. Some simple mathematical models of structural aspects, torques, and forces are included.

  17. Dispersion strengthening of aluminium-aluminium-oxide products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Niels

    1970-01-01

    The true stress-true strain curves at room temperature and at 400°C were determined for various types of aluminium-aluminium-oxide products containing from 0.2 to 4.7 weight per cent of aluminium oxide. The effect of particles on the initial flow stress and the flow stress for 0.2% offset at room...... temperature and at 400°C is in agreement with Orowan's theory. The increase in flow stress at room temperature for strain values below 3 per cent was related to the plastic strain by the equation σ-σoy=k1ε 1/2, where σoy is the initial flow stress and where k1 increases for increasing volume fraction...... and decreasing particle size of the dispersed particles. A general expression for k1 was derived for the relationship between the dislocation density and the strain in dispersion-strengthened products...

  18. Alloys of uranium and aluminium with low aluminium content; Alliages uranium-aluminium a faible teneur en aluminium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabane, G; Englander, M; Lehmann, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1955-07-01

    Uranium, as obtained after spinning in phase {gamma}, presents an heterogeneous structure with large size grains. The anisotropic structure of the metal leads to an important buckling and surface distortion of the fuel slug which is incompatible with its tubular cladding for nuclear fuel uses. Different treatments have been made to obtain an isotropic structure presenting high thermal stability (laminating, hammering and spinning in phase {alpha}) without success. Alloys of uranium and aluminium with low aluminium content present important advantage in respect of non allied uranium. The introduction of aluminium in the form of intermetallic compound (UAl{sub 2}) gives a better resistance to thermal fatigue. Alloys obtained from raw casting present an improved buckling and surface distortion in respect of pure uranium. This improvement is obtained with uranium containing between 0,15 and 0,5 % of aluminium. An even more improvement in thermal stability is obtained by thermal treatments of these alloys. These new characteristics are explained by the fine dispersion of the UAl{sub 2} particles in uranium. The results after treatments obtained from an alloy slug containing 0,4 % of aluminium show no buckling or surface distortion and no elongation. (M.P.)

  19. Determination of Aluminium Content in Aluminium Hydroxide Formulation by FT-NIR Transmittance Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lai, Xuxin; Zheng, Yiwu; Søndergaard, Ib

    2007-01-01

    A method for determining the aluminium content of an aluminium hydroxide suspension using near infrared (NIR) transmittance spectroscopy has been developed. Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) was used as reference method. The factors influencing the NIR analysis...... aluminium content in aluminium hydroxide suspension. (c) 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  20. Synthesis and properties of bimetallic aluminium alkoxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vyshinskaya, K.I.; Vasil'ev, G.A.; Vishnyakova, T.A.

    1997-01-01

    A single stage method of aluminium bimetallic alkoxide synthesis, which consists in activated aluminium reaction with metal salts in the relevant alcohols, has been developed. Properties of the compounds prepared are described

  1. Preparation of aluminium lakes by electrocoagulation

    OpenAIRE

    Prapai Pradabkham

    2008-01-01

    Aluminium lakes have been prepared by electrocoagulation employing aluminium as electrodes. The electrocoagulation is conducted in an aqueous alcoholic solution and is completed within one hour. The dye content in the lake ranges approximately between 4-32%.

  2. Introduction to Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortney, Clarence; Gregory, Mike

    This curriculum guide provides six units of instruction on basic welding. Addressed in the individual units of instruction are the following topics: employment opportunities for welders, welding safety and first aid, welding tools and equipment, basic metals and metallurgy, basic math and measuring, and procedures for applying for a welding job.…

  3. Distortion Control during Welding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akbari Pazooki, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    The local material expansion and contraction involved in welding result in permanent deformations or instability i.e., welding distortion. Considerable efforts have been made in controlling welding distortion prior to, during or after welding. Thermal Tensioning (TT) describes a group of in-situ

  4. Welding and cutting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drews, P.; Schulze Frielinghaus, W.

    1978-01-01

    This is a survey, with 198 literature references, of the papers published in the fields of welding and cutting within the last three years. The subjects dealt with are: weldability of the materials - Welding methods - Thermal cutting - Shaping and calculation of welded joints - Environmental protection in welding and cutting. (orig.) [de

  5. Effect of hydrogen on aluminium and aluminium alloys: A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambat, Rajan; Dwarakadasa, E.S.

    1996-01-01

    Susceptibility of aluminium and its alloys towards hydrogen embrittlement has been well established. Still a lot of confusion exists on the question of transport of hydrogen and its possible role in stress corrosion cracking. This paper reviews some of the fundamental properties of hydrogen...... in aluminium and its alloys and its effect on mechanical properties. The importance of hydrogen embrittlement over anodic dissolution to explain the stress corrosion cracking mechanism of these alloys is also examined in considerable detail. The various experimental findings concerning the link between...

  6. Chapter 2. Theoretical aspects of aluminium production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanko, E.A.; Kabirov, Sh.O.; Safiev, Kh.; Azizov, B.S.; Mirpochaev, Kh.A.

    2011-01-01

    This article is devoted to theoretical aspects of aluminium production. Thus, the electrochemistry of electrolysis process, calculation of base industrial indicators of aluminium electrolytic cell, and processes occurring on anode and cathode were considered. Factors, which increase the current output and electrolytic cell productivity were studied. The side effects, including anode effect, sodium extraction on cathode, aluminium dissolution in the electrolyte, aluminium carbide formation, and influence of admixtures in the electrolyte were studied as well.

  7. Design and analysis of aluminium brdiges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soetens, F.; Straalen, IJ.J. van

    2004-01-01

    Applications of aluminium have grown considerably in building and civil engineering the last decade, which is due to various aspects: light weight, durability and maintenance, use of extrusions. The paper starts with a short history of aluminium bridges and then focuses on aluminium bridges in the

  8. Advanced Welding Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Some of the applications of advanced welding techniques are shown in this poster presentation. Included are brief explanations of the use on the Ares I and Ares V launch vehicle and on the Space Shuttle Launch vehicle. Also included are microstructural views from four advanced welding techniques: Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) weld (fusion), self-reacting friction stir welding (SR-FSW), conventional FSW, and Tube Socket Weld (TSW) on aluminum.

  9. Development and fabrication of seamless Aluminium finned clad tubes for metallic uranium fuel rods for research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, A.K.; Hussain, M.M.; Jayachandran, N.K.; Abdulla, K.K.

    2012-01-01

    Natural uranium metal or its alloy is used as fuel in nuclear reactors. Usually fuel is clad with compatible material to prevent its direct contact with coolant which prevents spread of activity. One of the methods of producing fuel for nuclear reactor is by co-drawing finished uranium rods with aluminum clad tube to develop intimate contact for effective heat removal during reactor operation. Presently seam welded Aluminium tubes are used as clad for Research Reactor fuel. The paper will highlight entire fabrication process followed for the fabrication of seamless Aluminium finned tubes along with relevant characterisation results

  10. Hot workability of aluminium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Yeon Chul; Oh, Kyung Jin

    1986-01-01

    Hot Workability of aluminium alloys, 2024, 6061 and 7075, has been studied by hot torsion tests at temperatures from 320 to 515 deg C and at strain rates from 1.26 x 10 -3 to 5.71 x 10 -3 sec -1 . Hot working condition of these aluminium alloys was determined quantitatively from the constitutive equations obtained from flow stress curves in torsion. Experimental data of the logarith of the Zener-Hollomonn parameter showed good linear relationships to the logarith of sinh(ασ-bar)

  11. Diffusion bonding of an aluminium alloy (AA 2124) reinforced with SiC whiskers, using AL-Li interlayers (AA 8090)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urena, A.; Gomez de Salazar, J.M.; Escalera, M.D.; Escriche, E.

    1994-01-01

    The use of an AL-Li alloy as interlayer for the diffusion bonding of an aluminium matrix composite reinforced with silicon carbide whiskers has been studied. The influence of the different welding parameters on the joint microstructure and mechanical strength has also been analyzed. Besides, the failure mechanisms of shear tested joints have been investigated using fractographic techniques. (Author) 9 refs

  12. Developments in the US aluminium recycling industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolling, R N

    1983-06-01

    In the USA scrap recovery of aluminium has gained in importance since the war. Today its amounts to about 32% of total supply. On the other hand primary production in the US seems to have hardly any expansion possibilities. The development of the aluminium beverage can is the clearest example for recycling growth. The increased use of aluminium in passenger cars has led to very close technical and local relations of aluminium foundries and secondary smelters. The changing nature of the aluminium business caused by the growth of recycling should be recognized and made use of.

  13. Selected Welding Techniques, Part 2

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1964-01-01

    Partial contents: CONVENTIONAL WELD JOINTS VERSUS BUTT JOINTS IN 1-INCH ALUMINUM PLATE, SPECIAL WELD JOINT PREPARATION, UPSET METAL EDGES FOR INCREASED WELD JOINT STRENGTH, OUT-OF-POSITION WELDING OF HEAVY GAGE...

  14. TIG welding of pure titanium with an TiAl6V4 alloy; Schweissen von technisch reinem Titan. WIG-Schweissen mit der Titanlegierung TiAl6V4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karaaslan, A. [Techn. Univ. Yildiz (Turkey). Sektion fuer Metallurgie und Werkstofftechnik

    2004-07-01

    The present contribution describes the Tig welding process of pure Titanium with an high strength Titanium Aluminium alloy. The characterization of the metallurgical properties of the welds was carried out by hardness measurements and by tensile testing. Parallel to the results of light microscopic investigations of the microstructure the metallurgical and physical background will be highlighted. (orig.)

  15. The prophylactic reduction of aluminium intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lione, A

    1983-02-01

    The use of modern analytical methods has demonstrated that aluminium salts can be absorbed from the gut and concentrated in various human tissues, including bone, the parathyroids and brain. The neurotoxicity of aluminium has been extensively characterized in rabbits and cats, and high concentrations of aluminium have been detected in the brain tissue of patients with Alzheimer's disease. Various reports have suggested that high aluminium intakes may be harmful to some patients with bone disease or renal impairment. Fatal aluminium-induced neuropathies have been reported in patients on renal dialysis. Since there are no demonstrable consequences of aluminium deprivation, the prophylactic reduction of aluminium intake by many patients would appear prudent. In this report, the major sources of aluminium in foods and non-prescription drugs are summarized and alternative products are described. The most common foods that contain substantial amounts of aluminium-containing additives include some processed cheeses, baking powders, cake mixes, frozen doughs, pancake mixes, self-raising flours and pickled vegetables. The aluminium-containing non-prescription drugs include some antacids, buffered aspirins, antidiarrhoeal products, douches and haemorrhoidal medications. The advisability of recommending a low aluminium diet for geriatric patients is discussed in detail.

  16. Aluminium and energy. An interview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, E R

    1978-06-01

    The interview between METALL and the president of Aluswuisse refers mainly to aspects of energy and deals more closely with the questions whether western Europe in view of relatively high prices for electricity is still competitive and which part can be played by aluminium in overcoming the energy crisis.

  17. Recovery mechanisms in nanostructured aluminium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Tianbo; Hansen, Niels; Huang, Xiaoxu

    2012-01-01

    Commercial purity aluminium (99.5%) has been cold rolled to a true strain of 5.5 (99.6% reduction in thickness). The material is very strong but low temperature recovery may be a limiting factor. This has been investigated by isothermal annealing treatments in the temperature range 5–100C. Hardness...

  18. Dynamical study of liquid aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubey, G.S.; Chaturvedi, D.K.

    1979-09-01

    Recent molecular dynamics data of Ebbsjoe et al. in liquid aluminium have been analysed through the memory function formalism. Two forms of the memory functions which have correct asymptotic limit at large wavenumbers but accounts for interatomic correlations in a different manner are considered. The results for ω 2 s(q, ω) obtained from both models are compared with experimental data. (author)

  19. Effect of Bio char on Plant Growth and Aluminium Form of Soil under Aluminium Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Lianwen; Li, Qingbiao; Sun, Jingwei; Feng, Ying

    2018-01-01

    Aluminium-enriched acid red soils in South China easily cause aluminium toxicity to plants, but biochip can improve soils and eliminate soil contaminations. In this project, biochip was used in potted plant control test to study the effect of biochip on plant growth in soil under acid aluminium stress and the migration and conversion of aluminium in plant-soil system. The fin dings show that the application of biochip increases the pH value of soil under aluminium stress significantly, changes the existing form of aluminium ion in soil, reduces the plants’ absorption of aluminium, and alleviates the aluminium toxicity to plants, but too much biochip may inhibit the growth of plants. In this case, further study should be carried out as regards the volume and way of biochip input in practical applications as well as the timeliness of aluminium toxicity removal.

  20. Effect of linear energy on the properties of an AL alloy in DPMIG welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Tianfa; Jin, Li; Xue, Jiaxiang

    2018-01-01

    The effect of different linear energy parameters on the DPMIG welding performance of AA1060 aluminium alloy is studied in this paper. The stability of the welding process is verified with a Labview electrical signal acquisition system, and the microstructure and tensile properties of the welded joint are studied via optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and electrical tensile tests. The test results show that the welding process for the DPMIG methods stable and that the weld beads appear as scales. Tensile strength results indicate that, with increasing linear energy, the tensile strength first increases and then decreases. The tensile strength of the joint is maximized when the linear energy is 120.5 J / mm-1.

  1. A review of literature from the First International Conference on Friction Stir Welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowyer, W.H.

    2000-06-01

    The papers from the first international conference on Friction Stir Welding (FSW) have been reviewed. Taken together the papers provide a very optimistic picture for the development and application of friction stir welding in general and to the case of the copper canister in particular. Whilst a considerable development effort is in progress the process has been industrialised for joining of aluminium sheet and it is accepted by Lloyds register for this purpose. Development of procedures and equipment to weld thicker materials and a wider range of materials is progressing ahead of the research activity to aid the understanding of the process at this stage. Nevertheless, well-established weld assessment procedures are being applied to experimental welds with very encouraging results. Summaries of the key papers are presented in an appendix

  2. A Study on Tooling and Its Effect on Heat Generation and Mechanical Properties of Welded Joints in Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikader, Sujoy; Biswas, Pankaj; Puri, Asit Baran

    2018-04-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) has been the most attracting solid state welding process as it serves numerous advantages like good mechanical, metallurgical properties etc. Non weldable aluminium alloys like 5XXX, 7XXX series can be simply joined by this process. In this present study a mathematical model has been developed and experiments were successfully performed to evaluate mechanical properties of FSW on similar aluminium alloys i.e. AA1100 for different process parameters and mainly two kind of tool geometry (straight cylindrical and conical or cylindrical tapered shaped pin with flat shoulder). Tensile strength and micro hardness for different process parameters are reported of the welded plate sample. It was noticed that in FSW of similar alloy with tool made of SS-310 tool steel, friction is the major contributor for the heat generation. It was seen that tool geometry, tool rotational speed, plunging force by the tool and traverse speed have significant effect on tensile strength and hardness of friction stir welded joints.

  3. Automatic welding of fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briola, J.

    1958-01-01

    The welding process depends on the type of fuel element, the can material and the number of cartridges to be welded: - inert-gas welding (used for G2 and the 1. set of EL3), - inert atmosphere arc welding (used for welding uranium and zirconium), - electronic welding (used for the 2. set of EL3 and the tank of Proserpine). (author) [fr

  4. Detecting flaws in welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodacre, A.; Lawton, H.

    1979-01-01

    An apparatus and a method for detecting flaws in welds in a workpiece, the portion of the workpiece containing the weld is maintained at a constant temperature and the weld is scanned by an infra red detector. The weld is then scanned again with the workpiece in contact with a cooling probe to produce a steeper temperature gradient across the weld. Comparison of the signals produced by each scan reveals the existence of defects in the welds. The signals may be displayed on an oscilloscope and the display may be observed by a TV camera and recorded on videotape. (UK)

  5. Fusion welding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kenneth C.; Jones, Eric D.; McBride, Marvin A.

    1983-01-01

    A process for the fusion welding of nickel alloy steel members wherein a ferrite containing pellet is inserted into a cavity in one member and melted by a welding torch. The resulting weld nugget, a fusion of the nickel containing alloy from the members to be welded and the pellet, has a composition which is sufficiently low in nickel content such that ferrite phases occur within the weld nugget, resulting in improved weld properties. The steel alloys encompassed also include alloys containing carbon and manganese, considered nickel equivalents.

  6. Two- and three-dimensional characterizations of hot tears in a Al-Mg-Si alloy laser weld

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabregue, D. [Universite de Lyon, INSA-Lyon, MATEIS, CNRS UMR5510, 7 Avenue Jean Capelle, F-69621 Villeurbanne (France)], E-mail: damien.fabregue@insa-lyon.fr; Deschamps, A.; Suery, M. [SIMAP, Grenoble-INP, CNRS-UJF, BP 75, 38402 St Martin d' Heres Cedex (France); Proudhon, H. [Universite de Lyon, INSA-Lyon, MATEIS, CNRS UMR5510, 7 Avenue Jean Capelle, F-69621 Villeurbanne (France)

    2008-08-15

    Hot tears in 6xxx aluminium alloy laser welds are characterized. They are shown to be intergranular, originating from fracture of liquid films without plasticity of the surrounding grains. The hot tear initiates on both sides of the fusion zone, follows the liquid films between the columnar grains of the weld line and then propagates around the equiaxed grains of the fusion zone centre. By using three-dimensional X-ray tomography, the exact shape of the hot tears has been visualized.

  7. Two- and three-dimensional characterizations of hot tears in a Al-Mg-Si alloy laser weld

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabregue, D.; Deschamps, A.; Suery, M.; Proudhon, H.

    2008-01-01

    Hot tears in 6xxx aluminium alloy laser welds are characterized. They are shown to be intergranular, originating from fracture of liquid films without plasticity of the surrounding grains. The hot tear initiates on both sides of the fusion zone, follows the liquid films between the columnar grains of the weld line and then propagates around the equiaxed grains of the fusion zone centre. By using three-dimensional X-ray tomography, the exact shape of the hot tears has been visualized

  8. Effect of heating produced by welding on the microstructure and on the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of AA7028 alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calatayud, A.; Rodenas, M.; Ferrer, C.; Amigo, V.; Salvador, M.D.

    1997-01-01

    The microstructural and stress corrosion cracking changes due to welding are studied for the AA7028 aluminium alloy. Special attention is paid to the characterization of what is known as the white zone. The influence of the delay step between quenching and aging in a T73 treatment on the microstructure and on the characteristics of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) is also studied. Finally the effect of thermal treatments applied on this zone after the welding is analysed. (Author) 7 refs

  9. Weld controller for automated nuclear service welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barfield, K.L.; Strubhar, P.M.; Green, D.I.

    1995-01-01

    B and W Nuclear Technologies (BWNT) uses many different types of weld heads for automated welding in the commercial nuclear service industry. Some weld heads are purchased as standard items, while others are custom designed and fabricated by BWNT requiring synchronized multiaxis motion control. BWNT recently completed a development program to build a common weld controller that interfaces to all types of weld heads used by BWNT. Their goal was to construct a system that had the flexibility to add different modules to increase the capability of the controller as different application needs become necessary. The benefits from having a common controller are listed. This presentation explains the weld controller system and the types of applications to which it has been applied

  10. Keyhole shapes during laser welding of thin metal sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aalderink, B J; Lange, D F de; Aarts, R G K M; Meijer, J

    2007-01-01

    Camera observations of the full penetration keyhole laser welding process show that the keyhole shape is elongated under certain welding conditions. Under these unfavourable circumstances, the welding process is susceptible to holes in the weld bead. Existing models of the pressure balance at the keyhole wall cannot explain this keyhole elongation. In this paper a new model is presented, accounting for the doubly curved shape of the keyhole wall. In this model, the surface tension pressure has one term that tends to close the keyhole and another term that tries to open it. Model calculations show that when the keyhole diameter is of the same order as the sheet thickness, the latter part can become dominant, causing the keyhole to elongate. Experiments on thin aluminium (AA5182) and mild steel (DC04) sheets verify these model calculations. As the keyhole radius depends on the radius of the focused laser spot, it was found for both materials that the ratio of the spot radius and the sheet thickness must be above a critical value to prevent keyhole elongation. These critical radii are 0.25 for AA5182 and 0.4 for DC04, respectively. Furthermore, differences in appearance of the weld bead between the circular and the elongated keyhole welds could be explained by this model

  11. Effect of Post Weld Heat Treatment on Corrosion Behavior of AA2014 Aluminum – Copper Alloy Electron Beam Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkata Ramana, V. S. N.; Mohammed, Raffi; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.; Srinivasa Rao, K.

    2018-03-01

    The present work pertains to the study of corrosion behavior of aluminum alloy electron beam welds. The aluminium alloy used in the present study is copper containing AA2014 alloy. Electron Beam Welding (EBW) was used to weld the alloys in annealed (O) condition. Microstructural changes across the welds were recorded and the effect of post weld heat treatment (PWHT) in T4 (Solutionized and naturally aged) condition on pitting corrosion resistance was studied. A software based PAR basic electrochemical system was used for potentio-dynamic polarization tests. From the study it is observed that weld in O condition is prone to more liquation than that of PWHT condition. This may be attributed to re-melting and solidification of excess eutectic present in the O condition of the base metal. It was also observed that slightly higher hardness values are recorded in O condition than that of PWHT condition. The pitting corrosion resistance of the PMZ/HAZ in PWHT condition is better than that of O condition. This is attributed to copper segregation at the grain boundaries of PMZ in O condition.

  12. Mechanical and Tribological Characteristics of TIG Hardfaced Dispersive Layer by Reinforced with Particles Extruded Aluminium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Dimitrova

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of the implemented technology for generation of hardfaced dispersive layers obtained by additive material containing reinforcing phase of non-metal particles. The wear resistant coatings are deposited on pure aluminium metal matrix by shielded gas metal-arc welding applying tungsten inert gas (TIG with extruded aluminium wire reinforced by particles as additive material. Wire filler is produced by extrusion of a pack containing metalized and plated by flux micro/nano SiC particles. The metalized particles implanting in the metal matrix and its dispersive hardfacing are realized by solid-state welding under conditions of hot plastic deformation. Tribological characteristics are studied of the hardfaced layers of dispersive reinforced material on pure aluminium metal matrix with and without flux. Hardness profiles of the hardfaced layers are determined by nanoindentation. The surface layers are studied by means of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM and Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX analysis. Increase by 15-31 % of the wear resistance of the hardfaced layers and 30-40 % of their hardness was found, which is due to the implanted in the layer reinforcing phase of metalized micro/nano SiC particles.

  13. Bumblebee pupae contain high levels of aluminium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exley, Christopher; Rotheray, Ellen; Goulson, David

    2015-01-01

    The causes of declines in bees and other pollinators remains an on-going debate. While recent attention has focussed upon pesticides, other environmental pollutants have largely been ignored. Aluminium is the most significant environmental contaminant of recent times and we speculated that it could be a factor in pollinator decline. Herein we have measured the content of aluminium in bumblebee pupae taken from naturally foraging colonies in the UK. Individual pupae were acid-digested in a microwave oven and their aluminium content determined using transversely heated graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Pupae were heavily contaminated with aluminium giving values between 13.4 and 193.4 μg/g dry wt. and a mean (SD) value of 51.0 (33.0) μg/g dry wt. for the 72 pupae tested. Mean aluminium content was shown to be a significant negative predictor of average pupal weight in colonies. While no other statistically significant relationships were found relating aluminium to bee or colony health, the actual content of aluminium in pupae are extremely high and demonstrate significant exposure to aluminium. Bees rely heavily on cognitive function and aluminium is a known neurotoxin with links, for example, to Alzheimer's disease in humans. The significant contamination of bumblebee pupae by aluminium raises the intriguing spectre of cognitive dysfunction playing a role in their population decline.

  14. Amélioration des performances du procédé de soudage TIG sur un acier au carbone et un alliage d'aluminium par dépôt de silice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sire, Stéphane; Marya, Surendar

    This Note presents ways to improve the weld penetration potential of TIG process by optimising silica application around the joints in a plain carbon steel and an aluminium alloy 5086. Whereas for plain carbon steels, full coverage of joint improves penetration, the presence of a blank zone around the joint in the flux coating on aluminium 5086 using AC-TIG seems to be the best solution for cosmetic and deep welds. To cite this article: S. Sire, S. Marya, C. R. Mecanique 330 (2002) 83-89.

  15. Protective Coatings for Wet Storage of Aluminium-Clad Spent Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, S.M.C.; Correa, O.V.; Souza, J.A. De; Ramanathan, L.V. [Materials science and Technology Center, Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares - IPEN, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes 2242, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Corrosion protection of spent RR fuel for long term wet storage was considered important, primarily from the safety standpoint and the use of conversion coatings was proposed in 2008. This paper presents the results of: (a) on-going field tests in which un-coated and lanthanide-based conversion coated Al alloy coupons were exposed to the IEA-R1 reactor spent fuel basin for durations of up to a year; (b) preparation of cerium modified hydrotalcite coatings and cerium sealed boehmite coatings on AA 6061 alloy; (c) corrosion resistance of coated specimens in NaCl solutions. The field studies indicated that the oxidized and cerium dioxide coated coupons were the most corrosion resistant. The cerium modified hydrotalcite and cerium sealed boehmite coated specimens showed marked increase in pitting corrosion resistance. (author)

  16. Handbook of Plastic Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Aminul

    The purpose of this document is to summarize the information about the laser welding of plastic. Laser welding is a matured process nevertheless laser welding of micro dimensional plastic parts is still a big challenge. This report collects the latest information about the laser welding of plastic...... materials and provides an extensive knowhow on the industrial plastic welding process. The objectives of the report include: - Provide the general knowhow of laser welding for the beginners - Summarize the state-of-the-art information on the laser welding of plastics - Find the technological limits in terms...... of design, materials and process - Find the best technology, process and machines adaptive to Sonion’s components - Provide the skills to Sonion’s Design Engineers for successful design of the of the plastic components suitable for the laser welding The ultimate goal of this report is to serve...

  17. Nondestructive testing: welding industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raj, Baldev; Subramanian, C.V.

    1992-01-01

    This chapter highlights various conventional and advanced nondestructive testing (NDT) techniques that have been used for weld evaluation. Welding Codes and Standards of International and National organisations that have been followed in India for various weld evaluation purposes are also included. The chapter also emphasises the importance of NDT by way of a few case studies that have been carried out on important critical welded components. (author). 12 refs., 17 figs., 1 appendix

  18. Pengaruh besar arus pengelasan dan kecepatan volume alir gas pada proses las GMAW terhadap ketangguhan aluminium 5083

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I N Budiarsa

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Level of welding current and flow rate of gas volume are welding parameters, which can influence result of welding process use of GMAW (Gas Metal Arc Welding at material of Aluminium 5083. Testing to be carried out is impact test with nocth type of standart test from A.S.T.M. standart pt.31 Designation E23-82. Specimens to be applied use of standard from DIN 50115 and standart ISO V nocth. Treatments to be given to specimen are variation flow rate of gas volume and level of welding current. By using of factorial experiment method can be showed that level of welding current and flow rate of gas volume and its interaction give a significance effect toward toughness properties of material. The result obtained with level of welding current 250 Ampere at variation of gas volume flow rate (17 l/minute, 18 l/minute, 19l/minute gives result low level toughness properties of material. The lowest level toughness (26,967 at (250 Ampere, 19l/minute

  19. Instructional Guidelines. Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fordyce, H. L.; Doshier, Dale

    Using the standards of the American Welding Society and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, this welding instructional guidelines manual presents a course of study in accordance with the current practices in industry. Intended for use in welding programs now practiced within the Federal Prison System, the phases of the program are…

  20. Welding Course Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genits, Joseph C.

    This guide is intended for use in helping students gain a fundamental background on the major aspects of the welding trade. The course emphasis is on mastery of the manipulative skills necessary to develop successful welding techniques and on acquisition of an understanding of the specialized tools and equipment used in welding. The first part…

  1. Underwater welding of steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibarra, S.; Olson, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    A fundamental basis to understand the behavior of wet underwater welding of steel is introduced. Both the pyrometallurgical and physical metallurgy concepts are discussed. Modifications of welding consumables and practice are suggested. This chapter promotes further contributions of meatllurgical research to improve and promote wet underwater welding. (orig.)

  2. Welding Over Paint Primer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnson, Kevin S; Liu, Stephen; Olson, David L

    1998-01-01

    .... According to the hydrogen-oxygen and }hydrogen-fluorine equilibrium considerations, an increase in the partial pressure of oxygen or fluorine could decrease the partial pressure of hydrogen within the welding arc. Consequently, a welding consumable that contains chemical ingredients of high oxygen and fluorine potential would be capable of minimizing hydrogen pick-up in the weld pool.

  3. Power distribution: conductors in aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmid, R.

    2007-01-01

    This article takes a look at the use of aluminium conductors in medium and low-voltage cables. The author discusses how the increasing price of copper has led to the increasing use of aluminium as a material for the production of the conductors used in medium and low-voltage power cables. Aid is provided that is to help purchasers make the correct decisions when buying medium and low-voltage cables. The current market situation is examined and the appropriate norms are looked at. Technical data and economic aspects are discussed, both for medium and low-voltage applications. The electrical characteristics of the type of cable to be used are examined and discussed

  4. Neutron Cross Sections for Aluminium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsberg, Leif

    1963-08-15

    Total, elastic, inelastic, (n, 2n), (n, {alpha}), (n, p), and (n, {gamma}) cross sections for aluminium have been compiled from thermal to 100 MeV based upon literature search and theoretical interpolations and estimates. Differential elastic cross sections in the centre of mass system are represented by the Legendre coefficients. This method was chosen in order to obtain the best description of the energy dependence of the anisotropy.

  5. Aluminium and nickel in human albumin solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Sandberg, E

    1989-01-01

    Five different brands of commercially available human albumin solutions for infusion were analysed for their aluminium and nickel contents by atomic absorption spectrometry. The aluminium concentrations ranged from 12 micrograms/l to 1109 micrograms/l and the nickel concentrations ranged from 17...... micrograms/l to 77 micrograms/l. Examination of the aluminium and nickel contents of the constituents for the production of one brand showed too low levels to explain the final contamination of the product. By following the aluminium and nickel concentrations of the same brand during the production...... of a batch of albumin solution, filtration was shown to contribute to contamination, although the largest increase in aluminium as well as nickel concentrations appeared during the bulk concentrating process. To avoid health risks to certain patients, regulations should be established requiring aluminium...

  6. Crack initiation and propagation paths in small diameter FSW 6082-T6 aluminium tubes under fatigue loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Tovo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports results of fatigue tests of friction stir welded (FSW aluminium tubes. Relatively small 38 mm diameter tubes were used and hence an automated FSW process using a retracting tool was designed for this project, as the wall thickness of the aluminium tube was similar to the diameter of the FSW tool. This is a more complex joint geometry to weld than the more usual larger diameter tube reported in the literature. S-N fatigue testing was performed using load ratios of R = 0.1 and R = -1. Crack path analysis was performed using both low magnification stereo microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, in order to identify crack initiation sites and to determine the direction of crack propagation. Work is still in progress to follow the crack path through the various microstructural zones associated with the weld. A simple statistical analysis was used to characterize the most typical crack initiation site. This work forms part of a wider project directed at determining multiaxial fatigue design rules for small diameter 6082-T6 aluminium tubes that could be of use in the ground vehicle industry.

  7. Surface treatments for aluminium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardelean, M.; Lascău, S.; Ardelean, E.; Josan, A.

    2018-01-01

    Typically, in contact with the atmosphere, the aluminium surface is covered with an aluminium oxide layer, with a thickness of less than 1-2μm. Due to its low thickness, high porosity and low mechanical strength, this layer does not protect the metal from corrosion. Anodizing for protective and decorative purposes is the most common method of superficial oxidation processes and is carried out through anodic oxidation. The oxide films, resulted from anodizing, are porous, have a thickness of 20-50μm, and are heat-resistant, stable to water vapour and other corrosion agents. Hard anodizing complies with the same obtains principles as well as decorative and protective anodization. The difference is in that hard anodizing is achieved at low temperatures and high intensity of electric current. In the paper are presented the results of decorative and hard anodization for specimens made from several aluminium alloys in terms of the appearance of the specimens and of the thickness of the anodized.

  8. Degradation Processes of Al-Zn Welded Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Votava

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Welding of metal materials belongs to non-demountable joints. Current trend especially in an automotive industry is to join materials with a different melting temperature. Most of all, there are dural profiles with ferrite or austenite steel. The reason for this is the effort to lower the weight of the whole construction and at the same time preserve sufficient mechanical characteristics. However, there is a big risk of different electrical potentials of both of these metals in this type of non-demountable joints. The experimental part of this paper brings evaluation of mechanical-corrosion processes of overlapped joints produced by the CMT (cold metal transfer method. The base material for weld bead is dural sheet AlMg3 and dural sheet with a surface treatment aluzinc DX51D+AZ 150. Material AlSi5 in the form of a wire was used as an additional material for a welding bath. Method CMT was used in order to create a weld bead. Initial analysis of weld bead was done visually using a binocular microscope. Further, a metallographic analysis of weld bead and base material was processed. The aim was to identify the heat affected area around the welded joint. Microhardness of intermetallic aluminium phases was measured, after the identification of intermetallic phases a chemical analysis EDS was processed. Prepared samples underwent corrosion degradation in a salt spray environment in compliance with the norm ČSN EN ISO 9227. Visual and metallographic evaluation of the individual samples was processed after every week of exposition to the salt spray environment. The goal of this experiment was to record the initial impulse of galvanic corrosion which consists in corrosion degradation in the area of welded joint.

  9. Detection of aluminium in different culinary media using black ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jacques Blessing

    The interactions between food and aluminium local kitchen utensils can be a potential source of aluminium released which can ... need to be adopted to preserve consumers' health. ..... Corrosion behaviour of different ... Aluminium beverage.

  10. Introduction. Aluminium production on electrolytic cells with calcined anodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galushkin, N.V.

    1995-01-01

    This chapter presents the monograph content, which includes the description of physicochemical processes in aluminium electrolytic cells, and mechanism of electrolytic aluminium obtaining. The short description of aluminium electrolytic cells construction is presented in this book as well.

  11. Coprecipitation of yttrium and aluminium hydroxide for preparation of yttrium aluminium garnet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrolijk, J.W.G.A.; Willems, J.W.M.M.; Metselaar, R.

    1990-01-01

    Coprecipitation of yttrium and aluminium hydroxide for the preparation of pure yttrium aluminium garnet (YAG) powder with small grain size is the subject of this study. Starting materials are sulphates and chlorides of yttrium and aluminium. To obtain pure YAG (Y3Al5O12), the pH during flocculation

  12. Toxicity of aluminium on five aquatic invertebrates; Aluminiums toksisitet paa 5 akvatiske invertebrater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moe, J [Oslo Univ. (Norway)

    1996-01-01

    The conference paper deals with the experiments done by investigating the effects from the toxicity of aluminium on aquatic invertebrates. The aim of the experiments was to compare the toxicity of unstable aluminium compounds with stable forms of aluminium. 8 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Aluminium in foodstuffs and diets in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorhem, L; Haegglund, G

    1992-01-01

    The levels of aluminium have been determined in a number of individual foodstuffs on the Swedish market and in 24 h duplicate diets collected by women living in the Stockholm area. The results show that the levels in most foods are very low and that the level in vegetables can vary by a factor 10. Beverages from aluminium cans were found to have aluminium levels not markedly different from those in glass bottles. Based on the results of the analysis of individual foods, the average Swedish daily diet was calculated to contain about 0.6 mg aluminium, whereas the mean content of the collected duplicate diets was 13 mg. A cake made from a mix containing aluminium phosphate in the baking soda was identified as the most important contributor of aluminium to the duplicate diets. Tea and aluminium utensils were estimated to increase the aluminium content of the diets by approximately 4 and 2 mg/day, respectively. The results also indicate that a considerable amount of aluminium must be introduced from other sources.

  14. Numerical modelling in friction lap joining of aluminium alloy and carbon-fiber-reinforced-plastic sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, A.; Bang, H. S.; Bang, H. S.

    2018-05-01

    Multi-material combinations of aluminium alloy and carbon-fiber-reinforced-plastics (CFRP) have gained attention in automotive and aerospace industries to enhance fuel efficiency and strength-to-weight ratio of components. Various limitations of laser beam welding, adhesive bonding and mechanical fasteners make these processes inefficient to join metal and CFRP sheets. Friction lap joining is an alternative choice for the same. Comprehensive studies in friction lap joining of aluminium to CFRP sheets are essential and scare in the literature. The present work reports a combined theoretical and experimental study in joining of AA5052 and CFRP sheets using friction lap joining process. A three-dimensional finite element based heat transfer model is developed to compute the temperature fields and thermal cycles. The computed results are validated extensively with the corresponding experimentally measured results.

  15. Analysis of a weld of an hydrogen tank under pressure: contribution of the nano-indentation for the characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russo, C.; Delobelle, P.; Perreux, D.; Russo, C.; Munier, E.; Decamps, B.

    2007-01-01

    This work deals with the size of an hydrogen spherical tank under pressure, composed of two half shell in aluminium alloy AZ5G machined in a forged bar and welded by electrons beam by a circumference. In this work, it is shown what the nano-indentation test can bring here. The influence of the tempering heat treatment after welding, the grains diameter and the loss in alloy elements (Zn and Mg) on the local mechanical properties of the weld bead has been revealed. In the same way, a hardening of the alloy due to the hydrogen penetration and leading to an increase of the dislocations density is observed. (O.M.)

  16. Homogeneous weldings of copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campurri, C.; Lopez, M.; Fernandez, R.; Osorio, V.

    1995-01-01

    This research explored the metallurgical and mechanical properties of arc welding of copper related with influence of Argon, Helium and mixtures of them. Copper plates of 6 mm thickness were welded with different mixtures of the mentioned gases. The radiography of welded specimens with 100% He and 100% Ar does not show show any porosity. On the other hand, the copper plates welded different gas mixtures presented uniform porosity in the welded zone. The metallographies show recrystallized grain in the heat affected zone, while the welding zone showed a dendritic structure. The results of the tensile strength vary between a maximum of 227 MPa for 100% He and a minimum of 174 MOa for the mixture of 60% He and 40% Ar. For the elongation after fracture the best values, about 36%, were obtained for pure gases. As a main conclusion, we can say that arc welding of copper is possible without loosing the mechanical and metallurgical properties of base metal. 6 refs

  17. Special metallurgy - the electrical butt-welding by flashing of sintered magnesium-magnesium oxide composites (1963)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charleux, J.

    1963-01-01

    Electrical resistance welding has become quite important since World War II because of the need of a high yield in aeronautical production. Progress has been due in particular to the improvements made in electronically controlled apparatus making possible the automatic control of welding. For the butt-welding of sections requiring either a high production rate or a high quality weld, the flash butt-welding system has been very much developed these last few years. The use of this welding method is of great importance in the field of the bonding of oxidisable metals such as magnesium or aluminium and its alloys, because the welded joint is free from oxides. This study consists of general considerations on the flash-welding process with regard to temperature distribution in the parts during welding, and to electrical phenomena connected with flashing. Besides this general or theoretical section, we have applied the welding process to the bonding of sintered magnesium, a magnesium-magnesium oxide composite, whose use as a structural element in nuclear reactors is considered. (author) [fr

  18. Phase transformation of aluminium hydroxide to aα- alumina prepared from different aluminium salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masliana Muslimin; Meor Yusoff Meor Sulaiman

    2006-01-01

    The study intends to look at the most suitable aluminium salt to produce a single-phase a-alumina by the hydrothermal method. In the process to produce alumina from the calcination of aluminium hydroxide (Al(OH) 3 ), three different aluminium salts namely aluminium sulfate (Al 2 (SO 4) 2), aluminium nitrate (A(NO 3 ) 3 ) and aluminium chloride (AlCl 3 ) were tried. The process involved the used of NH 4 OH as the precipitating medium. Aluminium hydroxide produced from each of these salts were characterised by x-ray diffraction (XRD) technique to identity the crystalline phase. Aluminium hydroxide produced by all the different aluminium salts is present as boehmite or pseudo-boehmite phase. Aluminium hydroxide produced from Al 2 (SO) 2 , Al(NO) 3 and AlCl 3 shows the transformation of the boehmite phase to a α-alumina phase at 500 0 C. On further heating, the α-alumina continuously formed at 800 o C followed soon at 1000 o C. But for the Al(NO3) 3 salts a different phase transitions occurs on heating especially at 1000 o C. Here it was observed not a single alumina phase is presence but the presence of both α and γ--alumina phases. At 1300 o C, the single α-alumina phase was formed. The study concluded that aluminium sulphate is recommended in order to obtain a single-phase α-alumina with the required characteristics. (Author)

  19. Temperature measurements of the aluminium claddings of fuel elements in nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Daolong

    1986-01-01

    A method for embedding the sheathed thermocouples in the aluminium claddings of some fuel elements of experimental reactors by ultrasonic welding technique is described. The measurement results of the cladding temperature of fuel elements in reactors are given. By means of this method, the joint between the sheathed thermocouples and the cladding of fuel elements can be made very tight, there are no bulges on the cladding surfaces, and the sheathed thermocouples are embedded strongly and reliably. Therefore an essential means is provided for acquiring the stable and dynamic state data of the cladding temperature of in-core fuel elements

  20. Preparation of aluminium lakes by electrocoagulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prapai Pradabkham

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium lakes have been prepared by electrocoagulation employing aluminium as electrodes. The electrocoagulation is conducted in an aqueous alcoholic solution and is completed within one hour. The dye content in the lake ranges approximately between 4-32%.

  1. Electron Conditioning of Technical Aluminium Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Pimpec, F

    2004-09-02

    The effect of electron conditioning on commercially aluminium alloys 1100 and 6063 were investigated. Contrary to the assumption that electron conditioning, if performed long enough, can reduce and stabilize the SEY to low values (= 1.3, value of many pure elements [1]), the SEY of aluminium did not go lower than 1.8. In fact, it reincreases with continued electron exposure dose.

  2. Thermal formation of corundum from aluminium hydroxides ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aluminium hydroxides have been precipitated from various aluminium salts and the differences in their thermal behaviour have been investigated. Pseudoboehmite derived from the nitrate, sulfate and chloride all form -Al2O3 at ∼ 400°C but the formation of -Al2O3 at 1200°C occurs more readily in the material derived ...

  3. Characterisation and concentration profile of aluminium during ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An aluminium(Al) characterisation study was conducted at a surface water treatment plant (Buffalo Pound Water Treatment Plant (BPWTP) in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, Canada) to understand better the effect of alum coagulant on various Al fractions. The raw water source for BPWTP is Buffalo Pound Lake water. The Al ...

  4. Thermal formation of corundum from aluminium hydroxides ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Aluminium hydroxides have been precipitated from various aluminium salts and the differences in their thermal behaviour have been investigated. Pseudoboehmite derived from the nitrate, sulfate and chloride all form γ-Al2O3 at ~ 400°C but the formation of α-Al2O3 at 1200°C occurs more readily in the material ...

  5. Lactobacillus plantarum CCFM639 alleviates aluminium toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Leilei; Zhai, Qixiao; Liu, Xiaoming; Wang, Gang; Zhang, Qiuxiang; Zhao, Jianxin; Narbad, Arjan; Zhang, Hao; Tian, Fengwei; Chen, Wei

    2016-02-01

    Aluminium (Al) is the most abundant metal in the earth's crust. Al exposure can cause a variety of adverse physiological effects in humans and animals. Our aim was to demonstrate that specific probiotic bacteria can play a special physiologically functional role in protection against Al toxicity in mice. Thirty strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were tested for their aluminium-binding ability, aluminium tolerance, their antioxidative capacity, and their ability to survive the exposure to artificial gastrointestinal (GI) juices. Lactobacillus plantarum CCFM639 was selected for animal experiments because of its excellent performance in vitro. Forty mice were divided into four groups: control, Al only, Al plus CCFM639, and Al plus deferiprone (DFP). CCFM639 was administered at 10(9) CFU once daily for 10 days, followed by a single oral dose of aluminium chloride hexahydrate at 5.14 mg aluminium (LD50) for each mouse. The results showed that CCFM639 treatment led to a significant reduction in the mortality rates with corresponding decrease in intestinal aluminium absorption and in accumulation of aluminium in the tissues and amelioration of hepatic histopathological damage. This probiotic treatment also resulted in alleviation of hepatic, renal, and cerebral oxidative stress. The treatment of L. plantarum CCFM639 has potential as a therapeutic dietary strategy against acute aluminium toxicity.

  6. Steam generated conversion coating on aluminium alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Din, Rameez Ud; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Ambat, Rajan

    Aluminium and its alloys are widely used in aerospace industry owing to their high strength to weight ratio. The surface of aluminium under normal conditions has a thin oxide film (2.5-10 nm) responsible for its inherent corrosion resistance. This oxide film can further be converted or transformed...... into functional conversion coatings in order to enhance corrosion resistance and adhesion to paint systems. Chromium based conversion coatings have been extensively used on aluminium alloys to improve adhesion of subsequent paint layers and corrosion resistance. However, the use of hexavalent chromium is strictly...... regulated due to its toxic nature and suspected carcinogenicity. So, it is highly imperative to develop other alternatives for chrome conversion coatings. Treatment of aluminium with natural water at elevated temperatures results in the formation of different forms of aluminium oxide (γ-AlO(OH) , Al(OH)3...

  7. Welding skate with computerized controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, W. A., Jr.

    1968-01-01

    New welding skate concept for automatic TIG welding of contoured or double-contoured parts combines lightweight welding apparatus with electrical circuitry which computes the desired torch angle and positions a torch and cold-wire guide angle manipulator.

  8. Challenges to Resistance Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Quanfeng

    This report originates from the compulsory defense during my Ph.D. study at the Technical University of Denmark. Resistance welding is an old and well-proven technology. Yet the emergence of more and more new materials, new designs, invention off new joining techniques, and more stringent...... requirement in quality have imposed challenges to the resistance welding. More some research and development have to be done to adapt the old technology to the manufacturing industry of the 21st century. In the 1st part of the report, the challenging factors to the resistance welding are reviewed. Numerical...... simulation of resistance welding has been under development for many years. Yet it is no easy to make simulation results reliable and accurate because of the complexity of resistance welding process. In the 2nd part of the report numerical modeling of resistance welding is reviewed, some critical factors...

  9. Ultrasonic Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabors, Sammy

    2015-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Ultrasonic Stir Welding (USW) to join large pieces of very high-strength metals such as titanium and Inconel. USW, a solid-state weld process, improves current thermal stir welding processes by adding high-power ultrasonic (HPU) energy at 20 kHz frequency. The addition of ultrasonic energy significantly reduces axial, frictional, and shear forces; increases travel rates; and reduces wear on the stir rod, which results in extended stir rod life. The USW process decouples the heating, stirring, and forging elements found in the friction stir welding process allowing for independent control of each process element and, ultimately, greater process control and repeatability. Because of the independent control of USW process elements, closed-loop temperature control can be integrated into the system so that a constant weld nugget temperature can be maintained during welding.

  10. Automatization of welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwabuchi, Masashi; Tomita, Jinji; Nishihara, Katsunori.

    1978-01-01

    Automatization of welding is one of the effective measures for securing high degree of quality of nuclear power equipment, as well as for correspondence to the environment at the site of plant. As the latest ones of the automatic welders practically used for welding of nuclear power apparatuses in factories of Toshiba and IHI, those for pipes and lining tanks are described here. The pipe welder performs the battering welding on the inside of pipe end as the so-called IGSCC countermeasure and the succeeding butt welding through the same controller. The lining tank welder is able to perform simultaneous welding of two parallel weld lines on a large thin plate lining tank. Both types of the welders are demonstrating excellent performance at the shops as well as at the plant site. (author)

  11. Method for aluminium dross utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucheva, B.; Petkov, R.; Tzonev, Tz.

    2003-01-01

    A new hydrometallurgical method has been developed for metal aluminum utilization from secondary aluminum dross. Secondary aluminum dross is a powder product with an average of 35% aluminium content (below 1mm). It is waste from primary aluminum dross pyrometallurgical flux less treatment in rotary DC electric arc furnace. This method is based on aluminum leaching in copper chloride water solution. As a result an aluminum oxychloride solution and solids, consisting of copper and oxides are obtained. In order to copper chloride solution regenerate hydrochloric acid is added to the solids. The process is simple, quick, economic and safe. The aluminum oxychloride solution contains 56 g/l Al 2 O 3 . The molar ratios are Al:Cl=0,5; OH:Al=1. The solution has 32 % basicity and 1,1 g/cm 3 density. For increasing the molar ratio of aluminium to chlorine aluminum hydroxide is added to this solution at 80 o C. Aluminum hydroxide is the final product from the secondary aluminum dross alkaline leaching. As a result aluminum oxychloride solution of the following composition is prepared: Al 2 O 3 - 180 g/l; Al:Cl=1,88; OH:Al=4,64; basicity 82%; density 1,22 g/cm 3 , pH=4 -4,5. Aluminum oxychloride solution produced by means of this method can be used in potable and wastewater treatment, paper making, in refractory mixture as a binder etc. (Original)

  12. Dual wire welding torch and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez, Fernando Martinez; Stump, Kevin S.; Ludewig, Howard W.; Kilty, Alan L.; Robinson, Matthew M.; Egland, Keith M.

    2009-04-28

    A welding torch includes a nozzle with a first welding wire guide configured to orient a first welding wire in a first welding wire orientation, and a second welding wire guide configured to orient a second welding wire in a second welding wire orientation that is non-coplanar and divergent with respect to the first welding wire orientation. A method of welding includes moving a welding torch with respect to a workpiece joint to be welded. During moving the welding torch, a first welding wire is fed through a first welding wire guide defining a first welding wire orientation and a second welding wire is fed through a second welding wire guide defining a second welding wire orientation that is divergent and non-coplanar with respect to the first welding wire orientation.

  13. Electric arc welding gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luttrell, Edward; Turner, Paul W.

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates to improved apparatus for arc welding an interior joint formed by intersecting tubular members. As an example, the invention is well suited for applications where many similar small-diameter vertical lines are to be welded to a long horizontal header. The improved apparatus includes an arc welding gun having a specially designed welding head which is not only very compact but also produces welds that are essentially free from rolled-over solidified metal. The welding head consists of the upper end of the barrel and a reversely extending electrode holder, or tip, which defines an acute angle with the barrel. As used in the above-mentioned example, the gun is positioned to extend upwardly through the vertical member and the joint to be welded, with its welding head disposed within the horizontal header. Depending on the design of the welding head, the barrel then is either rotated or revolved about the axis of the vertical member to cause the electrode to track the joint.

  14. Electron beam welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, M.M.

    1974-01-01

    Electron-beam equipment is considered along with fixed and mobile electron-beam guns, questions of weld environment, medium and nonvacuum welding, weld-joint designs, tooling, the economics of electron-beam job shops, aspects of safety, quality assurance, and repair. The application of the process in the case of individual materials is discussed, giving attention to aluminum, beryllium, copper, niobium, magnesium, molybdenum, tantalum, titanium, metal alloys, superalloys, and various types of steel. Mechanical-property test results are examined along with the areas of application of electron-beam welding

  15. Robot welding process control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romine, Peter L.

    1991-01-01

    This final report documents the development and installation of software and hardware for Robotic Welding Process Control. Primary emphasis is on serial communications between the CYRO 750 robotic welder, Heurikon minicomputer running Hunter & Ready VRTX, and an IBM PC/AT, for offline programming and control and closed-loop welding control. The requirements for completion of the implementation of the Rocketdyne weld tracking control are discussed. The procedure for downloading programs from the Intergraph, over the network, is discussed. Conclusions are made on the results of this task, and recommendations are made for efficient implementation of communications, weld process control development, and advanced process control procedures using the Heurikon.

  16. Use of servo controlled weld head for end closure welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pathak, S.K.; Setty, D.S.; Rameswara Rao, A.; Hemantha Rao, G.V.S.; Jayaraj, R.N. [Nuclear Fuel Complex, Dept. of Atomic Energy, Hyderabad (India)

    2010-07-01

    In the PHWR fuel fabrication line resistance welding processes are used for joining various zirconium based alloy components to fuel tube of similar material. The quality requirement of these welding processes is very stringent and has to meet all the product requirements. At present these welding processes are being carried out by using standard resistance welding machines. In the resistance welding process in addition to current and time, force is one of the critical and important parameter, which influences the weld quality. At present advanced feed back type fast response medium frequency weld controllers are being used. This has upslope/down slope, constant and repetitive weld pattern selection features makes this critical welding process more reliable. Compared to weld controllers, squeeze force application devices are limited and normally standard high response pneumatic cylinders are used in the welding process. With this type of devices the force is constant during welding process and cannot be varied during welding process as per the material deformation characteristics. Similarly due to non-availability of feed back systems in the squeeze force application systems restricts the accuracy and quality of the welding process. In the present paper the influence of squeeze force pattern on the weld quality using advanced feed back type servo based force control system was studied. Different squeeze forces were used during pre and post weld heat periods along with constant force and compared with the weld quality. (author)

  17. Variation in aluminium patch test reactivity over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemund, Ingrid; Mowitz, Martin; Zimerson, Erik; Bruze, Magnus; Hindsén, Monica

    2017-11-01

    Contact allergy to aluminium has been reported more frequently in recent years. It has been pointed out that positive patch test reactions to aluminium may not be reproducible on retesting. To investigate possible variations in patch test reactivity to aluminium over time. Twenty-one adults, who had previously reacted positively to aluminium, were patch tested with equimolar dilution series in pet. of aluminium chloride hexahydrate and aluminium lactate, four times over a period of 8 months. Thirty-six of 84 (43%) serial dilution tests with aluminium chloride hexahydrate and 49 of 84 (58%) serial dilution tests with aluminium lactate gave negative results. The range of reactivity varied between a negative reaction to aluminium chloride hexahydrate at 10% and/or to aluminium lactate at 12%, and a positive reaction to aluminium chloride hexahydrate at 0.1% and/or to aluminium lactate at 0.12%. The highest individual difference in test reactivity noticed was 320-fold when the two most divergent minimal eliciting concentrations were compared. The patch test reactivity to aluminium varies over time. Aluminium-allergic individuals may have false-negative reactions. Therefore, retesting with aluminium should be considered when there is a strong suspicion of aluminium contact allergy. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Analysis of Using Acoustic Microscopy to Evaluate Defects in Spot Welding Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korzeniowski M.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the possibilities of using acoustic microscopy to evaluate defects in resistance spot welding joints. For this purpose, the welded joints were made from two grades of aluminium plates EN AW5754 H24 and EN AW6005 T606, which were then subjected to non-destructive testing using acoustic microscopy and conventional destructive testing using traditional light microscopy techniques. Additionally, the study examined the influence of the typical contaminants found in industrial conditions on the quality of the joint.

  19. Alveolar proteinosis associated with aluminium dust inhalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, R; Nigam, S; Sivakumaran, P

    2016-08-01

    Secondary alveolar proteinosis is a rare lung disease which may be triggered by a variety of inhaled particles. The diagnosis is made by detection of anti-granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor antibodies in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, which appears milky white and contains lamellar bodies. Aluminium has been suggested as a possible cause, but there is little evidence in the literature to support this assertion. We report the case of a 46-year-old former boilermaker and boat builder who developed secondary alveolar proteinosis following sustained heavy aluminium exposure. The presence of aluminium was confirmed both by histological examination and metallurgical analysis of a mediastinal lymph node. Despite cessation of exposure to aluminium and treatment with whole-lung lavage which normally results in improvements in both symptoms and lung function, the outcome was poor and novel therapies are now being used for this patient. It may be that the natural history in aluminium-related alveolar proteinosis is different, with the metal playing a mediating role in the disease process. Our case further supports the link between aluminium and secondary alveolar proteinosis and highlights the need for measures to prevent excessive aluminium inhalation in relevant industries. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Challenges in LCA modelling of multiple loops for aluminium cans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niero, Monia; Olsen, Stig Irving

    considered the case of closed-loop recycling for aluminium cans, where body and lid are different alloys, and discussed the abovementioned challenge. The Life Cycle Inventory (LCI) modelling of aluminium processes is traditionally based on a pure aluminium flow, therefore neglecting the presence of alloying...... elements. We included the effect of alloying elements on the LCA modelling of aluminium can recycling. First, we performed a mass balance of the main alloying elements (Mn, Fe, Si, Cu) in aluminium can recycling at increasing levels of recycling rate. The analysis distinguished between different aluminium...... packaging scrap sources (i.e. used beverage can and mixed aluminium packaging) to understand the limiting factors for multiple loop aluminium can recycling. Secondly, we performed a comparative LCA of aluminium can production and recycling in multiple loops considering the two aluminium packaging scrap...

  1. Investigation of the aluminium-aluminium oxide reversible transformation as observed by hot stage electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, C. A.; Judd, G.; Ansell, G. S.

    1972-01-01

    Thin foils of high purity aluminium and an Al-Al2O3 SAP type of alloy were oxidised in a specially designed hot stage specimen chamber in an electron microscope. Below 450 C, amorphous aluminium oxide formed on the foil surface and was first detectable at foil edges, holes, and pits. Islands of aluminium then nucleated in this amorphous oxide. The aluminium islands displayed either a lateral growth with eventual coalescence with other islands, or a reoxidation process which caused the islands to disappear. The aluminium island formation was determined to be related to the presence of the electron beam. A mechanism based upon electron charging due to the electron beam was proposed to explain the nucleation, growth, coalescence, disappearance, and geometry of the aluminium islands.

  2. Confined recrystallization of high-purity aluminium during accumulative roll bonding of aluminium laminates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chekhonin, Paul; Beausir, Benoît; Scharnweber, Juliane; Oertel, Carl-Georg; Hausöl, Tina; Höppel, Heinz Werner; Brokmeier, Heinz-Günter; Skrotzki, Werner

    2012-01-01

    Aluminium laminates consisting of high-purity aluminium and commercially pure aluminium have been produced by accumulative roll bonding (ARB) at ambient temperature for up to 10 cycles. To study the microstructure and texture development of the high-purity aluminium layers with regard to the shrinking layer thickness during ARB, microstructure and texture investigations were carried out by electron backscatter diffraction and neutron and X-ray diffraction, respectively. While the commercially pure aluminium layers develop an ultrafine-grained microstructure, partial discontinuous recrystallization occurs in the high-purity layers. The texture of the high-purity layers mainly consists of Cube and “Tilted Cube” (tilted with respect to the transverse direction) components. The experimental results are discussed with respect to confined recrystallization in the ARB aluminium laminates.

  3. Niobium-base grain refiner for aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Pontes, P. da; Robert, M.H.; Cupini, N.L.

    1980-01-01

    A new chemical grain refiner for aluminium has been developed, using inoculation of a niobium-base compound. When a bath of molten aluminium is inoculated whith this refiner, an intermetallic aluminium-niobium compound is formed which acts as a powerful nucleant, producing extremely fine structure comparable to those obtained by means of the traditional grain refiner based on titanium and boron. It was found that the refinement of the structure depends upon the weight percentage of the new refiner inoculated as well as the time of holding the bath after inoculation and before pouring, but mainly on the inoculating temperature. (Author) [pt

  4. Net shape powder processing of aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaffer, G.B.

    2000-01-01

    The increasing interest in light weight materials coupled to the need for cost-effective processing have combined to create a significant opportunity for aluminium powder metallurgy. Net shape processing of aluminium using the classical press-and-sinter powder metallurgy technique is a unique and important metal-forming method which is cost effective in producing complex parts at, or very close to, final dimensions. This paper provides an overview of the net shape powder processing of aluminium. Current research is critically reviewed and the future potential is briefly considered

  5. Effects of aluminium surface morphology and chemical modification on wettability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahimi, Maral; Fojan, Peter; Gurevich, Leonid

    2014-01-01

    -life aluminium surfaces of different morphology: unpolished aluminium, polished aluminium, and aluminium foil, were subjected to surface modification procedures which involved the formation of a layer of hydrophilic hyperbranched polyethyleneglycol via in situ polymerization, molecular vapour deposition...... of a monolayer of fluorinated silane, and a combination of those. The effect of these surface modification techniques on roughness and wettability of the aluminium surfaces was elucidated by ellipsometry, contact angle measurements and atomic force microscopy. We demonstrated that by employing different types...

  6. Measuring weld heat to evaluate weld integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schauder, V., E-mail: schauder@hks-prozesstechnik.de [HKS-Prozesstechnik GmbH, Halle (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    Eddy current and ultrasonic testing are suitable for tube and pipe mills and have been used for weld seam flaw detection for decades, but a new process, thermography, is an alternative. By measuring the heat signature of the weld seam as it cools, it provides information about weld integrity at and below the surface. The thermal processes used to join metals, such as plasma, induction, laser, and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW), have improved since they were developed, and they get better with each passing year. However, no industrial process is perfect, so companies that conduct research in flaw detection likewise continue to develop and improve the technologies used to verify weld integrity: ultrasonic testing (UT), eddy current testing (ET), hydrostatic, X-ray, magnetic particle, and liquid penetrant are among the most common. Two of these are used for verifying the integrity of the continuous welds such as those used on pipe and tube mills: UT and ET. Each uses a transmitter to send waves of ultrasonic energy or electrical current through the material and a receiver (probe) to detect disturbances in the flow. The two processes often are combined to capitalize on the strengths of each. While ET is good at detecting flaws at or near the surface, UT penetrates the material, detecting subsurface flaws. One drawback is that sound waves and electrical current waves have a specific direction of travel, or an alignment. A linear defect that runs parallel to the direction of travel of the ultrasonic sound wave or a flaw that is parallel to the coil winding direction of the ET probe can go undetected. A second drawback is that they don't detect cold welds. An alternative process, thermography, works in a different fashion: It monitors the heat of the material as the weld cools. Although it measures the heat at the surface, the heat signature provides clues about cooling activity deep in the material, resulting in a thorough assessment of the weld's integrity It

  7. An investigation on mechanical property of commercial copper tube to aluminium 2025 tube plate by FWTPET process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kannan, S., E-mail: kannan.dgl201127@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mining Machinery Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology (ISM), Dhanbad, Jharkhand 826004 (India); Senthil Kumaran, S., E-mail: sskumaran@ymail.com [Research and Development Center, Department of Mechanical Engineering, RVS Educational Trust' s Group of Institutions, RVS School of Engineering and Technology, Dindigul, Tamilnadu 624005 (India); Kumaraswamidhas, L.A., E-mail: lakdhas1978@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mining Machinery Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology (ISM), Dhanbad, Jharkhand 826004 (India)

    2016-07-05

    Frictional welding of tube to tube plate by external tool (FWTPET) posses wide spread industrial in mass production process for joint similar and dissimilar materials. Frictional welding process allows welding of some materials that are exceptionally hard to fusion weld. The good quality joint between the tube and tube plate is achieved by selecting the proper process parameter. In this present research, the frictional welding is done between the Aluminium 2025 tube plate and commercial copper tube possessing a clearance fit of 0.1 mm between tube and hole. In this study, two conditions were considered while handing out this experiment. The condiction1 is tube without holes [WOH] and condition 2 is tube with holes [WH] on the tube circumference. In total, twenty seven work pieces have been considered separately for both conditions and the mechanical property such as compression strength and hardness value has been measured for the both set of work piece in two conditions to analysis the joint strength of the welding process. Taguchi L{sub 27} orthogonal array has been used in this process to identify the process parameter which influences the joint strength of the welded samples. ANOVA method is used to calculate the percentage of contribution by each process parameter which influences the better joint strength. Genetic algorithm is used to authenticate the outcome obtained from the both experimental value and optimization value. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) has been performed to probe microstructures and chemical compositions for work piece without holes which has higher mechanical property. - Highlights: • FWTPET for dissimilar metals commercial copper tube and Al 2025 tube plate. • The hardness value for tube without holes are 180.988 Hv. • The compression strength for tube without holes are 376.05 MPa. • SEM confirm heat production is done to melt parent metal by diffusion process. • EDX prove no trace

  8. Aluminium Toxicity Targets in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sónia Silva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium (Al is the third most abundant metallic element in soil but becomes available to plants only when the soil pH drops below 5.5. At those conditions, plants present several signals of Al toxicity. As reported by literature, major consequences of Al exposure are the decrease of plant production and the inhibition of root growth. The root growth inhibition may be directly/indirectly responsible for the loss of plant production. In this paper the most remarkable symptoms of Al toxicity in plants and the latest findings in this area are addressed. Root growth inhibition, ROS production, alterations on root cell wall and plasma membrane, nutrient unbalances, callose accumulation, and disturbance of cytoplasmic Ca2+ homeostasis, among other signals of Al toxicity are discussed, and, when possible, the behavior of Al-tolerant versus Al-sensitive genotypes under Al is compared.

  9. TIG welding method and TIG welding device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoneda, Eishi

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of TIG welding for members having different heat capacities including a cladding tube and an end plug of a fuel rod to be used, for example, in a reactor, and a device therefor. Namely, in the TIG welding method, the flow rate of a sealed gas to the side of a member having smaller heat capacity is made greater than that on the side of the member having greater heat capacity bordered on the top end of a welding electrode. Since the sealed gas is jetted being localized relative to the welding electrode, arc is restricted in a region of the member having smaller heat capacity and is increased at a region having a larger heat capacity. As a result, the arc is localized, so that the heat input amount to the region having a large heat capacity is increased, and then a plurality of members at the abutting portion are melted uniformly thereby capable of obtaining a uniform molten pool. A bead is formed at the abutting portion thereby capable of obtaining a welded portion with less unevenness and having large strength. (I.S.)

  10. Explosion metal welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popoff, A.A.

    1976-01-01

    Process parameters pertaining to welding similar and dissimilar metals using explosives are reviewed. The discussion centers on the interrelationship of physical parameters which play a part in achieving desirable metallurgical results. Present activities in explosion metal welding at LASL are presented and shown how they related to the interests of the ERDA community

  11. Electron beam welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabbay, M.

    1972-01-01

    The bead characteristics and the possible mechanisms of the electron beam penetration are presented. The different welding techniques are exposed and the main parts of an electron beam welding equipment are described. Some applications to nuclear, spatial and other industries are cited [fr

  12. Welding problems in nuclear power engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubchenko, A.S.

    1986-01-01

    The problems of welding industry in nuclear power plant engineering, mainly related to the improvement of molten bath protection, are considered. Development of new materials for welding electrodes, for cladding and welding fluxes, is pointed out. Production of the following equipment is brought to a commercial level: welding heads and welding machines for branch pipe welding, anticorrosion cladding, zonal thermal treatment, electron beam welding facilities for the welding and maintenance of turbineblades, equipment for nondestructive testing of welded joints

  13. Method for welding beryllium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, R.D.; Smith, F.M.; O`Leary, R.F.

    1997-04-01

    A method is provided for joining beryllium pieces which comprises: depositing aluminum alloy on at least one beryllium surface; contacting that beryllium surface with at least one other beryllium surface; and welding the aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces together. The aluminum alloy may be deposited on the beryllium using gas metal arc welding. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be subjected to elevated temperatures and pressures to reduce porosity before welding the pieces together. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be machined into a desired welding joint configuration before welding. The beryllium may be an alloy of beryllium or a beryllium compound. The aluminum alloy may comprise aluminum and silicon. 9 figs.

  14. Method for welding beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, R.D.; Smith, F.M.; O'Leary, R.F.

    1997-01-01

    A method is provided for joining beryllium pieces which comprises: depositing aluminum alloy on at least one beryllium surface; contacting that beryllium surface with at least one other beryllium surface; and welding the aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces together. The aluminum alloy may be deposited on the beryllium using gas metal arc welding. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be subjected to elevated temperatures and pressures to reduce porosity before welding the pieces together. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be machined into a desired welding joint configuration before welding. The beryllium may be an alloy of beryllium or a beryllium compound. The aluminum alloy may comprise aluminum and silicon. 9 figs

  15. Modelling and Pareto optimization of mechanical properties of friction stir welded AA7075/AA5083 butt joints using neural network and particle swarm algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shojaeefard, Mohammad Hasan; Behnagh, Reza Abdi; Akbari, Mostafa; Givi, Mohammad Kazem Besharati; Farhani, Foad

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Defect-free friction stir welds have been produced for AA5083-O/AA7075-O. ► Back-propagation was sufficient for predicting hardness and tensile strength. ► A hybrid multi-objective algorithm is proposed to deal with this MOP. ► Multi-objective particle swarm optimization was used to find the Pareto solutions. ► TOPSIS is used to rank the given alternatives of the Pareto solutions. -- Abstract: Friction Stir Welding (FSW) has been successfully used to weld similar and dissimilar cast and wrought aluminium alloys, especially for aircraft aluminium alloys, that generally present with low weldability by the traditional fusion welding process. This paper focuses on the microstructural and mechanical properties of the Friction Stir Welding (FSW) of AA7075-O to AA5083-O aluminium alloys. Weld microstructures, hardness and tensile properties were evaluated in as-welded condition. Tensile tests indicated that mechanical properties of the joint were better than in the base metals. An Artificial Neural Network (ANN) model was developed to simulate the correlation between the Friction Stir Welding parameters and mechanical properties. Performance of the ANN model was excellent and the model was employed to predict the ultimate tensile strength and hardness of butt joint of AA7075–AA5083 as functions of weld and rotational speeds. The multi-objective particle swarm optimization was used to obtain the Pareto-optimal set. Finally, the Technique for Order Preference by Similarity to the Ideal Solution (TOPSIS) was applied to determine the best compromised solution.

  16. Transition welds in welding of two-ply steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fartushnyj, V.G.; Evsyukov, Yu.G.

    1977-01-01

    Studied were physico-mechanical properties of welds made by various welding wires of chromium-nickel and nickel-chromium steels in submerged arc welding of double-layer steels with main layer of the VSt.3sp. carbon steel. It is shown that service-reliable structures welded of two-layer steels are obtained by providing the content from 11 to 20 % Ni in the automatically welded transition layer

  17. Steam Initiated Surface Modification of Aluminium Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Din, Rameez Ud

    The extensive demand of aluminium alloys in various industries such as in transportationis mainly due to the high strength to weight ratio, which could be translated into fuel economy and efficiency. Corrosion protection of aluminium alloys is an important aspect for all applications which includes...... the use of aluminium alloys in the painted form requiring a conversion coating to improve the adhesion. Chromate based conversion coating processes are extremely good for these purposes, however the carcinogenic and toxic nature of hexavalent chromium led to the search for more benign and eco......, crystalline nano-particles, role of steam-based treatment on adhesion of industrially applied powder coating, and investigations of a failed painted aluminium window profile due to defects in the extruded profile. Chapters 13 and 14 describe the overall discussion, conclusions and future work based...

  18. Generation and characterization of nano aluminium powder ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    Generation and characterization of nano aluminium powder obtained through wire ... Department of Aerospace Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology. Madras, Chennai 600 .... pressure developed due to current flow (z-Pinch). Figure 2.

  19. Irradiation effects in magnesium and aluminium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sturcken, E.F.

    1979-01-01

    Effects of neutron irradiation on microstructure, mechanical properties and swelling of several magnesium and aluminium alloys were studied. The neutron fluences of 2-3 X 10 22 n/cm 2 , >0.2 MeV produced displacement doses of 20 to 45 displacements per atom (dpa). Ductility of the magnesium alloys was severely reduced by irradiation induced recrystallization and precipitation of various forms. Precipitation of transmuted silicon occurred in the aluminium alloys. However, the effect on ductility was much less than for the magnesium alloys. The magnesium and aluminium alloys had excellent resistance to swelling: The best magnesium alloy was Mg/3.0 wt% Al/0.19 wt% Ca; its density decreased by only 0.13%. The best aluminium alloy was 6063, with a density decrease of 0.22%. (Auth.)

  20. COMBINED ALUMINIUM SULFATE/HYDROXIDE PROCESS FOR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sulfate, and used for fluoride removal from water by combining with Nalgonda Technique. ... effects on human health and could result in fluorosis. ... [23], nanoscale aluminium oxide hydroxide (AlOOH) [24] and natural zeolite [25], were among.

  1. Aluminium reprocessing with local mineral raw material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirsaidov, U.M.

    2002-01-01

    With the purpose of utilization of ice sediment, receiving from mud fields solutions and flotation tails and at using local aluminium and fluorine-containing raw material was elaborated fundamental technologic scheme presented in this chapter of book

  2. Deformation features of aluminium in tensile tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quadros, N.F. de.

    1984-01-01

    It is presented a method to analyse stress-strain curves. Plastic and elastic strains were studied. The strains were done by tensile tests in four types of materials: highly pure aluminium, pure aluminium, commercially pure aluminium and aluminium - uranium. The chemical compositions were obtained by spectroscopy analysis and neutron activation analysis. Tensile tests were carried out at three strain rates, at room temperature, 100,200, 300 and 400 0 C, with knives extensometer and strain-gages to studied the elastic strain region. A multiple spring model based on two springs model to analyse elastic strain caused by tests without extensometers, taking in account moduli of elasticity and, an interactive analysis system with graphic capability were developed. It was suggested a qualitative model to explain the quantized multielasticity of Bell. (M.C.K.) [pt

  3. Grinding Parts For Automatic Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burley, Richard K.; Hoult, William S.

    1989-01-01

    Rollers guide grinding tool along prospective welding path. Skatelike fixture holds rotary grinder or file for machining large-diameter rings or ring segments in preparation for welding. Operator grasps handles to push rolling fixture along part. Rollers maintain precise dimensional relationship so grinding wheel cuts precise depth. Fixture-mounted grinder machines surface to quality sufficient for automatic welding; manual welding with attendant variations and distortion not necessary. Developed to enable automatic welding of parts, manual welding of which resulted in weld bead permeated with microscopic fissures.

  4. Modification of wool surface by liposomes for dyeing with weld.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montazer, Majid; Zolfaghari, Alireza; Toliat, Taibeh; Moghadam, Mohammad Bameni

    2009-01-01

    In this research work, wool surface has been modified by liposome to investigate its effects on dyeing with weld, a yellow natural dye. To do this, samples were first treated with aluminium sulphate and afterward with different concentrations of liposomes at various temperatures for 30 minutes and, finally, dyed with weld at 75, 85, and 95 degrees C for 30, 45, and 60 minutes. K/S values of fabric samples were calculated and washing, light and rub fastness properties of the samples were indicated. The results proposed that the sample treated with 1% liposomes and dyed at 75 degrees C for 60 min has the highest K/S value. The central composite design (CCD) used for the experimental plan with three variables on the results of color strength and statistical analysis confirms the optimum conditions obtained by the experimental results. It was also found that washing, light, wet, and dry rub fastness properties of samples dyed with weld, including liposomes, have not significantly changed. The results of water drop absorption indicated that the hydrophobicity is higher for the samples pretreated with liposomes. The SEM picture of wool sample treated with mordant and liposomes and finally dyed with weld shows a coated layer on the fiber surface.

  5. Two-dimensional modeling of conduction-mode laser welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russo, A.J.

    1984-01-01

    WELD2D is a two-dimensional finite difference computer program suitable for modeling the conduction-mode welding process when the molten weld pool motion can be neglected. The code is currently structured to treat butt-welded geometries in a plane normal to the beam motion so that dissimilar materials may be considered. The surface heat transfer models used in the code include a Gaussian beam or uniform laser source, and a free electron theory reflectance calculation. Temperature-dependent material parameters are used in the reflectance calculation. Measured cold reflection data are used to include surface roughness or oxide effects until melt occurs, after which the surface is assumed to be smooth and clean. Blackbody reradiation and a simple natural convection model are also included in the upper surface boundary condition. Either an implicit or explicit finite-difference representation of the heat conduction equation in an enthalpy form is solved at each time step. This enables phase transition energies to be easily and accurately incorporated into the formulation. Temperature-dependent 9second-order polynominal dependence) thermal conductivities are used in the conduction calculations. Constant values of specific heat are used for each material phase. At present, material properties for six metals are included in the code. These are: aluminium, nickel, steel, molybdenum, copper and silicon

  6. Diffusion bonding of transition structures for integral aluminium-fibre reinforced polymer (FRP) compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hehl, A. von [IWT - Stiftung Institut fuer Werkstofftechnik, Hauptabteilung Werkstofftechnik, Bremen (Germany); Syassen, F. [Airbus Operations GmbH, Metal Technology, Bremen (Germany); Schimanski, K.

    2012-04-15

    Components in hybrid design become more and more important in terms of their lightweight potential. In this context the demand for weight saving in aerospace leads to increasing numbers of applications of fibre composites for primary structural components. In consequence the use of FRP-metal compounds is necessary. Within the investigations of the researcher group ''Schwarz Silber'' (FOR 1224) founded by the DFG (German Research Foundation) material optimised interface structures for advanced CFRP-aluminium compounds are currently being studied. Within their work the researcher group focussed on three concepts realizing the transition structures: the usage of wires (titanium), foils (titanium) and fibres (glass fibre) as transition elements between CFRP and aluminium. For the connection of the aluminium sheet and the transition element die-casting and laser beam welding are basically used. As a possible alternative to the both liquid phase processes a feasibility study haven been done focussing the solid state processes diffusion bonding. The experimental results show the high potential of this process in view of the transferable loads for integral transition structures. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Prediction of Weld Residual Stress of Narrow Gap Welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jun Seog; Huh, Nam Su

    2010-01-01

    The conventional welding technique such as shield metal arc welding has been mostly applied to the piping system of the nuclear power plants. It is well known that this welding technique causes the overheating and welding defects due to the large groove angle of weld. On the other hand, the narrow gap welding(NGW) technique has many merits, for instance, the reduction of welding time, the shrinkage of weld and the small deformation of the weld due to the small groove angle and welding bead width comparing with the conventional welds. These characteristics of NGW affect the deformation behavior and the distribution of welding residual stress of NGW, thus it is believed that the residual stress results obtained from conventional welding procedure may not be applied to structural integrity evaluation of NGW. In this paper, the welding residual stress of NGW was predicted using the nonlinear finite element analysis to simulate the thermal and mechanical effects of the NGW. The present results can be used as the important information to perform the flaw evaluation and to improve the weld procedure of NGW

  8. Capabilities of infrared weld monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanders, P.G.; Keske, J.S.; Leong, K.H.; Kornecki, G.

    1997-11-01

    A non-obtrusive pre-aligned, solid-state device has been developed to monitor the primary infrared emissions during laser welding. The weld monitor output is a 100-1000 mV signal that depends on the beam power and weld characteristics. The DC level of this signal is related to weld penetration, while AC portions of the output can be correlated with surface irregularities and part misalignment or contamination. Changes in DC behavior are also noted for both full and deep penetration welds. Full penetration welds are signified by an abrupt reduction in the weld monitor output. Bead on plate welds were made on steel, aluminum, and magnesium with both a CW CO{sub 2} laser and a pulsed Nd:YAG laser to explore the relationships between the weld characteristics and the weld monitor output.

  9. Silane based coating of aluminium mold

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    having at least one closed cavity is provided, at least one surface of the at least one cavity being an aluminium surface coated with a silane based coating layer. The silane based anti-stiction coating improves the anti-stiction properties of the mold which may allow for molding and demolding...... of structures which would otherwise be difficult to mold. The resistance of the coated aluminium mold is significantly improved by applying a silane-based coating layer....

  10. Characterization of aluminium alloys rapidly solidified

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro, W.A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discussed the investigation of the microstructural and mechanical properties of the aluminium alloys (3003; 7050; Al-9% Mg) rapidly solidified by melt spinning process (cooling rate 10 4 - 10 6 K/s). The rapidly solidification process of the studied aluminium alloys brought a microcrystallinity, a minimum presence of coarse precipitation and, also, better mechanical properties of them comparing to the same alloys using ingot process. (author) [pt

  11. Structural evolution in nanoporous anodic aluminium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocca, Emmanuel; Vantelon, Delphine; Reguer, Solenn; Mirambet, François

    2012-01-01

    Nanoporous and self-organized layers of aluminium alloys are used in many applications as membranes, templates for nanometric objects or corrosion protection for aluminium alloys. The use of this nanometric structure widely remains empirical, especially in the case of very small pores ( 4 into AlO 6 cluster and a partial release of sulphate ions are an important chemical transformation of the amorphous structure. This structural transformation defines the chemistry (pH and surface charge) inside the nanopores, the ageing behaviour and the possible incorporation or diffusion of chemical species in the nanostructure. Highlights: ► Investigations of local chemical environment of aluminium atoms in anodic aluminium oxide. ► The oxide structure is constituted by 2/3 of aluminium in tetrahedral coordination 1/3 in octahedral coordination. ► In contact with water, AlO 4 clusters are transformed into AlO 6 cluster and the aluminium sulphate bonds are hydrolysed. ► These transformations induce a pH decrease inside the nanostructure.

  12. Welding method, and welding device for use therein, and method of analysis for evaluating welds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aendenroomer, A.J.; Den Ouden, G.; Xiao, Y.H.; Brabander, W.A.J.

    1995-01-01

    Described is a method of automatically welding pipes, comprising welding with a pulsation welding current and monitoring, by means of a sensor, the variations occurring in the arc voltage caused by weld pool oscillations. The occurrence of voltage variations with only frequency components below 100

  13. Weld analysis and control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Larry Z. (Inventor); Rodgers, Michael H. (Inventor); Powell, Bradley W. (Inventor); Burroughs, Ivan A. (Inventor); Goode, K. Wayne (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The invention is a Weld Analysis and Control System developed for active weld system control through real time weld data acquisition. Closed-loop control is based on analysis of weld system parameters and weld geometry. The system is adapted for use with automated welding apparatus having a weld controller which is capable of active electronic control of all aspects of a welding operation. Enhanced graphics and data displays are provided for post-weld analysis. The system provides parameter acquisition, including seam location which is acquired for active torch cross-seam positioning. Torch stand-off is also monitored for control. Weld bead and parent surface geometrical parameters are acquired as an indication of weld quality. These parameters include mismatch, peaking, undercut, underfill, crown height, weld width, puddle diameter, and other measurable information about the weld puddle regions, such as puddle symmetry, etc. These parameters provide a basis for active control as well as post-weld quality analysis and verification. Weld system parameters, such as voltage, current and wire feed rate, are also monitored and archived for correlation with quality parameters.

  14. Welding processes handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Weman, Klas

    2003-01-01

    Deals with the main commercially significant and commonly used welding processes. This title takes the student or novice welder through the individual steps involved in each process in an easily understood way. It covers many of the requirements referred to in European Standards including EN719, EN 729, EN 729 and EN 287.$bWelding processes handbook is a concise, explanatory guide to the main commercially significant and commonly-used welding processes. It takes the novice welder or student through the individual steps involved in each process in a clear and easily understood way. It is intended to provide an up-to-date reference to the major applications of welding as they are used in industry. The contents have been arranged so that it can be used as a textbook for European welding courses in accordance with guidelines from the European Welding Federation. Welding processes and equipment necessary for each process are described so that they can be applied to all instruction levels required by the EWF and th...

  15. [Aluminium content in foods with aluminium-containing food additives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogimoto, Mami; Suzuki, Kumi; Kabashima, Junichiro; Nakazato, Mitsuo; Uematsu, Yoko

    2012-01-01

    The aluminium (Al) content of 105 samples, including bakery products made with baking powder, agricultural products and seafoods treated with alum, was investigated. The amounts of Al detected were as follows (limit of quantification: 0.01 mg/g): 0.01-0.37 mg/g in 26 of 57 bakery products, 0.22-0.57 mg/g in 3 of 6 powder mixes, 0.01-0.05 mg/g in all three agricultural products examined, 0.03-0.90 mg/g in 4 of 6 seafood samples, 0.01-0.03 mg/g in 3 of 11 samples of instant noodles, 0.04-0.14 mg/g in 3 of 4 samples of vermicelli, 0.01 mg/g in 1 of 16 soybean products, but none in soybeans. Amounts equivalent to the PTWI of a 16 kg infant were detected in two samples of bakery products, two samples of powder mixes and one sample of salted jellyfish, if each sample was taken once a week. These results suggest that certain foods, depending on the product and the intake, might exceed the PTWI of children, especially infants.

  16. Aluminium exclusion and aluminium tolerance in woody plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivano eBrunner

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The aluminium (Al cation Al3+ is highly rhizotoxic and is a major stress factor to plants on acid soils, which cover large areas of tropical and boreal regions. Many woody plant species are native to acid soils and are well adapted to high Al3+ conditions. In tropical regions, both woody Al accumulator and non-Al accumulator plants occur, whereas in boreal regions woody plants are non-Al accumulators. The mechanisms of these adaptations can be divided into those that facilitate the exclusion of Al3+ from root cells (exclusion mechanisms and those that enable plants to tolerate Al3+ once it has entered the root and shoot symplast (internal tolerance mechanisms. The biochemical and molecular basis of these mechanisms have been intensively studied in several crop plants and the model plant Arabidopsis. In this review, we examine the current understanding of Al3+ exclusion and tolerance mechanisms from woody plants. In addition, we discuss the ecology of woody non-Al accumulator and Al accumulator plants, and present examples of Al3+ adaptations in woody plant populations. This paper complements previous reviews focusing on crop plants and provides insights into evolutionary processes operating in plant communities that are widespread on acid soils.

  17. Formation Mechanisms for Entry and Exit Defects in Bobbin Friction Stir Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Tamadon

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Bobbin friction stir welding (BFSW is an innovative variant for the solid state welding process whereby a rotating symmetrical tool causes a fully penetrated bond. Despite the process development, there are still unknown variables in the characterization of the process parameters which can cause uncontrolled weld defects. The entry zone and the exit zone consist of two discontinuity-defects and removing them is one of the current challenges for improving the weld quality. In the present research, the characteristic features of the entry and exit defects in the weld structure and formation mechanism of them during the BFSW processing was investigated. Using stacked layers of multi-colour plasticine the material flow, analogous to metal flow, can be visualised. By using different colours as the path markers of the analogue model, the streamline flow can be easily delineated in the discontinuity defects compared with the metal welds. AA6082-T6 aluminium plates and multi-layered plasticine slabs were employed to replicate the entry-exit defects in the metal weld and analogue samples. The fixed-bobbin tool utilized for this research was optimized by adding a thread feature and tri-flat geometry to the pin and closed-end spiral scrolls on both shoulder surfaces. Samples were processed at different rotating and longitudinal speeds to show the degree of dependency on the welding parameters for the defects. The analogue models showed that the entry zone and the exit zone of the BFSW are affected by the inhomogeneity of the material flow regime which causes the ejection or disruption of the plastic flow in the gap between the bobbin shoulders. The trial aluminium welds showed that the elimination of entry-exit defects in the weld body is not completely possible but the size of the defects can be minimized by modification of the welding parameters. For the entry zone, the flow pattern evolution suggested formation mechanisms for a sprayed tail, island zone

  18. Thermal stir welding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A welding method is provided for forming a weld joint between first and second elements of a workpiece. The method includes heating the first and second elements to form an interface of material in a plasticized or melted state interface between the elements. The interface material is then allowed to cool to a plasticized state if previously in a melted state. The interface material, while in the plasticized state, is then mixed, for example, using a grinding/extruding process, to remove any dendritic-type weld microstructures introduced into the interface material during the heating process.

  19. Thermal stir welding apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A welding method and apparatus are provided for forming a weld joint between first and second elements of a workpiece. The method includes heating the first and second elements to form an interface of material in a plasticized or melted state interface between the elements. The interface material is then allowed to cool to a plasticized state if previously in a melted state. The interface material, while in the plasticized state, is then mixed, for example, using a grinding/extruding process, to remove any dendritic-type weld microstructures introduced into the interface material during the heating process.

  20. Review of Welding Terminology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelika Petrėtienė

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses welding terms in accordance with the Lithuanian standard LST EN 1792 „Welding. The multilingual list of welding terms and similar processes”, „The Russian–Lithuanian dictionary of the terms of mechanical engineering technology and welding“ and the examples from postgraduates‘ final works. It analyses the infringement of lexical, word-building and morphological rules. First-year students should already be familiar with the standardized terms of their speciality. More active propagation of the terms should help to avoid terminology mistakes in various scientific spheres.

  1. Half bead welding technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canonico, D.A.; Holz, P.P.

    1978-05-01

    The ORNL has employed the Section XI half-bead procedure for six repair welds. Table 2 identifies the repairs and the components upon which they were accomplished. The weld repairs were performed to permit us to evaluate material properties, residual stresses, weld repair procedures, and structural behavior of repaired pressure vessels. As a consequence of our study we concluded that when the half bead procedure is correctly applied: (1) there is no metallurgical degradation of the base material, (2) residual stresses of yield point magnitude will be present, and (3) the structural integrity of the pressure vessel is not impaired at Charpy V-notch upper shelf temperatures

  2. Influence of Process Parameters on the Quality of Aluminium Alloy EN AW 7075 Using Selective Laser Melting (SLM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, N.; Imran, M.; Wischeropp, T. M.; Emmelmann, C.; Siddique, S.; Walther, F.

    Selective laser melting (SLM) is an additive manufacturing process, forming the desired geometry by selective layer fusion of powder material. Unlike conventional manufacturing processes, highly complex parts can be manufactured with high accuracy and little post processing. Currently, different steel, aluminium, titanium and nickel-based alloys have been successfully processed; however, high strength aluminium alloy EN AW 7075 has not been processed with satisfying quality. The main focus of the investigation is to develop the SLM process for the wide used aluminium alloy EN AW 7075. Before process development, the gas-atomized powder material was characterized in terms of statistical distribution: size and shape. A wide range of process parameters were selected to optimize the process in terms of optimum volume density. The investigations resulted in a relative density of over 99%. However, all laser-melted parts exhibit hot cracks which typically appear in aluminium alloy EN AW 7075 during the welding process. Furthermore the influence of processing parameters on the chemical composition of the selected alloy was determined.

  3. Dimensional accuracy of aluminium extrusions in mechanical calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raknes, Christian Arne; Welo, Torgeir; Paulsen, Frode

    2018-05-01

    Reducing dimensional variations in the extrusion process without increasing cost is challenging due to the nature of the process itself. An alternative approach—also from a cost perspective—is using extruded profiles with standard tolerances and utilize downstream processes, and thus calibrate the part within tolerance limits that are not achievable directly from the extrusion process. In this paper, two mechanical calibration strategies for the extruded product are investigated, utilizing the forming lines of the manufacturer. The first calibration strategy is based on global, longitudinal stretching in combination with local bending, while the second strategy utilizes the principle of transversal stretching and local bending of the cross-section. An extruded U-profile is used to make a comparison between the two methods using numerical analyses. To provide response surfaces with the FEA program, ABAQUS is used in combination with Design of Experiment (DOE). DOE is conducted with a two-level fractional factorial design to collect the appropriate data. The aim is to find the main factors affecting the dimension accuracy of the final part obtained by the two calibration methods. The results show that both calibration strategies have proven to reduce cross-sectional variations effectively form standard extrusion tolerances. It is concluded that mechanical calibration is a viable, low-cost alternative for aluminium parts that demand high dimensional accuracy, e.g. due to fit-up or welding requirements.

  4. TEM investigation of aluminium containing precipitates in high aluminium doped silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong-Leung, J.; FitzGerald, J.D.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Silicon carbide is a promising semiconductor material for applications in high temperature and high power devices. The successful growth of good quality epilayers in this material has enhanced its potential for device applications. As a novel semiconductor material, there is a need for studying its basic physical properties and the role of dopants in this material. In this study, silicon carbide epilayers were grown on 4H-SiC wafers of (0001) orientation with a miscut angle of 8 deg at a temperature of 1550 deg C. The epilayers contained regions of high aluminium doping well above the solubility of aluminium in silicon carbide. High temperature annealing of this material resulted in the precipitation of aluminium in the wafers. The samples were analysed by secondary ion mass spectrometry and transmission electron microscopy. Selected area diffraction studies show the presence of aluminium carbide and aluminium silicon carbide phases. Copyright (2002) Australian Society for Electron Microscopy Inc

  5. Contribution to a research on electron beam welding of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stohr, J.

    1964-03-01

    such conditions that the molten zone shows a small section, which is the main characteristic of this method. These tests have also established that the hollow cut by the electron beam, is free of molten metal, which allows a flow of electrons, whose penetration into the material is negligible. This way of looking has been confirmed by macro-graphies of mixtures, where very short welding points have been performed. These macro-graphies show the existence of a central hole. Tests made under dynamic operating confirm also the existence of a hole, when during the welding process, the electron beam pressure, the molten metal is pushed against the height, then existence of a hole, when during the welding process, the electron beam is suddenly cut off. Therefore, the welding process can be explained as follows: Through electron beam pressure, the molten metal is pushed against the height, then flows down, once the electron beam has moved away, and fills the previously made hole. The existence of a welding seam corroborates this point of view: autoradiographic of straight sections of parts containing radiotracers, show well the mixing due to metal flow. As a matter of fact, the filling of the hole is made by the molten metal coming as well from the higher part, as the lateral back part of the hole (on grounds of way of moving); The penetrating depth also depends on material's characteristics. Tests made with pieces of Cu, Fe, Al show that the penetrating depth is almost proportional to specific heat and in this particular case, one gets: h(Al) / C(Al) = h (Fe) / C (Fe) = h (Cu) / C (Cu) This proportionality comes to an end, welding alloys with one or several additional elements show a high vapour pressure at the melting pint. Tests made with Aluminium and an Al-Mg alloy show indeed a considerable increase of penetrating depth for the latter, in spite of the fact, that the specific heat is practically the same. This increase of penetrating depth can be explained by the pressure

  6. Recent developments in pipeline welding practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    Fourteen chapters are included: overview of pipeline welding systems and quality assurance, CRC automatic welding system, H.C. Price Co. automatic welding system, semi-automatic MIG-welding process, partial penetration welding of steel pipes for gas distribution, construction procedures and quality control in offshore pipeline construction, welding in repair and maintenance of gas transmission pipelines, British Gas studies of welding on pressurized gas transmission pipelines, hot tapping pipelines, underwater welding for offshore pipelines and associated equipment, radial friction welding, material composition vs weld properties, review of NDT of pipeline welds, and safety assurance in pipeline construction. A bibliography of approximately 150 references is included, arranged according to subject and year.

  7. Investigation of aluminium-rich alloy system of aluminium-strontium-silicium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganiev, I.N.; Vakhobov, A.B.; Dzhuraev, T.D.; Alidzhanov, F.N.

    1976-01-01

    An area of the solid solution based on aluminium was studied, and the surface was plotted of the liquidus adjoining the apex of the aluminium corner of the strontium-aluminium-silicon system. The investigation was carried out by microstructure and differential thermal analyses and by the measurement of the microhardness of the component phases. A combined solubility of silicon and strontium in aluminium was studied along three radial sections at Sr-to-Si ratios of 1/2, 1/1 and 2/1. The relationships of ''composition vs. Microhardness'', obtained in these sections, made it possible to define the boundaries of the phase regions in the aluminium corner of the strontium-aluminium-silicon system at 500 deg C. The greatest solubility is that along the Al-SrAl 2 Si 2 section at a Sr/Si ratio of 1/2. A further increase in the content of strontium brings about a drop in the solubility of silicon in solid aluminium. The projection of the liquidus surface of the strontium-aluminium-silicon system, rich in aluminium, includes four surfaces of primary crystallization: α-Al, SrAl 4 , SrAl 2 Si 2 and Si. The system comprises a section of Al-SrAl 2 Si 2 representing a quasibinary system of an eutectic type. The eutectic reaction takes place at a temperature of 640 deg C. The quasibinary Al-SrAl 2 Si 2 section divides the aluminium corner of the Sr-Al-Si system into two independent systems Al-SrAl 4 -SrAl 2 Si 2 and Al-Si-SrAl 2 Si 2 of an eutectic type

  8. Residual stress by repair welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mochizuki, Masahito; Toyoda, Masao

    2003-01-01

    Residual stress by repair welds is computed using the thermal elastic-plastic analysis with phase-transformation effect. Coupling phenomena of temperature, microstructure, and stress-strain fields are simulated in the finite-element analysis. Weld bond of a plate butt-welded joint is gouged and then deposited by weld metal in repair process. Heat source is synchronously moved with the deposition of the finite-element as the weld deposition. Microstructure is considered by using CCT diagram and the transformation behavior in the repair weld is also simulated. The effects of initial stress, heat input, and weld length on residual stress distribution are studied from the organic results of numerical analysis. Initial residual stress before repair weld has no influence on the residual stress after repair treatment near weld metal, because the initial stress near weld metal releases due to high temperature of repair weld and then stress by repair weld regenerates. Heat input has an effect for residual stress distribution, for not its magnitude but distribution zone. Weld length should be considered reducing the magnitude of residual stress in the edge of weld bead; short bead induces high tensile residual stress. (author)

  9. Welding of refractory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lessmann, G.G.

    1984-01-01

    This review primarily summarizes welding evaluations supported by NASA-Lewis Research Center in the 1960s. A literature search run in preparation for this review indicates that more recent work is modest by comparison. Hence, this review restates these accomplishments briefly and addresses opportunities which have evolved in welding technology (such as lasers) in the intervening decade. Emphasis in this review is given to tantalum- and niobium-base alloys. Considerable work was also done to assure that a consistent comparison was made with tungsten. A wide variety of candidate alloys derived primarily from developments directed at aircraft propulsion applications were available. Early efforts by NASA were directed at screening studies to select promising structural alloys for the space power application. This objective required fine tuning of welding procedures, e.g., the demonstration of stringent standards for control of welding atmosphere to assure good corrosion resistance in liquid alkali metals. 16 figures, 6 tables

  10. Multispot fiber laser welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schutt Hansen, Klaus

    This dissertation presents work and results achieved in the field of multi beam fiber laser welding. The project has had a practical approach, in which simulations and modelling have been kept at a minimum. Different methods to produce spot patterns with high power single mode fiber lasers have...... been examined and evaluated. It is found that both diamond turned DOE’s in zinc sulphide and multilevel etched DOE’s (Diffractive Optical Elements) in fused silica have a good performance. Welding with multiple beams in a butt joint configuration has been tested. Results are presented, showing it has...... been possible to control the welding width in incremental steps by adding more beams in a row. The laser power was used to independently control the keyhole and consequently the depth of fusion. An example of inline repair of a laser weld in butt joint configuration was examined. Zinc powder was placed...

  11. Friction stir welding tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolle,; Charles R. , Clark; Denis E. , Barnes; Timothy, A [Ammon, ID

    2008-04-15

    A friction stir welding tool is described and which includes a shank portion; a shoulder portion which is releasably engageable with the shank portion; and a pin which is releasably engageable with the shoulder portion.

  12. Reinforcement with alumina particles at the interface region of AA6101-T6 and AA1350 alloys during friction stir welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashok Kumar, R.; Thansekhar, M. R.

    2018-04-01

    This paper deals the combinational effect of friction stir welding and friction stir processing on dissimilar AA6101-T6 and AA1350 aluminium alloys. For that, alumina particles are reinforced at interface region of AA6101-T6 and AA1350 aluminium alloys. Friction Stir Welding and Friction Stir Processing are done simultaneously for various sizes of groove. To analyze the welding quality and surface modifications, mechanical, wear and microstructural tests are carried out. Among these, smallest groove of 0.5 mm width and 1 mm depth reveals highest tensile and bending strengths and largest groove of 2 mm width and 3 mm depth gives maximum hardness and wear resistance. Taguchi technique shows that groove width is most influencing parameter. Developed second order models with interaction predict the responses with minimum error.

  13. Underwater Welding Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Esam F. Alajmi; Ahmad A. Alqenaei

    2017-01-01

    Welding demand in offshore and marine applications is increased with the increasing in oil and gas activities as well as increasing in the marine transportation and industrial applications. Applications of underwater welding well be increased in Kuwait in the coming years due to the strategic directive of the country toward starting the offshore oil and gas exploration and production, and the increase in marine transportation projects. Therefore, there is a need to understand the concept of u...

  14. Prediction of Outside Surface Aluminium Tank Corrosion on TRIGA Mark - IIResearch Reactor Bandung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soedardjo

    2000-01-01

    The prediction of outside surface aluminium tank corrosion on researchreactor design which coated by epoxy paint, has been assessed. The new TRIGAMark - II Bandung research reactor tank design separated by 3 section arebottom, middle and upper section then inserted into the existing old reactor.The separation carried out caused by the space constraint on top of old tank,so that the novel tank impossible inserted into old tank all at once. Thespace between novel and old tank is 10 mm. After bottom and middle section oftank welded then followed by epoxy painting and inserted partially into oldtank. From then on the middle and upper section welded and followed by epoxypainting then inserted into old tank. Based on prediction result, that theroot cause of corrosion would be took place on welding and on imperfectlyepoxy painting area. The outside surface novel tank would be generated by thereaction between imperfectly epoxy painting area and the highly basecondition on cement grout that available on novel and old tank gap. (author)

  15. Joining of Dissimilar alloy Sheets (Al 6063&AISI 304 during Resistance Spot Welding Process: A Feasibility Study for Automotive industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reddy Sreenivasulu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Present design trends in automotive manufacture have shifted emphasis to alternative lightweight materials in order to achieve higher fuel efficiency and to bring down vehicle emission. Although some other joining techniques are more and more being used, spot welding still remains the primary joining method in automobile manufacturing so far. Spot welds for automotive applications should have a sufficiently large diameter, so that nugget pullout mode is the dominant failure mode. Interfacial mode is unacceptable due to its low load carrying and energy absorption capability. Strength tests with different static loading were performed in, to reveal the failure mechanisms for the lap-shear geometry and the cross-tension geometry. Based on the literature survey performed, venture into this work was amply motivated by the fact that a little research work has been conducted to joining of dissimilar materials like non ferrous to ferrous. Most of the research works concentrated on joining of different materials like steel to steel or aluminium alloy to aluminium alloy by resistance spot welding. In this work, an experimental study on the resistance spot weldability of aluminium alloy (Al 6063 and austenitic stainless steel (AISI304 sheets, which are lap joined by using a pedestal type resistance spot welding machine. Welding was conducted using a 45-deg truncated cone copper electrode with 10-mm face diameter. The weld nugget diameter, force estimation under lap shear test and T – peel test were investigated using digital type tensometer attached with capacitive displacement transducer (Mikrotech, Bangalore, Model: METM2000ER1. The results shows that joining of Al 6063 and AISI 304 thin sheets by RSW method are feasible for automotive structural joints where the loads are below 1000N act on them, it is observed that by increasing the spots per unit length, then the joint with standing strength to oppose failure is also increased linearly incase of

  16. Fracture toughness and crack growth resistance of pressure vessel plate and weld metal steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moskovic, R.

    1988-01-01

    Compact tension specimens were used to measure the initiation fracture toughness and crack growth resistance of pressure vessel steel plates and submerged arc weld metal. Plate test specimens were manufactured from four different casts of steel comprising: aluminium killed C-Mn-Mo-Cu and C-Mn steel and two silicon killed C-Mn steels. Unionmelt No. 2 weld metal test specimens were extracted from welds of double V butt geometry having either the C-Mn-Mo-Cu steel (three weld joints) or one particular silicon killed C-Mn steel (two weld joints) as parent plate. A multiple specimen test technique was used to obtain crack growth data which were analysed by simple linear regression to determine the crack growth resistance lines and to derive the initiation fracture toughness values for each test temperature. These regression lines were highly scattered with respect to temperature and it was very difficult to determine precisely the temperature dependence of the initiation fracture toughness and crack growth resistance. The data were re-analysed, using a multiple linear regression method, to obtain a relationship between the materials' crack growth resistance and toughness, and the principal independent variables (temperature, crack growth, weld joint code and strain ageing). (author)

  17. Potentiometric titration curves of aluminium salt solutions and its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Potentiometric titration curves of aluminium salt solutions and its species conversion ... of aluminium salt solutions under the moderate slow rate of base injection. ... silicate radical, and organic acid radical on the titration curves and its critical ...

  18. Effect of tempering on corrosion resistance of cast aluminium bronzes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaltonen, P.; Klemetti, K.; Haenninen, H.

    1985-01-01

    The subject of this study is corrosion resistance of aluminium bronzes, which are copper base alloys containing aluminium up to 12% with additions of nickel, iron and manganese. The main conclutions that can be drawn are: (1) The dealloying corrosion resistance of nickel-aluminium bronze is much better than that of aluminium bronze with iron and manganese additions, but it is not immune; (2) The dealloying corrosion resistance of aluminium bronzes can be improved by appropiate heat treatments. The best properties were obtained by temperering between 600 and 800 deg C, depending on the initial microstructure; (3) In crevice conditions, where local acidification can occur, dealloying of aluminium bronzes is a consequence of the preferential attack of aluminium-rich phases. By appropriate tempering, a uniform distribution of aluminium-rich phases is obtained and the continous path for selective corrosion is not formed

  19. Aluminium hydroxide-the carrier for catalysts coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Normatov, I.Sh.; Mirsaidov, U.M.

    2003-01-01

    At present time several methods of receiving aluminium hydroxide are exist. But all they differ by much staging of process connected with preliminary receiving of intermediate compounds, with application of expensive metallic aluminium

  20. Effect of Sintering Temperature on the Properties of Aluminium-Aluminium Oxide Composite Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewan Muhammad Nuruzzaman

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, aluminium-aluminium oxide (Al-Al2O3 metal matrix composites of different weight percentage reinforcements of aluminium oxide were processed at different sintering temperatures. In order to prepare these composite specimens, conventional powder metallurgy (PM method was used. Three types specimens of different compositions such as 95%Al+5%Al2O3, 90%Al+10%Al2O3 and 85%Al+15%Al2O3 were prepared under 20 Ton compaction load. Then, all the specimens were sintered in a furnace at two different temperatures 550oC and 580oC. In each sintering process, two different heating cycles were used. After the sintering process, it was observed that undistorted flat specimens were successfully prepared for all the compositions. The effects of sintering temperature and weight fraction of aluminium oxide particulates on the density, hardness and microstructure of Al-Al2O3 composites were observed. It was found that density and hardness of the composite specimens were significantly influenced by sintering temperature and percentage aluminium oxide reinforcement. Furthermore, optical microscopy revealed that almost uniform distribution of aluminium oxide reinforcement within the aluminium matrix was achieved.

  1. Automatic welding machine for piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Koyama, Takaichi; Iizuka, Tomio; Ito, Yoshitoshi; Takami, Katsumi.

    1978-01-01

    A remotely controlled automatic special welding machine for piping was developed. This machine is utilized for long distance pipe lines, chemical plants, thermal power generating plants and nuclear power plants effectively from the viewpoint of good quality control, reduction of labor and good controllability. The function of this welding machine is to inspect the shape and dimensions of edge preparation before welding work by the sense of touch, to detect the temperature of melt pool, inspect the bead form by the sense of touch, and check the welding state by ITV during welding work, and to grind the bead surface and inspect the weld metal by ultrasonic test automatically after welding work. The construction of this welding system, the main specification of the apparatus, the welding procedure in detail, the electrical source of this welding machine, the cooling system, the structure and handling of guide ring, the central control system and the operating characteristics are explained. The working procedure and the effect by using this welding machine, and the application to nuclear power plants and the other industrial field are outlined. The HIDIC 08 is used as the controlling computer. This welding machine is useful for welding SUS piping as well as carbon steel piping. (Nakai, Y.)

  2. Aluminium and the human breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbre, P D

    2016-06-01

    The human population is exposed to aluminium (Al) from diet, antacids and vaccine adjuvants, but frequent application of Al-based salts to the underarm as antiperspirant adds a high additional exposure directly to the local area of the human breast. Coincidentally the upper outer quadrant of the breast is where there is also a disproportionately high incidence of breast cysts and breast cancer. Al has been measured in human breast tissues/fluids at higher levels than in blood, and experimental evidence suggests that at physiologically relevant concentrations, Al can adversely impact on human breast epithelial cell biology. Gross cystic breast disease is the most common benign disorder of the breast and evidence is presented that Al may be a causative factor in formation of breast cysts. Evidence is also reviewed that Al can enable the development of multiple hallmarks associated with cancer in breast cells, in particular that it can cause genomic instability and inappropriate proliferation in human breast epithelial cells, and can increase migration and invasion of human breast cancer cells. In addition, Al is a metalloestrogen and oestrogen is a risk factor for breast cancer known to influence multiple hallmarks. The microenvironment is established as another determinant of breast cancer development and Al has been shown to cause adverse alterations to the breast microenvironment. If current usage patterns of Al-based antiperspirant salts contribute to causation of breast cysts and breast cancer, then reduction in exposure would offer a strategy for prevention, and regulatory review is now justified. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Steam Assisted Accelerated Growth of Oxide Layer on Aluminium Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Din, Rameez Ud; Yuksel, Serkan; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl

    2013-01-01

    Corrosion resistance of aluminium alloys is related to the composition and morphology of the oxide film on the surface of aluminium. In this paper we investigated the use of steam on the surface modification of aluminium to produce boehmite films. The study reveals a detailed investigation...... of the effect of vapour pressure, structure of intermetallic particles and thickness of boehmite films on the corrosion behaviour of aluminium alloys....

  4. Advances in development and application of aluminium batteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qingfeng, Li; Zhuxian, Qiu

    2001-01-01

    Aluminium has long attracted attention as a potential battery anode because of its high theoretical voltage and specific energy. The protective oxide layer at aluminium surface is however detrimental to its performance to achieve its reversible potential, and also causing the delayed activation o...... aluminium batteres, especially aluminium-air batteries, and a wide range of their applications from emergency power supplies, reserve batteries field portable batteries, to batteries for electric vehicles and underwater propulsion....

  5. Aluminium hydroxide-induced granulomas in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valtulini, S; Macchi, C; Ballanti, P

    2005-01-01

    The effect of intramuscular injection of 40 mg/2 ml aluminium hydroxide in the neck of pigs was examined in a number of ways. The investigation followed repeated slaughterhouse reports, according to which 64.8% of pigs from one particular farm were found at slaughter to have one or more nodules...... in the muscles of the neck (group slaughtered). The pigs had been injected with a vaccine containing 40 mg/2 ml dose of aluminium hydroxide as adjuvant. Research consisted of two phases: first, an epidemiological study was carried out, aimed at determining the risk factors for the granulomas. The results...... and adjuvant) to pigs inoculated twice with apyrogenic bi-distilled water (group water) and to pigs inoculated once with the adjuvant and once with apyrogenic bi-distilled water (group adjuvant/water). Both studies agreed in their conclusions, which indicate that the high amount of aluminium hydroxide...

  6. Analysis of aluminium in rat following administration of allergen immunotherapy using either aluminium or microcrystalline-tyrosine-based adjuvants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougall, Stuart A; Heath, Matthew D; Kramer, Matthias F; Skinner, Murray A

    2016-03-01

    Investigation into the absorption, distribution and elimination of aluminium in rat after subcutaneous aluminium adjuvant formulation administration using ICP-MS is described. Assays were verified under the principles of a tiered approach. There was no evidence of systemic exposure of aluminium, in brain or in kidney. Extensive and persistent retention of aluminium at the dose site was observed for at least 180 days after administration. This is the first published work that has quantified aluminium adjuvant retention based on the quantity of aluminium delivered in a typical allergy immunotherapy course. The results indicate that the repeated administration of aluminium-containing adjuvants will likely contribute directly and significantly to an individual's body burden of aluminium.

  7. Aluminium toxicity tolerance in crop plants: Present status of research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... tolerance of which genes of the Aluminium-activated malate transporter (ALMT) and multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) families are prominent. In this review, the progress of research in identifying aluminium toxicity tolerant genes is discussed. Keywords: Aluminium toxicity, soil acidity, hydroponic screening, ...

  8. Aluminium allergy and granulomas induced by vaccinations for children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Rosa Marie O; Zachariae, Claus; Johansen, Jeanne Duus

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination with aluminium-adsorbed vaccines can induce aluminium allergy with persistent itching subcutaneous nodules at the injection site - vaccination granulomas. In this article we give an overview of childhood aluminium-adsorbed vaccines available in Denmark. Through literature studies we...... examine the incidence, the symptoms and the prognosis for the vaccination granulomas and the allergy. Finally we discuss the status in Denmark....

  9. Aluminium allergy and granulomas induced by vaccinations for children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Rosa Marie O; Zachariae, Claus; Johansen, Jeanne Duus

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination with aluminium-adsorbed vaccines can induce aluminium allergy with persistent itching subcutaneous nodules at the injection site - vaccination granulomas. In this article we give an overview of childhood aluminium-adsorbed vaccines available in Denmark. Through literature studies we...

  10. Spectrophotometric determination of aluminium in steel with xylenol orange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majeed, A.; Javed, N.; Khan, M.S.

    1996-01-01

    Spectrophotometric determination of Aluminium in steel based on colour reaction between Aluminium and xylenol orange has been carried out. Red coloured complex formed in weak acidic solution is measured for its absorbance at 550 nm. The various optimum experimental conditions for Aluminium xylenol orange (Al-Xo) complex have been studied. (author)

  11. Energy Absorption of Monolithic and Fibre Reinforced Aluminium Cylinders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Kanter, J.L.C.G.

    2006-01-01

    Summary accompanying the thesis: Energy Absorption of Monolithic and Fibre Reinforced Aluminium Cylinders by Jens de Kanter This thesis presents the investigation of the crush behaviour of both monolithic aluminium cylinders and externally fibre reinforced aluminium cylinders. The research is based

  12. Corrosion behaviour of borated aluminium used as neutron absorber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emmerich, R. [EaglePicher Technologies GmbH, Oehringen (Germany); Ensinger, W.; Enders, B. [Philipps-Univ. of Marburg, Dept. of Chemistry, Material Science Centre (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    The electrochemical behaviour of pure and borated aluminium was examined. Measurements were performed in two different electrolytes at 90 C containing different trace-amounts of chloride. For borated aluminium current transients, i.e. metastable depassivation events were found. It is suggested to attribute these transients to less stable passivation layers in comparison to pure aluminium.

  13. Alternate Welding Processes for In-Service Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-24

    Conducting weld repairs and attaching hot tap tees onto pressurized pipes has the advantage of avoiding loss of service and revenue. However, the risks involved with in-service welding need to be managed by ensuring that welding is performed in a rep...

  14. Certification of a weld produced by friction stir welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obaditch, Chris; Grant, Glenn J

    2013-10-01

    Methods, devices, and systems for providing certification of friction stir welds are disclosed. A sensor is used to collect information related to a friction stir weld. Data from the sensor is compared to threshold values provided by an extrinsic standard setting organizations using a certification engine. The certification engine subsequently produces a report on the certification status of the weld.

  15. Internal friction in iron-aluminium alloys having a high aluminium content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hillairet, J.; Delaplace, J.; Silvent, A.

    1966-01-01

    By using a torsion pendulum to measure the internal friction of iron-aluminium alloys containing between 25 and 50 atom per cent of aluminium, it has been possible to show the existence of three damping peaks due to interstitial carbon. Their evolution is followed as a function of the carbon content, of the thermal treatment and of the aluminium content. A model based on the preferential occupation of tetrahedral sites is proposed as an interpretation of the results. A study of the Zener peak in these substitution alloys shows also that a part of the short distance disorder existing at high temperatures can be preserved by quenching. (author) [fr

  16. Process for the manufacture of plates containing neutron poison from aluminium and aluminium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, G.; Pollmann, E.; Srostlik, P.

    1985-01-01

    A process for guaranteeing sub-critical arrangements of nuclear fuel in tranport and/or storage containers is described, in which a homogeneous distribution of neutron poison in the aluminium matrix is guaranteed. A homogeneous mixture of aluminium powder and neutron poison powder is produced, this is pressed into plates in several stages, dried and made into hollow aluminium profiles of rectangular cross-section. The open ends of the hollow profile are then closed and this is rolled to the required dimension at 470-500 0 C. (orig./HP) [de

  17. TITANIUM CARBON ALUMINIUM : A NOVEL GRAIN REFINER FOR ALUMINIUM-LITHIUM ALLOYS

    OpenAIRE

    Birch , M.; Cowell , A.

    1987-01-01

    This work explores the possibility of achieving grain size control in aluminium-lithium alloys with the titanium carbon aluminium (TiCAl) master alloys invented at the Technical University of Berlin and developed by London and Scandinavian Metallurgical Co Ltd (LSM). Grain refining tests were conducted on a single batch of 8090 alloy using addition rates of 0.2wt% and 0.4wt% of TiCAl and 3/1 titanium boron aluminium (TiBAl). Other tests using 0.4wt% of binary TiAl gave poor results, showing t...

  18. Prediction of shear and tensile strength of the diffusion bonded AA5083 and AA7075 aluminium alloy using ANN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagai Francis Britto, A.; Raj, R. Edwin; Mabel, M. Carolin

    2017-01-01

    Diffusion bonding is a pressure welding technique to establish bonds by inter diffusion of atoms. Bonding characteristics were generated by varying the significant process conditions such as the bonding temperature, the pressing load and the duration of pressure while bonding the aluminium alloys AA5083 and AA7075. Deriving analytical correlation with the process variables to weld strength is quite involved due to the non-linear dependency of the process variables with the mechanical strength of the joints. An arbitrary function approximation mechanism, the artificial neural network (ANN) is therefore employed to develop the models for predicting the mechanical properties of the bonded joints. Back propagation technique, which alters the network weights to minimize the mean square error was used to develop the ANN models. The models were tested, validated and found to be satisfactory with good prediction accuracy.

  19. Prediction of shear and tensile strength of the diffusion bonded AA5083 and AA7075 aluminium alloy using ANN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagai Francis Britto, A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, St.Xavier' s Catholic College of Engineering, Nagercoil 629003,Tamil Nadu (India); Raj, R. Edwin, E-mail: redwinraj@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, St.Xavier' s Catholic College of Engineering, Nagercoil 629003,Tamil Nadu (India); Mabel, M. Carolin [Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, St.Xavier' s Catholic College of Engineering, Nagercoil 629003,Tamil Nadu (India)

    2017-04-24

    Diffusion bonding is a pressure welding technique to establish bonds by inter diffusion of atoms. Bonding characteristics were generated by varying the significant process conditions such as the bonding temperature, the pressing load and the duration of pressure while bonding the aluminium alloys AA5083 and AA7075. Deriving analytical correlation with the process variables to weld strength is quite involved due to the non-linear dependency of the process variables with the mechanical strength of the joints. An arbitrary function approximation mechanism, the artificial neural network (ANN) is therefore employed to develop the models for predicting the mechanical properties of the bonded joints. Back propagation technique, which alters the network weights to minimize the mean square error was used to develop the ANN models. The models were tested, validated and found to be satisfactory with good prediction accuracy.

  20. Molybdenum solubility in aluminium nitrate solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heres, X.; Sans, D.; Bertrand, M.; Eysseric, C. [CEA, Centre de Marcoule, Nuclear Energy Division, DRCP, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze Cedex (France); Brackx, E.; Domenger, R.; Excoffier, E. [CEA, Centre de Marcoule, Nuclear Energy Division, DTEC, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze Cedex (France); Valery, J.F. [AREVA-NC, DOR/RDP, Paris - La Defense (France)

    2016-07-01

    For over 60 years, research reactors (RR or RTR for research testing reactors) have been used as neutron sources for research, radioisotope production ({sup 99}Mo/{sup 99m}Tc), nuclear medicine, materials characterization, etc... Currently, over 240 of these reactors are in operation in 56 countries. They are simpler than power reactors and operate at lower temperature (cooled to below 100 C. degrees). The fuel assemblies are typically plates or cylinders of uranium alloy and aluminium (U-Al) coated with pure aluminium. These fuels can be processed in AREVA La Hague plant after batch dissolution in concentrated nitric acid and mixing with UOX fuel streams. The aim of this study is to accurately measure the solubility of molybdenum in nitric acid solution containing high concentrations of aluminium. The higher the molybdenum solubility is, the more flexible reprocessing operations are, especially when the spent fuels contain high amounts of molybdenum. To be most representative of the dissolution process, uranium-molybdenum alloy and molybdenum metal powder were dissolved in solutions of aluminium nitrate at the nominal dissolution temperature. The experiments showed complete dissolution of metallic elements after 30 minutes long stirring, even if molybdenum metal was added in excess. After an induction period, a slow precipitation of molybdic acid occurs for about 15 hours. The data obtained show the molybdenum solubility decreases with increasing aluminium concentration. The solubility law follows an exponential relation around 40 g/L of aluminium with a high determination coefficient. Molybdenum solubility is not impacted by the presence of gadolinium, or by an increasing concentration of uranium. (authors)

  1. Ultrasonic inspection of austenitic welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baikie, B.L.; Wagg, A.R.; Whittle, M.J.; Yapp, D.

    1976-01-01

    The ultrasonic examination of austenitic stainless steel weld metal has always been regarded as a difficult proposition because of the large and variable ultrasonic attenuations and back scattering obtained from apparently similar weld deposits. The work to be described shows how the existence of a fibre texture within each weld deposit (as a result of epitaxial growth through successive weld beads) produces a systematic variation in the ultrasonic attenuation coefficient and the velocity of sound, depending upon the angle between the ultrasonic beam and the fibre axis. Development work has shown that it is possible to adjust the welding parameters to ensure that the crystallographic texture within each weld is compatible with improved ultrasonic transmission. The application of the results to the inspection of a specific weld in type 316 weld metal is described

  2. Arc-weld pool interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glickstein, S.S.

    1978-08-01

    The mechanisms involved in arc-weld pool interactions are extremely complex and no complete theory is presently available to describe much of the phenomena observed during welding. For the past several years, experimental and analytical studies have been undertaken at the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory to increase basic understanding of the gas tungsten arc welding process. These studies have included experimental spectral analysis of the arc in order to determine arc temperature and analytical modeling of the arc and weld puddle. The investigations have been directed toward determining the cause and effects of variations in the energy distribution incident upon the weldment. In addition, the effect of weld puddle distortion on weld penetration was investigated, and experimental and analytical studies of weld process variables have been undertaken to determine the effects of the variables upon weld penetration and configuration. A review of the results and analysis of these studies are presented

  3. Resistance Spot Welding of dissimilar Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislav Kolařík

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analysis of the properties of resistance spot welds between low carbon steel and austenitic CrNi stainless steel. The thickness of the welded dissimilar materials was 2 mm. A DeltaSpot welding gun with a process tape was used for welding the dissimilar steels. Resistance spot welds were produced with various welding parameters (welding currents ranging from 7 to 8 kA. Light microscopy, microhardness measurements across the welded joints, and EDX analysis were used to evaluate the quality of the resistance spot welds. The results confirm the applicability of DeltaSpot welding for this combination of materials.

  4. Defect generation during solidification of aluminium foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, M.; Garcia-Moreno, F.; Banhart, J.

    2010-01-01

    The reason for the frequent occurrence of cell wall defects in metal foams was investigated. Aluminium foams often expand during solidification, a process which is referred as solidification expansion (SE). The effect of SE on the structure of aluminium foams was studied in situ by X-ray radioscopy and ex situ by X-ray tomography. A direct correlation between the magnitude of SE and the number of cell wall ruptures during SE and finally the number of defects in the solidified foams was found.

  5. An aluminium evaporation source for ion plating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walley, P.A.; Cross, K.B.

    1977-01-01

    Ion plating with aluminium is becoming increasingly accepted as a method of anti-corrosion surface passivation, the usual requirements being for a layer between 12 and 50 microns in thickness, (0.0005 to 0.002). The evaporation system described here offers a number of advantages over high power electron beam sources when used for aluminium ion plating. The source consists of a resistively heated, specially shaped, boron nitride-titanium diboride boat and a metering feed system. Its main features are small physical size, soft vacuum compatibility, low power consumption and metered evaporation output. (author)

  6. The determination of trace oxygen in aluminium and aluminium-silicon alloy by helium-3 activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandecasteele, C.; Goethals, P.; Kieffer, R.; Hoste, J.

    1975-01-01

    The determination of oxygen in aluminium and aluminium-silicon alloy by helium-3 activation is studied. The 18 F formed from oxygen is separated by distillation followed by precipitation of leadfluorochloride. The chemical yield is determined by activation in an isotopic neutron source. Concentrations of resp. 27 and 64 ng.g -1 with a precision for a single determination of resp. 30 and 13% are found in 99.5% aluminium and in aluminium-silicon (3%) alloy. (author)

  7. Multipass autogenous electron beam welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, J.L.; Mustaleski, T.M. Jr.; Watson, L.C.

    1986-01-01

    A multipass, autogenous welding procedure was developed for 7.6 mm (0.3 in.) wall thickness Type 304L stainless steel cylinders. The joint geometry has a 1.5 mm (0.06 in.) root-face width and a rectangular stepped groove that is 0.762 mm (0.03 in.) wide at the top of the root face and extends 1.5 mm in height, terminating into a groove width of 1.27 mm which extends to the outside of the 1.27 mm high weld-boss. One weld pass is made on the root, three passes on the 0.762 mm wide groove and three passes to complete the weld. Multipass, autogenous, electron beam welds maintain the characteristic high depth-to-width ratios and low heat input of single-pass, electron beam welds. The increased part distortion (which is still much less than from arc processes) in multipass weldments is corrected by a preweld machined compensation. Mechanical properties of multipass welds compare well with single-pass welds. The yield strength of welds in aluminum alloy 5083 is approximately the same for single-pass or multipass electron beam and gas, metal-arc welds. The incidence and size of porosity is less in multipass electron beam welding of aluminum as compared to gas, metal-arc welds. The multipass, autogenous, electron beam welding method has proven to be a reliable way to make some difficult welds in multilayer parts or in an instance where inside part temperature or weld underbead must be controlled and weld discontinuities must be minimized

  8. Lightweight Design and Welding Manufacturing of a Hydrogen Fuel Cell Powered Car’s Chassis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelos Ch. Tsirogiannis

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The development of the chassis for the hydrogen fuel cell powered car has been involved in the designing and manufacturing aspects, while taking into consideration the mass, strength, stiffness, centre of gravity (COG, and manufacturing cost requirements. Towards this direction, a chassis design is proposed employing a space frame structure and constructed by an aluminium alloy with great strength. The structural design has been derived through the lightweight engineering approaches in conjunction with the part consolidation, Design for Assembly (DFA and Design for Manufacture methods. Moreover, it has been performed in compliance with the safety regulations of the Shell Eco Marathon racing competition. The material’s principal characteristics are the great strength, the low mass, as well as the great workability, machinability, and weldability. Following the national and global environmental issues, the recyclable characteristics of the aluminium alloy are an extra asset. Furthermore, the existence of aluminium alloy manufacturers around the fabricating area provides low cost supply and fast delivery benefits. The integration of the fuel cell powered vehicle is obtained through the designing and the manufacturing processes of the chassis and the parts fitted on the chassis. The manufacturing procedures are described thoroughly; mainly consisting of the cutting and welding processes and the assembling of the parts that are fitted on the chassis. Additionally, the proper welding parameters for the custom chassis design are investigated and are selected after deductive reasoning. The quality control of the weld joints is conducted by non-destructive methods (NDT ensuring the required structural properties of the welds. A combination of the selected material, the specific type of the chassis, and the manufacturing processes lead to construction simplicity in a low manufacturing cost by using the existing laboratory equipment. Furthermore, the

  9. Laser welding engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhieh, N. M.; El Eesawi, M. E.; Hashkel, A. E.

    2007-01-01

    Laser welding was in its early life used mainly for unusual applications where no other welding process would be suitable that was twenty five years ago. Today, laser welding is a fully developed part of the metal working industry, routinely producing welds for common items such as cigarette lighters, which springs, motor/transformer lamination, hermetic seals, battery and pacemaker cans and hybrid circuit packages. Yet very few manufacturing engineering have seriously considers employing lasers in their own operations. Why? There are many reasons, but a main one must be not acquainted with the operation and capabilities of a laser system. Other reasons, such as a relatively high initial cost and a concern about using lasers in the manufacturing environment, also are frequently cited, and the complexity of the component and flexibility of the light delivery system. Laser welding could be used in place of many different standard processes, such as resistance (spot or seam), submerged arc, RF induction, high-frequency resistance, ultrasonic and electronic and electron-beam. while each of these techniques has established an independent function in the manufacturing world, the flexible laser welding approach will operate efficiently and economically in many different applications. Its flexibility will even permit the welding system to be used for other machining function, such as drilling, scribing, sealing and serializing. In this article, we will look at how laser welding works and what benefits it can offer to manufacturing engineers. Some industry observers state that there are already 2,000 laser machine tools being used for cutting, welding and drilling and that the number could reach 30,000 over the next 15 years as manufacturing engineers become more aware of the capabilities of lasers [1). While most laser applications are dedicated to one product or process that involves high-volume, long-run manufacturing, the flexibility of a laser to supply energy to hard

  10. Welding. Performance Objectives. Intermediate Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Kenneth

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of nine terminal objectives for an intermediate welding course. The materials were developed for a 36-week (3 hours daily) course designed to prepare the student for employment in the field of welding. Electric welding and specialized (TIG & MIG)…

  11. Welding. Performance Objectives. Basic Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Kenneth

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of eight terminal objectives for a basic welding course. The materials were developed for a 36-week (2 hours daily) course developed to teach the fundamentals of welding shop work, to become familiar with the operation of the welding shop…

  12. Pulsed TIG welding of pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Killing, U.

    1989-01-01

    The present study investigates into the effects of impulse welding parameters on weld geometry in the joint welding of thin-walled sheets and pipes (d=2.5 mm), and it uses random samples of thick-walled sheets and pipes (d=10 mm), in fixed positions. (orig./MM) [de

  13. Enhancement of wear and ballistic resistance of armour grade AA7075 aluminium alloy using friction stir processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Sudhakar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Industrial applications of aluminium and its alloys are restricted because of their poor tribological properties. Thermal spraying, laser surfacing, electron beam welding are the most widely used techniques to alter the surface morphology of base metal. Preliminary studies reveal that the coating and layering of aluminium alloys with ceramic particles enhance the ballistic resistance. Furthermore, among aluminium alloys, 7075 aluminium alloy exhibits high strength which can be compared to that of steels and has profound applications in the designing of lightweight fortification structures and integrated protection systems. Having limitations such as poor bond integrity, formation of detrimental phases and interfacial reaction between reinforcement and substrate using fusion route to deposit hard particles paves the way to adopt friction stir processing for fabricating surface composites using different sizes of boron carbide particles as reinforcement on armour grade 7075 aluminium alloy as matrix in the present investigation. Wear and ballistic tests were carried out to assess the performance of friction stir processed AA7075 alloy. Significant improvement in wear resistance of friction stir processed surface composites is attributed to the change in wear mechanism from abrasion to adhesion. It has also been observed that the surface metal matrix composites have shown better ballistic resistance compared to the substrate AA7075 alloy. Addition of solid lubricant MoS2 has reduced the depth of penetration of the projectile to half that of base metal AA7075 alloy. For the first time, the friction stir processing technique was successfully used to improve the wear and ballistic resistances of armour grade high strength AA7075 alloy.

  14. Friction welding method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Ryuichi; Hatanaka, Tatsuo.

    1969-01-01

    A friction welding method for forming a lattice-shaped base and tie plate supporter for fuel elements is disclosed in which a plate formed with a concavity along its edge is pressure welded to a rotating member such as a boss by longitudinally contacting the projecting surfaces remaining on either side of the concavity with the rotating member during the high speed rotation thereof in the presence of an inert gas. Since only the two projecting surfaces of the plate are fused by friction to the rotary member, heat expansion is absorbed by the concavity to prevent distortion; moreover, a two point contact surface assures a stable fitting and promotes the construction of a rigid lattice in which a number of the abovementioned plates are friction welded between rotating members to form any desired complex arrangement. The inert has serves to protect the material quality of the contacting surfaces from air during the welding step. The present invention thus provides a method in which even Zircaloy may be friction welded in place of casting stainless steel in the construction of supporting lattices to thereby enhance neutron economy. (K. J. Owens)

  15. Friction stir welding tool and process for welding dissimilar materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J; Jana, Saumyadeep; Mattlin, Karl F

    2013-05-07

    A friction stir welding tool and process for lap welding dissimilar materials are detailed. The invention includes a cutter scribe that penetrates and extrudes a first material of a lap weld stack to a preselected depth and further cuts a second material to provide a beneficial geometry defined by a plurality of mechanically interlocking features. The tool backfills the interlocking features generating a lap weld across the length of the interface between the dissimilar materials that enhances the shear strength of the lap weld.

  16. Durability of bare and anodised aluminium in atmosphere of very different corrosivities I. Bare aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, J. A.; Escudero, E.; Lopez, V.; Simancas, J.; Morcillo, M.

    2004-01-01

    The behaviour of bare aluminium is studied in atmospheric exposure at 11 natural testing stations with salinity levels ranging between 2.1 and 684 mg Cl''- m''-2 d''-1. In atmospheres of low or moderate aggressivity aluminium behaves as a passive material, though the insignificant corrosion that is produced is sufficient to spoil its appearance. In contrast, at salinity levels of 50 mg Cl''- m''-2 ''-1 or above, aluminium is susceptible to pitting corrosion even in the first year of atmospheric exposure, or in the second year at salinities of ≤ 10 mg Cl''- m''-2 d''-1. For comparative purposes, results are included for aluminium protected with an anodic film of 28 μm thickness exposed at the same testing stations. A 28 μm anodic film, correctly sealed, prevents the risk of localised corrosion even in the most unfavourable situations. (Author) 23 refs

  17. Irradiation damage in aluminium single crystals produced by 50-keV aluminium and copper ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, L.; Johansen, A.; Koch, J.

    1968-01-01

    Aluminium single crystals, thin enough to be examined by electron microscopy, have been irradiated with 50-keV aluminium and copper ions. The irradiation fluxes were in the range 1011–1014 cm−2 s−1 and the doses were from 6 × 1012 to 6 × 1014 cm−2. Irradiation along either a or a direction produces...... rows of dislocation loops all lying parallel to one particular direction. If the aluminium target is quenched from 600 °C and annealed at room temperature prior to irradiation with aluminium ions, the rows of loops are suppressed. The amount of damage observed is considerably less than would...

  18. Exemplification of Tomographic Method to Evaluate the Quality of Welded Joints Made from EN 5754-H22 Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Błachnio Józef

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The quality of welded joints depends on many factors. The relevant standards stipulate technical conditions of welds quality assessment, which provides the basis for stating whether the given joint is compatible with the requirements or whether it is defective. In practice, making welded joints that are totally devoid of defects is extremely difficult. To conduct the control of inner structure of the given joint a non-destructive method with the application of industrial CT scanner might be applied. This modern diagnosing method combines the x-ray examination with advanced computer technology. The basic advantage of computer-assisted tomography consists in examining objects in three dimensions and the possibility to carry out three-dimensional reconstructions. The aim of this article is to discuss the use of this method to evaluate the quality of welded joints made of aluminium alloys. Capabilities of computer-assisted tomography were depicted by the case of weld probes constructed with TIG (ang. Tungsten Inert Gas welding by different process variables. One has made the analysis of the quality of probes showing the smallest and the biggest internal and external welding defects.

  19. Plasma Processes of Cutting and Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-02-01

    TIG process. 2.2.2 Keyhole Welding In plasma arc welding , the term...Cutting 3 3 4 4 4 2.2 Plasma Arc Welding 5 2.2.1 Needle Arc Welding 2.2.2 Keyhole Welding 5 6 3. Applications 8 93.1 Economics 4. Environmental Aspects of...Arc Lengths III. Needle Arc Welding Conditions IV. Keyhole Welding Conditions v. Chemical Analyses of Plates Used - vii - 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

  20. Friction Stir Welding Process: A Green Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Esther T. Akinlabi; Stephen A. Akinlabi

    2012-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process invented and patented by The Welding Institute (TWI) in the United Kingdom in 1991 for butt and lap welding of metals and plastics. This paper highlights the benefits of friction stir welding process as an energy efficient and a green technology process in the field of welding. Compared to the other conventional welding processes, its benefits, typical applications and its use in joining similar and dissimilar materia...