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Sample records for welded aa6061 aluminium

  1. Heat input effect of friction stir welding on aluminium alloy AA 6061-T6 welded joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedmak Aleksandar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the heat input and maximum temperature developed during friction stir welding with different parameters. Aluminium alloy (AA 6061-T6 has been used for experimental and numerical analysis. Experimental analysis is based on temperature measurements by using infrared camera, whereas numerical analysis was based on empirical expressions and finite element method. Different types of defects have been observed in respect to different levels of heat input.

  2. Parameter Design in Fusion Welding of AA 6061 Aluminium Alloy using Desirability Grey Relational Analysis (DGRA) Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adalarasan, R.; Santhanakumar, M.

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, yield strength, ultimate strength and micro-hardness of the lap joints formed with Al 6061 alloy sheets by using the processes of Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welding and Metal Inert Gas (MIG) welding were studied for various combinations of the welding parameters. The parameters taken for study include welding current, voltage, welding speed and inert gas flow rate. Taguchi's L9 orthogonal array was used to conduct the experiments and an integrated technique of desirability grey relational analysis was disclosed for optimizing the welding parameters. The ignored robustness in desirability approach is compensated by the grey relational approach to predict the optimal setting of input parameters for the TIG and MIG welding processes which were validated through the confirmation experiments.

  3. Experimental investigation of hardness of FSW and TIG joints of Aluminium alloys of AA7075 and AA6061

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chetan Patil

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports hardness testing conducted on welded butt joints by FSW and TIG welding process on similar and dissimilar aluminium alloys. FSW joints were produced for similar alloys of AA7075T651 and dissimilar alloys of AA7075T651- AA6061T6. The Friction stir welds of AA7075 & AA6061 aluminium alloy were produced at different tool rotational speeds of 650,700, 800, 900, 1000 and transverse speed of 30, 35, 40 mm/min. TIG welding was conducted along the rolling direction of similar and dissimilar aluminium plates. The Brinell hardness testing techniques were employed to conduct the tests; these tests were conducted on the welds to ascertain the joint integrity before characterization to have an idea of the quality of the welds

  4. Effect of pin tool design on the material flow of dissimilar AA7075-AA6061 friction stir welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Mohammed M.; Ishak, M.; Rejab, M. R. M.

    2017-10-01

    Tool design is the most influential aspect in the friction stir welding (FSW) technology. Influence of pin tool geometry on material flow pattern are studied in this work during the FSW of dissimilar AA7075 and AA6061 aluminium alloys. Three truncated pin tool profiles (threaded, threaded with single flat, and unthreaded with single flat) were used to prepare the weldments. The workpieces were joined using a custom-made clamping system under 1100 rpm of spindle speed, 300 mm/min of traverse rate and 3° of tilt angle. The metallographic analysis showed that defect-free welds can be produced using the three pin tools with significant changes in the mixing stir zone structure. The results declared that the introducing of the flat on the cone of the probe deviates the pattern of the onion rings without changing the chemical composition of the created layers. This in turn improves the hardness distribution and tensile strength of the welded joint. It was also noted that both heat affected zone (HAZ) and thermal-mechanical affected zone (TMAZ) are similar in composition to their corresponding base materials (BM).

  5. Special grain boundaries in the nugget zone of friction stir welded AA6061-T6 under various welding parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Wang [Key Lab of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Yong, Zou, E-mail: yzou@sdu.edu.cn [Key Lab of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Xuemei, Liu [Key Lab of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Matsuda, Kenji [Department of Materials Science and Technology, Faculty of Engineering, University of Toyama, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan)

    2016-08-01

    The age hardenable AA6061-T6 plate was butt welded by friction stir welding. The total heat input, generated by friction between the tool and work piece and plastic deformation, results in a consumption of meta-stable phases in the nugget zone. Precipitation phenomena were closely related to the diffusion of the solute atoms. The existence of special grain boundaries like Σ1a and Σ3 will increase the difficulty in diffusion, which will improve the hardness in the nugget zone. Furthermore, the formation of Σ3 grain boundaries can result from an impingement of re-crystallized grains coming from texture components in twin relationship already. An appropriate strain level may benefit the development of the twin components with a similar intensity. The welding parameters have an effect on heat source mode and the strain level. Then, the type of dynamic re-crystallization and distribution of the special grain boundaries was altered by changing the parameters.

  6. Heat input effect of friction stir welding on aluminum alloy AA 6061-T6 welded joint

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sedmak, A.; Kumar, R.; Chattopadhyaya, S.; Hloch, Sergej; Tadić, S.; Djurdjević, A. A.; Čeković, I. R.; Dončeva, E.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 2 (2016), s. 637-641 ISSN 0354-9836 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : friction stir welding * defect * heat input * maximum temperature Subject RIV: JQ - Machines ; Tools Impact factor: 1.093, year: 2016 http://www.doiserbia.nb.rs/img/doi/0354-9836/2016/0354-98361500147D.pdf

  7. Optimization of weld characteristics of friction welded AA 6061-AA 6351 joints using grey-principal component analysis (G-PCA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adalarasan, R.; Santhanakumar, M. [Saveetha Engineering College, Chennai (India); Sundaram, A. Shanmuga [Sree Sastha Institute of Engineering and Technology, Chennai (India)

    2014-01-15

    Friction welding is a solid state joining process in which the quality of welded joint is influenced by the input parameter setting. The objective of the present study is to conduct experimental investigation of the bond strength and hardness of the friction welded joints involving AA 6061 and AA 6351 alloys by conducting experiments designed by Taguchi's L{sub 9} orthogonal matrix array. A systematic approach becomes essential to find the optimal setting of friction welding parameters. Hence a new approach named grey-principal component analysis (G-PCA) is presented in which the principal component analysis (PCA) is used to generate weights for the grey relational coefficients obtained in the grey relational analysis (GRA). The results of the confirmation experiment conducted with the optimal setting predicted by the G-PCA have shown improvements in the performance characteristics. Hence G-PCA can be used for experimental welding optimization.

  8. Optimization of Process Parameters to enhance the Hardness on Squeeze Cast Aluminium Alloy AA6061

    OpenAIRE

    M. Thirumal Azhagan; B. Mohan; A. Rajadurai

    2014-01-01

    The automotive and aerospace industries have been the main driving force behind the search of new production processes which are capable of producing components with high integrity. Squeeze casting is one such novel metal processing technique which combines the advantages of both casting and forging in one operation. Squeeze casting process is suited for all melting ranges of metals varying from lead to iron. But nowadays, light weight materials like aluminium and magnesium are mostly used in...

  9. Design and Analysis of Wind Turbine Blade Hub using Aluminium Alloy AA 6061-T6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravikumar, S.; Jaswanthvenkatram, V.; Sai kumar, Y. J. N. V.; Sohaib, S. Md.

    2017-05-01

    This work presents the design and analysis of horizontal axis wind turbine blade hub using different material. The hub is very crucial part of the wind turbine, which experience the loads from the blades and the loads were transmitted to the main shaft. At present wind turbine is more expensive and weights more than a million pounds, with the nacelle, rotor hub and blades accounting for most of the weight. In this work Spheroidal graphite cast iron GGG 40.3 is replaced by aluminium alloy 6061-T6 to enhance the casting properties and also to improve the strength-weight ratio. This transition of material leads to reduction in weight of the wind turbine. All the loads caused by wind and extreme loads on the blades are transferred to the hub. Considering the IEC 61400-1 standard for defining extreme loads on the hub the stress and deflection were calculated on the hub by using Finite element Analysis. Result obtained from ANSYS is compared and discussed with the existing design.

  10. Aluminium AA6061 Matrix Composite Reinforced with Spherical Alumina Particles Produced by Infiltration: Perspective on Aerospace Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Bacciarini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Metal matrix composites, based on AA6061 reinforced with 60 vol% Al2O3 spherical particles, were produced by gas pressure infiltration and characterized for hardness, impulse excitation modulus, tensile properties (at room temperature and at 250°C, and machining. It was experimentally demonstrated that the novel alumina powder used in the present work does not react with the liquid Mg-containing matrix during the infiltration process. The AA6061 matrix therefore retains its ability to be strengthened by precipitation heat treatment. The latter behaviour combined with the spherical particle shape confers the studied material higher strength and better machinability in comparison with similar composites produced using standard angular alumina particles. The overall features are promising for applications in the aerospace industry, where light and strong materials are required.

  11. Multi-Objective Optimization of Friction Stir Welding Process Parameters of AA6061-T6 and AA7075-T6 Using a Biogeography Based Optimization Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamjidy, Mehran; Baharudin, B T Hang Tuah; Paslar, Shahla; Matori, Khamirul Amin; Sulaiman, Shamsuddin; Fadaeifard, Firouz

    2017-05-15

    The development of Friction Stir Welding (FSW) has provided an alternative approach for producing high-quality welds, in a fast and reliable manner. This study focuses on the mechanical properties of the dissimilar friction stir welding of AA6061-T6 and AA7075-T6 aluminum alloys. The FSW process parameters such as tool rotational speed, tool traverse speed, tilt angle, and tool offset influence the mechanical properties of the friction stir welded joints significantly. A mathematical regression model is developed to determine the empirical relationship between the FSW process parameters and mechanical properties, and the results are validated. In order to obtain the optimal values of process parameters that simultaneously optimize the ultimate tensile strength, elongation, and minimum hardness in the heat affected zone (HAZ), a metaheuristic, multi objective algorithm based on biogeography based optimization is proposed. The Pareto optimal frontiers for triple and dual objective functions are obtained and the best optimal solution is selected through using two different decision making techniques, technique for order of preference by similarity to ideal solution (TOPSIS) and Shannon's entropy.

  12. Multi-Objective Optimization of Friction Stir Welding Process Parameters of AA6061-T6 and AA7075-T6 Using a Biogeography Based Optimization Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehran Tamjidy

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The development of Friction Stir Welding (FSW has provided an alternative approach for producing high-quality welds, in a fast and reliable manner. This study focuses on the mechanical properties of the dissimilar friction stir welding of AA6061-T6 and AA7075-T6 aluminum alloys. The FSW process parameters such as tool rotational speed, tool traverse speed, tilt angle, and tool offset influence the mechanical properties of the friction stir welded joints significantly. A mathematical regression model is developed to determine the empirical relationship between the FSW process parameters and mechanical properties, and the results are validated. In order to obtain the optimal values of process parameters that simultaneously optimize the ultimate tensile strength, elongation, and minimum hardness in the heat affected zone (HAZ, a metaheuristic, multi objective algorithm based on biogeography based optimization is proposed. The Pareto optimal frontiers for triple and dual objective functions are obtained and the best optimal solution is selected through using two different decision making techniques, technique for order of preference by similarity to ideal solution (TOPSIS and Shannon’s entropy.

  13. Multi-Objective Optimization of Friction Stir Welding Process Parameters of AA6061-T6 and AA7075-T6 Using a Biogeography Based Optimization Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamjidy, Mehran; Baharudin, B. T. Hang Tuah; Paslar, Shahla; Matori, Khamirul Amin; Sulaiman, Shamsuddin; Fadaeifard, Firouz

    2017-01-01

    The development of Friction Stir Welding (FSW) has provided an alternative approach for producing high-quality welds, in a fast and reliable manner. This study focuses on the mechanical properties of the dissimilar friction stir welding of AA6061-T6 and AA7075-T6 aluminum alloys. The FSW process parameters such as tool rotational speed, tool traverse speed, tilt angle, and tool offset influence the mechanical properties of the friction stir welded joints significantly. A mathematical regression model is developed to determine the empirical relationship between the FSW process parameters and mechanical properties, and the results are validated. In order to obtain the optimal values of process parameters that simultaneously optimize the ultimate tensile strength, elongation, and minimum hardness in the heat affected zone (HAZ), a metaheuristic, multi objective algorithm based on biogeography based optimization is proposed. The Pareto optimal frontiers for triple and dual objective functions are obtained and the best optimal solution is selected through using two different decision making techniques, technique for order of preference by similarity to ideal solution (TOPSIS) and Shannon’s entropy. PMID:28772893

  14. Influencia de los parámetros de la soldadura metálica fría en las aleaciones AA5083 y AA6061//Influence of the colt metal welding parameters on the AA5083 and AA6061 aluminum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Eduardo de‐Luna‐Alanís

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available El trabajo tuvo como objetivo evaluar la influencia de la velocidad de la soldadura y de las correcciones del arco y pulso en el proceso de Transferencia Metálica Fría sobre las propiedades mecánicas de las aleaciones AA5083 y AA6061. Se desarrolló un diseño experimental de tipo factorial multinivel, con 4 factores independientes (Corrección de Arco, Pulso, Velocidad de Soldadura y Aleación. Los parámetros fundamentales fueron: Corriente de base 250 A; Voltaje de arco 21 V y Polaridad (Direct current electrode positive, DCEP. La evaluación se realizó a través de un ensayo de tracción transversal sobre probetas planas obtenidas de los cupones soldados. Se demuestra que el modelo aplicado es adecuado, revelándose en los experimentos diferencias sustanciales en las propiedades Tensión de fluencia 29,56 %, Módulo de elasticidad 51,16 % y Trabajo específico de deformación elástica 42,30 %, el cual no posee una dependencia lineal con elresto de las propiedades anteriores.Palabras claves: transferencia metálica fría, aleación AA5083, aleación AA6061, propiedades mecánicas._______________________________________________________________________________AbstractThe work objective was to evaluatethe influence of Cold Metal Transfer process arc and pulse corrections and welding speed on the mechanical properties of AA5083 and AA6061 aluminum alloys. For it, a Factorial Multilevel experimental design whit 4 independent factor (arc correction, pulse correction, welding speed and alloy was developed. The essential welding parameters employed were: base current 250 A; arc voltage 21 V and polarity (DCEP. The evaluation was made whit a transverse traction test of plate welded coupons. The experimental model applied wasadequate and substantial differences was showed between yield tensile strength 29,56 %, elasticity module (51,16 % and specific work of elastic deformation 42,30 %, which it does not possess a lineal dependence whit the rest

  15. Mechanical Behaviour Investigation Of Aluminium Alloy Tailor Welded Blank Developed By Using Friction Stir Welding Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwi Anggono, Agus; Sugito, Bibit; Hariyanto, Agus; Subroto; Sarjito

    2017-10-01

    The objective on the research was to investigate the mechanical properties and microstructure of tailor welded blank (TWB) made from AA6061-T6 and AA1100 using friction stir welding (FSW) process. Due to the dissimilar mechanical properties of the two aluminium alloys, microhardness test was conducted to measure the hardness distribution across the weld nugget. The mixing of two distinct materials was influenced by tool rotation speed. Therefore, microstructure analysis was carried out to investigate the grain size and shape. The grain size of AA6061-T6 has increased in the heat affected zone (HAZ) while for AA1100 has decreased. In the weld nugget, it has found a hook defects in the dissimilar aluminium joining. By using monotonic tensile load, the different weld line direction was observed with the expansion in tool rotation. The joints failure were consistently on the area of AA1100 series. Furthermore, two specimens were investigated, one through the dissimilar aluminium and the other through similiar material. Inspection of the weld nugget hardness was shown that nonhomogen material intermixing during the stiring process as confirmed by microhardness measurement.

  16. Influence of tool pin in friction stir welding on activated carbon reinforced aluminium metal matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    DijuSamuel, G.; Raja Dhas, J. Edwin

    2017-10-01

    This paper focus on impact of tool pin in friction stir welding on activated carbon reinforced aluminium metal matrix composite. For fabrication of metal matrix composite AA6061 is used as matrix and activated carbon is used as reinforcement and it is casted using modified stir casting technique. After casting metal matrix composite has undergone various microstructure tests like SEM,EDAX and XRD. FSW is carried out in this metal matrix composite by choosing various tool pin profile like square,round,Threaded round, hexagon and taper. The quality of welded plates is measured in terms of ultimate tensile strength and hardness.

  17. Microstructure, mechanical properties and texture of an AA6061/AA5754 composite fabricated by cross accumulative roll bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verstraete, K., E-mail: kevin.verstraete@u-psud.fr [Université Paris-Sud, SP2M, ICMMO, UMR CNRS 8182, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Helbert, A.L. [Université Paris-Sud, SP2M, ICMMO, UMR CNRS 8182, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Brisset, F. [Université Paris-Sud, ICMMO, UMR CNRS 8182, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Benoit, A.; Paillard, P. [Institut des Matériaux Jean Rouxel (IMN), UMR 6502, Polytech’Nantes, Nantes Cedex (France); Baudin, T. [Université Paris-Sud, SP2M, ICMMO, UMR CNRS 8182, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2015-07-29

    AA6061 alloy is a widely used material in the automotive and aerospace industries, but is prone to hot cracking, which limits its weldability. To prevent this phenomenon, the AA6061/AA5754 composite was formed using a severe plastic deformation technique, Cross Accumulative Roll Bonding (CARB), at an elevated temperature (350 °C) to ensure good bonding between layers. This technique was efficient to maintain a small grain size, even under the process temperature conditions, and consequently, preserve good mechanical properties. The composite had better mechanical properties than the initial aluminium alloys. Microstructure and texture remained stable after two cycles and yield stress tended towards an equal value in the rolling and the transverse directions. After two cycles, the main component was the {001}〈110〉 rotated Cube, which was maintained for up to 10 cycles. Diffusion was more effective as the strain increased. Finally, a tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding process was performed on the composite and confirmed resistance to hot cracking.

  18. Multi-Objective Optimization of Friction Stir Welding of Aluminium Alloy Using Grey Relation Analysis with Entropy Measurement Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SAURABH KUMAR GUPTA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present research focus on optimization of Friction Stir Welding (FSW process parameters for joining of AA6061 aluminium alloy using hybrid approach. The FSW process parameters considered are tool rotational speed, welding speed and axial force. The quality characteristics considered are tensile strength (TS and percentage of tensile elongation (TE. Taguchi based experimental design L9 orthogonal array is used for determining the experimental results. The value of weights corresponding to each quality characteristic is determined by using the entropy measurement method so that their importance can be properly explained. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA is used to determine the contribution of FSW process parameters. The confirmation tests also have been done for verifying the results.

  19. Experimental analysis of cut welding in aluminium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dorph, Pernille; De Chiffre, Leonardo; Bay, Niels

    1993-01-01

    Cut welding is a newly developed cold pressure welding process. In the present work, an experimental investigation was carried out analyzing the mechanisms involved in cut welding of a block to a strip. Experiments were carried out in technically pure aluminium. The investigation has involved...... tensile testing and metallographic investigations of the welds. The results show that this variant of cut welding is a very reproducible process giving a weld strength equal to 30-40% the strength of the parent material. The experiments have shown that the reason for this relatively low strength...... is an uneven pressure distribution along the weld due to a wave formed during sliding. Attempts to alter the material flow during sliding are presented....

  20. Friction stir welding of single crystal aluminium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonda, Richard Warren; Wert, John A.; Reynolds, A.P.

    2007-01-01

    Friction stir welds were prepared in different orientations in an aluminium single crystal. The welds were quenched to preserve the microstructure surrounding the tool and then electron backscattered diffraction was used to reveal the generation of grain boundaries and the evolution...... of crystallographic texture around the tool in each weld. The extent of both dynamic recrystallisation and conventional recrystallisation varied considerably as a function of weld orientation. As the base plate begins to interact with the deformation field surrounding the tool, regions of the single crystal rotate...

  1. Friction Welding of Aluminium and Aluminium Alloys with Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Ambroziak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents our actual knowledge and experience in joining dissimilar materials with the use of friction welding method. The joints of aluminium and aluminium alloys with the different types of steel were studied. The structural effects occurring during the welding process were described. The mechanical properties using, for example, (i microhardness measurements, (ii tensile tests, (iii bending tests, and (iv shearing tests were determined. In order to obtain high-quality joints the influence of different configurations of the process such as (i changing the geometry of bonding surface, (ii using the interlayer, or (iii heat treatment was analyzed. Finally, the issues related to the selection of optimal parameters of friction welding process were also investigated.

  2. Process Parameters Optimization for Producing AA6061/TiB2 Composites by Friction Stir Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rao Santha Dakarapu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir processing (FSP is solid state novel technique developed to refine microstructure and to improve the mechanical properties and be used to fabricate the aluminium alloy matrix composites. An attempt is made to fabricate AA6061/TiB2 aluminium alloy composite (AMCs and the influence of process parameters like rotational speed, transverse feed, axial load and percentage reinforcement on microstructure and mechanical properties were studied. The microstructural observations are carried out and revealed that the reinforcement particles (TiB2 were uniformly dispersed in the nugget zone. The Tensile strength and Hardness of composites were evaluated. It was observed that tensile strength, and hardness were increased with increased the rotational speed and percentage reinforcement of particles. The process parameters were optimized using Taguchi analysis (Single Variable and Grey analysis (Multi Variable. The most influential parameter was rotational speed in single variable method and multi variable optimization method. The ANOVA also done to know the percentage contribution of each parameter.

  3. Friction stir welding (FSW of aluminium foam sandwich panels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bušić

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on the influence of welding speed and tool tilt angle upon the mechanical properties at the friction stir welding of aluminium foam sandwich panels. Double side welding was used for producing butt welds of aluminium sandwich panels applying insertion of extruded aluminium profile. Such insertion provided lower pressure of the tool upon the aluminium panels, providing also sufficient volume of the material required for the weldment formation. Ultimate tensile strength and flexural strength for three-point bending test have been determined for samples taken from the welded joints. Results have confirmed anticipated effects of independent variables.

  4. Thermal cycling and strain behaviour of AA6061-20% SiC(w) composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonollo, F.; Ceschini, L.; Garagnani, G.L.; Persiani, F.; Zambon, A. (Padua Univ. (Italy). Dip. di Innovazione Meccanica e Gestionale Bologna Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Metallurgia Bologna Univ. (Italy). Dip. di Ingegneria delle Costruzioni Meccaniche, Nucleari, Aeronautiche e di Metallurgia)

    1992-12-01

    This paper describes a study on the effect of thermal cycling on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the fiber reinforced aluminium alloy composite, AA6061 - 20% SiC(w), tested between 100 and 450 degrees C under constant stress (0 to 30 MPa). The test specimens were obtained from extruded bars produced by powder metallurgy. Two specimen orientations were chosen and investigated - longitudinal and transverse. Thermal cycling, carried out by means of suitably designed and assembled test equipment, was aimed at the evaluation of elongation versus extrusion direction, and hardness variation (HR 330N) versus the number of cycles. The microstructural changes in the composite were analyzed by employing light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, image analysis and transmission electron microscopy. It was observed that: thermal cycling under stress induced very high tensile elongations; significant deformations were also achieved without external loading; there was a correlation among the thermal cycling variables, specimen orientation and applied stress; a re-orientation process occurred along the applied stress direction.

  5. Resistance welding of aluminium diecasting; Widerstandspressschweissen von Aluminiumdruckguss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, K.; Grobelin, K. [Hess Engineering AG, Frauenfeld (Switzerland)

    2001-07-01

    Components consist of die cast with aluminium are used in many machines and vehicles. From economical point of view die casting is a very interesting method to produce moulded components. Aluminium belongs to the most important materials utilized for lightweight construction. It is possible to produce components having high strengths as well as high elongation at rupture by applying new die cast alloys. Since about ten years ago, one is able to weld aluminium die cast successfully. This has become possible because of the improvement of the die cast process after extensive research work. Now components contain only less than the prior common quantities of gas. Resistance suits very well for assembling components consisting of aluminium die cast. High strength is in existence. The porosity has less influence on quality of weld while applying the method of butt welding than applying that one of fusion welding because of occurrences of pressure during butt welding. From the economical view of point, the methods are very suitable for series manufacturing because of the short execution time. Moreover it is an advantage that knowledge gathered for resistance welding of aluminium wrought materials can be mostly applied to aluminium die cast. (orig.)

  6. Friction Stir Welding of three dissimilar aluminium alloy used in aeronautics industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boşneag, A.; Constantin, M. A.; Niţu, E.; Iordache, M.

    2017-10-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is an innovative solid-state joining process. This process was, in first time, develop to join the similar aluminum plates but now the technology can be used to weld a large area of materials similar or dissimilar. Taking these into account FSW process, for dissimilar materials are increasingly required, more than traditional arc welding, in industrial environment. More than that FSW is used in aeronautics industry because of very good result and very good weldability between aluminum alloy used at building of airplanes, where the body of airplane are 20% aluminum alloy and this percent can be increaser in future. In this paper is presented an experimental study which includes welding three dissimilar aluminum alloy, with different properties, used in aeronautics industry, this materials are: AA 2024, AA6061 and AA7075. After welding with different parameters, the welding join and welding process will be analyzed considering process temperature, process vertical force, and roughnessof welding seams, visual aspect and microhardness.

  7. Design of welded aluminium connections (Entwurf und Berechnung von Aluminium Schweissverbindungen)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soetens, F.

    1998-01-01

    In the past two decades considerable research effort has been put into welded aluminium connections in order to better understand their structural behaviour and to up-date the design rules in the existing standards at the time [1].

  8. Corrosion fatigue behaviour of aluminium 5083-H111 welded using gas metal arc welding method

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mutombo, K

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available susceptible to hydrogen-induced porosity. The weld pool may dissolve large amount of hydrogen from the arc atmosphere. On solidification, the solubility of hydrogen decreases and the entrapped hydrogen forms gas porosity. Typical sources of hydrogen... Behaviour of Aluminium 5083-H111 Welded Using Gas Metal Arc Welding Method Kalenda Mutombo1 and Madeleine du Toit2 1CSIR/ 2University of Pretoria South Africa 1. Introduction Aluminium and its alloys are widely used as engineering materials...

  9. Friction stir welding of Aluminium matrix composites – A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramanya Prabhu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir welding (FSW is established as one of the prominent welding techniques to join aluminium matrix composites (AMCs. It is a solid state welding process, takes place well below the melting temperature of the material, eliminates the detrimental effects of conventional fusion welding process. Although the process is capable to join AMCs, challenges are still open that need to be fulfill to widen its applications. This paper gives the outline of the friction stir welding technique used to join AMCs. Effect of process variables on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the joints, behavior of reinforcing materials during welding, effect of tool profiles on the joint strength are discussed in detail. Few improvements and direction for future research are also proposed.

  10. Optimization of Aluminium-to-Magnesium Ultrasonic Spot Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panteli, A.; Chen, Y.-C.; Strong, D.; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Prangnell, P. B.

    2012-03-01

    The ability to join dissimilar materials in the automotive industry will result in more efficient multimaterial structures. However, welding of aluminium (Al) to magnesium (Mg) alloys is problematic because of the rapid formation of brittle intermetallic phases at the weld interface. Ultrasonic welding (USW) is a solid-state joining technology that may offer a potential solution, but USW of Al to Mg is currently not well understood. Here, we have investigated the effect of process variables and energy input on joint formation between Al-6111 and Mg-AZ31 alloys, and we report on the optimum welding conditions, heat generation, and the formation of a significant intermetallic reaction layer. Furthermore, the factors influencing the interface reaction rate and the advantages of precoating the Mg with Al are discussed.

  11. Rare earth conversion coatings grown on AA6061 aluminum alloys. Corrosion studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brachetti S, S. B. [Instituto Tecnologico de Ciudad Madero, Av. 1o. de Mayo y Sor Juana I. de la Cruz, Col. Los Mangos, 89440 Ciudad Madero, Tanaulipas (Mexico); Dominguez C, M. A.; Torres H, A. M.; Onofre B, E. [IPN, Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada - Altamira, Carretera Tampico-Puerto Industrial Altamira Km. 14.5, 89600 Altamira, Tamaulipas (Mexico); De la Cruz H, W., E-mail: mdominguezc@ipn.mx [UNAM, Centro de Nanociencias y Nanotecnologia, Apdo. Postal 2681, 22800 Ensenada, Baja California (Mexico)

    2014-07-01

    The present work is aimed to investigate the corrosion resistance of rare earth protective coatings deposited by spontaneous deposition on AA6061 aluminum alloy substrates. Coatings were deposited from water-based Ce(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} and La(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} solutions by varing parameters such as rare earth solution concentration, bath temperature and immersion time. The values of the Tafel slopes indicate that the cathodic process is favored by concentration polarization rather than activation polarization. Chemical and morphological characterizations of the surface before and after electrochemical evaluations were performed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. (Author)

  12. Toughness behavior in roll-bonded laminates based on AA6061/SiCp composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosseini Monazzah, A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11155-9466, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Pouraliakbar, H. [Department of Advanced Materials, WorldTech Scientific Research Center (WT-SRC), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bagheri, R., E-mail: rezabagh@sharif.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11155-9466, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Seyed Reihani, S.M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11155-9466, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-03-01

    Lamination has been shown to enhance damage tolerance of discontinuously reinforced aluminum (DRA) composites. Doing this technique, DRA layers could be laminated with ductile interlayers. In this research, two types of laminates consisting similar DRA layers and a ductile AA1050 interlayer were fabricated by means of hot roll-bonding. AA6061–5 vol% SiCp and AA6061–15 vol% SiCp composites were considered as exterior layers. Different rolling strains, was applied to control the interfacial strength which was examined by shear test. Toughness behavior of laminates was evaluated by three-point bending test in crack-divider orientation. Based on obtained results, the plastic deformation of ductile interlayer and delamination are challenging toughening mechanisms which were influenced by the degree of interfacial bonding and ceramic particle content. An increment in reinforcement content alters the toughness behavior of laminates in the way that the governing mechanism in laminates containing 5 vol% SiCp is interfacial adhesion since in laminates having 15 vol% SiCp the dominant mechanism is AA1050 deformability. Meanwhile, optical and scanning electron microscopy observations proved the importance of toughening mechanisms in each type of materials. Also, shear test results revealed that the interfacial strength of laminates increases by the number of rolling passes and deteriorated by higher reinforcement contents.

  13. Designing aluminium friction stir welded joints against multiaxial fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Susmel

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The present paper investigates the accuracy of the Modified Wöhler Curve Method (MWCM in estimating multiaxial fatigue strength of aluminium friction stir (FS welded joints. Having developed a bespoke joining technology, circumferentially FS welded tubular specimens of Al 6082-T6 were tested under proportional and non-proportional tension and torsion, the effect of non-zero mean stresses being also investigated. The validation exercise carried out using the experimental results have demonstrated that the MWCM applied in terms of nominal stresses, notch stresses, and also the Point Method is accurate in predicting the fatigue lifetime of the tested FS welded joints, with its use resulting in life estimates that fall within the uniaxial and torsional calibration scatter bands.

  14. Mechanical properties of 5083 aluminium welds after manual and automatic pulsed gas metal arc welding using E5356 filler

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mutombo, K

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Semi-automatic and automatic pulsed gas metal arc welding (GMAW) of aluminium alloy 5083 with ER5356 filler wire causes considerable softening in the weld. The tensile strength of dressed automatic welds approaches that of the base metal...

  15. Tensile Strength and Hardness Correlations with Microscopy in Friction welded Aluminium to Copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satish, Rengarajan; Seshagiri Rao, Vaddi; Ananthapadmanaban, Dattaguru; Ravi, Balappa

    2016-01-01

    Aluminium and copper are good conductors of heat and electricity, copper being the better conductor, is a costly metal indeed. On the other hand, aluminium is cheap, easily available and also has a lower density than copper. Hence, worldwide efforts are being made to partially replace copper wire. Solid state welding should be used to join aluminium to copper. This is because the use of fusion welding results in brittle phases formed in the weld interface. One of the solid state welding techniques used for joining aluminium to copper is friction welding. In this paper, an attempt has been made to join aluminium to copper by friction welding by varying the friction welding parameters, namely friction pressure, upset pressure, burn-off length and speed of rotation of the workpiece. Nine different friction welding parameter combinations were used during welding in accordance with ASTM standards and results have been reported. Tensile strength and hardness tests were carried out for each parameter combination. Optimum friction welding parameter combination was identified with respect to tensile strength. Scanning Electron Microscopy and Electron dispersive spectroanalysis were obtained to identify modes of fracture and presence of intermetallic phases for each friction welding combination with the aim to narrow down friction welding parameters that give good properties on the whole.

  16. Efecto de los ciclos térmicos de soldadura por arco eléctrico indirecto modificado (AEIM en las propiedades mecánicas de la aleación AA6061-T6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambriz, Ricardo R.

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Results of temperature measurements during welding of 12.7 mm thick AA6061-T6 alloy plates by modified indirect electric arc (MIEA are presented. This study describes the thermal cycles of the heat affected zone (HAZ and also in the fusion zone. Depending upon the position of the transducers, the maximum temperatures measured in the HAZ range from 308 to 693 °C, these measurements were related with the tensile test results, and the failure zone reported previously by the authors [1]. It was observed that, there is a decrease in the mechanical strength of the welded joints, due to the microstructural changes suffered by AA6061-T6 alloy in which formation of the β’ occurs according to the TTT transformation diagram. The inherent cooling conditions of the weld pool observed for the MIEA technique (only one pass of welding, have permitted to establish the characteristics of solidification and microstructure for a specific cooling rate.

    Se presentan los resultados de medición de temperatura durante la soldadura por arco eléctrico indirecto modificado (AEIM de la aleación AA6061-T6. Éstas, describen los ciclos térmicos de la zona afectada por el calor (ZAC y en la zona de fusión. Los resultados muestran que las temperaturas máximas medidas en la ZAC se encuentran en un rango de 308 a 693 °C, dependiendo de la posición de los sensores, estas mediciones fueron correlacionadas con los resultados de resistencia a la tracción y la zona de fallo, reportados previamente por los autores[1]. Se observó que existe una disminución en la resistencia mecánica de las uniones, debido a los cambios microestructurales por la formación de precipitados sobreenvejecidos, β’, de acuerdo con su diagrama de transformación (TTT. Las condiciones de enfriamiento en el baño fundido inherentes a la técnica por AEIM (un solo paso de soldadura, permitieron establecer las características de solidificación y microestructura esperada

  17. Laser beam welded tailored sheets made of aluminium for industrial manufacture; Laserstrahlgeschweisste massgeschneiderte Bleche aus Aluminium fuer die industrielle Fertigung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behler, K.; Beyer, E. [Fraunhofer-Inst. fuer Lasertechnik, Aachen (Germany); Berkmanns, J. [Fraunhofer Resource Center, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Meyer, Y. [PSA, Bievres (France); Winderlich, B. [Fraunhofer-Inst. fuer Werkstoffphysik und Schichttechnologie, Dresden (Germany)

    1995-12-31

    The results described for the use of laser beam welding for the manufacture of tailored blanks made of aluminium show the different suitability for welding of alloys of the 5000 and 6000 series, the ability to use Nd:YAG and CO{sub 2} lasers for this application, possibilities of improving process behaviour and the results of welding and the similar or improved seam properties compared to other melting welding processes. This and the different activities of developments orientated towards industry make it clear that laser beam welding technique is very suitable for joints on aluminium. However, the material and process-specific aspects must be observed when introduced to industry. (orig./RHM) [Deutsch] Die dargestellten Ergebnisse zum Einsatz des Laserstrahlschweissens fuer die Herstellung von Tailored Blanks aus Aluminium zeigen die unterschiedliche Schweisseignung von Legierungen der 5000- und 6000-Serie; die Einsatzfaehigkeit von Nd:YAG- und CO{sub 2}-Laser fuer diesen Anwendungsfall; Moeglichkeiten zur Verbesserung von Prozessverhalten und Schweissergebnissen; die im Vergleich zu anderen Schmelzschweissverfahren aehnlichen, z.T. verbesserten Nahteigenschaften. Dies und die verschiedenen Aktivitaeten industrieorientierter Entwicklungen verdeutlichen, dass die Laserstrahlschweisstechnik sehr gut zur Verbindung von Aluminium geeignet ist. Allerdings muessen material- und verfahrensspezifische Aspekte bei der industriellen Umsetzung beachtet werden. (orig./RHM)

  18. An investigation on compression strength analysis of commercial aluminium tube to aluminium 2025 tube plate by using TIG welding process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kannan, S., E-mail: kannan.dgl201127@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mining Machinery Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology (ISM), Dhanbad, Jharkhand, India, 826004 (India); Senthil Kumaran, S., E-mail: sskumaran@ymail.com [Research and Development Center, Department of Mechanical Engineering, RVS Educational Trust' s Group of Institutions, RVS School of Engineering and Technology, Dindigul, Tamilnadu, India, 624005 (India); Kumaraswamidhas, L.A., E-mail: lakdhas1978@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mining Machinery Engineering, Indian School of Mines University, Dhanbad, Jharkhand, India, 826004 (India)

    2016-05-05

    In this present study, Tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding was applied to weld the dissimilar materials and authenticate the mechanical and metallurgical properties of tube to tube plate made up of commercial aluminium and Al 2025 respectively using an Zirconiated tungsten electrode along with filler material aluminium ER 2219. In total, twenty five pieces has been subjected to compression strength and hardness value to evaluate the optimal joint strength. The three optimization technique has been used in this experiment. Taguchi L{sub 25} orthogonal array is used to identify the most influencing process parameter which affects the joint strength. ANOVA method is measured for both compression strength and hardness to calculate the percentage of contribution for each process parameter. Genetic algorithm is used to validate the results obtained from the both experimental value and optimization value. The micro structural study is depicted the welding joints characterization in between tube to tube plate joints. The radiograph test is conducted to prove the welds are non-defective and no flaws are found during the welding process. The mechanical property of compression strength and hardness has been measured to obtain the optimal joint strength of the welded sample was about 174.846 MPa and 131.364 Hv respectively. - Highlights: • Commercial Al tube and Al 2025 tube plate successfully welded by TIG welding. • Compression strength and hardness value proves to obtain optimal joint strength. • The maximum compression and hardness was achieved in various input parameters.

  19. Optimisation of hardness and tensile strength of friction stir welded ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR OKE

    The present work aims to optimize the operating parameters such as rotational speed, welding speed and tool diameter for maximum Hardness and Tensile strength of the friction stir welded joint on AA6061 alloy. Three factors with five level response surface design matrix were developed by using MINITAB14 software ...

  20. Effective corrosion protection of AA6061 aluminum alloy by sputtered Al-Ce coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dominguez-Crespo, M.A., E-mail: mdominguezc@ipn.m [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, GIPMAT CICATA-Altamira, km 14.5, Carretera Tampico-Puerto Industrial Altamira, C.P. 89600 Altamira, Tamps (Mexico); Torres-Huerta, A.M. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, GIPMAT CICATA-Altamira, km 14.5, Carretera Tampico-Puerto Industrial Altamira, C.P. 89600 Altamira, Tamps (Mexico); Rodil, S.E. [Instituto de Investigacion en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Exterior s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, Del. Coyoacan, C.P. 04510 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Ramirez-Meneses, E. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, GIPMAT CICATA-Altamira, km 14.5, Carretera Tampico-Puerto Industrial Altamira, C.P. 89600 Altamira, Tamps (Mexico); Suarez-Velazquez, G.G. [Alumna del PTA del CICATA-Altamira IPN, km 14.5, Carretera Tampico-Puerto Industrial Altamira, C.P. 89600 Altamira, Tamps (Mexico); Hernandez-Perez, M.A. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, ESIQIE, C.P. 07738 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2009-12-30

    Al-Ce coatings were deposited on silicon and AA6061 aluminum alloy substrates by DC magnetron sputtering using aluminum in combination with pure cerium targets. The materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in order to consider their application as high corrosion resistance coatings. The corrosion behavior of the films was studied using a NaCl aqueous solution (3.5 wt%). As for the characterization results, an apparent amorphous phase of aluminum oxide with small cerium compounds embedded in the matrix was detected by the X-ray diffraction patterns and HRTEM on the deposited films at 200 W and 4 Pa. At these conditions, AFM and SEM images evidenced crack-free coatings with low-roughness nanometric structures and columnar growth. EIS and Tafel results converged to indicate an inhibition of the corrosion reactions. The film displayed good stability in the aggressive medium and after 1 day of exposure underwent very little degradation. The variations in the impedance and Tafel characteristics were found to occur as a function of cerium content, which provokes important changes in the film protective properties.

  1. Laser welding of SSM Cast A356 aluminium alloy processed with CSIR-Rheo technology

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Akhter, R

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Samples of aluminium alloy A356 were manufactured by Semi Solid Metals HPDC technology, developed recently in CSIR, Pretoria. They were butt welded in as cast conditions using as Nd: YAG laser. The best metal and weld microstructure were presented...

  2. Investigación de la interacción matriz/refuerzo en materiales compuestos AA6061/partículas Ti-Al mediante análisis de imagen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez, N.

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper is compared the stability of different contents of intermetallic particles (Ti3Al and TiAl in an aluminium alloy (AA6061. A powder metallurgy route combined with a secondary hot extrusion process, was followed to fabricate the composites. The matrix/ reinforcement interaction was enhanced by solubilization heat treatments at temperatures ranging form 470 to 530ºC and times from 1 to 24 h. Scanning electron microscopy was employed to study the microstructure of the composites. The reaction layer thickness and its growing speed were determined by image analysis. The stoichiometric composition was obtained by dispersive energy diffraction of X ray.

    La presente comunicación compara la estabilidad que presentan diferentes refuerzos intermetálicos (Ti3Al y TiAl adicionados a una matriz de aluminio (AA6061, empleándose para ambos refuerzos diferentes contenidos del mismo. El método de fabricación elegido combina una vía pulvimetalúrgica con un proceso secundario de extrusión en caliente. Para estudiar la interacción del refuerzo con la matriz, se llevan a cabo tratamientos térmicos de solubilización en estufas con atmósfera controlada, a una temperatura de 530ºC y variando el tiempo entre 0 y 24 h. Se utiliza la microscopía electrónica de barrido (MEB para el estudio microestructural de los compuestos, calculándose el espesor y la velocidad de crecimiento de las capas de reacción mediante técnicas de análisis de imagen. La estequiometría de las capas formadas se determina mediante microanálisis por energías dispersivas de rayos X (EDX.

  3. Determination of local material properties of laser beam welded aluminium-steel and aluminium-titanium compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunkel, M.; Hehl, A. von [IWT Stiftung Institut fuer Werkstofftechnik Bremen (Germany); Barr, A.

    2012-04-15

    The combination of different metallic materials, such as aluminium and steel or aluminium and titanium, by firmly bonding via laser beam welding enables the production of customised hybrid lightweight designs with enhanced properties. Both weld geometry and local material behaviour, which are responsible for the final load characteristics of the compound, are influenced by the process parameters during welding. A novel approach of coupling process, microstructure and mechanical simulation, considering the development of weld geometry and local material conditions is intended to deliver a fast and reliable method for evaluating the quasi-static strength of laser beam welded hybrid compounds. Besides the objective to promote a reduction of expensive welding experiments, the developed method can enhance the performance of hybrid structures as well as their lightweight potential for automotive and aircraft applications. The experimental determination of the local mechanical properties as the basis for the regarded simulation approach is an essential part of a running research project. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. Microstructural development from interdiffusion and reaction between U−Mo and AA6061 alloys annealed at 600° and 550 °C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, E., E-mail: Emmanuel.Perez@inl.gov [Nuclear Fuels and Materials Division, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6188 (United States); Keiser, D.D., E-mail: dennis.keiser@inl.gov [Nuclear Fuels and Materials Division, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6188 (United States); Sohn, Y.H., E-mail: yongho.sohn@ucf.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Central Florida, 4000 Central Florida Blvd., Orlando, FL 32816 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    The U.S. Material Management and Minimization Reactor Conversion Program is developing low enrichment fuel systems encased in Al-alloy for use in research and test reactors. Monolithic fuel plates have local regions where the U−Mo fuel plate may come into contact with the Al-alloy 6061 (AA6061) cladding. This results in the development of interdiffusion zones with complex microstructures with multiple phases. In this study, the microstructural development of diffusion couples, U−7 wt%Mo, U−10 wt%Mo, and U−12 wt%Mo vs. AA6061, annealed at 600 °C for 24 h and at 550 °C for 1, 5, and 20 h, were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy with x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy. The microstructural development and kinetics were compared to diffusion couples U−Mo vs. high purity Al and binary Al−Si alloys. The diffusion couples developed complex interaction regions where phase development was influenced by the alloying additions of the AA6061. - Highlights: • Diffusion couples of U−7Mo, U−10Mo, and U−12Mo vs. AA6061 were analyzed by SEM with XEDS. • The couples were annealed at 600 °C for 24 h and at 550 °C for 1, 5 and 20 h. • The interaction regions were more complex than those in diffusion couples of U−Mo vs. high purity Al and Al−Si alloys. • Analysis showed that the alloying additions of the AA6061 were present in the interaction regions. • Phase development was significantly influenced by the alloying additions of the AA6061.

  5. Braze Welding TIG of Titanium and Aluminium Alloy Type Al – Mg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winiowski A.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the course and the results of technological tests related to TIG-based arc braze welding of titanium and AW-5754 (AlMg3 aluminium alloy. The tests involved the use of an aluminium filler metal (Al99.5 and two filler metals based on Al-Si alloys (AlSi5 and AlSi12. Braze welded joints underwent tensile tests, metallographic examinations using a light microscope as well as structural examinations involving the use of a scanning electron microscope and an X-ray energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS. The highest strength and quality of welds was obtained when the Al99.5 filler metal was used in a braze welding process. The tests enabled the development of the most convenient braze welding conditions and parameters.

  6. Numerical simulation of the laser welding process for the prediction of temperature distribution on welded aluminium aircraft components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsirkas, S. A.

    2018-03-01

    The present investigation is focused to the modelling of the temperature field in aluminium aircraft components welded by a CO2 laser. A three-dimensional finite element model has been developed to simulate the laser welding process and predict the temperature distribution in T-joint laser welded plates with fillet material. The simulation of the laser beam welding process was performed using a nonlinear heat transfer analysis, based on a keyhole formation model analysis. The model employs the technique of element ;birth and death; in order to simulate the weld fillet. Various phenomena associated with welding like temperature dependent material properties and heat losses through convection and radiation were accounted for in the model. The materials considered were 6056-T78 and 6013-T4 aluminium alloys, commonly used for aircraft components. The temperature distribution during laser welding process has been calculated numerically and validated by experimental measurements on different locations of the welded structure. The numerical results are in good agreement with the experimental measurements.

  7. An investigation of friction effect on formability of AA 6061-T4 sheet during cold forming condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Mohamed; Farouk, Mohamed; Elsayed, Ahmed; Shazly, Mostafa; Hegazy, Abdel Aziz

    2017-10-01

    Friction is one of the principal parameters that have a crucial effect on the sheet metal forming process. The use of a proper lubricant type will enhance and improve the product surface quality, tool life and material formability. In this paper, a set of experimental cup tests has been carried out to investigate the effect of friction on the formability of AA6061-T4 sheet by deploying four different types of lubricant (oil, nylon, grease and nylon grease combination). A finite element model was built up to simulate the cup test process using FE package, LS-DYNA. The material model has been used in the simulation was MAT_036 Barlat. The material characterization has been defined using tensile data and the forming limit curve of AA 6061-T4 from literature. The Thickness distributions and maximum heights of the cup at the four lubricants conditions obtained from the experimental and FE simulation shows the significant effect of the friction on the material formability and failure location. A good agreement between the experimental measurements and simulation results has been achieved.

  8. Comparative study on laser welding and TIG welding of semi-solid high pressure die cast A356 aluminium alloy

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Govender, G

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available components. The low porosity levels in SSM high pressure die castings (HPDC) improves the weldability of these components. The aim of the current research was to perform a comparative study of laser and TIG welding of SSM HPDC aluminium alloy A356. SSM...

  9. Braze Welding TIG of Titanium and Aluminium Alloy Type Al – Mg

    OpenAIRE

    Winiowski A.; Majewski D.

    2016-01-01

    The article presents the course and the results of technological tests related to TIG-based arc braze welding of titanium and AW-5754 (AlMg3) aluminium alloy. The tests involved the use of an aluminium filler metal (Al99.5) and two filler metals based on Al-Si alloys (AlSi5 and AlSi12). Braze welded joints underwent tensile tests, metallographic examinations using a light microscope as well as structural examinations involving the use of a scanning electron microscope and an X-ray energy disp...

  10. Human biomonitoring of aluminium after a single, controlled manual metal arc inert gas welding process of an aluminium-containing worksheet in nonwelders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, Jens; Brand, Peter; Hartmann, Laura; Schettgen, Thomas; Kossack, Veronika; Lenz, Klaus; Purrio, Ellwyn; Reisgen, Uwe; Kraus, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    Several existing field studies evaluate aluminium welding works but no thoroughly controlled exposure scenario for welding fume has been described yet. This study provides information about the uptake and elimination of aluminium from welding fumes under controlled conditions. In the Aachen Workplace Simulation Laboratory, we are able to generate welding fumes of a defined particle mass concentration. We exposed 12, until then occupationally unexposed participants with aluminium-containing welding fumes of a metal inert gas (MIG) welding process of a total dust mass concentration of 2.5 mg/m(3) for 6 h. Room air filter samples were collected, and the aluminium concentration in air derived. Urine and plasma samples were collected directly before and after the 6-h lasting exposure, as well as after 1 and 7 days. Human biomonitoring methods were used to determine the aluminium content of the samples with high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry. Urinary aluminium concentrations showed significant changes after exposure compared to preexposure levels (mean t(1) (0 h) 13.5 µg/L; mean t(2) (6 h) 23.5 µg/L). Plasma results showed the same pattern but pre-post comparison did not reach significance. We were able to detect a significant increase of the internal aluminium burden of a single MIG aluminium welding process in urine, while plasma failed significance. Biphasic elimination kinetic can be observed. The German BAT of 60 µg/g creatinine was not exceeded, and urinary aluminium returned nearly to baseline concentrations after 7 days.

  11. Optimisation of hardness and tensile strength of friction stir welded ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Optimisation of hardness and tensile strength of friction stir welded AA6061 alloy using response surface methodology coupled with grey relational analysis and principle component ... Response Surface Methodology (RSM) was adopted to develop mathematical model between the response and process parameters.

  12. Thermomechanical modelling of dissimilar Friction Melt Bonding of AA6061 to Dual-phase steel: Prediction of solidification cracking and residual stresses

    OpenAIRE

    Jimenez Mena, Norberto; Drezet, Jean-Marie; Jacques, Pascal; Simar, Aude; Thermec

    2016-01-01

    Friction Melt Bonding (FMB) is a novel technique that has been successfully applied to weld aluminium to steel in lap-joint configuration. To carry out the weld, a rotating cylindrical tool showing no pin is pressed against the surface of the steel sheet which is placed over the aluminium one. Heat will is generated from the friction and plastic dissipation induced by the tool in the steel plate. This heat does not melt the steel, but locally melts the aluminium in contact underneath owing to...

  13. Experimental Observation of Keyhole Shapes in the Laser Welding of Aluminium Blanks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aalderink, B.J.; Aalderink, Benno; Aarts, Ronald G.K.M.; de Lange, D.F.; Meijer, J.

    2007-01-01

    A camera-based in situ monitoring system for the Nd:yttrium–aluminum–garnet laser keyhole welding process of aluminium has been developed. The use of an external illumination source for image formation decouples the performance of this system from many process parameters. A prototype of the

  14. The structure and properties of autogenous laser beam welds in aluminium alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Whitaker, Iain Robert

    1994-01-01

    Autogenous laser beam welds were made in sheets of the aluminium alloys 8090, 8009 and 6061. The Al-Li based alloy 8090 was subjected to both continuous wave CO2 and pulsed Nd:YAG thermal cycles with average powers of 1.5-3.8 kW and 0.8- 0.9 kW respectively. The two techniques were compared for their influence on the 8090 solidified weld pool shape, the fusion zone microstructure and microhardness, the HAZ and the susceptibility of the fusion zone to post-weld heat treatment. It was found tha...

  15. INVESTIGATION OF SINGLE-PASS/DOUBLE-PASS TECHNIQUES ON FRICTION STIR WELDING OF ALUMINIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.A.A. Sathari

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to study the effects of single-pass/ double-pass techniques on friction stir welding of aluminium. Two pieces of AA1100 with a thickness of 6.0 mm were friction stir welded using a CNC milling machine at rotational speeds of 1400 rpm, 1600 rpm and 1800 rpm respectively for single-pass and double-pass. Microstructure observations of the welded area were studied using an optical microscope. The specimens were tested by using a tensile test and Vickers hardness test to evaluate their mechanical properties. The results indicated that, at low rotational speed, defects such as ‘surface lack of fill’ and tunnels in the welded area contributed to a decrease in mechanical properties. Welded specimens using double-pass techniques show increasing values of tensile strength and hardness. From this investigation it is found that the best parameters of FSW welded aluminium AA1100 plate were those using double-pass techniques that produce mechanically sound joints with a hardness of 56.38 HV and 108 MPa strength at 1800 rpm compared to the single-pass technique. Friction stir welding, single-pass/ double-pass techniques, AA1100, microstructure, mechanical properties.

  16. Fatigue of friction stir welded 2024-T351 aluminium alloy

    OpenAIRE

    Booth, D.; Sinclair, I.

    2002-01-01

    Fatigue failure characteristics of friction stir welds in 13mm gauge 2024-T351 plate have been assessed. Failure occurred from either the weld region (nugget/flow arm) or from the material immediately surrounding the weld. Fatigue failure from the surrounding material was essentially conventional, initiating from large S-phase intermetallic particles and growing in a macroscopic mode I manner. Corresponding fatigue lives were seen to be comparable to parent plate and results previously report...

  17. Finite element modelling and updating of friction stir welding (FSW joint for vibration analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahari Siti Norazila

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir welding of aluminium alloys widely used in automotive and aerospace application due to its advanced and lightweight properties. The behaviour of FSW joints plays a significant role in the dynamic characteristic of the structure due to its complexities and uncertainties therefore the representation of an accurate finite element model of these joints become a research issue. In this paper, various finite elements (FE modelling technique for prediction of dynamic properties of sheet metal jointed by friction stir welding will be presented. Firstly, nine set of flat plate with different series of aluminium alloy; AA7075 and AA6061 joined by FSW are used. Nine set of specimen was fabricated using various types of welding parameters. In order to find the most optimum set of FSW plate, the finite element model using equivalence technique was developed and the model validated using experimental modal analysis (EMA on nine set of specimen and finite element analysis (FEA. Three types of modelling were engaged in this study; rigid body element Type 2 (RBE2, bar element (CBAR and spot weld element connector (CWELD. CBAR element was chosen to represent weld model for FSW joints due to its accurate prediction of mode shapes and contains an updating parameter for weld modelling compare to other weld modelling. Model updating was performed to improve correlation between EMA and FEA and before proceeds to updating, sensitivity analysis was done to select the most sensitive updating parameter. After perform model updating, total error of the natural frequencies for CBAR model is improved significantly. Therefore, CBAR element was selected as the most reliable element in FE to represent FSW weld joint.

  18. Effect of Manganese on the Mechanical Properties of Welded As-Cast Aluminium Joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isiaka Oluwole OLADELE

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The effects of manganese on the mechanical properties of welded and un-weld as-cast 6063 aluminium alloy has been studied. Alloys of varying percentage of manganese from 0.019 to 0.24 were sand cast. A wooden pattern of dimensions 200×100×100mm was used, the aluminium (500g was charged into an induction furnace and heated to 750°C for 15 minutes, this was followed by the addition of weighed powdered manganese, stirred and heated at the same temperature for another 5 minutes and thereafter poured into the already prepared sand mould at a temperature of 690°C. The as-cast aluminium samples, were sectioned into two equal parts of 45mm each using power hack saw; a weld groove was created between the sides of the samples using an electric hand grinding machine, the groove served as the path along which the filler metal was deposited on the aluminium, a single v butt joint was produced from each sample and Metal Inert Gas Welding process was carried out to produce the required joint design. The different cast samples were machined to the different test pieces after which they were assessed to determine their mechanical properties (impact, hardness (welded joint and heat affected zone and tensile tests. The microstructures of the welded samples were also studied. From the results, it was observed that Sample F, which has 0.172% Mn, has the best hardness and impact strength while sample C with 0.160% Mn has the highest ultimate tensile strength.

  19. Microstructure of friction stir welded joints of 2017A aluminium alloy sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mroczka, K; Dutkiewicz, J; Pietras, A

    2010-03-01

    The present study examines a friction stir welded 2017A aluminium alloy. Transmission electron microscope investigations of the weld nugget revealed the average grain size of 5 microm, moderate density of dislocations as well as the presence of nanometric precipitates located mostly in grains interiors. Scanning electron microscope observations of fractures showed the presence of ductile fracture in the region of the weld nugget with brittle precipitates in the lower part. The microhardness analysis performed on the cross-section of the joints showed fairly small changes; however, after the artificial ageing process an increase in hardness was observed. The change of the joint hardness subject to the ageing process indicates partial supersaturation in the material during friction stir welding and higher precipitation hardening of the joint.

  20. Laser welding of aluminium-magnesium alloys sheets process optimization and welds characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, C. [GEMPPM (CALFETMAT), 69 - Villeurbanne (France); Fouquet, F. [GEMPPM (CALFETMAT), 69 - Villeurbanne (France); Robin, M. [GEMPPM (CALFETMAT), 69 - Villeurbanne (France)

    1996-12-31

    The purpose of the present study was to obtain good quality welds using a CO2 laser with Al-Mg alloys sheet. Defects formation mechanisms were analyzed and a welding procedure was defined, using several characterization technics, in order to realize low defects welding seams. After laser welding optimization, comparative tensile tests and microstructural analysis were carried out. (orig.)

  1. Microstructure and mechanical properties of nanocrystalline high strength Al-Mg-Si (AA6061) alloy by high energy ball milling and spark plasma sintering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rana, Jatinkumar Kumar [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Sivaprahasam, D. [International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials, Hyderabad 500005 (India); Seetharama Raju, K. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Subramanya Sarma, V., E-mail: vsarma@iitm.ac.in [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India)

    2009-12-15

    In the present paper, the microstructure and mechanical properties of nanostructured Al-Mg-Si based AA6061 alloy obtained by high energy ball milling and spark plasma sintering were reported. Gas atomized microcrystalline powder of AA6061 alloy was ball milled under wet condition at room temperature to obtain nanocrystalline powder with grain size of {approx}30 nm. The nanocrystalline powder was consolidated to fully dense compacts by spark plasma sintering (SPS) at 500 deg. C. The grain size after SPS consolidation was found to be {approx}85 nm. The resultant SPS compacts exhibited microhardness of 190-200 HV{sub 100g}, compressive strength of {approx}800 MPa and strain to fracture of {approx}15%.

  2. Peculiarities of welding pool degassing at surface deposition of aluminium alloys with powder wire

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    Володимир Якович Зусін

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The article contains the analysis of the conventional methods of surface deposition of aluminium alloys. It was shown that at surface deposition of aluminium alloys interstices, arising at hydrogen bubbles formation in the weld pool lat the moment of its crystallization are the most probable defects. An additional source of hydrogen supply into the weld pool springs up at surface deposition of aluminium alloys-this is the powder electrode charge. So, a model of formation of gas bubbles with due regard to this factor was developed. Presence of various surface defects, like cavities, shears, and micro-cracks is a factor, promoting formation of gaseous hydrogen phase inside a drop of electrode metal. Further development of gas bubbles, entrapped into the weld pool goes on by their consolidation and hydrogen diffusion from the molten metal into gaseous section. Intensification of bubble degassing, both at the stage of molten metal drop and at the welding pool stage is the most efficient way. The process of degassing depends on the amount of hydrogen, introduced into the weld pool. Proposed was an analytical dependence of evaluation of the original hydrogen concentration in the weld pool upon the coefficient of powder wire filling and dimensions of the charge particles. Experimental research of the influence of the parameters of powder wire upon the porosity of deposited metal made it possible to determine an optimal range of charge granulation and the coefficient of powder wire filling, ensuring intensive degassing during the period of its existence in liquid state and reaching deposited metal with sufficient density

  3. Effects of welding parameters on the mechanical properties of inert gas welded 6063 Aluminium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ertan, Taner [MAKO Corporation (Turkey); Uguz, Agah [Uludag Univ. (Turkey). Mechnical Engineering Dept.; Ertan, Rukiye

    2012-07-01

    The influence of welding parameters, namely welding current and gas flow rate, on the mechanical properties of Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) and Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) welded 6063 Aluminum alloy (AA 6063) has been investigated. In order to study the effect of the welding current and gas flow rate, microstructural examination, hardness measurements and room temperature tensile tests have been carried out. The experimental results show that the mechanical properties of GTAW welded joints have better mechanical properties than those of SMAW welded joints. Increasing the welding current appeared to have a beneficial effect on the mechanical properties. However, either increasing or decreasing the gas flow rate resulted in a decrease of hardness and tensile strength. It was also found that, the highest strength was obtained in GTAW welded samples at 220 A and 15 l/min gas flow rate.

  4. Numerical analysis of the adherends with similar thickness on weld-bonded single lap aluminium joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jianli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the adherend with similar thickness varied from 1 mm to 3 mm on the stress distribution in weld-bonded single lap aluminium joint was investigated using elasto-plastic finite element method (FEM. The results from the numerical simulation show that all the values of the peak stresses along the mid-bondline at the points near the both ends of the lap zone as well as the ones in the region of the nugget are increased when the adherend thickness increased. It is suggested that the adherend thickness of 2 mm to 2.5 mm be appropriate to optimize the stress distribution in the weld-bonded single lap aluminium joint.

  5. Multiaxial fatigue of aluminium friction stir welded joints: preliminary results

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    D. G. Hattingh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present research is to check the accuracy of the Modified Wöhler Curve Method (MWCM in estimating the fatigue strength of friction stir (FS welded tubular joints of Al 6082-T6 subjected to in-phase and out-of-phase multiaxial fatigue loading. The welded samples being investigated were manufactured by equipping an MTS I-STIR process development system with a retracting tool that was specifically designed and optimised for this purpose. These specimens were tested under proportional and non-proportional tension and torsion, the effect of non-zero mean stresses being also investigated. The validation exercise carried out by using the generated experimental results allowed us to prove that the MWCM (applied in terms of nominal stresses is highly accurate in predicting the fatigue strength of the tested FS welded joints, its usage resulting in estimates falling with the uniaxial and torsional calibration scatter bands.

  6. Laser beam welding of cast aluminium; Laserstrahlschweissen von Aluminiumguss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkmanns, J. [Fraunhofer Resource Center, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Behler, K.; Beyer, E, [Fraunhofer-Inst. fuer Lasertechnik, Aachen (Germany); Winderlich, B. [Fraunhofer-Inst. fuer Werkstoffphysik und Schichttechnologie, Dresden (Germany); Wehner, F. [Alusingen, Singen (Germany)

    1995-12-31

    In this publication, using the example of laser beam welding, it is shown that the suitability of the material for welding, particularly the gas content, must be optimized by casting technique, in order to improve the quality of a joint. Further, measures to improve the possibility of welding are to be taken, for example the application of additional material, or, for mixed joints, a corresponding movement of the position of the laser beam. (orig./RHM) [Deutsch] Der Einsatz von Al-Gusswerkstoffen ist, insbesondere in Kombination mit Profilwerkstoffen, eine interessante Moeglichkeit zur Umsetzung von Leichtbaukonzepten in der Fahrzeugindustrie. In dieser Veroeffentlichung wird am Beispiel des Laserstrahlschweissens gezeigt, dass die Schweisseignung des Werkstoffs, besonders der Gasgehalt, giesstechnisch zu optimieren ist, um die Qualitaet einer Verbindung zu verbessern. Darueber hinaus sind aber auch Massnahmen zur Verbesserung der Schweissmoeglichkeit durchzufuehren, wie zum Beispiel die Anwendungen vom Zusatzwerkstoff oder, bei Mischverbindungen, eine entsprechende Positionsverschiebung des Laserstrahles. (orig./RHM)

  7. Comparative study on transverse shrinkage, mechanical and metallurgical properties of AA2219 aluminium weld joints prepared by gas tungsten arc and gas metal arc welding processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Arunkumar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium alloy AA2219 is a high strength alloy belonging to 2000 series. It has been widely used for aerospace applications, especially for construction of cryogenic fuel tank. However, arc welding of AA2219 material is very critical. The major problems that arise in arc welding of AA2219 are the adverse development of residual stresses and the re-distribution as well as dissolution of copper rich phase in the weld joint. These effects increase with increase in heat input. Thus, special attention was taken to especially thick section welding of AA2219-T87 aluminium alloy. Hence, the present work describes the 25 mm-thick AA2219-T87 aluminium alloy plate butt welded by GTAW and GMAW processes using multi-pass welding procedure in double V groove design. The transverse shrinkage, conventional mechanical and metallurgical properties of both the locations on weld joints were studied. It is observed that the fair copper rich cellular (CRC network is on Side-A of both the weldments. Further, it is noticed that, the severity of weld thermal cycle near to the fusion line of HAZ is reduced due to low heat input in GTAW process which results in non dissolution of copper rich phase. Based on the mechanical and metallurgical properties it is inferred that GTAW process is used to improve the aforementioned characteristics of weld joints in comparison to GMAW process.

  8. Influence of friction stir welding parameters on properties of 2024 T3 aluminium alloy joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eramah Abdsalam M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to analyse the process of friction stir welding (FSW of 3mm thick aluminium plates made of high strength aluminium alloy - 2024 T3, as well as to assess the mechanical properties of the produced joints. FSW is a modern procedure which enables joining of similar and dissimilar materials in the solid state, by the combined action of heat and mechanical work. This paper presents an analysis of the experimental results obtained by testing the butt welded joints. Tensile strength of the produced joints is assessed, as well as the distribution of hardness, micro-and macrostructure through the joints (in the base material, nugget, heat affected zone and thermo-mechanically affected zone. Different combinations of the tool rotation speed and the welding speed are used, and the dependence of the properties of the joints on these parameters of welding technology is determined. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 34018 i br. TR 35006

  9. Atmospheric pressure plasma oxidation of AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy surface for strong and durable adhesive bonding applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleema, N.; Gallant, D.

    2013-10-01

    AA 6061-T6 aluminum alloy surface has been treated using atmospheric pressure helium-oxygen plasma at room temperature prior to bonding with a bi-component epoxy resin. The adhesive joint strengths were evaluated via single lap shear tests as prepared (pristine conditions) as well as following degradation by exposure to extreme temperature and humidity conditions (cataplasma conditions). Very high adhesion strength of 24 ± 1 MPa was achieved on surfaces after a very short exposure of the He/O2 plasma of only 15 s under pristine conditions resulting in cohesive failure of the adhesive itself. Best results were obtained under cataplasma conditions with adhesion strength of 22.6 ± 1 MPa by introducing a very simple pretreatment with scotch brite® prior to plasma exposure. With many different surface treatment methods being predominantly tested and evaluated, the adhesive bonding community may highly benefit from the present work as the treatment method uses very simple, economical and safe procedures in obtaining results comparable to benchmark methods such as Forest Products Laboratory (FPL) etch, anodization and so on.

  10. Evaluation of two commercially-available lubricants by means of ring test to AA 6061 F aluminum alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério Alves Oliveira

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows friction results obtained through compression ring tests for two commercially-available lubricants (i.e., Oildag and Deltaforge applied in the hot forging of aluminum alloys. The experiments were performed with AA 6061 F aluminum alloy samples with the goal of observing the behavior of each lubricant in several conditions of temperature (200, 300, and 450 °C, strain rates (1, 10 and 50 s-1, and strain (25, 50 and 75%. The friction coefficients for each lubrication condition were established by means of calibration curves determined from finite element calculations with the use of the PEP/Larstran software package. An Analysis-of-Variance approach for the ring's internal diameter was followed in order to evaluate the performance of the lubricants. The results indicated that the Oildag lubricant presents a better stability as well as lower friction coefficients than the Deltaforge lubricant for the range of conditions tested, which translates into a better friction condition at die-part interface.

  11. Effect Of Milling Time On Microstructure Of AA6061 Composites Fabricated Via Mechanical Alloying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomiczek B.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to determine the effect of manufacturing conditions, especially milling time, on the microstructure and crystallite size of a newly developed nanostructural composite material with the aluminium alloy matrix reinforced with halloysite nanotubes. Halloysite, being a clayey mineral of volcanic origin, is characterized by high porosity and large specific surface area. Thus it can be used as an alternative reinforcement in metal matrix composite materials. In order to obtain this goal, composite powders with fine microstructures were fabricated using high-energy mechanical alloying, cold compacting and hot extrusion techniques. The obtained composite powders of aluminium alloy reinforced with 5, 10 and 15 wt% of halloysite nanotubes were characterized with SEM, TEM and XRD analysis. It has been proven that the use of mechanical alloying leads to a high degree of deformation, which, coupled with a decreased grain size below 100 nm and the dispersion of the refined reinforcing particles–reinforces the material very well.

  12. Weldability of AA 5052 H32 aluminium alloy by TIG welding and FSW process - A comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanavas, S.; Raja Dhas, J. Edwin

    2017-10-01

    Aluminium 5xxx series alloys are the strongest non-heat treatable aluminium alloy. Its application found in automotive components and body structures due to its good formability, good strength, high corrosion resistance, and weight savings. In the present work, the influence of Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welding parameters on the quality of weld on AA 5052 H32 aluminium alloy plates were analyzed and the mechanical characterization of the joint so produced was compared with Friction stir (FS) welded joint. The selected input variable parameters are welding current and inert gas flow rate. Other parameters such as welding speed and arc voltage were kept constant throughout the study, based on the response from several trial runs conducted. The quality of the weld is measured in terms of ultimate tensile strength. A double side V-butt joints were fabricated by double pass on one side to ensure maximum strength of TIG welded joints. Macro and microstructural examination were conducted for both welding process.

  13. Assessment of the biological effects of welding fumes emitted from metal inert gas welding processes of aluminium and zinc-plated materials in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, L; Bauer, M; Bertram, J; Gube, M; Lenz, K; Reisgen, U; Schettgen, T; Kraus, T; Brand, P

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate biological effects and potential health risks due to two different metal-inert-gas (MIG) welding fumes (MIG welding of aluminium and MIG soldering of zinc coated steel) in healthy humans. In a threefold cross-over design study 12 male subjects were exposed to three different exposure scenarios. Exposures were performed under controlled conditions in the Aachener Workplace Simulation Laboratory (AWSL). On three different days the subjects were either exposed to filtered ambient air, to welding fumes from MIG welding of aluminium, or to fumes from MIG soldering of zinc coated materials. Exposure was performed for 6 h and the average fume concentration was 2.5 mg m(-3). Before, directly after, 1 day after, and 7 days after exposure spirometric and impulse oscillometric measurements were performed, exhaled breath condensate (EBC) was collected and blood samples were taken and analyzed for inflammatory markers. During MIG welding of aluminium high ozone concentrations (up to 250 μg m(-3)) were observed, whereas ozone was negligible for MIG soldering. For MIG soldering, concentrations of high-sensitivity CRP (hsCRP) and factor VIII were significantly increased but remained mostly within the normal range. The concentration of neutrophils increased in tendency. For MIG welding of aluminium, the lung function showed significant decreases in Peak Expiratory Flow (PEF) and Mean Expiratory Flow at 75% vital capacity (MEF 75) 7 days after exposure. The concentration of ristocetin cofactor was increased. The observed increase of hsCRP during MIG-soldering can be understood as an indicator for asymptomatic systemic inflammation probably due to zinc (zinc concentration 1.5 mg m(-3)). The change in lung function observed after MIG welding of aluminium may be attributed to ozone inhalation, although the late response (7 days after exposure) is surprising. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Influence of the welding parameters on the heat affected zone for aluminium welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meseguer-Valdenebro José L.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work analyzes the Heat Affected Zone in an aluminum alloy welded assembly using the Metal Inert Gas welding technique. Making use of numerical simulations of the involved thermal processes, the aluminum alloy cooling curve is calculated and the extension of the Heat Affected Zone is evaluated. The connection between this last parameter, the cooling rate, and the maximum obtained temperature is assessed. Additionally, the response surface method is exploited to fit the dependence of the Heat Affected Zone with the welding parameters and to optimize these parameters in order to minimize that region.

  15. Property Evaluation of Friction Stir Welded Dissimilar Metals : AA6101-T6 and AA1350 Aluminium Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendran ASHOK KUMAR

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Next to copper, aluminium alloys are widely used in electrical industries, because of their high electrical conductivity. AA6101-T6 and AA1350 aluminium alloys are widely used in electrical bus bars. As these alloys are joined by mechanical fasteners in electrical bus bars, the conductive area has been reduced. To avoid this problem, they should be joined without removal of metal as well as their properties. Friction stir welding technique is mainly invented for joining similar and dissimilar aluminium alloys. In this investigation, friction stir welding of AA6101-T6 and AA1350 aluminium alloys was done by varying tool traversing speed, rotational speed and tilt angle with hexagonal pin profiled tool. The analysis of variance was employed to study the effect of above parameters on mechanical properties of welded joints. From the experimental results, it is observed that welded joint with the combination of 1070 rpm rotating speed, 78 mm/min traversing speed and 2° tilt angle provides better mechanical properties. Analysis of variance shows that most significant impact on tensile strength is made by variation in tool rotating speed while tool tilt angle makes the most significant impact on elongation and bending strength.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.23.1.14132

  16. Effect of post weld heat treatment on tensile properties and microstructure characteristics of friction stir welded armour grade AA7075-T651 aluminium alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Sivaraj

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the effects of post weld heat treatments, namely artificial ageing and solution treatment followed by artificial ageing, on microstructure and mechanical properties of 12 mm thick friction stir welded joints of precipitation hardenable high strength armour grade AA7075-T651 aluminium alloy. The tensile properties, such as yield strength, tensile strength, elongation and notch tensile strength, are evaluated and correlated with the microhardness and microstructural features. The scanning electron microscope is used to characterie the fracture surfaces. The solution treatment followed by ageing heat treatment cycle is found to be marginally beneficial in improving the tensile properties of friction stir welds of AA7075-T651 aluminium alloy.

  17. Design of Laser Welding Parameters for Joining Ti Grade 2 and AW 5754 Aluminium Alloys Using Numerical Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mária Behúlová

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Joining of dissimilar Al-Ti alloys is very interesting from the point of view of weight reduction of components and structures in automotive or aerospace industries. In the dependence on cooling rate and chemical composition, rapid solidification of Al-Ti alloys during laser welding can lead to the formation of metastable phases and brittle intermetallic compounds that generally reduce the quality of produced weld joints. The paper deals with design and testing of welding parameters for preparation of weld joints of two sheets with different thicknesses from titanium Grade 2 and AW 5754 aluminium alloy. Temperature fields developed during the formation of Al-Ti butt joints were investigated by numerical simulation in ANSYS software. The influence of laser welding parameters including the laser power and laser beam offset on the temperature distribution and weld joint formation was studied. The results of numerical simulation were verified by experimental temperature measurement during laser beam welding applying the TruDisk 4002 disk laser. The microstructure of produced weld joints was assessed by light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. EDX analysis was applied to determine the change in chemical composition across weld joints. Mechanical properties of weld joints were evaluated using tensile tests and Vickers microhardness measurements.

  18. Soudage homogène MIG de l'alliage d'aluminium 6061 MIG homogeneous welding of 6061 aluminium alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit Alexandre

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Le soudage homogène (métal d'apport identique au métal de base de l'alliage d'aluminium 6061 avec un procédé dit semi-automatique (MIG n'a jamais été reporté jusqu'à maintenant dans la littérature. Nous montrons ici que l'utilisation d'un dérivé du procédé de soudage MIG, le MIG CMT (Cold Metal Transfer permet d'obtenir des cordons de soudures sains (sans fissuration à chaud. De plus des traitements thermiques ont permis de retrouver partiellement ou de restaurer totalement les propriétés de la soudure. Nos résultats sont comparés à des essais de soudage MIG CMT avec le métal d'apport préconisé pour le soudage de l'alliage 6061. The homogeneous welding (same filler metal as base metal of the 6061 aluminium alloy with MIG process has never been reported in the open access literature. This work shows that the CMT (Cold Metal Transfer MIG, a derivative of MIG, allows producing welds without hot-cracking. Moreover, further heat treatments partially increased or fully restore the mechanical properties of the weld. These results are compared with 6061 heterogeneous welds usually met in the industry.

  19. Hot Press as a Sustainable Direct Recycling Technique of Aluminium: Mechanical Properties and Surface Integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajis, Mohd Amri; Ahmad, Azlan

    2017-01-01

    Meltless recycling technique has been utilized to overcome the lack of primary resources, focusing on reducing the usage of energy and materials. Hot press was proposed as a novel direct recycling technique which results in astoundingly low energy usage in contrast with conventional recycling. The aim of this study is to prove the technical feasibility of this approach by characterizing the recycled samples. For this purpose, AA6061 aluminium chips were recycled by utilizing hot press process under various operating temperature (Ts = 430, 480, and 530 °C) and holding times (ts = 60, 90, and 120 min). The maximum mechanical properties of recycled chip are Ultimate tensile strength (UTS) = 266.78 MPa, Elongation to failure (ETF) = 16.129%, while, for surface integrity of the chips, the calculated microhardness is 81.744 HV, exhibited at Ts = 530 °C and ts = 120 min. It is comparable to theoretical AA6061 T4-temper where maximum UTS and microhardness is increased up to 9.27% and 20.48%, respectively. As the desired mechanical properties of forgings can only be obtained by means of a final heat treatment, T5-temper, aging after forging process was employed. Heat treated recycled billet AA6061 (T5-temper) are considered comparable with as-received AA6061 T6, where the value of microhardness (98.649 HV) at 175 °C and 120 min of aging condition was revealed to be greater than 3.18%. Although it is quite early to put a base mainly on the observations in experimental settings, the potential for significant improvement offered by the direct recycling methods for production aluminium scrap can be clearly demonstrated. This overtures perspectives for industrial development of solid state recycling processes as environmentally benign alternatives of current melting based practices. PMID:28771207

  20. Local zone-wise elastic-plastic constitutive parameters of Laser-welded aluminium alloy 6061 using digital image correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Ruixiang; Wei, Yuepeng; Lei, Zhenkun; Jiang, Hao; Tao, Wang; Yan, Cheng; Li, Xiaolei

    2018-02-01

    The mechanical properties of aluminium alloys can be affected by the local high temperature in laser welding. In this paper, an inversion identification method of local zone-wise elastic-plastic constitutive parameters for laser welding of aluminium alloy 6061 was proposed based on full-field optical measurement data using digital image correlation (DIC). Three regions, i.e., the fusion zone, heat-affected zone, and base zone, of the laser-welded joint were distinguished by means of microstructure optical observation and micrometer hardness measurement. The stress data were obtained using a laser-welded specimen via a uniaxial tensile test. Meanwhile, the local strain data of the laser-welded specimen were obtained by the DIC technique. Thus, the stress-strain relationship for different local regions was established. Finally, the constitutive parameters of the Ramberg-Osgood model were identified by least-square fitting to the experimental stress-strain data. Experimental results revealed that the mechanical properties of the local zones of the welded joints clearly weakened, and these results are consistent with the results of the hardness measurement.

  1. Effect of Welding Speed on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties due to The Deposition of Reinforcements on Friction Stir Welded Dissimilar Aluminium Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baridula Ravinder Reddy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The strength of the welded joint obtained by solid state stir welding process was found to be improved as compared to fusion welding process. The deposition of reinforcements during friction stir welding process can further enhance the strength of the welded joint by locking the movement of grain boundaries. In the present study, the aluminium alloys AA2024 and AA7075 were welded effectively by depositing the multi-walled carbon nanotubes in to the stir zone. The mechanical properties and microstructures were studied by varying the traverse speed at constant rotational speed. The results show that rotating tool pin stirring action and heat input play an important role in controlling the grain size. The carbon nanotubes were found to be distributed uniformly at a welding speed (traverse speed of 80mm/min. This enhanced the mechanical properties of the welded joint. The microstructure and Electron dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX studies indicate that the deposition of carbon nanotubes in the stir zone was influenced by the traverse speed.

  2. Mechanical Characteristics of Welded Joints of Aluminum Alloy 6061 T6 Formed by Arc and Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astarita, A.; Squillace, A.; Nele, L.

    2016-01-01

    Butt welds formed by arc welding in inert gas with nonconsumable electrode (tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding) and by friction stir welding (FSW) from aluminum alloy AA6061 T6 are studied. Comparative analysis of the structures and mechanical properties of the welded joints is performed using the results of optical and electron microscopy, tensile tests, tests for residual bending ductility, and measurements of microhardness. The changes in the microstructure in different zones and the degrees of degradation of the mechanical properties after the welding are determined. It is shown that the size of the tool for the friction stir welding affects the properties of the welds. Quantitative results showing the relation between the microscopic behavior of the alloy and the welding-induced changes in the microstructure are obtained. Friction stir welding is shown to provide higher properties of the welds.

  3. Analysis of Thermo-Elastic Fracture Problem during Aluminium Alloy MIG Welding Using the Extended Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuanfang He

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermo-elastic fracture problem and equations are established for aluminium alloy Metal Inert Gas (MIG welding, which include a moving heat source and a thermoelasticity equation with the initial and boundary conditions for a plate structure with a crack. The extended finite element method (XFEM is implemented to solve the thermo-elastic fracture problem of a plate structure with a crack under the effect of a moving heat source. The combination of the experimental measurement and simulation of the welding temperature field is done to verify the model and solution method. The numerical cases of the thermomechanical parameters and stress intensity factors (SIFs of the plate structure in the welding heating and cooling processes are investigated. The research results provide reference data and an approach for the analysis of the thermomechanical characteristics of the welding process.

  4. Effect of Tool Geometry and Welding Speed on Mechanical Properties and Microstructure of Friction Stir Welded Joints of Aluminium Alloys AA6082-T6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patil Hiralal Subhash

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir welding is a solid state innovative joining technique, widely being used for joining aluminium alloys in aerospace, marine automotive and many other applications of commercial importance. The welding parameters and tool pin profile play a major role in deciding the weld quality. In this paper, an attempt has been made to understand the influences of welding speed and pin profile of the tool on friction stir welded joints of AA6082-T6 alloy. Three different tool pin profiles (tapered cylindrical four flutes, triangular and hexagonal have been used to fabricate the joints at different welding speeds in the range of 30 to 74 mm/min. Microhardness (HV and tensile tests performed at room temperature were used to evaluate the mechanical properties of the joints. In order to analyse the microstructural evolution of the material, the weld’s cross-sections were observed optically and SEM observations were made of the fracture surfaces. From this investigation it is found that the hexagonal tool pin profile produces mechanically sound and metallurgically defect free welds compared to other tool pin profiles.

  5. Effect of friction time on the properties of friction welded YSZ‐alumina composite and 6061 aluminium alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uday M. Basheer

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study the effect of friction time on the microstructure and mechanical properties of alumina 0, 25, 50 wt% yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ composite and 6061 aluminium alloy joints formed by friction welding. The alumina-YSZ composites were prepared through slip casting in plaster of Paris molds (POP and subsequently sintered at 1600°C, while the aluminium rods were machined down using a lathe machine to the dimension required. The welding process was carried out under different rotational speeds and friction times, while friction force (0.5 ton-force was kept constant. Scanning electron microscopy was used to characterize the interface of the joints structure. The experimental results showed that the friction time has a significant effect on joint structure and mechanical properties.

  6. Modelling of plastic flow localization and damage development in friction stir welded 6005A aluminium alloy using physics based strain hardening law

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kim Lau; Pardoen, Thomas; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2010-01-01

    Plastic flow localisation and ductile failure during tensile testing of friction stir welded aluminium spec- imens are investigated with a specific focus on modelling the local, finite strain, hardening response. In the experimental part, friction stir welds in a 6005A-T6 aluminium alloy were...... prepared and analysed using digital image correlation (DIC) during tensile testing as well as scanning electron microscopy (SEM) on polished samples and on fracture surfaces. The locations of the various regions of the weld were determined based on hardness measurements, while the flow behaviour...

  7. Experimental and numerical investigation on under-water friction stir welding of armour grade AA2519-T87 aluminium alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sree Sabari

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir welding (FSW is a promising welding process that can join age hardenable aluminium alloys with high joint efficiency. However, the thermal cycles experienced by the material to be joined during FSW resulted in the deterioration of mechanical properties due to the coarsening and dissolution of strengthening precipitates in the thermo-mechanical affected zone (TMAZ and heat affected zone (HAZ. Under water friction stir welding (UWFSW is a variant of FSW process which can maintain low heat input as well as constant heat input along the weld line. The heat conduction and dissipation during UWFSW controls the width of TMAZ and HAZ and also improves the joint properties. In this investigation, an attempt has been made to evaluate the mechanical properties and microstructural characteristics of AA2519-T87 aluminium alloy joints made by FSW and UWFSW processes. Finite element analysis has been used to estimate the temperature distribution and width of TMAZ region in both the joints and the results have been compared with experimental results and subsequently correlated with mechanical properties.

  8. Laser transmission welding of polylactide to aluminium thin films for applications in the food-packaging industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, Nunziante; Campana, Giampaolo; Fiorini, Maurizio; Morelli, Raffaele

    2017-06-01

    Laser transmission welding is a suitable technology to join thin films of similar or dissimilar materials without any addition of chemical solvents or adhesives. This process represents a very important opportunity in the case of packaging applications (for example in food and pharmaceutical sectors) where the realisation of strong welds by avoiding the contact between the thermal source and the processed materials and, furthermore, without using any third material that could contaminate the contents, is reliable and relevant. The aim of this paper is to prove the feasibility of the laser transmission welding of polylactide to aluminium thin films by means of laser transmission welding through the use of a low power pulsed wave fibre laser. Laser joint samples were realised, analysed by optical microscopy to reveal possible defects and to evaluate the weld width and tested to measure the mechanical tensile strength. An accurate relationship between the joint quality and both the welding speed and the k-factor, which represents the delivered energy per unit length and affects the bonding mechanism at the interface, was determined. The achieved feasibility area is extremely narrow and possible only for the higher value of the average power. The joint tensile strength was proven to be in a proportional relationship with the effective bonded area and reached satisfactory values.

  9. Effect of tool shape and welding parameters on mechanical properties and microstructure of dissimilar friction stir welded aluminium alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chetan Aneja

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present experimental study, dissimilar aluminum alloy AA5083 and AA6082 were friction stir welded by varying tool shape, welding speed and rotary speed of the tool in order to investigate the effect of varying tool shape and welding parameters on the mechanical properties as well as microstructure. The friction stir welding (FSW process parameters have great influence on heat input per unit length of weld. The outcomes of experimental study prove that mechanical properties increases with decreasing welding speed. Furthermore mechanical properties were also found to improve as the rotary speed increases and the same phenomenon was found to happen while using straight cylindrical threaded pin profile tool. The microstructure of the dissimilar joints revealed that at low welding speeds, the improved material mixing was observed. The similar phenomenon was found to happen at higher rotational speeds using straight cylindrical threaded tool.

  10. An Analysis of Microstructure and Mechanical Properties on Friction Stir Welded Joint of Dissimilar 304 Stainless Steel and Commercially Pure Aluminium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balamagendiravarman M.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, friction stir welding of dissimilar 304 stainless steel and commercially pure aluminium was performed under the following condition of tool rotational speed 1000 rpm, traverse speed 60 mm/min and tool tilt angle 2 degree. Microstructural characterisation was carried out by optical microscope, scanning electron microscope (SEM. Optical images shows that the microstructural change is very minimum in steel side when compared to aluminium side due to the difference in mechanical and thermal properties. The intermetallic compound Al3Fe was observed at the interfacial region and stir region of the welded joint. The maximum ultimate tensile strength is 78% of commercially pure aluminium base metal. Microhardness profile was measured across the weld interface and the maximum value reaches at the stir zone due to the formation of intermettalics.

  11. Process Parameters Optimization for Friction Stir Welding of Pure Aluminium to Brass (CuZn30 using Taguchi Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elfar O. M. R.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the friction stir welding of dissimilar commercial pure aluminium and brass (CuZn30 plates was investigated and the process parameters were optimized using Taguchi L9 orthogonal array. The considered process parameters were the rotational speed, traverse speed and pin offset. The optimum setting was determined with reference to ultimate tensile strength of the joint. The predicted optimum value of ultimate tensile strength was confirmed by experimental run using optimum parameters. Analysis of variance revealed that traverse speed is the most significant factor in controlling the joint tensile strength and pin offset also plays a significant role. In this investigation, the optimum tensile strength is 50% of aluminium base metal. Metallographic examination revealed that intermetallic compounds were formed in the interface of the optimum joint where the tensile failure was observed to take place.

  12. A numerical analysis of empty and foam-filled aluminium conical tubes under oblique impact loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mat, Fauziah; Ismail, Khairul Azwan; Yaacob, Sazali

    2015-05-01

    In real impact applications, an energy absorber rarely sustains dynamic loading either axial or oblique but a combination of both. Established studies have proved that thin-walled tube is an excellent energy absorber under dynamic loading. Furthermore, the introduction of foam filling successfully enhanced the energy absorption capacity of thin-walled tube. However, the understanding of its response under oblique loading has yet been fully explored. Moreover, emerging in automotive industry has lead to increase interests on lightweight materials such as aluminium alloy. As such, this paper presents the crushing behaviour of empty and foam-filled aluminium alloy (AA6061-T6) conical tubes under oblique impact loading using a validated nonlinear finite element (FE) code, LS-DYNA. The study aims to assess the effect of foam filling on the energy absorption of AA6061-T6 tubes for variations in filler density. In fact, to the best of our knowledge, this study is the first attempt to evaluate a response of empty and foam-filled aluminum conical tube by using an experimentally validated model under oblique dynamic loading conditions. Good correlations between the numerical and experimental results were observed. The study show that initial peak force and the energy absorption increase with increasing filler density under axial and oblique loading. On the other hand, the effect of foam filling (0.534 g/cm3 aluminium foam filler) is less pronounced for the initial peak force under axial impact loading. Furthermore, the initial peak force and dynamic force of empty and foam-filled AA6061-T6 conical tubes decrease as the load angle increases from 0 deg to 20 deg hence reduces the energy absorption capacity.

  13. Effect of KOH to Na2SiO3 Ratio on Microstructure and Hardness of Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation Coatings on AA 6061 Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ashutosh; Jang, Yong-Joo; Jung, Jae Pil

    2017-10-01

    In this study, plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) process has been employed to fabricate alumina coatings on AA 6061 aluminum alloy from an electrolyte containing water glass (Na2SiO3) and alkali (KOH). The effect of deposition time and the alkali to water glass (KOH: Na2SiO3) composition ratio on the coating morphology and properties are studied. The different phases of the oxide layer and microstructure are investigated by x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. The results indicate that initially γ-Al2O3 forms in the coating, and as the processing time is increased from 5 to 60 minutes, α-Al2O3 phase becomes prominent. Further, higher the content of Na2SiO3, higher is the hardness and coating growth rate due to the formation of stable α-Al2O3 and Al-Si-O phase. It has been reported that the optimum properties of the PEO coatings can be obtained at a ratio of KOH: Na2SiO3 ≈ 15:10 followed by 10:10.

  14. Effect of annealing, thickness ratio and bend angle on springback of AA6061-T6 with non-uniform thickness section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan M.F.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-uniform thickness section section is considered one of the most effective approaches to reduce automotive part weight. Reduction in term of mass and size result in less fuel consumption and greenhouse gases. Thickness is the most significant parameter to formability, therefore forming a section with non-uniform thickness becomes a great challenge. Improper process and incorrect decision may lead to severe defect and one of the main concerns is the springback. This study will focus on springback behaviour of non-uniform thickness AA6061 strip with complex profile using Taguchi Method. Profile projector (PC 3000 is used to measure the spring back and two-line technique is applied to measure angles (after loading between two lines. Three parameters (i.e. annealing temperature, thickness ratio and bend angle are studied, and results determine that the most significant parameter is bend angle, followed by thickness ratio, and then by the annealing temperature of the specimen during bending process.

  15. ON THE SOLIDIFICATION CHARACTERISTICS AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF ALUMINUM ALLOY AA 6061/Al2O3-SiCP COMPOSITE PRODUCED BY HIGH PRESSURE DIE CASTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BABAFEMI MALOMO

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of the high pressure die casting (HPDC process in facilitating a controlled solidification mechanism during the fabrication of hybrid (Al2O3-SiCp reinforced aluminum alloy composite is investigated. The aluminum matrix composite was synthesized with 5%, 10% and 20% volume fraction of reinforcements by infiltrating molten aluminum AA 6061 via squeeze casting into prefabricated ceramic preforms. The parameters for experimentation are the casting pressure (80MPa, pouring temperature (740 degree C, die preheat temperature (300 degree C, pressure holding time (15 s and die cooling rate of 0.2 kg/s water flow rate. The composites were examined by optical microscopy, mechanical properties determined by tensile testing and fractured specimens analyzed by SEM fractography. The results indicate that the sample with 5% volume fraction of reinforcements showed significant variations in temperature profile and intensities of phase transformation at the beginning and the end of solidification, while for samples with 10% and 20% volume fractions, this process occurred at fairly constant temperatures with minimal inflexions in phase characteristics. The solidification time increased progressively with increasing volume fraction of reinforcements as the cooling rates reduce, and the mechanical properties with the exception of percent elongation were enhanced with increasing volume fractions of reinforcements.

  16. Effect of KOH to Na2SiO3 Ratio on Microstructure and Hardness of Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation Coatings on AA 6061 Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ashutosh; Jang, Yong-Joo; Jung, Jae Pil

    2017-09-01

    In this study, plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) process has been employed to fabricate alumina coatings on AA 6061 aluminum alloy from an electrolyte containing water glass (Na2SiO3) and alkali (KOH). The effect of deposition time and the alkali to water glass (KOH: Na2SiO3) composition ratio on the coating morphology and properties are studied. The different phases of the oxide layer and microstructure are investigated by x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. The results indicate that initially γ-Al2O3 forms in the coating, and as the processing time is increased from 5 to 60 minutes, α-Al2O3 phase becomes prominent. Further, higher the content of Na2SiO3, higher is the hardness and coating growth rate due to the formation of stable α-Al2O3 and Al-Si-O phase. It has been reported that the optimum properties of the PEO coatings can be obtained at a ratio of KOH: Na2SiO3 ≈ 15:10 followed by 10:10.

  17. Enhancing Corrosion and Wear Resistance of AA6061 by Friction Stir Processing with Fe78Si9B13 Glass Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingyu Guo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy samples including annealed Fe78Si9B13 particles were prepared by friction stir processing (FSP and investigated by various techniques. The Fe78Si9B13-reinforced particles are uniformly dispersed in the aluminum alloy matrix. The XRD results indicated that the lattice parameter of α-Al increases and the preferred orientation factors F of (200 plane of α-Al reduces after friction stir processing. The coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE for FSP samples increases at first with the temperature but then decreases as the temperature further increased, which can be explained by the dissolving of Mg and Si from β phase and Fe78Si9B13 particles. The corrosion and wear resistance of FSP samples have been improved compared with that of base metal, which can be attributed to the reduction of grain size and the CTE mismatch between the base metal and reinforced particles by FSP, and the lubrication effect of Fe78Si9B13 particles also plays a role in improving wear resistance. In particular, the FSP sample with reinforced particles in amorphous state exhibited superior corrosion and wear resistance due to the unique metastable structure.

  18. The Influence of the Dispersion Method on the Microstructure and Properties of MWCNTs/AA6061 Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobrzański L. A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study the effect of different methods of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs dispersion, and their influence on the microstructure and properties of aluminium alloy matrix composites produced using the powder metallurgy techniques, such as powder milling/mixing and hot extrusion. The main problem in the manufacturing of nanocomposites is the homogeneous distribution of MWCNTs in the metal matrix. To achieve their proper distribution a high-energy and low-energy mechanical milling, using a planetary ball mill, and mixing, using a turbulent mixer, were applied. Studies have shown that composite materials prepared using milling and extrusion have a much better dispersion of the reinforcing phase, which leads to better mechanical properties of the obtained rods. The low-energy mechanical mixing and mixing using the turbulent mixer neither change the powder morphology nor lead to adequate dispersion of the carbon nanotubes, which directly affects the resulting properties.

  19. Seam gap bridging of laser based processes for the welding of aluminium sheets for industrial applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aalderink, B.J.; Aalderink, Benno; Pathiraj, B.; Aarts, Ronald G.K.M.

    2010-01-01

    Laser welding has a large potential for the production of tailor welded blanks in the automotive industry, due to the low heat input and deep penetration. However, due to the small laser spot and melt pool, laser-based welding processes in general have a low tolerance for seam gaps. In this paper,

  20. Friction stir scribe welding technique for dissimilar joining of aluminium and galvanised steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Tianhao [Center for Friction Stir Processing, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX, USA; Sidhar, Harpreet [Center for Friction Stir Processing, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX, USA; Mishra, Rajiv S. [Center for Friction Stir Processing, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX, USA; Hovanski, Yuri [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Energy Materials and Manufacturing, Richland, WA, USA; Upadhyay, Piyush [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Energy Materials and Manufacturing, Richland, WA, USA; Carlson, Blair [General Motors Technical Center, Warren, MI, USA

    2017-10-04

    Friction stir scribe technology, a derivative of friction stir welding, was applied for the dissimilar lap welding of an aluminum alloy and galvanized mild steel sheets. During the process, the rotating tool with a cobalt steel scribe first penetrated the top material — aluminum — and then the scribe cut the bottom material — steel. The steel was displaced into the upper material to produce a characteristic hook feature. Lap welds were shear tested, and their fracture paths were studied. Welding parameters affected the welding features including hook height, which turned out to be highly related to fracture position. Therefore, in this paper, the relationships among welding parameters, hook height, joint strength and fracture position are presented. In addition, influence of zinc coating on joint strength was also studied. Keywords: friction stir scribe technology; dissimilar material welding; zinc coating; hook height; joint strength; fracture position

  1. Experimental characterization of nanoparticles emissions during Laser Shock Processing of AA6061, AISI304 and Ti6Al4V

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João F. Gomes

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an experimental study on the emission of nanometric size particles during laser shock processing of metallic materials: stainless steel, aluminum and titanium alloys which are the most common ones processed by this technique. The emission of nanometric size particles was confirmed to consist of aggregates composed of smaller spherical particles in the range of 10-20 nm, covered by a small concentric “layer” probably of metal oxides. The analysis of the nanoparticles showed the presence of the main elements present in the tested alloys as well as high oxygen content, which is another indication of the presence of oxides of Fe, Al and Ti. The amount of emitted nanoparticles, showed considerable increases over the baseline measured for the working environment, and these increases correspond to the more intense pulses of the laser beam. The material density was seen to highly affect the quantity of emitted nanoparticles. During LSP of aluminium alloy (the lighter material a large quantity of nanoparticles was measured, while in LSP of stainless steel few nanoparticles were observed, and this is the denser material, among the three tested. Titanium alloy results in intermediate values. The study of these emissions is innovative and relevant for industrial environments where the manufacturing process is in use.

  2. On the Role of Processing Parameters in Producing Recycled Aluminum AA6061 Based Metal Matrix Composite (MMC-AlR) Prepared Using Hot Press Forging (HPF) Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Azlan; Lajis, Mohd Amri; Yusuf, Nur Kamilah

    2017-09-19

    Solid-state recycling, which involves the direct recycling of scrap metal into bulk material using severe plastic deformation, has emerged as a potential alternative to the conventional remelting and recycling techniques. Hot press forging has been identified as a sustainable direct recycling technique that has fewer steps and maintains excellent material performance. An experimental investigation was conducted to explore the hardness and density of a recycled aluminum-based metal matrix composite by varying operating temperature and holding time. A mixture of recycled aluminum, AA6061, and aluminum oxide were simultaneously heated to 430, 480, and 530 °C and forged for 60, 90, and 120 min. We found a positive increase in microhardness and density for all composites. The hardness increased approximately 33.85%, while density improved by about 15.25% whenever the temperature or the holding time were increased. Based on qualitative analysis, the composite endures substantial plastic deformation due to the presence of hardness properties due to the aluminum oxide embedded in the aluminum matrix. These increases were significantly affected by the operating temperature; the holding time also had a subordinate role in enhancing the metal matrix composite properties. Furthermore, in an effort to curb the shortage of primary resources, this study reviewed the promising performance of secondary resources produced by using recycled aluminum and aluminum oxide as the base matrix and reinforcement constituent, respectively. This study is an outline for machining practitioners and the manufacturing industry to help increase industry sustainability with the aim of preserving the Earth for our community in the future.

  3. Friction Stir Welding of Age-Hardenable Aluminum Alloys: A Parametric Approach Using RSM Based GRA Coupled With PCA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayan, D.; Rao, V. S.

    2014-04-01

    Age-hardenable aluminum alloys, primarily used in the aerospace, automobile and marine industries (2×××, 6××× and 7×××), can be welded using solid-state welding techniques. Friction stir welding is an emerging solid-state welding technique used to join both similar and dissimilar materials. The strength of a friction stir welded joint depends on the joining process parameters. Therefore, a combination of the statistical techniques of a response surface methodology based on a grey relational analysis coupled to a principal component analysis was proposed to select the process parameters suitable for joining AA 2024 and AA 6061 aluminum alloys via friction stir welding. The significant process parameters, such as rotational speed, welding speed, axial load and pin shapes (PS) were considered during the statistical experiment. The results indicate that the square PS plays a vital role and yields an ultimate tensile strength of 141 MPa for an elongation of 12 % versus cylinder and taper pin profiles. The root cause for joint strength loss and fracture mode was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. Severe material flow during macro defects, such as pin holes and porosity, degrades the joint strength by approximately 44 % for AA 2024 and 51 % for AA 6061 fabricated FS-welded aluminum alloys relative to the base material. The results of this approach are useful for accurately controlling the response and optimize the process parameters.

  4. Emission of nanoparticles during friction stir welding (FSW) of aluminium alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, J F; Miranda, R M; Santos, T J; Carvalho, P A

    2014-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is now well established as a welding process capable of joining some different types of metallic materials, as it was (1) found to be a reliable and economical way of producing high quality welds, and (2) considered a "clean" welding process that does not involve fusion of metal, as is the case with other traditional welding processes. The aim of this study was to determine whether the emission of particles during FSW in the nanorange of the most commonly used aluminum (Al) alloys, AA 5083 and AA 6082, originated from the Al alloy itself due to friction of the welding tool against the item that was being welded. Another goal was to measure Al alloys in the alveolar deposited surface area during FSW. Nanoparticles dimensions were predominantly in the 40- and 70-nm range. This study demonstrated that microparticles were also emitted during FSW but due to tool wear. However, the biological relevance and toxic manifestations of these microparticles remain to be determined.

  5. Fatigue resistance of welded joints in aluminium high-speed craft : A total stress concept

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Den Besten, J.H.

    2015-01-01

    Crew transfers, surveillance duties and {security, rescue, interception} operations at sea typically require high-speed craft. Aluminium is quite often selected as hull structure material because of its weight save potential in comparison to steel. The fatigue strength, however, may become a point

  6. High Temperature Plasticity of Bimetallic Magnesium and Aluminum Friction Stir Welded Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regev, Michael; El Mehtedi, Mohamad; Cabibbo, Marcello; Quercetti, Giovanni; Ciccarelli, Daniele; Spigarelli, Stefano

    2014-02-01

    The high temperature deformation of a bimetallic AZ31/AA6061 Friction Stir Welded joint was investigated in the present study by constant load creep experiments carried out at 473 K (200 °C). The microstructural analysis revealed the strongly inhomogeneous nature of the weld, which was characterized by an extremely fine grain size in the magnesium-rich zones and by the extensive presence of intermetallic phases. In the high stress regime, the creep strain was concentrated in the refined and particle-rich microstructure of the weld zone, while the AA6061 base metal remained undeformed. In the low stress regime, deformation became more homogeneously distributed between the AZ31 base metal and the weld zone. The creep behavior of the weld was found to obey the constitutive equation describing the minimum creep rate dependence on applied stress for the base AZ31, slightly modified to take into account the finer microstructure and the role of secondary phase particles, i.e., the retardation of grain growth and the obstruction of grain boundary sliding.

  7. Fatigue behavior of GMAW welded Aluminium alloy AA7020; Comportamiento a fatiga de uniones soldadas GMAW de la aleacion de aluminio AA 7020

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloem, C. A.; Salvador, M. D.; Amigo, V.; Vicente, A.

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this investigation is to evaluate the influence on the fatigue behavior by the finishing of the bulge in a welded aluminium-zinc-magnesium alloy AA7020. It was determined that total or partial elimination of the bulge has very little influence on its behavior, giving a very similar result on both cases, where one is better than the other by only 3%. (Author) 20 refs.

  8. Experimental Investigation and Prediction of Mechanical Properties of Friction Stir Welded Aluminium Metal Matrix Composite Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahya BOZKURT

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir welding (FSW is a relatively contemporary solid state welding process and has been employed in aerospace, railway, automotive and marine industries for joining of aluminum, magnesium, zinc, titanium, copper alloys, dissimilar metals and thermoplastics. The FSW process parameters such as tool rotation speed, tool traverse speed and tilt angle play an important role in deciding the joining quality. The present study defines the effect of FSW process on the tensile properties of the AA2124/SiC/25p metal matrix composite (MMC plates. Obtained results showed that the joint efficiency decreases by increasing the tool traverse speed while tool rotation speed was kept constant. Second contribution of this study is the application of decision tree technique to predict the tensile properties of friction stir welded MMC plates. It is seen that methodology can be applied with great accuracy.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.18.4.3092

  9. Factorial Analysis of Welding Current Influence on Heat Affected Zone Hardness of Cast Iron, Aluminium, and Mild Steel Weldments Cooled in Palm Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. I. Nwoye

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Factorial analysis of heat affected zone hardness of some metals was evaluated. Three models were derived and used as tools for evaluating the welding current influence on the predictability of HAZ hardness in aluminium, cast iron, and mild steel weldments similarly cooled in palm oil. It was discovered that on welding these materials, and similarly cooling their respective weldments in palm oil, the model predicts aluminium weldment HAZ hardness by multiplying the determined general current product rule (GCPR with the ratio: HAZ hardness product of cast iron and mild steel/HAZ hardness sum of cast iron and mild steel . Computational analysis of experimental and model-predicted results indicates that aluminium, cast iron, and mild steel weldment HAZ hardness per unit welding current as evaluated from experiment and derived model are 3.3917, 4.8333, and 2.7944 and 3.3915, 4.8335, and 2.7946 (VHN A−1, respectively. Deviational analysis shows that the maximum deviation of model-predicted HAZ hardness from the experimental results is less than 0.007%. This invariably implies over 99.99 % confidence level for the derived models.

  10. Wear characteristics and defects analysis of friction stir welded joint of aluminium alloy 6061-t6

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kumar, R.; Chattopadhyaya, S.; Hloch, Sergej; Krolczyk, G.; Legutko, S.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 1 (2016), s. 128-135 ISSN 1507-2711 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : Friction stir welding (FSW) * grinding machine * Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM) Subject RIV: JQ - Machines ; Tools Impact factor: 1.145, year: 2016 http://www.ein.org.pl/2016-01-17

  11. Microstructure and mechanical properties of similar and dissimilar joints of aluminium alloy and pure copper by friction stir welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.C. Sinha

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the microstructure and mechanical properties of similar and dissimilar friction stir welded joints of aluminium alloy (AlA and pure copper (Cu were evaluated at variable tool rotational speeds from 150 to 900 rpm in steps of 150 rpm at 60 mm/min travel speed and constant tilt angle 2°. The interfacial microstructures of the joints were characterised by optical and scanning electron microscopy. The Al4Cu9, AlCu, Al2Cu and Al2Cu3 intermetallic compounds have been observed at the interface and stir zone region of dissimilar Al/Cu FSWed joints. Variation in the grain size was observed in the stir zone depending upon the heat input value. Axial force, traverse force and torque value were analysed with variation in tool rotational speed. Residual stresses were measured at the stir zone by X-ray diffraction technique. Maximum ultimate tensile strength of ∼75% of AlA strength for AlA–AlA joints has been obtained at 750 rpm and for Cu–Cu joint tensile strength of ∼100% of tensile strength of Cu was obtained at 300 rpm. However, for Cu–AlA joint when processed at 600 rpm tool rotational speed achieved maximum ultimate tensile strength of ∼77% of AlA.

  12. Analysis of the tool plunge in friction stir welding - comparison of aluminium alloys 2024 T3 and 2024 T351

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veljić Darko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Temperature, plastic strain and heat generation during the plunge stage of the friction stir welding (FSW of high-strength aluminium alloys 2024 T3 and 2024 T351 are considered in this work. The plunging of the tool into the material is done at different rotating speeds. A three-dimensional finite element (FE model for thermomechanical simulation is developed. It is based on arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation, and Johnson-Cook material law is used for modelling of material behaviour. From comparison of the numerical results for alloys 2024 T3 and 2024 T351, it can be seen that the former has more intensive heat generation from the plastic deformation, due to its higher strength. Friction heat generation is only slightly different for the two alloys. Therefore, temperatures in the working plate are higher in the alloy 2024 T3 for the same parameters of the plunge stage. Equivalent plastic strain is higher for 2024 T351 alloy, and the highest values are determined under the tool shoulder and around the tool pin. For the alloy 2024 T3, equivalent plastic strain is the highest in the influence zone of the tool pin. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 34016 i br. TR 35006

  13. Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Vocational Education.

    This curriculum guide is designed for use by South Carolina vocational education teachers as a continuing set of lesson plans for a two-year course on welding. Covered in the individual sections of the guide are the following topics: an orientation to welding, oxyacetylene welding, advanced oxyacetylene welding, shielded metal arc welding, TIG…

  14. Mechanical and toughness properties of robotic-FSW repair welds in 6061-T6 aluminium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinckmann, S.; Strombeck, A. v.; Schilling, C.; Santos, J.F. dos; Kocak, M. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Materialforschung; Lohwasser, D. [DaimlerChrysler Aerospace Airbus GmbH, Bremen (Germany)

    2000-07-01

    Panel or structures welded in fixed installations might require local repair of eventual process induced defects. Ideally such repair operations should take place outside the production line to avoid interruption of the manufacturing flow. Robotic FSW systems offer the required flexibility to perform such repairs. The main objective of this work was to conduct a preliminary investigation on the microstructural, mechanical and toughness properties of robotic friction stir repair welds. To achieve this objective defective welds have been purposely produced and subsequently repaired. Specimens for microstructural analysis, mechanical and fracture toughness testing have been obtained from repaired and defect-free welds as well as from the base plate for comparison purposes. The mechanical properties have been established using standard tests, i.e. hardness, bending and tensile. Toughness properties of the joints have been determined using small (compact tension - CT) and large (M(T)) scale specimens. Fatigue pre-cracks were positioned in the nugget and HAZ. Crack resistance curves (R-Curves) were determined using the potential drop technique. The obtained results indicated that the additional thermal cycle and deformation process imposed by the repair weld did not adversely affect the mechanical and toughness properties of the nugget area. Both defect-free and repair welds showed higher toughness than the base material. Pre-cracks positioned in the nugget region were deviated into the lower strength TMAZ after initiation and ductile crack growth within the nugget area due to strength undermatch. Later propagation remained within the TMAZ. (orig.) [German] Das Schweissen von Elementen oder Strukturen kann eine lokale Reparatur erfordern, wenn durch den Fuegeprozess ausgeloeste Fehler auftreten. Vorteilhafterweise sollten die Reparaturen ausserhalb der Fertigungslinie erfolgen, um den Produktionsablauf nicht zu stoeren. Robotergestuetzte FSW-Systeme bieten die benoetigte

  15. Caractérisation et compréhension du comportement en corrosion de structures en alliage d'aluminium-cuivre-lithium 2050 assemblées par Friction Stir Welding (FSW)

    OpenAIRE

    Proton, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    A l'heure où les matériaux composites prennent une part toujours plus importante dans les structures aéronautiques, l'utilisation de l'alliage d'aluminium-lithium 2050 assemblé par Friction Stir Welding (FSW) est envisagé pour remplacer les structures rivetées en alliages d'aluminium traditionnels. L'objectif global de ce travail de thèse était d'étudier le comportement en corrosion et en corrosion sous contrainte de joints soudés FSW de l'alliage d'aluminium-lithium 2050 mais aussi l'influen...

  16. Residual stresses, defects and fatigue cycling in friction stir butt welds in 5383-H321 and 5083-H321 aluminium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, M.N.; Bradley, G.R. [Mechanical and Marine Engineering, Univ. of Plymouth, Plymouth (United Kingdom); Hattingh, D.G. [Mechanical Engineering, PE Technikon, Port Elizabeth (South Africa); Hughes, D.J.; Webster, P.J. [FaME38, ILL-ESRF, Grenoble (France)

    2003-07-01

    This paper presents results from a substantial investigation of residual stresses and defects associated with single pass and double pass friction stir welds in 5083-H321 and 5383-H321 aluminium alloys. The residual stress part of the paper summarises data on their as-welded magnitude and plate-to-plate variation, together with their modification during applied bending fatigue loading corresponding to cyclic lives of 10{sup 5} and 10{sup 7} cycles. Results indicate fairly low initial peak tensile stresses both parallel with, and perpendicular to, the weld run. Peak tensile stresses occur just outside the tool shoulder with values typically in the range 0-30 MPa. Peak compressive stresses have much higher magnitudes (typically in the range -50 MPa to -140 MPa) and occur at distances of up to 40 mm from the weld centreline. Significant plate-to-plate variability in residual stress magnitudes exists, and fatigue cycling can raise peak tensile stresses by as much as a factor of four (to around 80 MPa). This has significant potential influence on fatigue life prediction. The paper also presents data on the occurrence of partial-fusion defects (PFD's or so-called 'kissing bonds' or 'onion-skin' defects) as a function of tool travel speed (in the range 80-200 mm/min), and their influence on fatigue life. Results indicate that PFD's can sometimes be associated with crack initiation, but that their major effect is more likely to appear when levels of plastic deformation are high, i.e. during relatively fast fatigue crack growth or during fast fracture. (orig.)

  17. Caratterizzazione microstrutturale e prove di resilienza su giunti Friction Stir Welding e Linear Friction Welding di compositi a matrice metallica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Merlin

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In questo studio sono stati caratterizzati giunti Friction Stir Welding e Linear Friction Welding su compositi a matrice in lega di alluminio e rinforzo particellare ceramico. Il processo FSW è stato applicato a due compositi ottenuti con processo fusorio, quindi estrusi e trattati termicamente T6: AA6061/20%vol.Al2O3p e AA7005/10%vol.Al2O3p. I giunti LFW sono stati invece realizzati su un composito con matrice in lega di alluminio e rinforzo particellare in carburo di silicio, ottenuto mediante metallurgia delle polveri, quindi forgiato e trattato termicamente T4: AA2124/25%vol.SiCp. Sono stati esaminati gli effetti della saldatura sullecaratteristiche microstrutturali dei giunti, avvalendosi di tecniche di microscopia ottica con analisi di immagine e di microscopia elettronica in scansione (SEM con microsonda a dispersione di energia (EDS. Sono state quindi condotte prove di resilienza con pendolo strumentato Charpy. Lo studio dei meccanismi di danneggiamento è stato effettuato mediante analisi al SEM delle superfici di frattura. Entrambi i processi di saldatura hanno portato a giunti sostanzialmente esenti da difetti. La microstruttura dei cordoni è risultata dipendente sia dalle caratteristiche microstrutturali iniziali dei compositi considerati, sia dalla tipologia di processo di saldatura. Nel caso dei compositi AA6061/20%Al2O3p e AA7005/10%Al2O3p saldati FSW si è osservato un sostanziale incremento di resilienza, rispetto al materiale base, in conseguenza dell’affinamento dei grani della matrice, della riduzione della dimensione media delle particelle di rinforzo e della loro spigolosità, indotte dal processo di saldatura. Il composito AA2124/25%SiCp saldato LFW ha presentato valori di resilienza confrontabili con quelli del materiale base, in conseguenza, soprattutto, dei limitati effetti della saldatura su dimensione e distribuzione delle particelle di rinforzo.

  18. Influence of energy input in friction stir welding on structure evolution and mechanical behaviour of precipitation-hardening in aluminium alloys (AA2024-T351, AA6013-T6 and Al-Mg-Sc)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weis Olea, Cesar Afonso [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstofforschung

    2008-12-04

    Aluminium alloys AA2024 T351, AA6013 T6 and the recently developed Al-Mg-Sc for aircraft industry applications, which are usually considered difficult to weld by conventional fusion welding processes, demonstrate outstanding performance when joined by friction stir welding (FSW). The main feature of the process is to produce solid-state welds, where the maximum temperatures attained during the process are about 80 % that of the melting temperature of the base material. The process generates substantial plastic deformation, due to the solid-state stirring, and consequently creates a high dislocation density, which is a precursor to dynamic recrystallization, a metallurgical feature that characterizes the stir zone (weld centre). A relevant aspect considered, regarding precipitation-hardening aluminium alloys, is the deterioration of the mechanical properties in the weld zones, which are fundamentally attributed to changes in the characteristics of strengthening precipitates. Among the strengthening mechanisms acting in these aluminium alloys, the most important is basically dependent on the morphology, size and population of the precipitates. The thermal cycle and deformation generated during the FSW process alter the precipitation characteristics previously present in the base material. FSW input energy regulates the magnitude of the thermal cycle and the intensity of deformation taking place during the process, and it can be controlled by the welding parameters, affecting the precipitates evolution and consequently the mechanical properties of the joint. Nevertheless, there remains a lack of knowledge about the substructural evolution of these alloys during FSW, and its correlation with weld energy input and their respective mechanical properties, particularly for the Al-Mg-Sc alloy. The main objective of this work is to explain the micro and substructural evolution (emphasizing precipitates evolution) of AA2024- T351, AA6013-T6 and Al-Mg-Sc alloys in similar

  19. The effect of welding on the strength of aluminium stiffened plates subject to combined uniaxial compression and lateral pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedram Masoud

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays aluminum stiffened plates are one of the major constituents of the marine structures, espe¬cially high-speed vessels. On one hand, these structures are subject to various forms of loading in the harsh sea envi¬ronment, like hydrostatic lateral pressures and in-plane compression. On the other hand, fusion welding is often used to assemble those panels. The common marine aluminum alloys in the both 5,000 and 6,000 series, however, lose a re¬markable portion of their load carrying capacity due to welding. This paper presents the results of sophisticated finite-element investigations considering both geometrical and mechanical imperfections. The tested models were those pro¬posed by the ultimate strength committee of 15th ISSC. The presented data illuminates the effects of welding on the strength of aluminum plates under above-mentioned load conditions.

  20. Corrosion behavior of Al6061 alloy weldment produced by friction stir welding process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Gharavi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the corrosion behavior of welded lap joints of AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy produced by friction stir welding process has been investigated. Corrosion properties of welded lap joints were studied by cyclic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy tests. All tests were performed in an aerated 0.6 mol L−1 NaCl aqueous solution with pH = 6.5 at a temperature of 30 °C to characterize corrosion morphology and realize corrosion features of weld regions as opposed to the parent alloy. The microstructure of weld nugget (WN, heated affected zone (HAZ, and parent alloy were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The experimental results indicated that the welding process has a major effect on the corrosion resistance, which possibly associated to the break-down and dissolution of intermetallic particles. It is supposed that an increasing in intermetallic distributed throughout the matrix of weld regions increases the galvanic corrosion couples. Furthermore, by decreasing the grain size in the weld regions, the susceptibility to corrosion is enhanced. The pitting corrosion and intergranular attack are the dominant corrosion types in the weld regions and the parent alloy.

  1. Corrosion fatigue performance in simulated sea water of aluminium 6061-T651 welded using ER4043 filler wire

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mutombo, K

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The fatigue life of Al6061-T651 for various applied stress amplitudes in the unwelded and welded conditions was significantly lower in 3.5% NaCl simulated sea water solution, compared to that in air. The damage ratio increased with a decrease...

  2. Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Earl; And Others

    The curriculum guide for welding instruction contains 16 units presented in six sections. Each unit is divided into the following areas, each of which is color coded: terminal objectives, specific objectives, suggested activities, and instructional materials; information sheet; transparency masters; assignment sheet; test; and test answers. The…

  3. Low-cycle fatigue of dissimilar friction stir welded aluminum alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, R.I. [The University of Alabama, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Jordon, J.B., E-mail: bjordon@eng.ua.edu [The University of Alabama, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Allison, P.G. [The University of Alabama, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Rushing, T.; Garcia, L. [Engineering Research and Development Center, Army Corps of Engineers, Vicksburg, MS 39180 (United States)

    2016-01-27

    In this work, experiments were conducted to quantify structure-property relations of low-cycle fatigue behavior of dissimilar friction stir welding (FSW) of AA6061-to-AA7050 high strength aluminum alloys. In addition, a microstructure-sensitive fatigue model is employed to further elucidate cause-effect relationships. Experimental strain-controlled fatigue testing revealed an increase in the cyclic strain hardening and the number-of cycles to failure as the tool rotational speed was increased. At higher applied strain amplitudes (>0.3%), the corresponding stress amplitude increased and the plastic strain amplitude decreased, as the number of cycles increased. However, at 0.2% strain amplitude, the plastic strain decreased until it was almost negligible. Inspection of the hysteresis loops demonstrated that at low strain amplitudes, there was an initial stage of strain hardening that increased until it reached a maximum strain hardening level, afterwards a nearly perfect elastic behavior was observed. Under fully-reversed fatigue loading, all samples failed at the region between the heat-affected and thermomechanically-affected zones. Inspection of the fractured surfaces under scanning electron microscopy revealed that the cracks initiated at either the crown or the root surface of the weld, and from secondary intermetallic particles located near the free surface of the weld. Lastly, a microstructure-sensitive multistage fatigue model was employed to correlate the fatigue life of the dissimilar FSW of AA6061-to-AA7050 considering microstructural features such as grain size, intermetallic particles and mechanical properties.

  4. STUDY OF ARC IMPULSE FREQUENCY EFFECT ON THE STRUCTURE AND PROPERTIES OF WELDED CONNECTION ELEMENTS IN ALUMINIUM PIPELINE SYSTEMS, MADE WITH MASTERTIG 3500

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr. Pavel V. Bakhmatov

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Summary . The article focuses on the arc impulse frequency effect on the structure and properties of welded connections in aluminum pipeline systems hand-operated with argon-arc welding nonconsumable rod on MasterTig3500. It was revealed that the frequency of the welding current impulses plays an important role in the forming of the welded connection. The authors determined the optimal value of the welding current frequency significantly accelerating the welding process to ensure consistent quality of the weld. The authors detailed some features of cleaning assembly parts with a wire brush prior to welding process.

  5. Estudo do Processo de Fabricação de Compósitos de Matriz Metálica da Liga de Alumínio AA6061 por Metalurgia do Pó via Moagem de Alta Energia e Sinterização a Vácuo

    OpenAIRE

    Sousa, Marcio Marcelo Sampaio de

    2012-01-01

    O presente trabalho tem como escopo processar e fabricar compósitos de matriz metálica da liga de Alumínio AA6061 com reforço particulado de nitreto de silício (Si3N4) e nitreto de alumínio (AlN) através de técnicas de Metalurgia do Pó (MP) com o propósito de melhorar as propriedades mecânicas deste material. O estágio atual da indústria exige materiais com propriedades especificas que não podem ser atendidas pelo uso isolado das ligas metálicas, dos materiais cerâmicos e dos materiais polimé...

  6. TIG welding of aluminium foams. Analysis of foaming operating parameters; Soldadura TIG de espumas de aluminio. Analisis de los parametros operacionales de espumado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portoles, A.; Berenguer, O.; Onoro, J.; Ranninger, C.

    2011-07-01

    In this work the influence of main parameters that take part during TIG welding process are analyzed. Some of these parameters belong to the welding process, as for example the welding speed, intensity and voltage while others are from the material and tooling features, as for example foaming material and tooling design. The result of this work shows a strong dependence on these parameters of the TIG welding process for metallic foams. (Author) 16 refs.

  7. Optimization of Friction Stir Welding Tool Advance Speed via Monte-Carlo Simulation of the Friction Stir Welding Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Kirk A; St-Georges, Lyne; Kiss, Laszlo I

    2014-04-30

    Recognition of the friction stir welding process is growing in the aeronautical and aero-space industries. To make the process more available to the structural fabrication industry (buildings and bridges), being able to model the process to determine the highest speed of advance possible that will not cause unwanted welding defects is desirable. A numerical solution to the transient two-dimensional heat diffusion equation for the friction stir welding process is presented. A non-linear heat generation term based on an arbitrary piecewise linear model of friction as a function of temperature is used. The solution is used to solve for the temperature distribution in the Al 6061-T6 work pieces. The finite difference solution of the non-linear problem is used to perform a Monte-Carlo simulation (MCS). A polynomial response surface (maximum welding temperature as a function of advancing and rotational speed) is constructed from the MCS results. The response surface is used to determine the optimum tool speed of advance and rotational speed. The exterior penalty method is used to find the highest speed of advance and the associated rotational speed of the tool for the FSW process considered. We show that good agreement with experimental optimization work is possible with this simplified model. Using our approach an optimal weld pitch of 0.52 mm/rev is obtained for 3.18 mm thick AA6061-T6 plate. Our method provides an estimate of the optimal welding parameters in less than 30 min of calculation time.

  8. Optimization of Friction Stir Welding Tool Advance Speed via Monte-Carlo Simulation of the Friction Stir Welding Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirk A. Fraser

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Recognition of the friction stir welding process is growing in the aeronautical and aero-space industries. To make the process more available to the structural fabrication industry (buildings and bridges, being able to model the process to determine the highest speed of advance possible that will not cause unwanted welding defects is desirable. A numerical solution to the transient two-dimensional heat diffusion equation for the friction stir welding process is presented. A non-linear heat generation term based on an arbitrary piecewise linear model of friction as a function of temperature is used. The solution is used to solve for the temperature distribution in the Al 6061-T6 work pieces. The finite difference solution of the non-linear problem is used to perform a Monte-Carlo simulation (MCS. A polynomial response surface (maximum welding temperature as a function of advancing and rotational speed is constructed from the MCS results. The response surface is used to determine the optimum tool speed of advance and rotational speed. The exterior penalty method is used to find the highest speed of advance and the associated rotational speed of the tool for the FSW process considered. We show that good agreement with experimental optimization work is possible with this simplified model. Using our approach an optimal weld pitch of 0.52 mm/rev is obtained for 3.18 mm thick AA6061-T6 plate. Our method provides an estimate of the optimal welding parameters in less than 30 min of calculation time.

  9. Hybrid laser-arc welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hybrid laser-arc welding (HLAW) is a combination of laser welding with arc welding that overcomes many of the shortfalls of both processes. This important book gives a comprehensive account of hybrid laser-arc welding technology and applications. The first part of the book reviews...... the characteristics of the process, including the properties of joints produced by hybrid laser-arc welding and ways of assessing weld quality. Part II discusses applications of the process to such metals as magnesium alloys, aluminium and steel as well as the use of hybrid laser-arc welding in such sectors as ship...... building and the automotive industry. With its distinguished editor and international team of contributors, Hybrid laser-arc welding, will be a valuable source of reference for all those using this important welding technology. Professor Flemming Ove Olsen works in the Department of Manufacturing...

  10. Aluminium bridges, aluminium bridge decks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soetens, F.; Straalen, IJ.J. van

    2003-01-01

    Applications of aluminium have grown considerably in building and civil engineering the last decade. In building and civil engineering the increase of aluminium applications is due to various aspects like light weight, durability and maintenance, use of extrusions, and esthetics. The paper starts

  11. Eficiencia térmica en soldadura de la aleación AA6061-T6 por arco eléctrico indirecto modificado y digitalización de señales de intensidad de corriente

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambriz, R. R.

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The results of the thermal efficiency on welding by modified indirect electric arc technique (MIEA [1] of the 6061- T6 aluminum alloy are presented. These values are in a range of 90 to 94 %, which depend of the preheating employed. Thermal efficiency was obtained by means of a balance energy which considers the heat input, the amount of melted mass of the welding profiles, and welding parameters during the joining, especially of the arc current data acquisition. Also, some dimensionless parameters were employed in order to determine the approximation grade of the melted pool, the heat affected zone (HAZ, and their corresponding values with the experimental results.

    En el presente trabajo de investigación, se presentan los resultados de la eficiencia térmica en la soldadura de una aleación de aluminio 6061-T6 por medio de la técnica de arco eléctrico indirecto modificado (AEIM [1]. Los valores se encuentran en un rango de 90-94 % dependiendo de la temperatura de precalentamiento y fueron obtenidos a través de un balance térmico que considera a la energía aportada por el arco eléctrico, la cantidad de masa fundida de los perfiles de soldadura obtenidos y las variables operativas en el proceso de unión, poniendo especial atención en los datos recogidos en el proceso de digitalización para la intensidad de corriente del arco eléctrico. También se em - plearon algunos parámetros adimensionales para determinar el grado de aproximación de la porción del baño fundido, el ancho de la zona afectada por el calor (ZAC y sus correspondientes aproximaciones con los resultados experimentales.

  12. Effect of Pre/Post T6 Heat Treatment on the Mechanical Properties of Laser Welded SSM Cast A356 Aluminium Alloy

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Akhter, R

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available h to the alloy A356. During welding, the fusion heat facil- tates the diffusion and the segregation grows, this become less , with a respective drop in the strength and hardness f the metal in the heat affected zone. Due to this effect the e.... von Allmen, Laser Beam Interaction with Metals, Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 1987. ] S. Ramasamy, C.E. Albright, J. Laser Appl. 12 (2000) 101. ] M.L. Santella, T. Engstrom, D. Storjohann, T.Y. Pan, Scripta Mater. 53 (2005) 201–206. ] L. Ivanchev, D...

  13. Investigate The Effect Of Welding Parameters On Mechanical Properties During The Welding Of Al-6061 Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra Prasad

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Friction welding is a solid state welding technique which is being used in recent times to weld similar as well as dissimilar metals for getting defect free weld. Many combinations like low carbon to stainless steel austenitic to ferrite stainless steel aluminium to copper and titanium to aluminium or steel have been tried out by various solid state welding processes with quite good results. In the present work the 3 level full factorial design has been employed to investigate the effect of welding parameters on tensile strength toughness and heat generation during the welding of Al-6061 alloy. Mathematical relationships between friction welding parameters and mechanical properties like heat generation tensile strength and toughness have also been developed. An attempt has also been made to examine the fracture surfaces of test specimens using SEM. It has been found that welding speed is the most significant parameter thats affect the heat generation tensile strength and toughness. it has been found that tensile strength and toughness during welding increases with increased in welding speed while tensile strength and toughness initially increased as the welding time increases after that it decreased with increase in welding time. The difference in weight of alloying elements can be clearly seen by analyzing spectrum of elements.

  14. Aluminium in human sweat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minshall, Clare; Nadal, Jodie; Exley, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    It is of burgeoning importance that the human body burden of aluminium is understood and is measured. There are surprisingly few data to describe human excretion of systemic aluminium and almost no reliable data which relate to aluminium in sweat. We have measured the aluminium content of sweat in 20 healthy volunteers following mild exercise. The concentration of aluminium ranged from 329 to 5329μg/L. These data equate to a daily excretion of between 234 and 7192μg aluminium and they strongly suggest that perspiration is the major route of excretion of systemic aluminium in humans. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. Microstructural chacarteristics of an AA6061 spinning alloy

    OpenAIRE

    Oldani, C.; Aguirre, L.; Manzini,R.

    2008-01-01

    El proceso de repujado para la fabricación de tubos de aluminio ha sido muy poco estudiado, quizá debido al bajo tonelaje procesado por este método, lo que lo hace poco relevante frente a otros procesos de deformación plástica. Sin embargo, es un método económicamente competitivo para la fabricación de recipientes de presión livianos, consistentes en un liner de aleación de aluminio reforzado con fibra de vidrio. Los efectos producidos sobre la microestructura de una aleación de aluminio AA 6...

  16. Insights into intermetallic phases on pulse welded dissimilar metal joints

    OpenAIRE

    Beyer, E.; Brenner, B; Göbel, G.; Herrmannsdörfer, T.; Kaspar, J.

    2010-01-01

    The Magnetic Pulse Welding (MPW) process has been developed to an industrially used joining method which is considered to be a fast, noncontact, clean and "cold" solid state welding process. Unlike fusion welding, the absence of direct heat during the welding cycle makes it possible to join dissimilar metals, for instance aluminium to copper or copper to steel, without noticeable detrimental metallurgical defects. This is very desirable, as today s industry lacks technologies to join often no...

  17. Assessment of Gap and Charging Voltage Influence on Mechanical Behaviour of Joints Obtained by Magnetic Pulse Welding

    OpenAIRE

    Buiron, N.; dos Santos, B; Franz, G; Habak, M.; Haye, D.; Jouaffre, D.; Morel, M; Rachik, M; Raoelison, R.

    2012-01-01

    This work investigates the study of the experimental weldability in magnetic pulse welding process of a one material assembly (aluminium AA6060T6) and a dissimilar metal couple (aluminium6060T6/copper). The weld quality is defined using a destructive process allowing measuring the weld dimension. A diagram charging voltage-air gap is used to establish the variance of weldability. With the criterion of width of the weld, this representation is able to determine the operational w...

  18. Sensitivity analysis on ultimate strength of aluminium stiffened panels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rigo, P.; Sarghiuta, R.; Estefen, S.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an extensive sensitivity analysis carried out by the Committee III.1 "Ultimate Strength" of ISSC?2003 in the framework of a benchmark on the ultimate strength of aluminium stiffened panels. Previously, different benchmarks were presented by ISSC committees...... stiffened aluminium panels (including extruded profiles). Main objectives are to compare codes/models and to perfom quantitative sensitivity analysis of the ultimate strength of a welded aluminium panel on various parameters (typically the heat-affected zone). Two phases were planned. In Phase A, alle...... of different parameters (sensitivity analysis)...

  19. Intermediate layer, microstructure and mechanical properties of aluminum alloy/stainless steel butt joint using laser-MIG hybrid welding-brazing method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zongtao; Wan, Zhandong; Li, Yuanxing; Xue, Junyu; Hui, Chen

    2017-07-01

    Butt joining of AA6061 aluminum (Al) alloy and 304 stainless steel of 2-mm thickness was conducted using laser-MIG hybrid welding-brazing method with ER4043 filler metal. To promote the mechanical properties of the welding-brazing joints, two kinds of intermediate layers (Al-Si-Mg alloy and Ag-based alloy) are used to adjust the microstructures of the joints. The brazing interface and the tensile strength of the joints were characterized. The results showed that the brazing interface between Al alloy and stainless steel consisted of double layers of Fe2Al5 (near stainless steel) and Fe4Al13 intermetallic compounds (IMCs) with a total thickness of 3.7 μm, when using Al-Si-Mg alloy as the intermediate layer. The brazing interface of the joints using Ag-based alloy as intermediate layer also consists of double IMC layers, but the first layer near stainless steel was FeAl2 and the total thickness of these two IMC layers decreased to 3.1 μm. The tensile strength of the joints using Al-Si-Mg alloy as the intermediate layer was promoted to 149 MPa, which was 63 MPa higher than that of the joints using Al-Si-Mg alloy as the intermediate layer. The fractures occurred in the brazing interface between Al alloy and stainless steel.

  20. Genesis of the microstructures during friction stir welding of aluminium alloys of the series 2000 and 5000 and resulting mechanical behavior; Genese des microstructures lors du soudage par friction malaxage d'alliages d'aluminium de la serie 2000 et 5000 et comportement mecanique resultant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genevois, C.

    2004-09-15

    The 2024 alloy (Al-Cu-Mg) is used for minimizing the weight of structural components in the transportation industry. However, this alloy is not easy to weld by traditional techniques. Friction stir welding (FSW) is a recently developed solid state process which removes the solidification defects. In this study, the microstructures of FSW welds of this alloy were finely characterized by SAXS, DSC, TEM, SEM, EBSD and optical microscopy. In order to highlight the interactions between deformation, precipitation and recrystallization, which all take place during the welding of the 2024 alloy, model experiments were carried out as well as a comparative study between the alloys 5251 and 2024. The combination of the welding characterisation and the model experiments allow to define the metallurgical phenomena controlling the mechanical strength of the welded joints and their microstructure. In addition, a detailed characterisation of the mechanical behaviour of the welded joints was carried out, validated by a finite element model. (author)

  1. Human exposure to aluminium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exley, Christopher

    2013-10-01

    Human activities have circumvented the efficient geochemical cycling of aluminium within the lithosphere and therewith opened a door, which was previously only ajar, onto the biotic cycle to instigate and promote the accumulation of aluminium in biota and especially humans. Neither these relatively recent activities nor the entry of aluminium into the living cycle are showing any signs of abating and it is thus now imperative that we understand as fully as possible how humans are exposed to aluminium and the future consequences of a burgeoning exposure and body burden. The aluminium age is upon us and there is now an urgent need to understand how to live safely and effectively with aluminium.

  2. On the effects of thermomechanical processing on failure mode in precipitation-hardened aluminium alloys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haas, M. de; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    2002-01-01

    This paper concentrates on the influences of thermomechanical processing on fracture behaviour of Al-Mg-Si-Cu (AA6061) alloys. Important factors are grain boundary structure and extent of matrix- and grain boundary precipitation. Large grain boundary phases in the as-air-cooled alloy, explains its

  3. An integrated approach for predictive control of extrusion weld seams: experimental support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, A.J. den; Werkhoven, R.J.; Sillekens, W.H.; Katgerman, L.

    2010-01-01

    In hollow aluminium extrusions, longitudinal weld-seams are formed through a solid-state bonding process at elevated temperatures and under conditions of interfacial pressure and plastic deformation. For structurally loaded components, sound weld seams are imperative. In our research, a weld seam

  4. Corrosion of aluminium and aluminium alloys in nitric acid. Zur Korrosion von Aluminium-Werkstoffen in Salpetersaeure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horn, E.M.; Schoeller, K. (Bayer AG, Leverkusen (Germany, F.R.)); Doelling, H. (Vereinigte Aluminium-Werke AG, Bonn (Germany, F.R.). Leichtmetall-Forschungsinstitut)

    1990-06-01

    A literature survey was made to show the suitability of aluminium and aluminium alloys in contact with highly concentrated nitric acid, particularly with regard to the corrosion behaviour of weld joints made using various welding processes. The corrosion resistance of Al99.5 in nitric acid was investigated as functions of temperature and acid concentrations. The linear corrosion rates are plotted in an Arrhenius diagram. Decreasing nitric acid concentrations are causing a parallel shift of the lines in the Arrhenius diagram towards higher corrosion rates. Starting with Al99.5, the corrosion rates in nitric acid at and above 99.8 concentration decrease as the Al contents of the materials increase. Doping with copper should be avoided. After exposure of wrought as well as continuously cast Al and Al alloys to highly concentrated technical grade nitric acid at 30deg C (1 year test period), the corrosion behaviour of a number of alloys was comparable to that of pure aluminium grades. (orig.).

  5. The effect of welding parameters on the corrosion behaviour of friction stir welded AA2024-T351

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jariyaboon, M; Davenport, A.J.; Ambat, Rajan

    2007-01-01

    The effect of welding parameters (rotation speed and travel speed) on the corrosion behaviour of friction stir welds in the high strength aluminium alloy AA2024-T351 was investigated. It was found that rotation speed plays a major role in controlling the location of corrosion attack. Localised...

  6. Sustainable Aluminium Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio R. Ermolli

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, an analytical presentation of some popular aluminium systems that contribute to sustainability of structures is presented. Special emphasis has been given to the properties of aluminium, while the influence of these systems in the overall performance of the structure regarding environment and economy is described. In particular, characteristics of aluminium elements such as high reflectivity and recyclability and their role in life cycle analysis (LCA are analyzed. The connections between energy efficiency and conservation of buildings and aluminium application are also discussed. Building applications such as curtain walls, window frames and facade sheets are presented and thoroughly investigated, considering their environmental and economic aspects. Furthermore, many innovative techniques that use aluminium elements in collaboration with other systems in order to produce renewable energy, such as solar panels and photovoltaics, are introduced. Finally, environmental innovations such as optimized ventilation mechanisms and light and shade management systems based on aluminium members are presented.

  7. Welding Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This competency-based curriculum guide is a handbook for the development of welding trade programs. Based on a survey of Alaskan welding employers, it includes all competencies a student should acquire in such a welding program. The handbook stresses the importance of understanding the principles associated with the various elements of welding.…

  8. WOOD WELDING

    OpenAIRE

    Marcos Theodoro Muller; Rafael Rodolfo de Melo; Diego Martins Stangerlin

    2010-01-01

    The term "wood welding" designates what can be defined as "welding of wood surfaces". This new process, that it provides the joint of wood pieces without the use of adhesives or any other additional material, provokes growing interest in the academic environment, although it is still in laboratorial state. Linear friction welding induced bymechanical vibration yields welded joints of flat wood surfaces. The phenomenon of the welding occurs in less time than 10 seconds, with the temperature in...

  9. Characterization through nano indentation technique of mechanical properties of an aluminium alloy welded zone for hydrogen storage; Apport de la nanoindentation pour la caracterisation d'un cordon de soudure par faisceau d'electrons d'un reservoir d'hydrogene sous pression en alliage d'aluminium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delobelle, P.; Perreux, D.; Russo, C. [Universite de Franche-Comte, Institut FEMTO-ST, UMR 6174, Depart. LMARC, 25 - Besancon (France); Meunier, E. [CEA Valduc (DRMN/SMCM/LCSi), 21 - Is-sur-Tille (France); Decamps, B. [Laboratoire de Chimie Metallurgique des Terres Rares, UPR 209, 94 - Vitry-Thiais, (France)

    2008-07-01

    In this study we use the nano indentation technique which is a powerful tool to characterise the mechanical properties of a welded bond. The Berkovich indentation has the advantage to test small material volumes compared to the conventional tensile tests. The welded process with electrons beam of hydrogen vessels induces different regions and the aim of this study is to characterize the differences of the mechanical properties of the different zones of the weld. To identify the stress-strain curves of the tested material, F.E. inverse method has been used. After treatment, for one pass, the hardness of the melted zone is greater than those of the base material and for the two passes, the hardness is still lower than those of the base material. The interface zones present a hardness which is always higher than those of the weld. A relation of the Hall-Petch type which correlates the evolution of the hardness with the zinc concentration and the grain size has been proposed. Moreover a relation between the normalized hardness and the hydrogen concentration CH has been found. The parameters of the stress-strain curves of the four regions; base material, interface, one and two passes melted zones, have been deduced. The identified laws are used in a F.E. model of a welded sphere to model its radial deformation under internal pressure loading. (authors)

  10. Rows of Dislocation Loops in Aluminium Irradiated by Aluminium Ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, L.; Johansen, A.; Koch, J.

    1967-01-01

    Single-crystal aluminium specimens, irradiated with 50-keV aluminium ions, contain dislocation loops that are arranged in regular rows along <110 > directions. ©1967 The American Institute of Physics......Single-crystal aluminium specimens, irradiated with 50-keV aluminium ions, contain dislocation loops that are arranged in regular rows along directions. ©1967 The American Institute of Physics...

  11. Joining of Aluminium Alloy and Steel by Laser Assisted Reactive Wetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liedl, Gerhard; Vázquez, Rodrigo Gómez; Murzin, Serguei P.

    2017-12-01

    Compounds of dissimilar materials, like aluminium and steel offer an interesting opportunity for the automotive industry to reduce the weight of a car body. Thermal joining of aluminium and steel leads to the formation of brittle intermetallic compounds, which negatively affects the properties of the welded joint. Amongst others, growth of such intermetallic compounds depends on maximum temperature and on the time at certain temperatures. Laser welding with its narrow well seam and its fast heating and cooling cycles provides an excellent opportunity to obtain an ultrathin diffusion zone. Joining of sheet metal DC01 with aluminium alloy AW6016 has been chosen for research. The performed experimental studies showed that by a variation of the beam power and scanning speed it is possible to obtain an ultrathin diffusion zone with narrow intermetallic interlayers. With the aim of supporting further investigation of laser welding of the respective and other dissimilar pairings a multi-physical simulation model has been developed.

  12. Advanced Welding Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Four advanced welding techniques and their use in NASA are briefly reviewed in this poster presentation. The welding techniques reviewed are: Solid State Welding, Friction Stir Welding (FSW), Thermal Stir Welding (TSW) and Ultrasonic Stir Welding.

  13. Resistance welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Zhang, Wenqi; Rasmussen, Mogens H.

    2003-01-01

    Resistance welding comprises not only the well known spot welding process but also more complex projection welding operations, where excessive plastic deformation of the weld point may occur. This enables the production of complex geometries and material combinations, which are often not possible...... to weld by traditional spot welding operations. Such joining processes are, however, not simple to develop due to the large number of parameters involved. Development has traditionally been carried out by large experimental investigations, but the development of a numerical programme system has changed...

  14. Phosphorus enhances aluminium tolerance in both aluminium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Seedlings growing in acid soils suffer both phosphorus (P) deficiency and aluminium (Al) toxicity stresses. An experiment was conducted to study the effects of Al and P interaction on Al-tolerant (ET8) and Al-sensitive (ES8) wheat genotypes in an acid soil. This study aimed to determine the interactive effect of Al and P in soil ...

  15. Measurement of the composition change in Al5754 alloy during long pulsed Nd : YAG laser welding based on LIBS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jandaghi, M; Parvin, P [Physics Department, Amir Kabir University of Technology, PO Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Torkamany, M J; Sabbaghzadeh, J, E-mail: Parvin@aut.ac.i [Iranian National Centre for Laser Science and Technology (INLC), PO Box 14665-576, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-10-21

    Weld metal composition change in aluminium alloy 5754 in keyhole mode welding, using a long pulsed Nd : YAG laser, was investigated theoretically and supported with experimental measurements. A comprehensive model for the calculation of vaporization rates was developed based on the kinetic theory of gases and the thermodynamic laws. During the laser welding process, the significant variables were pulse duration and power density. It was predicted in the model and concurred experimentally that the concentration of magnesium in the weld metal decreases with an increase in the laser pulse duration, while the aluminium concentration increases. Moreover, the concentrations of aluminium and magnesium elements in the weld metal were determined by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for different welding conditions.

  16. Welding Technician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ken

    2009-01-01

    About 95% of all manufactured goods in this country are welded or joined in some way. These welded products range in nature from bicycle handlebars and skyscrapers to bridges and race cars. The author discusses what students need to know about careers for welding technicians--wages, responsibilities, skills needed, career advancement…

  17. Survey of welding processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-07-01

    The current KYTC SPECIAL PROVISION NO. 4 WELDING STEEL BRIDGES prohibits the use of welding processes other than shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) and submerged arc welding (SAW). Nationally, bridge welding is codified under ANSI/AASHTO/AWS D1....

  18. Electric pulse treatment of welded joint of aluminum alloy

    OpenAIRE

    A.A. Mitiaev; I. P. Volchok; Yu. L. Nadezhdin; V.A. Sokirko; I. A. Vakulenko

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Explanation of the redistribution effect of residual strengthes after electric pulse treatment of arc welding seam of the aluminum alloy. Methodology. Alloy on the basis of aluminium of АК8М3 type served as the research material. As a result of mechanical treatment of the ingots after alloy crystallization the plates with 10 mm thickness were obtained. After edge preparation the elements, which are being connected were butt welded using the technology of semiautomatic argon arc weldi...

  19. Fatigue performance of matching and dissimilar joints in aluminium alloys 5083-H111 and 6061-T651 after fully automatic pulsed GAMW using ER5356 filler wire

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mutombo, K

    2010-08-31

    Full Text Available The tensile strength and fatigue properties of Al5083-H111 welded with aluminium-magnesium alloyed ER5356 filler wire appeared similar to those of the base metal. This joint failed in the weld metal as a result of a slight reduction in hardness...

  20. FSW Numerical Simulation of Aluminium Plates by Sysweld - Part I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jančo Roland

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Friction Stir Welding (FSW is one of the most effective solid state joining processes and it has numerous potential applications in many industries. The simulation process can provide the evolution of physical quantities such as temperature, metallurgical phase proportions, stress and strain which can be easily measured during welding. The numerical modelling requires the modelling of a complex interaction between thermal, metallurgical and mechanical phenomena. The aim of this paper is to describe the thermal-fluid simulation of FSW using the finite element method. In the theoretical part of the paper heating is provided by the material flow and contact condition between the tool and the welded material. The thermal-fluid results from the numerical simulation for aluminium alloy using SYSWELD are also presented in this paper.

  1. FSW Numerical Simulation of Aluminium Plates by SYSWELD - Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jančo Roland

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Friction Stir Welding (FSW is one of the most effective solid state joining processes and has numerous potential applications in many industries. The simulation process can provide the evolution of physicals quantities such as temperature, metallurgical phase proportions, stress and strain which can be easily measured during welding. The numerical modelling requires the modelling of the complex interaction between thermal, metallurgical and mechanical phenomena. The aim of this paper is to describe the thermal-fluid simulation of FSW using the finite element method. In the theoretical part of paper heating is provided by the material flow and contact condition between the tool and the welded material. Thermal-mechanical results from the numerical simulation using SYSWELD are also presented for aluminium alloy.

  2. Energetic peculiarities of metal heating under laser welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oparin, M.I.; Nikiforov, G.D.; Fedorov, S.A. (Moskovskij Aviatsionnyj Tekhnologicheskij Inst. (USSR))

    1981-07-01

    A connection between the energy and thermal parameters of the welding process of laser welding is studied. It is established that the connection between energy and thermal parameters of laser welding regime is carried out through the coefficient of metal absorption. Experimental determination of absorption coefficients of various metals (aluminium alloys, copper, 12Kh18N10T steel, St 3 steel, 0T4 titanium alloy, VN2 niobium alloy) has permitted to develope the methodics of approximated thermal calculations and to built up a nomogram for determining parameters of lazer welding regime. Limits of the thickness of welded sheets of the above materials in dependence on the welding speed are determined according to the nomogram.

  3. Recovery in aluminium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gundlach, Carsten

    2006-01-01

    In the present thesis the development of a unique experimental method for volume characterisation of individual embedded crystallites down to a radius of 150 nm is presented. This method is applied to in-situ studies of recovery in aluminium. The method is an extension of 3DXRD microscopy, an X...... by the combined use of X-ray micro focusing optics, new scanning algorithms and the use of foils. The ratio of foil thickness to crystallite size should be at least 10 such that the central ones are situated in a bulk environment. To avoid thermal drifts, gold reference markers are deposited onto the sample...... are represented as strings. To identify the strings a combination of a 5D connected component type algorithm and multi-peak fitting was found to be superior. The first use of the method was a study of recovery of a deformed aluminium alloy (AA1050). The aluminium alloy was deformed by cold rolling to a thickness...

  4. Soldadura (Welding). Spanish Translations for Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohhertz, Durwin

    Thirty transparency masters with Spanish subtitles for key words are provided for a welding/general mechanical repair course. The transparency masters are on such topics as oxyacetylene welding; oxyacetylene welding equipment; welding safety; different types of welds; braze welding; cutting torches; cutting with a torch; protective equipment; arc…

  5. WELDING TORCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correy, T.B.

    1961-10-01

    A welding torch into which water and inert gas are piped separately for cooling and for providing a suitable gaseous atmosphere is described. A welding electrode is clamped in the torch by a removable collet sleeve and a removable collet head. Replacement of the sleeve and head with larger or smaller sleeve and head permits a larger or smaller welding electrode to be substituted on the torch. (AEC)

  6. Plasma arc welding weld imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor); Mcgee, William F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A welding torch for plasma arc welding apparatus has a transparent shield cup disposed about the constricting nozzle, the cup including a small outwardly extending polished lip. A guide tube extends externally of the torch and has a free end adjacent to the lip. First and second optical fiber bundle assemblies are supported within the guide tube. Light from a strobe light is transmitted along one of the assemblies to the free end and through the lip onto the weld site. A lens is positioned in the guide tube adjacent to the second assembly and focuses images of the weld site onto the end of the fiber bundle of the second assembly and these images are transmitted along the second assembly to a video camera so that the weld site may be viewed continuously for monitoring the welding process.

  7. Fire exposed aluminium structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maljaars, J.; Fellinger, J.H.H.; Soetens, F.

    2005-01-01

    Material properties and mechanical response models for fire design of steel structures are based on extensive research and experience. Contrarily, the behaviour of aluminium load bearing structures exposed to fire is relatively unexplored. This article gives an overview of physical and mechanical

  8. Fire exposed aluminium structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maljaars, J.; Fellinger, J.H.H.; Soetens, F.

    2006-01-01

    Material properties and mechanical response models for fire design of steel structures are based on extensive research and experience. Contrarily, the behaviour of aluminium load bearing structures exposed to fire is relatively unexplored. This article gives an overview of physical and mechanical

  9. On the microstructure analysis of FSW joints of aluminium components made via direct metal laser sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherillo, Fabio; Astarita, Antonello; di Martino, Daniela; Contaldi, Vincenzo; di Matteo, Luca; di Petta, Paolo; Casarin, Renzo; Squillace, Antonino; Langella, Antonio

    2017-10-01

    Additive Manufacturing (AM), applied to metal industry, is a family of processes that allow complex shape components to be realized from raw materials in the form of powders. The compaction of the powders can be achieved by local melting of the powder bed or by solid state sintering. Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) is an additive manufacturing process in which a focalized laser beam is the heat source that allows the powders to be compacted. By DMLS it is possible to realize complex shape components. One of the limits of DMLS, as for every additive layer manufacturing techniques, is the unfeasibility to realize large dimension parts. Due to this limit the study of joining process of parts made via ALM is of great interest. One of the most promising options is the Friction Stir Welding (FSW), a solid state welding technique that has been proven to be very effective in the welding of metals difficult to weld, above all aluminium alloys. Since FSW is a solid-state technique, the microstructure of the various zone of the weld bead depends not only by the process itself but also by the parent microstruct ure of the parts to be welded. Furthermore, parts made of aluminium alloy via DMLS have a particular microstructure that is the result of repeated severe thermal cycles. In the present work the authors, starting from the description of the parent microstructure of parts made of AlSi10Mg aluminium alloy, study the microstructure evolution occurred within the joint made by Friction Stir Welding, analysing in details the microstructure of the main well recognized zone of the weld bead. The structure of the parent material is characterized by the presence of melting pools with a very fine microstructure. In the joint the recrystallization, the grain refinement and, above all, the redistribution of intermetallic phases occurs, resulting in an homogenization of the microstructure and in an increase of micro hardness.

  10. Friction Melt Bonding: An innovative process for aluminium-steel lap joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simar Aude

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A new process based on Friction Stir Welding has been developed to weld dissimilar metals, particularly steel and aluminum, in a lap-joint configuration. In this Friction Melt Bonding process, frictional heat generated by the rotating and translating tool brings about local and transient melting (Figure 1. Welding then occurs owing to controlled reactivity and solidification at the interface between the two plates. With an adequate choice of the welding parameters, low alloy steel and aluminium alloys have been successfully welded. Characterisation of the microstructure was systematically performed to highlight the influence of the process parameters, particularly the temperature cycle, on the steel-Al interface. The thickness of the intermetallic layer varies from a couple of micrometers to tens of micrometers depending on the advancing speed of the tool (Fig. 2. The lap shear properties of the joints were also investigated and analysed based on the morphology of the intermetallic layer.

  11. Role of work hardening characteristics of matrix alloys in the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    verted into true stress–true strain curves. Figure 1 shows the true stress–true strain curves for different aluminium alloys viz. AA6061, AA2024, AA7010, AA2014, AA7075 and commercial purity aluminium. It is observed that commercial purity aluminium has the lowest yield strength and AA7010 has the highest yield strength.

  12. WELDING METHOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell, A.A.; Dunbar, J.V.; Ruffner, J.H.

    1959-09-29

    A semi-automatic method is described for the weld joining of pipes and fittings which utilizes the inert gasshielded consumable electrode electric arc welding technique, comprising laying down the root pass at a first peripheral velocity and thereafter laying down the filler passes over the root pass necessary to complete the weld by revolving the pipes and fittings at a second peripheral velocity different from the first peripheral velocity, maintaining the welding head in a fixed position as to the specific direction of revolution, while the longitudinal axis of the welding head is disposed angularly in the direction of revolution at amounts between twenty minutas and about four degrees from the first position.

  13. Fatigue life estimation of welded joints of an aluminium alloy under superimposed random load waves (follow-up report). Effects of high frequency components; Jujo random kajuka ni okeru aluminium gokin yosetsu tsugite no hiro jumyo suitei (zokuho). Koshuha seibun no eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, I.; Maenaka, H.; Takada, A. [Ship Research Inst., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    In order to examine fatigue behavior of boxing welded joints of anticorrosion aluminum A 5083 P-O alloy, the residual stress measurements, static loading tests, elastic finite element analyses, constant amplitude fatigue tests, and random fatigue tests were conducted. For a load wave in the random loading fatigue tests, a direct current component, a zero-mean narrow band random process, and a high frequency component were combined and superimposed, to examine the effect of the high frequency component and the effect of the stress cycle count method and the mean stress correction on the life estimation. For the fatigue analysis, a reference stress, such as that considering the structural stress concentration, was proved effective in reducing the amount of scattering in the fatigue test results and in improving the life estimation accuracy. Accordingly, for the actual scale measurements, it is insufficient only to measure the stress at points far from the crack initiation place. It is required to analyze the fatigue by measuring the reference stress same as the basic data acquisition tests in the laboratory. 4 refs., 21 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Ontwerpen en berekenen van aluminium constructies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soetens, F.

    1996-01-01

    De toepassing van aluminium in dragende constructies is succesvol, indien de gunstige eigenschappen van aluminium goed worden benut en er voor de minder gunstige eigenschappen een adequate constructieve oplossing wordt geboden. De toepassingsmogelijkheden van aluminium zijn de laatste jaren

  15. Syllabus in Trade Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development.

    The syllabus outlines material for a course two academic years in length (minimum two and one-half hours daily experience) leading to entry-level occupational ability in several welding trade areas. Fourteen units covering are welding, gas welding, oxyacetylene welding, cutting, nonfusion processes, inert gas shielded-arc welding, welding cast…

  16. Diffusion welding; Soudage par diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniault, J.; Gillet, R. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-07-01

    After a brief recall of the principle, and of the advantages of the method, we give some examples of metallic bonding in a first part where we describe preliminary trials: Ta-Mo, Zr-Zr, Zr-Nb, Nb-stainless steel, Mo-stainless steel, aluminium-aluminium (A5-A5). The second part of the note is devoted to trials on construction elements: on tubular elements for bonding between Mo or Nb on one hand, and stainless steel on the other hand (We indicate in what conditions the bonding are tight and what are their mechanical strength and their resistance to thermic cycles). We indicate, in this chapter, a method to obtain radiation windows in Be welded on an element made of stainless steel. (authors) [French] pres un bref rappel du principe, et des avantages de la methode, on donne quelques exemples de liaisons metalliques dans une premiere partie qui traite d'essais preliminaires: Ta - Mo, Zr - Zr, Zr - Nb, Nb - acier inoxydable, molybdene - acier inoxydable, aluminium - aluminium (A5-A5). La deuxieme partie de la note est consacree a des essais sur elements de construction: sur des elements tabulaires, pour des liaisons entre molybdene ou niobium d'une part, et acier inoxydable d'autre part. On indique dans quelles conditions les liaisons sont etanches et quelles sont leurs resistances mecaniques et aux chocs thermiques. On indique, dans ce meme chapitre, une methode pour l'obtention de fenetres en beryllium soudees sur un support en acier inoxydable. (auteurs)

  17. Fatigue tests on aluminium bridges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maljaars, J.; Soetens, F.; Straalen, IJ.J. van

    2004-01-01

    Traffic bridges are subjected to variable loads and should therefore be checked on fatigue. Especially low weight materials, like aluminium, are sensitive to fatigue, because the variable load is a substantial part of the total load. This paper shows the structural design of an aluminium bridge

  18. Manufacture of thin-walled clad tubes by pressure welding of roll bonded sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Hans Christian; Grydin, Olexandr; Stolbchenko, Mykhailo; Homberg, Werner; Schaper, Mirko

    2017-10-01

    Clad tubes are commonly manufactured by fusion welding of roll bonded metal sheets or, mechanically, by hydroforming. In this work, a new approach towards the manufacture of thin-walled tubes with an outer diameter to wall thickness ratio of about 12 is investigated, involving the pressure welding of hot roll bonded aluminium-steel strips. By preparing non-welded edges during the roll bonding process, the strips can be zip-folded and (cold) pressure welded together. This process routine could be used to manufacture clad tubes in a continuous process. In order to investigate the process, sample tube sections with a wall thickness of 2.1 mm were manufactured by U-and O-bending from hot roll bonded aluminium-stainless steel strips. The forming and welding were carried out in a temperature range between RT and 400°C. It was found that, with the given geometry, a pressure weld is established at temperatures starting above 100°C. The tensile tests yield a maximum bond strength at 340°C. Micrograph images show a consistent weld of the aluminium layer over the whole tube section.

  19. Aluminium in Drinkwater: voorkomen, herkomst en gezondheidsaspecten

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versteegh JFM; de Boer JLM; van den Velde-Koerts T

    1992-01-01

    Aluminium can occur in drinking water because of the application of aluminium salts as a coagulant in the treatment of drinking water. In the Netherlands mostly iron salts are used instead of aluminium. Besides this aluminium can be present in the source for drinking water. In shallow groundwater

  20. Application of laser additive manufacturing to produce dies for aluminium high pressure die casting

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Pereira, MFVT

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available . Washout damages are a direct result of the flow of the aluminium melt impinging on and rubbing against the die cavity surfaces. Corrosion is attributed to friction wear caused when the melt solidifies around core surfaces and when the casting is ejected... Process Time (h) Process Time (h) Process Time (h) Process Time (h) Milling 2.5 Laser sinter 10.5 Laser weld 2.5 Laser weld 12 Grinding 1 Grinding 1 Grinding 4 Grinding 1 Jig bore Jig bore Jig bore Jig bore Heat Treatment 4...

  1. Aluminium, antiperspirants and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbre, P D

    2005-09-01

    Aluminium salts are used as the active antiperspirant agent in underarm cosmetics, but the effects of widespread, long term and increasing use remain unknown, especially in relation to the breast, which is a local area of application. Clinical studies showing a disproportionately high incidence of breast cancer in the upper outer quadrant of the breast together with reports of genomic instability in outer quadrants of the breast provide supporting evidence for a role for locally applied cosmetic chemicals in the development of breast cancer. Aluminium is known to have a genotoxic profile, capable of causing both DNA alterations and epigenetic effects, and this would be consistent with a potential role in breast cancer if such effects occurred in breast cells. Oestrogen is a well established influence in breast cancer and its action, dependent on intracellular receptors which function as ligand-activated zinc finger transcription factors, suggests one possible point of interference from aluminium. Results reported here demonstrate that aluminium in the form of aluminium chloride or aluminium chlorhydrate can interfere with the function of oestrogen receptors of MCF7 human breast cancer cells both in terms of ligand binding and in terms of oestrogen-regulated reporter gene expression. This adds aluminium to the increasing list of metals capable of interfering with oestrogen action and termed metalloestrogens. Further studies are now needed to identify the molecular basis of this action, the longer term effects of aluminium exposure and whether aluminium can cause aberrations to other signalling pathways in breast cells. Given the wide exposure of the human population to antiperspirants, it will be important to establish dermal absorption in the local area of the breast and whether long term low level absorption could play a role in the increasing incidence of breast cancer.

  2. Roll bonding of strained aluminium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staun, Jakob M.

    2003-01-01

    This report investigates roll bonding of pre-strained (å ~ 4) aluminium sheets to produce high strain material from high purity aluminium (99.996%) and commercial pure aluminium (99.6%). The degree of bonding is investigated by optical microscopy and ultrasonic scanning. Under the right...... circumstances both materials show good bonding, but the high purity material is excluded because of recrystallisation and the resulting loss of mechanical properties. The effect of cross stacking and roll bonding pre-strained sheets of the commercial purity material is investigated and some dependence...

  3. The non-destructive prediction of the aluminium content in pressed skulls of aluminium dross

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Varužan Kevorkijan; Srečo Davor Škapin; Uroš Kovačec

    2012-01-01

    During production of primary and secondary aluminium, various amounts of aluminium dross, a mixture consisting of molten aluminium metal and different oxide compounds, is skimmed per tonne of molten metal...

  4. The toxicity of aluminium in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exley, C

    2016-06-01

    We are living in the 'aluminium age'. Human exposure to aluminium is inevitable and, perhaps, inestimable. Aluminium's free metal cation, Alaq(3+), is highly biologically reactive and biologically available aluminium is non-essential and essentially toxic. Biologically reactive aluminium is present throughout the human body and while, rarely, it can be acutely toxic, much less is understood about chronic aluminium intoxication. Herein the question is asked as to how to diagnose aluminium toxicity in an individual. While there are as yet, no unequivocal answers to this problem, there are procedures to follow to ascertain the nature of human exposure to aluminium. It is also important to recognise critical factors in exposure regimes and specifically that not all forms of aluminium are toxicologically equivalent and not all routes of exposure are equivalent in their delivery of aluminium to target sites. To ascertain if Alzheimer's disease is a symptom of chronic aluminium intoxication over decades or breast cancer is aggravated by the topical application of an aluminium salt or if autism could result from an immune cascade initiated by an aluminium adjuvant requires that each of these is considered independently and in the light of the most up to date scientific evidence. The aluminium age has taught us that there are no inevitabilities where chronic aluminium toxicity is concerned though there are clear possibilities and these require proving or discounting but not simply ignored. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Friction welding of Al-Cu-SiC composite to AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel

    OpenAIRE

    Özdemir, Niyazi; Balaban, Zülküf

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigates thefeasibility of joining an aluminium matrix composite reinforced with 5, 10 and15 vol. % of SiCp particles to AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel by usingfriction welding technique. In the present study, optical and electronmicroscopy as well as lap shear strength test and microhardness measurementswere used to evaluate the quality of bonding of Al-Cu-SiC and AISI 304austenitic stainless steel joints produced by friction welding

  6. Combined Laser Beam Braze-Welding Process for Fluxless Al-Cu Connections

    OpenAIRE

    Solchenbach, Tobias; Plapper, Peter

    2013-01-01

    A combined laser beam welding and brazing process for Al-Cu connections in overlap configuration is investigated. Aluminium and copper for electric and electronic application is used for experiments without surface treatment or activation, e.g. by flux. Although Al and Cu have been considered as “not weldable”, the possibility of a thermal joining process, i.e., the weld-brazing, was proved. The inevitable formation of intermetallic compounds at the inter...

  7. Distortion Control during Welding

    OpenAIRE

    Akbari Pazooki, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    The local material expansion and contraction involved in welding result in permanent deformations or instability i.e., welding distortion. Considerable efforts have been made in controlling welding distortion prior to, during or after welding. Thermal Tensioning (TT) describes a group of in-situ methods to control welding distortion. In these methods local heating and/or cooling strategies are applied during welding. Additional heating and/or cooling sources can be implemented either stationa...

  8. A Survey on Friction Stir Welding Of Dissimilar Magnesium Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unnikrishnan, M. A.; Raja, Dhas. J. Edwin

    2017-10-01

    There is a consistent demand for superior materials in every industry. The areas on demand are automobile and aerospace sectors in major.. The most commonly used material in these fields is Aluminium.Though it possess all the properties up to some extent constant demand is pushing for alternate materials. Dissimilar alloys have been a relatively new approach towards these fields.. Friction stir welding dissimilar alloys is a big leap in Automobile sector. In this paper a detailed review of Friction stir welding of Dissimilar Magnesium alloys has been done. This work will serve as a reference to subsequent researchers.

  9. A simple surface treatment and characterization of AA 6061 aluminum alloy surface for adhesive bonding applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleema, N.; Sarkar, D. K.; Paynter, R. W.; Gallant, D.; Eskandarian, M.

    2012-11-01

    Structural adhesive bonding of aluminum is widely used in aircraft and automotive industries. It has been widely noted that surface preparation of aluminum surfaces prior to adhesive bonding plays a significant role in improving the strength of the adhesive bond. Surface cleanliness, surface roughness, surface wettability and surface chemistry are controlled primarily by proper surface treatment methods. In this study, we have employed a very simple technique influencing all these criteria by simply immersing aluminum substrates in a very dilute solution of sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and we have studied the effect of varying the treatment period on the adhesive bonding characteristics. A bi-component epoxy adhesive was used to join the treated surfaces and the bond strengths were evaluated via single lap shear (SLS) tests in pristine as well as degraded conditions. Surface morphology, chemistry, crystalline nature and wettability of the NaOH treated surfaces were characterized using various surface analytical tools such as scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM/EDX), optical profilometry, infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and contact angle goniometry. Excellent adhesion characteristics with complete cohesive failure of the adhesive were encountered on the NaOH treated surfaces that are comparable to the benchmark treatments such as anodization, which involve use of strong acids and multiple steps of treatment procedures. The NaOH treatment reported in this work is a very simple method with the use of a very dilute solution with simple ultrasonication being sufficient to produce durable joints.

  10. A simple surface treatment and characterization of AA 6061 aluminum alloy surface for adhesive bonding applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleema, N., E-mail: saleema.noormohammed@imi.cnrc-nrc.gc.ca [National Research Council of Canada (ATC-NRC), 501 Boulevard University East, Saguenay, Quebec G7H 8C3 (Canada); Sarkar, D.K. [Centre Universitaire de Recherche sur l' Aluminium (CURAL), University of Quebec at Chicoutimi (UQAC), 555 Boulevard University East, Saguenay, Quebec G7H 2B1 (Canada); Paynter, R.W. [Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique Energie Materiaux Telecommunications (INRS-EMT), 1650 Boulevard Lionel-Boulet, Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2 (Canada); Gallant, D.; Eskandarian, M. [National Research Council of Canada (ATC-NRC), 501 Boulevard University East, Saguenay, Quebec G7H 8C3 (Canada)

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A very simple surface treatment method to achieve excellent and durable aluminum adhesive bonding. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our method involves simple immersion of aluminum in very dilute NaOH solution at room temperature with no involvement of strong acids or multiple procedures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Surface analysis via various surface characterization techniques showed morphological and chemical modifications favorable for obtaining highly durable bond strengths on the treated surface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Safe, economical, reproducible and simple method, easily applicable in industries. - Abstract: Structural adhesive bonding of aluminum is widely used in aircraft and automotive industries. It has been widely noted that surface preparation of aluminum surfaces prior to adhesive bonding plays a significant role in improving the strength of the adhesive bond. Surface cleanliness, surface roughness, surface wettability and surface chemistry are controlled primarily by proper surface treatment methods. In this study, we have employed a very simple technique influencing all these criteria by simply immersing aluminum substrates in a very dilute solution of sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and we have studied the effect of varying the treatment period on the adhesive bonding characteristics. A bi-component epoxy adhesive was used to join the treated surfaces and the bond strengths were evaluated via single lap shear (SLS) tests in pristine as well as degraded conditions. Surface morphology, chemistry, crystalline nature and wettability of the NaOH treated surfaces were characterized using various surface analytical tools such as scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM/EDX), optical profilometry, infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and contact angle goniometry. Excellent adhesion characteristics with complete cohesive failure of the adhesive were encountered on the NaOH treated surfaces that are comparable to the benchmark treatments such as anodization, which involve use of strong acids and multiple steps of treatment procedures. The NaOH treatment reported in this work is a very simple method with the use of a very dilute solution with simple ultrasonication being sufficient to produce durable joints.

  11. Manufacturing Systems Demonstration: Bimetallic Friction STIR Joining of AA6061 and High Hardness Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-31

    are shown in Table 8. c) Shear – ASTM D1002: Standard Test Method for Apparent Shear Strength of Single- Lap -Joint Adhesively Bonded Metal...b) Bending ............................................................................................................. 26 c) Shear ...25 8. Bend Test Results of Best Parameter Specimens ............................................ 26 9. Shear

  12. WELDING PROCESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambrow, J.; Hausner, H.

    1957-09-24

    A method of joining metal parts for the preparation of relatively long, thin fuel element cores of uranium or alloys thereof for nuclear reactors is described. The process includes the steps of cleaning the surfaces to be jointed, placing the sunfaces together, and providing between and in contact with them, a layer of a compound in finely divided form that is decomposable to metal by heat. The fuel element members are then heated at the contact zone and maintained under pressure during the heating to decompose the compound to metal and sinter the members and reduced metal together producing a weld. The preferred class of decomposable compounds are the metal hydrides such as uranium hydride, which release hydrogen thus providing a reducing atmosphere in the vicinity of the welding operation.

  13. Corrosion behaviour of laser-cleaned AA7024 aluminium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, F. D.; Liu, H.; Suebka, C.; Liu, Y. X.; Liu, Z.; Guo, W.; Cheng, Y. M.; Zhang, S. L.; Li, L.

    2018-03-01

    Laser cleaning has been considered as a promising technique for the preparation of aluminium alloy surfaces prior to joining and welding and has been practically used in the automotive industry. The process is based on laser ablation to remove surface contaminations and aluminium oxides. However the change of surface chemistry and oxide status may affect corrosion behaviour of aluminium alloys. Until now, no work has been reported on the corrosion characteristics of laser cleaned metallic surfaces. In this study, we investigated the corrosion behaviour of laser-cleaned AA7024-T4 aluminium alloy using potentiodynamic polarisation, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and scanning vibrating electrode technique (SVET). The results showed that the laser-cleaned surface exhibited higher corrosion resistance in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution than as-received hot-rolled alloy, with significant increase in impedance and decrease in capacitance, while SVET revealed that the active anodic points appeared on the as-received surface were not presented on the laser-cleaned surfaces. Such corrosion behaviours were correlated to the change of surface oxide status measured by glow discharge optical emission spectrometry (GDOES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). It was suggested that the removal of the original less protective oxide layer consisting of MgO and MgAl2O4 on the as-received surfaces and the newly formed more protective oxide layer containing mainly Al2O3 and MgO by laser cleaning were responsible for the improvement of the corrosion performance.

  14. Welding processes handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Weman, Klas

    2011-01-01

    Offers an introduction to the range of available welding technologies. This title includes chapters on individual techniques that cover principles, equipment, consumables and key quality issues. It includes material on such topics as the basics of electricity in welding, arc physics, and distortion, and the weldability of particular metals.$bThe first edition of Welding processes handbook established itself as a standard introduction and guide to the main welding technologies and their applications. This new edition has been substantially revised and extended to reflect the latest developments. After an initial introduction, the book first reviews gas welding before discussing the fundamentals of arc welding, including arc physics and power sources. It then discusses the range of arc welding techniques including TIG, plasma, MIG/MAG, MMA and submerged arc welding. Further chapters cover a range of other important welding technologies such as resistance and laser welding, as well as the use of welding techniqu...

  15. Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process invented in 1991 at The Welding Institute in the United Kingdom. A weld is made in the FSW process by translating a rotating pin along a weld seam so as to stir the sides of the seam together. FSW avoids deleterious effects inherent in melting and promises to be an important welding process for any industries where welds of optimal quality are demanded. This article provides an introduction to the FSW process. The chief concern is the physical effect of the tool on the weld metal: how weld seam bonding takes place, what kind of weld structure is generated, potential problems, possible defects for example, and implications for process parameters and tool design. Weld properties are determined by structure, and the structure of friction stir welds is determined by the weld metal flow field in the vicinity of the weld tool. Metal flow in the vicinity of the weld tool is explained through a simple kinematic flow model that decomposes the flow field into three basic component flows: a uniform translation, a rotating solid cylinder, and a ring vortex encircling the tool. The flow components, superposed to construct the flow model, can be related to particular aspects of weld process parameters and tool design; they provide a bridge to an understanding of a complex-at-first-glance weld structure. Torques and forces are also discussed. Some simple mathematical models of structural aspects, torques, and forces are included.

  16. Dispersion strengthening of aluminium-aluminium-oxide products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Niels

    1970-01-01

    The true stress-true strain curves at room temperature and at 400°C were determined for various types of aluminium-aluminium-oxide products containing from 0.2 to 4.7 weight per cent of aluminium oxide. The effect of particles on the initial flow stress and the flow stress for 0.2% offset at room...... temperature and at 400°C is in agreement with Orowan's theory. The increase in flow stress at room temperature for strain values below 3 per cent was related to the plastic strain by the equation σ-σoy=k1ε 1/2, where σoy is the initial flow stress and where k1 increases for increasing volume fraction...

  17. Introduction to Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortney, Clarence; Gregory, Mike

    This curriculum guide provides six units of instruction on basic welding. Addressed in the individual units of instruction are the following topics: employment opportunities for welders, welding safety and first aid, welding tools and equipment, basic metals and metallurgy, basic math and measuring, and procedures for applying for a welding job.…

  18. Distortion Control during Welding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akbari Pazooki, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    The local material expansion and contraction involved in welding result in permanent deformations or instability i.e., welding distortion. Considerable efforts have been made in controlling welding distortion prior to, during or after welding. Thermal Tensioning (TT) describes a group of in-situ

  19. Effect of hydrogen on aluminium and aluminium alloys: A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambat, Rajan; Dwarakadasa, E.S.

    1996-01-01

    Susceptibility of aluminium and its alloys towards hydrogen embrittlement has been well established. Still a lot of confusion exists on the question of transport of hydrogen and its possible role in stress corrosion cracking. This paper reviews some of the fundamental properties of hydrogen...... in aluminium and its alloys and its effect on mechanical properties. The importance of hydrogen embrittlement over anodic dissolution to explain the stress corrosion cracking mechanism of these alloys is also examined in considerable detail. The various experimental findings concerning the link between...

  20. Aluminium toxicity in plants: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Rout, G.; SAMANTARAY, S.; Das, P

    2001-01-01

    International audience; Aluminium toxicity and problems concerning tolerance and ecological performance are discussed briefly. Differential tolerance of plant genotypes to aluminium stress is a more promising approach to increase our understanding of aluminium tolerance in plants. Induction of Al tolerance and its characterization are also reviewed. The cytogenetic effects of aluminium on plants are discussed in depth. Efforts have been made to compare the relative sensitivity of various plan...

  1. Buckwheat stomatal traits under aluminium toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Oleksandr E. Smirnov; Anatoliy M. Kosyan; Oksana I. Kosyk; Natalia Yu. Taran

    2014-01-01

    Aluminium influence on some stomatal parameters of common buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench.) was studied. Significant changes in stomatal density, stomatal index and stomatal shape coefficient under aluminium treatment were revealed. Stomatal closure and no difference in total stomatal potential conductance index of treatment plants were suggested as aluminium resistance characteristics.

  2. Buckwheat stomatal traits under aluminium toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleksandr E. Smirnov

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium influence on some stomatal parameters of common buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench. was studied. Significant changes in stomatal density, stomatal index and stomatal shape coefficient under aluminium treatment were revealed. Stomatal closure and no difference in total stomatal potential conductance index of treatment plants were suggested as aluminium resistance characteristics.

  3. Does Aluminium Trigger Breast Cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Jennrich

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Summary. Breast cancer is by far the most common cancer in women in the western world. In 90% of breast cancers, environmental factors are among the causes. The frequency with which the tumour occurs in the outer upper part of the breast has risen with above average rates in recent decades. Aluminium salts as ingredients in deodorants and antiperspirants are being absorbed by the body to a greater extent than hitherto assumed. Their toxicity for healthy and diseased breast tissue cells includes various well-documented pathomechanisms. In the sense of primary and secondary prevention, the cancer-triggering potential of aluminium and its use in anti-perspirant deodorants must be re-evaluated. For the same reason the access to a targeted diagnosis and treatment of aluminium loading must be facilitated.

  4. Advanced Welding Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Some of the applications of advanced welding techniques are shown in this poster presentation. Included are brief explanations of the use on the Ares I and Ares V launch vehicle and on the Space Shuttle Launch vehicle. Also included are microstructural views from four advanced welding techniques: Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) weld (fusion), self-reacting friction stir welding (SR-FSW), conventional FSW, and Tube Socket Weld (TSW) on aluminum.

  5. Joining of metals and ceramics by friction welding. Verbinden von Metallen und Keramik mit Hilfe der Reibschweisstechnik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruenauer, H.; Simanowski, R. (KUKA Schweissanlagen und Roboter GmbH, Augsburg (Germany)); Horn, H. (Fachhochschule Hamburg (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstoffkunde)

    1992-03-01

    Friction welding as a process to join ceramics and metals will be a good alternative to existing joining processes in many applications, all the more because good bonds can be achieved without any coating of the ceramic materials. Fricton welding, however, requires high-quality ceramic materials. Defects in the ceramic materials can lead to their destruction during the friction welding process. This can also be seen as a concurrent quality assurance of the mechanical and technological properties of the ceramic materials. Studies so far conducted show good results in the case of cements with aluminium oxide and /or zinc oxide. Thank to very positive, first results wich have been obtainded by friction welding of silicon carbide and silicon nitride with aluminium, it may be as successful as oxidic ceramics. (orig.).

  6. Aluminium toxicity in chronic renal insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savory, J; Bertholf, R L; Wills, M R

    1985-08-01

    Aluminium is a ubiquitous element in the environment and has been demonstrated to be toxic, especially in individuals with impaired renal function. Not much is known about the biochemistry of aluminium and the mechanisms of its toxic effects. Most of the interest in aluminium has been in the clinical setting of the haemodialysis unit. Here aluminium toxicity occurs due to contamination of dialysis solutions, and treatment of the patients with aluminium-containing phosphate binding gels. Aluminium has been shown to be the major contributor to the dialysis encephalopathy syndrome and an osteomalacic component of dialysis osteodystrophy. Other clinical disturbances associated with aluminium toxicity are a microcytic anaemia and metastatic extraskeletal calcification. Aluminium overload can be treated effectively by chelation therapy with desferrioxamine and haemodialysis. Aluminium is readily transferred from the dialysate to the patient's bloodstream during haemodialysis. Once transferred, the aluminium is tightly bound to non-dialysable plasma constituents. Very low concentrations of dialysate aluminium in the range of 10-15 micrograms/l are recommended to guard against toxic effects. Very few studies have been directed towards the separation of the various plasma species which bind aluminium. Gel filtration chromatography has been used to identify five major fractions, one of which is of low molecular weight and the others appear to be protein-aluminium complexes. Recommendations on aluminium monitoring have been published and provide 'safe' and toxic concentrations. Also, the frequency of monitoring has been addressed. Major problems exist with the analytical methods for measuring aluminium which result from inaccurate techniques and contamination difficulties. The most widely used analytical technique is electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry which can provide reliable measurements in the hands of a careful analyst.

  7. Effect of linear energy on the properties of an AL alloy in DPMIG welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Tianfa; Jin, Li; Xue, Jiaxiang

    2018-01-01

    The effect of different linear energy parameters on the DPMIG welding performance of AA1060 aluminium alloy is studied in this paper. The stability of the welding process is verified with a Labview electrical signal acquisition system, and the microstructure and tensile properties of the welded joint are studied via optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and electrical tensile tests. The test results show that the welding process for the DPMIG methods stable and that the weld beads appear as scales. Tensile strength results indicate that, with increasing linear energy, the tensile strength first increases and then decreases. The tensile strength of the joint is maximized when the linear energy is 120.5 J / mm-1.

  8. A review of literature from the First International Conference on Friction Stir Welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowyer, W.H. [Meadow End Farm, Farnham (United Kingdom)

    2000-06-15

    The papers from the first international conference on Friction Stir Welding (FSW) have been reviewed. Taken together the papers provide a very optimistic picture for the development and application of friction stir welding in general and to the case of the copper canister in particular. Whilst a considerable development effort is in progress the process has been industrialised for joining of aluminium sheet and it is accepted by Lloyds register for this purpose. Development of procedures and equipment to weld thicker materials and a wider range of materials is progressing ahead of the research activity to aid the understanding of the process at this stage. Nevertheless, well-established weld assessment procedures are being applied to experimental welds with very encouraging results. Summaries of the key papers are presented in an appendix.

  9. Constitutive modelling of aluminium foams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, W.M.; Lemmen, P.P.M.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper an aluminium foam model is proposed for a vehicle crash analysis. The model assumes that there is no coupling between stresses and strains in different principal directions. The stress in each principle direction is then interpolated from an experimental recorded uniaxial stress strain

  10. Mechanical and Tribological Characteristics of TIG Hardfaced Dispersive Layer by Reinforced with Particles Extruded Aluminium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Dimitrova

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of the implemented technology for generation of hardfaced dispersive layers obtained by additive material containing reinforcing phase of non-metal particles. The wear resistant coatings are deposited on pure aluminium metal matrix by shielded gas metal-arc welding applying tungsten inert gas (TIG with extruded aluminium wire reinforced by particles as additive material. Wire filler is produced by extrusion of a pack containing metalized and plated by flux micro/nano SiC particles. The metalized particles implanting in the metal matrix and its dispersive hardfacing are realized by solid-state welding under conditions of hot plastic deformation. Tribological characteristics are studied of the hardfaced layers of dispersive reinforced material on pure aluminium metal matrix with and without flux. Hardness profiles of the hardfaced layers are determined by nanoindentation. The surface layers are studied by means of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM and Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX analysis. Increase by 15-31 % of the wear resistance of the hardfaced layers and 30-40 % of their hardness was found, which is due to the implanted in the layer reinforcing phase of metalized micro/nano SiC particles.

  11. Reprocessing weld and method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Killian, M.L.; Lewis, H.E.

    1993-08-03

    A process is described for improving the fatigue resistance of a small primary structural weld at a joint between structural members of a weldment, the weld having been made with the welding energy input of E[sub 1], the process comprising: applying a reprocessing weld on at least a portion of either one or both toes of the primary structural weld, thereby covering said toe portion, the reprocessing weld containing a filler metal and having a cross-sectional area which is less than the corresponding cross-sectional area of the primary structural weld, the reprocessing weld extending onto the face of the primary structural weld at one side of the toe portion covered and onto the structural member at the other side of the toe portion covered, and the total welding energy input, E[sub 2], used in said reprocessing the primary structural weld being less than the welding energy input E[sub 1] of the primary structural weld.

  12. Bumblebee pupae contain high levels of aluminium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exley, Christopher; Rotheray, Ellen; Goulson, David

    2015-01-01

    The causes of declines in bees and other pollinators remains an on-going debate. While recent attention has focussed upon pesticides, other environmental pollutants have largely been ignored. Aluminium is the most significant environmental contaminant of recent times and we speculated that it could be a factor in pollinator decline. Herein we have measured the content of aluminium in bumblebee pupae taken from naturally foraging colonies in the UK. Individual pupae were acid-digested in a microwave oven and their aluminium content determined using transversely heated graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Pupae were heavily contaminated with aluminium giving values between 13.4 and 193.4 μg/g dry wt. and a mean (SD) value of 51.0 (33.0) μg/g dry wt. for the 72 pupae tested. Mean aluminium content was shown to be a significant negative predictor of average pupal weight in colonies. While no other statistically significant relationships were found relating aluminium to bee or colony health, the actual content of aluminium in pupae are extremely high and demonstrate significant exposure to aluminium. Bees rely heavily on cognitive function and aluminium is a known neurotoxin with links, for example, to Alzheimer's disease in humans. The significant contamination of bumblebee pupae by aluminium raises the intriguing spectre of cognitive dysfunction playing a role in their population decline.

  13. Bumblebee pupae contain high levels of aluminium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Exley

    Full Text Available The causes of declines in bees and other pollinators remains an on-going debate. While recent attention has focussed upon pesticides, other environmental pollutants have largely been ignored. Aluminium is the most significant environmental contaminant of recent times and we speculated that it could be a factor in pollinator decline. Herein we have measured the content of aluminium in bumblebee pupae taken from naturally foraging colonies in the UK. Individual pupae were acid-digested in a microwave oven and their aluminium content determined using transversely heated graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Pupae were heavily contaminated with aluminium giving values between 13.4 and 193.4 μg/g dry wt. and a mean (SD value of 51.0 (33.0 μg/g dry wt. for the 72 pupae tested. Mean aluminium content was shown to be a significant negative predictor of average pupal weight in colonies. While no other statistically significant relationships were found relating aluminium to bee or colony health, the actual content of aluminium in pupae are extremely high and demonstrate significant exposure to aluminium. Bees rely heavily on cognitive function and aluminium is a known neurotoxin with links, for example, to Alzheimer's disease in humans. The significant contamination of bumblebee pupae by aluminium raises the intriguing spectre of cognitive dysfunction playing a role in their population decline.

  14. Aluminium levels in Italian diets and in selected foods from aluminium utensils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramiccioni, L; Ingrao, G; Milana, M R; Santaroni, P; Tomassi, G

    1996-10-01

    In Italy, data on aluminium concentration in food items are scarce although aluminium containers are widely used to cook, to freeze or to wrap foods (foil) and it is known that aluminium can migrate from containers to foods. Therefore, an experimental study was carried out to quantify aluminium exposure from ingestion of actual total diets and from migration from containers to foods in conditions representative of the actual use. Samples of 24 h diets were collected, homogenized, lyophilized and the amount of aluminium was determined by atomic absorption spectrometry. The aluminium concentrations ranged from 1.0 to 2.1 mg/kg of food; the intake of aluminium ranged from 2.5 to 6.3 mg/day. The amount of aluminium migrating from aluminium cookware was determined by cooking various representative foods in aluminium and in glass or stainless steel containers. From comparison of the results, the increase in aluminium because of migration from cookware was relatively low, with the highest release into acidic and salty foods. The daily intake of aluminium even if all the foods were prepared and stored in aluminium containers would be approximately 6 mg/day, a very low value compared with the Provisional Tolerable Weekly Intake of 7 mg/kg body weight (equivalent to 60 mg/day for an adult man) established by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives.

  15. Handbook of Plastic Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Aminul

    The purpose of this document is to summarize the information about the laser welding of plastic. Laser welding is a matured process nevertheless laser welding of micro dimensional plastic parts is still a big challenge. This report collects the latest information about the laser welding of plastic...... materials and provides an extensive knowhow on the industrial plastic welding process. The objectives of the report include: - Provide the general knowhow of laser welding for the beginners - Summarize the state-of-the-art information on the laser welding of plastics - Find the technological limits in terms...... of design, materials and process - Find the best technology, process and machines adaptive to Sonion’s components - Provide the skills to Sonion’s Design Engineers for successful design of the of the plastic components suitable for the laser welding The ultimate goal of this report is to serve...

  16. Pengaruh Suhu Terhadap % Recovery Aluminium pada Pengolahan Campuran Aluminium Oksida yang Terakumulasi pada Permukaan Aluminium Cair (DROSS)

    OpenAIRE

    Ulpa, Dwi Raafiah

    2010-01-01

    Dross adalah kotoran yang mengapung di atas permukaan aluminium cair yang terbentuk akibat proses penambahan fluks ke dalam aluminium cair. Suhu merupakan variabel yang sangat berpengaruh dalam pengolahan dross. Telah dilakukan pengamatan pada pengolahan dross dengan cara sentrifugasi yang melibatkan variasi suhu (772oC – 802oC). Alat yang digunakan dalam pengolahan dross adalah alat pengolahan dross. Hasil pengamatan menunjukkan pada suhu maksimum 802oC menghasilkan recovery aluminium maksim...

  17. Crack initiation and propagation paths in small diameter FSW 6082-T6 aluminium tubes under fatigue loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Tovo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports results of fatigue tests of friction stir welded (FSW aluminium tubes. Relatively small 38 mm diameter tubes were used and hence an automated FSW process using a retracting tool was designed for this project, as the wall thickness of the aluminium tube was similar to the diameter of the FSW tool. This is a more complex joint geometry to weld than the more usual larger diameter tube reported in the literature. S-N fatigue testing was performed using load ratios of R = 0.1 and R = -1. Crack path analysis was performed using both low magnification stereo microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, in order to identify crack initiation sites and to determine the direction of crack propagation. Work is still in progress to follow the crack path through the various microstructural zones associated with the weld. A simple statistical analysis was used to characterize the most typical crack initiation site. This work forms part of a wider project directed at determining multiaxial fatigue design rules for small diameter 6082-T6 aluminium tubes that could be of use in the ground vehicle industry.

  18. Welding Course Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genits, Joseph C.

    This guide is intended for use in helping students gain a fundamental background on the major aspects of the welding trade. The course emphasis is on mastery of the manipulative skills necessary to develop successful welding techniques and on acquisition of an understanding of the specialized tools and equipment used in welding. The first part…

  19. Instructional Guidelines. Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fordyce, H. L.; Doshier, Dale

    Using the standards of the American Welding Society and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, this welding instructional guidelines manual presents a course of study in accordance with the current practices in industry. Intended for use in welding programs now practiced within the Federal Prison System, the phases of the program are…

  20. Aluminium and nickel in human albumin solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Sandberg, E

    1989-01-01

    Five different brands of commercially available human albumin solutions for infusion were analysed for their aluminium and nickel contents by atomic absorption spectrometry. The aluminium concentrations ranged from 12 micrograms/l to 1109 micrograms/l and the nickel concentrations ranged from 17...... micrograms/l to 77 micrograms/l. Examination of the aluminium and nickel contents of the constituents for the production of one brand showed too low levels to explain the final contamination of the product. By following the aluminium and nickel concentrations of the same brand during the production...... of a batch of albumin solution, filtration was shown to contribute to contamination, although the largest increase in aluminium as well as nickel concentrations appeared during the bulk concentrating process. To avoid health risks to certain patients, regulations should be established requiring aluminium...

  1. Degradation Processes of Al-Zn Welded Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Votava

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Welding of metal materials belongs to non-demountable joints. Current trend especially in an automotive industry is to join materials with a different melting temperature. Most of all, there are dural profiles with ferrite or austenite steel. The reason for this is the effort to lower the weight of the whole construction and at the same time preserve sufficient mechanical characteristics. However, there is a big risk of different electrical potentials of both of these metals in this type of non-demountable joints. The experimental part of this paper brings evaluation of mechanical-corrosion processes of overlapped joints produced by the CMT (cold metal transfer method. The base material for weld bead is dural sheet AlMg3 and dural sheet with a surface treatment aluzinc DX51D+AZ 150. Material AlSi5 in the form of a wire was used as an additional material for a welding bath. Method CMT was used in order to create a weld bead. Initial analysis of weld bead was done visually using a binocular microscope. Further, a metallographic analysis of weld bead and base material was processed. The aim was to identify the heat affected area around the welded joint. Microhardness of intermetallic aluminium phases was measured, after the identification of intermetallic phases a chemical analysis EDS was processed. Prepared samples underwent corrosion degradation in a salt spray environment in compliance with the norm ČSN EN ISO 9227. Visual and metallographic evaluation of the individual samples was processed after every week of exposition to the salt spray environment. The goal of this experiment was to record the initial impulse of galvanic corrosion which consists in corrosion degradation in the area of welded joint.

  2. The non-destructive prediction of the aluminium content in pressed skulls of aluminium dross

    OpenAIRE

    Varužan Kevorkijan; Srečo Davor Škapin; Uroš Kovačec

    2012-01-01

    During production of primary and secondary aluminium, various amounts of aluminium dross, a mixture consisting of molten aluminium metal and different oxide compounds, is skimmed per tonne of molten metal. In order to preserve the maximum aluminium content in hot dross for further extraction, it is necessary to cool the dross (e.g. by pressing) immediately after skimming. During pressing, the skimmed dross is transformed into so-called pressed skulls, convenient for storage, transport or furt...

  3. Does Aluminium Trigger Breast Cancer?

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Jennrich; Claus Schulte-Uebbing

    2016-01-01

    Summary. Breast cancer is by far the most common cancer in women in the western world. In 90% of breast cancers, environmental factors are among the causes. The frequency with which the tumour occurs in the outer upper part of the breast has risen with above average rates in recent decades. Aluminium salts as ingredients in deodorants and antiperspirants are being absorbed by the body to a greater extent than hitherto assumed. Their toxicity for healthy and diseased breast tissue cells includ...

  4. A biogeochemical cycle for aluminium?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exley, Christopher

    2003-09-15

    The elaboration of biogeochemical cycles for elements which are known to be essential for life has enabled a broad appreciation of the homeostatic mechanisms which underlie element essentiality. In particular they can be used effectively to identify any part played by human activities in element cycling and to predict how such activities might impact upon the lithospheric and biospheric availability of an element in the future. The same criteria were the driving force behind the construction of a biogeochemical cycle for aluminium, a non-essential element which is a known ecotoxicant and a suspected health risk in humans. The purpose of this exercise was to examine the concept of a biogeochemical cycle for aluminium and not to review the biogeochemistry of this element. The cycle as presented is rudimentary and qualitative though, even in this nascent form, it is informative and predictive and, for these reasons alone, it is deserving of future quantification. A fully fledged biogeochemical cycle for aluminium should explain the biospheric abundance of this element and whether we should expect its (continued) active involvement in biochemical evolution.

  5. Toxicity of aluminium on five aquatic invertebrates; Aluminiums toksisitet paa 5 akvatiske invertebrater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moe, J. [Oslo Univ. (Norway)

    1996-01-01

    The conference paper deals with the experiments done by investigating the effects from the toxicity of aluminium on aquatic invertebrates. The aim of the experiments was to compare the toxicity of unstable aluminium compounds with stable forms of aluminium. 8 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Brain-aluminium concentration in dialysis encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, J R; Smith, A I; Ward, M K; Parkinson, I S; Kerr, D N

    1978-04-29

    Brain-aluminium concentrations were found to be significantly higher in 7 patients dying with dialysis encephalopathy (mean 15.9 microgram aluminium/g dry weight) than in 11 dialysed controls (4.4 microgram/g) and in 2 uraemic patients who were not dialysed (2.7 microgram/g). The grey matter from the patients with dialysis encephalopathy contained about three times as much aluminium as white matter. The results suggest that dialysis with untreated and/or softened tap-water (aluminium concentration 0.1-1.2 mg/1) makes the major contribution to brain-aluminium levels; dialysis with deionised water (aluminium concentration normally less than 0.02 mg/1) and intake of phosphate-binding AL(OH)3 gel are less important. Brain aluminium levels remain elevated for up to four years after restoration of good renal function by transplantation. The association of dialysis encephalopathy with high levels of aluminium in the brain and in the dialysis water emphasises the potential neurotoxicity of aluminium in man.

  7. Aluminium and nickel in human albumin solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Sandberg, E

    1989-01-01

    Five different brands of commercially available human albumin solutions for infusion were analysed for their aluminium and nickel contents by atomic absorption spectrometry. The aluminium concentrations ranged from 12 micrograms/l to 1109 micrograms/l and the nickel concentrations ranged from 17...... micrograms/l to 77 micrograms/l. Examination of the aluminium and nickel contents of the constituents for the production of one brand showed too low levels to explain the final contamination of the product. By following the aluminium and nickel concentrations of the same brand during the production...

  8. Physics of arc welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagar, T. W.

    1982-05-01

    A discussion of the factors controlling the size and shape of the weld fusion zone is presented along with a description of current theories of heat and fluid flow phenomena in the plasma and the molten metal weld pool. Although experimental results confirm that surface tension, plasma jets, and weld pool convection all strongly influence the fusion zone shape; no comprehensive model is available from which to predict welding behavior. It is proposed that the lack of such an understanding is a major impediment to development of automated welding processes. In addition, sensors for weld torch positioning are reviewed in terms of the mechnical and electromagnetic energy spectra which have been used. New developments in this area are also needed in order to advance the technology of automated welding.

  9. Dual wire weld feed proportioner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, R. E.

    1968-01-01

    Dual feed mechanism enables proportioning of two different weld feed wires during automated TIG welding to produce a weld alloy deposit of the desired composition. The wires are fed into the weld simultaneously. The relative feed rates of the wires and the wire diameters determine the weld deposit composition.

  10. Dynamic Interaction between Machine, Tool, and Substrate in Bobbin Friction Stir Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad K. Sued

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The bobbin friction stir welding (BFSW process has benefits for welding aluminium alloy 6082-T6 in the boat-building industry. However this alloy is difficult to weld in the thin state. There are a large number of process variables and covert situational factors that affect weld quality. This paper investigates how tool holder and machine-type affect BFSW weld quality of 4 mm Al6082-T6. The variables were tool features (three types, machine-controller type (two types, and tool holder (fixed versus floating. Fourier analysis was performed on motor spindle current to determine the frequency response of the machine. An interaction was found between the computer numerical control (CNC, the degrees of freedom of the tool holder, and the substrate (workpiece. The conventional idea that the welding tool has a semisteady interaction with the substrate is not supported. Instead the interaction is highly dynamic, and this materially affects the weld quality. Specific vibrational interactions are associated with poor welding. The CNC machine-type also emerges as a neglected variable that needs to be given attention in the selection of process parameters. Although compliance in the tool holder might seem useful, it is shown to have negative consequences as it introduces tool positioning problems.

  11. The effect of interlayers on dissimilar friction weld properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado-Zepeda, Cuauhtemoc

    The influence of silver interlayers on the metallurgical and mechanical properties of dissimilar aluminium alloy/stainless steel friction welds are investigated. An elastic contact model is proposed that explains the conditions at and close to the contact surface, which produce Al2O3 particle fracture in dissimilar MMC/AISI 304 stainless steel friction welds. Intermixed (IM) and particle dispersed (PD) regions are formed in Ag-containing dissimilar friction welds. These regions form very early in the joining operation and both contain Ag3Al. Therefore, an interlayer (Ag) introduced with the specific aim of preventing FexAly compound formation in MMC/AISI 304 stainless steel friction welds promotes the formation of another intermetallic phase at the bondline. Since IM and PD regions are progressively removed as the friction welding operation proceeds thinner intermetallic layers are produced when long friction welding times are applied. This type of behavior is quite different from that observed in silver-free dissimilar MMC/AISI 304 stainless steel welds. Nanoparticles of silver are formed in dissimilar MMC/Ag/AISI 304 stainless steel welds produced using low friction pressures. Nanoparticle formation in dissimilar friction welds has never been previously observed or investigated. The introduction of silver interlayers decreases heat generation during welding, produces narrower softened zone regions and improved notch tensile strength properties. All research to-date has assumed per se that joint mechanical properties wholly depend on the mechanical properties and width of the intermetallic layer formed at the dissimilar joint interface. However, it is shown in this thesis that the mechanical properties of MMC/AISI 304 stainless steel joints are determined by the combined effects of intermetallic formation at the bondline and softened zone formation in MMC base material immediately adjacent to the joint interface. A methodology for calculating the notch tensile

  12. Lactobacillus plantarum CCFM639 alleviates aluminium toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Leilei; Zhai, Qixiao; Liu, Xiaoming; Wang, Gang; Zhang, Qiuxiang; Zhao, Jianxin; Narbad, Arjan; Zhang, Hao; Tian, Fengwei; Chen, Wei

    2016-02-01

    Aluminium (Al) is the most abundant metal in the earth's crust. Al exposure can cause a variety of adverse physiological effects in humans and animals. Our aim was to demonstrate that specific probiotic bacteria can play a special physiologically functional role in protection against Al toxicity in mice. Thirty strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were tested for their aluminium-binding ability, aluminium tolerance, their antioxidative capacity, and their ability to survive the exposure to artificial gastrointestinal (GI) juices. Lactobacillus plantarum CCFM639 was selected for animal experiments because of its excellent performance in vitro. Forty mice were divided into four groups: control, Al only, Al plus CCFM639, and Al plus deferiprone (DFP). CCFM639 was administered at 10(9) CFU once daily for 10 days, followed by a single oral dose of aluminium chloride hexahydrate at 5.14 mg aluminium (LD50) for each mouse. The results showed that CCFM639 treatment led to a significant reduction in the mortality rates with corresponding decrease in intestinal aluminium absorption and in accumulation of aluminium in the tissues and amelioration of hepatic histopathological damage. This probiotic treatment also resulted in alleviation of hepatic, renal, and cerebral oxidative stress. The treatment of L. plantarum CCFM639 has potential as a therapeutic dietary strategy against acute aluminium toxicity.

  13. Electron Conditioning of Technical Aluminium Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Pimpec, F

    2004-09-02

    The effect of electron conditioning on commercially aluminium alloys 1100 and 6063 were investigated. Contrary to the assumption that electron conditioning, if performed long enough, can reduce and stabilize the SEY to low values (= 1.3, value of many pure elements [1]), the SEY of aluminium did not go lower than 1.8. In fact, it reincreases with continued electron exposure dose.

  14. COMBINED ALUMINIUM SULFATE/HYDROXIDE PROCESS FOR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    community level. KEY WORDS: Nalgonda Technique, Aluminium sulfate, Aluminium hydroxide, Fluoride, Drinking water. INTRODUCTION. Fluoride is a common constituent in natural waters or wastewaters. It may originate from either natural geological sources or industries that use fluoride-containing compounds as raw.

  15. Generation and characterization of nano aluminium powder ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    levels of energy to the exploding wire in the argon atmo- sphere. The particles obtained in the argon medium are of spherical shape with fcc structure of the aluminium particle. Figure 9 shows the TEM structure of nano aluminium particles obtained by the wire explosion process at different ambience. The particles produced ...

  16. Behaviour of millscale reinforced Aluminium Bronze composite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Despite the desirable characteristics exhibited by most aluminium bronze, the deficient responses in certain critical applications have necessitated improvement in the mechanical properties. The microstructural and mechanical properties of cast aluminium bronze reinforced with iron millscale particles were investigated in ...

  17. Thermal formation of corundum from aluminium hydroxides ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aluminium hydroxides have been precipitated from various aluminium salts and the differences in their thermal behaviour have been investigated. Pseudoboehmite derived from the nitrate, sulfate and chloride all form -Al2O3 at ∼ 400°C but the formation of -Al2O3 at 1200°C occurs more readily in the material derived ...

  18. Characterisation and concentration profile of aluminium during ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An aluminium(Al) characterisation study was conducted at a surface water treatment plant (Buffalo Pound Water Treatment Plant (BPWTP) in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, Canada) to understand better the effect of alum coagulant on various Al fractions. The raw water source for BPWTP is Buffalo Pound Lake water. The Al ...

  19. Acoustic properties of aluminium foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García, L. E.

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses normal incidence sound absorption by aluminium foam manufactured with powder metallurgy technology. Aluminium foams with different surface morphologies were obtained by varying the type of precursor and adding filler materials during the foaming process. The sound absorption coefficients found for these aluminium foams were compared to the coefficient for commercial foams marketed under the name ALPORAS. The effect of foam thickness on the absorption coefficient was studied for each sample prepared. The combination of good acoustic and mechanical properties makes aluminium foams particularly attractive products. The study included an analysis of the effect of 2-, 5- and 10-cm air gaps on the sound absorption coefficient. The results showed that such gaps, which are routinely used in construction to reduce the reverberation period in indoor premises, raised the low frequency absorption coefficient significantly. This increase was found to depend on aluminium foam density and thickness and the depth of the air gap. In this same line, we have investigated the absorption coefficient of the aluminium foams combined with a mineral fiber panel.Se presenta un estudio del coeficiente de absorción acústica a incidencia normal de espumas de aluminio fabricadas mediante la técnica pulvimetalúrgica. Se fabricaron espumas de aluminio de distinta morfología superficial variando el tipo de precursor y usando materiales de relleno durante el proceso de espumación. Se muestra un estudio comparativo del coeficiente de absorción acústica de las espumas de aluminio fabricadas y las espumas comerciales conocidas como ALPORAS. Para cada muestra fabricada se estudió la influencia del espesor sobre el valor del coeficiente de absorción.El atractivo de las espumas de aluminio radica en que en ellas se combinan interesantes propiedades acústicas y mecánicas. Se analizó el efecto de una cámara de aire de 2, 5 y 10 cm de anchura sobre el

  20. Welding arc plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Bruce L.

    1990-01-01

    The problems of weld quality control and weld process dependability continue to be relevant issues in modern metal welding technology. These become especially important for NASA missions which may require the assembly or repair of larger orbiting platforms using automatic welding techniques. To extend present welding technologies for such applications, NASA/MSFC's Materials and Processes Lab is developing physical models of the arc welding process with the goal of providing both a basis for improved design of weld control systems, and a better understanding of how arc welding variables influence final weld properties. The physics of the plasma arc discharge is reasonably well established in terms of transport processes occurring in the arc column itself, although recourse to sophisticated numerical treatments is normally required to obtain quantitative results. Unfortunately the rigor of these numerical computations often obscures the physics of the underlying model due to its inherent complexity. In contrast, this work has focused on a relatively simple physical model of the arc discharge to describe the gross features observed in welding arcs. Emphasis was placed of deriving analytic expressions for the voltage along the arc axis as a function of known or measurable arc parameters. The model retains the essential physics for a straight polarity, diffusion dominated free burning arc in argon, with major simplifications of collisionless sheaths and simple energy balances at the electrodes.

  1. Welding skate with computerized controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, W. A., Jr.

    1968-01-01

    New welding skate concept for automatic TIG welding of contoured or double-contoured parts combines lightweight welding apparatus with electrical circuitry which computes the desired torch angle and positions a torch and cold-wire guide angle manipulator.

  2. Computerized adaptive control weld skate with CCTV weld guidance project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, W. A.

    1976-01-01

    This report summarizes progress of the automatic computerized weld skate development portion of the Computerized Weld Skate with Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) Arc Guidance Project. The main goal of the project is to develop an automatic welding skate demonstration model equipped with CCTV weld guidance. The three main goals of the overall project are to: (1) develop a demonstration model computerized weld skate system, (2) develop a demonstration model automatic CCTV guidance system, and (3) integrate the two systems into a demonstration model of computerized weld skate with CCTV weld guidance for welding contoured parts.

  3. Modern Methods of Rail Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyrev, Nikolay A.; Kozyreva, Olga A.; Usoltsev, Aleksander A.; Kryukov, Roman E.; Shevchenko, Roman A.

    2017-10-01

    Existing methods of rail welding, which are enable to get continuous welded rail track, are observed in this article. Analysis of existing welding methods allows considering an issue of continuous rail track in detail. Metallurgical and welding technologies of rail welding and also process technologies reducing aftereffects of temperature exposure are important factors determining the quality and reliability of the continuous rail track. Analysis of the existing methods of rail welding enable to find the research line for solving this problem.

  4. Challenges to Resistance Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Quanfeng

    This report originates from the compulsory defense during my Ph.D. study at the Technical University of Denmark. Resistance welding is an old and well-proven technology. Yet the emergence of more and more new materials, new designs, invention off new joining techniques, and more stringent...... requirement in quality have imposed challenges to the resistance welding. More some research and development have to be done to adapt the old technology to the manufacturing industry of the 21st century. In the 1st part of the report, the challenging factors to the resistance welding are reviewed. Numerical...... simulation of resistance welding has been under development for many years. Yet it is no easy to make simulation results reliable and accurate because of the complexity of resistance welding process. In the 2nd part of the report numerical modeling of resistance welding is reviewed, some critical factors...

  5. Ultrasonic Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabors, Sammy

    2015-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Ultrasonic Stir Welding (USW) to join large pieces of very high-strength metals such as titanium and Inconel. USW, a solid-state weld process, improves current thermal stir welding processes by adding high-power ultrasonic (HPU) energy at 20 kHz frequency. The addition of ultrasonic energy significantly reduces axial, frictional, and shear forces; increases travel rates; and reduces wear on the stir rod, which results in extended stir rod life. The USW process decouples the heating, stirring, and forging elements found in the friction stir welding process allowing for independent control of each process element and, ultimately, greater process control and repeatability. Because of the independent control of USW process elements, closed-loop temperature control can be integrated into the system so that a constant weld nugget temperature can be maintained during welding.

  6. Dual wire welding torch and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez, Fernando Martinez; Stump, Kevin S.; Ludewig, Howard W.; Kilty, Alan L.; Robinson, Matthew M.; Egland, Keith M.

    2009-04-28

    A welding torch includes a nozzle with a first welding wire guide configured to orient a first welding wire in a first welding wire orientation, and a second welding wire guide configured to orient a second welding wire in a second welding wire orientation that is non-coplanar and divergent with respect to the first welding wire orientation. A method of welding includes moving a welding torch with respect to a workpiece joint to be welded. During moving the welding torch, a first welding wire is fed through a first welding wire guide defining a first welding wire orientation and a second welding wire is fed through a second welding wire guide defining a second welding wire orientation that is divergent and non-coplanar with respect to the first welding wire orientation.

  7. Studies of welded joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Krupa

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Studies of a welded joint were described. The joint was made as a result of the reconstruction of a truss and one of the possible means to make a repair. The studies were of a simulation character and were targeted at the detection of welding defects and imperfections thatshould be eliminated in a real structure. A model was designed and on this model the tests and examinations were carried out. The modelwas made under the same conditions as the conditions adopted for repair. It corresponded to the real object in shape and dimensions, and in the proposed technique of welding and welding parameters. The model was composed of five plates joined together with twelve beads.The destructive and non-destructive tests were carried out; the whole structure and the respective welds were also examined visually. Thedefects and imperfections in welds were detected by surface methods of inspection, penetration tests and magnetic particle flaw detection.The model of the welded joint was prepared by destructive methods, a technique that would never be permitted in the case of a realstructure. For the investigations it was necessary to cut out the specimens from the welded joint in direction transverse to the weld run. The specimens were subjected to metallographic examinations and hardness measurements. Additionally, the joint cross-section was examined by destructive testing methods to enable precise determination of the internal defects and imperfections. The surface methods were applied again, this time to determine the severity of welding defects. The analysis has proved that, fabricated under proper conditions and with parameters of the welding process duly observed, the welded joint has good properties and repairs of this type are possible in practice.

  8. A Reaction Coating on Aluminium Alloys by Laser Processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, X.B.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    1993-01-01

    An aluminium oxide layer of 100 µm in thickness has been successfully coated on aluminium alloy 6061 and pure aluminium using a powder mixture of silicon oxide and aluminium by laser processing. A strong Al/Al2O3 interface was formed. The exothermic chemical reaction between SiO2 and Al may promote

  9. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Umamaheswarrao, P. Vol 7, No 4 (2015) - Articles Optimisation of hardness and tensile strength of friction stir welded AA6061 alloy using response surface methodology coupled with grey relational analysis and principle component analysis. Abstract PDF. ISSN: 2141-2839. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE ...

  10. Robot welding process control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romine, Peter L.

    1991-01-01

    This final report documents the development and installation of software and hardware for Robotic Welding Process Control. Primary emphasis is on serial communications between the CYRO 750 robotic welder, Heurikon minicomputer running Hunter & Ready VRTX, and an IBM PC/AT, for offline programming and control and closed-loop welding control. The requirements for completion of the implementation of the Rocketdyne weld tracking control are discussed. The procedure for downloading programs from the Intergraph, over the network, is discussed. Conclusions are made on the results of this task, and recommendations are made for efficient implementation of communications, weld process control development, and advanced process control procedures using the Heurikon.

  11. Explosive Welding of Pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drennov, Oleg; Drennov, Andrey; Burtseva, Olga

    2013-06-01

    For connection by welding it is suggested to use the explosive welding method. This method is rather new. Nevertheless, it has become commonly used among the technological developments. This method can be advantageous (saving material and physical resources) comparing to its statical analogs (electron-beam welding, argon-arc welding, plasma welding, gas welding, etc.), in particular, in hard-to-reach areas due to their geographic and climatic conditions. Explosive welding of cylindrical surfaces is performed by launching of welded layer along longitudinal axis of construction. During this procedure, it is required to provide reliable resistance against radial convergent strains. The traditional method is application of fillers of pipe cavity, which are dense cylindrical objects having special designs. However, when connecting pipes consecutively in pipelines by explosive welding, removal of the fillers becomes difficult and sometimes impossible. The suggestion is to use water as filler. The principle of non-compressibility of liquid under quasi-dynamic loading is used. In one-dimensional gasdynamic and elastic-plastic calculations we determined non-deformed mass of water (perturbations, which are moving in the axial direction with sound velocity, should not reach the layer end boundaries for 5-7 circulations of shock waves in the radial direction). Linear dimension of the water layer from the zone of pipe coupling along axis in each direction is >= 2R, where R is the internal radius of pipe.

  12. Alveolar proteinosis associated with aluminium dust inhalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, R; Nigam, S; Sivakumaran, P

    2016-08-01

    Secondary alveolar proteinosis is a rare lung disease which may be triggered by a variety of inhaled particles. The diagnosis is made by detection of anti-granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor antibodies in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, which appears milky white and contains lamellar bodies. Aluminium has been suggested as a possible cause, but there is little evidence in the literature to support this assertion. We report the case of a 46-year-old former boilermaker and boat builder who developed secondary alveolar proteinosis following sustained heavy aluminium exposure. The presence of aluminium was confirmed both by histological examination and metallurgical analysis of a mediastinal lymph node. Despite cessation of exposure to aluminium and treatment with whole-lung lavage which normally results in improvements in both symptoms and lung function, the outcome was poor and novel therapies are now being used for this patient. It may be that the natural history in aluminium-related alveolar proteinosis is different, with the metal playing a mediating role in the disease process. Our case further supports the link between aluminium and secondary alveolar proteinosis and highlights the need for measures to prevent excessive aluminium inhalation in relevant industries. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Aluminium in Biological Environments: A Computational Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujika, Jon I; Rezabal, Elixabete; Mercero, Jose M; Ruipérez, Fernando; Costa, Dominique; Ugalde, Jesus M; Lopez, Xabier

    2014-01-01

    The increased availability of aluminium in biological environments, due to human intervention in the last century, raises concerns on the effects that this so far “excluded from biology” metal might have on living organisms. Consequently, the bioinorganic chemistry of aluminium has emerged as a very active field of research. This review will focus on our contributions to this field, based on computational studies that can yield an understanding of the aluminum biochemistry at a molecular level. Aluminium can interact and be stabilized in biological environments by complexing with both low molecular mass chelants and high molecular mass peptides. The speciation of the metal is, nonetheless, dictated by the hydrolytic species dominant in each case and which vary according to the pH condition of the medium. In blood, citrate and serum transferrin are identified as the main low molecular mass and high molecular mass molecules interacting with aluminium. The complexation of aluminium to citrate and the subsequent changes exerted on the deprotonation pathways of its tritable groups will be discussed along with the mechanisms for the intake and release of aluminium in serum transferrin at two pH conditions, physiological neutral and endosomatic acidic. Aluminium can substitute other metals, in particular magnesium, in protein buried sites and trigger conformational disorder and alteration of the protonation states of the protein's sidechains. A detailed account of the interaction of aluminium with proteic sidechains will be given. Finally, it will be described how alumnium can exert oxidative stress by stabilizing superoxide radicals either as mononuclear aluminium or clustered in boehmite. The possibility of promotion of Fenton reaction, and production of hydroxyl radicals will also be discussed. PMID:24757505

  14. ALUMINIUM IN BIOLOGICAL ENVIRONMENTS: A COMPUTATIONAL APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon I Mujika

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The increased availability of aluminium in biological environments, due to human intervention in the last century, raises concerns on the effects that this so far “excluded from biology” metal might have on living organisms. Consequently, the bioinorganic chemistry of aluminium has emerged as a very active field of research. This review will focus on our contributions to this field, based on computational studies that can yield an understanding of the aluminum biochemistry at a molecular level. Aluminium can interact and be stabilized in biological environments by complexing with both low molecular mass chelants and high molecular mass peptides. The speciation of the metal is, nonetheless, dictated by the hydrolytic species dominant in each case and which vary according to the pH condition of the medium. In blood, citrate and serum transferrin are identified as the main low molecular mass and high molecular mass molecules interacting with aluminium. The complexation of aluminium to citrate and the subsequent changes exerted on the deprotonation pathways of its tritable groups will be discussed along with the mechanisms for the intake and release of aluminium in serum transferrin at two pH conditions, physiological neutral and endosomatic acidic. Aluminium can substitute other metals, in particular magnesium, in protein buried sites and trigger conformational disorder and alteration of the protonation states of the protein's sidechains. A detailed account of the interaction of aluminium with proteic sidechains will be given. Finally, it will be described how alumnium can exert oxidative stress by stabilizing superoxide radicals either as mononuclear aluminium or clustered in boehmite. The possibility of promotion of Fenton reaction, and production of hydroxyl radicals will also be discussed.

  15. Aluminium accumulation and immunosuppressive effect in recipients of kidney transplants.

    OpenAIRE

    Nordal, K.P.; Dahl, E; Albrechtsen, D; Halse, J.; Leivestad, T.; Tretli, S; Flatmark, A.

    1988-01-01

    Aluminium that has accumulated in the body is thought to have a generalised cytotoxic effect. A prospective study of aluminium accumulation in bone-that is, subclinical aluminium toxicity--was carried out in 94 recipients of kidney allografts, who were followed up for three years. Subclinical aluminium toxicity was found in 66 patients. A significantly smaller proportion of patients with aluminium accumulation experienced a rejection episode: 30 (58%) nu 12 (86%) who received grafts from cada...

  16. Investigation of the aluminium-aluminium oxide reversible transformation as observed by hot stage electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, C. A.; Judd, G.; Ansell, G. S.

    1972-01-01

    Thin foils of high purity aluminium and an Al-Al2O3 SAP type of alloy were oxidised in a specially designed hot stage specimen chamber in an electron microscope. Below 450 C, amorphous aluminium oxide formed on the foil surface and was first detectable at foil edges, holes, and pits. Islands of aluminium then nucleated in this amorphous oxide. The aluminium islands displayed either a lateral growth with eventual coalescence with other islands, or a reoxidation process which caused the islands to disappear. The aluminium island formation was determined to be related to the presence of the electron beam. A mechanism based upon electron charging due to the electron beam was proposed to explain the nucleation, growth, coalescence, disappearance, and geometry of the aluminium islands.

  17. Leak-Tight Welding Experience from the Industrial Assembly of the LHC Cryostats at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Bourcey, N; Chiggiato, P; Limon, P; Mongelluzzo, A; Musso, G; Poncet, A; Parma, V

    2008-01-01

    The assembly of the approximately 1700 LHC main ring cryostats at CERN involved extensive welding of cryogenic lines and vacuum vessels. More than 6 km of welding requiring leak tightness to a rate better than 1.10-9 mbar.l.s-1 on stainless steel and aluminium piping and envelopes was made, essentially by manual welding but also making use of orbital welding machines. In order to fulfil the safety regulations related to pressure vessels and to comply with the leak-tightness requirements of the vacuum systems of the machine, welds were executed according to high qualification standards and following a severe quality assurance plan. Leak detection by He mass spectrometry was extensively used. Neon leak detection was used successfully to locate leaks in the presence of helium backgrounds. This paper presents the quality assurance strategy adopted for welds and leak detection. It presents the statistics of non-conformities on welds and leaks detected throughout the entire production and the advances in the use...

  18. Measuring weld heat to evaluate weld integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schauder, V., E-mail: schauder@hks-prozesstechnik.de [HKS-Prozesstechnik GmbH, Halle (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    Eddy current and ultrasonic testing are suitable for tube and pipe mills and have been used for weld seam flaw detection for decades, but a new process, thermography, is an alternative. By measuring the heat signature of the weld seam as it cools, it provides information about weld integrity at and below the surface. The thermal processes used to join metals, such as plasma, induction, laser, and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW), have improved since they were developed, and they get better with each passing year. However, no industrial process is perfect, so companies that conduct research in flaw detection likewise continue to develop and improve the technologies used to verify weld integrity: ultrasonic testing (UT), eddy current testing (ET), hydrostatic, X-ray, magnetic particle, and liquid penetrant are among the most common. Two of these are used for verifying the integrity of the continuous welds such as those used on pipe and tube mills: UT and ET. Each uses a transmitter to send waves of ultrasonic energy or electrical current through the material and a receiver (probe) to detect disturbances in the flow. The two processes often are combined to capitalize on the strengths of each. While ET is good at detecting flaws at or near the surface, UT penetrates the material, detecting subsurface flaws. One drawback is that sound waves and electrical current waves have a specific direction of travel, or an alignment. A linear defect that runs parallel to the direction of travel of the ultrasonic sound wave or a flaw that is parallel to the coil winding direction of the ET probe can go undetected. A second drawback is that they don't detect cold welds. An alternative process, thermography, works in a different fashion: It monitors the heat of the material as the weld cools. Although it measures the heat at the surface, the heat signature provides clues about cooling activity deep in the material, resulting in a thorough assessment of the weld's integrity It

  19. Fine welding with lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLellan, D

    2008-01-01

    The need for micro joining metallic alloys for surgical instruments, implants and advanced medical devices is driving a rapid increase in the implementation of laser welding technology in research, development and volume production. This article discusses the advantages of this welding method and the types of lasers used in the process.

  20. Laser Welding in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Gary L.; Kaukler, William F.

    1989-01-01

    Solidification type welding process experiments in conditions of microgravity were performed. The role of convection in such phenomena was examined and convective effects in the small volumes obtained in the laser weld zone were observed. Heat transfer within the weld was affected by acceleration level as indicated by the resulting microstructure changes in low gravity. All experiments were performed such that both high and low gravity welds occurred along the same weld beam, allowing the effects of gravity alone to be examined. Results indicate that laser welding in a space environment is feasible and can be safely performed IVA or EVA. Development of the hardware to perform the experiment in a Hitchhiker-g platform is recomended as the next step. This experiment provides NASA with a capable technology for welding needs in space. The resources required to perform this experiment aboard a Shuttle Hitchhiker-pallet are assessed. Over the four year period 1991 to 1994, it is recommended that the task will require 13.6 manyears and $914,900. In addition to demonstrating the technology and ferreting out the problems encountered, it is suggested that NASA will also have a useful laser materials processing facility for working with both the scientific and the engineering aspects of materials processing in space. Several concepts are also included for long-term optimization of available solar power through solar pumping solid state lasers directly for welding power.

  1. DC arc weld starter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campiotti, Richard H.; Hopwood, James E.

    1990-01-01

    A system for starting an arc for welding uses three DC power supplies, a high voltage supply for initiating the arc, an intermediate voltage supply for sustaining the arc, and a low voltage welding supply directly connected across the gap after the high voltage supply is disconnected.

  2. Recovery mechanisms in nanostructured aluminium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Tianbo; Hansen, Niels; Huang, Xiaoxu

    2012-01-01

    Commercial purity aluminium (99.5%) has been cold rolled to a true strain of 5.5 (99.6% reduction in thickness). The material is very strong but low temperature recovery may be a limiting factor. This has been investigated by isothermal annealing treatments in the temperature range 5–100C. Hardness...... tests, microstructural investigations by electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were carried out to identify and characterise possible recovery mechanisms. Annihilation of zigzagged dislocations, positioned between deformationinduced lamellar boundaries...... of medium-to-high angles, and annihilation of dislocations in boundaries were found to be important recovery mechanisms, whereas other mechanisms, such as triple junction motion, subgrain coalescence, and boundary migration, were less important or negligible. The recovery kinetics was analysed based...

  3. Aluminium Toxicity Targets in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sónia Silva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium (Al is the third most abundant metallic element in soil but becomes available to plants only when the soil pH drops below 5.5. At those conditions, plants present several signals of Al toxicity. As reported by literature, major consequences of Al exposure are the decrease of plant production and the inhibition of root growth. The root growth inhibition may be directly/indirectly responsible for the loss of plant production. In this paper the most remarkable symptoms of Al toxicity in plants and the latest findings in this area are addressed. Root growth inhibition, ROS production, alterations on root cell wall and plasma membrane, nutrient unbalances, callose accumulation, and disturbance of cytoplasmic Ca2+ homeostasis, among other signals of Al toxicity are discussed, and, when possible, the behavior of Al-tolerant versus Al-sensitive genotypes under Al is compared.

  4. Aluminium ultrahigh vacuum system for the 3 GeV TPS synchrotron light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiung, G. Y.; Chang, C. C.; Chen, C. L.; Wu, L. H.; Cheng, C. M.; Chan, C. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Hsueh, H. P.; Hsu, S. N.; Chen, J. R.

    2013-06-01

    The 3-GeV Taiwan Photon Source (TPS) is a large accelerator and synchrotron light source of circumference 518.4 m. The electron storage ring of TPS requires an ultrahigh-vacuum pressure per beam current less than 2×10-10 Pa/mA in the beam duct to maintain a long life of the circulating beam without scattering of ions by residual gases. Aluminium alloys used for the beam ducts have a benefit of greater thermal conductivity that simplifies the structure of vacuum vessels built with the cooling components. Machining completely free of oil applied to the aluminium chambers followed by cleaning with ozonized water and welding in house provide a precise dimensional control within 0.3 mm and a clean surface with a small rate ~ 6.4×10-12 Pa m/s of thermal outgassing after baking at 150 °C for 24 h. The assembled ion pump with non-evaporable getter pump is capable of evacuating the chamber to a pressure < 1×10-9 Pa. The average pressure inside the duct is expected to be sufficiently small. The clean process to manufacture the aluminium ultrahigh vacuum system is described.

  5. Characterisation and concentration profile of aluminium during ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Characterisation and concentration profile of aluminium during drinking-water treatment. ... at a surface water treatment plant (Buffalo Pound Water Treatment Plant ... Seasonal evaluations of Al at BPWTP showed that raw lake water total ...

  6. APPLICATION OF ANTIFRICTION ALUMINIUM-SILICON ALLOY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Ju. Stetsenko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available It is shown that antifriction aluminium-silicon alloy is perspective material for change of the parts of heavy and expensive bronze in different frictional units of machines and mechanisms.

  7. Aluminium Process Fault Detection and Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazatul Aini Abd Majid

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The challenges in developing a fault detection and diagnosis system for industrial applications are not inconsiderable, particularly complex materials processing operations such as aluminium smelting. However, the organizing into groups of the various fault detection and diagnostic systems of the aluminium smelting process can assist in the identification of the key elements of an effective monitoring system. This paper reviews aluminium process fault detection and diagnosis systems and proposes a taxonomy that includes four key elements: knowledge, techniques, usage frequency, and results presentation. Each element is explained together with examples of existing systems. A fault detection and diagnosis system developed based on the proposed taxonomy is demonstrated using aluminium smelting data. A potential new strategy for improving fault diagnosis is discussed based on the ability of the new technology, augmented reality, to augment operators’ view of an industrial plant, so that it permits a situation-oriented action in real working environments.

  8. Steam generated conversion coating on aluminium alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Din, Rameez Ud; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Ambat, Rajan

    into functional conversion coatings in order to enhance corrosion resistance and adhesion to paint systems. Chromium based conversion coatings have been extensively used on aluminium alloys to improve adhesion of subsequent paint layers and corrosion resistance. However, the use of hexavalent chromium is strictly...... regulated due to its toxic nature and suspected carcinogenicity. So, it is highly imperative to develop other alternatives for chrome conversion coatings. Treatment of aluminium with natural water at elevated temperatures results in the formation of different forms of aluminium oxide (γ-AlO(OH) , Al(OH)3...... pressure steam produced by an autoclave at a temperature of 107 – 121 °C and pressure of 15 -17 psi for 10 minutes to produce a thin coating of aluminium oxide. The aim of this study is to understand the effect of high pressure steam with and without different chemical additives on surface morphology...

  9. Aluminium phosphide induced acute kidney injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quaiser Saif

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium phosphide is one of the most common agricultural poisons being consumed in north India. Consumption of a fresh tablet is lethal as no antidote is available. Acute intoxication primarily presents with cardiovascular collapse due to myocardial toxicity. We report here a case of acute severe poisoning along with cardiovascular collapse and oliguria. The patient developed acute kidney injury during the illness (a rare entity in aluminium phosphide poisoning, which completely resolved following prompt conservative treatment.

  10. Welding method, and welding device for use therein, and method of analysis for evaluating welds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aendenroomer, A.J.; Den Ouden, G.; Xiao, Y.H.; Brabander, W.A.J.

    1995-01-01

    Described is a method of automatically welding pipes, comprising welding with a pulsation welding current and monitoring, by means of a sensor, the variations occurring in the arc voltage caused by weld pool oscillations. The occurrence of voltage variations with only frequency components below 100

  11. Thermoplastic welding apparatus and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsen, Marc R.; Negley, Mark A.; Geren, William Preston; Miller, Robert James

    2017-03-07

    A thermoplastic welding apparatus includes a thermoplastic welding tool, at least one tooling surface in the thermoplastic welding tool, a magnetic induction coil in the thermoplastic welding tool and generally encircling the at least one tooling surface and at least one smart susceptor in the thermoplastic welding tool at the at least one tooling surface. The magnetic induction coil is adapted to generate a magnetic flux field oriented generally parallel to a plane of the at least one smart susceptor.

  12. Laser forming and welding processes

    CERN Document Server

    Yilbas, Bekir Sami; Shuja, Shahzada Zaman

    2013-01-01

    This book introduces model studies and experimental results associated with laser forming and welding such as laser induced bending, welding of sheet metals, and related practical applications. The book provides insight into the physical processes involved with laser forming and welding. The analytical study covers the formulation of laser induced bending while the model study demonstrates the simulation of bending and welding processes using the finite element method. Analytical and numerical solutions for laser forming and welding problems are provided.

  13. Welding processes handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Weman, Klas

    2003-01-01

    Deals with the main commercially significant and commonly used welding processes. This title takes the student or novice welder through the individual steps involved in each process in an easily understood way. It covers many of the requirements referred to in European Standards including EN719, EN 729, EN 729 and EN 287.$bWelding processes handbook is a concise, explanatory guide to the main commercially significant and commonly-used welding processes. It takes the novice welder or student through the individual steps involved in each process in a clear and easily understood way. It is intended to provide an up-to-date reference to the major applications of welding as they are used in industry. The contents have been arranged so that it can be used as a textbook for European welding courses in accordance with guidelines from the European Welding Federation. Welding processes and equipment necessary for each process are described so that they can be applied to all instruction levels required by the EWF and th...

  14. Aluminium exclusion and aluminium tolerance in woody plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivano eBrunner

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The aluminium (Al cation Al3+ is highly rhizotoxic and is a major stress factor to plants on acid soils, which cover large areas of tropical and boreal regions. Many woody plant species are native to acid soils and are well adapted to high Al3+ conditions. In tropical regions, both woody Al accumulator and non-Al accumulator plants occur, whereas in boreal regions woody plants are non-Al accumulators. The mechanisms of these adaptations can be divided into those that facilitate the exclusion of Al3+ from root cells (exclusion mechanisms and those that enable plants to tolerate Al3+ once it has entered the root and shoot symplast (internal tolerance mechanisms. The biochemical and molecular basis of these mechanisms have been intensively studied in several crop plants and the model plant Arabidopsis. In this review, we examine the current understanding of Al3+ exclusion and tolerance mechanisms from woody plants. In addition, we discuss the ecology of woody non-Al accumulator and Al accumulator plants, and present examples of Al3+ adaptations in woody plant populations. This paper complements previous reviews focusing on crop plants and provides insights into evolutionary processes operating in plant communities that are widespread on acid soils.

  15. Thermal stir welding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A welding method is provided for forming a weld joint between first and second elements of a workpiece. The method includes heating the first and second elements to form an interface of material in a plasticized or melted state interface between the elements. The interface material is then allowed to cool to a plasticized state if previously in a melted state. The interface material, while in the plasticized state, is then mixed, for example, using a grinding/extruding process, to remove any dendritic-type weld microstructures introduced into the interface material during the heating process.

  16. Thermal stir welding apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A welding method and apparatus are provided for forming a weld joint between first and second elements of a workpiece. The method includes heating the first and second elements to form an interface of material in a plasticized or melted state interface between the elements. The interface material is then allowed to cool to a plasticized state if previously in a melted state. The interface material, while in the plasticized state, is then mixed, for example, using a grinding/extruding process, to remove any dendritic-type weld microstructures introduced into the interface material during the heating process.

  17. Solar array welding developement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elms, R. V., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The present work describes parallel gap welding as used for joining solar cells to the cell interconnect system. Sample preparation, weldable cell parameter evaluation, bond scheduling, bond strength evaluation, and bonding and thermal shock tests are described. A range of weld schedule parameters - voltage, time, and force - can be identified for various cell/interconnect designs that will provide adequate bond strengths and acceptably small electrical degradation. Automation of solar array welding operations to a significant degree has been achieved in Europe and will be receiving increased attention in the U.S. to reduce solar array fabrication costs.

  18. Review of Welding Terminology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelika Petrėtienė

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses welding terms in accordance with the Lithuanian standard LST EN 1792 „Welding. The multilingual list of welding terms and similar processes”, „The Russian–Lithuanian dictionary of the terms of mechanical engineering technology and welding“ and the examples from postgraduates‘ final works. It analyses the infringement of lexical, word-building and morphological rules. First-year students should already be familiar with the standardized terms of their speciality. More active propagation of the terms should help to avoid terminology mistakes in various scientific spheres.

  19. Joining of Dissimilar alloy Sheets (Al 6063&AISI 304 during Resistance Spot Welding Process: A Feasibility Study for Automotive industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reddy Sreenivasulu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Present design trends in automotive manufacture have shifted emphasis to alternative lightweight materials in order to achieve higher fuel efficiency and to bring down vehicle emission. Although some other joining techniques are more and more being used, spot welding still remains the primary joining method in automobile manufacturing so far. Spot welds for automotive applications should have a sufficiently large diameter, so that nugget pullout mode is the dominant failure mode. Interfacial mode is unacceptable due to its low load carrying and energy absorption capability. Strength tests with different static loading were performed in, to reveal the failure mechanisms for the lap-shear geometry and the cross-tension geometry. Based on the literature survey performed, venture into this work was amply motivated by the fact that a little research work has been conducted to joining of dissimilar materials like non ferrous to ferrous. Most of the research works concentrated on joining of different materials like steel to steel or aluminium alloy to aluminium alloy by resistance spot welding. In this work, an experimental study on the resistance spot weldability of aluminium alloy (Al 6063 and austenitic stainless steel (AISI304 sheets, which are lap joined by using a pedestal type resistance spot welding machine. Welding was conducted using a 45-deg truncated cone copper electrode with 10-mm face diameter. The weld nugget diameter, force estimation under lap shear test and T – peel test were investigated using digital type tensometer attached with capacitive displacement transducer (Mikrotech, Bangalore, Model: METM2000ER1. The results shows that joining of Al 6063 and AISI 304 thin sheets by RSW method are feasible for automotive structural joints where the loads are below 1000N act on them, it is observed that by increasing the spots per unit length, then the joint with standing strength to oppose failure is also increased linearly incase of

  20. Aluminium toxicity in winter wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szabó A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium is the most frequent metal of the earth crust; it occurs mainly as biologically inactive, insoluble deposit. Environmental problems, industrial contaminations and acid rains increase the soil acidity, leading to the mobilization of Al. Half of the world’s potential arable lands are acidic; therefore, Al-toxicity decreases crop productivity. Wheat is a staple food for 35% of the world population. The effects of Al-stress (0.1 mM were studied on winter wheat; seedlings were grown hydroponically, at acidic pH. After two weeks, the root weight was decreased; a significant difference was found in the P- and Ca-content. The shoot weight and element content changed slightly; Al-content in the root was one magnitude higher than in the shoot, while Al-translocation was limited. The root plasma membrane H+-ATPase has central role in the uptake processes; Al-stress increased the Mg2+-ATPase activity of the microsomal fraction.

  1. Creep in dispersion strengthened aluminium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlova, A.; Kucharova, K.; Cadek, J.; Besterci, M.; Slesar, M.

    1986-01-01

    Results of an investigation of creep at 623 and 723 K in two DISPAL type dispersion strengthened aluminium alloys containing nominal concentrations of 2.5 and 10 vol. pct of dispersed Al4C3 and 2.1 and 3.8 vol. pct of Al2O3, respectively, are presented. The dispersoid particles 25-85 nm in diameter are situated predominantly in grain boundaries and to a less extent as clusters inside the grains. Steady state creep rate, which is strongly applied stress dependent, is most probably controlled by lattice diffusion. A threshold stress characterizing the creep can be identified with the Orowan bowing stress for lattice dislocations. It is shown that creep can be described in terms of lattice diffusion controlled climb of Orowan dislocation loops around dispersed particles. A comparison with creep behavior of dispersion strengthened alloys SAP and NOVAMET shows better resistance of DISPAL as compared to these alloys though its creep ductility is relatively low. 27 references.

  2. Multispot fiber laser welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schutt Hansen, Klaus

    This dissertation presents work and results achieved in the field of multi beam fiber laser welding. The project has had a practical approach, in which simulations and modelling have been kept at a minimum. Different methods to produce spot patterns with high power single mode fiber lasers have...... been examined and evaluated. It is found that both diamond turned DOE’s in zinc sulphide and multilevel etched DOE’s (Diffractive Optical Elements) in fused silica have a good performance. Welding with multiple beams in a butt joint configuration has been tested. Results are presented, showing it has...... been possible to control the welding width in incremental steps by adding more beams in a row. The laser power was used to independently control the keyhole and consequently the depth of fusion. An example of inline repair of a laser weld in butt joint configuration was examined. Zinc powder was placed...

  3. Friction stir welding tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolle,; Charles R. , Clark; Denis E. , Barnes; Timothy, A [Ammon, ID

    2008-04-15

    A friction stir welding tool is described and which includes a shank portion; a shoulder portion which is releasably engageable with the shank portion; and a pin which is releasably engageable with the shoulder portion.

  4. Concurrent ultrasonic weld evaluation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Donald W.; Johnson, John A.; Smartt, Herschel B.

    1987-01-01

    A system for concurrent, non-destructive evaluation of partially completed welds for use in conjunction with an automated welder. The system utilizes real time, automated ultrasonic inspection of a welding operation as the welds are being made by providing a transducer which follows a short distance behind the welding head. Reflected ultrasonic signals are analyzed utilizing computer based digital pattern recognition techniques to discriminate between good and flawed welds on a pass by pass basis. The system also distinguishes between types of weld flaws.

  5. Effect of aluminium phosphate as admixture on oxychloride cement

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The effect of admixing of aluminium phosphate on oxychloride cement in the matrix has been investigated. It is shown that aluminium phosphate retards the setting process of the cement and improves water-tightness.

  6. The non-destructive prediction of the aluminium content in pressed skulls of aluminium dross

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varužan Kevorkijan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available During production of primary and secondary aluminium, various amounts of aluminium dross, a mixture consisting of molten aluminium metal and different oxide compounds, is skimmed per tonne of molten metal. In order to preserve the maximum aluminium content in hot dross for further extraction, it is necessary to cool the dross (e.g. by pressing immediately after skimming. During pressing, the skimmed dross is transformed into so-called pressed skulls, convenient for storage, transport or further inhouse processing. Pressed skulls, which represent a valuable source of aluminium, are generally valued on a free-metal recovery basis. Therefore, it is important and useful to develop a method of fast and cost-effective non-destructive measurement of the free aluminium content in pressed skulls, independent of the technology of pressed skulls recycling. Following the theoretical considerations presented in this work, a practical industrial methodology was developed for non-destructive prediction of the amount of free aluminium in pressed skulls, wAl, based on non-destructive measurement of the density, ρ, of the pressed skulls.

  7. Effect of Sintering Temperature on the Properties of Aluminium-Aluminium Oxide Composite Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewan Muhammad Nuruzzaman

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, aluminium-aluminium oxide (Al-Al2O3 metal matrix composites of different weight percentage reinforcements of aluminium oxide were processed at different sintering temperatures. In order to prepare these composite specimens, conventional powder metallurgy (PM method was used. Three types specimens of different compositions such as 95%Al+5%Al2O3, 90%Al+10%Al2O3 and 85%Al+15%Al2O3 were prepared under 20 Ton compaction load. Then, all the specimens were sintered in a furnace at two different temperatures 550oC and 580oC. In each sintering process, two different heating cycles were used. After the sintering process, it was observed that undistorted flat specimens were successfully prepared for all the compositions. The effects of sintering temperature and weight fraction of aluminium oxide particulates on the density, hardness and microstructure of Al-Al2O3 composites were observed. It was found that density and hardness of the composite specimens were significantly influenced by sintering temperature and percentage aluminium oxide reinforcement. Furthermore, optical microscopy revealed that almost uniform distribution of aluminium oxide reinforcement within the aluminium matrix was achieved.

  8. Weld formation control at electron beam welding with beam oscillations

    OpenAIRE

    Trushnikov, Dmitriy; Koleva, Elena; Mladenov, Georgy; A. Shcherbakov

    2014-01-01

    Electron beam welding is used extensively to produce essential machine parts. The control of the basic beam parameters beam power or beam current at constant accelerating voltage, welding speed, current of focusing lens and distance between electron gun and welded sample surface is not enough to obtain at most of the regimes sound welds. Control of the focus position using analysis of the high frequency component of the current, collected by plasma, at periodic interactions on the beam (the o...

  9. Analysis of aluminium in rat following administration of allergen immunotherapy using either aluminium or microcrystalline-tyrosine-based adjuvants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougall, Stuart A; Heath, Matthew D; Kramer, Matthias F; Skinner, Murray A

    2016-03-01

    Investigation into the absorption, distribution and elimination of aluminium in rat after subcutaneous aluminium adjuvant formulation administration using ICP-MS is described. Assays were verified under the principles of a tiered approach. There was no evidence of systemic exposure of aluminium, in brain or in kidney. Extensive and persistent retention of aluminium at the dose site was observed for at least 180 days after administration. This is the first published work that has quantified aluminium adjuvant retention based on the quantity of aluminium delivered in a typical allergy immunotherapy course. The results indicate that the repeated administration of aluminium-containing adjuvants will likely contribute directly and significantly to an individual's body burden of aluminium.

  10. Aluminium and the human breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbre, P D

    2016-06-01

    The human population is exposed to aluminium (Al) from diet, antacids and vaccine adjuvants, but frequent application of Al-based salts to the underarm as antiperspirant adds a high additional exposure directly to the local area of the human breast. Coincidentally the upper outer quadrant of the breast is where there is also a disproportionately high incidence of breast cysts and breast cancer. Al has been measured in human breast tissues/fluids at higher levels than in blood, and experimental evidence suggests that at physiologically relevant concentrations, Al can adversely impact on human breast epithelial cell biology. Gross cystic breast disease is the most common benign disorder of the breast and evidence is presented that Al may be a causative factor in formation of breast cysts. Evidence is also reviewed that Al can enable the development of multiple hallmarks associated with cancer in breast cells, in particular that it can cause genomic instability and inappropriate proliferation in human breast epithelial cells, and can increase migration and invasion of human breast cancer cells. In addition, Al is a metalloestrogen and oestrogen is a risk factor for breast cancer known to influence multiple hallmarks. The microenvironment is established as another determinant of breast cancer development and Al has been shown to cause adverse alterations to the breast microenvironment. If current usage patterns of Al-based antiperspirant salts contribute to causation of breast cysts and breast cancer, then reduction in exposure would offer a strategy for prevention, and regulatory review is now justified. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. [Aluminium allergy and granulomas induced by vaccinations for children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Rosa Marie Ø; Zachariae, Claus; Johansen, Jeanne Duus

    2015-04-27

    Vaccination with aluminium-adsorbed vaccines can induce aluminium allergy with persistent itching subcutaneous nodules at the injection site – vaccination granulomas. In this article we give an overview of childhood aluminium-adsorbed vaccines available in Denmark. Through literature studies we examine the incidence, the symptoms and the prognosis for the vaccination granulomas and the allergy. Finally we discuss the status in Denmark.

  12. Corrosion behaviour of borated aluminium used as neutron absorber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emmerich, R. [EaglePicher Technologies GmbH, Oehringen (Germany); Ensinger, W.; Enders, B. [Philipps-Univ. of Marburg, Dept. of Chemistry, Material Science Centre (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    The electrochemical behaviour of pure and borated aluminium was examined. Measurements were performed in two different electrolytes at 90 C containing different trace-amounts of chloride. For borated aluminium current transients, i.e. metastable depassivation events were found. It is suggested to attribute these transients to less stable passivation layers in comparison to pure aluminium.

  13. Steam Assisted Accelerated Growth of Oxide Layer on Aluminium Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Din, Rameez Ud; Yuksel, Serkan; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl

    2013-01-01

    Corrosion resistance of aluminium alloys is related to the composition and morphology of the oxide film on the surface of aluminium. In this paper we investigated the use of steam on the surface modification of aluminium to produce boehmite films. The study reveals a detailed investigation...

  14. Aluminium allergy and granulomas induced by vaccinations for children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Rosa Marie O; Zachariae, Claus; Johansen, Jeanne Duus

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination with aluminium-adsorbed vaccines can induce aluminium allergy with persistent itching subcutaneous nodules at the injection site - vaccination granulomas. In this article we give an overview of childhood aluminium-adsorbed vaccines available in Denmark. Through literature studies we...... examine the incidence, the symptoms and the prognosis for the vaccination granulomas and the allergy. Finally we discuss the status in Denmark....

  15. Stability of aluminium beams in case of fire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulen, O.R. van der; Soetens, F.; Maljaars, J.

    2014-01-01

    Fire is often the dominant design criterion for aluminium structures. Present design rules for aluminium constructions in fire neglect both the decrease in susceptibility to local buckling and the effects of creep, that are intrinsic to aluminium. They may therefore either overestimate or

  16. Energy Absorption of Monolithic and Fibre Reinforced Aluminium Cylinders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Kanter, J.L.C.G.

    2006-01-01

    Summary accompanying the thesis: Energy Absorption of Monolithic and Fibre Reinforced Aluminium Cylinders by Jens de Kanter This thesis presents the investigation of the crush behaviour of both monolithic aluminium cylinders and externally fibre reinforced aluminium cylinders. The research is based

  17. Time Dependent Development of Aluminium Pitting Corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert E. Melchers

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium alloys have excellent corrosion resistance to a wide variety of exposure conditions. Usually they corrode by pitting rather than by uniform corrosion. For infrastructure applications long-term corrosion behaviour is of interest. The relatively limited long-term pitting data that is available shows that maximum and average pit depths do not follow the power law function as conventionally assumed but tend to follow a bimodal trend with exposure time. This is consistent with the bimodal trends observed previously for corrosion mass loss of aluminium alloys. Most likely it is the result of the accumulation of corrosion products over the pit mouths, leading to the gradual development of localised anoxic conditions within pits. In turn this permits the development within the pits of anoxic autocatalytic conditions, consistent with established theory for pitting corrosion of aluminium. It also is consistent with observations of hydrogen evolution from pits. The implications of this for practical applications are discussed.

  18. Alternate Welding Processes for In-Service Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-24

    Conducting weld repairs and attaching hot tap tees onto pressurized pipes has the advantage of avoiding loss of service and revenue. However, the risks involved with in-service welding need to be managed by ensuring that welding is performed in a rep...

  19. Certification of a weld produced by friction stir welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obaditch, Chris; Grant, Glenn J

    2013-10-01

    Methods, devices, and systems for providing certification of friction stir welds are disclosed. A sensor is used to collect information related to a friction stir weld. Data from the sensor is compared to threshold values provided by an extrinsic standard setting organizations using a certification engine. The certification engine subsequently produces a report on the certification status of the weld.

  20. Welding defects at friction stir welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Podržaj

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an overview of different types of defects at friction stir welding. In order to explain the reasons for their occurrence a short theoretical background of the process is given first. The main emphasis is on the parameters that influence the process. An energy supply based division of defects into three disjoint groups was used. The occurring defects are demonstrated on various materials.

  1. Workmanship standards for fusion welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, M. D.

    1967-01-01

    Workmanship standards manual defines practices, that adhere to rigid codes and specifications, for fusion welding of component piping, assemblies, and systems. With written and pictorial presentations, it is part of the operating procedure for fusion welding.

  2. Enhancement of wear and ballistic resistance of armour grade AA7075 aluminium alloy using friction stir processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Sudhakar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Industrial applications of aluminium and its alloys are restricted because of their poor tribological properties. Thermal spraying, laser surfacing, electron beam welding are the most widely used techniques to alter the surface morphology of base metal. Preliminary studies reveal that the coating and layering of aluminium alloys with ceramic particles enhance the ballistic resistance. Furthermore, among aluminium alloys, 7075 aluminium alloy exhibits high strength which can be compared to that of steels and has profound applications in the designing of lightweight fortification structures and integrated protection systems. Having limitations such as poor bond integrity, formation of detrimental phases and interfacial reaction between reinforcement and substrate using fusion route to deposit hard particles paves the way to adopt friction stir processing for fabricating surface composites using different sizes of boron carbide particles as reinforcement on armour grade 7075 aluminium alloy as matrix in the present investigation. Wear and ballistic tests were carried out to assess the performance of friction stir processed AA7075 alloy. Significant improvement in wear resistance of friction stir processed surface composites is attributed to the change in wear mechanism from abrasion to adhesion. It has also been observed that the surface metal matrix composites have shown better ballistic resistance compared to the substrate AA7075 alloy. Addition of solid lubricant MoS2 has reduced the depth of penetration of the projectile to half that of base metal AA7075 alloy. For the first time, the friction stir processing technique was successfully used to improve the wear and ballistic resistances of armour grade high strength AA7075 alloy.

  3. Steam Initiated Surface Modification of Aluminium Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Din, Rameez Ud

    , crystalline nano-particles, role of steam-based treatment on adhesion of industrially applied powder coating, and investigations of a failed painted aluminium window profile due to defects in the extruded profile. Chapters 13 and 14 describe the overall discussion, conclusions and future work based...... the use of aluminium alloys in the painted form requiring a conversion coating to improve the adhesion. Chromate based conversion coating processes are extremely good for these purposes, however the carcinogenic and toxic nature of hexavalent chromium led to the search for more benign and eco...

  4. Welding and Brazing Silicon Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, T. J.

    1986-01-01

    Hot isostatic pressing and conventional furnace brazing effective under right conditions. Study performed showed feasibility of welding SiC using several welding and brazing techniques. Use of SiC improves engine efficiency by allowing increase in operating temperature. SiC successfully hot-pressure-welded at 3,550 degrees F (1,950 degrees C) in argon. Refinements of solid-state welding and brazing procedures used sufficient for some specific industrial applications.

  5. Exemplification of Tomographic Method to Evaluate the Quality of Welded Joints Made from EN 5754-H22 Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Błachnio Józef

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The quality of welded joints depends on many factors. The relevant standards stipulate technical conditions of welds quality assessment, which provides the basis for stating whether the given joint is compatible with the requirements or whether it is defective. In practice, making welded joints that are totally devoid of defects is extremely difficult. To conduct the control of inner structure of the given joint a non-destructive method with the application of industrial CT scanner might be applied. This modern diagnosing method combines the x-ray examination with advanced computer technology. The basic advantage of computer-assisted tomography consists in examining objects in three dimensions and the possibility to carry out three-dimensional reconstructions. The aim of this article is to discuss the use of this method to evaluate the quality of welded joints made of aluminium alloys. Capabilities of computer-assisted tomography were depicted by the case of weld probes constructed with TIG (ang. Tungsten Inert Gas welding by different process variables. One has made the analysis of the quality of probes showing the smallest and the biggest internal and external welding defects.

  6. Experimental and numerical thermo-mechanical analysis of friction stir welding of high-strength alluminium alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veljić Darko M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents experimental and numerical analysis of the change of temperature and force in the vertical direction during the friction stir welding of high-strength aluminium alloy 2024 T3. This procedure confirmed the correctness of the numerical model, which is subsequently used for analysis of the temperature field in the welding zone, where it is different to determine the temperature experimentally. 3D finite element model is developed using the software package Abaqus; arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation is applied. Johnson-Cook material law and Coulomb’s Law of friction are used for modelling the material behaviour. Temperature fields are symmetrical with respect to the welding line. The temperature values below the tool shoulder, i.e. in the welding zone, which are reached during the plunge stage, are approximately constant during the entire welding process and lie within the interval 430-502°C. The temperature of the material in the vicinity of the tool is about 500°C, while the values on the top surface of the welding plates (outside the welding zone, but close to the tool shoulder are about 400°C. The temperature difference between the top and bottom surface of the plates is small, 10-15°C. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 34018 and ON 174004

  7. Self-Reacting Friction Stir Welding for Aluminum Alloy Circumferential Weld Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorkman, Gerry; Cantrell, Mark; Carter, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Friction stir welding is an innovative weld process that continues to grow in use, in the commercial, defense, and space sectors. It produces high quality and high strength welds in aluminum alloys. The process consists of a rotating weld pin tool that plasticizes material through friction. The plasticized material is welded by applying a high weld forge force through the weld pin tool against the material during pin tool rotation. The high weld forge force is reacted against an anvil and a stout tool structure. A variation of friction stir welding currently being evaluated is self-reacting friction stir welding. Self-reacting friction stir welding incorporates two opposing shoulders on the crown and root sides of the weld joint. In self-reacting friction stir welding, the weld forge force is reacted against the crown shoulder portion of the weld pin tool by the root shoulder. This eliminates the need for a stout tooling structure to react the high weld forge force required in the typical friction stir weld process. Therefore, the self-reacting feature reduces tooling requirements and, therefore, process implementation costs. This makes the process attractive for aluminum alloy circumferential weld applications. To evaluate the application of self-reacting friction stir welding for aluminum alloy circumferential welding, a feasibility study was performed. The study consisted of performing a fourteen-foot diameter aluminum alloy circumferential demonstration weld using typical fusion weld tooling. To accomplish the demonstration weld, weld and tack weld development were performed and fourteen-foot diameter rings were fabricated. Weld development consisted of weld pin tool selection and the generation of a process map and envelope. Tack weld development evaluated gas tungsten arc welding and friction stir welding for tack welding rings together for circumferential welding. As a result of the study, a successful circumferential demonstration weld was produced leading

  8. Welding. Performance Objectives. Basic Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Kenneth

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of eight terminal objectives for a basic welding course. The materials were developed for a 36-week (2 hours daily) course developed to teach the fundamentals of welding shop work, to become familiar with the operation of the welding shop…

  9. Welding. Performance Objectives. Intermediate Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Kenneth

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of nine terminal objectives for an intermediate welding course. The materials were developed for a 36-week (3 hours daily) course designed to prepare the student for employment in the field of welding. Electric welding and specialized (TIG & MIG)…

  10. Effect of flyash particles with aluminium melt on the wear of aluminium metal matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vipin K. Sharma

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The present work deals with the fabrication and tribological testing of an aluminium flyash composite. The metal matrix selected was aluminium and flyash contents in different percentages were reinforced in it to fabricate the required metal matrix composite (MMC. Stir casting method was used to fabricate the MMC with 2–4–6% weight of flyash contents in aluminium. Tribological analysis of the tribo pairs formed between the smooth surfaces of cast iron disc and smooth MMC pin has been considered and friction force and wear of the MMC were investigated by using a Pin-on-disc setup. It was observed that the MMC with 6% weight of flyash content in aluminium matrix results in less wear (0.32 g and 4% weight of flyash content gives the low coefficient of friction (0.12 between the tribopairs of cast iron surface and MMC surface.

  11. Irradiation damage in aluminium single crystals produced by 50-keV aluminium and copper ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, L.; Johansen, A.; Koch, J.

    1968-01-01

    Aluminium single crystals, thin enough to be examined by electron microscopy, have been irradiated with 50-keV aluminium and copper ions. The irradiation fluxes were in the range 1011–1014 cm−2 s−1 and the doses were from 6 × 1012 to 6 × 1014 cm−2. Irradiation along either a or a direction produces...... rows of dislocation loops all lying parallel to one particular direction. If the aluminium target is quenched from 600 °C and annealed at room temperature prior to irradiation with aluminium ions, the rows of loops are suppressed. The amount of damage observed is considerably less than would...

  12. Friction stir welding tool and process for welding dissimilar materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J; Jana, Saumyadeep; Mattlin, Karl F

    2013-05-07

    A friction stir welding tool and process for lap welding dissimilar materials are detailed. The invention includes a cutter scribe that penetrates and extrudes a first material of a lap weld stack to a preselected depth and further cuts a second material to provide a beneficial geometry defined by a plurality of mechanically interlocking features. The tool backfills the interlocking features generating a lap weld across the length of the interface between the dissimilar materials that enhances the shear strength of the lap weld.

  13. Ultrasonic Evaluation of Weld Strength for Aluminum Ultrasonic Spot Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffari, Bita; Hetrick, Elizabeth T.; Mozurkewich, George; Reatherford, Larry V.

    2005-04-01

    The goal of this work is to determine the feasibility of using an ultrasonic, non-destructive technique for post-process evaluation of aluminum ultrasonic spot welds. A focused immersion transducer was utilized to obtain a C-scan of the weld interface, from which a weighted ultrasonic contact area was estimated. Weldments were subsequently tested destructively to determine the weld strength. The square root of the weld contact area displayed a relatively good correlation with weld strength, r2=0.85.

  14. Weld bead profile of laser welding dissimilar joints stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Ghusoon R.; Ishak, M.; Aqida, S. N.; Abdulhadi, Hassan A.

    2017-10-01

    During the process of laser welding, the material consecutively melts and solidifies by a laser beam with a peak high power. Several parameters such as the laser energy, pulse frequency, pulse duration, welding power and welding speed govern the mode of the welding process. The aim of this paper is to investigate the effect of peak power, incident angle, and welding speed on the weld bead geometry. The first investigation in this context was conducted using 2205-316L stainless steel plates through the varying of the welding speed from 1.3 mm/s to 2.1 mm/s. The second investigation was conducted by varying the peak power from 1100 W to 1500 W. From the results of the experiments, the welding speed and laser power had a significant effect on the geometry of the weld bead, and the variation in the diameter of the bead pulse-size. Due to the decrease in the heat input, welding speed affected penetration depth more than bead width, and a narrow width of heat affected zone was achieved ranging from 0.2 to 0.5 mm. Conclusively, weld bead geometry dimensions increase as a function of peak power; at over 1350 W peak power, the dimensions lie within 30 μm.

  15. Weld Nugget Temperature Control in Thermal Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A control system for a thermal stir welding system is provided. The control system includes a sensor and a controller. The sensor is coupled to the welding system's containment plate assembly and generates signals indicative of temperature of a region adjacent and parallel to the welding system's stir rod. The controller is coupled to the sensor and generates at least one control signal using the sensor signals indicative of temperature. The controller is also coupled to the welding system such that at least one of rotational speed of the stir rod, heat supplied by the welding system's induction heater, and feed speed of the welding system's weld material feeder are controlled based on the control signal(s).

  16. Electrogeneration of aluminium to remove silica in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelover-Santiago, S L; Pérez-Castrejón, S; Martín-Domínguez, A; Villegas-Mendoza, I E

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study on electrogeneration of aluminium, as a coagulant to remove silica in make-up water for cooling towers. Three electrochemical systems were tested, two with aluminium electrodes (one with polarity change and another without it), and a third one with aluminium anodes and cathodes of stainless steel. From the obtained results it was concluded that under the studied conditions, the most advantageous system to produce aluminium and remove silica is the one with both electrodes of aluminium working with direct current. Due to chemical production of aluminium at the cathode, the concentration of aluminium in the water at the outlet of the electrochemical reactor is much higher than the one calculated according to Faraday's law. Under the tested conditions it was possible to remove up to 66% of silica from water containing around 50 mg L(-1).

  17. Molecular breeding of cereals for aluminium resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluminium (Al3+) toxicity is the primary factor limiting crop production on acidic soils worldwide. In addition to an application of lime for soil amelioration, Al3+ resistant plant varieties have been deployed to raise productivity on such hostile soils. This has been possible due to the exploita...

  18. Aluminium overhead highway traffic sign structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Courage, W.M.G.; Soetens, F.; Noordzij, R.; Drabbels, J.

    1998-01-01

    This paper deals with the design and manufacturing of aluminium overhead sign structures. These gantries are built up by using two X-shaped column frames connected by a triangular space frame girder. Slenderness and a low solidity ratio were objectives in the architectonic design. Braces and main

  19. Microstructure Development during Solidification of Aluminium Alloys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruvalcaba Jimenez, D.G.

    2009-01-01

    This Thesis demonstrates studies on microstructure development during the solidification of aluminium alloys. New insights of structure development are presented here. Experimental techniques such as quenching and in-situ High-brilliance X-ray microscopy were utilized to study the microstructure

  20. Improving mechanical properties of aluminium alloy through ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper investigates the microstructure and mechanical properties of aluminum alloy (Al-Si-Fe) reinforced with coconut shell-ash particulate. The aluminium (Al-Si-Fe) alloy composite was produced by a double-stir casting process at a speed of 700 rpm for 10 and 5 minutes at first and second stirring respectively.

  1. Dissolved aluminium in the Southern Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middag, R.; van Slooten, C.; de Baar, H. J. W.; Laan, P.

    2011-01-01

    Dissolved aluminium (Al) occurs in a wide range of concentrations in the world oceans. The concentrations of Al in the Southern Ocean are among the lowest ever observed. An all-titanium CTD sampling system makes it possible to study complete deep ocean sections of Al and other trace elements with

  2. Electric pulse treatment of welded joint of aluminum alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Mitiaev

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Explanation of the redistribution effect of residual strengthes after electric pulse treatment of ark welding seam of the aluminum alloy. Methodology. Alloy on the basis of aluminium of АК8М3 type served as the research material. As a result of mechanical treatment of the ingots after alloy crystallization the plates with 10 mm thickness were obtained. After edge preparation the elements, which are being connected were butt welded using the technology of semiautomatic argon arc welding by the electrode with a diameter of 3 mm of AK-5 alloy. Metal structure of the welded joint was examined under the light microscope at a magnification of 200 and under the scanning electronic microscope «JSM-6360 LA». The Rockwell hardness (HRF was used as a strength characteristic of alloy. Hardness measuring of the phase constituents (microhardness was carried out using the device PМТ-3, with the indenter loadings 5 and 10 g. The crystalline structure parameters of alloy (dislocation density, second kind of the crystalline grid distortion and the scale of coherent scattering regions were determined using the methods of X-ray structural analysis. Electric pulse treatment (ET was carried out on the special equipment in the conditions of the DS enterprise using two modes A and В. Findings. On the basis of researches the previously obtained microhardness redistribution effect in the area of welded connection after ET was confirmed. As a result of use of the indicated treatment it was determined not only the reduction of microhardness gradient but also the simultaneous hardening effect in the certain thermal affected areas near the welding seam. During study of chemical composition of phase constituents it was discovered, that the structural changes of alloy as a result of ET first of all are caused by the redistribution of chemical elements, which form the connections themselves. By the nature of the influence the indicated treatment can be

  3. Numerical simulation of welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jan Langkjær; Thorborg, Jesper

    Aim of project:To analyse and model the transient thermal field from arc welding (SMAW, V-shaped buttweld in 15mm plate) and to some extend the mechanical response due to the thermal field. - To implement this model in a general purpose finite element program such as ABAQUS.The simulation...... stress is also taken into account.Work carried out:With few means it is possible to define a thermal model which describes the thermal field from the welding process in reasonable agreement with reality. Identical results are found with ABAQUS and Rosenthal’s analytical solution of the governing heat...... transfer equation under same conditions. It is relative easy tointroduce boundary conditions such as convection and radiation where not surprisingly the radiation has the greatest influence especially from the high temperature regions in the weld pool and the heat affected zone.Due to the large temperature...

  4. Extravehicular activity welding experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, J. Kevin

    1989-01-01

    The In-Space Technology Experiments Program (INSTEP) provides an opportunity to explore the many critical questions which can only be answered by experimentation in space. The objective of the Extravehicular Activity Welding Experiment definition project was to define the requirements for a spaceflight experiment to evaluate the feasibility of performing manual welding tasks during EVA. Consideration was given to experiment design, work station design, welding hardware design, payload integration requirements, and human factors (including safety). The results of this effort are presented. Included are the specific objectives of the flight test, details of the tasks which will generate the required data, and a description of the equipment which will be needed to support the tasks. Work station requirements are addressed as are human factors, STS integration procedures and, most importantly, safety considerations. A preliminary estimate of the cost and the schedule for completion of the experiment through flight and postflight analysis are given.

  5. Pulsed welding plasma source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knyaz'kov, A.; Pustovykh, O.; Verevkin, A.; Terekhin, V.; Shachek, A.; Tyasto, A.

    2016-04-01

    It is shown that in order to form the current pulse of a near rectangular shape, which provides conversion of the welding arc into a dynamic mode, it is rational to connect a forming element made on the basis of an artificial forming line in series to the welding DC circuit. The paper presents a diagram of a pulsed device for welding with a non-consumable electrode in argon which was developed using the forming element. The conversion of the arc into the dynamic mode is illustrated by the current and voltage oscillograms of the arc gap and the dynamic characteristic of the arc within the interval of one pulse generation time in the arc gap. The background current travels in the interpulse interval.

  6. Ternary gas plasma welding torch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor); Mcgee, William F. (Inventor); Waldron, Douglas J. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A plasma arc welding torch is discussed. A first plasma gas is directed through the body of the welding torch and out of the body across the tip of a welding electrode disposed at the forward end of the body. A second plasma gas is disposed for flow through a longitudinal bore in the electrode. The second plasma gas enters one end of the electrode and exits the electrode at the tip thereof for co-acting with the electric welding arc to produce the desired weld. A shield gas is directed through the torch body and circulates around the head of the torch adjacent to the electrode tip.

  7. The Favourable Choice of the Shape of Billet's Contact Surface to Quality of Extruded Aluminium Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Skorulski

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical and experimental method of optimization the aluminium billet’s contact surface during extrusion have been presented inthis paper. The theoretical assumption, based on welding criteria, have been confirmed by experimental researches. The technique ofmeasurement has been shown as well. Experiments are made using plasticine as a substiute material. Some kind of different variants have been investigated. The theory and experiments have been provided to optimize the modeling shape and may help in design and technology.The theory has been tested experimentally using a plasticine as a substitute material and a plexiglass die such that the velocity fields at the surfaces could be observed and measured during plastic flow, allowing the empirical coefficients in the mathematical formulation to be estimated. On the basis of the theory and experiments an optimal billet’s contact surface was proposed.

  8. Tribological properties of aluminium-based materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias Victoria, Patricia

    In order to improve the tribological performance of the aluminium-steel contact, two research lines have been followed: (1) Use of the ordered fluids liquid crystals and ionic liquids as lubricant additives. (2) Tribological behaviour of new powder metallurgy aluminium materials processed by mechanical milling. A parafinic-naftenic base oil modified by a 1wt% of four additives has been used: Three liquid crystals with increasing polarity: 4,4' -dibutylazobenzene (LC1) wear was studied for each additive. While the ionic liquid gives low friction (wear (≤10-5 mm3m-1), the performance of the liquid crystalline additives depends on the conditions. LC3 shows a higher lubricating ability than the neutral LC1 and LC2 under high load, speed or temperature. Only the ionic liquid shows tribochemical interaction (by SEM and EDS) with the steel and aluminium surfaces, with an increment in the fluorine content inside the wear track. The second line was to study the influence of the process conditions on the dry and lubricated wear of new powder-metallurgy aluminium materials. MA Al-NH3 milled under NH3 atmosphere was compared with (MA Al-Air) processed in air and with Al-1 which has not been mechanically alloyed. Conditions for mild to severe wear transition have been established. Al-1 is always under a severe wear regime. MA Al-NH3 shows transition to severe wear at 150°C, showing a 60% reduction in wear rate with respect to MA Al-Air and a two order of magnitude reduction with respect to Al-1. The wear resistance of MA Al-NH3 is attributed to its high hardness, lower porosity, and fine microstructure with submicroscopic reinforcing phases such as aluminium carbide and nitride (by X-ray diffraction and TEM observations).

  9. Hot cracking in Al-Mg-Si alloy laser welding - operating parameters and their effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cicala, E. [Polytechnic University, Mechanical Faculty, 1 blv. Mihai Viteazu, 300222 Timisoara (Romania); Duffet, G. [Universite de Bourgogne, Laboratoire Laser et Traitements des Materiaux (LTm), 12 rue de la Fonderie, 71200 Le Creusot (France)]. E-mail: g.duffet@u-bourgogne.fr; Andrzejewski, H. [Universite de Bourgogne, Laboratoire Laser et Traitements des Materiaux (LTm), 12 rue de la Fonderie, 71200 Le Creusot (France); Grevey, D. [Universite de Bourgogne, Laboratoire Laser et Traitements des Materiaux (LTm), 12 rue de la Fonderie, 71200 Le Creusot (France); Ignat, S. [Polytechnic University, Mechanical Faculty, 1 blv. Mihai Viteazu, 300222 Timisoara (Romania); Universite de Bourgogne, Laboratoire Laser et Traitements des Materiaux (LTm), 12 rue de la Fonderie, 71200 Le Creusot (France)

    2005-03-25

    Hot cracking is a phenomenon that frequently occurs in the laser welding of some 'special' alloys, such as the aluminium-magnesium-silicon type. Each occurrence of this phenomenon needs to be studied in itself, taking into account not only the individual, but also the interactive, influences of the various parameters. The advantage of using laser beams in welding processes lies in the speeds that can be reached. The disadvantage, however, is that, owing to the high cooling rates characteristic of the interaction between the laser beam and the material, the welding speed itself becomes a cause of hot cracking. The aim of this paper is to see how this disadvantage may be eliminated. We consider what the most important parameters may be, relating to tensile strength and the quantity of cracks produced, that might influence the presence or absence of hot cracking. The most influential factors in avoiding hot cracking are the welding speed and wire parameters. Also important is welding stability, as instability generates cracks. We can then determine a technological window, useful for industrial applications, which takes into account the values of these influential factors and stability.

  10. Integrated sensors for robotic laser welding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iakovou, D.; Aarts, Ronald G.K.M.; Meijer, J.; Beyer, E.; Dausinger, F; Ostendorf, A; Otto, A.

    2005-01-01

    A welding head is under development with integrated sensory systems for robotic laser welding applications. Robotic laser welding requires sensory systems that are capable to accurately guide the welding head over a seam in three-dimensional space and provide information about the welding process as

  11. Sensor integration for robotic laser welding processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iakovou, D.; Aarts, Ronald G.K.M.; Meijer, J.; Ostendorf, A; Hoult, A.; Lu, Y.

    2005-01-01

    The use of robotic laser welding is increasing among industrial applications, because of its ability to weld objects in three dimensions. Robotic laser welding involves three sub-processes: seam detection and tracking, welding process control, and weld seam inspection. Usually, for each sub-process,

  12. Acoustic-Emission Weld-Penetration Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maram, J.; Collins, J.

    1986-01-01

    Weld penetration monitored by detection of high-frequency acoustic emissions produced by advancing weld pool as it melts and solidifies in workpiece. Acoustic emission from TIG butt weld measured with 300-kHz resonant transducer. Rise in emission level coincides with cessation of weld penetration due to sudden reduction in welding current. Such monitoring applied to control of automated and robotic welders.

  13. Le soudage de l'aluminium et de ses alliages

    CERN Document Server

    Favre, G

    2005-01-01

    Le soudage de l'aluminium requiert un savoir-faire spécifique pour éviter la formation, dans la soudure, de défauts rédhibitoires tels que les manques de fusion ou soufflures. Ces défauts ont pour causes principales la présence d’une couche d'alumine, une diffusivité thermique élevée et une solubilité très faible de l’hydrogène dans le métal à l’état solide. Les règles de l’art à appliquer pour la préparation des assemblages et pour le choix des paramètres de soudage sont rappelées. Les divers procédés de soudage mis en Å"uvre par la section TS-MME-AS (faisceau d’électrons, laser, TIG, MIG) sont ensuite exposés à travers quelques applications récentes liées au LHC et à ses expériences. Enfin, une nouvelle technologie, le Friction Stir Welding (FSW), est présentée. Ce procédé de friction malaxage se déroule à l’état pâteux sans fusion. Il permet de réaliser des assemb...

  14. Neuro-Fuzzy Model for the Prediction and Classification of the Fused Zone Levels of Imperfections in Ti6Al4V Alloy Butt Weld

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Casalino

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Weld imperfections are tolerable defects as stated from the international standard. Nevertheless they can produce a set of drawbacks like difficulty to assembly, reworking, limited fatigue life, and surface imperfections. In this paper Ti6Al4V titanium butt welds were produced by CO2 laser welding. The following tolerable defects were analysed: weld undercut, excess weld metal, excessive penetration, incomplete filled groove, root concavity, and lack of penetration. A neuro-fuzzy model for the prediction and classification of the defects in the fused zone was built up using the experimental data. Weld imperfections were connected to the welding parameters by feed forward neural networks. Then the imperfections were clustered using the C-means fuzzy clustering algorithm. The clusters were named after the ISO standard classification of the levels of imperfection for electron and laser beam welding of aluminium alloys and steels. Finally, a single-value metric was proposed for the assessment of the overall bead geometry quality. It combined an index for each defect and functioned according to the criterion “the-smallest-the-best.”

  15. Weld procedure development with OSLW - optimization software for laser welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuerschbach, P.W.; Eisler, G.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Steele, R.J. [Naval Air Warfare Center, China Lake, CA (United States)

    1998-06-01

    Weld procedure development can require extensive experimentation, in-depth process knowledge, and is further complicated by the fact that there are often multiple sets of parameters that will meet the weld requirements. Choosing among these multiple weld procedures can be hastened with computer models that find parameters to meet selected weld dimensional requirements while simultaneously optimizing important figures of merit. Software is described that performs this task for CO{sub 2} laser beam welding. The models are based on dimensionless parameter correlations that are derived from solutions to the moving heat source equations. The use of both handbook and empirically verified thermophysical property values allows OSLW to be extended to many different materials. Graphics displays show the resulting solution on contour plots that can be used to further probe the model. The important figures of merit for laser beam welding are energy transfer efficiency and melting efficiency. The application enables the user to input desired weld shape dimensions, select the material to be welded, and to constrain the search problem to meet the application requirements. Successful testing of the software at a laser welding fabricator has validated this tool for weld procedure development.

  16. Aluminium in brain tissue in familial Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Ambreen; King, Andrew; Troakes, Claire; Exley, Christopher

    2017-03-01

    The genetic predispositions which describe a diagnosis of familial Alzheimer's disease can be considered as cornerstones of the amyloid cascade hypothesis. Essentially they place the expression and metabolism of the amyloid precursor protein as the main tenet of disease aetiology. However, we do not know the cause of Alzheimer's disease and environmental factors may yet be shown to contribute towards its onset and progression. One such environmental factor is human exposure to aluminium and aluminium has been shown to be present in brain tissue in sporadic Alzheimer's disease. We have made the first ever measurements of aluminium in brain tissue from 12 donors diagnosed with familial Alzheimer's disease. The concentrations of aluminium were extremely high, for example, there were values in excess of 10μg/g tissue dry wt. in 5 of the 12 individuals. Overall, the concentrations were higher than all previous measurements of brain aluminium except cases of known aluminium-induced encephalopathy. We have supported our quantitative analyses using a novel method of aluminium-selective fluorescence microscopy to visualise aluminium in all lobes of every brain investigated. The unique quantitative data and the stunning images of aluminium in familial Alzheimer's disease brain tissue raise the spectre of aluminium's role in this devastating disease. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  17. Welding. Student Learning Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palm Beach County Board of Public Instruction, West Palm Beach, FL.

    This student learning guide contains 30 modules for completing a course in welding. It is designed especially for use in secondary schools in Palm Beach County, Florida. Each module covers one task, and consists of a purpose, performance objective, enabling objectives, learning activities keyed to resources, information sheets, student self-check…

  18. Thermal Stresses in Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jan Langkjær

    1998-01-01

    Studies of the transient temperature fields and the hereby induced deformations and stressses in a butt-welded mild steel plate modelledrespectively in 2D plane stress state (as well as plane strain state) and in full 3D have been done. The model has been implemented in the generalpurpose FE...

  19. Elementary TIG Welding Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, John E., III

    The text was prepared to help deaf students develop the skills needed by an employed welder. It uses simplified language and illustrations to present concepts which should be reinforced by practical experience with welding skills. Each of the 12 lessons contains: (1) an information section with many illustrations which presents a concept or…

  20. Toxicity of dissolved and precipitated aluminium to marine diatoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillmore, Megan L; Golding, Lisa A; Angel, Brad M; Adams, Merrin S; Jolley, Dianne F

    2016-05-01

    Localised aluminium contamination can lead to high concentrations in coastal waters, which have the potential for adverse effects on aquatic organisms. This research investigated the toxicity of 72-h exposures of aluminium to three marine diatoms (Ceratoneis closterium (formerly Nitzschia closterium), Minutocellus polymorphus and Phaeodactylum tricornutum) by measuring population growth rate inhibition and cell membrane damage (SYTOX Green) as endpoints. Toxicity was correlated to the time-averaged concentrations of different aluminium size-fractions, operationally defined as aluminium exposure varied between diatom species. C. closterium was the most sensitive species (10% inhibition of growth rate (72-h IC10) of 80 (55-100)μg Al/L (95% confidence limits)) while M. polymorphus (540 (460-600)μg Al/L) and P. tricornutum (2100 (2000-2200)μg Al/L) were less sensitive (based on measured total aluminium). Dissolved aluminium was the primary contributor to toxicity in C. closterium, while a combination of dissolved and precipitated aluminium forms contributed to toxicity in M. polymorphus. In contrast, aluminium toxicity to the most tolerant diatom P. tricornutum was due predominantly to precipitated aluminium. Preliminary investigations revealed the sensitivity of C. closterium and M. polymorphus to aluminium was influenced by initial cell density with aluminium toxicity significantly (paluminium toxicity to diatoms do not involve compromising the plasma membrane. These results indicate that marine diatoms have a broad range in sensitivity to aluminium with toxic mechanisms related to both dissolved and precipitated aluminium. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. effect of post-weld heat treatment on the microstructure

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    among others are shielded metal arc welding, submerge arc welding, gas metal arc welding, plasma arc welding, gas ... welding (SMAW) technique is preferable to the other techniques ..... studies''International Journal of Innovative Research.

  2. SHADOW: a new welding technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Thorsten; Olowinsky, Alexander M.; Durand, Friedrich

    2002-06-01

    The new welding technique 'SHADOW ' is introduced. SHADOW means the use of a single pulse to generate a quasi continuous weld of several millimeters in length. HET processing time is defined by the pulse duration of the pulsed laser. At present, a state-of-the-art laser is capable of a maximum pulse duration of 20 ms. The variation of the laser power depend on time is a vital capability of the pulsed laser to adapt the energy deposition into the workpiece. Laser beam welds of several watch components were successfully performed. Similar metals like crowns and axes made out of stainless steel have been welded using pulsed laser radiation. Applying a series of about 130 single pulses for the crown-axis combination the total energy accumulates to 19.5 J. The use of the SHADOW welding technique reduces the energy to 2.5 J. While welding dissimilar metals like stainless steel and bras, the SHADOW welding reduces drastically the contamination as well as the distortion. Laser beam welding of copper has a low process reliability due to the high reflection and the high thermal conductivity. SHADOW welds of 3.6 mm length were performed on 250 micrometers thick copper plates with very high reproducibility. As a result, a pilot plant for laser beam welding of copper plates has been set up. The work to be presented has partly been funded by the European Commission in a project under the contract BRPR-CT-0634.

  3. [Association between serum aluminium level and methylation of amyloid precursor protein gene in workers engaged in aluminium electrolysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X J; Yuan, Y Z; Niu, Q

    2016-04-20

    To investigate the association between serum aluminium level and methylation of the promoter region of amyloid precursor protein (APP)gene in workers engaged in aluminium electrolysis. In 2012, 366 electrolysis workers in an aluminium factory were enrolled as exposure group (working years >10 and age >40 years)and divided into low-exposure group and high-exposure group based on the median serum aluminium level. Meanwhile, 102 workers in a cement plant not exposed to aluminium were enrolled as control group. Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry was used to measure serum aluminium level, methylation specific PCR was used to measure the methylation rate of the promoter region of APP gene, and ELI-SA was used to measure the protein expression of APP in lymphocytes in peripheral blood. The exposure group had a significantly higher serum aluminium level than the control group (45.07 μg/L vs 30.51 μg/L, P0.05). The multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that with reference to the control group, low aluminium exposure (OR=1.86, 95% CI 1.67~3.52)and high aluminium exposure (OR=2.98, 95% CI 1.97~4.15)were risk factors for a reduced methylation rate of the promoter region of APP gene. Reduced methylation of the promoter region of APP gene may be associated with increased serum aluminium level, and downregulated methylation of the promoter region of APP gene may accelerate APP gene transcription.

  4. Welding residual stress distributions for dissimilar metal nozzle butt welds in pressurized water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji Soo; Kim, Ju Hee; Bae, Hong Yeol; OH, Chang Young; Kim, Yun Jae [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyungsoo [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Song, Tae Kwang [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15

    In pressurized water nuclear reactors, dissimilar metal welds are susceptible to primary water stress corrosion cracking. To access this problem, accurate estimation of welding residual stresses is important. This paper provides general welding residual stress profiles in dissimilar metal nozzle butt welds using finite element analysis. By introducing a simplified shape for dissimilar metal nozzle butt welds, changes in the welding residual stress distribution can be seen using a geometry variable. Based on the results, a welding residual stress profile for dissimilar metal nozzle butt welds is proposed that modifies the existing welding residual stress profile for austenitic pipe butt welds.

  5. In-field Welding and Coating Protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-12

    Gas Technology Institute (GTI) and Edison Welding Institute (EWI) created both laboratory and infield girth weld samples to evaluate the effects of weld geometry and hydrogen off-gassing on the performance of protective coatings. Laboratory made plat...

  6. Closed circuit TV system monitors welding operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilman, M.

    1967-01-01

    TV camera system that has a special vidicon tube with a gradient density filter is used in remote monitoring of TIG welding of stainless steel. The welding operations involve complex assembly welding tools and skates in areas of limited accessibility.

  7. Gamma-radiation-induced corrosion of aluminum alloy: low dose effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanjana, K.; Ampornrat, P.; Channuie, J.

    2017-06-01

    Gamma-radiation-induced corrosion of aluminium alloy 6061 (AA6061) immersed in demineralized water was studied at radiation dose up to 206 kGy using a Co-60 gamma radiation source. The surface morphology and chemical composition of the oxide produced on the post-irradiated samples were investigated using SEM-EDS. The electrochemical corrosion potentials (Ecorr ) of the post-irradiated samples were measured. The corrosion behavior of AA6061 appeared to be dose dependent under the experimental conditions. A dramatic change in surface morphology was observed in the samples exposed to gamma radiation at 206 kGy. At this radiation dose the aluminium oxide scale developed can be clearly seen. The results from electrochemical corrosion tests have shown that the corrosion potentials (Ecorr ) can be undoubtedly decreased by gamma irradiation, giving corrosion rate of 7 × 10-4 mm/yr.

  8. ALUHAB — The Superior Aluminium Foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babcsan, N.; Beke, S.; Makk, P.; Soki, P.; Számel, Gy; Degischer, H. P.; Mokso, R.

    A new metal foaming technology has been developed to produce aluminum foams with controlled cell sizes, a wide range of alloy compositions, and attractive mechanical properties. ALUHAB aluminium foams are manufactured from a special foamable aluminium alloy containing ultrafine particles (80-3000 nm). The technology uses high temperature ultrasonication to homogeneously disperse the particles and thus create a stable, foamable aluminum melt. Oscillating gas injector (loud-nozzle) technology permits the injection of optimally sized bubbles into the melt that are independent of the injector orifice diameter. Using this direct gas injection method, bubble size is regulated by the frequency and the power of the ultrasound, producing uniform bubble sizes in the sub-millimeter range. The technology results in extremely stable metal foams which can be cast into complex forms and re-melted without loss of foam integrity. Processing methods and properties of the ALUHAB foams will be discussed.

  9. Controlled Precipitation Gaseous Cavities in Aluminium Castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roučka J.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available At thermal junctions of aluminium alloy castings and at points where risering proves to be difficult there appear internal or external shrinkages, which are both functionally and aesthetically inadmissible. Applying the Probat Fluss Mikro 100 agent, which is based on nano-oxides of aluminium, results in the appearance of a large amount of fine microscopic pores, which compensate for the shrinking of metal. Experimental tests with gravity die casting of AlSi8Cu3 and AlSi10Mg alloys have confirmed that the effect of the agent can be of advantage in foundry practice, leading to the production of castings without local concentrations of defects and without the appearance of shrinkages and macroscopic gas pores. Also, beneficial effect on the mechanical properties of the metal has been observed.

  10. Demethylation of Quinine Using Anhydrous Aluminium Trichloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiyi Asnawi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Quinine is a natural alkaloid having a methoxy group bound to quinoline ring and an allyl group bound to quinuclidine ring. Demethylation of quinine applying strong acid such as HBr or HI at high temperature was unsuccessful. The aim of this research was to obtain demethylated quinine by means of mild and selective demethylation procedure to prevent the addition reaction of allyl group. Selective demethylation of quinine has been carried out using anhydrous aluminium trichloride as reagent. The demethylation product was achieved in 68.12% yield by mole ratio of quinine to anhydrous aluminium trichloride of 1 to 4 in dried methylene chloride under nitrogen atmosphere. The reaction was firstly carried out at 0°C for 4 h and after the reaction mixture reached room temperature, the reaction was continued up to 24 h.

  11. The Friction of Saline Ice on Aluminium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Wallen-Russell

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The friction of ice on other materials controls loading on offshore structures and vessels in the Arctic. However, ice friction is complicated, because ice in nature exists near to its melting point. Frictional heating can cause local softening and perhaps melting and lubrication, thus affecting the friction and creating a feedback loop. Ice friction is therefore likely to depend on sliding speed and sliding history, as well as bulk temperature. The roughness of the sliding materials may also affect the friction. Here we present results of a series of laboratory experiments, sliding saline ice on aluminium, and controlling for roughness and temperature. We find that the friction of saline ice on aluminium μice-al=0.1 typically, but that this value varies with sliding conditions. We propose physical models which explain the variations in sliding friction.

  12. What is the risk of aluminium as a neurotoxin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exley, Christopher

    2014-06-01

    Aluminium is neurotoxic. Its free ion, Al(3+) (aq), is highly biologically reactive and uniquely equipped to do damage to essential cellular (neuronal) biochemistry. This unequivocal fact must be the starting point in examining the risk posed by aluminium as a neurotoxin in humans. Aluminium is present in the human brain and it accumulates with age. The most recent research demonstrates that a significant proportion of individuals older than 70 years of age have a potentially pathological accumulation of aluminium somewhere in their brain. What are the symptoms of chronic aluminium intoxication in humans? What if neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease are the manifestation of the risk of aluminium as a neurotoxin? How might such an (outrageous) hypothesis be tested?

  13. Feet sunk in molten aluminium: The burn and its prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Peña, David; Arnáiz-García, María Elena; Valero-Gasalla, Javier Luis; Arnáiz-García, Ana María; Campillo-Campaña, Ramón; Alonso-Peña, Javier; González-Santos, Jose María; Fernández-Díaz, Alaska Leonor; Arnáiz, Javier

    2015-08-01

    Nowadays, despite improvements in safety rules and inspections in the metal industry, foundry workers are not free from burn accidents. Injuries caused by molten metals include burns secondary to molten iron, aluminium, zinc, copper, brass, bronze, manganese, lead and steel. Molten aluminium is one of the most common causative agents of burns (60%); however, only a few publications exist concerning injuries from molten aluminium. The main mechanisms of lesion from molten aluminium include direct contact of the molten metal with the skin or through safety apparel, or when the metal splash burns through the pants and rolls downward along the leg. Herein, we report three cases of deep dermal burns after 'soaking' the foot in liquid aluminium and its evolutive features. This paper aims to show our experience in the management of burns due to molten aluminium. We describe the current management principles and the key features of injury prevention. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  14. Factors affecting weld root morphology in laser keyhole welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frostevarg, Jan

    2018-02-01

    Welding production efficiency is usually optimised if full penetration can be achieved in a single pass. Techniques such as electron and laser beam welding offer deep high speed keyhole welding, especially since multi-kilowatt lasers became available. However, there are limitations for these techniques when considering weld imperfections such as weld cap undercuts, interior porosity or humps at the root. The thickness of sheets during full penetration welding is practically limited by these root humps. The mechanisms behind root morphology formation are not yet satisfactory understood. In this paper root humping is studied by reviewing previous studies and findings and also by sample examination and process observation by high speed imaging. Different process regimes governing root quality are presented, categorized and explained. Even though this study mainly covers laser beam and laser arc hybrid welding, the presented findings can generally be applied full penetration welding in medium to thick sheets, especially the discussion of surface tension effects. As a final result of this analysis, a map of methods to optimise weld root topology is presented.

  15. Dynamics of space welding impact and corresponding safety welding study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragomeni, James M; Nunes, Arthur C

    2004-03-01

    This study was undertaken in order to be sure that no hazard would exist from impingement of hot molten metal particle detachments upon an astronauts space suit during any future electron beam welding exercises or experiments. The conditions under which molten metal detachments might occur in a space welding environment were analyzed. The safety issue is important during welding with regards to potential molten metal detachments from the weld pool and cold filler wire during electron beam welding in space. Theoretical models were developed to predict the possibility and size of the molten metal detachment hazards during the electron beam welding exercises at low earth orbit. Some possible ways of obtaining molten metal drop detachments would include an impulse force, or bump, to the weld sample, cut surface, or filler wire. Theoretical models were determined for these detachment concerns from principles of impact and kinetic energies, surface tension, drop geometry, surface energies, and particle dynamics. A weld pool detachment parameter for specifying the conditions for metal weld pool detachment by impact was derived and correlated to the experimental results. The experimental results were for the most part consistent with the theoretical analysis and predictions. c2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Dynamics of space welding impact and corresponding safety welding study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragomeni, James M.; Nunes, Arthur C.

    2004-03-01

    This study was undertaken in order to be sure that no hazard would exist from impingement of hot molten metal particle detachments upon an astronauts space suit during any future electron beam welding exercises or experiments. The conditions under which molten metal detachments might occur in a space welding environment were analyzed. The safety issue is important during welding with regards to potential molten metal detachments from the weld pool and cold filler wire during electron beam welding in space. Theoretical models were developed to predict the possibility and size of the molten metal detachment hazards during the electron beam welding exercises at low earth orbit. Some possible ways of obtaining molten metal drop detachments would include an impulse force, or bump, to the weld sample, cut surface, or filler wire. Theoretical models were determined for these detachment concerns from principles of impact and kinetic energies, surface tension, drop geometry, surface energies, and particle dynamics. A weld pool detachment parameter for specifying the conditions for metal weld pool detachment by impact was derived and correlated to the experimental results. The experimental results were for the most part consistent with the theoretical analysis and predictions.

  17. Aluminium matrix composites fabricated by infiltration method

    OpenAIRE

    L.A. Dobrzański; M. Kremzer; A.J. Nowak; Nagel, A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this work is to examine the structure and properties of metal matrix composites obtained by infiltration method of porous ceramic preforms by liquid aluminium alloy.Design/methodology/approach: Ceramic preforms were manufactured by the sintering method of ceramic powder. The preform material consists of powder Condea Al2O3 CL 2500, however, as the pore forming the carbon fibers Sigrafil C10 M250 UNS were used. Then ceramic preforms were infiltrated with liquid eutectic EN ...

  18. Silica passivation layer on aluminium brazing sheets

    OpenAIRE

    Schäuble, Kathrin

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The request for more efficient fuel economy to save raw materials and to reduce air pollution becomes more and more crucial in the automotive industry. To fulfil this demand by weight reduction, conventional materials such as steel and copper are replaced by light metals. Due to its beneficial material properties e. g. low density, high strength, good formability and high thermal conductivity, aluminium becomes a frequently used candidate. Particularly in the heat-exchanger industry ...

  19. Determination of Optimal Parameters for Diffusion Bonding of Semi-Solid Casting Aluminium Alloy by Response Surface Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaewploy Somsak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Liquid state welding techniques available are prone to gas porosity problems. To avoid this solid state bonding is usually an alternative of preference. Among solid state bonding techniques, diffusion bonding is often employed in aluminium alloy automotive parts welding in order to enhance their mechanical properties. However, there has been no standard procedure nor has there been any definitive criterion for judicious welding parameters setting. It is thus a matter of importance to find the set of optimal parameters for effective diffusion bonding. This work proposes the use of response surface methodology in determining such a set of optimal parameters. Response surface methodology is more efficient in dealing with complex process compared with other techniques available. There are two variations of response surface methodology. The one adopted in this work is the central composite design approach. This is because when the initial upper and lower bounds of the desired parameters are exceeded the central composite design approach is still capable of yielding the optimal values of the parameters that appear to be out of the initially preset range. Results from the experiments show that the pressing pressure and the holding time affect the tensile strength of jointing. The data obtained from the experiment fits well to a quadratic equation with high coefficient of determination (R2 = 94.21%. It is found that the optimal parameters in the process of jointing semi-solid casting aluminium alloy by using diffusion bonding are the pressing pressure of 2.06 MPa and 214 minutes of the holding time in order to achieve the highest tensile strength of 142.65 MPa

  20. Fundamental Laser Welding Process Investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Claus; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    1998-01-01

    In a number of systematic laboratory investigations the fundamental behavior of the laser welding process was analyzed by the use of normal video (30 Hz), high speed video (100 and 400 Hz) and photo diodes. Sensors were positioned to monitor the welding process from both the top side and the rear...... side of the specimen.Special attention has been given to the dynamic nature of the laser welding process, especially during unstable welding conditions. In one series of experiments, the stability of the process has been varied by changing the gap distance in lap welding. In another series...... video pictures (400 Hz), a clear impact on the seam characteristics has been identified when a hump occurs.Finally, a clear correlation between the position of the focus point, the resultant process type and the corresponding signal intensity and signal variation has been found for sheets welded...

  1. Investigation of concrete produced using recycled aluminium dross for hot weather concreting conditions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mailar, Gireesh; N, Sujay Raghavendra; B.M, Sreedhara; D.S, Manu; Hiremath, Parameshwar; K, Jayakesh

    2016-01-01

    Aluminium dross is a by-product obtained from the aluminium smelting process. Currently, this dross is processed in rotary kilns to recover the residual aluminium, and the resultant salt cake is sent to landfills...

  2. The aluminium content of infant formulas remains too high.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuchu, Nancy; Patel, Bhavini; Sebastian, Blaise; Exley, Christopher

    2013-10-08

    Recent research published in this journal highlighted the issue of the high content of aluminium in infant formulas. The expectation was that the findings would serve as a catalyst for manufacturers to address a significant problem of these, often necessary, components of infant nutrition. It is critically important that parents and other users have confidence in the safety of infant formulas and that they have reliable information to use in choosing a product with a lower content of aluminium. Herein, we have significantly extended the scope of the previous research and the aluminium content of 30 of the most widely available and often used infant formulas has been measured. Both ready-to-drink milks and milk powders were subjected to microwave digestion in the presence of 15.8 M HNO3 and 30% w/v H2O2 and the aluminium content of the digests was measured by TH GFAAS. Both ready-to-drink milks and milk powders were contaminated with aluminium. The concentration of aluminium across all milk products ranged from ca 100 to 430 μg/L. The concentration of aluminium in two soya-based milk products was 656 and 756 μg/L. The intake of aluminium from non-soya-based infant formulas varied from ca 100 to 300 μg per day. For soya-based milks it could be as high as 700 μg per day. All 30 infant formulas were contaminated with aluminium. There was no clear evidence that subsequent to the problem of aluminium being highlighted in a previous publication in this journal that contamination had been addressed and reduced. It is the opinion of the authors that regulatory and other non-voluntary methods are now required to reduce the aluminium content of infant formulas and thereby protect infants from chronic exposure to dietary aluminium.

  3. Multiply-negatively charged aluminium clusters and fullerenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, Noelle

    2008-07-15

    Multiply negatively charged aluminium clusters and fullerenes were generated in a Penning trap using the 'electron-bath' technique. Aluminium monoanions were generated using a laser vaporisation source. After this, two-, three- and four-times negatively charged aluminium clusters were generated for the first time. This research marks the first observation of tetra-anionic metal clusters in the gas phase. Additionally, doubly-negatively charged fullerenes were generated. The smallest fullerene dianion observed contained 70 atoms. (orig.)

  4. Corrosion of Metal-Matrix Composites with Aluminium Alloy Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Bobic

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behaviour of MMCs with aluminium alloy matrix was presented. The corrosion characteristics of boron-, graphite-, silicon carbide-, alumina- and mica- reinforced aluminium MMCs were reviewed. The reinforcing phase influence on MMCs corrosion rate as well as on various corrosion forms (galvanic, pitting, stress corrosion cracking, corrosion fatique, tribocorrosion was discussed. Some corrosion protection methods of aluminium based MMCs were described

  5. Improvement of photodynamic activity of aluminium sulphophthalocyanine due to biotinylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerovich, Irina G.; Jerdeva, Victoria V.; Derkacheva, Valentina M.; Meerovich, Gennadii A.; Lukyanets, Eugeny A.; Kogan, Eugenia A.; Savitsky, Alexander P.

    2003-09-01

    The photodynamic activity of dibiotinylated aluminium sulphophthalocyanine in vitro and in vivo were studied. It was obtained that in vitro dibiotinylated aluminium sulphophthalocyanine provides the effective damage of small cell lung carcinoma OAT-75. In vivo dibiotinylated aluminium sulphophthalocyanine causes destruction of tumor (Erlich carcinoma), results in total necrosis of tumor tissue and expresses vascular damage (trombosis and destruction of vascular walls) even in concentration 0.25 mg/kg of a body weight.

  6. No risk of Alzheimer's disease from aluminium in consumer products

    OpenAIRE

    Federal Institute for Risk Assessment

    2007-01-01

    Aluminium is the third most frequent element in the earth's crust and occurs naturally in drinking water and other foods, particularly in fruit and vegetables. For consumers the main uptake route is food. There may be additional exposure from aluminium-containing food-contact articles like kitchen utensils, cans, foils or tubes from which the light metal migrates into the food. Furthermore, aluminium may also be contained in medicinal products to neutralise gastric acid, so-called antacids an...

  7. Determination of Aluminium Content in Aluminium Hydroxide Formulation by FT-NIR Transmittance Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lai, Xuxin; Zheng, Yiwu; Søndergaard, Ib

    2007-01-01

    A method for determining the aluminium content of an aluminium hydroxide suspension using near infrared (NIR) transmittance spectroscopy has been developed. Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) was used as reference method. The factors influencing the NIR analysis...... by NIR transmission each on five different days, with total of 175 spectra used for the calibration set. The multivariate data analysis technique partial least square regression (PLSR) was applied to build the calibration model. Six batches of aluminium hydroxide samples were used for the test set. ICP......-AES and NIR transmittance spectroscopy exhibit comparable precision and accuracy. The NIR method provides several advantages: no complicated sample preparation; easy to operate; fast and non-destructive. In conclusion, NIR transmittance spectroscopy can be an alternative analytical method for determining...

  8. Pulsed ultrasonic stir welding system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An ultrasonic stir welding system includes a welding head assembly having a plate and a rod passing through the plate. The rod is rotatable about a longitudinal axis thereof. During a welding operation, ultrasonic pulses are applied to the rod as it rotates about its longitudinal axis. The ultrasonic pulses are applied in such a way that they propagate parallel to the longitudinal axis of the rod.

  9. Cholinergic System Under Aluminium Toxicity in Rat Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Yellamma, K.; Saraswathamma, S.; Kumari, B. Nirmala

    2010-01-01

    The present investigation envisages the toxic effects of aluminium on the cholinergic system of male albino rat brain. Aluminium toxicity (LD50/24 h) evaluated as per Probit method was found to be 700 mg/kg body weight. One-fifth of lethal dose was taken as the sublethal dose. For acute dose studies, rats were given a single lethal dose of aluminium acetate orally for one day only and for chronic dose studies, the rats were administered with sublethal dose of aluminium acetate once in a day f...

  10. Properties of ceramic-reinforced aluminium matrix composites - a review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Das, Dipti Kanta; Mishra, Purna Chandra; Singh, Saranjit; Thakur, Ratish Kumar

    2014-01-01

    .... The properties discussed include microstructural, optical, physical and mechanical behaviour of ceramic-reinforced aluminium matrix composites and effects of reinforcement fraction, particle size...

  11. Comparison of Welding Residual Stresses of Hybrid Laser-Arc Welding and Submerged Arc Welding in Offshore Steel Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Michael Joachim; Yu, Zhenzhen; Liu, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    In the offshore industry, welding-induced distortion and tensile residual stresses have become a major concern in relation to the structural integrity of a welded structure. Particularly, the continuous increase in size of welded plates and joints needs special attention concerning welding induced...... residual stresses. These stresses have a negative impact on the integrity of the welded joint as they promote distortion, reduce fatigue life, and contribute to corrosion cracking and premature failure in the weld components. This paper deals with the influence and impact of welding method on the welding...... induced residual stresses. It is also investigated whether the assumption of residual stresses up to yield strength magnitude are present in welded structures as stated in the design guidelines. The fatigue strength for welded joints is based on this assumption. The two welding methods investigated...

  12. The effect of post-welding conditions in friction stir welds: From weld simulation to Ductile Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hattel, Jesper Henri; Nielsen, Kim Lau; Tutum, Cem Celal

    2012-01-01

    effect of the post-welding conditions when subjecting a friction stir weld to loading transverse to the weld line. The numerical model of the friction stir welded joint, employs a step-wise modeling approach to combine an in-situ weld simulation with a post-welding failure analysis. Using the commercial......The post-welding stress state, strain history and material conditions of friction stir welded joints are often strongly idealized when used in subsequent modeling analyses, typically by neglecting one or more of the features above. But, it is obvious that the conditions after welding do influence...... the weld performance. The objective of this paper is to discuss some of the main conflicts that arise when taking both the post-welding material conditions and stressestrain state into account in a subsequent structural analysis. The discussion is here based on a preliminary numerical study of the possible...

  13. Pulsed ultrasonic stir welding method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method of performing ultrasonic stir welding uses a welding head assembly to include a plate and a rod passing through the plate. The rod is rotatable about a longitudinal axis thereof. In the method, the rod is rotated about its longitudinal axis during a welding operation. During the welding operation, a series of on-off ultrasonic pulses are applied to the rod such that they propagate parallel to the rod's longitudinal axis. At least a pulse rate associated with the on-off ultrasonic pulses is controlled.

  14. Reconditioning medical prostheses by welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rontescu, C.; Cicic, D. T.; Vasile, I. M.; Bogatu, A. M.; Amza, C. G.

    2017-08-01

    After the technological process of making, some of the medical prostheses may contain imperfections, which can lead to framing the product in the spoilage category. This paper treats the possibility of reconditioning by welding of the prosthesis made of titanium alloys. The paper presents the obtained results after the reconditioning by welding, using the GTAW process, of a intramedullary rod type prosthesis in which was found a crack after the non-destructive examination. The obtained result analysis, after the micrographic examination of the welded joint areas, highlighted that the process of reconditioning by welding can be applied successfully in such situations.

  15. Portable electron beam weld chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, J. R.; Dimino, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    Development and characteristics of portable vacuum chamber for skate type electron beam welding are discussed. Construction and operational details of equipment are presented. Illustrations of equipment are provided.

  16. Friction stir welding: multi-response optimisation using Taguchi-based GRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitender Kundu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In present experimental work, friction stir welding of aluminium alloy 5083- H321 is performed for optimisation of process parameters for maximum tensile strength. Taguchi’s L9 orthogonal array has been used for three parameters – tool rotational speed (TRS, traverse speed (TS, and tool tilt angle (TTA with three levels. Multi-response optimisation has been carried out through Taguchi-based grey relational analysis. The grey relational grade has been calculated for all three responses – ultimate tensile strength, percentage elongation, and micro-hardness. Analysis of variance is the tool used for obtaining grey relational grade to find out the significant process parameters. TRS and TS are the two most significant parameters which influence most of the quality characteristics of friction stir welded joint. Validation of predicted values done through confirmation experiments at optimum setting shows a good agreement with experimental values.

  17. Comparison of deposited surface area of airborne ultrafine particles generated from two welding processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, J F; Albuquerque, P C; Miranda, Rosa M; Santos, Telmo G; Vieira, M T

    2012-09-01

    This article describes work performed on the assessment of the levels of airborne ultrafine particles emitted in two welding processes metal-active gas (MAG) of carbon steel and friction-stir welding (FSW) of aluminium in terms of deposited area in alveolar tract of the lung using a nanoparticle surface area monitor analyser. The obtained results showed the dependence from process parameters on emitted ultrafine particles and clearly demonstrated the presence of ultrafine particles, when compared with background levels. The obtained results showed that the process that results on the lower levels of alveolar-deposited surface area is FSW, unlike MAG. Nevertheless, all the tested processes resulted in important doses of ultrafine particles that are to be deposited in the human lung of exposed workers.

  18. Penggunaan Dross Press Machine Sebagai Pemisah Kotoran Dari Aluminium Di Unit Billet Plant Aplikasi PT. Cakra Compact Aluminium Industries Tanjung Morawa

    OpenAIRE

    Sitohang, Febry Arno SM.

    2011-01-01

    Pada pengolahan aluminium yang terdapat di PT. Cakra Compact Aluminium Industries Tanjung Morawa terdapat beberapa unit yang salah satunya adalah unit billet. Proses yang dilakukan pada unit ini adalah proses peleburan billet dan pencetakan. Dalam proses peleburan dan pencetakan billet terdapat kotoran-kotoran yang bercampur dengan aluminium yang telah di lebur di dapur peleburan atau melter. Kotoran aluminium tersebut berupa gumpalan yang bersifat ringan dan mengapung di atas aluminium yang ...

  19. Gas Metal Arc Welding. Welding Module 5. Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This guide is intended to assist vocational educators in teaching an eight-unit module in gas metal arc welding. The module is part of a welding curriculum that has been designed to be totally integrated with Missouri's Vocational Instruction Management System. The following topics are covered in the module: safety and testing, gas metal arc…

  20. There is (still) too much aluminium in infant formulas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Infant formulas are sophisticated milk-based feeds for infants which are used as a substitute for breast milk. Historically they are known to be contaminated by aluminium and in the past this has raised health concerns for exposed infants. We have measured the aluminium content of a number of widely used infant formulas to determine if their contamination by aluminium and consequent issues of child health persists. Methods Samples of ready-made milks and powders used to make milks were prepared by microwave digestion of acid/peroxide mixtures and their aluminium content determined by THGA. Results The concentration of aluminium in ready-made milks varied from ca 176 to 700 μg/L. The latter concentration was for a milk for preterm infants. The aluminium content of powders used to make milks varied from ca 2.4 to 4.3 μg/g. The latter content was for a soya-based formula and equated to a ready-to-drink milk concentration of 629 μg/L. Using the manufacturer's own guidelines of formula consumption the average daily ingestion of aluminium from infant formulas for a child of 6 months varied from ca 200 to 600 μg of aluminium. Generally ingestion was higher from powdered as compared to ready-made formulas. Conclusions The aluminium content of a range of well known brands of infant formulas remains high and particularly so for a product designed for preterm infants and a soya-based product designed for infants with cow's milk intolerances and allergies. Recent research demonstrating the vulnerability of infants to early exposure to aluminium serves to highlight an urgent need to reduce the aluminium content of infant formulas to as low a level as is practically possible. PMID:20807425

  1. Long-term effects of aluminium dust inhalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Susan; Reid, Alison; Fritschi, Lin; de Klerk, Nicholas; Musk, A W Bill

    2013-12-01

    During the 1950s and 1960s, aluminium dust inhalation was used as a potential prophylaxis against silicosis in underground miners, including in Australia. We investigated the association between aluminium dust inhalation and cardiovascular, cerebrovascular and Alzheimer's diseases in a cohort of Australian male underground gold miners. We additionally looked at pneumoconiosis mortality to estimate the effect of the aluminium therapy. SMRs and 95% CI were calculated to compare mortality of the cohort members with that of the Western Australian male population (1961-2009). Internal comparisons on duration of aluminium dust inhalation were examined using Cox regression. Aluminium dust inhalation was reported for 647 out of 1894 underground gold miners. During 42 780 person-years of follow-up, 1577 deaths were observed. An indication of increased mortality of Alzheimer's disease among miners ever exposed to aluminium dust was found (SMR=1.38), although it was not statistically significant (95% CI 0.69 to 2.75). Rates for cardiovascular and cerebrovascular death were above population levels, but were similar for subjects with or without a history of aluminium dust inhalation. HRs suggested an increasing risk of cardiovascular disease with duration of aluminium dust inhalation (HR=1.02, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.04, per year of exposure). No difference in the association between duration of work underground and pneumoconiosis was observed between the groups with or without aluminium dust exposure. No protective effect against silicosis was observed from aluminium dust inhalation. Conversely, exposure to aluminium dust may possibly increase the risk of cardiovascular disease and dementia of the Alzheimer's type.

  2. There is (still too much aluminium in infant formulas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burrell Shelle-Ann M

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infant formulas are sophisticated milk-based feeds for infants which are used as a substitute for breast milk. Historically they are known to be contaminated by aluminium and in the past this has raised health concerns for exposed infants. We have measured the aluminium content of a number of widely used infant formulas to determine if their contamination by aluminium and consequent issues of child health persists. Methods Samples of ready-made milks and powders used to make milks were prepared by microwave digestion of acid/peroxide mixtures and their aluminium content determined by THGA. Results The concentration of aluminium in ready-made milks varied from ca 176 to 700 μg/L. The latter concentration was for a milk for preterm infants. The aluminium content of powders used to make milks varied from ca 2.4 to 4.3 μg/g. The latter content was for a soya-based formula and equated to a ready-to-drink milk concentration of 629 μg/L. Using the manufacturer's own guidelines of formula consumption the average daily ingestion of aluminium from infant formulas for a child of 6 months varied from ca 200 to 600 μg of aluminium. Generally ingestion was higher from powdered as compared to ready-made formulas. Conclusions The aluminium content of a range of well known brands of infant formulas remains high and particularly so for a product designed for preterm infants and a soya-based product designed for infants with cow's milk intolerances and allergies. Recent research demonstrating the vulnerability of infants to early exposure to aluminium serves to highlight an urgent need to reduce the aluminium content of infant formulas to as low a level as is practically possible.

  3. Influence of tool pin profile on microstructure and corrosion behaviour of AA2219 Al–Cu alloy friction stir weld nuggets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ch. Venkata Rao

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available To overcome the problems of fusion welding of aluminium alloys, the friction stir welding (FSW is recognized as an alternative joining method to improve the mechanical and corrosion properties. Tool profile is one of the important variables which affect the performance of the FS weld. In the present work, the effect of tool profile on the weld nugget microstructure and pitting corrosion of AA2219 aluminium–copper alloy was studied. FSW of AA2219 alloy was carried out using five profiles, namely conical, square, triangle, pentagon and hexagon. The temperature measurements were made in the region adjacent to the rotating pin. It was observed that the peak temperature is more in hexagonal tool pin compared to the welds produced with other tool pin profiles. It is observed that the extensive deformation experienced at the nugget zone and the evolved microstructure strongly influences the hardness and corrosion properties of the joint during FSW. It was found that the microstructure changes like grain size, misorientation and precipitate dissolution during FSW influence the hardness and corrosion behaviour. Pitting corrosion resistance of friction stir welds of AA2219 was found to be better for hexagon profile tool compared to other profiles, which was attributed to material flow and strengthening precipitate morphology in nugget zone. Higher amount of heat generation in FS welds made with hexagonal profile tool may be the reason for greater dissolution of strengthening precipitates in nugget zone.

  4. [New welding processes and health effects of welding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Vecchia, G Marina; Maestrelli, Piero

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes some of the recent developments in the control technology to enhance capability of Pulse Gas Metal Arc Welding. Friction Stir Welding (FSW) processing has been also considered. FSW is a new solid-state joining technique. Heat generated by friction at the rotating tool softens the material being welded. FSW can be considered a green and energy-efficient technique without deleterious fumes, gas, radiation, and noise. Application of new welding processes is limited and studies on health effects in exposed workers are lacking. Acute and chronic health effects of conventional welding have been described. Metal fume fever and cross-shift decline of lung function are the main acute respiratory effects. Skin and eyes may be affected by heat, electricity and UV radiations. Chronic effects on respiratory system include chronic bronchitis, a benign pneumoconiosis (siderosis), asthma, and a possible increase in the incidence of lung cancer. Pulmonary infections are increased in terms of severity, duration, and frequency among welders.

  5. Modeling Stress-Strain State in Butt-Welded Joints after TIG Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Atroshenko

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper mathematical model was developed for definition of thermal-welding cycle influence on welding deformations distribution in flat samples of austenitic steels after TIG welding and developed recommendations to reduce the welding deformation on o the machinery for welding with a copper backing.

  6. Joining of hybrid AA6063-6SiCp-3Grp composite and AISI 1030 steel by friction welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Rajesh Jesudoss Hynes

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Joining of metals and aluminium hybrid metal matrix composites has significant applications in aviation, ship building and automotive industries. In the present work, investigation is carried out on Friction Welding of AISI 1030 steel and hybrid AA6063-6SiCp-3Grpcomposite, that are difficult to weld by fusion welding technique. Silicon carbide and graphite particle reinforced AA6063 matrix hybrid composite was developed successfully using stir casting method and the joining feasibility of AISI1030 steel with AA6063-6SiCp-3Grp hybrid composite was tried out by friction stud welding technique. During friction stage of welding process, the particulates (SiC & Graphite used for reinforcement, tend to increase the viscosity and lead to improper mixing of matrix and reinforcement. This eventually results in lower strength in dissimilar joints. To overcome this difficulty AA1100 interlayer is used while joining hybrid composite to AISI 1030 steel. Experimentation was carried out using Taguchi based design of experiments (DOE technique. Multiple regression methods were applied to understand the relationship between process parameters of the friction stud welding process. Micro structural examination reveals three separate zones namely fully plasticized zone, partially deformed zone and unaffected base material zone. Ultra fine dynamically recrystallized grains of about 341 nm were observed at the fully plasticized zone. EDX analysis confirms the presence of intermetallic compound Fe2Al5 at the joint interface. According to the experimental analysis using DOE, rotational speed and interlayer sheet thickness contribute about 39% and 36% respectively in determining the impact strength of the welded joints. It is found that joining with 0.5 mm interlayer sheet provides efficient joints. Developed regression model could be used to predict the axial shortening distance and impact strength of the welded joint with reasonable accuracy.

  7. Speciation analysis of aluminium and aluminium fluoride complexes by HPIC-UVVIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankowski, Marcin; Zioła-Frankowska, Anetta

    2010-10-15

    The study presents a new analytical method for speciation analysis in fractionation of aluminium fluoride complexes and free Al(3+) in soil samples. Aluminium speciation was studied in model solutions and soil extract samples by means of high performance ion chromatography (HPIC) with UV-VIS detection using post-column reaction with tiron for the separation and detection of aluminium fluoride complex and Al(3+) forms during one analysis. The paper presents particular stages of the chromatographic process optimization involving selecting the appropriate eluent strength, type of elution or concentration and quantity of derivatization reagent. HPIC was performed on a bifunctional analytical column Dionex IonPac CS5A. The use of gradient elution and the eluents A: 1M NH(4)Cl and B: water acidified to pH of eluent phase, enabled full separation of fluoride aluminium forms as AlF(2)(+), AlF(3)(0), AlF(4)(-) (first signal), AlF(2+) (second signal) and form Al(3+) in a single analytical procedure. The proposed new method HPIC-UVVIS was applied successfully in the quantitative and qualitative analysis of soil samples. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Exposure to fumes in typical New Zealand welding operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dryson, E W; Rogers, D A

    1991-08-28

    Sixteen welders, welding under typical New Zealand conditions, had ambient air within their welding helmets sampled and analysed for ozone, nitrogen oxides, fluoride, carbon monoxide, aluminium, chromium, iron, nickel, zinc and total dust. Postshift urinary metals were also analysed, and a respiratory questionnaire completed for each welder. Levels above the New Zealand Workplace Exposure Standard (WES) were found for nitrogen dioxide in four welders (two TIG, one MMA and one plasma cutter), and for total chromium in one plasma cutter, who also had a nickel level of 24% of the WES. Dust levels were highest in the plasma cutters, with one reaching 8.67 mg/m3 (WES = 5 mg/m3). Urinary levels however did not indicate excessive short or long term uptake. Where efficient fume extraction was in use, levels of air contaminants were lower than with natural ventilation. Respiratory symptoms were reported by 67% of welders, 38% meeting criteria for chronic bronchitis (relative risk = 2.0). Smoking welders reported more symptoms than nonsmoking welders.

  9. Welding--Trade or Profession?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albright, C. E.; Smith, Kenneth

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses a collaborative program between schools with the purpose of training and providing advanced education in welding. Modern manufacturing is turning to automation to increase productivity, but it can be a great challenge to program robots and other computer-controlled welding and joining systems. Computer programming and…

  10. Metal Working and Welding Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    This student guide, one of a series of correspondence training courses designed to improve the job performance of members of the Marine Corps, deals with the skills needed by metal workers and welders. Addressed in the six individual units of the course are the following topics: weldable metals and their alloys, arc welding, gas welding,…

  11. Weld bonding of stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santos, I. O.; Zhang, Wenqi; Goncalves, V.M.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive theoretical and experimental investigation of the weld bonding process with the purpose of evaluating its relative performance in case of joining stainless steel parts, against alternative solutions based on structural adhesives or conventional spot-welding. Th...

  12. An interesting and efficient green corrosion inhibitor for aluminium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An interesting and efficient green corrosion inhibitor for aluminium from extracts of Moringa oleifera in acidic solution. ... The environmentally friendly inhibitor could find possible applications in metal surface anodizing and surface coating in industries. Keywords: Moringa oleifera, Aluminium, Hydrochloric acid, Langmuir ...

  13. Aluminium and Alzheimer's disease: the science that describes the link

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Exley, Christopher

    2001-01-01

    ... that has been encircled is the gene for the amyloid precursor protein. (Thanks to Walter Lukiw for supplying this information.) Aluminium and Alzheimer's Disease: The Science that Describes the LinkAluminium and Alzheimer's Disease The Science that Describes the Link Edited by Christopher Exley Birchall Centre for Inorganic Chemistry and Materials Scienc...

  14. Tolerance to Aluminium toxicity in Tanzanian sorghum genotypes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aluminium (Al) toxicity is a major abiotic constraint on grain sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench) production on acid soils in East Africa. Aluminium in acidic soil inhibits water and mineral uptake from and consequently, reduces plant vigour and yield. A study was done to determine genetic diversity of Tanzania's sorghum ...

  15. Synthesis of aluminium nanoparticles by arc evaporation of an ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. Aluminium nanoparticles (Al Nps) are synthesized using arc discharge method by applying direct current between aluminium electrodes in liquid environment without any use of vacuum equipment, heat exchangers, high temperatures furnaces and inert gases. After synthesis of Al Nps, in situ coating process on.

  16. Enhanced corrosion protection by microstructural control of aluminium brazing sheet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Norouzi Afshar, F.

    2013-01-01

    Aluminium brazing sheet is a sandwich material made out of two aluminium alloys (AA4xxx/AA3xxx) and is widely used in automotive heat exchangers. One of the main performance criteria for heat exchanger units is the lifetime of the product. The lifetime of the heat exchanger units is determined by

  17. Combined Corrosion and Wear of Aluminium Alloy 7075-T6

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Y.; Mol, J.M.C.; Janssen, G.C.A.M.

    2016-01-01

    The aluminium alloy 7075-T6 is widely used in engineering. In some applications, like slurry transport, corrosion and abrasion occur simultaneously, resulting in early material failure. In the present work, we investigated the combined effect of corrosion and wear on the aluminium alloy 7075-T6. We

  18. Effects and mechanisms of grain refinement in aluminium alloys

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Grain refinement plays a crucial role in improving characteristics and properties of cast and wrought aluminium alloys. Generally Al–Ti and Al–Ti–B master alloys are added to the aluminium alloys to grain refine the solidified product. The mechanism of grain refinement is of considerable controversy in the scientific literature ...

  19. The effects of aluminium and selenium supplementation on brain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This in vivo study was designed to investigate the potential of aluminium (Al), in the absence of added iron, to participate in either antioxidant or pro-oxidant events. Some markers of oxidative stress were determined in liver and brain of rats exposed to aluminium lactate, either alone or in the presence of dietary supplements ...

  20. Aluminium salt slag characterization and utilization--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsakiridis, P E

    2012-05-30

    Aluminium salt slag (also known as aluminium salt cake), which is produced by the secondary aluminium industry, is formed during aluminium scrap/dross melting and contains 15-30% aluminium oxide, 30-55% sodium chloride, 15-30% potassium chloride, 5-7% metallic aluminium and impurities (carbides, nitrides, sulphides and phosphides). Depending on the raw mix the amount of salt slag produced per tonne of secondary aluminium ranges from 200 to 500 kg. As salt slag has been classified as toxic and hazardous waste, it should be managed in compliance with the current legislation. Its landfill disposal is forbidden in most of the European countries and it should be recycled and processed in a proper way by taking the environmental impact into consideration. This paper presents a review of the aluminium salt slag chemical and mineralogical characteristics, as well as various processes for metal recovery, recycling of sodium and potassium chlorides content back to the smelting process and preparation of value added products from the final non metallic residue. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Friction factor of CP aluminium and aluminium–zinc alloys

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Friction factor has been determined for CP aluminium and aluminium–zinc alloys using ring compression test at different temperatures from 303 K to 773 K. It is found that CP aluminium exhibits sticking whereas Al–Zn alloys do not exhibit sticking at elevated temperatures. Hot working of Al–Zn alloy is easier than that of CP ...

  2. Laser cladding of aluminium using TiB2

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kumar, S

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Modification of Aluminium surface by injecting, dispersing and melting TiB2 powder with the help of a laser beam promises to enhance tribological properties of Aluminium. The present work consists of making single lines and various overlapping lines...

  3. Design and Analysis of Butterfly Valve Disc Using Aluminium (1100 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the present study butterfly valve which is commonly used for water line application was designed by using Pro-E software and analyzed its deflection using Ansys software. For the analysis, two materials such as aluminium (1100) and aluminium carbon nanotube 4% was used and compared these two materials ...

  4. Numerical Modelling of Drawbeads for Forming of Aluminium Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joshi, Y; Christiansen, Peter; Masters, I

    2016-01-01

    The drawbeads in stamping tools are usually designed based on experience from the forming of steel. However, aluminium alloys display different forming behaviour to steels, which is not reflected in the drawbead design for tools used for stamping aluminium. This paper presents experimental results...

  5. Carbonaceous alumina films deposited by MOCVD from aluminium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry was used to characterize carbonaceous, crystalline aluminium oxide films grown on Si(100) by low-pressure metal organic chemical vapour deposition, using aluminium acetylacetonate as the precursor. The presence of carbon in the films, attribured to the use of a metalorganic precursor for the ...

  6. Aluminium toxicity tolerance in crop plants: Present status of research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Soil acidity is one of the major constraints to agricultural production in large parts around the world. In acid soils, aluminium toxicity and consequent low phosphorous availability impair plant growth. The primary response to aluminium stress is visible in the roots. Exclusion and neutralization are two well known mechanism ...

  7. Aluminium removal from water after defluoridation with the electrocoagulation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Richa; Mathur, Sanjay; Brighu, Urmila

    2015-01-01

    Fluoride is the most electronegative element and has a strong affinity for aluminium. Owing to this fact, most of the techniques used for fluoride removal utilized aluminium compounds, which results in high concentrations of aluminium in treated water. In the present paper, a new approach is presented to meet the WHO guideline for residual aluminium concentration as 0.2 mg/L. In the present work, the electrocoagulation (EC) process was used for fluoride removal. It was found that aluminium content in water increases with an increase in the energy input. Therefore, experiments were optimized for a minimum energy input to achieve the target value (0.7 mg/L) of fluoride in resultant water. These optimized sets were used for further investigations of aluminium control. The experimental investigations revealed that use of bentonite clay as coagulant in clariflocculation brings down the aluminium concentration of water below the WHO guideline. Bentonite dose of 2 g/L was found to be the best for efficient removal of aluminium.

  8. Three body abrasion of laser surface alloyed aluminium AA1200

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mabhali, Luyolo AB

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Laser surface alloying of aluminium AA1200 was performed with a 4 kW Nd:YAG laser to improve the abrasion wear resistance. Aluminium surfaces reinforced with metal matrix composites and intermetallic phases were achieved. The phases present depended...

  9. Effects and mechanisms of grain refinement in aluminium alloys

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. Grain refinement plays a crucial role in improving characteristics and properties of cast and wrought aluminium alloys. Generally Al–Ti and Al–Ti–B master alloys are added to the aluminium alloys to grain refine the solidified product. The mechanism of grain refinement is of considerable controversy in the scientific ...

  10. Advances in development and application of aluminium batteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qingfeng, Li; Zhuxian, Qiu

    2001-01-01

    Aluminium has long attracted attention as a potential battery anode because of its high theoretical voltage and specific energy. The protective oxide layer at aluminium surface is however detrimental to its performance to achieve its reversible potential, and also causing the delayed activation o...

  11. Recycling of aluminium oxide; El oxido de aluminio reciclado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfaro, I.; Cano, M.; Rodriguez-Maribona, I.

    1998-07-01

    From the aluminium recycling process, a waste called Paval is obtained. The majority compound from Paval is the aluminium oxide, which must be recycled due to environment conservation. This paper presents the physico-chemical characteristics of Paval and the different treatments carried out to obtain the residue without impurities. finally, it shows the future investigation in new applications. (Author) 3 refs.

  12. Analysis of a weld of an hydrogen tank under pressure: contribution of the nano-indentation for the characterization; Analyse d'une soudure d'un reservoir d'hydrogene sous pression: apport de la nanoindentation pour la caracterisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, C.; Delobelle, P.; Perreux, D. [Laboratoire de Mecanique Appliquee R. Chaleat (LMARC), Institut FEMTO-ST, UFC and CNRS, 25 - Besancon (France); Russo, C.; Munier, E. [CEA Valduc, 21 - Is-sur-Tille (France); Decamps, B. [Institut de Chimie et des Materiaux Paris-Est vient, CNRS, CMTR-ICMPE, 94 - Thiais (France)

    2007-07-01

    This work deals with the size of an hydrogen spherical tank under pressure, composed of two half shell in aluminium alloy AZ5G machined in a forged bar and welded by electrons beam by a circumference. In this work, it is shown what the nano-indentation test can bring here. The influence of the tempering heat treatment after welding, the grains diameter and the loss in alloy elements (Zn and Mg) on the local mechanical properties of the weld bead has been revealed. In the same way, a hardening of the alloy due to the hydrogen penetration and leading to an increase of the dislocations density is observed. (O.M.)

  13. 29 CFR 1910.255 - Resistance welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Resistance welding. 1910.255 Section 1910.255 Labor... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Welding, Cutting and Brazing § 1910.255 Resistance welding. (a.... Ignitron tubes used in resistance welding equipment shall be equipped with a thermal protection switch. (3...

  14. 46 CFR 154.660 - Pipe welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pipe welding. 154.660 Section 154.660 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR... § 154.660 Pipe welding. (a) Pipe welding must meet Part 57 of this chapter. (b) Longitudinal butt welds...

  15. 49 CFR 179.300-9 - Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding. 179.300-9 Section 179.300-9... Specifications for Multi-Unit Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-106A and 110AW) § 179.300-9 Welding. (a) Longitudinal... fusion welded on class DOT-110A tanks. Welding procedures, welders and fabricators must be approved in...

  16. METHOD AND SYSTEM FOR LASER WELDING

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    The invention relates to laser welding of at least two adjacent, abutting or overlapping work pieces in a welding direction using multiple laser beams guided to a welding region, wherein at least two of the multiple laser beams are coupled into the welding region so as to form a melt and at least...

  17. Magnetic Deflection Of Welding Electron Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinzak, R. Michael; Booth, Gary N.

    1991-01-01

    Electron-beam welds inside small metal parts produced with aid of magnetic deflector. Beam redirected so it strikes workpiece at effective angle. Weld joint positioned to where heavy microfissure concentration removed when subsequent machining required, increasing likelihood of removing any weld defects located in face side of electron-beam weld.

  18. Clamp and Gas Nozzle for TIG Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gue, G. B.; Goller, H. L.

    1982-01-01

    Tool that combines clamp with gas nozzle is aid to tungsten/inert-gas (TIG) welding in hard-to-reach spots. Tool holds work to be welded while directing a stream of argon gas at weld joint, providing an oxygen-free environment for tungsten-arc welding.

  19. Comparison of Welding Residual Stresses of Hybrid Laser-Arc Welding and Submerged Arc Welding in Offshore Steel Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Andreassen, Michael Joachim; Yu, Zhenzhen; Liu, Stephen; Guerrero-Mata, Martha Patricia

    2016-01-01

    In the offshore industry, welding-induced distortion and tensile residual stresses have become a major concern in relation to the structural integrity of a welded structure. Particularly, the continuous increase in size of welded plates and joints needs special attention concerning welding induced residual stresses. These stresses have a negative impact on the integrity of the welded joint as they promote distortion, reduce fatigue life, and contribute to corrosion cracking and premature fail...

  20. Research on stress corrosion behavior of CCSE40 welded by underwater wet welding with austenitic welding rod in seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Y.; Bai, Q.; Dong, S.; Yang, Z. L.; Gao, Y.

    2017-09-01

    The stress corrosion behavior of CCSE40 welded by underwater wet welding with austenitic welding rod in seawater was studied. Microstructure, mechanical property and stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of the underwater wet welding joint were analyzed by metallographic observation, tensile and bending tests, slow strain rate test (SSRT) and SEM. The results indicated that the weld zone (WZ) and the heat affected zone (HAZ) were all sensitive to the stress corrosion, and the WZ was more sensitive than the HAZ.

  1. Research on the Effects of Technical Parameters on the Molding of the Weld by A-TIG Welding

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Kai; Pan, Wu

    2012-01-01

    The effects of welding parameters on the molding of weld by A-TIG welding of a 4mm thickness mild steel plate is studied in the present paper. The results obtained show that: as welding current increases A-TIG welding penetration gets deeper than TIG welding; size and shape of HAZ has remarkable change; A-TIG welding has the narrower weld pool width than TIG welding.

  2. Tailored Aluminium based Coatings for Optical Appearance and Corrosion Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aggerbeck, Martin

    potential differences in the microstructure, and protection from the network of the Al3Ti phases precipitated during the heat treatment. Laser surface cladding of aluminium containing up to 20 wt. % Ti6Al4V were studied focusing on the microstructure and the alkaline corrosion properties. Due......The current project investigated the possibility of designing aluminium based coatings focusing on the effect of composition and surface finish on the optical appearance and on the alkaline corrosion properties using titanium as the main alloying element. The main results and discussions...... with aluminium. Unfortunately, aluminium corrodes heavily in the alkaline environments known e.g. from a brush less car wash (> pH 12). Today nickel salt sealing is used to protect e.g. aluminium wheel rims, but an alternative is needed due to environmental and health reasons. Investigations using the previously...

  3. Experimental fatigue curves for aluminium brazed areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitescu, A.; Babiş, C.; Niţoi, D. F.; Radu, C.

    2017-08-01

    An important factor for the quality of joints is the brazed area. The fatigue check occupies a major position among many test procedures and methods, especially by the joining technologies. The results of processing the fatigue data experiments for aluminium brazed samples are used to find the regression function and the response surface methodology. The fatigue process of mechanical components under service loading is stochastic in nature. The prediction of time-dependent fatigue reliability is critical for the design and maintenance planning of many structural components.

  4. Deviatoric response of the aluminium alloy, 5083

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby-Thomas, Gareth; Hazell, Paul; Millett, Jeremy; Bourne, Neil

    2009-06-01

    Aluminium alloys such as 5083 are established light weight armour materials. As such, the shock response of these materials is of great importance. The shear strength of a material under shock loading provides an insight into its ballistic performance. In this investigation embedded manganin stress gauges have been employed to measure both the longitudinal and lateral components of stress during plate impact experiments over a range of impact stresses. In turn, these results were used to determine the shear strength and to investigate the time dependence of lateral stress behind the shock front to give an indication of material response.

  5. Aluminium hydroxide-induced granulomas in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valtulini, S; Macchi, C; Ballanti, P

    2005-01-01

    in the muscles of the neck (group slaughtered). The pigs had been injected with a vaccine containing 40 mg/2 ml dose of aluminium hydroxide as adjuvant. Research consisted of two phases: first, an epidemiological study was carried out, aimed at determining the risk factors for the granulomas. The results...... indicated that the vaccine was to be held responsible for the formation of granulomas. A clinical trial was then performed to further substantiate the initial hypothesis, by comparing pigs, which were aseptically inoculated twice with either the original vaccine or the adjuvant alone (groups vaccine...... was the cause of the granulomas....

  6. Aluminium and the automobile. Aluminium und Automobil. Vortraege eines internationalen Symposiums der Aluminium-Zentrale, Duesseldorf, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-04-01

    The first symposium on 'Aluminium and the Automobile' took place in March 1976. The lectures of the latest symposium report on the time in between; with special regard to the extent and intensity with wich aluminium - whose advantages and desadvantages are known - was a subject of research and development work done by car producers and parts- and accessory producing industry. Producers of engine blocks, wheels brakes, sunroofs, window-glass mechanisms, heat exchangers, air-filters, drive shafts - just to mention a few described their success but also gave and account of so far unsolved problems. Aluminum and car producers from abroad gave valuable contributions as well. Good news is the technical progress which was clearly reflected in all the lectures. The automobile of the future needs to be further developed in order te fulfill the requirements of lower weight and energy saving cost reduction is equally important for the German and European car industry due to the increasingly hard competitive struggle. Contrary to previous predictions a sufficient supply of alluminium with be available in the years to come.

  7. Automatic welding of stainless steel tubing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clautice, W. E.

    1978-01-01

    The use of automatic welding for making girth welds in stainless steel tubing was investigated as well as the reduction in fabrication costs resulting from the elimination of radiographic inspection. Test methodology, materials, and techniques are discussed, and data sheets for individual tests are included. Process variables studied include welding amperes, revolutions per minute, and shielding gas flow. Strip chart recordings, as a definitive method of insuring weld quality, are studied. Test results, determined by both radiographic and visual inspection, are presented and indicate that once optimum welding procedures for specific sizes of tubing are established, and the welding machine operations are certified, then the automatic tube welding process produces good quality welds repeatedly, with a high degree of reliability. Revised specifications for welding tubing using the automatic process and weld visual inspection requirements at the Kennedy Space Center are enumerated.

  8. Automatic welding systems for large ship hulls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arregi, B.; Granados, S.; Hascoet, JY.; Hamilton, K.; Alonso, M.; Ares, E.

    2012-04-01

    Welding processes represents about 40% of the total production time in shipbuilding. Although most of the indoor welding work is automated, outdoor operations still require the involvement of numerous operators. To automate hull welding operations is a priority in large shipyards. The objective of the present work is to develop a comprehensive welding system capable of working with several welding layers in an automated way. There are several difficulties for the seam tracking automation of the welding process. The proposed solution is the development of a welding machine capable of moving autonomously along the welding seam, controlling both the position of the torch and the welding parameters to adjust the thickness of the weld bead to the actual gap between the hull plates.

  9. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of an Ultrasonic Spot Welded Aluminum Alloy: The Effect of Welding Energy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    He Peng; Daolun Chen; Xianquan Jiang

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the microstructures, tensile lap shear strength, and fatigue resistance of 6022-T43 aluminum alloy joints welded via a solid-state welding technique-ultrasonic spot welding (USW...

  10. Versatile Friction Stir Welding/Friction Plug Welding System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Robert

    2006-01-01

    A proposed system of tooling, machinery, and control equipment would be capable of performing any of several friction stir welding (FSW) and friction plug welding (FPW) operations. These operations would include the following: Basic FSW; FSW with automated manipulation of the length of the pin tool in real time [the so-called auto-adjustable pin-tool (APT) capability]; Self-reacting FSW (SRFSW); SR-FSW with APT capability and/or real-time adjustment of the distance between the front and back shoulders; and Friction plug welding (FPW) [more specifically, friction push plug welding] or friction pull plug welding (FPPW) to close out the keyhole of, or to repair, an FSW or SR-FSW weld. Prior FSW and FPW systems have been capable of performing one or two of these operations, but none has thus far been capable of performing all of them. The proposed system would include a common tool that would have APT capability for both basic FSW and SR-FSW. Such a tool was described in Tool for Two Types of Friction Stir Welding (MFS- 31647-1), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 30, No. 10 (October 2006), page 70. Going beyond what was reported in the cited previous article, the common tool could be used in conjunction with a plug welding head to perform FPW or FPPW. Alternatively, the plug welding head could be integrated, along with the common tool, into a FSW head that would be capable of all of the aforementioned FSW and FPW operations. Any FSW or FPW operation could be performed under any combination of position and/or force control.

  11. Real time computer controlled weld skate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, W. A., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A real time, adaptive control, automatic welding system was developed. This system utilizes the general case geometrical relationships between a weldment and a weld skate to precisely maintain constant weld speed and torch angle along a contoured workplace. The system is compatible with the gas tungsten arc weld process or can be adapted to other weld processes. Heli-arc cutting and machine tool routing operations are possible applications.

  12. Corrosion Properties of Laser Welded Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weldingh, Jakob; Olsen, Flemmming Ove

    1997-01-01

    In this paper the corrosion properties of laser welded AISI 316L stainless steel are examined. A number of different welds has been performed to test the influence of the weld parameters of the resulting corrosion properties. It has been chosen to use the potential independent critical pitting...... temperature (CPT) test as corrosion test. The following welding parameters are varied: Welding speed, lsser power, focus point position and laser operation mode (CW or pulsed)....

  13. Control of Welding Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    Structures, Office of Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for R&E (ET), Department of Defense, Washington, D.C. CHARLES ZANIS, Assistant Director for Platform... CHARLES NULL, Head, Metals Branch, Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, D.C. ROBERT A. WEBER, Welding Engineering and Metallurgy, U.S. Army Corps of...Needs. Pp. 487-90. in Papers Presented at the August 3-8, 1Q80, AIME Syi,.posium. Essers, W . ., and R. Walter. Heat transfer and penet ration

  14. The effect of friction welding self-regulation process on weld structure and hardness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Ptak

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The self-regulation phenomenon that occurs during friction welding process was characterised, and the effect of the self-regulation of theenergy-related parameters on structure and hardness distribution in SW7Mo steel – 55 steel welded joint was determined experimentally.The structure and hardness of the weld zone were examined, the energy required for the stable run of a friction welding process wascalculated, and a relationship between the welding energy and weld hardness was derived.

  15. Investigation on the sorption of aluminium in drinking water by low ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aluminium is one of the trace inorganic metals present in drinking water. High aluminium concentrations (3.6 to 6 mg/ℓ) may precipitate as aluminium hydroxide affecting aquatic life. Aluminium is also a suspected agent of neurological disorders such as Alzheimer\\'s disease and senile dementia. The present investigation ...

  16. 10,170 flawless welds

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2014-01-01

    The welding of tubes containing the principal current-carrying busbars in the LHC magnets was one of the main activities of the SMACC project. After a year of preparation and another of intense activity in the tunnel, the last weld was completed on Wednesday 14 May. Over 10,170 welds have been inspected and not a single fault has been found.    The welder (above) creates the weld using an orbital welding machine (below) specifically designed for CERN. Each of the eight sectors of the LHC contains around 210 interconnects between the superconducting magnets. Consolidating these interconnections was the SMACC project’s primary objective. One of the last jobs before closing the interconnects is the welding of the M lines: each has a 104 mm diameter and a radial clearance of just 45 mm. In total: 10,170 welds carried out in a single year of activities. A true challenge, which was carried out by a team of 30 highly specialised welders, working under the supervision o...

  17. Laser welding of fused quartz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piltch, Martin S.; Carpenter, Robert W.; Archer, III, McIlwaine

    2003-06-10

    Refractory materials, such as fused quartz plates and rods are welded using a heat source, such as a high power continuous wave carbon dioxide laser. The radiation is optimized through a process of varying the power, the focus, and the feed rates of the laser such that full penetration welds may be accomplished. The process of optimization varies the characteristic wavelengths of the laser until the radiation is almost completely absorbed by the refractory material, thereby leading to a very rapid heating of the material to the melting point. This optimization naturally occurs when a carbon dioxide laser is used to weld quartz. As such this method of quartz welding creates a minimum sized heat-affected zone. Furthermore, the welding apparatus and process requires a ventilation system to carry away the silicon oxides that are produced during the welding process to avoid the deposition of the silicon oxides on the surface of the quartz plates or the contamination of the welds with the silicon oxides.

  18. The technology and welding joint properties of hybrid laser-tig welding on thick plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenghai, Zhang; Yifu, Shen; Huijuan, Qiu

    2013-06-01

    The technologies of autogenous laser welding and hybrid laser-TIG welding are used on thick plate of high strength lower alloy structural steel 10CrNiMnMoV in this article. The unique advantages of hybrid laser-TIG welding is summarized by comparing and analyzing the process parameters and welding joints of autogenous laser welding laser welding and hybrid laser-TIG welding. With the optimal process parameters of hybrid welding, the good welding joint without visible flaws can be obtained and its mechanical properties are tested according to industry standards. The results show that the hybrid welding technology has certain advantages and possibility in welding thick plates. It can reduce the demands of laser power, and it is significant for lowering the aspect ratio of weld during hybrid welding, so the gas in the molten pool can rise and escape easily while welding thick plates. Therefore, the pores forming tendency decreases. At the same time, hybrid welding enhances welding speed, and optimizes the energy input. The transition and grain size of the microstructure of hybrid welding joint is better and its hardness is higher than base material. Furthermore, its tensile strength and impact toughness is as good as base material. Consequently, the hybrid welding joint can meet the industry needs completely.

  19. RECYCLING AND PROPERTIES OF RECYCLED ALUMINIUM ALLOYS USED IN THE TRANSPORTATION INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka KUCHARIKOVÁ

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, a transportation industry creates a lot of metal scrap because production and use of cars are on the increase worldwide. This is based on the fact that increase in the production of cars increases usage of aluminium alloys in transportation applications. Therefore, it is necessary to reduce the production of components from primary aluminium alloy and increase their replacement with secondary—recycled—aluminium alloys because the production of recycled aluminium alloys is less expensive and less energy-intensive than the creation of new aluminium alloy through the electrolysis. In addition, the recycled aluminium alloys have comparable microstructural parameters and properties as the same primary aluminium alloys.

  20. Review of laser hybrid welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Claus

    2004-01-01

    In this artucle an overview og the hybrid welding process is given. After a short historic overview, a review of the fundamental phenomenon taking place when a laser (CO2 or Nd:YAG) interacts in the same molten pool as a more conventional source of energy, e.g. tungsten in-active gas, plasma......, or metal inactive gas/metal active gas.This is followed by reports of how the many process parameters governing the hybrid welding process can be set and how the choice of secondary energy source, shielding gas, etc. can affect the overall welding process....

  1. Novel Process Revolutionizes Welding Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Glenn Research Center, Delphi Corporation, and the Michigan Research Institute entered into a research project to study the use of Deformation Resistance Welding (DRW) in the construction and repair of stationary structures with multiple geometries and dissimilar materials, such as those NASA might use on the Moon or Mars. Traditional welding technologies are burdened by significant business and engineering challenges, including high costs of equipment and labor, heat-affected zones, limited automation, and inconsistent quality. DRW addresses each of those issues, while drastically reducing welding, manufacturing, and maintenance costs.

  2. Convection in arc weld pools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oreper, G.M.; Eagar, T.W.; Szekely, J.

    1982-11-01

    A mathematical model was developed to account for convection and temperature distributions in stationary arc weld pools driven by buoyancy, electromagnetic and surface tension forces. It is shown that the electromagnetic and surface tension forces dominate the flow behavior. In some cases, these forces produce double circulation loops, which are indirectly confirmed by experimental measurements of segregation in the weld pool. It is also shown that the surface tension driven flows are very effective in dissipating the incident energy flux on the pool surface which, in turn, reduces the vaporization from the weld pool.

  3. Plasticity Theory of Fillet Welds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    This paper deals with simple methods for calculation of fillet welds based on the theory of plasticity. In developing the solutions the lower-bound theorem is used. The welding material and parts of the base material are subdivided into triangular regions with homogeneous stress fields; thereby...... a safe and statically admissible stress distribution is established. The plasticity solutions are compared with tests carried out at the Engineering Academy of Denmark, Lyngby, in the early nineties, and old fillet weld tests. The new failure conditions are in very good agreement with the yield load...

  4. Specification and qualification of welding procedures for metallic materials : welding procedure test : part 1 : arc and gas welding of steels and arc welding of nickel and nickel alloys : technical corrigendum 1

    CERN Document Server

    International Organization for Standardization. Geneva

    2005-01-01

    Specification and qualification of welding procedures for metallic materials : welding procedure test : part 1 : arc and gas welding of steels and arc welding of nickel and nickel alloys : technical corrigendum 1

  5. Automated Variable-Polarity Plasma-Arc Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numes, A. C., Jr.; Bayless, E. O., Jr.; Jones, S. C., III; Munafo, P.; Munafo, A.; Biddle, A.; Wilson, W.

    1984-01-01

    Variable-polarity plasma-arc methods produces better welds at lower cost than gas-shielded tungsten-arc welding in assemblies. Weld porosity very low and costs of joint preparation, depeaking, inspection, and weld repair minimized.

  6. Does allergen-specific immunotherapy induce contact allergy to aluminium?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netterlid, Eva; Hindsén, Monica; Siemund, Ingrid; Björk, Jonas; Werner, Sonja; Jacobsson, Helene; Güner, Nuray; Bruze, Magnus

    2013-01-01

    Persistent, itching nodules have been reported to appear at the injection site after allergen-specific immuno-therapy with aluminium-precipitated antigen extract, occasionally in conjunction with contact allergy to aluminium. This study aimed to quantify the development of contact allergy to aluminium during allergen-specific immunotherapy. A randomized, controlled, single-blind multicentre study of children and adults entering allergen-specific immunotherapy was performed using questionnaires and patch-testing. A total of 205 individuals completed the study. In the 3 study groups all subjects tested negative to aluminium before allergen-specific immunotherapy and 4 tested positive after therapy. In the control group 4 participants tested positive to aluminium. Six out of 8 who tested positive also had atopic dermatitis. Positive test results were found in 5/78 children and 3/127 adults. Allergen-specific immunotherapy was not shown to be a risk factor for contact allergy to aluminium. Among those who did develop aluminium allergy, children and those with atopic dermatitis were more highly represented.

  7. New developments in aluminium titanate ceramics and refractories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alecu, I.D.; Cilia, R.A.; Dean, G.A.; Reuben, R.; Stead, R.J.; Wing, R.F. [Rojan Advanced Ceramics Pty Ltd., Spearwood, WA (Australia)

    2002-07-01

    During the recent years there has been a world-wide resurgence in the interest for aluminium titanate ceramics. Aluminium titanate (AT) possesses a unique collection of outstanding properties that make it a favourite candidate for applications where thermal shock resistance, thermal and / or phonic insulation, or compatibility with molten metals are key requirements. Particularly promising are the applications of aluminium titanate in the non-ferrous metallurgical industry, primarily in aluminium smelters and foundries. Aluminium titanate is best suitable for manufacturing ceramic components for gravity and low-pressure die casting of non-ferrous metals and alloys. Examples of such components are casting nozzles and spouts, sprue bushes, connecting tubes, riser tubes, etc. As aluminium titanate (AT) is generally known as a ceramic material with a modest mechanical strength, most applications have been so far as components that either are small enough, or are subjected to small enough mechanical loads, so that the risk of failure is acceptably low. Currently there is an increasing demand for larger and / or stronger components, which obviously require significantly stronger aluminium titanate ceramic materials, as well as adequate forming technologies. (orig.)

  8. Mechanical and durability aspects of concrete incorporating secondary aluminium slag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Satish Reddy

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The environmental impact can be minimised by making use of many industrial wastes in a sustainable manner. Recycling and reutilisation of industrial waste and by-products is of paramount importance in cement and concrete industry. In view of rapid infrastructure growth, there is an emerging need for development of cementitious materials or fillers either to replace cement or fine aggregate for stable growth. One of the industrial wastes is secondary aluminium dross. In this paper, an attempt has been made to study the mechanical and durability aspects of concrete incorporated with secondary aluminium dross. Cement has been partially replaced by secondary aluminium dross in different proportions to study the mechanical and durability aspects. Various properties such as compressive strength, split tensile strength, flexural strength, sorptivity, water absorption, rapid chloride penetration have been studied for the usefulness of secondary aluminium dross as construction material. It is observed that up to 15% replacement of cement by secondary aluminium dross, the responses are comparable with the conventional concrete. Studies have also been carried out by adding other supplementary cementitious materials such as fly ash and silica fume in various proportions along with secondary aluminium dross and found the improved mechanical and durability properties. From the overall study, it can be concluded that the concrete incorporated with secondary aluminium dross can be used for making paver blocks, refractory bricks and for normal concrete strength applications.

  9. Laser welding and post weld treatment of modified 9Cr-1MoVNb steel.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Z. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2012-04-03

    Laser welding and post weld laser treatment of modified 9Cr-1MoVNb steels (Grade P91) were performed in this preliminary study to investigate the feasibility of using laser welding process as a potential alternative to arc welding methods for solving the Type IV cracking problem in P91 steel welds. The mechanical and metallurgical testing of the pulsed Nd:YAG laser-welded samples shows the following conclusions: (1) both bead-on-plate and circumferential butt welds made by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser show good welds that are free of microcracks and porosity. The narrow heat affected zone has a homogeneous grain structure without conventional soft hardness zone where the Type IV cracking occurs in conventional arc welds. (2) The laser weld tests also show that the same laser welder has the potential to be used as a multi-function tool for weld surface remelting, glazing or post weld tempering to reduce the weld surface defects and to increase the cracking resistance and toughness of the welds. (3) The Vicker hardness of laser welds in the weld and heat affected zone was 420-500 HV with peak hardness in the HAZ compared to 240 HV of base metal. Post weld laser treatment was able to slightly reduce the peak hardness and smooth the hardness profile, but failed to bring the hardness down to below 300 HV due to insufficient time at temperature and too fast cooling rate after the time. Though optimal hardness of weld made by laser is to be determined for best weld strength, methods to achieve the post weld laser treatment temperature, time at the temperature and slow cooling rate need to be developed. (4) Mechanical testing of the laser weld and post weld laser treated samples need to be performed to evaluate the effects of laser post treatments such as surface remelting, glazing, re-hardening, or tempering on the strength of the welds.

  10. Joining of AZ31 and AZ91 Mg alloys by friction stir welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ratna Sunil

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Two dissimilar magnesium (Mg alloy sheets, one with low aluminium (AZ31 and another with high aluminium (AZ91 content, were successfully joined by friction stir welding (FSW. The effect of process parameters on the formation of hot cracks was investigated. A sound metallurgical joint was obtained at optimized process parameters (1400 rpm with 25 mm/min feed which contained fine grains and distributed β (Mg17Al12 phase within the nugget zone. An increasing trend in the hardness measurements has also confirmed more amount of dissolution of aluminium within the nugget zone. A sharp interface between nugget zone and thermo mechanical affected zone (TMAZ was clearly noticed at the AZ31 Mg alloy side (advancing but not on the AZ91 Mg alloy side (retreating. From the results it can be concluded that FSW can be effectively used to join dissimilar metals, particularly difficult to process metals such as Mg alloys, and hot cracking can be completely eliminated by choosing appropriate process parameters to achieve sound joint.

  11. Influence of Column Axial Load and Heat Affected Zone on the Strength of Aluminium Column Web in Tension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianfranco De Matteis

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The component method for aluminium joints has been recently introduced in some codes and guidelines. Nevertheless, it is still in need of some development and improvement, as in some cases it was obtained by adapting the existing formulations that are valid for steel. The current paper presents the main outcomes of a parametric analysis carried out by means of finite element (FE numerical models for determining the influence of both column axial load and heat affected zone—in the case of welded details—on the structural response of the column web in a tension component. The proposed study integrates previous research carried out by the authors, where the influence of the assumed alloy was investigated and interpreted by corrective parameters expressed as a function of both the material strain hardening and ductility.

  12. The varied functions of aluminium-activated malate transporters-much more than aluminium resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Antony J; Baker, Alison; Muench, Stephen P

    2016-06-15

    The ALMT (aluminium-activated malate transporter) family comprises a functionally diverse but structurally similar group of ion channels. They are found ubiquitously in plant species, expressed throughout different tissues, and located in either the plasma membrane or tonoplast. The first family member identified was TaALMT1, discovered in wheat root tips, which was found to be involved in aluminium resistance by means of malate exudation into the soil. However, since this discovery other family members have been shown to have many other functions such as roles in stomatal opening, general anionic homoeostasis, and in economically valuable traits such as fruit flavour. Recent evidence has also shown that ALMT proteins can act as key molecular actors in GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) signalling, the first evidence that GABA can act as a signal transducer in plants. © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  13. Investigation of concrete produced using recycled aluminium dross for hot weather concreting conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Mailar, Gireesh; N, Sujay Raghavendra; B.M, Sreedhara; D.S, Manu; Hiremath, Parameshwar; K., Jayakesh

    2016-01-01

    Aluminium dross is a by-product obtained from the aluminium smelting process. Currently, this dross is processed in rotary kilns to recover the residual aluminium, and the resultant salt cake is sent to landfills. The present study investigates the utilization of recycled aluminium dross in producing concrete, which is suitable for hot weather concreting condition. The primary objectives of the experimental study are to examine the feasibility of using concrete blended with recycled aluminium...

  14. Materials participation in welded joints manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghenghea, L. D.

    2016-08-01

    Management of materials dilution to form a joint with higher features asked by complex metallic structures is a problem that took attention and efforts of welding processes researchers and this communication will give a little contribution presenting some scientific and experimental results of dilution processes studied by Welding Research Group from Iasi, Romania, TCM Department. Liquid state welding processes have a strong dependence related to dilution of base and filler materials, the most important are for automatic joining using welding. The paper presents a review of some scientific works already published and their contributions, results of dilution coefficient evaluation using weighing, graphics and software applied for shielded metal arc welding process. Paper results could be used for welders’ qualification, welding procedure specification and other welding processes researchers’ activities. The results of Welding Research Group from Iasi, Romania, TCM Department, show dilution coefficient values between 20-30 % of base material and 70-80 % of filler material for studied welding process.

  15. Filler wire for aluminum alloys and method of welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorkman, Jr., Gerald W. O. (Inventor); Cho, Alex (Inventor); Russell, Carolyn K. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A weld filler wire chemistry has been developed for fusion welding 2195 aluminum-lithium. The weld filler wire chemistry is an aluminum-copper based alloy containing high additions of titanium and zirconium. The additions of titanium and zirconium reduce the crack susceptibility of aluminum alloy welds while producing good weld mechanical properties. The addition of silver further improves the weld properties of the weld filler wire. The reduced weld crack susceptibility enhances the repair weldability, including when planishing is required.

  16. MFDC - technological improvement in resistance welding controls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somani, A.K.; Naga Bhaskar, V.; Chandramouli, J.; Rameshwara Rao, A. [Nuclear Fuel Complex, Dept. of Atomic Energy, Hyderabad (India)

    2008-07-01

    Among the various Resistance Welding operations carried out in the production line of a fuel bundle end plug welding is the most critical operation. Welding controllers play a very vital role in obtaining consistent weld quality by regulating and controlling the weld current. Conventional mains synchronized welding controllers are at best capable of controlling the weld current at a maximum speed of the mains frequency. In view of the very short welding durations involved in the various stages of a fuel bundle fabrication, a need was felt for superior welding controllers. Medium Frequency Welding Controllers offer a solution to these limitations in addition to offering other advantages. Medium Frequency power sources offer precise welding current control as they regulate and correct the welding current faster, typically twenty times faster when operated at 1000Hz. An MFDC was employed on one of the welding machines and its performance was studied. This paper discusses about the various advantages of MFDCs with other controllers employed at NFC to end plug welding operation. (author)

  17. Gas Shielding Technology for Welding and Brazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur J.; Gradl, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    Welding is a common method that allows two metallic materials to be joined together with high structural integrity. When joints need to be leak-tight, light-weight, or free of contaminant-trapping seams or surface asperities, welding tends to be specified. There are many welding techniques, each with its own advantages and disadvantages. Some of these techniques include Forge Welding, Gas Tungsten Arc Welding, Friction Stir Welding, and Laser Beam Welding to name a few. Whichever technique is used, the objective is a structural joint that meets the requirements of a particular component or assembly. A key practice in producing quality welds is the use of shielding gas. This article discusses various weld techniques, quality of the welds, and importance of shielding gas in each of those techniques. Metallic bonds, or joints, are produced when metals are put into intimate contact. In the solid-state "blacksmith welding" process, now called Forge Welding (FOW), the site to be joined is pounded into intimate contact. The surfaces to be joined usually need to be heated to make it easier to deform the metal. The surfaces are sprinkled with a flux to melt surface oxides and given a concave shape so that surface contamination can be squeezed out of the joint as the surfaces are pounded together; otherwise the surface contamination would be trapped in the joint and would weaken the weld. In solid-state welding processes surface oxides or other contamination are typically squeezed out of the joint in "flash."

  18. Aluminium migration into beverages: are dented cans safe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veríssimo, Marta I S; Gomes, M Teresa S R

    2008-11-01

    Aluminium (Al) migration from cans to beer and tea was studied along time. Analyses of Al in the canned drinks were performed till the sell-by date, and, in seven months, aluminium migration was found to increase 0.14 mg L(-1) in beer, and 0.6 mg L(-1) in tea. This study included dented cans from which aluminium migration into tea was found to be particularly severe. Al concentration in dented canned tea increased 9.6 mg L(-1) in seven months.

  19. Corrosion issues of powder coated AA6060 aluminium profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Din, Rameez Ud; Valgarðsson, Smári; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl

    2015-01-01

    In this study detailed microstructural investigation of the reason for unexpected corrosion of powder coated aluminium alloy AA6060 windows profiles has been performed. The results from this study reveals that the failure of the window profiles was originated from the surface defects present...... on the extruded AA6060 aluminium profile after metallurgical process prior to powder coating. Surface defects are produced due to intermetallic particles in the alloy, which disturb the flow during the extrusion process. The corrosion mechanism leading to the failure of the powder coated AA6060 aluminium profiles...

  20. Effects of aluminium surface morphology and chemical modification on wettability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahimi, Maral; Fojan, Peter; Gurevich, Leonid

    2014-01-01

    Aluminium alloys are some of the predominant metals in industrial applications such as production of heat exchangers, heat pumps. They have high heat conductivity coupled with a low specific weight. In cold working conditions, there is a risk of frost formation on the surface of aluminium...... of a monolayer of fluorinated silane, and a combination of those. The effect of these surface modification techniques on roughness and wettability of the aluminium surfaces was elucidated by ellipsometry, contact angle measurements and atomic force microscopy. We demonstrated that by employing different types...

  1. Welding and Production Metallurgy Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This 6000 square foot facility represents the only welding laboratory of its kind within DA. It is capable of conducting investigations associated with solid state...

  2. Thermomechanical Modelling of Resistance Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Zhang, Wenqi

    2007-01-01

    The present paper describes a generic programme for analysis, optimization and development of resistance spot and projection welding. The programme includes an electrical model determining electric current and voltage distribution as well as heat generation, a thermal model calculating heat...

  3. Laser Welding of Ship Steel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brayton, W. C; Banas, C. M; Peters, G. T

    1979-01-01

    ... joint cleanliness and fitup conditions. In the current program, welds were formed between surfaces with nonperfect fitup, between plasma-cut surfaces, between surfaces deliberately mismatched to provide a varging joint gap and under out...

  4. Welding process modelling and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romine, Peter L.; Adenwala, Jinen A.

    1993-01-01

    The research and analysis performed, and software developed, and hardware/software recommendations made during 1992 in development of the PC-based data acquisition system for support of Welding Process Modeling and Control is reported. A need was identified by the Metals Processing Branch of NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, for a mobile data aquisition and analysis system, customized for welding measurement and calibration. Several hardware configurations were evaluated and a PC-based system was chosen. The Welding Measurement System (WMS) is a dedicated instrument, strictly for the use of data aquisition and analysis. Although the WMS supports many of the functions associated with the process control, it is not the intention for this system to be used for welding process control.

  5. Automatic Control Of Length Of Welding Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iceland, William F.

    1991-01-01

    Nonlinear relationships among current, voltage, and length stored in electronic memory. Conceptual microprocessor-based control subsystem maintains constant length of welding arc in gas/tungsten arc-welding system, even when welding current varied. Uses feedback of current and voltage from welding arc. Directs motor to set position of torch according to previously measured relationships among current, voltage, and length of arc. Signal paths marked "calibration" or "welding" used during those processes only. Other signal paths used during both processes. Control subsystem added to existing manual or automatic welding system equipped with automatic voltage control.

  6. aluminium alloy by ultrasonic cavitation peening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janka Styková

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents first results of the experimental investigation of the influence of the cavitation shot less peening process on the properties of stainless steel and aluminium alloy specimens. The cavitation field was generated by an ultrasonic horn submerged in water and operated by an ultrasonic generator. The temperature of the water was controlled by thermometer and adjusted by separate water cooling system. The mass loss, the mass loss rate and the modification of the surface hardness are evaluated for different cavitation exposure intervals. The mass loss was measured by micro weighing scale and the surface hardness by the micro-hardness meter. The presented results indicates the significant improvement in the surface hardness for both tested materials.

  7. Silane based coating of aluminium mold

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    A method of preparing an aluminum mold for injection molding is provided, the method comprises the steps of providing an aluminum mold having a least one surface, subjecting the at least one surface to a gas or liquid phase silane to thereby form an anti-stiction coating, the anti-stiction coating...... comprising a chemically bonded monolayer of silane compounds on the at least one surface wherein the silane is a halogenated silane. The at least one surface coated with the anti-stiction coating may be configured to withstand an injection molding process at a pressure above 100 MPa. Furthermore, a mold...... having at least one closed cavity is provided, at least one surface of the at least one cavity being an aluminium surface coated with a silane based coating layer. The silane based anti-stiction coating improves the anti-stiction properties of the mold which may allow for molding and demolding...

  8. Brazing of Titanium with Aluminium Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winiowski A.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study presents results of vacuum diffusion brazing of Grade 2 titanium with 6082 (AlMg1Si0.6Cu0.3 aluminium alloy using B-Ag72Cu-780 (Ag72Cu28 grade silver brazing metal as an interlayer. Brazed joints underwent shear tests, light-microscopy-based metallographic examinations and structural examinations using scanning electron microscopy (SEM and X-ray energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS. The highest quality and shear strength of 20 MPa was characteristic of joints brazed at 530°C with a 30-minute hold. The structural examinations revealed that in diffusion zone near the boundary with titanium the braze contained solid solutions based on hard and brittle Ti-Al type intermetallic phases determining the strength of the joints.

  9. DNA Strand Patterns on Aluminium Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Shahhosseini

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A new patterning method using Deoxyribose Nucleic Acid (DNA strands capable of producing nanogaps of less than 100 nm is proposed and investigated in this work. DNA strands from Bosenbergia rotunda were used as the fundamental element in patterning DNA on thin films of aluminium (Al metal without the need for any lithographic techniques. The DNA strands were applied in buffer solutions onto thin films of Al on silicon (Si and the chemical interactions between the DNA strands and Al creates nanometer scale arbitrary patterning by direct transfer of the DNA strands onto the substrate. This simple and cost-effective method can be utilized in the fabrication of various components in electronic chips for microelectronics and Nano Electronic Mechanical System (NEMS applications in general.

  10. Ship construction and welding

    CERN Document Server

    Mandal, Nisith R

    2017-01-01

    This book addresses various aspects of ship construction, from ship types and construction materials, to welding technologies and accuracy control. The contents of the book are logically organized and divided into twenty-one chapters. The book covers structural arrangement with longitudinal and transverse framing systems based on the service load, and explains basic structural elements like hatch side girders, hatch end beams, stringers, etc. along with structural subassemblies like floors, bulkheads, inner bottom, decks and shells. It presents in detail double bottom construction, wing tanks & duct keels, fore & aft end structures, etc., together with necessary illustrations. The midship sections of various ship types are introduced, together with structural continuity and alignment in ship structures. With regard to construction materials, the book discusses steel, aluminum alloys and fiber reinforced composites. Various methods of steel material preparation are discussed, and plate cutting and form...

  11. Welding of Prosthetic Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciechowska M.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the techniques of joining metal denture elements, used in prosthetic dentistry: the traditional soldering technique with a gas burner and a new technique of welding with a laser beam; the aim of the study was to make a comparative assessment of the quality of the joints in view of the possibility of applying them in prosthetic structures. Fractographic examinations were conducted along with tensile strength and impact strength tests, and the quality of the joints was assessed compared to the solid metal. The experiments have shown that the metal elements used to make dentures, joined by the technique which employs a laser beam, have better strength properties than those achieved with a gas burner.

  12. Effect of fiber laser parameters on laser welded AZ31B Magnesium alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mat Salleh Naqiuddin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the usage of Magnesium (Mg alloys has been hugely applied in the industrial application such as in automotive, marine, and electronic due to its advantages of recyclability and lightweight. This alloys required low heat input to be weld since it is easily evaporated due to the Magnesium Oxide (MgO at the surface and it also possesses lower melting point compared to steel. Laser welding is more convenient to weld Mg alloys due to its high power and lower heat input. AZ31B was selected since it has strong mechanical properties among others Mg alloys due to the major alloying elements; Aluminium (Al and Zinc (Zn. Low power fiber laser machine with wavelength of 900 nm was used in this experiment. The intention of this work was to investigate the effect of low power fiber laser parameters and effect of shielding gas on weld penetration and microstructure. Another aim in this work was to produce the joint for this thin sheets metal. Penetration depth and microstructure evaluation were emphasized in the analysis section. Bead-on-Plate (BOP and laser lap welding was conducted on AZ31B with thicknesses of 1.0 mm and 0.6 mm for feasibility study using pulsed wave (PW mode. Defocusing features was used in order to find better focal position, which has less occurrence of evaporation (underfill. The effect of different angle of irradiation was also investigated. Two types of shielding gases, Argon (Ar and Nitrogen (N2 were used in order to study the effect of shielding gas. Lastly, the effect of pulsed energy on penetration types and depth of BOP welded samples was investigated. Focus point was found at focal length of 156 mm with 393.75 μm. For BOP experiment, higher pulsed energy used contributes to melt through defect. Meanwhile, Ns shielding gas proved to be better shielding gas in laser welding the AZ31B. Higher angle of irradiation could reduce the underfill defect. Fillet Lap joint of similar metal was successfully done where 2.0 J of

  13. Effect of Fe and Si content in Aluminium Alloys as a result of increased recycling: Testing of high purity Aluminium Alloys in uniaxial tension

    OpenAIRE

    Slagsvold, Marius

    2011-01-01

    The recycling of aluminium from used aluminium scrap leads to an unavoidable presence of pollutions in the form of elements of various amounts. Two such elements are iron and silicon. These will always be present to some extent in an aluminium alloy as they are introduced to the alloy during processing. Iron and silicon are accumulative elements, meaning that they can never be completely eliminated once introduced into the aluminium. Some alloys have very narrow compositional windows, they ha...

  14. Manufacturing and Machining Challenges of Hybrid Aluminium Metal Matix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baburaja, Kammuluri; Sainadh Teja, S.; Karthik Sri, D.; Kuldeep, J.; Gowtham, V.

    2017-08-01

    Manufacturing which involves material removal processes or material addition processes or material transformation processes. One or all the processes to obtain the final desired properties for a material with desired shape which meets the required precision and accuracy values for the expected service life of a material in working conditions. Researchers found the utility of aluminium to be the second largest after steel. Aluminium and its metal matrix composite possess wide applications in various applications in aerospace industry, automobile industry, Constructions and even in kitchen utensils. Hybrid Al-MMCconsist of two different materials, and one will be from organic origin along with the base material. In this paper an attempt is made to bring out the importance of utilization of aluminium and the challenges concerned in manufacturing and machining of hybrid aluminium MMC.

  15. COMPARATION BETWEEN NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTING METHODS FOR THE ALUMINIUM BRAZED PIECES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan NIŢOI

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Presented paper refers to different control methods used in aluminium brazed joining because of possible defects. Low joining complexity permits exact damages position in relation with materials geometry.

  16. Aluminium leaching from red mud by filamentous fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urík, Martin; Bujdoš, Marek; Milová-Žiaková, Barbora; Mikušová, Petra; Slovák, Marek; Matúš, Peter

    2015-11-01

    This contribution investigates the efficient and environmentally friendly aluminium leaching from red mud (bauxite residue) by 17 species of filamentous fungi. Bioleaching experiments were examined in batch cultures with the red mud in static, 7-day cultivation. The most efficient fungal strains in aluminium bioleaching were Penicillium crustosum G-140 and Aspergillus niger G-10. The A. niger G-10 strain was capable to extract up to approximately 141 mg·L(-1) of aluminium from 0.2 g dry weight red mud. Chemical leaching with organic acids mixture, prepared according to A. niger G-10 strain's respective fungal excretion during cultivation, proved that organic acids significantly contribute to aluminium solubilization from red mud. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A comparison of the physics of Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW), Electron Beam Welding (EBW), and Laser Beam Welding (LBW)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The physics governing the applicability and limitations of gas tungsten arc (GTA), electron beam (EB), and laser beam (LB) welding are compared. An appendix on the selection of laser welding systems is included.

  18. Upgraded HFIR Fuel Element Welding System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sease, John D [ORNL

    2010-02-01

    The welding of aluminum-clad fuel plates into aluminum alloy 6061 side plate tubing is a unique design feature of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) fuel assemblies as 101 full-penetration circumferential gas metal arc welds (GMAW) are required in the fabrication of each assembly. In a HFIR fuel assembly, 540 aluminum-clad fuel plates are assembled into two nested annular fuel elements 610 mm (24-inches) long. The welding process for the HFIR fuel elements was developed in the early 1960 s and about 450 HFIR fuel assemblies have been successfully welded using the GMAW process qualified in the 1960 s. In recent years because of the degradation of the electronic and mechanical components in the old HFIR welding system, reportable defects in plate attachment or adapter welds have been present in almost all completed fuel assemblies. In October 2008, a contract was awarded to AMET, Inc., of Rexburg, Idaho, to replace the old welding equipment with standard commercially available welding components to the maximum extent possible while maintaining the qualified HFIR welding process. The upgraded HFIR welding system represents a major improvement in the welding system used in welding HFIR fuel elements for the previous 40 years. In this upgrade, the new inner GMAW torch is a significant advancement over the original inner GMAW torch previously used. The innovative breakthrough in the new inner welding torch design is the way the direction of the cast in the 0.762 mm (0.030-inch) diameter aluminum weld wire is changed so that the weld wire emerging from the contact tip is straight in the plane perpendicular to the welding direction without creating any significant drag resistance in the feeding of the weld wire.

  19. A study of processes for welding pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weston, J. (ed.)

    1991-07-01

    A review was made of exisiting and potential processes for welding pipelines: fusion welding (arc, electron beam, laser, thermit) and forge welding (friction, flash, magnetically impelled arc butt, upset butt, explosive, shielded active gas, gas pressure). Consideration of J-lay operations gave indications that were reflections of the status of the processes in terms of normal land and offshore S-lay operation: forge welding processes, although having promise require considerable development; fusion welding processes offer several possibilities (mechanized GMA welding likely to be used in 1991-2); laser welding requires development in all pipeline areas: a production machine for electron beam welding will involve high costs. Nondestructive testing techniques are also reviewed. Demand for faster quality assessment is being addressed by speeding radiographic film processing and through the development of real time radiography and automatic ultrasonic testing. Conclusions on most likely future process developments are: SMAW with cellulosic electrodes is best for tie-ins, short pip runs; SMAW continues to be important for small-diameter lines, although mechanized GMA could be used, along with mechanical joining, MIAB, radial fraction, and flash butt; mechanized GMA welding is likely to predominate for large diameter lines and probably will be used for the first J-lay line (other techniques could be used too); and welding of piping for station facilities involves both shop welding of sub-assemblies and on-site welding of pipe and sub-assemblies to each other (site welding uses both SMAW and GMAW). Figs, tabs.

  20. Weld procedure produces quality welds for thick sections of Hastelloy-X

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flens, F. J.; Fletcher, C. W.; Glasier, L. F., Jr.

    1967-01-01

    Welding program produces premium quality, multipass welds in heavy tube sections of Hastelloy-X. It develops semiautomatic tungsten/inert gas procedures, weld wire procurement specifications material weld properties, welder-operator training, and nondestructive testing inspection techniques and procedures.

  1. Analysis of Orthogonal Cutting of Aluminium-based Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Ravinder Reddy, P.; A.A. Sriramakrishna

    2002-01-01

    A turning test on aluminium-based metal-matrix composites (MMCs) (aluminium-30% silicon carbide) was performed with K-20 carbide tool material and wear patterns and the wear land growth rates were analysed to evaluate the wear characteristics and to classify the relationship between the physical (mechanical) properties and the flank wear of cutting tools. The study was also extended to the machining aspects and the width of cuts on MMCs and the influence of various cutting parameters. ...

  2. Prevention of Dealloying in Manganese Aluminium Bronze Propeller: Part II

    OpenAIRE

    Napachat Tareelap; Kaysinee Sriraksasin; Nakorn Srisukhumbowornchai; Swieng Thuanboon; Choochat Nitipanyawong

    2014-01-01

    Due to the failure of manganese aluminium bronze (MAB) propeller caused by dealloying corrosion as described in Part I [1], this work aims to study the prevention of dealloying corrosion using aluminium and zinc sacrificial anodes. The results indicated that both of the sacrificial anodes could prevent the propeller from dealloying. Moreover, the dealloying in seawater was less than that found in brackish water. It was possible that hydroxide ions, from cathodic reaction, reacted with calcium...

  3. Metal-Ceramic Interfaces in Laser Coated Aluminium Alloys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, X.B.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    1994-01-01

    A novel process was developed to firmly coat an aluminium alloy, Al6061, with α-Al2O3 by means of laser processing. In this approach a mixture of SiO2 and Al powder was used to inject in the laser melted surface of aluminium. A reaction product α-Al2O3 layer of a thickness of 100 µm was created

  4. Adhesive Bonding of Aluminium Alloy A5754 by Epoxy Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Michalec

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Joining thin sheets of aluminium and its alloys is a promising area in the field of joining materials. Nowadays, joining methods that do not melt the material itself are increasingly being utilised. This paper deals with adhesive bonding of aluminium alloy A5754 by two-component epoxy resins. Theresults show that joints bonded by Hysol 9466 have appropriate mechanical properties, but that joints bonded by Hysol 9492 have better thermal stability.

  5. Influence of Chemical Composition on Porosity in Aluminium Alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Kucharčík L.; Brůna M.; Sládek A.

    2014-01-01

    Porosity is one of the major defects in aluminum castings, which results is a decrease of a mechanical properties. Porosity in aluminum alloys is caused by solidification shrinkage and gas segregation. The final amount of porosity in aluminium castings is mostly influenced by several factors, as amount of hydrogen in molten aluminium alloy, cooling rate, melt temperature, mold material, or solidification interval. This article deals with effect of chemical composition on porosity in Al-Si alu...

  6. Investigation of different anode materials for aluminium rechargeable batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Torrero, David; Leung, Puiki; García-Quismondo, Enrique; Ventosa, Edgar; Anderson, Marc; Palma, Jesús; Marcilla, Rebeca

    2018-01-01

    In order to shed some light into the importance of the anodic reaction in reversible aluminium batteries, we investigate here the electrodeposition of aluminium in an ionic liquid electrolyte (BMImCl-AlCl3) using different substrates. We explore the influence of the type of anodic material (aluminium, stainless steel and carbon) and its 3D geometry on the reversibility of the anodic reaction by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and galvanostatic charge-discharge. The shape of the CVs confirms that electrodeposition of aluminium was feasible in the three materials but the highest peak currents and smallest peak separation in the CV of the aluminium anode suggested that this material was the most promising. Interestingly, carbon-based substrates appeared as an interesting alternative due to the high peak currents in CV, moderate overpotentials and dual role as anode and cathode. 3D substrates such as fiber-based carbon paper and aluminium mesh showed significantly smaller overpotentials and higher efficiencies for Al reaction suggesting that the use of 3D substrates in full batteries might result in enhanced power. This is corroborated by polarization testing of full Al-batteries.

  7. Role of magnesium in alleviation of aluminium toxicity in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Jayakumar; Babourina, Olga; Rengel, Zed

    2011-04-01

    Magnesium is pivotal for activating a large number of enzymes; hence, magnesium plays an important role in numerous physiological and biochemical processes affecting plant growth and development. Magnesium can also ameliorate aluminium phytotoxicity, but literature reports on the dynamics of magnesium homeostasis upon exposure to aluminium are rare. Herein existing knowledge on the magnesium transport mechanisms and homeostasis maintenance in plant cells is critically reviewed. Even though overexpression of magnesium transporters can alleviate aluminium toxicity in plants, the mechanisms governing such alleviation remain obscure. Possible magnesium-dependent mechanisms include (i) better carbon partitioning from shoots to roots; (ii) increased synthesis and exudation of organic acid anions; (iii) enhanced acid phosphatase activity; (iv) maintenance of proton-ATPase activity and cytoplasmic pH regulation; (v) protection against an aluminium-induced cytosolic calcium increase; and (vi) protection against reactive oxygen species. Future research should concentrate on assessing aluminium toxicity and tolerance in plants with overexpressed or antisense magnesium transporters to increase understanding of the aluminium-magnesium interaction.

  8. Greenhouse gas emissions from aluminium production - a life cycle approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norgate, T.E.; Rankin, W.J. [CSIRO Minerals, Clayton South, Victoria (Australia)

    2001-07-01

    A life cycle assessment (LCA) of aluminium metal production was carried out from bauxite mining through aluminium smelting on three process route, namely (1) the Bayer process for alumina production; (2) the Hall-Heroult process for aluminium production; and (3) the carbothermic reduction process for aluminium production. Some developing processes associated with these processes, such as the drained cathodes, inert cathodes and low temperature electrolytes for the Hall-Heroult process, and the direct and solvent-based processing options for carbothermic reduction of alumina and also of dross, were also included in the study. A 'cradle to gate' LCA of the various technological processes were found to offer the possibility of significant reduction in GHG emissions for primary aluminium production. However, none of these developments have been implemented commercially, hence such reductions may be expected in the longer, rather than the shorter, term. In the immediate future, GHG emissions from primary aluminium production are more likely to come from energy conservation measures than from technological developments. Changing from coal-based electricity to natural gas-based or hydroelectric-based electricity should result in substantial reductions, particularly if such changes are accompanied by increases in electricity generation efficiency. 11 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs.

  9. The binding, transport and fate of aluminium in biological cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exley, Christopher; Mold, Matthew J

    2015-04-01

    Aluminium is the most abundant metal in the Earth's crust and yet, paradoxically, it has no known biological function. Aluminium is biochemically reactive, it is simply that it is not required for any essential process in extant biota. There is evidence neither of element-specific nor evolutionarily conserved aluminium biochemistry. This means that there are no ligands or chaperones which are specific to its transport, there are no transporters or channels to selectively facilitate its passage across membranes, there are no intracellular storage proteins to aid its cellular homeostasis and there are no pathways which evolved to enable the metabolism and excretion of aluminium. Of course, aluminium is found in every compartment of every cell of every organism, from virus through to Man. Herein we have investigated each of the 'silent' pathways and metabolic events which together constitute a form of aluminium homeostasis in biota, identifying and evaluating as far as is possible what is known and, equally importantly, what is unknown about its uptake, transport, storage and excretion. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Compressive Behaviour and Energy Absorption of Aluminium Foam Sandwich

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endut, N. A.; Hazza, M. H. F. Al; Sidek, A. A.; Adesta, E. T. Y.; Ibrahim, N. A.

    2018-01-01

    Development of materials in automotive industries plays an important role in order to retain the safety, performance and cost. Metal foams are one of the idea to evolve new material in automotive industries since it can absorb energy when it deformed and good for crash management. Recently, new technology had been introduced to replace metallic foam by using aluminium foam sandwich (AFS) due to lightweight and high energy absorption behaviour. Therefore, this paper provides reliable data that can be used to analyze the energy absorption behaviour of aluminium foam sandwich by conducting experimental work which is compression test. Six experiments of the compression test were carried out to analyze the stress-strain relationship in terms of energy absorption behavior. The effects of input variables include varying the thickness of aluminium foam core and aluminium sheets on energy absorption behavior were evaluated comprehensively. Stress-strain relationship curves was used for energy absorption of aluminium foam sandwich calculation. The result highlights that the energy absorption of aluminium foam sandwich increases from 12.74 J to 64.42 J respectively with increasing the foam and skin thickness.

  11. Nitrogen And Oxygen Amount In Weld After Welding With Micro-Jet Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Węgrzyn T.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Micro-jet cooling after welding was tested only for MIG welding process with argon, helium and nitrogen as a shielded gases. A paper presents a piece of information about nitrogen and oxygen in weld after micro-jet cooling. There are put down information about gases that could be chosen both for MIG/MAG welding and for micro-jet process. There were given main information about influence of various micro-jet gases on metallographic structure of steel welds. Mechanical properties of weld was presented in terms of nitrogen and oxygen amount in WMD (weld metal deposit.

  12. TECHNOLOGICAL ISSUES IN MECHANISED FEED WIG/TIG WELDING SURFACING OF WELDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BURCA Mircea

    2016-09-01

    manual welding tests in the light of using the process for welding surfacing being known that in such applications mechanised operations are recommended whenever possible given the latter strengths i.e. increased productivity and quality deposits. The research also aims at achieving a comparative a study between wire mechanised feed based WIG manual welding and the manual rod entry based manual welding in terms of geometry deposits, deposits aesthetics, operating technique, productivity, etc . In this regard deposits were made by means of two welding procedures, and subsequently welding surfacing was made with the optimum values of the welding parameters in this case.

  13. Automatic monitoring of vibration welding equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spicer, John Patrick; Chakraborty, Debejyo; Wincek, Michael Anthony; Wang, Hui; Abell, Jeffrey A; Bracey, Jennifer; Cai, Wayne W

    2014-10-14

    A vibration welding system includes vibration welding equipment having a welding horn and anvil, a host device, a check station, and a robot. The robot moves the horn and anvil via an arm to the check station. Sensors, e.g., temperature sensors, are positioned with respect to the welding equipment. Additional sensors are positioned with respect to the check station, including a pressure-sensitive array. The host device, which monitors a condition of the welding equipment, measures signals via the sensors positioned with respect to the welding equipment when the horn is actively forming a weld. The robot moves the horn and anvil to the check station, activates the check station sensors at the check station, and determines a condition of the welding equipment by processing the received signals. Acoustic, force, temperature, displacement, amplitude, and/or attitude/gyroscopic sensors may be used.

  14. Experimental and simulated strength of spot welds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Chris Valentin; Bennedbæk, Rune A.K.; Larsen, Morten B.

    2014-01-01

    Weld strength testing of single spots in DP600 steel is presented for the three typical testing procedures, i.e. tensile-shear, cross-tension and peel testing. Spot welds are performed at two sets of welding parameters and strength testing under these conditions is presented by load......-elongation curves revealing the maximum load and the elongation at break. Welding and strength testing is simulated by SORPAS® 3D, which allows the two processes to be prepared in a combined simulation, such that the simulated welding properties are naturally applied to the simulation of strength testing. Besides...... the size and shape of the weld nugget, these properties include the new strength of the material in the weld and the heat affected zone based on the predicted hardness resulting from microstructural phase changes simulated during cooling of the weld before strength testing. Comparisons between overall...

  15. Electrical connection for aluminium conductors in automotive applications : Prestudy of available solutions for electrical connection methods of aluminium cables

    OpenAIRE

    Hamedi, Emilia

    2017-01-01

    Due to increasing weight of electrical component and wiring harnesses in a vehicle contrary to the demand of light constructed vehicles as well as the constantly increasing and fluctuating price of copper compared to aluminium’s stable and far lower price, the use of aluminium conductors as an alternative have been promoted.  This thesis work lay theoretical research of the available methods used for electrical connection of aluminium conductors in order to increase the knowledge about the av...

  16. Thermal treatment of dissimilar steels' welded joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikulina, A. A.; Denisova, A. S.; Gradusov, I. N.; Ryabinkina, P. A.; Rushkovets, M. V.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper combinations of chrome-nickel steel and high-carbon steel, produced by flash butt welding after heat treatment, are investigated. Light and electron microscopic studies show that the welded joints after heat treatment have a complex structure consisting of several phases as initial welded joints. A martensite structure in welded joints after thermal treatment at 300... 800 °C has been found.

  17. Closed circuit television welding alignment system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darner, G.S.

    1976-09-01

    Closed circuit television (CCTV) weld targeting systems were developed to provide accurate and repeatable positioning of the electrode of an electronic arc welder with respect to the parts being joined. A sliding mirror electrode holder was developed for use with closed circuit television equipment on existing weld fixturing. A complete motorized CCTV weld alignment system was developed to provide weld targeting for even the most critical positioning requirements.

  18. Preventing Contamination In Electron-Beam Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodin, Wesley D.; Gulbrandsen, Kevin A.; Oleksiak, Carl

    1990-01-01

    Simple expedient eliminates time-consuming, expensive manual hand grinding. Use of groove and backup tube greatly reduces postweld cleanup in some electron-beam welding operations. Tube-backup method developed for titanium parts, configurations of which prevents use of solid-block backup. In new welding configuration, tube inserted in groove to prevent contact between alumina beads and molten weld root. When welding complete and beads and tube removed, only minor spatter remains and is ground away easily.

  19. Performance of mesh seam welds in tailor welded blanks; Terado blank yo mash seam yosetsubu no tokusei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchihara, M.; Takahashi, M.; Kurita, M.; Hirose, Y.; Fukui, K. [Sumitomo Metal Industries, Ltd., Osaka (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    Formability, fatigue properties and corrosion behavior of mash seam welded steel sheets were investigated and the results were compared with laser weld. The stretch formability of mash seam weld and laser weld were same level. Mash seam weld however, showed slightly smaller formability in hole expansion test. The fatigue strength of mash seam welds was lower than that of laser welds in case of differential thickness joints. Corrosion was apt to initiate at weld in both mash seam and laser weld with E-coat. The corrosion resistance of welds was improved by using zinc coated steel. 3 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Welding technology for rails. Rail no setsugo gijutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okumura, M.; Karimine, K. (Nippon Steel Corp., Tokyo (Japan)); Uchino, K.; Sugino, K. (Nippon Steel Corp., Kitakyushu, Fukuoka (Japan). Technical Research Inst. of Yawata Works); Ueyama, K. (JR Railway Technical Research Inst., Tokyo (Japan))

    1993-08-01

    The rail joining technology is indispensable for making long welded rails. Flush butt welding, gas welding, enclosed arc welding, and thermit welding are used properly as the welding methods. A method for improving the joint reliability by controlling the residual stress distribution of welded joint is investigated to prepare high carbon component weld metal similar to the rail. Problems with each of the welding methods and the newly developed technology to solve the problems are outlined. Composition of the coating is improved also, and a high C system welding rod is developed which has satisfactory weldability. High performance and high efficient new enclosed arc welding technology not available by now is developed which utilizes high carbon welding metal as a new EA welding work technology, and put to practical use. As a result of this study, useful guides are obtained for the establishment of satisfactory thermit welding technology. 17 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.