WorldWideScience

Sample records for welded 7075-t7351 aluminum

  1. Weld Repair of Thin Aluminum Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuyukian, C. S.; Mitchell, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    Weld repairing of thin aluminum sheets now possible, using niobium shield and copper heat sinks. Refractory niobium shield protects aluminum adjacent to hole, while copper heat sinks help conduct heat away from repair site. Technique limits tungsten/inert-gas (TIG) welding bombardment zone to melt area, leaving surrounding areas around weld unaffected. Used successfully to repair aluminum cold plates on Space Shuttle, Commercial applications, especially in sealing fractures, dents, and holes in thin aluminum face sheets or clad brazing sheet in cold plates, heat exchangers, coolers, and Solar panels. While particularly suited to thin aluminum sheet, this process also used in thicker aluminum material to prevent surface damage near weld area.

  2. Interpretation of aluminum-alloy weld radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duren, P. C.; Risch, E. R.

    1971-01-01

    Report proposes radiographic terminology standardization which allows scientific interpretation of radiographic films to replace dependence on individual judgement and experience. Report includes over 50 photographic pages where radiographs of aluminum welds with defects are compared with prepared weld sections photomacrographs.

  3. Electron-beam welding of aluminum alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brillant, Marcel; de Bony, Yves

    1980-08-15

    The objective of this article is to describe the status of the application of electron-beam welding to aluminum alloys. These alloys are widely employed in the aeronautics, space and nuclear industries.

  4. Modeling aluminum-lithium alloy welding characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Edward L.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop a finite element model of the heat-affected zone in the vicinity of a weld line on a plate in order to determine an accurate plastic strain history. The resulting plastic strain increments calculated by the finite element program were then to be used to calculate the measure of damage D. It was hoped to determine the effects of varying welding parameters, such as beam power, efficiency, and weld speed, and the effect of different material properties on the occurrence of microfissuring. The results were to be compared first to the previous analysis of Inconel 718, and then extended to aluminum 2195.

  5. Friction Pull Plug Welding in Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke, Shane A.; Bradford, Vann

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has recently invested much time and effort into the process development of Friction Pull Plug Welding (FPPW). FPPW, is a welding process similar to Friction Push Plug Welding in that, there is a small rotating part (plug) being spun and simultaneously pulled (forged) into a larger part. These two processes differ, in that push plug welding requires an internal reaction support, while pull plug welding reacts to the load externally. FPPW was originally conceived as a post proof repair technique for the Space Shuttle fs External Tank. FPPW was easily selected as the primary weld process used to close out the termination hole on the Constellation Program's ARES I Upper Stage circumferential Self-Reacting Friction Stir Welds (SR-FSW). The versatility of FPPW allows it to also be used as a repair technique for both SR-FSW and Conventional Friction Stir Welds. To date, all MSFC led development has been concentrated on aluminum alloys (2195, 2219, and 2014). Much work has been done to fully understand and characterize the process's limitations. A heavy emphasis has been spent on plug design, to match the various weldland thicknesses and alloy combinations. This presentation will summarize these development efforts including weld parameter development, process control, parameter sensitivity studies, plug repair techniques, material properties including tensile, fracture and failure analysis.

  6. Weld Development for Aluminum Fission Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, Carl Edward [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Martinez, Jesse Norris [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-05-16

    The Sigma welding team was approached to help fabricate a small fission chamber (roughly ½ inch dia. x ½ inch tall cylinder). These chambers are used as radiation sensors that contain small traces of radionuclides (Cf 252, U 235, and U 238) that serve to ionize gas atoms in addition to external radiation. When a voltage is applied within the chamber, the resulting ion flow can be calibrated and monitored. Aluminum has the advantage of not forming radioactive compounds when exposed to high external radiation (except from minor Na alloy content). Since aluminum has not been used before in this application, this presented an unexplored challenge.

  7. FSW of Aluminum Tailor Welded Blanks across Machine Platforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovanski, Yuri; Upadhyay, Piyush; Carlson, Blair; Szymanski, Robert; Luzanski, Tom; Marshall, Dustin

    2015-02-16

    Development and characterization of friction stir welded aluminum tailor welded blanks was successfully carried out on three separate machine platforms. Each was a commercially available, gantry style, multi-axis machine designed specifically for friction stir welding. Weld parameters were developed to support high volume production of dissimilar thickness aluminum tailor welded blanks at speeds of 3 m/min and greater. Parameters originally developed on an ultra-high stiffness servo driven machine where first transferred to a high stiffness servo-hydraulic friction stir welding machine, and subsequently transferred to a purpose built machine designed to accommodate thin sheet aluminum welding. The inherent beam stiffness, bearing compliance, and control system for each machine were distinctly unique, which posed specific challenges in transferring welding parameters across machine platforms. This work documents the challenges imposed by successfully transferring weld parameters from machine to machine, produced from different manufacturers and with unique control systems and interfaces.

  8. Friction stir welding process to repair voids in aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Charles D. (Inventor); Litwinski, Edward (Inventor); Valdez, Juan M. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    The present invention provides an in-process method to repair voids in an aluminum alloy, particularly a friction stir weld in an aluminum alloy. For repairing a circular void or an in-process exit hole in a weld, the method includes the steps of fabricating filler material of the same composition or compatible with the parent material into a plug form to be fitted into the void, positioning the plug in the void, and friction stir welding over and through the plug. For repairing a longitudinal void (30), the method includes machining the void area to provide a trough (34) that subsumes the void, fabricating filler metal into a strip form (36) to be fitted into the trough, positioning the strip in the trough, and rewelding the void area by traversing a friction stir welding tool longitudinally through the strip. The method is also applicable for repairing welds made by a fusing welding process or voids in aluminum alloy workpieces themselves.

  9. Properties of welded joints in laser welding of aeronautic aluminum-lithium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malikov, A. G.; Orishich, A. M.

    2017-01-01

    The work presents the experimental investigation of the laser welding of the aluminum-lithium alloys (system Al-Mg-Li) and aluminum alloy (system Al-Cu-Li) doped with Sc. The influence of the nano-structuring of the surface layer welded joint by the cold plastic deformation method on the strength properties of the welded joint is determined. It is founded that, regarding the deformation degree over the thickness, the varying value of the welded joint strength is different for these aluminum alloys.

  10. Diode laser welding of aluminum to steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santo, Loredana; Quadrini, Fabrizio; Trovalusci, Federica

    2011-01-01

    Laser welding of dissimilar materials was carried out by using a high power diode laser to join aluminum to steel in a butt-joint configuration. During testing, the laser scan rate was changed as well as the laser power: at low values of fluence (i.e. the ratio between laser power and scan rate), poor joining was observed; instead at high values of fluence, an excess in the material melting affected the joint integrity. Between these limiting values, a good aesthetics was obtained; further investigations were carried out by means of tensile tests and SEM analyses. Unfortunately, a brittle behavior was observed for all the joints and a maximum rupture stress about 40 MPa was measured. Apart from the formation of intermeltallic phases, poor mechanical performances also depended on the chosen joining configuration, particularly because of the thickness reduction of the seam in comparison with the base material.

  11. Enabling high speed friction stir welding of aluminum tailor welded blanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovanski, Yuri

    Current welding technologies for production of aluminum tailor-welded blanks (TWBs) are utilized in low-volume and niche applications, and have yet to be scaled for the high-volume vehicle market. This study targeted further weight reduction, part reduction, and cost savings by enabling tailor-welded blank technology for aluminum alloys at high-volumes. While friction stir welding (FSW) has traditionally been applied at linear velocities less than one meter per minute, high volume production applications demand the process be extended to higher velocities more amenable to cost sensitive production environments. Unfortunately, weld parameters and performance developed and characterized at low to moderate welding velocities do not directly translate to high speed linear friction stir welding. Therefore, in order to facilitate production of high volume aluminum FSW components, parameters were developed with a minimum welding velocity of three meters per minute. With an emphasis on weld quality, welded blanks were evaluated for post-weld formability using a combination of numerical and experimental methods. Evaluation across scales was ultimately validated by stamping full-size production door inner panels made from dissimilar thickness aluminum tailor-welded blanks, which provided validation of the numerical and experimental analysis of laboratory scale tests.

  12. Narrow groove gas metal-arc welding of aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, R.E.

    1975-01-01

    The Gas Metal-Arc (GMA) welding process is explained and the equipment used described with an analysis of power supply function and the action of the arc, followed by discussion of general applications and problems. GMA braze welding of beryllium is then described, as is the development of a special high purity filler wire and a narrow deep groove joint design for improved weld strength in beryllium. This joint design and the special wire are applied in making high strength welds in high strength aluminum for special applications. High speed motion pictures of the welding operation are shown to illustrate the talk. (auth)

  13. Microstructural Characterization of Friction Stir Welded Aluminum-Steel Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Sterling, R.J. Steel, C.-O. Pettersson. “Microstructure and mechanical properties of friction stir welded SAF 2507 super duplex stainless steel.” Mater...MICROSTRUCTURAL CHARACTERIZATION OF FRICTION STIR WELDED ALUMINUM-STEEL JOINTS By ERIN ELIZABETH PATTERSON A thesis submitted in...for his work producing the dissimilar weld samples used in this study. Without his work, this project would not have been possible. I would also

  14. Optimum welding condition of 2017 aluminum similar alloy friction welded joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsujino R.; Ochi, H. [Osaka Inst. of Tech., Osaka (Japan); Morikawa, K. [Osaka Sangyo Univ., Osaka (Japan); Yamaguchi, H.; Ogawa, K. [Osaka Prefecture Univ., Osaka (Japan); Fujishiro, Y.; Yoshida, M. [Sumitomo Metal Technology Ltd., Hyogo (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    Usefulness of the statistical analysis for judging optimization of the friction welding conditions was investigated by using 2017 aluminum similar alloy, where many samples under fixed welding conditions were friction welded and analyzed statistically. In general, selection of the optimum friction welding conditions for similar materials is easy. However, it was not always the case for 2017 aluminum alloy. For optimum friction welding conditions of this material, it is necessary to apply relatively larger upset pressure to obtain high friction heating. Joint efficiencies obtained under the optimum friction welding conditions showed large shape parameter (m value) of Weibull distribution as well as in the dissimilar materials previously reported. The m value calculated on the small number of data can be substituted for m value on the 30 data. Therefore, m value is useful for practical use in the factory for assuming the propriety of the friction welding conditions. (orig.)

  15. Effect of weld line shape on material flow during friction stir welding of aluminum and steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasui, Toshiaki; Ando, Naoyuki; Morinaka, Shinpei; Mizushima, Hiroki; Fukumoto, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    The effect of weld line shape on material flow during the friction stir welding of aluminum and steel was investigated. The material flow velocity was evaluated with simulated experiments using plasticine as the simulant material. The validity of the simulated experiments was verified by the marker material experiments on aluminum. The circumferential velocity of material around the probe increased with the depth from the weld surface. The effect is significant in cases where the advancing side is located on the outside of curve and those with higher curvature. Thus, there is an influence of weld line shape on material flow

  16. Ultrasonic Welding of Thin Alumina and Aluminum Using Inserts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikuro, Tomoaki; Matsuoka, Shin-Ichi

    This paper describes an experimental study of ultrasonic welding of thin ceramics and metals using inserts. Ultrasonic welding has enable the joining of various thick ceramics, such as Al2O3 and ZrO2, to aluminum at room temperature quickly and easily as compared to other welding methods. However, for thin ceramics, which are brittle, welding is difficult to perform without causing damage. In this study, aluminum anodized oxide with different anodizing time was used as thin alumina ceramic. Vapor deposition of aluminum alloys was used to create an effective binder layer for welding at a low pressure and within a short duration in order to prevent damage to the anodic oxide film formed with a short anodizing time. For example, ultrasonic welding of thin Al2O3/Al was accomplished under the following conditions: ultrasonic horn tip amplitude of 30µm, welding pressure of 5MPa, and required duration of 0.1s. However, since the vapor deposition film tends to exfoliate as observed in the anodic oxide film formed with a long anodizing time, welding was difficult.

  17. High-Speed Friction-Stir Welding to Enable Aluminum Tailor-Welded Blanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovanski, Yuri; Upadhyay, Piyush; Carsley, John; Luzanski, Tom; Carlson, Blair; Eisenmenger, Mark; Soulami, Ayoub; Marshall, Dustin; Landino, Brandon; Hartfield-Wunsch, Susan

    2015-05-01

    Current welding technologies for production of aluminum tailor-welded blanks (TWBs) are utilized in low-volume and niche applications, and they have yet to be scaled for the high-volume vehicle market. This study targeted further weight reduction, part reduction, and cost savings by enabling tailor-welded blank technology for aluminum alloys at high volumes. While friction-stir welding (FSW) has been traditionally applied at linear velocities less than 1 m/min, high-volume production applications demand the process be extended to higher velocities more amenable to cost-sensitive production environments. Unfortunately, weld parameters and performance developed and characterized at low-to-moderate welding velocities do not directly translate to high-speed linear FSW. Therefore, to facilitate production of high-volume aluminum FSW components, parameters were developed with a minimum welding velocity of 3 m/min. With an emphasis on weld quality, welded blanks were evaluated for postweld formability using a combination of numerical and experimental methods. An evaluation across scales was ultimately validated by stamping full-size production door inner panels made from dissimilar thickness aluminum TWBs, which provided validation of the numerical and experimental analysis of laboratory-scale tests.

  18. Cracking susceptibility of aluminum alloys during laser welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Abbaschian

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The influence of laser parameters in welding aluminum alloys was studied in order to reduce hot cracking. The extension of cracks at the welding surface was used as a cracking susceptibility (CS index. It has been shown that the CS changes with changing welding velocity for binary Al-Cu alloys. In general, the CS index increased until a maximum velocity and then dropped to zero, generating a typical lambda-curve. This curve is due to two different mechanisms: 1 the refinement of porosities with increasing velocity and 2 the changes in the liquid fraction due to decreasing microsegregation with increasing velocities.

  19. Microhardness Testing of Aluminum Alloy Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohanon, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    A weld is made when two pieces of metal are united or fused together using heat or pressure, and sometimes both. There are several different types of welds, each having their own unique properties and microstructure. Strength is a property normally used in deciding which kind of weld is suitable for a certain metal or joint. Depending on the weld process used and the heat required for that process, the weld and the heat-affected zone undergo microstructural changes resulting in stronger or weaker areas. The heat-affected zone (HAZ) is the region that has experienced enough heat to cause solid-state microstructural changes, but not enough to melt the material. This area is located between the parent material and the weld, with the grain structure growing as it progresses respectively. The optimal weld would have a short HAZ and a small fluctuation in strength from parent metal to weld. To determine the strength of the weld and decide whether it is suitable for the specific joint certain properties are looked at, among these are ultimate tensile strength, 0.2% offset yield strength and hardness. Ultimate tensile strength gives the maximum load the metal can stand while the offset yield strength gives the amount of stress the metal can take before it is 0.2% longer than it was originally. Both of these are good tests, but they both require breaking or deforming the sample in some way. Hardness testing, however, provides an objective evaluation of weld strengths, and also the difference or variation in strength across the weld and HAZ which is difficult to do with tensile testing. Hardness is the resistance to permanent or plastic deformation and can be taken at any desired point on the specimen. With hardness testing, it is possible to test from parent metal to weld and see the difference in strength as you progress from parent material to weld. Hardness around grain boundaries and flaws in the material will show how these affect the strength of the metal while still

  20. Analysis and Comparison of Friction Stir Welding and Laser Assisted Friction Stir Welding of Aluminum Alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanelli, Sabina Luisa; Casalino, Giuseppe; Casavola, Caterina; Moramarco, Vincenzo

    2013-12-18

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a solid-state joining process; i.e. , no melting occurs. The welding process is promoted by the rotation and translation of an axis-symmetric non-consumable tool along the weld centerline. Thus, the FSW process is performed at much lower temperatures than conventional fusion welding, nevertheless it has some disadvantages. Laser Assisted Friction Stir Welding (LAFSW) is a combination in which the FSW is the dominant welding process and the laser pre-heats the weld. In this work FSW and LAFSW tests were conducted on 6 mm thick 5754H111 aluminum alloy plates in butt joint configuration. LAFSW is studied firstly to demonstrate the weldability of aluminum alloy using that technique. Secondly, process parameters, such as laser power and temperature gradient are investigated in order to evaluate changes in microstructure, micro-hardness, residual stress, and tensile properties. Once the possibility to achieve sound weld using LAFSW is demonstrated, it will be possible to explore the benefits for tool wear, higher welding speeds, and lower clamping force.

  1. Electromagnetic hammer removes weld distortions from aluminum tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwinghamer, R. J.

    1965-01-01

    Distortions around weld areas on sheet-aluminum tanks and other structures are removed with a portable electromagnetic hammer. The hammer incorporates a coil that generates a controlled high-energy pulsed magnetic field over localized areas on the metal surface.

  2. Continuous internal channels formed in aluminum fusion welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gault, J.; Sabo, W.

    1967-01-01

    Process produces continuous internal channel systems on a repeatable basis in 2014-T6 aluminum. Standard machining forms the initial channel, which is filled with tungsten carbide powder. TIG machine fusion welding completes formation of the channel. Chem-mill techniques enlarge it to the desired size.

  3. Molten pool characterization of laser lap welded copper and aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Zhiqing; Hu, Shengsun; Zuo, Di; Cai, Wayne; Lee, Dongkyun; Elijah, Kannatey-Asibu, Jr.

    2013-12-01

    A 3D finite volume simulation model for laser welding of a Cu-Al lap joint was developed using ANSYS FLUENT to predict the weld pool temperature distribution, velocity field, geometry, alloying element distribution and transition layer thickness—all key attributes and performance characteristics for a laser-welded joint. Melting and solidification of the weld pool was simulated with an enthalpy-porosity formulation. Laser welding experiments and metallographic examination by SEM and EDX were performed to investigate the weld pool features and validate the simulated results. A bowl-shaped temperature field and molten pool, and a unique maximum fusion zone width were observed near the Cu-Al interface. Both the numerical simulation and experimental results indicate an arch-shaped intermediate layer of Cu and Al, and a gradual transition of Cu concentration from the aluminum plate to the copper plate with high composition gradient. For the conditions used, welding with Cu on top was found to result in a better weld joint.

  4. Molten pool characterization of laser lap welded copper and aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue, Zhiqing; Hu, Shengsun; Zuo, Di; Cai, Wayne; Lee, Dongkyun; Elijah, Kannatey-Asibu Jr

    2013-01-01

    A 3D finite volume simulation model for laser welding of a Cu–Al lap joint was developed using ANSYS FLUENT to predict the weld pool temperature distribution, velocity field, geometry, alloying element distribution and transition layer thickness—all key attributes and performance characteristics for a laser-welded joint. Melting and solidification of the weld pool was simulated with an enthalpy-porosity formulation. Laser welding experiments and metallographic examination by SEM and EDX were performed to investigate the weld pool features and validate the simulated results. A bowl-shaped temperature field and molten pool, and a unique maximum fusion zone width were observed near the Cu–Al interface. Both the numerical simulation and experimental results indicate an arch-shaped intermediate layer of Cu and Al, and a gradual transition of Cu concentration from the aluminum plate to the copper plate with high composition gradient. For the conditions used, welding with Cu on top was found to result in a better weld joint. (paper)

  5. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of an Ultrasonic Spot Welded Aluminum Alloy: The Effect of Welding Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Peng

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to evaluate the microstructures, tensile lap shear strength, and fatigue resistance of 6022-T43 aluminum alloy joints welded via a solid-state welding technique–ultrasonic spot welding (USW–at different energy levels. An ultra-fine necklace-like equiaxed grain structure is observed along the weld line due to the occurrence of dynamic crystallization, with smaller grain sizes at lower levels of welding energy. The tensile lap shear strength, failure energy, and critical stress intensity of the welded joints first increase, reach their maximum values, and then decrease with increasing welding energy. The tensile lap shear failure mode changes from interfacial fracture at lower energy levels, to nugget pull-out at intermediate optimal energy levels, and to transverse through-thickness (TTT crack growth at higher energy levels. The fatigue life is longer for the joints welded at an energy of 1400 J than 2000 J at higher cyclic loading levels. The fatigue failure mode changes from nugget pull-out to TTT crack growth with decreasing cyclic loading for the joints welded at 1400 J, while TTT crack growth mode remains at all cyclic loading levels for the joints welded at 2000 J. Fatigue crack basically initiates from the nugget edge, and propagates with “river-flow” patterns and characteristic fatigue striations.

  6. Welding of AA1050 aluminum with AISI 304 stainless steel by rotary friction welding process

    OpenAIRE

    Alves, Eder Paduan; Piorino Neto, Francisco; An, Chen Ying

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: The purpose of this work was to assess the development of solid state joints of dissimilar material AA1050 aluminum and AISI 304 stainless steel, which can be used in pipes of tanks of liquid propellants and other components of the Satellite Launch Vehicle. The joints were obtained by rotary friction welding process (RFW), which combines the heat generated from friction between two surfaces and plastic deformation. Tests were conducted with different welding process parameters. The ...

  7. The investigation of typical welding defects for 5456 aluminum alloy friction stir welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Huabin; Yan Keng; Lin Tao; Chen Shanben; Jiang Chengyu; Zhao Yong

    2006-01-01

    The external factors on the friction stir welding defects are so abundant that the experiments of friction stir welding were conducted for 5456 aluminum alloy. With the changes of the tool tilt angle and material condition, defects can be generated. These defects can be conventional ones (lack of penetration or voids), or lazy S, which are unique to friction stir welding. However, the origin of the defects remains an area of uncertainty. In this study, an attempt has been made to investigate the formation of these defects. The typical welding defects of friction stir welding joint for 5456 aluminum alloy were analyzed and discussed, respectively, by using optical microscopy (OM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The microscopic examination of the nugget zone and fracture location of the weld confirms that the tilt angle can change the plastic material flow patterns in the stir zone and accordingly control the weld properties. In addition, the oxide layer from the initial butt surface during FSW is dispersed at the grain boundary. These A1 2 O 3 particles are actually the major cause of failure of the joint

  8. Fracture toughness of steel--aluminum deformation welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albright, C.E.

    1978-11-01

    A study of the fracture toughness (in this case, G/sub Ic/) of steel--aluminum deformation welds using a specially developed double cantilever beam fracture toughness specimen is presented. Welds made at 350 0 C were heat treated at 360, 380, 400, 420, and 440 0 C. An intermetallic reaction product layer of Fe 2 Al 5 is formed at the steel--aluminum interface with increasing heat treating temperature and time by a process of nucleation and growth of discrete particles. A transition in toughness from a higher average G/sub Ic/ value (6097 N/m) to a very low average G/sub Ic/ value (525 N/m) is observed. The decrease in toughness is accompanied by an increase in Fe 2 Al 5 particle diameter from 4 to 8 μm. Failure at the higher toughness values is characterized by ductile rupture through the aluminum. At the lower toughness values, failure occurs between the aluminum and the Fe 2 Al 5 reaction product layer. A void layer forming by a vacancy condensation mechanism in the aluminum adjacent to the Fe 2 Al 5 is shown to cause the embrittlement

  9. Ultrasonic Real-Time Quality Monitoring Of Aluminum Spot Weld Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez Regalado, Waldo Josue

    The real-time ultrasonic spot weld monitoring system, introduced by our research group, has been designed for the unsupervised quality characterization of the spot welding process. It comprises the ultrasonic transducer (probe) built into one of the welding electrodes and an electronics hardware unit which gathers information from the transducer, performs real-time weld quality characterization and communicates with the robot programmable logic controller (PLC). The system has been fully developed for the inspection of spot welds manufactured in steel alloys, and has been mainly applied in the automotive industry. In recent years, a variety of materials have been introduced to the automotive industry. These include high strength steels, magnesium alloys, and aluminum alloys. Aluminum alloys have been of particular interest due to their high strength-to-weight ratio. Resistance spot welding requirements for aluminum vary greatly from those of steel. Additionally, the oxide film formed on the aluminum surface increases the heat generation between the copper electrodes and the aluminum plates leading to accelerated electrode deterioration. Preliminary studies showed that the real-time quality inspection system was not able to monitor spot welds manufactured with aluminum. The extensive experimental research, finite element modelling of the aluminum welding process and finite difference modeling of the acoustic wave propagation through the aluminum spot welds presented in this dissertation, revealed that the thermodynamics and hence the acoustic wave propagation through an aluminum and a steel spot weld differ significantly. For this reason, the hardware requirements and the algorithms developed to determine the welds quality from the ultrasonic data used on steel, no longer apply on aluminum spot welds. After updating the system and designing the required algorithms, parameters such as liquid nugget penetration and nugget diameter were available in the ultrasonic data

  10. Grain fragmentation in ultrasonic-assisted TIG weld of pure aluminum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qihao; Lin, Sanbao; Yang, Chunli; Fan, Chenglei; Ge, Hongliang

    2017-11-01

    Under the action of acoustic waves during an ultrasonic-assisted tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding process, a grain of a TIG weld of aluminum alloy is refined by nucleation and grain fragmentation. Herein, effects of ultrasound on grain fragmentation in the TIG weld of aluminum alloy are investigated via systematic welding experiments of pure aluminum. First, experiments involving continuous and fixed-position welding are performed, which demonstrate that ultrasound can break the grain of the TIG weld of pure aluminum. The microstructural characteristics of an ultrasonic-assisted TIG weld fabricated by fixed-position welding are analyzed. The microstructure is found to transform from plane crystal, columnar crystal, and uniform equiaxed crystal into plane crystal, deformed columnar crystal, and nonuniform equiaxed crystal after application of ultrasound. Second, factors influencing ultrasonic grain fragmentation are investigated. The ultrasonic amplitude and welding current are found to have a considerable effect on grain fragmentation. The degree of fragmentation first increases and then decreases with an increase in ultrasonic amplitude, and it increases with an increase in welding current. Measurement results of the vibration of the weld pool show that the degree of grain fragmentation is related to the intensity of acoustic nonlinearity in the weld pool. The greater the intensity of acoustic nonlinearity, the greater is the degree of grain fragmentation. Finally, the mechanism of ultrasonic grain fragmentation in the TIG weld of pure aluminum is discussed. A finite element simulation is used to simulate the acoustic pressure and flow in the weld pool. The acoustic pressure in the weld pool exceeds the cavitation threshold, and cavitation bubbles are generated. The flow velocity in the weld pool does not change noticeably after application of ultrasound. It is concluded that the high-pressure conditions induced during the occurrence of cavitation, lead to grain

  11. Aluminum and stainless steel tubes joined by simple ring and welding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townhill, A.

    1967-01-01

    Duranel ring is used to join aluminum and stainless steel tubing. Duranel is a bimetal made up of roll-bonded aluminum and stainless steel. This method of joining the tubing requires only two welding operations.

  12. Effects Of Welding On The Fatigue Behaviour Of Commercial Aluminum AA-1100 Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uthayakumar, M.; Balasubramanian, V.; Rani, Ahmad Majdi Abdul; Hadzima, Branislav

    2018-04-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is an budding solid state welding process, which is frequently used for joining aluminum alloys where materials can be joined without melt and recast. Therefore, when welding alloys through FSW the phase transformations occurs will be in the solid state form. The present work is aimed in evaluating the fatigue life of friction stir welded commercial grade aluminum alloy joints. The commercial grade AA1100 aluminum alloy of 12mm thickness plate is welded and the specimens are tested using a rotary beam fatigue testing machine at different stress levels. The stress versus number of cycles (S-N) curves was plotted using the data points. The Fatigue life of tungsten inert gas (TIG) and metal inert gas (MIG) welded joints was compared. The fatigue life of the weld joints was interrelated with the tensile properties, microstructure and micro hardness properties. The effects of the notches and welding processes are evaluated and reported.

  13. Welding of AA1050 aluminum with AISI 304 stainless steel by rotary friction welding process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Ying An

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work was to assess the development of solid state joints of dissimilar material AA1050 aluminum and AISI 304 stainless steel, which can be used in pipes of tanks of liquid propellants and other components of the Satellite Launch Vehicle. The joints were obtained by rotary friction welding process (RFW, which combines the heat generated from friction between two surfaces and plastic deformation. Tests were conducted with different welding process parameters. The results were analyzed by means of tensile tests, Vickers microhardness, metallographic tests and SEM-EDX. The strength of the joints varied with increasing friction time and the use of different pressure values. Joints were obtained with superior mechanical properties of the AA1050 aluminum, with fracture occurring in the aluminum away from the bonding interface. The analysis by EDX at the interface of the junction showed that interdiffusion occurs between the main chemical components of the materials involved. The RFW proves to be a great method for obtaining joints between dissimilar materials, which is not possible by fusion welding processes.

  14. Improving resistance welding of aluminum sheets by addition of metal powder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al Naimi, Ihsan K.; Al-Saadi, Moneer H.; Daws, Kasim M.

    2015-01-01

    . The improvement obtained is shown to be due to the development of a secondary bond in the joint beside the weld nugget increasing the total weld area. The application of powder additive is especially feasible, when using welding machines with insufficient current capacity for producing the required nugget size......In order to ensure good quality joints between aluminum sheets by resistance spot welding, a new approach involving the addition of metal powder to the faying surfaces before resistance heating is proposed. Three different metal powders (pure aluminum and two powders corresponding to the alloys AA....... In such cases the best results are obtained with pure aluminum powder....

  15. Microstructural and mechanical properties of pure aluminum, 5083 and 7075 alloys joined by friction stir welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilmaz, Selim Sarper [Celal Bayar Univ., Manisa, Muradiye (Turkey)

    2012-07-01

    In this study, microstructural and mechanical properties of pure aluminum, 5083 and 7075 alloys joined by friction stir welding were investigated. Hardness, tensile, bending and impact tests were applied to the welded samples. In addition, optical and SEM tests were carried out. The effects of welding speed on microstructure and mechanical properties were investigated in these materials. Then, the optimal conditions for friction stir welding were determined for pure aluminum, 5083 and 7075 alloys. The maximum hardness was observed for 7075 while the minimum hardness was observed for pure aluminum. (orig.)

  16. Microprobe investigation of brittle segregates in aluminum MIG and TIG welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larssen, P. A.; Miller, E. L.

    1968-01-01

    Quantitative microprobe analysis of segregated particles in aluminum MIG /Metal Inert Gas/ and TIG /Tungsten Inert Gas/ welds indicated that there were about ten different kinds of particles, corresponding to ten different intermetallic compounds. Differences between MIG and TIG welds related to the individual cooling rates of these welds.

  17. Optimization of pulsed TIG welding process parameters on mechanical properties of AA 5456 Aluminum alloy weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Warangal 506 004 (India)], E-mail: adepu_kumar7@yahoo.co.in; Sundarrajan, S. [Scientist ' G' , Defence Research and Development Laboratory, Hyderabad 500 028 (India)

    2009-04-15

    The present work pertains to the improvement of mechanical properties of AA 5456 Aluminum alloy welds through pulsed tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding process. Taguchi method was employed to optimize the pulsed TIG welding process parameters of AA 5456 Aluminum alloy welds for increasing the mechanical properties. Regression models were developed. Analysis of variance was employed to check the adequacy of the developed models. The effect of planishing on mechanical properties was also studied and observed that there was improvement in mechanical properties. Microstructures of all the welds were studied and correlated with the mechanical properties.

  18. Optimization of pulsed TIG welding process parameters on mechanical properties of AA 5456 Aluminum alloy weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, A.; Sundarrajan, S.

    2009-01-01

    The present work pertains to the improvement of mechanical properties of AA 5456 Aluminum alloy welds through pulsed tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding process. Taguchi method was employed to optimize the pulsed TIG welding process parameters of AA 5456 Aluminum alloy welds for increasing the mechanical properties. Regression models were developed. Analysis of variance was employed to check the adequacy of the developed models. The effect of planishing on mechanical properties was also studied and observed that there was improvement in mechanical properties. Microstructures of all the welds were studied and correlated with the mechanical properties

  19. Mechanical properties of friction stir welded aluminum alloys 5083 and 5383

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeom Kee Paik

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of high-strength aluminum alloys is increasing in shipbuilding industry, particularly for the design and construction of war ships, littoral surface craft and combat ships, and fast passenger ships. While various welding methods are used today to fabricate aluminum ship structures, namely gas metallic arc welding (GMAW, laser welding and friction stir welding (FSW, FSW technology has been recognized to have many advantages for the construction of aluminum structures, as it is a low-cost welding process. In the present study, mechanical properties of friction stir welded aluminum alloys are examined experimentally. Tensile testing is undertaken on dog-bone type test specimen for aluminum alloys 5083 and 5383. The test specimen includes friction stir welded material between identical alloys and also dissimilar alloys, as well as unwelded (base alloys. Mechanical properties of fusion welded aluminum alloys are also tested and compared with those of friction stir welded alloys. The insights developed from the present study are documented together with details of the test database. Part of the present study was obtained from the Ship Structure Committee project SR-1454 (Paik, 2009, jointly funded by its member agencies.

  20. Electric pulse treatment of welded joint of aluminum alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Mitiaev

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Explanation of the redistribution effect of residual strengthes after electric pulse treatment of ark welding seam of the aluminum alloy. Methodology. Alloy on the basis of aluminium of АК8М3 type served as the research material. As a result of mechanical treatment of the ingots after alloy crystallization the plates with 10 mm thickness were obtained. After edge preparation the elements, which are being connected were butt welded using the technology of semiautomatic argon arc welding by the electrode with a diameter of 3 mm of AK-5 alloy. Metal structure of the welded joint was examined under the light microscope at a magnification of 200 and under the scanning electronic microscope «JSM-6360 LA». The Rockwell hardness (HRF was used as a strength characteristic of alloy. Hardness measuring of the phase constituents (microhardness was carried out using the device PМТ-3, with the indenter loadings 5 and 10 g. The crystalline structure parameters of alloy (dislocation density, second kind of the crystalline grid distortion and the scale of coherent scattering regions were determined using the methods of X-ray structural analysis. Electric pulse treatment (ET was carried out on the special equipment in the conditions of the DS enterprise using two modes A and В. Findings. On the basis of researches the previously obtained microhardness redistribution effect in the area of welded connection after ET was confirmed. As a result of use of the indicated treatment it was determined not only the reduction of microhardness gradient but also the simultaneous hardening effect in the certain thermal affected areas near the welding seam. During study of chemical composition of phase constituents it was discovered, that the structural changes of alloy as a result of ET first of all are caused by the redistribution of chemical elements, which form the connections themselves. By the nature of the influence the indicated treatment can be

  1. Automatic Welding System of Aluminum Pipe by Monitoring Backside Image of Molten Pool Using Vision Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskoro, Ario Sunar; Kabutomori, Masashi; Suga, Yasuo

    An automatic welding system using Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welding with vision sensor for welding of aluminum pipe was constructed. This research studies the intelligent welding process of aluminum alloy pipe 6063S-T5 in fixed position and moving welding torch with the AC welding machine. The monitoring system consists of a vision sensor using a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera to monitor backside image of molten pool. The captured image was processed to recognize the edge of molten pool by image processing algorithm. Neural network model for welding speed control were constructed to perform the process automatically. From the experimental results it shows the effectiveness of the control system confirmed by good detection of molten pool and sound weld of experimental result.

  2. Development and modeling of hot tearing test in TIG welding of aluminum alloy 6056

    OpenAIRE

    Niel , Aurélie; Fras , Gilles; Deschaux-Beaume , Frédéric; Bordreuil , Cyril

    2010-01-01

    International audience; TIG welding process is widely used in the aeronautic industry. However, the increase of productivity which generally require an increase of welding speed is limited by the appearance of defects, such as hot tearing. This study focuses on the analysis of hot tearing in TIG welding on a 6056 aluminum alloy, used in aircraft manufacturing. Thanks to the developpement of an original hot tearing test and to numerical simulation of welding process, the influence of various p...

  3. Fabrication of Aluminum Tubes Filled with Aluminum Alloy Foam by Friction Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiko Hangai

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum foam is usually used as the core of composite materials by combining it with dense materials, such as in Al foam core sandwich panels and Al-foam-filled tubes, owing to its low tensile and bending strengths. In this study, all-Al foam-filled tubes consisting of ADC12 Al-Si-Cu die-cast aluminum alloy foam and a dense A1050 commercially pure Al tube with metal bonding were fabricated by friction welding. First, it was found that the ADC12 precursor was firmly bonded throughout the inner wall of the A1050 tube without a gap between the precursor and the tube by friction welding. No deformation of the tube or foaming of the precursor was observed during the friction welding. Next, it was shown that by heat treatment of an ADC12-precursor-bonded A1050 tube, gases generated by the decomposition of the blowing agent expand the softened ADC12 to produce the ADC12 foam interior of the dense A1050 tube. A holding time during the foaming process of approximately tH = 8.5 min with a holding temperature of 948 K was found to be suitable for obtaining a sound ADC12-foam-filled A1050 tube with sufficient foaming, almost uniform pore structures over the entire specimen, and no deformation or reduction in the thickness of the tube.

  4. Effect of Interfacial Reaction on the Mechanical Performance of Steel to Aluminum Dissimilar Ultrasonic Spot Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lei; Wang, Li; Chen, Ying-Chun; Robson, Joe D.; Prangnell, Philip B.

    2016-01-01

    The early stages of formation of intermetallic compounds (IMC) have been investigated in dissimilar aluminum to steel welds, manufactured by high power (2.5 kW) ultrasonic spot welding (USW). To better understand the influence of alloy composition, welds were produced between a low-carbon steel (DC04) and two different aluminum alloys (6111 and 7055). The joint strengths were measured in lap shear tests and the formation and growth behavior of IMCs at the weld interface were characterized by electron microscopy, for welding times from 0.2 to 2.4 seconds. With the material combinations studied, the η (Fe2Al5) intermetallic phase was found to form first, very rapidly in the initial stage of welding, with a discontinuous island morphology. Continuous layers of η and then θ (FeAl3) phase were subsequently seen to develop on extending the welding time to greater than 0.7 second. The IMC layer formed in the DC04-AA7055 combination grew thicker than for the DC04-AA6111 welds, despite both weld sets having near identical thermal histories. Zinc was also found to be dissolved in the IMC phases when welding with the AA7055 alloy. After post-weld aging of the aluminum alloy, fracture in the lap shear tests always occurred along the joint interface; however, the DC04-AA6111 welds had higher fracture energy than the DC04-AA7055 combination.

  5. High-strength laser welding of aluminum-lithium scandium-doped alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malikov, A. G.; Ivanova, M. Yu.

    2016-11-01

    The work presents the experimental investigation of laser welding of an aluminum alloy (system Al-Mg-Li) and aluminum alloy (system Al-Cu-Li) doped with Sc. The influence of nano-structuring of the surface layer welded joint by cold plastic deformation on the strength properties of the welded joint is determined. It is founded that, regarding the deformation degree over the thickness, the varying value of the welded joint strength is different for these aluminum alloys. The strength of the plastically deformed welded joint, aluminum alloys of the Al-Mg-Li and Al-Cu-Li systems reached 0.95 and 0.6 of the base alloy strength, respectively.

  6. Process for optimizing titanium and zirconium additions to aluminum welding consumables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dvornak, M.J.; Frost, R.H.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a process for manufacturing an aluminum welding consumable. It comprises: creating an aluminum melt; adding to the aluminum melt solid pieces of a master alloy, comprising aluminum and a weld-enhancing additive to form a mixture, wherein the weld-enhancing additive being a material selected from the group consisting of titanium and zirconium, so that the weld-enhancing additive exists in the alloy prior to addition to the melt in the form of intermetallic particles relatively large in size and small in number, and after addition to the melt the weld-enhancing additive exists in the form of fractured intermetallic particles of refined size having dissolved fractured interfaces, casting the mixture into a chill mold to form an ingot; reducing the ingot to rods of rough wire dimension by cold rolling; annealing the reduced rods; and drawing the rods into wire

  7. Weld Growth Mechanisms and Failure Behavior of Three-Sheet Resistance Spot Welds Made of 5052 Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Yan, Fuyu; Luo, Zhen; Chao, Y. J.; Ao, Sansan; Cui, Xuetuan

    2015-06-01

    This paper investigates the weld nugget formation in three-sheet aluminum alloy resistance spot welding. The nugget formation process in three equal thickness sheets and three unequal thickness sheets of 5052 aluminum alloy were studied. The results showed that the nugget was initially formed at the workpiece/workpiece interfaces (i.e., both upper interface and lower interface). The two small nuggets then grew along the radial direction and axial direction (welding direction) as the welding time increased. Eventually, the two nuggets fused into one large nugget. During the welding process, the Peltier effect between the Cu-Al caused the shift of the nugget in the welding direction. In addition, the mechanical strength and fracture mode of the weld nuggets at the upper and lower interfaces were also studied using tensile shear specimen configuration. Three failure modes were identified, namely interfacial, mixed, and pullout. The critical welding time and critical nugget diameter corresponding to the transitions of these modes were investigated. Finally, an empirical failure load formula for three-sheet weld similar to two-sheet spot weld was developed.

  8. Effect of Shielding Gas on the Properties of AW 5083 Aluminum Alloy Laser Weld Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyskoč, Maroš; Sahul, Miroslav; Sahul, Martin

    2018-04-01

    The paper deals with the evaluation of the shielding gas influence on the properties of AW 5083 aluminum alloy weld joints produced with disk laser. Butt weld joints were produced under different shielding gas types, namely Ar, He, Ar + 5 vol.% He, Ar + 30 vol.% He and without shielding weld pool. Light and electron microscopy, computed tomography, microhardness measurements and tensile testing were used for evaluation of weld joint properties. He-shielded weld joints were the narrowest ones. On the other hand, Ar-shielded weld joints exhibited largest weld width. The choice of shielding gas had significant influence on the porosity level of welds. The lowest porosity was observed in weld joint produced in Ar with the addition of 5 vol.% He shielding atmosphere (only 0.03%), while the highest level of porosity was detected in weld joint produced in pure He (0.24%). Except unshielded aluminum alloy weld joint, the lowest tensile strength was recorded in He-shielded weld joints. On the contrary, the highest average microhardness was measured in He-shielded weld joints.

  9. Experimental Investigation on Electric Current-Aided Laser Stake Welding of Aluminum Alloy T-Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinge Zhang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, aluminum alloy T-joints were welded using the laser stake-welding process. In order to improve the welding quality of the T-joints, an external electric current was used to aid the laser stake-welding process. The effects of the process parameters on the weld morphology, mechanical properties, and microstructure of the welded joints were analyzed and discussed in detail. The results indicate that the aided electric current should be no greater than a certain maximum value. Upon increasing the aided electric current, the weld width at the skin and stringer faying surface obviously increased, but there was an insignificant change in the penetration depth. Furthermore, the electric current and pressing force should be chosen to produce an expected weld width at the faying surface, whereas the laser power and welding speed should be primarily considered to obtain an optimal penetration depth. The tensile shear specimens failed across the faying surface or failed in the weld zone of the skin. The specimens that failed in the weld of the skin could resist a higher tensile shear load compared with specimens that failed across the faying surface. The microstructural observations and microhardness results demonstrated that the tensile shear load capacity of the aluminum alloy welded T-joint was mainly determined by the weld width at the faying surface.

  10. Effect of tool rotational speed and penetration depth on dissimilar aluminum alloys friction stir spot welds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquín M. Piccini

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In the last years, the automotive industry is looking for the use of aluminum parts in replace of steel parts in order to reduce the vehicles weight. These parts have to be joined, for instance, by welding processes. The more common welding process in the automotive industry is the Resistance Spot Welding (RSW technique. However, RSW of aluminum alloys has many disadvantages. Regarding this situation, a variant of the Friction Stir Welding process called Friction Stir Spot Welding (FSSW has been developed, showing a strong impact in welding of aluminum alloys and dissimilar materials in thin sheets. Process parameters affect the characteristics of the welded joints. However, the information available on this topic is scarce, particularly for dissimilar joints and thin sheets. The aim of this work was to study the effect of the rotational speed and the tool penetration depth on the characteristics of dissimilar FSS welded joints. Defects free joints have been achieved with higher mechanical properties than the ones reported. The maximum fracture load was 5800 N. It was observed that the effective joint length of the welded spots increased with the tool penetration depth, meanwhile the fracture load increased and then decreased. Finally, welding at 1200 RPM produced welded joints with lower mechanical properties than the ones achieved at 680 and 903 RPM.

  11. Influence of scandium on the microstructure and strength properties of the welded joint at the laser welding of aluminum-lithium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malikov, A. G.; Golyshev, A. A.; Ivanova, M. Yu.

    2017-10-01

    Today, aeronautical equipment manufacture involves up-to-date high-strength aluminum alloys of decreased density resulting from lithium admixture. Various technologies of fusible welding of these alloys are being developed. Serious demands are imposed to the welded joints of aluminum alloys in respect to their strength characteristics. The paper presents experimental investigations of the optimization of the laser welding of aluminum alloys with the scandium-modified welded joint. The effect of scandium on the micro-and macro-structure has been studied as well as the strength characteristics of the welded joint. It has been found that scandium under in the laser welding process increases the welded joint elasticity for the system Al-Mg-Li, aluminum alloy 1420 by 20 %, and almost doubles the same for the system Al-Cu-Li, aluminum alloy 1441.

  12. Upgrading weld quality of a friction stir welded aluminum alloys AMG6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernykh, I. K.; Vasil'ev, E. V.; Matuzko, E. N.; Krivonos, E. V.

    2018-01-01

    In the course of introduction of FSW technology into the industry there is a keen interest in this process; there are issues such as how does joining take place, what is the structure of the joint, and where there are dangerous zones. The objective of this research is to obtain information about the structure of the joint, what are the temperatures that arise during the joining, what strength is apply to the tool when joining the material, what tensile strength of joint, and where fracture tended to occur. Specimens were produced at different modes of welding at a tool rotation speed of 315 to 625 rpm and tool travel speed of 40 to 125 mm/min. During the experiment, the strength applied to the tool was measured, which reached 800016000 N (Fz) and 400-1400 N (Fx) and the temperature on the surface of the tool, which is in the range 250-400°C. Before the welding process the tool was heated to a temperature in the range of 100-250 degrees, but the tensile strength is not had a tangible impact. The tensile strength is about 80 % of that of the aluminum alloy base metal tensile strength, and fracture tended is occur not at the line of joint but follow the shape of the tool. In the transverse cross section of a FSW material there is a microstructural regions such as weld nugget, thermomechanically affected zone and heat-affected zone with parent material.

  13. Damage Tolerance Assessment of Friction Pull Plug Welds in an Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, Preston; Burkholder, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Friction stir welding is a solid state welding process used in the fabrication of cryogenic propellant tanks. Self-reacting friction stir welding is one variation of the friction stir weld process being developed for manufacturing tanks. Friction pull plug welding is used to seal the exit hole that remains in a circumferential self-reacting friction stir weld. A friction plug weld placed in a self-reacting friction stir weld results in a non-homogenous weld joint where the initial weld, plug weld, their respective heat affected zones and the base metal all interact. The welded joint is a composite plastically deformed material system with a complex residual stress field. In order to address damage tolerance concerns associated with friction plug welds in safety critical structures, such as propellant tanks, nondestructive inspection and proof testing may be required to screen hardware for mission critical defects. The efficacy of the nondestructive evaluation or the proof test is based on an assessment of the critical flaw size. Test data relating residual strength capability to flaw size in an aluminum alloy friction plug weld will be presented.

  14. Thermomechanical treatment of welded joints of aluminum-lithium alloys modified by scandium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malikov, A. G.

    2017-12-01

    At present, the aeronautical equipment manufacture involves up-to-date high-strength aluminum alloys of decreased density resulting from the lithium admixture. Various technologies of fusible welding of these alloys are being developed. The paper presents experimental investigations of the optimization of the laser welding of aluminum alloys with the scandium-modified welded joint after thermomechanical treatment. The effect of scandium on the micro- and macrostructure is studied along with strength characteristics of the welded joint. It is found that thermomechanical treatment allows us to obtain the strength of the welded joint 0.89 for the Al-Mg-Li system and 0.99 for the Al-Cu-Li system with the welded joint modified by scandium in comparison with the base alloy after treatment.

  15. The microstructure of aluminum A5083 butt joint by friction stir welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jasri, M. A. H. M.; Afendi, M.; Ismail, A.; Ishak, M.

    2015-01-01

    This study presents the microstructure of the aluminum A5083 butt joint surface after it has been joined by friction stir welding (FSW) process. The FSW process is a unique welding method because it will not change the chemical properties of the welded metals. In this study, MILKO 37 milling machine was modified to run FSW process on 4 mm plate of aluminum A5083 butt joint. For the experiment, variables of travel speed and tool rotational speed based on capability of machine were used to run FSW process. The concentrated heat from the tool to the aluminum plate changes the plate form from solid to plastic state. Two aluminum plates is merged to become one plate during plastic state and return to solid when concentrated heat is gradually further away. After that, the surface and cross section of the welded aluminum were investigated with a microscope by 400 x multiplication zoom. The welding defect in the FSW aluminum was identified. Then, the result was compared to the American Welding Society (AWS) FSW standard to decide whether the plate can be accepted or rejected

  16. The microstructure of aluminum A5083 butt joint by friction stir welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jasri, M. A. H. M.; Afendi, M. [School of Mechatronic Engineering, Universiti Malaysia Perlis, Pauh, 02600, Arau, Perlis (Malaysia); Ismail, A. [UniKL MIMET, JalanPantaiRemis, 32200, Lumut, Perak (Malaysia); Ishak, M. [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Malaysia Pahang, 02600, Pekan, Pahang (Malaysia)

    2015-05-15

    This study presents the microstructure of the aluminum A5083 butt joint surface after it has been joined by friction stir welding (FSW) process. The FSW process is a unique welding method because it will not change the chemical properties of the welded metals. In this study, MILKO 37 milling machine was modified to run FSW process on 4 mm plate of aluminum A5083 butt joint. For the experiment, variables of travel speed and tool rotational speed based on capability of machine were used to run FSW process. The concentrated heat from the tool to the aluminum plate changes the plate form from solid to plastic state. Two aluminum plates is merged to become one plate during plastic state and return to solid when concentrated heat is gradually further away. After that, the surface and cross section of the welded aluminum were investigated with a microscope by 400 x multiplication zoom. The welding defect in the FSW aluminum was identified. Then, the result was compared to the American Welding Society (AWS) FSW standard to decide whether the plate can be accepted or rejected.

  17. Technique for in-place welding of aluminum backed up by a combustible material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnuolo, A. C.

    1971-01-01

    Welding external aluminum jacket, tightly wrapped around inner layer of wood composition fiberboard, in oxygen free environment prevents combustion and subsequent damage to underlying fiberboard. Technique also applies to metal cutting in similar assemblies without disassembly to remove combustible materials from welding heat proximity.

  18. Friction Stir Weld Failure Mechanisms in Aluminum-Armor Structures Under Ballistic Impact Loading Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    REPORT Friction Stir Weld Failure Mechanisms in Aluminum-Armor Structures Under Ballistic Impact Loading Conditions 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY...properties and of the attendant ballistic-impact failure mechanisms in prototypical friction stir welding (FSW) joints found in armor structures made of high...mechanisms, friction stir welding M. Grujicic, B. Pandurangan, A. Arakere, C-F. Yen, B. A. Cheeseman Clemson University Office of Sponsored Programs 300

  19. Friction welding of A 6061 aluminum alloy and S45C carbon steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinoda, T. [Nagoya Univ., Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya (Japan); Kawata, S. [Post Graduate Student, Nagoya Univ., Nagoya (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    Many researches for friction welding of aluminum with either carbon steel or stainless steel have been carried out. From those results, it is concluded that the greatest problem is the formation of brittle intermetallic compounds at weld interface. However, it is not clearly demonstrated the effect of friction welding parameters on the formation of intermetallic compounds. This research purposes are to evaluate the formation of intermetallic compounds and to investigate the effect of friction welding parameters on the strength of welded joint. For these purposes, A6061 aluminum alloy and S45C carbon steel were used with a continuous drive vertical friction welding machine. Tensile test results revealed that the maximum tensile strength was achieved at extremely short friction time and high upset. The joint strength reached 92% of the tensile strength of A6061 base metal. Tensile strength of friction welding was increasing with increasing upset pressure when friction time 1sec. However, tensile properties were deteriorated with increasing friction time. It was observed that the amount of formed intermetallic compound was increasing with increasing friction time at weld interface. Partly formed intermetallic compound on weld interface were identified when friction time 1 sec. However, intermetallic compound layer were severely developed with longer friction time at weld interface. It was concluded that intermetallic compound layer deteriorated the tensile properties of weld joints. (orig.)

  20. Physical simulation method for the investigation of weld seam formation during the extrusion of aluminum alloys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fang, G; Zhou, J.

    2017-01-01

    Extrusion through the porthole die is a predominant forming process used in the production of hollow aluminum alloy profiles across the aluminum extrusion industry. Longitudinal weld seams formed during the process may negatively influence the quality of extruded profiles. It is therefore of

  1. Inertia and friction welding of aluminum alloy 1100 to type 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, M.A.

    1979-01-01

    The inertia and friction-welding processes were evaluated for joining aluminum alloy 1100-H14 and Type 316 vacuum-induction melted, vacuum-arc remelted (VIM VAR) stainless steel. While both processes consistently produced joints in which the strength exceeded the strength of the aluminum base metal, 100 percent bonding was not reliably achieved with inertia welding. The deficiency points out the need for development of nondestructive testing techniques for this type of joint. Additionally, solid-state volume diffusion did not appear to be a satisfactory explanation for the inertia and friction-welding bonding mechanism

  2. Pore formation during C.W.Nd: YAG laser welding of aluminum alloys for automotive applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastor, M.; Zhao, H.; DebRoy, T.

    2000-01-01

    Pore formation is an important concern in laser welding of automotive aluminum alloys. This paper investigates the influence of the laser beam defocusing on pore formation during continuous wave Nd:YAG laser welding of aluminum automotive alloys 5182 and 5754. It was found that the instability of the keyhole during welding was a dominant cause of pore formation while hydrogen rejection played an insignificant role. The defocusing of the laser beam greatly affected the stability of the keyhole. Finally, the mechanism of the collapse of the keyhole and pore formation is proposed. (Author) 45 refs

  3. Influence of Post Weld Heat Treatment on Strength of Three Aluminum Alloys Used in Light Poles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig C. Menzemer

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The conjoint influence of welding and artificial aging on mechanical properties were investigated for extrusions of aluminum alloy 6063, 6061, and 6005A. Uniaxial tensile tests were conducted on the aluminum alloys 6063-T4, 6061-T4, and 6005A-T1 in both the as-received (AR and as-welded (AW conditions. Tensile tests were also conducted on the AR and AW alloys, subsequent to artificial aging. The welding process used was gas metal arc (GMAW with spray transfer using 120–220 A of current at 22 V. The artificial aging used was a precipitation heat treatment for 6 h at 182 °C (360 °F. Tensile tests revealed the welded aluminum alloys to have lower strength, both for yield and ultimate tensile strength, when compared to the as-received un-welded counterpart. The beneficial influence of post weld heat treatment (PWHT on strength and ductility is presented and discussed in terms of current design provisions for welded aluminum light pole structures.

  4. Enhancing the Ductility of Laser-Welded Copper-Aluminum Connections by using Adapted Filler Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigl, M.; Albert, F.; Schmidt, M.

    Laser micro welding of direct copper-aluminum connections typically leads to the formation of intermetallic phases and an embrittlement of the metal joints. By means of adapted filler materials it is possible to reduce the brittle phases and thereby enhance the ductility of these dissimilar connections. As the element silicon features quite a well compatibility with copper and aluminum, filler materials based on Al-Si and Cu-Si alloys are used in the current research studies. In contrast to direct Cu-Al welds, the aluminum filler alloy AlSi12 effectuates a more uniform element mixture and a significantly enhanced ductility.

  5. Effect of Mg and Cu on mechanical properties of high-strength welded joints of aluminum alloys obtained by laser welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annin, B. D.; Fomin, V. M.; Karpov, E. V.; Malikov, A. G.; Orishich, A. M.

    2017-09-01

    Results of experimental investigations of welded joints of high-strength aluminum-lithium alloys of the Al-Cu-Li and Al-Mg-Li systems are reported. The welded joints are obtained by means of laser welding and are subjected to various types of processing for obtaining high-strength welded joints. A microstructural analysis is performed. The phase composition and mechanical properties of the welded joints before and after heat treatment are studied. It is found that combined heat treatment of the welded joint (annealing, quenching, and artificial ageing) increases the joint strength, but appreciably decreases the alloy strength outside the region thermally affected by the welding process.

  6. Evaluation the Mechanical Properties of Shot Peened TIG Welded Aluminum Sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Ameed Zain Al-Abideen

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available A tungsten inert gas (TIG welding is one of the most popular kinds of welding used to join metals mainly for aluminum alloys. However, many challenges may be met with this kind of joining process; these challenges arise from decay of mechanical properties of welded materials. In the present study, an attempt was made to enhancing the mechanical properties of TIG weld joint of 6061-T6 aluminum alloy by hardening the surfaces using shoot peening technique. To optimize the shoot peening process three times of exposure (5, 10, and 15 min. was used. All peened and unpeened, and welded and unwelded samples were characterized by metallographic test to indicate the phase transformation and modification in microstructure occurring during welding process. Tensile test and Vickers micro-hardness measurements were performed for all samples to investigate the effect of shoot peening on mechanical properties of welded aluminum. The results indicated a significant improvement in properties for peened welded and unwelded samples compared with those unpeened one. Also, the results showed that the tensile and microhardness properties were increased with increasing the time of exposure to 15 min. due to generation of compressive residual stresses at surface.

  7. Optimizing friction stir weld parameters of aluminum and copper using conventional milling machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manisegaran, Lohappriya V.; Ahmad, Nurainaa Ayuni; Nazri, Nurnadhirah; Noor, Amirul Syafiq Mohd; Ramachandran, Vignesh; Ismail, Muhammad Tarmizizulfika; Ahmad, Ku Zarina Ku; Daruis, Dian Darina Indah

    2018-05-01

    The joining of two of any particular materials through friction stir welding (FSW) are done by a rotating tool and the work piece material that generates heat which causes the region near the FSW tool to soften. This in return will mechanically intermix the work pieces. The first objective of this study is to join aluminum plates and copper plates by means of friction stir welding process using self-fabricated tools and conventional milling machine. This study also aims to investigate the optimum process parameters to produce the optimum mechanical properties of the welding joints for Aluminum plates and Copper plates. A suitable tool bit and a fixture is to be fabricated for the welding process. A conventional milling machine will be used to weld the aluminum and copper. The most important parameters to enable the process are speed and pressure of the tool (or tool design and alignment of the tool onto the work piece). The study showed that the best surface finish was produced from speed of 1150 rpm and tool bit tilted to 3°. For a 200mm × 100mm Aluminum 6061 with plate thickness of 2 mm at a speed of 1 mm/s, the time taken to complete the welding is only 200 seconds or equivalent to 3 minutes and 20 seconds. The Copper plates was successfully welded using FSW with tool rotation speed of 500 rpm, 700 rpm, 900 rpm, 1150 rpm and 1440 rpm and with welding traverse rate of 30 mm/min, 60 mm/min and 90 mm/min. As the conclusion, FSW using milling machine can be done on both Aluminum and Copper plates, however the weld parameters are different for the two types of plates.

  8. Manual gas tungsten arc (dc) and semiautomatic gas metal arc welding of 6XXX aluminum. Welding procedure specification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wodtke, C.H.; Frizzell, D.R.; Plunkett, W.A.

    1985-08-01

    Procedure WPS-1009 is qualified under Section IX of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for manual gas tungsten arc (DC) and semiautomatic gas metal arc (DC) welding of aluminum alloys 6061 and 6063 (P-23), in thickness range 0.187 to 2 in.; filler metal is ER4043 (F-23); shielding gases are helium (GTAW) and argon (GMAW)

  9. Strain hardening and damage in 6xxx series aluminum alloy friction stir welds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simar, Aude; Nielsen, Kim Lau; de Meester, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    A friction stir weld in 6005A-T6 aluminum alloy has been prepared and analyzed by micro-hardness measurements, tensile testing and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The locations of the various weld zones were determined by micro-hardness indentation measurements. The flow behavior of the various...... zones of the weld was extracted using micro-tensile specimens cut out parallel to the welding direction. The measured material properties and weld topology were then introduced in a fully coupled micro-mechanical finite element model, accounting for nucleation and growth of voids as well as void shape...... evolution. The model shows satisfactory preliminary results in predicting the tensile behaviour of the weld and the true strain at fracture....

  10. Study of 2219 aluminum alloy using direct current A-TIG welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Zou, Jiasheng

    2017-07-01

    Direct current A-TIG (DCEN A-TIG) welding using special active agent had eliminated the pores and the oxidation of 2219 high-strength aluminum alloy in welding. Addition of AlF3-25% LiF active agent to DCEN A-TIG welding and arc morphology showed a trailing phenomenon. However, the change in arc morphology was not remarkable when AlF3-75% LiF active agent was added. Addition of AlF3-75% LiF active agent can refine the grain size of DCEN A-TIG joint. The mechanical properties of the weld were optimal at 10% AlF3-75% LiF active agent. Compared with AC TIG and AC A-TIG welding, DCEN A-TIG welding yielded better results for 2219 Al alloy.

  11. Damage Tolerance Behavior of Friction Stir Welds in Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, Preston; Burkholder, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Friction stir welding is a solid state welding process used in the fabrication of various aerospace structures. Self-reacting and conventional friction stir welding are variations of the friction stir weld process employed in the fabrication of cryogenic propellant tanks which are classified as pressurized structure in many spaceflight vehicle architectures. In order to address damage tolerance behavior associated with friction stir welds in these safety critical structures, nondestructive inspection and proof testing may be required to screen hardware for mission critical defects. The efficacy of the nondestructive evaluation or the proof test is based on an assessment of the critical flaw size. Test data describing fracture behavior, residual strength capability, and cyclic mission life capability of friction stir welds at ambient and cryogenic temperatures have been generated and will be presented in this paper. Fracture behavior will include fracture toughness and tearing (R-curve) response of the friction stir welds. Residual strength behavior will include an evaluation of the effects of lack of penetration on conventional friction stir welds, the effects of internal defects (wormholes) on self-reacting friction stir welds, and an evaluation of the effects of fatigue cycled surface cracks on both conventional and selfreacting welds. Cyclic mission life capability will demonstrate the effects of surface crack defects on service load cycle capability. The fracture data will be used to evaluate nondestructive inspection and proof test requirements for the welds.

  12. The development of a quality prediction system for aluminum laser welding to measure plasma intensity using photodiodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Ji Young [Technical Research Center, Hyundai Steel Company, Dangjin (Korea, Republic of); Sohn, Yong Ho [Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando (United States); Park, Young Whan; Kwak, Jae Seob [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Pukyong National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Lightweight metals have been used to manufacture the body panels of cars to reduce the weight of car bodies. Typically, aluminum sheets are welded together, with a focus on weld quality assurance. A weld quality prediction system for the laser welding of aluminum was developed in this research to maximize welding production. The behavior of the plasma was also analyzed, dependent on various welding conditions. The light intensity of the plasma was altered with heat input and wire feed rate conditions, and the strength of the weld and sensor signals correlated closely for this heat input condition. Using these characteristics, a new algorithm and program were developed to evaluate the weld quality. The design involves a combinatory algorithm using a neural network model for the prediction of tensile strength from measured signals and a fuzzy multi-feature pattern recognition algorithm for the weld quality classification to improve predictability of the system.

  13. The development of a quality prediction system for aluminum laser welding to measure plasma intensity using photodiodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Ji Young; Sohn, Yong Ho; Park, Young Whan; Kwak, Jae Seob

    2016-01-01

    Lightweight metals have been used to manufacture the body panels of cars to reduce the weight of car bodies. Typically, aluminum sheets are welded together, with a focus on weld quality assurance. A weld quality prediction system for the laser welding of aluminum was developed in this research to maximize welding production. The behavior of the plasma was also analyzed, dependent on various welding conditions. The light intensity of the plasma was altered with heat input and wire feed rate conditions, and the strength of the weld and sensor signals correlated closely for this heat input condition. Using these characteristics, a new algorithm and program were developed to evaluate the weld quality. The design involves a combinatory algorithm using a neural network model for the prediction of tensile strength from measured signals and a fuzzy multi-feature pattern recognition algorithm for the weld quality classification to improve predictability of the system

  14. Numerically Based Phase Transformation Maps for Dissimilar Aluminum Alloys Joined by Friction Stir-Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carter Hamilton

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Sheets of aluminum 2017A-T451 and 7075-T651 were friction stir-welded in a butt-weld configuration. An existing computational model of the welding process for temperature distribution and material flow was adapted to estimate the phase transformations that occur across the weld zone. Near the weld center, process temperatures are sufficient to fully dissolve the equilibrium η phase in 7075 and partially dissolve the equilibrium S phase in 2017A. Upon cooling, Guinier–Preston (GP and Guinier–Preston–Bagaryatsky (GPB zones re-precipitate, and hardness recovers. Due to the more complete dissolution of the equilibrium phase in 7075, the hardness recovery skews toward whichever side of the weld, i.e., the advancing or retreating side, represents the 7075 workpiece. Phase transformation maps generated by the numerical simulation align not only with the hardness profiles taken across the weld zone, but also with positron lifetimes obtained through positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS. Boundaries between the aluminum matrix and the secondary phases provide open volumes to trap positrons; therefore, positron lifetimes across the weld correspond with the phase transformations that occur in 7075 and 2017A during processing.

  15. Microstructure and mechanical properties of GTAW welded joints of AA6105 aluminum alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minerva Dorta-Almenara

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW is one of the most used methods to weld aluminum. This work investigates the influence of welding parameters on the microstructure and mechanical properties of GTAW welded AA6105 aluminum alloy joints. AA6105 alloy plates with different percent values of cold work were joined by GTAW, using various combinations of welding current and speed. The fusion zone, in which the effects of cold work have disappeared, and the heat affected zone of the welded samples were examined under optical and scanning electron microscopes, additionally, mechanical tests and measures of Vickers microhardness were performed. Results showed dendritic morphology with solute micro- and macrosegregation in the fusion zone, which is favored by the constitutional supercooling when heat input increases. When heat input increased and welding speed increased or remained constant, greater segregation was obtained, whereas welding speed decrease produced a coarser microstructure. In the heat affected zone recrystallization, dissolution, and coarsening of precipitates occurred, which led to variations in hardness and strength.

  16. A mechanism for the formation of equiaxed grains in welds of aluminum-lithium alloy 2090

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, D.C.; Wang, G.-X.; Srivatsan, T.S.

    2003-01-01

    In this technical note, the formation and presence of a zone of equiaxed grains (EQZ) along the fusion boundary of welded aluminum-lithium alloy 2090 using filler metals containing zirconium and lithium is presented and discussed. However, no EQZ was evident in welded joints of alloy 2090 using the commercial filler metals: aluminum alloy 2319 and 4145. Under identical conditions, aluminum-lithium alloy 2090 was fusion welded using several new filler metals containing various amounts of zirconium and lithium. Results reveal an increase in the width of the zone of equiaxed grains with an increase in zirconium and lithium content in the filler metal. A viable mechanism for the formation of equiaxed grains and its relationship to filler metal composition is highlighted

  17. High-power Laser Welding of Thick Steel-aluminum Dissimilar Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahdo, Rabi; Springer, André; Pfeifer, Ronny; Kaierle, Stefan; Overmeyer, Ludger

    According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), a worldwide reduction of CO2-emissions is indispensable to avoid global warming. Besides the automotive sector, lightweight construction is also of high interest for the maritime industry in order to minimize CO2-emissions. Using aluminum, the weight of ships can be reduced, ensuring lower fuel consumption. Therefore, hybrid joints of steel and aluminum are of great interest to the maritime industry. In order to provide an efficient lap joining process, high-power laser welding of thick steel plates (S355, t = 5 mm) and aluminum plates (EN AW-6082, t = 8 mm) is investigated. As the weld seam quality greatly depends on the amount of intermetallic phases within the joint, optimized process parameters and control are crucial. Using high-power laser welding, a tensile strength of 10 kN was achieved. Based on metallographic analysis, hardness tests, and tensile tests the potential of this joining method is presented.

  18. A new technique for the strengthening of aluminum tungsten inert gas weld metals: using carbon nanotube/aluminum composite as a filler metal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattahi, M; Nabhani, N; Rashidkhani, E; Fattahi, Y; Akhavan, S; Arabian, N

    2013-01-01

    The effect of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) on the mechanical properties of aluminum multipass weld metal prepared by the tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding process was investigated. High energy ball milling was used to disperse MWCNT in the aluminum powder. Carbon nanotube/aluminum composite filler metal was fabricated for the first time by hot extrusion of ball-milled powders. After welding, the tensile strength, microhardness and MWCNT distribution in the weld metal were investigated. The test results showed that the tensile strength and microhardness of weld metal was greatly increased when using the filler metal containing 1.5 wt.% MWCNT. Therefore, according to the results presented in this paper, it can be concluded that the filler metal containing MWCNT can serve as a super filler metal to improve the mechanical properties of TIG welds of Al and its alloys. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Friction stir welding of T joints of dissimilar aluminum alloy: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakare, Shrikant B.; Kalyankar, Vivek D.

    2018-04-01

    Aluminum alloys are preferred in the mechanical design due to their advantages like high strength, good corrosion resistance, low density and good weldability. In various industrial applications T joints configuration of aluminum alloys are used. In different fields, T joints having skin (horizontal sheet) strengthen by stringers (vertical sheets) were used to increase the strength of structure without increasing the weight. T joints are usually carried out by fusion welding which has limitations in joining of aluminum alloy due to significant distortion and metallurgical defects. Some aluminum alloys are even non weldable by fusion welding. The friction stir welding (FSW) has an excellent replacement of conventional fusion welding for T joints. In this article, FSW of T joints is reviewed by considering aluminum alloy and various joint geometries for defect analysis. The previous experiments carried out on T joints shows the factors such as tool geometry, fixturing device and joint configurations plays significant role in defect free joints. It is essential to investigate the material flow during FSW to know joining mechanism and the formation of joint. In this study the defect occurred in the FSW are studied for various joint configurations and parameters. Also the effect of the parameters and defects occurs on the tensile strength are studied. It is concluded that the T-joints of different joint configurations can be pretended successfully. Comparing to base metal some loss in tensile strength was observed in the weldments as well as overall reduction of the hardness in the thermos mechanically affected zone also observed.

  20. Microstructure and pitting corrosion of friction stir welded joints in 2219-O aluminum alloy thick plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Weifeng; Liu Jinhe

    2009-01-01

    Effect of welding parameters on the microstructure and pitting corrosion of different positions along the thickness of weld nugget zone in friction stir welded 2219-O aluminum alloy plate was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), polarization experiment and electrochemical impedance tests (EIS). It was found that the material presents significant passivation and the top has best corrosion resistance compared to the bottom and base material. Corrosion resistance decreases with the increase of traverse speed from 60 to 100 mm/min at rotary speed 400 rpm. Corrosion resistance at rotary speed 600 rpm is lower than that at 500 rpm.

  1. Structural Phase Evolution in Ultrasonic-Assisted Friction Stir Welded 2195 Aluminum Alloy Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliseev, A. A.; Fortuna, S. V.; Kalashnikova, T. A.; Chumaevskii, A. V.; Kolubaev, E. A.

    2017-10-01

    The authors examined the structural and phase state of fixed joints produced by method of friction stir welding (FSW) and ultrasonic-assisted friction stir welding (UAFSW) from extruded profile of aluminum alloy AA2195. In order to identify the role of ultrasonic application in the course of welding, such characteristics, as volume fraction and average size of secondary particles are compared in the base material and stir zones of FSW and UAFSW joints. By applying the methods of SEM and TEM analysis, researchers established the complex character of phase transitions as a result of ultrasonic application.

  2. Study of Weld Imperfections on Thin Aluminum Tubes According To ISO 10042

    CERN Document Server

    Rizkallah, Rabel

    2014-01-01

    The following report presents the work done as part of my summer student internship at CERN in the EN/MME group, and is divided into two parts. Part I of the report is a continuation of the work started previously by the student Quentin Drouhet, which aims at studying and classifying welding imperfections on various materials of small thicknesses. Drouhet worked on the welding imperfections found on thin Stainless Steel plates of thicknesses of 2 and 6 millimeters, welded using the GTAW (or TIG welding) process. My job was to conduct a similar study on thin Aluminum tubes welded using this same process. Part II of the report will introduce a new method for defect analysis that is still not available at CERN: the micro-tomographic testing

  3. Influence of Alloy and Solidification Parameters on Grain Refinement in Aluminum Weld Metal due to Inoculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schempp, Philipp [BAM, Germany; Tang, Z. [BIAS, Germany; Cross, Carl E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Seefeld, T. [BIAS, Germany; Pittner, A. [BAM, Germany; Rethmeier, M. [BAM, Germany

    2012-06-28

    The goals are: (1) Establish how much Ti/B grain refiner is need to completely refine aluminum weld metal for different alloys and different welding conditions; (2) Characterize how alloy composition and solidification parameters affect weld metal grain refinement; and (3) Apply relevant theory to understand observed behavior. Conclusions are: (1) additions of Ti/B grain refiner to weld metal in Alloys 1050, 5083, and 6082 resulted in significant grain refinement; (2) grain refinement was more effective in GTAW than LBW, resulting in finer grains at lower Ti content - reason is limited time available for equiaxed grain growth in LBW (inability to occlude columnar grain growth); (3) welding travel speed did not markedly affect grain size within GTAW and LBW clusters; and (4) application of Hunt CET analysis showed experimental G to be on the order of the critical G{sub CET}; G{sub CET} was consistently higher for GTAW than for LBW.

  4. Tensile strength and fatigue strength of 6061 aluminum alloy friction welded joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ochi, H.; Tsujino, R. [Osaka Inst. of Tech., Asahi-ku Osaka (Japan); Sawai, T. [Osaka Sangyo Univ., Daito (Japan); Yamamoto, Y. [Setsunan Univ., Neyagawa (Japan); Ogawa, K. [Osaka Prefecture Univ., Sakai (Japan); Suga, Y. [Keio Univ., Kohoku-ku, Yokohama (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    Friction welding of 6061 aluminum alloy was carried out in order to examine the relationship between deformation heat input in the upset stage and joint performance. The joint performance was evaluated by tensile testing and fatigue testing. Stabilized tensile strength was obtained when the deformation heat input in the upset stage exceeded 200 J/s. Weld condition at the weld interface and the width of softened area affected fatigue strength more than tensile strength. That is, when the weld condition at the weld interface is good and the softened area is wide, fatigue strength increases. On the other hand, when the weld condition at the weld interface is good and the softened area is narrow, and when the weld condition at the weld interface is somewhat poor in spite of the wide softened area, fatigue strength decreases. The fatigue limit obtained by the fatigue testing revealed that, when the deformation heat input in the upset stage exceeded a certain value, sound joints could be produced. (orig.)

  5. A Review of Dissimilar Welding Techniques for Magnesium Alloys to Aluminum Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liming Liu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Welding of dissimilar magnesium alloys and aluminum alloys is an important issue because of their increasing applications in industries. In this document, the research and progress of a variety of welding techniques for joining dissimilar Mg alloys and Al alloys are reviewed from different perspectives. Welding of dissimilar Mg and Al is challenging due to the formation of brittle intermetallic compound (IMC such as Mg17Al12 and Mg2Al3. In order to increase the joint strength, three main research approaches were used to eliminate or reduce the Mg-Al intermetallic reaction layer. First, solid state welding techniques which have a low welding temperature were used to reduce the IMCs. Second, IMC variety and distribution were controlled to avoid the degradation of the joining strength in fusion welding. Third, techniques which have relatively controllable reaction time and energy were used to eliminate the IMCs. Some important processing parameters and their effects on weld quality are discussed, and the microstructure and metallurgical reaction are described. Mechanical properties of welds such as hardness, tensile, shear and fatigue strength are discussed. The aim of the report is to review the recent progress in the welding of dissimilar Mg and Al to provide a basis for follow-up research.

  6. A Review of Dissimilar Welding Techniques for Magnesium Alloys to Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liming; Ren, Daxin; Liu, Fei

    2014-01-01

    Welding of dissimilar magnesium alloys and aluminum alloys is an important issue because of their increasing applications in industries. In this document, the research and progress of a variety of welding techniques for joining dissimilar Mg alloys and Al alloys are reviewed from different perspectives. Welding of dissimilar Mg and Al is challenging due to the formation of brittle intermetallic compound (IMC) such as Mg17Al12 and Mg2Al3. In order to increase the joint strength, three main research approaches were used to eliminate or reduce the Mg-Al intermetallic reaction layer. First, solid state welding techniques which have a low welding temperature were used to reduce the IMCs. Second, IMC variety and distribution were controlled to avoid the degradation of the joining strength in fusion welding. Third, techniques which have relatively controllable reaction time and energy were used to eliminate the IMCs. Some important processing parameters and their effects on weld quality are discussed, and the microstructure and metallurgical reaction are described. Mechanical properties of welds such as hardness, tensile, shear and fatigue strength are discussed. The aim of the report is to review the recent progress in the welding of dissimilar Mg and Al to provide a basis for follow-up research. PMID:28788646

  7. Different finite element techniques to predict welding residual stresses in aluminum alloy plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moein, Hadi; Sattari-Far, Iradj

    2014-01-01

    This study is a 3D thermomechanical finite element (FE) analysis of a single-pass and butt-welded work-hardened aluminum (Al) 5456 plates. It aims to validate the use of FE welding simulations to predict residual stress states in assessing the integrity of welded components. The predicted final residual stresses in the plate from the FE simulations are verified through comparison with experimental measurements. Three techniques are used to simulate the welding process. In the first two approaches, welding deposition is applied by using element birth and interaction techniques. In the third approach, the entire weld zone is simultaneously deposited. Results show a value at approximately the yield strength for longitudinal residual stresses of the welded center of the butt-welded Al alloy plates with a thickness of 2 mm. Considering the application of a comprehensive heat source, along with heat loss modeling and the temperature dependent properties of the material, the approach without deposition predicts a reasonable distribution of residual stresses. However, the element birth and interaction techniques, compared with the no-deposit technique, provide more accurate results in calculating residual stresses. Furthermore, the element interaction technique, compared with the element birth technique, exhibits higher efficiency and flexibility in modeling the deposition of welded metals as well as less modeling cost.

  8. A Review of Dissimilar Welding Techniques for Magnesium Alloys to Aluminum Alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liming; Ren, Daxin; Liu, Fei

    2014-05-08

    Welding of dissimilar magnesium alloys and aluminum alloys is an important issue because of their increasing applications in industries. In this document, the research and progress of a variety of welding techniques for joining dissimilar Mg alloys and Al alloys are reviewed from different perspectives. Welding of dissimilar Mg and Al is challenging due to the formation of brittle intermetallic compound (IMC) such as Mg 17 Al 12 and Mg₂Al₃. In order to increase the joint strength, three main research approaches were used to eliminate or reduce the Mg-Al intermetallic reaction layer. First, solid state welding techniques which have a low welding temperature were used to reduce the IMCs. Second, IMC variety and distribution were controlled to avoid the degradation of the joining strength in fusion welding. Third, techniques which have relatively controllable reaction time and energy were used to eliminate the IMCs. Some important processing parameters and their effects on weld quality are discussed, and the microstructure and metallurgical reaction are described. Mechanical properties of welds such as hardness, tensile, shear and fatigue strength are discussed. The aim of the report is to review the recent progress in the welding of dissimilar Mg and Al to provide a basis for follow-up research.

  9. Effect of Post Weld Heat Treatment on Corrosion Behavior of AA2014 Aluminum – Copper Alloy Electron Beam Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkata Ramana, V. S. N.; Mohammed, Raffi; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.; Srinivasa Rao, K.

    2018-03-01

    The present work pertains to the study of corrosion behavior of aluminum alloy electron beam welds. The aluminium alloy used in the present study is copper containing AA2014 alloy. Electron Beam Welding (EBW) was used to weld the alloys in annealed (O) condition. Microstructural changes across the welds were recorded and the effect of post weld heat treatment (PWHT) in T4 (Solutionized and naturally aged) condition on pitting corrosion resistance was studied. A software based PAR basic electrochemical system was used for potentio-dynamic polarization tests. From the study it is observed that weld in O condition is prone to more liquation than that of PWHT condition. This may be attributed to re-melting and solidification of excess eutectic present in the O condition of the base metal. It was also observed that slightly higher hardness values are recorded in O condition than that of PWHT condition. The pitting corrosion resistance of the PMZ/HAZ in PWHT condition is better than that of O condition. This is attributed to copper segregation at the grain boundaries of PMZ in O condition.

  10. Corrosion Properties of Dissimilar Friction Stir Welded 6061 Aluminum and HT590 Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Bosung; Song, Kuk Hyun; Park, Kwangsuk

    2018-05-01

    Corrosion properties of dissimilar friction stir welded 6061 aluminum and HT590 steel were investigated to understand effects of galvanic corrosion. As cathode when coupled, HT590 was cathodically protected. However, the passivation of AA6061 made the aluminum alloy cathode temporarily, which leaded to corrosion of HT590. From the EIS analysis showing Warburg diffusion plot in Nyquist plots, it can be inferred that the stable passivation layer was formed on AA6061. However, the weld as well as HT590 did not show Warburg diffusion plot in Nyquist plots, suggesting that there was no barrier for corrosion or even if it exists, the barrier had no function for preventing and/or retarding charge transport through the passivation layer. The open circuit potential measurements showed that the potential of the weld was similar to that of HT590, which lied in the pitting region for AA6061, making the aluminum alloy part of the weld keep corrosion state. That resulted in the cracked oxide film on AA6061 of the weld, which could not play a role of corrosion barrier.

  11. Ductile damage development in friction stir welded aluminum (AA2024) joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kim Lau

    2008-01-01

    Ductile damage development in a friction stir welded aluminum joint subjected to tension is analyzed numerically by FE-analysis, based on a total Lagrangian formulation. An elastic-viscoplastic constitutive relation that accounts for nucleation and growth of microvoids is applied. Main focus...

  12. Microstructure and Mechanical Performance of Friction Stir Spot-Welded Aluminum-5754 Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, N.; Bandyopadhyay, K.; Sarangi, M.; Panda, Sushanta Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Friction stir spot welding (FSSW) is a recent trend of joining light-weight sheet metals while fabricating automotive and aerospace body components. For the successful application of this solid-state welding process, it is imperative to have a thorough understanding of the weld microstructure, mechanical performance, and failure mechanism. In the present study, FSSW of aluminum-5754 sheet metal was tried using tools with circular and tapered pin considering different tool rotational speeds, plunge depths, and dwell times. The effects of tool design and process parameters on temperature distribution near the sheet-tool interface, weld microstructure, weld strength, and failure modes were studied. It was found that the peak temperature was higher while welding with a tool having circular pin compared to tapered pin, leading to a bigger dynamic recrystallized stir zone (SZ) with a hook tip bending towards the upper sheet and away from the keyhole. Hence, higher lap shear separation load was observed in the welds made from circular pin compared to those made from tapered pin. Due to influence of size and hardness of SZ on crack propagation, three different failure modes of weld nugget were observed through optical cross-sectional micrograph and SEM fractographs.

  13. Ultrasonic Spot and Torsion Welding of Aluminum to Titanium Alloys: Process, Properties and Interfacial Microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balle, Frank; Magin, Jens

    Hybrid lightweight structures shape the development of future vehicles in traffic engineering and the aerospace industry. For multi-material concepts made out of aluminum and titanium alloys, the ultrasonic welding technique is an alternative effective joining technology. The overlapped structures can be welded in the solid state, even without gas shielding. In this paper the conventional ultrasonic spot welding with longitudinal oscillation mode is compared to the recent ultrasonic torsion welding with a torsional mode at 20 kHz working frequency. For each technique the process parameters welding force, welding energy and oscillation amplitude were optimized for the hybrid joints using design of experiments. Relationships between the process parameters, mechanical properties and related welding zone should be understood. Central aspects of the research project are microscopic studies of the joining zone in cross section and extensive fracture surface analysis. Detailed electron microscopy and spectroscopy of the hybrid interface help to understand the interfacial formation during ultrasonic welding as well as to transfer the gained knowledge for further multi-metal joints.

  14. Experimental Investigation and Optimization of TIG Welding Parameters on Aluminum 6061 Alloy Using Firefly Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rishi; Mevada, N. Ramesh; Rathore, Santosh; Agarwal, Nitin; Rajput, Vinod; Sinh Barad, AjayPal

    2017-08-01

    To improve Welding quality of aluminum (Al) plate, the TIG Welding system has been prepared, by which Welding current, Shielding gas flow rate and Current polarity can be controlled during Welding process. In the present work, an attempt has been made to study the effect of Welding current, current polarity, and shielding gas flow rate on the tensile strength of the weld joint. Based on the number of parameters and their levels, the Response Surface Methodology technique has been selected as the Design of Experiment. For understanding the influence of input parameters on Ultimate tensile strength of weldment, ANOVA analysis has been carried out. Also to describe and optimize TIG Welding using a new metaheuristic Nature - inspired algorithm which is called as Firefly algorithm which was developed by Dr. Xin-She Yang at Cambridge University in 2007. A general formulation of firefly algorithm is presented together with an analytical, mathematical modeling to optimize the TIG Welding process by a single equivalent objective function.

  15. Welding of Aluminum Alloys to Steels: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    and deformations are a few examples of the unwanted consequences which somehow would lead to brittle fracture, fatigue fracture, shape instability...was made under the copper tips of the spot welding machine. The fatigue results showed higher fatigue strength of the joints with transition layer...kHz ultrasonic butt welding system with a vibration source applying eight bolt-clamped Langevin type PZT transducers and a 50 kW static induction

  16. Effect of process parameters on mechanical properties of friction stir spot welded magnesium to aluminum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, H.M.; Yuan, W.; Badarinarayan, H.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Lap-shear failure load of ∼2.5 kN was achieved in dissimilar Mg to Al spot welds. • Failure load depends on both welding geometrical features and IMCs formation. • Thin and discontinuous IMCs formed in stir zone are beneficial for weld strength. • Low heat input and good material mixing/interlocking is essential for high strength. - Abstract: Friction stir spot welding was applied to dissimilar cast magnesium (Mg) alloy AM60B and wrought aluminum (Al) alloy 6022-T4 under various welding conditions. The influence of tool rotation rate and shoulder plunge depth on lap-shear failure load was examined. Welds were made at four different tool rotation rates of 1000, 1500, 2000 and 2500 revolution per minute (rpm) and various tool shoulder plunge depths from 0 mm to 0.9 mm. The cross section of each weld exhibited the formation of intermetallic compounds (IMCs) in the stir zone. An increase in tool rotation rate decreased the width of the stir zone and resulted in lower lap-shear failure loads. The stir zone width increased and interlocking of IMCs was observed with an increase in tool shoulder plunge depth at 1000 rpm. High lap-shear failure loads were achieved in welds having a large stir zone width with formation of discontinuous IMCs at the tip of the interfacial hook. An average lap-shear failure load of 2.5 kN was achieved for welds made at 1000 rpm and 0.9 mm shoulder plunge. The present study suggests that the mechanical properties of friction stir spot welded dissimilar alloys are greatly influenced by the stir zone width, interfacial hooks and IMCs which are all weld process dependent

  17. Effect of zirconium addition on welding of aluminum grain refined by titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaid, A.I.O.

    2011-01-01

    Aluminum and its alloys solidify in large grains columnar structure which tends to reduce their mechanical behaviour and surface quality. Therefore, they are industrially grain refined by titanium or titanium + boron. Furthermore, aluminum oxidizes in ordinary atmosphere which makes its weldability difficult and weak. Therefore, it is anticipated that the effect of addition of zirconium at a weight percentages of 0.1% (which proved to be an effective grain refiner on the weldability of aluminum grain refined by Ti) is worthwhile investigating. This formed the objective of this research work. In this paper, the effect of zirconium addition at a weight percentage of 0.1%, which corresponds to the peritctic limit on the aluminum-zirconium phase diagram, on the weldability of aluminum grain refined by Ti is investigated. Rolled sheets of commercially pure aluminum, Al grain refined Ti of 3 mm thickness were welded together using Gas Tungsten Arc Welding method (GTAW), formerly known as TIG. A constant air gap was maintained at a constant current level, 30 ampere AC, was used because it removes the oxides of the welding process under the same process parameters. Metallographic examination of weldments of the different combinations of aluminum and its microalloys at the heat affected zone, HAZ, and base metal was carried out and examined for width, porosity, cracks and microhardness. It was found that grain refining of commercially pure aluminum by Ti resulted in enhancement of its weldability. Similarly, addition of zirconium to Al grain refined by Ti resulted in further enhancement of the weldment. Photomicrographs of the HAZ regions are presented and discussed. (author)

  18. Inhibition of the formation of intermetallic compounds in aluminum-steel welded joints by friction stir welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torres López, Edwar A.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Formation of deleterious phases during welding of aluminum and steel is a challenge of the welding processes, for decades. Friction Stir Welding (FSW has been used in an attempt to reduce formation of intermetallic compounds trough reducing the heat input. In this research, dissimilar joint of 6063-T5 aluminum alloy and AISI-SAE 1020 steel were welded using this technique. The temperature of welded joints was measured during the process. The interface of the welded joints was characterized using optical microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Additionally, composition measurements were carried out by X-EDS and DRX. The experimental results revealed that the maximum temperature on the joint studied is less than 360 °C. The microstructural characterization in the aluminum-steel interface showed the absence of intermetallic compounds, which is a condition attributed to the use of welding with low thermal input parameters.La unión de juntas aluminio-acero, sin la formación de fases deletéreas del tipo FexAly, ha sido, por décadas, un desafío para los procesos de soldadura. La soldadura por fricción-agitación ha sido empleada para intentar reducir el aporte térmico y evitar la formación de compuestos intermetálicos. Usando esta técnica fueron soldadas juntas disimilares de aluminio 6063-T5 y acero AISI-SAE 1020. La soldadura fue acompañada de medidas de temperatura durante su ejecución. La interfase de las juntas soldadas fue caracterizada utilizando microscopía óptica, electrónica de barrido y electrónica de transmisión. Adicionalmente fueron realizadas medidas puntuales X-EDS y DRX. Los resultados experimentales revelan que la temperatura máxima en la junta es inferior a 360 °C. La caracterización microestructural en la interfase aluminio-acero demostró la ausencia de compuestos intermetálicos, condición atribuida al uso de parámetros de soldadura con bajo aporte térmico.

  19. Improved TIG weld joint strength in aluminum alloy 2219-T87 by filler metal substitution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorman, R. M.; Lovoy, C. V.

    1972-01-01

    The results of an investigation on weld joint characteristics of aluminum alloy 2219-T87 are given. Five different alloys were utilized as filler material. The mechanical properties of the joints were determined at ambient and cryogenic temperatures for weldments in the as-welded condition and also, for weldments after elevated temperature exposures. Other evaluations included hardness surveys, stress corrosion susceptibility, and to a limited extent, the internal metallurgical weld structures. The overall results indicate that M-943 filler weldments are superior in strength to weldments containing either the standard 2319 filler or fillers 2014, 2020, and a dual wire feed consisting of three parts 2319 and one part 5652. In addition, no deficiencies were evident in M-934 filler weldments with regard to ductility, joint strength after elevated temperature exposure, weld hardness, metallographic structures, or stress corrosion susceptibility.

  20. Microstructural analysis of the 2195 aluminum-lithium alloy welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talia, George E.

    1993-01-01

    The principal objective of this research was to explain a tendency of 2195 Al-Li alloy to crack at elevated temperature during welding. Therefore, a study was made on the effect of welding and thermal treatment on the microstructure of Al-Li Alloy 2195. The critical roles of precipitates, boundaries, phases, and other features of the microstructure were inferred from the crack propagation paths and the morphology of fracture surface of the alloy with different microstructures. Particular emphasis was placed on the microstructures generated by the welding process and the mechanisms of crack propagation in such structures. Variation of the welding parameters and thermal treatments were used to alter the micro/macro structures, and they were characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopy. A theoretical model is proposed to explain changes in the microstructure of welded material. This model proposes a chemical reaction in which gases from the air (i.e., nitrogen) release hydrogen inside the alloy. Such a reaction could generate large internal stresses capable to induce porosity and crack-like delamination in the material.

  1. A Fundamental Study of Laser Beam Welding Aluminum-Lithium Alloy 2195 for Cryogenic Tank Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martukanitz, R. P.; Jan. R.

    1996-01-01

    Based on the potential for decreasing costs of joining stiffeners to skin by laser beam welding, a fundamental research program was conducted to address the impediments identified during an initial study involving laser beam welding of aluminum-lithium alloys. Initial objectives of the program were the identification of governing mechanism responsible for process related porosity while establishing a multivariant relationship between process parameters and fusion zone geometry for laser beam welds of alloy 2195. A three-level fractional factorial experiment was conducted to establish quantitative relationships between primary laser beam processing parameters and critical weld attributes. Although process consistency appeared high for welds produced during partial completion of this study, numerous cracks on the top-surface of the welds were discovered during visual inspection and necessitated additional investigations concerning weld cracking. Two experiments were conducted to assess the effect of filler alloy additions on crack sensitivity: the first experiment was used to ascertain the effects of various filler alloys on cracking and the second experiment involved modification to process parameters for increasing filler metal dilution. Results indicated that filler alloys 4047 and 4145 showed promise for eliminating cracking.

  2. Improving Mechanical Properties of PVPPA Welded Joints of 7075 Aluminum Alloy by PWHT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guowei Li

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, 7075 aluminum alloy with a thickness of 10 mm was successfully welded with no obvious defects by pulsed variable polarity plasma arc (PVPPA welding. The mechanical properties of PVPPA welded joints have been researched by post weld heat treatment (PWHT. The results indicate that the heat treatment strongly affects the mechanical properties of the welded joints. The tensile strength and the microhardness of the welded joints gradually improved with the increase of the solution temperature. With the increase of the solution time, the tensile strength, and microhardness first dramatically increased and then decreased slightly. The best tensile strength of 537.5 MPa and the microhardness of 143.7 HV were obtained after 490 °C × 80 min + 120 °C × 24 h, and the strength was nearly 91.2% of that of the parent metal, and increased about 35% compared with as-welded. The improvement of strength and microhardness was mainly due to the precipitation of η′ phase.

  3. Tensile behavior of friction stir welded AA 6061-T4 aluminum alloy joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidarzadeh, A.; Khodaverdizadeh, H.; Mahmoudi, A.; Nazari, E.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Range of parameters for defect-free friction stir welded AA 6061-T4 was reached. ► A model was developed for predicting UTS and EL of friction stir welded AA 6061-T4. ► The maximum values of UTS and EL of joints were estimated by developed model. ► The optimum values of FSW process parameters were determined. -- Abstract: In this investigation response surface methodology based on a central composite rotatable design with three parameters, five levels and 20 runs, was used to develop a mathematical model predicting the tensile properties of friction stir welded AA 6061-T4 aluminum alloy joints at 95% confidence level. The three welding parameters considered were tool rotational speed, welding speed and axial force. Analysis of variance was applied to validate the predicted model. Microstructural characterization and fractography of joints were examined using optical and scanning electron microscopes. Also, the effects of the welding parameters on tensile properties of friction stir welded joints were analyzed in detail. The results showed that the optimum parameters to get a maximum of tensile strength were 920 rev/min, 78 mm/min and 7.2 kN, where the maximum of tensile elongation was obtained at 1300 rev/min, 60 mm/min and 8 kN.

  4. Fundamental Study of Electron Beam Welding of AA6061-T6 Aluminum Alloy for Nuclear Fuel Plate Assembly (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Soosung; Lee, Haein; Lee, Donbae; Park, Jongman; Lee, Yoonsang

    2013-01-01

    Certain characteristics, such as solidification cracking, porosity, HAZ (Heat-affected Zone) degradation must be considered during welding. Because of high energy density and low heat input, especially LBW and EBW processes posses the advantage of minimizing the fusing zone and HAZ and producing deeper penetration than arc welding processes. In present study, to apply for the nuclear fuel plate fabrication and assembly, a fundamental EBW experiment using AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy specimens was conducted. Furthermore, to establish the welding process, and satisfy the requirements of the weld quality, EBW apparatus using a electron welding gun and vacuum chamber was developed, and preliminary investigations for optimizing the welding parameters of the specimens using AA6061-T6 aluminum plates were also performed. In this experiment, a feasibility test was carried out by tensile tester, bead-on-plate welding and metallographic examination to comply with the aluminum welding procedure. The EB weld quality of AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy for the fuel plate assembly has been also studied by the mechanical testing and microstructure examinations. This study was carried out to determine the suitable welding process and to investigate tensile strength of AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy. In the present experiment, satisfactory EBW of the square butt weld specimens was developed. In comparison with the rolling directions of test specimens, the tensile strengths were no difference between the longitudinal and transverse welds. Based on this fundamental study, fabrication and assembly of the nuclear fuel plates will be provided for the future Kijang research reactor project

  5. Study of aluminum content in a welding metal by thermoelectric measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreón, H.; Ramirez, S.; Coronado, C.; Salazar, M.

    2018-03-01

    This work investigates the effect caused by the aluminum content in a welding metal and its variation in mechanical properties through the use of a non-destructive thermoelectric technique. It is known that aluminum has positive effects as deoxidizer in low percentages and alloying element together with Niobium and Vanadium. Aluminum has a positive and negative effect, initially improves the mechanical properties of the metal, as it acts as a grain refiner, increasing the yield strength, but in larger quantities, important mechanical properties such as hardness and toughness are seriously affected. For this purpose, HSLA ASTM 572 Gr. 50 steel was used as the base metal, where the weld metal was deposited, after which the specimens were fabricated and the mechanical tests and non-destructive tests were carried out. The sensitivity of the thermoelectric potential technique to microstructural and chemical composition changes was confirmed. The evolution of absolute thermoelectric potential (TEP) values with respect to the percentage of aluminum added to the weld was observed, being also quite sensitive to defects such as micro-cracks.

  6. Microstructural variation through weld thickness and mechanical properties of peened friction stir welded 6061 aluminum alloy joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdulstaar, Mustafa A., E-mail: mustafa.abdulstaar@gmail.com [Institute of Material Science and Engineering, Clausthal University of Technology, Agricolastr. 6, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Al-Fadhalah, Khaled J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering & Petroleum, Kuwait University, P.O. Box 5969, Safat 13060 (Kuwait); Wagner, Lothar [Institute of Material Science and Engineering, Clausthal University of Technology, Agricolastr. 6, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany)

    2017-04-15

    The current study examined the effect of microstructure variation on the development of mechanical properties in friction stir welded joints of 6061-T6 aluminum alloy, which were subsequently processed by shot peening (SP). Following to FSW, fatigue specimens were extracted perpendicularly to the welding direction. Surface Skimming to 0.5 mm from crown and root sides of the joint was made and SP was later applied on the two sides using ceramic shots of two different Almen intensities of 0.18 mmA and 0.24 mmA. Microstructural examination by electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD) indicated variation in the grain refinement of the weld zone, with coarsest grains (5 μm) at the crown side and finest grains (2 μm) at the root side. Reduction of microhardness to 60 HV occurred in the weld zone for samples in FSW condition. Application of SP promoted significant strain hardening at the crown side, with Almen intensities of 0.24 mmA providing maximum increase in microhardness to 120 HV. On the contrary, only a maximum microhardness of 75 HV was obtained at the root side. The difference in strain hardening capability at the two sides was strongly dependent on grain size. The two Almen intensities produced similar distribution of compressive residual stresses in the subsurface regions that led to enhance the fatigue strength to the level of base metal for N ≥ 10{sup 5} cycles. Yet, the increase in fatigue strength was more pronounced with increasing Almen intensity to 0.24 mmA, demonstrating further enhancement by strain hardening. - Highlights: • Grain refinement was observed after friction stir welding of AA 6061-T6. • Reduction in microhardness and fatigue strength were obtained after welding. • Variation in grain refinement led to different hardening behavior after peening. • Shot peening induced beneficial compressive residual stresses. • Shot peening and surface skimming markedly improved the fatigue performance.

  7. Pitting corrosion of friction stir welded aluminum alloy thick plate in alkaline chloride solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Weifeng; Liu Jinhe; Zhu Hongqiang

    2010-01-01

    The pitting corrosion of different positions (Top, Middle and Bottom) of weld nugget zone (WNZ) along thickness plate in friction stir welded 2219-O aluminum alloy in alkaline chloride solution was investigated by using open circuit potential, cyclic polarization, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscope. The results indicate that the material presents significant passivation, the top has highest corrosion potential, pitting potential and re-passivation potential compared with the bottom and base material. With the increase of traverse speed from 60 to 100 mm/min or rotary speed from 500 to 600 rpm, the corrosion resistance decreases.

  8. Acoustic Emission Weld Monitoring in the 2195 Aluminum-Lithium Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, James L.

    2005-01-01

    Due to its low density, the 2195 aluminum-lithium alloy was developed as a replacement for alloy 2219 in the Space Shuttle External Tank (ET). The external tank is the single largest component of the space shuttle system. It is 154 feet long and 27.6 feet in diameter, and serves as the structural backbone for the shuttle during launch, absorbing most of the 7 million plus pounds of thrust produced. The almost 4% decrease in density between the two materials provides an extra 7500 pounds of payload capacity necessary to put the International Space Station components into orbit. The ET is an all-welded structure; hence, the requirement is for up to five rewelds without hot cracking. Unfortunately, hot cracking during re-welding or repair operations was occurring and had to be dealt with before the new super lightweight tank could be used. Weld metal porosity formation was also of concern because it leads to hot cracking during weld repairs. Accordingly, acoustic emission (AE) nondestructive testing was employed to monitor the formation of porosity and hot cracks in order to select the best filler metal and optimize the weld schedule. The purpose of this work is to determine the feasibility of detecting hot cracking in welded aluminum-lithium (Al-Li) structures through the analysis of acoustic emission data. By acoustically characterizing the effects of reheating during a repair operation, the potential for hidden flaws coalescing and becoming "unstable" as the panel is repaired could be reduced. Identification of regions where microcrack growth is likely to occur and the location of active flaw growth in the repair weld will provide the welder with direct feedback as to the current weld quality enabling adjustments to the repair process be made in the field. An acoustic emission analysis of the source mechanisms present during welding has been conducted with the goals of locating regions in the weld line that are susceptible to damage from a repair operation

  9. Joint properties of dissimilar Al6061-T6 aluminum alloy/Ti–6%Al–4%V titanium alloy by gas tungsten arc welding assisted hybrid friction stir welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bang, HanSur; Bang, HeeSeon; Song, HyunJong; Joo, SungMin

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Hybrid friction stir welding for Al alloy and Ti alloy joint has been carried out. • Mechanical strength of dissimilar joint by HFSW and FSW has been compared. • Microstructure of dissimilar joint by HFSW and FSW has been compared. - Abstract: Hybrid friction stir butt welding of Al6061-T6 aluminum alloy plate to Ti–6%Al–4%V titanium alloy plate with satisfactory acceptable joint strength was successfully achieved using preceding gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) preheating heat source of the Ti alloy plate surface. Hybrid friction stir welding (HFSW) joints were welded completely without any unwelded zone resulting from smooth material flow by equally distributed temperature both in Al alloy side and Ti alloy side using GTAW assistance for preheating the Ti alloy plate unlike friction stir welding (FSW) joints. The ultimate tensile strength was approximately 91% in HFSW welds by that of the Al alloy base metal, which was 24% higher than that of FSW welds without GTAW under same welding condition. Notably, it was found that elongation in HFSW welds increased significantly compared with that of FSW welds, which resulted in improved joint strength. The ductile fracture was the main fracture mode in tensile test of HFSW welds

  10. The Effectiveness of Surface Coatings on Preventing Interfacial Reaction During Ultrasonic Welding of Aluminum to Magnesium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panteli, Alexandria; Robson, Joseph D.; Chen, Ying-Chun; Prangnell, Philip B.

    2013-12-01

    High power ultrasonic spot welding (USW) is a solid-state joining process that is advantageous for welding difficult dissimilar material couples, like magnesium to aluminum. USW is also a useful technique for testing methods of controlling interfacial reaction in welding as the interface is not greatly displaced by the process. However, the high strain rate deformation in USW has been found to accelerate intermetallic compound (IMC) formation and a thick Al12Mg17 and Al3Mg2 reaction layer forms after relatively short welding times. In this work, we have investigated the potential of two approaches for reducing the IMC reaction rate in dissimilar Al-Mg ultrasonic welds, both involving coatings on the Mg sheet surface to (i) separate the join line from the weld interface, using a 100- μm-thick Al cold spray coating, and (ii) provide a diffusion barrier layer, using a thin manganese physical vapor deposition (PVD) coating. Both methods were found to reduce the level of reaction and increase the failure energy of the welds, but their effectiveness was limited due to issues with coating attachment and survivability during the welding cycle. The effect of the coatings on the joint's interface microstructure, and the fracture behavior have been investigated in detail. Kinetic modeling has been used to show that the benefit of the cold spray coating can be attributed to the reaction rate reverting to that expected under static conditions. This reduces the IMC growth rate by over 50 pct because at the weld line, the high strain rate dynamic deformation in USW normally enhances diffusion through the IMC layer. In comparison, the thin PVD barrier coating was found to rapidly break up early in USW and become dispersed throughout the deformation layer reducing its effectiveness.

  11. Investigation on dissimilar underwater friction stir lap welding of 6061-T6 aluminum alloy to pure copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jingqing; Shen, Yifu; Yao, Xin; Xu, Haisheng; Li, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • 6061-T6 Al and pure Cu were successfully underwater friction stir lap welded. • The underwater weld was analyzed via comparing with the classical weld. • The oxidation of Cu was prevented via the external water. • The amount of Al–Cu intermetallic was decreased by the external water. • The thickness of Al–Cu diffusion interlayer was decreased by the external water. - Abstract: Friction stir welding (classical FSW) is considered to offer advantages over the traditional fusion welding techniques in terms of dissimilar welding. However, some challenges still exist in the dissimilar friction stir lap welding of the aluminum/copper (Al/Cu) metallic couple, among which the formation of the Al–Cu intermetallic compounds is the major problem. In the present research, due to the fact that the formation and growth of the intermetallic are significantly controlled by the thermal history, the underwater friction stir welding (underwater FSW) was employed for fabricating the weld, and the weld obtained by underwater FSW (underwater weld) was analyzed via comparing with the weld obtained under same parameters by classical FSW (classical weld). In order to investigate the effect of the external water on the thermal history, the K-type thermocouple was utilized to measure the weld temperature, and it is found that the water could decrease the peak temperature and shorten the thermal cycle time. The XRD results illustrate that the interface of the welds mainly consist of the Al–Cu intermetallic compounds such as CuAl 2 and Cu 9 Al 4 together with some amounts of Al and Cu, and it is also found that the amount of the intermetallic in the underwater weld is obvious less than in the classical weld. The SEM images and the EDS line scan results also illustrate that the Al–Cu diffusion interlayer at the Al–Cu interface of the underwater weld was obviously thinner than that of the classical weld

  12. Effect of heat treatment on the properties of laser-beam welded rheo-cast F357 aluminum

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Theron, M

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Semi-solid metal rheo-cast F357 aluminum plates were joined by autogenous Nd:YAG laser welding and were welded in either the as-cast (F) condition, T4 temper or T6 temper condition. The weldability of this age-hardenable Al–7%Si–0.6%Mg casting alloy...

  13. Microstructure, mechanical behavior and corrosion properties of friction stir welded aluminum alloys used in the aerospace industry

    OpenAIRE

    Alfaro Mercado, Ulises

    2011-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) has been identified as “key” technology for the production of primary aerospace structures, being able to substitute conventional riveted airframes. FSW is a solid state welding process that avoids any problems caused by the solidification of the melted weld pool. Besides the production of high quality similar joints from high strength aluminum alloys, it allows for joining materials of different metallurgical characteristics. However, problems concerning the corro...

  14. Effect of friction stir welding on microstructure and corrosion behavior of LF6 aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghauri, Faizan Ali; Farooq, A.; Ahmad, A.; Deen, K. M.

    2017-03-01

    The LF6 aluminum alloy plates were joined by friction stir welding method. The tool rotational (1180 rpm) and transverse speed (0.56 mm s-1) were kept constant during welding of 4 mm thick plates. The microstructural features, hardness and tensile properties of the welded samples were determined to evaluate the structural integrity in comparison with the base metal. The electrochemical behavior of base metal (BM), thermo-mechanically affected zone (TMAZ) and weld nugget zone (WNZ) was also investigated by potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in 3.5% NaCl solution. The microstructural study revealed significant grain refinement and agglomeration of β (Mg2Al3) intermetallic precipitates in the WNZ. The relatively higher hardness and a decrease in the ductility (3%) also assured the formation of precipitates β precipitates in the WNZ welded samples. The fracture surface of welded sample also revealed the existence of β precipitates within the elongated dimples which may be considered as the crack initiation sites. The relatively lower corrosion rate (23.68 mpy) and higher charge transfer resistance (403 Ω cm2) of BM compared to WNZ could be associated with the galvanic dissolution of Al-matrix through competitive charge transfer and relaxation (adsorption/desorption of intermediate species) processes specifically at the vicinity of the β precipitates.

  15. Gas Metal Arc Weld (GMAW) Qualification of 7020-T651 Aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    strength Al, with tough, ductile , weld joints may provide improved protection and crash safety by means of a rigid vehicle structure. This...characteristics and ballistic protection, with V50 statistics of 5083 and 7039 aluminum and RHA steel . Aberdeen Proving Ground (MD): Army Research...633. 9. McQueen H, Leo P, Cerri E. Al-Zn-Mg for extrusion– hot workability. In TMS 2009, Al Alloys: Fabrication, Characterization and Applications II

  16. Thermal Management in Friction-Stir Welding of Precipitation-Hardening Aluminum Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upadhyay, Piyush; Reynolds, Anthony

    2015-05-25

    Process design and implementation in FSW is mostly dependent on empirical information gathered through experience. Basic science of friction stir welding and processing can only be complete when fundamental interrelationships between process control parameters and response variables and resulting weld microstructure and properties are established to a reasonable extent. It is known that primary process control parameters like tool rotation and translation rate and forge axis force have complicated and interactive relationships to the process response variables such as peak temperature, time at temperature etc. Of primary influence to the other process response parameters are temperature and its gradient at the deformation and heat affected zones. Through review of pertinent works in the literature and some experimental results from boundary condition work performed in precipitation hardening aluminum alloys this paper will partially elucidate the nature and effects of temperature transients caused by variation of thermal boundaries in Friction Stir Welding.

  17. An Experimental Evaluation of Electron Beam Welded Thixoformed 7075 Aluminum Alloy Plate Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ava Azadi Chegeni

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Two plates of thixoformed 7075 aluminum alloy were joined using Electron Beam Welding (EBW. A post-welding-heat treatment (PWHT was performed within the semi-solid temperature range of this alloy at three temperatures, 610, 617 and 628 °C, for 3 min. The microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of EB welded plates, as well as the heat-treated specimens, were investigated in the Base Metal (BM, Heat Affected Zone (HAZ, and Fusion Zone (FZ, using optical microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, EDX (Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis, and Vickers hardness test. Results indicated that after EBW, the grain size substantially decreased from 67 µm in both BM and HAZ to 7 µm in the FZ, and a hardness increment was observed in the FZ as compared to the BM and HAZ. Furthermore, the PWHT led to grain coarsening throughout the material, along with a further increase in hardness in the FZ.

  18. Role of Tool Shoulder End Features on Friction Stir Weld Characteristics of 6082 Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugada, Krishna Kishore; Adepu, Kumar

    2018-03-01

    Understanding the temperature generation around the tool shoulder contact is one of the important aspects of the friction stir welding process. In the present study, the effects of various tool shoulder end feature on the temperature and mechanical properties of the 6082 aluminum alloy were investigated. The experimental results show that the axial force during the welding is considerably reduced by using tools with shoulder end features. The detailed observation revealed that around the tool shoulder contact, the amount of heat generation is higher between trialing edge (TE) to retreating side-leading edge corner (RS-LE) counter clockwise direction and lower between RS-LE to TE clockwise direction. Out of the four shoulder end featured tools, the welds produced with ridges shoulder tool resulted in superior properties with significantly lower axial force (approximately 32%) compared to plane shoulder tool.

  19. Effect of zirconium addition on welding of aluminum grain refined by titanium plus boron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaid, A. I. O.

    2014-06-01

    Aluminum oxidizes freely in ordinary atmosphere which makes its welding difficult and weak, particularly it solidifies in columnar structure with large grains. Therefore, it is anticipated that the effect of addition of some grain refiners to its melt before solidification is worth while investigating as it may enhance its weldabilty and improve its mechanical strength. In this paper, the effect of addition of zirconium at a weight of 0.1% (which corresponds to the peretictic limit on the aluminum-zirconium base phase diagram) to commercially pure aluminum, grain refined by Ti+B on its weldability, using gas tungsten arc welding, GTAW, method which was formerly known as TIG. A constant current level of 30 AC Ampere was used because it removes the oxides during the welding process. Metallographic examination of the weldments of the different combinations of Al with Al and Al with its microalloys: in the heat affected zone, HAZ, and away from it was carried out and examined for HAZ width, porosity, cracks and microhardness. It was found that grain refining by Ti+B or Zr resulted in enhancement of the weldment.

  20. Effect of zirconium addition on welding of aluminum grain refined by titanium plus boron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaid, A. I. O.

    2013-01-01

    Aluminum oxidizes freely in ordinary atmosphere which makes its welding difficult and weak, particularly it solidifies in columnar structure with large grains. Therefore, it is anticipated that the effect of addition of some grain refiners to its melt before solidification is worth while investigating as it may enhance its weldabilty and improve its mechanical strength. In this paper, the effect of addition of zirconium at a weight of 0.1 percentage (which corresponds to the peretictic limit on the aluminum-zirconium base phase diagram) to commercially pure aluminum, grain refined by Tau i+Beta on its weldability, using gas tungsten arc welding, GTAW, method which was formerly known as TIG. A constant current level of 30 AC Ampere was used because it removes the oxides during the welding process. Metallographic examination of the weldments of the different combinations of Al with Al and Al with its microalloys: in the heat affected zone, HAZ, and away from it was carried out and examined for HAZ width, porosity, cracks and microhardness. It was found that grain refining by Tau i+Beta or Zr resulted in enhancement of the weldment. (author)

  1. Effect of zirconium addition on welding of aluminum grain refined by titanium plus boron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaid, A I O

    2014-01-01

    Aluminum oxidizes freely in ordinary atmosphere which makes its welding difficult and weak, particularly it solidifies in columnar structure with large grains. Therefore, it is anticipated that the effect of addition of some grain refiners to its melt before solidification is worth while investigating as it may enhance its weldabilty and improve its mechanical strength. In this paper, the effect of addition of zirconium at a weight of 0.1% (which corresponds to the peretictic limit on the aluminum-zirconium base phase diagram) to commercially pure aluminum, grain refined by Ti+B on its weldability, using gas tungsten arc welding, GTAW, method which was formerly known as TIG. A constant current level of 30 AC Ampere was used because it removes the oxides during the welding process. Metallographic examination of the weldments of the different combinations of Al with Al and Al with its microalloys: in the heat affected zone, HAZ, and away from it was carried out and examined for HAZ width, porosity, cracks and microhardness. It was found that grain refining by Ti+B or Zr resulted in enhancement of the weldment

  2. Application of slip-band visualization technique to tensile analysis of laser-welded aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muchiar, -; Yoshida, Sanichiro J.; Widiastuti, Rini; Kusnowo, A.; Takahashi, Kunimitsu; Sato, Shunichi

    1997-03-01

    Recently we have developed a new optical interferometric technique capable of visualizing slip band occurring in a deforming solid-state object. In this work we applied this technique to a tensile analysis of laser-welded aluminum plate samples, and successfully revealed stress concentration that shows strong relationships with the tensile strength and the fracture mechanism. We believe that this method is a new, convenient way to analyze the deformation characteristics of welded objects and evaluate the quality of welding. The analysis has been made for several types of aluminum alloys under various welding conditions, and has shown the following general results. When the penetration is deep, a slip band starts appearing at the fusion zone in an early stage of the elastic region of the strain-stress curve and stays there till the sample fractures at that point. When the penetration is shallow, a slip band appears only after the yield point and moves vigorously over the whole surface of the sample till a late stage of plastic deformation when the slip band stays at the fusion zone where the sample eventually fractures. When the penetration depth is medium, some intermediate situation of the above two extreme cases is observed.

  3. Microstructure of Friction Stir Welded AlSi9Mg Cast with 5083 and 2017A Wrought Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, C.; Kopyściański, M.; Dymek, S.; Węglowska, A.; Pietras, A.

    2018-03-01

    Wrought aluminum alloys 5083 and 2017A were each joined with cast aluminum alloy AlSi9Mg through friction stir welding in butt weld configurations. For each material system, the wrought and cast alloy positions, i.e., the advancing side or the retreating side, were exchanged between welding trials. The produced weldments were free from cracks and discontinuities. For each alloy configuration, a well-defined nugget comprised of alternating bands of the welded alloys characterized the microstructure. The degree of mixing, however, strongly depended on which wrought alloy was present and on its position during processing. In all cases, the cast AlSi9Mg alloy dominated the weld center regardless of its position during welding. Electron backscattered diffraction analysis showed that the grain size in both alloys (bands) constituting the nugget was similar and that the majority of grain boundaries exhibited a high angle character (20°-60°). Regardless of the alloy, however, all grains were elongated along the direction of the material plastic flow during welding. A numerical simulation of the joining process visualized the material flow patterns and temperature distribution and helped to rationalize the microstructural observations. The hardness profiles across the weld reflected the microstructure formed during welding and correlated well with the temperature changes predicted by the numerical model. Tensile specimens consistently fractured in the cast alloy near the weld nugget.

  4. Dissimilar friction welding of 6061-T6 aluminum and AISI 1018 steel: Properties and microstructural characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taban, Emel; Gould, Jerry E.; Lippold, John C.

    2010-01-01

    Joining of dissimilar materials is of increasing interest for a wide range of industrial applications. The automotive industry, in particular, views dissimilar materials joining as a gateway for the implementation of lightweight materials. Specifically, the introduction of aluminum alloy parts into a steel car body requires the development of reliable, efficient and economic joining processes. Since aluminum and steel demonstrate different physical, mechanical and metallurgical properties, identification of proper welding processes and practices can be problematic. In this work, inertia friction welding has been used to create joints between a 6061-T6 aluminum alloy and a AISI 1018 steel using various parameters. The joints were evaluated by mechanical testing and metallurgical analysis. Microstructural analyses were done using metallography, microhardness testing, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray elemental mapping, focused ion beam (FIB) with ultra high resolution SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in TEM and STEM modes. Results of these analysis first suggested that joint strengths on the order of 250 MPa could be achieved. In addition, failures were seen in the plasticized layer on the aluminum side of the joint. Further, bond lines were characterized by a thin layer of formed Al-Fe intermetallic. This intermetallic layer averaged roughly 250 nm thick and compositionally appears related to the FeAl and Fe 2 Al 5 phases.

  5. Corrosion evaluation of multi-pass welded nickel–aluminum bronze alloy in 3.5% sodium chloride solution: A restorative application of gas tungsten arc welding process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabbaghzadeh, Behnam; Parvizi, Reza; Davoodi, Ali; Moayed, Mohammad Hadi

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Corrosion of GTA welded nickel–aluminum bronze (C95800) was studied. • Drastic microstructural changes occurred during the welding operations. • The β′ and α phases acts as anode and cathode, correspondingly, in weld region. • A few nanoamperes couple current was measured in ZRA test as galvanic corrosion. • Corrosion resistance of weld parts could not be weakened in marine environments. - Abstract: In this research, the corrosion behavior of a gas tungsten arc welded nickel–aluminum bronze (NAB) alloy is investigated by DC and AC electrochemical techniques in 3.5% sodium chloride solution. Regarding the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potentiodynamic results, uniform corrosion resistance of instantly immersed weld and base samples are almost analogous and increased (more in weld region) during the immersion times. Moreover, zero resistant ammeter results demonstrated that the few nanoampere galvanic currents are attributed to microstructural and morphological differences between these two regions. Therefore, the welding procedure could not deteriorate the general corrosion resistance of the restored damaged NAB parts operating in marine environments

  6. Studies on post weld heat treatment of dissimilar aluminum alloys by laser beam welding technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, B.; Krishna, N. Murali; Cheepu, Muralimohan; Sivaprasad, K.; Muthupandi, V.

    2018-03-01

    The present study mainly focuses on post weld heat treatment (PWHT) of AA5083 and AA6061 alloys by joining these using laser beam welding at three different laser power and two different beam spot sizes and three different welding speeds. Effects of these parameters on microstructural and mechanical properties like hardness, tensile strength were studied at PWHT condition and significant changes had been observed. The PWHT used was artificial aging technique. The microstructural observations revealed that there was a appreciable changes were taken place in the grain size. The microhardness observations proven that the change in the hardness profile in AA6061 was appreciable than in the AA5083. The tensile strength of 246 MPa was recorded as highest. The fractured surfaces observed are predominantly ductile in nature.

  7. Evaluation of occupational exposure to toxic metals released in the process of aluminum welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matczak, Wanda; Gromiec, Jan

    2002-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate occupational exposure to welding fumes and its elements on aluminum welders in Polish industry. The study included 52 MIG/Al fume samples and 18 TIG/Al samples in 3 plants. Air samples were collected in the breathing zone of welders (total and respirable dust). Dust concentration was determined gravimetrically, and the elements in the collected dust were determined by AAS. Mean time-weighted average (TWA) concentrations of the welding dusts/fumes and their components in the breathing zone obtained for different welding processes were, in mg/m3: MIG/Al fumes mean 6.0 (0.8-17.8), Al 2.1 (0.1-7.7), Mg 0.2 (TIG/Al fumes 0.7 (0.3-1.4), Al 0.17 (0.07-0.50). A correlation has been found between the concentration of the main components and the fume/dust concentrations in MIG/Al and TIG/Al fumes. Mean percentages of the individual components in MIG/Al fumes/dusts were Al: 30 (9-56) percent; Mg: 3 (1-5.6) percent; Mn: 0.2 (0.1-0.3) percent; Cu: 0.2 (welding methods, the nature of welding-related operations, and work environment conditions.

  8. Identifying Combination of Friction Stir Welding Parameters to Maximize Strength of Lap Joints of AA2014-T6 Aluminum Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendrana C.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available AA2014 aluminum alloy (Al-Cu alloy has been widely utilized in fabrication of lightweight structures like aircraft structures, demanding high strength to weight ratio and good corrosion resistance. The fusion welding of these alloys will lead to solidification problems such as hot cracking. Friction stir welding is a new solid state welding process, in which the material being welded does not melt and recast. Lot of research works have been carried out by many researchers to optimize process parameters and establish empirical relationships to predict tensile strength of friction stir welded butt joints of aluminum alloys. However, very few investigations have been carried out on friction stir welded lap joints of aluminum alloys. Hence, in this investigation, an attempt has been made to optimize friction stir lap welding (FSLW parameters to attain maximum tensile strength using statistical tools such as design of experiment (DoE, analysis of variance (ANOVA, response graph and contour plots. By this method, it is found that maximum tensile shear fracture load of 12.76 kN can be achieved if a joint is made using tool rotational speed of 900 rpm, welding speed of 110 mm/min, tool shoulder diameter of 12 mm and tool tilt angle of 1.5°.

  9. Heat input effect of friction stir welding on aluminum alloy AA 6061-T6 welded joint

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sedmak, A.; Kumar, R.; Chattopadhyaya, S.; Hloch, Sergej; Tadić, S.; Djurdjević, A. A.; Čeković, I. R.; Dončeva, E.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 2 (2016), s. 637-641 ISSN 0354-9836 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : friction stir welding * defect * heat input * maximum temperature Subject RIV: JQ - Machines ; Tools Impact factor: 1.093, year: 2016 http://www.doiserbia.nb.rs/img/doi/0354-9836/2016/0354-98361500147D.pdf

  10. Improved microstructure and mechanical properties in gas tungsten arc welded aluminum joints by using graphene nanosheets/aluminum composite filler wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattahi, M; Gholami, A R; Eynalvandpour, A; Ahmadi, E; Fattahi, Y; Akhavan, S

    2014-09-01

    In the present study, different amounts of graphene nanosheets (GNSs) were added to the 4043 aluminum alloy powders by using the mechanical alloying method to produce the composite filler wires. With each of the produced composite filler wires, one all-weld metal coupon was welded using the gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding process. The microstructure, mechanical properties and fracture surface morphology of the weld metals have been evaluated and the results are compared. As the amount of GNSs in the composition of filler wire is increased, the microstructure of weld metal was changed from the dendritic structure to fine equiaxed grains. Furthermore, the tensile strength and microhardness of weld metal was improved, and is attributed to the augmented nucleation and retarded growth. From the results, it was seen that the GNSs/Al composite filler wire can be used to improve the microstructure and mechanical properties of GTA weld metals of aluminum and its alloys. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of Post Weld Heat Treatment on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Submerged Friction Stir Welded 7A04 Aluminum Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HAO Ya-xin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available 7A04 aluminum alloy plate was jointed by submerged friction stir welding(SFSW, and welded joints were treated (Post Weld Heat Treatment, PWHT, and the effect of post weld heat treatment on the microstructure and mechanical properties in SFSW was investigated. The results show that PWHT joints exhibit dispersively distributed fine precipitates phase morphology, are significantly superior than the feature of the small amount of precipitates with dispersed distribution in SFSW joints. Compared with SFSW joints, the mechanical properties of joints are improved significantly by PWHT. The average hardness of the weld joints nugget zone is increased by 39.7HV, and the tensile strength is increased by 67MPa, reaches 96.1% of the base material, strain hardening capacity of the joints is also enhanced, the tensile fracture exhibits mixed fracture feature of microporous polymerization and cleavage.

  12. Gas tungsten arc welding assisted hybrid friction stir welding of dissimilar materials Al6061-T6 aluminum alloy and STS304 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bang, HanSur; Bang, HeeSeon; Jeon, GeunHong; Oh, IkHyun; Ro, ChanSeung

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► GTAW assisted hybrid friction stir welding (HFSW) has been carried out for dissimilar butt joint. ► Mechanical strength of dissimilar butt joint by HFSW and FSW has been investigated and compared. ► Microstructure of dissimilar butt joint by HFSW and FSW has been investigated and compared. -- Abstract: The aim of this research is to evaluate the potential for using the gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) assisted hybrid friction stir welding (HFSW) process to join a stainless steel alloy (STS304) to an aluminum alloy (Al6061) in order to improve the weld strength. The difference in mechanical and microstructural characteristics of dissimilar joint by friction stir welding (FSW) and HFSW has been investigated and compared. Transverse tensile strength of approximately 93% of the aluminum alloy (Al6061) base metal tensile strength is obtained with HFSW, which is higher than the tensile strength of FSW welds. This may be due to the enhanced material plastic flow and partial annealing effect in dissimilar materials due to preheating of stainless steel surface by GTAW, resulting in significantly increased elongation of welds. The results indicate that HFSW that integrates GTAW preheating to FSW is advantageous in joining dissimilar combinations compared to conventional FSW.

  13. Microstructure and failure mechanisms of refill friction stir spot welded 7075-T6 aluminum alloy joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Zhikang; Yang, Xinqi; Zhang, Zhaohua; Cui, Lei; Li, Tielong

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► There is a correlation between the void in the weld and the joint strength. ► The preferable mechanical properties can be obtained by lowering rotational speed. ► The alclad has an adverse effect on the mechanical properties. -- Abstract: In this paper, the microstructure and mechanical properties of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy joints joined by refill friction stir spot welding (RFSSW) were investigated. The keyhole was refilled successfully, and the microstructure of the weld exhibited variations in the grain sizes in the width and the thickness directions. There existed defects (hook, voids, bonding ligament, etc.) associated to the material flow in the weld. Mechanical properties of the joint have been investigated in terms of hardness and tensile/shear and cross-tension test, and the fracture mechanisms were observed by SEM (scanning electron microscope). The hardness profile of the weld exhibited a W-shaped appearance in the macroscopic level, which reached the minimum at the boundary of the sleeve and the clamping ring. The variation laws between tensile/shear and cross-tension strength and processing parameters were rather complicated. The void in the weld played an important role in determining the strength of the joint. On the whole, the preferable strength can be obtained at lower rotational speed. Shear fracture mode was observed under tensile–shear loadings, and nugget debonding, plug type fracture (on the upper sheet) and plug type fracture (on the lower sheet) modes were observed under cross-tension loadings. It was also observed that the main feature affecting the mechanical properties of the joint is the alclad between the upper and lower sheets and the connecting qualities between the stir zone and thermo-mechanically affected zone.

  14. Nondestructive Evaluation of Friction Stir-Welded Aluminum Alloy to Coated Steel Sheet Lap Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, H.; Kumar, A.; Rajkumar, K. V.; Saravanan, T.; Jayakumar, T.; Pal, Tapan Kumar

    2015-11-01

    Dissimilar lap joints of aluminum sheet (AA 6061) of 2 mm thickness and zinc-coated steel sheet of 1 mm thickness were produced by friction stir welding with different combinations of rotational speed and travel speed. Ultrasonic C- and B-scanning, and radiography have been used in a complementary manner for detection of volumetric (cavity and flash) and planar (de bond) defects as the defects are in micron level. Advanced ultrasonic C-scanning did not provide any idea about the defects, whereas B-scanning cross-sectional image showed an exclusive overview of the micron-level defects. A digital x-ray radiography methodology is proposed for quality assessment of the dissimilar welds which provide three-fold increase in signal-to-noise ratio with improved defect detection sensitivity. The present study clearly shows that the weld tool rotational speed and travel speed have a decisive role on the quality of the joints obtained by the friction stir welding process. The suitability of the proposed NDE techniques to evaluate the joint integrity of dissimilar FSW joints is thus established.

  15. Microstructural characterizations and mechanical properties in underwater friction stir welding of aluminum and magnesium dissimilar alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Yong; Lu, Zhengping; Yan, Keng; Huang, Linzhao

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Aluminum and magnesium alloys were joined by underwater friction stir welding. • Underwater FSW was conducted to improve properties of joint with lower heat input. • Microstructures and mechanical properties of dissimilar joint were investigated. • Intermetallic compounds developed in the fracture interface were analyzed. • Fracture features of the tensile samples were analyzed. - Abstract: Formation of intermetallic compounds in the stir zone of dissimilar welds affects the mechanical properties of the joints significantly. In order to reduce heat input and control the amount and morphological characteristics of brittle intermetallic compounds underwater friction stir welding of 6013 Al alloy and AZ31 Mg alloy was carried out. Microstructures, mechanical properties, elements distribution, and the fracture surface of the joints were analyzed by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, etc. The result shows that sound dissimilar joint with good mechanical properties can be obtained by underwater friction stir welding. Al and Mg alloys were stirred together and undergone the process of recrystallization, forming complex intercalated flow patterns in the stir zone. Tensile strength of the dissimilar joint was up to 152.3 MPa. Maximum hardness (142HV) appeared in the middle of the centerline of the specimen. Intermetallic compounds layer consisting of Al 3 Mg 2 and Mg 17 Al 12 formed in the Al/Mg interface and resulted in the fracture of the joint

  16. Influence of friction stir welding parameters on titanium-aluminum heterogeneous lap joining configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picot, Florent; Gueydan, Antoine; Hug, Éric

    2017-10-01

    Lap joining configuration for Friction Stir Welding process is a methodology mostly dedicated to heterogeneous bonding. This welding technology was applied to join pure titanium with pure aluminum by varying the rotation speed and the movement speed of the tool. Regardless of the process parameters, it was found that the maximum strength of the junction remains almost constant. Microstructural observations by means of Scanning Electron Microscopy and Energy Dispersive Spectrometry analysis enable to describe the interfacial join and reveal asymmetric Cold Lap Defects on the sides of the junction. Chemical analysis shows the presence of one exclusive intermetallic compound through the interface identified as TiAl3. This compound is responsible of the crack spreading of the junction during the mechanical loading. The original version of this article supplied to AIP Publishing contained an accidental inversion of the authors, names. An updated version of this article, with the authors names formatted correctly was published on 20 October 2017.

  17. Friction stir spot welding of 2024-T3 aluminum alloy with SiC nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paidar, Moslem; Sarab, Mahsa Laali [Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    In this study, the Friction stir spot welding (FSSW) of 2024-T3 aluminum alloy with 1.6 mm thickness was investigated. The effects of the silicon carbide (SiC) nanoparticles on the metallurgical and mechanical properties were discussed. The effects of particles on tension shear and wear tests were also investigated. The process was conducted at a constant rotational speed of 1000 rpm. Results showed that adding SiC nanoparticles to the weld during FSSW had a major effect on the mechanical properties. In fact, the addition of nanoparticles as barriers prevented grain growth in the Stir zone (SZ). The data obtained in the tensile-shear and wear tests showed that tensile-shear load and wear resistance increased with the addition of SiC nanoparticles, which was attributed to the fine grain size produced in the SZ.

  18. Numerical Simulation of Stationary AC Tungsten Inert Gas Welding of Aluminum Plate in Consideration of Oxide Layer Cleaning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashiro, Shinichi; Tanaka, Manabu

    An unified numerical simulation model of AC TIG welding of the aluminum plate considering energy balance among the electrode, the arc and the base metal and employing an analytical model for calculating cleaning rate of the oxide layer has been developed for investigating heat transport properties and weld pool formation process in AC TIG welding of aluminum plate. As a result of this simulation, it was shown that although the heat flux from the arc onto the base metal increases in EN (Electrode Negative) phase due to the electron condensation, that in EP (Electrode Positive) phase conversely decreases because mainly of cooling caused by the electron emission. Furthermore, the validity of the simulation model was confirmed by comparing to experimental results such as the arc voltage, the area of cleaning zone and the shape of weld pool.

  19. Numerical analysis of AC tungsten inert gas welding of aluminum plate in consideration of oxide layer cleaning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tashiro, Shinichi, E-mail: tashiro@jwri.osaka-u.ac.jp; Miyata, Minoru; Tanaka, Manabu

    2011-08-01

    A unified numerical simulation model of AC TIG welding of the aluminum plate considering energy balance among the electrode, the arc and the base metal and employing an analytical model for calculating cleaning rate of the oxide layer has been developed for investigating heat transport properties and weld pool formation process in AC TIG welding of aluminum plate. As a result of this simulation, it was shown that although the heat flux from the arc onto the base metal increases in EN (Electrode Negative) phase due to the electron condensation, that in EP (Electrode Positive) phase conversely decreases because mainly of cooling caused by the electron emission. Furthermore, the validity of the simulation model was confirmed by comparing to experimental results such as the arc voltage, the area of cleaning zone and the shape of weld pool.

  20. The effect of thermal treatments on the corrosion behavior of friction stir welded 7050 and 7075 aluminum alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumsden, J.; Pollock, G.; Mahoney, M. [Rockwell Scientific, Camino dos Rios, Thousand Oaks, CA (United States)

    2003-07-01

    The rapid thermal cycle generated during friction stir welding (FSW) produces a gradient of microstructures and precipitate distributions in the weld heat affected zone (HAZ) and the thermo mechanical affected zone (TMAZ). Metallurgical transformations associated with such heating and cooling become complex under these nonequilibrium conditions, producing unstable microstructures, which cause unpredictable changes in properties relative to the parent alloy. Our work has shown that the composition changes caused by the nucleation and coarsening of precipitates during FSW produce a sensitized microstructure in 7050 and 7075 aluminum alloys. This paper describes the deleterious effects on the corrosion behavior of 7050 and 7075 aluminum alloys resulting from FSW and the effects of pre- and post- weld heat treatments on the corrosion properties of the welded material. (orig.)

  1. Inhibition of the formation of intermetallic compounds in aluminum-steel welded joints by friction stir welding; Inhibicion de la formacion de compuestos intermetalicos en juntas aluminio-acero soldadas por friccion-agitacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres Lopez, E. A.; Ramirez, A. J.

    2015-07-01

    Formation of deleterious phases during welding of aluminum and steel is a challenge of the welding processes, for decades. Friction Stir Welding (FSW) has been used in an attempt to reduce formation of intermetallic compounds trough reducing the heat input. In this research, dissimilar joint of 6063-T5 aluminum alloy and AISI-SAE 1020 steel were welded using this technique. The temperature of welded joints was measured during the process. The interface of the welded joints was characterized using optical microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Additionally, composition measurements were carried out by X-EDS and DRX. The experimental results revealed that the maximum temperature on the joint studied is less than 360 degree centigrade. The microstructural characterization in the aluminum-steel interface showed the absence of intermetallic compounds, which is a condition attributed to the use of welding with low thermal input parameters. (Author)

  2. Effect of water-cooling treatment times on properties of friction stir welded joints of 7N01-T4 aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, T. H.; Wang, Y.; Fang, X. F.; Liang, P.; Zhao, Y.; Li, Y. H.; Liu, X. M.

    2018-02-01

    Due to the deformation caused by residual stress in the welding process, welded components need treatment to reduce welding distortion. In this paper, several different times of flame-heating and water-cooling treatment were subjected to the friction stir welding joints of 15mm thick 7N01P-T4 aluminum alloy sheets to study the microstructure variation of friction stir welding joints of 7N01P-T4 aluminum alloy, and to analyze the effect on micro-hardness, tensile and fracture mechanical properties. This investigation will be helpful to optimize treatment methods and provide instruction on industrial production.

  3. Dissimilar Joining of Stainless Steel and 5083 Aluminum Alloy Sheets by Gas Tungsten Arc Welding-Brazing Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheepu, Muralimohan; Srinivas, B.; Abhishek, Nalluri; Ramachandraiah, T.; Karna, Sivaji; Venkateswarlu, D.; Alapati, Suresh; Che, Woo Seong

    2018-03-01

    The dissimilar joining using gas tungsten arc welding - brazing of 304 stainless steel to 5083 Al alloy had been conducted with the addition of Al-Cu eutectic filler metal. The interface microstructure formation between filler metal and substrates, and spreading of the filler metal were studied. The interface microstructure between filler metal and aluminum alloy characterized that the formation of pores and elongated grains with the initiation of micro cracks. The spreading of the liquid braze filler on stainless steel side packed the edges and appeared as convex shape, whereas a concave shape has been formed on aluminum side. The major compounds formed at the fusion zone interface were determined by using X-ray diffraction techniques and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis. The micro hardness at the weld interfaces found to be higher than the substrates owing to the presence of Fe2Al5 and CuAl2 intermetallic compounds. The maximum tensile strength of the weld joints was about 95 MPa, and the tensile fracture occurred at heat affected zone on weak material of the aluminum side and/or at stainless steel/weld seam interface along intermetallic layer. The interface formation and its effect on mechanical properties of the welds during gas tungsten arc welding-brazing has been discussed.

  4. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Three-Layer TIG-Welded 2219 Aluminum Alloys with Dissimilar Heat Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dengkui; Li, Quan; Zhao, Yue; Liu, Xianli; Song, Jianling; Wang, Guoqing; Wu, Aiping

    2018-05-01

    2219-C10S and 2219-CYS aluminum alloys are 2219 aluminum alloys with different heat treatment processes, and they have been widely used in the aerospace industry. In the present study, 2219-C10S and 2219-CYS aluminum alloys were butt-welded by three-layer tungsten inert gas arc welding (with the welding center of the third layer shifted toward the CYS side), and the microstructure characteristics and mechanical properties of the welded joint were investigated. The lamellar θ' phases, the bulk or rod θ phases, and the coarse rod-shaped or pancake-shaped Al-Cu-Fe-Mn phases coexisted in the two aluminum alloys. The Cu content of the α-Al matrix and the distribution of eutectic structures of different welding layers in the weld zone (WZ) were varied, implying that the segregation degrees of the Cu element were different due to the different welding thermal cycles in different welding layers. The microhardness values of the CYS side were much higher than those of the C10S side in each region on both sides of the joint. The tensile test deformation was concentrated mainly in the regions of WZ and the over aged zone (OAZ), where the microhardness values were relatively low. The main deformation concentrated region was transferred from the CYS side to the C10S side with the increase in the tensile load during the tensile test. The fracture behavior of the tensile test showed that the macroscopic crack initiated near the front weld toe had gone through the crack blunt region, the shear fracture region of the partially melted zone (PMZ), and the shear fracture region of OAZ. Meanwhile, the fracture characteristics gradually evolved from brittle to ductile. The concentrated stress and the dense eutectic structure in the region near the front weld toe of the C10S side contributed to the fracture of the joint. The shift of the welding center of the third layer to the CYS side resulted in two effects: (i) the microhardness values from the middle layer to the top layer in the

  5. Analysis and Prediction of the Billet Butt and Transverse Weld in the Continuous Extrusion Process of a Hollow Aluminum Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Shumei; Wang, Yongxiao; Liu, Chuanxi; Lu, Shuai; Liu, Sujun; Su, Chunjian

    2017-08-01

    In continuous extrusions of aluminum profiles, the thickness of the billet butt and the length of the discarded extrudate containing the transverse weld play key roles in reducing material loss and improving product quality. The formation and final distribution of the billet butt and transverse weld depend entirely on the flow behavior of the billet skin material. This study examined the flow behavior of the billet skin material as well as the formation and evolution of the billet butt and the transverse weld in detail through numerical simulation and a series of experiments. In practical extrusions, even if the billet skin is removed by lathe turning shortly before extrusion, billet skin impurities are still distributed around the transverse weld and in the billet butt. The thickness of the scrap billet butt and the length of the discarded extrudate containing the transverse weld can be exactly predicted via simulation.

  6. An Investigation of the Microstructure of an Intermetallic Layer in Welding Aluminum Alloys to Steel by MIG Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Quoc Manh; Huang, Shyh-Chour

    2015-12-02

    Butt joints of A5052 aluminum alloy and SS400 steel, with a new type of chamfered edge, are welded by means of metal inert gas welding and ER4043 Al-Si filler metal. The microhardness and microstructure of the joint are investigated. An intermetallic layer is found on the surface of the welding seam and SS400 steel sheet. The hardness of the intermetallic layer is examined using the Vickers hardness test. The average hardness values at the Intermetallic (IMC) layer zone and without the IMC layer zone were higher than that of the welding wire ER4043. The tensile strength test showed a fracture at the intermetallic layer when the tensile strength is 225.9 MPa. The tensile value test indicated the average of welds was equivalent to the 85% tensile strength of the A5052 aluminum alloy. The thickness of the intermetallic layers is non-uniform at different positions with the ranges from 1.95 to 5 μm. The quality of the butt joint is better if the intermetallic layer is minimized. The Si crystals which appeared at the welding seam, indicating that this element participated actively during the welding process, also contributed to the IMC layer's formation.

  7. Characteristics of plasma plume in fiber laser welding of aluminum alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Ming; Chen, Cong; Hu, Ming; Guo, Lianbo; Wang, Zemin, E-mail: zmwang@mail.hust.edu.cn; Zeng, Xiaoyan

    2015-01-30

    Highlights: • Spectroscopic properties of fiber laser induced Al plasma plume are measured. • The plume is usually a metal vapor dominated weakly ionized plasma. • The plume is a strongly ionized plasma after laser power is higher than 5 kW. • Plasma shielding effect must be considered after laser power reaches 5 kW. • Plasma shielding effect is dominated by inverse bremsstrahlung absorption. - Abstract: To understand the laser–matter interaction in fiber laser welding of aluminum alloys, the effects of laser power on the characteristics of fiber laser induced plasma plume were studied by emission spectroscopic analysis firstly. The plasma characteristic parameters including electron temperature, electron density, ionization degree, and inverse bremsstrahlung linear absorption coefficient were computed according to the spectral data. It was found that the laser power of 5 kW is a turning point. After the laser power reaches 5 kW, the plume changes from a metal vapor dominated weakly ionized plasma to a strongly ionized plasma. The corresponding phenomena are the dramatic increase of the value of characteristic parameters and the appearance of strong plasma shielding effect. The calculation of effective laser power density demonstrated that the plasma shielding effect is dominated by inverse bremsstrahlung absorption. The finding suggested the plasma shielding effect must be considered in fiber laser welding of aluminum alloys, rather than is ignored as claimed in previous view.

  8. Joining aluminum to titanium alloy by friction stir lap welding with cutting pin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Yanni; Li, Jinglong; Xiong, Jiangtao; Huang, Fu; Zhang, Fusheng; Raza, Syed Hamid

    2012-01-01

    Aluminum 1060 and titanium alloy Ti–6Al–4V plates were lap joined by friction stir welding. A cutting pin of rotary burr made of tungsten carbide was employed. The microstructures of the joining interface were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Joint strength was evaluated by a tensile shear test. During the welding process, the surface layer of the titanium plate was cut off by the pin, and intensively mixed with aluminum situated on the titanium plate. The microstructures analysis showed that a visible swirl-like mixed region existed at the interface. In this region, the Al metal, Ti metal and the mixed layer of them were all presented. The ultimate tensile shear strength of joint reached 100% of 1060Al that underwent thermal cycle provided by the shoulder. - Highlights: ► FSW with cutting pin was successfully employed to form Al/Ti lap joint. ► Swirl-like structures formed due to mechanical mixing were found at the interface. ► High-strength joints fractured at Al suffered thermal cycle were produced.

  9. A metallurgical and mechanical study on dissimilar Friction Stir welding of aluminum 1050 to brass (CuZn30)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esmaeili, A.; Givi, M.K. Besharati; Rajani, H.R. Zareie

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Brass and aluminum 1050 are joined for the first time through Friction Stir welding. → Welding parameters are optimized to obtain a sound joint. → The ultimate tensile strength of the sound joint reaches 80% of aluminum base metal. → The effect of interfacial intermetallic compounds on mechanical properties is probed. → CuZn, Cu9Al4 and CuAl2 form the majority of observed intermetallic compounds. - Abstract: In this research, the effect of Friction Stir welding parameters on mechanical and metallurgical properties of aluminum 1050/brass (70%Cu-30%Zn) joints was investigated. Optical microscopy, SEM, X-ray diffraction analysis and EDS analysis were used to probe microstructures and chemical compositions. In order to examine mechanical properties, besides hardness test, tensile strength of the welds was measured. The main parameters in this study were the tool rotational speed, offset, welding speed, and depth of the sinking pin. The maximum ultimate tensile strength of the joint reached in this research was 80% of the base metal (aluminum). Results show that the optimum parameters will yield a defect free joint arisen from a suitable material flow and a narrow multilayer intermetallic compound at interface in addition to a composite structure in the stir zone which all result in a strong joint. Also, by leaving the optimized condition, occurrence of large brass fragments and weld defects lower weld strength besides shifting fracture path from interface to the stir zone. Also, according to the results, using low rotation speed is accompanied by disappearance of interfacial intermetallic layer, whereas fast rotation will thicken this layer. Moreover, severe mechanical twining is observed in TMAZ of brass which leads to high values of hardness in this region.

  10. Computational Analysis of Material Flow During Friction Stir Welding of AA5059 Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grujicic, M.; Arakere, G.; Pandurangan, B.; Ochterbeck, J. M.; Yen, C.-F.; Cheeseman, B. A.; Reynolds, A. P.; Sutton, M. A.

    2012-09-01

    Workpiece material flow and stirring/mixing during the friction stir welding (FSW) process are investigated computationally. Within the numerical model of the FSW process, the FSW tool is treated as a Lagrangian component while the workpiece material is treated as an Eulerian component. The employed coupled Eulerian/Lagrangian computational analysis of the welding process was of a two-way thermo-mechanical character (i.e., frictional-sliding/plastic-work dissipation is taken to act as a heat source in the thermal-energy balance equation) while temperature is allowed to affect mechanical aspects of the model through temperature-dependent material properties. The workpiece material (AA5059, solid-solution strengthened and strain-hardened aluminum alloy) is represented using a modified version of the classical Johnson-Cook model (within which the strain-hardening term is augmented to take into account for the effect of dynamic recrystallization) while the FSW tool material (AISI H13 tool steel) is modeled as an isotropic linear-elastic material. Within the analysis, the effects of some of the FSW key process parameters are investigated (e.g., weld pitch, tool tilt-angle, and the tool pin-size). The results pertaining to the material flow during FSW are compared with their experimental counterparts. It is found that, for the most part, experimentally observed material-flow characteristics are reproduced within the current FSW-process model.

  11. Influence of tube spinning on formability of friction stir welded aluminum alloy tubes for hydroforming application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, X.S. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Hu, Z.L., E-mail: zhilihuhit@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Hubei Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology of Automobile Parts, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); State Key Laboratory of Materials Processing and Die and Mould Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (China); Yuan, S.J. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Hua, L. [Hubei Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology of Automobile Parts, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2014-06-01

    Due to economic and ecological reasons, the application of tailor-welded blanks of aluminum alloy has gained more and more attention in manufacturing lightweight structures for automotives and aircrafts. In the study, the research was aimed to highlight the influence of spinning on the formability of FSW tubes. The microstructural characteristics of the FSW tubes during spinning were studied by electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The formability of the FSW tubes with different spinning reduction was assessed by hydraulic bulge test. It is found that the spinning process shows a grain refinement of the tube. The grains of the FSW tube decrease with increasing thickness reduction, and the effect of grain refinement is more obvious for the BM compared to that of the weld. The difference of grain size and precipitates between the weld and BM leads to an asymmetric W-type microhardness distribution after spinning. The higher thickness reduction of the tube, the more uniform distribution of grains and precipitates it shows, and consequently results in more significant increase of strength. As compared with the result of tensile test, the tube after spinning shows better formability when the stress state changes from uniaxial to biaxial stress state.

  12. An integrated multiphysics model for friction stir welding of 6061 Aluminum alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Nourani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a new, combined ‘integrated’- ‘multiphysics’ model of friction stir welding (FSW where a set of governing equations from non-Newtonian incompressible fluid dynamics, conductive and convective heat transfer, and plain stress solid mechanics have been coupled for calculating the process variables and material behaviour both during and after welding. More specifically, regarding the multiphysics feature, the model is capable of simultaneously predicting the local distribution, location and magnitude of maximum temperature, strain, and strain rate fields around the tool pin during the process; while for the integrated (post-analysis part, the above predictions have been used to study the microstructure and residual stress field of welded parts within the same developed code. A slip/stick condition between the tool and workpiece, friction and deformation heat source, convection and conduction heat transfer in the workpiece, a solid mechanics-based viscosity definition, and the Zener-Hollomon- based rigid-viscoplastic material properties with solidus cut-off temperature and empirical softening regime have been employed. In order to validate all the predicted variables collectively, the model has been compared to a series of published case studies on individual/limited set of variables, as well as in-house experiments on FSW of aluminum 6061.

  13. High Temperature Analysis of Aluminum-Lithium 2195 Alloy to Aid in the Design of Improved Welding Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talia, George E.; Widener, Christian

    1996-01-01

    Aluminum-lithium alloys have extraordinary properties. The addition of lithium to an aluminum alloy decreases its density, while making large increases in its strength and hardness. The down side is that they are unstable at higher temperatures, and are subsequently difficult to weld or even manufacture. Martin Marietta, though, developed an aluminum-lithium alloy 2195 that was reported to have exceptional properties and good weldability. Thus, it was chosen as the alloy for the space shuttles super light external tank. Unfortunately, welding 2195 has turned out to be much more of a challenge than anticipated. Thus, research has been undergone in order to understand the mechanisms that are causing the welding problems. Gas reactions have been observed to be detrimental to weld strength. Water vapor has often been identified as having a significant role in these reactions. Nitrogen, however, has also been shown to have a direct correlation to porosity. These reactions were suspected as being complex and responsible for the two main problems of welding 2195. One, the initial welds of 2195 are much weaker than the parent metal. Second, each subsequent welding pass increases the size and number of cracks and porosity, yielding significant reductions in strength. Consequently, the objective of this research was to characterize the high-temperature reactions of 2195 in order to understand the mechanisms for crack growth and the formation of porosity in welds. In order to accomplish that goal, an optical hot-stage microscope, HSM, was used to observe those reactions as they occurred. Surface reactions of 2195 were observed in a variety of environments, such as air, vacuum, nitrogen and helium. For comparison, some samples of Al-2219 were also observed. Some of the reacted surfaces were then analyzed on a scanning electron microscope, SEM. Additionally, a gas chromatograph was used to analyze the gaseous products of the high temperature reactions.

  14. Aluminum alloy weldability. Identification of weld solidification cracking mechanisms through novel experimental technique and model development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coniglio, Nicolas

    2008-07-01

    The objective of the present thesis is to make advancements in understanding solidification crack formation in aluminum welds, by investigating in particular the aluminum 6060/4043 system. Alloy 6060 is typical of a family of Al-Mg-Si extrusion alloys, which are considered weldable only when using an appropriate filler alloy such as 4043 (Al-5Si). The effect of 4043 filler dilution (i.e. weld metal silicon content) on cracking sensitivity and solidification path of Alloy 6060 welds are investigated. Afterwards, cracking models are developed to propose mechanisms for solidification crack initiation and growth. Cracking Sensitivity. Building upon the concept that silicon improves weldability and that weldability can be defined by a critical strain rate, strain rate-composition combinations required for solidification crack formation in the Al- 6060/4043 system were determined using the newly developed Controlled Tensile Weldability (CTW) test utilizing local strain extensometer measurements. Results, presented in a critical strain rate - dilution map, show a crack - no crack boundary which reveals that higher local strain rates require higher 4043 filler dilution to avoid solidification cracking when arc welding Alloy 6060. Using the established crack - no crack boundary as a line of reference, additional parameters were examined and their influence on cracking characterized. These parameter influences have included studies of weld travel speed, weld pool contaminants (Fe, O, and H), and grain refiner additions (TiAl{sub 3} + Boron). Each parameter has been independently varied and its effect on cracking susceptibility quantified in terms of strain rate - composition combinations. Solidification Path. Solidification path of the Al-6060/4043 system was characterized using thermal analysis and phase identification. Increasing 4043 filler dilution from 0 to 16% in Alloy 6060 arc welds resulted in little effect on thermal arrests and microstructure, no effect on

  15. Design for low-cost gas metal arc weld-based aluminum 3-D printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haselhuhn, Amberlee S.

    Additive manufacturing, commonly known as 3-D printing, has the potential to change the state of manufacturing across the globe. Parts are made, or printed, layer by layer using only the materials required to form the part, resulting in much less waste than traditional manufacturing methods. Additive manufacturing has been implemented in a wide variety of industries including aerospace, medical, consumer products, and fashion, using metals, ceramics, polymers, composites, and even organic tissues. However, traditional 3-D printing technologies, particularly those used to print metals, can be prohibitively expensive for small enterprises and the average consumer. A low-cost open-source metal 3-D printer has been developed based upon gas metal arc weld (GMAW) technology. Using this technology, substrate release mechanisms have been developed, allowing the user to remove a printed metal part from a metal substrate by hand. The mechanical and microstructural properties of commercially available weld alloys were characterized and used to guide alloy development in 4000 series aluminum-silicon alloys. Wedge casting experiments were performed to screen magnesium, strontium, and titanium boride alloying additions in hypoeutectic aluminum-silicon alloys for their properties and the ease with which they could be printed. Finally, the top performing alloys, which were approximately 11.6% Si modified with strontium and titanium boride were cast, extruded, and drawn into wire. These wires were printed and the mechanical and microstructural properties were compared with those of commercially available alloys. This work resulted in an easier-to-print aluminum-silicon-strontium alloy that exhibited lower porosity, equivalent yield and tensile strengths, yet nearly twice the ductility compared to commercial alloys.

  16. Microstructure and texture evolution in aluminum and commercially pure titanium dissimilar welds fabricated using ultrasonic additive manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sridharan, Niyanth; Wolcott, Paul; Dapino, Marcelo; Babu, S.S.

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonic additive manufacturing (UAM) is a solid-state hybrid manufacturing technique. In this work characterization using electron back scatter diffraction was performed on aluminum–titanium dissimilar metal welds made using a 9 kW ultrasonic additive manufacturing system. The results showed that the aluminum texture at the interface after ultrasonic additive manufacturing is similar to aluminum texture observed during accumulative roll bonding of aluminum alloys. It is finally concluded that the underlying mechanism of bond formation in ultrasonic additive manufacturing primarily relies on severe shear deformation at the interface.

  17. 3-dimensional numerical analysis of friction stir welding of copper and aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleagha, M. E. Aalami; Hadi, Behzad; Shahbazi, Mohammad Ali [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, School of Engineering, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    A time dependent Eulerian thermal/material flow model of friction stir welding was developed and applied to the dissimilar joining of pure copper and aluminum 1050-H16 alloy to investigate the maximum penetration of base metals. Thermal and material flow analysis was done with the assumed velocity field in the stir zone and considering a thermal source of energy obtained from the both Coulomb type of friction and the loss of shear stress in a non-Newtonian viscous behavior of metal flow. The developed model was used to estimate temperature gradient and penetration of material under three different conditions of tool offset and compared with the experimental results. The model shows that the penetration of the base metals is closely related to tool offset. In all of the cases, the metal fixed in the advancing side is copper. Nevertheless, when considering tool offset in the copper side and also when considering tool offset in the aluminum side, penetrating metals are copper and aluminum, respectively. Also, the model shows that the maximum temperature achieved in the base metals significantly depends on the tool offset.

  18. An investigation of the residual stress characterization and relaxation in peened friction stir welded aluminum-lithium alloy joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatamleh, Omar; Rivero, Iris V.; Swain, Shayla E.

    2009-01-01

    In this investigation the residual stresses generated from friction stir welded (FSW) 2195 aluminum-lithium alloy joints were characterized. The results derived from this research revealed significant levels of tensile residual stresses at the surface and throughout the thickness of the FSW samples. Furthermore, residual stress relaxation at the surface and throughout the thickness of the samples was assessed for laser peened friction stir welded aluminum-lithium joints. To do so the samples were cycled several times at a constant amplitude load. The results indicated that most of the relaxation for the surface residual stresses took place during the first cycle of loading. Also, residual stresses relaxation throughout the thickness of the welded region of unpeened samples significantly exceeded the relaxation exhibited by the laser peened samples.

  19. Role of the micro/macro structure of welds in crack nucleation and propagation in aerospace aluminum-lithium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talia, George E.

    1996-01-01

    Al-Li alloys offer the benefits of increased strength, elastic modulus and lower densities as compared to conventional aluminum alloys. Martin Marietta Laboratories has developed an Al-Li alloy designated 2195 which is designated for use in the cryogenic tanks of the space shuttle. The Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) welding process is currently being used to produce these welds [1]. VPPA welding utilizes high temperature ionized gas (plasma) to transfer heat to the workpiece. An inert gas, such as Helium, is used to shield the active welding zone to prevent contamination of the molten base metal with surrounding reactive atmospheric gases. [1] In the Space Shuttle application, two passes of the arc are used to complete a butt-type weld. The pressure of the plasma stream is increased during the first pass to force the arc entirely through the material, a practice commonly referred to as keyholing. Molten metal forms on either side of the arc and surface tension draws this liquid together as the arc passes. 2319 Al alloy filler material may also be fed into the weld zone during this pass. During the second pass, the plasma stream pressure is reduced such that only partial penetration of the base material is obtained. Al 2319 filler material is added during this pass to yield a uniform, fully filled welded joint. This additional pass also acts to alter the grain structure of the weld zone to yield a higher strength joint.

  20. Advanced Process Possibilities in Friction Crush Welding of Aluminum, Steel, and Copper by Using an Additional Wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besler, Florian A.; Grant, Richard J.; Schindele, Paul; Stegmüller, Michael J. R.

    2017-12-01

    Joining sheet metal can be problematic using traditional friction welding techniques. Friction crush welding (FCW) offers a high speed process which requires a simple edge preparation and can be applied to out-of-plane geometries. In this work, an implementation of FCW was employed using an additional wire to weld sheets of EN AW5754 H22, DC01, and Cu-DHP. The joint is formed by bringing together two sheet metal parts, introducing a wire into the weld zone and employing a rotating disk which is subject to an external force. The requirements of the welding preparation and the fundamental process variables are shown. Thermal measurements were taken which give evidence about the maximum temperature in the welding center and the temperature in the periphery of the sheet metals being joined. The high welding speed along with a relatively low heat input results in a minimal distortion of the sheet metal and marginal metallurgical changes in the parent material. In the steel specimens, this FCW implementation produces a fine grain microstructure, enhancing mechanical properties in the region of the weld. Aluminum and copper produced mean bond strengths of 77 and 69 pct to that of the parent material, respectively, whilst the steel demonstrated a strength of 98 pct. Using a wire offers the opportunity to use a higher-alloyed additional material and to precisely adjust the additional material volume appropriate for a given material alignment and thickness.

  1. Mechanical Property Analysis in the Retracted Pin-Tool (RPT) Region of Friction Stir Welded (FSW) Aluminum Lithium 2195

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey; Oelgoetz, Peter A.

    1999-01-01

    The "Auto-Adjustable Pin Tool for Friction Stir Welding", was developed at The Marshall Space Flight Center to address process deficiencies unique to the FSW process. The auto-adjustable pin tool, also called the retractable pin-tool (R.PT) automatically withdraws the welding probe of the pin-tool into the pin-tool's shoulder. The primary function of the auto-adjustable pin-tool is to allow for keyhole closeout, necessary for circumferential welding and localized weld repair, and, automated pin-length adjustment for the welding of tapered material thickness. An overview of the RPT hardware is presented. The paper follows with studies conducted using the RPT. The RPT was used to simulate two capabilities; welding tapered material thickness and closing out the keyhole in a circumferential weld. The retracted pin-tool regions in aluminum- lithium 2195 friction stir weldments were studied through mechanical property testing and metallurgical sectioning. Correlation's can be =de between retractable pin-tool programmed parameters, process parameters, microstructure, and resulting weld quality.

  2. The effect of laser surface melting on microstructure and corrosion behavior of friction stir welded aluminum alloy 2219

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shengchong; Zhao, Yong; Zou, Jiasheng; Yan, Keng; Liu, Chuan

    2017-11-01

    This study aimed to explore the electrochemical properties and microstructure of friction stir welds to understand the correlation between their properties and processing. Friction stir welding is a promising solid-state joining process for high-strength aluminum alloys (AA). Although friction stir welding (FSW) eliminates the problems of fusion welding due to the fact that it is performed below Tm, it causes severe plastic deformation in the material. Some AA welded by FSW exhibit relatively poor corrosion resistance. In this research, the corrosion resistance of such welds was enhanced through laser surface melting. A friction stir weld of AA 2219 was laser melted. The melt depth and microstructure were observed using optical and scanning electron microscopy. The melt zone exhibited epitaxially grown columnar grains. The redistribution of elemental composition was analyzed using energy-dispersive spectroscopy. The anticorrosion properties of both laser-melted and original welds were studied in aqueous 3.5% NaCl solution using cyclic potentiodynamic polarization. The results indicated a noticeable increase in the pitting corrosion resistance after the laser treatment on the surface. The repassivation potential was nobler than the corrosion potential after the laser treatment, confirming that the resistance to pitting growth improved.

  3. Effect of Rotation Rate on Microstructure and Properties of Underwater Friction Stir Welded 7A04-T6 Aluminum Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Wen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Underwater friction stir welding (FSW on 7A04-T6 aluminum alloy plates was carried out, and the effect of rotation rate on microstructure and mechanical properties of joints was investigated. The results show that the minimum hardness of underwater FSW joints is located in the thermo-mechanically affected zone. The hardness of welded joints at the high rotation rate of 950r/min exhibits W-shaped distribution, and the average hardness value in the nugget zone is higher than that of welded joints at the low rotation rate of 475, 600, 750r/min. When the rotation rate increases from 475r/min to 750r/min with a constant welding speed of 235mm/min, the precipitated phases in the nugget zone gradually become coarse, and the ultimate tensile strength coefficient of the joint decreases from 89.71% to 82.33%; when rotation rate increases to 950r/min, the precipitated phases dissolve into aluminum matrix during welding, and age after welding. This produces the fine and homogeneous dispersed phases, which results in an increase of the strength coefficient to 89.04% and a certain enhancement of strain hardening capacity and elongation for the joints. All the tensile fracture surfaces exhibit the mixed characteristics of microporous polymerization and cleavage fracture.

  4. The effect of postprocessing on tensile property and microstructure evolution of friction stir welding aluminum alloy joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Z.L.; Wang, X.S.; Pang, Q.; Huang, F.; Qin, X.P.; Hua, L.

    2015-01-01

    Friction stir welding is an efficient manufacturing method for joining aluminum alloy and can dramatically reduce grain size conferring excellent plastic deformation properties. Consequently, friction stir welding is used to manufacture tailor welded blanks to optimize weight or performance in the final component. In the study, the microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of friction stir welding joint during plastic forming and subsequent heat treatment were investigated. The microstructural characteristics of the friction stir welding joints were studied by Electron Backscattered Diffraction and Transmission Electron Microscopy. The mechanical properties were evaluated by tensile and microhardness tests. It is found that the tensile and yield strengths of friction stir welding joints are significantly improved after severe plastic deformation due to the grain refinement. Following heat treatment, the strength of the friction stir welding joints significantly decrease due to the obvious abnormal grain growth. Careful attention must be given to the processing route of any friction stir welding joint intended for plastic forming, especially the annealing between forming passes. Severe plastic deforming of the friction stir welding joint leads to a high level of stored energy/dislocation density, which causes the abnormal grain growth during subsequent heat treatment, and consequently reduce the mechanical properties of the friction stir welding joint. - Highlights: • Great changes are observed in the microstructure of FSW joint after postprocessing. • Postprocessing shows great effect on the microstructure stability of FSW joint. • The weld shows more significant decrease in strength than the BM due to the AGG. • Attention must be given to the processing route of FSW joint for plastic forming

  5. Influences of post weld heat treatment on tensile strength and microstructure characteristics of friction stir welded butt joints of AA2014-T6 aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendran, C.; Srinivasan, K.; Balasubramanian, V.; Balaji, H.; Selvaraj, P.

    2016-08-01

    Friction stir welded (FSWed) joints of aluminum alloys exhibited a hardness drop in both the advancing side (AS) and retreating side (RS) of the thermo-mechanically affected zone (TMAZ) due to the thermal cycle involved in the FSW process. In this investigation, an attempt has been made to overcome this problem by post weld heat treatment (PWHT) methods. FSW butt (FSWB) joints of Al-Cu (AA2014-T6) alloy were PWHT by two methods such as simple artificial aging (AA) and solution treatment followed by artificial aging (STA). Of these two treatments, STA was found to be more beneficial than the simple aging treatment to improve the tensile properties of the FSW joints of AA2014 aluminum alloy.

  6. Indentation Creep Behavior of Nugget Zone of Friction Stir Welded 2014 Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Jayashree; Robi, P. S.; Sankar, M. Ravi

    2018-04-01

    The present study is aimed at evaluating the creep behavior of the nugget zone of friction welded 2014 Aluminum alloy by indentation creep tests. Impression creep testing was carried out at different temperatures of 300°C, 350°C and 400 °C with stress 124.77MPa, 187.16MPa, 249.55 MPa using a 1.0 mm diameter WC indenter. Experiments were conducted till the curve enters the steady state creep region. Constitutive modeling of creep behavior was carried out considering the temperature, stress and steady state creep rate. Microstructural investigation of the crept specimen at 400°C temperature and 187.16 MPa load was carried out and found that the small precipitates accumulate along the grain boundaries at the favorable conditions of the creep temperature and stress, new precipitates evolve due to the ageing. The grains are broken and deformed due to the creep phenomena.

  7. Laser welding of aluminum alloy sheet test%铝合金薄板激光焊接试验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王中林; 杨晟; 石金发

    2011-01-01

    The purpse of Technology testing is to find a relatively economical and practical method of laser welding of aluminum alloy for the modem industrial assembly technology to provide new ideas to promote productivity improvement and cost reduction. Analyzed the characteristics of aluminum alloy laser welding technology, technical difficulties and Solutions, recording using 300W single - beam laser welding of aluminum alloy with the relevant parameters and tile welding effect, to build dual - beam laser welding test platform for high - power dual - beam and record the total about 500W into two beams of laser welding and related parameters during the test. By laser and argon arc welding test mixture. On the part of the welded samples were quantitatively analyzed. After analysis, made of aluminum alloy laser welding technology improvements.%工艺试验的目的是寻求相对经济实用的铝合金激光焊接方法,为现代工业装配生产提供新的工艺思路,促进生产效率的提升和成本的降低。分析了铝合金激光焊接的工艺特性、技术难点和解决思路,记录利用300W激光对铝合金进行单光束焊接的有关参数和焊接效果,搭建双光束激光焊接试验平台,记录较高功率双光束和总量约500W激光分成双光束焊接试验过程及有关参数。进行了激光、氩弧混合焊接试验。对部分焊接样品进行了定量分析。经过分析研究,提出了铝合金激光焊接工艺改进意见。

  8. Effect of dual laser beam on dissimilar welding-brazing of aluminum to galvanized steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadpour, Masoud; Yazdian, Nima; Yang, Guang; Wang, Hui-Ping; Carlson, Blair; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2018-01-01

    In this investigation, the joining of two types of galvanized steel and Al6022 aluminum alloy in a coach peel configuration was carried out using a laser welding-brazing process in dual-beam mode. The feasibility of this method to obtain a sound and uniform brazed bead with high surface quality at a high welding speed was investigated by employing AlSi12 as a consumable material. The effects of alloying elements on the thickness of intermetallic compound (IMC) produced at the interface of steel and aluminum, surface roughness, edge straightness and the tensile strength of the resultant joint were studied. The comprehensive study was conducted on the microstructure of joints by means of a scanning electron microscopy and EDS. Results showed that a dual-beam laser shape and high scanning speed could control the thickness of IMC as thin as 3 μm and alter the failure location from the steel-brazed interface toward the Al-brazed interface. The numerical simulation of thermal regime was conducted by the Finite Element Method (FEM), and simulation results were validated through comparative experimental data. FEM thermal modeling evidenced that the peak temperatures at the Al-steel interface were around the critical temperature range of 700-900 °C that is required for the highest growth rate of IMC. However, the time duration that the molten pool was placed inside this temperature range was less than 1 s, and this duration was too short for diffusion-control based IMC growth.

  9. A Microstructural Evaluation of Friction Stir Welded 7075 Aluminum Rolled Plate Heat Treated to the Semi-Solid State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ava Azadi Chegeni

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Two rolled plates of 7075 aluminum alloy were used as starting material. The plates were welded using a simultaneous double-sided friction stir welding (FSW process. One way of obtaining feedstock materials for Semi-solid processing or thixoforming is via deformation routes followed by partial melting in the semi-solid state. As both the base plate materials and the friction weld area have undergone extensive deformation specimens were subjected to a post welding heat-treatment in the semi-solid range at a temperature of 628 °C, for 3 min in order to observe the induced microstructural changes. A comparison between the microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of friction stir welded plates was performed before and after the heat-treatment in the Base Metal (BM, the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ, the Thermomechanically Affected Zone (TMAZ and the Nugget Zone (NZ using optical microscopy, Scanning Electron microscopy (SEM and Vickers hardness tests. The results revealed that an extremely fine-grained structure, obtained in the NZ after FSW, resulted in a rise of hardness from the BM to the NZ. Furthermore, post welding heat-treatment in the semi-solid state gave rise to a consistent morphology throughout the material which was similar to microstructures obtained by the thixoforming process. Moreover, a drop of hardness was observed after heat treatment in all regions as compared to that in the welded microstructure.

  10. Mitigating Localized Corrosion Using Thermally Sprayed Aluminum (TSA) Coatings on Welded 25% Cr Superduplex Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, S.; Lu, Q.; Harvey, M. D. F.

    2015-04-01

    Thermally sprayed aluminum (TSA) coating has been increasingly used for the protection of carbon steel offshore structures, topside equipment, and flowlines/pipelines exposed to both marine atmospheres and seawater immersion conditions. In this paper, the effectiveness of TSA coatings in preventing localized corrosion, such as pitting and crevice corrosion of 25% Cr superduplex stainless steel (SDSS) in subsea applications, has been investigated. Welded 25% Cr SDSS (coated and uncoated) with and without defects, and surfaces coated with epoxy paint were also examined. Pitting and crevice corrosion tests, on welded 25% Cr SDSS specimens with and without TSA/epoxy coatings, were conducted in recirculated, aerated, and synthetic seawater at 90 °C for 90 days. The tests were carried out at both the free corrosion potentials and an applied cathodic potential of -1100 mV saturated calomel electrode. The acidity (pH) of the test solution was monitored daily and adjusted to between pH 7.5 and 8.1, using dilute HCl solution or dilute NaOH, depending on the pH of the solution measured during the test. The test results demonstrated that TSA prevented pitting and crevice corrosion of 25% Cr SDSS in artificial seawater at 90 °C, even when 10-mm-diameter coating defect exposing the underlying steel was present.

  11. Low-cycle fatigue of dissimilar friction stir welded aluminum alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, R.I. [The University of Alabama, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Jordon, J.B., E-mail: bjordon@eng.ua.edu [The University of Alabama, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Allison, P.G. [The University of Alabama, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Rushing, T.; Garcia, L. [Engineering Research and Development Center, Army Corps of Engineers, Vicksburg, MS 39180 (United States)

    2016-01-27

    In this work, experiments were conducted to quantify structure-property relations of low-cycle fatigue behavior of dissimilar friction stir welding (FSW) of AA6061-to-AA7050 high strength aluminum alloys. In addition, a microstructure-sensitive fatigue model is employed to further elucidate cause-effect relationships. Experimental strain-controlled fatigue testing revealed an increase in the cyclic strain hardening and the number-of cycles to failure as the tool rotational speed was increased. At higher applied strain amplitudes (>0.3%), the corresponding stress amplitude increased and the plastic strain amplitude decreased, as the number of cycles increased. However, at 0.2% strain amplitude, the plastic strain decreased until it was almost negligible. Inspection of the hysteresis loops demonstrated that at low strain amplitudes, there was an initial stage of strain hardening that increased until it reached a maximum strain hardening level, afterwards a nearly perfect elastic behavior was observed. Under fully-reversed fatigue loading, all samples failed at the region between the heat-affected and thermomechanically-affected zones. Inspection of the fractured surfaces under scanning electron microscopy revealed that the cracks initiated at either the crown or the root surface of the weld, and from secondary intermetallic particles located near the free surface of the weld. Lastly, a microstructure-sensitive multistage fatigue model was employed to correlate the fatigue life of the dissimilar FSW of AA6061-to-AA7050 considering microstructural features such as grain size, intermetallic particles and mechanical properties.

  12. Experimental and numerical study of spatter formation and composition change in fiber laser welding of aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dongsheng; Hua, Xueming; Ye, Youxiong; Huang, Lijin; Li, Fang; Huang, Ye

    2018-05-01

    A laser welding experiment with glass is conducted to directly observe the keyhole behavior and spatter formation in fiber laser welding of aluminum alloy. A 3D model is developed to investigate the spatter formation and composition change. An additional conservation equation is introduced to describe the Mg element distribution, and the Mg element loss due to evaporation is also considered. Based on numerical and experimental results, it is found that the keyhole geometry in laser welding of aluminum alloy is different from that in laser welding of steel. There are three required steps for spatter formation around the keyhole. The high momentum of the molten metal, the high recoil pressure and vapor shear stress, and the low surface tension around the keyhole contribute to the easy formation of spatter. The in-homogeneous distribution of Mg element in the weld can be attributable to the continuous evaporation of Mg element at the top surface of keyhole rear, the upward flow of low Mg element region from the bottom of the keyhole to the top surface of keyhole rear along the fusion line, the collapse of the keyhole, and the ejection of spatters.

  13. Investigation of the material flow and texture evolution in friction-stir welded aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Suk Hoon; Han, Heung Nam; Oh, Kyu Hwan; Cho, Jae-Hyung; Lee, Chang Gil; Kim, Sung-Joon

    2009-12-01

    The material flow and crystallographic orientation in aluminum alloy sheets joined by friction stir welding (FSW) were investigated by electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD). The microstructure and microtexture of the material near the stir zone was found to be influenced by the rotational behavior of the tool pin. It was found that, during FSW, the forward movement of the tool pin resulted in loose contact between the tool pin and the receding material at the advancing side. This material behavior inside the joined aluminum plates was also observed by an X-ray micrograph by inlaying a gold marker into the plates. As the advancing speed of the tool increases at a given rotation speed, the loose contact region widens. As the microtexture of the material near the stir zone is very close to the simple shear texture on the basis of the frame of the tool pin in the normal and tangent directions, the amount of incompletely rotated material due to the loose contact could be estimated from the tilt angle of the shear texture in the pole figure around the key hole.

  14. Multi-Track Friction Stir Lap Welding of 2024 Aluminum Alloy: Processing, Microstructure and Mechanical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengke Zou

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir lap welding (FSLW raises the possibility of fabricating high-performance aluminum components at low cost and high efficiency. In this study, we mainly applied FSLW to fabricate multi-track 2024 aluminum alloy without using tool tilt angle, which is important for obtaining defect-free joint but significantly increases equipment cost. Firstly, systematic single-track FSLW experiments were conducted to attain appropriate processing parameters, and we found that defect-free single-track could also be obtained by the application of two-pass processing at a rotation speed of 1000 rpm and a traverse speed of 300 mm/min. Then, multi-track FSLW experiments were conducted and full density multi-track samples were fabricated at an overlapping rate of 20%. Finally, the microstructure and mechanical properties of the full density multi-track samples were investigated. The results indicated that ultrafine equiaxed grains with the grain diameter about 9.4 μm could be obtained in FSLW samples due to the dynamic recrystallization during FSLW, which leads to a yield strength of 117.2 MPa (17.55% higher than the rolled 2024-O alloy substrate and an elongation rate of 31.05% (113.84% higher than the substrate.

  15. Friction stir weld assisted diffusion bonding of 5754 aluminum alloy to coated high strength steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haghshenas, M.; Abdel-Gwad, A.; Omran, A.M.; Gökçe, B.; Sahraeinejad, S.; Gerlich, A.P.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Successful lap joints of Al 5754 sheet to coated DP600 and 22MnB5 steels. • Negligible effect of welding speed on mechanical properties of Al 5754/22MnB5 joints. • Lower strength of Al 5754/22MnB5 joints compared with Al 5754/DP600 joints. - Abstract: In the present paper friction stir-induced diffusion bonding is used for joining sheets of 5754 aluminum alloy to coated high strength steels (DP600 and 22MnB5) by promoting diffusion bonding in an overlap configuration. Mechanical performance and microstructures of joints were analyzed by overlap shear testing, metallography, and X-ray diffraction. Our results show that the strength of joint is dependent upon tool travel speed and the depth of the tool pin relative to the steel surface. The thickness and types of intermetallic compounds formed at the interface play a significant role in achieving a joint with optimum performance. That is, the formation of high aluminum composition intermetallic compounds (i.e. Al 5 Fe 2 ) at the interface of the friction stir lap joint appeared to have a more negative effect on joint strength compared to the presence of high iron composition intermetallic phases (i.e. FeAl). This is in agreement with previously reported findings that FeAl intermetallic can improve the fracture toughness and interface strength in Al/St joints

  16. Effect of current and speed on porosity in autogenous Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welding of aluminum alloys A1100 butt joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milyardi, Indra; Sunar Baskoro, Ario

    2018-04-01

    Autogenous Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welding has been conducted on aluminum alloy A1100. The purpose of this research is to determine the proper current and speed of autogenous TIG welding with butt joint pattern. Variations on welding current are 150 A, 155 A, and 160 A with the variations on welding speed are 1 mm/seconds, 1.1 mm/seconds, 1.2 mm/seconds. The welded results were tested using non-destructive test (NDT) method using X-Ray radiography. After the test, it is found that the appropriate current for the best result without porosity can be achieved using the welding parameter of welding current of 160 A and the welding speed of 1.1 mm seconds.

  17. The investigation of abnormal particle-coarsening phenomena in friction stir repair weld of 2219-T6 aluminum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Bo; Shen, Yifu

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Defective friction stir welds were repaired by overlapping FSW technique. → Abnormal Al 2 Cu-coarsening phenomena were found in 2219-T6 friction stir repair weld. → Three formation mechanisms were proposed for reasonable explanations. -- Abstract: The single-pass friction stir weld of aluminum 2219-T6 with weld-defects was repaired by overlapping friction stir welding technique. However, without any post weld heat treatment process, it was found that the phenomena of abnormal particle-coarsening of Al 2 Cu had occurred in the overlapping friction stir repair welds. The detecting results of non-destructive X-ray inspection proved that not only one group of repair FSW process parameters could lead to occurrence of the abnormal phenomena. And the abnormally coarsened particles always appeared on the advancing side of repair welds rather than the retreating side where the fracture behaviors occurred after mechanical tensile testing. The size of the biggest particle lying in the dark bands of 'Onion-rings' was more than 150 μm. After the related investigation by scanning electron microscope and X-ray energy spectrometer, three types of formation mechanisms were proposed for reasonably explaining the abnormal phenomenon: Aggregation Mechanism, Diffusion Mechanisms I and II. Aggregation Mechanism was according to the motion-laws of stir-pin. Diffusion Mechanisms were based on the classical theories of precipitate growth in metallic systems. The combined action of the three detailed mechanisms contributed to the abnormal coarsening behavior of Al 2 Cu particles in the friction stir repair weld.

  18. Joining of Cu-Mg-Mn Aluminum Alloy with Linear Friction Welding

    OpenAIRE

    A. Medvedev; V. Bychkov; A. Selivanov; Yu. J. Ershova; B. Bolshakov; I.V. Alexаndrov; F. F. Musin

    2014-01-01

    Al-Cu-Mg-Mn alloy samples were joined together with linear friction welding in two conditions, as is, without pretreatment, and after etching the welding interface. The effect of the welding interface condition was evaluated based on microstructure analysis, microhardness and tensile testing at room temperature. Also, the temperature distribution during welding was estimated with an analytical one-dimensional heat conduction model of the welding process and welding process data

  19. The study on defects in aluminum 2219-T6 thick butt friction stir welds with the application of multiple non-destructive testing methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Bo; Shen, Yifu; Hu, Weiye

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Friction stir weld-defect forming mechanisms of thick butt-joints. → Relationship between weld-defects and friction stir welding process parameters. → Multiple non-destructive testing methods applied to friction stir welds. → Empirical criterion basing on mass-conservation for inner material-loss defects. → Nonlinear correlation between weld strengths and root-flaw lengths. -- Abstract: The present study focused on the relationship between primary friction stir welding process parameters and varied types of weld-defect discovered in aluminum 2219-T6 friction stir butt-welds of thick plates, meanwhile, the weld-defect forming mechanisms were investigated. Besides a series of optical metallographic examinations for friction stir butt welds, multiple non-destructive testing methods including X-ray detection, ultrasonic C-scan testing, ultrasonic phased array inspection and fluorescent penetrating fluid inspection were successfully used aiming to examine the shapes and existence locations of different weld-defects. In addition, precipitated Al 2 Cu phase coarsening particles were found around a 'kissing-bond' defect within the weld stirred nugget zone by means of scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. On the basis of volume conservation law in material plastic deformation, a simple empirical criterion for estimating the existence of inner material-loss defects was proposed. Defect-free butt joints were obtained after process optimization of friction stir welding for aluminum 2219-T6 plates in 17-20 mm thickness. Process experiments proved that besides of tool rotation speed and travel speed, more other appropriate process parameter variables played important roles at the formation of high-quality friction stir welds, such as tool-shoulder target depth, spindle tilt angle, and fixture clamping conditions on the work-pieces. Furthermore, the nonlinear correlation between weld tensile strengths and weld crack

  20. Microstructure and mechanical properties of aluminum 5083 weldments by gas tungsten arc and gas metal arc welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Yao [State Key Laboratory of Nonlinear Mechanics, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Wang Wenjing [School of Mechanical, Electronic and Control Engineering, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Xie Jijia [State Key Laboratory of Nonlinear Mechanics, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Sun Shouguang [School of Mechanical, Electronic and Control Engineering, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Wang Liang [College of Metallurgy and Material Engineering, Chongqing University of Science and Technology, Chongqing 401331 (China); Qian Ye; Meng Yuan [State Key Laboratory of Nonlinear Mechanics, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Wei Yujie, E-mail: yujie_wei@lnm.imech.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Nonlinear Mechanics, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2012-07-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Welding zones by GTAW and GMAW are softer than the parent material Al5083. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GTAW for Al5083 are mechanically more reliable than that welded by GMAW. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GTAW welds fail by shear, but GMAW welds show mixed shear and normal failure. - Abstract: The mechanical properties and microstructural features of aluminum 5083 (Al5083) weldments processed by gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and gas metal arc welding (GMAW) are investigated. Weldments processed by both methods are mechanically softer than the parent material Al5083, and could be potential sites for plastic localization. It is revealed that Al5083 weldments processed by GTAW are mechanical more reliable than those by GMAW. The former bears higher strength, more ductility, and no apparent microstructure defects. Perceivable porosity in weldments by GMAW is found, which could account for the distinct mechanical properties between weldments processed by GTAW and GMAW. It is suggested that caution should be exercised when using GMAW for Al5083 in the high-speed-train industry where such light weight metal is broadly used.

  1. Microstructure and mechanical properties of aluminum 5083 weldments by gas tungsten arc and gas metal arc welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yao; Wang Wenjing; Xie Jijia; Sun Shouguang; Wang Liang; Qian Ye; Meng Yuan; Wei Yujie

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Welding zones by GTAW and GMAW are softer than the parent material Al5083. ► GTAW for Al5083 are mechanically more reliable than that welded by GMAW. ► GTAW welds fail by shear, but GMAW welds show mixed shear and normal failure. - Abstract: The mechanical properties and microstructural features of aluminum 5083 (Al5083) weldments processed by gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and gas metal arc welding (GMAW) are investigated. Weldments processed by both methods are mechanically softer than the parent material Al5083, and could be potential sites for plastic localization. It is revealed that Al5083 weldments processed by GTAW are mechanical more reliable than those by GMAW. The former bears higher strength, more ductility, and no apparent microstructure defects. Perceivable porosity in weldments by GMAW is found, which could account for the distinct mechanical properties between weldments processed by GTAW and GMAW. It is suggested that caution should be exercised when using GMAW for Al5083 in the high-speed-train industry where such light weight metal is broadly used.

  2. Effect of Friction Stir Welding Parameters on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of AA2024-T4 Aluminum Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. W. El-Morsy

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the effects of rotational and traverse speeds on the 1.5 mm butt joint performance of friction stir welded 2024-T4 aluminum alloy sheets have been investigated. Five rotational speeds ranging from 560 to 1800 rpm and five traverse speeds ranging from 11 to 45 mm/min have been employed. The characterization of microstructure and the mechanical properties (tensile, microhardness, and bending of the welded sheets have been studied. The results reveal that by varying the welding parameters, almost sound joints and high performance welded joints can be successfully produced at the rotational speeds of 900 rpm and 700 rpm and the traverse speed of 35 mm/min. The maximum welding performance of joints is found to be 86.3% with 900 rpm rotational speed and 35 mm/min traverse speed. The microhardness values along the cross-section of the joints show a dramatic drop in the stir zone where the lowest value reached is about 63% of the base metal due to the softening of the welded zone caused by the heat input during joining.

  3. Laser Spot Welding of Copper-aluminum Joints Using a Pulsed Dual Wavelength Laser at 532 and 1064 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stritt, Peter; Hagenlocher, Christian; Kizler, Christine; Weber, Rudolf; Rüttimann, Christoph; Graf, Thomas

    A modulated pulsed laser source emitting green and infrared laser light is used to join the dissimilar metals copper and aluminum. The resultant dynamic welding process is analyzed using the back reflected laser light and high speed video observations of the interaction zone. Different pulse shapes are applied to influence the melt pool dynamics and thereby the forming grain structure and intermetallic phases. The results of high-speed images and back-reflections prove that a modulation of the pulse shape is transferred to oscillations of the melt pool at the applied frequency. The outcome of the melt pool oscillation is shown by the metallurgically prepared cross-section, which indicates different solidification lines and grain shapes. An energy-dispersivex-ray analysis shows the mixture and the resultant distribution of the two metals, copper and aluminum, within the spot weld. It can be seen that the mixture is homogenized the observed melt pool oscillations.

  4. Experimental Determination of Temperature During Rotary Friction Welding of AA1050 Aluminum with AISI 304 Stainless Steel

    OpenAIRE

    Alves, Eder Paduan; Piorino Neto, Francisco; An, Chen Ying; Silva, Euclides Castorino da

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: The purpose of this study was the temperature monitoring at bonding interface during the rotary friction welding process of dissimilar materiais: AA1050 aluminum with AISI 304 stainless steel. As it is directly related to the mechanical strenght of the junction, its experimental determination in real time is of fundamental importance for understanding and characterizing the main process steps, and the definition and optimization of parameters. The temperature gradients were obtained...

  5. Experimental Determination of Temperature During Rotary Friction Welding of AA1050 Aluminum with AISI 304 Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eder Paduan Alves

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was the temperature monitoring at bonding interface during the rotary friction welding process of dissimilar materials: AA1050 aluminum with AISI 304 stainless steel. As it is directly related to the mechanical strenght of the junction, its experimental determination in real time is of fundamental importance for understanding and characterizing the main process steps, and the definition and optimization of parameters. The temperature gradients were obtained using a system called Thermocouple Data-Logger, which allowed monitoring and recording data in real-time operation. In the graph temperature versus time obtained, the heating rates, cooling were analyzed, and the maximum temperature was determined that occurred during welding, and characterized every phases of the process. The efficiency of this system demonstrated by experimental tests and the knowledge of the temperature at the bonding interface open new lines of research to understand the process of friction welding.

  6. Numerical simulation of spatter formation during fiber laser welding of 5083 aluminum alloy at full penetration condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dongsheng; Hua, Xueming; Huang, Lijin; Zhao, Jiang

    2018-03-01

    The droplet escape condition in laser welding is established in this paper. A three-dimensional numerical model is developed to study the weld pool convection and spatter formation at full penetration during the fiber laser welding of 5083 aluminum alloy. It is found that when laser power is 9 kW, the bottom of the keyhole is dynamically opened and closed. When the bottom of the keyhole is closed, the molten metal at the bottom of the back keyhole wall flows upwards along the fusion line. When the bottom of the keyhole is opened, few spatters can be seen around the keyhole at the top surface, two flow patterns exists in the rear part of the keyhole: a portion of molten metal flows upwards along the fusion line, other portion of molten metal flows to the bottom of the keyhole, which promote the spatter formation at the bottom of the keyhole rear wall.

  7. Finite Element Simulation of Temperature and Strain Distribution during Friction Stir Welding of AA2024 Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Rahul; Pal, Surjya Kanta; Singh, Shiv Brat

    2017-02-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a solid state joining process and is handy for welding aluminum alloys. Finite Element Method (FEM) is an important tool to predict state variables of the process but numerical simulation of FSW is highly complex due to non-linear contact interactions between tool and work piece and interdependency of displacement and temperature. In the present work, a three dimensional coupled thermo-mechanical method based on Lagrangian implicit method is proposed to study the thermal history, strain distribution and thermo-mechanical process in butt welding of Aluminum alloy 2024 using DEFORM-3D software. Workpiece is defined as rigid-visco plastic material and sticking condition between tool and work piece is defined. Adaptive re-meshing is used to tackle high mesh distortion. Effect of tool rotational and welding speed on plastic strain is studied and insight is given on asymmetric nature of FSW process. Temperature distribution on the workpiece and tool is predicted and maximum temperature is found in workpiece top surface.

  8. Influence of shielding gas on the mechanical and metallurgical properties of DP-GMA-welded 5083-H321 aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koushki, Amin Reza; Goodarzi, Massoud; Paidar, Moslem

    2016-12-01

    In the present research, 6-mm-thick 5083-H321 aluminum alloy was joined by the double-pulsed gas metal arc welding (DP-GMAW) process. The objective was to investigate the influence of the shielding gas composition on the microstructure and properties of GMA welds. A macrostructural study indicated that the addition of nitrogen and oxygen to the argon shielding gas resulted in better weld penetration. Furthermore, the tensile strength and bending strength of the welds were improved when oxygen and nitrogen (at concentrations as high as approximately 0.1vol%) were added to the shielding gas; however, these properties were adversely affected when the oxygen and nitrogen contents were increased further. This behavior was attributed to the formation of excessive brown and black oxide films on the bead surface, the formation of intermetallic compounds in the weld metal, and the formation of thicker oxide layers on the bead surface with increasing nitrogen and oxygen contents in the argon-based shielding gas. Analysis by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy revealed that most of these compounds are nitrides or oxides.

  9. Nugget Structure Evolution with Rotation Speed for High-Rotation-Speed Friction-Stir-Welded 6061 Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H. J.; Wang, M.; Zhu, Z.; Zhang, X.; Yu, T.; Wu, Z. Q.

    2018-03-01

    High-rotation-speed friction stir welding (HRS-FSW) is a promising technique to reduce the welding loads during FSW and thus facilitates the application of FSW for in situ fabrication and repair. In this study, 6061 aluminum alloy was friction stir welded at high-rotation speeds ranging from 3000 to 7000 rpm at a fixed welding speed of 50 mm/min, and the effects of rotation speed on the nugget zone macro- and microstructures were investigated in detail in order to illuminate the process features. Temperature measurements during HRS-FSW indicated that the peak temperature did not increase consistently with rotation speed; instead, it dropped remarkably at 5000 rpm because of the lowering of material shear stress. The nugget size first increased with rotation speed until 5000 rpm and then decreased due to the change of the dominant tool/workpiece contact condition from sticking to sliding. At the rotation speed of 5000 rpm, where the weld material experienced weaker thermal effect and higher-strain-rate plastic deformation, the nugget exhibited relatively small grain size, large textural intensity, and high dislocation density. Consequently, the joint showed superior nugget hardness and simultaneously a slightly low tensile ductility.

  10. Micro-Mechanical Modeling of Ductile Fracture in Welded Aluminum-Lithium Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Ahmed

    2002-01-01

    This computation model for microscopic crack growth in welded aluminum-lithium alloys consists of a cavity with initial volume specified by the fraction f(sub 0), i.e. the void volume relative to the cell volume. Thus, cell size D and initial porosity f(sub 0) defines the key parameters in this model. The choice of cell size requires: 1) D must be representative of the large inclusion spacing. 2) Predicted R-curves scale almost proportionally with D for fixed f(sub 0). 3) mapping of one finite element per cell must provide adequate resolution of the stress-strain fields in the active layer and the adjacent material. For the ferritic steels studied thus far with this model, calibrated cell sizes range from 50-200 microns with f(sub 0) in the 0.0001 to 0.004 micron range. This range of values for D and f (sub 0) satisfies issues 1) and 3). This computational model employs the Gurson and Tvergaard constitutive model for porous plastic materials to describe the progressive damage of cells due to the growth of pre-existing voids. The model derives from a rigid-plastic limit analysis of a solid having a volume fraction (f) of voids approximated by a homogenous spherical body containing a spherical void.

  11. Aluminum Lithium Alloy 2195 Fusion Welding Improvements with New Filler Wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, C.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this research was to assess the B218 weld filler wire for Super Lightweight External Tank production, which could improve current production welding and repair productivity. We took the following approaches: (1) Perform a repair weld quick look evaluation between 4043/B218 and B218/B218 weld filler wire combinations and evaluation tensile properties for planished and unplanished conditions; and (2) Perform repair weld evaluation on structural simulation panel using 4043-B218 and B218/B218 weld filler wire combinations and evaluation tensile and simulated service fracture properties for planished and unplanished conditions.

  12. Statistical analysis of process parameters to eliminate hot cracking of fiber laser welded aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin; Wang, Hui-Ping; Wang, Xiaojie; Cui, Haichao; Lu, Fenggui

    2015-03-01

    This paper investigates hot cracking rate in Al fiber laser welding under various process conditions and performs corresponding process optimization. First, effects of welding process parameters such as distance between welding center line and its closest trim edge, laser power and welding speed on hot cracking rate were investigated experimentally with response surface methodology (RSM). The hot cracking rate in the paper is defined as ratio of hot cracking length over the total weld seam length. Based on the experimental results following Box-Behnken design, a prediction model for the hot cracking rate was developed using a second order polynomial function considering only two factor interaction. The initial prediction result indicated that the established model could predict the hot cracking rate adequately within the range of welding parameters being used. The model was then used to optimize welding parameters to achieve cracking-free welds.

  13. Influence of surface pretreatment in resistance spot welding of aluminum AA1050

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al Naimi, Ihsan K.; Al Saadi, Moneer H.; Daws, Kasim M.

    2015-01-01

    quality. An experimental study of the influence of pretreatment on weld quality in RSW of AA1050 sheets with three thicknesses, comparing welding of as-received sheet with pretreated sheet by either pickling in NaOH or glass-blasting were investigated. Different weld settings were applied with low...

  14. Dissimilar joining of galvanized high-strength steel to aluminum alloy in a zero-gap lap joint configuration by two-pass laser welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Junjie; Harooni, Masoud; Carlson, Blair; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Defect-free two-pass laser partially penetrated lap joint of galvanized steel to aluminum was achieved. • The thickness of the Al-rich intermetallic compounds could be controlled by optimal parameters. • The dynamic behavior of the molten pool and keyhole were monitored by a high speed charge-coupled device camera. • The presence of zinc in the intermetallic compounds could improve the strength of the lap joints. - Abstract: A welding procedure based on using two-pass laser scans is introduced for dissimilar joining of overlapped galvanized high-strength dual-phase (DP) steel DP590 to aluminum alloy (AA) 6061 sheets. The first pass is based on a defocused laser spot that scans across the top of the two overlapped sheets and heats the zinc coating at the faying surface to be melted and partially vaporized, while the second pass is executed with a focused laser spot in order to perform the welding. Completely defect-free galvanized steel to aluminum lap joints were obtained by using this two-pass laser welding procedure. An on-line machine vision system was applied to monitor the keyhole dynamics during the laser welding process. An energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) was carried out to determine the atomic percent of zinc, aluminum, and iron in the galvanized steel to aluminum lap joints. Mechanical testing and micro-hardness test were conducted to evaluate the mechanical properties of the galvanized steel to aluminum lap joints. The experimental results showed that the lap joint of galvanized steel to aluminum obtained by the two-pass laser welding approach had a higher failure value than those joints obtained when the zinc at the faying surface was mechanically removed under the same welding speed and laser power

  15. Numerical Analysis of Crack Progress in Different Areas of a Friction Stir Welded Bead for an 5251 H14 Aluminum Alloy Specimen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Kambouz

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The assemblies welded by Friction Stir Welding have a major advantage which is the absence of a metal filler. This process contributes to the welding of materials that are known to be difficult to weld using the conventional techniques often employed in the field of transport, for example in the automobile body by applying a spot welding. The numerical modeling of this type of process is complex, not only in terms of the variety of physical phenomena which must be considered, but also because of the experimental procedure that must be followed in order to verify and validate numerical predictions. In this work, a finite element model is proposed in order to simulate the crack propagation under monotonic loading in different areas of the weld seam of a strain hardening CT-50 aluminum alloy 5251H14 specimen.

  16. Nondestructive Evaluation of the Friction Weld Process on 2195/2219 Grade Aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suits, Michael W.; Clark, Linda S.; Cox, Dwight E.

    1999-01-01

    In 1996, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center began an ambitious program designed to find alternative methods of repairing conventional TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas) welds and VPPA (Variable Polarity Plasma Arc) welds on the Space Shuttle External Tank without producing additional heat-related anomalies or conditions. Therefore, a relatively new method, invented by The Welding Institute (TWI) in Cambridge, England, called Friction Stir Welding (FSW), was investigated for use in this application, as well as being used potentially as an initial weld process. As with the conventional repair welding processes, nondestructive evaluation (NDE) plays a crucial role in the verification of these repairs. Since it was feared that conventional NDE might have trouble with this type of weld structure (due to shape of nugget, grain structure, etc.) it was imperative that a complete study be performed to address the adequacy of the NDE process. This paper summarizes that process.

  17. Comparison of the Effects of Tool Geometry for Friction Stir Welding Thin Sheet Aluminum Alloys for Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merry, Josh; Takeshita, Jennifer; Tweedy, Bryan; Burford, Dwight

    2006-01-01

    In this presentation, the results of a recent study on the effect of pin tool design for friction stir welding thin sheets (0.040") of aluminum alloys 2024 and 7075 are provided. The objective of this study was to investigate and document the effect of tool shoulder and pin diameter, as well as the presence of pin flutes, on the resultant microstructure and mechanical properties at both room temperature and cryogenic temperature. Specifically, the comparison between three tools will include: FSW process load analysis (tool forces required to fabricate the welds), Static Mechanical Properties (ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, and elongation), and Process window documenting the range of parameters that can be used with the three pin tools investigated. All samples were naturally aged for a period greater than 10 days. Prior research has shown 7075 may require post weld heat treatment. Therefore, an additional pair of room temperature and cryogenic temperature samples was post-weld aged to the 7075-T7 condition prior to mechanical testing.

  18. Characterization of exposures to airborne nanoscale particles during friction stir welding of aluminum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfefferkorn, Frank E; Bello, Dhimiter; Haddad, Gilbert; Park, Ji-Young; Powell, Maria; McCarthy, Jon; Bunker, Kristin Lee; Fehrenbacher, Axel; Jeon, Yongho; Virji, M Abbas; Gruetzmacher, George; Hoover, Mark D

    2010-07-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is considered one of the most significant developments in joining technology over the last half century. Its industrial applications are growing steadily and so are the number of workers using this technology. To date, there are no reports on airborne exposures during FSW. The objective of this study was to investigate possible emissions of nanoscale (<100 nm) and fine (<1 microm) aerosols during FSW of two aluminum alloys in a laboratory setting and characterize their physicochemical composition. Several instruments measured size distributions (5 nm to 20 microm) with 1-s resolution, lung deposited surface areas, and PM(2.5) concentrations at the source and at the breathing zone (BZ). A wide range aerosol sampling system positioned at the BZ collected integrated samples in 12 stages (2 nm to 20 microm) that were analyzed for several metals using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Airborne aerosol was directly collected onto several transmission electron microscope grids and the morphology and chemical composition of collected particles were characterized extensively. FSW generates high concentrations of ultrafine and submicrometer particles. The size distribution was bimodal, with maxima at approximately 30 and approximately 550 nm. The mean total particle number concentration at the 30 nm peak was relatively stable at approximately 4.0 x 10(5) particles cm(-3), whereas the arithmetic mean counts at the 550 nm peak varied between 1500 and 7200 particles cm(-3), depending on the test conditions. The BZ concentrations were lower than the source concentrations by 10-100 times at their respective peak maxima and showed higher variability. The daylong average metal-specific concentrations were 2.0 (Zn), 1.4 (Al), and 0.24 (Fe) microg m(-3); the estimated average peak concentrations were an order of magnitude higher. Potential for significant exposures to fine and ultrafine aerosols, particularly of Al, Fe, and Zn, during FSW may

  19. Selected Welding Techniques, Part 2

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1964-01-01

    Partial contents: CONVENTIONAL WELD JOINTS VERSUS BUTT JOINTS IN 1-INCH ALUMINUM PLATE, SPECIAL WELD JOINT PREPARATION, UPSET METAL EDGES FOR INCREASED WELD JOINT STRENGTH, OUT-OF-POSITION WELDING OF HEAVY GAGE...

  20. Numerical Simulation of Mechanical Property of Post Friction Stir Weld Artificial Ageing of Aluminum Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WAN Zhenyu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available KWN model was used to establish the precipitation evolution model of friction stir welding of Al-Mg-Si alloy. The yield strength was divided into three parts:the contribution from grain size, the contribution from solid solution and the contribution from the precipitations. Based on this model, the yield strength and hardness of friction stir weld was predicted. The effect of post weld artificial ageing on mechanical properties of friction stir weld was further investigated. The results indicate that longer holding time can be beneficial to the recovery of mechanical properties in the stirring zone. Higher temperature can lead to quick recovery of mechanical properties in the stirring zone, but when the holding temperature is higher than 200℃, longer holding time can lead the base metal softened, which is harmful to the service of friction stir welds. The mechanical property in the heat affected zone cannot be improved by post weld artificial ageing.

  1. Solid state welding processes for an oxide dispersion strengthened nickel-chromium-aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, T. J.

    1975-01-01

    Solid-state welding processes were evaluated for joining TD-NiCrAl (Ni-16Cr-4Al-2ThO2) alloy sheet. Both hot-press and resistance spot welding techniques were successfully applied in terms of achieving grain growth across the bond line. Less success was achieved with a resistance seam welding process. In stress-rupture shear and tensile shear tests of lap joints at 1100 C, most failures occurred in the parent material, which indicates that the weld quality was good and that the welds were not a plane of weakness. The overall weld quality was not as good as previously attained with TD-NiCr, probably because the presence of alumina at the faying surfaces and the developmental TD-NiCrAl sheet, which was not of the quality of the TD-NiCr sheet in terms of surface flatness and dimensional control.

  2. Bobbin-Tool Friction-Stir Welding of Thick-Walled Aluminum Alloy Pressure Vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalder, E C; Pastrnak, J W; Engel, J; Forrest, R S; Kokko, E; Ternan, K M; Waldron, D

    2007-06-06

    It was desired to assemble thick-walled Al alloy 2219 pressure vessels by bobbin-tool friction-stir welding. To develop the welding-process, mechanical-property, and fitness-for-service information to support this effort, extensive friction-stir welding-parameter studies were conducted on 2.5 cm. and 3.8 cm. thick 2219 Al alloy plate. Starting conditions of the plate were the fully-heat-treated (-T62) and in the annealed (-O) conditions. The former condition was chosen with the intent of using the welds in either the 'as welded' condition or after a simple low-temperature aging treatment. Since preliminary stress-analyses showed that stresses in and near the welds would probably exceed the yield-strength of both 'as welded' and welded and aged weld-joints, a post-weld solution-treatment, quenching, and aging treatment was also examined. Once a suitable set of welding and post-weld heat-treatment parameters was established, the project divided into two parts. The first part concentrated on developing the necessary process information to be able to make defect-free friction-stir welds in 3.8 cm. thick Al alloy 2219 in the form of circumferential welds that would join two hemispherical forgings with a 102 cm. inside diameter. This necessitated going to a bobbin-tool welding-technique to simplify the tooling needed to react the large forces generated in friction-stir welding. The bobbin-tool technique was demonstrated on both flat-plates and plates that were bent to the curvature of the actual vessel. An additional issue was termination of the weld, i.e. closing out the hole left at the end of the weld by withdrawal of the friction-stir welding tool. This was accomplished by friction-plug welding a slightly-oversized Al alloy 2219 plug into the termination-hole, followed by machining the plug flush with both the inside and outside surfaces of the vessel. The second part of the project involved demonstrating that the welds were fit for the intended

  3. Using X-ray Diffraction to Assess Residual Stresses in Laser Peened and Welded Aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    inch thick. The chemical composition of this plate material is: magnesium 4.7, manganese 0.9, iron 0.20, silicon 0.10, chromium 0.08, zinc 0.03...19. The plates were clamped to the welding table using L-shaped clamps. The welded areas were surface ground to remove any slag and debris.[1] 28

  4. Interfacial Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Friction Stir Welded Joints of Commercially Pure Aluminum and 304 Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugan, Balamagendiravarman; Thirunavukarasu, Gopinath; Kundu, Sukumar; Kailas, Satish V.; Chatterjee, Subrata

    2018-05-01

    In the present investigation, friction stir welding of commercially pure aluminum and 304 stainless steel was carried out at varying tool rotational speeds from 200 to 1000 rpm in steps of 200 rpm using 60 mm/min traverse speed at 2 (degree) tool tilt angle. Microstructural characterization of the interfacial zone was carried out using optical microscope and scanning electron microscope. Energy-dispersive spectroscopy indicated the presence of FeAl3 intermetallic phase. Thickness of the intermetallic layer increased with the increase in tool rotational speed. X-ray diffraction studies indicated the formation of intermetallic phases like FeAl2, Fe4Al13, Fe2Al5, and FeAl3. A maximum tensile strength of 90% that of aluminum along with 4.5% elongation was achieved with the welded sample at tool rotational speed of 400 rpm. The stir zone showed higher hardness as compared to base metals, heat affected zone, and thermo-mechanically affected zone due to the presence of intermetallics. The maximum hardness value at the stir zone was achieved at 1000 rpm tool rotational speed.

  5. Studies of localized corrosion in welded aluminum alloys by the scanning reference electrode technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danford, M. D.; Nunes, A. C.

    1995-01-01

    Localized corrosion in welded samples of 2219-T87 Al alloy (2319 filler), 2090 Al-Li alloy (4043 and 2319 fillers), and 2195 Al-Li alloy (4043 and 2319 fillers) has been investigated using the relatively new scanning reference electrode technique. The weld beads are cathodic in all cases, leading to reduced anode/cathode ratios. A reduction in anode/cathode ratio leads to an increase in the corrosion rates of the welded metals, in agreement with results obtained in previous electrochemical and stress corrosion studies involving the overall corrosion rates of welded samples. The cathodic weld beads are bordered on both sides by strong anodic regions, with high propensity for corrosion.

  6. Effect of Sleeve Plunge Depth on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Refill Friction Stir Spot Welding of 2198 Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Yumei; Shi, Yao; Ji, Shude; Wang, Yue; Li, Zhengwei

    2017-10-01

    Refill friction stir spot welding (RFSSW) is a new spot welding technology, by which spot joint without keyhole can be obtained. In this work, RFSSW was used to join 2-mm-thick 2198-T8 aluminum alloy sheets and effects of the sleeve plunge depth on microstructure and lap shear properties of the joints were mainly discussed. Results showed that when using small plunge depths of 2.4 and 2.6 mm, joints showed good formation and no defects were observed. Incomplete refilling defect was observed with increasing plunge depth due to material loss during welding. Size of the grains at sleeve-affected zone (SAZ) is smaller than that at the pin-affected zone, and the size becomes bigger with increasing the plunge depth. More secondary phase particles can be observed at SAZ with increasing the sleeve plunge depth. The lap shear failure load firstly increased and then decreased with increasing the sleeve plunge depth. The maximum failure load of 9819 N was attained with plug fracture mode when using 2.6 mm. Fracture morphologies show ductile fracture mode.

  7. Microstructural Characteristics and Mechanical Properties of Friction Stir Spot Welded 2A12-T4 Aluminum Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huijie Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available 2A12-T4 aluminum alloy was friction stir spot welded, and the microstructural characteristics and mechanical properties of the joints were investigated. A softened microstructural region existed in the joint, and it consisted of stir zone (SZ, thermal mechanically affected zone (TMAZ, and heat affected zone (HAZ. The minimum hardness was located in TMAZ, and the average hardness value in SZ can be improved by appropriately increasing welding heat input. The area of complete bonding region at the interface increased with increasing welding heat input because more interface metals were mixed. In a certain range of FSSW parameters, the tensile shear failure load of the joint increased with increasing rotation speed, but it decreased with increasing plunge rate or decreasing shoulder plunging depth. Two kinds of failure modes, that is, shear fracture mode and tensile-shear mixed fracture mode, can be observed in the tensile shear tests, and the joint that failed in the tensile-shear mixed fracture mode possessed a high carrying capability.

  8. Computational Analysis of Material Flow During Friction Stir Welding of AA5059 Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    structures in Finland; (b) manufacture of Al-Mg-Si-based alloy 181 FSW-joined bullet- train cabins in Japan; (c) fabrication of 182 Al-Cu-based alloy...Simonsen, Visualisation of Material 857Flow in an Autogenous Friction Stir Weld, Proc. 1st International 858Symp. FSW, Thousand Oaks, CA, 1999 85928...A.P. Reynolds, Visualization of Material Flow in an Autogenous 860Friction Stir Weld, Sci. Technol. Weld. Join., 2000, 5, p 120–124 86129. T.U. Seidel

  9. Effects of Friction Stir Welding on Corrosion Behaviors of AA2024-T4 Aluminum Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ales Steve Korakan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the corrosion behavior of welded joints of AA2024-T4 Al alloy produced by friction stir welding process has been investigated. Tests were performed in an aerated 3.5% NaCl aqueous solution with pH = 7 at 20±2°C. Corrosion rate and corrosion morphology of weld regions were evaluated and compared to those of the parent metal. The microstructure of weld nugget, thermomechanical affected zone, heated affected zone, and parent metal were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. It was observed that corrosion initiated at FSW related spots and the sizes of local corrosion increased with time.

  10. Friction stir welding of dissimilar AA2024 and AA7075 aluminum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khodir, Saad Ahmed; Shibayanagi, Toshiya

    2008-01-01

    The present study focuses on the microstructure and mechanical properties of dissimilar joints of 2024-T3 Al alloy to 7075-T6 Al alloy produced by friction stir welding. Effects of welding speed and fixed location of base metals on microstructures, hardness distributions, and tensile properties of the welded joints were investigated. SEM-EDS analysis revealed that the stir zone contains a mixed structure and onion ring pattern with a periodic change of grain size as well as a heterogeneous distribution of alloying elements. The maximum tensile strength of 423.0 MPa was achieved for the joint produced at welding speed of 1.67 mm/s when 2024 Al alloy was located on the advancing side

  11. Effect of thermal exposure, forming, and welding on high-temperature, dispersion-strengthened aluminum alloy: Al-8Fe-1V-2Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, J. R.; Gilman, P. S.; Zedalis, M. S.; Skinner, D. J.; Peltier, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of applying conventional hot forming and welding methods to high temperature aluminum alloy, Al-8Fe-1V-2Si (FVS812), for structural applications and the effect of thermal exposure on mechanical properties were determined. FVS812 (AA8009) sheet exhibited good hot forming and resistance welding characteristics. It was brake formed to 90 deg bends (0.5T bend radius) at temperatures greater than or equal to 390 C (730 F), indicating the feasibility of fabricating basic shapes, such as angles and zees. Hot forming of simple contoured-flanged parts was demonstrated. Resistance spot welds with good static and fatigue strength at room and elevated temperatures were readily produced. Extended vacuum degassing during billet fabrication reduced porosity in fusion and resistance welds. However, electron beam welding was not possible because of extreme degassing during welding, and gas-tungsten-arc welds were not acceptable because of severely degraded mechanical properties. The FVS812 alloy exhibited excellent high temperature strength stability after thermal exposures up to 315 C (600 F) for 1000 h. Extended billet degassing appeared to generally improve tensile ductility, fatigue strength, and notch toughness. But the effects of billet degassing and thermal exposure on properties need to be further clarified. The manufacture of zee-stiffened, riveted, and resistance-spot-welded compression panels was demonstrated.

  12. Eutectic structures in friction spot welding joint of aluminum alloy to copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Junjun; Suhuddin, Uceu F. H.; Cardillo, Maria E. B.; Santos, Jorge F. dos

    2014-01-01

    A dissimilar joint of AA5083 Al alloy and copper was produced by friction spot welding. The Al-MgCuAl 2 eutectic in both coupled and divorced manners were found in the weld. At a relatively high temperature, mass transport of Cu due to plastic deformation, material flow, and atomic diffusion, combined with the alloy system of AA5083 are responsible for the ternary eutectic melting

  13. Mechanical Properties Of AA 6061-T6 Aluminum Alloy Friction Stir Welds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asmaa M. Abdullah

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The different parameters on mechanical and microstructural properties of aluminium alloy 6061-T6 Friction stir-welded (FSW joints were investigated in the present study. Different welded specimens were produced by employing variable rotating speeds and welding speeds. Tensile strength of the produced joints was tested at room temperature and the the effecincy was assessed, it was 75% of the base metal at rotational speed 1500 rpm and weld speed 50 mm/min. Hardness of various zones of FSW welds are presented and analyzed by means of brinell hardness number . Besides to thess tests the bending properties investigated and showed good results in some specimen and not in onother the mamximum stress was 240 N/mm2 at rotational speed 1500 rpm and weld speed 50 mm/min , while the maximum stress at 1250 rpm and 75 mm/min 94 N/mm2 , hardness results shwed lower values in heat affected and nugget zones than the base metal with improving of hardness at 1500 rpm, 75 mm/min .

  14. Intergranular corrosion following friction stir welding of aluminum alloy 7075-T651

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumsden, J.B.; Mahoney, M.W.; Pollock, G.; Rhodes, C.G.

    1999-12-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW), a relatively new solid-state joining process, is used to join Al alloys of all compositions, including alloys essentially considered unweldable. This study focused on microstructures in FSW Al alloy 7075-T651 (AA 7075-T651 [UNS 97075-T651]), an alloy not commonly fusion welded, and the resultant corrosion susceptibility. Although the heat input associated with FSW was relatively low and the time at temperature was short compared to fusion welding, localized microstructures, chemical segregation, and precipitate distributions were created that generally are not present in parent metal AA 7075-T651. Typically, in the weld and heat affected zone (HAZ), the times at peak temperature were short, cooling was relatively rapid, and peak temperatures were {lt} {approx}500 C. Accordingly, a corresponding microstructural gradient developed from the weld nugget into the unaffected parent metal with the precipitate distribution in and around grain boundaries reflecting this temperature excursion. Some of these microstructures, when exposed to a corrosive environment, showed selective grain boundary attack and a decrease in the pitting potential relative to the parent metal. A characterization of the microstructure and localized chemistry differences within the weld zones suggested that the decrease in corrosion resistance correlated with a depletion of Cu within the grain boundaries and precipitate-free zones. These results provided evidence that the lowered resistance to intergranular corrosion following FSW of AA 7075-T651 was caused by a difference in pitting potentials.

  15. Interface and properties of the friction stir welded joints of titanium alloy Ti6Al4V with aluminum alloy 6061

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Aiping; Song, Zhihua; Nakata, Kazuhiro; Liao, Jinsun; Zhou, Li

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Friction stir butt welding of titanium alloy Ti6Al4V and aluminum alloy A6061-T6. • Welding parameters affect interfacial microstructure of the joint. • Welding parameters affect the mechanical property of joint and fracture position. • Joining mechanism of Ti6Al4V/A6061 dissimilar alloys by FSW is investigated. - Abstract: Titanium alloy Ti6Al4V and aluminum alloy 6061 dissimilar material joints were made with friction stir welding (FSW) method. The effects of welding parameters, including the stir pin position, the rotating rate and the travel speed of the tool, on the interface and the properties of the joints were investigated. The macrostructure of the joints and the fracture surfaces of the tensile test were observed with optical microscope and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The interface reaction layer was investigated with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The factors affecting the mechanical properties of the joints were discussed. The results indicated that the tensile strength of the joints and the fracture location are mainly dependent on the rotating rate, and the interface and intermetallic compound (IMC) layer are the governing factor. There is a continuous 100 nm thick TiAl 3 IMC at the interface when the rotating rate is 750 rpm. When the welding parameters were appropriate, the joints fractured in the thermo-mechanically affected zone (TMAZ) and the heat affected zone (HAZ) of the aluminum alloy and the strength of the joints could reach 215 MPa, 68% of the aluminum base material strength, as well as the joint could endure large plastic deformation

  16. Biomonitoring for iron, manganese, chromium, aluminum, nickel and cadmium in workers exposed to welding fume: a preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mulyana

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The control of exposure to welding fumes is increasing importance in promoting a healthy, safe and productive work environment. This study is a case-control design, random study was conducted among welder (56 subjects and non welder (39 subjects with more than 1 years experience in the same job task in an automotive parts manufactory within the industrial area at Cikarang in 2013. All subjects were completed physical examination, informed consent and questionnaire. Blood heavy metals were determined by Inductively-Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS. Whole blood iron, manganese, chromium and lead in welder were higher than non-welder, but not different for aluminum, nickel and cadmium. In welder, chromium and manganese correlated with smoking status, cadmium correlated with age and smoking status. In multivariate analysis, wholeblood cadmium correlates with age and smoking status.

  17. The "Lazy S" Feature in Friction Stir Welding of AA2099 Aluminum -Lithium Alloy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Klages, Holli K

    2007-01-01

    The addition of Lithium to Aluminum-Lithium (Al-Li) alloys results in reduced density as well as increased stiffness and strength, and so these materials are attractive for selected aerospace structures...

  18. Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior of Multipass TIG-Welded AA2219 Aluminum Alloy in 3.5 wt pct NaCl Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venugopal, A.; Sreekumar, K.; Raja, V. S.

    2012-09-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of the AA2219 aluminum alloy in the single-pass (SP) and multipass (MP) welded conditions was examined and compared with that of the base metal (BM) in 3.5 wt pct NaCl solution using a slow-strain-rate technique (SSRT). The reduction in ductility was used as a parameter to evaluate the SCC susceptibility of both the BM and welded joints. The results showed that the ductility ratio ( ɛ NaCl/( ɛ air) was 0.97 and 0.96, respectively, for the BM and MP welded joint, and the same was marginally reduced to 0.9 for the SP welded joint. The fractographic examination of the failed samples revealed a typical ductile cracking morphology for all the base and welded joints, indicating the good environmental cracking resistance of this alloy under all welded conditions. To understand the decrease in the ductility of the SP welded joint, preexposure SSRT followed by microstructural observations were made, which showed that the decrease in ductility ratio of the SP welded joint was caused by the electrochemical pitting that assisted the nucleation of cracks in the form of corrosion induced mechanical cracking rather than true SCC failure of the alloy. The microstructural examination and polarization tests demonstrated a clear grain boundary (GB) sensitization of the PMZ, resulting in severe galvanic corrosion of the SP weld joint, which initiated the necessary conditions for the localized corrosion and cracking along the PMZ. The absence of PMZ and a refined fusion zone (FZ) structure because of the lesser heat input and postweld heating effect improved the galvanic corrosion resistance of the MP welded joint greatly, and thus, failure occurred along the FZ.

  19. Fusion welding of Fe-added lap joints between AZ31B magnesium alloy and 6061 aluminum alloy by hybrid laser-tungsten inert gas welding technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi, Xiao-dong; Liu, Li-ming

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: → Hybrid Laser-TIG fusion welding technique was used for joining Mg to Al alloys. → Laser defocusing amount determined penetration depth inside Al alloy of joints. → The addition of Fe interlayer suppressed Mg-Al intermetallics greatly in joints. → A maximum joint strength with optimum thickness of Fe interlayer was obtained. → Excessive addition of Fe interlayer was adverse for the strength improvement. -- Abstract: AZ31B magnesium alloy and 6061-T6 aluminum alloy were lap joined together with the addition of Fe interlayer by fusion welding of hybrid laser-tungsten inert gas (TIG) technique. The influence of location of laser focal spot (LFS) on joint penetration depth and that of the depth on joint strength were investigated. The results showed that when the LFS was just on the surface of Al plate, the deepest penetration could be obtained, which contributed to the improvement of shear strength of Fe-added joints, but not to the elevation of the strength of Mg/Al direct joints. The addition of Fe interlayer suppressed massive production of Mg-Al intermetallics but produced Fe-Al intermetallics in the fusion zone of the joints, whose micro-hardness was extremely high and was also adverse for the enhancement of joint shear strength. The effect of Fe-interlayer thickness on the joint shear strength was also examined, and the maximum shear strength of Fe-added joint could achieve 100 MPa with 0.13 mm thick Fe interlayer. The fracture modes of 0.07 and 0.13 mm Fe-interlayer-added joints were both quasi-cleavage, while those of direct and 0.22 mm interlayer-added joints were completely cleavage. The theoretical shear strength of the Fe-added joints was also discussed.

  20. Modelling of fluid flow phenomenon in laser+GMAW hybrid welding of aluminum alloy considering three phase coupling and arc plasma shear stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guoxiang; Li, Pengfei; Cao, Qingnan; Hu, Qingxian; Gu, Xiaoyan; Du, Baoshuai

    2018-03-01

    The present study aims to develop a unified three dimensional numerical model for fiber laser+GMAW hybrid welding, which is used to study the fluid flow phenomena in hybrid welding of aluminum alloy and the influence of laser power on weld pool dynamic behavior. This model takes into account the coupling of gas, liquid and metal phases. Laser heat input is described using a cone heat source model with changing peak power density, its height being determined based on the keyhole size. Arc heat input is modeled as a double ellipsoid heat source. The arc plasma flow and droplet transfer are simulated through the two simplified models. The temperature and velocity fields for different laser powers are calculated. The computed results are in general agreement with the experimental data. Both the peak and average values of fluid flow velocity during hybrid welding are much higher than those of GMAW. At a low level of laser power, both the arc force and droplet impingement force play a relatively large role on fluid flow in the hybrid welding. Keyhole depth always oscillates within a range. With an increase in laser power, the weld pool behavior becomes more complex. An anti-clockwise vortex is generated and the stability of keyhole depth is improved. Besides, the effects of laser power on different driving forces of fluid flow in weld pool are also discussed.

  1. Evaluation of Microstructure, Mechanical Properties and Corrosion Resistance of Friction Stir-Welded Aluminum and Magnesium Dissimilar Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Jagesvar; Taiwade, Ravindra V.; Sapate, Sanjay G.; Patil, Awanikumar P.; Dhoble, Ashwinkumar S.

    2017-10-01

    Microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of dissimilar friction stir-welded aluminum and magnesium alloys were investigated by applying three different rotational speeds at two different travel speeds. Sound joints were obtained in all the conditions. The microstructure was examined by an optical and scanning electron microscope, whereas localized chemical information was studied by energy-dispersive spectroscopy. Stir zone microstructure showed mixed bands of Al and Mg with coarse and fine equiaxed grains. Grain size of stir zone reduced compared to base metals, indicated by dynamic recrystallization. More Al patches were observed in the stir zone as rotational speed increased. X-ray diffraction showed the presence of intermetallics in the stir zone. Higher tensile strength and hardness were obtained at a high rotational speed corresponding to low travel speed. Tensile fractured surface indicated brittle nature of joints. Dissimilar friction stir weld joints showed different behaviors in different corrosive environments, and better corrosion resistance was observed at a high rotational speed corresponding to low travel speed (FW3) in a sulfuric and chloride environments. Increasing travel speed did not significantly affect on microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance as much as the rotational speed.

  2. Influence of Filler Alloy Composition and Process Parameters on the Intermetallic Layer Thickness in Single-Sided Cold Metal Transfer Welding of Aluminum-Steel Blanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvayeh, Zahra; Vallant, Rudolf; Sommitsch, Christof; Götzinger, Bruno; Karner, Werner; Hartmann, Matthias

    2017-11-01

    Hybrid components made of aluminum alloys and high-strength steels are typically used in automotive lightweight applications. Dissimilar joining of these materials is quite challenging; however, it is mandatory in order to produce multimaterial car body structures. Since especially welding of tailored blanks is of utmost interest, single-sided Cold Metal Transfer butt welding of thin sheets of aluminum alloy EN AW 6014 T4 and galvanized dual-phase steel HCT 450 X + ZE 75/75 was experimentally investigated in this study. The influence of different filler alloy compositions and welding process parameters on the thickness of the intermetallic layer, which forms between the weld seam and the steel sheet, was studied. The microstructures of the weld seam and of the intermetallic layer were characterized using conventional optical light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The results reveal that increasing the heat input and decreasing the cooling intensity tend to increase the layer thickness. The silicon content of the filler alloy has the strongest influence on the thickness of the intermetallic layer, whereas the magnesium and scandium contents of the filler alloy influence the cracking tendency. The layer thickness is not uniform and shows spatial variations along the bonding interface. The thinnest intermetallic layer (mean thickness < 4 µm) is obtained using the silicon-rich filler Al-3Si-1Mn, but the layer is more than twice as thick when different low-silicon fillers are used.

  3. Characterization of Residual Stress Effects on Fatigue Crack Growth of a Friction Stir Welded Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, John A.; Smith, Stephen W.; Seshadri, Banavara R.; James, Mark A.; Brazill, Richard L.; Schultz, Robert W.; Donald, J. Keith; Blair, Amy

    2015-01-01

    An on-line compliance-based method to account for residual stress effects in stress-intensity factor and fatigue crack growth property determinations has been evaluated. Residual stress intensity factor results determined from specimens containing friction stir weld induced residual stresses are presented, and the on-line method results were found to be in excellent agreement with residual stress-intensity factor data obtained using the cut compliance method. Variable stress-intensity factor tests were designed to demonstrate that a simple superposition model, summing the applied stress-intensity factor with the residual stress-intensity factor, can be used to determine the total crack-tip stress-intensity factor. Finite element, VCCT (virtual crack closure technique), and J-integral analysis methods have been used to characterize weld-induced residual stress using thermal expansion/contraction in the form of an equivalent delta T (change in local temperature during welding) to simulate the welding process. This equivalent delta T was established and applied to analyze different specimen configurations to predict residual stress distributions and associated residual stress-intensity factor values. The predictions were found to agree well with experimental results obtained using the crack- and cut-compliance methods.

  4. Welding of a neutron high-flux reactor made of aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinser, P.; Schupp, N.

    1996-01-01

    The HFR300 of the Institute ''Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL)'' at Grenoble was found to be damaged by a number of serious defects which could not be made good by repair work, so that a new reactor had to be installed. Some of the welding tasks performed so far in this installation are explained. (orig./MM) [de

  5. Microstructure and mechanical properties of resistance-spot-welded joints for A5052 aluminum alloy and DP 600 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jianbin [College of Automotive Collaborative Innovation Center, Chongqing University, No. 174, Shazheng Street, Shapingba District, Chongqing 400044 (China); Yuan, Xinjian, E-mail: xinjianyuan@yahoo.com [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, No. 174, Shazheng Street, Shapingba District, Chongqing 400044 (China); Hu, Zhan; Sun, Changzheng; Zhang, Yanxin; Zhang, Yuxuan [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, No. 174, Shazheng Street, Shapingba District, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2016-10-15

    The microstructure and mechanical properties of resistance-spot-welded A5052 aluminum alloy and DP 600 dual-phase steel joint were studied. The fusion zone (FZ) and heat-affected zone (HAZ) of DP 600 exhibited lath martensite and ferrite-martensite structures, respectively. The microstructure of FZ and HAZ in the A5052 side was composed of cellular crystals and the boundary region of FZ exhibited a columnar crystal morphology. A Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} intermetallic compound (IMC) layer with 3.3 μm thickness was found adjacent to the DP 600 side, whereas a needle-shaped Fe{sub 4}Al{sub 13} IMC layer with length of 0.67 μm to 15.8 μm was found adjacent to the aluminum alloy side. The maximum tensile shear load of the A5052/DP 600 joint was 5.5 KN, with a corresponding molten nugget diameter of 6.3 mm. The fracture morphology of the optimized A5052/DP 600 joint was mainly an elongated dimple fracture accompanied by cleavage fracture. - Highlights: •A5052 and DP 600 with large gaps in properties were investigated by RSW. •The microstructures of RSW joints in DP 600/A5052 were examined detailedly. •The micro/macro-characteristics and strength relations of joints were analyzed.

  6. Investigation of Interface Bonding Mechanism of an Explosively Welded Tri-Metal Titanium/Aluminum/Magnesium Plate by Nanoindentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, T. T.; Wang, W. X.; Zhou, J.; Cao, X. Q.; Yan, Z. F.; Wei, Y.; Zhang, W.

    2018-04-01

    A tri-metal titanium/aluminum/magnesium (Ti/Al/Mg) cladding plate, with an aluminum alloy interlayer plate, was fabricated for the first time by explosive welding. Nanoindentation tests and associated microstructure analysis were conducted to investigate the interface bonding mechanisms of the Ti/Al/Mg cladding plate. A periodic wavy bonding interface (with an amplitude of approximately 30 μm and a wavelength of approximately 160 μm) without a molten zone was formed between the Ti and Al plates. The bonding interface between the Al and the Mg demonstrated a similar wavy shape, but the wave at this location was much larger with an amplitude of approximately 390 μm and a wavelength of approximately 1580 μm, and some localized melted zones also existed at this location. The formation of the wavy interface was found to result from a severe deformation at the interface, which was caused by the strong impact or collision. The nanoindentation tests showed that the material hardness decreased with increasing distance from the bonding interface. Material hardness at a location was found to be correlated with the degree of plastic deformation at that site. A larger plastic deformation was correlated with an increase in hardness.

  7. Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Earl; And Others

    The curriculum guide for welding instruction contains 16 units presented in six sections. Each unit is divided into the following areas, each of which is color coded: terminal objectives, specific objectives, suggested activities, and instructional materials; information sheet; transparency masters; assignment sheet; test; and test answers. The…

  8. Numerical Simulation of Temperature Distribution and Material Flow During Friction Stir Welding 2017A Aluminum Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mimouni Oussama

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the use of fluid dynamic code, FLUENT to model the flow of metal in the AA2017A case around the welding tool pin (FSW. A standard threaded tool profile is used for the analysis of phenomena during welding such as heat generation and flow of the material are included. The main objective is to gain a better understanding of the flow of material around a tool. The model showed a large number of phenomena similar to those of the real process. The model has also generated a sufficient amount of heat, which leads to a good estimate of the junction temperature. These results were obtained using a viscosity which is near the solidus softening.

  9. Microstructural analysis of cracks generated during welding of 2195 aluminum-lithium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talia, George E.

    1994-01-01

    This research summarizes a series of studies conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center to characterize the properties of 2195 Al-Li alloy. 2195 Al-Li alloy, developed by Martin Marietta laboratories, is designated as a replacement of 2219 Al-Cu alloy for the External Tank (E.T.) of the space shuttle. 2195 Al-Li alloy with its advantage of increased strength per weight over its predecessor, 2219 Al-Cu alloy, also challenges current technology. 2195 Al-Li has a greater tendency to crack than its predecessor. The present study began with the observation of pore formation in 2195 Al-Li alloy in a thermal aging process. In preliminary studies, Talia and Nunes found that most of the two pass welds studied exhibited round and crack-like porosity at the weld roots. Furthermore, the porosity observed was associated with the grain boundaries. The porosity level can be increased by thermal treatment in the air. A solid state reaction proceeding from dendritic boundaries in the weld fusion zone was observed to correlate with the generation of the porosity.

  10. Evaluation of Surface Roughness by Image Processing of a Shot-Peened, TIG-Welded Aluminum 6061-T6 Alloy: An Experimental Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anas M. Atieh

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Visual inspection through image processing of welding and shot-peened surfaces is necessary to overcome equipment limitations, avoid measurement errors, and accelerate processing to gain certain surface properties such as surface roughness. Therefore, it is important to design an algorithm to quantify surface properties, which enables us to overcome the aforementioned limitations. In this study, a proposed systematic algorithm is utilized to generate and compare the surface roughness of Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG welded aluminum 6061-T6 alloy treated by two levels of shot-peening, high-intensity and low-intensity. This project is industrial in nature, and the proposed solution was originally requested by local industry to overcome equipment capabilities and limitations. In particular, surface roughness measurements are usually only possible on flat surfaces but not on other areas treated by shot-peening after welding, as in the heat-affected zone and weld beads. Therefore, those critical areas are outside of the measurement limitations. Using the proposed technique, the surface roughness measurements were possible to obtain for weld beads, high-intensity and low-intensity shot-peened surfaces. In addition, a 3D surface topography was generated and dimple size distributions were calculated for the three tested scenarios: control sample (TIG-welded only, high-intensity shot-peened, and low-intensity shot-peened TIG-welded Al6065-T6 samples. Finally, cross-sectional hardness profiles were measured for the three scenarios; in all scenarios, lower hardness measurements were obtained compared to the base metal alloy in the heat-affected zone and in the weld beads even after shot-peening treatments.

  11. Method for welding beryllium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, R.D.; Smith, F.M.; O`Leary, R.F.

    1997-04-01

    A method is provided for joining beryllium pieces which comprises: depositing aluminum alloy on at least one beryllium surface; contacting that beryllium surface with at least one other beryllium surface; and welding the aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces together. The aluminum alloy may be deposited on the beryllium using gas metal arc welding. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be subjected to elevated temperatures and pressures to reduce porosity before welding the pieces together. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be machined into a desired welding joint configuration before welding. The beryllium may be an alloy of beryllium or a beryllium compound. The aluminum alloy may comprise aluminum and silicon. 9 figs.

  12. Method for welding beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, R.D.; Smith, F.M.; O'Leary, R.F.

    1997-01-01

    A method is provided for joining beryllium pieces which comprises: depositing aluminum alloy on at least one beryllium surface; contacting that beryllium surface with at least one other beryllium surface; and welding the aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces together. The aluminum alloy may be deposited on the beryllium using gas metal arc welding. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be subjected to elevated temperatures and pressures to reduce porosity before welding the pieces together. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be machined into a desired welding joint configuration before welding. The beryllium may be an alloy of beryllium or a beryllium compound. The aluminum alloy may comprise aluminum and silicon. 9 figs

  13. Friction stir welding process and material microstructure evolution modeling in 2000 and 5000 series of aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalavarthy, Harshavardhan

    Interactions between the rotating and advancing pin-shaped tool (terminated at one end with a circular-cylindrical shoulder) with the clamped welding-plates and the associated material and heat transport during a Friction Stir Welding (FSW) process are studied computationally using a fully-coupled thermo-mechanical finite-element analysis. To surmount potential numerical problems associated with extensive mesh distortions/entanglement, an Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) formulation was used which enabled adaptive re-meshing (to ensure the continuing presence of a high-quality mesh) while allowing full tracking of the material free surfaces. To demonstrate the utility of the present computational approach, the analysis is applied to the cases of same-alloy FSW of two Aluminum-alloy grades: (a) AA5083 (a solid-solution strengthened and strain-hardened/stabilized Al-Mg-Mn alloy); and (b) AA2139 (a precipitation hardened quaternary Al-Cu-Mg-Ag alloy). Both of these alloys are currently being used in military-vehicle hull structural and armor systems. In the case of non-age-hardenable AA5083, the dominant microstructure evolution processes taking place during FSW are extensive plastic deformation and dynamic recrystallization of highly-deformed material subjected to elevated temperatures approaching the melting temperature. To account for the competition between plastic-deformation controlled strengthening and dynamic-recrystallization induced softening phenomena during the FSW process, the original Johnson-Cook strain- and strain-rate hardening and temperature-softening material strength model is modified in the present work using the available recrystallization-kinetics experimental data. In the case of AA2139, in addition to plastic deformation and dynamic recrystallization, precipitates coarsening, over-aging, dissolution and re-precipitation had to be also considered. Limited data available in the open literature pertaining to the kinetics of the aforementioned

  14. Correlation of Weld Appearance with Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of 2024-T4 Aluminum Alloy Welded by Fiber Laser with Filler Wire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XU Fei

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Two typical cross-section of welds, including nail shape and near X shape, are obtained in the process of fiber laser welding 2024-T4 Al alloy with filler wire. The correlations of the two weld appearances and other elements (such as microstructure, microhardness, and joint's tensile properties were analyzed. The results show that the weld with near X shape cross-section during the welding process is more stable than that with nail shape cross-section, and the welding spatter of the former is smaller than that of the latter. The microstructure of the weld zone is columnar grains and equiaxed grains, the columnar grains are formed near the fusion line and growing along the vertical direction of the fusion line, the equiaxed grains are distributed in the center of the weld zone. The secondary dendrite of the grains in the center of the weld with nail shape cross-section grows better, and gradually forms to equiaxed dendrite, while the grains size of the weld with near X shape cross-section is relatively finer, exhibiting equiaxed cellular grain. Compared with the joint with nail shape cross-section of the weld, the joint with near X shape cross-section of the weld have some different characteristics, the precipitation strengthening phase θ(Al2Cu content in weld zone of the latter is more than that of the former, the average microhardness value of the weld zone of the latter is higher than that of the former, the softening phenomenon of heat affect zone (HAZ of the latter is weaker than that of the former, and the joint's tensile strength and plasticity of the latter are lower than that of the former slightly.

  15. A Case Study for the Welding of Dissimilar EN AW 6082 and EN AW 5083 Aluminum Alloys by Friction Stir Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sefika Kasman

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of keeping constant the tool rotational speed to the welding speed ratio (υ ratio on the mechanical properties of the dissimilar friction stir welding of EN AW6082-T6 and EN AW5083-H111. Two different pins shaped as triangular and pentagonal were associated with the constant υ ratio. From the tensile test results, it was found that the υ ratio does not create an evident change in the weld joint strength. The small cavity- and tunnel-type defects were observed at the nugget zone and located on the advancing side of the pin. These defects caused a decrease in the strength and elongation of the weld joint. The most important inference obtained from the experimental results is that if the υ ratio is kept constant, the weld joint strength for each weld does not correspond to a constant value.

  16. Effects of laser shock peening on stress corrosion behavior of 7075 aluminum alloy laser welded joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J.T., E-mail: jiasqq1225@126.com [School of Mechanical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); School of Materials Engineering, Jiangsu University of Technology, Changzhou 213001 (China); Zhang, Y.K. [School of Mechanical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); School of Mechanical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China); Chen, J.F.; Zhou, J.Y.; Ge, M.Z.; Lu, Y.L.; Li, X.L. [School of Materials Engineering, Jiangsu University of Technology, Changzhou 213001 (China)

    2015-10-28

    7075 aluminum alloy weldments were processed by an intensive process known as laser shock peening (LSP), meanwhile its stress corrosion behaviors were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) tests. Results showed that the effect of LSP on corrosion behavior of the joint was fairly useful and obvious. With LSP, the elongation, time of fracture and static toughness after the SSRT test were improved by 11.13%, 20% and 100%, respectively. At the same time, the location of the fracture also changed. LSP led to a transition of the fracture type from transgranular to intergranular The reasons for these enhancements of the joint on corrosion behavior were caused by microstructure, residual stress, micro-hardness, and fracture appearance.

  17. Advanced Welding Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Some of the applications of advanced welding techniques are shown in this poster presentation. Included are brief explanations of the use on the Ares I and Ares V launch vehicle and on the Space Shuttle Launch vehicle. Also included are microstructural views from four advanced welding techniques: Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) weld (fusion), self-reacting friction stir welding (SR-FSW), conventional FSW, and Tube Socket Weld (TSW) on aluminum.

  18. Effect of Repair Welding on Electrochemical Corrosion and Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior of TIG Welded AA2219 Aluminum Alloy in 3.5 Wt Pct NaCl Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venugopal, A.; Sreekumar, K.; Raja, V. S.

    2010-12-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of AA2219 aluminum alloy in the as-welded (AW) and repair-welded (RW) conditions was examined and compared with that of the base metal (BM) in 3.5 wt pct NaCl solution using the slow strain rate technique (SSRT). The reduction in ductility was used as a parameter to evaluate the SCC susceptibility of both BM and welded joints. The results show that the ductility ratio ( ɛ NaCl/( ɛ air)) of the BM was close to one (0.97) and reduced to 0.9 for the AW joint. This value further reduced to 0.77 after carrying out one repair welding operation. However, the RW specimen exhibited higher ductility than the single-weld specimens even in 3.5 wt pct NaCl solution. SSRT results obtained using pre-exposed samples followed by post-test metallographic observations clearly showed localized pitting corrosion along the partially melted zone (PMZ), signifying that the reduction in ductility ratio of both the AW and RW joints was more due to mechanical overload failure, caused by the localized corrosion and a consequent reduction in specimen thickness, than due to SCC. Also, the RW joint exhibited higher ductility than the AW joint both in air and the environment, although SCC index (SI) for the former is lower than that of the latter. Fractographic examination of the failed samples, in general, revealed a typical ductile cracking morphology for all the base and welded joints, indicating the good environmental cracking resistance of this alloy. Microstructural examination and polarization tests further demonstrate grain boundary melting along the PMZ, and that provided the necessary electrochemical condition for the preferential cracking on that zone of the weldment.

  19. Dissimilar Impact Welding of 6111-T4, 5052-H32 Aluminum Alloys to 22MnB5, DP980 Steels and the Structure-Property Relationship of a Strongly Bonded Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bert; Vivek, Anupam; Presley, Michael; Daehn, Glenn S.

    2018-03-01

    The ability to weld high-strength aluminum to high-strength steel is highly desired for vehicle lightweighting but difficult to attain by conventional means. In this work, vaporizing foil actuator welding was used to successfully weld four Al/Fe combinations consisting of high-strength alloys: AA5052-H32, AA6111-T4, DP980, and 22MnB5. Flyer velocities up to 727 m/s were reached using 10 kJ input energy. In lap-shear testing, samples primarily failed in base aluminum near the aluminum's native strength, showing that the welds were stronger than a base metal and that the base metal was not significantly weakened by the welding process. A particularly strong weld area was studied by transmission electron microscopy to shed light on the microstructural features of strong impact welds. It was found to be characterized by a continuously bonded, fully crystalline interface, extremely fine (nanoscale) grains, mesoscopic as well as microscopic wavy features, and lack of large continuous intermetallic compounds.

  20. Effects of filling material and laser power on the formation of intermetallic compounds during laser-assisted friction stir butt welding of steel and aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Xinjiang; Jin, Xiangzhong; Peng, Nanxiang; Ye, Ying; Wu, Sigen; Dai, Houfu

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, two kinds of materials, Ni and Zn, are selected as filling material during laser-assisted friction stir butt welding of Q235 steel and 6061-T6 aluminum alloy, and their influences on the formation of intermetallic compounds on the steel/aluminum interface of the joints were first studied. SEM was used to analyze the profile of the intermetallic compound layer and the fractography of tensile fracture surfaces. In addition, EDS was applied to investigate the types of the intermetallic compounds. The results indicate that a thin iron-abundant intermetallic compound layer forms and ductile fracture mode occurs when Ni is added, but a thick aluminum-abundant intermetallic compound layer generates and brittle fracture mode occurs when Zn is added. So the tensile strength of the welds with Ni as filling material is greater than that with Zn as filling material. Besides, the effect of laser power on the formation of intermetallic compound layer when Ni is added was investigated. The preheated temperature field produced by laser beam in the cross section of workpiece was calculated, and the tensile strength of the joints at different laser powers was tested. Results show that only when suitable laser power is adopted, can suitable preheating temperature of the steel reach, then can thin intermetallic compound layer form and high tensile strength of the joints reach. Either excessive or insufficient laser power will reduce the tensile strength of the joints.

  1. Building A Simulation Model For The Prediction Of Temperature Distribution In Pulsed Laser Spot Welding Of Dissimilar Low Carbon Steel 1020 To Aluminum Alloy 6061

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yousef, Adel K. M.; Taha, Ziad A.; Shehab, Abeer A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a computer model used to analyze the heat flow during pulsed Nd: YAG laser spot welding of dissimilar metal; low carbon steel (1020) to aluminum alloy (6061). The model is built using ANSYS FLUENT 3.6 software where almost all the environments simulated to be similar to the experimental environments. A simulation analysis was implemented based on conduction heat transfer out of the key hole where no melting occurs. The effect of laser power and pulse duration was studied.Three peak powers 1, 1.66 and 2.5 kW were varied during pulsed laser spot welding (keeping the energy constant), also the effect of two pulse durations 4 and 8 ms (with constant peak power), on the transient temperature distribution and weld pool dimension were predicated using the present simulation. It was found that the present simulation model can give an indication for choosing the suitable laser parameters (i.e. pulse durations, peak power and interaction time required) during pulsed laser spot welding of dissimilar metals.

  2. Double-sided laser beam welded T-joints for aluminum-lithium alloy aircraft fuselage panels: Effects of filler elements on microstructure and mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bing; Tao, Wang; Chen, Yanbin; Li, Hao

    2017-08-01

    In the current work, T-joints consisting of 2.0 mm thick 2060-T8/2099-T83 aluminum-lithium alloys for aircraft fuselage panels have been fabricated by double-sided fiber laser beam welding with different filler wires. A new type wire CW3 (Al-6.2Cu-5.4Si) was studied and compared with conventional wire AA4047 (Al-12Si) mainly on microstructure and mechanical properties. It was found that the main combined function of Al-6.2%Cu-5.4%Si in CW3 resulted in considerable improvements especially on intergranular strength, hot cracking susceptibility and hoop tensile properties. Typical non-dendritic equiaxed zone (EQZ) was observed along welds' fusion boundary. Hot cracks and fractures during the load were always located within the EQZ, however, this typical zone could be restrained by CW3, effectively. Furthermore, changing of the main intergranular precipitated phase within the EQZ from T phase by AA4047 to T2 phase by CW3 also resulted in developments on microscopic intergranular reinforcement and macroscopic hoop tensile properties. In addition, bridging caused by richer substructure dendrites within CW3 weld's columnar zone resulted in much lower hot cracking susceptibility of the whole weld than AA4047.

  3. Statistical aspects of fatigue crack growth life of base metal, weld metal and heat affected zone in FSWed 7075-T651aluminum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohn, Hye Jeong; Haryadi, Gunawan Dwi; Kim, Seon Jin

    2014-01-01

    The statistical aspects of fatigue crack growth life of base metal (BM), weld metal (WM) and heat affected zone (HAZ) in friction stir welded (FSWed) 7075-T651 aluminum alloy has been studied by Weibull statistical analysis. The fatigue crack growth tests were performed at room temperature on ASTM standard CT specimens under three different constant stress intensity factor range controls. The main objective of this paper is to investigate the effects of statistical aspects of fatigue crack growth life on stress intensity factor ranges and material properties, namely BM, WM and HAZ specimens. In this work, the Weibull distribution was employed to estimate the statistical aspects of fatigue crack growth life. The shape parameter of Weibull distribution for fatigue crack growth life was significantly affected by material properties and the stress intensity factor range. The scale parameter of WM specimen exhibited the lowest value at all stress intensity factor ranges.

  4. Effect of process parameters on microstructure and mechanical behaviors of friction stir linear welded aluminum to magnesium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, H.M.; Ghaffari, B.; Yuan, W.; Jordon, J.B.; Badarinarayan, H.

    2016-01-01

    The microstructure and lap-shear behaviors of friction stir linear welded wrought Al alloy AA6022-T4 to cast Mg alloy AM60B joints were examined. A process window was developed to initially identify the potential process conditions. Multitudes of welds were produced by varying the tool rotation rate and tool traverse speed. Welds produced at 1500 revolutions per minute (rpm) tool rotation rate and either 50 mm/min or 75 mm/min tool traverse speed displayed the highest quasi-static failure load of ~3.3 kN per 30 mm wide lap-shear specimens. Analysis of cross sections of untested coupons indicated that the welds made at these optimum welding parameters had negligible microvoids and displayed a favorable weld geometry for the cold lap and hook features at the faying surface, compared to welds produced using other process parameters. Cross sections of the tested coupons indicated that the dominant crack initiated on the advancing side and progressed through the weld nugget, which consists of intermetallic compounds (IMC). This study demonstrates the feasibility of welding wrought Al and cast Mg alloy via friction stir linear welding with promising lap-shear strength results.

  5. Effect of process parameters on microstructure and mechanical behaviors of friction stir linear welded aluminum to magnesium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, H.M. [Research & Development Division, Hitachi America Ltd., Farmington Hills, MI 48335 (United States); Ghaffari, B. [Research and Advanced Engineering, Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI 48121 (United States); Yuan, W., E-mail: wei.yuan@hitachi-automotive.us [Research & Development Division, Hitachi America Ltd., Farmington Hills, MI 48335 (United States); Jordon, J.B. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Badarinarayan, H. [Research & Development Division, Hitachi America Ltd., Farmington Hills, MI 48335 (United States)

    2016-01-10

    The microstructure and lap-shear behaviors of friction stir linear welded wrought Al alloy AA6022-T4 to cast Mg alloy AM60B joints were examined. A process window was developed to initially identify the potential process conditions. Multitudes of welds were produced by varying the tool rotation rate and tool traverse speed. Welds produced at 1500 revolutions per minute (rpm) tool rotation rate and either 50 mm/min or 75 mm/min tool traverse speed displayed the highest quasi-static failure load of ~3.3 kN per 30 mm wide lap-shear specimens. Analysis of cross sections of untested coupons indicated that the welds made at these optimum welding parameters had negligible microvoids and displayed a favorable weld geometry for the cold lap and hook features at the faying surface, compared to welds produced using other process parameters. Cross sections of the tested coupons indicated that the dominant crack initiated on the advancing side and progressed through the weld nugget, which consists of intermetallic compounds (IMC). This study demonstrates the feasibility of welding wrought Al and cast Mg alloy via friction stir linear welding with promising lap-shear strength results.

  6. Probing liquation cracking and solidification through modeling of momentum, heat, and solute transport during welding of aluminum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, S.; Chakraborty, S.; DebRoy, T.

    2005-01-01

    A transport phenomena-based mathematical model is developed to understand liquation cracking in weldments during fusion welding. Equations of conservation of mass, momentum, heat, and solute transport are numerically solved considering nonequilibrium solidification and filler metal addition to determine the solid and liquid phase fractions in the solidifying region and the solute distribution in the weld pool. An effective partition coefficient that considers the local interface velocity and the undercooling is used to simulate solidification during welding. The calculations show that convection plays a dominant role in the solute transport inside the weld pool. The predicted weld-metal solute content agreed well with the independent experimental observations. The liquation cracking susceptibility in Al-Cu alloy weldments could be reliably predicted by the model based on the computed solidifying weld-metal composition and solid fraction considering nonequilibrium solidification

  7. Aluminum 6060-T6 friction stir welded butt joints: fatigue resistance with different tools and feed rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baragetti, S.; D'Urso, G.

    2014-01-01

    The fatigue behavior of AA6060-T6 friction stir welded butt joints was investigated. The joints were produced by using both a standard and a threaded tri-flute cylindrical-tool with flat shoulder. The friction stir welding process was carried out using different feed rates. Preliminary tensile tests, micrograph analyses and hardness profile measurements across the welds were carried out. Welded and unwelded fatigue samples were tested under axial loading (R = 0.1) with upper limits of 10 4 and 10 5 cycles, using threaded and unthreaded (standard) tools at different feed rates. The best tensile and fatigue performance was obtained using the standard tool at low feed rate.

  8. Experimental investigation of the degree of weakening in structural notch area of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy sheet welded with the RFSSW method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kubit Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the methodology of the research determining the degree of weakening of the welded sheet obtained by the refill friction stir spot welding (RFSSW method. The considered weakness is the effect of a structural notch resulting from penetration by the tool. RFSSW technology is a relatively new method of joining metals, which can successfully provide an alternative to resistance welding or riveting - traditionally used methods of joining thin-walled structures in the aerospace and automotive industries. The study presented in the paper focuses on the overlapping of sheet metal with 7075-T6 aluminum alloy combined in the configuration: 1.6 mm top sheet and 0.8 mm bottom sheet. Joints were assembled following the following process parameters: Welding time 1.5 s, the tool plunge depth in the range of 1.5 ÷ 1.9 mm, and the spindle speed of 2600 rpm. The analysis of the microstructure of joints revealed that along the edge of the tool path a structural notch is formed, the size and shape of which depend on the parameters applied. The paper describes the study consisting in punching the welded area along the formed notch in the upper sheet. The punching process was performed on a universal testing machine and the punching force was measured during the test. Based on the force value, the degree of sheet weakening in the notched area was determined. The smallest weakening was observed in joints made with the smallest tool depth, i.e. 1.5 mm, whereas the biggest weakening was obtained for tool depth of 1.9 mm. The load applied to the joints was equal to 5290N and 7585N respectively.

  9. Influence of tool geometry and rotational speed on mechanical properties and defect formation in friction stir lap welded 5456 aluminum alloy sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salari, Emad; Jahazi, Mohammad; Khodabandeh, Alireza; Ghasemi-Nanesa, Hadi

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Successful lap joint friction stir welding of AA5456 with two different tempers. • New stepped conical threaded pin for FSW of lap joints is introduced. • Investigated interactions between tool geometry and mechanical properties. • Microstructure and fracture surface analysis of dissimilar lap welds. - Abstract: Friction stir welding of AA5456 aluminum alloy in lap joint configuration is with two different tempers, T321 and O, and different thicknesses, 5 mm and 2.5 mm was investigated. The influences of tool geometry and various rotational speeds on macrostructure, microstructure and joint strength are presented. Specifically, four different tool pin profiles (a conical thread pin, a cylindrical–conical thread pin, a stepped conical thread pin and Flared Triflute pin tool) and two rotational speeds, 600 and 800 rpm, were used. The results indicated that, tool geometry influences significantly material flow in the nugget zone and accordingly control the weld mechanical properties. Of particular interest is the stepped conical threaded pin, which is introduced for the first time in the present investigation. Scanning electron microscopy investigation of the fracture location of samples was carried out and the findings correlated with tool geometry features and their influences on material flow and tension test results. The optimum microstructure and mechanical properties were obtained for the joints produced with the stepped conical thread pin profile and rotational speed of 600 rpm. The characteristics of the nugget zone microstructure, hooking height, and fracture location of the weld joints were used as criteria to quantify the influence of processing conditions on joint performance and integrity. The results are interpreted in the framework of physical metallurgy properties and compared with published literature

  10. Exploring the effects of SiC reinforcement incorporation on mechanical properties of friction stir welded 7075 aluminum alloy: Fatigue life, impact energy, tensile strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahrami, Mohsen; Helmi, Nader; Dehghani, Kamran; Givi, Mohammad Kazem Besharati

    2014-01-01

    In the current research, the role of SiC nano-particles in improving the mechanical properties of friction stir welded (FSWed) 7075 aluminum alloy is investigated. To this end, friction stir welding (FSW) was conducted at 1250 rpm and 40 mm/min. The experiment carried out with and without incorporating SiC nano-particles along the joint line. Cross-sectional microstructures of the joints were characterized employing optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results achieved through X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirmed the presence of SiC powders. Moreover, it was discovered that the volume fraction of the reinforcement particles was 20%. Along with an excellent bonding between SiC nano-particles and aluminum matrix, SEM photograph demonstrated a good dispersion of SiC reinforcements. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) results were also in tight agreement with the recent SEM microstructure. Thanks to the presence of SiC nano-particles, tensile strength, percent elongation, fatigue life, and toughness of the joint improved tremendously. The fracture morphologies were in good agreement with corresponding ductility results

  11. Exploring the effects of SiC reinforcement incorporation on mechanical properties of friction stir welded 7075 aluminum alloy: Fatigue life, impact energy, tensile strength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahrami, Mohsen, E-mail: Mohsen.bahrami@aut.ac.ir [Faculty of Mining and Metallurgical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology (AUT), Hafez Avenue, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Helmi, Nader [Faculty of Mining and Metallurgical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology (AUT), Hafez Avenue, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dehghani, Kamran [Faculty of Mining and Metallurgical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology (AUT), Hafez Avenue, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Centre of Excellence in Smart Structures and Dynamical Systems (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Givi, Mohammad Kazem Besharati [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-02-10

    In the current research, the role of SiC nano-particles in improving the mechanical properties of friction stir welded (FSWed) 7075 aluminum alloy is investigated. To this end, friction stir welding (FSW) was conducted at 1250 rpm and 40 mm/min. The experiment carried out with and without incorporating SiC nano-particles along the joint line. Cross-sectional microstructures of the joints were characterized employing optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results achieved through X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirmed the presence of SiC powders. Moreover, it was discovered that the volume fraction of the reinforcement particles was 20%. Along with an excellent bonding between SiC nano-particles and aluminum matrix, SEM photograph demonstrated a good dispersion of SiC reinforcements. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) results were also in tight agreement with the recent SEM microstructure. Thanks to the presence of SiC nano-particles, tensile strength, percent elongation, fatigue life, and toughness of the joint improved tremendously. The fracture morphologies were in good agreement with corresponding ductility results.

  12. Effect of welding parameters (plunge depths of shoulder, pin geometry, and tool rotational speed) on the failure mode and stir zone characteristics of friction stir spot welded aluminum 2024-T3 sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paidar, Moslem; Sarab, Mahsa Lali; Taheri, Morteza; Khodabandeh, Alireza [Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of welding parameters on the failure mode and stir zone characteristics of aluminum alloy 2024-T3 joined by friction stir spot welding. The welding parameters in this work are tool rotational speed, plunge depths of shoulder, and pin geometry. In accordance with the methods of previous investigations, the rotational speeds were set to 630 rpm to 2000 rpm. Two pin geometries with concave shoulder were used: triangular and cylindrical. The plunge depths of the shoulder were 0.3, 0.5 and 0.7 mm. The shoulder diameter and pin height for both geometries were 14 and 2.4 mm, respectively. The diameter of the cylindrical and triangular pins was 5 mm. Results show that the parameters mentioned earlier influence fracture mode under tension shear loading. Two different fracture modes were observed during the examinations. Low-penetration depths and low-rotational speeds lead to shear fracture, whereas high values of these factors cause the tension-shear fracture mode. Fracture of the lower sheet sometimes occurs at high rotational speeds.

  13. Artificial neural networks application for modeling of friction stir welding effects on mechanical properties of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, E.

    2015-12-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a relatively new solid-state joining technique that is widely adopted in manufacturing and industry fields to join different metallic alloys that are hard to weld by conventional fusion welding. Friction stir welding is a very complex process comprising several highly coupled physical phenomena. The complex geometry of some kinds of joints makes it difficult to develop an overall governing equations system for theoretical behavior analyse of the friction stir welded joints. Weld quality is predominantly affected by welding effective parameters, and the experiments are often time consuming and costly. On the other hand, employing artificial intelligence (AI) systems such as artificial neural networks (ANNs) as an efficient approach to solve the science and engineering problems is considerable. In present study modeling of FSW effective parameters by ANNs is investigated. To train the networks, experimental test results on thirty AA-7075-T6 specimens are considered, and the networks are developed based on back propagation (BP) algorithm. ANNs testing are carried out using different experimental data that they are not used during networks training. In this paper, rotational speed of tool, welding speed, axial force, shoulder diameter, pin diameter and tool hardness are regarded as inputs of the ANNs. Yield strength, tensile strength, notch-tensile strength and hardness of welding zone are gathered as outputs of neural networks. According to the obtained results, predicted values for the hardness of welding zone, yield strength, tensile strength and notch-tensile strength have the least mean relative error (MRE), respectively. Comparison of the predicted and the experimental results confirms that the networks are adjusted carefully, and the ANN can be used for modeling of FSW effective parameters.

  14. Artificial neural networks application for modeling of friction stir welding effects on mechanical properties of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maleki, E

    2015-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a relatively new solid-state joining technique that is widely adopted in manufacturing and industry fields to join different metallic alloys that are hard to weld by conventional fusion welding. Friction stir welding is a very complex process comprising several highly coupled physical phenomena. The complex geometry of some kinds of joints makes it difficult to develop an overall governing equations system for theoretical behavior analyse of the friction stir welded joints. Weld quality is predominantly affected by welding effective parameters, and the experiments are often time consuming and costly. On the other hand, employing artificial intelligence (AI) systems such as artificial neural networks (ANNs) as an efficient approach to solve the science and engineering problems is considerable. In present study modeling of FSW effective parameters by ANNs is investigated. To train the networks, experimental test results on thirty AA-7075-T6 specimens are considered, and the networks are developed based on back propagation (BP) algorithm. ANNs testing are carried out using different experimental data that they are not used during networks training. In this paper, rotational speed of tool, welding speed, axial force, shoulder diameter, pin diameter and tool hardness are regarded as inputs of the ANNs. Yield strength, tensile strength, notch-tensile strength and hardness of welding zone are gathered as outputs of neural networks. According to the obtained results, predicted values for the hardness of welding zone, yield strength, tensile strength and notch-tensile strength have the least mean relative error (MRE), respectively. Comparison of the predicted and the experimental results confirms that the networks are adjusted carefully, and the ANN can be used for modeling of FSW effective parameters. (paper)

  15. Improving Joint Formation and Tensile Properties of Dissimilar Friction Stir Welding of Aluminum and Magnesium Alloys by Solving the Pin Adhesion Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhenlei; Ji, Shude; Meng, Xiangchen

    2018-03-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW), as a solid-state welding technology invented by TWI in 1991, has potential to join dissimilar Al/Mg alloys. In this study, the pin adhesion phenomenon affecting joint quality during FSW of 6061-T6 aluminum and AZ31B magnesium alloys was investigated. The adhesion phenomenon induced by higher heat input easily transformed the tapered-and-screwed pin into a tapered pin, which greatly reduced the tool's ability to drive the plasticized materials and further deteriorated joint formation. Under the condition without the pin adhesion, the complex intercalated interlayer at the bottom of stir zone was beneficial to mechanical interlocking of Al/Mg alloys, improving tensile properties. However, the formation of intermetallic compounds was still the main reason of the joint fracture, significantly deteriorating tensile properties. Under the welding speed of 60 mm/min without the pin adhesion phenomenon, the maximum tensile strength of 107 MPa and elongation of 1.2% were achieved.

  16. A Correlation between the Ultimate Shear Stress and the Thickness Affected by Intermetallic Compounds in Friction Stir Welding of Dissimilar Aluminum Alloy–Stainless Steel Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florent Picot

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work, Friction Stir Welding (FSW was applied to join a stainless steel 316L and an aluminum alloy 5083. Ranges of rotation and translation speeds of the tool were used to obtain welding samples with different heat input coefficients. Depending on the process parameters, the heat generated by FSW creates thin layers of Al-rich InterMetallic Compound (IMC mainly composed of FeAl3, identified by energy dispersive spectrometry. Traces of Fe2Al5 were also depicted in some samples by X-ray diffraction analysis and transmission electron microscopy. Monotonous tensile tests performed on the weld joint show the existence of a maximum mechanical resistance for a judicious choice of rotation and translation speeds. It can be linked to an affected zone of average thickness of 15 µm which encompass the presence of IMC and the chaotic mixing caused by plastic deformation in this area. A thickness of less than 15 µm is not sufficient to ensure a good mechanical resistance of the joint. For a thickness higher than 15 µm, IMC layers become more brittle and less adhesive due to high residual stresses which induces numerous cracks after cooling. This leads to a progressive decrease of the ultimate shear stress supported by the bond.

  17. X-Ray and Neutron Diffraction Measurements of Dislocation Density and Subgrain Size in a Friction-Stir-Welded Aluminum Alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, Wan Chuck; Ungar, Tomas; Feng, Zhili; Kenik, Edward A.; Clausen, B.

    2009-01-01

    The dislocation density and subgrain size were determined in the base material and friction-stir welds of 6061-T6 aluminum alloy. High-resolution X-ray diffraction measurement was performed in the base material. The result of the line profile analysis of the X-ray diffraction peak shows that the dislocation density is about 4.5 x 10 14 m -2 and the subgrain size is about 200 nm. Meanwhile, neutron diffraction measurements have been performed to observe the diffraction peaks during friction-stir welding (FSW). The deep penetration capability of the neutron enables us to measure the peaks from the midplane of the Al plate underneath the tool shoulder of the friction-stir welds. The peak broadening analysis result using the Williamson-Hall method shows the dislocation density of about 3.2 x 10 15 m -2 and subgrain size of about 160 nm. The significant increase of the dislocation density is likely due to the severe plastic deformation during FSW. This study provides an insight into understanding the transient behavior of the microstructure under severe thermomechanical deformation

  18. Investigation of plasma arc welding as a method for the additive manufacturing of titanium-(6)aluminum-(4)vanadium alloy components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavinoha, Joe N.

    The process of producing near net-shape components by material deposition is known as additive manufacturing. All additive manufacturing processes are based on the addition of material with the main driving forces being cost reduction and flexibility in both manufacturing and product design. With wire metal deposition, metal is deposited as beads side-by-side and layer-by-layer in a desired pattern to build a complete component or add features on a part. There are minimal waste products, low consumables, and an efficient use of energy and feedstock associated with additive manufacturing processes. Titanium and titanium alloys are useful engineering materials that possess an extraordinary combination of properties. Some of the properties that make titanium advantageous for structural applications are its high strength-to-weight ratio, low density, low coefficient of thermal expansion, and good corrosion resistance. The most commonly used titanium alloy, Ti-6Al-4V, is typically used in aerospace applications, pressure vessels, aircraft gas turbine disks, cases and compressor blades, and surgical implants. Because of the high material prices associated with titanium alloys, the production of near net-shape components by additive manufacturing is an attractive option for the manufacturing of Ti-6Al-4V alloy components. In this thesis, the manufacturing of cylindrical Ti-6Al-4V alloy specimens by wire metal deposition utilizing the plasma arc welding process was demonstrated. Plasma arc welding is a cost effective additive manufacturing technique when compared to other current additive manufacturing methods such as laser beam welding and electron beam welding. Plasma arc welding is considered a high-energy-density welding processes which is desirable for the successful welding of titanium. Metal deposition was performed using a constant current plasma arc welding power supply, flow-purged welding chamber, argon shielding and orifice gas, ERTi-5 filler metal, and Ti-6Al

  19. In-situ neutron diffraction measurements of temperature and stresses during friction stir welding of 6061-T6 aluminum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, Wan Chuck; Feng, Zhili; Wang, Xun-Li; Brown, D.W.; Clausen, B.; An, Ke; Choo, Hahn; Hubbard, Camden R.; David, Stan A.

    2007-01-01

    The evolution of temperature and thermal stresses during friction stir welding of Al6061-T6 was investigated by means of in-situ, time-resolved neutron diffraction technique. A method is developed to deconvolute the temperature and stress from the lattice spacing changes measured by neutron diffraction. The deep penetration capability of neutrons made it possible for the first time to obtain the temperature and thermal stresses inside a friction stir weld

  20. Microhardness and Strain Field Characterization of Self-Reacting Friction Stir and Plug Welds of Dissimilar Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Karla Renee

    2011-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process with potential advantages for aerospace and automotive industries dealing with light alloys. Self-reacting friction stir welding (SR-FSW) is one variation of the FSW process being developed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for use in the fabrication of propellant tanks. Friction plug welding is used to seal the exit hole that remains in a circumferential SR-FSW. This work reports on material properties and strain patterns developed in a SR-FSW with a friction plug weld. Specifically, this study examines the behavior of a SR-FSW formed between an AA 2014-T6 plate on the advancing side and an AA 2219-T87 plate on the retreating side and a SR-FSW (AA 2014-T6 to AA 2219-T87) with a 2219-T87 plug weld. This study presents the results of a characterization of the micro-hardness, joint strength, and strain field characterization of SR-FSW and FPW joints tested at room temperature and cryogenic temperatures.

  1. Tool geometry, rotation and travel speeds effects on the properties of dissimilar magnesium/aluminum friction stir welded lap joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammadi, J.; Behnamian, Y.; Mostafaei, A.; Gerlich, A.P.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Tool geometry, rotation and travel speeds show great effect on the microstructure stability of FSW joint. • Increasing rotation and travel speeds resulted in increasing the tensile strength and ductility of the joints. • Better intermixing between Al/Mg alloys was obtained by tapered threaded pin. • A mechanical interlocking mechanism proposed for higher ductility and superior tensile properties in FSW joints. - Abstract: Lap joint friction stir welding (FSW) between dissimilar AZ31B and Al 6061 alloys sheets was conducted using various welding parameters including tool geometry, rotation and travel speeds. Tapered threaded pin and tapered pin tools were applied to fabricate FSW joints, using different rotation and travel speeds. Metallurgical investigations including X-ray diffraction pattern (XRD), optical microscopy images (OM), scanning electron microscopy equipped with an energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM–EDS) and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) were used to characterize joints microstructures made with different welding parameters. Intermetallic phases were detected in the weld zone (WZ). Various microstructures were observed in the stir zone which can be attributed to using different travel and rotation speeds. Mechanical evaluation including lap shear fracture load test and microhardness measurements indicated that by simultaneously increasing the tool rotation and travel speeds, the joint tensile strength and ductility reached a maximum value. Microhardness studies and extracted results from stress–strain curves indicated that mechanical properties were affected by FSW process. Furthermore, phase analyses by XRD indicated the presence of intermetallic compounds in the weld zone. Finally, in the Al/Mg dissimilar weld, fractography studies showed that intermetallic compounds formation in the weld zone had an influence on the failure mode

  2. Microhardness, strength and strain field characterization of self-reacting friction stir and plug welds of dissimilar aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Karla Renee

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process with potential advantages for aerospace and automotive industries dealing with light alloys. Self-reacting friction stir welding (SR-FSW) is one variation of the FSW process being developed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for use in the fabrication of propellant tanks. Friction plug welding is used to seal the exit hole that remains in a circumferential SR-FSW. This work reports on material properties and strain patterns developed in a SR-FSW with a friction plug weld. Specifically, this study examines the behavior of a SR-FSW formed between an AA2014-T6 plate on the advancing side and an AA2219-T87 plate on the retreating side and a SR-FSW (AA2014-T6 to AA2219-T87) with a 2219-T87 plug weld. This study presents the results of a characterization of the micro-hardness, joint strength, and strain field characterization of SR-FSW and FPW joints tested at room temperature and cryogenic temperatures. The initial weld microstructure analysis showed a nugget region with fine grains and a displaced weld seam from the advancing side past the thermo-mechanical affected zone (TMAZ) into the nugget region. The displaced material shared the same hardness as the parent material. Dynamic recrystallization was observed in the SR-FSW zone and the displaced weld seam region. The welds revealed a fine grain structure in the SR-FSW zone with a sharp demarcation seen on the advancing side and fairly diffuse flow observed on the retreating side. The parent material hardness is 145 HV700g with a drop in hardness starting at the HAZ to 130 HV700g. The hardness further drops in the TMAZ to118 HV700g with an increase representing a dispersed interface of AA2014-T6 material to 135 HV700g. The hardness then drops significantly within the nugget region to 85 HV700g followed by an increase through the retreating side TMAZ into the HAZ to 135 HV 700g. There was a sharp increase in the hardness value within

  3. Aluminum-Scandium Alloys: Material Characterization, Friction Stir Welding, and Compatibility With Hydrogen Peroxide (MSFC Center Director's Discretionary Fund Final Report, Proj. No. 04-14)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. A.; Chen, P. S.

    2004-01-01

    This Technical Memorandum describes the development of several high-strength aluminum (Al) alloys that are compatible with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) propellant for NASA Hypersonic-X (Hyper-X) vehicles fuel tanks and structures. The yield strengths for some of these Al-magnesium-based alloys are more than 3 times stronger than the conventional 5254-H112 Al alloy, while maintaining excellent H2O2 compatibility similar to class 1 5254 alloy. The alloy development strategy is to add scandium, zirconium, and other transitional metals with unique electrochemical properties, which will not act as catalysts, to decompose the highly concentrated 90 percent H2O2. Test coupons are machined from sheet metals for H2O2 long-term exposure testing and mechanical properties testing. In addition, the ability to weld the new alloys using friction stir welding has also been explored. The new high-strength alloys could represent an enabling material technology for Hyper-X vehicles, where flight weight reduction is a critical requirement.

  4. Computational Investigation of Hardness Evolution During Friction-Stir Welding of AA5083 and AA2139 Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    expensive post-weld machining; and (g) low 102 environmental impact . However, some disadvantages of the 103 FSW process have also been identified such as (a...material. Its 443 density and thermal properties are next set to that of AISI- H13 , 444 a hot-worked tool steel, frequently used as the FSW-tool 445

  5. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Dissimilar Friction Stir Welding between Ultrafine Grained 1050 and 6061-T6 Aluminum Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yufeng Sun

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The ultrafine grained (UFGed 1050 Al plates with a thickness of 2 mm, which were produced by the accumulative roll bonding technique after five cycles, were friction stir butt welded to 2 mm thick 6061-T6 Al alloy plates at a different revolutionary pitch that varied from 0.5 to 1.25 mm/rev. In the stir zone, the initial nano-sized lamellar structure of the UFGed 1050 Al alloy plate transformed into an equiaxial grain structure with a larger average grain size due to the dynamic recrystallization and subsequent grain growth. However, an equiaxial grain structure with a much smaller grain size was simultaneously formed in the 6061 Al alloy plates, together with coarsening of the precipitates. Tensile tests of the welds obtained at different welding speeds revealed that two kinds of fracture modes occurred for the specimens depending on their revolutionary pitches. The maximum tensile strength was about 110 MPa and the fractures were all located in the stir zone close to the 1050 Al side.

  6. Study of local-zone microstructure, strength and fracture toughness of hybrid laser-metal-inert-gas-welded A7N01 aluminum alloy joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiaomin, E-mail: xmwang991011@163.com [School of Life Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031, Sichuan (China); Li, Bo [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031, Sichuan (China); Li, Mingxing; Huang, Cui [School of Life Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031, Sichuan (China); Chen, Hui [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031, Sichuan (China)

    2017-03-14

    Mechanical properties of hybrid laser-metal-inert-gas-welded A7N01-T5 aluminum alloy joints were studied by using local samples that were extracted from the base metal (BM), heat-affected zone (HAZ), and fusion zone (FZ) of the joint to investigate the triangular relationship of microstructure, strength and fracture toughness of the local zones. The BM had the highest yield strength, ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and lowest elongation, which contrasts with the FZ. The yield strength of the HAZ is lower than that of the BM, whereas its UTS is very close to that of the BM, and its elongation is higher than that of the BM. The fracture toughness of the three local zones decreased as HAZ>BM>FZ. To analyze differences in local mechanical behavior, the detailed microstructure of the three local zones was studied by optical microscopy and electron backscattered diffraction, whereas the fracture surface and precipitation were studied by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The variation of grain size, especially the morphology and distribution of strengthening phase in HAZ in welding process is the key factor that leads to its different mechanical properties from that of BM, which can be elucidated by different dislocation mechanism, sheared mechanism or Orowan mechanism. The as-cast microstructure and second-phase particles that segregate between dendritic branches provide the FZ with the lowest yield strength and UTS. The factors including area fraction of the precipitates, the difference of strength between the matrix and the grain boundaries, the precipitate-free zone along grain boundaries, as well as the grain boundaries angle are taken into account to explain the difference of fracture toughness among BM, HAZ and FZ, and their fracture modes.

  7. Capabilities of infrared weld monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanders, P.G.; Keske, J.S.; Leong, K.H.; Kornecki, G.

    1997-11-01

    A non-obtrusive pre-aligned, solid-state device has been developed to monitor the primary infrared emissions during laser welding. The weld monitor output is a 100-1000 mV signal that depends on the beam power and weld characteristics. The DC level of this signal is related to weld penetration, while AC portions of the output can be correlated with surface irregularities and part misalignment or contamination. Changes in DC behavior are also noted for both full and deep penetration welds. Full penetration welds are signified by an abrupt reduction in the weld monitor output. Bead on plate welds were made on steel, aluminum, and magnesium with both a CW CO{sub 2} laser and a pulsed Nd:YAG laser to explore the relationships between the weld characteristics and the weld monitor output.

  8. Effect of Processing Parameters on Plastic Flow and Defect Formation in Friction-Stir-Welded Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, X. H.; Xue, P.; Wang, D.; Ni, D. R.; Xiao, B. L.; Ma, Z. Y.

    2018-04-01

    The effect of processing parameters on material flow and defect formation during friction stir welding (FSW) was investigated on 6.0-mm-thick 2014Al-T6 rolled plates with an artificially thickened oxide layer on the butt surface as the marker material. It was found that the "S" line in the stir zone (SZ) rotated with the pin and stayed on the retreating side (RS) and advancing side (AS) at low and high heat inputs, respectively. When the tool rotation rate was extremely low, the oxide layer under the pin moved to the RS first and then to the AS perpendicular to the welding direction, rather than rotating with the pin. The material flow was driven by the shear stresses produced by the forces at the pin-workpiece interface. With increases of the rotation rate, the depth of the shoulder-affected zone (SAZ) first decreased and then increased due to the decreasing shoulder friction force and increasing heat input. Insufficient material flow appeared in the whole of the SZ at low rotation rates and in the bottom of the SZ at high rotation rates, resulting in the formation of the "S" line. The extremely inadequate material flow is the reason for the lack of penetration and the kissing bonds in the bottom of the SZ at extremely low and low rotation rates, respectively.

  9. Effects of Fusion Tack Welds on Self-Reacting Friction Stir Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.; Pendleton, M. L.; Brooke, S. A.; Russell, C. K.

    2012-01-01

    In order to know whether fusion tack welds would affect the strength of self-reacting friction stir seam welds in 2195-T87 aluminum alloy, the fracture stresses of 144 tensile test coupons cut from 24 welded panels containing segments of friction stir welds were measured. Each of the panels was welded under unique processing conditions. A measure of the effect of the tack welds for each panel was devised. An analysis of the measures of the tack weld effect supported the hypothesis that fusion tack welds do not affect the strength of self-reacting friction stir welds to a 5% level of confidence.

  10. Electron beam welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, M.M.

    1974-01-01

    Electron-beam equipment is considered along with fixed and mobile electron-beam guns, questions of weld environment, medium and nonvacuum welding, weld-joint designs, tooling, the economics of electron-beam job shops, aspects of safety, quality assurance, and repair. The application of the process in the case of individual materials is discussed, giving attention to aluminum, beryllium, copper, niobium, magnesium, molybdenum, tantalum, titanium, metal alloys, superalloys, and various types of steel. Mechanical-property test results are examined along with the areas of application of electron-beam welding

  11. Multipass autogenous electron beam welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, J.L.; Mustaleski, T.M. Jr.; Watson, L.C.

    1986-01-01

    A multipass, autogenous welding procedure was developed for 7.6 mm (0.3 in.) wall thickness Type 304L stainless steel cylinders. The joint geometry has a 1.5 mm (0.06 in.) root-face width and a rectangular stepped groove that is 0.762 mm (0.03 in.) wide at the top of the root face and extends 1.5 mm in height, terminating into a groove width of 1.27 mm which extends to the outside of the 1.27 mm high weld-boss. One weld pass is made on the root, three passes on the 0.762 mm wide groove and three passes to complete the weld. Multipass, autogenous, electron beam welds maintain the characteristic high depth-to-width ratios and low heat input of single-pass, electron beam welds. The increased part distortion (which is still much less than from arc processes) in multipass weldments is corrected by a preweld machined compensation. Mechanical properties of multipass welds compare well with single-pass welds. The yield strength of welds in aluminum alloy 5083 is approximately the same for single-pass or multipass electron beam and gas, metal-arc welds. The incidence and size of porosity is less in multipass electron beam welding of aluminum as compared to gas, metal-arc welds. The multipass, autogenous, electron beam welding method has proven to be a reliable way to make some difficult welds in multilayer parts or in an instance where inside part temperature or weld underbead must be controlled and weld discontinuities must be minimized

  12. Upgraded HFIR Fuel Element Welding System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sease, John D.

    2010-01-01

    The welding of aluminum-clad fuel plates into aluminum alloy 6061 side plate tubing is a unique design feature of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) fuel assemblies as 101 full-penetration circumferential gas metal arc welds (GMAW) are required in the fabrication of each assembly. In a HFIR fuel assembly, 540 aluminum-clad fuel plates are assembled into two nested annular fuel elements 610 mm (24-inches) long. The welding process for the HFIR fuel elements was developed in the early 1960 s and about 450 HFIR fuel assemblies have been successfully welded using the GMAW process qualified in the 1960 s. In recent years because of the degradation of the electronic and mechanical components in the old HFIR welding system, reportable defects in plate attachment or adapter welds have been present in almost all completed fuel assemblies. In October 2008, a contract was awarded to AMET, Inc., of Rexburg, Idaho, to replace the old welding equipment with standard commercially available welding components to the maximum extent possible while maintaining the qualified HFIR welding process. The upgraded HFIR welding system represents a major improvement in the welding system used in welding HFIR fuel elements for the previous 40 years. In this upgrade, the new inner GMAW torch is a significant advancement over the original inner GMAW torch previously used. The innovative breakthrough in the new inner welding torch design is the way the direction of the cast in the 0.762 mm (0.030-inch) diameter aluminum weld wire is changed so that the weld wire emerging from the contact tip is straight in the plane perpendicular to the welding direction without creating any significant drag resistance in the feeding of the weld wire.

  13. Study on Pores in Ultrasonic‐Assisted TIG Weld of  Aluminum Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qihao Chen

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasonic‐assisted tungsten inert gas welding was carried out on a thin plate of 2195 Al‐Li alloy, and the characteristics of the weld pores were analyzed in terms of their size and porosity. The effects of welding speed and ultrasonic power on the porosity and size of the pores were investigated. The pores were found to occur primarily adjacent to the surface of the weld. The porosity decreased and the size increased with a decrease in welding speed. The effect of ultrasonic power on the characteristics of the pores was different from that of the welding speed. The porosity and size of the pores decreased and then increased with an increase in ultrasonic power. A relationship was found between the transient cavitation intensity and the characteristics of pores. An increasing transient cavitation intensity results in a decrease in the porosity and size of pores when the transient cavitation intensity is lower. However, it can result in an increase in the porosity and pore size when the transient cavitation intensity further increases. Finally, the influencing mechanism of cavitation on welding pores was discussed.

  14. Welding Penetration Control of Fixed Pipe in TIG Welding Using Fuzzy Inference System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskoro, Ario Sunar; Kabutomori, Masashi; Suga, Yasuo

    This paper presents a study on welding penetration control of fixed pipe in Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welding using fuzzy inference system. The welding penetration control is essential to the production quality welds with a specified geometry. For pipe welding using constant arc current and welding speed, the bead width becomes wider as the circumferential welding of small diameter pipes progresses. Having welded pipe in fixed position, obviously, the excessive arc current yields burn through of metals; in contrary, insufficient arc current produces imperfect welding. In order to avoid these errors and to obtain the uniform weld bead over the entire circumference of the pipe, the welding conditions should be controlled as the welding proceeds. This research studies the intelligent welding process of aluminum alloy pipe 6063S-T5 in fixed position using the AC welding machine. The monitoring system used a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera to monitor backside image of molten pool. The captured image was processed to recognize the edge of molten pool by image processing algorithm. Simulation of welding control using fuzzy inference system was constructed to simulate the welding control process. The simulation result shows that fuzzy controller was suitable for controlling the welding speed and appropriate to be implemented into the welding system. A series of experiments was conducted to evaluate the performance of the fuzzy controller. The experimental results show the effectiveness of the control system that is confirmed by sound welds.

  15. Fusion welding of thin metal foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casey, H.

    1975-01-01

    Aspects of fusion welding of thin metal foils are reviewed and the current techniques employed at LASL to join foils are described. Techniques for fusion welding approximately 0.025-mm-thick foils of copper, aluminum, and stainless steels have been developed using both electron beam and laser welding equipment. These techniques, together with the related aspects of joint design, tooling and fixturing, joint preparation, and modifications to the commercially available welding equipment, are included in the review. (auth)

  16. Friction stir welding joint of dissimilar materials between AZ31B magnesium and 6061 aluminum alloys: Microstructure studies and mechanical characterizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadi, J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran 141554933 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Behnamian, Y. [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2V4 (Canada); Mostafaei, A., E-mail: amir.mostafaei@gmail.com [Young Researchers and Elites Club, Tehran North Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Izadi, H. [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2V4 (Canada); Saeid, T. [Faculty of Materials Engineering, Sahand University of Technology, Tabriz 513351996 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kokabi, A.H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran 113659466 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Gerlich, A.P., E-mail: adrian.gerlich@uwaterloo.ca [Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2015-03-15

    Friction stir welding is an efficient manufacturing method for joining dissimilar alloys, which can dramatically reduce grain sizes and offer high mechanical joint efficiency. Lap FSW joints between dissimilar AZ31B and Al 6061 alloy sheets were made at various tool rotation and travel speeds. Rotation and travel speeds varied between 560–1400 r/min and 16–40 mm/min respectively, where the ratio between these parameters was such that nearly constant pitch distances were applied during welding. X-ray diffraction pattern (XRD), optical microscopy images (OM), electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and scanning electron microscopy equipped with an energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) were used to investigate the microstructures of the joints welded. Intermetallic phases including Al{sub 12}Mg{sub 17} (γ) and Al{sub 3}Mg{sub 2} (β) were detected in the weld zone (WZ). For different tool rotation speeds, the morphology of the microstructure in the stir zone changed significantly with travel speed. Lap shear tensile test results indicated that by simultaneously increasing the tool rotation and travel speeds to 1400 r/min and 40 mm/min, the joint tensile strength and ductility reached a maximum. Microhardness measurements and tensile stress–strain curves indicated that mechanical properties were affected by FSW parameters and mainly depended on the formation of intermetallic compounds in the weld zone. In addition, a debonding failure mode in the Al/Mg dissimilar weld nugget was investigated by SEM and surface fracture studies indicated that the presence of intermetallic compounds in the weld zone controlled the failure mode. XRD analysis of the fracture surface indicated the presence of brittle intermetallic compounds including Al{sub 12}Mg{sub 17} (γ) and Al{sub 3}Mg{sub 2} (β). - Highlights: • Dissimilar Al/Mg joint was obtained by lap friction stir welding technique. • Effect of rotation and travel speeds on the formation of intermetallic

  17. Friction stir welding joint of dissimilar materials between AZ31B magnesium and 6061 aluminum alloys: Microstructure studies and mechanical characterizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammadi, J.; Behnamian, Y.; Mostafaei, A.; Izadi, H.; Saeid, T.; Kokabi, A.H.; Gerlich, A.P.

    2015-01-01

    Friction stir welding is an efficient manufacturing method for joining dissimilar alloys, which can dramatically reduce grain sizes and offer high mechanical joint efficiency. Lap FSW joints between dissimilar AZ31B and Al 6061 alloy sheets were made at various tool rotation and travel speeds. Rotation and travel speeds varied between 560–1400 r/min and 16–40 mm/min respectively, where the ratio between these parameters was such that nearly constant pitch distances were applied during welding. X-ray diffraction pattern (XRD), optical microscopy images (OM), electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and scanning electron microscopy equipped with an energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) were used to investigate the microstructures of the joints welded. Intermetallic phases including Al 12 Mg 17 (γ) and Al 3 Mg 2 (β) were detected in the weld zone (WZ). For different tool rotation speeds, the morphology of the microstructure in the stir zone changed significantly with travel speed. Lap shear tensile test results indicated that by simultaneously increasing the tool rotation and travel speeds to 1400 r/min and 40 mm/min, the joint tensile strength and ductility reached a maximum. Microhardness measurements and tensile stress–strain curves indicated that mechanical properties were affected by FSW parameters and mainly depended on the formation of intermetallic compounds in the weld zone. In addition, a debonding failure mode in the Al/Mg dissimilar weld nugget was investigated by SEM and surface fracture studies indicated that the presence of intermetallic compounds in the weld zone controlled the failure mode. XRD analysis of the fracture surface indicated the presence of brittle intermetallic compounds including Al 12 Mg 17 (γ) and Al 3 Mg 2 (β). - Highlights: • Dissimilar Al/Mg joint was obtained by lap friction stir welding technique. • Effect of rotation and travel speeds on the formation of intermetallic compounds • Microstructure and chemical

  18. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Dissimilar Joints of Al-Mg2Si and 5052 Aluminum Alloy by Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, B. W.; Qin, Q. D.; Zhang, D. H.; Wu, Y. J.; Su, X. D.

    2018-03-01

    Al-Mg2Si alloy and 5052 Al alloy were welded successfully by friction stir welding (FSW) in this study. The results show that the alloy consists of three distinct zones after FSW: the base material zone (BMZ), the transitional zone, and the weld nugget (WN). The morphologies of the primary Mg2Si phases are identified as coarse equiaxed crystals for Al-Mg2Si alloys in the BMZ. The WN is a mixture of rich Al-Mg2Si and rich 5052 alloy, and a banded structure is formed in the zone. Interestingly, in the WN, the equiaxed crystals changed to polygonal particles with substantially reduced sizes in the rich Al-Mg2Si zone. However, in addition to the white rich Mg phase appearing in the rich 5052 zone near the interface, the 5052 alloy does not show obvious changes. The hardness gradually increases from the BMZ of the 5052 to the welded joint to the Al-Mg2Si BMZ. In addition, the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of the welded joint is higher than that of the base material of the Al-Mg2Si, whereas it is lower than that of the 5052 base alloy. The results of the elongation are similar to the UTS results. The fracture mechanism is also investigated.

  19. Effect of tool shape and welding parameters on mechanical properties and microstructure of dissimilar friction stir welded aluminium alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Chetan Aneja; Amit Handa

    2016-01-01

    In the present experimental study, dissimilar aluminum alloy AA5083 and AA6082 were friction stir welded by varying tool shape, welding speed and rotary speed of the tool in order to investigate the effect of varying tool shape and welding parameters on the mechanical properties as well as microstructure. The friction stir welding (FSW) process parameters have great influence on heat input per unit length of weld. The outcomes of experimental study prove that mechanical properties increases w...

  20. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Welds of Al - Mg - Si Alloys After Different Modes of Impulse Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondrat'ev, S. Yu.; Morozova, Yu. N.; Golubev, Yu. A.; Hantelmann, C.; Naumov, A. A.; Mikhailov, V. G.

    2018-03-01

    Welded joints of aluminum alloy 6082-T6 formed by the method of impulse friction stir welding are studied. The effect of the power and frequency of the pulses on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the welded joints is determined. Application of an additional pulse during the welding affects the surface quality and the shape of the weld, the distribution of the oxide layer and of particles of the hardening phase, and the grain size in the zone of dynamic recrystallization.

  1. Numerical simulation of heat transfer and fluid flow during double-sided laser beam welding of T-joints for aluminum aircraft fuselage panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhibin; Tao, Wang; Li, Liqun; Chen, Yanbin; Shi, Chunyuan

    2017-06-01

    In comparison with conventional laser beam welding, double-sided laser beam welding has two laser heat sources simultaneously and symmetrically loaded from both sides makes it to be a more complicated coupled heat transport and fluid flow process. In this work, in order to understand the heat transfer and fluid flow, a three-dimensional model was developed and validated with the experimental results. The temperature field, fluid flow field, and keyhole characteristic were calculated using the developed model by FLUENT software. Calculated results indicated that the temperature and fluid flow fields were bilateral symmetry along the stringer center, and the molten pool maximum length was located near the keyhole intersection position. The skin side had higher temperature and faster cooling speed. Several characteristic flow patterns in the weld pool cross section, including the vortexes flows near the keyhole opening position, the convection flows above the keyhole intersection location, the regularity downward flows at the molten pool bottom. And in the lengthwise section, a distinct vortex flow below the keyhole, and the liquid metal behind the keyhole first flowed to near the molten pool maximum length location and then to the molten pool surface. Perpendicular to and along welding direction the keyhole liquid metal flowed to the weld molten pool surface and around the keyhole, respectively. The special temperature fields and fluid flow patterns were closely related to the effects of the double sides' laser energy coupling and enhancement. The calculated weld pool geometry basically in good agreement with the experimental results indicated that the developed model was validity and reasonable.

  2. B218 Weld Filler Wire Characterization for Al-Li Alloy 2195

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorkman, Gerry; Russell, Carolyn

    2000-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Lockheed Martin Space Systems- Michoud Operations, and McCook Metals have developed an aluminum-copper weld filler wire for fusion welding aluminum lithium alloy 2195. The aluminum-copper based weld filler wire has been identified as B218, a McCook Metals designation. B218 is the result of six years of weld filler wire development funded by NASA, Lockheed Martin, and McCook Metals. The filler wire chemistry was developed to produce enhanced 2195 weld and repair weld mechanical properties over the 4043 aluminum-silicon weld filler wire, which is currently used to weld 2195 on the Super Lightweight External Tank for the NASA Space Shuttle Program. An initial characterization was performed consisting of a repair weld evaluation using B218 and 4043 weld filler wires. The testing involved room temperature and cryogenic repair weld tensile testing along with fracture toughness testing. From the testing, B218 weld filler wire produce enhanced repair weld tensile strength, ductility, and fracture properties over 4043. B218 weld filler wire has proved to be a superior weld filler wire for welding aluminum lithium alloy 2195 over 4043.

  3. Joining of beryllium by braze welding technique: preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banaim, P.; Abramov, E. [Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beersheba (Israel); Zalkind, S.; Eden, S.

    1998-01-01

    Within the framework of some applications, there is a need to join beryllium parts to each other. Gas Tungsten Arc Braze Welds were made in beryllium using 0.3 mm commercially Aluminum (1100) shim preplaced at the joint. The welds exhibited a tendency to form microcracks in the Fusion Zone and Heat Affected Zone. All the microcracks were backfilled with Aluminum. (author)

  4. Galvanic corrosion of beryllium welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, M.A.; Butt, D.P.; Lillard, R.S.

    1997-01-01

    Beryllium is difficult to weld because it is highly susceptible to cracking. The most commonly used filler metal in beryllium welds is Al-12 wt.% Si. Beryllium has been successfully welded using Al-Si filler metal with more than 30 wt.% Al. This filler creates an aluminum-rich fusion zone with a low melting point that tends to backfill cracks. Drawbacks to adding a filler metal include a reduction in service temperature, a lowering of the tensile strength of the weld, and the possibility for galvanic corrosion to occur at the weld. To evaluate the degree of interaction between Be and Al-Si in an actual weld, sections from a mock beryllium weldment were exposed to 0.1 M Cl - solution. Results indicate that the galvanic couple between Be and the Al-Si weld material results in the cathodic protection of the weld and of the anodic dissolution of the bulk Be material. While the cathodic protection of Al is generally inefficient, the high anodic dissolution rate of the bulk Be during pitting corrosion combined with the insulating properties of the Be oxide afford some protection of the Al-Si weld material. Although dissolution of the Be precipitate in the weld material does occur, no corrosion of the Al-Si matrix was observed

  5. Welding hazards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    Welding technology is advancing rapidly in the developed countries and has converted into a science. Welding involving the use of electricity include resistance welding. Welding shops are opened in residential area, which was causing safety hazards, particularly the teenagers and children who eagerly see the welding arc with their naked eyes. There are radiation hazards from ultra violet rays which irritate the skin, eye irritation. Welding arc light of such intensity could damage the eyes. (Orig./A.B.)

  6. Modelling of damage development and ductile failure in welded joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kim Lau

    , a study of the damage development in Resistance SpotWelded joints, when subject to the commonly used static shear-lab or cross-tension testing techniques, has been carried out ([P3]-[P6]). The focus in thesis is on the Advanced High Strength Steels, Dual-Phase 600, which is used in for example......This thesis focuses on numerical analysis of damage development and ductile failure in welded joints. Two types of welds are investigated here. First, a study of the localization of plastic flow and failure in aluminum sheets, welded by the relatively new Friction Stir (FS) Welding method, has been...... conducted ([P1], [P2], [P7]-[P9]). The focus in the thesis is on FS-welded 2xxx and 6xxx series of aluminum alloys, which are attractive, for example, to the aerospace industry, since the 2024 aluminum in particular, is typically classified as un-weldable by conventional fusion welding techniques. Secondly...

  7. Influence of Welding Process and Post Weld Heat Treatment on Microstructure and Pitting Corrosion Behavior of Dissimilar Aluminium Alloy Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkata Ramana, V. S. N.; Mohammed, Raffi; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.; Srinivasa Rao, K.

    2018-03-01

    Welding of dissimilar Aluminum alloy welds is becoming important in aerospace, shipbuilding and defence applications. In the present work, an attempt has been made to weld dissimilar aluminium alloys using conventional gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and friction stir welding (FSW) processes. An attempt was also made to study the effect of post weld heat treatment (T4 condition) on microstructure and pitting corrosion behaviour of these welds. Results of the present investigation established the differences in microstructures of the base metals in T4 condition and in annealed conditions. It is evident that the thickness of the PMZ is relatively more on AA2014 side than that of AA6061 side. In FS welds, lamellar like shear bands are well noticed on the top of the stir zone. The concentration profile of dissimilar friction stir weld in T4 condition revealed that no diffusion has taken place at the interface. Poor Hardness is observed in all regions of FS welds compared to that of GTA welds. Pitting corrosion resistance of the dissimilar FS welds in all regions was improved by post weld heat treatment.

  8. Fatigue and Damage Tolerance of Friction Stir Welded Joints for Aerospace Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lemmen, H.J.K.

    2010-01-01

    Friction stir welding is a young welding process with high potential to replace riveted joints in aerospace structures like the fuselage. Friction stir welding is a robust process and capable of welding high strength aluminum alloys. Therefore it can lead to both costs and weight savings. To

  9. Evaluation of Electron Beam Welding Performance of AA6061-T6 Plate-type Fuel Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Soo-Sung; Seo, Kyoung-Seok; Lee, Don-Bae; Park, Jong-Man; Lee, Yoon-Sang; Lee, Chong-Tak

    2014-01-01

    As one of the most commonly used heat-treatable aluminum alloys, AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy is available in a wide range of structural materials. Typically, it is used in structural members, auto-body sheet and many other applications. Generally, this alloy is easily welded by conventional GTAW (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding), LBW (Laser Beam Welding) and EBW(Electron Beam Welding). However, certain characteristics, such as solidification cracking, porosity, HAZ (Heat-affected Zone) degradation must be considered during welding. Because of high energy density and low heat input, especially LBW and EBW processes possess the advantage of minimizing the fusing zone and HAZ and producing deeper penetration than arc welding processes. In present study, to apply for the plate-type nuclear fuel fabrication and assembly, a fundamental electron beam welding experiment using AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy specimens was conducted. Furthermore, to establish the suitable welding process, and satisfy the requirements of the weld quality, EBW apparatus using an electron welding gun and vacuum chamber was developed, and preliminary investigations for optimizing the welding parameters of the specimens using AA6061-T6 aluminum plates were also performed. The EB weld quality of AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy for the plate-type fuel assembly has been also studied by the weld penetrations of side plate to end fitting and fixing bar and weld inspections using computed tomography

  10. Welding Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This competency-based curriculum guide is a handbook for the development of welding trade programs. Based on a survey of Alaskan welding employers, it includes all competencies a student should acquire in such a welding program. The handbook stresses the importance of understanding the principles associated with the various elements of welding.…

  11. Effects of process parameters on microstructure and mechanical properties of friction stir lap linear welded 6061 aluminum alloy to NZ30K magnesium alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Tan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The microstructures and lap-shear behaviors of friction stir lap linear welded as-extruded 6061 Al alloy to as-cast Mg–3.0Nd–0.2Zn–0.7Zr (wt.% (NZ30K alloy joints were examined. Various tool rotation and travel speeds were adopted to prepare the joints. The analysis of temperature field indicates that the peak temperature for each sample can reach 450 °C, which exceeds the eutectic reaction temperatures of 437 °C and 450 °C according to the binary phase diagram of Al–Mg system. The fierce intermixing can be found at the interface between Al and Mg alloys, forming the intermetallic of Al3Mg2. Welds with the rotation speed of 900 rpm and travel speed of 120 mm/min display the highest tensile shear failure load of about 2.24 kN. The value was increased by 13% after the sample was heat treated at 400 °C for 0.5 h.

  12. Global and Local Mechanical Properties and Microstructure of Friction Stir Welds with Dissimilar Materials and/or Thicknesses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zadpoor, A.A.; Sinke, J.; Benedictus, R.

    2010-01-01

    This article studies the properties of a wide range of friction-stir-welded joints with dissimilar aluminum alloys or thicknesses. Two aluminum alloys, namely, 2024-T3 and 7075-T6, are selected for the study and are welded in ten different combinations of alloys and thicknesses. The welding

  13. Design of Friction Stir Spot Welding Tools by Using a Novel Thermal-Mechanical Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zheng-Ming; Qiu, Qi-Hong; Lin, Pai-Chen

    2016-08-09

    A simple thermal-mechanical model for friction stir spot welding (FSSW) was developed to obtain similar weld performance for different weld tools. Use of the thermal-mechanical model and a combined approach enabled the design of weld tools for various sizes but similar qualities. Three weld tools for weld radii of 4, 5, and 6 mm were made to join 6061-T6 aluminum sheets. Performance evaluations of the three weld tools compared fracture behavior, microstructure, micro-hardness distribution, and welding temperature of welds in lap-shear specimens. For welds made by the three weld tools under identical processing conditions, failure loads were approximately proportional to tool size. Failure modes, microstructures, and micro-hardness distributions were similar. Welding temperatures correlated with frictional heat generation rate densities. Because the three weld tools sufficiently met all design objectives, the proposed approach is considered a simple and feasible guideline for preliminary tool design.

  14. Wide Panel Testing Technique for Evaluating Repair Weld Strengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Patrick R.; Bynum, Julian E.; Shah, Sandeep R.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes a new tensile testing technique for evaluating the overall effect of a repair weld on the strength of a welded joint. Previously, repair weld strengths have been evaluated using one-inch width tensile specimens, but this technique does not capture all of the effects that result from a repair. The new technique involves testing of "wide panel" tensile specimens which contain the full length of a repair weld within a longer initial weld, allowing the specimen to capture the combined effects of residual stresses, local strength degradation, and load redistribution around a repair. The development of strains in the repair area of standard aluminum alloy specimens and new high-performance aluminum-lithium alloy specimens was observed and evaluated using photoelastic material. The results of this evaluation show an increased sensitivity to repair welding residual stresses in the aluminum-lithium alloy specimens.

  15. Fabrication of AA6061-T6 Plate Type Fuel Assembly Using Electron Beam Welding Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Soosung; Seo, Kyoungseok; Lee, Donbae; Park, Jongman; Lee, Yoonsang; Lee, Chongtak

    2014-01-01

    AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy is easily welded by conventional GTAW (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding), LBW (Laser Beam Welding) and EBW. However, certain characteristics, such as solidification cracking, porosity, HAZ (Heat-affected Zone) degradation must be considered during welding. Because of high energy density and low heat input, especially LBW and EBW processes possess the advantage of minimizing the fusing zone and HAZ and producing deeper penetration than arc welding processes. In present study, to apply for the nuclear fuel plate fabrication and assembly, a fundamental EBW experiment using AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy specimens was conducted. Furthermore, to establish the welding process, and satisfy the requirements of the weld quality, EBW apparatus using an electron welding gun and vacuum chamber was developed, and preliminary investigations for optimizing the welding parameters of the specimens using AA6061-T6 aluminum plates were also performed. The EB weld quality of AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy for the fuel plate assembly has been also studied by the shrinkage measurement and weld inspection using computed tomography. This study was carried out to determine the suitable welding parameters and to evaluate tensile strength of AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy. In the present experiment, satisfactory electron beam welding process of the full-sized sample was being developed. Based on this fundamental study, fabrication of the plate-type fuel assembly will be provided for the future Ki-Jang research reactor project

  16. Welding abilities of UFG metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morawiński, Łukasz; Chmielewski, Tomasz; Olejnik, Lech; Buffa, Gianluca; Campanella, Davide; Fratini, Livan

    2018-05-01

    Ultrafine Grained (UFG) metals are characterized by an average grain size of welded joints with similar properties to the base of UFG material are crucial for the production of finished engineering components. Conventional welding methods based on local melting of the joined edges cannot be used due to the UFG microstructure degradation caused by the heat occurrence in the heat affected zone. Therefore, the possibility of obtaining UFG materials joints with different shearing plane (SP) positions by means of friction welded processes, which do not exceed the melting temperature during the process, should be investigated. The article focuses on the Linear Friction Welding (LFW) method, which belongs to innovative welding processes based on mixing of the friction-heated material in the solid state. LFW is a welding process used to joint bulk components. In the process, the friction forces work due to the high frequency oscillation and the pressure between the specimens is converted in thermal energy. Character and range of recrystallization can be controlled by changing LFW parameters. Experimental study on the welded UFG 1070 aluminum alloy by means of FLW method, indicates the possibility of reducing the UFG structure degradation in the obtained joint. A laboratory designed LFW machine has been used to weld the specimens with different contact pressure and oscillation frequency.

  17. Advanced Welding Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Four advanced welding techniques and their use in NASA are briefly reviewed in this poster presentation. The welding techniques reviewed are: Solid State Welding, Friction Stir Welding (FSW), Thermal Stir Welding (TSW) and Ultrasonic Stir Welding.

  18. Resistance seam welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schueler, A.W.

    1977-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of the resistance seam welding process are presented. Types of seam welds, types of seam welding machines, seam welding power supplies, resistance seam welding parameters and seam welding characteristics of various metals

  19. Automatic orbital GTAW welding: Highest quality welds for tomorrow's high-performance systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henon, B. K.

    1985-01-01

    Automatic orbital gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) or TIG welding is certain to play an increasingly prominent role in tomorrow's technology. The welds are of the highest quality and the repeatability of automatic weldings is vastly superior to that of manual welding. Since less heat is applied to the weld during automatic welding than manual welding, there is less change in the metallurgical properties of the parent material. The possibility of accurate control and the cleanliness of the automatic GTAW welding process make it highly suitable to the welding of the more exotic and expensive materials which are now widely used in the aerospace and hydrospace industries. Titanium, stainless steel, Inconel, and Incoloy, as well as, aluminum can all be welded to the highest quality specifications automatically. Automatic orbital GTAW equipment is available for the fusion butt welding of tube-to-tube, as well as, tube to autobuttweld fittings. The same equipment can also be used for the fusion butt welding of up to 6 inch pipe with a wall thickness of up to 0.154 inches.

  20. Investigation of fracture in pressurized gas metal arc welded beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiple, C.R.; Merlini, R.J.; Adams, R.O.

    1976-01-01

    Premature failures during proof testing of pressurized-gas-metal-arc (PGMA) welded beryllium assemblies were investigated. The failures were almost entirely within the beryllium (a forming grade, similar to HP-10 or S-240), close to and parallel to the weld interface. The aluminum-silicon weld filler metal deposit was not centered in the weld groove in the failed assemblies, and failure occurred on the side of the weld opposite the bias in the weld deposit. Tensile tests of welded samples demonstrated that the failures were unrelated to residual machining damage from cutting the weld groove, and indicated small lack-of-fusion areas near the weld start to be the most likely origin of the failures. Acoustic emission was monitored during tensile tests of the welds. The majority of acoustic emission was probably from crack propagation through the weld filler metal. Tensile bars cut from the region of the weld start behaved differently; they failed at lower loads and exhibited an acoustic emission behavior believed to be from cracking in the weld metal-beryllium interface. Improvement in the quality of these and similar beryllium welds can therefore most likely be made by centering the weld deposit and reducing the size of the weld start defect. 21 fig

  1. Welding robot package; Arc yosetsu robot package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishikawa, S. [Yaskawa Electric Corp., Kitakyushu (Japan)

    1998-09-01

    For the conventional high-speed welding robot, the welding current was controlled mainly for reducing the spatters during short circuits and for stabilizing the beads by the periodic short circuits. However, an increase of deposition amount in response to the speed is required for the high-speed welding. Large-current low-spatter welding current region control was added. Units were integrated into a package by which the arc length is kept in short without dispersion of arc length for welding without defects such as undercut and unequal beads. In automobile industry, use of aluminum parts is extended for the light weight. The welding is very difficult, and automation is not so progressing in spite of the poor environment. Buckling of welding wire is easy to occur, and supply of wire is obstructed by the deposition of chipped powders on the torch cable, which stay within the contact chip resulting in the deposition. Dislocation of locus is easy to occur at the corner of rectangular pipe during the welding. By improving these troubles, an aluminum MIG welding robot package has been developed. 13 figs.

  2. Fatique Resistant, Energy Efficient Welding Program, Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egland, Keith; Ludewig, Howard

    2006-05-25

    The program scope was to affect the heat input and the resultant weld bead geometry by synchronizing robotic weave cycles with desired pulsed waveform shapes to develop process parameters relationships and optimized pulsed gas metal arc welding processes for welding fatique-critical structures of steel, high strength steel, and aluminum. Quality would be addressed by developing intelligent methods of weld measurement that accurately predict weld bead geometry from process information. This program was severely underfunded, and eventually terminated. The scope was redirected to investigate tandem narrow groove welding of steel butt joints during the one year of partial funding. A torch was designed and configured to perform a design of experiments of steel butt weld joints that validated the feasability of the process. An initial cost model estimated a 60% cost savings over conventional groove welding by eliminating the joint preparation and reducing the weld volume needed.

  3. Modelación del perfil de soldadura y de la cavidad de vapor en la aleación de aluminio 5182 soldada con láser. // Welding profile and steam cavity modelation in aluminum 5182 alloy welded with laser.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pastor

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available El presente trabajo incursiona en el desarrollo de modelos para predecir la forma de la cavidad de vapor y el perfil de laaleación de aluminio 5182 con soldadura láser, para lo cual ha sido empleado el paquete profesional de elementos finitosCOSMOS/M. La modelación de la soldadura ha sido realizada considerando como variable el grado de desenfoque del hazde láser, considerando el flujo de calor según un modelo Gaussiano, con un coeficiente de absorción de 0.24 para lacondición de haz enfocado y 0.16 para las condiciones de desenfoque negativo y positivo. La validez de los resultadosobtenidos se comprobó mediante los resultados obtenidos en pruebas experimentales.Palabras claves: Aleaciones de aluminio, láser de Nd:YAG._______________________________________________________________________AbstractThe purpose of this research is the study of laser welding process for the 5182 aluminum alloys and the development ofmodels by means of the COSMOS/M package, in order to predict the shape of the steam cavity and the weldingtemperatures profile. Modeling has been done considering the degree of defocusing. The heat flow applied on the modelswas a Gauss flow, with a coefficient of absorption of 0.24 for the condition of the focused face and 0.16 for the conditionsof negative and positive defocusing. The validity of the models has been demonstrated comparing their results with thoseobtained by experimental tests.Key words: Aluminum alloys, Nd: YAG laser.

  4. Welding Technician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ken

    2009-01-01

    About 95% of all manufactured goods in this country are welded or joined in some way. These welded products range in nature from bicycle handlebars and skyscrapers to bridges and race cars. The author discusses what students need to know about careers for welding technicians--wages, responsibilities, skills needed, career advancement…

  5. Welding rework data acquisition and automation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romine, Peter L.

    1996-01-01

    Aluminum-Lithium is a modern material that NASA MSFC is evaluating as an option for the aluminum alloys and other aerospace metals presently in use. The importance of aluminum-lithium is in it's superior weight to strength characteristics. However, aluminum-lithium has produced many challenges in regards to manufacturing and maintenance. The solution to these problems are vital to the future uses of the shuttle for delivering larger payloads into earth orbit and are equally important to future commercial applications of aluminum-lithium. The Metals Processes Branch at MSFC is conducting extensive tests on aluminum-lithium which includes the collection of large amounts of data. This report discusses the automation and data acquisition for two processes: the initial weld and the repair. The new approach reduces the time required to collect the data, increases the accuracy of the data, and eliminates several types of human errors during data collection and entry. The same material properties that enhance the weight to strength characteristics of aluminum-lithium contribute to the problems with cracks occurring during welding, especially during the repair/rework process. The repairs are required to remove flaws or defects discovered in the initial weld, either discovered by x-ray, visual inspection, or some other type of nondestructive evaluation. It has been observed that cracks typically appear as a result of or beyond the second repair. MSFC scientists have determined that residual mechanical stress introduced by the welding process is a primary cause of the cracking. Two obvious solutions are to either prevent or minimize the stress introduced during the welding process, or remove or reduce the stress after the welding process and MSFC is investigating both of these.

  6. Infrared sensing techniques for adaptive robotic welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, T.T.; Groom, K.; Madsen, N.H.; Chin, B.A.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this research is to investigate the feasibility of using infrared sensors to monitor the welding process. Data were gathered using an infrared camera which was trained on the molten metal pool during the welding operation. Several types of process perturbations which result in weld defects were then intentionally induced and the resulting thermal images monitored. Gas tungsten arc using ac and dc currents and gas metal arc welding processes were investigated using steel, aluminum and stainless steel plate materials. The thermal images obtained in the three materials and different welding processes revealed nearly identical patterns for the same induced process perturbation. Based upon these results, infrared thermography is a method which may be very applicable to automation of the welding process

  7. Braze welding of cobalt with a silver–copper filler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everett M. Criss

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method of joining cobalt by braze-welding it with a silver–copper filler was developed in order to better understand the residual stresses in beryllium–aluminum/silicon weldments which are problematic to investigate because of the high toxicity of Be. The base and filler metals of this new welding system were selected to replicate the physical properties, crystal structures, and chemical behavior of the Be–AlSi welds. Welding parameters of this surrogate Co–AgCu system were determined by experimentation combining 4-point bending tests and microscopy. Final welds are 5 pass manual TIG (tungsten inert gas, with He top gas and Ar back gas. Control of the welding process produces welds with full penetration melting of the cobalt base. Microscopy indicates that cracking is minimal, and not through thickness, whereas 4-point bending shows failure is not by base-filler delamination. These welds improve upon the original Be–AlSi welds, which do not possess full penetration, and have considerable porosity. We propose that utilization of our welding methods will increase the strength of the Be–AlSi weldments. The specialized welding techniques developed for this study may be applicable not only for the parent Be–AlSi welds, but to braze welds and welds utilizing brittle materials in general. This concept of surrogacy may prove useful in the study of many different types of exotic welds.

  8. Resistance welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Zhang, Wenqi; Rasmussen, Mogens H.

    2003-01-01

    Resistance welding comprises not only the well known spot welding process but also more complex projection welding operations, where excessive plastic deformation of the weld point may occur. This enables the production of complex geometries and material combinations, which are often not possible...... to weld by traditional spot welding operations. Such joining processes are, however, not simple to develop due to the large number of parameters involved. Development has traditionally been carried out by large experimental investigations, but the development of a numerical programme system has changed...... this enabling prediction of the welding performance in details. The paper describes the programme in short and gives examples on industrial applications. Finally investigations of causes for failure in a complex industrial joint of two dissimilar metals are carried out combining numerical modelling...

  9. In-Space Friction Stir Welding Machine, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Longhurst Engineering, PLC, and Vanderbilt University propose an in-space friction stir welding (FSW) machine for joining complex structural aluminum components. The...

  10. Latest MIG, TIG arc-YAG laser hybrid welding systems for various welding products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishide, Takashi; Tsubota, Shuho; Watanabe, Masao

    2003-03-01

    Laser welding is capable of high-efficiency low-strain welding, and so its applications are started to various products. We have also put the high-power YAG laser of up to 10 kW to practical welding use for various products. On the other hand the weakest point of this laser welding is considered to be strict in the welding gap aiming allowance. In order to solve this problem, we have developed hybrid welding of TIG, MIG arc and YAG laser, taking the most advantages of both the laser and arc welding. Since the electrode is coaxial to the optical axis of the YAG laser in this process, it can be applied to welding of various objects. In the coaxial MIG, TIG-YAG welding, in order to make irradiation positions of the YAG laser beams having been guided in a wire or an electrode focused to the same position, the beam transmitted in fibers is separated to form a space between the separated beams, in which the laser is guided. With this method the beam-irradiating area can be brought near or to the arc-generating point. This enables welding of all directions even for the member of a three-dimensional shape. This time we carried out welding for various materials and have made their welding of up to 1 mm or more in welding groove gap possible. We have realized high-speed 1-pass butt welding of 4m/min in welding speed with the laser power of 3 kW for an aluminum alloy plate of approximately 4 mm thick. For a mild steel plate also we have realized butt welding of 1m/min with 5 kW for 6 mm thick. Further, in welding of stainless steel we have shown its welding possibility, by stabilizing the arc with the YAG laser in the welding atmosphere of pure argon, and shown that this welding is effective in high-efficiency welding of various materials. Here we will report the fundamental welding performances and applications to various objects for the coaxial MIG, TIG-YAG welding we have developed.

  11. Aluminum Hydroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluminum hydroxide is used for the relief of heartburn, sour stomach, and peptic ulcer pain and to ... Aluminum hydroxide comes as a capsule, a tablet, and an oral liquid and suspension. The dose and ...

  12. Soldadura (Welding). Spanish Translations for Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohhertz, Durwin

    Thirty transparency masters with Spanish subtitles for key words are provided for a welding/general mechanical repair course. The transparency masters are on such topics as oxyacetylene welding; oxyacetylene welding equipment; welding safety; different types of welds; braze welding; cutting torches; cutting with a torch; protective equipment; arc…

  13. Low-cycle fatigue of welded joints of alloy AMg5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modestova, R.V.; Borisenko, V.A.; Parfenova, I.N.; Stepanov, S.V.

    1986-01-01

    The authors study the low-cycle fatigue of welded joints of aluminum alloy AMg5 in order to determine the cyclic strength coefficient of welded seams. Tests were carried out on cylindrical specimens of the parent metal, welded specimens, and models of welded vessels. The average values of mechanical properties of the specimens and the parent metal are shown. It is shown that when designing welded vessels of aluminum alloy AMg5, the permissible amplitudes of conventional compressive stresses are recommended to be determined as the lower of the two values calculated using the equations presented

  14. WELDING TORCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correy, T.B.

    1961-10-01

    A welding torch into which water and inert gas are piped separately for cooling and for providing a suitable gaseous atmosphere is described. A welding electrode is clamped in the torch by a removable collet sleeve and a removable collet head. Replacement of the sleeve and head with larger or smaller sleeve and head permits a larger or smaller welding electrode to be substituted on the torch. (AEC)

  15. Crack trajectory near a weld: Modeling and simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rashid, M.M.; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2008-01-01

    A 2D computational model of ductile fracture, in which arbitrary crack extension through the mesh is accommodated without mesh bias, is used to study ductile fracture near the weld line in welded aluminum plates. Comparisons of the calculated toughness behavior and crack trajectory are made...

  16. Welding stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poirier, J.; Barbe, B.; Jolly, N.

    1976-01-01

    The aim is to show how internal stresses are generated and to fix the orders of magnitude. A realistic case, the vertical welding of thick plates free to move one against the other, is described and the deformations and stresses are analyzed. The mathematical model UEDA, which accounts for the elastic modulus, the yield strength and the expansion coefficient of the metal with temperature, is presented. The hypotheses and results given apply only to the instantaneous welding of a welded plate and to a plate welded by a moving electrode [fr

  17. WELDING METHOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell, A.A.; Dunbar, J.V.; Ruffner, J.H.

    1959-09-29

    A semi-automatic method is described for the weld joining of pipes and fittings which utilizes the inert gasshielded consumable electrode electric arc welding technique, comprising laying down the root pass at a first peripheral velocity and thereafter laying down the filler passes over the root pass necessary to complete the weld by revolving the pipes and fittings at a second peripheral velocity different from the first peripheral velocity, maintaining the welding head in a fixed position as to the specific direction of revolution, while the longitudinal axis of the welding head is disposed angularly in the direction of revolution at amounts between twenty minutas and about four degrees from the first position.

  18. Tensile Properties of Friction Stir Welded Joints of AA 2024-T6 Alloy at Different Welding Speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avula, Dhananjayulu; Devuri, Venkateswarlu; Cheepu, Muralimohan; Dwivedi, Dheerendra Kumar

    2018-03-01

    The influence of welding speed on the friction stir welded joint properties of hardness, tensile properties, defects and microstructure characterization are studied in the present study. The friction stir welding was conducted on AA2014-T6 heat treated alloy with 5 mm thickness plate in butt joint configuration. The welding speed was varied from 8 mm/min to 120 mm/min at the fixed travel speed and load conditions. It is observed that the welding speeds at higher rate with wide range can be possible to weld this alloy at higher rates of tool revolution suggesting that the inherent capability of friction stir welding technique for aluminum 2014 alloys. The strength of the joints gradually increases with enhancing of welding speed. The micro structural observations exhibited the formation of equiaxed grains in the stir zone and slightly in the thermo-mechanically affected zone. In addition, the size of the grains decreases with increase in welding speed owing to the presence of low heat input. Hence the hardness of the joints slightly increased in the stir zones over the other zones of the weld nugget. The joint strength initially increases with the welding speed and starts to decreases after reaching to the maximum value. The relationship between the welding conditions and friction stir welded joint properties has been discussed.

  19. Effect of rotation speed and welding speed on Friction Stir Welding of AA1100 Aluminium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, P.; Bojanampati, S.; Karthikeyan, R.; Ganithi, R.

    2018-04-01

    Aluminum AA1100 is the most widely used grade of Aluminium due to its excellent corrosion resistance, high ductility and reflective finish, the selected material was welded with Friction Stir Welding (FSW) process on a CNC machine, using a combination of different tool rotation speed (1500 rpm, 2500 rpm, 3500 rpm) and welding speed (10 mm/min, 30 mm/min, 50 mm/min) as welding parameters. The effect of FSW using this welding parameter was studied by measuring the ultimate tensile strength of the welded joints. A high-speed steel tool was prepared for welding the Aluminium AA1100 alloy having an 8mm shoulder diameter and pin dimension of 4mm diameter and 2.8 mm length. The welded joints were tested using the universal testing machine. It was found that Ultimate Tensile Strength of FSW specimen was highest with a value of 98.08 MPa when the weld was performed at rotation speed of 1500 RPM and welding speed of 50 mm/min.

  20. TRANSIENT FINITE ELEMENT SIMULATION AND MICROSTRUCTURE EVOLUTION OF AA2219 WELD JOINT USING GAS TUNGSTEN ARC WELDING PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivaraman Arunkumar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study we focus on finite element simulation of gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW of AA2219 aluminum alloy and the behavioral of the microstructure before and after weld. The simulations were performed using commercial COMSOL Multiphysics software. The thermal history of the weld region was studied by initially developed mathematical model. A sweep type meshing was used and transient analysis was performed for one welding cycle. The highest temperature noted was 3568 °C during welding. The welding operation was performed on 200×100×25 mm plates. Through metallurgical characterization, it was observed that a fair copper rich cellular (CRC network existed in the weld region. A small amount of intermetallic compounds like Al2Cu is observed through the XRD pattern.

  1. Effect of tool shape and welding parameters on mechanical properties and microstructure of dissimilar friction stir welded aluminium alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chetan Aneja

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present experimental study, dissimilar aluminum alloy AA5083 and AA6082 were friction stir welded by varying tool shape, welding speed and rotary speed of the tool in order to investigate the effect of varying tool shape and welding parameters on the mechanical properties as well as microstructure. The friction stir welding (FSW process parameters have great influence on heat input per unit length of weld. The outcomes of experimental study prove that mechanical properties increases with decreasing welding speed. Furthermore mechanical properties were also found to improve as the rotary speed increases and the same phenomenon was found to happen while using straight cylindrical threaded pin profile tool. The microstructure of the dissimilar joints revealed that at low welding speeds, the improved material mixing was observed. The similar phenomenon was found to happen at higher rotational speeds using straight cylindrical threaded tool.

  2. Method for laser welding a fin and a tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuerschbach, Phillip W.; Mahoney, A. Roderick; Milewski, John O

    2001-01-01

    A method of laser welding a planar metal surface to a cylindrical metal surface is provided, first placing a planar metal surface into approximate contact with a cylindrical metal surface to form a juncture area to be welded, the planar metal surface and cylindrical metal surface thereby forming an acute angle of contact. A laser beam, produced, for example, by a Nd:YAG pulsed laser, is focused through the acute angle of contact at the juncture area to be welded, with the laser beam heating the juncture area to a welding temperature to cause welding to occur between the planar metal surface and the cylindrical metal surface. Both the planar metal surface and cylindrical metal surface are made from a reflective metal, including copper, copper alloys, stainless steel alloys, aluminum, and aluminum alloys.

  3. A simple aluminum gasket for use with both stainless steel and aluminum flanges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langley, R.A.

    1991-01-01

    A technique has been developed for making aluminum wire seal gaskets of various sizes and shapes for use with both stainless steel and aluminum alloy flanges. The gasket material used is 0.9999 pure aluminum, drawn to a diameter of 3 mm. This material can be easily welded and formed into various shapes. A single gasket has been successfully used up to five times without baking. The largest gasket tested to date is 3.5 m long and was used in the shape of a parallelogram. Previous use of aluminum wire gaskets, including results for bakeout at temperatures from 20 to 660{degree}C, is reviewed. A search of the literature indicates that this is the first reported use of aluminum wire gaskets for aluminum alloy flanges. The technique is described in detail, and the results are summarized. 11 refs., 4 figs.

  4. STUDY OF ARC IMPULSE FREQUENCY EFFECT ON THE STRUCTURE AND PROPERTIES OF WELDED CONNECTION ELEMENTS IN ALUMINIUM PIPELINE SYSTEMS, MADE WITH MASTERTIG 3500

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr. Pavel V. Bakhmatov

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Summary . The article focuses on the arc impulse frequency effect on the structure and properties of welded connections in aluminum pipeline systems hand-operated with argon-arc welding nonconsumable rod on MasterTig3500. It was revealed that the frequency of the welding current impulses plays an important role in the forming of the welded connection. The authors determined the optimal value of the welding current frequency significantly accelerating the welding process to ensure consistent quality of the weld. The authors detailed some features of cleaning assembly parts with a wire brush prior to welding process.

  5. Welding process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul Nassir Ibrahim; Azali Muhammad; Ab. Razak Hamzah; Abd. Aziz Mohamed; Mohamad Pauzi Ismail

    2008-01-01

    For the final chapter of this book, there is basic introduction on welding process. The good radiography must know somehow on welding process so that they can know what kind of welding that must rejected or not. All of the exposure technique that mention in earlier chapter almost applicable in this field because welding process is critical problem if there is no inspection will be done. So, for this chapter, all the discontinuity that usually appeared will be discussed and there is another discontinuity maybe not to important and do not give big impact if found it, do not described here. On top of that, the decision to accept or reject based on code, standard and specification that agreed by both to make sure that decision that agreed is corrected and more meaningful.

  6. SISTEM KONTROL JARINGAN SYARAF TIRUAN BERBASIS SIMULASI PADA PENGELASAN PIPA ALUMINUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ario Sunar Baskoro

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Dalam penelitian ini telah dikembangkan sistem pengelasan otomatis Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG dengan menggunakan sensor vision pada pengelasan pipa aluminum. Penelitian ini mempelajari proses pengelasan cerdas pipa paduan aluminum 6063S-T5 dalam posisi tetap dengan obor las (welding torch bergerak dan menggunakan mesin las AC. Model Jaringan Syaraf Tiruan (neural network untuk pengendalian kecepatan pengelasan telah dikembangkan agar dapat bekerja secara otomatis. Untuk melatih Jaringan Syaraf Tiruan ini diperlukan cukup banyak data dari penelitian sehingga memerlukan waktu dan dana yang cukup besar. Penelitian ini menawarkan proses baru untuk memperkirakan dan mengendalikan penetrasi pengelasan dalam pengelasan pipa paduan aluminum. Penetrasi las diperkirakan dengan menggunakan metode perkiraan secara hibrida yaitu dengan mengombinasikan simulasi pengelasan dan pengamatan visual menggunakan sensor vision. Dari hasil eksperimen didapatkan bahwa sistem pengendalian cukup efektif untuk mendeteksi kolam las (molten pool dan menghasilkan pengelasan yang baik. This research has developed an automatic welding system Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG using sensor vision on aluminum pipe welding. This research studied the process of intelligent welding of alloy pipe aluminum 6063S-T5 in a fixed position with a welding torch to move and use the AC welding machines. The neural network model to control the speed of the welding has been developed in order to work automatically. The neural network train need quite a lot of data from studies that require time and substansial funds. This research offers a new process for estimating and controlling welding penetration in welding of aluminum alloy pipe. Weld penetration was estimated by using the approximate hybrid method that combines the simulations of welding and visual inspection using sensor vision. The experiment results that the control system is effective enough to detect the molten pool and produce a good weld.

  7. Syllabus in Trade Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development.

    The syllabus outlines material for a course two academic years in length (minimum two and one-half hours daily experience) leading to entry-level occupational ability in several welding trade areas. Fourteen units covering are welding, gas welding, oxyacetylene welding, cutting, nonfusion processes, inert gas shielded-arc welding, welding cast…

  8. Quantifying the debonding of inclusions through tomography and computational homology.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Wei-Yang; Johnson, George C. (University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA); Mota, Alejandro; Foulk, James W., III; Jin, Huiqing

    2010-09-01

    This report describes a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project to use of synchrotron-radiation computed tomography (SRCT) data to determine the conditions and mechanisms that lead to void nucleation in rolled alloys. The Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has provided SRCT data of a few specimens of 7075-T7351 aluminum plate (widely used for aerospace applications) stretched to failure, loaded in directions perpendicular and parallel to the rolling direction. The resolution of SRCT data is 900nm, which allows elucidation of the mechanisms governing void growth and coalescence. This resolution is not fine enough, however, for nucleation. We propose the use statistics and image processing techniques to obtain sub-resolution scale information from these data, and thus determine where in the specimen and when during the loading program nucleation occurs and the mechanisms that lead to it. Quantitative analysis of the tomography data, however, leads to the conclusion that the reconstruction process compromises the information obtained from the scans. Alternate, more powerful reconstruction algorithms are needed to address this problem, but those fall beyond the scope of this project.

  9. Feasibility of ultrasonic and eddy current methods for measurement of residual stress in shot peened metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavrentyev, Anton I.; Stucky, Paul A.; Veronesi, William A.

    2000-01-01

    Shot peening is a well-known method for extending the fatigue life of metal components by introducing compressive residual stresses near their surfaces. The capability to nondestructively evaluate the near surface residual stress would greatly aid the assurance of proper fatigue life in shot-peened components. This paper presents preliminary results from a feasibility study examining the use of ultrasonic and eddy current NDE methods for residual stress measurement in components where the stress has been introduced by shot peening. With an ultrasonic method, a variation of ultrasonic surface wave speed with shot peening intensity was measured. Near surface conductivity was measured by eddy current methods. Since the effective penetration depth of both methods employed is inversely related to the excitation frequency, by making measurements at different frequencies, each method has the potential to provide the stress-depth profile. Experiments were conducted on aluminum specimens (alloy 7075-T7351) peened within the Almen peening intensity range of 4C to 16C. The experimental results obtained demonstrate a correlation between peening intensity and Rayleigh wave velocity and between peening intensity and conductivity. The data suggests either of the methods may be suitable, with limitations, for detecting unsatisfactory levels of shot peening. Several factors were found to contribute to the measured responses: surface roughness, near surface plastic deformation (cold work) and residual stress. The contribution of each factor was studied experimentally. The feasibility of residual stress determination from the measured data is discussed

  10. Diffusionless bonding of aluminum to Zircaloy-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, R.D.

    1965-04-01

    Aluminum can be bonded to zirconium without difficulty even when a thin layer of oxide is present on the surface of the zirconium . No detectable diffusion takes place during the bonding process. The bond layer can be stretched as much. as 8% without affecting the bond. The bond can be heated for 1000 hours at 260 o C (500 o F), and can be water quenched from 260 o C (500 o F) without any noticeable change in the bond strength. An extrusion technique has been devised for making transition sections of aluminum bonded to zirconium which can then be used to join these metals by conventional welding. Welding can be done close to the bond zone without seriously affecting the integrity of the bond. This method of bonding aluminum to Zircaloy-2 is covered by Canadian patent 702,438 January 26, 1965. (author)

  11. Friction stir scribe welding technique for dissimilar joining of aluminium and galvanised steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Tianhao [Center for Friction Stir Processing, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX, USA; Sidhar, Harpreet [Center for Friction Stir Processing, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX, USA; Mishra, Rajiv S. [Center for Friction Stir Processing, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX, USA; Hovanski, Yuri [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Energy Materials and Manufacturing, Richland, WA, USA; Upadhyay, Piyush [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Energy Materials and Manufacturing, Richland, WA, USA; Carlson, Blair [General Motors Technical Center, Warren, MI, USA

    2017-10-04

    Friction stir scribe technology, a derivative of friction stir welding, was applied for the dissimilar lap welding of an aluminum alloy and galvanized mild steel sheets. During the process, the rotating tool with a cobalt steel scribe first penetrated the top material — aluminum — and then the scribe cut the bottom material — steel. The steel was displaced into the upper material to produce a characteristic hook feature. Lap welds were shear tested, and their fracture paths were studied. Welding parameters affected the welding features including hook height, which turned out to be highly related to fracture position. Therefore, in this paper, the relationships among welding parameters, hook height, joint strength and fracture position are presented. In addition, influence of zinc coating on joint strength was also studied. Keywords: friction stir scribe technology; dissimilar material welding; zinc coating; hook height; joint strength; fracture position

  12. Mechanisms of the porosity formation during the fiber laser lap welding of aluminium alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Wang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available When joining the aluminum alloys, one of the biggest challenges is the formation of porosity, which deteriorates mechanical properties of welds. In this study, the lap welding was conducted on an aluminum alloy 5754 metal sheets with a thickness of 2 mm. The effects of various laser welding parameters on the weld quality were investigated. The porosity content was measured by X-ray inspections. The key is to control the solidification duration of molten pool. When the solidification duration of molten pool is large enough, more bubbles can escape from the molten pool and less remain as porosity.

  13. Tailored Welding Technique for High Strength Al-Cu Alloy for Higher Mechanical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biradar, N. S.; Raman, R.

    AA2014 aluminum alloy, with 4.5% Cu as major alloying element, offers highest strength and hardness values in T6 temper and finds extensive use in aircraft primary structures. However, this alloy is difficult to weld by fusion welding because the dendritic structure formed can affect weld properties seriously. Among the welding processes, AC-TIG technique is largely used for welding. As welded yield strength was in the range of 190-195 MPa, using conventional TIG technique. Welding metallurgy of AA2014 was critically reviewed and factors responsible for lower properties were identified. Square-wave AC TIG with Transverse mechanical arc oscillation (TMAO) was postulated to improve the weld strength. A systematic experimentation using 4 mm thick plates produced YS in the range of 230-240 MPa, has been achieved. Through characterization including optical and SEM/EDX was conducted to validate the metallurgical phenomena attributable to improvement in weld properties.

  14. Processing and structure of in situ Fe-Al alloys produced by gas tungsten arc welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banovic, S.W.; DuPont, J.N.; Marder, A.R. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States). Energy Research Center

    1997-02-14

    Iron aluminide weld overlays are being investigated for corrosion and erosion protection of boiler tubes in low NOx burners. The primary objective of the research is to identify overlay compositions which can be deposited in a crack-free condition and provide corrosion protection in moderately reducing environments. In the current phase of work, Fe-Al alloy weld overlays were produced by depositing commercially pure aluminum wire on to low carbon steel substrates using Gas Tungsten Arc Welding. A systematic variation of the wire feed speed and current, two major factors affecting dilution, resulted in a variation in aluminum contents of the welds ranging from 3--42 wt% aluminum. The aluminum content was observed to increase with wire feed speed and a decrease in the current. The aluminum content was also found to affect the cracking susceptibility of the overlays. At 10wt% aluminum, few to no cracks were observed in the deposits. Above this value, cracking was prevalent throughout the weld. In addition, two types of microstructures were found correlating to different concentrations of aluminum. A homogeneous matrix with second phase particles consisting of coarse columnar grains was found for low aluminum concentrations. With higher aluminum contents, a two-phase constituent was observed to surround primary dendrites growing from the substrate. The transition of the microstructures occurred between 24 and 32 wt% Al.

  15. Abnormal Grain Growth Suppression in Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hales, Stephen J. (Inventor); Claytor, Harold Dale (Inventor); Alexa, Joel A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention provides a process for suppressing abnormal grain growth in friction stir welded aluminum alloys by inserting an intermediate annealing treatment ("IAT") after the welding step on the article. The IAT may be followed by a solution heat treatment (SHT) on the article under effectively high solution heat treatment conditions. In at least some embodiments, a deformation step is conducted on the article under effective spin-forming deformation conditions or under effective superplastic deformation conditions. The invention further provides a welded article having suppressed abnormal grain growth, prepared by the process above. Preferably the article is characterized with greater than about 90% reduction in area fraction abnormal grain growth in any friction-stir-welded nugget.

  16. Analysis of the unstressed lattice spacing, d0, for the determination of the residual stress in a friction stir welded plate of an age-hardenable aluminum alloy – Use of equilibrium conditions and a genetic algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cioffi, F.; Hidalgo, J.I.; Fernández, R.; Pirling, T.; Fernández, B.; Gesto, D.; Puente Orench, I.; Rey, P.; González-Doncel, G.

    2014-01-01

    Procedures based on equilibrium conditions (stress and bending moment) have been used to obtain an unstressed lattice spacing, d 0 , as a crucial requirement for calculating the residual stress (RS) profile across a joint conducted on a 10 mm thick plate of age-hardenable AA2024 alloy by friction stir welding (FSW). Two procedures have been used that take advantage of neutron diffraction measurements. First, equilibrium conditions were imposed on sections parallel to the weld so that a constant d 0 value corresponding to the base material region could be calculated analytically. Second, balance conditions were imposed on a section transverse to the weld. Then, using the data and a genetic algorithm, suitable d 0 values for the different regions of the weld have been found. For several reasons, the comb method has proved to be inappropriate for RS determination in the case of age-hardenable alloys. However, the equilibrium conditions, together with the genetic algorithm, has been shown to be very suitable for determining RS profiles in FSW joints of these alloys, where inherent microstructural variations of d 0 across the weld are expected

  17. Electron-beam fusion welding of beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, R.P.; Dixon, R.D.; Liby, A.L.

    1978-01-01

    Ingot-sheet beryllium (Be) having three different chemistries and three different thicknesses was fusion-welded by the electron-beam process. Several different preheats were used to obtain 100% penetration and crack-free welds. Cracking susceptability was found to be related to aluminum (Al) content; the higher Al-content material was most susceptable. However, adequate preheat allowed full penetration and crack-free welds to be made in all materials tested. The effect of a post-weld heat treatment on the mechanical properties of these compositions was also determined. The heat treatment produced no significant effect on the ultimate tensile strength. However, the yield strength was decreased and the ductility was increased. These changes are attributed to the formation of AlFeBe 4 and FeBe 11

  18. Structure/property relationships in multipass GMA welding of beryllium.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hochanadel, P. W. (Patrick W.); Hults, W. L. (William L.); Thoma, D. J. (Dan J.); Dave, V. R. (Vivek R.); Kelly, A. M. (Anna Marie); Pappin, P. A. (Pallas A.); Cola, M. J. (Mark J.); Burgardt, P. (Paul)

    2001-01-01

    Beryllium is an interesting metal that has a strength to weight ratio six times that of steel. Because of its unique mechanical properties, beryllium is used in aerospace applications such as satellites. In addition, beryllium is also used in x-ray windows because it is nearly transparent to x-rays. Joining of beryllium has been studied for decades (Ref.l). Typically joining processes include braze-welding (either with gas tungsten arc or gas metal arc), soldering, brazing, and electron beam welding. Cracking which resulted from electron beam welding was recently studied to provide structure/property relationships in autogenous welds (Ref. 2). Braze-welding utilizes a welding arc to melt filler, and only a small amount of base metal is melted and incorporated into the weld pool. Very little has been done to characterize the braze-weld in terms of the structure/property relationships, especially with reference to multipass welding. Thus, this investigation was undertaken to evaluate the effects of multiple passes on microstructure, weld metal composition, and resulting material properties for beryllium welded with aluminum-silicon filler metal.

  19. Friction stir spot welding of dissimilar aluminium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozkurt, Yahya

    2016-01-01

    Friction stir spot welding (FSSW) has been proposed as an effective technology to spot weld the so-called “difficult to be welded” metal alloys such as thin sheets aluminum alloys and dissimilar materials. FSSW is derived from friction stir welding technology, its principle benefit being low cost joining, lower welding temperature and shorter welding time than conventional welding methods. In this study, dissimilar AlMg 3 and AlCu 4 Mg 1 aluminium alloy plates were FSSWed by offsetting the low strength sheet on upper side of the weld. The effects of tool rotation speed on the microstructure, lap shear fracture load (LSFL), microhardness and fracture features of the weld are investigated by constant welding parameters. The maximum LSFL was obtained by increasing the tool rotational speed. However, the joints exhibited pull-out nugget fracture mode under lap shear tensile testing conditions. The largest completely bonded zone was observed as 5.86 mm which was narrower at the opposite position of the joint. Key words: friction stir spot welding, aluminium alloys, mechanical properties, dissimilar joint, welding parameters

  20. Ship construction and welding

    CERN Document Server

    Mandal, Nisith R

    2017-01-01

    This book addresses various aspects of ship construction, from ship types and construction materials, to welding technologies and accuracy control. The contents of the book are logically organized and divided into twenty-one chapters. The book covers structural arrangement with longitudinal and transverse framing systems based on the service load, and explains basic structural elements like hatch side girders, hatch end beams, stringers, etc. along with structural subassemblies like floors, bulkheads, inner bottom, decks and shells. It presents in detail double bottom construction, wing tanks & duct keels, fore & aft end structures, etc., together with necessary illustrations. The midship sections of various ship types are introduced, together with structural continuity and alignment in ship structures. With regard to construction materials, the book discusses steel, aluminum alloys and fiber reinforced composites. Various methods of steel material preparation are discussed, and plate cutting and form...

  1. Improving the particle distribution and mechanical properties of friction-stir-welded composites by using a smooth pin tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huijie; Hu, Yanying; Zhao, Yunqiang; Fujii, Hidetoshi

    2017-09-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a very promising technique for joining particle-reinforced aluminum-matrix composites (PRAMCs), but with increase in the volume fraction of reinforcing particles, their distribution in welds becomes inhomogeneous. This leads to an inconsistent deformation of welds and their destruction at low stresses. In order to improve the weld microstructure, a smooth pin tool was used for the friction stir welding of AC4A + 30 vol.% SiC particle-reinforced aluminum-matrix composites. The present work describes the effect of welding parameters on the characteristics of particle distribution and the mechanical properties of welds. The ultimate strength of weld reached, 309 MPa, was almost 190% of that of the basic material. The mechanism of SiC particle conglomeration is clearly illustrated by means of schematic illustrations.

  2. Caracterização microestrutural e comportamento mecânico das ligas de alumínio AA2139 T3 e T8 soldadas por fricção rotativa com mistura Microstructural characterization and mechanical behavior of an AA2139 T3 and T8 aluminum alloy joined by friction stir welding (FSW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinícius Toledo Saccon

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho visou analisar a caracterização microestrutural e o comportamento mecânico das ligas de alumínio AA2139 T3 e T8 quando são soldadas pelo processo Soldagem por Fricção Rotativa com Mistura, o qual é realizado na fase sólida. A análise microestrutural foi realizada utilizando microscopia óptica e eletrônica de varredura, e o comportamento mecânico foi avaliado através de medidas de microdureza e ensaio de tração convencional complementado pelo sistema ARAMIS. As ligas foram soldadas nos mesmos parâmetros de soldagem e com a mesma ferramenta, a fim de avaliar a qualidade da junta soldada para as duas condições de tratamento térmico, T3 e T8. Os resultados obtidos mostraram soldas resistentes para ambos os tratamentos térmicos, porém com melhores propriedades mecânicas para a liga AA2139 T3.This work aimed to study the microstructural characterization and mechanical behavior of AA2139 T3 and T8 aluminum alloys joined by FSW - Friction Stir Welding. The microstructural analysis has been done using optical microscope and scanning electron microscopy, and the mechanical analysis were evaluate through microhardness testing and conventional tensile test using the ARAMIS system . Each alloy were welded using the same welding parameters and the same tool in order to evaluate the joint quality for both heat treatment used for this work, T3 and T8. The result showed sounds joints for both heat treatments, although with better mechanical properties for the alloy AA2139 T3.

  3. Welding template

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Venue, R.J. of.

    1976-01-01

    A welding template is described which is used to weld strip material into a cellular grid structure for the accommodation of fuel elements in a nuclear reactor. On a base plate the template carries a multitude of cylindrical pins whose upper half is narrower than the bottom half and only one of which is attached to the base plate. The others are arrested in a hexagonal array by oblong webs clamped together by chuck jaws which can be secured by means of screws. The parts are ground very accurately. The template according to the invention is very easy to make. (UWI) [de

  4. Solid state impact welding of BMG and copper by vaporizing foil actuator welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vivek, Anupam, E-mail: vivek.4@osu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, 2041 College Road, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Presley, Michael [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, 2041 College Road, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Flores, Katharine M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, 2041 College Road, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Washington University, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Hutchinson, Nicholas H.; Daehn, Glenn S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, 2041 College Road, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2015-05-14

    The objective of this study was to create impact welds between a Zr-based Bulk Metallic Glass (BMG) and copper at a laboratory scale and subsequently investigate the relationship between interfacial structure and mechanical properties. Vaporizing Foil Actuator (VFA) has recently been demonstrated as a versatile tool for metalworking applications: impact welding of dissimilar materials being one of them. Its implementation for welding is termed as VFA Welding or VFAW. With 8 kJ input energy into an aluminum foil actuator, a 0.5 mm thick Cu110 alloy sheet was launched toward a BMG target resulting in an impact at a velocity of nearly 600 m/s. For this experiment, the welded interface was straight with a few BMG fragments embedded in the copper sheet in some regions. Hardness tests across the interface showed increase in strength on the copper side. Instrumented peel test resulted in failure in the parent copper sheet. A slower impact velocity during a separate experiment resulted in a weld, which had wavy regions along the interface and in peel failure again happened in the parent copper sheet. Some through-thickness cracks were observed in the BMG plate and there was some spall damage in the copper flyers. TEM electron diffraction on a sample, cut out from the wavy weld interface region using a focused ion beam, showed that devitrification of the BMG was completely avoided in this welding process.

  5. Microstructure examination and microhardness of friction stir welded joint of (AA7020-O after PWHT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghada M.F. Essa

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the microstructure and microhardness of the welded joints of the annealed aluminum alloy AA7020-O produced by friction stir welding (FSW technique. The material was applied to post weld heat treatment (solution treatment and artificially aged, T6. The traverse speed and the rotational speed are the most important process parameters of FSW, and have great influence on the heat input of the welding operation which governs the welded joints quality. To investigate their effect, the welding operation was performed using three traverse speeds, 20, 40 and 60 mm/s with two rotational speeds of 1125 and 1400 rpm, and other welding parameters were kept constant to produce comparable joints. It was found that the two rotational speeds are accepted with lower traverse speeds to produce sound joints. Microstructure of the welded joints was significantly affected by the FSW process parameters, and slight effect was reported for the grain size. Microhardness examination showed high weld joint quality with respect to the base metal hardness, which proves the reprecipitation of the hardening phase in the weld zone. The microhardness profile was strongly dependant on the rotational speed, and the average values of the joints hardness have increased with the decrease in the rotational speed, where it have been slightly affected by the welding speed. Keywords: Friction stir welding, Aluminum alloy, Mechanical properties, Microstructures

  6. Texture analysis of a friction stir welded ultrafine grained Al–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composite produced by accumulative roll-bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shamanian, Morteza, E-mail: shamanian@cc.iut.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mohammadnezhad, Mahyar [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Szpunar, Jerzy [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N5A9 (Canada)

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • Aluminum matrix composite was successfully bonded using friction stir welding. • After welding process the fraction of low angle boundary area rapidly decreases. • The grain growth in the NZ is related the increase of temperature during the FSW. • The aluminum matrix composite has a strong Rotated Cube texture. • The weld nugget has a Rotated Cube and shear texture. - Abstract: In recent years, several studies have been focused on friction stir welding of aluminum alloys, and some researchers have also been reported on welding of aluminum-based composites. In the present research, ultrafine grained sheets of aluminum matrix composite (Al–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) were produced by accumulative roll-bonding (ARB) technique. The aluminum composite sheets were then joined by friction stir welding. The present work describes the effect of the FSW process on the microstructure and crystallographic textures in the base metal and weld nugget. Electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) results demonstrated the existence of different grain orientations within the weld nugget as compared to the base metal. Al composite plates have a Rotated Cube texture component. Moreover, in the nugget, grain structure with Rotated Cube and shear texture developed. Friction stir welding coarsened the grain size in the weld zone from the original grain size of 3–17 μm.

  7. Texture analysis of a friction stir welded ultrafine grained Al–Al2O3 composite produced by accumulative roll-bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamanian, Morteza; Mohammadnezhad, Mahyar; Szpunar, Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Aluminum matrix composite was successfully bonded using friction stir welding. • After welding process the fraction of low angle boundary area rapidly decreases. • The grain growth in the NZ is related the increase of temperature during the FSW. • The aluminum matrix composite has a strong Rotated Cube texture. • The weld nugget has a Rotated Cube and shear texture. - Abstract: In recent years, several studies have been focused on friction stir welding of aluminum alloys, and some researchers have also been reported on welding of aluminum-based composites. In the present research, ultrafine grained sheets of aluminum matrix composite (Al–Al 2 O 3 ) were produced by accumulative roll-bonding (ARB) technique. The aluminum composite sheets were then joined by friction stir welding. The present work describes the effect of the FSW process on the microstructure and crystallographic textures in the base metal and weld nugget. Electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) results demonstrated the existence of different grain orientations within the weld nugget as compared to the base metal. Al composite plates have a Rotated Cube texture component. Moreover, in the nugget, grain structure with Rotated Cube and shear texture developed. Friction stir welding coarsened the grain size in the weld zone from the original grain size of 3–17 μm

  8. Formation mechanism for the nanoscale amorphous interface in pulse-welded Al/Fe bimetallic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jingjing; Yu, Qian; Zhang, Zijiao; Xu, Wei; Sun, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Pulse or impact welding traditionally has been referred to as “solid-state” welding. By integrating advanced interface characterizations and diffusion calculations, we report that the nanoscale amorphous interface in the pulse-welded Al/Fe bimetallic system is formed by rapid heating and melting of a thin Al layer at the interface, diffusion of iron atoms in the liquid aluminum, and subsequent rapid quenching with diffused iron atoms in solution. This finding challenges the commonly held belief regarding the solid-state nature of the impact-based welding process for dissimilar metals. Elongated ultra-fine grains with high dislocation density and ultra-fine equiaxed grains also are observed in the weld interface vicinity on the steel and aluminum sides, respectively, which further confirms that melting and the subsequent recrystallization occurred on the aluminum side of the interface.

  9. Formation mechanism for the nanoscale amorphous interface in pulse-welded Al/Fe bimetallic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jingjing [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822 (United States); Yu, Qian; Zhang, Zijiao [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Center for Electron Microscope, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Xu, Wei; Sun, Xin, E-mail: xin.sun@pnnl.gov [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States)

    2016-05-16

    Pulse or impact welding traditionally has been referred to as “solid-state” welding. By integrating advanced interface characterizations and diffusion calculations, we report that the nanoscale amorphous interface in the pulse-welded Al/Fe bimetallic system is formed by rapid heating and melting of a thin Al layer at the interface, diffusion of iron atoms in the liquid aluminum, and subsequent rapid quenching with diffused iron atoms in solution. This finding challenges the commonly held belief regarding the solid-state nature of the impact-based welding process for dissimilar metals. Elongated ultra-fine grains with high dislocation density and ultra-fine equiaxed grains also are observed in the weld interface vicinity on the steel and aluminum sides, respectively, which further confirms that melting and the subsequent recrystallization occurred on the aluminum side of the interface.

  10. Problems in repair-welding of duplex-treated tool steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Muhič

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper addresses problems in laser welding of die-cast tools used for aluminum pressure die-castings and plastic moulds. To extend life cycle of tools various surface improvements are used. These surface improvements significantly reduce weldability of the material. This paper presents development of defects in repair welding of duplex-treated tool steel. The procedure is aimed at reduction of defects by the newly developed repair laser welding techniques. Effects of different repair welding process parameters and techniques are considered. A microstructural analysis is conducted to detect defect formation and reveal the best laser welding method for duplex-treated tools.

  11. A fundamental study on the structural integrity of magnesium alloys joined by friction stir welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Harish Mangebettu

    The goal of this research is to study the factors that influence the physical and mechanical properties of lap-shear joints produced using friction stir welding. This study focuses on understanding the effect of tool geometry and weld process parameters including the tool rotation rate, tool plunge depth and dwell time on the mechanical performance of similar magnesium alloy and dissimilar magnesium to aluminum alloy weld joints. A variety of experimental activities were conducted including tensile and fatigue testing, fracture surface and failure analysis, microstructure characterization, hardness measurements and chemical composition analysis. An investigation on the effect of weld process conditions in friction stir spot welding of magnesium to magnesium produced in a manner that had a large effective sheet thickness and smaller interfacial hook height exhibited superior weld strength. Furthermore, in fatigue testing of friction stir spot welded of magnesium to magnesium alloy, lap-shear welds produced using a triangular tool pin profile exhibited better fatigue life properties compared to lap-shear welds produced using a cylindrical tool pin profile. In friction stir spot welding of dissimilar magnesium to aluminum, formation of intermetallic compounds in the stir zone of the weld had a dominant effect on the weld strength. Lap-shear dissimilar welds with good material mixture and discontinues intermetallic compounds in the stir zone exhibited superior weld strength compared to lap-shear dissimilar welds with continuous formation of intermetallic compounds in the stir zone. The weld structural geometry like the interfacial hook, hook orientation and bond width also played a major role in influencing the weld strength of the dissimilar lap-shear friction stir spot welds. A wide scatter in fatigue test results was observed in friction stir linear welds of aluminum to magnesium alloys. Different modes of failure were observed under fatigue loading including crack

  12. Effects of Mars Atmosphere on Arc Welds: Phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtright, Z. S.

    2018-01-01

    Gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) is a vital fusion welding process widely used throughout the aerospace industry. Its use may be critical for the repair or manufacture of systems, rockets, or facilities on the Martian surface. Aluminum alloy AA2219-T87 and titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V butt welds have been investigated for weldability and weld properties in a simulated Martian gas environment. The resulting simulated Martian welds were compared to welds made in a terrestrial atmosphere, all of which used argon shielding gas. It was found that GTAW is a process that may be used in a Martian gas environment, not accounting for pressure and gravitational effects, as long as adequate argon shielding gas is used to protect the weld metal. Simulated Martian welds exhibited higher hardness in all cases and higher tensile strength in the case of AA2219-T87. This has been attributed to the absorption of carbon into the fusion zone, causing carbide precipitates to form. These precipitates may act to pin dislocations upon tensile testing of AA2219-T87. Dissolved carbon may have also led to carburization, which may have caused the increase in hardness within the fusion zone of the welds. Based on the results of this experiment and other similar experiments, GTAW appears to be a promising process for welding in a Martian gas environment. Additional funding and experimentation is necessary to determine the effects of the low pressure and low gravity environment found on Mars on GTAW.

  13. Influencia de los parámetros de la soldadura metálica fría en las aleaciones AA5083 y AA6061//Influence of the colt metal welding parameters on the AA5083 and AA6061 aluminum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Eduardo de‐Luna‐Alanís

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available El trabajo tuvo como objetivo evaluar la influencia de la velocidad de la soldadura y de las correcciones del arco y pulso en el proceso de Transferencia Metálica Fría sobre las propiedades mecánicas de las aleaciones AA5083 y AA6061. Se desarrolló un diseño experimental de tipo factorial multinivel, con 4 factores independientes (Corrección de Arco, Pulso, Velocidad de Soldadura y Aleación. Los parámetros fundamentales fueron: Corriente de base 250 A; Voltaje de arco 21 V y Polaridad (Direct current electrode positive, DCEP. La evaluación se realizó a través de un ensayo de tracción transversal sobre probetas planas obtenidas de los cupones soldados. Se demuestra que el modelo aplicado es adecuado, revelándose en los experimentos diferencias sustanciales en las propiedades Tensión de fluencia 29,56 %, Módulo de elasticidad 51,16 % y Trabajo específico de deformación elástica 42,30 %, el cual no posee una dependencia lineal con elresto de las propiedades anteriores.Palabras claves: transferencia metálica fría, aleación AA5083, aleación AA6061, propiedades mecánicas._______________________________________________________________________________AbstractThe work objective was to evaluatethe influence of Cold Metal Transfer process arc and pulse corrections and welding speed on the mechanical properties of AA5083 and AA6061 aluminum alloys. For it, a Factorial Multilevel experimental design whit 4 independent factor (arc correction, pulse correction, welding speed and alloy was developed. The essential welding parameters employed were: base current 250 A; arc voltage 21 V and polarity (DCEP. The evaluation was made whit a transverse traction test of plate welded coupons. The experimental model applied wasadequate and substantial differences was showed between yield tensile strength 29,56 %, elasticity module (51,16 % and specific work of elastic deformation 42,30 %, which it does not possess a lineal dependence whit the rest

  14. WELDABILITY, WELDING METALLURGY, WELDING CHEMISTRY

    OpenAIRE

    Sarjito Jokosisworo

    2012-01-01

    Sambungan las merupakan bagian penting dari stuktur/bangunan yang dilas, dan kunci dari logam induk yang baik adalah kemampuan las (weld ability). Kemampuan las yang baik dan kemudahan dalam fabrikasi dari suatu logam merupakan pertimbangan dalam memilih suatu logam untuk konstruksi.

  15. Weld-brazing - a new joining process. [combination resistance spot welding and brazing of titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bales, T. T.; Royster, D. M.; Arnold, W. E., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A joining process designated weld brazing which combines resistance spot welding and brazing has been developed. Resistance spot welding is used to position and align the parts as well as to establish a suitable faying surface gap for brazing. Fabrication is then completed by capillary flow of the braze alloy into the joint. The process has been used successfully to fabricate Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy joints using 3003 aluminum braze alloy. Test results obtained on single overlap and hat-stiffened structural specimens show that weld brazed joints are superior in tensile shear, stress rupture, fatigue, and buckling than joint fabricated by spotwelding or brazing. Another attractive feature of the process is that the brazed joints is hermetically sealed by the braze material.

  16. Fatigue in Aluminum Highway Bridges under Random Loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rom, Søren; Agerskov, Henning

    2014-01-01

    Fatigue damage accumulation in aluminum highway bridges under random loading is studied. The fatigue life of welded joints has been determined both experimentally and from a fracture mechanics analysis. In the experimental part of the investigation, fatigue test series on welded plate test...... is normally used in the design against fatigue in aluminum bridges, may give results which are unconservative. The validity of the results obtained from Miner’s rule will depend on the distribution of the load history in tension and compression....

  17. An Experimental Study of the Electrical Contact Resistance in Resistance Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Quanfeng; Zhang, Wenqi; Bay, Niels

    2005-01-01

    Electrical contact resistance is of critical importance in resistance welding. In this article, the contact resistance is experimentally investigated for welding mild steel, stainless steel, and aluminum to themselves. A parametric study was carried out on a Gleeble® machine, investigating...

  18. Structure and Corrosion Resistance of Welded Joints of Alloy 1151 in Marine Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakulo, A. V.; Yakushin, B. F.; Puchkov, Yu. A.

    2017-07-01

    The corrosion behavior of joints formed by TIG and IMIG welding from clad sheets of heat-hardenable aluminum alloy 1151 of the Al - Cu - Mg system is studied. The corrosion tests are performed in an aqueous solution of NaCl in a salt-spray chamber. The welded joints are subjected to a metallographic analysis.

  19. Friction Stir Welding of three dissimilar aluminium alloy used in aeronautics industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boşneag, A.; Constantin, M. A.; Niţu, E.; Iordache, M.

    2017-10-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is an innovative solid-state joining process. This process was, in first time, develop to join the similar aluminum plates but now the technology can be used to weld a large area of materials similar or dissimilar. Taking these into account FSW process, for dissimilar materials are increasingly required, more than traditional arc welding, in industrial environment. More than that FSW is used in aeronautics industry because of very good result and very good weldability between aluminum alloy used at building of airplanes, where the body of airplane are 20% aluminum alloy and this percent can be increaser in future. In this paper is presented an experimental study which includes welding three dissimilar aluminum alloy, with different properties, used in aeronautics industry, this materials are: AA 2024, AA6061 and AA7075. After welding with different parameters, the welding join and welding process will be analyzed considering process temperature, process vertical force, and roughnessof welding seams, visual aspect and microhardness.

  20. WELDING PROCESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambrow, J.; Hausner, H.

    1957-09-24

    A method of joining metal parts for the preparation of relatively long, thin fuel element cores of uranium or alloys thereof for nuclear reactors is described. The process includes the steps of cleaning the surfaces to be jointed, placing the sunfaces together, and providing between and in contact with them, a layer of a compound in finely divided form that is decomposable to metal by heat. The fuel element members are then heated at the contact zone and maintained under pressure during the heating to decompose the compound to metal and sinter the members and reduced metal together producing a weld. The preferred class of decomposable compounds are the metal hydrides such as uranium hydride, which release hydrogen thus providing a reducing atmosphere in the vicinity of the welding operation.

  1. Problems in repair-welding of duplex-treated tool steels

    OpenAIRE

    T. Muhič; J. Tušek; M. Pleterski; D. Bombač

    2009-01-01

    The present paper addresses problems in laser welding of die-cast tools used for aluminum pressure die-castings and plastic moulds. To extend life cycle of tools various surface improvements are used. These surface improvements significantly reduce weldability of the material. This paper presents development of defects in repair welding of duplex-treated tool steel. The procedure is aimed at reduction of defects by the newly developed repair laser welding techniques. Effects of different repa...

  2. Present and future of laser welding machine; Laser yosetsuki no genjo to tenbo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taniu, Y. [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-04-01

    This paper describes recent trends of laser welding machine. For CO2 laser welding machine, seam weld of large diameter weld pipes using a 25 kW-class machine, and plate weld of steel plate using a 45 kW-class machine are reported. For YAG laser welding machine, high-output 5.5 kW-class machines are commercialized. Machines with slab structure of plate-like YAG chrystal have been developed which show high-oscillation efficiency and can be applied to cutting. Machines have been developed in which YAG laser output with slab structure is transmitted through GI fiber. High-speed welding of aluminum alloys can be realized by improving the converging performance. Efficiency of YAG laser can be enhanced through the time-divided utilization by switching the beam transmission path using fiber change-over switch. In the automobile industry, CO2 laser is mainly used, and a system combining CO laser with articulate robot is realized. TIG and MIG welding is often used for welding of aluminum for railway vehicles. It is required to reduce the welding strain. In the iron and steel industry, the productivity has been improved by the laser welding. YAG laser is put into practice for nuclear reactors. 5 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Model development for mechanical properties and weld quality class of friction stir welding using multi-objective Taguchi method and response surface methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, Mohamed Ackiel; Manurung, Yupiter HP; Berhan, Mohamed Nor

    2015-01-01

    This study presents the effect of the governing parameters in friction stir welding (FSW) on the mechanical properties and weld quality of a 6mm thick 6061 T651 Aluminum alloy butt joint. The main FSW parameters, the rotational and traverse speed were optimized based on multiple mechanical properties and quality features, which focus on the tensile strength, hardness and the weld quality class using the multi-objective Taguchi method (MTM). Multi signal to noise ratio (MSNR) was employed to determine the optimum welding parameters for MTM while further analysis concerning the significant level determination was accomplished via the well-established analysis of variance (ANOVA). Furthermore, the first order model for predicting the mechanical properties and weld quality class is derived by applying response surface methodology (RSM). Based on the experimental confirmation test, the proposed method can effectively estimate the mechanical properties and weld quality class which can be used to enhance the welding performance in FSW or other applications.

  4. Model development for mechanical properties and weld quality class of friction stir welding using multi-objective Taguchi method and response surface methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed, Mohamed Ackiel [University Kuala Lumpur Malaysia France Institute, Bandar Baru Bangi (Malaysia); Manurung, Yupiter HP; Berhan, Mohamed Nor [Universiti Teknologi MARA, Shah Alam (Malaysia)

    2015-06-15

    This study presents the effect of the governing parameters in friction stir welding (FSW) on the mechanical properties and weld quality of a 6mm thick 6061 T651 Aluminum alloy butt joint. The main FSW parameters, the rotational and traverse speed were optimized based on multiple mechanical properties and quality features, which focus on the tensile strength, hardness and the weld quality class using the multi-objective Taguchi method (MTM). Multi signal to noise ratio (MSNR) was employed to determine the optimum welding parameters for MTM while further analysis concerning the significant level determination was accomplished via the well-established analysis of variance (ANOVA). Furthermore, the first order model for predicting the mechanical properties and weld quality class is derived by applying response surface methodology (RSM). Based on the experimental confirmation test, the proposed method can effectively estimate the mechanical properties and weld quality class which can be used to enhance the welding performance in FSW or other applications.

  5. Welding processes handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Weman, Klas

    2011-01-01

    Offers an introduction to the range of available welding technologies. This title includes chapters on individual techniques that cover principles, equipment, consumables and key quality issues. It includes material on such topics as the basics of electricity in welding, arc physics, and distortion, and the weldability of particular metals.$bThe first edition of Welding processes handbook established itself as a standard introduction and guide to the main welding technologies and their applications. This new edition has been substantially revised and extended to reflect the latest developments. After an initial introduction, the book first reviews gas welding before discussing the fundamentals of arc welding, including arc physics and power sources. It then discusses the range of arc welding techniques including TIG, plasma, MIG/MAG, MMA and submerged arc welding. Further chapters cover a range of other important welding technologies such as resistance and laser welding, as well as the use of welding techniqu...

  6. Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process invented in 1991 at The Welding Institute in the United Kingdom. A weld is made in the FSW process by translating a rotating pin along a weld seam so as to stir the sides of the seam together. FSW avoids deleterious effects inherent in melting and promises to be an important welding process for any industries where welds of optimal quality are demanded. This article provides an introduction to the FSW process. The chief concern is the physical effect of the tool on the weld metal: how weld seam bonding takes place, what kind of weld structure is generated, potential problems, possible defects for example, and implications for process parameters and tool design. Weld properties are determined by structure, and the structure of friction stir welds is determined by the weld metal flow field in the vicinity of the weld tool. Metal flow in the vicinity of the weld tool is explained through a simple kinematic flow model that decomposes the flow field into three basic component flows: a uniform translation, a rotating solid cylinder, and a ring vortex encircling the tool. The flow components, superposed to construct the flow model, can be related to particular aspects of weld process parameters and tool design; they provide a bridge to an understanding of a complex-at-first-glance weld structure. Torques and forces are also discussed. Some simple mathematical models of structural aspects, torques, and forces are included.

  7. Effect of FSW welding speed on microstructure and microhardness of Al-0.84Mg-0.69Si-0.76Fe alloy at moderate rotational tool velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chand, Suresh; Vineetha, S.; Madhusudhan, D.; Sai Krishna, CH; Kusuma Devi, G.; Bhawani; Hemarao, K.; Ganesh Naidu, G.

    2018-03-01

    The plate of 7.0 mm thickness was double side welded using friction stir welding is investigated. The rotational velocity of friction stir welding tool is used 1400 rpm. The influence of welding speed on the microstructure and microhardness values of Al-0.84Mg-0.69Si-0.76Fe aluminum alloy is presented. Two welding speeds 25 mm/min and 31.5 mm/min are used. The microhardness values of friction stir weld are measured at various locations from the weld interface. The microhardness values in stir zone of weld are found larger than lower welding speed at constant rotational velocity of 1400 rpm of friction stir welding tool. The similar effects on microhardness values are found in the thermo-mechanically affected zone and heat affected zone. The fine microstructure is observed at 31.5 mm/min welding speed compared to the 25 mm/min welding speed at 1400 rpm.

  8. Thermographic Analysis of Stress Distribution in Welded Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domazet Ž.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The fatigue life prediction of welded joints based on S-N curves in conjunction with nominal stresses generally is not reliable. Stress distribution in welded area affected by geometrical inhomogeneity, irregular welded surface and weld toe radius is quite complex, so the local (structural stress concept is accepted in recent papers. The aim of this paper is to determine the stress distribution in plate type aluminum welded joints, to analyze the reliability of TSA (Thermal Stress Analysis in this kind of investigations, and to obtain numerical values for stress concentration factors for practical use. Stress distribution in aluminum butt and fillet welded joints is determined by using the three different methods: strain gauges measurement, thermal stress analysis and FEM. Obtained results show good agreement - the TSA mutually confirmed the FEM model and stresses measured by strain gauges. According to obtained results, it may be stated that TSA, as a relatively new measurement technique may in the future become a standard tool for the experimental investigation of stress concentration and fatigue in welded joints that can help to develop more accurate numerical tools for fatigue life prediction.

  9. Thermographic Analysis of Stress Distribution in Welded Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piršić, T.; Krstulović Opara, L.; Domazet, Ž.

    2010-06-01

    The fatigue life prediction of welded joints based on S-N curves in conjunction with nominal stresses generally is not reliable. Stress distribution in welded area affected by geometrical inhomogeneity, irregular welded surface and weld toe radius is quite complex, so the local (structural) stress concept is accepted in recent papers. The aim of this paper is to determine the stress distribution in plate type aluminum welded joints, to analyze the reliability of TSA (Thermal Stress Analysis) in this kind of investigations, and to obtain numerical values for stress concentration factors for practical use. Stress distribution in aluminum butt and fillet welded joints is determined by using the three different methods: strain gauges measurement, thermal stress analysis and FEM. Obtained results show good agreement - the TSA mutually confirmed the FEM model and stresses measured by strain gauges. According to obtained results, it may be stated that TSA, as a relatively new measurement technique may in the future become a standard tool for the experimental investigation of stress concentration and fatigue in welded joints that can help to develop more accurate numerical tools for fatigue life prediction.

  10. Optimization of welding current waveform for dissimilar material with DP590 and Al5052 by Delta-spot welding process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji Sun; Kim, In Ju; Kim, Young Gon [Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    The automotive industry has a target goal to improve fuel consumption due to restricted exhaust gas regulation. For this reason, the applicability of lightweight material, Al alloys, Mg alloys is also being expanded. In this concept, high strength steel, DP590 and light alloy, AL5052 are joined in the right place of the car body. However, it is difficult to join to steel and aluminum by conventional fusion welding. Generally, in respect to dissimilar metal joining by fusion welding, intermetallic compound layer is formed at the joint interface, hot cracking is generated. In this study, the effect of the current waveform on the mechanical characteristics and microstructure in Delta spot welding process of dissimilar metal was investigated. As results, Intermetallic compound (IMC) layer was reduced from 2.355 μm to 1.09 μm by using Delta spot welding process; also the welding current range improved by 50% in the delta spot welding, higher than in the inverter resistance welding. To conclude, the delta spot welding process adopting the process tapes contributes to improving the welding quality for dissimilar metals (Al5052 and DP590) due to a decrease in IMC layer.

  11. Introduction to Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortney, Clarence; Gregory, Mike

    This curriculum guide provides six units of instruction on basic welding. Addressed in the individual units of instruction are the following topics: employment opportunities for welders, welding safety and first aid, welding tools and equipment, basic metals and metallurgy, basic math and measuring, and procedures for applying for a welding job.…

  12. Distortion Control during Welding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akbari Pazooki, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    The local material expansion and contraction involved in welding result in permanent deformations or instability i.e., welding distortion. Considerable efforts have been made in controlling welding distortion prior to, during or after welding. Thermal Tensioning (TT) describes a group of in-situ

  13. Welding and cutting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drews, P.; Schulze Frielinghaus, W.

    1978-01-01

    This is a survey, with 198 literature references, of the papers published in the fields of welding and cutting within the last three years. The subjects dealt with are: weldability of the materials - Welding methods - Thermal cutting - Shaping and calculation of welded joints - Environmental protection in welding and cutting. (orig.) [de

  14. Effect of Water Cooling on the Performances of Friction Stir Welding Heat-Affected Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H. J.; Liu, H. J.; Yu, L.

    2012-07-01

    The heat-affected zone (HAZ) is generally the intrinsic weakest location of the normal friction stir welded precipitate hardened aluminum alloys. In order to improve the mechanical properties of the HAZ by controlling the temperature level, underwater friction stir welding (FSW) of an Al-Cu aluminum alloy was conducted in the present study. The results indicate that the hardness of the HAZ can be improved through underwater FSW. Microstructural analysis reveals that the hardness improvement is attributed to the lowering of precipitate coarsening level and the narrowing of precipitate free zone, which are essentially induced by the variations of welding thermal cycles under the cooling effect of water.

  15. Influence of the welding temperature and the welding speed on the mechanical properties of friction stir welds in EN AW-2219-T87

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, A.; Krutzlinger, M.; Zaeh, M. F.

    2018-06-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is an innovative joining technique, which has proven to produce high quality joints in high strength aluminum alloys. Consequently, it is commonly used to manufacture lightweight aerospace structures with stringent requirements. For these structures, it is necessary to ensure a high ultimate tensile strength (UTS). Various studies have reported that the UTS is significantly influenced by the welding parameters. Samples welded with different parameter sets showed a considerably different UTS, despite being free from detectable welding defects (e.g. tunnel defect, voids, or lack of penetration). Based on the observations in the literature, a hypothesis was posed. The welding temperature along with the welding speed determine the UTS of the weld. This study aims to prove this hypothesis experimentally by using temperature-controlled FSW to join plates of EN AW-2219-T87 in butt joint configuration. The welded samples were examined using visual inspection, metallography, X-ray imaging, and uniaxial tensile tests. Finally, a statistical analysis was conducted. Hereby, the hypothesis was confirmed.

  16. High-Speed Friction Stir Welding of AA7075-T6 Sheet: Microstructure, Mechanical Properties, Micro-texture, and Thermal History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingyi; Upadhyay, Piyush; Hovanski, Yuri; Field, David P.

    2018-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a cost-effective and high-quality joining process for aluminum alloys (especially heat-treatable alloys) that is historically operated at lower joining speeds (up to hundreds of millimeters per minute). In this study, we present a microstructural analysis of friction stir welded AA7075-T6 blanks with high welding speeds up to 3 M/min. Textures, microstructures, mechanical properties, and weld quality are analyzed using TEM, EBSD, metallographic imaging, and Vickers hardness. The higher welding speed results in narrower, stronger heat-affected zones (HAZs) and also higher hardness in the nugget zones. The material flow direction in the nugget zone is found to be leaning towards the welding direction as the welding speed increases. Results are coupled with welding parameters and thermal history to aid in the understanding of the complex material flow and texture gradients within the welds in an effort to optimize welding parameters for high-speed processing.

  17. Effect of the Grain Size of the Initial Structure of 1565chM Alloy on the Structure and Properties of the Joints Fabricated by Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovchinnikov, V. V.; Drits, A. M.; Gureeva, M. A.; Malov, D. V.

    2017-12-01

    The effect of the initial grain size in the structure of the aluminum 1565chM alloy on the mechanical properties of the welded joints formed by friction stir welding and on the grain size in the weld core is studied. It is shown that the design of tool and, especially, the parameters of a screw groove exert a great effect on the grain size in the weld core.

  18. Development of high frequency tungsten inert gas welding method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morisada, Yoshiaki; Fujii, Hidetoshi; Inagaki, Fuminori; Kamai, Masayoshi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► A new ultrasonic wave TIG welding method was developed. ► The area of the blowholes decreased to less than about 1/8 in the normal TIG weld. ► The number of blowholes decreased with the decreasing frequency. ► The number of blowholes increased when the frequency was less than 15 kHz. ► The microstructure of the weld was refined by ultrasonic wave. -- Abstract: A new welding method, called high frequency tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding, was developed to decrease blowholes in a weld. A1050 aluminum alloy plates (100 mm l × 50 mm w × 5 mm t ) were welded at a frequency from 10 to 40 kHz. An Ar-1% hydrogen mixture was used as the shielding gas to generate blowholes in the experiments. The welding was performed in the horizontal position so that the blowholes can easily be a problem. For comparison, a normal TIG welding was also performed at 60 Hz. After welding, the distribution of the blowholes in the welds was observed in order to evaluate the effect of the sonic wave. The number of blowholes changed with the frequency. A frequency near 15 kHz is the most suitable to decrease the blowholes. Using this new method, the area of blowholes is decreased to less than about 1/8 of the normal TIG weld. This method is much more effective for decreasing the number of blowholes, compared with an ultrasonic wave vibrator which is directly fixed to the sample.

  19. Robotic and automatic welding development at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, C. S.; Jackson, M. E.; Flanigan, L. A.

    1988-01-01

    Welding automation is the key to two major development programs to improve quality and reduce the cost of manufacturing space hardware currently undertaken by the Materials and Processes Laboratory of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. Variable polarity plasma arc welding has demonstrated its effectiveness on class 1 aluminum welding in external tank production. More than three miles of welds were completed without an internal defect. Much of this success can be credited to automation developments which stabilize the process. Robotic manipulation technology is under development for automation of welds on the Space Shuttle's main engines utilizing pathfinder systems in development of tooling and sensors for the production applications. The overall approach to welding automation development undertaken is outlined. Advanced sensors and control systems methodologies are described that combine to make aerospace quality welds with a minimum of dependence on operator skill.

  20. Friction Stir Welding of Dissimilar Al/Al and Al/Non-Al Alloys: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiangbin; Pan, Yi; Lados, Diana A.

    2018-05-01

    Friction stir welding is a solid-state welding technique that has many advantages over traditional fusion welding, and has been widely adopted in the aerospace and automotive industries. This article reviews research developments in friction stir welding of dissimilar alloys systems, including combinations of aluminum alloys with Mg alloys, Cu, and steel. Microstructural evolution, hardness, tensile and fatigue properties, residual stresses, and corrosion behavior of dissimilar welds will be reported. The effects of processing parameters such as tool rotation and traverse speeds, tool position, material position, and tool geometry on the weld quality are also presented. Discussions on future research directions in friction stir welding will also be provided in the context of existing literature and future high-integrity applications.

  1. Metallic glass coating on metals plate by adjusted explosive welding technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, W.D.; Liu, K.X.; Chen, Q.Y.; Wang, J.T.; Yan, H.H.; Li, X.J.

    2009-01-01

    Using an adjusted explosive welding technique, an aluminum plate has been coated by a Fe-based metallic glass foil in this work. Scanning electronic micrographs reveal a defect-free metallurgical bonding between the Fe-based metallic glass foil and the aluminum plate. Experimental evidence indicates that the Fe-based metallic glass foil almost retains its amorphous state and mechanical properties after the explosive welding process. Additionally, the detailed explosive welding process has been simulated by a self-developed hydro-code and the bonding mechanism has been investigated by numerical analysis. The successful welding between the Fe-based metallic glass foil and the aluminum plate provides a new way to obtain amorphous coating on general metal substrates.

  2. Strengthening of Aluminum Wires Treated with A206/Alumina Nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florián-Algarín, David; Marrero, Raúl; Li, Xiaochun; Choi, Hongseok; Suárez, Oscar Marcelo

    2018-03-10

    This study sought to characterize aluminum nanocomposite wires that were fabricated through a cold-rolling process, having potential applications in TIG (tungsten inert gas) welding of aluminum. A206 (Al-4.5Cu-0.25Mg) master nanocomposites with 5 wt % γAl₂O₃ nanoparticles were first manufactured through a hybrid process combining semi-solid mixing and ultrasonic processing. A206/1 wt % γAl₂O₃ nanocomposites were fabricated by diluting the prepared master nanocomposites with a monolithic A206 alloy, which was then added to a pure aluminum melt. The fabricated Al-γAl₂O₃ nanocomposite billet was cold-rolled to produce an Al nanocomposite wire with a 1 mm diameter and a transverse area reduction of 96%. Containing different levels of nanocomposites, the fabricated samples were mechanically and electrically characterized. The results demonstrate a significantly higher strength of the aluminum wires with the nanocomposite addition. Further, the addition of alumina nanoparticles affected the wires' electrical conductivity compared with that of pure aluminum and aluminum-copper alloys. The overall properties of the new material demonstrate that these wires could be an appealing alternative for fillers intended for aluminum welding.

  3. Influence of tool geometry and processing parameters on welding defects and mechanical properties for friction stir welding of 6061 Aluminium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneji, A.; Ali, M.; Pervaiz, S.

    2018-04-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a form of solid state welding process for joining metals, alloys, and selective composites. Over the years, FSW development has provided an improved way of producing welding joints, and consequently got accepted in numerous industries such as aerospace, automotive, rail and marine etc. In FSW, the base metal properties control the material’s plastic flow under the influence of a rotating tool whereas, the process and tool parameters play a vital role in the quality of weld. In the current investigation, an array of square butt joints of 6061 Aluminum alloy was to be welded under varying FSW process and tool geometry related parameters, after which the resulting weld was evaluated for the corresponding mechanical properties and welding defects. The study incorporates FSW process and tool parameters such as welding speed, pin height and pin thread pitch as input parameters. However, the weld quality related defects and mechanical properties were treated as output parameters. The experimentation paves way to investigate the correlation between the inputs and the outputs. The correlation between inputs and outputs were used as tool to predict the optimized FSW process and tool parameters for a desired weld output of the base metals under investigation. The study also provides reflection on the effect of said parameters on a welding defect such as wormhole.

  4. Metallography of Battery Resistance Spot Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, J. E.; Johannes, L. B.; Gonzalez, D.; Yayathi, S.; Figuered, J. M.; Darcy, E. C.; Bilc, Z. M.

    2015-01-01

    Li-ion cells provide an energy dense solution for systems that require rechargeable electrical power. However, these cells can undergo thermal runaway, the point at which the cell becomes thermally unstable and results in hot gas, flame, electrolyte leakage, and in some cases explosion. The heat and fire associated with this type of event is generally violent and can subsequently cause damage to the surrounding system or present a dangerous risk to the personnel nearby. The space flight environment is especially sensitive to risks particularly when it involves potential for fire within the habitable volume of the International Space Station (ISS). In larger battery packs such as Robonaut 2 (R2), numerous Li-ion cells are placed in parallel-series configurations to obtain the required stack voltage and desired run-time or to meet specific power requirements. This raises a second and less obvious concern for batteries that undergo certification for space flight use: the joining quality at the resistance spot weld of battery cells to component wires/leads and battery tabs, bus bars or other electronic components and assemblies. Resistance spot welds undergo materials evaluation, visual inspection, conductivity (resistivity) testing, destructive peel testing, and metallurgical examination in accordance with applicable NASA Process Specifications. Welded components are cross-sectioned to ensure they are free of cracks or voids open to any exterior surface. Pore and voids contained within the weld zone but not open to an exterior surface, and are not determined to have sharp notch like characteristics, shall be acceptable. Depending on requirements, some battery cells are constructed of aluminum canisters while others are constructed of steel. Process specific weld schedules must be developed and certified for each possible joining combination. The aluminum canisters' positive terminals were particularly difficult to weld due to a bi-metal strip that comes ultrasonically

  5. Weld overlay cladding with iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodwin, G.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-12-01

    The author has established a range of compositions for these alloys within which hot cracking resistance is very good, and within which cold cracking can be avoided in many instances by careful control of welding conditions, particularly preheat and postweld heat treatment. For example, crack-free butt welds have been produced for the first time in 12-mm thick wrought Fe{sub 3}Al plate. Cold cracking, however, still remains an issue in many cases. The author has developed a commercial source for composite weld filler metals spanning a wide range of achievable aluminum levels, and are pursuing the application of these filler metals in a variety of industrial environments. Welding techniques have been developed for both the gas tungsten arc and gas metal arc processes, and preliminary work has been done to utilize the wire arc process for coating of boiler tubes. Clad specimens have been prepared for environmental testing in-house, and a number of components have been modified and placed in service in operating kraft recovery boilers. In collaboration with a commercial producer of spiral weld overlay tubing, the author is attempting to utilize the new filler metals for this novel application.

  6. Microstructural evolution during friction stir welding of AlSi1MgMn alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Janjić

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides the research of the infl uence of geometric and kinematic parameters on the microstructure and mechanical properties of welded joint of aluminum alloy AlSi1MgMn (6082-T6 obtained through the Friction Stir Welding (FSW process. The experiment parameters were welding speed, rotation speed, angle of pin slope, pin diameter and shoulder diameter. On the obtained welded workpieces the dynamic testing on the impact toughness, and determination of microstructural zones were carried out.

  7. Automatic welding of fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briola, J.

    1958-01-01

    The welding process depends on the type of fuel element, the can material and the number of cartridges to be welded: - inert-gas welding (used for G2 and the 1. set of EL3), - inert atmosphere arc welding (used for welding uranium and zirconium), - electronic welding (used for the 2. set of EL3 and the tank of Proserpine). (author) [fr

  8. Detecting flaws in welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodacre, A.; Lawton, H.

    1979-01-01

    An apparatus and a method for detecting flaws in welds in a workpiece, the portion of the workpiece containing the weld is maintained at a constant temperature and the weld is scanned by an infra red detector. The weld is then scanned again with the workpiece in contact with a cooling probe to produce a steeper temperature gradient across the weld. Comparison of the signals produced by each scan reveals the existence of defects in the welds. The signals may be displayed on an oscilloscope and the display may be observed by a TV camera and recorded on videotape. (UK)

  9. Fusion welding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kenneth C.; Jones, Eric D.; McBride, Marvin A.

    1983-01-01

    A process for the fusion welding of nickel alloy steel members wherein a ferrite containing pellet is inserted into a cavity in one member and melted by a welding torch. The resulting weld nugget, a fusion of the nickel containing alloy from the members to be welded and the pellet, has a composition which is sufficiently low in nickel content such that ferrite phases occur within the weld nugget, resulting in improved weld properties. The steel alloys encompassed also include alloys containing carbon and manganese, considered nickel equivalents.

  10. Wear Resistance Analysis of A359/SiC/20p Advanced Composite Joints Welded by Friction Stir Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Cuevas Mata

    Full Text Available Abstract Advancement in automotive part development demands new cost-effective materials with higher mechanical properties and improved wear resistance as compared to existing materials. For instance, Aluminum Matrix Composites (AMC shows improved mechanical properties as wear and abrasion resistance, high strength, chemical and dimensional stability. Automotive industry has focused in AMC for a variety of applications in automotive parts in order to improve the fuel economy, minimize vehicle emissions, improve design options, and increase the performance. Wear resistance is one of the most important factors in useful life of the automotive components, overall in those components submitted to mechanical systems like automotive brakes and suspensions. Friction Stir Welding (FSW rises as the most capable process to joining AMC, principally for the capacity to weld without compromising their ceramic reinforcement. The aim of this study is focused on the analysis of wear characteristics of the friction-stir welded joint of aluminum matrix reinforced with 20 percent in weight silicon carbide composite (A359/SiC/20p. The experimental procedure consisted in cut samples into small plates and perform three welds on these with a FSW machine using a tool with 20 mm shoulder diameter and 8 mm pin diameter. The wear features of the three welded joints and parent metal were analyzed at constant load applying 5 N and a rotational speed of 100 rpm employing a Pin-on - Disk wear testing apparatus, using a sapphire steel ball with 6 mm diameter. The experimental results indicate that the three welded joints had low friction coefficient compared with the parent metal. The results determine that the FSW process parameters affect the wear resistance of the welded joints owing to different microstructural modifications during welding that causes a low wear resistance on the welded zone.

  11. Mathematical Modeling of Optical Radiation Emission as a Function of Welding Power during Gas Shielded Metal Arc Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Stefan; Janßen, Marco; Schmitz, Martin; Ott, Günter

    2017-11-01

    Arc welding is accompanied by intense optical radiation emission that can be detrimental not only for the welder himself but also for people working nearby or for passersby. Technological progress advances continuously in the field of joining, so an up-to-date radiation database is necessary. Additionally, many literature irradiance data have been measured for a few welding currents or for parts of the optical spectral region only. Within this paper, a comprehensive study of contemporary metal active gas, metal inert gas, and cold metal transfer welding is presented covering optical radiation emission from 200 up to 2,700 nm by means of (spectro-) radiometric measurements. The investigated welding currents range from 70 to 350 A, reflecting values usually applied in industry. Based upon these new irradiance data, three mathematical models were derived in order to describe optical radiation emission as a function of welding power. The linear, exponential, and sigmoidal emission models depend on the process variant (standard or pulsed) as well as on the welding material (mild and stainless steel, aluminum). In conjunction with the corresponding exposure limit values for incoherent optical radiation maximum permissible exposure durations were calculated as a function of welding power. Typical times are shorter than 1 s for the ultraviolet spectral region and range from 1 to 10 s for visible radiation. For the infrared regime, exposure durations are of the order of minutes to hours. Finally, a validation of the metal active gas emission models was carried out with manual arc welding.

  12. Effect of Local Post Weld Heat Treatment on Tensile Properties in Friction Stir Welded 2219-O Al Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Guannan; Sun, Lei; Lin, Caiyuan; Lin, Yanli

    2017-11-01

    To improve the formability of the aluminum alloy welds and overcome the size limitation of the bulk post weld heat treatment (BPWHT) on large size friction stir welded joints, a local post weld heat treatment method (LPWHT) was proposed. In this method, the resistance heating as the moving heat source is adopted to only heat the weld seam. The temperature field of LPWHT and its influence on the mechanical properties and formability of FSW 2219-O Al alloy joints was investigated. The evaluation of the tensile properties of FSW samples was also examined by mapping the global and local strain distribution using the digital image correlation methodology. The results indicated that the formability was improved greatly after LPWHT, while the hardness distribution of the FSW joint was homogenized. The maximum elongation can reach 1.4 times that of as-welded joints with increase the strength and the strain of the nugget zone increased from 3 to 8% when annealing at 300 °C. The heterogeneity on the tensile deformation of the as-welded joints was improved by the nugget zone showing large local strain value and the reason was given according to the dimple fracture characteristics at different annealing temperatures. The tensile strength and elongation of LPWHT can reach 93.3 and 96.1% of the BPWHT, respectively. Thus, the LPWHT can be advantageous compared to the BPWHT for large size welds.

  13. Diffusionless bonding of aluminum to type 304 stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, R D

    1963-03-15

    High strength diffusionless bonds can be produced between 1S aluminum and oxidized 304 stainless steel by hot pressing and extrusion bonding. Both the hot pressing and extrusion bonding techniques have been developed to a point where consistently good bonds can be obtained. Although the bonding is performed at elevated temperatures (about 510{sup o}C) a protective atmosphere is not required to produce strong bonds. The aluminum-stainless steel bonded specimens can be used to join aluminum and stainless steel by conventional welding. Welding close to the bond zone does not appear to affect the integrity of the bond. The extrusion bonding technique is covered by Canadian patent 702,438 January 26, 1965 and the hot press bonding technique by Canadian patent application 904,548 June 6, 1964. (author)

  14. Assessment of Aluminum FSW Joints Using Ultrasonic Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adamus K.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper concerns aluminum joints made using friction stir welding. Although in the aerospace industry there is a tendency to replace metal components with composites, aluminum continues to be a valuable material. Its share in the aircraft structures is the biggest among all structural metals. Lots of aluminum components are made of sheets and most of them require joining. Friction stir welding is a relatively new joining technology, particularly with regard to the sheets having a thickness of 1 mm or lower. The paper is dedicated to non-destructive testing of such joints using ultrasonic inspection. It was found that ultrasonic testing allows for distinguishing between joints without material discontinuities, joint with material discontinuities at the advancing side and joint with discontinuities extending through the whole width of the stir zone. During research only horizontally aligned defects were taken into account.

  15. Fracture Mechanics Prediction of Fatigue Life of Aluminum Highway Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rom, Søren; Agerskov, Henning

    2015-01-01

    Fracture mechanics prediction of the fatigue life of aluminum highway bridges under random loading is studied. The fatigue life of welded joints has been determined from fracture mechanics analyses and the results obtained have been compared with results from experimental investigations. The fati......Fracture mechanics prediction of the fatigue life of aluminum highway bridges under random loading is studied. The fatigue life of welded joints has been determined from fracture mechanics analyses and the results obtained have been compared with results from experimental investigations...... against fatigue in aluminum bridges, may give results which are unconservative. Furthermore, it was in both investigations found that the validity of the results obtained from Miner's rule will depend on the distribution of the load history in tension and compression....

  16. Diffusionless bonding of aluminum to type 304 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, R.D.

    1963-03-01

    High strength diffusionless bonds can be produced between 1S aluminum and oxidized 304 stainless steel by hot pressing and extrusion bonding. Both the hot pressing and extrusion bonding techniques have been developed to a point where consistently good bonds can be obtained. Although the bonding is performed at elevated temperatures (about 510 o C) a protective atmosphere is not required to produce strong bonds. The aluminum-stainless steel bonded specimens can be used to join aluminum and stainless steel by conventional welding. Welding close to the bond zone does not appear to affect the integrity of the bond. The extrusion bonding technique is covered by Canadian patent 702,438 January 26, 1965 and the hot press bonding technique by Canadian patent application 904,548 June 6, 1964. (author)

  17. Weld controller for automated nuclear service welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barfield, K.L.; Strubhar, P.M.; Green, D.I.

    1995-01-01

    B and W Nuclear Technologies (BWNT) uses many different types of weld heads for automated welding in the commercial nuclear service industry. Some weld heads are purchased as standard items, while others are custom designed and fabricated by BWNT requiring synchronized multiaxis motion control. BWNT recently completed a development program to build a common weld controller that interfaces to all types of weld heads used by BWNT. Their goal was to construct a system that had the flexibility to add different modules to increase the capability of the controller as different application needs become necessary. The benefits from having a common controller are listed. This presentation explains the weld controller system and the types of applications to which it has been applied

  18. The effect of hardening laws and thermal softening on modeling residual stresses in FSW of aluminum alloy 2024-T3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, Mads Rostgaard; Tutum, Cem Celal; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2013-01-01

    or kinematic hardening together with the metallurgical softening model were applied in order to give a first impression of the tendencies in residual stresses in friction stir welds when choosing different hardening and softening behaviors. Secondly, real friction stir butt welding of aluminum alloy 2024-T3...

  19. Influence of selected coatings on the welding result during Magnetic Pulse Welding (MPW): Presentation held at 9. Internationales Lasersymposium und Internationalen Fügetechnischen Symposium "Tailored Joining" 2016, Dresden, 22.-24.2.2016

    OpenAIRE

    Bellmann, Jörg; Lueg-Althoff, Jörn

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic Pulse Welding (MPW) has a great potential for large-scale industrial production. It is a clean and fast joining technique favorable for the generation of strong atomic bonded areas between similar and dissimilar metals. For example, aluminum and steel can be welded without formation of critical intermetallic phases due to the high-speed collision and the absence of external heat. Since the weld quality depends on the material’s behavior at the collision zone, surface layers in that r...

  20. Low temperature heat treatments of AA5754-Ti6Al4V dissimilar laser welds: Microstructure evolution and mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leo, P.; D'Ostuni, S.; Casalino, G.

    2018-03-01

    This paper presents the effects of the post welding heat treatments (PWHT) performed at 350 °C and 450 °C on the microstructure evolution and mechanical properties of AA5754 and Ti6Al4V dissimilar laser welds. The microstructure and tensile properties of the welds before and after low temperature treatment were analyzed. The off-set welding technique was applied to limit the formation of brittle intermetallic compounds during the welding process. The laser beam was directed onto the titanium side at a small distance from the aluminum edge. The keyhole formed and the full penetration was reached in the titanium side of the weld. Thereafter, the aluminum side melted as the heat that formed the keyhole transferred from the titanium fused zone. Two different energy lines (32 J/mm and 76 J/mm) were used. In this manner, a fused and a heat affected zones was revealed on both sides of the weld. Several intermetallic compounds formed in the intermetallic layer between the two metals. The thickness and the composition of the intermetallic layer depended on the welding parameters and the post welding heat treatment. The hardness and tensile properties of the welds before and after the post welding heat treatment were measured and analyzed.

  1. Structure evolution of multilayer materials of heat-resistant intermetallic compounds under the influence of temperature in the process of diffusion welding under pressure and their mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korzhov, Valeriy P.; Karpov, Michael I.; Prokhorov, Dmitriy V. [Institute of Solid State Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-01

    Multilayer materials of high-resistant intermetallic compounds of some transition metals with aluminum and silicon were obtained by diffusion welding of packages, collected from a large number of the respective foils, such as niobium and aluminum. Materials of intermetallics with silicon were obtained by the welding of packages built from metal foils with Si-coating. The change in the structure according to the temperature of the welding was studied, and the high-temperature bending strength was determined. Key words: multilayer composite, high-resistant material, intermetallic compound, diffusion welding, package rolling, layered structure, bending strength.

  2. Physical and chemical characterization of airborne particles from welding operations in automotive plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasch, Jean; D'Arcy, James

    2008-07-01

    Airborne particles were characterized from six welding operations in three automotive plants, including resistance spot welding, metal inert gas (MIG) welding and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding of aluminum and resistance spot welding, MIG welding and weld-through sealer of galvanized steel. Particle levels were measured throughout the process area to select a sampling location, followed by intensive particle sampling over one working shift. Temporal trends were measured, and particles were collected on filters to characterize their size and chemistry. In all cases, the particles fell into a bimodal size distribution with very large particles >20 mum in diameter, possibly emitted as spatter or metal expulsions, and very small particles about 1 mum in diameter, possibly formed from condensation of vaporized metal. The mass median aerodynamic diameter was about 1 mum, with only about 7% of the particle mass present as ultrafine particles welding particles could be accounted for by chemical analysis, with the remainder possibly present as oxygen. Predominant species were organic carbon, elemental carbon, iron, and aluminum. More than 80% of the particle mass could be accounted for from steel welding, primarily present as iron, organic carbon, zinc, and copper. Particle concentrations and elemental concentrations were compared with allowable concentrations as recommended by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration and the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists. In all cases, workplace levels were at least 11 times lower than recommended levels.

  3. Handbook of Plastic Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Aminul

    The purpose of this document is to summarize the information about the laser welding of plastic. Laser welding is a matured process nevertheless laser welding of micro dimensional plastic parts is still a big challenge. This report collects the latest information about the laser welding of plastic...... materials and provides an extensive knowhow on the industrial plastic welding process. The objectives of the report include: - Provide the general knowhow of laser welding for the beginners - Summarize the state-of-the-art information on the laser welding of plastics - Find the technological limits in terms...... of design, materials and process - Find the best technology, process and machines adaptive to Sonion’s components - Provide the skills to Sonion’s Design Engineers for successful design of the of the plastic components suitable for the laser welding The ultimate goal of this report is to serve...

  4. Nondestructive testing: welding industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raj, Baldev; Subramanian, C.V.

    1992-01-01

    This chapter highlights various conventional and advanced nondestructive testing (NDT) techniques that have been used for weld evaluation. Welding Codes and Standards of International and National organisations that have been followed in India for various weld evaluation purposes are also included. The chapter also emphasises the importance of NDT by way of a few case studies that have been carried out on important critical welded components. (author). 12 refs., 17 figs., 1 appendix

  5. Instructional Guidelines. Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fordyce, H. L.; Doshier, Dale

    Using the standards of the American Welding Society and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, this welding instructional guidelines manual presents a course of study in accordance with the current practices in industry. Intended for use in welding programs now practiced within the Federal Prison System, the phases of the program are…

  6. Welding Course Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genits, Joseph C.

    This guide is intended for use in helping students gain a fundamental background on the major aspects of the welding trade. The course emphasis is on mastery of the manipulative skills necessary to develop successful welding techniques and on acquisition of an understanding of the specialized tools and equipment used in welding. The first part…

  7. Underwater welding of steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibarra, S.; Olson, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    A fundamental basis to understand the behavior of wet underwater welding of steel is introduced. Both the pyrometallurgical and physical metallurgy concepts are discussed. Modifications of welding consumables and practice are suggested. This chapter promotes further contributions of meatllurgical research to improve and promote wet underwater welding. (orig.)

  8. Welding Over Paint Primer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnson, Kevin S; Liu, Stephen; Olson, David L

    1998-01-01

    .... According to the hydrogen-oxygen and }hydrogen-fluorine equilibrium considerations, an increase in the partial pressure of oxygen or fluorine could decrease the partial pressure of hydrogen within the welding arc. Consequently, a welding consumable that contains chemical ingredients of high oxygen and fluorine potential would be capable of minimizing hydrogen pick-up in the weld pool.

  9. Strengthening of Aluminum Wires Treated with A206/Alumina Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Florián-Algarín

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This study sought to characterize aluminum nanocomposite wires that were fabricated through a cold-rolling process, having potential applications in TIG (tungsten inert gas welding of aluminum. A206 (Al-4.5Cu-0.25Mg master nanocomposites with 5 wt % γAl2O3 nanoparticles were first manufactured through a hybrid process combining semi-solid mixing and ultrasonic processing. A206/1 wt % γAl2O3 nanocomposites were fabricated by diluting the prepared master nanocomposites with a monolithic A206 alloy, which was then added to a pure aluminum melt. The fabricated Al–γAl2O3 nanocomposite billet was cold-rolled to produce an Al nanocomposite wire with a 1 mm diameter and a transverse area reduction of 96%. Containing different levels of nanocomposites, the fabricated samples were mechanically and electrically characterized. The results demonstrate a significantly higher strength of the aluminum wires with the nanocomposite addition. Further, the addition of alumina nanoparticles affected the wires’ electrical conductivity compared with that of pure aluminum and aluminum–copper alloys. The overall properties of the new material demonstrate that these wires could be an appealing alternative for fillers intended for aluminum welding.

  10. Inspecting Friction Stir Welding using Electromagnetic Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinchen, David G.

    2004-01-01

    A report describes the use of advanced electromagnetic probes to measure the dimensions, the spatial distribution of electrical conductivity, and related other properties of friction stir welds (FSWs) between parts made of the same or different aluminum alloy(s). The probes are of the type described in in another Tech Brief. To recapitulate: A probe of this type is essentially an eddy-current probe that includes a primary (driver) winding that meanders and multiple secondary (sensing) windings that meander along the primary winding. Electrical conductivity is commonly used as a measure of heat treatment and tempering of aluminum alloys, but prior to the development of these probes, the inadequate sensitivity and limited accuracy of electrical-conductivity probes precluded such use on FSWs between different aluminum alloys, and the resolution of those probes was inadequate for measurement of FSW dimensions with positions and metallurgical properties. In contrast, the present probes afford adequate accuracy and spatial resolution for the purposes of measuring the dimensions of FSW welds and correlating spatially varying electrical conductivities with metallurgical properties, including surface defects.

  11. Orbital welding technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeschen, W.

    2003-01-01

    The TIG (Tungsten-inert gas) orbital welding technique is applied in all areas of pipe welding. The process is mainly used for austenitic and ferritic materials but also for materials like aluminium, nickel, and titanium alloys are commonly welded according to this technique. Thin-walled as well as thick-walled pipes are welded economically. The application of orbital welding is of particular interest in the area of maintenance of thick-walled pipes that is described in this article. (orig.) [de

  12. Homogeneous weldings of copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campurri, C.; Lopez, M.; Fernandez, R.; Osorio, V.

    1995-01-01

    This research explored the metallurgical and mechanical properties of arc welding of copper related with influence of Argon, Helium and mixtures of them. Copper plates of 6 mm thickness were welded with different mixtures of the mentioned gases. The radiography of welded specimens with 100% He and 100% Ar does not show show any porosity. On the other hand, the copper plates welded different gas mixtures presented uniform porosity in the welded zone. The metallographies show recrystallized grain in the heat affected zone, while the welding zone showed a dendritic structure. The results of the tensile strength vary between a maximum of 227 MPa for 100% He and a minimum of 174 MOa for the mixture of 60% He and 40% Ar. For the elongation after fracture the best values, about 36%, were obtained for pure gases. As a main conclusion, we can say that arc welding of copper is possible without loosing the mechanical and metallurgical properties of base metal. 6 refs

  13. Collision Welding of Dissimilar Materials by Vaporizing Foil Actuator: A Breakthrough Technology for Dissimilar Metal Joining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daehn, Glenn S. [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Vivek, Anupam [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Liu, Bert C. [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    2016-09-30

    This work demonstrated and further developed Vaporizing Foil Actuator Welding (VFAW) as a viable technique for dissimilar-metal joining for automotive lightweighting applications. VFAW is a novel impact welding technology, which uses the pressure developed from electrically-assisted rapid vaporization of a thin aluminum foil (the consumable) to launch and ultimately collide two of more pieces of metal to create a solid-state bond between them. 18 dissimilar combinations of automotive alloys from the steel, aluminum and magnesium alloy classes were screened for weldability and characterized by metallography of weld cross sections, corrosion testing, and mechanical testing. Most combinations, especially a good number of Al/Fe pairs, were welded successfully. VFAW was even able to weld combinations of very high strength materials such as 5000 and 6000 series aluminum alloys to boron and dual phase steels, which is difficult to impossible by other joining techniques such as resistance spot welding, friction stir welding, or riveting. When mechanically tested, the samples routinely failed in a base metal rather than along the weld interface, showing that the weld was stronger than either of the base metals. As for corrosion performance, a polymer-based protective coating was used to successfully combat galvanic corrosion of 5 Al/Fe pairs through a month-long exposure to warm salt fog. In addition to the technical capabilities, VFAW also consumes little energy compared to conventional welding techniques and requires relatively light, flexible tooling. Given the technical and economic advantages, VFAW can be a very competitive joining technology for automotive lightweighting. The success of this project and related activities has resulted in substantial interest not only within the research community but also various levels of automotive supply chain, which are collaborating to bring this technology to commercial use.

  14. Determination of airborne nanoparticles from welding operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, João Fernando Pereira; Albuquerque, Paula Cristina Silva; Miranda, Rosa Maria Mendes; Vieira, Maria Teresa Freire

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the levels of airborne ultrafine particles emitted in welding processes (tungsten inert gas [TIG], metal active gas [MAG] of carbon steel, and friction stir welding [FSW] of aluminum) in terms of deposited area in pulmonary alveolar tract using a nanoparticle surface area monitor (NSAM) analyzer. The obtained results showed the dependence of process parameters on emitted ultrafine particles and demonstrated the presence of ultrafine particles compared to background levels. Data indicated that the process that resulted in the lowest levels of alveolar deposited surface area (ADSA) was FSW, followed by TIG and MAG. However, all tested processes resulted in significant concentrations of ultrafine particles being deposited in humans lungs of exposed workers.

  15. New technique of skin embedded wire double-sided laser beam welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bing; Tao, Wang; Chen, Yanbin

    2017-06-01

    In the aircraft industry, double-sided laser beam welding is an approved method for producing skin-stringer T-joints on aircraft fuselage panels. As for the welding of new generation aluminum-lithium alloys, however, this technique is limited because of high hot cracking susceptibility and strengthening elements' uneven distributions within weld. In the present study, a new technique of skin embedded wire double-sided laser beam welding (LBW) has been developed to fabricate T-joints consisting of 2.0 mm thick 2060-T8/2099-T83 aluminum-lithium alloys using eutectic alloy AA4047 filler wire. Necessary dimension parameters of the novel groove were reasonably designed for achieving crack-free welds. Comparisons were made between the new technique welded T-joint and conventional T-joint mainly on microstructure, hot crack, elements distribution features and mechanical properties within weld. Excellent crack-free microstructure, uniform distribution of silicon and superior tensile properties within weld were found in the new skin embedded wire double-sided LBW T-joints.

  16. Study of localized corrosion in aluminum alloys by the scanning reference electrode technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danford, M. D.

    1995-01-01

    Localized corrosion in 2219-T87 aluminum (Al) alloy, 2195 aluminum-lithium (Al-Li) alloy, and welded 2195 Al-Li alloy (4043 filler) have been investigated using the relatively new scanning reference electrode technique (SRET). Anodic sites are more frequent and of greater strength in the 2195 Al-Li alloy than in the 2219-T87 Al alloy, indicating a greater tendency toward pitting for the latter. However, the overall corrosion rates are about the same for these two alloys, as determined using the polarization resistance technique. In the welded 2195 Al-Li alloy, the weld bean is entirely cathodic, with rather strongly anodic heat affected zones (HAZ) bordering both sides, indicating a high probability of corrosion in the HAZ parallel to the weld bead.

  17. Development of aluminium viscous damper by high speed MIG welding process; Kosoku MIG yosetsuho ni yoru aluminium sei viscous damper no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hino, H; Hotta, M [Nippon Light Metal Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Maeda, Y; Shimizu, H [Fukoku Co. Ltd., Saitama (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    We have developed a welded aluminum viscous damper to improve the joining strength between the case and the cover of the conventional damper mechanically fastened by adhesion. The distortion of the welded damper was decreased to an acceptable level using the high speed MIG welding process. Sound quality and good appearance were obtained by optimizing the initial speed of the filler wire and by controlling the welding conditions at the starting part and in the lap part. The leakage load and the fatigue limit of the welded damper were 5 and 10 times those of the conventional damper, respectively. 3 refs., 15 figs.

  18. Effect of microalloying on precipitate evolution in ferritic welds and implications for toughness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayanan, Badri K.; Kovarik, L.; Sarosi, Peter M.; Quintana, Marie A.; Mills, M.J.

    2010-01-01

    Ferritic weld metal deposited with a self-shielded arc-welding process has intentional additions of aluminum, magnesium, titanium and zirconium. This results in a complex precipitation process that has been characterized with a combination of electron microscopy techniques. This work indicates that the formation of a spinel oxide is critical for the nucleation of nitrides of zirconium and titanium and prevents the agglomeration of aluminum rich oxides and the formation of large aluminum nitrides. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy has been used to characterize the core/shell structure of the precipitates with microalloying additions. Thermodynamic modeling of the precipitate formation during solidification is consistent with the microstructural observations. The evolution of precipitate formation is critical to limit large inclusions and improve weld metal toughness.

  19. Apparatus and process for ultrasonic seam welding stainless steel foils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, Richard W.

    1992-01-01

    An ultrasonic seam welding apparatus having a head which is rotated to form contact, preferably rolling contact, between a metallurgically inert coated surface of the head and an outside foil of a plurality of layered foils or work materials. The head is vibrated at an ultrasonic frequency, preferably along a longitudinal axis of the head. The head is constructed to transmit vibration through a contacting surface of the head into each of the layered foils. The contacting surface of the head is preferably coated with aluminum oxide to prevent the head from becoming welded to layered stainless steel foils.

  20. Near Net Manufacturing Using Thin Gage Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshita, Jennifer; Potter, David; Holquin, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) and near net spin forming of FSW aluminumn blanks were investigated for large-scale pressure vessel applications. With a specific focus on very thin gage 2xxx and 7xxx aluminum alloys, the program concentrated on the following: the criteria used for material selection, a potential manufacturing flow, and the effectiveness and associated risks of near net spin forming. Discussion will include the mechanical properties of the friction stir welds and the parent material from before and after the spin forming process. This effort was performed under a NASA Space Exploration initiative focused on increasing the affordability, reliability and performance of pressure vessels larger than 10 ft. diameter.

  1. Solid-state resistance upset welding: A process with unique advantages for advanced materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanne, W.R. Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Solid-state resistance upset welding is suitable for joining many alloys that are difficult to weld using fusion processes. Since no melting takes place, the weld metal retains many of the characteristics of the base metal. Resulting welds have a hot worked structure, and thereby have higher strength than fusion welds in the same mate. Since the material being joined is not melted, compositional gradients are not introduced, second phase materials are minimally disrupted, and minor alloying elements, do not affect weldability. Solid-state upset welding has been adapted for fabrication of structures considered very large compared to typical resistance welding applications. The process has been used for closure of capsules, small vessels, and large containers. Welding emphasis has been on 304L stainless steel, the material for current applications. Other materials have, however, received enough attention to have demonstrated capability for joining alloys that are not readily weldable using fusion welding methods. A variety of other stainless steels (including A-286), superalloys (including TD nickel), refractory metals (including tungsten), and aluminum alloys (including 2024) have been successfully upset welded

  2. Parametric Investigation on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Ultrasonic spot welded Aluminium to Copper sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad Satpathy, Mantra; Das Mohapatra, Kasinath; Sahoo, Ananda Kumar; Sahoo, Susanta Kumar

    2018-03-01

    Ultrasonic welding is one of the promising solid state welding methods which have been widely used to join highly conductive materials like aluminum and copper. Despite these applications in the automotive field, other industries also have a strong interest to adopt this process for joining of various advanced alloys. In some of its applications, poor weld strength and sticking of the workpiece to the tool are issues. Thus, an attempt has been taken in the present study to overcome these issues by performing experiments with a suitable range of weld parameters. The major objectives of this study are to obtain a good joint strength with a reduced sticking phenomenon and microstructure of Al-Cu weld coupons. The results uncovered the mechanical strength of the joint increased up to 0.34 sec of weld time and afterward, it gradually decreased. Meantime, the plastic deformation in the weld zone enhanced the formation of an intermetallic layer of 1.5 μm thick, and it is composed of mainly Al2Cu compound. The temperature evolved during the welding process is also measured by thermocouples to show its relationship with the plastic deformation. The present work exemplifies a finer understanding of the failure behavior of joints and provides an insight of ultrasonic welding towards the improvement in the quality of weld.

  3. Modeling and validation of multiple joint reflections for ultra- narrow gap laser welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milewski, J.; Keel, G. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Sklar, E. [Opticad Corp., Santa Fe, New Mexico (United States)

    1995-12-01

    The effects of multiple internal reflections within a laser weld joint as a function of joint geometry and processing conditions have been characterized. A computer model utilizing optical ray tracing is used to predict the reflective propagation of laser beam energy focused into the narrow gap of a metal joint for the purpose of predicting the location of melting and coalescence which form the weld. The model allows quantitative analysis of the effects of changes to joint geometry, laser design, materials and processing variables. This analysis method is proposed as a way to enhance process efficiency and design laser welds which display deep penetration and high depth to width aspect ratios, reduced occurrence of defects and enhanced melting. Of particular interest to laser welding is the enhancement of energy coupling to highly reflective materials. The weld joint is designed to act as an optical element which propagates and concentrates the laser energy deep within the joint to be welded. Experimentation has shown that it is possible to produce welds using multiple passes to achieve deep penetration and high depth to width aspect ratios without the use of filler material. The enhanced laser melting and welding of aluminum has been demonstrated. Optimization through modeling and experimental validation has resulted in the development of a laser welding process variant we refer to as Ultra-Narrow Gap Laser Welding.

  4. Welding skate with computerized controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, W. A., Jr.

    1968-01-01

    New welding skate concept for automatic TIG welding of contoured or double-contoured parts combines lightweight welding apparatus with electrical circuitry which computes the desired torch angle and positions a torch and cold-wire guide angle manipulator.

  5. Process Model for Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Glynn

    1996-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a relatively new process being applied for joining of metal alloys. The process was initially developed by The Welding Institute (TWI) in Cambridge, UK. The FSW process is being investigated at NASA/MSEC as a repair/initial weld procedure for fabrication of the super-light-weight aluminum-lithium shuttle external tank. The FSW investigations at MSFC were conducted on a horizontal mill to produce butt welds of flat plate material. The weldment plates are butted together and fixed to a backing plate on the mill bed. A pin tool is placed into the tool holder of the mill spindle and rotated at approximately 400 rpm. The pin tool is then plunged into the plates such that the center of the probe lies at, one end of the line of contact, between the plates and the shoulder of the pin tool penetrates the top surface of the weldment. The weld is produced by traversing the tool along the line of contact between the plates. A lead angle allows the leading edge of the shoulder to remain above the top surface of the plate. The work presented here is the first attempt at modeling a complex phenomenon. The mechanical aspects of conducting the weld process are easily defined and the process itself is controlled by relatively few input parameters. However, in the region of the weld, plasticizing and forging of the parent material occurs. These are difficult processes to model. The model presented here addresses only variations in the radial dimension outward from the pin tool axis. Examinations of the grain structure of the weld reveal that a considerable amount of material deformation also occurs in the direction parallel to the pin tool axis of rotation, through the material thickness. In addition, measurements of the axial load on the pin tool demonstrate that the forging affect of the pin tool shoulder is an important process phenomenon. Therefore, the model needs to be expanded to account for the deformations through the material thickness and the

  6. ALUMINUM BOX BUNDLING PRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iosif DUMITRESCU

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In municipal solid waste, aluminum is the main nonferrous metal, approximately 80- 85% of the total nonferrous metals. The income per ton gained from aluminum recuperation is 20 times higher than from glass, steel boxes or paper recuperation. The object of this paper is the design of a 300 kN press for aluminum box bundling.

  7. Challenges to Resistance Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Quanfeng

    This report originates from the compulsory defense during my Ph.D. study at the Technical University of Denmark. Resistance welding is an old and well-proven technology. Yet the emergence of more and more new materials, new designs, invention off new joining techniques, and more stringent...... requirement in quality have imposed challenges to the resistance welding. More some research and development have to be done to adapt the old technology to the manufacturing industry of the 21st century. In the 1st part of the report, the challenging factors to the resistance welding are reviewed. Numerical...... simulation of resistance welding has been under development for many years. Yet it is no easy to make simulation results reliable and accurate because of the complexity of resistance welding process. In the 2nd part of the report numerical modeling of resistance welding is reviewed, some critical factors...

  8. Ultrasonic Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabors, Sammy

    2015-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Ultrasonic Stir Welding (USW) to join large pieces of very high-strength metals such as titanium and Inconel. USW, a solid-state weld process, improves current thermal stir welding processes by adding high-power ultrasonic (HPU) energy at 20 kHz frequency. The addition of ultrasonic energy significantly reduces axial, frictional, and shear forces; increases travel rates; and reduces wear on the stir rod, which results in extended stir rod life. The USW process decouples the heating, stirring, and forging elements found in the friction stir welding process allowing for independent control of each process element and, ultimately, greater process control and repeatability. Because of the independent control of USW process elements, closed-loop temperature control can be integrated into the system so that a constant weld nugget temperature can be maintained during welding.

  9. Automatization of welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwabuchi, Masashi; Tomita, Jinji; Nishihara, Katsunori.

    1978-01-01

    Automatization of welding is one of the effective measures for securing high degree of quality of nuclear power equipment, as well as for correspondence to the environment at the site of plant. As the latest ones of the automatic welders practically used for welding of nuclear power apparatuses in factories of Toshiba and IHI, those for pipes and lining tanks are described here. The pipe welder performs the battering welding on the inside of pipe end as the so-called IGSCC countermeasure and the succeeding butt welding through the same controller. The lining tank welder is able to perform simultaneous welding of two parallel weld lines on a large thin plate lining tank. Both types of the welders are demonstrating excellent performance at the shops as well as at the plant site. (author)

  10. The Application of the Method of Continuous Casting for Manufacturing of Welding Wire AMg6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azhazha, V.M.; Sverdlov, V.Ya.; Kondratov, A.A.; Rudycheva, T.Yu.

    2007-01-01

    The method of manufacturing semifinished item of high alloyed of aluminum, silver and copper alloys has been investigated on the basis of the continuous casting method. The sample of aluminum alloy AMg6 consist of small grains with the vios-cut dimension ∼ 15 mkm and which are stretched in the direction of longitudinal axis of the sample Such microstructure is favourable for plastic deformation of the sample. Welding wire which meets the demands of standards of commercial welding wires of this brand has been produced by the drawing from the sample

  11. The microstructure and microhardness of friction stir welded dissimilar copper/Al-5% Mg alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalashnikova, T. A.; Shvedov, M. A.; Vasilyev, P. A.

    2017-12-01

    A friction stir welded joint between copper and aluminum alloy has been investigated and characterized for the microstructure and microhardness number distribution. The microstructural evolution of the joint is studied using optical microscopy and microhardness. The mechanical characteristics in structural zones of FSW joints are determined by Vickers microhardness measurements. Samples were cut across the cross section. It is shown that intermetallic Cu/Al particles are formed at interfaces. The intermetallics microhardness in the dissimilar aluminum/cooper FSW joint differs from that of the joint produced by fusion welding. The grain structures obtained in different dissimilar joint zones are examined.

  12. Computer Tomography 3-D Imaging of the Metal Deformation Flow Path in Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Judy; Beshears, Ronald; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    In friction stir welding, a rotating threaded pin tool is inserted into a weld seam and literally stirs the edges of the seam together. This solid-state technique has been successfully used in the joining of materials that are difficult to fusion weld such as aluminum alloys. To determine optimal processing parameters for producing a defect free weld, a better understanding of the resulting metal deformation flow path is required. Marker studies are the principal method of studying the metal deformation flow path around the FSW pin tool. In our study, we have used computed tomography (CT) scans to reveal the flow pattern of a lead wire embedded in a FSW weld seam. At the welding temperature of aluminum, the lead becomes molten and thus tracks the aluminum deformation flow paths in a unique 3-dimensional manner. CT scanning is a convenient and comprehensive way of collecting and displaying tracer data. It marks an advance over previous more tedious and ambiguous radiographic/metallographic data collection methods.

  13. Dual wire welding torch and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez, Fernando Martinez; Stump, Kevin S.; Ludewig, Howard W.; Kilty, Alan L.; Robinson, Matthew M.; Egland, Keith M.

    2009-04-28

    A welding torch includes a nozzle with a first welding wire guide configured to orient a first welding wire in a first welding wire orientation, and a second welding wire guide configured to orient a second welding wire in a second welding wire orientation that is non-coplanar and divergent with respect to the first welding wire orientation. A method of welding includes moving a welding torch with respect to a workpiece joint to be welded. During moving the welding torch, a first welding wire is fed through a first welding wire guide defining a first welding wire orientation and a second welding wire is fed through a second welding wire guide defining a second welding wire orientation that is divergent and non-coplanar with respect to the first welding wire orientation.

  14. Electric arc welding gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luttrell, Edward; Turner, Paul W.

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates to improved apparatus for arc welding an interior joint formed by intersecting tubular members. As an example, the invention is well suited for applications where many similar small-diameter vertical lines are to be welded to a long horizontal header. The improved apparatus includes an arc welding gun having a specially designed welding head which is not only very compact but also produces welds that are essentially free from rolled-over solidified metal. The welding head consists of the upper end of the barrel and a reversely extending electrode holder, or tip, which defines an acute angle with the barrel. As used in the above-mentioned example, the gun is positioned to extend upwardly through the vertical member and the joint to be welded, with its welding head disposed within the horizontal header. Depending on the design of the welding head, the barrel then is either rotated or revolved about the axis of the vertical member to cause the electrode to track the joint.

  15. Robot welding process control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romine, Peter L.

    1991-01-01

    This final report documents the development and installation of software and hardware for Robotic Welding Process Control. Primary emphasis is on serial communications between the CYRO 750 robotic welder, Heurikon minicomputer running Hunter & Ready VRTX, and an IBM PC/AT, for offline programming and control and closed-loop welding control. The requirements for completion of the implementation of the Rocketdyne weld tracking control are discussed. The procedure for downloading programs from the Intergraph, over the network, is discussed. Conclusions are made on the results of this task, and recommendations are made for efficient implementation of communications, weld process control development, and advanced process control procedures using the Heurikon.

  16. Use of servo controlled weld head for end closure welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pathak, S.K.; Setty, D.S.; Rameswara Rao, A.; Hemantha Rao, G.V.S.; Jayaraj, R.N. [Nuclear Fuel Complex, Dept. of Atomic Energy, Hyderabad (India)

    2010-07-01

    In the PHWR fuel fabrication line resistance welding processes are used for joining various zirconium based alloy components to fuel tube of similar material. The quality requirement of these welding processes is very stringent and has to meet all the product requirements. At present these welding processes are being carried out by using standard resistance welding machines. In the resistance welding process in addition to current and time, force is one of the critical and important parameter, which influences the weld quality. At present advanced feed back type fast response medium frequency weld controllers are being used. This has upslope/down slope, constant and repetitive weld pattern selection features makes this critical welding process more reliable. Compared to weld controllers, squeeze force application devices are limited and normally standard high response pneumatic cylinders are used in the welding process. With this type of devices the force is constant during welding process and cannot be varied during welding process as per the material deformation characteristics. Similarly due to non-availability of feed back systems in the squeeze force application systems restricts the accuracy and quality of the welding process. In the present paper the influence of squeeze force pattern on the weld quality using advanced feed back type servo based force control system was studied. Different squeeze forces were used during pre and post weld heat periods along with constant force and compared with the weld quality. (author)

  17. A Preliminary Report on the Strength and Metallography of a Bimetallic Friction Stir Weld Joint Between AA6061 and MIL-DTL-46100E High Hardness Steel Armor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-26

    bimetallic friction stir weld joint between AA6061 and MIL-DTL-46100E High Hardness steel armor. ABSTRACT One half inch thick plates of 6061-T6 aluminum...alloy and High Hardness steel armor (MIL- STD-46100) were successfully joined by the friction stir welding (FSW) process using a tungsten-rhenium...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A preliminary report on the strength and metallography of a bimetallic friction stir weld joint between AA6061 and MIL-DTL

  18. Graphene-aluminum nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartolucci, Stephen F.; Paras, Joseph; Rafiee, Mohammad A.; Rafiee, Javad; Lee, Sabrina; Kapoor, Deepak; Koratkar, Nikhil

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We investigated the mechanical properties of aluminum and aluminum nanocomposites. → Graphene composite had lower strength and hardness compared to nanotube reinforcement. → Processing causes aluminum carbide formation at graphene defects. → The carbides in between grains is a source of weakness and lowers tensile strength. - Abstract: Composites of graphene platelets and powdered aluminum were made using ball milling, hot isostatic pressing and extrusion. The mechanical properties and microstructure were studied using hardness and tensile tests, as well as electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry. Compared to the pure aluminum and multi-walled carbon nanotube composites, the graphene-aluminum composite showed decreased strength and hardness. This is explained in the context of enhanced aluminum carbide formation with the graphene filler.

  19. Structure and Mechanical Properties of Friction Stir Weld Joints of Magnesium Alloy AZ31

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasawa, T.; Otsuka, M.; Yokota, T.; Ueki, T.

    The applicability of friction stir welding to hot rolled sheet of commercial magnesium alloy AZ31 plates has been investigated. Friction stir weld joint showed mechanical strength comparable to that of base material, though the ductility remained at one half of that of the latter. The results are consistent with the microstructure which is characterized by a fine grained bond layer bounded by-intermediate grained base metals. It is found that both anodizing treatment and insertion of aluminum foil between batting faces do not degrade the joint properties at all. The results suggest that friction stir welding can be potentially applied to magnesium alloy.

  20. Microstructure and properties of friction stir butt-welded AZ31 magnesium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xunhong; Wang Kuaishe

    2006-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a relatively new joining technique particularly for magnesium and aluminum alloys that are difficult to fusion weld. In this paper, an excellent friction stir weld of AZ31 magnesium alloy was obtained at proper parameter. In the friction stir zone (FSZ), the microstructure of the base material (BM) is replaced by fine grains and small particles of intermetallic compounds. The average microhardness of the friction stir zone is higher than that of the base material. The maximum tensile strength of joint can reach 93% that of the base material. And the failure locations are almost at the heating affected zone

  1. Microstructure evolution in dissimilar AA6060/copper friction stir welded joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalashnikova, T. A.; Shvedov, M. A.; Vasilyev, P. A.

    2017-12-01

    Friction stir welding process has been applied for making a dissimilar copper/aluminum alloy joint. The grain microstructure and mechanical properties of the obtained joint were studied. The structure of the cross-section of the FSW compound was analyzed. The microstructural evolution of the joint was examined using optical microscopy. The mechanical properties of the intermetallic particles were evaluated by measuring the microhardness according to the Vickers method. The microhardness of the intermetallic particles was by a factor of 4 lower than that of the particles obtained by fusion welding. The results of the investigations enable using friction stir welding for making dissimilar joints.

  2. Susceptibility testing for welding of AlMg alloys intended for extrusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Borowski

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of research was to determine the weldability, using Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG of extruded sections made of hard-deformable 5xxx series aluminum alloys with differing magnesium content, i.e. AlMg3, AlMg4,5, AlMg5, AlMg7. Welded joints were obtained as a result of a welding process consisting of several steps. Only welds characterized by very good appearance and quality were selected for tests. As a result of conducted research, TIG welding parameters were determined for sections with a thickness of 8 mm. It was observed that alloys of differing Mg content are characterized by high weldability and do not exhibit a significant reduction of the yield point. Moreover, joints exhibit uniform hardness distribution in the welded joint and heat-affected zone. Tensile strength is reduced.

  3. Potential Applications of Friction Stir Welding to the Hydrogen Economy. Hydrogen Regional Infrastructure Program In Pennsylvania, Materials Task

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brendlinger, Jennifer [Concurrent Technologies Corporation, Johnstown, PA (United States)

    2009-07-17

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a solid-state welding technique developed by The Welding Institute (TWI) of Cambridge, UK in the early 1990’s. The process uses a non-consumable rotating tool to develop frictional heat and plastically deform workpieces to be joined, resulting in a solid-state weld on the trailing side of the advancing tool. Since the materials to be joined are not melted, FSW results in a finer grain structure and therefore enhanced properties, relative to fusion welds. And unlike fusion welding, a relatively small number of key process parameters exist for FSW: tool rotational speed, linear weld velocity and force perpendicular to the joining surface. FSW is more energy efficient than fusion welding and can be accomplished in one or two passes, versus many more passes required of fusion welding thicker workpieces. Reduced post-weld workpiece distortion is another factor that helps to reduce the cost of FSW relative to fusion welding. Two primary areas have been identified for potential impact on the hydrogen economy: FSW of metallic pipes for hydrogen transmission and FSW of aluminum pressure vessels for hydrogen storage. Both areas have been under active development and are explored in this paper.

  4. Mechanical Properties and Wear Behavior of AA5182/WC Nanocomposite Fabricated by Friction Stir Welding at Different Tool Traverse Speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paidar, Moslem; Asgari, Ali; Ojo, Olatunji Oladimeji; Saberi, Abbas

    2018-03-01

    Grain growth inhibition at the heat-affected zone, improved weld strength and superior tribological properties of welds are desirable attributes of modern manufacturing. With the focused on these attributes, tungsten carbide (WC) nanoparticles were employed as reinforcements for the friction stir welding of 5-mm-thick AA5182 aluminum alloy by varying tool traverse speeds. The microstructure, microhardness, ultimate tensile strength, fracture and wear behavior of the resultant WC-reinforced welds were investigated, while unreinforced AA5182 welds were employed as controls for the study. The result shows that the addition of WC nanoparticles causes substantial grain refinement within the weld nugget. A decrease in traverse speed caused additional particle fragmentation, improved hardness value and enhanced weld strength in the reinforced welds. Improved wear rate and friction coefficient of welds were attained at a reduced traverse speed of 100 mm/min in the WC-reinforced welds. This improvement is attributed to the effects of reduced grain size/grain fragmentation and homogeneous dispersion of WC nanoparticles within the WC-reinforced weld nugget.

  5. Measuring weld heat to evaluate weld integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schauder, V., E-mail: schauder@hks-prozesstechnik.de [HKS-Prozesstechnik GmbH, Halle (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    Eddy current and ultrasonic testing are suitable for tube and pipe mills and have been used for weld seam flaw detection for decades, but a new process, thermography, is an alternative. By measuring the heat signature of the weld seam as it cools, it provides information about weld integrity at and below the surface. The thermal processes used to join metals, such as plasma, induction, laser, and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW), have improved since they were developed, and they get better with each passing year. However, no industrial process is perfect, so companies that conduct research in flaw detection likewise continue to develop and improve the technologies used to verify weld integrity: ultrasonic testing (UT), eddy current testing (ET), hydrostatic, X-ray, magnetic particle, and liquid penetrant are among the most common. Two of these are used for verifying the integrity of the continuous welds such as those used on pipe and tube mills: UT and ET. Each uses a transmitter to send waves of ultrasonic energy or electrical current through the material and a receiver (probe) to detect disturbances in the flow. The two processes often are combined to capitalize on the strengths of each. While ET is good at detecting flaws at or near the surface, UT penetrates the material, detecting subsurface flaws. One drawback is that sound waves and electrical current waves have a specific direction of travel, or an alignment. A linear defect that runs parallel to the direction of travel of the ultrasonic sound wave or a flaw that is parallel to the coil winding direction of the ET probe can go undetected. A second drawback is that they don't detect cold welds. An alternative process, thermography, works in a different fashion: It monitors the heat of the material as the weld cools. Although it measures the heat at the surface, the heat signature provides clues about cooling activity deep in the material, resulting in a thorough assessment of the weld's integrity It

  6. Corrosion behavior of Al6061 alloy weldment produced by friction stir welding process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Gharavi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the corrosion behavior of welded lap joints of AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy produced by friction stir welding process has been investigated. Corrosion properties of welded lap joints were studied by cyclic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy tests. All tests were performed in an aerated 0.6 mol L−1 NaCl aqueous solution with pH = 6.5 at a temperature of 30 °C to characterize corrosion morphology and realize corrosion features of weld regions as opposed to the parent alloy. The microstructure of weld nugget (WN, heated affected zone (HAZ, and parent alloy were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The experimental results indicated that the welding process has a major effect on the corrosion resistance, which possibly associated to the break-down and dissolution of intermetallic particles. It is supposed that an increasing in intermetallic distributed throughout the matrix of weld regions increases the galvanic corrosion couples. Furthermore, by decreasing the grain size in the weld regions, the susceptibility to corrosion is enhanced. The pitting corrosion and intergranular attack are the dominant corrosion types in the weld regions and the parent alloy.

  7. The effect of welding parameters on surface quality of AA6351 aluminium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yacob, S; Ariffin, N; Ali, R; Arshad, A; Wahab, M I A; Ismail, S A; Roji, NS M; Din, W B W; Zakaria, M H; Abdullah, A; Yusof, M I; Kamarulzaman, K Z; Mahyuddin, A; Hamzah, M N; Roslan, R; MAli, M A; Ahsan, Q

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, the effects of gas metal arc welding-cold metal transfer (GMAW-CMT) parameters on surface roughness are experimentally assessed. The purpose of this study is to develop a better understanding of the effects of welding speed, material thickness and contact tip to work distance on the surface roughness. Experiments are conducted using single pass gas metal arc welding-cold metal transfer (GMAW-CMT) welding technique to join the material. The material used in this experiment was AA6351 aluminum alloy with the thickness of 5mm and 6mm. A Mahr Marsuft XR 20 machine was used to measure the average roughness (Ra) of AA6351 joints. The main and interaction effect analysis was carried out to identify process parameters that affect the surface roughness. The results show that all the input process parameters affect the surface roughness of AA6351 joints. Additionally, the average roughness (Ra) results also show a decreasing trend with increased of welding speed. It is proven that gas metal arc welding-cold metal transfer (GMAW-CMT)welding process has been successful in term of providing weld joint of good surface quality for AA6351 based on the low value surface roughness condition obtained in this setup. The outcome of this experimental shall be valuable for future fabrication process in order to obtained high good quality weld. (paper)

  8. Pengaruh Kecepatan Putar Indentor Las Gesek Puntir (Friction Stir Welding Terhadap Kualitas Hasil Pengelasan Alumunium 1100-H18

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irza Sukmana

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum and their alloys have been applied in many industrial sectors. Although it shows a good corrosion properties, however welding process of aluminum still a challenge as it covered by oxide layer on the surface. Friction Stir Welding (FSW technology gives a potential chance to be used for joining process of aluminum. In this study, we use a vertical milling machine Milko-12 that has been utilized with indentor of FSW process for Aluminum 1100-H18 at 4 (four different rotation speed (Rt, i.e.: 352, 490, 653, and 910 rpm and constant transversal speed (V 20mm/minutes. Based on mechanical properties and metallography data of welded materials, the higher the Rt the higher the tensile strength. Rt of 653 rpm results the highest tensile strength of 107 MPa. The crack areas of all welded metals are at base metal (BM concluded that our vertical milling machine Milko-12 can be utilized for friction stir welding (FSW process for Aluminum.

  9. Investigation of Iron Aluminide Weld Overlays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banovic, S.W.; DuPont, J.B.; Levin, B.F.; Marder, A.R.

    1999-08-02

    Conventional fossil fired boilers have been retrofitted with low NO(sub)x burners in order for the power plants to comply with new clean air regulations. Due to the operating characteristics of these burners, boiler tube sulfidation corrosion typically has been enhanced resulting in premature tube failure. To protect the existing panels from accelerated attack, weld overlay coatings are typically being applied. By depositing an alloy that offers better corrosion resistance than the underlying tube material, the wastage rates can be reduced. While Ni-based and stainless steel compositions are presently providing protection, they are expensive and susceptible to failure via corrosion-fatigue due to microsegregation upon solidification. Another material system presently under consideration for use as a coating in the oxidation/sulfidation environments is iron-aluminum. These alloys are relatively inexpensive, exhibit little microsegregation, and show excellent corrosion resistance. However, their use is limited due to weldability issues and their lack of corrosion characterization in simulated low NO(sub)x gas compositions. Therefore a program was initiated in 1996 to evaluate the use of iron-aluminum weld overlay coatings for erosion/corrosion protection of boiler tubes in fossil fired boilers with low NO(sub)x burners. Investigated properties included weldability, corrosion behavior, erosion resistance, and erosion-corrosion performance.

  10. TIG welding method and TIG welding device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoneda, Eishi

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of TIG welding for members having different heat capacities including a cladding tube and an end plug of a fuel rod to be used, for example, in a reactor, and a device therefor. Namely, in the TIG welding method, the flow rate of a sealed gas to the side of a member having smaller heat capacity is made greater than that on the side of the member having greater heat capacity bordered on the top end of a welding electrode. Since the sealed gas is jetted being localized relative to the welding electrode, arc is restricted in a region of the member having smaller heat capacity and is increased at a region having a larger heat capacity. As a result, the arc is localized, so that the heat input amount to the region having a large heat capacity is increased, and then a plurality of members at the abutting portion are melted uniformly thereby capable of obtaining a uniform molten pool. A bead is formed at the abutting portion thereby capable of obtaining a welded portion with less unevenness and having large strength. (I.S.)

  11. Explosion metal welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popoff, A.A.

    1976-01-01

    Process parameters pertaining to welding similar and dissimilar metals using explosives are reviewed. The discussion centers on the interrelationship of physical parameters which play a part in achieving desirable metallurgical results. Present activities in explosion metal welding at LASL are presented and shown how they related to the interests of the ERDA community

  12. Electron beam welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabbay, M.

    1972-01-01

    The bead characteristics and the possible mechanisms of the electron beam penetration are presented. The different welding techniques are exposed and the main parts of an electron beam welding equipment are described. Some applications to nuclear, spatial and other industries are cited [fr

  13. Ultrasonic inspection of AA6013 laser welded joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Passini

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Interest in laser beam welding for aerospace applications is continuously growing, mainly for aluminum alloys. The joints quality is usually assessed by non-destructive inspection (NDI. In this work, bead on plate laser welds on 1.6 mm thick AA6013 alloy sheets, using a 2 kW Yb-fiber laser were obtained and inspected by pulse/echo ultrasonic phased-array technique. Good and poor quality welds were inspected in order to verify the limits of inspection, comparing also to X-ray radiography and metallographic inspections. The results showed that ultrasonic phased array technique was able to identify the presence of grouped porosity, through the attenuation of the amplitude of the echo signal. This attenuation is attributed to the scattering of the waves caused by micro pores, with individual size below the resolution limit of the equipment, but when grouped, can cause a perceptive effect on the reflection spectra.

  14. Welding problems in nuclear power engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubchenko, A.S.

    1986-01-01

    The problems of welding industry in nuclear power plant engineering, mainly related to the improvement of molten bath protection, are considered. Development of new materials for welding electrodes, for cladding and welding fluxes, is pointed out. Production of the following equipment is brought to a commercial level: welding heads and welding machines for branch pipe welding, anticorrosion cladding, zonal thermal treatment, electron beam welding facilities for the welding and maintenance of turbineblades, equipment for nondestructive testing of welded joints

  15. Simulation of Weld Mechanical Behavior to Include Welding Induced Residual Stress and Distortion: Coupling of SYSWELD and Abaqus Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    able to investigate how the welding process modifies the resultant fracture and fatigue behavior for structural components on its vessels. NSWCCD-61...Investigation of the Strain Rate and Temperature Effects on the Plastic Flow Stress and Ductile Failure Strain of Aluminum Alloys 5083- H116, 6082-T6, and a...883-895. 4. Xiaosheng Gao, Tingting Zhang, Matthew Hayden, and Charles Roe, Effects of the Stress State on Plasticity and Ductile Failure of an

  16. Modeling and design of energy concentrating laser weld joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milewski, J.O. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Sklar, E. [OptiCad Corp., Santa Fe, NM (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The application of lasers for welding and joining has increased steadily over the past decade with the advent of high powered industrial laser systems. Attributes such as high energy density and precise focusing allow high speed processing of precision assemblies. Other characteristics of the process such as poor coupling of energy due to highly reflective materials and instabilities associated with deep penetration keyhole mode welding remain as process limitations and challenges to be overcome. Reflective loss of laser energy impinging on metal surfaces can in some cases exceed ninety five percent, thus making the process extremely inefficient. Enhanced coupling of the laser beam can occur when high energy densities approach the vaporization point of the materials and form a keyhole feature which can trap laser energy and enhance melting and process efficiency. The extreme temperature, pressure and fluid flow dynamics of the keyhole make control of the process difficult in this melting regime. The authors design and model weld joints which through reflective propagation and concentration of the laser beam energy significantly enhance the melting process and weld morphology. A three dimensional computer based geometric optical model is used to describe the key laser parameters and joint geometry. Ray tracing is used to compute the location and intensity of energy absorption within the weld joint. Comparison with experimentation shows good correlation of energy concentration within the model to actual weld profiles. The effect of energy concentration within various joint geometry is described. This method for extending the design of the laser system to include the weld joint allows the evaluation and selection of laser parameters such as lens and focal position for process optimization. The design of narrow gap joints which function as energy concentrators is described. The enhanced laser welding of aluminum without keyhole formation has been demonstrated.

  17. Novel manufacturing process of nanoparticle/Al composite filler metals of tungsten inert gas welding by accumulative roll bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fattahi, M., E-mail: fattahi.put@gmail.com [Technical Inspection Engineering Department, Petroleum University of Technology, Abadan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Noei Aghaei, V. [Aerospace Engineering Department, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dabiri, A.R. [Technical Inspection Engineering Department, Petroleum University of Technology, Abadan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Amirkhanlou, S. [Young Researchers and Elite Club, Najafabad Branch, Islamic Azad University, Najafabad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Akhavan, S.; Fattahi, Y. [Materials Engineering Department, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-11-11

    In the present work, accumulative roll bonding (ARB) was used as an effective method for manufacturing nanoparticle/Al composite filler metals of tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding. After welding, the distribution of ceramic nanoparticles and mechanical properties of welds were investigated. By applying ARB, ceramic nanoparticles were uniformly dispersed in the composite filler metals. Consequently, the welds produced by these filler metals had a uniform dispersion of ceramic nanoparticles in their compositions. The test results showed that the yield strength of welds was greatly increased when using the nanoparticle/Al composite filler metals. The improvement in the yield strength was attributed to the coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch and Orowan strengthening mechanisms. Therefore, according to the results presented in this paper, it can be concluded that the nanoparticle/Al composite filler metals can serve as a novel filler metal for TIG welding of aluminum and its alloys.

  18. Transition welds in welding of two-ply steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fartushnyj, V.G.; Evsyukov, Yu.G.

    1977-01-01

    Studied were physico-mechanical properties of welds made by various welding wires of chromium-nickel and nickel-chromium steels in submerged arc welding of double-layer steels with main layer of the VSt.3sp. carbon steel. It is shown that service-reliable structures welded of two-layer steels are obtained by providing the content from 11 to 20 % Ni in the automatically welded transition layer

  19. The influence of zigzag-curve defect on the fatigue properties of friction stir welds in 7075-T6 Al alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Shusheng; Yang Xinqi; Fang Dapeng; Luan Guohong

    2007-01-01

    The microstructure and fatigue properties of friction stir welded joints of 7075-T6 Al alloy were discussed. It was shown that the zigzag-curve defect at the root of welds is Key factor to reduce the fatigue performance of single-sided friction stir welded joints of 7075-T6 high strength aluminum alloy. On the other hand, the FSW joints of 7075-T6 Al alloy achieved higher fatigue strength compared to the traditional fusion design curves IIW FAT40 and Draft Eurocode 9 design category 55-6 for structural aluminum alloy components

  20. The Plunge Phase of Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, John C.

    2005-01-01

    The many advantages of Friction Stir Welding have led to a relatively rapid acceptance in the often conservative welding community. Because the process is so different from traditional fusion welding, with which most investigators are most familiar, there remain many aspects of FSW for which there is no clear consensus. For example, the well known onion rings seen in transverse sections have been variously interpreted as grain size variations, variation in density of second phase particles and parts of the carousel of material rotating with the pin that have been shed from the carousel. Using Orientation Imaging Microscopy, Schneider has recently noted that the onion rings have a different orientation (and hence etch differently) than the surrounding material, and this orientation is consistent with slip plane orientations at the edge of the carousel. Likewise, the forces and torque exerted by the FSW tool on the work piece largely remain unaccounted for. Although these forces are routinely measured by investigators with commercial instrumented welders, they are rarely reported or even qualitatively analyzed. This paper will introduce a model based on a carousel or disk of material that rotates with the tool to estimate the torque and plunge force required to plunge a tool into the work piece. A stationary tool is modeled rather than the moving tool because effects such as thermal transients and metallurgical changes in the sample (primarily aging in aluminum) can be more easily accounted for. It is believed, however, that with some modifications the model should be applicable to a moving tool also.

  1. Grinding Parts For Automatic Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burley, Richard K.; Hoult, William S.

    1989-01-01

    Rollers guide grinding tool along prospective welding path. Skatelike fixture holds rotary grinder or file for machining large-diameter rings or ring segments in preparation for welding. Operator grasps handles to push rolling fixture along part. Rollers maintain precise dimensional relationship so grinding wheel cuts precise depth. Fixture-mounted grinder machines surface to quality sufficient for automatic welding; manual welding with attendant variations and distortion not necessary. Developed to enable automatic welding of parts, manual welding of which resulted in weld bead permeated with microscopic fissures.

  2. Prediction of Weld Residual Stress of Narrow Gap Welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jun Seog; Huh, Nam Su

    2010-01-01

    The conventional welding technique such as shield metal arc welding has been mostly applied to the piping system of the nuclear power plants. It is well known that this welding technique causes the overheating and welding defects due to the large groove angle of weld. On the other hand, the narrow gap welding(NGW) technique has many merits, for instance, the reduction of welding time, the shrinkage of weld and the small deformation of the weld due to the small groove angle and welding bead width comparing with the conventional welds. These characteristics of NGW affect the deformation behavior and the distribution of welding residual stress of NGW, thus it is believed that the residual stress results obtained from conventional welding procedure may not be applied to structural integrity evaluation of NGW. In this paper, the welding residual stress of NGW was predicted using the nonlinear finite element analysis to simulate the thermal and mechanical effects of the NGW. The present results can be used as the important information to perform the flaw evaluation and to improve the weld procedure of NGW

  3. Welding method, and welding device for use therein, and method of analysis for evaluating welds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aendenroomer, A.J.; Den Ouden, G.; Xiao, Y.H.; Brabander, W.A.J.

    1995-01-01

    Described is a method of automatically welding pipes, comprising welding with a pulsation welding current and monitoring, by means of a sensor, the variations occurring in the arc voltage caused by weld pool oscillations. The occurrence of voltage variations with only frequency components below 100

  4. BONDING ALUMINUM METALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noland, R.A.; Walker, D.E.

    1961-06-13

    A process is given for bonding aluminum to aluminum. Silicon powder is applied to at least one of the two surfaces of the two elements to be bonded, the two elements are assembled and rubbed against each other at room temperature whereby any oxide film is ruptured by the silicon crystals in the interface; thereafter heat and pressure are applied whereby an aluminum-silicon alloy is formed, squeezed out from the interface together with any oxide film, and the elements are bonded.

  5. Aluminum powder metallurgy processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flumerfelt, J.F.

    1999-02-12

    The objective of this dissertation is to explore the hypothesis that there is a strong linkage between gas atomization processing conditions, as-atomized aluminum powder characteristics, and the consolidation methodology required to make components from aluminum powder. The hypothesis was tested with pure aluminum powders produced by commercial air atomization, commercial inert gas atomization, and gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS). A comparison of the GARS aluminum powders with the commercial aluminum powders showed the former to exhibit superior powder characteristics. The powders were compared in terms of size and shape, bulk chemistry, surface oxide chemistry and structure, and oxide film thickness. Minimum explosive concentration measurements assessed the dependence of explosibility hazard on surface area, oxide film thickness, and gas atomization processing conditions. The GARS aluminum powders were exposed to different relative humidity levels, demonstrating the effect of atmospheric conditions on post-atomization processing conditions. The GARS aluminum powders were exposed to different relative humidity levels, demonstrating the effect of atmospheric conditions on post-atomization oxidation of aluminum powder. An Al-Ti-Y GARS alloy exposed in ambient air at different temperatures revealed the effect of reactive alloy elements on post-atomization powder oxidation. The pure aluminum powders were consolidated by two different routes, a conventional consolidation process for fabricating aerospace components with aluminum powder and a proposed alternative. The consolidation procedures were compared by evaluating the consolidated microstructures and the corresponding mechanical properties. A low temperature solid state sintering experiment demonstrated that tap densified GARS aluminum powders can form sintering necks between contacting powder particles, unlike the total resistance to sintering of commercial air atomization aluminum powder.

  6. Investigation of Microstructure and Microhardness in Self-Reacting Friction Stir Welded AA2014-T6 and AA2219-T87

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, K. Renee; McGill, Preston; Barkey, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process with potential advantages for aerospace and automotive industries dealing with light alloys. Self-reacting friction stir welding (SR-FSW) is one variation of the FSW process being developed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for use in the fabrication of propellant tanks. This work reports on the microstructure and microhardness of SR-FSW between two dissimilar aluminum alloys. Specifically, the study examines the cross section of the weld joint formed between an AA2014-T6 plate on the advancing side and an AA2219-T87 plate on the retreating side. The microstructural analysis shows an irregularly displaced weld seam from the advancing side past the thermo-mechanical affected zone (TMAZ) into the weld nugget region. There are sharp variations in the microhardness across the weld. These variations are described in the paper and mechanisms for their formation are discussed.

  7. High-Speed Friction Stir Welding of AA7075-T6 Sheet: Microstructure, Mechanical Properties, Micro-texture, and Thermal History

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jingyi; Upadhyay, Piyush; Hovanski, Yuri; Field, David P.

    2017-11-20

    Friction-stir-welding (FSW) is a cost-effective and high quality joining process for aluminum alloys (especially heat-treatable allo ys) that has been applied successfully in the aerospace industry. However, the full potential of FSW on more cost-sensitive applications is still limited by the production rate, namely the welding speed of the process. The majority of literature evaluating FSW of aluminum alloys is based on welds made in the range of welding speeds around hundreds of millimeters per minute, and only a handful are at a moderate speed of 1 m/min. In this study we present a microstructural analysis of friction stir welded AA7075-T6 blanks with welding speeds up to 3 m/min. Textures, microstructures, mechanical properties, and weld quality are analyzed using TEM, EBSD, metallographic imaging, and Vickers hardness. Results are coupled with welding parameters to aid in the understanding of the complex material flow and texture gradients within the welds in an effort to optimize welding parameters for high speed processing.

  8. Weld analysis and control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Larry Z. (Inventor); Rodgers, Michael H. (Inventor); Powell, Bradley W. (Inventor); Burroughs, Ivan A. (Inventor); Goode, K. Wayne (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The invention is a Weld Analysis and Control System developed for active weld system control through real time weld data acquisition. Closed-loop control is based on analysis of weld system parameters and weld geometry. The system is adapted for use with automated welding apparatus having a weld controller which is capable of active electronic control of all aspects of a welding operation. Enhanced graphics and data displays are provided for post-weld analysis. The system provides parameter acquisition, including seam location which is acquired for active torch cross-seam positioning. Torch stand-off is also monitored for control. Weld bead and parent surface geometrical parameters are acquired as an indication of weld quality. These parameters include mismatch, peaking, undercut, underfill, crown height, weld width, puddle diameter, and other measurable information about the weld puddle regions, such as puddle symmetry, etc. These parameters provide a basis for active control as well as post-weld quality analysis and verification. Weld system parameters, such as voltage, current and wire feed rate, are also monitored and archived for correlation with quality parameters.

  9. Welding processes handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Weman, Klas

    2003-01-01

    Deals with the main commercially significant and commonly used welding processes. This title takes the student or novice welder through the individual steps involved in each process in an easily understood way. It covers many of the requirements referred to in European Standards including EN719, EN 729, EN 729 and EN 287.$bWelding processes handbook is a concise, explanatory guide to the main commercially significant and commonly-used welding processes. It takes the novice welder or student through the individual steps involved in each process in a clear and easily understood way. It is intended to provide an up-to-date reference to the major applications of welding as they are used in industry. The contents have been arranged so that it can be used as a textbook for European welding courses in accordance with guidelines from the European Welding Federation. Welding processes and equipment necessary for each process are described so that they can be applied to all instruction levels required by the EWF and th...

  10. Porosity in fiber laser formation of 5A06 aluminum alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Yang Chun; Wang, Chun Ming; Hu, Xi Yuan; Wang, Jun; Yu, Sheng Fu [HUST, Wuhan (China)

    2010-05-15

    The mechanism of porosity formation and its suppression methods in laser formation of aluminum alloy have been studied using a 4kW fiber laser to weld 5A06 aluminum alloy with SAl-Mg5 filler. It was found that the porosity formation is closely related to the stability of the keyhole and fluctuation of the molten pool in the laser welding aluminum alloy. The filling wire increased the instability of the keyhole and weld pool, thus further increasing the amount of gas cavities in the joint. Prefabrication of a suitable gap for the butt joint can provide a natural passage for the flow of the liquid metal, which can weaken, and even completely eliminate the disturbance of the filling wire on the formation of keyhole. The gap can also provide a passage for the escape of the bubble. Thus, this method can greatly decrease the sheet's susceptibility to porosity. Moreover, for a thin sheet, if the power of the laser is sufficient to form a keyhole with stable penetration through the weld sheet, a weld bead without porosity can also be obtained because closing the keyhole is almost impossible

  11. Porosity in fiber laser formation of 5A06 aluminum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Yang Chun; Wang, Chun Ming; Hu, Xi Yuan; Wang, Jun; Yu, Sheng Fu

    2010-01-01

    The mechanism of porosity formation and its suppression methods in laser formation of aluminum alloy have been studied using a 4kW fiber laser to weld 5A06 aluminum alloy with SAl-Mg5 filler. It was found that the porosity formation is closely related to the stability of the keyhole and fluctuation of the molten pool in the laser welding aluminum alloy. The filling wire increased the instability of the keyhole and weld pool, thus further increasing the amount of gas cavities in the joint. Prefabrication of a suitable gap for the butt joint can provide a natural passage for the flow of the liquid metal, which can weaken, and even completely eliminate the disturbance of the filling wire on the formation of keyhole. The gap can also provide a passage for the escape of the bubble. Thus, this method can greatly decrease the sheet's susceptibility to porosity. Moreover, for a thin sheet, if the power of the laser is sufficient to form a keyhole with stable penetration through the weld sheet, a weld bead without porosity can also be obtained because closing the keyhole is almost impossible

  12. Thermal stir welding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A welding method is provided for forming a weld joint between first and second elements of a workpiece. The method includes heating the first and second elements to form an interface of material in a plasticized or melted state interface between the elements. The interface material is then allowed to cool to a plasticized state if previously in a melted state. The interface material, while in the plasticized state, is then mixed, for example, using a grinding/extruding process, to remove any dendritic-type weld microstructures introduced into the interface material during the heating process.

  13. Thermal stir welding apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A welding method and apparatus are provided for forming a weld joint between first and second elements of a workpiece. The method includes heating the first and second elements to form an interface of material in a plasticized or melted state interface between the elements. The interface material is then allowed to cool to a plasticized state if previously in a melted state. The interface material, while in the plasticized state, is then mixed, for example, using a grinding/extruding process, to remove any dendritic-type weld microstructures introduced into the interface material during the heating process.

  14. Review of Welding Terminology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelika Petrėtienė

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses welding terms in accordance with the Lithuanian standard LST EN 1792 „Welding. The multilingual list of welding terms and similar processes”, „The Russian–Lithuanian dictionary of the terms of mechanical engineering technology and welding“ and the examples from postgraduates‘ final works. It analyses the infringement of lexical, word-building and morphological rules. First-year students should already be familiar with the standardized terms of their speciality. More active propagation of the terms should help to avoid terminology mistakes in various scientific spheres.

  15. Half bead welding technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canonico, D.A.; Holz, P.P.

    1978-05-01

    The ORNL has employed the Section XI half-bead procedure for six repair welds. Table 2 identifies the repairs and the components upon which they were accomplished. The weld repairs were performed to permit us to evaluate material properties, residual stresses, weld repair procedures, and structural behavior of repaired pressure vessels. As a consequence of our study we concluded that when the half bead procedure is correctly applied: (1) there is no metallurgical degradation of the base material, (2) residual stresses of yield point magnitude will be present, and (3) the structural integrity of the pressure vessel is not impaired at Charpy V-notch upper shelf temperatures

  16. Structure and properties of fixed joints formed by ultrasonic-assisted friction-stir welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortuna, S. V., E-mail: s-fortuna@ispms.ru; Ivanov, K. V., E-mail: ikv@ispms.ru; Eliseev, A. A., E-mail: alan@ispms.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials ScienceTomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Tarasov, S. Yu., E-mail: tsy@ispms.ru; Ivanov, A. N., E-mail: ivan@ispms.ru; Rubtsov, V. E., E-mail: rvy@ispms.ru; Kolubaev, E. A., E-mail: eak@ispms.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials ScienceTomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-27

    This paper deals with structure and properties of aluminum alloy 7475 and its joints obtained by friction stir welding including under ultrasonic action. Microhardness measurements show that ultrasonic action increases strength properties of the joints. Optical and transmission electron microscopy reveals that this effect is related to the precipitation of tertiary coherent S-and T-phase particles.

  17. An investigation on capability of hybrid Nd:YAG laser-TIG welding technology for AA2198 Al-Li alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraji, Amir Hosein; Moradi, Mahmoud; Goodarzi, Massoud; Colucci, Pietro; Maletta, Carmine

    2017-09-01

    This paper surveys the capability of the hybrid laser-arc welding in comparison with lone laser welding for AA2198 aluminum alloy experimentally. In the present research, a continuous Nd:YAG laser with a maximum power of 2000 W and a 350 A electric arc were used as two combined welding heat sources. In addition to the lone laser welding experiments, two strategies were examined for hybrid welding; the first one was low laser power (100 W) accompanied by high arc energy, and the second one was high laser power (2000 W) with low arc energy. Welding speed and arc current varied in the experiments. The influence of heat input on weld pool geometry was surveyed. The macrosection, microhardness profile and microstructure of the welded joints were studied and compared. The results indicated that in lone laser welding, conduction mode occurred and keyhole was not formed even in low welding speeds and thus the penetration depth was so low. It was also found that the second approach (high laser power accompanied with low arc energy) is superior to the first one (low laser power accompanied with high arc energy) in hybrid laser-arc welding of Al2198, since lower heat input was needed for full penetration weld and as a result a smaller HAZ was created.

  18. Improving friction stir welding of blanks of different thicknesses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fratini, L. [Dipartimento di Tecnologia Meccanica, Produzione e Ingegneria Gestionale, Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy)], E-mail: abaqus@dtpm.unipa.it; Buffa, G. [Dipartimento di Tecnologia Meccanica, Produzione e Ingegneria Gestionale, Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Shivpuri, R. [Ohio State University, Department of Industrial, Welding and Systems Engineering, 1971 Neil Avenue, 210 Baker Systems, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2007-06-25

    Friction stir welding (FSW) appears to be a promising process even in the welding of blanks of different thicknesses. Actually, such particular tailor welded blanks (TWBs) are usually characterized by a reduction in ductility due to the utilized fusion welding process. In this paper the authors, starting from a preliminary feasibility study, investigate the possibility to improve the mechanical performances of friction stir welded blanks of aluminum alloy with different thicknesses. Both experiments and a FE analyses are developed for a few case studies with different thickness ratios between the blanks. The numerical investigations are performed with the aim to highlight the material temperature distribution during the process in order to determine process conditions for which an almost symmetric thermal flow is obtained in the two blanks of the joint. In this way, a few simple process design rules are derived and verified through experiments. In particular a thickness ratio up to 2 was considered and a joint resistance of about the 80% of the parent material ultimate tensile strength was observed.

  19. Improving friction stir welding of blanks of different thicknesses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fratini, L.; Buffa, G.; Shivpuri, R.

    2007-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) appears to be a promising process even in the welding of blanks of different thicknesses. Actually, such particular tailor welded blanks (TWBs) are usually characterized by a reduction in ductility due to the utilized fusion welding process. In this paper the authors, starting from a preliminary feasibility study, investigate the possibility to improve the mechanical performances of friction stir welded blanks of aluminum alloy with different thicknesses. Both experiments and a FE analyses are developed for a few case studies with different thickness ratios between the blanks. The numerical investigations are performed with the aim to highlight the material temperature distribution during the process in order to determine process conditions for which an almost symmetric thermal flow is obtained in the two blanks of the joint. In this way, a few simple process design rules are derived and verified through experiments. In particular a thickness ratio up to 2 was considered and a joint resistance of about the 80% of the parent material ultimate tensile strength was observed

  20. Dissimilar material joining using laser (aluminum to steel using zinc-based filler wire)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Alexandre; Shabadi, Rajashekar; Deschamps, Alexis; Suery, Michel; Matteï, Simone; Grevey, Dominique; Cicala, Eugen

    2007-04-01

    Joining steel with aluminum involving the fusion of one or both materials is possible by laser beam welding technique. This paper describes a method, called laser braze welding, which is a suitable process to realize this structure. The main problem with thermal joining of steel/aluminum assembly with processes such as TIG or MIG is the formation of fragile intermetallic phases, which are detrimental to the mechanical performances of such joints. Braze welding permits a localized fusion of the materials resulting in a limitation on the growth of fragile phases. This article presents the results of a statistical approach for an overlap assembly configuration using a filler wire composed of 85% Zn and 15% Al. Tensile tests carried on these assemblies demonstrate a good performance of the joints. The fracture mechanisms of the joints are analyzed by a detailed characterization of the seams.

  1. Interfacial Reaction During Dissimilar Joining of Aluminum Alloy to Magnesium and Titanium Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, J. D.; Panteli, A.; Zhang, C. Q.; Baptiste, D.; Cai, E.; Prangnell, P. B.

    Ultrasonic welding (USW), a solid state joining process, has been used to produce welds between AA6111 aluminum alloy and AZ31 magnesium alloys or titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V. The mechanical properties of the welds have been assessed and it has been shown that it is the nature and thickness of the intermetallic compounds (IMCs) at the joint line that are critical in determining joint strength and particularly fracture energy. Al-Mg welds suffer from a very low fracture energy, even when strength is comparable with that of similar metal Mg-Mg welds, due to a thick IMC layer always being formed. It is demonstrated that in USW of Al-Ti alloy the slow interdiffusion kinetics means that an IMC layer does not form during welding, and fracture energy is greater. A model has been developed to predict IMC formation during welding and provide an understanding of the critical factors that determine the IMC thickness. It is predicted that in Al-Mg welds, most of the lMC thickening occurs whilst the IMC regions grow as separate islands, prior to the formation of a continuous layer.

  2. The Development of 6061-Aluminum Windows for the MICE Liquid Absorber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, W.; Yang, S.Q.; Green, M.A.; Ishimoto, S.; Swanson, J.

    2005-01-01

    The thin windows for the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) liquid Absorber will be fabricated from 6061-T6-aluminum. The absorber and vacuum vessel thin windows are 300-mm in diameter and are 180 mm thick at the center. The windows are designed for an internal burst pressure of 0.68 MPa (100 psig) when warm. The MICE experiment design calls for changeable windows on the absorber, so a bolted window design was adopted. Welded windows offer some potential advantages over bolted windows when they are on the absorber itself. This report describes the bolted window and its seal. This report also describes an alternate window that is welded directly to the absorber body. The welded window design presented permits the weld to be ground off and re-welded. This report presents a thermal FEA analysis of the window seal-weld, while the window is being welded. Finally, the results of a test of a welded-window are presented

  3. Recent developments in pipeline welding practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    Fourteen chapters are included: overview of pipeline welding systems and quality assurance, CRC automatic welding system, H.C. Price Co. automatic welding system, semi-automatic MIG-welding process, partial penetration welding of steel pipes for gas distribution, construction procedures and quality control in offshore pipeline construction, welding in repair and maintenance of gas transmission pipelines, British Gas studies of welding on pressurized gas transmission pipelines, hot tapping pipelines, underwater welding for offshore pipelines and associated equipment, radial friction welding, material composition vs weld properties, review of NDT of pipeline welds, and safety assurance in pipeline construction. A bibliography of approximately 150 references is included, arranged according to subject and year.

  4. Hybrid laser-arc welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hybrid laser-arc welding (HLAW) is a combination of laser welding with arc welding that overcomes many of the shortfalls of both processes. This important book gives a comprehensive account of hybrid laser-arc welding technology and applications. The first part of the book reviews...... the characteristics of the process, including the properties of joints produced by hybrid laser-arc welding and ways of assessing weld quality. Part II discusses applications of the process to such metals as magnesium alloys, aluminium and steel as well as the use of hybrid laser-arc welding in such sectors as ship...... building and the automotive industry. With its distinguished editor and international team of contributors, Hybrid laser-arc welding, will be a valuable source of reference for all those using this important welding technology. Professor Flemming Ove Olsen works in the Department of Manufacturing...

  5. Residual stress by repair welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mochizuki, Masahito; Toyoda, Masao

    2003-01-01

    Residual stress by repair welds is computed using the thermal elastic-plastic analysis with phase-transformation effect. Coupling phenomena of temperature, microstructure, and stress-strain fields are simulated in the finite-element analysis. Weld bond of a plate butt-welded joint is gouged and then deposited by weld metal in repair process. Heat source is synchronously moved with the deposition of the finite-element as the weld deposition. Microstructure is considered by using CCT diagram and the transformation behavior in the repair weld is also simulated. The effects of initial stress, heat input, and weld length on residual stress distribution are studied from the organic results of numerical analysis. Initial residual stress before repair weld has no influence on the residual stress after repair treatment near weld metal, because the initial stress near weld metal releases due to high temperature of repair weld and then stress by repair weld regenerates. Heat input has an effect for residual stress distribution, for not its magnitude but distribution zone. Weld length should be considered reducing the magnitude of residual stress in the edge of weld bead; short bead induces high tensile residual stress. (author)

  6. Anodizing Aluminum with Frills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doeltz, Anne E.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    "Anodizing Aluminum" (previously reported in this journal) describes a vivid/relevant laboratory experience for general chemistry students explaining the anodizing of aluminum in sulfuric acid and constrasting it to electroplating. Additions to this procedure and the experiment in which they are used are discussed. Reactions involved are…

  7. Is the Aluminum Hypothesis Dead?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The Aluminum Hypothesis, the idea that aluminum exposure is involved in the etiology of Alzheimer disease, dates back to a 1965 demonstration that aluminum causes neurofibrillary tangles in the brains of rabbits. Initially the focus of intensive research, the Aluminum Hypothesis has gradually been abandoned by most researchers. Yet, despite this current indifference, the Aluminum Hypothesis continues to attract the attention of a small group of scientists and aluminum continues to be viewed with concern by some of the public. This review article discusses reasons that mainstream science has largely abandoned the Aluminum Hypothesis and explores a possible reason for some in the general public continuing to view aluminum with mistrust. PMID:24806729

  8. Welding of refractory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lessmann, G.G.

    1984-01-01

    This review primarily summarizes welding evaluations supported by NASA-Lewis Research Center in the 1960s. A literature search run in preparation for this review indicates that more recent work is modest by comparison. Hence, this review restates these accomplishments briefly and addresses opportunities which have evolved in welding technology (such as lasers) in the intervening decade. Emphasis in this review is given to tantalum- and niobium-base alloys. Considerable work was also done to assure that a consistent comparison was made with tungsten. A wide variety of candidate alloys derived primarily from developments directed at aircraft propulsion applications were available. Early efforts by NASA were directed at screening studies to select promising structural alloys for the space power application. This objective required fine tuning of welding procedures, e.g., the demonstration of stringent standards for control of welding atmosphere to assure good corrosion resistance in liquid alkali metals. 16 figures, 6 tables

  9. Multispot fiber laser welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schutt Hansen, Klaus

    This dissertation presents work and results achieved in the field of multi beam fiber laser welding. The project has had a practical approach, in which simulations and modelling have been kept at a minimum. Different methods to produce spot patterns with high power single mode fiber lasers have...... been examined and evaluated. It is found that both diamond turned DOE’s in zinc sulphide and multilevel etched DOE’s (Diffractive Optical Elements) in fused silica have a good performance. Welding with multiple beams in a butt joint configuration has been tested. Results are presented, showing it has...... been possible to control the welding width in incremental steps by adding more beams in a row. The laser power was used to independently control the keyhole and consequently the depth of fusion. An example of inline repair of a laser weld in butt joint configuration was examined. Zinc powder was placed...

  10. Friction stir welding tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolle,; Charles R. , Clark; Denis E. , Barnes; Timothy, A [Ammon, ID

    2008-04-15

    A friction stir welding tool is described and which includes a shank portion; a shoulder portion which is releasably engageable with the shank portion; and a pin which is releasably engageable with the shoulder portion.

  11. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Ultrasonic Spot Welded Mg/Al Alloy Dissimilar Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Peng

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Lightweight structural applications of magnesium and aluminum alloys inevitably necessitate welding and joining, especially dissimilar welding between these alloys. The objective of this study was to examine the feasibility of joining ZEK100 Mg alloy to Al6022 alloy via ultrasonic spot welding, focusing on effects of welding energy. An interface diffusion layer consisting of α-Mg and Al12Mg17 eutectic structure was observed to form, with its thickness increased from ~0.5 µm to ~30 µm with increasing welding energy from 500 J to 2000 J. The tensile lap shear peak load or strength and critical stress intensity of the welded joints first increased and then decreased with increasing welding energy, with their peak values achieved at 750 J. Fatigue life of the joints made at 750 J and 2000 J was equivalent at the lower cyclic loading levels, while it was longer for the joints made at 750 J at the higher cyclic loading levels. Fatigue fracture mode changed from interfacial failure to mainly transverse-through-thickness crack growth with decreasing cyclic loading level, which corresponded well to the bi-linear characteristic of S-N curves. Crack initiation basically occurred at the weld nugget border and at the interface between the two sheets, which can be understood via a theoretical stress analysis.

  12. Influential Parameters and Numerical Simulation of Heat Generated in the Process of Friction Stir Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilija KOVACEVIC

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the problem of friction stir welding (FSW technology. The mechanism of thermo-mechanical process of the FSW method has been identified and a correlation between the weld zone and its microstructure established. Presented are the basic analytical formulations for the definition of temperature fields. Analysis of influential parameters of welding FSW technology at the zone of the weld material and mechanical properties of the realized joint was performed. Influential welding parameters were defined based on tool geometry, technological parameters of processing and the axial load of tool. Specific problems with the FSW process are related to gaps (holes left behind by a tool at the end of the process and inflexibility of welding regarding the degree of variation of material thickness. Numerical simulation of process welding FSW proceeding was carried out on the example of Aluminum Alloy (AA 2219 using the ANSYS Mechanical ADPL (Transient Thermal software package. The defined was the temperature field in the welding process at specified time intervals.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.3.10022

  13. The aluminum smelting process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvande, Halvor

    2014-05-01

    This introduction to the industrial primary aluminum production process presents a short description of the electrolytic reduction technology, the history of aluminum, and the importance of this metal and its production process to modern society. Aluminum's special qualities have enabled advances in technologies coupled with energy and cost savings. Aircraft capabilities have been greatly enhanced, and increases in size and capacity are made possible by advances in aluminum technology. The metal's flexibility for shaping and extruding has led to architectural advances in energy-saving building construction. The high strength-to-weight ratio has meant a substantial reduction in energy consumption for trucks and other vehicles. The aluminum industry is therefore a pivotal one for ecological sustainability and strategic for technological development.

  14. Underwater Welding Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Esam F. Alajmi; Ahmad A. Alqenaei

    2017-01-01

    Welding demand in offshore and marine applications is increased with the increasing in oil and gas activities as well as increasing in the marine transportation and industrial applications. Applications of underwater welding well be increased in Kuwait in the coming years due to the strategic directive of the country toward starting the offshore oil and gas exploration and production, and the increase in marine transportation projects. Therefore, there is a need to understand the concept of u...

  15. Enabling lightweight designs by a new laser based approach for joining aluminum to steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockmann, Rüdiger; Kaufmann, Sebastian; Kirchhoff, Marc; Candel-Ruiz, Antonio; Müllerschön, Oliver; Havrilla, David

    2015-03-01

    As sustainability is an essential requirement, lightweight design becomes more and more important, especially for mobility. Reduced weight ensures more efficient vehicles and enables better environmental impact. Besides the design, new materials and material combinations are one major trend to achieve the required weight savings. The use of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics (abbr. CFRP) is widely discussed, but so far high volume applications are rarely to be found. This is mainly due to the fact that parts made of CFRP are much more expensive than conventional parts. Furthermore, the proper technologies for high volume production are not yet ready. Another material with a large potential for lightweight design is aluminum. In comparison to CFRP, aluminum alloys are generally more affordable. As aluminum is a metallic material, production technologies for high volume standard cutting or joining applications are already developed. In addition, bending and deep-drawing can be applied. In automotive engineering, hybrid structures such as combining high-strength steels with lightweight aluminum alloys retain significant weight reduction but also have an advantage over monolithic aluminum - enhanced behavior in case of crash. Therefore, since the use of steel for applications requiring high mechanical properties is unavoidable, methods for joining aluminum with steel parts have to be further developed. Former studies showed that the use of a laser beam can be a possibility to join aluminum to steel parts. In this sense, the laser welding process represents a major challenge, since both materials have different thermal expansion coefficients and properties related to the behavior in corrosive media. Additionally, brittle intermetallic phases are formed during welding. A promising approach to welding aluminum to steel is based on the use of Laser Metal Deposition (abbr. LMD) with deposit materials in the form of powders. Within the present work, the advantages of this

  16. Structure and properties of an aluminium alloy welded by electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruzimov, Sh.M.; Palvanov, S.R.; Pogrebnjak, A.D.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: In the given work the experimental results on research of influence of electronic beams on structure of an aluminum alloy are submitted. As a basis of samples the alloy Al-Mg-Zn-Cu by the additives Se-0.5 % and Nb-0.15 % is chosen. Samples from a cast aluminum alloy by thickness of 3 mm such as B-96 were welded with an electronic beam in three different modes at radius circle of a root of a welded seam of 5 mm. The welding was carried out by an alloy Amg 63 and Sv-1571 with application electron team welding joint of parts. The basic influence on the given process makes energy - allocation of an electronic beam. For research of phase structure used of X-ray beams (XRD), DRON-2 in copper K α - Cu measurement. For research of structure and morphology of a surface used optical microscope with increase 800-1500 times and electronic microscope with the microanalysis. On figures of optical microscopy the morphology of a seam sharply differs from morphology of an initial part. The microanalysis carried out with a place of a seam, has shown presence of the whole spectrum of elements, such as, Al; Zn; Na; Mg; Cu; and Mn. All measurements carried out in welding zone and in frontier zones that it was possible to carry out the comparative analysis. The element structure of these zones essentially differs in dependence of a condition of welding

  17. Fusion boundary microstructure evolution in aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostrivas, Anastasios Dimitrios

    2000-10-01

    A melting technique was developed to simulate the fusion boundary of aluminum alloys using the GleebleRTM thermal simulator. Using a steel sleeve to contain the aluminum, samples were heated to incremental temperatures above the solidus temperature of a number of alloys. In alloy 2195, a 4wt%Cu-1wt%Li alloy, an equiaxed non-dendritic zone (EQZ) could be formed by heating in the temperature range from approximately 630 to 640°C. At temperatures above 640°C, solidification occurred by the normal epitaxial nucleation and growth mechanism. Fusion boundary behavior was also studied in alloys 5454-H34, 6061-T6, and 2219-T8. Additionally, experimental alloy compositions were produced by making bead on plate welds using an alloy 5454-H32 base metal and 5025 or 5087 filler metals. These filler metals contain zirconium and scandium additions, respectively, and were expected to influence nucleation and growth behavior. Both as-welded and welded/heat treated (540°C and 300°C) substrates were tested by melting simulation, resulting in dendritic and EQZ structures depending on composition and substrate condition. Orientation imaging microscopy (OIM(TM)) was employed to study the crystallographic character of the microstructures produced and to verify the mechanism responsible for EQZ formation. OIM(TM) proved that grains within the EQZ have random orientation. In all other cases, where the simulated microstructures were dendritic in nature, it was shown that epitaxy was the dominant mode of nucleation. The lack of any preferred crystallographic orientation relationship in the EQZ supports a theory proposed by Lippold et al that the EQZ is the result of heterogeneous nucleation within the weld unmixed zone. EDS analysis of the 2195 on STEM revealed particles with ternary composition consisted of Zr, Cu and Al and a tetragonal type crystallographic lattice. Microdiffraction line scans on EQZ grains in the alloy 2195 showed very good agreement between the measured Cu

  18. Rotary Friction Welding of Weight Heavy Alloy with Wrought AlMg3 Alloy for Subcaliber Ammunition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olgierd Janusz Goroch

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The results of studies concerning friction welding of Weight Heavy Alloy (WHA with AlMg3 alloy are presented. The friction welding of density 17,5 Mg/m3 with aluminum alloy showed that it is possible to reach the joints with the strength exceeding the yield strength of wrought AlMg3 alloy. This strength looks to be promising from point of view of condition which have to be fulfilled in case of armor subcaliber ammunition, where WHA rods play the role Kinetic Energy Penetrators and aluminum is used for projectile ballistic cup.

  19. Rotary Friction Welding of Weight Heavy Alloy with Wrought AlMg3 Alloy for Subcaliber Ammunition

    OpenAIRE

    Olgierd Janusz Goroch; Zbigniew Gulbinowicz

    2017-01-01

    The results of studies concerning friction welding of Weight Heavy Alloy (WHA) with AlMg3 alloy are presented. The friction welding of density 17,5 Mg/m3 with aluminum alloy showed that it is possible to reach the joints with the strength exceeding the yield strength of wrought AlMg3 alloy. This strength looks to be promising from point of view of condition which have to be fulfilled in case of armor subcaliber ammunition, where WHA rods play the role Kinetic Energy Penetrators and aluminum i...

  20. Automatic welding machine for piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Koyama, Takaichi; Iizuka, Tomio; Ito, Yoshitoshi; Takami, Katsumi.

    1978-01-01

    A remotely controlled automatic special welding machine for piping was developed. This machine is utilized for long distance pipe lines, chemical plants, thermal power generating plants and nuclear power plants effectively from the viewpoint of good quality control, reduction of labor and good controllability. The function of this welding machine is to inspect the shape and dimensions of edge preparation before welding work by the sense of touch, to detect the temperature of melt pool, inspect the bead form by the sense of touch, and check the welding state by ITV during welding work, and to grind the bead surface and inspect the weld metal by ultrasonic test automatically after welding work. The construction of this welding system, the main specification of the apparatus, the welding procedure in detail, the electrical source of this welding machine, the cooling system, the structure and handling of guide ring, the central control system and the operating characteristics are explained. The working procedure and the effect by using this welding machine, and the application to nuclear power plants and the other industrial field are outlined. The HIDIC 08 is used as the controlling computer. This welding machine is useful for welding SUS piping as well as carbon steel piping. (Nakai, Y.)