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Sample records for welded 7075-t7351 aluminum

  1. Technology of welding aluminum alloys-III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, J. R.; Kor, L. J.; Oleksiak, C. E.

    1978-01-01

    Control of porosity in weld beads was major objective in development of aluminum welding program. Porosity, most difficult defect to control, is caused by hydrogen gas unable to escape during solidification. Hard tooling allows hotter bead than free-fall tooling so hydrogen bubbles can boil out instead of forming pores. Welding position, moisture, and cleanliness are other important factors in control of porosity.

  2. Filler wire for aluminum alloys and method of welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorkman, Jr., Gerald W. O. (Inventor); Cho, Alex (Inventor); Russell, Carolyn K. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A weld filler wire chemistry has been developed for fusion welding 2195 aluminum-lithium. The weld filler wire chemistry is an aluminum-copper based alloy containing high additions of titanium and zirconium. The additions of titanium and zirconium reduce the crack susceptibility of aluminum alloy welds while producing good weld mechanical properties. The addition of silver further improves the weld properties of the weld filler wire. The reduced weld crack susceptibility enhances the repair weldability, including when planishing is required.

  3. Ultrasonic Evaluation of Weld Strength for Aluminum Ultrasonic Spot Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffari, Bita; Hetrick, Elizabeth T.; Mozurkewich, George; Reatherford, Larry V.

    2005-04-01

    The goal of this work is to determine the feasibility of using an ultrasonic, non-destructive technique for post-process evaluation of aluminum ultrasonic spot welds. A focused immersion transducer was utilized to obtain a C-scan of the weld interface, from which a weighted ultrasonic contact area was estimated. Weldments were subsequently tested destructively to determine the weld strength. The square root of the weld contact area displayed a relatively good correlation with weld strength, r2=0.85.

  4. Some Effects of Nitrates on the Tensile Properties of Al 7075-T7351.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-03-01

    34NREPORT DMCERESTATIO N GE N ORormA Approved \\~ Reor No. No474618 la NAEOF ERFORIN RGANIATO :D OFA’C SYMBO la "AARE OF.(,3O RANAO Mnatr iFels...Inhibitors," AF INF 14985, AF/JACPD, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH, 1982. 2. S. C. Byrne and A. C. Miller, "Effect of Atmospheric Polutant Gases on the

  5. Laser micro welding of copper and aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mys, Ihor; Schmidt, Michael

    2006-02-01

    Aluminum combines comparably good thermal and electrical properties with a low price and a low material weight. These properties make aluminum a promising alternative to copper for a large number of electronic applications, especially when manufacturing high volume components. However, a main obstacle for a wide use of this material is the lack of a reliable joining process for the interconnection of copper and aluminum. The reasons for this are a large misalignment in the physical properties and even more a poor metallurgical affinity of both materials that cause high crack sensitivity and the formation of brittle intermetallic phases during fusion welding. This paper presents investigations on laser micro welding of copper and aluminum with the objective to eliminate brittle intermetallic phases in the welding structure. For these purposes a combination of spot welding, a proper beam offset and special filler material are applied. The effect of silver, nickel and tin filler materials in the form of thin foils and coatings in a thickness range 3-100 μm has been investigated. Use of silver and tin filler materials yields to a considerable improvement of the static and dynamic mechanical stability of welded joints. The analysis of the weld microstructure shows that an application even of small amounts of suitable filler materials helps to avoid critical, very brittle intermetallic phases on the interface between copper and solidified melt in the welded joints.

  6. Friction Pull Plug Welding in Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke, Shane A.; Bradford, Vann

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has recently invested much time and effort into the process development of Friction Pull Plug Welding (FPPW). FPPW, is a welding process similar to Friction Push Plug Welding in that, there is a small rotating part (plug) being spun and simultaneously pulled (forged) into a larger part. These two processes differ, in that push plug welding requires an internal reaction support, while pull plug welding reacts to the load externally. FPPW was originally conceived as a post proof repair technique for the Space Shuttle fs External Tank. FPPW was easily selected as the primary weld process used to close out the termination hole on the Constellation Program's ARES I Upper Stage circumferential Self-Reacting Friction Stir Welds (SR-FSW). The versatility of FPPW allows it to also be used as a repair technique for both SR-FSW and Conventional Friction Stir Welds. To date, all MSFC led development has been concentrated on aluminum alloys (2195, 2219, and 2014). Much work has been done to fully understand and characterize the process's limitations. A heavy emphasis has been spent on plug design, to match the various weldland thicknesses and alloy combinations. This presentation will summarize these development efforts including weld parameter development, process control, parameter sensitivity studies, plug repair techniques, material properties including tensile, fracture and failure analysis.

  7. Self-Reacting Friction Stir Welding for Aluminum Alloy Circumferential Weld Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorkman, Gerry; Cantrell, Mark; Carter, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Friction stir welding is an innovative weld process that continues to grow in use, in the commercial, defense, and space sectors. It produces high quality and high strength welds in aluminum alloys. The process consists of a rotating weld pin tool that plasticizes material through friction. The plasticized material is welded by applying a high weld forge force through the weld pin tool against the material during pin tool rotation. The high weld forge force is reacted against an anvil and a stout tool structure. A variation of friction stir welding currently being evaluated is self-reacting friction stir welding. Self-reacting friction stir welding incorporates two opposing shoulders on the crown and root sides of the weld joint. In self-reacting friction stir welding, the weld forge force is reacted against the crown shoulder portion of the weld pin tool by the root shoulder. This eliminates the need for a stout tooling structure to react the high weld forge force required in the typical friction stir weld process. Therefore, the self-reacting feature reduces tooling requirements and, therefore, process implementation costs. This makes the process attractive for aluminum alloy circumferential weld applications. To evaluate the application of self-reacting friction stir welding for aluminum alloy circumferential welding, a feasibility study was performed. The study consisted of performing a fourteen-foot diameter aluminum alloy circumferential demonstration weld using typical fusion weld tooling. To accomplish the demonstration weld, weld and tack weld development were performed and fourteen-foot diameter rings were fabricated. Weld development consisted of weld pin tool selection and the generation of a process map and envelope. Tack weld development evaluated gas tungsten arc welding and friction stir welding for tack welding rings together for circumferential welding. As a result of the study, a successful circumferential demonstration weld was produced leading

  8. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of an Ultrasonic Spot Welded Aluminum Alloy: The Effect of Welding Energy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    He Peng; Daolun Chen; Xianquan Jiang

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the microstructures, tensile lap shear strength, and fatigue resistance of 6022-T43 aluminum alloy joints welded via a solid-state welding technique-ultrasonic spot welding (USW...

  9. Welding of Aluminum Alloys to Steels: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    UNCLASSIFIED 7 UNCLASSIFIED 2.1. Fusion welding methods 2.1.1. Gas metal arc (MIG) welding and tungsten inert gas ( TIG ) welding techniques...UNCLASSIFIED 8 UNCLASSIFIED Fig.3. (a) Schematic of the butt TIG welding for joining the aluminum to steel and (b) formation of the cracks at the...dissimilar metals TIG welding -brazing of aluminum alloy to stainless steel, Materials Science and Engineering A 509 (2009) 31-40. [28] S.B. Lin, J.L. Song

  10. Weld Development for Aluminum Fission Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, Carl Edward [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Martinez, Jesse Norris [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-05-16

    The Sigma welding team was approached to help fabricate a small fission chamber (roughly ½ inch dia. x ½ inch tall cylinder). These chambers are used as radiation sensors that contain small traces of radionuclides (Cf 252, U 235, and U 238) that serve to ionize gas atoms in addition to external radiation. When a voltage is applied within the chamber, the resulting ion flow can be calibrated and monitored. Aluminum has the advantage of not forming radioactive compounds when exposed to high external radiation (except from minor Na alloy content). Since aluminum has not been used before in this application, this presented an unexplored challenge.

  11. Particulate and gaseous emissions when welding aluminum alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Homer; Epstein, Seymour; Peace, Jon

    2007-09-01

    Fabrication and repair of aluminum components and structures commonly involves the use of electric arc welding. The interaction of the arc and the metal being welded generates ultraviolet radiation, metallic oxides, fumes, and gases. Aluminum is seldom used as the pure metal but is often alloyed with other metals to improve strength and other physical properties. Therefore, the exact composition of any emissions will depend on the welding process and the particular aluminum alloy being welded. To quantify such emissions, The Aluminum Association sponsored several studies to characterize arc welding emissions by the gas metal arc welding (GMAW) and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) processes for various combinations of base and filler alloys. In all cases, the tests were conducted under conditions that could be found in a production weld shop without forced ventilation. The concentrations of each analyte that a welder could be exposed to were greatly affected by the welding process, the composition of the base and filler alloys, the position of the welder, and the welding helmet. The results obtained can be used by employers to identify and control potential hazards associated with the welding of aluminum alloys and can provide the basis for hazard communication to employees involved in the welding of these alloys.

  12. Real Time Ultrasonic Aluminum SPOT Weld Monitoring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regalado, W. Pérez; Chertov, A. M.; Maev, R. Gr.

    2010-02-01

    Aluminum alloys pose several properties that make them one of the most popular engineering materials: they have excellent corrosion resistance, and high weight-to-strength ratio. Resistance spot welding of aluminum alloys is widely used today but oxide film and aluminum thermal and electrical properties make spot welding a difficult task. Electrode degradation due to pitting, alloying and mushrooming decreases the weld quality and adjustment of parameters like current and force is required. To realize these adjustments and ensure weld quality, a tool to measure weld quality in real time is required. In this paper, a real time ultrasonic non-destructive evaluation system for aluminum spot welds is presented. The system is able to monitor nugget growth while the spot weld is being made. This is achieved by interpreting the echoes of an ultrasound transducer located in one of the welding electrodes. The transducer receives and transmits an ultrasound signal at different times during the welding cycle. Valuable information of the weld quality is embedded in this signal. The system is able to determine the weld nugget diameter by measuring the delays of the ultrasound signals received during the complete welding cycle. The article presents the system performance on aluminum alloy AA6022.

  13. 49 CFR 178.68 - Specification 4E welded aluminum cylinders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... the cylinder wall thickness. The weld must be in the center of the section. Weld reinforcement must be... of The Aluminum Association's 2002 publication, “Welding Aluminum: Theory and Practice.” The root of...

  14. Tool For Friction Stir Tack Welding of Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorkman, Gerald W.; Dingler, Johnny W.; Loftus, Zachary

    2003-01-01

    A small friction-stir-welding tool has been developed for use in tack welding of aluminum-alloy workpieces. It is necessary to tack-weld the workpieces in order to hold them together during friction stir welding because (1) in operation, a full-size friction-stir-welding tool exerts a large force that tends to separate the workpieces and (2) clamping the workpieces is not sufficient to resist this force. It is possible to tack the pieces together by gas tungsten arc welding, but the process can be awkward and time-consuming and can cause sufficient damage to necessitate rework. Friction stir tack welding does not entail these disadvantages. In addition, friction stir tack welding can be accomplished by use of the same automated equipment (except for the welding tool) used in subsequent full friction stir welding. The tool for friction stir tack welding resembles the tool for full friction stir welding, but has a narrower shoulder and a shorter pin. The shorter pin generates a smaller workpiece-separating force so that clamping suffices to keep the workpieces together. This tool produces a continuous or intermittent partial-penetration tack weld. The tack weld is subsequently consumed by action of the larger tool used in full friction stir welding tool.

  15. Renewal of corrosion protection of coated aluminum after welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, R. H.

    1969-01-01

    Effectiveness of conversion coatings designed to protect aluminum alloys against atmospheric corrosion is reduced after exposure to high temperature or welding. Damaged coating should be manually stripped six inches from the weld and then recoated by sponge or spray with the original solution.

  16. Gas Contamination In Plasma-Arc-Welded Aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcclure, John C.; Torres, Martin R.; Gurevitch, Alan C.; Newman, Robert A.

    1992-01-01

    Document describes experimental investigation on visible and tactile effects of gaseous contaminants in variable-polarity plasma arc (VPPA) welding of 2219 T-87 aluminum alloy. Contaminant gases (nitrogen, methane, oxygen, and hydrogen) introduced in argon arc and in helium shield gas in various controlled concentrations. Report represents results of experiments in form of photographs of fronts, backs, polished cross sections, and etched cross sections of welds made with various contaminants at various concentrations. Provides detailed discussion of conditions under which welds made.

  17. Gas-tungsten arc welding of aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, L.D.

    1982-03-25

    The present invention is directed to a gas-tungsten arc welding method for joining together structures formed of aluminum alloy with these structures disposed contiguously to a heat-damagable substrate of a metal dissimilar to the aluminum alloy. The method of the present invention is practiced by diamond machining the fay surfaces of the aluminum alloy structures to profice a mirror finish thereon having a surface roughness in the order of about one microinch. The fay surface are aligned and heated sufficiently by the tungsten electrode to fuse the aluminum alloy continguous to the fay surfaces to effect the weld joint. The heat input used to provide an oxide-free weld is significantly less than that required if the fay surfaces were prepared by using conventional chemical and mechanical practices.

  18. Analysis and Comparison of Aluminum Alloy Welded Joints Between Metal Inert Gas Welding and Tungsten Inert Gas Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lei; Guan, Yingchun; Wang, Qiang; Cong, Baoqiang; Qi, Bojin

    2015-09-01

    Surface contamination usually occurs during welding processing and it affects the welds quality largely. However, the formation of such contaminants has seldom been studied. Effort was made to study the contaminants caused by metal inert gas (MIG) welding and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding processes of aluminum alloy, respectively. SEM, FTIR and XPS analysis was carried out to investigate the microstructure as well as surface chemistry. These contaminants were found to be mainly consisting of Al2O3, MgO, carbide and chromium complexes. The difference of contaminants between MIG and TIG welds was further examined. In addition, method to minimize these contaminants was proposed.

  19. Microstructural Characterization of Friction Stir Welded Aluminum-Steel Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Erin E.; Hovanski, Yuri; Field, David P.

    2016-06-01

    This work focuses on the microstructural characterization of aluminum to steel friction stir welded joints. Lap weld configuration coupled with scribe technology used for the weld tool have produced joints of adequate quality, despite the significant differences in hardness and melting temperatures of the alloys. Common to friction stir processes, especially those of dissimilar alloys, are microstructural gradients including grain size, crystallographic texture, and precipitation of intermetallic compounds. Because of the significant influence that intermetallic compound formation has on mechanical and ballistic behavior, the characterization of the specific intermetallic phases and the degree to which they are formed in the weld microstructure is critical to predicting weld performance. This study used electron backscatter diffraction, energy dispersive spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and Vickers micro-hardness indentation to explore and characterize the microstructures of lap friction stir welds between an applique 6061-T6 aluminum armor plate alloy and a RHA homogeneous armor plate steel alloy. Macroscopic defects such as micro-cracks were observed in the cross-sectional samples, and binary intermetallic compound layers were found to exist at the aluminum-steel interfaces of the steel particles stirred into the aluminum weld matrix and across the interfaces of the weld joints. Energy dispersive spectroscopy chemical analysis identified the intermetallic layer as monoclinic Al3Fe. Dramatic decreases in grain size in the thermo-mechanically affected zones and weld zones that evidenced grain refinement through plastic deformation and recrystallization. Crystallographic grain orientation and texture were examined using electron backscatter diffraction. Striated regions in the orientations of the aluminum alloy were determined to be the result of the severe deformation induced by the complex weld tool geometry. Many of the textures observed in the weld

  20. Cold metal transfer welding of AA1050 aluminum thin sheets

    OpenAIRE

    İrizalp,Alaattin Ozan; Durmuş,Hülya; Yüksel, Nilay; Türkmen,İlyas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study was aimed to investigate the welding parameters on mechanical behavior of 2 mm thick AA1050 sheet materials joined by cold metal transfer (CMT) method. Macro structural examination showed that decreasing heat input decreased the pore size in the weld metal. Tensile test was applied and failure occurred in heat affected zone of aluminum sheet metal. Maximum tensile strength was found in the sample with minimum heat input. Heat affected zone was observed explicitly in the sa...

  1. Electric pulse treatment of welded joint of aluminum alloy

    OpenAIRE

    A.A. Mitiaev; I. P. Volchok; Yu. L. Nadezhdin; V.A. Sokirko; I. A. Vakulenko

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Explanation of the redistribution effect of residual strengthes after electric pulse treatment of arc welding seam of the aluminum alloy. Methodology. Alloy on the basis of aluminium of АК8М3 type served as the research material. As a result of mechanical treatment of the ingots after alloy crystallization the plates with 10 mm thickness were obtained. After edge preparation the elements, which are being connected were butt welded using the technology of semiautomatic argon arc weldi...

  2. Cracking susceptibility of aluminum alloys during laser welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Abbaschian

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The influence of laser parameters in welding aluminum alloys was studied in order to reduce hot cracking. The extension of cracks at the welding surface was used as a cracking susceptibility (CS index. It has been shown that the CS changes with changing welding velocity for binary Al-Cu alloys. In general, the CS index increased until a maximum velocity and then dropped to zero, generating a typical lambda-curve. This curve is due to two different mechanisms: 1 the refinement of porosities with increasing velocity and 2 the changes in the liquid fraction due to decreasing microsegregation with increasing velocities.

  3. Analysis and Comparison of Friction Stir Welding and Laser Assisted Friction Stir Welding of Aluminum Alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanelli, Sabina Luisa; Casalino, Giuseppe; Casavola, Caterina; Moramarco, Vincenzo

    2013-12-18

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a solid-state joining process; i.e. , no melting occurs. The welding process is promoted by the rotation and translation of an axis-symmetric non-consumable tool along the weld centerline. Thus, the FSW process is performed at much lower temperatures than conventional fusion welding, nevertheless it has some disadvantages. Laser Assisted Friction Stir Welding (LAFSW) is a combination in which the FSW is the dominant welding process and the laser pre-heats the weld. In this work FSW and LAFSW tests were conducted on 6 mm thick 5754H111 aluminum alloy plates in butt joint configuration. LAFSW is studied firstly to demonstrate the weldability of aluminum alloy using that technique. Secondly, process parameters, such as laser power and temperature gradient are investigated in order to evaluate changes in microstructure, micro-hardness, residual stress, and tensile properties. Once the possibility to achieve sound weld using LAFSW is demonstrated, it will be possible to explore the benefits for tool wear, higher welding speeds, and lower clamping force.

  4. Microhardness Testing of Aluminum Alloy Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohanon, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    A weld is made when two pieces of metal are united or fused together using heat or pressure, and sometimes both. There are several different types of welds, each having their own unique properties and microstructure. Strength is a property normally used in deciding which kind of weld is suitable for a certain metal or joint. Depending on the weld process used and the heat required for that process, the weld and the heat-affected zone undergo microstructural changes resulting in stronger or weaker areas. The heat-affected zone (HAZ) is the region that has experienced enough heat to cause solid-state microstructural changes, but not enough to melt the material. This area is located between the parent material and the weld, with the grain structure growing as it progresses respectively. The optimal weld would have a short HAZ and a small fluctuation in strength from parent metal to weld. To determine the strength of the weld and decide whether it is suitable for the specific joint certain properties are looked at, among these are ultimate tensile strength, 0.2% offset yield strength and hardness. Ultimate tensile strength gives the maximum load the metal can stand while the offset yield strength gives the amount of stress the metal can take before it is 0.2% longer than it was originally. Both of these are good tests, but they both require breaking or deforming the sample in some way. Hardness testing, however, provides an objective evaluation of weld strengths, and also the difference or variation in strength across the weld and HAZ which is difficult to do with tensile testing. Hardness is the resistance to permanent or plastic deformation and can be taken at any desired point on the specimen. With hardness testing, it is possible to test from parent metal to weld and see the difference in strength as you progress from parent material to weld. Hardness around grain boundaries and flaws in the material will show how these affect the strength of the metal while still

  5. Continuous internal channels formed in aluminum fusion welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gault, J.; Sabo, W.

    1967-01-01

    Process produces continuous internal channel systems on a repeatable basis in 2014-T6 aluminum. Standard machining forms the initial channel, which is filled with tungsten carbide powder. TIG machine fusion welding completes formation of the channel. Chem-mill techniques enlarge it to the desired size.

  6. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of an Ultrasonic Spot Welded Aluminum Alloy: The Effect of Welding Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, He; Chen, Daolun; Jiang, Xianquan

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the microstructures, tensile lap shear strength, and fatigue resistance of 6022-T43 aluminum alloy joints welded via a solid-state welding technique–ultrasonic spot welding (USW)–at different energy levels. An ultra-fine necklace-like equiaxed grain structure is observed along the weld line due to the occurrence of dynamic crystallization, with smaller grain sizes at lower levels of welding energy. The tensile lap shear strength, failure energy, and critical stress intensity of the welded joints first increase, reach their maximum values, and then decrease with increasing welding energy. The tensile lap shear failure mode changes from interfacial fracture at lower energy levels, to nugget pull-out at intermediate optimal energy levels, and to transverse through-thickness (TTT) crack growth at higher energy levels. The fatigue life is longer for the joints welded at an energy of 1400 J than 2000 J at higher cyclic loading levels. The fatigue failure mode changes from nugget pull-out to TTT crack growth with decreasing cyclic loading for the joints welded at 1400 J, while TTT crack growth mode remains at all cyclic loading levels for the joints welded at 2000 J. Fatigue crack basically initiates from the nugget edge, and propagates with “river-flow” patterns and characteristic fatigue striations. PMID:28772809

  7. Microstructural issues in a friction-stir-welded aluminum alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores, O.V.; Kennedy, C.; Murr, L.E.; Brown, D.; Pappu, S.; Nowak, B.M.; McClure, J.C. [Univ. of Texas, El Paso, TX (United States)

    1998-02-03

    Recent observations of microstructures associated with friction-stir welding (FSW) in a number of aluminum alloys have consistently demonstrated the actual weld zone to consist of a (dynamically) recrystallized grain structure resulting from the extreme, solid-state, plastic deformation characterizing the process. Because of solubilities associated with the various precipitates in 7075 and 6061 aluminum alloys, and the fact that the precipitates were either homogeneously distributed throughout both the original (unwelded) work-piece plates and the well zones (or formed varying densities of Widmanstaetten patterns within the original and recrystallized grains), it has been difficult to follow the stirring of stable, second-phase particles from the base metal (work-piece) into the weld zone. In the present investigation, a compositionally modified 1100 aluminum alloy (nominally 99.2% Al, 0.5% Fe, 0.15% Cu, 0.12% Si, 0.05 Mn, 0.04 Ti, balance in weight percent of Be and Mg), forming a stable microdendritic (second-phase), equiaxed, cell structure was friction-stir welded. These thermally stable, geometrically specific, precipitates in the base metal were compared with their disposition within the friction-stir-weld zone. In addition, as-cast plates of this alloy were cold-rolled 50% and friction-stir-welded in order to compare these two schedules (as-cast and 50% cold-rolled) in terms of residual hardness variations and related microstructural issues as well as the effect of prior deformation on the friction-stir welding process.

  8. Welding of AA1050 aluminum with AISI 304 stainless steel by rotary friction welding process

    OpenAIRE

    Chen Ying An; Francisco Piorino Neto; Eder Paduan Alves

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: The purpose of this work was to assess the development of solid state joints of dissimilar material AA1050 aluminum and AISI 304 stainless steel, which can be used in pipes of tanks of liquid propellants and other components of the Satellite Launch Vehicle. The joints were obtained by rotary friction welding process (RFW), which combines the heat generated from friction between two surfaces and plastic deformation. Tests were conducted with different welding process parameters. The ...

  9. Mechanical Characteristics of Welded Joints of Aluminum Alloy 6061 T6 Formed by Arc and Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astarita, A.; Squillace, A.; Nele, L.

    2016-01-01

    Butt welds formed by arc welding in inert gas with nonconsumable electrode (tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding) and by friction stir welding (FSW) from aluminum alloy AA6061 T6 are studied. Comparative analysis of the structures and mechanical properties of the welded joints is performed using the results of optical and electron microscopy, tensile tests, tests for residual bending ductility, and measurements of microhardness. The changes in the microstructure in different zones and the degrees of degradation of the mechanical properties after the welding are determined. It is shown that the size of the tool for the friction stir welding affects the properties of the welds. Quantitative results showing the relation between the microscopic behavior of the alloy and the welding-induced changes in the microstructure are obtained. Friction stir welding is shown to provide higher properties of the welds.

  10. Grain fragmentation in ultrasonic-assisted TIG weld of pure aluminum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qihao; Lin, Sanbao; Yang, Chunli; Fan, Chenglei; Ge, Hongliang

    2017-11-01

    Under the action of acoustic waves during an ultrasonic-assisted tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding process, a grain of a TIG weld of aluminum alloy is refined by nucleation and grain fragmentation. Herein, effects of ultrasound on grain fragmentation in the TIG weld of aluminum alloy are investigated via systematic welding experiments of pure aluminum. First, experiments involving continuous and fixed-position welding are performed, which demonstrate that ultrasound can break the grain of the TIG weld of pure aluminum. The microstructural characteristics of an ultrasonic-assisted TIG weld fabricated by fixed-position welding are analyzed. The microstructure is found to transform from plane crystal, columnar crystal, and uniform equiaxed crystal into plane crystal, deformed columnar crystal, and nonuniform equiaxed crystal after application of ultrasound. Second, factors influencing ultrasonic grain fragmentation are investigated. The ultrasonic amplitude and welding current are found to have a considerable effect on grain fragmentation. The degree of fragmentation first increases and then decreases with an increase in ultrasonic amplitude, and it increases with an increase in welding current. Measurement results of the vibration of the weld pool show that the degree of grain fragmentation is related to the intensity of acoustic nonlinearity in the weld pool. The greater the intensity of acoustic nonlinearity, the greater is the degree of grain fragmentation. Finally, the mechanism of ultrasonic grain fragmentation in the TIG weld of pure aluminum is discussed. A finite element simulation is used to simulate the acoustic pressure and flow in the weld pool. The acoustic pressure in the weld pool exceeds the cavitation threshold, and cavitation bubbles are generated. The flow velocity in the weld pool does not change noticeably after application of ultrasound. It is concluded that the high-pressure conditions induced during the occurrence of cavitation, lead to grain

  11. Welding of AA1050 aluminum with AISI 304 stainless steel by rotary friction welding process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Ying An

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work was to assess the development of solid state joints of dissimilar material AA1050 aluminum and AISI 304 stainless steel, which can be used in pipes of tanks of liquid propellants and other components of the Satellite Launch Vehicle. The joints were obtained by rotary friction welding process (RFW, which combines the heat generated from friction between two surfaces and plastic deformation. Tests were conducted with different welding process parameters. The results were analyzed by means of tensile tests, Vickers microhardness, metallographic tests and SEM-EDX. The strength of the joints varied with increasing friction time and the use of different pressure values. Joints were obtained with superior mechanical properties of the AA1050 aluminum, with fracture occurring in the aluminum away from the bonding interface. The analysis by EDX at the interface of the junction showed that interdiffusion occurs between the main chemical components of the materials involved. The RFW proves to be a great method for obtaining joints between dissimilar materials, which is not possible by fusion welding processes.

  12. Microprobe investigation of brittle segregates in aluminum MIG and TIG welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larssen, P. A.; Miller, E. L.

    1968-01-01

    Quantitative microprobe analysis of segregated particles in aluminum MIG /Metal Inert Gas/ and TIG /Tungsten Inert Gas/ welds indicated that there were about ten different kinds of particles, corresponding to ten different intermetallic compounds. Differences between MIG and TIG welds related to the individual cooling rates of these welds.

  13. Laser-multi-pass-narrow-gap-welding of hot crack sensitive thick aluminum plates

    OpenAIRE

    Dittrich, D.; Schedewy, R.; Brenner, B.; Standfuß, J.

    2013-01-01

    Although the current process limitations for laser beam welding of thick aluminum plates (>10 mm) have been overcome by high brilliant multi-kilowatt laser, there are still difficulties resulting from the material physical properties, e.g. the high heat conductivity, the large heat capacity and the high thermal expansion coefficient of aluminum. Especially for very deep weld seams, insufficient dilution of filler wire material in the root of the weld seam and the danger of hot cracks increase...

  14. Mechanical properties of friction stir welded aluminum alloys 5083 and 5383

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeom Kee Paik

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of high-strength aluminum alloys is increasing in shipbuilding industry, particularly for the design and construction of war ships, littoral surface craft and combat ships, and fast passenger ships. While various welding methods are used today to fabricate aluminum ship structures, namely gas metallic arc welding (GMAW, laser welding and friction stir welding (FSW, FSW technology has been recognized to have many advantages for the construction of aluminum structures, as it is a low-cost welding process. In the present study, mechanical properties of friction stir welded aluminum alloys are examined experimentally. Tensile testing is undertaken on dog-bone type test specimen for aluminum alloys 5083 and 5383. The test specimen includes friction stir welded material between identical alloys and also dissimilar alloys, as well as unwelded (base alloys. Mechanical properties of fusion welded aluminum alloys are also tested and compared with those of friction stir welded alloys. The insights developed from the present study are documented together with details of the test database. Part of the present study was obtained from the Ship Structure Committee project SR-1454 (Paik, 2009, jointly funded by its member agencies.

  15. Electric pulse treatment of welded joint of aluminum alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Mitiaev

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Explanation of the redistribution effect of residual strengthes after electric pulse treatment of ark welding seam of the aluminum alloy. Methodology. Alloy on the basis of aluminium of АК8М3 type served as the research material. As a result of mechanical treatment of the ingots after alloy crystallization the plates with 10 mm thickness were obtained. After edge preparation the elements, which are being connected were butt welded using the technology of semiautomatic argon arc welding by the electrode with a diameter of 3 mm of AK-5 alloy. Metal structure of the welded joint was examined under the light microscope at a magnification of 200 and under the scanning electronic microscope «JSM-6360 LA». The Rockwell hardness (HRF was used as a strength characteristic of alloy. Hardness measuring of the phase constituents (microhardness was carried out using the device PМТ-3, with the indenter loadings 5 and 10 g. The crystalline structure parameters of alloy (dislocation density, second kind of the crystalline grid distortion and the scale of coherent scattering regions were determined using the methods of X-ray structural analysis. Electric pulse treatment (ET was carried out on the special equipment in the conditions of the DS enterprise using two modes A and В. Findings. On the basis of researches the previously obtained microhardness redistribution effect in the area of welded connection after ET was confirmed. As a result of use of the indicated treatment it was determined not only the reduction of microhardness gradient but also the simultaneous hardening effect in the certain thermal affected areas near the welding seam. During study of chemical composition of phase constituents it was discovered, that the structural changes of alloy as a result of ET first of all are caused by the redistribution of chemical elements, which form the connections themselves. By the nature of the influence the indicated treatment can be

  16. Gas Metal Arc Weld (GMAW) Qualification of 7020-T651 Aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    to the 24–25 ksi YS of friction stir welds of 5059, which are not proportionally efficient to 5059 YS. High levels of YS are important to maintain...Technology Organisation, Materials Research Laboratories; 1983 June. Report No.: MRL-R-888. 8. Hori H. Tensile properties of friction stir welded ...joints – studies on characteristics of friction stir welded joints in structural aluminum alloys (Report 3). Welding International. 2007;21(9):626

  17. Elements loss analysis based on spectral diagnosis in laser-arc hybrid welding of aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong; Chen, Hui; Zhu, Minhao; Yang, Tao; Shen, Lin

    2017-07-01

    Aluminum alloy has been widely used in automobiles, high-speed trains, aerospace and many other fields. The loss of elements during welding process causes welding defects and affects the microstructure and properties of the joints. This paper discusses the correlation between welding process, spectral intensity and loss of elements in laser-arc hybrid welding of Al alloys. The results show that laser power and arc current have a significant impact on the spectral intensity and loss of elements. Compared with the base metal, the contents of alloying elements in the weld area are lower. The burning losses of alloy elements increase with the welding heat input.

  18. Effect of Interfacial Reaction on the Mechanical Performance of Steel to Aluminum Dissimilar Ultrasonic Spot Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lei; Wang, Li; Chen, Ying-Chun; Robson, Joe D.; Prangnell, Philip B.

    2016-01-01

    The early stages of formation of intermetallic compounds (IMC) have been investigated in dissimilar aluminum to steel welds, manufactured by high power (2.5 kW) ultrasonic spot welding (USW). To better understand the influence of alloy composition, welds were produced between a low-carbon steel (DC04) and two different aluminum alloys (6111 and 7055). The joint strengths were measured in lap shear tests and the formation and growth behavior of IMCs at the weld interface were characterized by electron microscopy, for welding times from 0.2 to 2.4 seconds. With the material combinations studied, the η (Fe2Al5) intermetallic phase was found to form first, very rapidly in the initial stage of welding, with a discontinuous island morphology. Continuous layers of η and then θ (FeAl3) phase were subsequently seen to develop on extending the welding time to greater than 0.7 second. The IMC layer formed in the DC04-AA7055 combination grew thicker than for the DC04-AA6111 welds, despite both weld sets having near identical thermal histories. Zinc was also found to be dissolved in the IMC phases when welding with the AA7055 alloy. After post-weld aging of the aluminum alloy, fracture in the lap shear tests always occurred along the joint interface; however, the DC04-AA6111 welds had higher fracture energy than the DC04-AA7055 combination.

  19. Weld Growth Mechanisms and Failure Behavior of Three-Sheet Resistance Spot Welds Made of 5052 Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Yan, Fuyu; Luo, Zhen; Chao, Y. J.; Ao, Sansan; Cui, Xuetuan

    2015-06-01

    This paper investigates the weld nugget formation in three-sheet aluminum alloy resistance spot welding. The nugget formation process in three equal thickness sheets and three unequal thickness sheets of 5052 aluminum alloy were studied. The results showed that the nugget was initially formed at the workpiece/workpiece interfaces (i.e., both upper interface and lower interface). The two small nuggets then grew along the radial direction and axial direction (welding direction) as the welding time increased. Eventually, the two nuggets fused into one large nugget. During the welding process, the Peltier effect between the Cu-Al caused the shift of the nugget in the welding direction. In addition, the mechanical strength and fracture mode of the weld nuggets at the upper and lower interfaces were also studied using tensile shear specimen configuration. Three failure modes were identified, namely interfacial, mixed, and pullout. The critical welding time and critical nugget diameter corresponding to the transitions of these modes were investigated. Finally, an empirical failure load formula for three-sheet weld similar to two-sheet spot weld was developed.

  20. Fabrication of Aluminum Tubes Filled with Aluminum Alloy Foam by Friction Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hangai, Yoshihiko; Nakano, Yukiko; Koyama, Shinji; Kuwazuru, Osamu; Kitahara, Soichiro; Yoshikawa, Nobuhiro

    2015-10-23

    Aluminum foam is usually used as the core of composite materials by combining it with dense materials, such as in Al foam core sandwich panels and Al-foam-filled tubes, owing to its low tensile and bending strengths. In this study, all-Al foam-filled tubes consisting of ADC12 Al-Si-Cu die-cast aluminum alloy foam and a dense A1050 commercially pure Al tube with metal bonding were fabricated by friction welding. First, it was found that the ADC12 precursor was firmly bonded throughout the inner wall of the A1050 tube without a gap between the precursor and the tube by friction welding. No deformation of the tube or foaming of the precursor was observed during the friction welding. Next, it was shown that by heat treatment of an ADC12-precursor-bonded A1050 tube, gases generated by the decomposition of the blowing agent expand the softened ADC12 to produce the ADC12 foam interior of the dense A1050 tube. A holding time during the foaming process of approximately t H = 8.5 min with a holding temperature of 948 K was found to be suitable for obtaining a sound ADC12-foam-filled A1050 tube with sufficient foaming, almost uniform pore structures over the entire specimen, and no deformation or reduction in the thickness of the tube.

  1. Fabrication of Aluminum Tubes Filled with Aluminum Alloy Foam by Friction Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiko Hangai

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum foam is usually used as the core of composite materials by combining it with dense materials, such as in Al foam core sandwich panels and Al-foam-filled tubes, owing to its low tensile and bending strengths. In this study, all-Al foam-filled tubes consisting of ADC12 Al-Si-Cu die-cast aluminum alloy foam and a dense A1050 commercially pure Al tube with metal bonding were fabricated by friction welding. First, it was found that the ADC12 precursor was firmly bonded throughout the inner wall of the A1050 tube without a gap between the precursor and the tube by friction welding. No deformation of the tube or foaming of the precursor was observed during the friction welding. Next, it was shown that by heat treatment of an ADC12-precursor-bonded A1050 tube, gases generated by the decomposition of the blowing agent expand the softened ADC12 to produce the ADC12 foam interior of the dense A1050 tube. A holding time during the foaming process of approximately tH = 8.5 min with a holding temperature of 948 K was found to be suitable for obtaining a sound ADC12-foam-filled A1050 tube with sufficient foaming, almost uniform pore structures over the entire specimen, and no deformation or reduction in the thickness of the tube.

  2. Improving resistance welding of aluminum sheets by addition of metal powder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al Naimi, Ihsan K.; Al-Saadi, Moneer H.; Daws, Kasim M.

    2015-01-01

    In order to ensure good quality joints between aluminum sheets by resistance spot welding, a new approach involving the addition of metal powder to the faying surfaces before resistance heating is proposed. Three different metal powders (pure aluminum and two powders corresponding to the alloys AA......2024 and AA7075) are investigated for the resistance spot welding of AA1050 aluminum sheets of three different thicknesses. Microstructural and mechanical analysis demonstrates that significant improvement in weld bead morphology and strength are obtained with the addition of metal powder....... The improvement obtained is shown to be due to the development of a secondary bond in the joint beside the weld nugget increasing the total weld area. The application of powder additive is especially feasible, when using welding machines with insufficient current capacity for producing the required nugget size...

  3. Taguchi analysis of dissimilar aluminum sheets joined by friction stir spot welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Kemal BİLİCİ

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the welding of materials of new and complex structure constitutes a problem for the industry. The solid state welding method for joining of these materials were effective. Sheets produced from aluminum and aluminum alloys, especially in areas such as automotive, railway and defense industry have revealed the requirement of the application of solid state welding methods. The friction stir spot welding is one of the solid state welding method. Welding parameters is very important FSSW in order to obtain the maximum welding strength in FSSW. SKNK as parameters (tool rotational speed, depth, dive team, team and team inclination angle of standby time is selected. In this study has investigated the joining of AA2024-T3 and AA5754-H22 aluminum alloy sheets with FSSW technique by Taguchi analysis. “The highest -the better” quality control characteristic using the Analysis of Variance (ANOVA method were obtained the optimum welding parameters. The results have been analyzed both the graphical methods and numerical data. The most important parameters affecting the weld tensile strength were detected as tool rotation speed (44.74% and the team of waiting time (31.60%. Weld tensile strength by Taguchi analysis result conducted for comparing experiments the increased by 42% compared to the initial parameters.Keywords: Friction stir spot welding, Mechanical properties, Taguchi method, Optimization

  4. Effect of tool rotational speed and penetration depth on dissimilar aluminum alloys friction stir spot welds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquín M. Piccini

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In the last years, the automotive industry is looking for the use of aluminum parts in replace of steel parts in order to reduce the vehicles weight. These parts have to be joined, for instance, by welding processes. The more common welding process in the automotive industry is the Resistance Spot Welding (RSW technique. However, RSW of aluminum alloys has many disadvantages. Regarding this situation, a variant of the Friction Stir Welding process called Friction Stir Spot Welding (FSSW has been developed, showing a strong impact in welding of aluminum alloys and dissimilar materials in thin sheets. Process parameters affect the characteristics of the welded joints. However, the information available on this topic is scarce, particularly for dissimilar joints and thin sheets. The aim of this work was to study the effect of the rotational speed and the tool penetration depth on the characteristics of dissimilar FSS welded joints. Defects free joints have been achieved with higher mechanical properties than the ones reported. The maximum fracture load was 5800 N. It was observed that the effective joint length of the welded spots increased with the tool penetration depth, meanwhile the fracture load increased and then decreased. Finally, welding at 1200 RPM produced welded joints with lower mechanical properties than the ones achieved at 680 and 903 RPM.

  5. Mechanisms for Solidification Crack Initiation and Growth in Aluminum Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coniglio, N.; Cross, C. E.

    2009-11-01

    In the present work, mechanisms are proposed for solidification crack initiation and growth in aluminum alloy 6060 arc welds. Calculations for an interdendritic liquid pressure drop, made using the Rappaz-Drezet-Gremaud (RDG) model, demonstrate that cavitation as a liquid fracture mechanism is not likely to occur except at elevated levels of hydrogen content. Instead, a porosity-based crack initiation model has been developed based upon pore stability criteria, assuming that gas pores expand from pre-existing nuclei. Crack initiation is taken to occur when stable pores form within the coherent dendrite region, depending upon hydrogen content. Following initiation, crack growth is modeled using a mass balance approach, controlled by local strain rate conditions. The critical grain boundary liquid deformation rate needed for solidification crack growth has been determined for a weld made with a 16 pct 4043 filler addition, based upon the local strain rate measurement and a simplified strain rate partitioning model. Combined models show that hydrogen and strain rate control crack initiation and growth, respectively. A hypothetical hydrogen strain rate map is presented, defining conceptually the combined conditions needed for cracking and porosity.

  6. The effect of impurity gasses on variable polarity plasma arc welded 2219 aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcclure, John C.; Torres, Martin R.; Gurevitch, Alan C.; Newman, Robert A.

    1989-01-01

    Variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA) welding has been used with considerable success by NASA for the welds on the Space Shuttle External Tank as well as by others concerned with high quality welded structures. The effects of gaseous contaminants on the appearance of VPPA welds on 2219 aluminum are examined so that a welder can recognize that such contamination is present and take corrective measures. There are many possible sources of such contamination including, contaminated gas bottles, leaks in the gas plumbing, inadequate shield gas flow, condensed moisture in the gas lines or torch body, or excessive contaminants on the workpiece. The gasses chosen for study in the program were nitrogen, oxygen, methane, and hydrogen. Welds were made in a carefully controlled environment and comparisons were made between welds with various levels of these contaminants and welds made with research purity (99.9999 percent) gasses. Photographs of the weld front and backside as well as polished and etched cross sections are presented.

  7. Damage Tolerance Assessment of Friction Pull Plug Welds in an Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, Preston; Burkholder, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Friction stir welding is a solid state welding process used in the fabrication of cryogenic propellant tanks. Self-reacting friction stir welding is one variation of the friction stir weld process being developed for manufacturing tanks. Friction pull plug welding is used to seal the exit hole that remains in a circumferential self-reacting friction stir weld. A friction plug weld placed in a self-reacting friction stir weld results in a non-homogenous weld joint where the initial weld, plug weld, their respective heat affected zones and the base metal all interact. The welded joint is a composite plastically deformed material system with a complex residual stress field. In order to address damage tolerance concerns associated with friction plug welds in safety critical structures, such as propellant tanks, nondestructive inspection and proof testing may be required to screen hardware for mission critical defects. The efficacy of the nondestructive evaluation or the proof test is based on an assessment of the critical flaw size. Test data relating residual strength capability to flaw size in an aluminum alloy friction plug weld will be presented.

  8. Upgrading weld quality of a friction stir welded aluminum alloys AMG6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernykh, I. K.; Vasil’ev, E. V.; Matuzko, E. N.; Krivonos, E. V.

    2018-01-01

    In the course of introduction of FSW technology into the industry there is a keen interest in this process; there are issues such as how does joining take place, what is the structure of the joint, and where there are dangerous zones. The objective of this research is to obtain information about the structure of the joint, what are the temperatures that arise during the joining, what strength is apply to the tool when joining the material, what tensile strength of joint, and where fracture tended to occur. Specimens were produced at different modes of welding at a tool rotation speed of 315 to 625 rpm and tool travel speed of 40 to 125 mm/min. During the experiment, the strength applied to the tool was measured, which reached 800016000 N (Fz) and 400-1400 N (Fx) and the temperature on the surface of the tool, which is in the range 250-400°C. Before the welding process the tool was heated to a temperature in the range of 100-250 degrees, but the tensile strength is not had a tangible impact. The tensile strength is about 80 % of that of the aluminum alloy base metal tensile strength, and fracture tended is occur not at the line of joint but follow the shape of the tool. In the transverse cross section of a FSW material there is a microstructural regions such as weld nugget, thermomechanically affected zone and heat-affected zone with parent material.

  9. Effect of different filler wires on weld formation for fiber laser welding 6A02 Aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, F.; Chen, L.; Lu, W.; He, E. G.

    2017-12-01

    6A02 aluminum alloy was welded by fibre laser welding with two different filler wires (ER4043 and ER5356). The weld apperance, microstructure and mechanical properties were analysed. The results show the welding course with ER4043 is more stable than that with ER5356, and the welding spatters of the former are smaller than that of the latter. The microsturtrue of the weld zone, including columnar-grains near the fusion zone and mixed microstructures (columnar grains and equiaxed grains) in the weld center zone, is finer with ER5356 than that with ER4043. So the average microhardness value of the former is higher than the latter. A great number of low melting point eutectic phases disperse in grains boundary. Due to the eutectic phases distributing more in two zones (overheat zone near the fusion zone and the weld center zone) than other zones, the welded joints have these two low hardness and weak strength zones. The ultimate strength and the elongations after fracture of the welded joints with ER4043 are lower than that with ER5356 slihgtly. However, the former are improved obviously and higher than the latter after heat treatment. The tensile properties of all joints can reach to the base material level. And the tensile fractures always occur near the fusion zone.

  10. Strain hardening and damage in 6xxx series aluminum alloy friction stir welds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simar, Aude; Nielsen, Kim Lau; de Meester, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    A friction stir weld in 6005A-T6 aluminum alloy has been prepared and analyzed by micro-hardness measurements, tensile testing and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The locations of the various weld zones were determined by micro-hardness indentation measurements. The flow behavior of the vario...

  11. The Effect of Tool Position for Aluminum and Copper at High Rotational Friction Stir Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Recep Çakır

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Friction Stir Welding (FSW is a solid state welding process used for welding similar and dissimilar materials. This welding technique allows welding of Aluminum alloys which present difficulties in fusion joining and allows different material couples to be welded continuously. In this study, 1050 aluminum alloy and commercially pure copper to increase heat input were produced at high rotation rate (2440 rev/min with four different pin position (0-1-1.5-2 mm and three different weld speeds (20-30-50 mm/min by friction stir welding. The influence of welding parameters on microstructure and mechanical properties of the joints was investigated. Tensile and bending tests and microhardness measurements were used to determine of mechanical properties. Nugget zone microstructures were investigated by optical microscope and scanning electron microscope (SEM and were analyzed in energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX. Depending on the XRD analysis results intermetallic phase was observed to form in the interfacial region. In the tensile test results, 83.55% weld performance was obtained in the friction stir welding merge of Al-Cu.

  12. Hazard of ultraviolet radiation emitted in gas tungsten arc welding of aluminum alloys

    OpenAIRE

    NAKASHIMA, Hitoshi; UTSUNOMIYA, Akihiro; FUJII, Nobuyuki; OKUNO, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) emitted during arc welding frequently causes keratoconjunctivitis and erythema. The extent of the hazard of UVR varies depending on the welding method and conditions. Therefore, it is important to identify the levels of UVR that are present under various conditions. In this study, we experimentally evaluated the hazard of UVR emitted in gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) of aluminum alloys. The degree of hazard of UVR is measured by the effective irradiance defined in...

  13. Physical simulation method for the investigation of weld seam formation during the extrusion of aluminum alloys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fang, G; Zhou, J.

    2017-01-01

    Extrusion through the porthole die is a predominant forming process used in the production of hollow aluminum alloy profiles across the aluminum extrusion industry. Longitudinal weld seams formed during the process may negatively influence the quality of extruded profiles. It is therefore of

  14. Influence of Post Weld Heat Treatment on Strength of Three Aluminum Alloys Used in Light Poles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig C. Menzemer

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The conjoint influence of welding and artificial aging on mechanical properties were investigated for extrusions of aluminum alloy 6063, 6061, and 6005A. Uniaxial tensile tests were conducted on the aluminum alloys 6063-T4, 6061-T4, and 6005A-T1 in both the as-received (AR and as-welded (AW conditions. Tensile tests were also conducted on the AR and AW alloys, subsequent to artificial aging. The welding process used was gas metal arc (GMAW with spray transfer using 120–220 A of current at 22 V. The artificial aging used was a precipitation heat treatment for 6 h at 182 °C (360 °F. Tensile tests revealed the welded aluminum alloys to have lower strength, both for yield and ultimate tensile strength, when compared to the as-received un-welded counterpart. The beneficial influence of post weld heat treatment (PWHT on strength and ductility is presented and discussed in terms of current design provisions for welded aluminum light pole structures.

  15. Strain signatures associated to the formation of hot cracks during laser beam welding of aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagenlocher, Christian; Stritt, Peter; Weber, Rudolf; Graf, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    The local surface displacement during the laser beam welding process of MgSi alloyed aluminum sheets (AA6014) in overlap configuration was optically determined near the weld seam by means of digital correlation of images recorded with a high-speed video camera. The analysis allowed the time- and space-resolved determination of the plane strain in the immediate vicinity of the solidification zone behind the weld pool. The observations revealed characteristic signatures in the temporal evolution of the strain that are related to the formation of centerline cracks in laser beam welding.

  16. Self-Reacting Friction Stir Welding for Aluminum Complex Curvature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Randy J.; Martin, W.; Schneider, J.; Hartley, P. J.; Russell, Carolyn; Lawless, Kirby; Jones, Chip

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph representation provides an overview of sucessful research conducted by Lockheed Martin and NASA to develop an advanced self-reacting friction stir technology for complex curvature aluminum alloys. The research included weld process development for 0.320 inch Al 2219, sucessful transfer from the 'lab' scale to the production scale tool and weld quality exceeding strenght goals. This process will enable development and implementation of large scale complex geometry hardware fabrication. Topics covered include: weld process development, weld process transfer, and intermediate hardware fabrication.

  17. Resistance Spot Welding of Aluminum Alloy to Steel with Transition Material - From Process to Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Shao, H; Kimchi, Menachem; Menachem Kimchi and Wanda Newman

    2004-05-11

    This paper summarizes work to date on resistance spot welding (RSW) of aluminum alloy to mild steel from process development to performance evaluation. A cold-rolled strip material is introduced as a transition material to aid the resistance welding process. The optimal welding parameters and electrode selections were established using a combination of experimental and analytical approaches. The mechanical behaviors of welded samples was evaluated using static and dynamic strength tests and cyclic fatigue tests. A statistical analysis was also performed to analyze the effect of different failure modes on the sample's peak load and energy absorption.

  18. Taguchi Optimization of Pulsed Current GTA Welding Parameters for Improved Corrosion Resistance of 5083 Aluminum Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastkerdar, E.; Shamanian, M.; Saatchi, A.

    2013-04-01

    In this study, the Taguchi method was used as a design of experiment (DOE) technique to optimize the pulsed current gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) parameters for improved pitting corrosion resistance of AA5083-H18 aluminum alloy welds. A L9 (34) orthogonal array of the Taguchi design was used, which involves nine experiments for four parameters: peak current ( P), base current ( B), percent pulse-on time ( T), and pulse frequency ( F) with three levels was used. Pitting corrosion resistance in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution was evaluated by anodic polarization tests at room temperature and calculating the width of the passive region (∆ E pit). Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed on the measured data and S/ N (signal to noise) ratios. The "bigger is better" was selected as the quality characteristic (QC). The optimum conditions were found as 170 A, 85 A, 40%, and 6 Hz for P, B, T, and F factors, respectively. The study showed that the percent pulse-on time has the highest influence on the pitting corrosion resistance (50.48%) followed by pulse frequency (28.62%), peak current (11.05%) and base current (9.86%). The range of optimum ∆ E pit at optimum conditions with a confidence level of 90% was predicted to be between 174.81 and 177.74 mVSCE. Under optimum conditions, the confirmation test was carried out, and the experimental value of ∆ E pit of 176 mVSCE was in agreement with the predicted value from the Taguchi model. In this regard, the model can be effectively used to predict the ∆ E pit of pulsed current gas tungsten arc welded joints.

  19. Microstructural Characterization of Friction Stir Welded Aluminum-Steel Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    plasticized by the rotation around the back of the tool in preparation for adhesion to the faying surface of the other alloy. In the case of a lap weld...strengths from lap - shear tests than the welds performed using the tool with the scribe. The cross-sectional morphology of the weld was different as...alloy serving as the matrix. Lap - shear samples from the welds performed with the scribe not only produced higher failure stresses but were also more

  20. Friction Stir Spot Welding of 6061 Aluminum-to-Copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heideman, Robert J.

    Friction stir spot welding (FSSW) between 1.5mm thick 6061 Al on top and 1.5mm thick Cu at bottom was conducted. First, weld parameters and the weld macrostructure that were necessary to form good quality welds, as determined using lap shear weld strength, were identified. Tool rotation speed and tool pin length are key variables that control weld strength. To obtain high quality strong welds, a Cu ring extruded upward from the lower Cu sheet into the upper 6061 Al-sheet, which promoted bonding and interlocking between the sheets, and an Al-rich stir zone between Cu ring and weld keyhole were both necessary. Second, a technique where the tool remained in the sample after FSSW helped determine the material flow that takes place during high quality weld formation and the functions of the welding tool features. The tool threads cause 6061 Al from the upper sheet to move downward into the region near the threads. The tool shoulder causes a counter flow movement of 6061 Al that results in the formation of the Al-rich stir zone and also causes the upward extrusion of the lower Cu sheet. This technique also identified that a Cu-rich material forms on the tool tip, that this material sheds and rebuilds during subsequent welds, and that this material can form large Cu-rich particles that can completely fill the tool threads, impede proper material flow and lead to a low strength, poor quality weld. Third, to further understand welding parameters, weld temperatures, torque, and vertical forces were measured. Temperature data was collected using a tool holder that permitted wireless thermocouple data collection. Through these measurements, rotational plunge weld energy was recognized as important in determining if a quality weld formed, and weld plunge rate was identified as the welding parameter that significantly impacted rotational weld plunge energy. The final phase of research was to improve weld quality consistency. Through repetitive trials with a single tool

  1. Study of 2219 aluminum alloy using direct current A-TIG welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Zou, Jiasheng

    2017-07-01

    Direct current A-TIG (DCEN A-TIG) welding using special active agent had eliminated the pores and the oxidation of 2219 high-strength aluminum alloy in welding. Addition of AlF3-25% LiF active agent to DCEN A-TIG welding and arc morphology showed a trailing phenomenon. However, the change in arc morphology was not remarkable when AlF3-75% LiF active agent was added. Addition of AlF3-75% LiF active agent can refine the grain size of DCEN A-TIG joint. The mechanical properties of the weld were optimal at 10% AlF3-75% LiF active agent. Compared with AC TIG and AC A-TIG welding, DCEN A-TIG welding yielded better results for 2219 Al alloy.

  2. Ultrasonic Impact Treatment to Improve Stress Corrosion Cracking Resistance of Welded Joints of Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, J.; Gou, G.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W.; Chen, H.; Yang, Y. P.

    2016-07-01

    Stress corrosion cracking is one of the major issues for welded joints of 6005A-T6 aluminum alloy in high-speed trains. High residual stress in the welded joints under corrosion results in stress corrosion cracking. Ultrasonic impact treatment was used to control the residual stress of the welded joints of 6005A-T6 aluminum alloy. Experimental tests show that ultrasonic impact treatment can induce compressive longitudinal and transverse residual stress in the welded joint, harden the surface, and increase the tensile strength of welded joints. Salt-fog corrosion tests were conducted for both an as-welded sample and an ultrasonic impact-treated sample. The surface of the treated sample had far fewer corrosion pits than that of the untreated sample. The treated sample has higher strength and lower tensile residual stress than the untreated sample during corrosion. Therefore, ultrasonic impact treatment is an effective technique to improve the stress corrosion cracking resistance of the welded joints of 6005A-T6 aluminum alloy.

  3. Damage Tolerance Behavior of Friction Stir Welds in Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, Preston; Burkholder, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Friction stir welding is a solid state welding process used in the fabrication of various aerospace structures. Self-reacting and conventional friction stir welding are variations of the friction stir weld process employed in the fabrication of cryogenic propellant tanks which are classified as pressurized structure in many spaceflight vehicle architectures. In order to address damage tolerance behavior associated with friction stir welds in these safety critical structures, nondestructive inspection and proof testing may be required to screen hardware for mission critical defects. The efficacy of the nondestructive evaluation or the proof test is based on an assessment of the critical flaw size. Test data describing fracture behavior, residual strength capability, and cyclic mission life capability of friction stir welds at ambient and cryogenic temperatures have been generated and will be presented in this paper. Fracture behavior will include fracture toughness and tearing (R-curve) response of the friction stir welds. Residual strength behavior will include an evaluation of the effects of lack of penetration on conventional friction stir welds, the effects of internal defects (wormholes) on self-reacting friction stir welds, and an evaluation of the effects of fatigue cycled surface cracks on both conventional and selfreacting welds. Cyclic mission life capability will demonstrate the effects of surface crack defects on service load cycle capability. The fracture data will be used to evaluate nondestructive inspection and proof test requirements for the welds.

  4. The development of a quality prediction system for aluminum laser welding to measure plasma intensity using photodiodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Ji Young [Technical Research Center, Hyundai Steel Company, Dangjin (Korea, Republic of); Sohn, Yong Ho [Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando (United States); Park, Young Whan; Kwak, Jae Seob [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Pukyong National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Lightweight metals have been used to manufacture the body panels of cars to reduce the weight of car bodies. Typically, aluminum sheets are welded together, with a focus on weld quality assurance. A weld quality prediction system for the laser welding of aluminum was developed in this research to maximize welding production. The behavior of the plasma was also analyzed, dependent on various welding conditions. The light intensity of the plasma was altered with heat input and wire feed rate conditions, and the strength of the weld and sensor signals correlated closely for this heat input condition. Using these characteristics, a new algorithm and program were developed to evaluate the weld quality. The design involves a combinatory algorithm using a neural network model for the prediction of tensile strength from measured signals and a fuzzy multi-feature pattern recognition algorithm for the weld quality classification to improve predictability of the system.

  5. Microstructure and mechanical properties of GTAW welded joints of AA6105 aluminum alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minerva Dorta-Almenara

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW is one of the most used methods to weld aluminum. This work investigates the influence of welding parameters on the microstructure and mechanical properties of GTAW welded AA6105 aluminum alloy joints. AA6105 alloy plates with different percent values of cold work were joined by GTAW, using various combinations of welding current and speed. The fusion zone, in which the effects of cold work have disappeared, and the heat affected zone of the welded samples were examined under optical and scanning electron microscopes, additionally, mechanical tests and measures of Vickers microhardness were performed. Results showed dendritic morphology with solute micro- and macrosegregation in the fusion zone, which is favored by the constitutional supercooling when heat input increases. When heat input increased and welding speed increased or remained constant, greater segregation was obtained, whereas welding speed decrease produced a coarser microstructure. In the heat affected zone recrystallization, dissolution, and coarsening of precipitates occurred, which led to variations in hardness and strength.

  6. Research on the welding process of aluminum alloy based on high power fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Wei; Pan, Xiaoming; Huang, Shanshi; Liu, Wenwen

    2017-08-01

    To research the formation and variation principle of the weld seam and molten pool for aluminum alloy high power fiber laser welding, the welding experiments for 5052 aluminum alloy were carried out. The influences of laser power, scanning velocity and protection gas on the welding process were systematically researched. The results show that with the increase of power and scanning velocity, the depth to width ratio first increases and then decreases. The ratio reaches the maximum value at 2.6 KW and 30 mm/s, respectively. When the power located at 2.6 KW to 2.8 KW or the velocity located at 25 mm/s to 30 mm/s, stable deep penetration welding can be obtained. The weld seam shows relative flat appearance and the molten pool presents typical "T shape" topography. Moreover, the protection gas also influences the appearance of the weld seam. Using the independently designed fixture, the quality of the weld seam can be well improved.

  7. Formation of Brittle Phases During Pulsed Current Gas Tungsten Arc Welding of Titanium to Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Shouzheng; Li, Yajiang; Wang, Juan; Liu, Kun

    2014-04-01

    Welding of titanium alloy TA15 to aluminum alloy Al 2024 was conducted by pulsed current gas tungsten arc welding using AlSi12 filler metal. Formation process of phases near the Ti/Al interface was discussed. Titanium and aluminum were partially fusion welded in the upper part while brazed together in the middle and bottom parts of the joint. In the upper part of the joint, intermetallics Ti3Al + Ti5Si3, TiAl + Ti5Si3, and TiAl3 were formed as three layers orderly from the titanium side to the weld metal. In the middle and bottom parts of the joint, intermetallics Ti5Si3 and TiAl3 were formed as two layers near the Ti/Al interface.

  8. High-power Laser Welding of Thick Steel-aluminum Dissimilar Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahdo, Rabi; Springer, André; Pfeifer, Ronny; Kaierle, Stefan; Overmeyer, Ludger

    According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), a worldwide reduction of CO2-emissions is indispensable to avoid global warming. Besides the automotive sector, lightweight construction is also of high interest for the maritime industry in order to minimize CO2-emissions. Using aluminum, the weight of ships can be reduced, ensuring lower fuel consumption. Therefore, hybrid joints of steel and aluminum are of great interest to the maritime industry. In order to provide an efficient lap joining process, high-power laser welding of thick steel plates (S355, t = 5 mm) and aluminum plates (EN AW-6082, t = 8 mm) is investigated. As the weld seam quality greatly depends on the amount of intermetallic phases within the joint, optimized process parameters and control are crucial. Using high-power laser welding, a tensile strength of 10 kN was achieved. Based on metallographic analysis, hardness tests, and tensile tests the potential of this joining method is presented.

  9. A new technique for the strengthening of aluminum tungsten inert gas weld metals: using carbon nanotube/aluminum composite as a filler metal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattahi, M; Nabhani, N; Rashidkhani, E; Fattahi, Y; Akhavan, S; Arabian, N

    2013-01-01

    The effect of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) on the mechanical properties of aluminum multipass weld metal prepared by the tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding process was investigated. High energy ball milling was used to disperse MWCNT in the aluminum powder. Carbon nanotube/aluminum composite filler metal was fabricated for the first time by hot extrusion of ball-milled powders. After welding, the tensile strength, microhardness and MWCNT distribution in the weld metal were investigated. The test results showed that the tensile strength and microhardness of weld metal was greatly increased when using the filler metal containing 1.5 wt.% MWCNT. Therefore, according to the results presented in this paper, it can be concluded that the filler metal containing MWCNT can serve as a super filler metal to improve the mechanical properties of TIG welds of Al and its alloys. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Disk Laser Weld Brazing of AW5083 Aluminum Alloy with Titanium Grade 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahul, Miroslav; Sahul, Martin; Vyskoč, Maroš; Čaplovič, Ľubomír; Pašák, Matej

    2017-03-01

    Disk laser weld brazing of dissimilar metals was carried out. Aluminum alloy 5083 and commercially pure titanium Grade 2 with the thickness of 2.0 mm were used as experimental materials. Butt weld brazed joints were produced under different welding parameters. The 5087 aluminum alloy filler wire with a diameter of 1.2 mm was used for joining dissimilar metals. The elimination of weld metal cracking was attained by offsetting the laser beam. When the offset was 0 mm, the intermixing of both metals was too high, thus producing higher amount of intermetallic compounds (IMCs). Higher amount of IMCs resulted in poorer mechanical properties of produced joints. Grain refinement in the fusion zone occurred especially due to the high cooling rates during laser beam joining. Reactions at the interface varied in the dependence of its location. Continuous thin IMC layer was observed directly at the titanium-weld metal interface. Microhardness of an IMC island in the weld metal reached up to 452.2 HV0.1. The XRD analysis confirmed the presence of tetragonal Al3Ti intermetallic compound. The highest tensile strength was recorded in the case when the laser beam offset of 300 μm from the joint centerline toward aluminum alloy was utilized.

  11. Microstructure and Salt Fog Corrosion Behavior of AA2219 Friction-Stir-Welded Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasa Rao, G.; Subba Rao, V. V.; Rao, S. R. K.

    2017-07-01

    Plates (8.1-mm-thick) from aluminum alloy AA2219-T87 are studied after friction stir welding. The plates are subjected to salt fog corrosion tests according to ASTM B117 at different pH values and different spraying times. The regions affected by corrosion are studied in different zones of welded joints by the methods of optical and transmission electron microscopy. The corrosion resistance is determined in acid, basic and neutral solutions. The resistances of the base metal and of the zones of welded joints are compared.

  12. Manufacturing of hybrid aluminum copper joints by electromagnetic pulse welding - Identification of quantitative process windows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psyk, Verena; Scheffler, Christian; Linnemann, Maik; Landgrebe, Dirk

    2017-10-01

    Compared to conventional joining techniques, electromagnetic pulse welding offers important advantages especially when it comes to dissimilar material connections as e.g. copper aluminum welds. However, due to missing guidelines and tools for process design, the process has not been widely implemented in industrial production, yet. In order to contribute to overcoming this obstacle, a combined numerical and experimental process analysis for electromagnetic pulse welding of Cu-DHP and EN AW-1050 was carried out and the results were consolidated in a quantitative collision parameter based process window.

  13. Structural Phase Evolution in Ultrasonic-Assisted Friction Stir Welded 2195 Aluminum Alloy Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliseev, A. A.; Fortuna, S. V.; Kalashnikova, T. A.; Chumaevskii, A. V.; Kolubaev, E. A.

    2017-10-01

    The authors examined the structural and phase state of fixed joints produced by method of friction stir welding (FSW) and ultrasonic-assisted friction stir welding (UAFSW) from extruded profile of aluminum alloy AA2195. In order to identify the role of ultrasonic application in the course of welding, such characteristics, as volume fraction and average size of secondary particles are compared in the base material and stir zones of FSW and UAFSW joints. By applying the methods of SEM and TEM analysis, researchers established the complex character of phase transitions as a result of ultrasonic application.

  14. Study of Weld Imperfections on Thin Aluminum Tubes According To ISO 10042

    CERN Document Server

    Rizkallah, Rabel

    2014-01-01

    The following report presents the work done as part of my summer student internship at CERN in the EN/MME group, and is divided into two parts. Part I of the report is a continuation of the work started previously by the student Quentin Drouhet, which aims at studying and classifying welding imperfections on various materials of small thicknesses. Drouhet worked on the welding imperfections found on thin Stainless Steel plates of thicknesses of 2 and 6 millimeters, welded using the GTAW (or TIG welding) process. My job was to conduct a similar study on thin Aluminum tubes welded using this same process. Part II of the report will introduce a new method for defect analysis that is still not available at CERN: the micro-tomographic testing

  15. A Review of Dissimilar Welding Techniques for Magnesium Alloys to Aluminum Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liming Liu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Welding of dissimilar magnesium alloys and aluminum alloys is an important issue because of their increasing applications in industries. In this document, the research and progress of a variety of welding techniques for joining dissimilar Mg alloys and Al alloys are reviewed from different perspectives. Welding of dissimilar Mg and Al is challenging due to the formation of brittle intermetallic compound (IMC such as Mg17Al12 and Mg2Al3. In order to increase the joint strength, three main research approaches were used to eliminate or reduce the Mg-Al intermetallic reaction layer. First, solid state welding techniques which have a low welding temperature were used to reduce the IMCs. Second, IMC variety and distribution were controlled to avoid the degradation of the joining strength in fusion welding. Third, techniques which have relatively controllable reaction time and energy were used to eliminate the IMCs. Some important processing parameters and their effects on weld quality are discussed, and the microstructure and metallurgical reaction are described. Mechanical properties of welds such as hardness, tensile, shear and fatigue strength are discussed. The aim of the report is to review the recent progress in the welding of dissimilar Mg and Al to provide a basis for follow-up research.

  16. A Review of Dissimilar Welding Techniques for Magnesium Alloys to Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liming; Ren, Daxin; Liu, Fei

    2014-01-01

    Welding of dissimilar magnesium alloys and aluminum alloys is an important issue because of their increasing applications in industries. In this document, the research and progress of a variety of welding techniques for joining dissimilar Mg alloys and Al alloys are reviewed from different perspectives. Welding of dissimilar Mg and Al is challenging due to the formation of brittle intermetallic compound (IMC) such as Mg17Al12 and Mg2Al3. In order to increase the joint strength, three main research approaches were used to eliminate or reduce the Mg-Al intermetallic reaction layer. First, solid state welding techniques which have a low welding temperature were used to reduce the IMCs. Second, IMC variety and distribution were controlled to avoid the degradation of the joining strength in fusion welding. Third, techniques which have relatively controllable reaction time and energy were used to eliminate the IMCs. Some important processing parameters and their effects on weld quality are discussed, and the microstructure and metallurgical reaction are described. Mechanical properties of welds such as hardness, tensile, shear and fatigue strength are discussed. The aim of the report is to review the recent progress in the welding of dissimilar Mg and Al to provide a basis for follow-up research. PMID:28788646

  17. Hazard of ultraviolet radiation emitted in gas tungsten arc welding of aluminum alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Hitoshi; Utsunomiya, Akihiro; Fujii, Nobuyuki; Okuno, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) emitted during arc welding frequently causes keratoconjunctivitis and erythema. The extent of the hazard of UVR varies depending on the welding method and conditions. Therefore, it is important to identify the levels of UVR that are present under various conditions. In this study, we experimentally evaluated the hazard of UVR emitted in gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) of aluminum alloys. The degree of hazard of UVR is measured by the effective irradiance defined in the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists guidelines. The effective irradiances measured in this study are in the range 0.10-0.91 mW/cm(2) at a distance of 500 mm from the welding arc. The maximum allowable exposure times corresponding to these levels are only 3.3-33 s/day. This demonstrates that unprotected exposure to UVR emitted by GTAW of aluminum alloys is quite hazardous in practice. In addition, we found the following properties of the hazard of UVR. (1) It is more hazardous at higher welding currents than at lower welding currents. (2) It is more hazardous when magnesium is included in the welding materials than when it is not. (3) The hazard depends on the direction of emission from the arc.

  18. Experiments and simulation for 6061-T6 aluminum alloy resistance spot welded lap joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florea, Radu Stefanel

    This comprehensive study is the first to quantify the fatigue performance, failure loads, and microstructure of resistance spot welding (RSW) in 6061-T6 aluminum (Al) alloy according to welding parameters and process sensitivity. The extensive experimental, theoretical and simulated analyses will provide a framework to optimize the welding of lightweight structures for more fuel-efficient automotive and military applications. The research was executed in four primary components. The first section involved using electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD) scanning, tensile testing, laser beam profilometry (LBP) measurements, and optical microscopy(OM) images to experimentally investigate failure loads and deformation of the Al-alloy resistance spot welded joints. Three welding conditions, as well as nugget and microstructure characteristics, were quantified according to predefined process parameters. Quasi-static tensile tests were used to characterize the failure loads in specimens based upon these same process parameters. Profilometer results showed that increasing the applied welding current deepened the weld imprints. The EBSD scans revealed the strong dependency between the grain sizes and orientation function on the process parameters. For the second section, the fatigue behavior of the RSW'ed joints was experimentally investigated. The process optimization included consideration of the forces, currents, and times for both the main weld and post-heating. Load control cyclic tests were conducted on single weld lap-shear joint coupons to characterize the fatigue behavior in spot welded specimens. Results demonstrate that welding parameters do indeed significantly affect the microstructure and fatigue performance for these welds. The third section comprised residual strains of resistance spot welded joints measured in three different directions, denoted as in-plane longitudinal, in-plane transversal, and normal, and captured on the fusion zone, heat affected zone

  19. Ductile damage development in friction stir welded aluminum (AA2024) joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kim Lau

    2008-01-01

    Ductile damage development in a friction stir welded aluminum joint subjected to tension is analyzed numerically by FE-analysis, based on a total Lagrangian formulation. An elastic-viscoplastic constitutive relation that accounts for nucleation and growth of microvoids is applied. Main focus in t...

  20. Experimental Investigation and Optimization of TIG Welding Parameters on Aluminum 6061 Alloy Using Firefly Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rishi; Mevada, N. Ramesh; Rathore, Santosh; Agarwal, Nitin; Rajput, Vinod; Sinh Barad, AjayPal

    2017-08-01

    To improve Welding quality of aluminum (Al) plate, the TIG Welding system has been prepared, by which Welding current, Shielding gas flow rate and Current polarity can be controlled during Welding process. In the present work, an attempt has been made to study the effect of Welding current, current polarity, and shielding gas flow rate on the tensile strength of the weld joint. Based on the number of parameters and their levels, the Response Surface Methodology technique has been selected as the Design of Experiment. For understanding the influence of input parameters on Ultimate tensile strength of weldment, ANOVA analysis has been carried out. Also to describe and optimize TIG Welding using a new metaheuristic Nature - inspired algorithm which is called as Firefly algorithm which was developed by Dr. Xin-She Yang at Cambridge University in 2007. A general formulation of firefly algorithm is presented together with an analytical, mathematical modeling to optimize the TIG Welding process by a single equivalent objective function.

  1. Analysis of Heat Affected Zone in Welded Aluminum Alloys Using Inverse and Direct Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zervaki, A. D.; Haidemenopoulos, G. N.; Lambrakos, S. G.

    2008-06-01

    The concept of constructing parameter spaces for process control and the prediction of properties within the heat affected zone (HAZ) of welds using inverse modeling is examined. These parameter spaces can be, in principle, either independent or a function of weld process conditions. The construction of these parameter spaces consists of two procedures. One procedure entails calculation of a parameterized set of temperature histories using inverse heat transfer analysis of the heat deposition occurring during welding. The other procedure entails correlating these temperature histories with either a specific process control parameter or physical property of the weld that is measurable. Two quantitative case study analyses based on inverse modeling are presented. One analysis examines the calculation of temperature histories as a function of process control parameters. For this case, the specific process control parameter adopted as prototypical is the electron beam focal point. Another analysis compares some general characteristics of inverse and direct modeling with respect to the prediction of properties of the HAZ for deep penetration welding of aluminum alloys. For this case, the specific property adopted as prototypical is hardness. This study provides a foundation for an examination of the feasibility of constructing a parameter space for the prediction of weld properties using weld cross-section measurements that are independent of weld process conditions.

  2. Inhibition of the formation of intermetallic compounds in aluminum-steel welded joints by friction stir welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torres López, Edwar A.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Formation of deleterious phases during welding of aluminum and steel is a challenge of the welding processes, for decades. Friction Stir Welding (FSW has been used in an attempt to reduce formation of intermetallic compounds trough reducing the heat input. In this research, dissimilar joint of 6063-T5 aluminum alloy and AISI-SAE 1020 steel were welded using this technique. The temperature of welded joints was measured during the process. The interface of the welded joints was characterized using optical microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Additionally, composition measurements were carried out by X-EDS and DRX. The experimental results revealed that the maximum temperature on the joint studied is less than 360 °C. The microstructural characterization in the aluminum-steel interface showed the absence of intermetallic compounds, which is a condition attributed to the use of welding with low thermal input parameters.La unión de juntas aluminio-acero, sin la formación de fases deletéreas del tipo FexAly, ha sido, por décadas, un desafío para los procesos de soldadura. La soldadura por fricción-agitación ha sido empleada para intentar reducir el aporte térmico y evitar la formación de compuestos intermetálicos. Usando esta técnica fueron soldadas juntas disimilares de aluminio 6063-T5 y acero AISI-SAE 1020. La soldadura fue acompañada de medidas de temperatura durante su ejecución. La interfase de las juntas soldadas fue caracterizada utilizando microscopía óptica, electrónica de barrido y electrónica de transmisión. Adicionalmente fueron realizadas medidas puntuales X-EDS y DRX. Los resultados experimentales revelan que la temperatura máxima en la junta es inferior a 360 °C. La caracterización microestructural en la interfase aluminio-acero demostró la ausencia de compuestos intermetálicos, condición atribuida al uso de parámetros de soldadura con bajo aporte térmico.

  3. Improved TIG weld joint strength in aluminum alloy 2219-T87 by filler metal substitution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorman, R. M.; Lovoy, C. V.

    1972-01-01

    The results of an investigation on weld joint characteristics of aluminum alloy 2219-T87 are given. Five different alloys were utilized as filler material. The mechanical properties of the joints were determined at ambient and cryogenic temperatures for weldments in the as-welded condition and also, for weldments after elevated temperature exposures. Other evaluations included hardness surveys, stress corrosion susceptibility, and to a limited extent, the internal metallurgical weld structures. The overall results indicate that M-943 filler weldments are superior in strength to weldments containing either the standard 2319 filler or fillers 2014, 2020, and a dual wire feed consisting of three parts 2319 and one part 5652. In addition, no deficiencies were evident in M-934 filler weldments with regard to ductility, joint strength after elevated temperature exposure, weld hardness, metallographic structures, or stress corrosion susceptibility.

  4. Thermal-mechanical modeling and experimental validation of weld solidification cracking in 6061-T6 aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dike, J.J.; Brooks, J.A.; Bammann, D.J.; Li, M.

    1997-12-31

    Finite element simulation using an internal state variable constitutive model coupled with a void growth and damage model are used to study weld solidification cracking of 6061-T6 aluminum. Calculated results are compared with data from an experimental program determining the locations of failure as a function of weld process parameters and specimen geometry. Two types of weld solidification cracking specimen were studied. One specimen, in which cracking did not occur, was used to evaluate finite element simulations of the thermal response and calculations of average strain across the weld. The other specimen type was used to determine the location of crack initiation as a function of weld process parameters. This information was used to evaluate the finite element simulations of weld solidification cracking. A solidification model which includes dendrite tip and eutectic undercooling was used in both thermal and mechanical finite element analyses. A strain rate and temperature history dependent constitutive model is coupled with a ductile void growth damage model in the mechanical analyses. Stresses near the weld pool are examined to explain results obtained in the finite element analyses and correlated with experimental observations. Good agreement is obtained between simulation and experiment for locations of crack initiation and extent of cracking. Some effects of uncertainties in material parameters are discussed.

  5. Effect of heat treatment on the properties of laser-beam welded rheo-cast F357 aluminum

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Theron, M

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Semi-solid metal rheo-cast F357 aluminum plates were joined by autogenous Nd:YAG laser welding and were welded in either the as-cast (F) condition, T4 temper or T6 temper condition. The weldability of this age-hardenable Al–7%Si–0.6%Mg casting alloy...

  6. Effect of friction stir welding on microstructure and corrosion behavior of LF6 aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghauri, Faizan Ali; Farooq, A.; Ahmad, A.; Deen, K. M.

    2017-03-01

    The LF6 aluminum alloy plates were joined by friction stir welding method. The tool rotational (1180 rpm) and transverse speed (0.56 mm s-1) were kept constant during welding of 4 mm thick plates. The microstructural features, hardness and tensile properties of the welded samples were determined to evaluate the structural integrity in comparison with the base metal. The electrochemical behavior of base metal (BM), thermo-mechanically affected zone (TMAZ) and weld nugget zone (WNZ) was also investigated by potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in 3.5% NaCl solution. The microstructural study revealed significant grain refinement and agglomeration of β (Mg2Al3) intermetallic precipitates in the WNZ. The relatively higher hardness and a decrease in the ductility (3%) also assured the formation of precipitates β precipitates in the WNZ welded samples. The fracture surface of welded sample also revealed the existence of β precipitates within the elongated dimples which may be considered as the crack initiation sites. The relatively lower corrosion rate (23.68 mpy) and higher charge transfer resistance (403 Ω cm2) of BM compared to WNZ could be associated with the galvanic dissolution of Al-matrix through competitive charge transfer and relaxation (adsorption/desorption of intermediate species) processes specifically at the vicinity of the β precipitates.

  7. An Experimental Evaluation of Electron Beam Welded Thixoformed 7075 Aluminum Alloy Plate Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ava Azadi Chegeni

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Two plates of thixoformed 7075 aluminum alloy were joined using Electron Beam Welding (EBW. A post-welding-heat treatment (PWHT was performed within the semi-solid temperature range of this alloy at three temperatures, 610, 617 and 628 °C, for 3 min. The microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of EB welded plates, as well as the heat-treated specimens, were investigated in the Base Metal (BM, Heat Affected Zone (HAZ, and Fusion Zone (FZ, using optical microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, EDX (Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis, and Vickers hardness test. Results indicated that after EBW, the grain size substantially decreased from 67 µm in both BM and HAZ to 7 µm in the FZ, and a hardness increment was observed in the FZ as compared to the BM and HAZ. Furthermore, the PWHT led to grain coarsening throughout the material, along with a further increase in hardness in the FZ.

  8. A GTA Welding Cooling Rate Analysis on Stainless Steel and Aluminum Using Inverse Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisan dos Santos Magalhaes

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents an analysis of the thermal influence of the heat transfer by convection and radiation during GTA (gas tungsten arc welding process. The authors’ in-house C++ previously-developed code was modified to calculate the amount of heat transfer by convection and radiation. In this software, an iterative Broydon-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno (BFGS inverse method was applied to estimate the amount of heat delivered to the plate when the appropriate sensitivity criteria were defined. The methodology was validated by accomplishing lab-controlled experiments on stainless steel AISI 304L and aluminum 6065 T5 plates. Due to some experimental singularities, the forced thermal convection induced by the electromagnetic field and thermal-capillary force were disregarded. Significant examples of these singularities are the relatively small weld bead when compared to the sample size and the reduced time of the welding process. In order to evaluate the local Nusselt number, empirical correlations for flat plates were used. The thermal emission was a dominant cooling effect on the aluminum cooling. However, it did not present the same behavior as the stainless steel samples. The study found that the heat losses by convection and radiation of the weld pool do not affect the cooling process significantly.

  9. Effect of zirconium addition on welding of aluminum grain refined by titanium plus boron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaid, A. I. O.

    2014-06-01

    Aluminum oxidizes freely in ordinary atmosphere which makes its welding difficult and weak, particularly it solidifies in columnar structure with large grains. Therefore, it is anticipated that the effect of addition of some grain refiners to its melt before solidification is worth while investigating as it may enhance its weldabilty and improve its mechanical strength. In this paper, the effect of addition of zirconium at a weight of 0.1% (which corresponds to the peretictic limit on the aluminum-zirconium base phase diagram) to commercially pure aluminum, grain refined by Ti+B on its weldability, using gas tungsten arc welding, GTAW, method which was formerly known as TIG. A constant current level of 30 AC Ampere was used because it removes the oxides during the welding process. Metallographic examination of the weldments of the different combinations of Al with Al and Al with its microalloys: in the heat affected zone, HAZ, and away from it was carried out and examined for HAZ width, porosity, cracks and microhardness. It was found that grain refining by Ti+B or Zr resulted in enhancement of the weldment.

  10. Identifying Combination of Friction Stir Welding Parameters to Maximize Strength of Lap Joints of AA2014-T6 Aluminum Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendrana C.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available AA2014 aluminum alloy (Al-Cu alloy has been widely utilized in fabrication of lightweight structures like aircraft structures, demanding high strength to weight ratio and good corrosion resistance. The fusion welding of these alloys will lead to solidification problems such as hot cracking. Friction stir welding is a new solid state welding process, in which the material being welded does not melt and recast. Lot of research works have been carried out by many researchers to optimize process parameters and establish empirical relationships to predict tensile strength of friction stir welded butt joints of aluminum alloys. However, very few investigations have been carried out on friction stir welded lap joints of aluminum alloys. Hence, in this investigation, an attempt has been made to optimize friction stir lap welding (FSLW parameters to attain maximum tensile strength using statistical tools such as design of experiment (DoE, analysis of variance (ANOVA, response graph and contour plots. By this method, it is found that maximum tensile shear fracture load of 12.76 kN can be achieved if a joint is made using tool rotational speed of 900 rpm, welding speed of 110 mm/min, tool shoulder diameter of 12 mm and tool tilt angle of 1.5°.

  11. Friction Stir Welding of Age-Hardenable Aluminum Alloys: A Parametric Approach Using RSM Based GRA Coupled With PCA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayan, D.; Rao, V. S.

    2014-04-01

    Age-hardenable aluminum alloys, primarily used in the aerospace, automobile and marine industries (2×××, 6××× and 7×××), can be welded using solid-state welding techniques. Friction stir welding is an emerging solid-state welding technique used to join both similar and dissimilar materials. The strength of a friction stir welded joint depends on the joining process parameters. Therefore, a combination of the statistical techniques of a response surface methodology based on a grey relational analysis coupled to a principal component analysis was proposed to select the process parameters suitable for joining AA 2024 and AA 6061 aluminum alloys via friction stir welding. The significant process parameters, such as rotational speed, welding speed, axial load and pin shapes (PS) were considered during the statistical experiment. The results indicate that the square PS plays a vital role and yields an ultimate tensile strength of 141 MPa for an elongation of 12 % versus cylinder and taper pin profiles. The root cause for joint strength loss and fracture mode was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. Severe material flow during macro defects, such as pin holes and porosity, degrades the joint strength by approximately 44 % for AA 2024 and 51 % for AA 6061 fabricated FS-welded aluminum alloys relative to the base material. The results of this approach are useful for accurately controlling the response and optimize the process parameters.

  12. Evaluation of occupational exposure to toxic metals released in the process of aluminum welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matczak, Wanda; Gromiec, Jan

    2002-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate occupational exposure to welding fumes and its elements on aluminum welders in Polish industry. The study included 52 MIG/Al fume samples and 18 TIG/Al samples in 3 plants. Air samples were collected in the breathing zone of welders (total and respirable dust). Dust concentration was determined gravimetrically, and the elements in the collected dust were determined by AAS. Mean time-weighted average (TWA) concentrations of the welding dusts/fumes and their components in the breathing zone obtained for different welding processes were, in mg/m3: MIG/Al fumes mean 6.0 (0.8-17.8), Al 2.1 (0.1-7.7), Mg 0.2 (TIG/Al fumes 0.7 (0.3-1.4), Al 0.17 (0.07-0.50). A correlation has been found between the concentration of the main components and the fume/dust concentrations in MIG/Al and TIG/Al fumes. Mean percentages of the individual components in MIG/Al fumes/dusts were Al: 30 (9-56) percent; Mg: 3 (1-5.6) percent; Mn: 0.2 (0.1-0.3) percent; Cu: 0.2 (welding methods, the nature of welding-related operations, and work environment conditions.

  13. Heat input effect of friction stir welding on aluminum alloy AA 6061-T6 welded joint

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sedmak, A.; Kumar, R.; Chattopadhyaya, S.; Hloch, Sergej; Tadić, S.; Djurdjević, A. A.; Čeković, I. R.; Dončeva, E.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 2 (2016), s. 637-641 ISSN 0354-9836 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : friction stir welding * defect * heat input * maximum temperature Subject RIV: JQ - Machines ; Tools Impact factor: 1.093, year: 2016 http://www.doiserbia.nb.rs/img/doi/0354-9836/2016/0354-98361500147D.pdf

  14. Welding of aluminum alloys through thermite like reactions in Al-CuO-Ni system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahrami Motlagh, Ehsan, E-mail: ehsan.bahramimotlagh@stu-mail.um.ac.ir [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Engineering Faculty, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, P.O. Box 9177948944, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Vahdati Khaki, Jalil; Haddad Sabzevar, Mohsen [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Engineering Faculty, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, P.O. Box 9177948944, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-04-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Combustion synthesis reactions were utilized for welding of aluminum alloys. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A composite joint reinforced by different intermetallic compounds was obtained. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using metal oxides as a part of raw materials makes the welding process economical. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Furthermore, this process introduces new applications for thermite reactions. - Abstract: In this work, first, a metastable composite powder of '14Al-3CuO-Ni' with a decreased ignition temperature was obtained via Arrested Reactive Milling (ARM), then this exothermic blend was used for welding of 1100 Aluminum alloy. The reactive media and the weld zones were investigated using scanning electron microscope. X-ray diffraction experiment and morphological investigations accompanied with the EDS analyses were carried out in order to evaluate the reactions' products. Vickers microhardness profile across the joint and the shear strength of the joints were determined. The weld zone thickness in each of the parent alloys was measured to be 750 {mu}m, approximately. Results showed that different reactions occurring during the process lead to the in situ formation of different intermetallic compounds such as Al{sub 3}Ni{sub 2} and Al{sub 7}Cu{sub 4}Ni as well as Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles at the interface. Thus, this area has the maximum hardness (80-90 VHN) and the minimum hardness of 35 VHN belongs to the parent alloys. The mean shear strength of the obtained joints was 27 MPa.

  15. Effect of Post Weld Heat Treatment on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Submerged Friction Stir Welded 7A04 Aluminum Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HAO Ya-xin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available 7A04 aluminum alloy plate was jointed by submerged friction stir welding(SFSW, and welded joints were treated (Post Weld Heat Treatment, PWHT, and the effect of post weld heat treatment on the microstructure and mechanical properties in SFSW was investigated. The results show that PWHT joints exhibit dispersively distributed fine precipitates phase morphology, are significantly superior than the feature of the small amount of precipitates with dispersed distribution in SFSW joints. Compared with SFSW joints, the mechanical properties of joints are improved significantly by PWHT. The average hardness of the weld joints nugget zone is increased by 39.7HV, and the tensile strength is increased by 67MPa, reaches 96.1% of the base material, strain hardening capacity of the joints is also enhanced, the tensile fracture exhibits mixed fracture feature of microporous polymerization and cleavage.

  16. Experimental Research on Fatigue Failure for 2219-T6 Aluminum Alloy Friction Stir-Welded Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guo-Qin; Niu, Jiang-Pei; Chen, Ya-Jing; Sun, Feng-Yang; Shang, De-Guang; Chen, Shu-Jun

    2017-08-01

    The fatigue experiment was executed for the 2219-T6 aluminum alloy friction stir-welded joints at the rotation speed of 800 r/min and the welding velocity of 150 mm/min. Most fatigue failures occurred in the weld nugget zone (WNZ), the thermo-mechanical affected zone and the nearby areas. The experimental results demonstrated that the sudden hardness gradient increases sites corresponding to the fatigue failure locations. The high-angle grain boundaries with the highest concentration were scattered within the WNZ. The microcracks initiated at the intersection of the soft grains. More than one crack initiation site was observed within the WNZ and the thermo-mechanical affected zone, when the fracture occurred in these areas. The rough surface of the welding area should be one of the main reasons for the fatigue failure occurrence. The fatigue crack growth rate in the WNZ at the first stage was fastest in comparison with the fatigue crack growth rate in the other areas of the joint.

  17. Direct observation of keyhole plasma characteristics in deep penetration laser welding of aluminum alloy 6016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiangzhong; Zeng, Licheng; Cheng, Yuanyong

    2012-06-01

    Deep penetration laser welding is associated with violent plasma generation which consists of metal vapour, ionized ions and electrons. The plasma resides both outside and inside the keyhole, known as the plasma plume and keyhole plasma, respectively. Plasma plumes have been studied extensively due to the convenience of observing them. However, very little work has been carried out on the investigation of keyhole plasmas. In this paper, a novel experimental set-up is designed to observe the keyhole plasma directly in CW and PW deep penetration laser welding of aluminum alloy 6016. Then on the basis of the experimentally obtained spectra, the electron temperature distribution of the keyhole plasma both in the radial and depth directions of the keyhole is calculated, and the effects of processing parameters such as laser power, welding velocity and defocus on the keyhole plasma temperature are studied. The results show that the electron temperature of the keyhole plasma both in the radial and depth directions is not uniformly distributed. The temperature increases as the laser power increases, decreases as the welding velocity increases and decreases as the location of the laser beam focal point is moved from within to above the keyhole.

  18. Experimental and numerical investigations of hybrid laser arc welding of aluminum alloys in the thick T-joint configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazar Atabaki, M.; Nikodinovski, M.; Chenier, P.; Ma, J.; Liu, W.; Kovacevic, R.

    2014-07-01

    In the present investigation, a numerical finite element model was developed to simulate the hybrid laser arc welding of different aluminum alloys, namely 5××× to 6××× series. The numerical simulation has been considered two double-ellipsoidal heat sources for the gas metal arc welding and laser welding. The offset distance of the metal arc welding and laser showed a significant effect on the molten pool geometry, the heat distribution and penetration depth during the welding process. It was confirmed that when the offset distance is within the critical distance the laser and arc share the molten pool and specific amount of penetration and dilution can be achieved. The models and experiments show that the off-distance between the two heat sources and shoulder width have considerable influence on the penetration depth and appearance of the weld beads. The experiments also indicate that the laser power, arc voltage and type of the filler metal can effectively determine the final properties of the bonds, specifically the bead appearance and microhardness of the joints. The experiments verified the numerical simulation as the thermocouples assist to comprehend the amount of heat distribution on the T-joint coupons. The role of the welding parameters on the mechanism of the hybrid laser welding of the aluminum alloys was also discussed.

  19. Friction stir spot welding of 2024-T3 aluminum alloy with SiC nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paidar, Moslem; Sarab, Mahsa Laali [Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    In this study, the Friction stir spot welding (FSSW) of 2024-T3 aluminum alloy with 1.6 mm thickness was investigated. The effects of the silicon carbide (SiC) nanoparticles on the metallurgical and mechanical properties were discussed. The effects of particles on tension shear and wear tests were also investigated. The process was conducted at a constant rotational speed of 1000 rpm. Results showed that adding SiC nanoparticles to the weld during FSSW had a major effect on the mechanical properties. In fact, the addition of nanoparticles as barriers prevented grain growth in the Stir zone (SZ). The data obtained in the tensile-shear and wear tests showed that tensile-shear load and wear resistance increased with the addition of SiC nanoparticles, which was attributed to the fine grain size produced in the SZ.

  20. Friction Stir Welding of SiC/Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    1999-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a new solid state process for joining metals by plasticizing and consolidating materials around the bond line using thermal energy producing from frictional forces. A feasibility study for FSW of Metal Matrix Composites (MMC) was investigated using aluminum 6092 alloy reinforced with 17% SiC particulates. FSW process consists of a special rotating pin tool that is positioned to plunge into the MMC surface at the bond line. As the tool rotates and move forward along the bond line, the material at the bond line is heated up and forced to flow around the rotating tip to consolidate on the tip's backside to form a solid state joint. FSW has the potential for producing sound welds with MMC because the processing temperature occurs well below the melting point of the metal matrix; thereby eliminating the reinforcement-to-matrix solidification defects, reducing the undesirable chemical reactions and porosity problems.

  1. Influence of friction stir welding parameters on titanium-aluminum heterogeneous lap joining configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picot, Florent; Gueydan, Antoine; Hug, Éric

    2017-10-01

    Lap joining configuration for Friction Stir Welding process is a methodology mostly dedicated to heterogeneous bonding. This welding technology was applied to join pure titanium with pure aluminum by varying the rotation speed and the movement speed of the tool. Regardless of the process parameters, it was found that the maximum strength of the junction remains almost constant. Microstructural observations by means of Scanning Electron Microscopy and Energy Dispersive Spectrometry analysis enable to describe the interfacial join and reveal asymmetric Cold Lap Defects on the sides of the junction. Chemical analysis shows the presence of one exclusive intermetallic compound through the interface identified as TiAl3. This compound is responsible of the crack spreading of the junction during the mechanical loading. The original version of this article supplied to AIP Publishing contained an accidental inversion of the authors, names. An updated version of this article, with the authors names formatted correctly was published on 20 October 2017.

  2. Influence of friction stir welding parameters on titanium-aluminum heterogeneous lap joining configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florent, Picot; Antoine, Gueydan; Éric, Hug

    2017-10-01

    Lap joining configuration for Friction Stir Welding process is a methodology mostly dedicated to heterogeneous bonding. This welding technology was applied to join pure titanium with 1050 aluminum alloy by varying the rotation speed and the movement speed of the tool. Regardless of the process parameters, it was found that the maximum strength of the junction remains almost constant. Microstructural observations by means of Scanning Electron Microscopy and Energy Dispersive Spectrometry analysis enable to describe the interfacial join and reveal asymmetric Cold Lap Defects on the sides of the junction. Chemical analysis shows the presence of one exclusive intermetallic compound through the interface identified as TiAl3. This compound is responsible of the crack spreading of the junction during the mechanical loading.

  3. Inhibition of the formation of intermetallic compounds in aluminum-steel welded joints by friction stir welding; Inhibicion de la formacion de compuestos intermetalicos en juntas aluminio-acero soldadas por friccion-agitacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres Lopez, E. A.; Ramirez, A. J.

    2015-07-01

    Formation of deleterious phases during welding of aluminum and steel is a challenge of the welding processes, for decades. Friction Stir Welding (FSW) has been used in an attempt to reduce formation of intermetallic compounds trough reducing the heat input. In this research, dissimilar joint of 6063-T5 aluminum alloy and AISI-SAE 1020 steel were welded using this technique. The temperature of welded joints was measured during the process. The interface of the welded joints was characterized using optical microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Additionally, composition measurements were carried out by X-EDS and DRX. The experimental results revealed that the maximum temperature on the joint studied is less than 360 degree centigrade. The microstructural characterization in the aluminum-steel interface showed the absence of intermetallic compounds, which is a condition attributed to the use of welding with low thermal input parameters. (Author)

  4. Computational Analysis of Material Flow During Friction Stir Welding of AA5059 Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    interfaces alone. 233Li et al. (Ref 25) carried out a series of FSW experiments 234involving either dissimilar aluminum-alloy grades or alumi - 235num/copper...within the weld region in a 317variety of solid-solution strengthened and age-hardened alumi - 318num- and titanium-based alloys. Since the main emphasis of...o o f U N C O R R E C T E D P R O O F 495 3.2 Material Models 496 3.2.1 Tool Material. FSW tools used for joining alumi - 497 num alloys are typically

  5. Computational Investigation of Hardness Evolution During Friction-Stir Welding of AA5083 and AA2139 Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    M.J. Starink, Precipitates and Intermetallic Phases in 972Precipitation Hardening Al-Cu-Mg-(Li) Based Alloys, Int. Mater. Rev., 9732005, 50, p 193...REPORT Computational Investigation of Hardness Evolution During Friction-Stir Welding of AA5083 and AA2139 Aluminum Alloys 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY...CLASSIFICATION OF: A fully coupled thermo-mechanical finite-element analysis of the friction-stir welding (FSW) process developed in our previous work

  6. Investigations on Laser Beam Welding of Different Dissimilar Joints of Steel and Aluminum Alloys for Automotive Lightweight Construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seffer, Oliver; Pfeifer, Ronny; Springer, André; Kaierle, Stefan

    Due to the enormous potential of weight saving, and the consequential reduction of pollutant emissions, the use of hybrid components made of steel and aluminum alloys is increasing steadily, especially concerning automotive lightweight construction. However, thermal joining of steel and aluminum is still being researched, due to a limited solubility of the binary system of iron and aluminum causing the formation of hard and brittle intermetallic phases, which decrease the strength and the formability of the dissimilar seam. The presented results show the investigation of laser beam welding for joining different dissimilar hybrid components of the steel materials HX220LAD+Z100, 22MnB5+AS150 and 1.4301, as well as the aluminum alloy AA6016-T4 as a lap joint. Among other things, the influences of the energy per unit length, the material grade, the sheet thickness t, the weld type (lap weld, fillet weld) and the arrangement of the base materials in a lap joint (aluminum-sided irradiation, steel-sided irradiation) on the achievable strengths are analyzed. The characterization of the dissimilar joints includes tensile shear tests and metallographic analyses, depending on the energy per unit length.

  7. Characteristics of plasma plume in fiber laser welding of aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ming; Chen, Cong; Hu, Ming; Guo, Lianbo; Wang, Zemin; Zeng, Xiaoyan

    2015-01-01

    To understand the laser-matter interaction in fiber laser welding of aluminum alloys, the effects of laser power on the characteristics of fiber laser induced plasma plume were studied by emission spectroscopic analysis firstly. The plasma characteristic parameters including electron temperature, electron density, ionization degree, and inverse bremsstrahlung linear absorption coefficient were computed according to the spectral data. It was found that the laser power of 5 kW is a turning point. After the laser power reaches 5 kW, the plume changes from a metal vapor dominated weakly ionized plasma to a strongly ionized plasma. The corresponding phenomena are the dramatic increase of the value of characteristic parameters and the appearance of strong plasma shielding effect. The calculation of effective laser power density demonstrated that the plasma shielding effect is dominated by inverse bremsstrahlung absorption. The finding suggested the plasma shielding effect must be considered in fiber laser welding of aluminum alloys, rather than is ignored as claimed in previous view.

  8. Fabrication of Aluminum Foam-Filled Thin-Wall Steel Tube by Friction Welding and Its Compression Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hangai, Yoshihiko; Saito, Masaki; Utsunomiya, Takao; Kitahara, Soichiro; Kuwazuru, Osamu; Yoshikawa, Nobuhiro

    2014-09-19

    Aluminum foam has received considerable attention in various fields and is expected to be used as an engineering material owing to its high energy absorption properties and light weight. To improve the mechanical properties of aluminum foam, combining it with dense tubes, such as aluminum foam-filled tubes, was considered necessary. In this study, an aluminum foam-filled steel tube, which consisted of ADC12 aluminum foam and a thin-wall steel tube, was successfully fabricated by friction welding. It was shown that a diffusion bonding layer with a thickness of approximately 10 μm was formed, indicating that strong bonding between the aluminum foam and the steel tube was realized. By the X-ray computed tomography observation of pore structures, the fabrication of an aluminum foam-filled tube with almost uniform pore structures over the entire specimen was confirmed. In addition, it was confirmed that the aluminum foam-filled steel tube exhibited mechanical properties superior to those of the ADC12 aluminum foam and steel tube. This is considered to be attributed to the combination of the aluminum foam and steel tube, which particularly prevents the brittle fracture and collapse of the ADC12 foam by the steel tube, along with the strong metal bonding between the aluminum foam and the steel tube.

  9. Fabrication of Aluminum Foam-Filled Thin-Wall Steel Tube by Friction Welding and Its Compression Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiko Hangai

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum foam has received considerable attention in various fields and is expected to be used as an engineering material owing to its high energy absorption properties and light weight. To improve the mechanical properties of aluminum foam, combining it with dense tubes, such as aluminum foam-filled tubes, was considered necessary. In this study, an aluminum foam-filled steel tube, which consisted of ADC12 aluminum foam and a thin-wall steel tube, was successfully fabricated by friction welding. It was shown that a diffusion bonding layer with a thickness of approximately 10 μm was formed, indicating that strong bonding between the aluminum foam and the steel tube was realized. By the X-ray computed tomography observation of pore structures, the fabrication of an aluminum foam-filled tube with almost uniform pore structures over the entire specimen was confirmed. In addition, it was confirmed that the aluminum foam-filled steel tube exhibited mechanical properties superior to those of the ADC12 aluminum foam and steel tube. This is considered to be attributed to the combination of the aluminum foam and steel tube, which particularly prevents the brittle fracture and collapse of the ADC12 foam by the steel tube, along with the strong metal bonding between the aluminum foam and the steel tube.

  10. An integrated multiphysics model for friction stir welding of 6061 Aluminum alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Nourani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a new, combined ‘integrated’- ‘multiphysics’ model of friction stir welding (FSW where a set of governing equations from non-Newtonian incompressible fluid dynamics, conductive and convective heat transfer, and plain stress solid mechanics have been coupled for calculating the process variables and material behaviour both during and after welding. More specifically, regarding the multiphysics feature, the model is capable of simultaneously predicting the local distribution, location and magnitude of maximum temperature, strain, and strain rate fields around the tool pin during the process; while for the integrated (post-analysis part, the above predictions have been used to study the microstructure and residual stress field of welded parts within the same developed code. A slip/stick condition between the tool and workpiece, friction and deformation heat source, convection and conduction heat transfer in the workpiece, a solid mechanics-based viscosity definition, and the Zener-Hollomon- based rigid-viscoplastic material properties with solidus cut-off temperature and empirical softening regime have been employed. In order to validate all the predicted variables collectively, the model has been compared to a series of published case studies on individual/limited set of variables, as well as in-house experiments on FSW of aluminum 6061.

  11. Influence of tube spinning on formability of friction stir welded aluminum alloy tubes for hydroforming application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, X.S. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Hu, Z.L., E-mail: zhilihuhit@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Hubei Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology of Automobile Parts, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); State Key Laboratory of Materials Processing and Die and Mould Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (China); Yuan, S.J. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Hua, L. [Hubei Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology of Automobile Parts, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2014-06-01

    Due to economic and ecological reasons, the application of tailor-welded blanks of aluminum alloy has gained more and more attention in manufacturing lightweight structures for automotives and aircrafts. In the study, the research was aimed to highlight the influence of spinning on the formability of FSW tubes. The microstructural characteristics of the FSW tubes during spinning were studied by electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The formability of the FSW tubes with different spinning reduction was assessed by hydraulic bulge test. It is found that the spinning process shows a grain refinement of the tube. The grains of the FSW tube decrease with increasing thickness reduction, and the effect of grain refinement is more obvious for the BM compared to that of the weld. The difference of grain size and precipitates between the weld and BM leads to an asymmetric W-type microhardness distribution after spinning. The higher thickness reduction of the tube, the more uniform distribution of grains and precipitates it shows, and consequently results in more significant increase of strength. As compared with the result of tensile test, the tube after spinning shows better formability when the stress state changes from uniaxial to biaxial stress state.

  12. Aluminum alloy weldability. Identification of weld solidification cracking mechanisms through novel experimental technique and model development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coniglio, Nicolas

    2008-07-01

    The objective of the present thesis is to make advancements in understanding solidification crack formation in aluminum welds, by investigating in particular the aluminum 6060/4043 system. Alloy 6060 is typical of a family of Al-Mg-Si extrusion alloys, which are considered weldable only when using an appropriate filler alloy such as 4043 (Al-5Si). The effect of 4043 filler dilution (i.e. weld metal silicon content) on cracking sensitivity and solidification path of Alloy 6060 welds are investigated. Afterwards, cracking models are developed to propose mechanisms for solidification crack initiation and growth. Cracking Sensitivity. Building upon the concept that silicon improves weldability and that weldability can be defined by a critical strain rate, strain rate-composition combinations required for solidification crack formation in the Al- 6060/4043 system were determined using the newly developed Controlled Tensile Weldability (CTW) test utilizing local strain extensometer measurements. Results, presented in a critical strain rate - dilution map, show a crack - no crack boundary which reveals that higher local strain rates require higher 4043 filler dilution to avoid solidification cracking when arc welding Alloy 6060. Using the established crack - no crack boundary as a line of reference, additional parameters were examined and their influence on cracking characterized. These parameter influences have included studies of weld travel speed, weld pool contaminants (Fe, O, and H), and grain refiner additions (TiAl{sub 3} + Boron). Each parameter has been independently varied and its effect on cracking susceptibility quantified in terms of strain rate - composition combinations. Solidification Path. Solidification path of the Al-6060/4043 system was characterized using thermal analysis and phase identification. Increasing 4043 filler dilution from 0 to 16% in Alloy 6060 arc welds resulted in little effect on thermal arrests and microstructure, no effect on

  13. Design for low-cost gas metal arc weld-based aluminum 3-D printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haselhuhn, Amberlee S.

    Additive manufacturing, commonly known as 3-D printing, has the potential to change the state of manufacturing across the globe. Parts are made, or printed, layer by layer using only the materials required to form the part, resulting in much less waste than traditional manufacturing methods. Additive manufacturing has been implemented in a wide variety of industries including aerospace, medical, consumer products, and fashion, using metals, ceramics, polymers, composites, and even organic tissues. However, traditional 3-D printing technologies, particularly those used to print metals, can be prohibitively expensive for small enterprises and the average consumer. A low-cost open-source metal 3-D printer has been developed based upon gas metal arc weld (GMAW) technology. Using this technology, substrate release mechanisms have been developed, allowing the user to remove a printed metal part from a metal substrate by hand. The mechanical and microstructural properties of commercially available weld alloys were characterized and used to guide alloy development in 4000 series aluminum-silicon alloys. Wedge casting experiments were performed to screen magnesium, strontium, and titanium boride alloying additions in hypoeutectic aluminum-silicon alloys for their properties and the ease with which they could be printed. Finally, the top performing alloys, which were approximately 11.6% Si modified with strontium and titanium boride were cast, extruded, and drawn into wire. These wires were printed and the mechanical and microstructural properties were compared with those of commercially available alloys. This work resulted in an easier-to-print aluminum-silicon-strontium alloy that exhibited lower porosity, equivalent yield and tensile strengths, yet nearly twice the ductility compared to commercial alloys.

  14. Effect of adding powder on joint properties of laser penetration welding for dual phase steel and aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, D. W.; Liu, J. S.; Lu, Y. Z.; Xu, S. H.

    2017-09-01

    The experiments of laser penetration welding for dual phase steel and aluminum alloy were carried out, and the effect of adding Mn or Si powder on mechanical properties and microstructure of the weld was investigated. Some defects, such as spatter, inclusion, cracks and softening in heat affected zone (HAZ), can be avoided in welding joints, and the increased penetration depth is obtained by adding Mn or Si powder. The average tensile-shear strength of Si-added joint is 3.84% higher than that of Mn-added joint, and the strength of both joints exceeds that of no-added joint. In the case of adding Mn powder, small amount of liquid Al is mixed into steel molten pool, and the Al content increases in both sides of the weld, which leads to the increased weld width in aluminum molten pool. Thus, transverse area increases in jointing steel to aluminum, which is significant for the improved tensile-shear strength of joints. As far as adding Si powder is concerned, it is not the case, the enhancement of the joint properties benefits from improvement of metallurgical reaction.

  15. The effect of laser surface melting on microstructure and corrosion behavior of friction stir welded aluminum alloy 2219

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shengchong; Zhao, Yong; Zou, Jiasheng; Yan, Keng; Liu, Chuan

    2017-11-01

    This study aimed to explore the electrochemical properties and microstructure of friction stir welds to understand the correlation between their properties and processing. Friction stir welding is a promising solid-state joining process for high-strength aluminum alloys (AA). Although friction stir welding (FSW) eliminates the problems of fusion welding due to the fact that it is performed below Tm, it causes severe plastic deformation in the material. Some AA welded by FSW exhibit relatively poor corrosion resistance. In this research, the corrosion resistance of such welds was enhanced through laser surface melting. A friction stir weld of AA 2219 was laser melted. The melt depth and microstructure were observed using optical and scanning electron microscopy. The melt zone exhibited epitaxially grown columnar grains. The redistribution of elemental composition was analyzed using energy-dispersive spectroscopy. The anticorrosion properties of both laser-melted and original welds were studied in aqueous 3.5% NaCl solution using cyclic potentiodynamic polarization. The results indicated a noticeable increase in the pitting corrosion resistance after the laser treatment on the surface. The repassivation potential was nobler than the corrosion potential after the laser treatment, confirming that the resistance to pitting growth improved.

  16. Advanced Process Possibilities in Friction Crush Welding of Aluminum, Steel, and Copper by Using an Additional Wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besler, Florian A.; Grant, Richard J.; Schindele, Paul; Stegmüller, Michael J. R.

    2017-12-01

    Joining sheet metal can be problematic using traditional friction welding techniques. Friction crush welding (FCW) offers a high speed process which requires a simple edge preparation and can be applied to out-of-plane geometries. In this work, an implementation of FCW was employed using an additional wire to weld sheets of EN AW5754 H22, DC01, and Cu-DHP. The joint is formed by bringing together two sheet metal parts, introducing a wire into the weld zone and employing a rotating disk which is subject to an external force. The requirements of the welding preparation and the fundamental process variables are shown. Thermal measurements were taken which give evidence about the maximum temperature in the welding center and the temperature in the periphery of the sheet metals being joined. The high welding speed along with a relatively low heat input results in a minimal distortion of the sheet metal and marginal metallurgical changes in the parent material. In the steel specimens, this FCW implementation produces a fine grain microstructure, enhancing mechanical properties in the region of the weld. Aluminum and copper produced mean bond strengths of 77 and 69 pct to that of the parent material, respectively, whilst the steel demonstrated a strength of 98 pct. Using a wire offers the opportunity to use a higher-alloyed additional material and to precisely adjust the additional material volume appropriate for a given material alignment and thickness.

  17. 3-dimensional numerical analysis of friction stir welding of copper and aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleagha, M. E. Aalami; Hadi, Behzad; Shahbazi, Mohammad Ali [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, School of Engineering, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    A time dependent Eulerian thermal/material flow model of friction stir welding was developed and applied to the dissimilar joining of pure copper and aluminum 1050-H16 alloy to investigate the maximum penetration of base metals. Thermal and material flow analysis was done with the assumed velocity field in the stir zone and considering a thermal source of energy obtained from the both Coulomb type of friction and the loss of shear stress in a non-Newtonian viscous behavior of metal flow. The developed model was used to estimate temperature gradient and penetration of material under three different conditions of tool offset and compared with the experimental results. The model shows that the penetration of the base metals is closely related to tool offset. In all of the cases, the metal fixed in the advancing side is copper. Nevertheless, when considering tool offset in the copper side and also when considering tool offset in the aluminum side, penetrating metals are copper and aluminum, respectively. Also, the model shows that the maximum temperature achieved in the base metals significantly depends on the tool offset.

  18. The effect of postprocessing on tensile property and microstructure evolution of friction stir welding aluminum alloy joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Z.L., E-mail: zhilihuhit@163.com [Hubei Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology of Automobile Parts, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); State Key Laboratory of Materials Processing and Die & Mould Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (China); Wang, X.S. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Pang, Q. [School of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Wuhan Donghu University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Huang, F.; Qin, X.P.; Hua, L. [Hubei Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology of Automobile Parts, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2015-01-15

    Friction stir welding is an efficient manufacturing method for joining aluminum alloy and can dramatically reduce grain size conferring excellent plastic deformation properties. Consequently, friction stir welding is used to manufacture tailor welded blanks to optimize weight or performance in the final component. In the study, the microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of friction stir welding joint during plastic forming and subsequent heat treatment were investigated. The microstructural characteristics of the friction stir welding joints were studied by Electron Backscattered Diffraction and Transmission Electron Microscopy. The mechanical properties were evaluated by tensile and microhardness tests. It is found that the tensile and yield strengths of friction stir welding joints are significantly improved after severe plastic deformation due to the grain refinement. Following heat treatment, the strength of the friction stir welding joints significantly decrease due to the obvious abnormal grain growth. Careful attention must be given to the processing route of any friction stir welding joint intended for plastic forming, especially the annealing between forming passes. Severe plastic deforming of the friction stir welding joint leads to a high level of stored energy/dislocation density, which causes the abnormal grain growth during subsequent heat treatment, and consequently reduce the mechanical properties of the friction stir welding joint. - Highlights: • Great changes are observed in the microstructure of FSW joint after postprocessing. • Postprocessing shows great effect on the microstructure stability of FSW joint. • The weld shows more significant decrease in strength than the BM due to the AGG. • Attention must be given to the processing route of FSW joint for plastic forming.

  19. Effect of Rotation Rate on Microstructure and Properties of Underwater Friction Stir Welded 7A04-T6 Aluminum Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Wen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Underwater friction stir welding (FSW on 7A04-T6 aluminum alloy plates was carried out, and the effect of rotation rate on microstructure and mechanical properties of joints was investigated. The results show that the minimum hardness of underwater FSW joints is located in the thermo-mechanically affected zone. The hardness of welded joints at the high rotation rate of 950r/min exhibits W-shaped distribution, and the average hardness value in the nugget zone is higher than that of welded joints at the low rotation rate of 475, 600, 750r/min. When the rotation rate increases from 475r/min to 750r/min with a constant welding speed of 235mm/min, the precipitated phases in the nugget zone gradually become coarse, and the ultimate tensile strength coefficient of the joint decreases from 89.71% to 82.33%; when rotation rate increases to 950r/min, the precipitated phases dissolve into aluminum matrix during welding, and age after welding. This produces the fine and homogeneous dispersed phases, which results in an increase of the strength coefficient to 89.04% and a certain enhancement of strain hardening capacity and elongation for the joints. All the tensile fracture surfaces exhibit the mixed characteristics of microporous polymerization and cleavage fracture.

  20. Optimization of process parameters of aluminum alloy AA 2014-T6 friction stir welds by response surface methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramanjaneyulu Kadaganchi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The heat treatable aluminum–copper alloy AA2014 finds wide application in the aerospace and defence industry due to its high strength-to-weight ratio and good ductility. Friction stir welding (FSW process, an emerging solid state joining process, is suitable for joining this alloy compared to fusion welding processes. This work presents the formulation of a mathematical model with process parameters and tool geometry to predict the responses of friction stir welds of AA 2014-T6 aluminum alloy, viz yield strength, tensile strength and ductility. The most influential process parameters considered are spindle speed, welding speed, tilt angle and tool pin profile. A four-factor, five-level central composite design was used and a response surface methodology (RSM was employed to develop the regression models to predict the responses. The mechanical properties, such as yield strength (YS, ultimate tensile strength (UTS and percentage elongation (%El, are considered as responses. Method of analysis of variance was used to determine the important process parameters that affect the responses. Validation trials were carried out to validate these results. These results indicate that the friction stir welds of AA 2014-T6 aluminum alloy welded with hexagonal tool pin profile have the highest tensile strength and elongation, whereas the joints fabricated with conical tool pin profile have the lowest tensile strength and elongation.

  1. Friction Stir Welding in Wrought and Cast Aluminum Alloys: Weld Quality Evaluation and Effects of Processing Parameters on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yi; Lados, Diana A.

    2017-04-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid-state process widely used for joining similar and dissimilar materials for critical applications in the transportation sector. Understanding the effects of the process on microstructure and mechanical properties is critical in design for structural integrity. In this study, four aluminum alloy systems (wrought 6061-T651 and cast A356, 319, and A390) were processed in both as-fabricated and pre-weld heat-treated (T6) conditions using various processing parameters. The effects of processing and heat treatment on the resulting microstructures, macro-/micro-hardness, and tensile properties were systematically investigated and mechanistically correlated to changes in grain size, characteristic phases, and strengthening precipitates. Tensile tests were performed at room temperature both along and across the welding zones. A new method able to evaluate weld quality (using a weld quality index) was developed based on the stress concentration calculated under tensile loading. Optimum processing parameter domains that provide both defect-free welds and good mechanical properties were determined for each alloy and associated with the thermal history of the process. These results were further related to characteristic microstructural features, which can be used for component design and materials/process optimization.

  2. Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Vocational Education.

    This curriculum guide is designed for use by South Carolina vocational education teachers as a continuing set of lesson plans for a two-year course on welding. Covered in the individual sections of the guide are the following topics: an orientation to welding, oxyacetylene welding, advanced oxyacetylene welding, shielded metal arc welding, TIG…

  3. Modeling, simulation and control of pulsed DE-GMA welding process for joining of aluminum to steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gang; Shi, Yu; Li, Jie; Huang, Jiankang; Fan, Ding

    2014-09-01

    Joining of aluminum to steel has attracted significant attention from the welding research community, automotive and rail transportation industries. Many current welding methods have been developed and applied, however, they can not precisely control the heat input to work-piece, they are high costs, low efficiency and consist lots of complex welding devices, and the generated intermetallic compound layer in weld bead interface is thicker. A novel pulsed double electrode gas metal arc welding(Pulsed DE-GMAW) method is developed. To achieve a stable welding process for joining of aluminum to steel, a mathematical model of coupled arc is established, and a new control scheme that uses the average feedback arc voltage of main loop to adjust the wire feed speed to control coupled arc length is proposed and developed. Then, the impulse control simulation of coupled arc length, wire feed speed and wire extension is conducted to demonstrate the mathematical model and predict the stability of welding process by changing the distance of contact tip to work-piece(CTWD). To prove the proposed PSO based PID control scheme's feasibility, the rapid prototyping experimental system is setup and the bead-on-plate control experiments are conducted to join aluminum to steel. The impulse control simulation shows that the established model can accurately represent the variation of coupled arc length, wire feed speed and the average main arc voltage when the welding process is disturbed, and the developed controller has a faster response and adjustment, only runs about 0.1 s. The captured electric signals show the main arc voltage gradually closes to the supposed arc voltage by adjusting the wire feed speed in 0.8 s. The obtained typical current waveform demonstrates that the main current can be reduced by controlling the bypass current under maintaining a relative large total current. The control experiment proves the accuracy of proposed model and feasibility of new control scheme

  4. Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior of Peened Friction Stir Welded 2195 Aluminum Alloy Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatamleh, Omar; Singh, Preet M.; Garmestani, Hamid

    2009-06-01

    The surface treatment techniques of laser and shot peening were used to investigate their effect on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in friction stir welded (FSW) 2195 aluminum alloy joints. The investigation consisted of two parts: the first part explored the peening effects on slow strain rate testing (SSRT) in a 3.5% NaCl solution, while the second part investigated the effects of peening on corrosion while submerged in a 3.5% NaCl solution with no external loads applied. For the SSRT, the laser-peened samples demonstrated superior properties to the other samples, but no signs of corrosion pitting or SCC were evident on any of the samples. For the second part of the study, the FSW plates were inspected periodically for signs of corrosion. After 60 days there were signs of corrosion pitting, but no stress corrosion cracking was noticed in any of the peened and unpeened samples.

  5. A review of computer aided interpretation technology for the evaluation of radiographs of aluminum welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, J. F., Sr.

    1987-01-01

    Industrial radiography is a well established, reliable means of providing nondestructive structural integrity information. The majority of industrial radiographs are interpreted by trained human eyes using transmitted light and various visual aids. Hundreds of miles of radiographic information are evaluated, documented and archived annually. In many instances, there are serious considerations in terms of interpreter fatigue, subjectivity and limited archival space. Quite often it is difficult to quickly retrieve radiographic information for further analysis or investigation. Methods of improving the quality and efficiency of the radiographic process are being explored, developed and incorporated whenever feasible. High resolution cameras, digital image processing, and mass digital data storage offer interesting possibilities for improving the industrial radiographic process. A review is presented of computer aided radiographic interpretation technology in terms of how it could be used to enhance the radiographic interpretation process in evaluating radiographs of aluminum welds.

  6. A Microstructural Evaluation of Friction Stir Welded 7075 Aluminum Rolled Plate Heat Treated to the Semi-Solid State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ava Azadi Chegeni

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Two rolled plates of 7075 aluminum alloy were used as starting material. The plates were welded using a simultaneous double-sided friction stir welding (FSW process. One way of obtaining feedstock materials for Semi-solid processing or thixoforming is via deformation routes followed by partial melting in the semi-solid state. As both the base plate materials and the friction weld area have undergone extensive deformation specimens were subjected to a post welding heat-treatment in the semi-solid range at a temperature of 628 °C, for 3 min in order to observe the induced microstructural changes. A comparison between the microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of friction stir welded plates was performed before and after the heat-treatment in the Base Metal (BM, the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ, the Thermomechanically Affected Zone (TMAZ and the Nugget Zone (NZ using optical microscopy, Scanning Electron microscopy (SEM and Vickers hardness tests. The results revealed that an extremely fine-grained structure, obtained in the NZ after FSW, resulted in a rise of hardness from the BM to the NZ. Furthermore, post welding heat-treatment in the semi-solid state gave rise to a consistent morphology throughout the material which was similar to microstructures obtained by the thixoforming process. Moreover, a drop of hardness was observed after heat treatment in all regions as compared to that in the welded microstructure.

  7. Microstructural characterization and mechanical properties of dissimilar friction welding of 1060 aluminum to AZ31B magnesium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Zhida; Qin, Guoliang, E-mail: glqin@sdu.edu.cn; Wang, Liyuan; Meng, Xiangmeng; Li, Fei

    2015-10-01

    Dissimilar welding of aluminum bars and magnesium bars was produced by the friction welding technique. The interfacial microstructure characteristics was evaluated after friction welding of Al–Mg alloy using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, as well as X-ray diffraction analysis. Friction and forge pressure were selected as variable parameters. The friction time was maintained at 10 s for a rotational speed of 2800 rpm. The chemical compositions of the interfaces of the welded joints were determined by using energy dispersive spectroscopy. Experimental results showed that intermetallic compounds (IMCs), consisting of phase β-Al{sub 3}Mg{sub 2} and γ-Al{sub 12}Mg{sub 17}, were generated in the interfaces of the Al and Mg alloys. When the friction and forge pressure increased the thickness of IMCs layer at the interfaces decreased as a result of more mass discarded from the welding interfaces. Heavy thickness of IMCs layer seriously deteriorated the mechanical properties of the joints. Microcracks were generated along the welded interfaces of all the welded samples. Formation of microcracks could be controlled effectively under the higher friction and forge pressure. Mechanical evaluations were conducted by determining microhardness and the tensile tests. It was observed that the tensile strength of the joints depended on the friction and forge pressure and the maximum tensile strength was 138 MPa.

  8. Effect of dual laser beam on dissimilar welding-brazing of aluminum to galvanized steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadpour, Masoud; Yazdian, Nima; Yang, Guang; Wang, Hui-Ping; Carlson, Blair; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2018-01-01

    In this investigation, the joining of two types of galvanized steel and Al6022 aluminum alloy in a coach peel configuration was carried out using a laser welding-brazing process in dual-beam mode. The feasibility of this method to obtain a sound and uniform brazed bead with high surface quality at a high welding speed was investigated by employing AlSi12 as a consumable material. The effects of alloying elements on the thickness of intermetallic compound (IMC) produced at the interface of steel and aluminum, surface roughness, edge straightness and the tensile strength of the resultant joint were studied. The comprehensive study was conducted on the microstructure of joints by means of a scanning electron microscopy and EDS. Results showed that a dual-beam laser shape and high scanning speed could control the thickness of IMC as thin as 3 μm and alter the failure location from the steel-brazed interface toward the Al-brazed interface. The numerical simulation of thermal regime was conducted by the Finite Element Method (FEM), and simulation results were validated through comparative experimental data. FEM thermal modeling evidenced that the peak temperatures at the Al-steel interface were around the critical temperature range of 700-900 °C that is required for the highest growth rate of IMC. However, the time duration that the molten pool was placed inside this temperature range was less than 1 s, and this duration was too short for diffusion-control based IMC growth.

  9. Suitability of diecast aluminum for plasma and electron beam welding - gas content of diecast metal and consequences for welding. Eignung von Aluminiumdruckguss zum Plasma- und Elektronenstrahlschweissen - Gasgehalt von Druckguss und Folgen fuer das Schweissen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruge, J.; Lutze, P. (Technische Univ. Braunschweig (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Schweisstechnik)

    1989-05-01

    Due to the gas content caused by manufacture, diecast aluminum tends to a great deal of pore formation when welded. In previous investigations, the cases of gas absorption during diecasting were cleared up and many welding processes were checked for their usability for the jointing of diecastings. Pressure welding and among welding processes plasma and electron beam welding proved to be promising. The physical and chemical bases are dealt with. The various groups of processes are also compared based on the laws found. (orig.).

  10. Mitigating Localized Corrosion Using Thermally Sprayed Aluminum (TSA) Coatings on Welded 25% Cr Superduplex Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, S.; Lu, Q.; Harvey, M. D. F.

    2015-04-01

    Thermally sprayed aluminum (TSA) coating has been increasingly used for the protection of carbon steel offshore structures, topside equipment, and flowlines/pipelines exposed to both marine atmospheres and seawater immersion conditions. In this paper, the effectiveness of TSA coatings in preventing localized corrosion, such as pitting and crevice corrosion of 25% Cr superduplex stainless steel (SDSS) in subsea applications, has been investigated. Welded 25% Cr SDSS (coated and uncoated) with and without defects, and surfaces coated with epoxy paint were also examined. Pitting and crevice corrosion tests, on welded 25% Cr SDSS specimens with and without TSA/epoxy coatings, were conducted in recirculated, aerated, and synthetic seawater at 90 °C for 90 days. The tests were carried out at both the free corrosion potentials and an applied cathodic potential of -1100 mV saturated calomel electrode. The acidity (pH) of the test solution was monitored daily and adjusted to between pH 7.5 and 8.1, using dilute HCl solution or dilute NaOH, depending on the pH of the solution measured during the test. The test results demonstrated that TSA prevented pitting and crevice corrosion of 25% Cr SDSS in artificial seawater at 90 °C, even when 10-mm-diameter coating defect exposing the underlying steel was present.

  11. Low-cycle fatigue of dissimilar friction stir welded aluminum alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, R.I. [The University of Alabama, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Jordon, J.B., E-mail: bjordon@eng.ua.edu [The University of Alabama, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Allison, P.G. [The University of Alabama, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Rushing, T.; Garcia, L. [Engineering Research and Development Center, Army Corps of Engineers, Vicksburg, MS 39180 (United States)

    2016-01-27

    In this work, experiments were conducted to quantify structure-property relations of low-cycle fatigue behavior of dissimilar friction stir welding (FSW) of AA6061-to-AA7050 high strength aluminum alloys. In addition, a microstructure-sensitive fatigue model is employed to further elucidate cause-effect relationships. Experimental strain-controlled fatigue testing revealed an increase in the cyclic strain hardening and the number-of cycles to failure as the tool rotational speed was increased. At higher applied strain amplitudes (>0.3%), the corresponding stress amplitude increased and the plastic strain amplitude decreased, as the number of cycles increased. However, at 0.2% strain amplitude, the plastic strain decreased until it was almost negligible. Inspection of the hysteresis loops demonstrated that at low strain amplitudes, there was an initial stage of strain hardening that increased until it reached a maximum strain hardening level, afterwards a nearly perfect elastic behavior was observed. Under fully-reversed fatigue loading, all samples failed at the region between the heat-affected and thermomechanically-affected zones. Inspection of the fractured surfaces under scanning electron microscopy revealed that the cracks initiated at either the crown or the root surface of the weld, and from secondary intermetallic particles located near the free surface of the weld. Lastly, a microstructure-sensitive multistage fatigue model was employed to correlate the fatigue life of the dissimilar FSW of AA6061-to-AA7050 considering microstructural features such as grain size, intermetallic particles and mechanical properties.

  12. Characterization of disk-laser dissimilar welding of titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V to aluminum alloy 2024

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caiazzo, Fabrizia; Alfieri, Vittorio; Cardaropoli, Francesco; Corrado, Gaetano; Sergi, Vincenzo

    2013-02-01

    Both technical and economic reasons suggest to join dissimilar metals, benefiting from the specific properties of each material in order to perform flexible design. Adhesive bonding and mechanical joining have been traditionally used although adhesives fail to be effective in high-temperature environments and mechanical joining are not adequate for leak-tight joints. Friction stir welding is a valid alternative, even being difficult to perform for specific joint geometries and thin plates. The attention has therefore been shifted to laser welding. Interest has been shown in welding titanium to aluminum, especially in the aviation industry, in order to benefit from both corrosive resistance and strength properties of the former, and low weight and cost of the latter. Titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V and aluminum alloy 2024 are considered in this work, being them among the most common ones in aerospace and automotive industries. Laser welding is thought to be particularly useful in reducing the heat affected zones and providing deep penetrative beads. Nevertheless, many challenges arise in welding dissimilar metals and the aim is further complicated considering the specific features of the alloys in exam, being them susceptible to oxidation on the upper surface and porosity formation in the fused zone. As many variables are involved, a systematic approach is used to perform the process and to characterize the beads referring to their shape and mechanical features, since a mixture of phases and structures is formed in the fused zone after recrystallization.

  13. Multi-Track Friction Stir Lap Welding of 2024 Aluminum Alloy: Processing, Microstructure and Mechanical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengke Zou

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir lap welding (FSLW raises the possibility of fabricating high-performance aluminum components at low cost and high efficiency. In this study, we mainly applied FSLW to fabricate multi-track 2024 aluminum alloy without using tool tilt angle, which is important for obtaining defect-free joint but significantly increases equipment cost. Firstly, systematic single-track FSLW experiments were conducted to attain appropriate processing parameters, and we found that defect-free single-track could also be obtained by the application of two-pass processing at a rotation speed of 1000 rpm and a traverse speed of 300 mm/min. Then, multi-track FSLW experiments were conducted and full density multi-track samples were fabricated at an overlapping rate of 20%. Finally, the microstructure and mechanical properties of the full density multi-track samples were investigated. The results indicated that ultrafine equiaxed grains with the grain diameter about 9.4 μm could be obtained in FSLW samples due to the dynamic recrystallization during FSLW, which leads to a yield strength of 117.2 MPa (17.55% higher than the rolled 2024-O alloy substrate and an elongation rate of 31.05% (113.84% higher than the substrate.

  14. Effect of Friction Stir Welding Parameters on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of AA2024-T4 Aluminum Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. W. El-Morsy

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the effects of rotational and traverse speeds on the 1.5 mm butt joint performance of friction stir welded 2024-T4 aluminum alloy sheets have been investigated. Five rotational speeds ranging from 560 to 1800 rpm and five traverse speeds ranging from 11 to 45 mm/min have been employed. The characterization of microstructure and the mechanical properties (tensile, microhardness, and bending of the welded sheets have been studied. The results reveal that by varying the welding parameters, almost sound joints and high performance welded joints can be successfully produced at the rotational speeds of 900 rpm and 700 rpm and the traverse speed of 35 mm/min. The maximum welding performance of joints is found to be 86.3% with 900 rpm rotational speed and 35 mm/min traverse speed. The microhardness values along the cross-section of the joints show a dramatic drop in the stir zone where the lowest value reached is about 63% of the base metal due to the softening of the welded zone caused by the heat input during joining.

  15. Laser Spot Welding of Copper-aluminum Joints Using a Pulsed Dual Wavelength Laser at 532 and 1064 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stritt, Peter; Hagenlocher, Christian; Kizler, Christine; Weber, Rudolf; Rüttimann, Christoph; Graf, Thomas

    A modulated pulsed laser source emitting green and infrared laser light is used to join the dissimilar metals copper and aluminum. The resultant dynamic welding process is analyzed using the back reflected laser light and high speed video observations of the interaction zone. Different pulse shapes are applied to influence the melt pool dynamics and thereby the forming grain structure and intermetallic phases. The results of high-speed images and back-reflections prove that a modulation of the pulse shape is transferred to oscillations of the melt pool at the applied frequency. The outcome of the melt pool oscillation is shown by the metallurgically prepared cross-section, which indicates different solidification lines and grain shapes. An energy-dispersivex-ray analysis shows the mixture and the resultant distribution of the two metals, copper and aluminum, within the spot weld. It can be seen that the mixture is homogenized the observed melt pool oscillations.

  16. Experimental Determination of Temperature During Rotary Friction Welding of AA1050 Aluminum with AISI 304 Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eder Paduan Alves

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was the temperature monitoring at bonding interface during the rotary friction welding process of dissimilar materials: AA1050 aluminum with AISI 304 stainless steel. As it is directly related to the mechanical strenght of the junction, its experimental determination in real time is of fundamental importance for understanding and characterizing the main process steps, and the definition and optimization of parameters. The temperature gradients were obtained using a system called Thermocouple Data-Logger, which allowed monitoring and recording data in real-time operation. In the graph temperature versus time obtained, the heating rates, cooling were analyzed, and the maximum temperature was determined that occurred during welding, and characterized every phases of the process. The efficiency of this system demonstrated by experimental tests and the knowledge of the temperature at the bonding interface open new lines of research to understand the process of friction welding.

  17. Numerical simulation of spatter formation during fiber laser welding of 5083 aluminum alloy at full penetration condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dongsheng; Hua, Xueming; Huang, Lijin; Zhao, Jiang

    2018-03-01

    The droplet escape condition in laser welding is established in this paper. A three-dimensional numerical model is developed to study the weld pool convection and spatter formation at full penetration during the fiber laser welding of 5083 aluminum alloy. It is found that when laser power is 9 kW, the bottom of the keyhole is dynamically opened and closed. When the bottom of the keyhole is closed, the molten metal at the bottom of the back keyhole wall flows upwards along the fusion line. When the bottom of the keyhole is opened, few spatters can be seen around the keyhole at the top surface, two flow patterns exists in the rear part of the keyhole: a portion of molten metal flows upwards along the fusion line, other portion of molten metal flows to the bottom of the keyhole, which promote the spatter formation at the bottom of the keyhole rear wall.

  18. Effect of Thermal Cycle on the Formation of Intermetallic Compounds in Laser Welding of Aluminum-Steel Overlap Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, J.; Thomy, C.; Vollertsen, F.

    The intermetallic compound (IMC) (or intermetallic phase layer) has a significant influence on the mechanical properties ofjoints between dissimilar metals obtained by thermal processes such as laser welding. Its formation is basically affected by thermal cycles in the joining or contact zone, where the IMC is formed. Within this study, the influence of the thermal cycle on the formation of the IMC during laser welding of an aluminum-steel (Al99.5-DC01) overlap joint was investigated. The temperature was measured directly by a thermocouple, and the weld seam was analyzed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The influence of peak temperature, cooling time and the integral of the thermal cycle on the thickness of the IMC was identified and discussed. It was identified that cooling time has the biggest influence on the thickness of the IMC.

  19. Influence of shielding gas on the mechanical and metallurgical properties of DP-GMA-welded 5083-H321 aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koushki, Amin Reza; Goodarzi, Massoud; Paidar, Moslem

    2016-12-01

    In the present research, 6-mm-thick 5083-H321 aluminum alloy was joined by the double-pulsed gas metal arc welding (DP-GMAW) process. The objective was to investigate the influence of the shielding gas composition on the microstructure and properties of GMA welds. A macrostructural study indicated that the addition of nitrogen and oxygen to the argon shielding gas resulted in better weld penetration. Furthermore, the tensile strength and bending strength of the welds were improved when oxygen and nitrogen (at concentrations as high as approximately 0.1vol%) were added to the shielding gas; however, these properties were adversely affected when the oxygen and nitrogen contents were increased further. This behavior was attributed to the formation of excessive brown and black oxide films on the bead surface, the formation of intermetallic compounds in the weld metal, and the formation of thicker oxide layers on the bead surface with increasing nitrogen and oxygen contents in the argon-based shielding gas. Analysis by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy revealed that most of these compounds are nitrides or oxides.

  20. Lap shear strength and fatigue behavior of friction stir spot welded dissimilar magnesium-to-aluminum joints with adhesive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chowdhury, S.H. [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3 (Canada); Chen, D.L., E-mail: dchen@ryerson.ca [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3 (Canada); Bhole, S.D. [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3 (Canada); Cao, X.; Wanjara, P. [National Research Council Canada Aerospace, 5145 Decelles Avenue, Montreal, Quebec H3T 2B2 (Canada)

    2013-02-01

    Lightweighting is currently considered as an effective way in improving fuel efficiency and reducing anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. The structural applications of lightweight magnesium and aluminum alloys in the aerospace and automotive sectors unavoidably involve welding and joining while guaranteeing the safety and durability of motor vehicles. The objective of this study was to evaluate the lap shear strength and fatigue properties of friction stir spot welded (FSSWed) dissimilar AZ31B-H24 Mg alloy and Al alloy (AA) 5754-O in three combinations, i.e., (top) Al/Mg (bottom), Al/Mg with an adhesive interlayer, and Mg/Al with an adhesive interlayer. For all the dissimilar Mg-to-Al weld combinations, FSSW induced an interfacial layer in the stir zone (SZ) that was composed of intermetallic compounds of Al{sub 3}Mg{sub 2} and Al{sub 12}Mg{sub 17}, which led to an increase in hardness. Both Mg/Al and Al/Mg dissimilar adhesive welds had significantly higher lap shear strength, failure energy and fatigue life than the Al/Mg dissimilar weld without adhesive. Two different types of fatigue failure modes were observed. In the Al/Mg adhesive weld, at high cyclic loads nugget pull-out failure occurred due to fatigue crack propagation circumferentially around the nugget. At low cyclic loads, fatigue failure occurred in the bottom Mg sheet due to the stress concentration of the keyhole leading to crack initiation followed by propagation perpendicular to the loading direction. In the Mg/Al adhesive weld, nugget pull-out failure mode was primarily observed at both high and low cyclic loads.

  1. Aluminum Lithium Alloy 2195 Fusion Welding Improvements with New Filler Wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, C.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this research was to assess the B218 weld filler wire for Super Lightweight External Tank production, which could improve current production welding and repair productivity. We took the following approaches: (1) Perform a repair weld quick look evaluation between 4043/B218 and B218/B218 weld filler wire combinations and evaluation tensile properties for planished and unplanished conditions; and (2) Perform repair weld evaluation on structural simulation panel using 4043-B218 and B218/B218 weld filler wire combinations and evaluation tensile and simulated service fracture properties for planished and unplanished conditions.

  2. Diode lasers for direct application by utilizing a trepanning optic for remote oscillation welding of aluminum and copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritsche, Haro; Müller, Norbert; Ferrario, Fabio; Fetissow, Sebastian; Grohe, Andreas; Hagen, Thomas; Steger, Ronny; Katzemaikat, Tristan; Ashkenasi, David; Gries, Wolfgang

    2017-02-01

    We report the first direct diode laser module integrated with a trepanning optic for remote oscillation welding. The trepanning optic is assembled with a collimated DirectProcess 900 laser engine. This modular laser is based on single emitters and beam combiners to achieve fiber coupled modules with a beam parameter product or BPP design consists in vertically stacking several diodes in the fast axis which leads to a rectangular output of about 100 W with BPP of design principle provides the option to adapt the wavelength configuration to match a broad set of applications, from the UV to the visible and to the far IR depending on the commercial availability of laser diodes. This opens numerous additional applications like laser pumping, scientific and medical applications, as well as materials processing applications such as cutting and welding of copper aluminum or steel. Furthermore, the module's short lead lengths enable very short pulses. Integrated with electronics, the module's pulse width can be adjusted from micro-seconds to cw mode operation by simple software commands. An optical setup can be directly attached instead of a fiber to the laser module thanks to its modular design. This paper's experimental results are based on a trepanning optic attached to the laser module. Alltogether the setup approximately fits in a shoe box and weighs less than 20 kg which allows for direct mounting onto a 3D-gantry system. The oscillating weld performance of the 500 W direct diode laser utilizing a novel trepanning optic is discussed for its application to aluminum/aluminum and aluminum/copper joints.

  3. Forming Limits of Weld Metal in Aluminum Alloys and Advanced High-Strength Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Smith, Mark T.; Grant, Glenn J.; Davies, Richard W.

    2010-10-25

    This work characterizes the mechanical properties of DP600 laser welded TWBs (1 mm-1.5 mm) near and in the weld, as well as their limits of formability. The approach uses simple uniaxial experiments to measure the variability in the forming limits of the weld region, and uses a theoretical forming limit diagram calculation to establish a probabilistic distribution of weld region imperfection using an M-K method approach

  4. Characterization of dynamic behavior of short circuit in pulsed gas metal arc welding of aluminum

    OpenAIRE

    Praveen, P.; Kang, M.J.; K.D.V. P. Yarlagadda

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This paper studies dynamic characteristics of short circuit in the pulsed current gas metal arc welding (GMAW-P).Design/methodology/approach: Welding experiments with different values of pulsing parameter and simultaneous recording of high speed camera pictures and welding signals (such as current and voltage) were used to identify different short circuit conditions in GMAW-P. The investigation is based on the synchronization of welding signals and high speed camera to characterize d...

  5. Influence of surface pretreatment in resistance spot welding of aluminum AA1050

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al Naimi, Ihsan K.; Al Saadi, Moneer H.; Daws, Kasim M.

    2015-01-01

    quality. An experimental study of the influence of pretreatment on weld quality in RSW of AA1050 sheets with three thicknesses, comparing welding of as-received sheet with pretreated sheet by either pickling in NaOH or glass-blasting were investigated. Different weld settings were applied with low...

  6. Numerical Analysis of Crack Progress in Different Areas of a Friction Stir Welded Bead for an 5251 H14 Aluminum Alloy Specimen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Kambouz

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The assemblies welded by Friction Stir Welding have a major advantage which is the absence of a metal filler. This process contributes to the welding of materials that are known to be difficult to weld using the conventional techniques often employed in the field of transport, for example in the automobile body by applying a spot welding. The numerical modeling of this type of process is complex, not only in terms of the variety of physical phenomena which must be considered, but also because of the experimental procedure that must be followed in order to verify and validate numerical predictions. In this work, a finite element model is proposed in order to simulate the crack propagation under monotonic loading in different areas of the weld seam of a strain hardening CT-50 aluminum alloy 5251H14 specimen.

  7. Friction Stir Welding for Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites (MMC's) (Center Director's Discretionary Fund, Project No. 98-09)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. A.; Carter, R. W.; Ding, J.

    1999-01-01

    This technical memorandum describes an investigation of using friction stir welding (FSW) process for joining a variety of aluminum metal matrix composites (MMC's) reinforced with discontinuous silicon-carbide (SiC) particulate and functional gradient materials. Preliminary results show that FSW is feasible to weld aluminum MMC to MMC or to aluminum-lithium 2195 if the SiC reinforcement is <25 percent by volume fraction. However, a softening in the heat-affected zone was observed and is known to be one of the major limiting factors for joint strength. The pin tool's material is made from a low-cost steel tool H-13 material, and the pin tool's wear was excessive such that the pin tool length has to be manually adjusted for every 5 ft of weldment. Initially, boron-carbide coating was developed for pin tools, but it did not show a significant improvement in wear resistance. Basically, FSW is applicable mainly for butt joining of flat plates. Therefore, FSW of cylindrical articles such as a flange to a duct with practical diameters ranging from 2-5 in. must be fully demonstrated and compared with other proven MMC joining techniques for cylindrical articles.

  8. Nondestructive Evaluation of the Friction Weld Process on 2195/2219 Grade Aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suits, Michael W.; Clark, Linda S.; Cox, Dwight E.

    1999-01-01

    In 1996, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center began an ambitious program designed to find alternative methods of repairing conventional TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas) welds and VPPA (Variable Polarity Plasma Arc) welds on the Space Shuttle External Tank without producing additional heat-related anomalies or conditions. Therefore, a relatively new method, invented by The Welding Institute (TWI) in Cambridge, England, called Friction Stir Welding (FSW), was investigated for use in this application, as well as being used potentially as an initial weld process. As with the conventional repair welding processes, nondestructive evaluation (NDE) plays a crucial role in the verification of these repairs. Since it was feared that conventional NDE might have trouble with this type of weld structure (due to shape of nugget, grain structure, etc.) it was imperative that a complete study be performed to address the adequacy of the NDE process. This paper summarizes that process.

  9. Comparison of the Effects of Tool Geometry for Friction Stir Welding Thin Sheet Aluminum Alloys for Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merry, Josh; Takeshita, Jennifer; Tweedy, Bryan; Burford, Dwight

    2006-01-01

    In this presentation, the results of a recent study on the effect of pin tool design for friction stir welding thin sheets (0.040") of aluminum alloys 2024 and 7075 are provided. The objective of this study was to investigate and document the effect of tool shoulder and pin diameter, as well as the presence of pin flutes, on the resultant microstructure and mechanical properties at both room temperature and cryogenic temperature. Specifically, the comparison between three tools will include: FSW process load analysis (tool forces required to fabricate the welds), Static Mechanical Properties (ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, and elongation), and Process window documenting the range of parameters that can be used with the three pin tools investigated. All samples were naturally aged for a period greater than 10 days. Prior research has shown 7075 may require post weld heat treatment. Therefore, an additional pair of room temperature and cryogenic temperature samples was post-weld aged to the 7075-T7 condition prior to mechanical testing.

  10. Ultrasonic Additive Manufacturing: Weld Optimization for Aluminum 6061, Development of Scarf Joints for Aluminum Sheet Metal, and Joining of High Strength Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolcott, Paul J.

    Ultrasonic additive manufacturing (UAM) is a low temperature, solid-state manufacturing process that enables the creation of layered, solid metal structures with designed anisotropies and embedded materials. As a low temperature process, UAM enables the creation of active composites containing smart materials, components with embedded sensors, thermal management devices, and many others. The focus of this work is on the improvement and characterization of UAM aluminum structures, advancing the capabilities of ultrasonic joining into sheet geometries, and examination of dissimilar material joints using the technology. Optimized process parameters for Al 6061 were identified via a design of experiments study indicating a weld amplitude of 32.8 synum and a weld speed of 200 in/min as optimal. Weld force and temperature were not significant within the levels studied. A methodology of creating large scale builds is proposed, including a prescribed random stacking sequence and overlap of 0.0035 in. (0.0889 mm) for foils to minimize voids and maximize mechanical strength. Utilization of heat treatments is shown to significantly increase mechanical properties of UAM builds, within 90% of bulk material. The applied loads during the UAM process were investigated to determine the stress fields and plastic deformation induced during the process. Modeling of the contact mechanics via Hertzian contact equations shows that significant stress is applied via sonotrode contact in the process. Contact modeling using finite element analysis (FEA), including plasticity, indicates that 5000 N normal loads result in plastic deformation in bulk aluminum foil, while at 3000 N no plastic deformation occurs. FEA studies on the applied loads during the process, specifically a 3000 N normal force and 2000 N shear force, show that high stresses and plastic deformation occur at the edges of a welded foil, and base of the UAM build. Microstructural investigations of heat treated foils confirms

  11. Characterization of exposures to airborne nanoscale particles during friction stir welding of aluminum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfefferkorn, Frank E; Bello, Dhimiter; Haddad, Gilbert; Park, Ji-Young; Powell, Maria; McCarthy, Jon; Bunker, Kristin Lee; Fehrenbacher, Axel; Jeon, Yongho; Virji, M Abbas; Gruetzmacher, George; Hoover, Mark D

    2010-07-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is considered one of the most significant developments in joining technology over the last half century. Its industrial applications are growing steadily and so are the number of workers using this technology. To date, there are no reports on airborne exposures during FSW. The objective of this study was to investigate possible emissions of nanoscale (<100 nm) and fine (<1 microm) aerosols during FSW of two aluminum alloys in a laboratory setting and characterize their physicochemical composition. Several instruments measured size distributions (5 nm to 20 microm) with 1-s resolution, lung deposited surface areas, and PM(2.5) concentrations at the source and at the breathing zone (BZ). A wide range aerosol sampling system positioned at the BZ collected integrated samples in 12 stages (2 nm to 20 microm) that were analyzed for several metals using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Airborne aerosol was directly collected onto several transmission electron microscope grids and the morphology and chemical composition of collected particles were characterized extensively. FSW generates high concentrations of ultrafine and submicrometer particles. The size distribution was bimodal, with maxima at approximately 30 and approximately 550 nm. The mean total particle number concentration at the 30 nm peak was relatively stable at approximately 4.0 x 10(5) particles cm(-3), whereas the arithmetic mean counts at the 550 nm peak varied between 1500 and 7200 particles cm(-3), depending on the test conditions. The BZ concentrations were lower than the source concentrations by 10-100 times at their respective peak maxima and showed higher variability. The daylong average metal-specific concentrations were 2.0 (Zn), 1.4 (Al), and 0.24 (Fe) microg m(-3); the estimated average peak concentrations were an order of magnitude higher. Potential for significant exposures to fine and ultrafine aerosols, particularly of Al, Fe, and Zn, during FSW may

  12. Forge Welding of Magnesium Alloy to Aluminum Alloy Using a Cu, Ni, or Ti Interlayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, Hideki; Sumioka, Junji; Kakiuchi, Shigeki; Tomida, Shogo; Takeda, Kouichi; Shimazaki, Kouichi

    2015-08-01

    The forge-welding process was examined to develop a high-strength bonding application of magnesium (Mg) alloy to aluminum (Al) alloy under high-productivity conditions. The effect of the insert material on the tensile strength of the joints, under various preheat temperatures and pressures, was investigated by analyzing the reaction layers of the bonded interface. The tensile strengths resulting from direct bonding, using pure copper (Cu), pure nickel (Ni), and pure titanium (Ti) inserts were 56, 100, 119, and 151 MPa, respectively. The maximum joint strength reached 93 pct with respect to the Mg cast billet. During high-pressure bonding, a microscopic plastic flow occurred that contributed to an anchor effect and the generation of a newly formed surface at the interface, particularly prominent with the Ti insert in the form of an oxide layer. The bonded interfaces of the maximum-strength inserts were investigated using scanning electron microscopy-energy-dispersive spectroscopy and electron probe microanalysis. The diffusion reaction layer at the bonded interface consisted of brittle Al-Mg intermetallics having a thickness of approximately 30 μm. In contrast, for the three inserts, the thicknesses of the diffusion reaction layer were infinitely thin. For the pure Ti insert, exhibiting the maximum tensile strength value among the inserts tested, focused ion beam-transmission electron microscopy-EDS analysis revealed a 60-nm-thick Al-Ti reaction layer, which had formed at the bonded interface on the Mg alloy side. Thus, a high-strength Al-Mg bonding method in air was demonstrated, suitable for mass production.

  13. Numerical Simulation of Mechanical Property of Post Friction Stir Weld Artificial Ageing of Aluminum Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WAN Zhenyu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available KWN model was used to establish the precipitation evolution model of friction stir welding of Al-Mg-Si alloy. The yield strength was divided into three parts:the contribution from grain size, the contribution from solid solution and the contribution from the precipitations. Based on this model, the yield strength and hardness of friction stir weld was predicted. The effect of post weld artificial ageing on mechanical properties of friction stir weld was further investigated. The results indicate that longer holding time can be beneficial to the recovery of mechanical properties in the stirring zone. Higher temperature can lead to quick recovery of mechanical properties in the stirring zone, but when the holding temperature is higher than 200℃, longer holding time can lead the base metal softened, which is harmful to the service of friction stir welds. The mechanical property in the heat affected zone cannot be improved by post weld artificial ageing.

  14. Multiphysics Simulation and Experimental Investigation of Aluminum Wettability on a Titanium Substrate for Laser Welding-Brazing Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan Dal

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The control of metal wettability is a key-factor in the field of brazing or welding-brazing. The present paper deals with the numerical simulation of the whole phenomena occurring during the assembly of dissimilar alloys. The study is realized in the frame of potential applications for the aircraft industry, considering the case of the welding-brazing of aluminum Al5754 and quasi-pure titanium Ti40. The assembly configuration, presented here, is a simplification of the real experiment. We have reduced the three-dimensional overlap configuration to a bi-dimensional case. In the present case, an aluminum cylinder is fused onto a titanium substrate. The main physical phenomena which are considered here are: the heat transfers, the fluid flows with free boundaries and the mass transfer in terms of chemical species diffusion. The numerical problem is implemented with the commercial software Comsol Multiphysics™, by coupling heat equation, Navier-Stokes and continuity equations and the free boundary motion. The latter is treated with the Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian method, with a particular focus on the contact angle implementation. The comparison between numerical and experimental results shows a very satisfactory agreement in terms of droplet shape, thermal field and intermetallic layer thickness. The model validates our numerical approach.

  15. Effect of Sleeve Plunge Depth on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Refill Friction Stir Spot Welding of 2198 Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Yumei; Shi, Yao; Ji, Shude; Wang, Yue; Li, Zhengwei

    2017-10-01

    Refill friction stir spot welding (RFSSW) is a new spot welding technology, by which spot joint without keyhole can be obtained. In this work, RFSSW was used to join 2-mm-thick 2198-T8 aluminum alloy sheets and effects of the sleeve plunge depth on microstructure and lap shear properties of the joints were mainly discussed. Results showed that when using small plunge depths of 2.4 and 2.6 mm, joints showed good formation and no defects were observed. Incomplete refilling defect was observed with increasing plunge depth due to material loss during welding. Size of the grains at sleeve-affected zone (SAZ) is smaller than that at the pin-affected zone, and the size becomes bigger with increasing the plunge depth. More secondary phase particles can be observed at SAZ with increasing the sleeve plunge depth. The lap shear failure load firstly increased and then decreased with increasing the sleeve plunge depth. The maximum failure load of 9819 N was attained with plug fracture mode when using 2.6 mm. Fracture morphologies show ductile fracture mode.

  16. Microstructural Characteristics and Mechanical Properties of Friction Stir Spot Welded 2A12-T4 Aluminum Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huijie Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available 2A12-T4 aluminum alloy was friction stir spot welded, and the microstructural characteristics and mechanical properties of the joints were investigated. A softened microstructural region existed in the joint, and it consisted of stir zone (SZ, thermal mechanically affected zone (TMAZ, and heat affected zone (HAZ. The minimum hardness was located in TMAZ, and the average hardness value in SZ can be improved by appropriately increasing welding heat input. The area of complete bonding region at the interface increased with increasing welding heat input because more interface metals were mixed. In a certain range of FSSW parameters, the tensile shear failure load of the joint increased with increasing rotation speed, but it decreased with increasing plunge rate or decreasing shoulder plunging depth. Two kinds of failure modes, that is, shear fracture mode and tensile-shear mixed fracture mode, can be observed in the tensile shear tests, and the joint that failed in the tensile-shear mixed fracture mode possessed a high carrying capability.

  17. Effect of Sleeve Plunge Depth on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Refill Friction Stir Spot Welding of 2198 Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Yumei; Shi, Yao; Ji, Shude; Wang, Yue; Li, Zhengwei

    2017-09-01

    Refill friction stir spot welding (RFSSW) is a new spot welding technology, by which spot joint without keyhole can be obtained. In this work, RFSSW was used to join 2-mm-thick 2198-T8 aluminum alloy sheets and effects of the sleeve plunge depth on microstructure and lap shear properties of the joints were mainly discussed. Results showed that when using small plunge depths of 2.4 and 2.6 mm, joints showed good formation and no defects were observed. Incomplete refilling defect was observed with increasing plunge depth due to material loss during welding. Size of the grains at sleeve-affected zone (SAZ) is smaller than that at the pin-affected zone, and the size becomes bigger with increasing the plunge depth. More secondary phase particles can be observed at SAZ with increasing the sleeve plunge depth. The lap shear failure load firstly increased and then decreased with increasing the sleeve plunge depth. The maximum failure load of 9819 N was attained with plug fracture mode when using 2.6 mm. Fracture morphologies show ductile fracture mode.

  18. Temperature distribution study during the friction stir welding process of Al2024-T3 aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yau, Y. H.; Hussain, A.; Lalwani, R. K.; Chan, H. K.; Hakimi, N.

    2013-08-01

    Heat flux characteristics are critical to good quality welding obtained in the important engineering alloy Al2024-T3 by the friction stir welding (FSW) process. In the present study, thermocouples in three different configurations were affixed on the welding samples to measure the temperatures: in the first configuration, four thermocouples were placed at equivalent positions along one side of the welding direction; the second configuration involved two equivalent thermocouple locations on either side of the welding path; while the third configuration had all the thermocouples on one side of the layout but with unequal gaps from the welding line. A three-dimensional, non-linear ANSYS computational model, based on an approach applied to Al2024-T3 for the first time, was used to simulate the welding temperature profiles obtained experimentally. The experimental thermal profiles on the whole were found to be in agreement with those calculated by the ANSYS model. The broad agreement between the two kinds of profiles validates the basis for derivation of the simulation model and provides an approach for the FSW simulation in Al2024-T3 and is potentially more useful than models derived previously.

  19. Effect of thermal exposure, forming, and welding on high-temperature, dispersion-strengthened aluminum alloy: Al-8Fe-1V-2Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, J. R.; Gilman, P. S.; Zedalis, M. S.; Skinner, D. J.; Peltier, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of applying conventional hot forming and welding methods to high temperature aluminum alloy, Al-8Fe-1V-2Si (FVS812), for structural applications and the effect of thermal exposure on mechanical properties were determined. FVS812 (AA8009) sheet exhibited good hot forming and resistance welding characteristics. It was brake formed to 90 deg bends (0.5T bend radius) at temperatures greater than or equal to 390 C (730 F), indicating the feasibility of fabricating basic shapes, such as angles and zees. Hot forming of simple contoured-flanged parts was demonstrated. Resistance spot welds with good static and fatigue strength at room and elevated temperatures were readily produced. Extended vacuum degassing during billet fabrication reduced porosity in fusion and resistance welds. However, electron beam welding was not possible because of extreme degassing during welding, and gas-tungsten-arc welds were not acceptable because of severely degraded mechanical properties. The FVS812 alloy exhibited excellent high temperature strength stability after thermal exposures up to 315 C (600 F) for 1000 h. Extended billet degassing appeared to generally improve tensile ductility, fatigue strength, and notch toughness. But the effects of billet degassing and thermal exposure on properties need to be further clarified. The manufacture of zee-stiffened, riveted, and resistance-spot-welded compression panels was demonstrated.

  20. Control of surface defects on plasma-MIG hybrid welds in cryogenic aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hee-Keun; Chun, Kwang-San; Park, Sang-Hyeon; Kang, Chung-Yun

    2015-07-01

    Lately, high production rate welding processes for Al alloys, which are used as LNG FPSO cargo containment system material, have been developed to overcome the limit of installation and high rework rates. In particular, plasma-metal inert gas (MIG) hybrid (PMH) welding can be used to obtain a higher deposition rate and lower porosity, while facilitating a cleaning effect by preheating and post heating the wire and the base metal. However, an asymmetric undercut and a black-colored deposit are created on the surface of PMH weld in Al alloys. For controlling the surface defect formation, the wire feeding speed and nozzle diameter in the PMH weld was investigated through arc phenomena with high-speed imaging and metallurgical analysis.

  1. Control of surface defects on plasma-MIG hybrid welds in cryogenic aluminum alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee-Keun Lee

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Lately, high production rate welding processes for Al alloys, which are used as LNG FPSO cargo containment system material, have been developed to overcome the limit of installation and high rework rates. In particular, plasma-metal inert gas (MIG hybrid (PMH welding can be used to obtain a higher deposition rate and lower porosity, while facilitating a cleaning effect by preheating and post heating the wire and the base metal. However, an asymmetric undercut and a black-colored deposit are created on the surface of PMH weld in Al alloys. For controlling the surface defect formation, the wire feeding speed and nozzle diameter in the PMH weld was investigated through arc phenomena with high-speed imaging and metallurgical analysis.

  2. Mechanical properties of friction stir welded 5083 aluminum alloy at cryogenic temperatures : Study on low temperature materials used in WE-NET 20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eguchi, H.; Ishige, K. [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan). Materials Technology Dept.; Hayashi, M.; Oyama, K.; Fujii, H.; Tanaka, J. [Cryogenic Materials Working Group Task 10 (Japan). WE-NET Program

    2002-07-01

    Using hydrogen conversion, the objective of the World Energy Network (WE-NET) program in Japan is the introduction of an international clean energy network, where liquid hydrogen promises to be the most effective carrier and storage medium. The widespread usage of 5083 aluminum alloy in liquid natural gas tankers makes it one of the candidate materials, since it is exposed to cryogenic temperature down to the 111 Kelvin mark. The fracture toughness of the weld metals prepared by conventional large current metal inert-gas (LC-MIG) arc welding was clarified. It was shown to decrease dramatically at temperatures below 77 Kelvin including 20 Kelvin of liquid hydrogen. The microstructure of the weld metals must be refined to achieve an improvement in their fracture toughness. The existence of numerous reports on fine microstructure in welding part of an aluminum alloy with friction stir welding (FSW) makes it a candidate as a possible solution for their usage. In this paper, the authors discussed and reported on the microstructural characteristics and different mechanical properties at cryogenic temperatures of the FSW and the LC-MIG welding. 2 refs., 1 tab., 11 figs.

  3. High Temperature Plasticity of Bimetallic Magnesium and Aluminum Friction Stir Welded Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regev, Michael; El Mehtedi, Mohamad; Cabibbo, Marcello; Quercetti, Giovanni; Ciccarelli, Daniele; Spigarelli, Stefano

    2014-02-01

    The high temperature deformation of a bimetallic AZ31/AA6061 Friction Stir Welded joint was investigated in the present study by constant load creep experiments carried out at 473 K (200 °C). The microstructural analysis revealed the strongly inhomogeneous nature of the weld, which was characterized by an extremely fine grain size in the magnesium-rich zones and by the extensive presence of intermetallic phases. In the high stress regime, the creep strain was concentrated in the refined and particle-rich microstructure of the weld zone, while the AA6061 base metal remained undeformed. In the low stress regime, deformation became more homogeneously distributed between the AZ31 base metal and the weld zone. The creep behavior of the weld was found to obey the constitutive equation describing the minimum creep rate dependence on applied stress for the base AZ31, slightly modified to take into account the finer microstructure and the role of secondary phase particles, i.e., the retardation of grain growth and the obstruction of grain boundary sliding.

  4. Prediction of corrosion fatigue crack initiation behavior of A7N01P-T4 aluminum alloy welded joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, J.; Chen, J.; Gou, G.; Chen, H.; Wang, W.

    2017-07-01

    Through investigating the corrosion fatigue crack initiation behavior of A7N01P-T4 aluminum alloy welded joints in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution, corrosion fatigue crack initiation life is formulated as Ni = 6.97 × 1012[Δσeqv1.739 - 491.739]-2 and the mechanism of corrosion fatigue crack initiation is proposed. SEM and TEM tests revealed that several corrosion fatigue cracks formed asynchronously and the first crack does not necessarily develop into the leading crack. The uneven reticular dislocations produced by fatigue loading are prone to piling up and tangling near the grain boundaries or the second phases and form the “high dislocation-density region” (HDDR), which acts as an anode in microbatteries and dissolved to form small crack. Thus the etching pits, HDDR near the grain boundaries and second phases are confirmed as the main causes inducing the initiation of fatigue crack.

  5. Biomonitoring for iron, manganese, chromium, aluminum, nickel and cadmium in workers exposed to welding fume: a preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mulyana

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The control of exposure to welding fumes is increasing importance in promoting a healthy, safe and productive work environment. This study is a case-control design, random study was conducted among welder (56 subjects and non welder (39 subjects with more than 1 years experience in the same job task in an automotive parts manufactory within the industrial area at Cikarang in 2013. All subjects were completed physical examination, informed consent and questionnaire. Blood heavy metals were determined by Inductively-Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS. Whole blood iron, manganese, chromium and lead in welder were higher than non-welder, but not different for aluminum, nickel and cadmium. In welder, chromium and manganese correlated with smoking status, cadmium correlated with age and smoking status. In multivariate analysis, wholeblood cadmium correlates with age and smoking status.

  6. Modelling of fluid flow phenomenon in laser+GMAW hybrid welding of aluminum alloy considering three phase coupling and arc plasma shear stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guoxiang; Li, Pengfei; Cao, Qingnan; Hu, Qingxian; Gu, Xiaoyan; Du, Baoshuai

    2018-03-01

    The present study aims to develop a unified three dimensional numerical model for fiber laser+GMAW hybrid welding, which is used to study the fluid flow phenomena in hybrid welding of aluminum alloy and the influence of laser power on weld pool dynamic behavior. This model takes into account the coupling of gas, liquid and metal phases. Laser heat input is described using a cone heat source model with changing peak power density, its height being determined based on the keyhole size. Arc heat input is modeled as a double ellipsoid heat source. The arc plasma flow and droplet transfer are simulated through the two simplified models. The temperature and velocity fields for different laser powers are calculated. The computed results are in general agreement with the experimental data. Both the peak and average values of fluid flow velocity during hybrid welding are much higher than those of GMAW. At a low level of laser power, both the arc force and droplet impingement force play a relatively large role on fluid flow in the hybrid welding. Keyhole depth always oscillates within a range. With an increase in laser power, the weld pool behavior becomes more complex. An anti-clockwise vortex is generated and the stability of keyhole depth is improved. Besides, the effects of laser power on different driving forces of fluid flow in weld pool are also discussed.

  7. Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Earl; And Others

    The curriculum guide for welding instruction contains 16 units presented in six sections. Each unit is divided into the following areas, each of which is color coded: terminal objectives, specific objectives, suggested activities, and instructional materials; information sheet; transparency masters; assignment sheet; test; and test answers. The…

  8. Evaluation of Microstructure, Mechanical Properties and Corrosion Resistance of Friction Stir-Welded Aluminum and Magnesium Dissimilar Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Jagesvar; Taiwade, Ravindra V.; Sapate, Sanjay G.; Patil, Awanikumar P.; Dhoble, Ashwinkumar S.

    2017-10-01

    Microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of dissimilar friction stir-welded aluminum and magnesium alloys were investigated by applying three different rotational speeds at two different travel speeds. Sound joints were obtained in all the conditions. The microstructure was examined by an optical and scanning electron microscope, whereas localized chemical information was studied by energy-dispersive spectroscopy. Stir zone microstructure showed mixed bands of Al and Mg with coarse and fine equiaxed grains. Grain size of stir zone reduced compared to base metals, indicated by dynamic recrystallization. More Al patches were observed in the stir zone as rotational speed increased. X-ray diffraction showed the presence of intermetallics in the stir zone. Higher tensile strength and hardness were obtained at a high rotational speed corresponding to low travel speed. Tensile fractured surface indicated brittle nature of joints. Dissimilar friction stir weld joints showed different behaviors in different corrosive environments, and better corrosion resistance was observed at a high rotational speed corresponding to low travel speed (FW3) in a sulfuric and chloride environments. Increasing travel speed did not significantly affect on microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance as much as the rotational speed.

  9. Evaluation of Microstructure, Mechanical Properties and Corrosion Resistance of Friction Stir-Welded Aluminum and Magnesium Dissimilar Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Jagesvar; Taiwade, Ravindra V.; Sapate, Sanjay G.; Patil, Awanikumar P.; Dhoble, Ashwinkumar S.

    2017-09-01

    Microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of dissimilar friction stir-welded aluminum and magnesium alloys were investigated by applying three different rotational speeds at two different travel speeds. Sound joints were obtained in all the conditions. The microstructure was examined by an optical and scanning electron microscope, whereas localized chemical information was studied by energy-dispersive spectroscopy. Stir zone microstructure showed mixed bands of Al and Mg with coarse and fine equiaxed grains. Grain size of stir zone reduced compared to base metals, indicated by dynamic recrystallization. More Al patches were observed in the stir zone as rotational speed increased. X-ray diffraction showed the presence of intermetallics in the stir zone. Higher tensile strength and hardness were obtained at a high rotational speed corresponding to low travel speed. Tensile fractured surface indicated brittle nature of joints. Dissimilar friction stir weld joints showed different behaviors in different corrosive environments, and better corrosion resistance was observed at a high rotational speed corresponding to low travel speed (FW3) in a sulfuric and chloride environments. Increasing travel speed did not significantly affect on microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance as much as the rotational speed.

  10. Influence of Filler Alloy Composition and Process Parameters on the Intermetallic Layer Thickness in Single-Sided Cold Metal Transfer Welding of Aluminum-Steel Blanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvayeh, Zahra; Vallant, Rudolf; Sommitsch, Christof; Götzinger, Bruno; Karner, Werner; Hartmann, Matthias

    2017-11-01

    Hybrid components made of aluminum alloys and high-strength steels are typically used in automotive lightweight applications. Dissimilar joining of these materials is quite challenging; however, it is mandatory in order to produce multimaterial car body structures. Since especially welding of tailored blanks is of utmost interest, single-sided Cold Metal Transfer butt welding of thin sheets of aluminum alloy EN AW 6014 T4 and galvanized dual-phase steel HCT 450 X + ZE 75/75 was experimentally investigated in this study. The influence of different filler alloy compositions and welding process parameters on the thickness of the intermetallic layer, which forms between the weld seam and the steel sheet, was studied. The microstructures of the weld seam and of the intermetallic layer were characterized using conventional optical light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The results reveal that increasing the heat input and decreasing the cooling intensity tend to increase the layer thickness. The silicon content of the filler alloy has the strongest influence on the thickness of the intermetallic layer, whereas the magnesium and scandium contents of the filler alloy influence the cracking tendency. The layer thickness is not uniform and shows spatial variations along the bonding interface. The thinnest intermetallic layer (mean thickness < 4 µm) is obtained using the silicon-rich filler Al-3Si-1Mn, but the layer is more than twice as thick when different low-silicon fillers are used.

  11. Characterization of Residual Stress Effects on Fatigue Crack Growth of a Friction Stir Welded Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, John A.; Smith, Stephen W.; Seshadri, Banavara R.; James, Mark A.; Brazill, Richard L.; Schultz, Robert W.; Donald, J. Keith; Blair, Amy

    2015-01-01

    An on-line compliance-based method to account for residual stress effects in stress-intensity factor and fatigue crack growth property determinations has been evaluated. Residual stress intensity factor results determined from specimens containing friction stir weld induced residual stresses are presented, and the on-line method results were found to be in excellent agreement with residual stress-intensity factor data obtained using the cut compliance method. Variable stress-intensity factor tests were designed to demonstrate that a simple superposition model, summing the applied stress-intensity factor with the residual stress-intensity factor, can be used to determine the total crack-tip stress-intensity factor. Finite element, VCCT (virtual crack closure technique), and J-integral analysis methods have been used to characterize weld-induced residual stress using thermal expansion/contraction in the form of an equivalent delta T (change in local temperature during welding) to simulate the welding process. This equivalent delta T was established and applied to analyze different specimen configurations to predict residual stress distributions and associated residual stress-intensity factor values. The predictions were found to agree well with experimental results obtained using the crack- and cut-compliance methods.

  12. Investigation of Interface Bonding Mechanism of an Explosively Welded Tri-Metal Titanium/Aluminum/Magnesium Plate by Nanoindentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, T. T.; Wang, W. X.; Zhou, J.; Cao, X. Q.; Yan, Z. F.; Wei, Y.; Zhang, W.

    2017-08-01

    A tri-metal titanium/aluminum/magnesium (Ti/Al/Mg) cladding plate, with an aluminum alloy interlayer plate, was fabricated for the first time by explosive welding. Nanoindentation tests and associated microstructure analysis were conducted to investigate the interface bonding mechanisms of the Ti/Al/Mg cladding plate. A periodic wavy bonding interface (with an amplitude of approximately 30 μm and a wavelength of approximately 160 μm) without a molten zone was formed between the Ti and Al plates. The bonding interface between the Al and the Mg demonstrated a similar wavy shape, but the wave at this location was much larger with an amplitude of approximately 390 μm and a wavelength of approximately 1580 μm, and some localized melted zones also existed at this location. The formation of the wavy interface was found to result from a severe deformation at the interface, which was caused by the strong impact or collision. The nanoindentation tests showed that the material hardness decreased with increasing distance from the bonding interface. Material hardness at a location was found to be correlated with the degree of plastic deformation at that site. A larger plastic deformation was correlated with an increase in hardness.

  13. Numerical Simulation of Temperature Distribution and Material Flow During Friction Stir Welding 2017A Aluminum Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mimouni Oussama

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the use of fluid dynamic code, FLUENT to model the flow of metal in the AA2017A case around the welding tool pin (FSW. A standard threaded tool profile is used for the analysis of phenomena during welding such as heat generation and flow of the material are included. The main objective is to gain a better understanding of the flow of material around a tool. The model showed a large number of phenomena similar to those of the real process. The model has also generated a sufficient amount of heat, which leads to a good estimate of the junction temperature. These results were obtained using a viscosity which is near the solidus softening.

  14. Friction stir processing of nickel aluminum propeller bronze in comparison to fusion welds

    OpenAIRE

    Murray, David L.

    2005-01-01

    Friction Stir Processing (FSP) is currently being considered for use in manufacture of the Navy's NiAl bronze propellers. Incorporating this technology may improve service performance and enable reduction of manufacturing time and cost. This program of research has employed miniature tensile sample designs to examine the distributions of longitudinal properties through the various regimes in a fusion weld. Also, the distributions of both longitudinal and transverse properties throughout t...

  15. Microstructural analysis of cracks generated during welding of 2195 aluminum-lithium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talia, George E.

    1994-01-01

    This research summarizes a series of studies conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center to characterize the properties of 2195 Al-Li alloy. 2195 Al-Li alloy, developed by Martin Marietta laboratories, is designated as a replacement of 2219 Al-Cu alloy for the External Tank (E.T.) of the space shuttle. 2195 Al-Li alloy with its advantage of increased strength per weight over its predecessor, 2219 Al-Cu alloy, also challenges current technology. 2195 Al-Li has a greater tendency to crack than its predecessor. The present study began with the observation of pore formation in 2195 Al-Li alloy in a thermal aging process. In preliminary studies, Talia and Nunes found that most of the two pass welds studied exhibited round and crack-like porosity at the weld roots. Furthermore, the porosity observed was associated with the grain boundaries. The porosity level can be increased by thermal treatment in the air. A solid state reaction proceeding from dendritic boundaries in the weld fusion zone was observed to correlate with the generation of the porosity.

  16. Examination of the physical processes associated with the keyhole region of variable polarity plasma arc welds in aluminum alloy 2219

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Daniel W.

    1987-01-01

    The morphology and properties of the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) weld composite zone are intimately related to the physical processes associated with the keyhole. This study examined the effects of oxide, halide, and sulfate additions to the weld plate on the keyhole and the weld pool. Changes in both the arc plasma character and the bead morphology were correlated to the chemical environment of the weld. Pool behavior was observed by adding flow markers to actual VPPA welds. A low temperature analog to the welding process was developed. The results of the study indicate that oxygen, even at low partial pressures, can disrupt the stable keyhole and weld pool. The results also indicate that the Marangoni surface tension driven flows dominate the weld pool over the range of welding currents studied.

  17. A Case Study for the Welding of Dissimilar EN AW 6082 and EN AW 5083 Aluminum Alloys by Friction Stir Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sefika Kasman

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of keeping constant the tool rotational speed to the welding speed ratio (υ ratio on the mechanical properties of the dissimilar friction stir welding of EN AW6082-T6 and EN AW5083-H111. Two different pins shaped as triangular and pentagonal were associated with the constant υ ratio. From the tensile test results, it was found that the υ ratio does not create an evident change in the weld joint strength. The small cavity- and tunnel-type defects were observed at the nugget zone and located on the advancing side of the pin. These defects caused a decrease in the strength and elongation of the weld joint. The most important inference obtained from the experimental results is that if the υ ratio is kept constant, the weld joint strength for each weld does not correspond to a constant value.

  18. Advanced Welding Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Some of the applications of advanced welding techniques are shown in this poster presentation. Included are brief explanations of the use on the Ares I and Ares V launch vehicle and on the Space Shuttle Launch vehicle. Also included are microstructural views from four advanced welding techniques: Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) weld (fusion), self-reacting friction stir welding (SR-FSW), conventional FSW, and Tube Socket Weld (TSW) on aluminum.

  19. Effect of Surface States on Joining Mechanisms and Mechanical Properties of Aluminum Alloy (A5052 and Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET by Dissimilar Friction Spot Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farazila Yusof

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this research, polyethylene terephthalate (PET, as a high-density thermoplastic sheet, and Aluminum A5052, as a metal with seven distinct surface roughnesses, were joined by friction spot welding (FSW. The effect of A5052’s various surface states on the welding joining mechanism and mechanical properties were investigated. Friction spot welding was successfully applied for the dissimilar joining of PET thermoplastics and aluminum alloy A5052. During FSW, the PET near the joining interface softened, partially melted and adhered to the A5052 joining surface. The melted PET evaporated to form bubbles near the joining interface and cooled, forming hollows. The bubbles have two opposite effects: its presence at the joining interface prevent PET from contacting with A5052, while bubbles or hollows are crack origins that induce crack paths which degrade the joining strength. On the other hand, the bubbles’ flow pushed the softened PET into irregularities on the roughened surface to form mechanical interlocking, which significantly improved the strength. The tensile-shear failure load for an as-received surface (0.31 μ m Ra specimen was about 0.4–0.8 kN while that for the treated surface (>0.31 μ m Ra specimen was about 4.8–5.2 kN.

  20. Effects of laser shock peening on stress corrosion behavior of 7075 aluminum alloy laser welded joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J.T., E-mail: jiasqq1225@126.com [School of Mechanical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); School of Materials Engineering, Jiangsu University of Technology, Changzhou 213001 (China); Zhang, Y.K. [School of Mechanical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); School of Mechanical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China); Chen, J.F.; Zhou, J.Y.; Ge, M.Z.; Lu, Y.L.; Li, X.L. [School of Materials Engineering, Jiangsu University of Technology, Changzhou 213001 (China)

    2015-10-28

    7075 aluminum alloy weldments were processed by an intensive process known as laser shock peening (LSP), meanwhile its stress corrosion behaviors were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) tests. Results showed that the effect of LSP on corrosion behavior of the joint was fairly useful and obvious. With LSP, the elongation, time of fracture and static toughness after the SSRT test were improved by 11.13%, 20% and 100%, respectively. At the same time, the location of the fracture also changed. LSP led to a transition of the fracture type from transgranular to intergranular The reasons for these enhancements of the joint on corrosion behavior were caused by microstructure, residual stress, micro-hardness, and fracture appearance.

  1. Dissimilar Impact Welding of 6111-T4, 5052-H32 Aluminum Alloys to 22MnB5, DP980 Steels and the Structure-Property Relationship of a Strongly Bonded Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bert; Vivek, Anupam; Presley, Michael; Daehn, Glenn S.

    2018-01-01

    The ability to weld high-strength aluminum to high-strength steel is highly desired for vehicle lightweighting but difficult to attain by conventional means. In this work, vaporizing foil actuator welding was used to successfully weld four Al/Fe combinations consisting of high-strength alloys: AA5052-H32, AA6111-T4, DP980, and 22MnB5. Flyer velocities up to 727 m/s were reached using 10 kJ input energy. In lap-shear testing, samples primarily failed in base aluminum near the aluminum's native strength, showing that the welds were stronger than a base metal and that the base metal was not significantly weakened by the welding process. A particularly strong weld area was studied by transmission electron microscopy to shed light on the microstructural features of strong impact welds. It was found to be characterized by a continuously bonded, fully crystalline interface, extremely fine (nanoscale) grains, mesoscopic as well as microscopic wavy features, and lack of large continuous intermetallic compounds.

  2. Submerged-arc welding slags: characterization and leaching strategies for the removal of aluminum and titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annoni, Raquel; Souza, Poliana Santos; Petrániková, Martina; Miskufova, Andrea; Havlík, Tomáš; Mansur, Marcelo Borges

    2013-01-15

    In the present study, submerged-arc welding slags were characterized by applying a variety of methods, including X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, particle size, Raman spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive X-ray analysis. The content of Al proved to be quite similar within neutral and acid slags (10-14%), while that of Ti proved to be much higher in acid slags (approximately 10%) than in neutral slags (<1%). The presence of spinel structures associated with Al species could also be identified in the analyzed samples. This characterization study was accompanied by leaching tests performed under changing operating conditions in an attempt to evaluate to what extent the Al and Ti bearing components could be removed from the slags. The leaching work involved three distinct strategies: (i) NaOH leaching followed by H(2)SO(4) leaching, (ii) acid leaching (HCl and H(2)SO(4)) using oxidizing/reducing agents, and (iii) slag calcination followed by H(2)SO(4) leaching. In the best result, 80% of Al was extracted in one single leaching stage after calcination of the acid slag with NaCl+C at 900 °C. By contrast, the removal of Ti proved to be unsatisfactory. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Numerical analysis of static performance comparison of friction stir welded versus riveted 2024-T3 aluminum alloy stiffened panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Qing; He, Yuting; Zhang, Teng; Wu, Liming

    2014-07-01

    Most researches on the static performance of stiffened panel joined by friction stir welding(FSW) mainly focus on the compression stability rather than shear stability. To evaluate the potential of FSW as a replacement for traditional rivet fastening for stiffened panel assembly in aviation application, finite element method(FEM) is applied to compare compression and shear stability performances of FSW stiffened panels with stability performances of riveted stiffened panels. FEMs of 2024-T3 aluminum alloy FSW and riveted stiffened panels are developed and nonlinear static analysis method is applied to obtain buckling pattern, buckling load and load carrying capability of each panel model. The accuracy of each FEM of FSW stiffened panel is evaluated by stability experiment of FSW stiffened panel specimens with identical geometry and boundary condition and the accuracy of each FEM of riveted stiffened panel is evaluated by semi-empirical calculation formulas. It is found that FEMs without considering weld-induced initial imperfections notably overestimate the static strengths of FSW stiffened panels. FEM results show that, buckling patterns of both FSW and riveted compression stiffened panels represent local buckling of plate between stiffeners. The initial buckling waves of FSW stiffened panel emerge uniformly in each plate between stiffeners while those of riveted panel mainly emerge in the mid-plate. Buckling patterns of both FSW and riveted shear stiffened panels represent local buckling of plate close to the loading corner. FEM results indicate that, shear buckling of FSW stiffened panel is less sensitive to the initial imperfections than compression buckling. Load carrying capability of FSW stiffened panel is less sensitive to the initial imperfections than initial buckling. It can be concluded that buckling loads of FSW panels are a bit lower than those of riveted panels whereas carrying capabilities of FSW panels are almost equivalent to those of riveted

  4. Dissimilar ultrasonic spot welding of aerospace aluminum alloy AA2139 to titanium alloy TiAl6V4

    OpenAIRE

    Prangnell, Philip; Zhang, Chaoqun Q; Robson, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    The microstructure, hardness, lap shear strength and fracture energy of AA2139–TiAl6V4 spot joints produced by ultrasonic welding were investigated and related to the weld thermal cycle. No obvious intermetallic reaction layer was observed in the AA2139–TiAl6V4 welds, even using transmission electron microscopy. The hardness profile of AA2139 side after welding was studied, demonstrating that the heat introduced by the welding process leads to some softening with partial hardness recovery aft...

  5. Double-sided laser beam welded T-joints for aluminum-lithium alloy aircraft fuselage panels: Effects of filler elements on microstructure and mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bing; Tao, Wang; Chen, Yanbin; Li, Hao

    2017-08-01

    In the current work, T-joints consisting of 2.0 mm thick 2060-T8/2099-T83 aluminum-lithium alloys for aircraft fuselage panels have been fabricated by double-sided fiber laser beam welding with different filler wires. A new type wire CW3 (Al-6.2Cu-5.4Si) was studied and compared with conventional wire AA4047 (Al-12Si) mainly on microstructure and mechanical properties. It was found that the main combined function of Al-6.2%Cu-5.4%Si in CW3 resulted in considerable improvements especially on intergranular strength, hot cracking susceptibility and hoop tensile properties. Typical non-dendritic equiaxed zone (EQZ) was observed along welds' fusion boundary. Hot cracks and fractures during the load were always located within the EQZ, however, this typical zone could be restrained by CW3, effectively. Furthermore, changing of the main intergranular precipitated phase within the EQZ from T phase by AA4047 to T2 phase by CW3 also resulted in developments on microscopic intergranular reinforcement and macroscopic hoop tensile properties. In addition, bridging caused by richer substructure dendrites within CW3 weld's columnar zone resulted in much lower hot cracking susceptibility of the whole weld than AA4047.

  6. Building A Simulation Model For The Prediction Of Temperature Distribution In Pulsed Laser Spot Welding Of Dissimilar Low Carbon Steel 1020 To Aluminum Alloy 6061

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousef, Adel K. M.; Taha, Ziad. A.; Shehab, Abeer A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a computer model used to analyze the heat flow during pulsed Nd: YAG laser spot welding of dissimilar metal; low carbon steel (1020) to aluminum alloy (6061). The model is built using ANSYS FLUENT 3.6 software where almost all the environments simulated to be similar to the experimental environments. A simulation analysis was implemented based on conduction heat transfer out of the key hole where no melting occurs. The effect of laser power and pulse duration was studied. Three peak powers 1, 1.66 and 2.5 kW were varied during pulsed laser spot welding (keeping the energy constant), also the effect of two pulse durations 4 and 8 ms (with constant peak power), on the transient temperature distribution and weld pool dimension were predicated using the present simulation. It was found that the present simulation model can give an indication for choosing the suitable laser parameters (i.e. pulse durations, peak power and interaction time required) during pulsed laser spot welding of dissimilar metals.

  7. Combination Effects of Nocolok Flux with Ni Powder on Properties and Microstructures of Aluminum-Stainless Steel TIG Welding-Brazing Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Huan; Lin, Sanbao; Yang, Chunli; Fan, Chenglei; Chen, Zhe

    2013-11-01

    A flux consisting of Nocolok and nickel powder was first applied for TIG welding-brazing of aluminum-stainless steel. Results of tensile and impact tests illustrated that a significant improvement in mechanical properties of the butt joint was obtained with the flux, tensile strength increased from 116 to 158 MPa, and impact energy increased from 3.2 to 6.7 J. Investigation results on microstructures of interfaces and seams suggested that Ni addition significantly decreased the thickness of intermetallic compound (IMC) layer on the interfaces, but did not change the phase structure of Al13Fe4. Furthermore, precipitate phase in the welded seams changed from Al6Fe to Al9FeNi, and the quantity of precipitate phases decreased from 12 to 9% approximately. Finally, effect of Ni powder's addition on the joint was analyzed and discussed. The reduction in the thickness of IMC and quantity of precipitate phases are beneficial to joint properties.

  8. Effect of process parameters on microstructure and mechanical behaviors of friction stir linear welded aluminum to magnesium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, H.M. [Research & Development Division, Hitachi America Ltd., Farmington Hills, MI 48335 (United States); Ghaffari, B. [Research and Advanced Engineering, Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI 48121 (United States); Yuan, W., E-mail: wei.yuan@hitachi-automotive.us [Research & Development Division, Hitachi America Ltd., Farmington Hills, MI 48335 (United States); Jordon, J.B. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Badarinarayan, H. [Research & Development Division, Hitachi America Ltd., Farmington Hills, MI 48335 (United States)

    2016-01-10

    The microstructure and lap-shear behaviors of friction stir linear welded wrought Al alloy AA6022-T4 to cast Mg alloy AM60B joints were examined. A process window was developed to initially identify the potential process conditions. Multitudes of welds were produced by varying the tool rotation rate and tool traverse speed. Welds produced at 1500 revolutions per minute (rpm) tool rotation rate and either 50 mm/min or 75 mm/min tool traverse speed displayed the highest quasi-static failure load of ~3.3 kN per 30 mm wide lap-shear specimens. Analysis of cross sections of untested coupons indicated that the welds made at these optimum welding parameters had negligible microvoids and displayed a favorable weld geometry for the cold lap and hook features at the faying surface, compared to welds produced using other process parameters. Cross sections of the tested coupons indicated that the dominant crack initiated on the advancing side and progressed through the weld nugget, which consists of intermetallic compounds (IMC). This study demonstrates the feasibility of welding wrought Al and cast Mg alloy via friction stir linear welding with promising lap-shear strength results.

  9. Experimental investigation of the degree of weakening in structural notch area of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy sheet welded with the RFSSW method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kubit Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the methodology of the research determining the degree of weakening of the welded sheet obtained by the refill friction stir spot welding (RFSSW method. The considered weakness is the effect of a structural notch resulting from penetration by the tool. RFSSW technology is a relatively new method of joining metals, which can successfully provide an alternative to resistance welding or riveting - traditionally used methods of joining thin-walled structures in the aerospace and automotive industries. The study presented in the paper focuses on the overlapping of sheet metal with 7075-T6 aluminum alloy combined in the configuration: 1.6 mm top sheet and 0.8 mm bottom sheet. Joints were assembled following the following process parameters: Welding time 1.5 s, the tool plunge depth in the range of 1.5 ÷ 1.9 mm, and the spindle speed of 2600 rpm. The analysis of the microstructure of joints revealed that along the edge of the tool path a structural notch is formed, the size and shape of which depend on the parameters applied. The paper describes the study consisting in punching the welded area along the formed notch in the upper sheet. The punching process was performed on a universal testing machine and the punching force was measured during the test. Based on the force value, the degree of sheet weakening in the notched area was determined. The smallest weakening was observed in joints made with the smallest tool depth, i.e. 1.5 mm, whereas the biggest weakening was obtained for tool depth of 1.9 mm. The load applied to the joints was equal to 5290N and 7585N respectively.

  10. Bond and electron beam welding quality control of the aluminum stabilized and reinforced CMS conductor by means of ultrasonic phased-array technology

    CERN Document Server

    Neuenschwander, J; Horváth, I L; Luthi, T; Marti, H

    2002-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is one of the general-purpose detectors to be provided for the LHC project at CERN. The design field of the CMS superconducting magnet is 4 T, the magnetic length is 12.5 m and the free bore is 6 m. The coils for CNIS are wound of aluminum-stabilized Rutherford type superconductors reinforced with high-strength aluminum alloy. For optimum performance of the conductor a void-free metallic bonding between the high-purity aluminum and the Rutherford type cable as well as between the electron beam welded reinforcement and the high-purity aluminum must be guaranteed. It is the main task of this development work to assess continuously the bond quality over the whole width and the total length of the conductors during manufacture. To achieve this goal we use the ultrasonic phased-array technology. The application of multi- element transducers allows an electronic scanning perpendicular to the direction of production. Such a testing is sufficiently fast in order to allow a continuous a...

  11. Effect of welding parameters (plunge depths of shoulder, pin geometry, and tool rotational speed) on the failure mode and stir zone characteristics of friction stir spot welded aluminum 2024-T3 sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paidar, Moslem; Sarab, Mahsa Lali; Taheri, Morteza; Khodabandeh, Alireza [Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of welding parameters on the failure mode and stir zone characteristics of aluminum alloy 2024-T3 joined by friction stir spot welding. The welding parameters in this work are tool rotational speed, plunge depths of shoulder, and pin geometry. In accordance with the methods of previous investigations, the rotational speeds were set to 630 rpm to 2000 rpm. Two pin geometries with concave shoulder were used: triangular and cylindrical. The plunge depths of the shoulder were 0.3, 0.5 and 0.7 mm. The shoulder diameter and pin height for both geometries were 14 and 2.4 mm, respectively. The diameter of the cylindrical and triangular pins was 5 mm. Results show that the parameters mentioned earlier influence fracture mode under tension shear loading. Two different fracture modes were observed during the examinations. Low-penetration depths and low-rotational speeds lead to shear fracture, whereas high values of these factors cause the tension-shear fracture mode. Fracture of the lower sheet sometimes occurs at high rotational speeds.

  12. Exploring the effects of SiC reinforcement incorporation on mechanical properties of friction stir welded 7075 aluminum alloy: Fatigue life, impact energy, tensile strength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahrami, Mohsen, E-mail: Mohsen.bahrami@aut.ac.ir [Faculty of Mining and Metallurgical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology (AUT), Hafez Avenue, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Helmi, Nader [Faculty of Mining and Metallurgical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology (AUT), Hafez Avenue, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dehghani, Kamran [Faculty of Mining and Metallurgical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology (AUT), Hafez Avenue, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Centre of Excellence in Smart Structures and Dynamical Systems (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Givi, Mohammad Kazem Besharati [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-02-10

    In the current research, the role of SiC nano-particles in improving the mechanical properties of friction stir welded (FSWed) 7075 aluminum alloy is investigated. To this end, friction stir welding (FSW) was conducted at 1250 rpm and 40 mm/min. The experiment carried out with and without incorporating SiC nano-particles along the joint line. Cross-sectional microstructures of the joints were characterized employing optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results achieved through X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirmed the presence of SiC powders. Moreover, it was discovered that the volume fraction of the reinforcement particles was 20%. Along with an excellent bonding between SiC nano-particles and aluminum matrix, SEM photograph demonstrated a good dispersion of SiC reinforcements. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) results were also in tight agreement with the recent SEM microstructure. Thanks to the presence of SiC nano-particles, tensile strength, percent elongation, fatigue life, and toughness of the joint improved tremendously. The fracture morphologies were in good agreement with corresponding ductility results.

  13. Artificial neural networks application for modeling of friction stir welding effects on mechanical properties of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, E.

    2015-12-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a relatively new solid-state joining technique that is widely adopted in manufacturing and industry fields to join different metallic alloys that are hard to weld by conventional fusion welding. Friction stir welding is a very complex process comprising several highly coupled physical phenomena. The complex geometry of some kinds of joints makes it difficult to develop an overall governing equations system for theoretical behavior analyse of the friction stir welded joints. Weld quality is predominantly affected by welding effective parameters, and the experiments are often time consuming and costly. On the other hand, employing artificial intelligence (AI) systems such as artificial neural networks (ANNs) as an efficient approach to solve the science and engineering problems is considerable. In present study modeling of FSW effective parameters by ANNs is investigated. To train the networks, experimental test results on thirty AA-7075-T6 specimens are considered, and the networks are developed based on back propagation (BP) algorithm. ANNs testing are carried out using different experimental data that they are not used during networks training. In this paper, rotational speed of tool, welding speed, axial force, shoulder diameter, pin diameter and tool hardness are regarded as inputs of the ANNs. Yield strength, tensile strength, notch-tensile strength and hardness of welding zone are gathered as outputs of neural networks. According to the obtained results, predicted values for the hardness of welding zone, yield strength, tensile strength and notch-tensile strength have the least mean relative error (MRE), respectively. Comparison of the predicted and the experimental results confirms that the networks are adjusted carefully, and the ANN can be used for modeling of FSW effective parameters.

  14. Theoretical Model of the Effect of Crack Tip Blunting on the Ultimate Tensile Strength of Welds in 2219-T87 Aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beil, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    A theoretical model representing blunting of a crack tip radius through diffusion of vacancies is presented. The model serves as the basis for a computer program which calculates changes, due to successive weld heat passes, in the ultimate tensile strength of 2219-T81 aluminum. In order for the model to yield changes of the same order in the ultimate tensile strength as that observed experimentally, a crack tip radius of the order of .001 microns is required. Such sharp cracks could arise in the fusion zone of a weld from shrinkage cavities or decohered phase boundaries between dendrites and the eutectic phase, or, possibly, from plastic deformation due to thermal stresses encountered during the welding process. Microstructural observations up to X2000 (resolution of about .1 micron) did not, in the fusion zone, show structural details which changed significantly under the influence of a heat pass, with the exception of possible small changes in the configuration of the interdendritic eutectic and in porosity build-up in the remelt zone.

  15. X-Ray and Neutron Diffraction Measurements of Dislocation Density and Subgrain Size in a Friction-Stir-Welded Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Wanchuck; Ungár, Tamás; Feng, Zhili; Kenik, Edward; Clausen, Bjørn

    2010-05-01

    The dislocation density and subgrain size were determined in the base material and friction-stir welds of 6061-T6 aluminum alloy. High-resolution X-ray diffraction measurement was performed in the base material. The result of the line profile analysis of the X-ray diffraction peak shows that the dislocation density is about 4.5 × 1014 m-2 and the subgrain size is about 200 nm. Meanwhile, neutron diffraction measurements have been performed to observe the diffraction peaks during friction-stir welding (FSW). The deep penetration capability of the neutron enables us to measure the peaks from the midplane of the Al plate underneath the tool shoulder of the friction-stir welds. The peak broadening analysis result using the Williamson-Hall method shows the dislocation density of about 3.2 × 1015 m-2 and subgrain size of about 160 nm. The significant increase of the dislocation density is likely due to the severe plastic deformation during FSW. This study provides an insight into understanding the transient behavior of the microstructure under severe thermomechanical deformation.

  16. Investigation of plasma arc welding as a method for the additive manufacturing of titanium-(6)aluminum-(4)vanadium alloy components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavinoha, Joe N.

    The process of producing near net-shape components by material deposition is known as additive manufacturing. All additive manufacturing processes are based on the addition of material with the main driving forces being cost reduction and flexibility in both manufacturing and product design. With wire metal deposition, metal is deposited as beads side-by-side and layer-by-layer in a desired pattern to build a complete component or add features on a part. There are minimal waste products, low consumables, and an efficient use of energy and feedstock associated with additive manufacturing processes. Titanium and titanium alloys are useful engineering materials that possess an extraordinary combination of properties. Some of the properties that make titanium advantageous for structural applications are its high strength-to-weight ratio, low density, low coefficient of thermal expansion, and good corrosion resistance. The most commonly used titanium alloy, Ti-6Al-4V, is typically used in aerospace applications, pressure vessels, aircraft gas turbine disks, cases and compressor blades, and surgical implants. Because of the high material prices associated with titanium alloys, the production of near net-shape components by additive manufacturing is an attractive option for the manufacturing of Ti-6Al-4V alloy components. In this thesis, the manufacturing of cylindrical Ti-6Al-4V alloy specimens by wire metal deposition utilizing the plasma arc welding process was demonstrated. Plasma arc welding is a cost effective additive manufacturing technique when compared to other current additive manufacturing methods such as laser beam welding and electron beam welding. Plasma arc welding is considered a high-energy-density welding processes which is desirable for the successful welding of titanium. Metal deposition was performed using a constant current plasma arc welding power supply, flow-purged welding chamber, argon shielding and orifice gas, ERTi-5 filler metal, and Ti-6Al

  17. Aluminum 6060-T6 friction stir welded butt joints: fatigue resistance with different tools and feed rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baragetti, S.; D' Urso, G. [University of Bergamo, Viale Marconi (Italy)

    2014-03-15

    The fatigue behavior of AA6060-T6 friction stir welded butt joints was investigated. The joints were produced by using both a standard and a threaded tri-flute cylindrical-tool with flat shoulder. The friction stir welding process was carried out using different feed rates. Preliminary tensile tests, micrograph analyses and hardness profile measurements across the welds were carried out. Welded and unwelded fatigue samples were tested under axial loading (R = 0.1) with upper limits of 10{sup 4} and 10{sup 5} cycles, using threaded and unthreaded (standard) tools at different feed rates. The best tensile and fatigue performance was obtained using the standard tool at low feed rate.

  18. Microhardness and Strain Field Characterization of Self-Reacting Friction Stir and Plug Welds of Dissimilar Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Karla Renee

    2011-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process with potential advantages for aerospace and automotive industries dealing with light alloys. Self-reacting friction stir welding (SR-FSW) is one variation of the FSW process being developed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for use in the fabrication of propellant tanks. Friction plug welding is used to seal the exit hole that remains in a circumferential SR-FSW. This work reports on material properties and strain patterns developed in a SR-FSW with a friction plug weld. Specifically, this study examines the behavior of a SR-FSW formed between an AA 2014-T6 plate on the advancing side and an AA 2219-T87 plate on the retreating side and a SR-FSW (AA 2014-T6 to AA 2219-T87) with a 2219-T87 plug weld. This study presents the results of a characterization of the micro-hardness, joint strength, and strain field characterization of SR-FSW and FPW joints tested at room temperature and cryogenic temperatures.

  19. Fatigue properties of 6061-T6 aluminum alloy butt joints processed by vacuum brazing and tungsten inert gas welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huei Lin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten inert gas welding and vacuum brazing butt joints of Al–Mg–Si alloy 6061 in the artificially aged condition T6 were studied. Constant amplitude and variable amplitude fatigue loading tests were performed. The experimental S-N curves were compared with the fatigue design curves recommended by the International Institute of Welding, British Standard, and Eurocode 9. Two mean stress correction methods, Goodman and Gerber, were evaluated. In terms of the size effect on the fatigue life, this article proposed an innovational thickness correction method based on the ratio of the ultimate tensile strengths of specimens with different thickness. For vacuum brazing components, the tensile strength–based thickness correction method was better than the thickness correction methods recommended by the International Institute of Welding and Eurocode 9.

  20. Aluminum-Scandium Alloys: Material Characterization, Friction Stir Welding, and Compatibility With Hydrogen Peroxide (MSFC Center Director's Discretionary Fund Final Report, Proj. No. 04-14)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. A.; Chen, P. S.

    2004-01-01

    This Technical Memorandum describes the development of several high-strength aluminum (Al) alloys that are compatible with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) propellant for NASA Hypersonic-X (Hyper-X) vehicles fuel tanks and structures. The yield strengths for some of these Al-magnesium-based alloys are more than 3 times stronger than the conventional 5254-H112 Al alloy, while maintaining excellent H2O2 compatibility similar to class 1 5254 alloy. The alloy development strategy is to add scandium, zirconium, and other transitional metals with unique electrochemical properties, which will not act as catalysts, to decompose the highly concentrated 90 percent H2O2. Test coupons are machined from sheet metals for H2O2 long-term exposure testing and mechanical properties testing. In addition, the ability to weld the new alloys using friction stir welding has also been explored. The new high-strength alloys could represent an enabling material technology for Hyper-X vehicles, where flight weight reduction is a critical requirement.

  1. Intermediate layer, microstructure and mechanical properties of aluminum alloy/stainless steel butt joint using laser-MIG hybrid welding-brazing method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zongtao; Wan, Zhandong; Li, Yuanxing; Xue, Junyu; Hui, Chen

    2017-07-01

    Butt joining of AA6061 aluminum (Al) alloy and 304 stainless steel of 2-mm thickness was conducted using laser-MIG hybrid welding-brazing method with ER4043 filler metal. To promote the mechanical properties of the welding-brazing joints, two kinds of intermediate layers (Al-Si-Mg alloy and Ag-based alloy) are used to adjust the microstructures of the joints. The brazing interface and the tensile strength of the joints were characterized. The results showed that the brazing interface between Al alloy and stainless steel consisted of double layers of Fe2Al5 (near stainless steel) and Fe4Al13 intermetallic compounds (IMCs) with a total thickness of 3.7 μm, when using Al-Si-Mg alloy as the intermediate layer. The brazing interface of the joints using Ag-based alloy as intermediate layer also consists of double IMC layers, but the first layer near stainless steel was FeAl2 and the total thickness of these two IMC layers decreased to 3.1 μm. The tensile strength of the joints using Al-Si-Mg alloy as the intermediate layer was promoted to 149 MPa, which was 63 MPa higher than that of the joints using Al-Si-Mg alloy as the intermediate layer. The fractures occurred in the brazing interface between Al alloy and stainless steel.

  2. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Dissimilar Friction Stir Welding between Ultrafine Grained 1050 and 6061-T6 Aluminum Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yufeng Sun

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The ultrafine grained (UFGed 1050 Al plates with a thickness of 2 mm, which were produced by the accumulative roll bonding technique after five cycles, were friction stir butt welded to 2 mm thick 6061-T6 Al alloy plates at a different revolutionary pitch that varied from 0.5 to 1.25 mm/rev. In the stir zone, the initial nano-sized lamellar structure of the UFGed 1050 Al alloy plate transformed into an equiaxial grain structure with a larger average grain size due to the dynamic recrystallization and subsequent grain growth. However, an equiaxial grain structure with a much smaller grain size was simultaneously formed in the 6061 Al alloy plates, together with coarsening of the precipitates. Tensile tests of the welds obtained at different welding speeds revealed that two kinds of fracture modes occurred for the specimens depending on their revolutionary pitches. The maximum tensile strength was about 110 MPa and the fractures were all located in the stir zone close to the 1050 Al side.

  3. Tensile-Shear Fatigue Behavior of Aluminum and Magnesium Lap-Joints obtained by Ultrasonic Welding and Adhesive Bonding

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carboni, Michele; Moroni, Fabrizio

    2011-01-01

    ...€‹ï€Œï€‡ï€‹ï€… www.elsevier.com/locate/procedia ICM11 Tensile-Shear Fatigue Behavior of Aluminum and Magnesium Lap-Joints obtained by Ultrasonic...

  4. Effects of heat treatment on the intermetallic compounds and mechanical properties of the stainless steel 321-aluminum 1230 explosive-welding interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiran, Mohammadreza Khanzadeh Gharah; Khalaj, Gholamreza; Pouraliakbar, Hesam; Jandaghi, Mohammadreza; Bakhtiari, Hamid; Shirazi, Masoud

    2017-11-01

    The effects of heat treatment on the microstructure and mechanical properties of intermetallic compounds in the interface of stainless steel 321 explosively bonded to aluminum 1230 were investigated in this study. Experimental investigations were performed by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and microhardness and shear tensile strength testing. Prior to heat treatment, increasing the stand-off distance between samples from 1 to 2.5 mm caused their interface to become wavy and the thickness of intermetallic layers to increase from 3.5 to 102.3 μm. The microhardness increased from HV 766 in the sample prepared at a stand-off distance of 1 mm to HV 927 in the sample prepared at a stand-off distance of 2.5 mm; in addition, the sample strength increased from 103.2 to 214.5 MPa. Heat treatment at 450°C for 6 h increased the thickness of intermetallic compound layers to 4.4 and 118.5 μm in the samples prepared at stand-off distances of 1 and 2.5 mm, respectively. These results indicated that increasing the duration and temperature of heat treatment decreased the microhardness and strength of the interface of explosively welded stainless steel 321-Al 1230 and increased the thickness of the intermetallic region.

  5. Microstructure Evolution and Failure Analysis of an Aluminum-Copper Cathode Conductive Head Produced by Explosive Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yanni; Luo, Yongguang; Qu, Hongtao; Zou, Juntao; Liang, Shuhua

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, microstructure evolution and failure analysis of the aluminum-copper interface of cathode conductive heads during their use were studied. The interface morphologies, compositions, conductivity and mechanical properties were investigated and analyzed. Obvious corrosion was found on the surface of the contact interface, which was more prevalent on an Al matrix. The crack increased sharply in the local metallurgical bonding areas on the interface, with the compound volume having no significant change. The phase transformation occurred on the interface during use, which was investigated using the elemental composition and x-ray diffraction pattern. The microhardness near the interface increased accordingly. An obvious electrical conductivity decrease appeared on the Al/Cu interface of the cathode conductive head after use over a specific time interval. Therefore, the deterioration of the microstructures and corrosion are the primary factors that affect the electrical conductivity and effective bonding, which will lead to eventual failure.

  6. Welding Using Chilled-Inert-Gas Purging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcgee, William F.; Rybicki, Daniel J.

    1995-01-01

    Report describes study of fusion welding using chilled inert gas. Marked improvement shown in welding of aluminum using chilled helium gas. Chilling inert gas produces two additional benefits: 1) creation of ultradense inert atmosphere around welds; 2) chilled gas cools metal more quickly down to temperature at which metals not reactive.

  7. Upgraded HFIR Fuel Element Welding System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sease, John D [ORNL

    2010-02-01

    The welding of aluminum-clad fuel plates into aluminum alloy 6061 side plate tubing is a unique design feature of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) fuel assemblies as 101 full-penetration circumferential gas metal arc welds (GMAW) are required in the fabrication of each assembly. In a HFIR fuel assembly, 540 aluminum-clad fuel plates are assembled into two nested annular fuel elements 610 mm (24-inches) long. The welding process for the HFIR fuel elements was developed in the early 1960 s and about 450 HFIR fuel assemblies have been successfully welded using the GMAW process qualified in the 1960 s. In recent years because of the degradation of the electronic and mechanical components in the old HFIR welding system, reportable defects in plate attachment or adapter welds have been present in almost all completed fuel assemblies. In October 2008, a contract was awarded to AMET, Inc., of Rexburg, Idaho, to replace the old welding equipment with standard commercially available welding components to the maximum extent possible while maintaining the qualified HFIR welding process. The upgraded HFIR welding system represents a major improvement in the welding system used in welding HFIR fuel elements for the previous 40 years. In this upgrade, the new inner GMAW torch is a significant advancement over the original inner GMAW torch previously used. The innovative breakthrough in the new inner welding torch design is the way the direction of the cast in the 0.762 mm (0.030-inch) diameter aluminum weld wire is changed so that the weld wire emerging from the contact tip is straight in the plane perpendicular to the welding direction without creating any significant drag resistance in the feeding of the weld wire.

  8. Perspective on Double Pulsed Gas Metal Arc Welding

    OpenAIRE

    Leilei Wang; Jiaxiang Xue

    2017-01-01

    Aluminum alloy welding suffers from problems such as solidification cracking and hydrogen-induced porosity, which are sufficiently severe to limit its potential applications. Because mitigated porosity incidence and solidification cracking are observed in aluminum welds using double pulsed gas metal arc welding (DP-GMAW), a comprehensive review of the mechanism is necessary, but absent from the literature. The oscillation of arc force and droplet pressure causes a weld pool stir effect. The e...

  9. Study on Pores in Ultrasonic‐Assisted TIG Weld of  Aluminum Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qihao Chen

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasonic‐assisted tungsten inert gas welding was carried out on a thin plate of 2195 Al‐Li alloy, and the characteristics of the weld pores were analyzed in terms of their size and porosity. The effects of welding speed and ultrasonic power on the porosity and size of the pores were investigated. The pores were found to occur primarily adjacent to the surface of the weld. The porosity decreased and the size increased with a decrease in welding speed. The effect of ultrasonic power on the characteristics of the pores was different from that of the welding speed. The porosity and size of the pores decreased and then increased with an increase in ultrasonic power. A relationship was found between the transient cavitation intensity and the characteristics of pores. An increasing transient cavitation intensity results in a decrease in the porosity and size of pores when the transient cavitation intensity is lower. However, it can result in an increase in the porosity and pore size when the transient cavitation intensity further increases. Finally, the influencing mechanism of cavitation on welding pores was discussed.

  10. The Study on the Overall Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation for 6061–7075 Dissimilar Aluminum Alloy Welded Parts Based on the Dielectric Breakdown Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaocun; Zhou, Jixue; Liu, Hongtao; Yang, Yuansheng

    2018-01-01

    Electrical connection of dissimilar metals will lead to galvanic corrosion. Therefore, overall surface treatment is necessary for the protection of dissimilar metal welded parts. However, serious unbalanced reactions may occur during overall surface treatment, which makes it difficult to prepare integral coating. In this paper, an overall ceramic coating was fabricated by plasma electrolytic oxidation to wrap the 6061–7075 welded part integrally. Moreover, the growth mechanism of the coating on different areas of the welded part was studied based on the dielectric breakdown theory. The reaction sequence of each area during the treatment was verified through specially designed dielectric breakdown tests. The results showed that the high impedance overall of ceramic coating can inhibit the galvanic corrosion of the 6061–7075 welded part effectively. PMID:29301306

  11. Effects of welding parameters on the mechanical properties of inert gas welded 6063 Aluminium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ertan, Taner [MAKO Corporation (Turkey); Uguz, Agah [Uludag Univ. (Turkey). Mechnical Engineering Dept.; Ertan, Rukiye

    2012-07-01

    The influence of welding parameters, namely welding current and gas flow rate, on the mechanical properties of Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) and Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) welded 6063 Aluminum alloy (AA 6063) has been investigated. In order to study the effect of the welding current and gas flow rate, microstructural examination, hardness measurements and room temperature tensile tests have been carried out. The experimental results show that the mechanical properties of GTAW welded joints have better mechanical properties than those of SMAW welded joints. Increasing the welding current appeared to have a beneficial effect on the mechanical properties. However, either increasing or decreasing the gas flow rate resulted in a decrease of hardness and tensile strength. It was also found that, the highest strength was obtained in GTAW welded samples at 220 A and 15 l/min gas flow rate.

  12. Simulation of Weld Mechanical Behavior to Include Welding-Induced Residual Stress and Distortion: Coupling of SYSWELD and Abaqus Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    2011, Vol. 88, pg. 45-56. 7. Z.H. Guo, X.Y. Ou, G.W. Shuai, and Y.H. Chen, Numerical Simulation of Temperature Field for TIG Welding of Aluminum Alloy...Memorandum Simulation of Weld Mechanical Behavior to Include Welding -Induced Residual Stress and Distortion: Coupling of SYSWELD and Abaqus Codes... Weld Mechanical Behavior to Include Welding -Induced Residual Stress and Distortion: Coupling of SYSWELD and Abaqus Codes by Charles R. Fisher

  13. Simulation of Weld Mechanical Behavior to Include Welding Induced Residual Stress and Distortion: Coupling of SYSWELD and Abaqus Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    2011, Vol. 88, pg. 45-56. 7. Z.H. Guo, X.Y. Ou, G.W. Shuai, and Y.H. Chen, Numerical Simulation of Temperature Field for TIG Welding of Aluminum Alloy...Memorandum Simulation of Weld Mechanical Behavior to Include Welding -Induced Residual Stress and Distortion: Coupling of SYSWELD and Abaqus Codes... Weld Mechanical Behavior to Include Welding -Induced Residual Stress and Distortion: Coupling of SYSWELD and Abaqus Codes by Charles R. Fisher

  14. Joining of beryllium by braze welding technique: preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banaim, P.; Abramov, E. [Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beersheba (Israel); Zalkind, S.; Eden, S.

    1998-01-01

    Within the framework of some applications, there is a need to join beryllium parts to each other. Gas Tungsten Arc Braze Welds were made in beryllium using 0.3 mm commercially Aluminum (1100) shim preplaced at the joint. The welds exhibited a tendency to form microcracks in the Fusion Zone and Heat Affected Zone. All the microcracks were backfilled with Aluminum. (author)

  15. Modelling of damage development and ductile failure in welded joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kim Lau

    conducted ([P1], [P2], [P7]-[P9]). The focus in the thesis is on FS-welded 2xxx and 6xxx series of aluminum alloys, which are attractive, for example, to the aerospace industry, since the 2024 aluminum in particular, is typically classified as un-weldable by conventional fusion welding techniques. Secondly...

  16. Friction Stir Welding of Steel Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The friction stir welding process has been developed primarily for the welding of aluminum alloys. Other higher melting allows such, as steels are much more difficult to join. Special attention must be given to pin tool material selection and welding techniques. This paper addresses the joining of steels and other high melting point materials using the friction stir welding process. Pin tool material and welding parameters will be presented. Mechanical properties of weldments will also be presented. Significance: There are many applications for the friction stir welding process other than low melting aluminum alloys. The FSW process can be expanded for use with high melting alloys in the pressure vessel, railroad and ship building industries.

  17. Variable-Polarity Plasma Arc Welding Of Alloy 2219

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Daniel W.; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Report presents results of study of variable-polarity plasma arc (VPPA) welding of aluminum alloy 2219. Consists of two parts: Examination of effects of microsegregation and transient weld stress on macrosegregation in weld pool and, electrical characterization of straight- and reverse-polarity portions of arc cycle.

  18. Behavior of aluminum in aluminum welders and manufacturers of aluminum sulfate--impact on biological monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riihimäki, Vesa; Valkonen, Sinikka; Engström, Bernt; Tossavainen, Antti; Mutanen, Pertti; Aitio, Antero

    2008-12-01

    The suitability of determining aluminum in serum or urine as a form of biological monitoring was critically assessed. Airborne and internal aluminum exposure was assessed for 12 aluminum welders in a shipyard and 5 manufacturers of aluminum sulfate. Particles were characterized with X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Aluminum in air and biological samples was analyzed using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Basic toxicokinetic features were inferred from the data. The mean 8-hour time-weighted average concentration of aluminum was 1.1 (range 0.008-6.1) mg/m(3) for the shipyard and 0.13 (range 0.02-0.5) mg/m(3) for the aluminum sulfate plant. Welding fume contained aluminum oxide particles aluminum sulfate particles ranged from 1 to 10 microm in diameter. The shipyard welders' mean postshift serum and urinary concentrations of aluminum (S-Al and U-Al, respectively) were 0.22 and 3.4 micromol/l, respectively, and the aluminum sulfate workers' corresponding values were 0.13 and 0.58 micromol/l. Between two shifts, the welders' S-Al concentration decreased by about 50% (Paluminum sulfate workers. After aluminum welding at the shipyard had ceased, the median S-Al concentration decreased by about 50% (P=0.007) within a year, but there was no change (P=0.75) in the corresponding U-Al concentration. About 1% of aluminum in welding fume appears to be rapidly absorbed from the lungs, whereas an undetermined fraction is retained and forms a lung burden. A higher fractional absorption of aluminum seems possible for aluminum sulfate workers without evidence of a lung burden. After rapid absorption, aluminum is slowly mobilized from the lung burden and dominates the S-Al and U-Al concentrations of aluminum welders. For kinetic reasons, S-Al or U-Al concentrations cannot be used to estimate the accumulation of aluminum in the target organs of toxicity. However, using U-Al analysis to monitor aluminum welders' lung burden seems practical.

  19. Fatigue and Damage Tolerance of Friction Stir Welded Joints for Aerospace Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lemmen, H.J.K.

    2010-01-01

    Friction stir welding is a young welding process with high potential to replace riveted joints in aerospace structures like the fuselage. Friction stir welding is a robust process and capable of welding high strength aluminum alloys. Therefore it can lead to both costs and weight savings. To

  20. Study of a fiber laser assisted friction stir welding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casalino, G.; Campanelli, S.; Ludovico, A. D.; Contuzzi, N.; Angelastro, A.

    2012-03-01

    Friction stir welding is a relatively new joining technique. This technique, which is considered a derivative of the more common friction welding method, was developed mainly for aluminum and its alloys. In recent years, this method has been used to join various other alloys. FSW has many advantages, including the following: the welding procedure is relatively simple with no consumables or filler metal; joint edge preparation is not needed; oxide removal prior to welding is unnecessary; high joint strength has been achieved in aluminum and magnesium alloys; FSW can be used with alloys that cannot be fusion welded due to crack sensitivity. The drawbacks of FSW include the need for powerful fixtures to clamp the workpiece to the welding table, the high force needed to move the welding tool forward, the relatively high wear rate of the welding tool, and weld speeds in FSW are slower, which can lead to longer process times. To overcome these drawbacks, a fiber laser-assisted friction stir welding system was designed (FLAFSW). The system combined a conventional commercial friction machine and a fiber pumped laser system. The scope is to investigate the influence of the laser assistance on the weld quality. A number of different aluminum plates, which are still mentioned to be difficult to be joint as intermetallic phases appear during melting welding techniques, were used. The evaluation of quality was performed through analysis of appearance, mechanical and microstructure characterization of the weld.

  1. Welding Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This competency-based curriculum guide is a handbook for the development of welding trade programs. Based on a survey of Alaskan welding employers, it includes all competencies a student should acquire in such a welding program. The handbook stresses the importance of understanding the principles associated with the various elements of welding.…

  2. Plasma arc welding, equipment, installation and process control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuershbach, P. W.

    1985-02-01

    The plasma arc welding (PAW) process can achieve the highest power density of all the conventional arc welding processes and has advantages over laser beam welding (LBW) and electron beam welding (EBW). Power density is an independent variable which can be precisely controlled. The combination of high orifice gas flowrates and arc current pulsation increases weld penetration for thin section partial penetration PAW welds. Contaminants (i.e., oxygen, water vapor) in the orifice gas system are important for stable operation of the pilot arc as is the concentric alignment of the electrode within the nozzle bore. Due to a refractory oxide skin, high heat input is necessary to weld aluminum with conventional arc processes. LBW has not proven practical. Low current ac PAW with 0.035 in. thick aluminum produced small welds with a good depth-to-width ratio.

  3. Aluminum automotive space frames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    Design of aluminum structures is to a new topic. Aircraft makers have successfully solved difficult structural problems with a high degree of understanding and reliability. Other transportation modes such as trucks, trailers, and railcars have faced structural problems with some emphasis on high- and low-cycle fatigue of welded aluminum structures. However, the automotive market places stringent engineering demands on materials and superimposes demanding cost constraints. A project was instituted at Reynolds Metals Co. to investigate the opportunities for the cost-effective application of aluminum to automotive spaceframes. Several areas were recognized as key to the success of this application. They were: equivalent or superior structural stiffness of the assembly to existing steel unibody and/or steel spaceframe vehicles; effective joining of spaceframe members; equivalent or superior crashworthiness of the assembly; weight savings; flexibility; and low-cost approach aimed at effective manufacturing. To gain experience with the key aspects in a practical environment, the experience of current builders of steel tube frame chassis was explored. These chassis are typically used in low-volume vehicles requiring torsional stiffness, excellent crashworthiness, and exterior body-style flexibility. A model was developed using finite element methods that accurately predicts mass and stiffness of frames. An effective aluminum space frame was generated which was 7.5% stiffer and more than 20% lighter than the steel frame, with stresses kept below the fatigue limit for aluminum welds.

  4. WOOD WELDING

    OpenAIRE

    Marcos Theodoro Muller; Rafael Rodolfo de Melo; Diego Martins Stangerlin

    2010-01-01

    The term "wood welding" designates what can be defined as "welding of wood surfaces". This new process, that it provides the joint of wood pieces without the use of adhesives or any other additional material, provokes growing interest in the academic environment, although it is still in laboratorial state. Linear friction welding induced bymechanical vibration yields welded joints of flat wood surfaces. The phenomenon of the welding occurs in less time than 10 seconds, with the temperature in...

  5. Design of Friction Stir Spot Welding Tools by Using a Novel Thermal-Mechanical Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zheng-Ming; Qiu, Qi-Hong; Lin, Pai-Chen

    2016-08-09

    A simple thermal-mechanical model for friction stir spot welding (FSSW) was developed to obtain similar weld performance for different weld tools. Use of the thermal-mechanical model and a combined approach enabled the design of weld tools for various sizes but similar qualities. Three weld tools for weld radii of 4, 5, and 6 mm were made to join 6061-T6 aluminum sheets. Performance evaluations of the three weld tools compared fracture behavior, microstructure, micro-hardness distribution, and welding temperature of welds in lap-shear specimens. For welds made by the three weld tools under identical processing conditions, failure loads were approximately proportional to tool size. Failure modes, microstructures, and micro-hardness distributions were similar. Welding temperatures correlated with frictional heat generation rate densities. Because the three weld tools sufficiently met all design objectives, the proposed approach is considered a simple and feasible guideline for preliminary tool design.

  6. Global and Local Mechanical Properties and Microstructure of Friction Stir Welds with Dissimilar Materials and/or Thicknesses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zadpoor, A.A.; Sinke, J.; Benedictus, R.

    2010-01-01

    This article studies the properties of a wide range of friction-stir-welded joints with dissimilar aluminum alloys or thicknesses. Two aluminum alloys, namely, 2024-T3 and 7075-T6, are selected for the study and are welded in ten different combinations of alloys and thicknesses. The welding

  7. Advanced Welding Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Four advanced welding techniques and their use in NASA are briefly reviewed in this poster presentation. The welding techniques reviewed are: Solid State Welding, Friction Stir Welding (FSW), Thermal Stir Welding (TSW) and Ultrasonic Stir Welding.

  8. Effects of process parameters on microstructure and mechanical properties of friction stir lap linear welded 6061 aluminum alloy to NZ30K magnesium alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Tan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The microstructures and lap-shear behaviors of friction stir lap linear welded as-extruded 6061 Al alloy to as-cast Mg–3.0Nd–0.2Zn–0.7Zr (wt.% (NZ30K alloy joints were examined. Various tool rotation and travel speeds were adopted to prepare the joints. The analysis of temperature field indicates that the peak temperature for each sample can reach 450 °C, which exceeds the eutectic reaction temperatures of 437 °C and 450 °C according to the binary phase diagram of Al–Mg system. The fierce intermixing can be found at the interface between Al and Mg alloys, forming the intermetallic of Al3Mg2. Welds with the rotation speed of 900 rpm and travel speed of 120 mm/min display the highest tensile shear failure load of about 2.24 kN. The value was increased by 13% after the sample was heat treated at 400 °C for 0.5 h.

  9. Melting Efficiency During Plasma Arc Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, J.C.; Evans, D. M.; Tang, W.; Nunes, A. C.

    1999-01-01

    A series of partial penetration Variable Polarity Plasma Arc welds were made at equal power but various combinations of current and voltage on 2219 aluminum. Arc Efficiency was measured calorimetrically and ranged between 48% and 66%. Melting efficiency depends on the weld pool shape. Increased current increases the melting efficiency as it increases the depth to width ratio of the weld pool. Higher currents are thought to raise arc pressure and depress the liquid at the bottom of the weld pool causing a more nearly two dimensional heat flow condition.

  10. Resistance welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Zhang, Wenqi; Rasmussen, Mogens H.

    2003-01-01

    Resistance welding comprises not only the well known spot welding process but also more complex projection welding operations, where excessive plastic deformation of the weld point may occur. This enables the production of complex geometries and material combinations, which are often not possible...... to weld by traditional spot welding operations. Such joining processes are, however, not simple to develop due to the large number of parameters involved. Development has traditionally been carried out by large experimental investigations, but the development of a numerical programme system has changed...

  11. Automatic orbital GTAW welding: Highest quality welds for tomorrow's high-performance systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henon, B. K.

    1985-01-01

    Automatic orbital gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) or TIG welding is certain to play an increasingly prominent role in tomorrow's technology. The welds are of the highest quality and the repeatability of automatic weldings is vastly superior to that of manual welding. Since less heat is applied to the weld during automatic welding than manual welding, there is less change in the metallurgical properties of the parent material. The possibility of accurate control and the cleanliness of the automatic GTAW welding process make it highly suitable to the welding of the more exotic and expensive materials which are now widely used in the aerospace and hydrospace industries. Titanium, stainless steel, Inconel, and Incoloy, as well as, aluminum can all be welded to the highest quality specifications automatically. Automatic orbital GTAW equipment is available for the fusion butt welding of tube-to-tube, as well as, tube to autobuttweld fittings. The same equipment can also be used for the fusion butt welding of up to 6 inch pipe with a wall thickness of up to 0.154 inches.

  12. Fatique Resistant, Energy Efficient Welding Program, Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egland, Keith; Ludewig, Howard

    2006-05-25

    The program scope was to affect the heat input and the resultant weld bead geometry by synchronizing robotic weave cycles with desired pulsed waveform shapes to develop process parameters relationships and optimized pulsed gas metal arc welding processes for welding fatique-critical structures of steel, high strength steel, and aluminum. Quality would be addressed by developing intelligent methods of weld measurement that accurately predict weld bead geometry from process information. This program was severely underfunded, and eventually terminated. The scope was redirected to investigate tandem narrow groove welding of steel butt joints during the one year of partial funding. A torch was designed and configured to perform a design of experiments of steel butt weld joints that validated the feasability of the process. An initial cost model estimated a 60% cost savings over conventional groove welding by eliminating the joint preparation and reducing the weld volume needed.

  13. Developments of electrical joints for aluminum-stabilized superconducting cables

    CERN Document Server

    Curé, B

    1999-01-01

    Electrical joints for the aluminum-stabilized conductors of the LHC experiment magnets have been studied. Two techniques have been tested: electron beam welding and MIG welding. The joint resistance was measured as a function of the magnetic field on ring shaped samples using the MA.RI.S.A. test facility, wherein current is induced in the test conductor by a varying magnetic field. The resistance is obtained by measuring either the voltage drop or the decay time. Calculation and finite-element simulation have been performed in order to separate the effect of both the copper-aluminum contact resistivity and the aluminum resistivity from the effect due to the joint technique (joint configuration, resistivity of the filler material, increasing of aluminum resistivity in the welding zone). The copper-aluminum contact resistivity and the current transfer length were obtained by measurements of the joint resistance of butt welded samples. (2 refs).

  14. Influence of the welding parameters on the heat affected zone for aluminium welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meseguer-Valdenebro José L.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work analyzes the Heat Affected Zone in an aluminum alloy welded assembly using the Metal Inert Gas welding technique. Making use of numerical simulations of the involved thermal processes, the aluminum alloy cooling curve is calculated and the extension of the Heat Affected Zone is evaluated. The connection between this last parameter, the cooling rate, and the maximum obtained temperature is assessed. Additionally, the response surface method is exploited to fit the dependence of the Heat Affected Zone with the welding parameters and to optimize these parameters in order to minimize that region.

  15. União de juntas dissimilares alumínio-aço de chapas finas pelo processo de soldagem por atrito com pino não consumível (SAPNC Dissimilar joint of aluminum-steel thin sheet by friction stir welding process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwar Andrés Torres

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Foram obtidas juntas dissimilares da liga de alumínio 6063-T5 e do aço AISI SAE 1020 com espessura de 2,0 mm soldadas por atrito com pino não consumível. O objetivo deste trabalho é avaliar o efeito da penetração e o deslocamento da ferramenta na obtenção de juntas soldadas Al-aço. As juntas foram avaliadas segundo a qualidade da superfície e a profundidade da região soldada. Foi determinado que além das velocidades de rotação (ω e avanço (ν, o deslocamento e a profundidade de penetração da ferramenta são parâmetros fundamentais, pois definem o aporte térmico e, com este, a aderência ou não de alumínio na ferramenta, a qualidade superficial e a formação de defeitos ao longo da linha da junta.Aluminum alloy 6063-T5 and AISI SAE 1020 were obtained with dissimilar welded joints by friction stir welding in 2.0 mm thick sheet. The aim was to evaluate the effect of welding parameters to obtain Al-steel welds. Joints were evaluated according to surface quality and depth of the welded region. It was determined that besides the rotational (ω and forward (ν speeds, the offset and the tool penetration are key parameters because they define the heat input and therefore the adherence of aluminum in the tool, the surface quality and defect formation along the joint line.

  16. Welding Technician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ken

    2009-01-01

    About 95% of all manufactured goods in this country are welded or joined in some way. These welded products range in nature from bicycle handlebars and skyscrapers to bridges and race cars. The author discusses what students need to know about careers for welding technicians--wages, responsibilities, skills needed, career advancement…

  17. Braze welding of cobalt with a silver–copper filler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everett M. Criss

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method of joining cobalt by braze-welding it with a silver–copper filler was developed in order to better understand the residual stresses in beryllium–aluminum/silicon weldments which are problematic to investigate because of the high toxicity of Be. The base and filler metals of this new welding system were selected to replicate the physical properties, crystal structures, and chemical behavior of the Be–AlSi welds. Welding parameters of this surrogate Co–AgCu system were determined by experimentation combining 4-point bending tests and microscopy. Final welds are 5 pass manual TIG (tungsten inert gas, with He top gas and Ar back gas. Control of the welding process produces welds with full penetration melting of the cobalt base. Microscopy indicates that cracking is minimal, and not through thickness, whereas 4-point bending shows failure is not by base-filler delamination. These welds improve upon the original Be–AlSi welds, which do not possess full penetration, and have considerable porosity. We propose that utilization of our welding methods will increase the strength of the Be–AlSi weldments. The specialized welding techniques developed for this study may be applicable not only for the parent Be–AlSi welds, but to braze welds and welds utilizing brittle materials in general. This concept of surrogacy may prove useful in the study of many different types of exotic welds.

  18. Femtosecond fiber laser welding of dissimilar metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huan; Yang, Lih-Mei; Bai, Shuang; Liu, Jian

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, welding of dissimilar metals was demonstrated for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, by using a high-energy high-repetition-rate femtosecond fiber laser. Metallurgical and mechanical properties were investigated and analyzed under various processing parameters (pulse energy, repetition rate, and welding speed). Results showed that the formation of intermetallic brittle phases and welding defects could be effectively reduced. Strong welding quality with more than 210 MPa tensile strength for stainless steel-aluminum and 175 MPa tensile strength for stainless steel-magnesium has been demonstrated. A minimal heat affected zone and uniform and homogenous phase transformation in the welding region have been demonstrated. This laser-welding technique can be extended for various applications in semiconductor, automobile, aerospace, and biomedical industries.

  19. Welding rework data acquisition and automation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romine, Peter L.

    1996-01-01

    Aluminum-Lithium is a modern material that NASA MSFC is evaluating as an option for the aluminum alloys and other aerospace metals presently in use. The importance of aluminum-lithium is in it's superior weight to strength characteristics. However, aluminum-lithium has produced many challenges in regards to manufacturing and maintenance. The solution to these problems are vital to the future uses of the shuttle for delivering larger payloads into earth orbit and are equally important to future commercial applications of aluminum-lithium. The Metals Processes Branch at MSFC is conducting extensive tests on aluminum-lithium which includes the collection of large amounts of data. This report discusses the automation and data acquisition for two processes: the initial weld and the repair. The new approach reduces the time required to collect the data, increases the accuracy of the data, and eliminates several types of human errors during data collection and entry. The same material properties that enhance the weight to strength characteristics of aluminum-lithium contribute to the problems with cracks occurring during welding, especially during the repair/rework process. The repairs are required to remove flaws or defects discovered in the initial weld, either discovered by x-ray, visual inspection, or some other type of nondestructive evaluation. It has been observed that cracks typically appear as a result of or beyond the second repair. MSFC scientists have determined that residual mechanical stress introduced by the welding process is a primary cause of the cracking. Two obvious solutions are to either prevent or minimize the stress introduced during the welding process, or remove or reduce the stress after the welding process and MSFC is investigating both of these.

  20. Laser welding of selected aerospace alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebadan, Gracie E.

    The study was aimed at developing an understanding of the microstructural effects of the laser welding process on the alloys, and assessing the structural integrity of the resultant welds. The effect of laser processing parameters such as laser power, laser beam traverse speed, lens focal length, and the manipulation of these parameters on the welding efficiency and weld area integrity was also investigated. Other tasks within the project included a study on the possibility of using an anodic film to enhance the laser weld ability of Al 6061. Finally, attempts were made to identify phases observed in the weld area of the composite materials. Nimonics C263 and PE11 exhibited laser welds free of cracks and porosity. The difference in composition between the two alloys did not result in any significant dissimilarities in their response to the laser welding process. The welds in both alloys exhibited a fine columnar dendritic microstructure, and while carbides were observed in the interdendritic regions of the welds, electron optical analysis did not reveal any gamma' precipitates in this region. It was concluded that for the welding of thin gage materials above a threshold laser power the resultant welding efficiency shows a greater dependence on laser beam mode, and laser spot size, than on laser power, and beam traverse speed. Aluminum 6061 was not easily welded with a laser in its as received form, and the welds showed some degree of porosity. Anodizing was found to improve the welding efficiency in this material. While the presence of an anodic film on the metal surface increased the welding efficiency of the alloy, no relationship was found between the thickness of the anodic film and welding efficiency in the range of film thicknesses investigated. Weld regions were observed to be cellular dendritic in structure, with narrow heat affected zones. No precipitates or low melting point phases could be identified in the weld region. Melt zones were successfully

  1. Residual Stress Measurement and Calibration for A7N01 Aluminum Alloy Welded Joints by Using Longitudinal Critically Refracted ( LCR) Wave Transmission Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qimeng; Chen, Jia; Gou, Guoqing; Chen, Hui; Li, Peng; Gao, W.

    2016-10-01

    Residual stress measurement and control are highly important for the safety of structures of high-speed trains, which is critical for the structure design. The longitudinal critically refracted wave technology is the most widely used method in measuring residual stress with ultrasonic method, but its accuracy is strongly related to the test parameters, namely the flight time at the free-stress condition ( t 0), stress coefficient ( K), and initial stress (σ0) of the measured materials. The difference of microstructure in the weld zone, heat affected zone, and base metal (BM) results in the divergence of experimental parameters. However, the majority of researchers use the BM parameters to determine the residual stress in other zones and ignore the initial stress (σ0) in calibration samples. Therefore, the measured residual stress in different zones is often high in errors and may result in the miscalculation of the safe design of important structures. A serious problem in the ultrasonic estimation of residual stresses requires separation between the microstructure and the acoustoelastic effects. In this paper, the effects of initial stress and microstructure on stress coefficient K and flight time t 0 at free-stress conditions have been studied. The residual stress with or without different corrections was investigated. The results indicated that the residual stresses obtained with correction are more accurate for structure design.

  2. Robotic Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffery, Waris S.

    1993-01-01

    The need for automated plasma welding was identified in the early stages of the Space Station Freedom Program (SSFP) because it requires approximately 1.3 miles of welding for assembly. As a result of the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc Welding (VPPAW) process's ability to make virtually defect-free welds in aluminum, it was chosen to fulfill the welding needs. Space Station Freedom will be constructed of 2219 aluminum utilizing the computer controlled VPPAW process. The 'Node Radial Docking Port', with it's saddle shaped weld path, has a constantly changing surface angle over 360 deg of the 282 inch weld. The automated robotic VPPAW process requires eight-axes of motion (six-axes of robot and two-axes of positioner movement). The robot control system is programmed to maintain Torch Center Point (TCP) orientation perpendicular to the part while the part positioner is tilted and rotated to maintain the vertical up orientation as required by the VPPAW process. The combined speed of the robot and the positioner are integrated to maintain a constant speed between the part and the torch. A laser-based vision sensor system has also been integrated to track the seam and map the surface of the profile during welding.

  3. Survey of welding processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-07-01

    The current KYTC SPECIAL PROVISION NO. 4 WELDING STEEL BRIDGES prohibits the use of welding processes other than shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) and submerged arc welding (SAW). Nationally, bridge welding is codified under ANSI/AASHTO/AWS D1....

  4. In-Space Friction Stir Welding Machine Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Longhurst Engineering, PLC, and Vanderbilt University propose an in-space friction stir welding (FSW) machine for joining complex structural aluminum components. The...

  5. Weld-brazing of titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bales, T. T.; Royster, D. M.; Arnold, W. E., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    A joining process, designated weld-brazing, which combines resistance spotwelding and brazing has been developed at the NASA Langley Research Center. Resistance spot-welding is employed to position and align the parts and to establish a suitable faying surface gap for brazing; it contributes to the integrity of the joint. Brazing enhances the properties of the joint and reduces the stress concentrations normally associated with spotwelds. Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy joints have been fabricated using 3003 aluminum braze both in a vacuum furnace and in a retort containing an inert gas environment.

  6. Soldadura (Welding). Spanish Translations for Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohhertz, Durwin

    Thirty transparency masters with Spanish subtitles for key words are provided for a welding/general mechanical repair course. The transparency masters are on such topics as oxyacetylene welding; oxyacetylene welding equipment; welding safety; different types of welds; braze welding; cutting torches; cutting with a torch; protective equipment; arc…

  7. Picosecond laser welding of similar and dissimilar materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Richard M; Chen, Jianyong; Shephard, Jonathan D; Thomson, Robert R; Hand, Duncan P

    2014-07-01

    We report picosecond laser welding of similar and dissimilar materials based on plasma formation induced by a tightly focused beam from a 1030 nm, 10 ps, 400 kHz laser system. Specifically, we demonstrate the welding of fused silica, borosilicate, and sapphire to a range of materials including borosilicate, fused silica, silicon, copper, aluminum, and stainless steel. Dissimilar material welding of glass to aluminum and stainless steel has not been previously reported. Analysis of the borosilicate-to-borosilicate weld strength compares well to those obtained using similar welding systems based on femtosecond lasers. There is, however, a strong requirement to prepare surfaces to a high (10-60 nm Ra) flatness to ensure a successful weld.

  8. WELDING TORCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correy, T.B.

    1961-10-01

    A welding torch into which water and inert gas are piped separately for cooling and for providing a suitable gaseous atmosphere is described. A welding electrode is clamped in the torch by a removable collet sleeve and a removable collet head. Replacement of the sleeve and head with larger or smaller sleeve and head permits a larger or smaller welding electrode to be substituted on the torch. (AEC)

  9. Crack trajectory near a weld: Modeling and simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rashid, M.M.; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2008-01-01

    A 2D computational model of ductile fracture, in which arbitrary crack extension through the mesh is accommodated without mesh bias, is used to study ductile fracture near the weld line in welded aluminum plates. Comparisons of the calculated toughness behavior and crack trajectory are made...

  10. Plasma arc welding weld imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor); Mcgee, William F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A welding torch for plasma arc welding apparatus has a transparent shield cup disposed about the constricting nozzle, the cup including a small outwardly extending polished lip. A guide tube extends externally of the torch and has a free end adjacent to the lip. First and second optical fiber bundle assemblies are supported within the guide tube. Light from a strobe light is transmitted along one of the assemblies to the free end and through the lip onto the weld site. A lens is positioned in the guide tube adjacent to the second assembly and focuses images of the weld site onto the end of the fiber bundle of the second assembly and these images are transmitted along the second assembly to a video camera so that the weld site may be viewed continuously for monitoring the welding process.

  11. Simulation of Temperature Distribution in TIG Spot Welds of(Al-Mg) Alloy Using Finite Element Method

    OpenAIRE

    Ahlam Abid Ameer Alkhafajy; Abdul Hussain G. Al-Maliky; Muna K Abbas

    2008-01-01

    This research concern to analyse and simulate the temperature distribution in the spot welding joints using tungsten arc welding shielded with inert gas (TIG Spot) for the aluminum-magnesium alloy type (5052-O). The effect of and the quantity of the heat input that enter the weld zone has been investigated welding current, welding time and arc length on temperature distribution. The finite element method (by utilizing programme ANSYS 5.4) is presented the temperature distribution in a circula...

  12. New weldable high strength aluminum alloy developed for cryogenic service

    Science.gov (United States)

    1966-01-01

    Wrought aluminum alloy has improved low temperature notch toughness and weldability. This alloy can be mill-fabricated to plate and sheet without difficulty. Post-weld aging improves weld ductility and strength properties. A typical treatment is 8 hours at 225 deg F plus 16 hours at 300 deg F.

  13. Fatigue in Aluminum Highway Bridges under Random Loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rom, Søren; Agerskov, Henning

    2014-01-01

    Fatigue damage accumulation in aluminum highway bridges under random loading is studied. The fatigue life of welded joints has been determined both experimentally and from a fracture mechanics analysis. In the experimental part of the investigation, fatigue test series on welded plate test...

  14. Metal vaporization from weld pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block-Bolten, A.; Eagar, T. W.

    1984-09-01

    Experimental studies of alloy vaporization from aluminum and stainless steel weld pools have been made in order to test a vaporization model based on thermodynamic data and the kinetic theory of gases. It is shown that the model can correctly predict the dominant metal vapors that form but that the absolute rate of vaporization is not known due to insufficient knowledge of the surface temperature distribution and subsequent condensation of the vapor in the cooler regions of the metal. Values of the net evaporation rates for different alloys have been measured and are found to vary by two orders of magnitude. Estimated maximum weld pool temperatures based upon the model are in good agreement with previous experimental measurements of electron beam welds.

  15. WELDING METHOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell, A.A.; Dunbar, J.V.; Ruffner, J.H.

    1959-09-29

    A semi-automatic method is described for the weld joining of pipes and fittings which utilizes the inert gasshielded consumable electrode electric arc welding technique, comprising laying down the root pass at a first peripheral velocity and thereafter laying down the filler passes over the root pass necessary to complete the weld by revolving the pipes and fittings at a second peripheral velocity different from the first peripheral velocity, maintaining the welding head in a fixed position as to the specific direction of revolution, while the longitudinal axis of the welding head is disposed angularly in the direction of revolution at amounts between twenty minutas and about four degrees from the first position.

  16. Aluminum Hydroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluminum hydroxide is used for the relief of heartburn, sour stomach, and peptic ulcer pain and to ... Aluminum hydroxide comes as a capsule, a tablet, and an oral liquid and suspension. The dose and ...

  17. Mechanical Properties of Aluminum-Based Dissimilar Alloy Joints by Power Beams, Arc and FSW Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okubo, Michinori; Kon, Tomokuni; Abe, Nobuyuki

    Dissimilar smart joints are useful. In this research, welded quality of dissimilar aluminum alloys of 3 mm thickness by various welding processes and process parameters have been investigated by hardness and tensile tests, and observation of imperfection and microstructure. Base metals used in this study are A1050-H24, A2017-T3, A5083-O, A6061-T6 and A7075-T651. Welding processes used are YAG laser beam, electron beam, metal inert gas arc, tungsten inert gas arc and friction stir welding. The properties of weld zones are affected by welding processes, welding parameters and combination of base metals. Properties of high strength aluminum alloy joints are improved by friction stir welding.

  18. A study of gas flow pattern, undercutting and torch modification in variable polarity plasma arc welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcclure, John C.; Hou, Haihui Ron

    1994-01-01

    A study on the plasma and shield gas flow patterns in variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA) welding was undertaken by shadowgraph techniques. Visualization of gas flow under different welding conditions was obtained. Undercutting is often present with aluminum welds. The effects of torch alignment, shield gas flow rate and gas contamination on undercutting were investigated and suggestions made to minimize the defect. A modified shield cup for the welding torch was fabricated which consumes much less shield gas while maintaining the weld quality. The current torch was modified with a trailer flow for Al-Li welding, in which hot cracking is a critical problem. The modification shows improved weldablility on these alloys.

  19. Effect of tool shape and welding parameters on mechanical properties and microstructure of dissimilar friction stir welded aluminium alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chetan Aneja

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present experimental study, dissimilar aluminum alloy AA5083 and AA6082 were friction stir welded by varying tool shape, welding speed and rotary speed of the tool in order to investigate the effect of varying tool shape and welding parameters on the mechanical properties as well as microstructure. The friction stir welding (FSW process parameters have great influence on heat input per unit length of weld. The outcomes of experimental study prove that mechanical properties increases with decreasing welding speed. Furthermore mechanical properties were also found to improve as the rotary speed increases and the same phenomenon was found to happen while using straight cylindrical threaded pin profile tool. The microstructure of the dissimilar joints revealed that at low welding speeds, the improved material mixing was observed. The similar phenomenon was found to happen at higher rotational speeds using straight cylindrical threaded tool.

  20. TRANSIENT FINITE ELEMENT SIMULATION AND MICROSTRUCTURE EVOLUTION OF AA2219 WELD JOINT USING GAS TUNGSTEN ARC WELDING PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivaraman Arunkumar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study we focus on finite element simulation of gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW of AA2219 aluminum alloy and the behavioral of the microstructure before and after weld. The simulations were performed using commercial COMSOL Multiphysics software. The thermal history of the weld region was studied by initially developed mathematical model. A sweep type meshing was used and transient analysis was performed for one welding cycle. The highest temperature noted was 3568 °C during welding. The welding operation was performed on 200×100×25 mm plates. Through metallurgical characterization, it was observed that a fair copper rich cellular (CRC network existed in the weld region. A small amount of intermetallic compounds like Al2Cu is observed through the XRD pattern.

  1. STUDY OF ARC IMPULSE FREQUENCY EFFECT ON THE STRUCTURE AND PROPERTIES OF WELDED CONNECTION ELEMENTS IN ALUMINIUM PIPELINE SYSTEMS, MADE WITH MASTERTIG 3500

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr. Pavel V. Bakhmatov

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Summary . The article focuses on the arc impulse frequency effect on the structure and properties of welded connections in aluminum pipeline systems hand-operated with argon-arc welding nonconsumable rod on MasterTig3500. It was revealed that the frequency of the welding current impulses plays an important role in the forming of the welded connection. The authors determined the optimal value of the welding current frequency significantly accelerating the welding process to ensure consistent quality of the weld. The authors detailed some features of cleaning assembly parts with a wire brush prior to welding process.

  2. Syllabus in Trade Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development.

    The syllabus outlines material for a course two academic years in length (minimum two and one-half hours daily experience) leading to entry-level occupational ability in several welding trade areas. Fourteen units covering are welding, gas welding, oxyacetylene welding, cutting, nonfusion processes, inert gas shielded-arc welding, welding cast…

  3. Electron beam weld development on a Filter Pack Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dereskiewicz, J. P.

    1994-06-01

    A continuous electron beam welding procedure was developed to replace the manual gas tungsten arc welding procedure on the Filter Pack Assembly. A statistical study was used to evaluate the feasibility of electron beam welding 6061-T6 aluminum covers to A356 cast weldments throughout the joint tolerance range specified on product drawings. Peak temperature exposures were not high enough to degrade the heat sensitive electrical components inside the cast weldment. Actual weldments with alodine coating on the weld joint area were successfully cleaned using a nonmetallic fiberglass brush cleaning method.

  4. Weld-brazing of titanium. [resistance spot welding combined with brazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bales, T. T.; Royster, D. M.; Arnold, W. E., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    A joining process, designated weld-brazing, which combines resistance spot-welding and brazing has been developed at the NASA Langley Research Center. Resistance spot-welding is employed to position and aline the parts and to establish a suitable faying surface gap for brazing and contributes to the integrity of the joint. Brazing enhances the properties of the joint and reduces the stress concentrations normally associated with spotwelds. Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy joints have been fabricated using 3003 aluminum braze both in a vaccum furnace and in a retort containing an inert gas environment.

  5. Tailored Welding Technique for High Strength Al-Cu Alloy for Higher Mechanical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biradar, N. S.; Raman, R.

    AA2014 aluminum alloy, with 4.5% Cu as major alloying element, offers highest strength and hardness values in T6 temper and finds extensive use in aircraft primary structures. However, this alloy is difficult to weld by fusion welding because the dendritic structure formed can affect weld properties seriously. Among the welding processes, AC-TIG technique is largely used for welding. As welded yield strength was in the range of 190-195 MPa, using conventional TIG technique. Welding metallurgy of AA2014 was critically reviewed and factors responsible for lower properties were identified. Square-wave AC TIG with Transverse mechanical arc oscillation (TMAO) was postulated to improve the weld strength. A systematic experimentation using 4 mm thick plates produced YS in the range of 230-240 MPa, has been achieved. Through characterization including optical and SEM/EDX was conducted to validate the metallurgical phenomena attributable to improvement in weld properties.

  6. Perspective on Double Pulsed Gas Metal Arc Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leilei Wang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum alloy welding suffers from problems such as solidification cracking and hydrogen-induced porosity, which are sufficiently severe to limit its potential applications. Because mitigated porosity incidence and solidification cracking are observed in aluminum welds using double pulsed gas metal arc welding (DP-GMAW, a comprehensive review of the mechanism is necessary, but absent from the literature. The oscillation of arc force and droplet pressure causes a weld pool stir effect. The expansion and shrinkage of the weld pool cause unusual remelting and resolidification of the previously solidified metal. DP-GMAW has an increased solidification growth rate and cooling rate, compared with conventional pulsed welding at same heat input. Both numerical and experimental results reveal the remarkable concept that refined microstructure in the fusion zone is obtained by using DP-GMAW. The mechanism of microstructural refinement is revealed as a weld pool stir effect and increased cooling rate. Hydrogen bubbles easily float out and then release from the weld pool originated from the weld pool stir effect. Reduced solidification cracking is achieved due to the refined solidification structure that originated from the increased cooling rate. The advantages, evolution process, and future trend of DP-GMAW are discussed.

  7. Friction stir scribe welding technique for dissimilar joining of aluminium and galvanised steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Tianhao [Center for Friction Stir Processing, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX, USA; Sidhar, Harpreet [Center for Friction Stir Processing, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX, USA; Mishra, Rajiv S. [Center for Friction Stir Processing, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX, USA; Hovanski, Yuri [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Energy Materials and Manufacturing, Richland, WA, USA; Upadhyay, Piyush [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Energy Materials and Manufacturing, Richland, WA, USA; Carlson, Blair [General Motors Technical Center, Warren, MI, USA

    2017-10-04

    Friction stir scribe technology, a derivative of friction stir welding, was applied for the dissimilar lap welding of an aluminum alloy and galvanized mild steel sheets. During the process, the rotating tool with a cobalt steel scribe first penetrated the top material — aluminum — and then the scribe cut the bottom material — steel. The steel was displaced into the upper material to produce a characteristic hook feature. Lap welds were shear tested, and their fracture paths were studied. Welding parameters affected the welding features including hook height, which turned out to be highly related to fracture position. Therefore, in this paper, the relationships among welding parameters, hook height, joint strength and fracture position are presented. In addition, influence of zinc coating on joint strength was also studied. Keywords: friction stir scribe technology; dissimilar material welding; zinc coating; hook height; joint strength; fracture position

  8. Laser Ablation Cleaning of Self-Reacting Friction Stir Weld Seam Surfaces: A Preliminary Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.; Russell, C. K.; Brooke, S. A.; Parry, Q.; Lowrey, N. M.

    2014-01-01

    Anodized aluminum panels were cleaned by three lasers at three separate sites with a view to determining whether more economical laser cleaning might supplant current manual cleaning methods for preparation of surfaces to be welded by the self-reacting friction stir process. Uncleaned panels yielded welds exhibiting residual oxide defect (ROD) and failing at very low stresses along the trace of the weld seam. Manually cleaned panels yielded welds without ROD; these welds failed at nominal stress levels along an angled fracture surface not following the weld seam trace. Laser cleaned panels yielded welds failing at intermediate stress levels. The inadequacy of the laser cleaning processes leaves questions: Was the anodized aluminum test too stringent to represent actual cleaning requirements? Were the wrong laser cleaning techniques/parameters used for the study? Is the laser cleaning mechanism inadequate for effective preweld surface cleaning?

  9. SISTEM KONTROL JARINGAN SYARAF TIRUAN BERBASIS SIMULASI PADA PENGELASAN PIPA ALUMINUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ario Sunar Baskoro

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Dalam penelitian ini telah dikembangkan sistem pengelasan otomatis Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG dengan menggunakan sensor vision pada pengelasan pipa aluminum. Penelitian ini mempelajari proses pengelasan cerdas pipa paduan aluminum 6063S-T5 dalam posisi tetap dengan obor las (welding torch bergerak dan menggunakan mesin las AC. Model Jaringan Syaraf Tiruan (neural network untuk pengendalian kecepatan pengelasan telah dikembangkan agar dapat bekerja secara otomatis. Untuk melatih Jaringan Syaraf Tiruan ini diperlukan cukup banyak data dari penelitian sehingga memerlukan waktu dan dana yang cukup besar. Penelitian ini menawarkan proses baru untuk memperkirakan dan mengendalikan penetrasi pengelasan dalam pengelasan pipa paduan aluminum. Penetrasi las diperkirakan dengan menggunakan metode perkiraan secara hibrida yaitu dengan mengombinasikan simulasi pengelasan dan pengamatan visual menggunakan sensor vision. Dari hasil eksperimen didapatkan bahwa sistem pengendalian cukup efektif untuk mendeteksi kolam las (molten pool dan menghasilkan pengelasan yang baik. This research has developed an automatic welding system Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG using sensor vision on aluminum pipe welding. This research studied the process of intelligent welding of alloy pipe aluminum 6063S-T5 in a fixed position with a welding torch to move and use the AC welding machines. The neural network model to control the speed of the welding has been developed in order to work automatically. The neural network train need quite a lot of data from studies that require time and substansial funds. This research offers a new process for estimating and controlling welding penetration in welding of aluminum alloy pipe. Weld penetration was estimated by using the approximate hybrid method that combines the simulations of welding and visual inspection using sensor vision. The experiment results that the control system is effective enough to detect the molten pool and produce a good weld.

  10. Experimental Evaluation and Characterization of Electron Beam Welding of 2219 AL-Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Sobih

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aiming to reduce the weight of components, thus allowing a profit in terms of energy saving, automotive industry as well as aircraft industry extensively uses aluminum alloys. The most widely used joining technology in aircraft industry is riveting, while welding seems to be used in the car industry in the case of aluminum alloys. However, welding technology is characterized by many defects, such as gas porosity; oxide inclusions; solidification cracking (hot tearing; and reduced strength in both the weld and the heat affected zones which could limit its development. Many techniques are used for aluminum alloys welding, among them is electron beam welding (EBW, which has unique advantages over other traditional fusion welding methods due to high-energy density, deep penetration, large depth-to-width ratio, and small heat affected zone. The welding parameters that yield to optimal weld joint have been previously obtained. These optimal parameters were validated by welding a specimen using these parameters. To evaluate this optimal weld joint, complete, microstructural observations and characterization have been carried out using scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. This evaluation leads to description and quantification of the solidification process within this weld joint.

  11. Processing and structure of in situ Fe-Al alloys produced by gas tungsten arc welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banovic, S.W.; DuPont, J.N.; Marder, A.R. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States). Energy Research Center

    1997-02-14

    Iron aluminide weld overlays are being investigated for corrosion and erosion protection of boiler tubes in low NOx burners. The primary objective of the research is to identify overlay compositions which can be deposited in a crack-free condition and provide corrosion protection in moderately reducing environments. In the current phase of work, Fe-Al alloy weld overlays were produced by depositing commercially pure aluminum wire on to low carbon steel substrates using Gas Tungsten Arc Welding. A systematic variation of the wire feed speed and current, two major factors affecting dilution, resulted in a variation in aluminum contents of the welds ranging from 3--42 wt% aluminum. The aluminum content was observed to increase with wire feed speed and a decrease in the current. The aluminum content was also found to affect the cracking susceptibility of the overlays. At 10wt% aluminum, few to no cracks were observed in the deposits. Above this value, cracking was prevalent throughout the weld. In addition, two types of microstructures were found correlating to different concentrations of aluminum. A homogeneous matrix with second phase particles consisting of coarse columnar grains was found for low aluminum concentrations. With higher aluminum contents, a two-phase constituent was observed to surround primary dendrites growing from the substrate. The transition of the microstructures occurred between 24 and 32 wt% Al.

  12. Ship construction and welding

    CERN Document Server

    Mandal, Nisith R

    2017-01-01

    This book addresses various aspects of ship construction, from ship types and construction materials, to welding technologies and accuracy control. The contents of the book are logically organized and divided into twenty-one chapters. The book covers structural arrangement with longitudinal and transverse framing systems based on the service load, and explains basic structural elements like hatch side girders, hatch end beams, stringers, etc. along with structural subassemblies like floors, bulkheads, inner bottom, decks and shells. It presents in detail double bottom construction, wing tanks & duct keels, fore & aft end structures, etc., together with necessary illustrations. The midship sections of various ship types are introduced, together with structural continuity and alignment in ship structures. With regard to construction materials, the book discusses steel, aluminum alloys and fiber reinforced composites. Various methods of steel material preparation are discussed, and plate cutting and form...

  13. Abnormal Grain Growth Suppression in Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hales, Stephen J. (Inventor); Claytor, Harold Dale (Inventor); Alexa, Joel A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention provides a process for suppressing abnormal grain growth in friction stir welded aluminum alloys by inserting an intermediate annealing treatment ("IAT") after the welding step on the article. The IAT may be followed by a solution heat treatment (SHT) on the article under effectively high solution heat treatment conditions. In at least some embodiments, a deformation step is conducted on the article under effective spin-forming deformation conditions or under effective superplastic deformation conditions. The invention further provides a welded article having suppressed abnormal grain growth, prepared by the process above. Preferably the article is characterized with greater than about 90% reduction in area fraction abnormal grain growth in any friction-stir-welded nugget.

  14. Quantifying the debonding of inclusions through tomography and computational homology.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Wei-Yang; Johnson, George C. (University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA); Mota, Alejandro; Foulk, James W., III; Jin, Huiqing

    2010-09-01

    This report describes a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project to use of synchrotron-radiation computed tomography (SRCT) data to determine the conditions and mechanisms that lead to void nucleation in rolled alloys. The Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has provided SRCT data of a few specimens of 7075-T7351 aluminum plate (widely used for aerospace applications) stretched to failure, loaded in directions perpendicular and parallel to the rolling direction. The resolution of SRCT data is 900nm, which allows elucidation of the mechanisms governing void growth and coalescence. This resolution is not fine enough, however, for nucleation. We propose the use statistics and image processing techniques to obtain sub-resolution scale information from these data, and thus determine where in the specimen and when during the loading program nucleation occurs and the mechanisms that lead to it. Quantitative analysis of the tomography data, however, leads to the conclusion that the reconstruction process compromises the information obtained from the scans. Alternate, more powerful reconstruction algorithms are needed to address this problem, but those fall beyond the scope of this project.

  15. Caracterização microestrutural e comportamento mecânico das ligas de alumínio AA2139 T3 e T8 soldadas por fricção rotativa com mistura Microstructural characterization and mechanical behavior of an AA2139 T3 and T8 aluminum alloy joined by friction stir welding (FSW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinícius Toledo Saccon

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho visou analisar a caracterização microestrutural e o comportamento mecânico das ligas de alumínio AA2139 T3 e T8 quando são soldadas pelo processo Soldagem por Fricção Rotativa com Mistura, o qual é realizado na fase sólida. A análise microestrutural foi realizada utilizando microscopia óptica e eletrônica de varredura, e o comportamento mecânico foi avaliado através de medidas de microdureza e ensaio de tração convencional complementado pelo sistema ARAMIS. As ligas foram soldadas nos mesmos parâmetros de soldagem e com a mesma ferramenta, a fim de avaliar a qualidade da junta soldada para as duas condições de tratamento térmico, T3 e T8. Os resultados obtidos mostraram soldas resistentes para ambos os tratamentos térmicos, porém com melhores propriedades mecânicas para a liga AA2139 T3.This work aimed to study the microstructural characterization and mechanical behavior of AA2139 T3 and T8 aluminum alloys joined by FSW - Friction Stir Welding. The microstructural analysis has been done using optical microscope and scanning electron microscopy, and the mechanical analysis were evaluate through microhardness testing and conventional tensile test using the ARAMIS system . Each alloy were welded using the same welding parameters and the same tool in order to evaluate the joint quality for both heat treatment used for this work, T3 and T8. The result showed sounds joints for both heat treatments, although with better mechanical properties for the alloy AA2139 T3.

  16. Equipment for Solid State Stir Welding of High Temperature Materials Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Stir welding generates high-quality joints in fabricated structure and is the baseline joining process for most NASA aluminum alloy structures such as cryogenic...

  17. Structure and Phase Composition of 09G2S Steel Modified by Different Types of Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Aleksandr N.; Popova, Natal’ya A.; Nikonenko, Elena L.; Ozhiganov, Evgenii A.; Ababkov, Nikolai V.; Koneva, Nina A.

    2017-10-01

    The paper presents the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigations of the structure and phase composition of the type 09G2S weld steel modified by four types of welding, namely: electrode welding and electropercussive welding both with and without the introduction of artificial flaws. Artificial flows are aluminum pieces. TEM investigations are carried out within the heat-affected zone, i.e. between the deposited and base metal, at 0.5 mm distance to the former. Welding electrode of the type E50A is used for welding 09G2S steel specimens. It is shown how the type of welding affects the steel morphology, phase composition, defect structure and its parameters. After each type of welding, the dislocation structure is polarized. This, however, does not cause internal stresses which can destroy the specimen.

  18. Distortion Control during Welding

    OpenAIRE

    Akbari Pazooki, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    The local material expansion and contraction involved in welding result in permanent deformations or instability i.e., welding distortion. Considerable efforts have been made in controlling welding distortion prior to, during or after welding. Thermal Tensioning (TT) describes a group of in-situ methods to control welding distortion. In these methods local heating and/or cooling strategies are applied during welding. Additional heating and/or cooling sources can be implemented either stationa...

  19. Weld-brazing - a new joining process. [combination resistance spot welding and brazing of titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bales, T. T.; Royster, D. M.; Arnold, W. E., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A joining process designated weld brazing which combines resistance spot welding and brazing has been developed. Resistance spot welding is used to position and align the parts as well as to establish a suitable faying surface gap for brazing. Fabrication is then completed by capillary flow of the braze alloy into the joint. The process has been used successfully to fabricate Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy joints using 3003 aluminum braze alloy. Test results obtained on single overlap and hat-stiffened structural specimens show that weld brazed joints are superior in tensile shear, stress rupture, fatigue, and buckling than joint fabricated by spotwelding or brazing. Another attractive feature of the process is that the brazed joints is hermetically sealed by the braze material.

  20. Experimental Evaluation and Characterization of Electron Beam Welding of 2219 AL-Alloy

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed Sobih; Zuhair Elseddig; Khalid Almazy; Mohamed Sallam

    2016-01-01

    Aiming to reduce the weight of components, thus allowing a profit in terms of energy saving, automotive industry as well as aircraft industry extensively uses aluminum alloys. The most widely used joining technology in aircraft industry is riveting, while welding seems to be used in the car industry in the case of aluminum alloys. However, welding technology is characterized by many defects, such as gas porosity; oxide inclusions; solidification cracking (hot tearing); and reduced strength in...

  1. Ribbon Reduces Spiking in Electron-Beam Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, R. E.

    1984-01-01

    Spiking in electron-beam welding reduced by placing high-vapor-pressure substance along path of electron beam. Strip of metal having vapor pressure higher than base metal at same temperature placed in slot machined along weld line. Strip vaporizes as beam strikes it, and vapor pressure keeps surface tension from closing off top of channel. Technique used successfully on nickel alloys and aluminum alloys and effective on steel and titanium.

  2. Residual Stress and Fatigue Strength of Hybrid Laser-MIG-Welded A7N01P-T4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiuying; Chen, Hui; Qiu, Peixian; Zhu, Zongtao

    2017-02-01

    A7N01P-T4 aluminum alloy is widely used in some important welded components of high-speed trains. The hybrid laser-metal inert gas (MIG) welding process was studied to solve problems associated with the MIG welding process, such as low welding efficiency, high residual stress and deformation, and serious loss of strength. A high-speed camera, a voltage and current collection system, and NI DAQ were used to acquire arc profiles, welding voltage, and welding current simultaneously. Thermal cycle tests were carried out. Residual stresses induced by the welding process and fatigue strength of the joint were investigated. Large-size fatigue specimens were used in fatigue tests. The results show that the energy of the hybrid welding process is focused, and the power density of hybrid welding process is intense. The heat input per unit of the hybrid welding process is only half of that of the MIG welding process. Compared with the MIG welded joint, the overall residual stress level of the hybrid-welded joint is lower. The peak longitudinal stress of the hybrid-welded joint is reduced by 20 pct. The fatigue strength of hybrid joints is 14 pct higher than that of MIG-welded joints. Narrow weld and HAZ, weak softening behavior, and low residual stress level are the causes of the improvement of fatigue strength.

  3. WELDING PROCESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambrow, J.; Hausner, H.

    1957-09-24

    A method of joining metal parts for the preparation of relatively long, thin fuel element cores of uranium or alloys thereof for nuclear reactors is described. The process includes the steps of cleaning the surfaces to be jointed, placing the sunfaces together, and providing between and in contact with them, a layer of a compound in finely divided form that is decomposable to metal by heat. The fuel element members are then heated at the contact zone and maintained under pressure during the heating to decompose the compound to metal and sinter the members and reduced metal together producing a weld. The preferred class of decomposable compounds are the metal hydrides such as uranium hydride, which release hydrogen thus providing a reducing atmosphere in the vicinity of the welding operation.

  4. Friction Stir Welding of three dissimilar aluminium alloy used in aeronautics industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boşneag, A.; Constantin, M. A.; Niţu, E.; Iordache, M.

    2017-10-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is an innovative solid-state joining process. This process was, in first time, develop to join the similar aluminum plates but now the technology can be used to weld a large area of materials similar or dissimilar. Taking these into account FSW process, for dissimilar materials are increasingly required, more than traditional arc welding, in industrial environment. More than that FSW is used in aeronautics industry because of very good result and very good weldability between aluminum alloy used at building of airplanes, where the body of airplane are 20% aluminum alloy and this percent can be increaser in future. In this paper is presented an experimental study which includes welding three dissimilar aluminum alloy, with different properties, used in aeronautics industry, this materials are: AA 2024, AA6061 and AA7075. After welding with different parameters, the welding join and welding process will be analyzed considering process temperature, process vertical force, and roughnessof welding seams, visual aspect and microhardness.

  5. An Experimental Study of the Electrical Contact Resistance in Resistance Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Quanfeng; Zhang, Wenqi; Bay, Niels

    2005-01-01

    Electrical contact resistance is of critical importance in resistance welding. In this article, the contact resistance is experimentally investigated for welding mild steel, stainless steel, and aluminum to themselves. A parametric study was carried out on a Gleeble® machine, investigating...

  6. Structure and Corrosion Resistance of Welded Joints of Alloy 1151 in Marine Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakulo, A. V.; Yakushin, B. F.; Puchkov, Yu. A.

    2017-07-01

    The corrosion behavior of joints formed by TIG and IMIG welding from clad sheets of heat-hardenable aluminum alloy 1151 of the Al - Cu - Mg system is studied. The corrosion tests are performed in an aqueous solution of NaCl in a salt-spray chamber. The welded joints are subjected to a metallographic analysis.

  7. Influencia de los parámetros de la soldadura metálica fría en las aleaciones AA5083 y AA6061//Influence of the colt metal welding parameters on the AA5083 and AA6061 aluminum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Eduardo de‐Luna‐Alanís

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available El trabajo tuvo como objetivo evaluar la influencia de la velocidad de la soldadura y de las correcciones del arco y pulso en el proceso de Transferencia Metálica Fría sobre las propiedades mecánicas de las aleaciones AA5083 y AA6061. Se desarrolló un diseño experimental de tipo factorial multinivel, con 4 factores independientes (Corrección de Arco, Pulso, Velocidad de Soldadura y Aleación. Los parámetros fundamentales fueron: Corriente de base 250 A; Voltaje de arco 21 V y Polaridad (Direct current electrode positive, DCEP. La evaluación se realizó a través de un ensayo de tracción transversal sobre probetas planas obtenidas de los cupones soldados. Se demuestra que el modelo aplicado es adecuado, revelándose en los experimentos diferencias sustanciales en las propiedades Tensión de fluencia 29,56 %, Módulo de elasticidad 51,16 % y Trabajo específico de deformación elástica 42,30 %, el cual no posee una dependencia lineal con elresto de las propiedades anteriores.Palabras claves: transferencia metálica fría, aleación AA5083, aleación AA6061, propiedades mecánicas._______________________________________________________________________________AbstractThe work objective was to evaluatethe influence of Cold Metal Transfer process arc and pulse corrections and welding speed on the mechanical properties of AA5083 and AA6061 aluminum alloys. For it, a Factorial Multilevel experimental design whit 4 independent factor (arc correction, pulse correction, welding speed and alloy was developed. The essential welding parameters employed were: base current 250 A; arc voltage 21 V and polarity (DCEP. The evaluation was made whit a transverse traction test of plate welded coupons. The experimental model applied wasadequate and substantial differences was showed between yield tensile strength 29,56 %, elasticity module (51,16 % and specific work of elastic deformation 42,30 %, which it does not possess a lineal dependence whit the rest

  8. Welding processes handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Weman, Klas

    2011-01-01

    Offers an introduction to the range of available welding technologies. This title includes chapters on individual techniques that cover principles, equipment, consumables and key quality issues. It includes material on such topics as the basics of electricity in welding, arc physics, and distortion, and the weldability of particular metals.$bThe first edition of Welding processes handbook established itself as a standard introduction and guide to the main welding technologies and their applications. This new edition has been substantially revised and extended to reflect the latest developments. After an initial introduction, the book first reviews gas welding before discussing the fundamentals of arc welding, including arc physics and power sources. It then discusses the range of arc welding techniques including TIG, plasma, MIG/MAG, MMA and submerged arc welding. Further chapters cover a range of other important welding technologies such as resistance and laser welding, as well as the use of welding techniqu...

  9. Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process invented in 1991 at The Welding Institute in the United Kingdom. A weld is made in the FSW process by translating a rotating pin along a weld seam so as to stir the sides of the seam together. FSW avoids deleterious effects inherent in melting and promises to be an important welding process for any industries where welds of optimal quality are demanded. This article provides an introduction to the FSW process. The chief concern is the physical effect of the tool on the weld metal: how weld seam bonding takes place, what kind of weld structure is generated, potential problems, possible defects for example, and implications for process parameters and tool design. Weld properties are determined by structure, and the structure of friction stir welds is determined by the weld metal flow field in the vicinity of the weld tool. Metal flow in the vicinity of the weld tool is explained through a simple kinematic flow model that decomposes the flow field into three basic component flows: a uniform translation, a rotating solid cylinder, and a ring vortex encircling the tool. The flow components, superposed to construct the flow model, can be related to particular aspects of weld process parameters and tool design; they provide a bridge to an understanding of a complex-at-first-glance weld structure. Torques and forces are also discussed. Some simple mathematical models of structural aspects, torques, and forces are included.

  10. Unique variable polarity plasma arc welding for space shuttle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwinghamer, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    Since the introduction of the Plasma Arc Torch in 1955 and subsequent to the work at Boeing in the 1960's, significant improvements crucial to success have been made in the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) Process at the Marshall Space Flight Center. Several very important advantages to this process are given, and the genesis of PA welding, the genesis of VPPA welding, special equiment requirements, weld property development, results with other aluminum alloys, and the eventual successful VPPA transition to production operations are discussed.

  11. Investigation into Interface Lifting Within FSW Lap Welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. S. Miller; C. R. Tolle; D. E. Clark; C. I. Nichol; T. R. McJunkin; H. B. Smartt

    2008-06-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is rapidly penetrating the welding market in many materials and applications, particularly in aluminum alloys for transportation applications. As this expansion outside the research laboratory continues, fitness for service issues will arise, and process control and NDE methods will become important determinants of continued growth. The present paper describes research into FSW weld nugget flaw detection within aluminum alloy lap welds. We present results for two types of FSW tool designs: a smooth pin tool and a threaded pin tool. We show that under certain process parameters (as monitored during welding with a rotating dynamometer that measures x, y, z, and torque forces) and tooling designs, FSW lap welds allow significant nonbonded interface lifting of the lap joint, while forming a metallurgical bond only within the pin region of the weld nugget. These lifted joints are often held very tightly together even though unbonded, and might be expected to pass cursory NDE while representing a substantial compromise in joint mechanical properties. The phenomenon is investigated here via radiographic and ultrasonic NDE techniques, with a copper foil marking insert (as described elsewhere) and by the tensile testing of joints. As one would expect, these results show that tool design and process parameters significantly affect plactic flow and this lifted interface. NDE and mechanical strength ramifications of this defect are discussed.

  12. Introduction to Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortney, Clarence; Gregory, Mike

    This curriculum guide provides six units of instruction on basic welding. Addressed in the individual units of instruction are the following topics: employment opportunities for welders, welding safety and first aid, welding tools and equipment, basic metals and metallurgy, basic math and measuring, and procedures for applying for a welding job.…

  13. Distortion Control during Welding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akbari Pazooki, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    The local material expansion and contraction involved in welding result in permanent deformations or instability i.e., welding distortion. Considerable efforts have been made in controlling welding distortion prior to, during or after welding. Thermal Tensioning (TT) describes a group of in-situ

  14. Optimization of welding current waveform for dissimilar material with DP590 and Al5052 by Delta-spot welding process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji Sun; Kim, In Ju; Kim, Young Gon [Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    The automotive industry has a target goal to improve fuel consumption due to restricted exhaust gas regulation. For this reason, the applicability of lightweight material, Al alloys, Mg alloys is also being expanded. In this concept, high strength steel, DP590 and light alloy, AL5052 are joined in the right place of the car body. However, it is difficult to join to steel and aluminum by conventional fusion welding. Generally, in respect to dissimilar metal joining by fusion welding, intermetallic compound layer is formed at the joint interface, hot cracking is generated. In this study, the effect of the current waveform on the mechanical characteristics and microstructure in Delta spot welding process of dissimilar metal was investigated. As results, Intermetallic compound (IMC) layer was reduced from 2.355 μm to 1.09 μm by using Delta spot welding process; also the welding current range improved by 50% in the delta spot welding, higher than in the inverter resistance welding. To conclude, the delta spot welding process adopting the process tapes contributes to improving the welding quality for dissimilar metals (Al5052 and DP590) due to a decrease in IMC layer.

  15. High-Speed Friction Stir Welding of AA7075-T6 Sheet: Microstructure, Mechanical Properties, Micro-texture, and Thermal History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingyi; Upadhyay, Piyush; Hovanski, Yuri; Field, David P.

    2018-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a cost-effective and high-quality joining process for aluminum alloys (especially heat-treatable alloys) that is historically operated at lower joining speeds (up to hundreds of millimeters per minute). In this study, we present a microstructural analysis of friction stir welded AA7075-T6 blanks with high welding speeds up to 3 M/min. Textures, microstructures, mechanical properties, and weld quality are analyzed using TEM, EBSD, metallographic imaging, and Vickers hardness. The higher welding speed results in narrower, stronger heat-affected zones (HAZs) and also higher hardness in the nugget zones. The material flow direction in the nugget zone is found to be leaning towards the welding direction as the welding speed increases. Results are coupled with welding parameters and thermal history to aid in the understanding of the complex material flow and texture gradients within the welds in an effort to optimize welding parameters for high-speed processing.

  16. High-Speed Friction Stir Welding of AA7075-T6 Sheet: Microstructure, Mechanical Properties, Micro-texture, and Thermal History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingyi; Upadhyay, Piyush; Hovanski, Yuri; Field, David P.

    2017-11-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a cost-effective and high-quality joining process for aluminum alloys (especially heat-treatable alloys) that is historically operated at lower joining speeds (up to hundreds of millimeters per minute). In this study, we present a microstructural analysis of friction stir welded AA7075-T6 blanks with high welding speeds up to 3 M/min. Textures, microstructures, mechanical properties, and weld quality are analyzed using TEM, EBSD, metallographic imaging, and Vickers hardness. The higher welding speed results in narrower, stronger heat-affected zones (HAZs) and also higher hardness in the nugget zones. The material flow direction in the nugget zone is found to be leaning towards the welding direction as the welding speed increases. Results are coupled with welding parameters and thermal history to aid in the understanding of the complex material flow and texture gradients within the welds in an effort to optimize welding parameters for high-speed processing.

  17. Robotic and automatic welding development at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, C. S.; Jackson, M. E.; Flanigan, L. A.

    1988-01-01

    Welding automation is the key to two major development programs to improve quality and reduce the cost of manufacturing space hardware currently undertaken by the Materials and Processes Laboratory of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. Variable polarity plasma arc welding has demonstrated its effectiveness on class 1 aluminum welding in external tank production. More than three miles of welds were completed without an internal defect. Much of this success can be credited to automation developments which stabilize the process. Robotic manipulation technology is under development for automation of welds on the Space Shuttle's main engines utilizing pathfinder systems in development of tooling and sensors for the production applications. The overall approach to welding automation development undertaken is outlined. Advanced sensors and control systems methodologies are described that combine to make aerospace quality welds with a minimum of dependence on operator skill.

  18. Interstitial pneumonitis after acetylene welding: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miran Brvar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Acetylene is a colorless gas commonly used for welding. It acts mainly as a simple asphyxiant. In this paper, however, we present a patient who developed a severe interstitial pneumonitis after acetylene exposure during aluminum welding. A 44-year old man was welding with acetylene, argon and aluminum electrode sticks in a non-ventilated aluminum tank for 2 h. Four hours after welding dyspnea appeared and 22 h later he was admitted at the Emergency Department due to severe respiratory insufficiency with pO2 = 6.7 kPa. Chest X-ray showed diffuse interstitial infiltration. Pulmonary function and gas diffusion tests revealed a severe restriction (55% of predictive volume and impaired diffusion capacity (47% of predicted capacity. Toxic interstitial pneumonitis was diagnosed and high-dose systemic corticosteroid methylprednisolone and inhalatory corticosteroid fluticasone therapy was started. Computed Tomography (CT of the lungs showed a diffuse patchy ground-glass opacity with no signs of small airway disease associated with interstitial pneumonitis. Corticosteroid therapy was continued for the next 8 weeks gradually reducing the doses. The patient's follow-up did not show any deterioration of respiratory function. In conclusion, acetylene welding might result in severe toxic interstitial pneumonitis that improves after an early systemic and inhalatory corticosteroid therapy.

  19. Interstitial pneumonitis after acetylene welding: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brvar, Miran

    2014-01-01

    Acetylene is a colorless gas commonly used for welding. It acts mainly as a simple asphyxiant. In this paper, however, we present a patient who developed a severe interstitial pneumonitis after acetylene exposure during aluminum welding. A 44-year old man was welding with acetylene, argon and aluminum electrode sticks in a non-ventilated aluminum tank for 2 h. Four hours after welding dyspnea appeared and 22 h later he was admitted at the Emergency Department due to severe respiratory insufficiency with pO2 = 6.7 kPa. Chest X-ray showed diffuse interstitial infiltration. Pulmonary function and gas diffusion tests revealed a severe restriction (55% of predictive volume) and impaired diffusion capacity (47% of predicted capacity). Toxic interstitial pneumonitis was diagnosed and high-dose systemic corticosteroid methylprednisolone and inhalatory corticosteroid fluticasone therapy was started. Computed Tomography (CT) of the lungs showed a diffuse patchy ground-glass opacity with no signs of small airway disease associated with interstitial pneumonitis. Corticosteroid therapy was continued for the next 8 weeks gradually reducing the doses. The patient's follow-up did not show any deterioration of respiratory function. In conclusion, acetylene welding might result in severe toxic interstitial pneumonitis that improves after an early systemic and inhalatory corticosteroid therapy.

  20. Weld overlay cladding with iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodwin, G.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-12-01

    The author has established a range of compositions for these alloys within which hot cracking resistance is very good, and within which cold cracking can be avoided in many instances by careful control of welding conditions, particularly preheat and postweld heat treatment. For example, crack-free butt welds have been produced for the first time in 12-mm thick wrought Fe{sub 3}Al plate. Cold cracking, however, still remains an issue in many cases. The author has developed a commercial source for composite weld filler metals spanning a wide range of achievable aluminum levels, and are pursuing the application of these filler metals in a variety of industrial environments. Welding techniques have been developed for both the gas tungsten arc and gas metal arc processes, and preliminary work has been done to utilize the wire arc process for coating of boiler tubes. Clad specimens have been prepared for environmental testing in-house, and a number of components have been modified and placed in service in operating kraft recovery boilers. In collaboration with a commercial producer of spiral weld overlay tubing, the author is attempting to utilize the new filler metals for this novel application.

  1. Metallography of Battery Resistance Spot Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, J. E.; Johannes, L. B.; Gonzalez, D.; Yayathi, S.; Figuered, J. M.; Darcy, E. C.; Bilc, Z. M.

    2015-01-01

    Li-ion cells provide an energy dense solution for systems that require rechargeable electrical power. However, these cells can undergo thermal runaway, the point at which the cell becomes thermally unstable and results in hot gas, flame, electrolyte leakage, and in some cases explosion. The heat and fire associated with this type of event is generally violent and can subsequently cause damage to the surrounding system or present a dangerous risk to the personnel nearby. The space flight environment is especially sensitive to risks particularly when it involves potential for fire within the habitable volume of the International Space Station (ISS). In larger battery packs such as Robonaut 2 (R2), numerous Li-ion cells are placed in parallel-series configurations to obtain the required stack voltage and desired run-time or to meet specific power requirements. This raises a second and less obvious concern for batteries that undergo certification for space flight use: the joining quality at the resistance spot weld of battery cells to component wires/leads and battery tabs, bus bars or other electronic components and assemblies. Resistance spot welds undergo materials evaluation, visual inspection, conductivity (resistivity) testing, destructive peel testing, and metallurgical examination in accordance with applicable NASA Process Specifications. Welded components are cross-sectioned to ensure they are free of cracks or voids open to any exterior surface. Pore and voids contained within the weld zone but not open to an exterior surface, and are not determined to have sharp notch like characteristics, shall be acceptable. Depending on requirements, some battery cells are constructed of aluminum canisters while others are constructed of steel. Process specific weld schedules must be developed and certified for each possible joining combination. The aluminum canisters' positive terminals were particularly difficult to weld due to a bi-metal strip that comes ultrasonically

  2. Effects of Post-Weld Heat Treatment on the Mechanical Properties of Similar- and Dissimilar-Alloy Friction Stir Welded Blanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadpoor, Amir Abbas; Sinke, Jos

    2011-01-01

    Friction stir welding is a solid state joining process with relatively low welding temperatures. Nevertheless, the mechanical properties of friction stir welded blanks are degraded after welding. Indeed, both strength and ductility of the welds are decreased after welding. Often, the resulting friction stir welded blanks need to be formed to their final structural shape. Therefore, the formability of friction stir welded blanks is of primary importance in the manufacturing of structural parts. This paper studies how the mechanical properties and particularly formability of friction stir welded blanks can be improved by applying a post weld heat treatment. Two aluminum alloys from 2000 and 7000 series, namely 2024-T3 and 7075-T6, are selected for the study. The sheet thickness of both materials is 2,0 mm. The selected alloys are welded in three configurations: 2024-T3 and 2024-T3, 7075-T6 and 7075-T6, and 2024-T3 and 7075-T6. The resulting welds are naturally aged for a few months. Three sets of standard dog bone shape tensile test specimens are then machined from the welds. The first set of the specimens is tested without any heat treatment. The second set of the specimens is solution heat treated and quenched before testing. The third set of the specimens is solution heat treated, quenched, and naturally aged for a week before testing. The mechanical properties of the three different sets of specimens are compared with each other. It is shown that careful selection of post weld heat-treatment can greatly improve the formability of friction stir welded blanks.

  3. Microstructural evolution during friction stir welding of AlSi1MgMn alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Janjić

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides the research of the infl uence of geometric and kinematic parameters on the microstructure and mechanical properties of welded joint of aluminum alloy AlSi1MgMn (6082-T6 obtained through the Friction Stir Welding (FSW process. The experiment parameters were welding speed, rotation speed, angle of pin slope, pin diameter and shoulder diameter. On the obtained welded workpieces the dynamic testing on the impact toughness, and determination of microstructural zones were carried out.

  4. Mathematical Modeling of Optical Radiation Emission as a Function of Welding Power during Gas Shielded Metal Arc Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Stefan; Janßen, Marco; Schmitz, Martin; Ott, Günter

    2017-11-01

    Arc welding is accompanied by intense optical radiation emission that can be detrimental not only for the welder himself but also for people working nearby or for passersby. Technological progress advances continuously in the field of joining, so an up-to-date radiation database is necessary. Additionally, many literature irradiance data have been measured for a few welding currents or for parts of the optical spectral region only. Within this paper, a comprehensive study of contemporary metal active gas, metal inert gas, and cold metal transfer welding is presented covering optical radiation emission from 200 up to 2,700 nm by means of (spectro-) radiometric measurements. The investigated welding currents range from 70 to 350 A, reflecting values usually applied in industry. Based upon these new irradiance data, three mathematical models were derived in order to describe optical radiation emission as a function of welding power. The linear, exponential, and sigmoidal emission models depend on the process variant (standard or pulsed) as well as on the welding material (mild and stainless steel, aluminum). In conjunction with the corresponding exposure limit values for incoherent optical radiation maximum permissible exposure durations were calculated as a function of welding power. Typical times are shorter than 1 s for the ultraviolet spectral region and range from 1 to 10 s for visible radiation. For the infrared regime, exposure durations are of the order of minutes to hours. Finally, a validation of the metal active gas emission models was carried out with manual arc welding.

  5. Effect of Local Post Weld Heat Treatment on Tensile Properties in Friction Stir Welded 2219-O Al Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Guannan; Sun, Lei; Lin, Caiyuan; Lin, Yanli

    2017-11-01

    To improve the formability of the aluminum alloy welds and overcome the size limitation of the bulk post weld heat treatment (BPWHT) on large size friction stir welded joints, a local post weld heat treatment method (LPWHT) was proposed. In this method, the resistance heating as the moving heat source is adopted to only heat the weld seam. The temperature field of LPWHT and its influence on the mechanical properties and formability of FSW 2219-O Al alloy joints was investigated. The evaluation of the tensile properties of FSW samples was also examined by mapping the global and local strain distribution using the digital image correlation methodology. The results indicated that the formability was improved greatly after LPWHT, while the hardness distribution of the FSW joint was homogenized. The maximum elongation can reach 1.4 times that of as-welded joints with increase the strength and the strain of the nugget zone increased from 3 to 8% when annealing at 300 °C. The heterogeneity on the tensile deformation of the as-welded joints was improved by the nugget zone showing large local strain value and the reason was given according to the dimple fracture characteristics at different annealing temperatures. The tensile strength and elongation of LPWHT can reach 93.3 and 96.1% of the BPWHT, respectively. Thus, the LPWHT can be advantageous compared to the BPWHT for large size welds.

  6. Non Destructive Analysis of Fsw Welds using Ultrasonic Signal Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavan Kumar, T.; Prabhakar Reddy, P.

    2017-08-01

    Friction Stir Welding is an evolving metal joining technique and is mostly used in joining materials which cannot be easily joined by other available welding techniques. It is a technique which can be used for welding dissimilar materials also. The strength of the weld joint is determined by the way in which these material are mixing with each other, since we are not using any filler material for the welding process the intermixing has a significant importance. The complication with the friction stir welding process is that there are many process parameters which effect this intermixing process such as tool geometry, rotating speed of the tool, transverse speed etc., In this study an attempt is made to compare the material flow and weld quality of various weldments by changing the parameters. Ultrasonic signal Analysis is used to characterize the microstructure of the weldments. use of ultrasonic waves is a non destructive, accurate and fast way of characterization of microstructure. In this method the relationship between the ultrasonic measured parameters and microstructures are evaluated using background echo and backscattered signal process techniques. The ultrasonic velocity and attenuation measurements are dependent on the elastic modulus and any change in the microstructure is reflected in the ultrasonic velocity. An insight into material flow is essential to determine the quality of the weld. Hence an attempt is made in this study to know the relationship between tool geometry and the pattern of material flow and resulting weld quality the experiments are conducted to weld dissimilar aluminum alloys and the weldments are characterized using and ultra Sonic signal processing. Characterization is also done using Scanning Electron Microscopy. It is observed that there is a good correlation between the ultrasonic signal processing results and Scanning Electron Microscopy on the observed precipitates. Tensile tests and hardness tests are conducted on the

  7. Wear Resistance Analysis of A359/SiC/20p Advanced Composite Joints Welded by Friction Stir Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Cuevas Mata

    Full Text Available Abstract Advancement in automotive part development demands new cost-effective materials with higher mechanical properties and improved wear resistance as compared to existing materials. For instance, Aluminum Matrix Composites (AMC shows improved mechanical properties as wear and abrasion resistance, high strength, chemical and dimensional stability. Automotive industry has focused in AMC for a variety of applications in automotive parts in order to improve the fuel economy, minimize vehicle emissions, improve design options, and increase the performance. Wear resistance is one of the most important factors in useful life of the automotive components, overall in those components submitted to mechanical systems like automotive brakes and suspensions. Friction Stir Welding (FSW rises as the most capable process to joining AMC, principally for the capacity to weld without compromising their ceramic reinforcement. The aim of this study is focused on the analysis of wear characteristics of the friction-stir welded joint of aluminum matrix reinforced with 20 percent in weight silicon carbide composite (A359/SiC/20p. The experimental procedure consisted in cut samples into small plates and perform three welds on these with a FSW machine using a tool with 20 mm shoulder diameter and 8 mm pin diameter. The wear features of the three welded joints and parent metal were analyzed at constant load applying 5 N and a rotational speed of 100 rpm employing a Pin-on - Disk wear testing apparatus, using a sapphire steel ball with 6 mm diameter. The experimental results indicate that the three welded joints had low friction coefficient compared with the parent metal. The results determine that the FSW process parameters affect the wear resistance of the welded joints owing to different microstructural modifications during welding that causes a low wear resistance on the welded zone.

  8. Reprocessing weld and method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Killian, M.L.; Lewis, H.E.

    1993-08-03

    A process is described for improving the fatigue resistance of a small primary structural weld at a joint between structural members of a weldment, the weld having been made with the welding energy input of E[sub 1], the process comprising: applying a reprocessing weld on at least a portion of either one or both toes of the primary structural weld, thereby covering said toe portion, the reprocessing weld containing a filler metal and having a cross-sectional area which is less than the corresponding cross-sectional area of the primary structural weld, the reprocessing weld extending onto the face of the primary structural weld at one side of the toe portion covered and onto the structural member at the other side of the toe portion covered, and the total welding energy input, E[sub 2], used in said reprocessing the primary structural weld being less than the welding energy input E[sub 1] of the primary structural weld.

  9. Analysis of the bonding strength and microstructure of AA6082 extrusion weld seams formed during physical simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bai, Sheng Wen; Fang, Gang; Zhou, J.

    2017-01-01

    The research was aimed to determine the effects of extrusion process condition on the weld seam quality of the aluminum alloy AA6082 by using a novel physical simulation method. A weld seam between two bars was formed under hydrostatic pressure in a specially designed die setup to simulate the

  10. Simulation model of Al-Ti dissimilar laser welding-brazing and its experimental verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behúlová, M.; Babalová, E.; Nagy, M.

    2017-02-01

    Formation of dissimilar weld joints of light metals and alloys including Al-Ti joints is interesting mainly due to demands on the weight reduction and corrosion resistance of components and structures in automotive, aircraft, aeronautic and other industries. Joining of Al-Ti alloys represents quite difficult problem. Generally, the fusion welding of these materials can lead to the development of different metastable phases and formation of brittle intermetallic compounds. The paper deals with numerical simulation of the laser welding-brazing process of titanium Grade 2 and EN AW 5083 aluminum alloy sheets using the 5087 aluminum filler wire. Simulation model for welding-brazing of testing samples with the dimensions of 50 × 100 × 2 mm was developed in order to perform numerical experiments applying variable welding parameters and to design proper combination of these parameters for formation of sound Al-Ti welded-brazed joints. Thermal properties of welded materials in the dependence on temperature were computed using JMatPro software. The conical model of the heat source was exploited for description of the heat input to the weld due to the moving laser beam source. The sample cooling by convection and radiation to the surrounding air and shielding argon gas was taken into account. Developed simulation model was verified by comparison of obtained results of numerical simulation with the temperatures measured during real experiments of laser welding-brazing by the TruDisk 4002 disk laser.

  11. Physical and chemical characterization of airborne particles from welding operations in automotive plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasch, Jean; D'Arcy, James

    2008-07-01

    Airborne particles were characterized from six welding operations in three automotive plants, including resistance spot welding, metal inert gas (MIG) welding and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding of aluminum and resistance spot welding, MIG welding and weld-through sealer of galvanized steel. Particle levels were measured throughout the process area to select a sampling location, followed by intensive particle sampling over one working shift. Temporal trends were measured, and particles were collected on filters to characterize their size and chemistry. In all cases, the particles fell into a bimodal size distribution with very large particles >20 mum in diameter, possibly emitted as spatter or metal expulsions, and very small particles about 1 mum in diameter, possibly formed from condensation of vaporized metal. The mass median aerodynamic diameter was about 1 mum, with only about 7% of the particle mass present as ultrafine particles welding particles could be accounted for by chemical analysis, with the remainder possibly present as oxygen. Predominant species were organic carbon, elemental carbon, iron, and aluminum. More than 80% of the particle mass could be accounted for from steel welding, primarily present as iron, organic carbon, zinc, and copper. Particle concentrations and elemental concentrations were compared with allowable concentrations as recommended by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration and the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists. In all cases, workplace levels were at least 11 times lower than recommended levels.

  12. Handbook of Plastic Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Aminul

    The purpose of this document is to summarize the information about the laser welding of plastic. Laser welding is a matured process nevertheless laser welding of micro dimensional plastic parts is still a big challenge. This report collects the latest information about the laser welding of plastic...... materials and provides an extensive knowhow on the industrial plastic welding process. The objectives of the report include: - Provide the general knowhow of laser welding for the beginners - Summarize the state-of-the-art information on the laser welding of plastics - Find the technological limits in terms...... of design, materials and process - Find the best technology, process and machines adaptive to Sonion’s components - Provide the skills to Sonion’s Design Engineers for successful design of the of the plastic components suitable for the laser welding The ultimate goal of this report is to serve...

  13. Welding Course Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genits, Joseph C.

    This guide is intended for use in helping students gain a fundamental background on the major aspects of the welding trade. The course emphasis is on mastery of the manipulative skills necessary to develop successful welding techniques and on acquisition of an understanding of the specialized tools and equipment used in welding. The first part…

  14. Instructional Guidelines. Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fordyce, H. L.; Doshier, Dale

    Using the standards of the American Welding Society and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, this welding instructional guidelines manual presents a course of study in accordance with the current practices in industry. Intended for use in welding programs now practiced within the Federal Prison System, the phases of the program are…

  15. Brazing dissimilar aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalalian, H.

    1979-01-01

    Dip-brazing process joins aluminum castings to aluminum sheet made from different aluminum alloy. Process includes careful cleaning, surface preparation, and temperature control. It causes minimum distortion of parts.

  16. CO2 laser welding of magnesium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhahri, Mohammed; Masse, Jean Eric; Mathieu, J. F.; Barreau, Gerard; Autric, Michel L.

    2000-02-01

    Metallic alloys with a low mass density can be considered to be basic materials in aeronautic and automotive industry. Magnesium alloys have better properties than aluminum alloys in respect of their low density and high resistance to traction. The main problems of magnesium alloy welding are the inflammability, the crack formation and the appearance of porosity during the solidification. The laser tool is efficient to overcome the difficulties of manufacturing by conventional processing. Besides, the laser processing mainly using shielding gases allows an effective protection of the metal against the action of oxygen and a small heat affected zone. In this paper, we present experimental results about 5 kW CO2 laser welding of 4 mm-thick magnesium alloy plates provided by Eurocopter France. The focused laser beam has about 0.15 mm of diameter. We have investigated the following sample: WE43, alloy recommended in aeronautic and space applications, is constituted with Mg, Y, Zr, rare earth. More ductile, it can be used at high temperatures until 250 degrees Celsius for times longer than 5000 hours without effects on its mechanical properties. A sample of RZ5 (French Norm: GZ4TR, United States Norm ZE41) is composed of Mg, Zn, Zr, La, rare earth. This alloy has excellent properties of foundry and it allows to the realization of components with complex form. Also, it has a good resistance and important properties of tightness. The parameters of the process were optimized in the following fields: laser power: 2 to 5 kW, welding speed: 1 to 4.5 m/min, focal position: -3 mm to +3 mm below or on the top of the metal surface, shielding gas: helium with a flow of 10 to 60 l/min at 4 bars. Metallurgical analyses and mechanical control are made (macroscopic structure, microscopic structure, interpretations of the structures and localization of possible defects, analyse phases, chemical composition, hardness, tensile test etc.) to understand the parameters influence of welding

  17. Inspecting Friction Stir Welding using Electromagnetic Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinchen, David G.

    2004-01-01

    A report describes the use of advanced electromagnetic probes to measure the dimensions, the spatial distribution of electrical conductivity, and related other properties of friction stir welds (FSWs) between parts made of the same or different aluminum alloy(s). The probes are of the type described in in another Tech Brief. To recapitulate: A probe of this type is essentially an eddy-current probe that includes a primary (driver) winding that meanders and multiple secondary (sensing) windings that meander along the primary winding. Electrical conductivity is commonly used as a measure of heat treatment and tempering of aluminum alloys, but prior to the development of these probes, the inadequate sensitivity and limited accuracy of electrical-conductivity probes precluded such use on FSWs between different aluminum alloys, and the resolution of those probes was inadequate for measurement of FSW dimensions with positions and metallurgical properties. In contrast, the present probes afford adequate accuracy and spatial resolution for the purposes of measuring the dimensions of FSW welds and correlating spatially varying electrical conductivities with metallurgical properties, including surface defects.

  18. Physics of arc welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagar, T. W.

    1982-05-01

    A discussion of the factors controlling the size and shape of the weld fusion zone is presented along with a description of current theories of heat and fluid flow phenomena in the plasma and the molten metal weld pool. Although experimental results confirm that surface tension, plasma jets, and weld pool convection all strongly influence the fusion zone shape; no comprehensive model is available from which to predict welding behavior. It is proposed that the lack of such an understanding is a major impediment to development of automated welding processes. In addition, sensors for weld torch positioning are reviewed in terms of the mechnical and electromagnetic energy spectra which have been used. New developments in this area are also needed in order to advance the technology of automated welding.

  19. Dual wire weld feed proportioner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, R. E.

    1968-01-01

    Dual feed mechanism enables proportioning of two different weld feed wires during automated TIG welding to produce a weld alloy deposit of the desired composition. The wires are fed into the weld simultaneously. The relative feed rates of the wires and the wire diameters determine the weld deposit composition.

  20. Collision Welding of Dissimilar Materials by Vaporizing Foil Actuator: A Breakthrough Technology for Dissimilar Metal Joining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daehn, Glenn S. [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Vivek, Anupam [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Liu, Bert C. [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    2016-09-30

    This work demonstrated and further developed Vaporizing Foil Actuator Welding (VFAW) as a viable technique for dissimilar-metal joining for automotive lightweighting applications. VFAW is a novel impact welding technology, which uses the pressure developed from electrically-assisted rapid vaporization of a thin aluminum foil (the consumable) to launch and ultimately collide two of more pieces of metal to create a solid-state bond between them. 18 dissimilar combinations of automotive alloys from the steel, aluminum and magnesium alloy classes were screened for weldability and characterized by metallography of weld cross sections, corrosion testing, and mechanical testing. Most combinations, especially a good number of Al/Fe pairs, were welded successfully. VFAW was even able to weld combinations of very high strength materials such as 5000 and 6000 series aluminum alloys to boron and dual phase steels, which is difficult to impossible by other joining techniques such as resistance spot welding, friction stir welding, or riveting. When mechanically tested, the samples routinely failed in a base metal rather than along the weld interface, showing that the weld was stronger than either of the base metals. As for corrosion performance, a polymer-based protective coating was used to successfully combat galvanic corrosion of 5 Al/Fe pairs through a month-long exposure to warm salt fog. In addition to the technical capabilities, VFAW also consumes little energy compared to conventional welding techniques and requires relatively light, flexible tooling. Given the technical and economic advantages, VFAW can be a very competitive joining technology for automotive lightweighting. The success of this project and related activities has resulted in substantial interest not only within the research community but also various levels of automotive supply chain, which are collaborating to bring this technology to commercial use.

  1. Determination of airborne nanoparticles from welding operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, João Fernando Pereira; Albuquerque, Paula Cristina Silva; Miranda, Rosa Maria Mendes; Vieira, Maria Teresa Freire

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the levels of airborne ultrafine particles emitted in welding processes (tungsten inert gas [TIG], metal active gas [MAG] of carbon steel, and friction stir welding [FSW] of aluminum) in terms of deposited area in pulmonary alveolar tract using a nanoparticle surface area monitor (NSAM) analyzer. The obtained results showed the dependence of process parameters on emitted ultrafine particles and demonstrated the presence of ultrafine particles compared to background levels. Data indicated that the process that resulted in the lowest levels of alveolar deposited surface area (ADSA) was FSW, followed by TIG and MAG. However, all tested processes resulted in significant concentrations of ultrafine particles being deposited in humans lungs of exposed workers.

  2. On the use of slag from silicomanganese production for welding flux manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyrev, N. A.; Kryukov, R. E.; Lipatova, U. I.; Kozyreva, O. E.

    2016-09-01

    The technologies for manufacturing of welding fluxes with the use of slag from silicomanganese production and dust of gas purification from aluminum production are developed. The new compositions and production technology of welding fluxes are offered. The comparative evaluation of the new compositions and widely used AN-348 flux is provided. It is shown that the quality of submerged arc welding with the use of the developed flux composition is significantly better than the submerged arc welding with AN-348 flux. The effect of fractional composition on high-quality performance of the weld is investigated. The macro- and microstructures, nonmetallic inclusions and the mechanical properties of the weld are examined. It is shown that the introduction of carbon-fluorine containing additive into the flux, based on the dust of gas purification from aluminum production, can significantly improve the whole complex of mechanical properties of the weld, especially characteristics of impact hardness at low temperatures. The conducted research served as a basis for development of submerged arc welding technologies protected by the patents of the Russian Federation.

  3. New technique of skin embedded wire double-sided laser beam welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bing; Tao, Wang; Chen, Yanbin

    2017-06-01

    In the aircraft industry, double-sided laser beam welding is an approved method for producing skin-stringer T-joints on aircraft fuselage panels. As for the welding of new generation aluminum-lithium alloys, however, this technique is limited because of high hot cracking susceptibility and strengthening elements' uneven distributions within weld. In the present study, a new technique of skin embedded wire double-sided laser beam welding (LBW) has been developed to fabricate T-joints consisting of 2.0 mm thick 2060-T8/2099-T83 aluminum-lithium alloys using eutectic alloy AA4047 filler wire. Necessary dimension parameters of the novel groove were reasonably designed for achieving crack-free welds. Comparisons were made between the new technique welded T-joint and conventional T-joint mainly on microstructure, hot crack, elements distribution features and mechanical properties within weld. Excellent crack-free microstructure, uniform distribution of silicon and superior tensile properties within weld were found in the new skin embedded wire double-sided LBW T-joints.

  4. Effect of Temperature on Microstructure and Fracture Mechanisms in Friction Stir Welded Al6061 Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorbane, A.; Ayoub, G.; Mansoor, B.; Hamade, R. F.; Imad, A.

    2017-05-01

    Aluminum and its alloys are widely used in different industries due to such attractive properties as adequate strength, ductility, and low density. It is desirable to characterize welds of aluminum alloys obtained using "friction stir welding" at high temperatures. Al-to-Al (both 6061-T6) butt joints are produced by friction stir welding at tool rotation speed of 1600 rpm and four levels of tool advancing speeds: 250, 500, 750, and 1000 mm/min. Microstructural properties of the different welds are investigated. Observed are noticeable differences in microstructure characteristics between the various weld zones. Mechanical properties of these welded joints are characterized under tensile tests at temperatures of 25, 100, 200, and 300 °C, at a constant strain rate of 10-3/s. The optimum microstructural and mechanical properties were obtained for the samples FS welded with 1600 rpm tool rotation speed at 1000 mm/min tool advancing speed. The studied welds exhibited yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, and strain to failure with values inferior of those of the base material. Observations of postmortem samples revealed that in the temperature range of 25-200 °C the locus of failure originates at the region between the thermo-mechanically affected zone and the heat-affected zones. However, at higher temperatures (300 °C), the failure occurs in the stir zone. A change in the crack initiation mechanism with temperature is suggested to explain this observation.

  5. Heavy-section welding with very high power laser beams: the challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goussain, Jean-Claude; Becker, Ahim; Chehaibou, A.; Leca, P.

    1997-08-01

    The 45 kW CO2 laser system of Institut de Soudure was used to evaluate and explore the possibilities offered by the high power laser beams for welding different materials in various thickness and in different welding positions. Stainless steels, low carbon steels, aluminum and titanium alloys were studied. Butt joints in 10 to 35 mm thick plates were achieved and evaluated by radiographic, metallurgical and mechanical tests. Gaps and alignment tolerances were determined with and without filler wire in order to obtain acceptable welds concerning the weld geometry, the aspect on front and end root sides. The main problem raised by heavy section welding concerns weld porosity in the weld which increases drastically with the thickness of the weld. Indications are given on their origin and the way to proceed in order to better control them. Lastly some large parts, recently welded on the system, are presented and discussed before drawing some conclusions on the prospects of very high power laser welding.

  6. Welding arc plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Bruce L.

    1990-01-01

    The problems of weld quality control and weld process dependability continue to be relevant issues in modern metal welding technology. These become especially important for NASA missions which may require the assembly or repair of larger orbiting platforms using automatic welding techniques. To extend present welding technologies for such applications, NASA/MSFC's Materials and Processes Lab is developing physical models of the arc welding process with the goal of providing both a basis for improved design of weld control systems, and a better understanding of how arc welding variables influence final weld properties. The physics of the plasma arc discharge is reasonably well established in terms of transport processes occurring in the arc column itself, although recourse to sophisticated numerical treatments is normally required to obtain quantitative results. Unfortunately the rigor of these numerical computations often obscures the physics of the underlying model due to its inherent complexity. In contrast, this work has focused on a relatively simple physical model of the arc discharge to describe the gross features observed in welding arcs. Emphasis was placed of deriving analytic expressions for the voltage along the arc axis as a function of known or measurable arc parameters. The model retains the essential physics for a straight polarity, diffusion dominated free burning arc in argon, with major simplifications of collisionless sheaths and simple energy balances at the electrodes.

  7. Near Net Manufacturing Using Thin Gage Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshita, Jennifer; Potter, David; Holquin, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) and near net spin forming of FSW aluminumn blanks were investigated for large-scale pressure vessel applications. With a specific focus on very thin gage 2xxx and 7xxx aluminum alloys, the program concentrated on the following: the criteria used for material selection, a potential manufacturing flow, and the effectiveness and associated risks of near net spin forming. Discussion will include the mechanical properties of the friction stir welds and the parent material from before and after the spin forming process. This effort was performed under a NASA Space Exploration initiative focused on increasing the affordability, reliability and performance of pressure vessels larger than 10 ft. diameter.

  8. Surface Hardness of Friction Stir Welded AA6063 Pipe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Azman

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The external surface hardness of friction stir welded aluminum alloy 6063 pipe joint was investigated in this paper. The 89mm of outside diameter pipe with 5mm of wall thickness was used as test pipe piece for this experiment on closed butt joint configuration by utilising Bridgeport 2216 CNC milling machine and orbital clamping unit specially designed to cater for this task and function. Several welded samples were produced on varying process parameters which were successfully joined by using a non-consumable tool with a flat shoulder and a cylindrical pin.

  9. Welding skate with computerized controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, W. A., Jr.

    1968-01-01

    New welding skate concept for automatic TIG welding of contoured or double-contoured parts combines lightweight welding apparatus with electrical circuitry which computes the desired torch angle and positions a torch and cold-wire guide angle manipulator.

  10. Computerized adaptive control weld skate with CCTV weld guidance project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, W. A.

    1976-01-01

    This report summarizes progress of the automatic computerized weld skate development portion of the Computerized Weld Skate with Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) Arc Guidance Project. The main goal of the project is to develop an automatic welding skate demonstration model equipped with CCTV weld guidance. The three main goals of the overall project are to: (1) develop a demonstration model computerized weld skate system, (2) develop a demonstration model automatic CCTV guidance system, and (3) integrate the two systems into a demonstration model of computerized weld skate with CCTV weld guidance for welding contoured parts.

  11. Modern Methods of Rail Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyrev, Nikolay A.; Kozyreva, Olga A.; Usoltsev, Aleksander A.; Kryukov, Roman E.; Shevchenko, Roman A.

    2017-10-01

    Existing methods of rail welding, which are enable to get continuous welded rail track, are observed in this article. Analysis of existing welding methods allows considering an issue of continuous rail track in detail. Metallurgical and welding technologies of rail welding and also process technologies reducing aftereffects of temperature exposure are important factors determining the quality and reliability of the continuous rail track. Analysis of the existing methods of rail welding enable to find the research line for solving this problem.

  12. Challenges to Resistance Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Quanfeng

    This report originates from the compulsory defense during my Ph.D. study at the Technical University of Denmark. Resistance welding is an old and well-proven technology. Yet the emergence of more and more new materials, new designs, invention off new joining techniques, and more stringent...... requirement in quality have imposed challenges to the resistance welding. More some research and development have to be done to adapt the old technology to the manufacturing industry of the 21st century. In the 1st part of the report, the challenging factors to the resistance welding are reviewed. Numerical...... simulation of resistance welding has been under development for many years. Yet it is no easy to make simulation results reliable and accurate because of the complexity of resistance welding process. In the 2nd part of the report numerical modeling of resistance welding is reviewed, some critical factors...

  13. Ultrasonic Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabors, Sammy

    2015-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Ultrasonic Stir Welding (USW) to join large pieces of very high-strength metals such as titanium and Inconel. USW, a solid-state weld process, improves current thermal stir welding processes by adding high-power ultrasonic (HPU) energy at 20 kHz frequency. The addition of ultrasonic energy significantly reduces axial, frictional, and shear forces; increases travel rates; and reduces wear on the stir rod, which results in extended stir rod life. The USW process decouples the heating, stirring, and forging elements found in the friction stir welding process allowing for independent control of each process element and, ultimately, greater process control and repeatability. Because of the independent control of USW process elements, closed-loop temperature control can be integrated into the system so that a constant weld nugget temperature can be maintained during welding.

  14. CONTRIBUTIONS FROM SMOKE ON IMPACT OF WELDING PROCEDURES HEALTH OPERATORS WELDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe AMZA

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents research conducted on the contents of fumes resulting from welding processes with emphasis on micro various metallic and nonmetallic elements involved in these fumes. It also presents the main health effects of welders and operators working in the welding stations. Are risks that may occur due to micro chromium, nickel, iron, manganese, silicon, fluorine, zinc, aluminum, copper, cadmium, lead, molybdenum, cobalt, vanadium and others.

  15. Computer modeling of the stress-strain state of a linear friction welded disk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Bychkov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper is dedicated to design issues of tooling for linear friction welding (LFW machine. Computer model of a LFW machine was built. As a result of computer simulation, the stress-strain state of the machine and disk module for linear friction welding of aluminum alloy blisks also was obtained. On the basis of the results of computer simulation a module with a replaceable unit and a new variant fixing of disc in the module were designed.

  16. Dual wire welding torch and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez, Fernando Martinez; Stump, Kevin S.; Ludewig, Howard W.; Kilty, Alan L.; Robinson, Matthew M.; Egland, Keith M.

    2009-04-28

    A welding torch includes a nozzle with a first welding wire guide configured to orient a first welding wire in a first welding wire orientation, and a second welding wire guide configured to orient a second welding wire in a second welding wire orientation that is non-coplanar and divergent with respect to the first welding wire orientation. A method of welding includes moving a welding torch with respect to a workpiece joint to be welded. During moving the welding torch, a first welding wire is fed through a first welding wire guide defining a first welding wire orientation and a second welding wire is fed through a second welding wire guide defining a second welding wire orientation that is divergent and non-coplanar with respect to the first welding wire orientation.

  17. Effect of welding speed on microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of laser welded-brazed Al/brass dissimilar joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, L.; Luo, L. Y.; Tan, C. W.; Li, Z. Y.; Song, X. G.; Zhao, H. Y.; Huang, Y. X.; Feng, J. C.

    2018-01-01

    Laser welding-brazing process was developed for joining 5052 aluminum alloy and H62 brass in butt configuration with Zn-15%Al filler. Effect of welding speed on microstructural characteristics and mechanical properties of joints were investigated. Acceptable joints without obvious defect were obtained with the welding speed of 0.5-0.6 m/min, while lower and higher welding speed caused excessive back reinforcement and cracking, respectively. Three reaction layers were observed at welding speed of 0.3 m/min, which were Al4.2Cu3.2Zn0.7 (τ‧)/Al4Cu9/CuZn from weld seam side to brass side; while at welding speed of 0.4-0.6 m/min, two layers Al4.2Cu3.2Zn0.7 and CuZn formed. The thickness of interfacial reaction layers increased with the decrease of welding speed, but varied little at different interfacial positions from top to bottom in one joint. Tensile test results indicated that the maximum joint tensile strength of 128 MPa was obtained at 0.5 m/min, which was 55.7% of that of Al base metal. All the joints fractured along the weld seam/brass interface. Some differences were found regarding fracture locations with three and two reaction layers. The joint fractured between Al4Cu9 and τ‧ IMC layer when the interface had three layers, while the crack occurred between CuZn and τ‧ phase in the case of two layers.

  18. Studies of welded joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Krupa

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Studies of a welded joint were described. The joint was made as a result of the reconstruction of a truss and one of the possible means to make a repair. The studies were of a simulation character and were targeted at the detection of welding defects and imperfections thatshould be eliminated in a real structure. A model was designed and on this model the tests and examinations were carried out. The modelwas made under the same conditions as the conditions adopted for repair. It corresponded to the real object in shape and dimensions, and in the proposed technique of welding and welding parameters. The model was composed of five plates joined together with twelve beads.The destructive and non-destructive tests were carried out; the whole structure and the respective welds were also examined visually. Thedefects and imperfections in welds were detected by surface methods of inspection, penetration tests and magnetic particle flaw detection.The model of the welded joint was prepared by destructive methods, a technique that would never be permitted in the case of a realstructure. For the investigations it was necessary to cut out the specimens from the welded joint in direction transverse to the weld run. The specimens were subjected to metallographic examinations and hardness measurements. Additionally, the joint cross-section was examined by destructive testing methods to enable precise determination of the internal defects and imperfections. The surface methods were applied again, this time to determine the severity of welding defects. The analysis has proved that, fabricated under proper conditions and with parameters of the welding process duly observed, the welded joint has good properties and repairs of this type are possible in practice.

  19. Fatigue Design Curves for 6061-T6 Aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yahr, G. T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Engineering Technology Division

    1993-04-21

    A request has been made to the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Committee that 6061-T6 aluminum be approved for use in the construction of Class 1 welded nuclear vessels so it can be used for the pressure vessel of the Advanced Neutron Source research reactor. Fatigue design curves with and without mean stress effects have been proposed. A knock-down factor of two is applied to the design curve for evaluation of welds. The basis of the curves is explained. The fatigue design curves are compared to fatigue data from base metal and weldments.

  20. Robot welding process control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romine, Peter L.

    1991-01-01

    This final report documents the development and installation of software and hardware for Robotic Welding Process Control. Primary emphasis is on serial communications between the CYRO 750 robotic welder, Heurikon minicomputer running Hunter & Ready VRTX, and an IBM PC/AT, for offline programming and control and closed-loop welding control. The requirements for completion of the implementation of the Rocketdyne weld tracking control are discussed. The procedure for downloading programs from the Intergraph, over the network, is discussed. Conclusions are made on the results of this task, and recommendations are made for efficient implementation of communications, weld process control development, and advanced process control procedures using the Heurikon.

  1. Explosive Welding of Pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drennov, Oleg; Drennov, Andrey; Burtseva, Olga

    2013-06-01

    For connection by welding it is suggested to use the explosive welding method. This method is rather new. Nevertheless, it has become commonly used among the technological developments. This method can be advantageous (saving material and physical resources) comparing to its statical analogs (electron-beam welding, argon-arc welding, plasma welding, gas welding, etc.), in particular, in hard-to-reach areas due to their geographic and climatic conditions. Explosive welding of cylindrical surfaces is performed by launching of welded layer along longitudinal axis of construction. During this procedure, it is required to provide reliable resistance against radial convergent strains. The traditional method is application of fillers of pipe cavity, which are dense cylindrical objects having special designs. However, when connecting pipes consecutively in pipelines by explosive welding, removal of the fillers becomes difficult and sometimes impossible. The suggestion is to use water as filler. The principle of non-compressibility of liquid under quasi-dynamic loading is used. In one-dimensional gasdynamic and elastic-plastic calculations we determined non-deformed mass of water (perturbations, which are moving in the axial direction with sound velocity, should not reach the layer end boundaries for 5-7 circulations of shock waves in the radial direction). Linear dimension of the water layer from the zone of pipe coupling along axis in each direction is >= 2R, where R is the internal radius of pipe.

  2. Structural transformations and properties of titanium-aluminum composite during heat treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervukhin, L. B.; Kryukov, D. B.; Krivenkov, A. O.; Chugunov, S. N.

    2017-08-01

    The link between the parameters of heat treatment of a layered titanium-aluminum composite material obtained by explosive welding with the formation of intermetallic compounds in it has been analyzed. The results of measurements of the microhardness of the composite and the thickness of the interlayer of the intermetallic phase obtained using different regimes of heat treatment have been discussed. Special attention has been paid to estimating the composition of the intermetallic phase in the composite prepared by explosive welding.

  3. Computer Tomography 3-D Imaging of the Metal Deformation Flow Path in Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Judy; Beshears, Ronald; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    In friction stir welding, a rotating threaded pin tool is inserted into a weld seam and literally stirs the edges of the seam together. This solid-state technique has been successfully used in the joining of materials that are difficult to fusion weld such as aluminum alloys. To determine optimal processing parameters for producing a defect free weld, a better understanding of the resulting metal deformation flow path is required. Marker studies are the principal method of studying the metal deformation flow path around the FSW pin tool. In our study, we have used computed tomography (CT) scans to reveal the flow pattern of a lead wire embedded in a FSW weld seam. At the welding temperature of aluminum, the lead becomes molten and thus tracks the aluminum deformation flow paths in a unique 3-dimensional manner. CT scanning is a convenient and comprehensive way of collecting and displaying tracer data. It marks an advance over previous more tedious and ambiguous radiographic/metallographic data collection methods.

  4. Effects of Friction Stir Welding Speed on AA2195 alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Ho-Sung

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of friction stir welding (FSW to aerospace has grown rapidly due to the high efficiency and environmental friendly nature of the process. FSW is achieved by plastic flow of frictionally heated material in solid state and offers many advantages of avoiding hot cracking and limiting component distortion. Recently low density, high modulus and high strength AA2195 are used as substitute for conventional aluminum alloys since the weight saving is critical in aerospace applications. One of the problems for this alloy is weld metal porosity formation leading to hot cracking. Combination of FSW and AA2195 provides synergy effect to improve mechanical properties and weight saving of aerospace structure such as cryogenic fuel tanks for launch systems. The objective of this paper is to investigate the effect of friction stir welding speed on mechanical and microstructural properties of AA2195. The friction stir welded materials were joined with four different tool rotation speeds (350~800 rpm and five welding speeds (120~360 mm/min, which are the two prime welding parameters in this process.

  5. Potential Applications of Friction Stir Welding to the Hydrogen Economy. Hydrogen Regional Infrastructure Program In Pennsylvania, Materials Task

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brendlinger, Jennifer [Concurrent Technologies Corporation, Johnstown, PA (United States)

    2009-07-17

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a solid-state welding technique developed by The Welding Institute (TWI) of Cambridge, UK in the early 1990’s. The process uses a non-consumable rotating tool to develop frictional heat and plastically deform workpieces to be joined, resulting in a solid-state weld on the trailing side of the advancing tool. Since the materials to be joined are not melted, FSW results in a finer grain structure and therefore enhanced properties, relative to fusion welds. And unlike fusion welding, a relatively small number of key process parameters exist for FSW: tool rotational speed, linear weld velocity and force perpendicular to the joining surface. FSW is more energy efficient than fusion welding and can be accomplished in one or two passes, versus many more passes required of fusion welding thicker workpieces. Reduced post-weld workpiece distortion is another factor that helps to reduce the cost of FSW relative to fusion welding. Two primary areas have been identified for potential impact on the hydrogen economy: FSW of metallic pipes for hydrogen transmission and FSW of aluminum pressure vessels for hydrogen storage. Both areas have been under active development and are explored in this paper.

  6. Thermal Modeling of Al-Al and Al-Steel Friction Stir Spot Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedrasiak, P.; Shercliff, H. R.; Reilly, A.; McShane, G. J.; Chen, Y. C.; Wang, L.; Robson, J.; Prangnell, P.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a finite element thermal model for similar and dissimilar alloy friction stir spot welding (FSSW). The model is calibrated and validated using instrumented lap joints in Al-Al and Al-Fe automotive sheet alloys. The model successfully predicts the thermal histories for a range of process conditions. The resulting temperature histories are used to predict the growth of intermetallic phases at the interface in Al-Fe welds. Temperature predictions were used to study the evolution of hardness of a precipitation-hardened aluminum alloy during post-weld aging after FSSW.

  7. Susceptibility testing for welding of AlMg alloys intended for extrusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Borowski

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of research was to determine the weldability, using Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG of extruded sections made of hard-deformable 5xxx series aluminum alloys with differing magnesium content, i.e. AlMg3, AlMg4,5, AlMg5, AlMg7. Welded joints were obtained as a result of a welding process consisting of several steps. Only welds characterized by very good appearance and quality were selected for tests. As a result of conducted research, TIG welding parameters were determined for sections with a thickness of 8 mm. It was observed that alloys of differing Mg content are characterized by high weldability and do not exhibit a significant reduction of the yield point. Moreover, joints exhibit uniform hardness distribution in the welded joint and heat-affected zone. Tensile strength is reduced.

  8. Corrosion behavior of Al6061 alloy weldment produced by friction stir welding process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Gharavi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the corrosion behavior of welded lap joints of AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy produced by friction stir welding process has been investigated. Corrosion properties of welded lap joints were studied by cyclic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy tests. All tests were performed in an aerated 0.6 mol L−1 NaCl aqueous solution with pH = 6.5 at a temperature of 30 °C to characterize corrosion morphology and realize corrosion features of weld regions as opposed to the parent alloy. The microstructure of weld nugget (WN, heated affected zone (HAZ, and parent alloy were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The experimental results indicated that the welding process has a major effect on the corrosion resistance, which possibly associated to the break-down and dissolution of intermetallic particles. It is supposed that an increasing in intermetallic distributed throughout the matrix of weld regions increases the galvanic corrosion couples. Furthermore, by decreasing the grain size in the weld regions, the susceptibility to corrosion is enhanced. The pitting corrosion and intergranular attack are the dominant corrosion types in the weld regions and the parent alloy.

  9. Thermomechanically coupled conduction mode laser welding simulations using smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Haoyue; Eberhard, Peter

    2017-10-01

    Process simulations of conduction mode laser welding are performed using the meshless Lagrangian smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method. The solid phase is modeled based on the governing equations in thermoelasticity. For the liquid phase, surface tension effects are taken into account to simulate the melt flow in the weld pool, including the Marangoni force caused by a temperature-dependent surface tension gradient. A non-isothermal solid-liquid phase transition with the release or absorption of additional energy known as the latent heat of fusion is considered. The major heat transfer through conduction is modeled, whereas heat convection and radiation are neglected. The energy input from the laser beam is modeled as a Gaussian heat source acting on the initial material surface. The developed model is implemented in Pasimodo. Numerical results obtained with the model are presented for laser spot welding and seam welding of aluminum and iron. The change of process parameters like welding speed and laser power, and their effects on weld dimensions are investigated. Furthermore, simulations may be useful to obtain the threshold for deep penetration welding and to assess the overall welding quality. A scalability and performance analysis of the implemented SPH algorithm in Pasimodo is run in a shared memory environment. The analysis reveals the potential of large welding simulations on multi-core machines.

  10. Microstructural developments and mechanical properties of friction stir welding of AZ91D magnesium alloy plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagabhushan Kumar Kadigithala

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir welding (FSW is an efficient technique which can be used particularly for magnesium and aluminum alloys that are difficult to fusion weld. In this work AZ91D Mg alloy plates 3mm thick were friction stir welded at different process variables such as rotational speed and welding speed. The range of rotational speeds varied from 1025 to 1525 rpm, and the welding speed varied from 25 to 75 mm/min. Good quality welds were obtained under 1025 rpm of rotational speed with the welding speeds range from 25 to 75 mm/min. The microstructure of the AZ91D alloy consists of primary α-phase, eutectic α-phase and eutectic β (Mg17Al12 phase in the received condition (gravity die cast. The original dendrite grain structure completely disappeared and was transformed to fine equiaxed grains in stir zone (SZ. It was observed that there was a slight increase in hardness in SZ, because of fine recrystallized grain structure. The transverse tensile test results of weld specimens indicated constant strength irrespective of traveling speed. Fractrographic analysis of the friction stir welded specimens showed the brittle failure.

  11. High Productivity Aluminum Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    25 Figure 10 Height Measurement of the top weld bead, produced with the HDGMAW technique, with the aid of a dial gauge...modified to include a 0.080” (2mm) deep top Vee groove preparation with a 90° included angle (Appendix 12) in which it “ rides ” during the welding operation... dial gauge 5.8 Weld Evaluations and Testing The conformance of the HDGMA welds in the proof of concept 5’ (1524mm) weldments to the requirements

  12. Measuring weld heat to evaluate weld integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schauder, V., E-mail: schauder@hks-prozesstechnik.de [HKS-Prozesstechnik GmbH, Halle (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    Eddy current and ultrasonic testing are suitable for tube and pipe mills and have been used for weld seam flaw detection for decades, but a new process, thermography, is an alternative. By measuring the heat signature of the weld seam as it cools, it provides information about weld integrity at and below the surface. The thermal processes used to join metals, such as plasma, induction, laser, and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW), have improved since they were developed, and they get better with each passing year. However, no industrial process is perfect, so companies that conduct research in flaw detection likewise continue to develop and improve the technologies used to verify weld integrity: ultrasonic testing (UT), eddy current testing (ET), hydrostatic, X-ray, magnetic particle, and liquid penetrant are among the most common. Two of these are used for verifying the integrity of the continuous welds such as those used on pipe and tube mills: UT and ET. Each uses a transmitter to send waves of ultrasonic energy or electrical current through the material and a receiver (probe) to detect disturbances in the flow. The two processes often are combined to capitalize on the strengths of each. While ET is good at detecting flaws at or near the surface, UT penetrates the material, detecting subsurface flaws. One drawback is that sound waves and electrical current waves have a specific direction of travel, or an alignment. A linear defect that runs parallel to the direction of travel of the ultrasonic sound wave or a flaw that is parallel to the coil winding direction of the ET probe can go undetected. A second drawback is that they don't detect cold welds. An alternative process, thermography, works in a different fashion: It monitors the heat of the material as the weld cools. Although it measures the heat at the surface, the heat signature provides clues about cooling activity deep in the material, resulting in a thorough assessment of the weld's integrity It

  13. Fine welding with lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLellan, D

    2008-01-01

    The need for micro joining metallic alloys for surgical instruments, implants and advanced medical devices is driving a rapid increase in the implementation of laser welding technology in research, development and volume production. This article discusses the advantages of this welding method and the types of lasers used in the process.

  14. Laser Welding in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Gary L.; Kaukler, William F.

    1989-01-01

    Solidification type welding process experiments in conditions of microgravity were performed. The role of convection in such phenomena was examined and convective effects in the small volumes obtained in the laser weld zone were observed. Heat transfer within the weld was affected by acceleration level as indicated by the resulting microstructure changes in low gravity. All experiments were performed such that both high and low gravity welds occurred along the same weld beam, allowing the effects of gravity alone to be examined. Results indicate that laser welding in a space environment is feasible and can be safely performed IVA or EVA. Development of the hardware to perform the experiment in a Hitchhiker-g platform is recomended as the next step. This experiment provides NASA with a capable technology for welding needs in space. The resources required to perform this experiment aboard a Shuttle Hitchhiker-pallet are assessed. Over the four year period 1991 to 1994, it is recommended that the task will require 13.6 manyears and $914,900. In addition to demonstrating the technology and ferreting out the problems encountered, it is suggested that NASA will also have a useful laser materials processing facility for working with both the scientific and the engineering aspects of materials processing in space. Several concepts are also included for long-term optimization of available solar power through solar pumping solid state lasers directly for welding power.

  15. DC arc weld starter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campiotti, Richard H.; Hopwood, James E.

    1990-01-01

    A system for starting an arc for welding uses three DC power supplies, a high voltage supply for initiating the arc, an intermediate voltage supply for sustaining the arc, and a low voltage welding supply directly connected across the gap after the high voltage supply is disconnected.

  16. Physics Of Variable-Polarity Plasma Arc Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Daniel W.; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Report describes experimental study of some of the physical and chemical effects that occur during variable-polarity plasma arc (VPPA) keyhole welding of 2219 aluminum alloy. Comprised three major programs: (1) determination of effects of chemical additions (i.e., impurities) on structure and shape of bead and keyhole; (2) determination of flow in regions surrounding keyhole; (3) development of analog used easily to study flow in keyhole region.

  17. Ultrasonic inspection of AA6013 laser welded joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Passini

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Interest in laser beam welding for aerospace applications is continuously growing, mainly for aluminum alloys. The joints quality is usually assessed by non-destructive inspection (NDI. In this work, bead on plate laser welds on 1.6 mm thick AA6013 alloy sheets, using a 2 kW Yb-fiber laser were obtained and inspected by pulse/echo ultrasonic phased-array technique. Good and poor quality welds were inspected in order to verify the limits of inspection, comparing also to X-ray radiography and metallographic inspections. The results showed that ultrasonic phased array technique was able to identify the presence of grouped porosity, through the attenuation of the amplitude of the echo signal. This attenuation is attributed to the scattering of the waves caused by micro pores, with individual size below the resolution limit of the equipment, but when grouped, can cause a perceptive effect on the reflection spectra.

  18. Novel manufacturing process of nanoparticle/Al composite filler metals of tungsten inert gas welding by accumulative roll bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fattahi, M., E-mail: fattahi.put@gmail.com [Technical Inspection Engineering Department, Petroleum University of Technology, Abadan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Noei Aghaei, V. [Aerospace Engineering Department, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dabiri, A.R. [Technical Inspection Engineering Department, Petroleum University of Technology, Abadan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Amirkhanlou, S. [Young Researchers and Elite Club, Najafabad Branch, Islamic Azad University, Najafabad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Akhavan, S.; Fattahi, Y. [Materials Engineering Department, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-11-11

    In the present work, accumulative roll bonding (ARB) was used as an effective method for manufacturing nanoparticle/Al composite filler metals of tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding. After welding, the distribution of ceramic nanoparticles and mechanical properties of welds were investigated. By applying ARB, ceramic nanoparticles were uniformly dispersed in the composite filler metals. Consequently, the welds produced by these filler metals had a uniform dispersion of ceramic nanoparticles in their compositions. The test results showed that the yield strength of welds was greatly increased when using the nanoparticle/Al composite filler metals. The improvement in the yield strength was attributed to the coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch and Orowan strengthening mechanisms. Therefore, according to the results presented in this paper, it can be concluded that the nanoparticle/Al composite filler metals can serve as a novel filler metal for TIG welding of aluminum and its alloys.

  19. Pengaruh Kecepatan Putar Indentor Las Gesek Puntir (Friction Stir Welding Terhadap Kualitas Hasil Pengelasan Alumunium 1100-H18

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irza Sukmana

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum and their alloys have been applied in many industrial sectors. Although it shows a good corrosion properties, however welding process of aluminum still a challenge as it covered by oxide layer on the surface. Friction Stir Welding (FSW technology gives a potential chance to be used for joining process of aluminum. In this study, we use a vertical milling machine Milko-12 that has been utilized with indentor of FSW process for Aluminum 1100-H18 at 4 (four different rotation speed (Rt, i.e.: 352, 490, 653, and 910 rpm and constant transversal speed (V 20mm/minutes. Based on mechanical properties and metallography data of welded materials, the higher the Rt the higher the tensile strength. Rt of 653 rpm results the highest tensile strength of 107 MPa. The crack areas of all welded metals are at base metal (BM concluded that our vertical milling machine Milko-12 can be utilized for friction stir welding (FSW process for Aluminum.

  20. Investigation of Iron Aluminide Weld Overlays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banovic, S.W.; DuPont, J.B.; Levin, B.F.; Marder, A.R.

    1999-08-02

    Conventional fossil fired boilers have been retrofitted with low NO(sub)x burners in order for the power plants to comply with new clean air regulations. Due to the operating characteristics of these burners, boiler tube sulfidation corrosion typically has been enhanced resulting in premature tube failure. To protect the existing panels from accelerated attack, weld overlay coatings are typically being applied. By depositing an alloy that offers better corrosion resistance than the underlying tube material, the wastage rates can be reduced. While Ni-based and stainless steel compositions are presently providing protection, they are expensive and susceptible to failure via corrosion-fatigue due to microsegregation upon solidification. Another material system presently under consideration for use as a coating in the oxidation/sulfidation environments is iron-aluminum. These alloys are relatively inexpensive, exhibit little microsegregation, and show excellent corrosion resistance. However, their use is limited due to weldability issues and their lack of corrosion characterization in simulated low NO(sub)x gas compositions. Therefore a program was initiated in 1996 to evaluate the use of iron-aluminum weld overlay coatings for erosion/corrosion protection of boiler tubes in fossil fired boilers with low NO(sub)x burners. Investigated properties included weldability, corrosion behavior, erosion resistance, and erosion-corrosion performance.

  1. Friction Stir Welding of Stainless Steel to Al Alloy: Effect of Thermal Condition on Weld Nugget Microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, M.; Gupta, R. K.; Husain, M. M.

    2014-02-01

    Joining of dissimilar materials is always a global challenge. Sometimes it is unavoidable to execute multifarious activities by a single component. In the present investigation, 6061 aluminum alloy and 304 stainless steel were joined by friction stir welding (FSW) at different tool rotational rates. Welded joints were characterized in optical and scanning electron microscopes. Reaction products in the stirring zone (SZ) were confirmed through X-ray diffraction. Joint strength was evaluated by tensile testing. It was found that the increment in average heat input and temperature at the weld nugget (WN) facilitated iron enrichment near the interface. Enhancement in the concentration of iron shifted the nature of intermetallics from the Fe2Al5 to Fe-rich end of the Fe-Al binary phase diagram. The peak microhardness and ultimate tensile strength were found to be maxima at the intermediate tool rotational rate, where Fe3Al and FeAl2 appeared along with Fe2Al5.

  2. Microstructural Effects of Multiple Passes during Friction Stir Processing of Nickel Aluminum Bronze

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    that has an evolved composition. The binary copper-aluminum system has an intermetallic phase which is prone to selective attack and therefore...yields increased corrosion. The addition of nickel and iron alloying 6 elements to the copper–aluminum system creates new intermetallic phases and...on Friction Stir Welding that allows the near surface regions of a material to be selectively processed to improve the material properties. Single

  3. ALUMINUM BOX BUNDLING PRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iosif DUMITRESCU

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In municipal solid waste, aluminum is the main nonferrous metal, approximately 80- 85% of the total nonferrous metals. The income per ton gained from aluminum recuperation is 20 times higher than from glass, steel boxes or paper recuperation. The object of this paper is the design of a 300 kN press for aluminum box bundling.

  4. The Plunge Phase of Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, John C.

    2005-01-01

    The many advantages of Friction Stir Welding have led to a relatively rapid acceptance in the often conservative welding community. Because the process is so different from traditional fusion welding, with which most investigators are most familiar, there remain many aspects of FSW for which there is no clear consensus. For example, the well known onion rings seen in transverse sections have been variously interpreted as grain size variations, variation in density of second phase particles and parts of the carousel of material rotating with the pin that have been shed from the carousel. Using Orientation Imaging Microscopy, Schneider has recently noted that the onion rings have a different orientation (and hence etch differently) than the surrounding material, and this orientation is consistent with slip plane orientations at the edge of the carousel. Likewise, the forces and torque exerted by the FSW tool on the work piece largely remain unaccounted for. Although these forces are routinely measured by investigators with commercial instrumented welders, they are rarely reported or even qualitatively analyzed. This paper will introduce a model based on a carousel or disk of material that rotates with the tool to estimate the torque and plunge force required to plunge a tool into the work piece. A stationary tool is modeled rather than the moving tool because effects such as thermal transients and metallurgical changes in the sample (primarily aging in aluminum) can be more easily accounted for. It is believed, however, that with some modifications the model should be applicable to a moving tool also.

  5. Welding method, and welding device for use therein, and method of analysis for evaluating welds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aendenroomer, A.J.; Den Ouden, G.; Xiao, Y.H.; Brabander, W.A.J.

    1995-01-01

    Described is a method of automatically welding pipes, comprising welding with a pulsation welding current and monitoring, by means of a sensor, the variations occurring in the arc voltage caused by weld pool oscillations. The occurrence of voltage variations with only frequency components below 100

  6. Thermoplastic welding apparatus and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsen, Marc R.; Negley, Mark A.; Geren, William Preston; Miller, Robert James

    2017-03-07

    A thermoplastic welding apparatus includes a thermoplastic welding tool, at least one tooling surface in the thermoplastic welding tool, a magnetic induction coil in the thermoplastic welding tool and generally encircling the at least one tooling surface and at least one smart susceptor in the thermoplastic welding tool at the at least one tooling surface. The magnetic induction coil is adapted to generate a magnetic flux field oriented generally parallel to a plane of the at least one smart susceptor.

  7. Laser forming and welding processes

    CERN Document Server

    Yilbas, Bekir Sami; Shuja, Shahzada Zaman

    2013-01-01

    This book introduces model studies and experimental results associated with laser forming and welding such as laser induced bending, welding of sheet metals, and related practical applications. The book provides insight into the physical processes involved with laser forming and welding. The analytical study covers the formulation of laser induced bending while the model study demonstrates the simulation of bending and welding processes using the finite element method. Analytical and numerical solutions for laser forming and welding problems are provided.

  8. Three Dimensional Numerical Simulation and Characterization of Crack Growth in the Weld Region of a Friction Stir Welded Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seshadri, Banavara R.; Smith, Stephen W.; Newman, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) fabrication technology is being adopted in aerospace applications. The use of this technology can reduce production cost, lead-times, reduce structural weight and need for fasteners and lap joints, which are typically the primary locations of crack initiation and multi-site fatigue damage in aerospace structures. FSW is a solid state welding process that is well-suited for joining aluminum alloy components; however, the process introduces residual stresses (both tensile and compressive) in joined components. The propagation of fatigue cracks in a residual stress field and the resulting redistribution of the residual stress field and its effect on crack closure have to be estimated. To insure the safe insertion of complex integral structures, an accurate understanding of the fatigue crack growth behavior and the complex crack path process must be understood. A life prediction methodology for fatigue crack growth through the weld under the influence of residual stresses in aluminum alloy structures fabricated using FSW will be detailed. The effects and significance of the magnitude of residual stress at a crack tip on the estimated crack tip driving force are highlighted. The location of the crack tip relative to the FSW and the effect of microstructure on fatigue crack growth are considered. A damage tolerant life prediction methodology accounting for microstructural variation in the weld zone and residual stress field will lead to the design of lighter and more reliable aerospace structures

  9. High-Speed Friction Stir Welding of AA7075-T6 Sheet: Microstructure, Mechanical Properties, Micro-texture, and Thermal History

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jingyi; Upadhyay, Piyush; Hovanski, Yuri; Field, David P.

    2017-11-20

    Friction-stir-welding (FSW) is a cost-effective and high quality joining process for aluminum alloys (especially heat-treatable allo ys) that has been applied successfully in the aerospace industry. However, the full potential of FSW on more cost-sensitive applications is still limited by the production rate, namely the welding speed of the process. The majority of literature evaluating FSW of aluminum alloys is based on welds made in the range of welding speeds around hundreds of millimeters per minute, and only a handful are at a moderate speed of 1 m/min. In this study we present a microstructural analysis of friction stir welded AA7075-T6 blanks with welding speeds up to 3 m/min. Textures, microstructures, mechanical properties, and weld quality are analyzed using TEM, EBSD, metallographic imaging, and Vickers hardness. Results are coupled with welding parameters to aid in the understanding of the complex material flow and texture gradients within the welds in an effort to optimize welding parameters for high speed processing.

  10. Welding processes handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Weman, Klas

    2003-01-01

    Deals with the main commercially significant and commonly used welding processes. This title takes the student or novice welder through the individual steps involved in each process in an easily understood way. It covers many of the requirements referred to in European Standards including EN719, EN 729, EN 729 and EN 287.$bWelding processes handbook is a concise, explanatory guide to the main commercially significant and commonly-used welding processes. It takes the novice welder or student through the individual steps involved in each process in a clear and easily understood way. It is intended to provide an up-to-date reference to the major applications of welding as they are used in industry. The contents have been arranged so that it can be used as a textbook for European welding courses in accordance with guidelines from the European Welding Federation. Welding processes and equipment necessary for each process are described so that they can be applied to all instruction levels required by the EWF and th...

  11. Fracture Mechanics Prediction of Fatigue Life of Aluminum Highway Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rom, Søren; Agerskov, Henning

    2015-01-01

    Fracture mechanics prediction of the fatigue life of aluminum highway bridges under random loading is studied. The fatigue life of welded joints has been determined from fracture mechanics analyses and the results obtained have been compared with results from experimental investigations. The fati......Fracture mechanics prediction of the fatigue life of aluminum highway bridges under random loading is studied. The fatigue life of welded joints has been determined from fracture mechanics analyses and the results obtained have been compared with results from experimental investigations....... The fatigue life of welded plate specimens has been investigated. Both the fracture mechanics analyses and the fatigue tests have been carried out using load histories, which correspond to one week's traffic loading, determined by means of strain gauge measurements on the deck structure of the Farø Bridges...... against fatigue in aluminum bridges, may give results which are unconservative. Furthermore, it was in both investigations found that the validity of the results obtained from Miner's rule will depend on the distribution of the load history in tension and compression....

  12. Thermal stir welding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A welding method is provided for forming a weld joint between first and second elements of a workpiece. The method includes heating the first and second elements to form an interface of material in a plasticized or melted state interface between the elements. The interface material is then allowed to cool to a plasticized state if previously in a melted state. The interface material, while in the plasticized state, is then mixed, for example, using a grinding/extruding process, to remove any dendritic-type weld microstructures introduced into the interface material during the heating process.

  13. Thermal stir welding apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A welding method and apparatus are provided for forming a weld joint between first and second elements of a workpiece. The method includes heating the first and second elements to form an interface of material in a plasticized or melted state interface between the elements. The interface material is then allowed to cool to a plasticized state if previously in a melted state. The interface material, while in the plasticized state, is then mixed, for example, using a grinding/extruding process, to remove any dendritic-type weld microstructures introduced into the interface material during the heating process.

  14. Solar array welding developement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elms, R. V., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The present work describes parallel gap welding as used for joining solar cells to the cell interconnect system. Sample preparation, weldable cell parameter evaluation, bond scheduling, bond strength evaluation, and bonding and thermal shock tests are described. A range of weld schedule parameters - voltage, time, and force - can be identified for various cell/interconnect designs that will provide adequate bond strengths and acceptably small electrical degradation. Automation of solar array welding operations to a significant degree has been achieved in Europe and will be receiving increased attention in the U.S. to reduce solar array fabrication costs.

  15. Review of Welding Terminology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelika Petrėtienė

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses welding terms in accordance with the Lithuanian standard LST EN 1792 „Welding. The multilingual list of welding terms and similar processes”, „The Russian–Lithuanian dictionary of the terms of mechanical engineering technology and welding“ and the examples from postgraduates‘ final works. It analyses the infringement of lexical, word-building and morphological rules. First-year students should already be familiar with the standardized terms of their speciality. More active propagation of the terms should help to avoid terminology mistakes in various scientific spheres.

  16. An investigation on capability of hybrid Nd:YAG laser-TIG welding technology for AA2198 Al-Li alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraji, Amir Hosein; Moradi, Mahmoud; Goodarzi, Massoud; Colucci, Pietro; Maletta, Carmine

    2017-09-01

    This paper surveys the capability of the hybrid laser-arc welding in comparison with lone laser welding for AA2198 aluminum alloy experimentally. In the present research, a continuous Nd:YAG laser with a maximum power of 2000 W and a 350 A electric arc were used as two combined welding heat sources. In addition to the lone laser welding experiments, two strategies were examined for hybrid welding; the first one was low laser power (100 W) accompanied by high arc energy, and the second one was high laser power (2000 W) with low arc energy. Welding speed and arc current varied in the experiments. The influence of heat input on weld pool geometry was surveyed. The macrosection, microhardness profile and microstructure of the welded joints were studied and compared. The results indicated that in lone laser welding, conduction mode occurred and keyhole was not formed even in low welding speeds and thus the penetration depth was so low. It was also found that the second approach (high laser power accompanied with low arc energy) is superior to the first one (low laser power accompanied with high arc energy) in hybrid laser-arc welding of Al2198, since lower heat input was needed for full penetration weld and as a result a smaller HAZ was created.

  17. Hybrid laser-arc welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hybrid laser-arc welding (HLAW) is a combination of laser welding with arc welding that overcomes many of the shortfalls of both processes. This important book gives a comprehensive account of hybrid laser-arc welding technology and applications. The first part of the book reviews...... the characteristics of the process, including the properties of joints produced by hybrid laser-arc welding and ways of assessing weld quality. Part II discusses applications of the process to such metals as magnesium alloys, aluminium and steel as well as the use of hybrid laser-arc welding in such sectors as ship...... building and the automotive industry. With its distinguished editor and international team of contributors, Hybrid laser-arc welding, will be a valuable source of reference for all those using this important welding technology. Professor Flemming Ove Olsen works in the Department of Manufacturing...

  18. The effect of welding on the strength of aluminium stiffened plates subject to combined uniaxial compression and lateral pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedram Masoud

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays aluminum stiffened plates are one of the major constituents of the marine structures, espe¬cially high-speed vessels. On one hand, these structures are subject to various forms of loading in the harsh sea envi¬ronment, like hydrostatic lateral pressures and in-plane compression. On the other hand, fusion welding is often used to assemble those panels. The common marine aluminum alloys in the both 5,000 and 6,000 series, however, lose a re¬markable portion of their load carrying capacity due to welding. This paper presents the results of sophisticated finite-element investigations considering both geometrical and mechanical imperfections. The tested models were those pro¬posed by the ultimate strength committee of 15th ISSC. The presented data illuminates the effects of welding on the strength of aluminum plates under above-mentioned load conditions.

  19. Structure and properties of fixed joints formed by ultrasonic-assisted friction-stir welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortuna, S. V., E-mail: s-fortuna@ispms.ru; Ivanov, K. V., E-mail: ikv@ispms.ru; Eliseev, A. A., E-mail: alan@ispms.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials ScienceTomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Tarasov, S. Yu., E-mail: tsy@ispms.ru; Ivanov, A. N., E-mail: ivan@ispms.ru; Rubtsov, V. E., E-mail: rvy@ispms.ru; Kolubaev, E. A., E-mail: eak@ispms.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials ScienceTomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-27

    This paper deals with structure and properties of aluminum alloy 7475 and its joints obtained by friction stir welding including under ultrasonic action. Microhardness measurements show that ultrasonic action increases strength properties of the joints. Optical and transmission electron microscopy reveals that this effect is related to the precipitation of tertiary coherent S-and T-phase particles.

  20. Comprehensive analysis of the capillary depth in deep penetration laser welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetzer, Florian; Boley, Meiko; Weber, Rudolf; Graf, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    Laser welding is the state of the art joining technology regarding productivity and thermal loads and stress on the workpiece. In deep penetration laser welding the quality of the resultant welds strongly depends on the stability of the capillary. The highly dynamic depth fluctuations are of major influence on the controllability of the laser welding process and on the prevention of weld defects. In the present paper the capillary dynamics is investigated by means of time- and spatially resolved in-process X-ray imaging and optical coherence tomography. The X-ray diagnostics allows measuring the geometry of the capillary with frame rates of 1 kHz, while the optical coherence tomography enables the determination of the capillary depth with an acquisition rate of up to 70 kHz. These measurements are correlated to time varying input laser power to provide profound insight in the dynamics of the laser welding process. The measurements are performed for copper, aluminum and mild steel. The capillary depth resulting from arbitrary laser power modulation was investigated. Thereby, the response of the capillary depth to laser power changes was determined. Based on these measurements the changes of the capillary depth in deep penetration laser welding were described by methods known from control theory. These analyses can be utilized to optimize control strategies, to calibrate transient simulations of deep penetration laser welding and to identify the influence of material properties.

  1. Influential Parameters and Numerical Simulation of Heat Generated in the Process of Friction Stir Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilija KOVACEVIC

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the problem of friction stir welding (FSW technology. The mechanism of thermo-mechanical process of the FSW method has been identified and a correlation between the weld zone and its microstructure established. Presented are the basic analytical formulations for the definition of temperature fields. Analysis of influential parameters of welding FSW technology at the zone of the weld material and mechanical properties of the realized joint was performed. Influential welding parameters were defined based on tool geometry, technological parameters of processing and the axial load of tool. Specific problems with the FSW process are related to gaps (holes left behind by a tool at the end of the process and inflexibility of welding regarding the degree of variation of material thickness. Numerical simulation of process welding FSW proceeding was carried out on the example of Aluminum Alloy (AA 2219 using the ANSYS Mechanical ADPL (Transient Thermal software package. The defined was the temperature field in the welding process at specified time intervals.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.3.10022

  2. Multispot fiber laser welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schutt Hansen, Klaus

    This dissertation presents work and results achieved in the field of multi beam fiber laser welding. The project has had a practical approach, in which simulations and modelling have been kept at a minimum. Different methods to produce spot patterns with high power single mode fiber lasers have...... been examined and evaluated. It is found that both diamond turned DOE’s in zinc sulphide and multilevel etched DOE’s (Diffractive Optical Elements) in fused silica have a good performance. Welding with multiple beams in a butt joint configuration has been tested. Results are presented, showing it has...... been possible to control the welding width in incremental steps by adding more beams in a row. The laser power was used to independently control the keyhole and consequently the depth of fusion. An example of inline repair of a laser weld in butt joint configuration was examined. Zinc powder was placed...

  3. Friction stir welding tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolle,; Charles R. , Clark; Denis E. , Barnes; Timothy, A [Ammon, ID

    2008-04-15

    A friction stir welding tool is described and which includes a shank portion; a shoulder portion which is releasably engageable with the shank portion; and a pin which is releasably engageable with the shoulder portion.

  4. Concurrent ultrasonic weld evaluation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Donald W.; Johnson, John A.; Smartt, Herschel B.

    1987-01-01

    A system for concurrent, non-destructive evaluation of partially completed welds for use in conjunction with an automated welder. The system utilizes real time, automated ultrasonic inspection of a welding operation as the welds are being made by providing a transducer which follows a short distance behind the welding head. Reflected ultrasonic signals are analyzed utilizing computer based digital pattern recognition techniques to discriminate between good and flawed welds on a pass by pass basis. The system also distinguishes between types of weld flaws.

  5. INCREASE OF THE OPERATIONAL PROPERTIES OF WELD AND PLASMA COATINGS USING NANOPOWDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrii Chornyi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, studies concerning determination of the oxide nanoparticles effect on structure and performance of the welds and plasma coatings were conducted. Ways of introducing nanodisperse refractory powders to the weld pool and how to cover with the deactivation of nanoparticles powder were determined. Introducing of the nanoparticles in the molten pool during the deposition and the coating was carried out by preparing a powder mixture by mechano-chemical processing in special high-energy intensive planetary mills. Structural studies of welds with nanooxides additives in the weld pool showed the formation of milled dispersed structure with microhardness 264-304 MPa. Statistical mean value of the number of non-metallic inclusions was defined. Mechanical testing of welds showed growth of the yield as well as tensile strength, when titanium and aluminum nanooxides were introduced into the weld pool. The most significant effect on these parameters has aluminum nanooxide in an amount of 0.5 vol.%, increasing the yield strength by 49 % and the tensile strength by 23 %. The toughness is mostly affected by titanium oxide in an amount of 1 vol.%., increasing its value by about 2 times. In turn, the introduction of alumina nanopowder in quantity 1,5 vol.% into the plasma coatings allowed to reduce friction and increase wear resistance of coatings by 2-3 times.

  6. 46 CFR 160.035-6 - Construction of aluminum oar-, hand-, and motor-propelled lifeboats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Length of boat not over (feet) Bar keel, stem and sternpost (inches) 5086-H112/6061-T6 Gunwales 1 Angle... plate to keel, disengaging gear grace plate to stem and sternpost, rudder attachment fitting to the... aluminum, the welded area is to be checked by a nondestructive test method such as X-ray, ultrasonic waves...

  7. Weld formation control at electron beam welding with beam oscillations

    OpenAIRE

    Trushnikov, Dmitriy; Koleva, Elena; Mladenov, Georgy; A. Shcherbakov

    2014-01-01

    Electron beam welding is used extensively to produce essential machine parts. The control of the basic beam parameters beam power or beam current at constant accelerating voltage, welding speed, current of focusing lens and distance between electron gun and welded sample surface is not enough to obtain at most of the regimes sound welds. Control of the focus position using analysis of the high frequency component of the current, collected by plasma, at periodic interactions on the beam (the o...

  8. Integral Hot Gas Pressure Forming of an AA2219 Aluminum Alloy Ellipsoidal Shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, S. J.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, W. W.

    2017-04-01

    To overcome the poor plastic deformation performance of AA2219 aluminum alloy sheet and its weld seam at room temperature, an integral hot gas pressure forming (IHGPF) process for a combined welded ellipsoidal shell was proposed. A simulation of the IHGPF process was conducted to analyze the axis length variation and thickness distribution during the forming process of the combined welded ellipsoidal shell at elevated temperature. The results demonstrated that lengths of the short and long axes were 150 mm and 220 mm, respectively, and that maximum wall thinning occurred at the pole. Furthermore, an experiment was conducted using IHGPF, and the forming accuracy was measured by three-dimensional video technology. A sound ellipsoidal shell with final axis length ratio of 1.5 was obtained with a shell diameter accuracy of more than 99.3%. It was experimentally proven that an aluminum alloy ellipsoidal shell can be formed using the proposed IHGPF technology.

  9. Aluminum powder metallurgy processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flumerfelt, J.F.

    1999-02-12

    The objective of this dissertation is to explore the hypothesis that there is a strong linkage between gas atomization processing conditions, as-atomized aluminum powder characteristics, and the consolidation methodology required to make components from aluminum powder. The hypothesis was tested with pure aluminum powders produced by commercial air atomization, commercial inert gas atomization, and gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS). A comparison of the GARS aluminum powders with the commercial aluminum powders showed the former to exhibit superior powder characteristics. The powders were compared in terms of size and shape, bulk chemistry, surface oxide chemistry and structure, and oxide film thickness. Minimum explosive concentration measurements assessed the dependence of explosibility hazard on surface area, oxide film thickness, and gas atomization processing conditions. The GARS aluminum powders were exposed to different relative humidity levels, demonstrating the effect of atmospheric conditions on post-atomization processing conditions. The GARS aluminum powders were exposed to different relative humidity levels, demonstrating the effect of atmospheric conditions on post-atomization oxidation of aluminum powder. An Al-Ti-Y GARS alloy exposed in ambient air at different temperatures revealed the effect of reactive alloy elements on post-atomization powder oxidation. The pure aluminum powders were consolidated by two different routes, a conventional consolidation process for fabricating aerospace components with aluminum powder and a proposed alternative. The consolidation procedures were compared by evaluating the consolidated microstructures and the corresponding mechanical properties. A low temperature solid state sintering experiment demonstrated that tap densified GARS aluminum powders can form sintering necks between contacting powder particles, unlike the total resistance to sintering of commercial air atomization aluminum powder.

  10. Rotary Friction Welding of Weight Heavy Alloy with Wrought AlMg3 Alloy for Subcaliber Ammunition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olgierd Janusz Goroch

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The results of studies concerning friction welding of Weight Heavy Alloy (WHA with AlMg3 alloy are presented. The friction welding of density 17,5 Mg/m3 with aluminum alloy showed that it is possible to reach the joints with the strength exceeding the yield strength of wrought AlMg3 alloy. This strength looks to be promising from point of view of condition which have to be fulfilled in case of armor subcaliber ammunition, where WHA rods play the role Kinetic Energy Penetrators and aluminum is used for projectile ballistic cup.

  11. Alternate Welding Processes for In-Service Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-24

    Conducting weld repairs and attaching hot tap tees onto pressurized pipes has the advantage of avoiding loss of service and revenue. However, the risks involved with in-service welding need to be managed by ensuring that welding is performed in a rep...

  12. Certification of a weld produced by friction stir welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obaditch, Chris; Grant, Glenn J

    2013-10-01

    Methods, devices, and systems for providing certification of friction stir welds are disclosed. A sensor is used to collect information related to a friction stir weld. Data from the sensor is compared to threshold values provided by an extrinsic standard setting organizations using a certification engine. The certification engine subsequently produces a report on the certification status of the weld.

  13. Investigation of Machine Design for Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romine, Peter L.

    1996-01-01

    The process of joining two pieces of metal together has not significantly changed over the last few decades. The basic idea used is to bring the pieces together and apply enough heat to melt the metal at the interface. The molten metal mixes and after cooling forms a strong joint. This process is called the fusion process. The most significant difference between the many fusion processes is how the heat is generated and applied. The Welding Institute (TWI), in Great Britain, has recently patented an innovative application of mechanical friction. TWI designed a tool and process called Friction Stir Welding (FSW) that uses friction to heat the metal to within a few hundred degrees Fahrenheit of melting, just to the point of being plastic-like. The tool then stirs the plasticized metal together forming a joint that has been shown to be as good or better than an equivalent fusion joint. The FSW process is well suited for the joining of the aluminum alloys used in the aerospace industry. The relatively low melting point of aluminum eliminates the requirements for exotic materials for pin tool design. The FSW process has been successfully used to join alloys such as 7075 which were before considered "unweldable", and aluminum-lithium 2195 which exhibits many problems when fusion welded. The objective this summer was to investigate the design of a FSW system that could take this process from the laboratory to the manufacturing floor. In particular, it was the goal of my NASA colleague to develop a concept for applying the FSW process to the manufacturing of aluminum cryogenic oxygen and hydrogen tanks, of the sort used to make the Shuttle External Tank.

  14. Welding defects at friction stir welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Podržaj

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an overview of different types of defects at friction stir welding. In order to explain the reasons for their occurrence a short theoretical background of the process is given first. The main emphasis is on the parameters that influence the process. An energy supply based division of defects into three disjoint groups was used. The occurring defects are demonstrated on various materials.

  15. Workmanship standards for fusion welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, M. D.

    1967-01-01

    Workmanship standards manual defines practices, that adhere to rigid codes and specifications, for fusion welding of component piping, assemblies, and systems. With written and pictorial presentations, it is part of the operating procedure for fusion welding.

  16. An Assessment of Molten Metal Detachment Hazards During Electron Beam Welding in the Space Shuttle Bay at LEO for the International Space Welding Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragomeni, James M.

    1996-01-01

    In 1997, the United States [NASA] and the Paton Electric Welding Institute are scheduled to cooperate in a flight demonstration on the U.S. Space Shuttle to demonstrate the feasibility of welding in space for a possible repair option for the International Space Station Alpha. This endeavor, known as the International Space Welding Experiment (ISWE), will involve astronauts performing various welding exercises such as brazing, cutting, welding, and coating using an electron beam space welding system that was developed by the E.O. Paton Electric Welding Institute (PWI), Kiev Ukraine. This electron beam welding system known as the "Universal Weld System" consists of hand tools capable of brazing, cutting, autogeneous welding, and coating using an 8 kV (8000 volts) electron beam. The electron beam hand tools have also been developed by the Paton Welding Institute with greater capabilities than the original hand tool, including filler wire feeding, to be used with the Universal Weld System on the U.S. Space Shuttle Bay as part of ISWE. The hand tool(s) known as the Ukrainian Universal Hand [Electron Beam Welding] Tool (UHT) will be utilized for the ISWE Space Shuttle flight welding exercises to perform welding on various metal alloy samples. A total of 61 metal alloy samples, which include 304 stainless steel, Ti-6AI-4V, 2219 aluminum, and 5456 aluminum alloys, have been provided by NASA for the ISWE electron beam welding exercises using the UHT. These samples were chosen to replicate both the U.S. and Russian module materials. The ISWE requires extravehicular activity (EVA) of two astronauts to perform the space shuttle electron beam welding operations of the 61 alloy samples. This study was undertaken to determine if a hazard could exist with ISWE during the electron beam welding exercises in the Space Shuttle Bay using the Ukrainian Universal Weld System with the UHT. The safety issue has been raised with regard to molten metal detachments as a result of several

  17. Welding and Brazing Silicon Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, T. J.

    1986-01-01

    Hot isostatic pressing and conventional furnace brazing effective under right conditions. Study performed showed feasibility of welding SiC using several welding and brazing techniques. Use of SiC improves engine efficiency by allowing increase in operating temperature. SiC successfully hot-pressure-welded at 3,550 degrees F (1,950 degrees C) in argon. Refinements of solid-state welding and brazing procedures used sufficient for some specific industrial applications.

  18. Heat-affected zone and phase composition of 0.09 C-2 Mn-1 Si-Fe steel depending on welding technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova, Natalya; Ozhiganov, Eugeniy; Nikonenko, Elena; Ababkov, Nikolay; Smirnov, Aleksander; Koneva, Nina

    2017-11-01

    The paper presents the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigations of the structure and phase composition of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) in welded joint modified by four types of welding, namely: electrode welding and electropercussive welding both with and without the introduction of artificial flaws. Artificial flows are aluminum pieces. TEM investigations are carried out within HAZ between the deposited and base metal at 1 mm distance to the latter. The type 0.09C-2Mn-1Si-Fe steel is used as weld material. It is shown that the welding process has an effect on the material morphology, phase composition, faulted structure and its parameters. Long-range stresses are divided into plastic and elastic components. It is demonstrated that the type of welding does not change the structural quality of welded joint represented by perlite and ferrite as contrasted with their volume fraction. According to observations, any type of welding with the introduction of artificial flaws results in the destruction of perlite. Polarization of the dislocation structure occurs. The amplitude of mean internal stresses does not practically depend on the welding type. It is shown that the introduction of artificial flaws both during electrode and electropercussive welding reduce the quantitative parameters of the faulted structure.

  19. Direct welding of glass and metal by 1  kHz femtosecond laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guodong; Cheng, Guanghua

    2015-10-20

    In the welding process between similar or dissimilar materials, inserting an intermediate layer and pressure assistance are usually thought to be necessary. In this paper, the direct welding between alumina-silicate glass and metal (aluminum, copper, and steel), under exposure from 1 kHz femtosecond laser pulses without any auxiliary processes, is demonstrated. The micron/nanometer-sized metal particles induced by laser ablation were considered to act as the adhesive in the welding process. The welding parameters were optimized by varying the pulse energy and the translation velocity of the sample. The shear joining strength characterized by a shear force testing equipment was as high as 2.34 MPa. This direct bonding technology has potential for applications in medical devices, sensors, and photovoltaic devices.

  20. Numerical Simulation of the Thermal Efficiency During Laser Deep Penetration Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganser, A.; Pieper, J.; Liebl, S.; Zaeh, M. F.

    The advantages of laser beam welding, such as its high flexibility, its high local energy input, and its fast processing speed, led to a substantial increase of industrial applications of the technology. High losses can be observed during laser welding of materials with a high thermal conductivity, such as aluminum or copper. This is caused by the heat conduction losses in the surrounding area of the process zone and due to reflections. These energy losses lead to a reduced efficiency of the laser welding process. A numerical model based on a CFD simulation is presented, which enables to calculate the molten pool isotherms. The thermal efficiency is determined for different keyhole geometries and welding velocities. This efficiency is defined as the ratio between the energy which is required to melt the volume of metal in the fusion zone and the absorbed laser beam power.

  1. Enabling lightweight designs by a new laser based approach for joining aluminum to steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockmann, Rüdiger; Kaufmann, Sebastian; Kirchhoff, Marc; Candel-Ruiz, Antonio; Müllerschön, Oliver; Havrilla, David

    2015-03-01

    As sustainability is an essential requirement, lightweight design becomes more and more important, especially for mobility. Reduced weight ensures more efficient vehicles and enables better environmental impact. Besides the design, new materials and material combinations are one major trend to achieve the required weight savings. The use of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics (abbr. CFRP) is widely discussed, but so far high volume applications are rarely to be found. This is mainly due to the fact that parts made of CFRP are much more expensive than conventional parts. Furthermore, the proper technologies for high volume production are not yet ready. Another material with a large potential for lightweight design is aluminum. In comparison to CFRP, aluminum alloys are generally more affordable. As aluminum is a metallic material, production technologies for high volume standard cutting or joining applications are already developed. In addition, bending and deep-drawing can be applied. In automotive engineering, hybrid structures such as combining high-strength steels with lightweight aluminum alloys retain significant weight reduction but also have an advantage over monolithic aluminum - enhanced behavior in case of crash. Therefore, since the use of steel for applications requiring high mechanical properties is unavoidable, methods for joining aluminum with steel parts have to be further developed. Former studies showed that the use of a laser beam can be a possibility to join aluminum to steel parts. In this sense, the laser welding process represents a major challenge, since both materials have different thermal expansion coefficients and properties related to the behavior in corrosive media. Additionally, brittle intermetallic phases are formed during welding. A promising approach to welding aluminum to steel is based on the use of Laser Metal Deposition (abbr. LMD) with deposit materials in the form of powders. Within the present work, the advantages of this

  2. Welding. Performance Objectives. Basic Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Kenneth

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of eight terminal objectives for a basic welding course. The materials were developed for a 36-week (2 hours daily) course developed to teach the fundamentals of welding shop work, to become familiar with the operation of the welding shop…

  3. Welding. Performance Objectives. Intermediate Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Kenneth

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of nine terminal objectives for an intermediate welding course. The materials were developed for a 36-week (3 hours daily) course designed to prepare the student for employment in the field of welding. Electric welding and specialized (TIG & MIG)…

  4. Studies on aluminum neurotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, S.

    1988-01-01

    This work reports the inhibitory effects of aluminum on glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) from yeast and brains. The aluminum contents and several enzyme activities in aluminum-fed rat brain homogenates were compared with those in age-matched control groups. The concentration of aluminum in the homogenates of the aluminum-fed groups were twice of that of the controls. Acetylcholinesterase activities were the same as in both groups but hexokinase and G6PD activities in the aluminum-fed group were about 73% and 70% of the control, respectively. Further studies on the inhibitory effects of aluminum on G6PD were performed with the enzymes purified from human and pig brains. Two forms of G6PD isozymes were purified from human and pig brain by ammonium sulfate fractionation, hydroxylapatite chromatography, affinity chromatography with NADP-agarose and Blue-Sepharose CL-6B, and gel filtration with Sephadex S-300. The two forms of isozymes (isozyme I and II), purified to be homogeneous, had a molecular weight of 220,000, and composed of 4 subunits of molecular weight of 57,000. HPLC peptide maps of tryptic digests and amino acid analyses of the isozymes showed extensive homologies between the isozymes. Interestingly, only the isozyme II in human and pig brain were active with 6-phosphogluconate as a substrate. No such an activity was found in isozyme I. Aluminum inactivated G6PD activity of the human and pig brain isozyme I and isozyme II without affecting the 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase activity of the isozyme II. Circular dichroism studies showed that the binding of aluminum to G6PD induced a decrease in {alpha}-helix and {beta}-sheet and a increase in random coil. Therefore it is suggested that inactivation of G6PD by aluminum is due to the conformational change induced by aluminum binding.

  5. Friction stir welding tool and process for welding dissimilar materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J; Jana, Saumyadeep; Mattlin, Karl F

    2013-05-07

    A friction stir welding tool and process for lap welding dissimilar materials are detailed. The invention includes a cutter scribe that penetrates and extrudes a first material of a lap weld stack to a preselected depth and further cuts a second material to provide a beneficial geometry defined by a plurality of mechanically interlocking features. The tool backfills the interlocking features generating a lap weld across the length of the interface between the dissimilar materials that enhances the shear strength of the lap weld.

  6. High energy density aluminum battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gilbert M.; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Dai, Sheng; Dudney, Nancy J.; Manthiram, Arumugan; McIntyre, Timothy J.; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Liu, Hansan

    2016-10-11

    Compositions and methods of making are provided for a high energy density aluminum battery. The battery comprises an anode comprising aluminum metal. The battery further comprises a cathode comprising a material capable of intercalating aluminum or lithium ions during a discharge cycle and deintercalating the aluminum or lithium ions during a charge cycle. The battery further comprises an electrolyte capable of supporting reversible deposition and stripping of aluminum at the anode, and reversible intercalation and deintercalation of aluminum or lithium at the cathode.

  7. Continuous EB welding of the reinforcement of the CMS conductor

    CERN Document Server

    Folch, R; Campi, D; Christin, R; Creton, J P; Curé, B; Hervé, A; Horváth, I L; Neuenschwander, J; Riboni, P; Sequeira-Lopes-Tavares, S; Sgobba, Stefano

    2002-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is one of the general-purpose detectors to be provided for the LHC project at CERN. The design field of the CMS superconducting magnet is 4 T, the magnetic length is 12.5 m and the free bore is 6 m. In order to withstand the electro-mechanical forces during the operation of the CMS magnet, the superconducting cable embedded in a 99.998% pure aluminum matrix is reinforced with two sections of aluminum alloy EN AW-6082 assembled by continuous Electron Beam Welding (EBW). A dedicated production line has been designed by Techmeta, a leading company in the field of EBW. The production line has a total length of 70 m. Non-stop welding of each of the 20 lengths of 2.5 km, required to build the coil, will last 22 hours. EBW is the most critical process involved in the production line. The main advantage of the EBW process is to minimize the Heat Affected Zone; this is particularly important for avoiding damage to the superconducting cable located only 4.7 mm from the welded joints. Two...

  8. The effect of hardening laws and thermal softening on modeling residual stresses in FSW of aluminum alloy 2024-T3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, Mads Rostgaard; Tutum, Cem Celal; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2013-01-01

    were simulated and compared with experimentally obtained results for both temperatures and residual stresses (using the slitting method). The comparisons showed good agreement regarding temperatures whereas the residual stress comparisons indicated different sensitivities for the cold and hot welding...... or kinematic hardening together with the metallurgical softening model were applied in order to give a first impression of the tendencies in residual stresses in friction stir welds when choosing different hardening and softening behaviors. Secondly, real friction stir butt welding of aluminum alloy 2024-T3...

  9. Weld bead profile of laser welding dissimilar joints stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Ghusoon R.; Ishak, M.; Aqida, S. N.; Abdulhadi, Hassan A.

    2017-10-01

    During the process of laser welding, the material consecutively melts and solidifies by a laser beam with a peak high power. Several parameters such as the laser energy, pulse frequency, pulse duration, welding power and welding speed govern the mode of the welding process. The aim of this paper is to investigate the effect of peak power, incident angle, and welding speed on the weld bead geometry. The first investigation in this context was conducted using 2205-316L stainless steel plates through the varying of the welding speed from 1.3 mm/s to 2.1 mm/s. The second investigation was conducted by varying the peak power from 1100 W to 1500 W. From the results of the experiments, the welding speed and laser power had a significant effect on the geometry of the weld bead, and the variation in the diameter of the bead pulse-size. Due to the decrease in the heat input, welding speed affected penetration depth more than bead width, and a narrow width of heat affected zone was achieved ranging from 0.2 to 0.5 mm. Conclusively, weld bead geometry dimensions increase as a function of peak power; at over 1350 W peak power, the dimensions lie within 30 μm.

  10. Microstructure Stability During Creep of Friction Stir Welded AA2024-T3 Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regev, Michael; Rashkovsky, Tal; Cabibbo, Marcello; Spigarelli, Stefano

    2018-01-01

    The poor weldability of the AA2024 aluminum alloy limits its use in industrial applications. Because friction stir welding (FSW) is a non-fusion welding process, it seems to be a promising solution for welding this alloy. In the current study, FSW was applied to butt weld AA2024-T3 aluminum alloy plates. Creep tests were conducted at 250 and at 315 °C on both the parent material and the friction stir welded specimens. The microstructures of the welded and non-welded AA2024-T3 specimens before and after the creep tests were studied and compared. A comprehensive transmission electron microscopy study together with a high-resolution scanning electron microscopy study and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy analysis was conducted to investigate the microstructure stability. The parent material seems to contain two kinds of Cu-rich precipitates—coarse precipitates of a few microns each and uniformly dispersed fine nanosized precipitates. Unlike the parent material, the crept specimens were found to contain the two kinds of precipitates mentioned above together with platelet-like precipitates. In addition, extensive decoration of the grain boundaries with precipitates was clearly observed in the crept specimens. Controlled aging experiments for up to 280 h at the relevant temperatures were conducted on both the parent material and the welded specimens in order to isolate the contribution of exposure to high temperatures to the microstructure changes. TEM study showed the development of dislocation networks into a cellular dislocation structure in the case of the parent metal. Changes in the dislocation structure as a function of the creep strain and the FSW process were recorded. A detailed creep data analysis was conducted, taking into account the instability of the microstructure.

  11. Is the Aluminum Hypothesis Dead?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The Aluminum Hypothesis, the idea that aluminum exposure is involved in the etiology of Alzheimer disease, dates back to a 1965 demonstration that aluminum causes neurofibrillary tangles in the brains of rabbits. Initially the focus of intensive research, the Aluminum Hypothesis has gradually been abandoned by most researchers. Yet, despite this current indifference, the Aluminum Hypothesis continues to attract the attention of a small group of scientists and aluminum continues to be viewed with concern by some of the public. This review article discusses reasons that mainstream science has largely abandoned the Aluminum Hypothesis and explores a possible reason for some in the general public continuing to view aluminum with mistrust. PMID:24806729

  12. Is the Aluminum Hypothesis dead?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidsky, Theodore I

    2014-05-01

    The Aluminum Hypothesis, the idea that aluminum exposure is involved in the etiology of Alzheimer disease, dates back to a 1965 demonstration that aluminum causes neurofibrillary tangles in the brains of rabbits. Initially the focus of intensive research, the Aluminum Hypothesis has gradually been abandoned by most researchers. Yet, despite this current indifference, the Aluminum Hypothesis continues to attract the attention of a small group of scientists and aluminum continues to be viewed with concern by some of the public. This review article discusses reasons that mainstream science has largely abandoned the Aluminum Hypothesis and explores a possible reason for some in the general public continuing to view aluminum with mistrust.

  13. Weld Nugget Temperature Control in Thermal Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A control system for a thermal stir welding system is provided. The control system includes a sensor and a controller. The sensor is coupled to the welding system's containment plate assembly and generates signals indicative of temperature of a region adjacent and parallel to the welding system's stir rod. The controller is coupled to the sensor and generates at least one control signal using the sensor signals indicative of temperature. The controller is also coupled to the welding system such that at least one of rotational speed of the stir rod, heat supplied by the welding system's induction heater, and feed speed of the welding system's weld material feeder are controlled based on the control signal(s).

  14. Numerical simulation of welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jan Langkjær; Thorborg, Jesper

    Aim of project:To analyse and model the transient thermal field from arc welding (SMAW, V-shaped buttweld in 15mm plate) and to some extend the mechanical response due to the thermal field. - To implement this model in a general purpose finite element program such as ABAQUS.The simulation...... stress is also taken into account.Work carried out:With few means it is possible to define a thermal model which describes the thermal field from the welding process in reasonable agreement with reality. Identical results are found with ABAQUS and Rosenthal’s analytical solution of the governing heat...... transfer equation under same conditions. It is relative easy tointroduce boundary conditions such as convection and radiation where not surprisingly the radiation has the greatest influence especially from the high temperature regions in the weld pool and the heat affected zone.Due to the large temperature...

  15. Extravehicular activity welding experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, J. Kevin

    1989-01-01

    The In-Space Technology Experiments Program (INSTEP) provides an opportunity to explore the many critical questions which can only be answered by experimentation in space. The objective of the Extravehicular Activity Welding Experiment definition project was to define the requirements for a spaceflight experiment to evaluate the feasibility of performing manual welding tasks during EVA. Consideration was given to experiment design, work station design, welding hardware design, payload integration requirements, and human factors (including safety). The results of this effort are presented. Included are the specific objectives of the flight test, details of the tasks which will generate the required data, and a description of the equipment which will be needed to support the tasks. Work station requirements are addressed as are human factors, STS integration procedures and, most importantly, safety considerations. A preliminary estimate of the cost and the schedule for completion of the experiment through flight and postflight analysis are given.

  16. Pulsed welding plasma source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knyaz'kov, A.; Pustovykh, O.; Verevkin, A.; Terekhin, V.; Shachek, A.; Tyasto, A.

    2016-04-01

    It is shown that in order to form the current pulse of a near rectangular shape, which provides conversion of the welding arc into a dynamic mode, it is rational to connect a forming element made on the basis of an artificial forming line in series to the welding DC circuit. The paper presents a diagram of a pulsed device for welding with a non-consumable electrode in argon which was developed using the forming element. The conversion of the arc into the dynamic mode is illustrated by the current and voltage oscillograms of the arc gap and the dynamic characteristic of the arc within the interval of one pulse generation time in the arc gap. The background current travels in the interpulse interval.

  17. The detection of tightly closed flaws by nondestructive testing (NDT) methods. [fatigue crack formation in aluminum alloy test specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rummel, W. D.; Rathke, R. A.; Todd, P. H., Jr.; Mullen, S. J.

    1975-01-01

    Liquid penetrant, ultrasonic, eddy current and X-radiographic techniques were optimized and applied to the evaluation of 2219-T87 aluminum alloy test specimens in integrally stiffened panel, and weld panel configurations. Fatigue cracks in integrally stiffened panels, lack-of-fusion in weld panels, and fatigue cracks in weld panels were the flaw types used for evaluation. A 2319 aluminum alloy weld filler rod was used for all welding to produce the test specimens. Forty seven integrally stiffened panels containing a total of 146 fatigue cracks, ninety three lack-of-penetration (LOP) specimens containing a total of 239 LOP flaws, and one-hundred seventeen welded specimens containing a total of 293 fatigue cracks were evaluated. Nondestructive test detection reliability enhancement was evaluated during separate inspection sequences in the specimens in the 'as-machined or as-welded', post etched and post proof loaded conditions. Results of the nondestructive test evaluations were compared to the actual flaw size obtained by measurement of the fracture specimens after completing all inspection sequences. Inspection data were then analyzed to provide a statistical basis for determining the flaw detection reliability.

  18. Ternary gas plasma welding torch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor); Mcgee, William F. (Inventor); Waldron, Douglas J. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A plasma arc welding torch is discussed. A first plasma gas is directed through the body of the welding torch and out of the body across the tip of a welding electrode disposed at the forward end of the body. A second plasma gas is disposed for flow through a longitudinal bore in the electrode. The second plasma gas enters one end of the electrode and exits the electrode at the tip thereof for co-acting with the electric welding arc to produce the desired weld. A shield gas is directed through the torch body and circulates around the head of the torch adjacent to the electrode tip.

  19. Emission of nanoparticles during friction stir welding (FSW) of aluminium alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, J F; Miranda, R M; Santos, T J; Carvalho, P A

    2014-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is now well established as a welding process capable of joining some different types of metallic materials, as it was (1) found to be a reliable and economical way of producing high quality welds, and (2) considered a "clean" welding process that does not involve fusion of metal, as is the case with other traditional welding processes. The aim of this study was to determine whether the emission of particles during FSW in the nanorange of the most commonly used aluminum (Al) alloys, AA 5083 and AA 6082, originated from the Al alloy itself due to friction of the welding tool against the item that was being welded. Another goal was to measure Al alloys in the alveolar deposited surface area during FSW. Nanoparticles dimensions were predominantly in the 40- and 70-nm range. This study demonstrated that microparticles were also emitted during FSW but due to tool wear. However, the biological relevance and toxic manifestations of these microparticles remain to be determined.

  20. Integrated sensors for robotic laser welding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iakovou, D.; Aarts, Ronald G.K.M.; Meijer, J.; Beyer, E.; Dausinger, F; Ostendorf, A; Otto, A.

    2005-01-01

    A welding head is under development with integrated sensory systems for robotic laser welding applications. Robotic laser welding requires sensory systems that are capable to accurately guide the welding head over a seam in three-dimensional space and provide information about the welding process as

  1. Sensor integration for robotic laser welding processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iakovou, D.; Aarts, Ronald G.K.M.; Meijer, J.; Ostendorf, A; Hoult, A.; Lu, Y.

    2005-01-01

    The use of robotic laser welding is increasing among industrial applications, because of its ability to weld objects in three dimensions. Robotic laser welding involves three sub-processes: seam detection and tracking, welding process control, and weld seam inspection. Usually, for each sub-process,

  2. Acoustic-Emission Weld-Penetration Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maram, J.; Collins, J.

    1986-01-01

    Weld penetration monitored by detection of high-frequency acoustic emissions produced by advancing weld pool as it melts and solidifies in workpiece. Acoustic emission from TIG butt weld measured with 300-kHz resonant transducer. Rise in emission level coincides with cessation of weld penetration due to sudden reduction in welding current. Such monitoring applied to control of automated and robotic welders.

  3. Ultrasonic dissimilar joining of aluminum alloy and polymer with the composite material of ABS polymer doping carbonized rice husk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Chin-Pao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The metal housing is typically jointed with plastic fittings by conventional gluing method or embedding injection molding to produce this type of devices. We propose to improve this new technique with more practical approach. In plastic-aluminum substrate dissimilar joining, the 5052 aluminum plate coarsening process was performed to increase the porosity of the permeable dissimilar phase. The ABS polymer plus carbonized rice husk powder was later induced or deposited on the microstructure to improve the bonding effect. The plastic -aluminum substrate dissimilar joining is completed by the final step of ultrasonic welding. The finished substrate will be tested on the properties of tensile strength to ensure its quality. According to the simulation analysis and measuring results, the maximum temperature between the interface of ABS polymer and 5052 aluminum alloy is about 400~450 °C during ultrasonic welding, which can make the surface of ABS polymer to be melted. Furthermore, after drilling micro-hole array and covering ABS plus carbonized rice husk powder, the 5052 aluminum alloy shows better joining effect with ABS polymer sheet by ultrasonic welding. This improved approach does not require mold or injection molding machinery to produce the high quality plastic -aluminum bonding parts.

  4. Weld procedure development with OSLW - optimization software for laser welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuerschbach, P.W.; Eisler, G.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Steele, R.J. [Naval Air Warfare Center, China Lake, CA (United States)

    1998-06-01

    Weld procedure development can require extensive experimentation, in-depth process knowledge, and is further complicated by the fact that there are often multiple sets of parameters that will meet the weld requirements. Choosing among these multiple weld procedures can be hastened with computer models that find parameters to meet selected weld dimensional requirements while simultaneously optimizing important figures of merit. Software is described that performs this task for CO{sub 2} laser beam welding. The models are based on dimensionless parameter correlations that are derived from solutions to the moving heat source equations. The use of both handbook and empirically verified thermophysical property values allows OSLW to be extended to many different materials. Graphics displays show the resulting solution on contour plots that can be used to further probe the model. The important figures of merit for laser beam welding are energy transfer efficiency and melting efficiency. The application enables the user to input desired weld shape dimensions, select the material to be welded, and to constrain the search problem to meet the application requirements. Successful testing of the software at a laser welding fabricator has validated this tool for weld procedure development.

  5. Interfacial Microstructure and Properties of Steel/Aluminum Powder Additive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YUAN Jiang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Based on first-principles density functional theory, the Fe/Al interface model of steel/aluminum laser welding was constructed by layer technique. The Fe/Al interface was studied by metal atom X (X=Sn, Sr, Zr, Ce, La.The results show that Sn, Sr and Ce preferentially displace the Al atoms at the Fe/Al interface, while La and Zr preferentially displace the Fe atoms at the Fe/Al interface. Alloying promotes the transfer of Fe/Al interfacial electrons between different orbits, enhances the ionic bond properties of Fe-Al, improves the Fe/Al interface binding capacity, improves the brittle fracture of Fe/Al interface, and the alloying effect of Sn most notable. On the basis of this, the laser lap welding test of Sn and Zr powder was carried out on 1.4mm thick DC51D+ZF galvanized steel and 1.2mm thick 6016 aluminum alloy specimen. The results show that the addition of powder can promote the flowability of the molten bath and change the composition and microstructure of the joint interface. The tensile strength of the steel/aluminum joint is 327.41MPa and the elongation is 22.93% with the addition of Sn powder, which is obviously improved compared with the addition of Zr powder and without the addition of powder.

  6. Welding. Student Learning Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palm Beach County Board of Public Instruction, West Palm Beach, FL.

    This student learning guide contains 30 modules for completing a course in welding. It is designed especially for use in secondary schools in Palm Beach County, Florida. Each module covers one task, and consists of a purpose, performance objective, enabling objectives, learning activities keyed to resources, information sheets, student self-check…

  7. Thermal Stresses in Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jan Langkjær

    1998-01-01

    Studies of the transient temperature fields and the hereby induced deformations and stressses in a butt-welded mild steel plate modelledrespectively in 2D plane stress state (as well as plane strain state) and in full 3D have been done. The model has been implemented in the generalpurpose FE...

  8. Elementary TIG Welding Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, John E., III

    The text was prepared to help deaf students develop the skills needed by an employed welder. It uses simplified language and illustrations to present concepts which should be reinforced by practical experience with welding skills. Each of the 12 lessons contains: (1) an information section with many illustrations which presents a concept or…

  9. Optimization of Resistance Spot Weld Condition for Single Lap Joint of Hot Stamped 22MnB5 by Taking Heating Temperature and Heating Time into Consideration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hong Seok; Kim, Byung Min; Park, Geun Hwan [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Woo Seung [Keimyung University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    In this study, optimization of the process parameters of the resistance spot welding of a sheet of aluminum-coated boron alloyed steel, 22MnB5, used in hot stamping has been performed by a Taguchi method to increase the strength of the weld joint. The process parameters selected were current, electrode force, and weld time. The heating temperature and heating time of 22MnB5 are considered to be noise factors. It was known that the variation in the thickness of the intermetallic compound layer between the aluminum-coated layer and the substrate, which influences on the formation of nugget, was generated due to the difference of diffusion reaction according to heating conditions. From the results of spot weld experiment, the optimum weld condition was determined to be when the current, electrode force, and weld time were 8kA, 4kN, and 18 cycles, respectively. The result of a test performed to verify the optimized weld condition showed that the tensile strength of the weld joint was over 32kN, which is considerably higher than the required strength, i.e., 23kN.

  10. effect of post-weld heat treatment on the microstructure

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    among others are shielded metal arc welding, submerge arc welding, gas metal arc welding, plasma arc welding, gas ... welding (SMAW) technique is preferable to the other techniques ..... studies''International Journal of Innovative Research.

  11. SHADOW: a new welding technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Thorsten; Olowinsky, Alexander M.; Durand, Friedrich

    2002-06-01

    The new welding technique 'SHADOW ' is introduced. SHADOW means the use of a single pulse to generate a quasi continuous weld of several millimeters in length. HET processing time is defined by the pulse duration of the pulsed laser. At present, a state-of-the-art laser is capable of a maximum pulse duration of 20 ms. The variation of the laser power depend on time is a vital capability of the pulsed laser to adapt the energy deposition into the workpiece. Laser beam welds of several watch components were successfully performed. Similar metals like crowns and axes made out of stainless steel have been welded using pulsed laser radiation. Applying a series of about 130 single pulses for the crown-axis combination the total energy accumulates to 19.5 J. The use of the SHADOW welding technique reduces the energy to 2.5 J. While welding dissimilar metals like stainless steel and bras, the SHADOW welding reduces drastically the contamination as well as the distortion. Laser beam welding of copper has a low process reliability due to the high reflection and the high thermal conductivity. SHADOW welds of 3.6 mm length were performed on 250 micrometers thick copper plates with very high reproducibility. As a result, a pilot plant for laser beam welding of copper plates has been set up. The work to be presented has partly been funded by the European Commission in a project under the contract BRPR-CT-0634.

  12. Welding residual stress distributions for dissimilar metal nozzle butt welds in pressurized water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji Soo; Kim, Ju Hee; Bae, Hong Yeol; OH, Chang Young; Kim, Yun Jae [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyungsoo [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Song, Tae Kwang [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15

    In pressurized water nuclear reactors, dissimilar metal welds are susceptible to primary water stress corrosion cracking. To access this problem, accurate estimation of welding residual stresses is important. This paper provides general welding residual stress profiles in dissimilar metal nozzle butt welds using finite element analysis. By introducing a simplified shape for dissimilar metal nozzle butt welds, changes in the welding residual stress distribution can be seen using a geometry variable. Based on the results, a welding residual stress profile for dissimilar metal nozzle butt welds is proposed that modifies the existing welding residual stress profile for austenitic pipe butt welds.

  13. In-field Welding and Coating Protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-12

    Gas Technology Institute (GTI) and Edison Welding Institute (EWI) created both laboratory and infield girth weld samples to evaluate the effects of weld geometry and hydrogen off-gassing on the performance of protective coatings. Laboratory made plat...

  14. Closed circuit TV system monitors welding operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilman, M.

    1967-01-01

    TV camera system that has a special vidicon tube with a gradient density filter is used in remote monitoring of TIG welding of stainless steel. The welding operations involve complex assembly welding tools and skates in areas of limited accessibility.

  15. Corrosion Protection of Aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalrymple, R. S.; Nelson, W. B.

    1963-07-01

    Treatment of aluminum-base metal surfaces in an autoclave with an aqueous chromic acid solution of 0.5 to 3% by weight and of pH below 2 for 20 to 50 hrs at 160 to 180 deg C produces an extremely corrosion-resistant aluminum oxidechromium film on the surface. A chromic acid concentration of 1 to 2% and a pH of about 1 are preferred.

  16. Fatigue Crack Growth Rate Test Results for Al-Li 2195 Parent Metal, Variable Polarity Plasma Arc Welds and Friction Stir Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafley, Robert A.; Wagner, John A.; Domack, Marcia S.

    2000-01-01

    The fatigue crack growth rate of aluminum-lithium (Al-Li) alloy 2195 plate and weldments was determined at 200-F, ambient temperature and -320-F. The effects of stress ratio (R), welding process, orientation and thickness were studied. Results are compared with plate data from the Space Shuttle Super Lightweight Tank (SLWT) allowables program. Data from the current series of tests, both plate and weldment, falls within the range of data generated during the SLWT allowables program.

  17. Factors affecting weld root morphology in laser keyhole welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frostevarg, Jan

    2018-02-01

    Welding production efficiency is usually optimised if full penetration can be achieved in a single pass. Techniques such as electron and laser beam welding offer deep high speed keyhole welding, especially since multi-kilowatt lasers became available. However, there are limitations for these techniques when considering weld imperfections such as weld cap undercuts, interior porosity or humps at the root. The thickness of sheets during full penetration welding is practically limited by these root humps. The mechanisms behind root morphology formation are not yet satisfactory understood. In this paper root humping is studied by reviewing previous studies and findings and also by sample examination and process observation by high speed imaging. Different process regimes governing root quality are presented, categorized and explained. Even though this study mainly covers laser beam and laser arc hybrid welding, the presented findings can generally be applied full penetration welding in medium to thick sheets, especially the discussion of surface tension effects. As a final result of this analysis, a map of methods to optimise weld root topology is presented.

  18. Dynamics of space welding impact and corresponding safety welding study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragomeni, James M; Nunes, Arthur C

    2004-03-01

    This study was undertaken in order to be sure that no hazard would exist from impingement of hot molten metal particle detachments upon an astronauts space suit during any future electron beam welding exercises or experiments. The conditions under which molten metal detachments might occur in a space welding environment were analyzed. The safety issue is important during welding with regards to potential molten metal detachments from the weld pool and cold filler wire during electron beam welding in space. Theoretical models were developed to predict the possibility and size of the molten metal detachment hazards during the electron beam welding exercises at low earth orbit. Some possible ways of obtaining molten metal drop detachments would include an impulse force, or bump, to the weld sample, cut surface, or filler wire. Theoretical models were determined for these detachment concerns from principles of impact and kinetic energies, surface tension, drop geometry, surface energies, and particle dynamics. A weld pool detachment parameter for specifying the conditions for metal weld pool detachment by impact was derived and correlated to the experimental results. The experimental results were for the most part consistent with the theoretical analysis and predictions. c2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Dynamics of space welding impact and corresponding safety welding study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragomeni, James M.; Nunes, Arthur C.

    2004-03-01

    This study was undertaken in order to be sure that no hazard would exist from impingement of hot molten metal particle detachments upon an astronauts space suit during any future electron beam welding exercises or experiments. The conditions under which molten metal detachments might occur in a space welding environment were analyzed. The safety issue is important during welding with regards to potential molten metal detachments from the weld pool and cold filler wire during electron beam welding in space. Theoretical models were developed to predict the possibility and size of the molten metal detachment hazards during the electron beam welding exercises at low earth orbit. Some possible ways of obtaining molten metal drop detachments would include an impulse force, or bump, to the weld sample, cut surface, or filler wire. Theoretical models were determined for these detachment concerns from principles of impact and kinetic energies, surface tension, drop geometry, surface energies, and particle dynamics. A weld pool detachment parameter for specifying the conditions for metal weld pool detachment by impact was derived and correlated to the experimental results. The experimental results were for the most part consistent with the theoretical analysis and predictions.

  20. Fundamental Laser Welding Process Investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Claus; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    1998-01-01

    In a number of systematic laboratory investigations the fundamental behavior of the laser welding process was analyzed by the use of normal video (30 Hz), high speed video (100 and 400 Hz) and photo diodes. Sensors were positioned to monitor the welding process from both the top side and the rear...... side of the specimen.Special attention has been given to the dynamic nature of the laser welding process, especially during unstable welding conditions. In one series of experiments, the stability of the process has been varied by changing the gap distance in lap welding. In another series...... video pictures (400 Hz), a clear impact on the seam characteristics has been identified when a hump occurs.Finally, a clear correlation between the position of the focus point, the resultant process type and the corresponding signal intensity and signal variation has been found for sheets welded...

  1. Occupational health concerns in the welding industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korczynski, R E

    2000-12-01

    The Workplace Safety and Health Branch initiated a proactive study in the welding industry in Manitoba. Eight welding companies participated in this study. Health concerns raised by welders were welders' flash, sore/red/teary eyes, headaches, nosebleeds, and a black mucous discharge from their nasal membrane. Most welders expressed concern regarding excessive smoke levels in the workplace and inadequate ventilation. Types of welding identified were MIG mild steel, MIG stainless steel, and TIG aluminum. Monitoring involved an assessment of noise levels, fume composition, and carbon monoxide and ozone concentrations. Metal analyses were according to National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Method 7300. Noise dosimeters used were the Quest model 100 and Micro 14 & 15. Carbon monoxide was monitored using the Gastech Model 4700 and ozone using the AID Portable Ozone Meter Model 560. In Manitoba, a hearing conservation program is required when the equivalent sound exposure level (normalized Lex 8-hr) exceeds 80 dBA-weighted. The American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists' threshold limit value-time weighted average (ACGIH TLV-TWA) for iron is 5.0 mg/m3, manganese is 0.2 mg/m3, carbon monoxide is 25 ppm, and ozone is 0.05 ppm (heavy work), 0.08 ppm (moderate work), and 0.1 ppm (light work). Welders' personal exposures to manganese ranged from 0.01-4.93 mg/m3 (N = 42; AM = 0.5; GM = 0.2; SD +/- 0.9; GSD +/- 3.2) and to iron ranged from 0.04-16.29 mg/m3 (N = 42; AM = 3.0; GM = 1.4; SD +/- 3.5; GSD +/- 2.5). Noise exposures ranged from 79-98 dBA (N = 44; AM = 88.9; GM = 88.8; SD +/- 4.2; GSD +/- 1.0). Carbon monoxide levels were less than 5.0 ppm (at source) and ozone levels varied from 0.4-0.6 ppm (at source). Ventilation upgrades in the workplace were required in most welding shops. Only 7 percent of the welders wore respiratory protection. A hearing conservation program and hearing protection were required at all monitored workplaces.

  2. CFRP-Strengthening and Long-Term Performance of Fatigue Critical Welds of a Steel Box Girder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland E. Koller

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Empa’s research efforts in the 1990s provided evidence that a considerable increase of the fatigue strength of welded aluminum beams can be achieved by externally bonding pultruded carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP laminates using rubber-toughened epoxies over the fatigue-weak welding zone on their tensile flange. The reinforcing effect obtained is determined by the stiffness of the unidirectional CFRP laminate which has twice the elastic modulus of aluminum. One can therefore easily follow that an unstressed CFRP laminate reinforcement of welded beams made of steel will not lead to a substantial increase in fatigue strength of the steel structure. This consideration led to the idea of prestressing an external reinforcement of the welded zone. The present investigation describes experimental studies to identify the adhesive system suitable for achieving high creep and fatigue strength of the prestressed CFRP patch. Experimental results (Wöhler-fields of shear-lap-specimens and welded steel beams reinforced with prestressed CFRP laminates are presented. The paper concludes by presenting a field application, the reinforcement of a steel pendulum by adhesively bonded prestressed CFRP laminates to the tensile flanges of the welded box girder. Inspections carried out periodically on this structure revealed neither prestress losses nor crack initiation after nine years of service.

  3. Pulsed ultrasonic stir welding system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An ultrasonic stir welding system includes a welding head assembly having a plate and a rod passing through the plate. The rod is rotatable about a longitudinal axis thereof. During a welding operation, ultrasonic pulses are applied to the rod as it rotates about its longitudinal axis. The ultrasonic pulses are applied in such a way that they propagate parallel to the longitudinal axis of the rod.

  4. Comparison of Welding Residual Stresses of Hybrid Laser-Arc Welding and Submerged Arc Welding in Offshore Steel Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Michael Joachim; Yu, Zhenzhen; Liu, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    In the offshore industry, welding-induced distortion and tensile residual stresses have become a major concern in relation to the structural integrity of a welded structure. Particularly, the continuous increase in size of welded plates and joints needs special attention concerning welding induced...... residual stresses. These stresses have a negative impact on the integrity of the welded joint as they promote distortion, reduce fatigue life, and contribute to corrosion cracking and premature failure in the weld components. This paper deals with the influence and impact of welding method on the welding...... induced residual stresses. It is also investigated whether the assumption of residual stresses up to yield strength magnitude are present in welded structures as stated in the design guidelines. The fatigue strength for welded joints is based on this assumption. The two welding methods investigated...

  5. The effect of post-welding conditions in friction stir welds: From weld simulation to Ductile Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hattel, Jesper Henri; Nielsen, Kim Lau; Tutum, Cem Celal

    2012-01-01

    effect of the post-welding conditions when subjecting a friction stir weld to loading transverse to the weld line. The numerical model of the friction stir welded joint, employs a step-wise modeling approach to combine an in-situ weld simulation with a post-welding failure analysis. Using the commercial......The post-welding stress state, strain history and material conditions of friction stir welded joints are often strongly idealized when used in subsequent modeling analyses, typically by neglecting one or more of the features above. But, it is obvious that the conditions after welding do influence...... the weld performance. The objective of this paper is to discuss some of the main conflicts that arise when taking both the post-welding material conditions and stressestrain state into account in a subsequent structural analysis. The discussion is here based on a preliminary numerical study of the possible...

  6. Pulsed ultrasonic stir welding method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method of performing ultrasonic stir welding uses a welding head assembly to include a plate and a rod passing through the plate. The rod is rotatable about a longitudinal axis thereof. In the method, the rod is rotated about its longitudinal axis during a welding operation. During the welding operation, a series of on-off ultrasonic pulses are applied to the rod such that they propagate parallel to the rod's longitudinal axis. At least a pulse rate associated with the on-off ultrasonic pulses is controlled.

  7. Reconditioning medical prostheses by welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rontescu, C.; Cicic, D. T.; Vasile, I. M.; Bogatu, A. M.; Amza, C. G.

    2017-08-01

    After the technological process of making, some of the medical prostheses may contain imperfections, which can lead to framing the product in the spoilage category. This paper treats the possibility of reconditioning by welding of the prosthesis made of titanium alloys. The paper presents the obtained results after the reconditioning by welding, using the GTAW process, of a intramedullary rod type prosthesis in which was found a crack after the non-destructive examination. The obtained result analysis, after the micrographic examination of the welded joint areas, highlighted that the process of reconditioning by welding can be applied successfully in such situations.

  8. Portable electron beam weld chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, J. R.; Dimino, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    Development and characteristics of portable vacuum chamber for skate type electron beam welding are discussed. Construction and operational details of equipment are presented. Illustrations of equipment are provided.

  9. Computed Tomography 3-D Imaging of the Metal Deformation Flow Path in Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Judy; Beshears, Ronald; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    In friction stir welding (FSW), a rotating threaded pin tool is inserted into a weld seam and literally stirs the edges of the seam together. To determine optimal processing parameters for producing a defect free weld, a better understanding of the resulting metal deformation flow path is required. Marker studies are the principal method of studying the metal deformation flow path around the FSW pin tool. In our study, we have used computed tomography (CT) scans to reveal the flow pattern of a lead wire embedded in a FSW weld seam. At the welding temperature of aluminum, the lead becomes molten and is carried with the macro-flow of the weld metal. By using CT images, a 3-dimensional (3D) image of the lead flow pattern can be reconstructed. CT imaging was found to be a convenient and comprehensive way of collecting and displaying tracer data. It marks an advance over previous more tedious and ambiguous radiographic/metallographic data collection methods.

  10. Impurity effects on gas tungsten arc welds in V?Cr?Ti alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossbeck, M. L.; King, J. F.; Hoelzer, D. T.

    2000-12-01

    Plates 6.4 mm thick of V-Cr-Ti alloys, mostly V-4Cr-4Ti, were welded in a glove box argon atmosphere. A hot titanium getter led to excessive hydrogen concentrations. A cold zirconium-aluminum getter was used to reduce both oxygen and hydrogen. It was observed that a major source of hydrogen was dissociation of water vapor by the electric arc of the welding torch. Careful monitoring of atmospheric impurities and successive pumping and backfilling cycles permitted welds of higher quality than previously achieved. Welds were evaluated primarily by the Charpy impact test. A ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) of -28°C was achieved in V-4Cr-4Ti. Previous GTA welds in the same material seldom had a DBTT below room temperature. Electron beam welding can achieve a DBTT of below -90°C in the V-4Cr-4Ti alloy, indicating a lower limit to the DBTT by impurity control.

  11. Welding and mechanical properties of cast FAPY (Fe-16 at. % Al-based) alloy slabs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikka, V.K.; Goodwin, G.M.; Alexander, D.J.; Howell, C.R.

    1995-08-01

    The low-aluminum-content iron-aluminum program deals with the development of a Fe-Al alloy with aluminum content such as a produce the minimum environmental effect at room temperature. The FAPY is an Fe-16 at. % Al-based alloy developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory as the highest aluminum-containing alloy with essentially no environmental effect. The chemical composition for FAPY in weight percent is: aluminum = 8.46, chromium = 5.50, zirconium = 0.20, carbon = 0.03, molybdenum = 2.00, yttrium = 0.10, and iron = 83.71. The cast ingots of the alloy can be hot worked by extrusion, forging, and rolling processes. The hot- worked cast structure can be cold worked with intermediate anneals at 800{degrees}C. Typical room-temperature ductility of the fine-grained wrought structure is 20 to 25% for this alloy. In contrast to the wrought structure, the cast ductility at room temperature is approximately 1% with a transition temperature of approximately 100 to 150{degrees}C, above which ductility values exceed 20%. The alloy has been melted and processed into bar, sheet, and foil. The alloy has also been cast into slabs, step-blocks of varying thicknesses, and shapes. The purpose of this section is to describe the welding response of cast slabs of three different thicknesses of FAPY alloy. Tensile, creep, and Charpy-impact data of the welded plates are also presented.

  12. Transverse-Weld Tensile Properties of a New Al-4Cu-2Si Alloy as Filler Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampath, K.

    2009-12-01

    AA2195, an Al-Cu-Li alloy in the T8P4 age-hardened condition, is a candidate aluminum armor for future combat vehicles, as this material offers higher static strength and ballistic protection than current aluminum armor alloys. However, certification of AA2195 alloy for armor applications requires initial qualification based on the ballistic performance of welded panels in the as-welded condition. Currently, combat vehicle manufacturers primarily use gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process to meet their fabrication needs. Unfortunately, a matching GMAW consumable electrode is currently not commercially available to allow effective joining of AA2195 alloy. This initial effort focused on an innovative, low-cost, low-risk approach to identify an alloy composition suitable for effective joining of AA2195 alloy, and evaluated transverse-weld tensile properties of groove butt joints produced using the identified alloy. Selected commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) aluminum alloy filler wires were twisted to form candidate twisted filler rods. Representative test weldments were produced using AA2195 alloy, candidate twisted filler rods and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process. Selected GTA weldments produced using Al-4wt.%Cu-2wt.%Si alloy as filler metal consistently provided transverse-weld tensile properties in excess of 275 MPa (40 ksi) UTS and 8% El (over 25 mm gage length), thereby showing potential for acceptable ballistic performance of as-welded panels. Further developmental work is required to evaluate in detail GMAW consumable wire electrodes based on the Al-Cu-Si system containing 4.2-5.0 wt.% Cu and 1.6-2.0 wt.% Si.

  13. Gas Metal Arc Welding. Welding Module 5. Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This guide is intended to assist vocational educators in teaching an eight-unit module in gas metal arc welding. The module is part of a welding curriculum that has been designed to be totally integrated with Missouri's Vocational Instruction Management System. The following topics are covered in the module: safety and testing, gas metal arc…

  14. Spin Forming of an Aluminum 2219-T6 Aft Bulkhead for the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle: Phase II Supplemental Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Squire, Michael D.; Domack, Marcia S.; Hoffman, Eric K.

    2015-01-01

    The principal focus of this project was to assist the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) Program in developing a spin forming fabrication process for manufacture of the aft bulkhead of the pressure vessel. The spin forming process will enable a single piece aluminum (Al) 2219 aft bulkhead which will eliminate the current multiple piece welded construction, simplify fabrication, and lead to an enhanced design that will reduce vehicle weight by eliminating welds. Phase I of this assessment explored spin forming the single-piece forward pressure vessel bulkhead from aluminum-lithium 2195.

  15. Fabrication of aluminum foam from aluminum scrap Hamza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Osman1 ,

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study the optimum parameters affecting the preparation of aluminum foam from recycled aluminum were studied, these parameters are: temperature, CaCO3 to aluminum scrap wt. ratio as foaming agent, Al2O3 to aluminum scrap wt. ratio as thickening agent, and stirring time. The results show that, the optimum parameters are the temperature ranged from 800 to 850oC, CaCO3 to aluminum scrap wt. ratio was 5%, Al2O3 to aluminum scrap wt. ratio was 3% and stirring time was 45 second with stirring speed 1200 rpm. The produced foam apparent densities ranged from 0.40-0.60 g/cm3. The microstructure of aluminum foam was examined by using SEM, EDX and XRD, the results show that, the aluminum pores were uniformly distributed along the all matrices and the cell walls covered by thin oxide film.

  16. [New welding processes and health effects of welding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Vecchia, G Marina; Maestrelli, Piero

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes some of the recent developments in the control technology to enhance capability of Pulse Gas Metal Arc Welding. Friction Stir Welding (FSW) processing has been also considered. FSW is a new solid-state joining technique. Heat generated by friction at the rotating tool softens the material being welded. FSW can be considered a green and energy-efficient technique without deleterious fumes, gas, radiation, and noise. Application of new welding processes is limited and studies on health effects in exposed workers are lacking. Acute and chronic health effects of conventional welding have been described. Metal fume fever and cross-shift decline of lung function are the main acute respiratory effects. Skin and eyes may be affected by heat, electricity and UV radiations. Chronic effects on respiratory system include chronic bronchitis, a benign pneumoconiosis (siderosis), asthma, and a possible increase in the incidence of lung cancer. Pulmonary infections are increased in terms of severity, duration, and frequency among welders.

  17. Friction-Stir Welding - Heavy Inclusions in Bi-metallic welds of Al 2219/2195

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rietz, Ward W., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Heavy Inclusions (HI) were detected for the first time by radiographic examination in aluminum alloy 2219forging/2195plate (advancing/retreating side) Friction Sir Welds (FSW) for the Space Shuttle External Tank (ET) Program. Radiographic HI indications appear as either small (approx.0.005"-0.025") individual particles or clusters of small particles. Initial work was performed to verify that the HI was not foreign material or caused by FSW pin tool debris. That and subsequent elemental analysis determined that the HI were large agglomerations of Al2Cu (theta phase), which is the strengthening precipitate in Al2219. A literature search on that subject determined that the agglomeration of phase has also been found in Al2219 bead on plate FSW [Ref. 1]. Since this was detected in ET space flight hardware, an investigative study of the effect of agglomerated theta phase particles in FSW Al2219f/2195p was performed. Numerous panels of various lengths were welded per ET weld procedures and radiographically inspected to determine if any HI was detected. Areas that had HI were sampled for room temperature and cyclic cryogenic (-423F) tensile testing and determined no significant adverse affect on mechanical properties when compared to test specimens without HI and historical data. Fracture surface examination using the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) revealed smaller phase agglomerations undetectable by radiographic inspection dispersed throughout the Al2219f/2195p FSW. This indicates that phase agglomeration is inherent to the Al2219f/2195p FSW process and only rarely creates agglomerations large enough to be detected by radiography. HI has not been observed in FSW of plate to plate material for either Al2219 or AL2195.

  18. Modeling Stress-Strain State in Butt-Welded Joints after TIG Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Atroshenko

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper mathematical model was developed for definition of thermal-welding cycle influence on welding deformations distribution in flat samples of austenitic steels after TIG welding and developed recommendations to reduce the welding deformation on o the machinery for welding with a copper backing.

  19. Design of a welded joint for robotic, on-orbit assembly of space trusses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rule, William K.

    1992-12-01

    In the future, some spacecraft will be so large that they must be assembled on-orbit. These spacecraft will be used for such tasks as manned missions to Mars or used as orbiting platforms for monitoring the Earth or observing the universe. Some large spacecraft will probably consist of planar truss structures to which will be attached special purpose, self-contained modules. The modules will most likely be taken to orbit fully outfitted and ready for use in heavy-lift launch vehicles. The truss members will also similarly be taken to orbit, but most unassembled. The truss structures will need to be assembled robotically because of the high costs and risks of extra-vehicular activities. Some missions will involve very large loads. To date, very few structures of any kind have been constructed in space. Two relatively simple trusses were assembled in the Space Shuttle bay in late 1985. Here the development of a design of a welded joint for on-orbit, robotic truss assembly is described. Mechanical joints for this application have been considered previously. Welded joints have the advantage of allowing the truss members to carry fluids for active cooling or other purposes. In addition, welded joints can be made more efficient structurally than mechanical joints. Also, welded joints require little maintenance (will not shake loose), and have no slop which would cause the structure to shudder under load reversal. The disadvantages of welded joints are that a more sophisticated assembly robot is required, weld flaws may be difficult to detect on-orbit, the welding process is hazardous, and welding introduces contamination to the environment. In addition, welded joints provide less structural damping than do mechanical joints. Welding on-orbit was first investigated aboard a Soyuz-6 mission in 1969 and then during a Skylab electron beam welding experiment in 1973. A hand held electron beam welding apparatus is currently being prepared for use on the MIR space station

  20. Welding--Trade or Profession?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albright, C. E.; Smith, Kenneth

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses a collaborative program between schools with the purpose of training and providing advanced education in welding. Modern manufacturing is turning to automation to increase productivity, but it can be a great challenge to program robots and other computer-controlled welding and joining systems. Computer programming and…

  1. Metal Working and Welding Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    This student guide, one of a series of correspondence training courses designed to improve the job performance of members of the Marine Corps, deals with the skills needed by metal workers and welders. Addressed in the six individual units of the course are the following topics: weldable metals and their alloys, arc welding, gas welding,…

  2. Weld bonding of stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santos, I. O.; Zhang, Wenqi; Goncalves, V.M.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive theoretical and experimental investigation of the weld bonding process with the purpose of evaluating its relative performance in case of joining stainless steel parts, against alternative solutions based on structural adhesives or conventional spot-welding. Th...

  3. Temperature Controlled Laser Joining of Aluminum to Galvanized Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, Daniel; Simon, Jörg; Stritt, Peter; Weber, Rudolf; Graf, Thomas; Bezençon, Cyrille; Bassi, Corrado

    Reliable joining of 6000 series aluminum alloy to galvanized steel is a challenge for current manufacturing technologies. To control and limit the formation of brittle intermetallic phases, mixing of both metals in liquid state has to be avoided. It has been shown that laser weld-brazing is a possible process. Thereby the aluminum and zinc layer of the galvanized steel are molten and the steel remains solid during the process. In addition, to avoid zinc degassing, the aluminum melt bath temperature has to be below zinc boiling temperature of 907°C. To meet these requirements a temperature controlled laser process was developed, allowing to join the two materials without flux and filler material. The thickness of the intermetallic layer shows a dependency on the set temperature used to control the process. At optimum set temperature the thickness of intermetallic phases can be limited to about 5 μm. Tensile strengths of the joints of up to 75% of the aluminum base material were achieved.

  4. Regeneration of aluminum hydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graetz, Jason Allan; Reilly, James J; Wegrzyn, James E

    2012-09-18

    The present invention provides methods and materials for the formation of hydrogen storage alanes, AlH.sub.x, where x is greater than 0 and less than or equal to 6 at reduced H.sub.2 pressures and temperatures. The methods rely upon reduction of the change in free energy of the reaction between aluminum and molecular H.sub.2. The change in free energy is reduced by lowering the entropy change during the reaction by providing aluminum in a state of high entropy, and by increasing the magnitude of the change in enthalpy of the reaction or combinations thereof.

  5. Aluminum Hydroxide and Magnesium Hydroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluminum Hydroxide, Magnesium Hydroxide are antacids used together to relieve heartburn, acid indigestion, and upset stomach. They ... They combine with stomach acid and neutralize it. Aluminum Hydroxide, Magnesium Hydroxide are available without a prescription. ...

  6. Fine structure at the diffusion welded interface of Fe3Al/Q235 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. The interface of Fe3Al/Q235 dissimilar materials joint, which was made by vacuum diffusion welding, combines excellently. There are Fe3Al, FeAl phases and α-Fe (Al) solid solution at the interface of. Fe3Al/Q235. Aluminum content decreases from 28% to 1⋅5% and corresponding phase changes from Fe3Al with.

  7. Joining of Low-Carbon Steel Sheets with Al-Based Weld

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boczkal G.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of the connection steel/Al/steel made by resistance welding was performed. The used low-carbon steel had low content of carbon and other elements, aluminum was of 99.997 wt.% Al purity. Formation of various FeAl intermetallic phases found in the phase diagram depending on the duration of the process was analyzed. Two distinctively different types of structure depending on time of welding were observed: 1 hypoeutectic structure for samples processed for 5 s, and 2 eutectic structure for samples processed for 10 s and more. The shear test showed increase of mechanical properties of the connection for the samples welded 10 s.

  8. Experimental Investigation and Prediction of Mechanical Properties of Friction Stir Welded Aluminium Metal Matrix Composite Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahya BOZKURT

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir welding (FSW is a relatively contemporary solid state welding process and has been employed in aerospace, railway, automotive and marine industries for joining of aluminum, magnesium, zinc, titanium, copper alloys, dissimilar metals and thermoplastics. The FSW process parameters such as tool rotation speed, tool traverse speed and tilt angle play an important role in deciding the joining quality. The present study defines the effect of FSW process on the tensile properties of the AA2124/SiC/25p metal matrix composite (MMC plates. Obtained results showed that the joint efficiency decreases by increasing the tool traverse speed while tool rotation speed was kept constant. Second contribution of this study is the application of decision tree technique to predict the tensile properties of friction stir welded MMC plates. It is seen that methodology can be applied with great accuracy.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.18.4.3092

  9. A study on heat-flow analysis of friction stir welding on a rotation affected zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Sung Wook; Jang, Beom Seon [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae Woong [Daewoo Shipbuilding and Marine Engineering Co., Soeul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    In recent years, as interest in environmental protection and energy conservation rose, technological development for lightweight efficiency of transport equipment, such as aircrafts, railcars, automobiles and vessels, have been briskly proceeding. This has led to an expansion of the application of lightweight alloys such as aluminum and magnesium. For the welding of these lightweight alloys, friction stir welding has been in development by many researchers. Heat-flow analysis of friction stir welding is one such research. The flow and energy equation is solved using the computational fluid dynamic commercial program 'Fluent'. In this study, a rotation affected zone concept is imposed. The rotation affected zone is a constant volume. In this volume, flow is rotated the same as the tool rotation speed and so plastic dissipation occurs. Through this simulation, the temperature distribution results are calculated and the simulation results are compared with the experimental results.

  10. 29 CFR 1910.255 - Resistance welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Resistance welding. 1910.255 Section 1910.255 Labor... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Welding, Cutting and Brazing § 1910.255 Resistance welding. (a.... Ignitron tubes used in resistance welding equipment shall be equipped with a thermal protection switch. (3...

  11. 46 CFR 154.660 - Pipe welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pipe welding. 154.660 Section 154.660 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR... § 154.660 Pipe welding. (a) Pipe welding must meet Part 57 of this chapter. (b) Longitudinal butt welds...

  12. 49 CFR 179.300-9 - Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding. 179.300-9 Section 179.300-9... Specifications for Multi-Unit Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-106A and 110AW) § 179.300-9 Welding. (a) Longitudinal... fusion welded on class DOT-110A tanks. Welding procedures, welders and fabricators must be approved in...

  13. METHOD AND SYSTEM FOR LASER WELDING

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    The invention relates to laser welding of at least two adjacent, abutting or overlapping work pieces in a welding direction using multiple laser beams guided to a welding region, wherein at least two of the multiple laser beams are coupled into the welding region so as to form a melt and at least...

  14. Magnetic Deflection Of Welding Electron Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinzak, R. Michael; Booth, Gary N.

    1991-01-01

    Electron-beam welds inside small metal parts produced with aid of magnetic deflector. Beam redirected so it strikes workpiece at effective angle. Weld joint positioned to where heavy microfissure concentration removed when subsequent machining required, increasing likelihood of removing any weld defects located in face side of electron-beam weld.

  15. Clamp and Gas Nozzle for TIG Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gue, G. B.; Goller, H. L.

    1982-01-01

    Tool that combines clamp with gas nozzle is aid to tungsten/inert-gas (TIG) welding in hard-to-reach spots. Tool holds work to be welded while directing a stream of argon gas at weld joint, providing an oxygen-free environment for tungsten-arc welding.

  16. Joining of dissimilar metals by diffusion bonding. Titanium alloy with aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akca, Enes [International Univ. of Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegovina). Research and Development Center; International Univ. of Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegovina). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Gursel, Ali [International Univ. of Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegovina). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents a novel diffusion bonding process of commercially pure aluminum to Ti-6Al-4V alloy at 520, 560, 600 and 640 C for 30, 45 and 60 minutes under argon gas shielding without the use of interlayer. The approach is to overcome the difficulties in fusion welding of dissimilar alloys. Diffusion bonding is a dissimilar metal welding process which can be applied to the materials without causing any physical deformations. Processed samples were metallographically prepared, optically examined followed by Vickers microhardness test and subjected to tensile test in order to determine joint strength. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy were used in this work to investigate the compositional changes across the joint region. Elemental composition of the region has been successfully defined between titanium alloy and aluminum. The maximum tensile strength was obtained from the samples bonded at the highest temperatures of 600 and 640 C.

  17. Comparison of Welding Residual Stresses of Hybrid Laser-Arc Welding and Submerged Arc Welding in Offshore Steel Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Andreassen, Michael Joachim; Yu, Zhenzhen; Liu, Stephen; Guerrero-Mata, Martha Patricia

    2016-01-01

    In the offshore industry, welding-induced distortion and tensile residual stresses have become a major concern in relation to the structural integrity of a welded structure. Particularly, the continuous increase in size of welded plates and joints needs special attention concerning welding induced residual stresses. These stresses have a negative impact on the integrity of the welded joint as they promote distortion, reduce fatigue life, and contribute to corrosion cracking and premature fail...

  18. Research on stress corrosion behavior of CCSE40 welded by underwater wet welding with austenitic welding rod in seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Y.; Bai, Q.; Dong, S.; Yang, Z. L.; Gao, Y.

    2017-09-01

    The stress corrosion behavior of CCSE40 welded by underwater wet welding with austenitic welding rod in seawater was studied. Microstructure, mechanical property and stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of the underwater wet welding joint were analyzed by metallographic observation, tensile and bending tests, slow strain rate test (SSRT) and SEM. The results indicated that the weld zone (WZ) and the heat affected zone (HAZ) were all sensitive to the stress corrosion, and the WZ was more sensitive than the HAZ.

  19. Research on the Effects of Technical Parameters on the Molding of the Weld by A-TIG Welding

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Kai; Pan, Wu

    2012-01-01

    The effects of welding parameters on the molding of weld by A-TIG welding of a 4mm thickness mild steel plate is studied in the present paper. The results obtained show that: as welding current increases A-TIG welding penetration gets deeper than TIG welding; size and shape of HAZ has remarkable change; A-TIG welding has the narrower weld pool width than TIG welding.

  20. Automatic welding of stainless steel tubing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clautice, W. E.

    1978-01-01

    The use of automatic welding for making girth welds in stainless steel tubing was investigated as well as the reduction in fabrication costs resulting from the elimination of radiographic inspection. Test methodology, materials, and techniques are discussed, and data sheets for individual tests are included. Process variables studied include welding amperes, revolutions per minute, and shielding gas flow. Strip chart recordings, as a definitive method of insuring weld quality, are studied. Test results, determined by both radiographic and visual inspection, are presented and indicate that once optimum welding procedures for specific sizes of tubing are established, and the welding machine operations are certified, then the automatic tube welding process produces good quality welds repeatedly, with a high degree of reliability. Revised specifications for welding tubing using the automatic process and weld visual inspection requirements at the Kennedy Space Center are enumerated.

  1. Automatic welding systems for large ship hulls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arregi, B.; Granados, S.; Hascoet, JY.; Hamilton, K.; Alonso, M.; Ares, E.

    2012-04-01

    Welding processes represents about 40% of the total production time in shipbuilding. Although most of the indoor welding work is automated, outdoor operations still require the involvement of numerous operators. To automate hull welding operations is a priority in large shipyards. The objective of the present work is to develop a comprehensive welding system capable of working with several welding layers in an automated way. There are several difficulties for the seam tracking automation of the welding process. The proposed solution is the development of a welding machine capable of moving autonomously along the welding seam, controlling both the position of the torch and the welding parameters to adjust the thickness of the weld bead to the actual gap between the hull plates.

  2. Improvement of Weldment Properties by Hot Forming Quenching of Friction Stir Welded TWB Sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae-Hoon Ko

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to improve the mechanical properties and formability of friction stir welded tailor-welded blanks (TWBs of Al6061 alloy with a new forming method called hot forming quenching (HFQ in which solid-solution heat-treated aluminum sheets are formed at elevated temperature. Forming and quenching during HFQ are simultaneously performed with the forming die for the solid-solution heat-treated sheet. In this study, specimens of aluminum TWBs were prepared by friction stir welding (FSW with a butt joint. The effectiveness of FSW joining was evaluated by observation of the macrostructure for different sheet thicknesses. In order to evaluate the formability of TWBs by HFQ, a hemisphere dome stretching test of the limit dome height achieved without specimen failure was performed with various tool temperatures. A Vickers test was also performed to measure weldment hardness as a function of position. The formability and mechanical properties of products formed by HFQ are compared with those formed by conventional forming methods, demonstrating the suitability of HFQ for sheet metal forming of friction stir welded TWBs.

  3. Prediction of Tensile Strength of Friction Stir Weld Joints with Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) and Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewan, Mohammad W.; Huggett, Daniel J.; Liao, T. Warren; Wahab, Muhammad A.; Okeil, Ayman M.

    2015-01-01

    Friction-stir-welding (FSW) is a solid-state joining process where joint properties are dependent on welding process parameters. In the current study three critical process parameters including spindle speed (??), plunge force (????), and welding speed (??) are considered key factors in the determination of ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of welded aluminum alloy joints. A total of 73 weld schedules were welded and tensile properties were subsequently obtained experimentally. It is observed that all three process parameters have direct influence on UTS of the welded joints. Utilizing experimental data, an optimized adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) model has been developed to predict UTS of FSW joints. A total of 1200 models were developed by varying the number of membership functions (MFs), type of MFs, and combination of four input variables (??,??,????,??????) utilizing a MATLAB platform. Note EFI denotes an empirical force index derived from the three process parameters. For comparison, optimized artificial neural network (ANN) models were also developed to predict UTS from FSW process parameters. By comparing ANFIS and ANN predicted results, it was found that optimized ANFIS models provide better results than ANN. This newly developed best ANFIS model could be utilized for prediction of UTS of FSW joints.

  4. Fe-Al Weld Overlay and High Velocity Oxy-Fuel Thermal Spray Coatings for Corrosion Protection of Waterwalls in Fossil Fired Plants with Low NOx Burners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regina, J.R.

    2002-02-08

    Iron-aluminum-chromium coatings were investigated to determine the best candidates for coatings of boiler tubes in Low NOx fossil fueled power plants. Ten iron-aluminum-chromium weld claddings with aluminum concentrations up to 10wt% were tested in a variety of environments to evaluate their high temperature corrosion resistance. The weld overlay claddings also contained titanium additions to investigate any beneficial effects from these ternary and quaternary alloying additions. Several High-Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) thermal spray coatings with higher aluminum concentrations were investigated as well. Gaseous corrosion testing revealed that at least 10wt%Al is required for protection in the range of environments examined. Chromium additions were beneficial in all of the environments, but additions of titanium were beneficial only in sulfur rich atmospheres. Similar results were observed when weld claddings were in contact with corrosive slag while simultaneously, exposed to the corrosive environments. An aluminum concentration of 10wt% was required to prevent large amounts of corrosion to take place. Again chromium additions were beneficial with the greatest corrosion protection occurring for welds containing both 10wt%Al and 5wt%Cr. The exposed thermal spray coatings showed either significant cracking within the coating, considerable thickness loss, or corrosion products at the coating substrate interface. Therefore, the thermal spray coatings provided the substrate very little protection. Overall, it was concluded that of the coatings studied weld overlay coatings provide superior protection in these Low NOx environments; specifically, the ternary weld composition of 10wt%Al and 5wt%Cr provided the best corrosion protection in all of the environments tested.

  5. Predicting weld solidification cracking using damage mechanics -- LDRD summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dike, J.J.; Brooks, J.A.; Bammann, D.J.; Li, M.; Krafcik, J.S.; Yang, N.Y.C.

    1997-04-01

    This report summarizes the efforts to develop and validate a finite element based model to predict weld solidification cracking behavior. Such a model must capture the solidification behavior, the thermal behavior in the weld pool region, the material mechanical response, and some failure criteria to determine when solidification cracking will occur. For such a program to be successful, each aspect of the model had to be accurately modeled and verified since the output of one portion of the model served as the input to other portions of the model. A solidification model which includes dendrite tip and eutectic undercooling was developed and used in both the thermal and mechanical finite element analysis. High magnification video techniques were developed to measure strains for validation of the mechanical predictions using a strain rate and temperature dependent constitutive model. This model was coupled with a ductile void growth damage model and correlated with experimental observations to determine capabilities of predicting cracking response. A two phase (solid + liquid) material model was also developed that can be used to more accurately capture the mechanics of weld solidification cracking. In general, reasonable agreement was obtained between simulation and experiment for location of crack initiation and extent of cracking for 6061-T6 aluminum. 35 refs.

  6. Deformation and Plateau Region of Functionally Graded Aluminum Foam by Amount Combinations of Added Blowing Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hangai, Yoshihiko; Utsunomiya, Takao; Kuwazuru, Osamu; Kitahara, Soichiro; Yoshikawa, Nobuhiro

    2015-10-21

    Recently, to further improve the performance of aluminum foam, functionally graded (FG) aluminum foams, whose pore structure varies with their position, have been developed. In this study, three types of FG aluminum foam of aluminum alloy die casting ADC12 with combinations of two different amounts of added blowing agent titanium(II) hydride (TiH₂) powder were fabricated by a friction stir welding (FSW) route precursor foaming method. The combinations of 1.0-0 mass %, 0.4-0 mass %, and 0.2-0 mass % TiH₂ were selected as the amounts of TiH₂ relative to the mass of the volume stirred by FSW. The static compression tests of the fabricated FG aluminum foams were carried out. The deformation and fracture of FG aluminum foams fundamentally started in the high-porosity (with TiH₂ addition) layer and shifted to the low-porosity (without TiH₂ addition) layer. The first and second plateau regions in the relationship between compressive stress and strain independently appeared with the occurrence of deformations and fractures in the high- and low-porosity layers. It was shown that FG aluminum foams, whose plateau region varies in steps by the combination of amounts of added TiH₂ ( i.e. , the combination of pore structures), can be fabricated.

  7. Deformation and Plateau Region of Functionally Graded Aluminum Foam by Amount Combinations of Added Blowing Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiko Hangai

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Recently, to further improve the performance of aluminum foam, functionally graded (FG aluminum foams, whose pore structure varies with their position, have been developed. In this study, three types of FG aluminum foam of aluminum alloy die casting ADC12 with combinations of two different amounts of added blowing agent titanium(II hydride (TiH2 powder were fabricated by a friction stir welding (FSW route precursor foaming method. The combinations of 1.0–0 mass %, 0.4–0 mass %, and 0.2–0 mass % TiH2 were selected as the amounts of TiH2 relative to the mass of the volume stirred by FSW. The static compression tests of the fabricated FG aluminum foams were carried out. The deformation and fracture of FG aluminum foams fundamentally started in the high-porosity (with TiH2 addition layer and shifted to the low-porosity (without TiH2 addition layer. The first and second plateau regions in the relationship between compressive stress and strain independently appeared with the occurrence of deformations and fractures in the high- and low-porosity layers. It was shown that FG aluminum foams, whose plateau region varies in steps by the combination of amounts of added TiH2 (i.e., the combination of pore structures, can be fabricated.

  8. Deformation and Plateau Region of Functionally Graded Aluminum Foam by Amount Combinations of Added Blowing Agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hangai, Yoshihiko; Utsunomiya, Takao; Kuwazuru, Osamu; Kitahara, Soichiro; Yoshikawa, Nobuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Recently, to further improve the performance of aluminum foam, functionally graded (FG) aluminum foams, whose pore structure varies with their position, have been developed. In this study, three types of FG aluminum foam of aluminum alloy die casting ADC12 with combinations of two different amounts of added blowing agent titanium(II) hydride (TiH2) powder were fabricated by a friction stir welding (FSW) route precursor foaming method. The combinations of 1.0–0 mass %, 0.4–0 mass %, and 0.2–0 mass % TiH2 were selected as the amounts of TiH2 relative to the mass of the volume stirred by FSW. The static compression tests of the fabricated FG aluminum foams were carried out. The deformation and fracture of FG aluminum foams fundamentally started in the high-porosity (with TiH2 addition) layer and shifted to the low-porosity (without TiH2 addition) layer. The first and second plateau regions in the relationship between compressive stress and strain independently appeared with the occurrence of deformations and fractures in the high- and low-porosity layers. It was shown that FG aluminum foams, whose plateau region varies in steps by the combination of amounts of added TiH2 (i.e., the combination of pore structures), can be fabricated. PMID:28793626

  9. Invisible Display in Aluminum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prichystal, Jan Phuklin; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Bladt, Henrik Henriksen

    2005-01-01

    for an integrated display in a metal surface is often ruled by design and functionality of a product. The integration of displays in metal surfaces requires metal removal in order to clear the area of the display to some extent. The idea behind an invisible display in Aluminum concerns the processing of a metal...

  10. Aluminum Sulfate 18 Hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jay A.

    2004-01-01

    A chemical laboratory information profile (CLIP) of the chemical, aluminum sulfate 18 hydrate, is presented. The profile lists physical and harmful properties, exposure limits, reactivity risks, and symptoms of major exposure for the benefit of teachers and students using the chemical in the laboratory.

  11. Versatile Friction Stir Welding/Friction Plug Welding System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Robert

    2006-01-01

    A proposed system of tooling, machinery, and control equipment would be capable of performing any of several friction stir welding (FSW) and friction plug welding (FPW) operations. These operations would include the following: Basic FSW; FSW with automated manipulation of the length of the pin tool in real time [the so-called auto-adjustable pin-tool (APT) capability]; Self-reacting FSW (SRFSW); SR-FSW with APT capability and/or real-time adjustment of the distance between the front and back shoulders; and Friction plug welding (FPW) [more specifically, friction push plug welding] or friction pull plug welding (FPPW) to close out the keyhole of, or to repair, an FSW or SR-FSW weld. Prior FSW and FPW systems have been capable of performing one or two of these operations, but none has thus far been capable of performing all of them. The proposed system would include a common tool that would have APT capability for both basic FSW and SR-FSW. Such a tool was described in Tool for Two Types of Friction Stir Welding (MFS- 31647-1), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 30, No. 10 (October 2006), page 70. Going beyond what was reported in the cited previous article, the common tool could be used in conjunction with a plug welding head to perform FPW or FPPW. Alternatively, the plug welding head could be integrated, along with the common tool, into a FSW head that would be capable of all of the aforementioned FSW and FPW operations. Any FSW or FPW operation could be performed under any combination of position and/or force control.

  12. Real time computer controlled weld skate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, W. A., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A real time, adaptive control, automatic welding system was developed. This system utilizes the general case geometrical relationships between a weldment and a weld skate to precisely maintain constant weld speed and torch angle along a contoured workplace. The system is compatible with the gas tungsten arc weld process or can be adapted to other weld processes. Heli-arc cutting and machine tool routing operations are possible applications.

  13. Corrosion Properties of Laser Welded Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weldingh, Jakob; Olsen, Flemmming Ove

    1997-01-01

    In this paper the corrosion properties of laser welded AISI 316L stainless steel are examined. A number of different welds has been performed to test the influence of the weld parameters of the resulting corrosion properties. It has been chosen to use the potential independent critical pitting...... temperature (CPT) test as corrosion test. The following welding parameters are varied: Welding speed, lsser power, focus point position and laser operation mode (CW or pulsed)....

  14. A Decade of Friction Stir Welding R and D at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center and a Glance into the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jeff; Carter, Bob; Lawless, Kirby; Nunes, Arthur; Russell, Carolyn; Suites, Michael; Schneider, Judy

    2006-01-01

    Welding at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), Huntsville, Alabama, has taken a new direction through the last 10 years. Fusion welding processes, namely variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA) and tungsten inert gas (TIG) were once the corner stone of welding development in the Space Flight Center's welding laboratories, located in the part of MSFC know as National Center for Advanced Manufacturing (NCM). Developed specifically to support the Shuttle Program's External Tank and later International Space Station manufacturing programs, was viewed as the paragon of welding processes for joining aluminum alloys. Much has changed since 1994, however, when NASA's Jeff Ding brought the FSW process to the NASA agency. Although, at that time, FSW was little more than a "lab curiosity", NASA researchers started investigating where the FSW process would best fit NASA manufacturing programs. A laboratory FSW system was procured and the first welds were made in fall of 1995. The small initial investment NASA made into the first FSW system has certainly paid off for the NASA agency in terms of cost savings, hardware quality and notoriety. FSW is now a part of Shuttle External Tank (ET) production and the preferred weld process for the manufacturing of components for the new Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV) and Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle (HLLV) that will take this country back to the moon. It is one of the solid state welding processes being considered for on-orbit space welding and repair, and is of considerable interest for Department of Defense @OD) manufacturing programs. MSFC involvement in these and other programs makes NASA a driving force in this country's development of FSW and other solid state welding technologies. Now, a decade later, almost the entire on-going welding R&D at MSFC now focuses on FSW and other more advanced solid state welding processes.

  15. Control of Welding Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    Structures, Office of Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for R&E (ET), Department of Defense, Washington, D.C. CHARLES ZANIS, Assistant Director for Platform... CHARLES NULL, Head, Metals Branch, Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, D.C. ROBERT A. WEBER, Welding Engineering and Metallurgy, U.S. Army Corps of...Needs. Pp. 487-90. in Papers Presented at the August 3-8, 1Q80, AIME Syi,.posium. Essers, W . ., and R. Walter. Heat transfer and penet ration

  16. The effect of friction welding self-regulation process on weld structure and hardness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Ptak

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The self-regulation phenomenon that occurs during friction welding process was characterised, and the effect of the self-regulation of theenergy-related parameters on structure and hardness distribution in SW7Mo steel – 55 steel welded joint was determined experimentally.The structure and hardness of the weld zone were examined, the energy required for the stable run of a friction welding process wascalculated, and a relationship between the welding energy and weld hardness was derived.

  17. Superplastic Forming/Adhesive Bonding of Aluminum (SPF/AB) Multi-Sheet Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, John A. (Technical Monitor); Will, Jeff D.; Cotton, James D.

    2003-01-01

    A significant fraction of airframe structure consists of stiffened panels that are costly and difficult to fabricate. This program explored a potentially lower-cost processing route for producing such panels. The alternative process sought to apply concurrent superplastic forming and adhesive bonding of aluminum alloy sheets. Processing conditions were chosen to balance adequate superplasticity of the alloy with thermal stability of the adhesive. As a first objective, an air-quenchable, superplastic aluminum-lithium alloy and a low-volatile content, low-viscosity adhesive with compatible forming/curing cycles were identified. A four-sheet forming pack was assembled which consisted of a welded two-sheet core separated from the face sheets by a layer of adhesive. Despite some preliminary success, of over 30 forming trials none was completely successful. The main problem was inadequate superplasticity in the heat-affected zones of the rib welds, which generally fractured prior to completion of the forming cycle. The welds are a necessary component in producing internal ribs by the 'four-sheet' process. Other challenges, such as surface preparation and adhesive bonding, were adequately solved. But without the larger issue of tearing at the weld locations, complex panel fabrication by SPF/AB does not appear viable.

  18. High cycle fatigue of AA6082 and AA6063 aluminum extrusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanninga, Nicholas E.

    The high cycle fatigue behavior of hollow extruded AA6082 and AA6063 aluminum extrusions has been studied. Hollow extruded aluminum profiles can be processed into intricate shapes, and may be suitable replacements for fatigue critical automotive applications requiring reduced weight. There are several features inherent in hollow aluminum extrusions, such as seam welds, charge welds, microstructural variations and die lines. The effects of such extrusion variables on high cycle fatigue properties were studied by taking specimens from an actual car bumper extrusion. It appears that extrusion die lines create large anisotropy differences in fatigue properties, while welds themselves have little effect on fatigue lives. Removal of die lines greatly increased fatigue properties of AA6082 specimens taken transverse to the extrusion direction. Without die lines, anisotropy in fatigue properties between AA6082 specimens taken longitudinal and transverse to the extrusion direction, was significantly reduced, and properties associated with the orientation of the microstructure appears to be isotropic. A fibrous microstructure for AA6082 specimens showed great improvements in fatigue behavior. The effects of elevated temperatures and exposure of specimens to NaCl solutions was also studied. Exposure to the salt solution greatly reduced the fatigue lives of specimens, while elevated temperatures showed more moderate reductions in fatigue lives.

  19. Investigation of Friction Stir Welding and Laser Engineered Net Shaping of Metal Matrix Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diwan, Ravinder M.

    2002-01-01

    The improvement in weld quality by the friction stir welding (FSW) process invented by TWI of Cambridge, England, patented in 1991, has prompted investigation of this process for advanced structural materials including Al metal matrix composite (Al-MMC) materials. Such materials can have high specific stiffness and other potential beneficial properties for the extreme environments in space. Developments of discontinuous reinforced Al-MMCs have found potential space applications and the future for such applications is quite promising. The space industry has recognized advantages of the FSW process over conventional welding processes such as the absence of a melt zone, reduced distortion, elimination of the need for shielding gases, and ease of automation. The process has been well proven for aluminum alloys, and work is being carried out for ferrous materials, magnesium alloys and copper alloys. Development work in the FSW welding process for joining of Al-MMCs is relatively recent and some of this and related work can be found in referenced research publications. NASA engineers have undertaken to spear head this research development work for FSW process investigation of Al-MMCs. Some of the reported related work has pointed out the difficulty in fusion welding of particulate reinforced MMCs where liquid Al will react with SiC to precipitate aluminum carbide (Al4C3). Advantages of no such reaction and no need for joint preparation for the FSW process is anticipated in the welding of Al-MMCs. The FSW process has been best described as a combination of extrusion and forging of metals. This is carried out as the pin tool rotates and is slowly plunged into the bond line of the joint as the pin tool's shoulder is in intimate contact with the work piece. The material is friction-stirred into a quality weld. Al-MMCs, 4 in. x 12 in. plates of 0.25 in. (6.35mm) thickness, procured from MMCC, Inc. were butt welded using FSW process at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) using

  20. 10,170 flawless welds

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2014-01-01

    The welding of tubes containing the principal current-carrying busbars in the LHC magnets was one of the main activities of the SMACC project. After a year of preparation and another of intense activity in the tunnel, the last weld was completed on Wednesday 14 May. Over 10,170 welds have been inspected and not a single fault has been found.    The welder (above) creates the weld using an orbital welding machine (below) specifically designed for CERN. Each of the eight sectors of the LHC contains around 210 interconnects between the superconducting magnets. Consolidating these interconnections was the SMACC project’s primary objective. One of the last jobs before closing the interconnects is the welding of the M lines: each has a 104 mm diameter and a radial clearance of just 45 mm. In total: 10,170 welds carried out in a single year of activities. A true challenge, which was carried out by a team of 30 highly specialised welders, working under the supervision o...